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Sample records for nanostructuring lithium niobate

  1. Micro- and nanostructuration of lithium niobate; Mikro- und Nanostrukturierung von Lithiumniobat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartung, Holger

    2010-04-13

    In the framework of this thesis the application of the ion-beam-enhanced-etching (IBEE) technique for the fabrication of different optical elements, among these photonic crystals, in lithium niobate, was studied. The development of a mask technology fitted to the requirements of the IBEE technique as well as a simulation of the process were performed. Hereby the limitations of the technique in view on minimal structure sizes and structure quality were analyzed. In chapter 1 first the material lithium niobate with its properties and the structuration procedures studied hitherto in the literature is presented. Chapter 2 presents the functionality of the IBEE process and describes the studies on the application of IBEE in lithium niobate performed in the framework of this thesis. In chapter 3 the experimental conditions of all applied processes of the IBEE procedure, the processes used for the mask fabrication, as well all further applied methods and technologies are summarized. Chapter 4 deals with the mask fabrication. The requirements on the masks and the developments necessary for their fulfilment are studied. In chapter 5 the performed simulation of the irradiation, annealing, and etching process is described. This simulation makes the prediciton of the geometry of the components from the process parameters and vice versa the determination of parameters for the reaching of an optimal element geometry possible. In chapter 6 the application of the technique for the fabrication of photonic-crystal membranes and their optical characterization is described. Chapter 7 shows the fabrication of different waveguide and diffractive elements in lithium niobate by means of IBEE.

  2. Reduced Dimensionality Lithium Niobate Microsystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichenfield, Matt [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The following report describes work performed under the LDRD program at Sandia National Laboratories October 2014 and September 2016. The work presented demonstrates the ability of Sandia Labs to develop state-of-the-art photonic devices based on thin film lithium niobate (LiNbO3 ). Section 1 provides an introduction to integrated LiNbO3 devices and motivation for developing thin film nonlinear optical systems. Section 2 describes the design, fabrication, and photonic performance of thin film optical microdisks fabricated from bulk LiNbO3 using a bulk implantation method developed at Sandia. Sections 3 and 4 describe the development of similar thin film LiNbO3 structures fabricated from LiNbO3 on insulator (LNOI) substrates and our demonstration of optical frequency conversion with state-of-the-art efficiency. Finally, Section 5 describes similar microdisk resonators fabricated from LNOI wafers with a buried metal layer, in which we demonstrate electro-optic modulation.

  3. Optical cleaning of lithium niobate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koesters, Michael

    2010-01-01

    An all-optical method for the removal of photoexcitable electrons from photorefractive centers to get rid of optical damage in lithium niobate crystals is presented, the so-called ''optical cleaning''. The method combines the photovoltaic drift of electrons with ionic charge compensation at sufficiently high temperatures of about 180 C. Optimum choice of the light pattern plus heat dramatically decreases the concentration of photoexcitable electrons in the exposed region leading to a suppression of optical damage. Experiments with slightly iron-doped lithium niobate crystals have shown an increase of the threshold for optical damage of more than 1000 compared to those of untreated crystals. (orig.)

  4. Optical cleaning of lithium niobate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koesters, Michael

    2010-01-15

    An all-optical method for the removal of photoexcitable electrons from photorefractive centers to get rid of optical damage in lithium niobate crystals is presented, the so-called ''optical cleaning''. The method combines the photovoltaic drift of electrons with ionic charge compensation at sufficiently high temperatures of about 180 C. Optimum choice of the light pattern plus heat dramatically decreases the concentration of photoexcitable electrons in the exposed region leading to a suppression of optical damage. Experiments with slightly iron-doped lithium niobate crystals have shown an increase of the threshold for optical damage of more than 1000 compared to those of untreated crystals. (orig.)

  5. Optical properties of lithium niobate single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palatnikov, M.N.; Sidorov, N.V.; Biryukova, I.V.; Kalinnikov, V.T. [Institute of Chemistry, Kola Science Centre RAS, 26a Fersman str., 184200 Apatity, Murmansk region (Russian Federation); Bormanis, K. [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, 8 Kengaraga str., Riga, LV-1063 (Latvia)

    2005-01-01

    Studies of thermal and {gamma}-irradiation effects on the optical properties in congruous lithium niobate single crystals containing Y, Mg, Gd, B, and Zn dopants including samples with double dopants Y, Mg and Gd, Mg are reported. Formation of defects at irradiation and thermal treatment of the samples is explored by electron absorption spectra. Considerable increase of absorption with the dose of {gamma}-radiation is observed at 500 nm. The changes of absorption examined under different conditions are explained by creation and destruction of Nb{sup 4+} defects. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Terahertz generation from Cu ion implantation into lithium niobate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuhua, E-mail: wyh61@163.com [Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Systems Science in Metallurgical Process, Wuhan university of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Wang, Ruwu; Yuan, Jie [Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Systems Science in Metallurgical Process, Wuhan university of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Wang, Yumei [Department of Nephrology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China)

    2014-03-15

    In this letter, the authors present first observation of terahertz generation from Cu implantation of lithium niobate crystal substrate. Lithium niobate single crystal is grown by Czochralski method. Metal nanoparticles synthesized by Cu ion implantation were implanted into lithium niobate single crystal using metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source. 1 kHz, 35 fs laser pulse centred at 800 nm was focused onto the samples. The supercontinuum spectra of the sample are obtained. Terahertz was generated via this kind of sample and investigated using the electro-optical sampling technique. The findings suggest that under the investigated implantation parameter, a strong spectral component in excess of 0.46 THz emission was found from Cu ion implantation of lithium niobate. -- Highlights: • We first observation of terahertz generation from Cu implantation of lithium niobate crystal substrate. • Lithium niobate single crystal is grown by Czochralski method. Cu nanoparticles in lithium niobate have been formed by using MEVVA ion source. • The THz bandwidth and center from this kind of sample were determined.

  7. Grating coupler on single-crystal lithium niobate thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhihua; Wang, Yiwen; Jiang, Yunpeng; Kong, Ruirui; Hu, Hui

    2017-10-01

    The grating coupler on single-crystal lithium niobate thin film (lithium niobate on insulator, LNOI) was designed. A bottom reflector was added in the LNOI material to improve the coupling efficiency. The grating structure was optimized by FDTD method. The material parameters such as layer thickness of lithium niobate thin film, SiO2 thickness were discussed with respect to the coupling efficiency, and the tolerances of grating period, etch depth, groove width and fiber position were also studied systematically. The simulated maximum coupling efficiency from a grating coupler with (without) bottom reflector to a single-mode fiber is about 78% (40%) in z-cut LNOI for TE polarization.

  8. Micromachining Lithium Niobate for Rapid Prototyping of Resonant Biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shibaany, Zeyad Yousif Abdoon; Hedley, John; Huo, Dehong; Hu, Zhongxu

    2014-01-01

    Lithium niobate material is widely used in MEMS application due to its piezoelectric properties. This paper presents the micromachining process of lithium niobate to rapid prototype a resonant biosensor design. A high precision CNC machine was used to machine a sample of lithium niobate material at 5 different spindle speeds to find out the best conditions to machine this brittle material. A qualitative visual check of the surface was performed by using scanning electron microscopy, surface roughness was quantitatively investigated using an optical surface profiler and Raman spectroscopy to check the strain of the surface. Results show that the surface quality of the lithium niobate was significantly affected by the spindle speed with optimum conditions at 70k rpm giving a strained surface with 500 nm rms roughness

  9. Stability of lithium niobate on irradiation at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primak, W.; Gavin, A.P.; Anderson, T.T.; Monahan, E.

    1977-01-01

    In contrast to results obtained for neutron irradiation in a thermal reactor near room temperature, lithium niobate plates irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) did not become metamict. This is attributed to the elevated temperature of the EBR-II. Ion bombardment experiments indicate that to avoid disordering of lithium niobate on irradiation, its temperature should be maintained above 673 K. Evidence for ionic conductivity was found at 873 K, indicating that it would be inadvisable to permit the temperature to rise that high, particularly with voltage across the plate. In reactor application as a microphone transducer, it is tentatively recommended that the lithium niobate be maintained in the middle of this temperature range for a major portion of reactor operating time

  10. Zr doping on lithium niobate crystals: Raman spectroscopy and chemometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokanyan, Ninel; Chapron, David; Kokanyan, Edvard; Fontana, Marc D.

    2017-03-01

    Raman measurements were investigated on Zr-doped lithium niobate LiNbO3 crystals with different concentrations. Spectra were treated by fitting procedure and principal component analysis which both provide results consistent with each other. The concentration dependence of the frequency on the main low-frequency optical phonons provides an insight of site incorporation of Zr ions in the host lattice. The threshold concentration of about 2% is evidenced, confirming the interest of Zr doping as an alternative to Mg doping for the reduction of the optical damage in lithium niobate.

  11. Optical waveguides in lithium niobate: Recent developments and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazzan, Marco, E-mail: marco.bazzan@unipd.it; Sada, Cinzia, E-mail: cinzia.sada@unipd.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “G. Galilei,” Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    The state of the art of optical waveguide fabrication in lithium niobate is reviewed, with particular emphasis on new technologies and recent applications. The attention is mainly devoted to recently developed fabrication methods, such as femtosecond laser writing, ion implantation, and smart cut waveguides as well as to the realization of waveguides with tailored functionalities, such as photorefractive or domain engineered structures. More exotic systems, such as reconfigurable and photorefractive soliton waveguides, are also considered. Classical techniques, such as Ti in-diffusion and proton exchange, are cited and briefly reviewed as a reference standpoint to highlight the recent developments. In all cases, the application-oriented point of view is preferred, in order to provide the reader with an up-to date panorama of the vast possibilities offered by lithium niobate to integrated photonics.

  12. Photorefractive effect at 775 nm in doped lithium niobate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nava, G.; Minzioni, P.; Cristiani, I.; Degiorgio, V. [Department of Electrical, Computer, and Biomedical Engineering, and CNISM, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Argiolas, N.; Bazzan, M.; Ciampolillo, M. V.; Pozza, G.; Sada, C. [Physics and Astronomy Departement, University of Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2013-07-15

    The photorefractive effect induced by 775-nm laser light on doped lithium niobate crystals is investigated by the direct observation in the far field of the transmitted-beam distortion as a function of time. Measurements performed at various Zr-doping concentrations and different light intensities show that the 775-nm light beam induces a steady-state photorefractive effect comparable to that of 532-nm light, but the observed build-up time of the photovoltaic field is longer by three-orders of magnitude. The 775-nm photorefractivity of lithium niobate crystals doped with 3 mol. % ZrO{sub 2} or with 5.5 mol. % MgO is found to be negligible.

  13. Erbium ion implantation into different crystallographic cuts of lithium niobate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nekvindová, P.; Švecová, B.; Cajzl, J.; Macková, Anna; Malinský, Petr; Oswald, Jiří; Kolitsch, A.; Špirková, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 4 (2012), s. 652-659 ISSN 0925-3467 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06041; GA ČR GA106/09/0125; GA ČR(CZ) GAP106/10/1477 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505; CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : Lithium niobate * Erbium * Ion implantation * Luminescence Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.918, year: 2012

  14. Er+ medium energy ion implantation into lithium niobate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švecová, B.; Nekvindová, P.; Macková, Anna; Oswald, Jiří; Vacík, Jiří; Grotzschel, R.; Spirkova, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 267, 8-9 (2009), s. 1332-1335 ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06041; GA AV ČR IAA200480702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505; CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : lithium niobate * erbium * ion implantation Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.156, year: 2009

  15. Enhancement of Lithium Niobate nanophotonic structures via spin-coating technique for optical waveguides application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhri Makram A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is dedicated to investigation of temperature effects in Lithium Niobate (LiNbO3 nanostructures. The LiNbO3 nanostructures were deposited on glass substrate by spin-coating technique. LiNbO3 was set down at 3000 rpm for 30 sec and annealed from 100 to 600 °C. The structures were characterized and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and ultra-violet visible (UV-vis spectrophotometer. The measured results have showed that by increasing annealing temperatures, the structures start to be more crystallized and be more homogenized until the optimum arrangement was achieved. Once this was accomplished, it's applicable for optical waveguides development. Eventually, it starts to be less crystallization and non-homogeneous. Energy gap was recorded to be at average value of 3.9 eV.

  16. Computer Modelling of Hafnium Doping in Lithium Niobate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romel M. Araujo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lithium niobate (LiNbO3 is an important technological material with good electro-optic, acousto-optic, elasto-optic, piezoelectric and nonlinear properties. Doping LiNbO3 with hafnium (Hf has been shown to improve the resistance of the material to optical damage. Computer modelling provides a useful means of determining the properties of doped and undoped LiNbO3, including its defect chemistry, and the effect of doping on the structure. In this paper, Hf-doped LiNbO3 has been modelled, and the final defect configurations are found to be consistent with experimental results.

  17. Study of structural differences between stoichiometric and congruent lithium niobate

    CERN Document Server

    Kling, A; Correia, J G; Da Silva, M F A; Diéguez, E; Agulló-López, F; Soares, J C

    1996-01-01

    The structural differences between stoichiometric and congruent (lithium deficient) lithium niobate single crystals were studied by RBS- and NRA-channeling as well as perturbed angular correlation (PAC) measurements. The d-PAC111Cd-PAC investigations point out that a second Li site can be detected in congruent material, while only one is present in stoichiometric. Channeling studies of different axes and the comparison of the results with computer simulations corroborated former indications that this additional lattice site can be attributed to the formation of ilmenite type stacking faults. A comparative study of the energy dependence of the dechanneling showed that a remarkable disorder is also present in the Nb sublattice of the congruent crystals and that these defects have a point-like character.

  18. Absorption and reflectivity of the lithium niobate surface masked with a graphene layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Salas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed simulations of the interaction of a graphene layer with the surface of lithium niobate utilizing density functional theory and molecular dynamics at 300K and atmospheric pressure. We found that the graphene layer is physisorbed on the lithium niobate surface with an adsorption energy of -0.8205 eV/(carbon-atom. Subsequently, the energy band structure, the optical absorption and reflectivity of the new system were calculated. We found important changes in these physical properties with respect to the corresponding ones of a graphene layer and of a lithium niobate crystal.

  19. Origin of light-deflection in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate under electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbert, Laurent

    2009-06-22

    The deflection of light reported by Müller et al. in lithium niobate [Appl. Phys. B 78, 367-370] and lithium tantalate [Appl. Optics 43 (34), 6344-6347] under electric field originates from refraction at domain-walls, like in ferroelastics. In ferroelectrics the optical discontinuity takes place at domain-walls as a consequence of the electro-optic effect. The theoretical deflection angle calculated from Snell's law is proportional to the square root of the electric field and matches the experimental results reported by Müller et al. for lithium niobate. The finite domain-wall thickness mentioned by the authors is not involved in the deflection phenomenon.

  20. Thin film lithium niobate microring modulators for analog photonics, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lithium niobate (LiNbO3) has been long regarded as the most attractive material for electro-optic modulation for high-performance optical communication systems of up...

  1. Ridge Waveguide Structures in Magnesium-Doped Lithium Niobate, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this NASA Phase I STTR effort, the feasibility of fabricating isolated ridge waveguides in 5% magnesium-doped lithium niobate (5% MgO:LN) will be established....

  2. Generating ultra-short energetic pulses with cascaded soliton compression in lithium niobate crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Binbin; Bache, Morten; Chong, A.

    2010-01-01

    By launching energetic femtosecond pulses in a lithium niobate crystal, the phase mismatched second-harmonic generation process compresses the 50 fs input pulse at 1250 nm to 30 fs through a soliton effect.......By launching energetic femtosecond pulses in a lithium niobate crystal, the phase mismatched second-harmonic generation process compresses the 50 fs input pulse at 1250 nm to 30 fs through a soliton effect....

  3. Properties and applications of potassium lithium tantalate niobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiaolin

    1998-06-01

    This thesis describes the physical and photorefractive properties of potassium lithium tantalate niobate (KLTN) single crystal material. The top seeded solution growth method is reviewed. The phase transition temperatures and dielectric properties are related to the compositions of the KLTN crystals. A liquid/solid interface dynamics model is introduced to explain the experimental results which is that hydrogen ion concentration in KLTN crystals can be reduced dramatically by doping copper in the absence of titanium. Dark conductivity of KLTN crystals are contributed by two species when the temperature is in the range of 250 K and 350 K. Two species are hydrogen ions and shallow trapped electrons (holes). These results have been confirmed by direct dc conductivity measurements and holograms fixing experiments. Hydrogen ion has two types of motion in the crystals: O-H vibration and O-H libration. We established a model to describe hydrogen ions motions and hopping in KLTN crystals. The theoretical prediction is in agreement with experimental results. Hologram thermal fixing for optical data storage is discussed. Hydrogen ions are identified as the mobile ion which is responsible for thermal fixing. In ferroelectric phase KLTN crystals, spontaneous polarization of individual microdomains can be aligned throughout the entire crystal by the poling process. Photorefractive space charge fields play a role deploing the microdomains wherever space charge field opposing to spontaneous polarization. This may cause microdomain switching and lead to the generation of index grating. Experimental observation of Barkhausen current jumps is the signature of domain inversion. Holograms thermal fixing in potassium niobate crystals are also investigated. Because potassium niobate crystal has an orthognal structure with space group mm2, 3D polarization dependence of OH bands are observed. A special cut of iron doped potassium niobate crystal was designed to achieve the maximum

  4. Integrated optics on Lithium Niobate for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaltron, A.; Bettella, G.; Pozza, G.; Zamboni, R.; Ciampolillo, M.; Argiolas, N.; Sada, C.; Kroesen, S.; Esseling, M.; Denz, C.

    2015-05-01

    In micro-analytical chemistry and biology applications, optofluidic technology holds great promise for creating efficient lab-on-chip systems where higher levels of integration of different stages on the same platform is constantly addressed. Therefore, in this work the possibility of integrating opto-microfluidic functionalities in lithium niobate (LiNbO3) crystals is presented. In particular, a T-junction droplet generator is directly engraved in a LiNbO3 substrate by means of laser ablation process and optical waveguides are realized in the same material by exploiting the Titanium in-diffusion approach. The coupling of these two stages as well as the realization of holographic gratings in the same substrate will allow creating new compact optical sensor prototypes, where the optical properties of the droplets constituents can be monitored.

  5. Photorefractive lithium niobate crystals for applications in photonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartwig, U.

    2006-12-01

    Lithium niobate crystals (LiNbO 3 ) generally show a photorefractive response, i.e., light-induced refractive index changes. Crystals are investigated at room temperature and at elevated temperatures. As a result 'classical' photorefractive holographic volume-phase gratings, originating from space charge fields and the electro-optic effect, and 'non-classical' photorefractive volume-phase gratings, which can be traced back to strong absorption gratings, emerge. Single domain and periodically poled crystals (PPLN) are investigated. PPLN is typically used in non-linear optics for frequency conversion. The crystals also show non-linear photorefractive response during holographic recording with isotropically polarized light beams of equal intensity and, in the case of PPLN, by mixing of domain and holographic gratings. The results are important for applications combining the photorefractive and non-linear optical properties of LiNbO 3 . (orig.)

  6. Twinning structures in near-stoichiometric lithium niobate single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Shuhua; Chen, Yanfeng

    2010-01-01

    A near-stoichiometric lithium niobate single crystal has been grown by the Czochralski method in a hanging double crucible with a continuous powder supply system. Twins were found at one of the three characteristic growth ridges of the as-grown crystal. The twin structure was observed and analyzed by transmission synchrotron topography. The image shifts ΔX and ΔY in the transmission synchrotron topograph were calculated for the 3 anti 2 anti 12 and 0 anti 222 reflections based on results from high-resolution X-ray diffractometry. It is confirmed that one of the {01 anti 1 anti 2} m planes is the composition face of the twin and matrix crystals. The formation mechanism of these twins is discussed. (orig.)

  7. Sub-band-gap laser micromachining of lithium niobate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, F. K.; Müllenborn, Matthias

    1995-01-01

    Laser processing of insulators and semiconductors is usually realized using photon energies exceeding the band-gap energy. This makes laser processing of insulators difficult since high photon energies typically require either a pulsed laser or a frequency-doubled continuous-wave laser. A new...... method is reported which enables us to do laser processing of lithium niobate using sub-band-gap photons. Using high scan speeds, moderate power densities, and sub-band-gap photon energies results in volume removal rates in excess of 106µm3/s. This enables fast micromachining of small piezoelectric...... structures, or simple etching of grooves for precision positioning of optical fibers. ©1995 American Institute of Physics....

  8. Fabrication and performance of porous lithium sodium potassium niobate ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Caifeng; Zhu, Yuan; Ji, Jun; Cai, Feixiang; Zhang, Youming; Zhang, Ningyi; Wang, Andong

    2018-02-01

    Porous lithium sodium potassium niobate (LNK) ceramic has excellent piezoelectric properties, chemical stability and great chemical compatibility. It has a good application potential in the field of biological bone substitute. In the paper, porous LNK ceramic was fabricated with egg albumen foaming agent by foaming method. Effects of preparation process of the porous LNK ceramic on density, phase structure, hole size and piezoelectric properties were researched and characterized. The results show that the influence factors of LNK solid content and foaming agent addition are closely relevant to properties of the porous LNK ceramic. When solid content is 65% and foaming agent addition is 30%, the porous LNK ceramic has uniform holes and the best piezoelectric properties.

  9. Temperature dependence of the thermoelectric coeffiicients of lithium niobate and lithium tantalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khachaturyan, O.A.; Gabrielyan, A.I.; Kolesnik, S.P.

    1988-01-01

    Thermoelectric Zeebeck,Thomson, Peltier coefficients for LiNbO 3 and LiTaO 3 monocrystals and their dependence on temperature in 300-1400 K range were investigated. It is shown that Zeebeck (α) coefficient changes its sign, depending on temperature change - the higher is α, the higher is material conductivity in the corresponding temperature region. Thomson and Peltier coefficients were calculated analytically for lithium niobate and tantalate

  10. 640-Gbit/s data transmission and clock recovery using an ultrafast periodically poled lithium niobate device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Gomez-Agis, F.; Ware, C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the first demonstration of the use of a periodically poled lithium niobate device for signal processing at 640 Gbit/s. Clock recovery is performed successfully using the lithium niobate device, and the clock signal is used to control fiber-based demultiplexer. The full 640-Gbit...

  11. Acoustic wave filter based on periodically poled lithium niobate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courjon, Emilie; Bassignot, Florent; Ulliac, Gwenn; Benchabane, Sarah; Ballandras, Sylvain

    2012-09-01

    Solutions for the development of compact RF passive transducers as an alternative to standard surface or bulk acoustic wave devices are receiving increasing interest. This article presents results on the development of an acoustic band-pass filter based on periodically poled ferroelectric domains in lithium niobate. The fabrication of periodically poled transducers (PPTs) operating in the range of 20 to 650 MHz has been achieved on 3-in (76.2-mm) 500-μm-thick wafers. This kind of transducer is able to excite elliptical as well as longitudinal modes, yielding phase velocities of about 3800 and 6500 ms(-1), respectively. A new type of acoustic band-pass filter is proposed, based on the use of PPTs instead of the SAWs excited by classical interdigital transducers. The design and the fabrication of such a filter are presented, as well as experimental measurements of its electrical response and transfer function. The feasibility of such a PPT-based filter is thereby demonstrated and the limitations of this method are discussed.

  12. Spectrophotometric determination of optical parameters of lithium niobate films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina S. Kozlova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Lithium niobate films on silicon substrates have been synthesized by high-frequency magnetron sputtering of a target. The spectral dependences of the reflectance in the 300–700 nm range at small incidence angles and the angular dependence of p- and s-polarized light for a discrete set of wavelengths from 300 to 700 nm with wavelength increments of 50 nm, for angles of 1 arc deg, have been obtained using spectrophotometry. The refractive indicies, the film thickness and the extinction coefficients have been determined using a numerical method for solving inverse problems. The initial approximations for the solution of inverse problems have been defined using methods based on the estimation of the interference extrema positions in the reflection spectra. The resultant refractive indicies of the film differ from those typical of LiNbO3 single crystals. These differences are attributed to the structural disorder induced by the predominant crystallite orientation and the absorption in the film.

  13. Gold particle formation via photoenhanced deposition on lithium niobate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaniewski, A.M., E-mail: azaniews@asu.edu; Meeks, V.; Nemanich, R.J.

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • Gold chloride is reduced into solid gold nanoparticles at the surface of a polarized semiconductor. • Reduction processes are driven by ultraviolet light. • Gold nanoparticle and silver nanoparticle deposition patterns are compared. - Abstract: In this work, we report on a technique to reduce gold chloride into sub-micron particles and nanoparticles. We use photoelectron transfer from periodically polarized lithium niobate (PPLN) illuminated with above band gap light to drive the surface reactions required for the reduction and particle formation. The particle sizes and distributions on the PPLN surface are sensitive to the solution concentration, with inhibited nucleation and large particles (>150 nm) for both low (2E−8M to 9E−7M) and high (1E−5M to 1E−3M) concentrations of gold chloride. At midrange values of the concentration, nucleation is more frequent, resulting in smaller sized particles (<150 nm). We compare the deposition process to that for silver, which has been previously studied. We find that the reduction of gold chloride into nanoparticles is inhibited compared to silver ion reduction, due to the multi-step reaction required for gold particle formation. This also has consequences for the resulting deposition patterns: while silver deposits into nanowires along boundaries between areas with opposite signed polarizations, such patterning of the deposition is not observed for gold, for a wide range of concentrations studied (2E−8 to 1E−3M).

  14. Diamond micro-milling of lithium niobate for sensing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo, Dehong; Choong, Zi Jie; Shi, Yilun; Hedley, John; Zhao, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Lithium niobate (LiNbO 3 ) is a crystalline material which is widely applied in surface acoustic wave, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and optical devices, owing to its superior physical, optical, and electronic properties. Due to its low toughness and chemical inactivity, LiNbO 3 is considered to be a hard-to-machine material and has been traditionally left as as an inert substrate upon which other micro structures are deposited. However, in order to make use of its superior material properties and increase efficiency, the fabrication of microstructures directly on LiNbO 3 is in high demand. This paper presents an experimental investigation on the micro machinability of LiNbO 3 via micro milling with the aim of obtaining optimal process parameters. Machining of micro slots was performed on Z -cut LiNbO 3 wafers using single crystal diamond tools. Surface and edge quality, cutting forces, and the crystallographic effect were examined and characterized. Ductile mode machining of LiNbO 3 was found to be feasible at a low feed rate and small depth of cut. A strong crystallographic effect on the machined surface quality was also observed. Finally, some LiNbO 3 micro components applicable to sensing applications were fabricated. (paper)

  15. Magnetophotorefractive effect and interference filters in lithium niobate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam-Hansen, C.

    1996-03-01

    This thesis deals with the fundamental photorefractive and photovoltaic properties of iron-doped lithium niobate crystals. Experimental observations of a strong magnetic field effect on the energy coupling and grating formation in a vectorial interaction scheme are presented. To the author's knowledge these are the first reported results in the field. It is shown that an enhancement of the diffraction efficiency of 60% is possible by applying even a moderate magnetic field of 0.23 T. A new theoretical model of the magnetophotorefractive effect in the vectorial interaction scheme is presented. It describes the space-charge field formation, two-wave mixing and grating formation under the influence of an externally applied magnetic field. Good agreement with the experimental results and the first measurement of nondiagonal components of the magnetophotovoltaic tensor are reported. A theoretical model for the temperature properties of photorefractive interference filters with subangstrom bandwidths are presented and compared favourably with experimental investigations. A novel method for determining the spectral response of these filters from a combined thermal and angular response measurements is described. (au) 9 tabs., 30 ills., 84 refs

  16. Analysis of Waveguides on Lithium Niobate Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiwen Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Waveguides formed by etching, proton-exchange (PE, and strip-loaded on single-crystal lithium niobate (LN thin film were designed and simulated by a full-vectorial finite difference method. The single-mode condition, optical power distribution, and bending loss of these kinds of waveguides were studied and compared systematically. For the PE waveguide, the optical power distributed in LN layer had negligible change with the increase of PE thickness. For the strip-loaded waveguide, the relationships between optical power distribution in LN layer and waveguide thickness were different for quasi-TE (q-TE and quasi-TM (q-TM modes. The bending loss would decrease with the increase of bending radius. There was a bending loss caused by the electromagnetic field leakage when the neff of q-TM waveguide was smaller than that of nearby TE planar waveguide. LN ridge waveguides possessed a low bending loss even at a relatively small bending radius. This study is helpful for the understanding of waveguide structures as well as for the optimization and the fabrication of high-density integrated optical components.

  17. Recent Achievements on Photovoltaic Optoelectronic Tweezers Based on Lithium Niobate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel García-Cabañes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This review presents an up-dated summary of the fundamentals and applications of optoelectronic photovoltaic tweezers for trapping and manipulation of nano-objects on the surface of lithium niobate crystals. It extends the contents of previous reviews to cover new topics and developments which have emerged in recent years and are marking the trends for future research. Regarding the theoretical description of photovoltaic tweezers, detailed simulations of the electrophoretic and dielectrophoretic forces acting on different crystal configurations are discussed in relation to the structure of the obtained trapping patterns. As for the experimental work, we will pay attention to the manipulation and patterning of micro-and nanoparticles that has experimented an outstanding progress and relevant applications have been reported. An additional focus is now laid on recent work about micro-droplets, which is a central topic in microfluidics and optofluidics. New developments in biology and biomedicine also constitute a relevant part of the review. Finally, some topics partially related with photovoltaic tweezers and a discussion on future prospects and challenges are included.

  18. Tunable dual-wavelength filter and its group delay dispersion in domain-engineered lithium niobate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-hao Shao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A tunable dual-wavelength filter is experimentally demonstrated in domain-engineered lithium niobate. Application of an electric field on the y-surfaces of the sample results in the optical axes rotating clockwise and anticlockwise, which makes selective polarization rotation. The quasi phase-matching wavelengths could be adjusted through suitable domain design. A unique dual valley spectrum is obtained in a periodically poled lithium niobate structure with a central defect if the sample is placed between two parallel polarizers. The expected bandwidth could be varied from ∼1 nm to ∼40 nm. Moreover, both the spectral response and group delay dispersion could be engineered.

  19. Annealing behaviour of MeV erbium implanted lithium niobate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gortmaker, P.; McCallum, J.C. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Lithium niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}) is a crystalline ceramic commonly used in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices. Recently, rare earth doping of LiNbO{sub 3} has become a topic of particular interest. The electronic configuration of rare earth elements such as Erbium (Er) and Neodymium (Nd) allows them to lase in nearly any host matrix making fabrication of a whole range of new optoelectronic devices possible. At present, the doping technique, for LiNbO{sub 3} are centred upon diffusion technology, but the diffusion profiles for the rare earths are not generally well-matched to the optical modes of the device. The aim of this research is to develop MeV implantation and annealing conditions of rare earth doped LiNbO{sub 3} that would be compatible with optoelectronic device fabrication. To determine the characteristics of the rare earth elements in the LiNbO{sub 3} host material over the depth range of interest in optoelectronic device applications, high energy Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and ion channeling (RBS-C) must be used. Presented here are the Er depth profile and lattice damage results obtained from 5 MeV RBS-C measurements on samples of LiNbO{sub 3} implanted with various doses of MeV Erbium and subsequently thermally annealed at a temperature of 1000 deg C. It was found that there is a peak implant concentration (2 x 10{sup 16} Er/cm{sup 2}) for which erbium no longer goes substitutional in the lattice, and the implantation damage is not fully removed by annealing. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Ion-beam enhanced etching for the 3D structuration of lithium niobate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gischkat, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The present thesis deals with the usage of the ion-beam enhanced etching (IBEE) for the 3D structuration of lithium niobate (LiNbO 3 ).Hereby the approach of the enhancement of the wet-chemical etching rate due to the irradiation with energetic ions is pursued. This method is very success promising for the realization of micro- and nanostructures with perpendicular structural walls as well as small roughnesses. The aim of this thesis consisted therein to form the foundations for the realization of three-dimensional micro- and nanostructures (for instance: Layer systems and photonic crystals) in LiNbO 3 with high optical quality and to demonstrate on selected examples. Conditions for the success of the IBEE structuration technique is first of all the understanding of the defect formation under ion irradiation as well as the radiation-induced structure changes in the crystal and the change of the chemical resistance connected with this. For this the defect formation was studied in dependence on th ion mass, the ion energy, and the irradiation temperature. Thermally induced influences and effects on the radiation damage, as they can occur in intermediate steps in the complex processing, must be known and were studied by means of subsequent temperature treatment. The results from the defect studies were subsequently applied for the fabrication of micro- and nanostructures in LiNbO 3 . Shown is the realization of lateral structure with nearly perpendicular structure walls as well as the realization of thin membranes and slits. The subsequent combination of lateral structuration with the fabrication of thin membranes and slits allowed the three-dimensional structuration of LiNbO 3 . This is exemplarily shown for a microresonator and for a 2D photonic crystal with below lying air slit. [de

  1. Annealed proton exchanged optical waveguides in lithium niobate differences between the X- and Z-cuts

    CERN Document Server

    Nekvindova, P; Cervena, J; Budnar, M; Razpet, A; Zorko, B; Pelicon, P; 10.1016/S0925-3467(01)00186-0

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes results and assessments of our systematic fabrication and characterization of proton exchanged (PE) and annealed proton exchanged (APE) waveguides in lithium niobate. This study focused on different behavior of crystallographically diverse X(1120) and Z (0001) substrate cuts during waveguide fabrication, and differences in characteristics of the resulting waveguides. Non-toxic adipic acid was used as a proton source, and the waveguides properties were defined by mode spectroscopy (waveguide characteristics) and neutron depth profiling (NDP, lithium concentration and distribution), infrared vibration spectra and elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA, concentration and depth distribution of hydrogen). It was discovered that the X-cut structure is more permeable for moving particles (lithium and hydrogen ions), which leads to a higher effectiveness of the PE process within the X-cut. The explanation of this phenomenon is based on fitting X-cut orientation towards cleavage planes of lithium niobate c...

  2. Determination of electro-optic coefficients of lithium niobate crystal by polarization and interference methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syuy, A. V.; Kile, E. O.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper electrooptical coefficients r22, [r13 - 0.9r33 ], of nominally pure single congruent crystal of lithium niobate are determined. Measurement of electro-optic coefficients is produced by two independent methods: polarization and interference. The polarization scheme is based on the Senarmont method and interference scheme - on conoscopic figures.

  3. Investigation of enhanced forward and backward anti-stokes Raman signals in lithium niobate waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Da; Hong, Pengda; Ding, Yujie J., E-mail: yding300@gmail.com [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Liu, Zhaojun; Wang, Lei [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); School of Information Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Hua, Ping-Rang; Zhang, De-Long [School of Precision Instruments and Opto-electronics Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2015-07-07

    We have observed enhancements of the anti-Stokes Raman signals generated in lithium niobate waveguides in the forward and backward configurations by at least one order of magnitude under the pump power of the microwatt level. These output signals were measured using a single photon detector. The forward and backward propagating anti-Stokes signals exhibited different spectral features.

  4. Erbium medium temperature localised doping into lithium niobate and sapphire: A comparative study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nekvindová, P.; Macková, Anna; Peřina, Vratislav; Červená, Jarmila; Čapek, P.; Schrofel, J.; Špirková, J.; Oswald, Jiří

    90-91, - (2003), s. 559-564 ISSN 1012-0394 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : lithium niobate * sapphire * erbium Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.687, year: 2003

  5. The laser conoscopy of lithium niobate crystals of different composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikoul, O. Y.; Sidorov, N. V.; Teplyakova, N. A.; Palatnikov, M. N.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we study conoscopic patterns of single crystals of LiNbO3 congruent (Li/Nb = 0.946) and stoichiometric (Li/Nb = 1) compounds, as well as congruent crystals doped with cations: Mg2+ (0.86 wt.%), Zn2+ (0.03, 0.52, 0.62 wt.%), Cu2 + (0.015 wt.%), B3+ (0.12 wt.%), Gd3+ (0.51 wt.%), Y3+ (0.46 wt.%), Gd3+ (0.23 wt.%): Mg2+ (0.75 wt.%), Mg2+ (0.86 wt.%): Fe3+ (0.0036 wt.%), Ta5+ (1.13 wt.%): Mg2+ (0.011 wt.%), Y3+ (0.24 wt.%): Mg2+ (0.63 wt.%). Conoscopic patterns of lithium niobate crystals were recorded at excitation by He-Ne laser (λo = 632.8 nm) and the second harmonic of MLL-100 laser Y:Al garnet (λo = 532 nm, P = 1mW), which does not cause the effect of photorefractive and more powerful radiation of the second harmonic MLL-100 laser Y: Al garnet (λo = 532 nm, P = 90 mW). Irradiation of crystals radiation 632.8 nm and 532 nm (P = 1 mW) photorefractive effect is absent and there is no disclosure of the photoinduced light scattering indicatrix. In this case, conoscopic paintings reflect the state of structural defects in the crystal in the absence of photorefractive effect. When excited by MLL-100 laser radiation on Y:Al garnet (λo = 532 nm, P = 90 mW) in conoscopic patterns appear as its own crystal defects (defined composition and crystal growth conditions), and defects, induced by laser radiation. These crystals characterized by rather a low photorefractive effect. In crystals with a low effect of photorefractive optical distortions associated with the passage of laser light through the crystal is not "smeared" the strong destruction of the laser beam due to photorefractive effect, and confidently observable.

  6. Interaction of light with impurities in lithium niobate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwesyg, Judith Renate Marie-Luise

    2011-06-06

    Congruent lithium niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}) and 5-mol% MgO-doped LiNbO{sub 3} (MgO:LN) crystals are widely used as nonlinear-optical crystals in frequency-conversion devices due to their large nonlinear-optic coefficients. These devices usually require high optical pump powers, but absorption of photons by impurities limits their usability due to heat accumulation that leads to thermo-optic refractive index changes. These refractive index changes distort the beam shape and disturb the phase-matching condition. Furthermore pyroelectric fields can build up. In this thesis the residual optical absorption in congruent LiNbO{sub 3} (CLN) and MgO:LN crystals is studied. Absorption spectra of CLN and MgO:LN crystals between 400-2000 nm reveal a residual absorption up to 0.04 cm{sup -1}. This absorption is mainly caused by transition metal impurities. Between 2300-2800 nm unknown hydrogen absorption bands in CLN and MgO:LN are revealed on the order of 0.001 cm{sup -1}. High-temperature annealing is applied to the CLN and MgO:LN crystals, which decreases optical absorption by up to one order of magnitude. As an application, the operation of a 1550-nm pumped singly-resonant CW optical parametric oscillator, resonant around 2600 nm, using a low-loss, periodically-poled, annealed CLN crystal is demonstrated. Another issue that affects CLN is photorefractive damage (PRD), i.e. light-induced refractive index changes. In contrast, MgO:LN crystals do not suffer from PRD even at high optical intensities. However, it is shown in this thesis that PRD can occur within seconds in MgO:LN, using green laser light at light intensity levels as low as 100 mW/cm{sup 2}, if the crystal is heated by several degrees Celsius during or before illumination. Photorefractive damage does not occur in CLN crystals under the same conditions. We show that the pyroelectric effect together with an elevated photoconductivity compared to that of CLN causes this beam distortion and that this effect also

  7. Interaction of light with impurities in lithium niobate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwesyg, Judith Renate Marie-Luise

    2011-01-01

    Congruent lithium niobate (LiNbO 3 ) and 5-mol% MgO-doped LiNbO 3 (MgO:LN) crystals are widely used as nonlinear-optical crystals in frequency-conversion devices due to their large nonlinear-optic coefficients. These devices usually require high optical pump powers, but absorption of photons by impurities limits their usability due to heat accumulation that leads to thermo-optic refractive index changes. These refractive index changes distort the beam shape and disturb the phase-matching condition. Furthermore pyroelectric fields can build up. In this thesis the residual optical absorption in congruent LiNbO 3 (CLN) and MgO:LN crystals is studied. Absorption spectra of CLN and MgO:LN crystals between 400-2000 nm reveal a residual absorption up to 0.04 cm -1 . This absorption is mainly caused by transition metal impurities. Between 2300-2800 nm unknown hydrogen absorption bands in CLN and MgO:LN are revealed on the order of 0.001 cm -1 . High-temperature annealing is applied to the CLN and MgO:LN crystals, which decreases optical absorption by up to one order of magnitude. As an application, the operation of a 1550-nm pumped singly-resonant CW optical parametric oscillator, resonant around 2600 nm, using a low-loss, periodically-poled, annealed CLN crystal is demonstrated. Another issue that affects CLN is photorefractive damage (PRD), i.e. light-induced refractive index changes. In contrast, MgO:LN crystals do not suffer from PRD even at high optical intensities. However, it is shown in this thesis that PRD can occur within seconds in MgO:LN, using green laser light at light intensity levels as low as 100 mW/cm 2 , if the crystal is heated by several degrees Celsius during or before illumination. Photorefractive damage does not occur in CLN crystals under the same conditions. We show that the pyroelectric effect together with an elevated photoconductivity compared to that of CLN causes this beam distortion and that this effect also influences frequency conversion

  8. Thermo-electric oxidization of iron in lithium niobate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Lithium niobate crystals (LiNbO 3 ) are a promising material for nonlinear-optical applications like frequency conversion to generate visible light, e.g., in laser displays, but their achievable output power is greatly limited by the ''optical damage'', i.e., light-induced refractive-index changes caused by excitation of electrons from iron impurities and the subsequent retrapping in unilluminated areas of the crystal. The resulting space-charge fields modify the refractive indices due to the electro-optic effect. By this ''photorefractive effect'' the phase-matching condition, i.e., the avoidance of destructive interference between light generated at different crystal positions due to the dispersion of the fundamental wave and the converted wave, is disturbed critically above a certain light intensity threshold. The influence of annealing treatments conducted in the presence of an externally applied electric field (''thermo-electric oxidization'') on the valence state of iron impurities and thereby on the optical damage is investigated. It is observed that for highly iron-doped LiNbO 3 crystals this treatment leads to a nearly complete oxidization from Fe 2+ to Fe 3+ indicated by the disappearance of the absorption caused by Fe 2+ . During the treatment an absorption front forms that moves through the crystal. The absorption in the visible as well as the electrical conductivity are decreased by up to five orders of magnitude due to this novel treatment. The ratio of the Fe 2+ concentration to the total iron concentration - a measure for the strength of the oxidization - is in the order of 10 -6 for oxidized crystals whereas it is about 10 -1 for untreated samples. Birefringence changes are observed at the absorption front that are explained by the removal of hydrogen and lithium ions from the crystal that compensate for the charges of the also removed electrons from Fe 2+ . A microscopic shock-wave model is developed that explains the observed absorption front by

  9. Influence of UV light and heat on the ferroelectric properties of lithium niobate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steigerwald, Hendrik

    2011-08-15

    One of the most important non-linear-optical materials is lithium niobate, due to its ease of fabrication, robustness, transparency in the visible-to-infrared and excellent nonlinear properties. In this thesis the issue of tailoring ferroelectric domain structures in lithium niobate crystals is approached from two sides: interaction of defect structures inside the crystal with growing ferroelectric domains is investigated and also actual domain patterning on all crystal faces by different methods is performed. Special emphasis is given to the Mg-doped material. The fundamental understanding and the methods of domain patterning developed in this thesis are then used to obtain tailored domain structures that meet the requirements of their intended application in non-linear optics. (orig.)

  10. Propagation of light in the lithium niobate crystal along directions close to an optical axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, V.V.; Egorova, G.A.; Lonskij, Eh.S.; Potapov, E.V.; Rakov, A.V.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental results are given of studying some characteristics of electrooptical modulator from lithium niobate when propagating in it linear-polarized light in directions close to the optical axis, the electric field being applied along the X axis. It has been shown that an increase in an angle of deviation from the optical axis of a light beam passing in the crystal changes the value of the controlling voltage. This is accompanied by the rotation of the polarization plane and the change in the intensity of the light being passed. The methods have been proposed of increasing the modulator aperture, determining the main refraction indices and some electrooptical coefficients fo the lithium niobate crystal

  11. Modeling of Lithium Niobate (LiNbO3) and Aluminum Nitride (AlN) Nanowires Using Comsol Multiphysics Software: The Case of Pressure Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, A. A.; Alsaad, A.; Al-Bataineh, Q. M.; Al-Naafa, M. A.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, Lithium niobate (LiNbO3) and Aluminum nitride (AlN) nanostructures were designed and investigated using the COMSOL Multiphysics software for pressure sensing applications. The Finite Element Method (FEM) was used for solving the differential equations with various parameters such as size, length, force, etc. The variation of the total maximum displacement as a function of applied force for various NWs lengths and the variation of the voltage as a function of applied force were plotted and discussed. AlN nanowires exhibit a better piezoelectric response than LiNbO3 nanowires do.

  12. Photonic guiding structures in lithium niobate crystals produced by energetic ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng

    2009-10-01

    A range of ion beam techniques have been used to fabricate a variety of photonic guiding structures in the well-known lithium niobate (LiNbO3 or LN) crystals that are of great importance in integrated photonics/optics. This paper reviews the up-to-date research progress of ion-beam-processed LiNbO3 photonic structures and reports on their fabrication, characterization, and applications. Ion beams are being used with this material in a wide range of techniques, as exemplified by the following examples. Ion beam milling/etching can remove the selected surface regions of LiNbO3 crystals via the sputtering effects. Ion implantation and swift ion irradiation can form optical waveguide structures by modifying the surface refractive indices of the LiNbO3 wafers. Crystal ion slicing has been used to obtain bulk-quality LiNbO3 single-crystalline thin films or membranes by exfoliating the implanted layer from the original substrate. Focused ion beams can either generate small structures of micron or submicron dimensions, to realize photonic bandgap crystals in LiNbO3, or directly write surface waveguides or other guiding devices in the crystal. Ion beam-enhanced etching has been extensively applied for micro- or nanostructuring of LiNbO3 surfaces. Methods developed to fabricate a range of photonic guiding structures in LiNbO3 are introduced. Modifications of LiNbO3 through the use of various energetic ion beams, including changes in refractive index and properties related to the photonic guiding structures as well as to the materials (i.e., electro-optic, nonlinear optic, luminescent, and photorefractive features), are overviewed in detail. The application of these LiNbO3 photonic guiding structures in both micro- and nanophotonics are briefly summarized.

  13. Aperture scaling effects with monolithic periodically poled lithium niobate optical parametric oscillators and generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missey, M; Dominic, V; Powers, P; Schepler, K L

    2000-02-15

    We used elliptical beams to demonstrate aperture scaling effects in nanosecond single-grating and multigrating periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) monolithic optical parametric oscillators and generators. Increasing the cavity Fresnel number in single-grating crystals broadened both the beam divergence and the spectral bandwidth. Both effects are explained in terms of the phase-matching geometry. These effects are suppressed when a multigrating PPLN crystal is used because the individual gratings provide small effective subapertures. A flood-pumped multigrating optical parametric generator displayed a low output beam divergence and contained 19 pairs of signal and idler frequencies.

  14. Control of coercive field in lithium niobate crystals with repeated polarization reversal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, Jung Hoon; Jeong, Doun; Park, Taeyong; Kim, Chulhan; Kwon, Soon-Bok; Cha, Myoungsik; Choi, Byeong Cheol; Yu, Nanei; Kurimura, Sunao; Jeon, Gyerok

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the amount of decrease in coercive field of congruent lithium niobate during repeated poling and back-poling was measured. The polarization is reversed in 300 ms and then back-poled during the rest period. The coercive field can be decreased around 1 kV/mm with a repeated poling interval of 5 s. As the interval prolonged, the poling field decrease became smaller, and a stretched exponential function is suggested for the experimental fitting resulting in a set of meaningful parameters. These values are essential for the design of high quality domain engineering

  15. Periodic domain inversion in x-cut single-crystal lithium niobate thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackwitz, P.; Rüsing, M.; Berth, G.; Zrenner, A.; Widhalm, A.; Müller, K.

    2016-01-01

    We report the fabrication of periodically poled domain patterns in x-cut lithium niobate thin-film. Here, thin films on insulator have drawn particular attention due to their intrinsic waveguiding properties offering high mode confinement and smaller devices compared to in-diffused waveguides in bulk material. In contrast to z-cut thin film lithium niobate, the x-cut geometry does not require back electrodes for poling. Further, the x-cut geometry grants direct access to the largest nonlinear and electro-optical tensor element, which overall promises smaller devices. The domain inversion was realized via electric field poling utilizing deposited aluminum top electrodes on a stack of LN thin film/SiO 2 layer/Bulk LN, which were patterned by optical lithography. The periodic domain inversion was verified by non-invasive confocal second harmonic microscopy. Our results show domain patterns in accordance to the electrode mask layout. The second harmonic signatures can be interpreted in terms of spatially, overlapping domain filaments which start their growth on the +z side.

  16. Low-energy Self-defocusing Soliton Compression at Optical Communication Wavelengths in Unpoled Lithium Niobate Ridge Waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Hairun; Zeng, Xianglong; Zhou, Binbin

    2014-01-01

    Self-defocusing soliton compression supported by the cascaded phase-mismatched second-harmonic generation process is numerically demonstrated in unpoled lithium niobate ridge waveguides where nano-joule pulses are operated and quasi-phase-matching is unnecessary. The soliton range is 1100-1800 nm....

  17. Photorefractive lithium niobate crystals for applications in photonics; Photorefraktive Lithiumniobatkristalle fuer Anwendungen in der Photonik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartwig, U.

    2006-12-15

    Lithium niobate crystals (LiNbO{sub 3}) generally show a photorefractive response, i.e., light-induced refractive index changes. Crystals are investigated at room temperature and at elevated temperatures. As a result 'classical' photorefractive holographic volume-phase gratings, originating from space charge fields and the electro-optic effect, and 'non-classical' photorefractive volume-phase gratings, which can be traced back to strong absorption gratings, emerge. Single domain and periodically poled crystals (PPLN) are investigated. PPLN is typically used in non-linear optics for frequency conversion. The crystals also show non-linear photorefractive response during holographic recording with isotropically polarized light beams of equal intensity and, in the case of PPLN, by mixing of domain and holographic gratings. The results are important for applications combining the photorefractive and non-linear optical properties of LiNbO{sub 3}. (orig.)

  18. Ferroelectric domain inversion and its stability in lithium niobate thin film on insulator with different thicknesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Guang-hao; Bai, Yu-hang; Cui, Guo-xin; Li, Chen; Qiu, Xiang-biao; Wu, Di; Lu, Yan-qing, E-mail: yqlu@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Geng, De-qiang [Jinan Jingzheng Electronics Co., Ltd., Jinan 250100 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Ferroelectric domain inversion and its effect on the stability of lithium niobate thin films on insulator (LNOI) are experimentally characterized. Two sets of specimens with different thicknesses varying from submicron to microns are selected. For micron thick samples (∼28 μm), domain structures are achieved by pulsed electric field poling with electrodes patterned via photolithography. No domain structure deterioration has been observed for a month as inspected using polarizing optical microscopy and etching. As for submicron (540 nm) films, large-area domain inversion is realized by scanning a biased conductive tip in a piezoelectric force microscope. A graphic processing method is taken to evaluate the domain retention. A domain life time of 25.0 h is obtained and possible mechanisms are discussed. Our study gives a direct reference for domain structure-related applications of LNOI, including guiding wave nonlinear frequency conversion, nonlinear wavefront tailoring, electro-optic modulation, and piezoelectric devices.

  19. Phase Regeneration of a BPSK Data Signal Using a Lithium Niobate Phase Modulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulvad, Hans Christian Hansen; Da Ros, Francesco; Galili, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We propose a scheme for phase regeneration of an optical binary phase shift keying (BPSK) data signal using a Lithium Niobate (LiNbO3) phase modulator. The scheme is based on heterodyne detection of the BPSK data signal with a continuous wave local oscillator (CW-LO). Carrier recovery...... in the optical domain, leading to a phase-regenerated BPSK data signal by the coherent superposition with a phase-inverted copy. The proposed scheme constitutes a compact and stable setup, where active phase-stabilization of the electrical data- and carrier-paths can potentially be avoided. An analytical...... is then achieved in the electrical domain using a ×2 frequency-multiplier and a narrow-band filtering scheme. Subsequently, a superposition of the recovered carrier and the heterodyne detected data signal is used to modulate the CW-LO in a LiNbO3 phase modulator. The result is a parametric mixing process...

  20. Transcription of domain patterns in near-stoichiometric magnesium-doped lithium niobate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Hao; Tian Tian; Sun Tongqing; Kong Yongfa; Chen Shaolin; Zhang Ling; Rupp, Romano; Xu Jingjun

    2010-01-01

    Recently, light-induced domain reversal has been developed to a promising method for domain engineering, but the depth of reversed domain is only of several tens of microns, which greatly limits its practical applications. In this Letter, we fabricated domain patterns on the -z face of 1.0 mol % Mg doped near-stoichiometric lithium niobate with the assistance of a focal 532 nm laser, and then succeeded to transcribe these domain patterns from the -z to the +z face by applying external field without laser illumination. The transcribed domains have much larger depths, can sustain more than 100 times of the transcription cycles without large deformation, and can be erased by one transcription cycle with illumination of 532 nm laser. Finally, a light-induced ferroelectric domain transcription model was proposed.

  1. Numerical and Experimental Study of Optoelectronic Trapping on Iron-Doped Lithium Niobate Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Gazzetto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Optoelectronic tweezers (OET are a promising technique for the realization of reconfigurable systems suitable to trap and manipulate microparticles. In particular, dielectrophoretic (DEP forces produced by OET represent a valid alternative to micro-fabricated metal electrodes, as strong and spatially reconfigurable electrical fields can be induced in a photoconductive layer by means of light-driven phenomena. In this paper we report, and compare with the experimental data, the results obtained by analyzing the spatial configurations of the DEP-forces produced by a 532 nm laser beam, with Gaussian intensity distribution, impinging on a Fe-doped Lithium Niobate substrate. Furthermore, we also present a promising preliminary result for water-droplets trapping, which could open the way to the application of this technique to biological samples manipulation.

  2. Nanotechnology in lithium niobate for integrated optic frequency conversion in the UV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busacca, Alessandro C.; Santini, Claudia; Oliveri, Luigi; Riva-Sanseverino, Stefano; Parisi, Antonino; Cino, Alfonso C.; Assanto, Gaetano

    2017-11-01

    In the domain of Earth Explorer satellites nanoengineered nonlinear crystals can optimize UV tunable solid-state laser converters. Lightweight sources can be based on Lithium Niobate (LN) domain engineering by electric field poling and guided wave interactions. In this Communication we report the preliminary experimental results and the very first demonstration of UltraViolet second-harmonic generation by first-order quasi-phase-matching in a surface-periodically-poled proton-exchanged LN waveguide. The pump source was a Ti-Sapphire laser with a tunability range of 700- 980 nm and a 40 GHz linewidth. We have measured UV continuous-wave light at 390 nm by means of a lock-in amplifier and of a photodiode with enhanced response in the UV. Measured conversion efficiency was about 1%W-1cm-2. QPM experiments show good agreement with theory and pave the way for a future implementation of the technique in materials less prone to photorefractive damage and wider transparency in the UV, such as Lithium Tantalate.

  3. Effect of powder processing conditions on the electromechanical properties of lithium doped potassium sodium niobate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Mensur-Alkoy

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lithium doped potassium sodium niobate ceramics with (K0.50−x/2Na0.50−x/2LixNbO3 composition where x = 0.04 and 0.07 were fabricated by solid state calcination and pressureless sintering methods. However, two different powder processing and calcination routes were used in this study and their effect on the structural and electrical properties were investigated and discussed. The routes were namely loose calcination and compact calcination. A general trend of decreasing grain size was observed in the sintered ceramics prepared from these powders. The most drastic effect was observed on the electromechanical properties of the samples, where the maximum strain of 7% lithium modified sample under an E-field of 50 kV/cm was increased from 0.09% to 0.12% by changing processing route. Furthermore, hysteretic behavior of the strain was found to decrease. This tendency was also valid for ferroelectric hysteresis property, with remnant polarization (2Pr increasing from 23 μC/cm2 to 46 μC/cm2. The improvements observed in the electrical properties were discussed on the basis of chemical homogeneity and uniform ionic distribution.

  4. Influence of heat treatment on structure and some physical properties of lithium boro-niobate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashif, I.; Sakr, E. M.; Soliman, A. A.; Ratep, A.

    2012-08-01

    The glass composition (90 mol% Li2B4O7-10 mol% Nb2O5) was prepared by the melt quenching technique. The quenched sample was heat treated at 480°C, 545°C and 630°C for 5 h and heat treated at 780°C with different time. The times were 5, 10, 15, 20, 28, and 36 h. The glass and glass ceramics were studied by differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and dc conductivity as a function of temperature. Lithium niobate (LiNbO3) and lithium diborate (Li2B4O7) were the main phases in glass ceramic addition to traces from LiNb3O8. Crystallite size of the main phases determined from the X-ray diffraction peaks are in the range <100 nm. The fraction of crystalline (LiNbO3) phase increases with increase the heat treatment temperature and time. The relation between physical properties and structure were studied.

  5. Effect of powder processing conditions on the electromechanical properties of lithium doped potassium sodium niobate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mensur-Alkoy, E.; Berksoy-Yavuz, A.

    2016-07-01

    Lithium doped potassium sodium niobate ceramics with (K0.50−x/2Na0.50−x/2Lix)NbO3 composition where x=0.04 and 0.07 were fabricated by solid state calcination and pressureless sintering methods. However, two different powder processing and calcination routes were used in this study and their effect on the structural and electrical properties were investigated and discussed. The routes were namely loose calcination and compact calcination. A general trend of decreasing grain size was observed in the sintered ceramics prepared from these powders. The most drastic effect was observed on the electromechanical properties of the samples, where the maximum strain of 7% lithium modified sample under an E-field of 50kV/cm was increased from 0.09% to 0.12% by changing processing route. Furthermore, hysteretic behavior of the strain was found to decrease. This tendency was also valid for ferroelectric hysteresis property, with remnant polarization (2Pr) increasing from 23μC/cm2 to 46μC/cm2. The improvements observed in the electrical properties were discussed on the basis of chemical homogeneity and uniform ionic distribution. (Author)

  6. Ion irradiation effects on lithium niobate etalons for tunable spectral filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garranzo, D.; Ibarmia, S.; Alvarez-Herrero, A.; Olivares, J.; Crespillo, M.; Díaz, M.

    2017-11-01

    , coupled with the HV field, could trigger a dielectric breakdown in the Lithium Niobate. In this paper we present the electro-optical results obtained when exposing a set of LN samples and a lowquality full size etalon to different radiation conditions. In a first irradiation campaign, performed at the Centre for Micro Analysis of Materials (CMAM-Madrid) facilities, we were mainly focused on the long-term degradation effects with a series of high flux (109 cm-2 s-1) proton tests at an energy of 10 MeV. In order to study the possibility of a single ion breakdown, a second campaign was carried out, at the Texas A&M University (TAMU), exposing Lithium Niobate to high LET ion species (78Kr, 40Ar, 129Xe, 197Au) accelerated to the GeV energy range to penetrate or even pass through the entire Lithium Niobate thickness.

  7. Generation and tunable enhancement of a sum-frequency signal in lithium niobate nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeyev, Anton; Reig Escalé, Marc; Grange, Rachel

    2017-02-01

    Recent developments in the fabrication of lithium niobate (LiNbO3) structures down to the nanoscale opens up novel applications of this versatile material in nonlinear optics. Current nonlinear optical studies in sub-micron waveguides are mainly restricted to the generation of second and third harmonics. In this work, we demonstrate the generation and waveguiding of the sum-frequency generation (SFG) signal in a single LiNbO3 nanowire with a cross-section of 517 nm  ×  654 nm. Furthermore, we enhance the guided SFG signal 17.9 times by means of modal phase matching. We also display tuning of the phase-matched wavelength by varying the nanowire cross-section and changing the polarization of the incident laser. The results prove that LiNbO3 nanowires can be successfully used for nonlinear wave-mixing applications and assisting the miniaturization of optical devices. , which features invited work from the best early-career researchers working within the scope of J Phys D. This project is part of the Journal of Physics series’ 50th anniversary celebrations in 2017. Rachel Grange was selected by the Editorial Board of J Phys D as an Emerging Leader.

  8. Label-free investigation of the effects of lithium niobate polarization on cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandracchia, B.; Gennari, O.; Paturzo, M.; Grilli, S.; Ferraro, P.

    2017-06-01

    The determination of contact area is pivotal to understand how biomaterials properties influence cell adhesion. In particular, the influence of surface charges is well-known but still controversial, especially when new functional materials and methods are introduced. Here, we use for the first time Holographic Total Internal Reflection Microscopy (HoloTIRM) to study the influence of the spontaneous polarization of ferroelectric lithium niobate (LN) on the adhesion properties of fibroblast cells. The selective illumination of a very thin region directly above the substrate, achieved by Total Internal Reflection, provides high-contrast images of the contact regions. Holographic recording, on the other hand, allows for label-free quantitative phase imaging of the contact areas between cells and LN. Phase signal is more sensitive in the first 100nm and, thus more reliable in order to locate focal contacts. This work shows that cells adhering on negatively polarized LN present a significant increase of the contact area in comparison with cells adhering on the positively polarized LN substrate, as well as an intensification of contact vicinity. This confirms the potential of LN as a platform for investigating the role of charges on cellular processes. The similarity of cell adhesion behavior on negatively polarized LN and glass control also confirms the possibility to use LN as an active substrate without impairing cell behavior.

  9. High-Q photonic resonators and electro-optic coupling using silicon-on-lithium-niobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witmer, Jeremy D.; Valery, Joseph A.; Arrangoiz-Arriola, Patricio; Sarabalis, Christopher J.; Hill, Jeff T.; Safavi-Naeini, Amir H.

    2017-04-01

    Future quantum networks, in which superconducting quantum processors are connected via optical links, will require microwave-to-optical photon converters that preserve entanglement. A doubly-resonant electro-optic modulator (EOM) is a promising platform to realize this conversion. Here, we present our progress towards building such a modulator by demonstrating the optically-resonant half of the device. We demonstrate high quality (Q) factor ring, disk and photonic crystal resonators using a hybrid silicon-on-lithium-niobate material system. Optical Q factors up to 730,000 are achieved, corresponding to propagation loss of 0.8 dB/cm. We also use the electro-optic effect to modulate the resonance frequency of a photonic crystal cavity, achieving a electro-optic modulation coefficient between 1 and 2 pm/V. In addition to quantum technology, we expect that our results will be useful both in traditional silicon photonics applications and in high-sensitivity acousto-optic devices.

  10. Complex extraordinary dielectric function of Mg-doped lithium niobate crystals at terahertz frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, K. A.; Kitaeva, G. Kh.; Kovalev, S. P.; Germansky, S. A.; Buryakov, A. M.; Tuchak, A. N.; Penin, A. N.

    2016-08-01

    We study the dispersion of the extraordinary dielectric function real and imaginary parts in the wide terahertz-frequency range of the lowest polariton branch for bulk LiNbO3 and Mg:LiNbO3 crystals. At frequencies 0.1-2.5 THz, both dispersion parts are measured by means of standard time-domain terahertz spectroscopy, and at higher frequencies up to 5.5 THz, the dielectric function real part is determined using a common scheme of spontaneous parametric down-conversion under near-forward Raman scattering by phonon polaritons. A special approach is applied for measuring of the dielectric function imaginary part at frequencies 1-3 THz, based on the analysis of visibility of three-wave second-order interference under spontaneous parametric down-conversion. The generalized approximate expressions are obtained for complex dielectric function dispersion within the lower polariton branches of LiNbO3 and Mg:LiNbO3. It is shown that the well-known decrease in terahertz-wave absorption of lithium niobate crystals under Mg-doping is caused by changes in the defect structure and reduction of coupling of the terahertz-frequency polaritons with Debye relaxational mode.

  11. Anisotropic surface acoustic waves in tungsten/lithium niobate phononic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jia-Hong; Yu, Yuan-Hai

    2018-02-01

    Phononic crystals (PnC) were known for acoustic band gaps for different acoustic waves. PnCs were already applied in surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices as reflective gratings based on the band gaps. In this paper, another important property of PnCs, the anisotropic propagation, was studied. PnCs made of circular tungsten films on a lithium niobate substrate were analyzed by finite element method. Dispersion curves and equal frequency contours of surface acoustic waves in PnCs of various dimensions were calculated to study the anisotropy. The non-circular equal frequency contours and negative refraction of group velocity were observed. Then PnC was applied as an acoustic lens based on the anisotropic propagation. Trajectory of SAW passing PnC lens was calculated and transmission of SAW was optimized by selecting proper layers of lens and applying tapered PnC. The result showed that PnC lens can suppress diffraction of surface waves effectively and improve the performance of SAW devices.

  12. Optical homogeneity, defects, and photorefractive properties of stoichiometric, congruent, and zinc-doped lithium niobate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorov, N. V.; Yanichev, A. A.; Palatnikov, M. N.; Gabain, A. A.; Pikoul, O. Yu.

    2014-07-01

    Using the laser-conoscopy method, the photorefractive light-scattering method, and the Raman light-scattering method, we have studied the structural and optical homogeneities and photorefractive properties of (i) stoichiometric lithium niobate crystals (LiNbO3(stoich)), which were grown from a melt with 58.6 mol % of Li2O; (ii) congruent crystals (LiNbO3(congr)); and (iii) congruent crystals that were doped with Zn2+ cations (LiNbO3:Zn; [Zn] = 0.03-1.59 mol %). We have shown that the speckle-structure of the photorefractive light scattering in all the crystals is three-layer. The shapes of the second and third layers repeat in general the shape of the first layer. We have shown that the differences that are observed between the Raman spectra, the photorefractive light scattering, and the conoscopic patterns of the examined crystals are caused by the fact that defects are distributed inhomogeneously over the volume of these crystals and that Zn2+ cations are incorporated inhomogeneously into the lattice. This leads to the appearance of local changes in the elastic characteristics of the crystal and to the appearance of mechanical stresses, which locally change the optical indicatrix and, correspondingly, the conoscopic pattern and the Raman spectrum.

  13. X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigation of structurally modified lithium niobate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitova, Tonya

    2008-02-15

    The type and concentration of impurity centers in different valence states are crucial for tuning the photorefractive properties of doped Lithium Niobate (LN) crystals. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) is an appropriate tool for studying the local structure of impurity centers. XAS combined with absorption in UV/VIS/IR and High Resolution X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (HRXES) provide information about the valence state of the dopant ions in as-grown, reduced or oxidized doped LN crystals. Cu (Cu{sup 1+} and Cu{sup 2+}) and Fe (Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}) atoms are found in two different valence states, whereas there are indications for a third Mn valency, in addition to Mn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 3+} in manganese-doped LN crystals. One of the charge compensation mechanisms during reduction of copper- doped LN crystals is outgassing of oxygen atoms. Cu ions in the reduced crystals have at least two different site symmetries: twofold (Cu{sup 1+}) and sixfold (Cu{sup 2+}) coordinated by O atoms. Fe and Mn atoms are coordinated by six O atoms. Cu and Fe ions are found to occupy only Li sites, whereas Mn ions are also incorporated into Li and Nb sites. The refractive index change in LN crystals irradiated with {sup 3}He{sup 2+} ions is caused by structurally disordered centers, where Nb atoms are displaced from normal crystallographic sites and Li or/and O vacancies are present. (orig.)

  14. Higher Order Elastic Constants, Gruneisen Parameters and Lattice Thermal Expansion of Lithium Niobate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thresiamma Philip

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The second and third-order elastic constants and pressure derivatives of second- order elastic constants of trigonal LiNbO3 (lithium niobate have been obtained using the deformation theory. The strain energy density estimated using finite strain elasticity is compared with the strain dependent lattice energy density obtained from the elastic continuum model approximation. The second-order elastic constants and the non-vanishing third-order elastic constants along with the pressure derivatives of trigonal LiNbO3 are obtained in the present work. The second and third-order elastic constants are compared with available experimental values. The second-order elastic constant C11 which corresponds to the elastic stiffness along the basal plane of the crystal is less than C33 which corresponds to the elastic stiffness tensor component along the c-axis of the crystal. The pressure derivatives, dC'ij/dp obtained in the present work, indicate that trigonal LiNbO3 is compressible. The higher order elastic constants are used to find the generalized Gruneisen parameters of the elastic waves propagating in different directions in LiNbO3. The Brugger gammas are evaluated and the low temperature limit of the Gruneisen gamma is obtained. The results are compared with available reported values.

  15. Probing the pseudo-1-D ion diffusion in lithium titanium niobate anode for Li-ion battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Suman; Dutta, Dipak; Araujo, Rafael B; Chakraborty, Sudip; Ahuja, Rajeev; Bhattacharyya, Aninda J

    2016-08-10

    Comprehensive understanding of the charge transport mechanism in the intrinsic structure of an electrode material is essential in accounting for its electrochemical performance. We present here systematic experimental and theoretical investigations of Li(+)-ion diffusion in a novel layered material, viz. lithium titanium niobate. Lithium titanium niobate (exact composition Li0.55K0.45TiNbO5·1.06H2O) is obtained from sol-gel synthesized potassium titanium niobate (KTiNbO5) by an ion-exchange method. The Li(+)-ions are inserted and de-inserted preferentially into the galleries between the octahedral layers formed by edge and corner sharing TiO6 and NbO6 octahedral units and the effective chemical diffusion coefficient, is estimated to be 3.8 × 10(-11) cm(2) s(-1) using the galvanostatic intermittent titration technique (GITT). Calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) strongly confirm the anisotropic Li(+)-ion diffusion in the interlayer galleries and that Li(+)-ions predominantly diffuse along the crystallographic b-direction. The preferential Li(+)-ion diffusion along the b-direction is assisted by line-defects, which are observed to be higher in concentration along the b-direction compared to the a- and c-directions, as revealed by high resolution electron microscopy. The Li-Ti niobate can be cycled to low voltages (≈0.2 V) and show stable and satisfactory battery performance over 100 cycles. Due to the possibility of cycling to low voltages, cyclic voltammetry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy convincingly reveal the reversibility of Ti(3+) ↔ Ti(2+) along with Ti(4+) ↔ Ti(3+) and Nb(5+) ↔ Nb(4+).

  16. Nanostructured lithium titanates (Li4Ti5O12) for lithium-ion batteries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wen, L

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available in Advanced Batteries and Supercapacitors Part of the series Nanostructure Science and Technology pp 127-169 Nanostructured Lithium Titanates (Li4Ti5O12) for Lithium-Ion Batteries Lei Wen Hong-Ze Luo Guang-Yin Liu Hai-Tao Zheng ABSTRACT...

  17. Conversion of broadband IR radiation and structural disorder in lithium niobate single crystals with low photorefractive effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinova, Man Nen; Syuy, Alexander V.; Krishtop, Victor V.; Pogodina, Veronika A.; Ponomarchuk, Yulia V.; Sidorov, Nikolay V.; Gabain, Aleksei A.; Palatnikov, Mikhail N.; Litvinov, Vladimir A.

    2016-11-01

    The conversion of broadband IR radiation when the noncritical phase matching condition is fulfilled in lithium niobate (LiNbO3) single crystals with stoichiometric (R = Li/Nb = 1) and congruent (R = 0.946) compositions, as well as in congruent single crystals doped with zinc has been investigated. It is shown that the spectrum parameters of converted radiation, such as the conversion efficiency, spectral width and position of maximum, depend on the ordering degree of structural units of the cation sublattice along the polar axis of crystal.

  18. Study of Er+ ion-implanted lithium niobate structure after an annealing procedure by RBS and RBS/channelling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macková, Anna; Malinský, Petr; Švecová, B.; Nekvindová, P.; Groetzschel, R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 268, 11-12 (2010), s. 2042-2045 ISSN 0168-583X. [19th International conference on Ion beam analysis. Cambridge, 07.09.2009-11.09.2009] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06041; GA ČR GA106/09/0125 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Lithium niobate * Erbium * Ion implantation Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.042, year: 2010

  19. The compact converter of Bessel beams of zero and second orders on the basis of z-cut lithium niobate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paranin, V D; Karpeev, S V; Khonina, S N; Tukmakov, K N

    2016-01-01

    Transformation of zero-order Bessel beams into a second-order vortex beam in the process of propagation in a c-cut of lithium niobate LiNbO 3 crystal has been investigated experimentally. The possibility of controlling beam transformation by means of changing the curve radius of the illuminating beam is shown. The possibility of Bessel beam transforming by compact devices on the basis of thin c-cuts of uniaxial crystals with a diffraction mask formed on their surface is proved. (paper)

  20. Interface modulated currents in periodically proton exchanged Mg doped lithium niobate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumayer, Sabine M.; Rodriguez, Brian J., E-mail: brian.rodriguez@ucd.ie, E-mail: gallo@kth.se [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Manzo, Michele; Gallo, Katia, E-mail: brian.rodriguez@ucd.ie, E-mail: gallo@kth.se [Department of Applied Physics, KTH-Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullbacken 21, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Kholkin, Andrei L. [Department of Physics and CICECO-Aveiro Institute of Materials, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal and Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-21

    Conductivity in Mg doped lithium niobate (Mg:LN) plays a key role in the reduction of photorefraction and is therefore widely exploited in optical devices. However, charge transport through Mg:LN and across interfaces such as electrodes also yields potential electronic applications in devices with switchable conductivity states. Furthermore, the introduction of proton exchanged (PE) phases in Mg:LN enhances ionic conductivity, thus providing tailorability of conduction mechanisms and functionality dependent on sample composition. To facilitate the construction and design of such multifunctional electronic devices based on periodically PE Mg:LN or similar ferroelectric semiconductors, fundamental understanding of charge transport in these materials, as well as the impact of internal and external interfaces, is essential. In order to gain insight into polarization and interface dependent conductivity due to band bending, UV illumination, and chemical reactivity, wedge shaped samples consisting of polar oriented Mg:LN and PE phases were investigated using conductive atomic force microscopy. In Mg:LN, three conductivity states (on/off/transient) were observed under UV illumination, controllable by the polarity of the sample and the externally applied electric field. Measurements of currents originating from electrochemical reactions at the metal electrode–PE phase interfaces demonstrate a memresistive and rectifying capability of the PE phase. Furthermore, internal interfaces such as domain walls and Mg:LN–PE phase boundaries were found to play a major role in the accumulation of charge carriers due to polarization gradients, which can lead to increased currents. The insight gained from these findings yield the potential for multifunctional applications such as switchable UV sensitive micro- and nanoelectronic devices and bistable memristors.

  1. On the temperature dependence of the spontaneous polarization of lithium niobate and lithium tantalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismailzade, I.G.; Ismailov, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    The temperature dependence of spontaneous polarization Psub(s)(T) of LiNbO 3 and LiTaO 3 ferroelectrics is studied by the precision X-ray diffraction method up to the Curie temperature - 1140 and 650 deg C, respectively. It is shown that for LiTaO 3 a deviation from continuous variation of spontaneous polarization with temperature is observed, expressing itself more disticntly at temperatures corresponding to intermediate ferroelectric phase transitions. The Psub(s)(T) obtained has whown that up to 210 deg C the value of LiNbO 3 spontaneous polarization practically remains constant and it decreases with the temperature increase, and near the phase transition temperature (transition of the first order) Psub(s)(T) is 40% of spontaneous polarization at room temperature. As in the case of lithium tantalate stepwise changes of Psub(s)(T) for LiNbO 3 are observed

  2. Electrochemical lithium insertion in some niobates MNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} (M=Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-de la Cruz, A.; Lopez Alcaraz, N.; Fuentes, A.F.; Torres-Martinez, L.M. [Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Monterrey (Mexico). Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas

    1999-09-01

    Several oxides with the general formula MNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} (M=Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd) have been tested as cathodes for lithium batteries. When discharging electrochemical cells using these niobates as active materials down 0.5 V, the maximum observed lithium content (x) in Li{sub x}MNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} was x=0.9, 0.9, 1.15, 1.5, 2.3 and 3.0 for M=Mn, Co, Zn, Cd, Ni and Cu, respectively. In situ X-ray diffraction experiments revealed in all cases a certain loss of crystallinity as the insertion reaction proceeds. Only the copper niobate showed an almost complete amorphization after the initial discharge. The kinetics of lithium insertion in these compounds was studied by electrochemical spectroscopy in a stepping potential mode. (orig.)

  3. Nanostructured lithium sulfide materials for lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Kyu; Lee, Yun Jung; Sun, Yang-Kook

    2016-08-01

    Upon the maturation and saturation of Li-ion battery technologies, the demand for the development of energy storage systems with higher energy densities has surged to meet the needs of key markets such as electric vehicles. Among the many next generation high-energy storage options, the Lisbnd S battery system is considered particularly close to mass commercialization because of its low cost and the natural abundance of sulfur. In this review, we focus on nanostructured Li2S materials for Lisbnd S batteries. Due to a lithium source in its molecular structure, Li2S can be coupled with various Li-free anode materials, thereby giving it the potential to surmount many of the problems related with a Li-metal anode. The hurdles that impede the full utilization of Li2S materials include its high activation barrier and the low electrical conductivity of bulk Li2S particles. Various strategies that can be used to assist the activation process and facilitate electrical transport are analyzed. To provide insight into the opportunities specific to Li2S materials, we highlight some major advances and results that have been achieved in the development of metal Li-free full cells and all-solid-state cells based on Li2S cathodes.

  4. Hydrothermal synthesis of nanostructured spinel lithium manganese oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhanqiang; Wang, Wen-lou; Liu, Xianming; Wu, Minchang; Li, Dan; Zeng, Zhen

    2004-04-01

    Nanostructured spherical spinel lithium manganese oxide (LiMnO) with about 200 nm in diameter was synthesized for the first time by mild hydrothermal method. The formation of the nanostructured spheres was through self-assembly of the nanoparticles and nanobelts. The influence of the reaction temperature and the time of formation of the nanostructures have been systematically studied. The thermal stability of the nanostructures has been examined by heating-treatment at different temperatures. Powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy were used to characterize the products.

  5. Integrated source of tunable nonmaximally mode-entangled photons in a domain-engineered lithium niobate waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, Yang; Wu, Zi-jian; Xu, Fei, E-mail: feixu@nju.edu.cn; Lu, Yan-qing, E-mail: yqlu@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Cui, Guo-xin [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Nanoapplications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, CAS, Suzhou 215000 (China); Tan, Ai-hong [Laboratory for Quantum Information, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2014-04-28

    The nonmaximally entangled state is a special kind of entangled state, which has important applications in quantum information processing. It has been generated in quantum circuits based on bulk optical elements. However, corresponding schemes in integrated quantum circuits have been rarely considered. In this Letter, we propose an effective solution for this problem. An electro-optically tunable nonmaximally mode-entangled photon state is generated in an on-chip domain-engineered lithium niobate (LN) waveguide. Spontaneous parametric down-conversion and electro-optic interaction are effectively combined through suitable domain design to transform the entangled state into our desired formation. Moreover, this is a flexible approach to entanglement architectures. Other kinds of reconfigurable entanglements are also achievable through this method. LN provides a very promising platform for future quantum circuit integration.

  6. Agile multicasting based on cascaded χ(2) nonlinearities in a step-chirped periodically poled lithium niobate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlawat, Meenu; Bostani, Ameneh; Tehranchi, Amirhossein; Kashyap, Raman

    2013-08-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the possibility of agile multicasting for wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) networks, of a single-channel to two and seven channels over the C band, also extendable to S and L bands. This is based on cascaded χ(2) nonlinear mixing processes, namely, second-harmonic generation (SHG)-sum-frequency generation (SFG) and difference-frequency generation (DFG) in a 20-mm-long step-chirped periodically poled lithium niobate crystal, specially designed and fabricated for a 28-nm-wide SH-SF bandwidth centered at around 1.55 μm. The multiple idlers are simultaneously tuned by detuning the pump wavelengths within the broad SH-SF bandwidth. By selectively tuning the pump wavelengths over less than 10 and 6 nm, respectively, multicasting into two and seven idlers is successfully achieved across ~70 WDM channels within the 50 GHz International Telecommunication Union grid spacing.

  7. Enhanced Cherenkov phase matching terahertz wave generation via a magnesium oxide doped lithium niobate ridged waveguide crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Takeya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available When combined with a nonlinear waveguide crystal, Cherenkov phase matching allows for highly effective generation of high power and broadband terahertz (THz waves. Using a ridged Lithium Niobate (LiNbO3 waveguide coupled with a specially designed silicon lens, we successfully generated THz waves with intensity of approximately three orders of magnitude stronger than those from conventional photoconductive antenna. The broadband spectrum was from 0.1 THz to 7 THz with a maximum dynamic range of 80 dB. The temporal shape of time domain pulse is a regular single cycle which could be used for high depth resolution time of flight tomography. The generated THz wave can also be easily monitored by compact room-temperature THz camera, enabling us to determine the spatial characteristics of the THz propagation.

  8. Integrated source of tunable nonmaximally mode-entangled photons in a domain-engineered lithium niobate waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming, Yang; Wu, Zi-jian; Xu, Fei; Lu, Yan-qing; Cui, Guo-xin; Tan, Ai-hong

    2014-01-01

    The nonmaximally entangled state is a special kind of entangled state, which has important applications in quantum information processing. It has been generated in quantum circuits based on bulk optical elements. However, corresponding schemes in integrated quantum circuits have been rarely considered. In this Letter, we propose an effective solution for this problem. An electro-optically tunable nonmaximally mode-entangled photon state is generated in an on-chip domain-engineered lithium niobate (LN) waveguide. Spontaneous parametric down-conversion and electro-optic interaction are effectively combined through suitable domain design to transform the entangled state into our desired formation. Moreover, this is a flexible approach to entanglement architectures. Other kinds of reconfigurable entanglements are also achievable through this method. LN provides a very promising platform for future quantum circuit integration

  9. Hysteresis-free high-temperature precise bimorph actuators produced by direct bonding of lithium niobate wafers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shur, V. Ya.; Baturin, I. S.; Mingaliev, E. A.; Zorikhin, D. V.; Udalov, A. R.; Greshnyakov, E. D. [Ferroelectric Laboratory, Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, 51 Lenin Ave., 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-02

    The current paper presents a piezoelectric bimorph actuator produced by direct bonding of lithium niobate wafers with the mirrored Y and Z axes. Direct bonding technology allowed to fabricate bidomain plate with precise positioning of ideally flat domain boundary. By optimizing the cutting angle (128° Y-cut), the piezoelectric constant became as large as 27.3 pC/N. Investigation of voltage dependence of bending displacement confirmed that bimorph actuator has excellent linearity and hysteresis-free. Decrease of the applied voltage down to mV range showed the perfect linearity up to the sub-nm deflection amplitude. The frequency and temperature dependences of electromechanical transmission coefficient in wide temperature range (from 300 to 900 K) were investigated.

  10. Highly coherent mid-IR supercontinuum by self-defocusing solitons in lithium niobate waveguides with all-normal dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Hairun; Zhou, Binbin; Zeng, Xianglong

    2014-01-01

    We numerically investigate self-defocusing solitons in a lithium niobate (LN) waveguide designed to have a large refractive index (RI) change. The waveguide evokes strong waveguide dispersion and all-normal dispersion is found in the entire guiding band spanning the near-IR and the beginning of t...... dispersion, the soliton spectral tunneling effect is also investigated, with which few-cycle pico-joule pulses at 2 mm are formed by a near-IR pump. © 2014 Optical Society of America....... where no linear dispersion (i.e. non-solitonic) regimes exist within the guiding band. Soliton compressions at 2 mm and 3 mm are investigated, with nano-joule single cycle pulse formations and highly coherent octave-spanning supercontinuum generations. With an alternative design on the waveguide...

  11. Determination of trace elements in lithium niobate crystals by solid sampling and solution-based spectrometry methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bencs, Laszlo, E-mail: bencs.laszlo@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Gyoergy, Krisztina; Kardos, Marta [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Osan, Janos; Alfoeldy, Balint [Institute for Atomic Energy Research, Centre for Energy Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Varga, Imre [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Lorand Eoetvoes University, P.O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Ajtony, Zsolt [Institute of Food Science, University of West Hungary, H-9200 Mosonmagyarovar, Lucsony u. 15-17 (Hungary); Szoboszlai, Norbert [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Lorand Eoetvoes University, P.O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Stefanka, Zsolt [Institute for Isotope Research, Centre for Energy Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority, H-1136 Budapest, Fenyes Adolf u. 4 (Hungary); Szeles, Eva [Institute for Isotope Research, Centre for Energy Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Kovacs, Laszlo [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2012-05-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid sampling GFAAS was studied for Cr, Fe and Mn determination in lithium niobate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solution based GFAAS, FAAS, ICP-OES and ICP-MS were elaborated for method validation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The performances of the elaborated spectrochemical methods have been compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The chemical forms of the matrix produced in GFAAS cycles were studied by XANES. - Abstract: Solid sampling (SS) graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) and solution-based (SB) methods of GFAAS, flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were elaborated and/or optimized for the determination of Cr, Fe and Mn trace elements used as dopants in lithium niobate optical crystals. The calibration of the SS-GFAAS analysis was possible with the application of the three-point-estimation standard addition method, while the SB methods were mostly calibrated against matrix-matched and/or acidic standards. Spectral and non-spectral interferences were studied in SB-GFAAS after digestion of the samples. The SS-GFAAS method required the use of less sensitive spectral lines of the analytes and a higher internal furnace gas (Ar) flow rate to decrease the sensitivity for crystal samples of higher (doped) analyte content. The chemical forms of the matrix produced at various stages of the graphite furnace heating cycle, dispensed either as a solid sample or a solution (after digestion), were studied by means of the X-ray near-edge absorption structure (XANES). These results revealed that the solid matrix vaporized/deposited in the graphite furnace is mostly present in the metallic form, while the dry residue from the solution form mostly vaporized/deposited as the oxide of niobium.

  12. Tip-induced domain growth on the non-polar cuts of lithium niobate single-crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alikin, D. O.; Ievlev, A. V.; Turygin, A. P.; Lobov, A. I.; Kalinin, S. V.; Shur, V. Ya.

    2015-05-01

    Currently, ferroelectric materials with designed domain structures are considered as a perspective material for new generation of photonic, data storage, and data processing devices. Application of external electric field is the most convenient way of the domain structure formation. Lots of papers are devoted to the investigation of domain kinetics on polar surface of crystals while the forward growth remains one of the most mysterious stages due to lack of experimental methods allowing to study it. Here, we performed tip-induced polarization reversal on X- and Y-non-polar cuts in single-crystal of congruent lithium niobate which allows us to study the forward growth with high spatial resolution. The revealed difference in the shape and length of domains induced on X- and Y-cuts is beyond previously developed theoretical approaches used for the theoretical consideration of the domains growth at non-polar ferroelectric surfaces. To explain experimental results, we used kinetic approach with anisotropy of screening efficiency along different crystallographic directions.

  13. Nanoscale observation of the distribution of the polarization orientation of ferroelectric domains in lithium niobate thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier, B.; Bornand, V.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) in the so-called piezoresponse mode is used to image the ferroelectric domains in radio frequency sputtered lithium niobate (LiNbO 3 ) thin films. It is shown that ferroelectric domains are clearly detectable and most of the time confined in the grains. The vertical and the lateral motion of the vibration of the tip in response to the applied alternating voltage is recorded in order to reconstruct a cartography of the orientation of the ferroelectric domains, allowing us to observe the distribution of the orientation of the polarization in the polycrystalline film and providing additional information about the direction of the polarization, although it is not a fully 3D cartography. From Piezoresponse Force Microscopy images, it is clear that the dispersion of the orientation of the polarization vector in the studied LiNbO 3 sample is very high. It is shown that the AFM quasi-3D mapping of the distribution of orientation in the material provides a valuable information and may help understanding the fundamental phenomena which govern the growth of the material

  14. Substitution mechanisms and location of Co2+ ions in congruent and stoichiometric lithium niobate crystals derived from electron paramagnetic resonance data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grachev, V. G.; Hansen, K.; Meyer, M.; Kokanyan, E. P.; Malovichko, G. I.

    2017-03-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra and their angular dependencies were measured for Co2+ trace impurities in stoichiometric samples of lithium niobate doped with rhodium. It was found that Co2+ substitutes for Li+ in the dominant axial center (CoLi) and that the principal substitution mechanism in stoichiometric lithium niobate is 4Co2+ ↔ 3Li+  +  Nb5+. The four Co2+ ions can occupy the nearest possible cation sites by occupying a Nb site and its three nearest-neighbor Li sites, creating a trigonal pyramid with C3 symmetry, as well as non-neighboring sites (e.g. a CoNb-CoLi pair at the nearest sites on the C3 axis with two nearby isolated single Co2+ ions substituted for Li+). In congruent crystals and samples with Li content enriched by vapor transport equilibrium treatment the excess charge of the Co2+ centers is compensated by lithium vacancies located rather far from the Co2+ ions for the dominant axial center or in the nearest neighborhood for low-symmetry satellite centers (the Co2+ ↔ 2Li+ substitution mechanism). The use of exact numerical diagonalization of the spin-Hamiltonian matrices explains all the details of the EPR spectra and gives a value for hyperfine interaction A || that is several times smaller than that obtained using perturbation formulae. The refined values of A and g-tensor components can be used as reliable cornerstones for ab initio and cluster calculations.

  15. Lithium insertion in nanostructured TiO(2)(B) architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dylla, Anthony G; Henkelman, Graeme; Stevenson, Keith J

    2013-05-21

    Electric vehicles and grid storage devices have potentialto become feasible alternatives to current technology, but only if scientists can develop energy storage materials that offer high capacity and high rate capabilities. Chemists have studied anatase, rutile, brookite and TiO2(B) (bronze) in both bulk and nanostructured forms as potential Li-ion battery anodes. In most cases, the specific capacity and rate of lithiation and delithiation increases as the materials are nanostructured. Scientists have explained these enhancements in terms of higher surface areas, shorter Li(+) diffusion paths and different surface energies for nanostructured materials allowing for more facile lithiation and delithiation. Of the most studied polymorphs, nanostructured TiO2(B) has the highest capacity with promising high rate capabilities. TiO2(B) is able to accommodate 1 Li(+) per Ti, giving a capacity of 335 mAh/g for nanotubular and nanoparticulate TiO2(B). The TiO2(B) polymorph, discovered in 1980 by Marchand and co-workers, has been the focus of many recent studies regarding high power and high capacity anode materials with potential applications for electric vehicles and grid storage. This is due to the material's stability over multiple cycles, safer lithiation potential relative to graphite, reasonable capacity, high rate capability, nontoxicity, and low cost (Bruce, P. G.; Scrosati, B.; Tarascon, J.-M. Nanomaterials for Rechargeable Lithium Batteries. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed.2008, 47, 2930-2946). One of the most interesting properties of TiO2(B) is that both bulk and nanostructured forms lithiate and delithiate through a surface redox or pseudocapacitive charging mechanism, giving rise to stable high rate charge/discharge capabilities in the case of nanostructured TiO2(B). When other polymorphs of TiO2 are nanostructured, they still mainly intercalate lithium through a bulk diffusion-controlled mechanism. TiO2(B) has a unique open crystal structure and low energy Li

  16. Šolc-Type Wavelength Filters Based on TE↔TM Mode Conversion Utilizing Periodically Poled Ti-Diffused Lithium Niobate Channel Waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongsik Jung

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We have demonstrated the Šolc-type wavelength filters in a 52 mm long periodically poled Ti-diffused lithium niobate channel waveguide which has a domain period of 16.6 μm. At room temperature, the center wavelength and the full-width at half maximum of the filter were about 1272.49 nm and 0.23 nm, respectively. The nearest side-lobe is about 7 dB. New structure of optical add/drop multiplexer (OADM utilizing Šolc-type TE↔TM mode converters was proposed for the first time.

  17. Ion-beam enhanced etching for the 3D structuration of lithium niobate; Ionenstrahlverstaerktes Aetzen fuer die 3D-Strukturierung von Lithiumniobat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gischkat, Thomas

    2010-01-12

    The present thesis deals with the usage of the ion-beam enhanced etching (IBEE) for the 3D structuration of lithium niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}).Hereby the approach of the enhancement of the wet-chemical etching rate due to the irradiation with energetic ions is pursued. This method is very success promising for the realization of micro- and nanostructures with perpendicular structural walls as well as small roughnesses. The aim of this thesis consisted therein to form the foundations for the realization of three-dimensional micro- and nanostructures (for instance: Layer systems and photonic crystals) in LiNbO{sub 3} with high optical quality and to demonstrate on selected examples. Conditions for the success of the IBEE structuration technique is first of all the understanding of the defect formation under ion irradiation as well as the radiation-induced structure changes in the crystal and the change of the chemical resistance connected with this. For this the defect formation was studied in dependence on th ion mass, the ion energy, and the irradiation temperature. Thermally induced influences and effects on the radiation damage, as they can occur in intermediate steps in the complex processing, must be known and were studied by means of subsequent temperature treatment. The results from the defect studies were subsequently applied for the fabrication of micro- and nanostructures in LiNbO{sub 3}. Shown is the realization of lateral structure with nearly perpendicular structure walls as well as the realization of thin membranes and slits. The subsequent combination of lateral structuration with the fabrication of thin membranes and slits allowed the three-dimensional structuration of LiNbO{sub 3}. This is exemplarily shown for a microresonator and for a 2D photonic crystal with below lying air slit. [German] Die vorliegende Arbeit beschaeftigt sich mit der Ausnutzung des ionenstrahlverstaerkten Aetzens (IBEE: Ion Beam Enhanced Etching) fuer die 3D-Strukturierung von

  18. Thermal plasma fabricated lithium niobate-tantalate films on sapphire substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulinich, S.A.; Yoshida, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Terashima, K.

    2003-01-01

    We report the deposition of LiNb 1-x Ta x O 3 (0≤x≤1) films on (001) sapphire substrates in soft vacuum using a radio frequency thermal plasma. The growth rate, crystallinity, c-axis orientation, and surface roughness were examined as functions of substrate temperature, precursor feed rate, and substrate surface condition. The film Nb/Ta ratio was well controlled by using an appropriate uniform mixture of lithium-niobium and lithium-tantalum alkoxide solutions. The epitaxy and crystallinity of the films were much improved when the film growth rate was raised from 20 to 180-380 nm/min, where the films with the (006) rocking curve full width at half maximum values as low as 0.12 deg. -0.2 deg. could be produced. The film roughness could be reduced by using a liquid precursor with higher metal concentrations, achieving the root-mean-square value on the order of 5 nm. The refractive indices of the films are in good correspondence with their composition and crystallinity

  19. Irradiation-induced modification of the material parameters in magnesium-doped lithium niobate; Bestrahlungsinduzierte Modifikation der Materialparameter in Magnesiumdotiertem Lithiumniobat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jentjens, Lena

    2010-07-01

    In the framework of this thesis the material properties of lithium niobate are directedly influenced by the irradiation with {sup 3}He ions with an energy of 40 MeV. In the first part the irradiation-induced material changes are intensively studied. Long-time stable changes of the refractive index are measured in the range of up to 6.10{sup -3}, which depend on the radiation dose and exhibit until now no saturation behaviour. Accompanied is this change by an also dose-dependent deformation as well as a brownish change of color of the crystals. Furthermore a by several orders of magnitude increased electrical dark- and photoconductivity, which depends on the ion dose and exhibits until now also no saturation behaviour. An effect independent on the ion dose is the reduction of the coercive field strength by about 10%. Furthermore it was stated the quantity of the effects not only depends on the absolute dose, but also on the irradiation direction in view of the crystallographic c-axis. The second part of this thesis deals with the generation of microscopic structures in lithium niobate. By an ion microbeam respectively a shiftable slit aperture the fabrication of refractive-index gratings is pursued. Grating with periodicity lengths in the range of 12-160 {mu}m could until now be detected and promise in comparison with photorefractive gratings the advance of larger stability.

  20. Self-assembled MoS2–carbon nanostructures: influence of nanostructuring and carbon on lithium battery performance

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Shyamal K.

    2012-01-01

    Composites of MoS 2 and amorphous carbon are grown and self-assembled into hierarchical nanostructures via a hydrothermal method. Application of the composites as high-energy electrodes for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries is investigated. The critical roles of nanostructuring of MoS 2 and carbon composition on lithium-ion battery performance are highlighted. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. Nanostructured silicon anodes for lithium ion rechargeable batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teki, Ranganath; Datta, Moni K; Krishnan, Rahul; Parker, Thomas C; Lu, Toh-Ming; Kumta, Prashant N; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2009-10-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries are integral to today's information-rich, mobile society. Currently they are one of the most popular types of battery used in portable electronics because of their high energy density and flexible design. Despite their increasing use at the present time, there is great continued commercial interest in developing new and improved electrode materials for lithium ion batteries that would lead to dramatically higher energy capacity and longer cycle life. Silicon is one of the most promising anode materials because it has the highest known theoretical charge capacity and is the second most abundant element on earth. However, silicon anodes have limited applications because of the huge volume change associated with the insertion and extraction of lithium. This causes cracking and pulverization of the anode, which leads to a loss of electrical contact and eventual fading of capacity. Nanostructured silicon anodes, as compared to the previously tested silicon film anodes, can help overcome the above issues. As arrays of silicon nanowires or nanorods, which help accommodate the volume changes, or as nanoscale compliant layers, which increase the stress resilience of silicon films, nanoengineered silicon anodes show potential to enable a new generation of lithium ion batteries with significantly higher reversible charge capacity and longer cycle life.

  2. Atomic scale imaging of structural changes in solid electrolyte lanthanum lithium niobate upon annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Xiaobing; Fisher, Craig A.J.; Kobayashi, Shunsuke; Ikuhara, Yumi H.; Fujiwara, Yasuyuki; Hoshikawa, Keigo; Moriwake, Hiroki; Kohama, Keiichi; Iba, Hideki; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    La (1-x)/3 Li x NbO 3 (LLNbO) is a promising electrolyte material for solid-state lithium-ion batteries because it is stable in contact with Li metal and contains a high concentration of intrinsic Li-ion vacancies. One strategy for improving its ionic conductivity and making it more competitive with other solid-state Li-ion electrolytes is to disorder the Li-ion vacancies by appropriate post-synthesis heat treatment, e.g., annealing. In this study, we examine the effects of annealing on single crystals of LLNbO with Li contents x = 0.07 and 0.13 based on simultaneous atomic resolution high angle annular dark field and annular bright field imaging methods using state-of-the-art aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopes. It is found that La modulation within A1 layers of the cation-deficient layered perovskite structure becomes more diffuse after annealing. In addition, some La atoms move to A-site positions and O4 window positions in the nominally vacant A2 layer, while O atom columns in this layer become rumpled in the [001] p direction, indicating that the NbO 6 octahedra are more heavily distorted after annealing. The observed crystal structure differences between as-prepared and annealed single crystals explain the drop in Li-ion conductivities of LLNbO single crystals after heat treatment.

  3. Comparative study of 0° X-cut and Y + 36°-cut lithium niobate high-voltage sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, N.; Branch, D. W.; Cular, S.; Schamiloglu, E.

    2015-01-01

    A comparison study between Y + 36° and 0° X-cut lithium niobate (LiNbO 3 ) was performed to evaluate the influence of crystal cut on the acoustic propagation to realize a piezoelectric high-voltage sensor. The acoustic time-of-flight for each crystal cut was measured when applying direct current (DC), alternating current (AC), and pulsed voltages. Results show that the voltage-induced shift in the acoustic wave propagation time scaled quadratically with voltage for DC and AC voltages applied to X-cut crystals. For the Y + 36° crystal, the voltage-induced shift scales linearly with DC voltages and quadratically with AC voltages. When applying 5 μs voltage pulses to both crystals, the voltage-induced shift scaled linearly with voltage. For the Y + 36° cut, the voltage-induced shift from applying DC voltages ranged from 10 to 54 ps and 35 to 778 ps for AC voltages at 640 V over the frequency range of 100 Hz–100 kHz. Using the same conditions as the Y + 36° cut, the 0° X-cut crystal sensed a shift of 10–273 ps for DC voltages and 189–813 ps for AC voltage application. For 5 μs voltage pulses, the 0° X-cut crystal sensed a voltage induced shift of 0.250–2 ns and the Y + 36°-cut crystal sensed a time shift of 0.115–1.6 ns. This suggests a frequency sensitive response to voltage where the influence of the crystal cut was not a significant contributor under DC, AC, or pulsed voltage conditions. The measured DC data were compared to a 1-D impedance matrix model where the predicted incremental length changed as a function of voltage. When the voltage source error was eliminated through physical modeling from the uncertainty budget, the combined uncertainty of the sensor (within a 95% confidence interval) decreased to 0.0033% using a Y + 36°-cut crystal and 0.0032% using an X-cut crystal for all the voltage conditions used in this experiment

  4. Are lithium niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}) and lithium tantalate (LiTaO{sub 3}) ferroelectrics bioactive?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilarinho, Paula Maria, E-mail: paula.vilarinho@ua.pt; Barroca, Nathalie; Zlotnik, Sebastian; Félix, Pedro; Fernandes, Maria Helena

    2014-06-01

    The use of functional materials, such as ferroelectrics, as platforms for tissue growth in situ or ex situ, is new and holds great promise. But the usage of materials in any bioapplication requires information on biocompatibility and desirably on bioactive behavior when bone tissue engineering is envisaged. Both requirements are currently unknown for many ferroelectrics. Herein the bioactivity of LiNbO{sub 3} and LiTaO{sub 3} is reported. The formation of apatite-like structures on the surface of LiNbO{sub 3} and LiTaO{sub 3} powders after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) for different soaking periods indicates their bioactive potential. The mechanism of apatite formation is suggested. In addition, the significant release of lithium ions from the ferroelectric powders in the very first minutes of soaking in SBF is examined and ways to overcome this likely hurdle addressed. - Highlights: • LiNbO{sub 3} and LiTaO{sub 3} are bioactive ferroelectrics. • Cauliflower apatite type structures indicative of in-vitro bioactivity of LiNbO{sub 3} and LiTaO{sub 3.} • Negative surface charges anchor Ca{sup 2+} to which PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} attracts forming apatite structure nuclei. • Use of ferroelectrics as platforms for tissue growth in situ or ex situ is new and holds great promise.

  5. Fabrication of Y128- and Y36-cut lithium niobate single-crystalline thin films by crystal-ion-slicing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Yao; Gong, Chaoguan; Bai, Xiaoyuan; Wu, Chuangui; Luo, Wenbo; Böttger, Roman; Zhou, Shengqiang; Tian, Benlang; Zhang, Wanli

    2018-04-01

    Y128- and Y36-cut single-crystalline lithium niobate (LN) thin films are fabricated by the crystal-ion-slicing (CIS) technique onto LN substrates. The conditions for the successful exfoliation of submicron-thick LN thin films are independent of the wafer orientation used in the present work. Wafer bonding using benzocyclobutene (BCB) is adopted to transfer LN thin films onto substrates, instead of the generally used hydrophilic bonding, which does not need a strict surface polishing process before the bonding. A noncontact polishing method involving low-energy Ar+ irradiation is adopted to treat the sliced LN thin films. The atomic force microscopy result shows that the surface roughness of the LN thin film is reduced from 10.6 to 6.4 nm.

  6. Numerical analysis of continuous charge of lithium niobate in a double-crucible Czochralski system using the accelerated crucible rotation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitashima, Tomonori; Liu, Lijun; Kitamura, Kenji; Kakimoto, Koichi

    2004-05-01

    The transport mechanism of supplied raw material in a double-crucible Czochralski system using the accelerated crucible rotation technique (ACRT) was investigated by three-dimensional and time-dependent numerical simulation. The calculation clarified that use of the ACRT resulted in enhancement of the mixing effect of the supplied raw material. It is, therefore, possible to maintain the composition of the melt in an inner crucible during crystal growth by using the ACRT. The effect of the continuous charge of the raw material on melt temperature was also investigated. Our results showed that the effect of feeding lithium niobate granules on melt temperature was small, since the feeding rate of the granules is small. Therefore, solidification of the melt surface due to the heat of fusion in this system is not likely.

  7. Nonlinear excitations and charge transport in lithium niobate crystals investigated using femtosecond-light gratings; Nichtlineare Anregungen und Ladungstransport in Lithiumniobatkristallen untersucht mit Femtosekunden-Lichtgittern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxein, Karl Dominik

    2009-12-15

    Lithium niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}) is a widely employed material in nonlinear optics and photonics. Its usage is hampered by the photorefractive effect, which can destroy beam profiles and phase matching conditions. Existing methods to suppress photorefraction fail for the interesting regime of very high intensities and short pulses. Therefore, the photorefractive effect is investigated using femtosecond laser pulses: By utilizing so-called 2K holography, the occupation of energetically shallow traps is observed to occur in less than 100 fs after a two-photon excitation. Writing of photorefractive gratings into oxidized iron-doped LiNbO{sub 3} is much faster with pulses than with cw light. This is explained by the sensitization of the crystal due to charge trapping in photorefractive centers after nonlinear excitations. Finally, light-induced scattering of pulse light is suppressed compared to the scattering of cw light due to the small coherence length of pulses. (orig.)

  8. Total internal reflection quasiphase matching-based broadband second harmonic generation in a plane-parallel uniaxial crystal of lithium niobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barma, Minakshi Deb; Deb, Sumita; Saha, Ardhendu

    2018-01-01

    The present work analytically investigates the generation of broadband second harmonic (SH) using total internal reflection (TIR) quasiphase matching technique in a plane-parallel uniaxial crystal having optic axis nonparallel with respect to the horizontal base. A computer-aided simulation has been performed using lithium niobate as the nonlinear material to determine the possibility of generating broadband SH intensity when broadband fundamental laser radiation is allowed to undergo TIR inside the crystal. The simulated results indicate a peak conversion efficiency of 5.22% with a spectral bandwidth (BW) of 116 nm, centered at 2.258 μm in a 10-mm-long slab. The effect of variation in operating temperature, crystal length, crystal thickness, angle of deviation of optic axis, and angle of incidence of fundamental beam at the air-prism interface on efficiency and BW of resulting SH output has been studied.

  9. Formation of self-organized domain structures with charged domain walls in lithium niobate with surface layer modified by proton exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shur, V. Ya.; Akhmatkhanov, A. R.; Chuvakova, M. A.; Dolbilov, M. A.; Zelenovskiy, P. S.; Lobov, A. I.

    2017-03-01

    We have studied the self-organized dendrite domain structures appeared as a result of polarization reversal in the uniform field in lithium niobate single crystals with the artificial surface layer created by proton exchange. We have revealed the self-organized sub-micron scale dendrite domain patterns consisting of domain stripes oriented along the X crystallographic directions separated by arrays of dashed residual domains at the surface by scanning probe microscopy. Raman confocal microscopy allowed visualizing the quasi-regular dendrite domain structures with similar geometry in the vicinity of both polar surfaces. The depth of the structure was about 20 μm for Z+ polar surface and 70 μm for Z- one. According to the proposed mechanism, the dendrite structure formation at the surface was related to the ineffective screening of the residual depolarization field. The computer simulation of the structure formation based on the cellular automata model with probabilistic switching rule proved the eligibility of the proposed scheme, the simulated dendrite domain patterns at various depths being similar to the experimental ones.

  10. The Formation of Self-Organized Domain Structures at Non-Polar Cuts of Lithium Niobate as a Result of Local Switching by an SPM Tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Turygin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We have studied experimentally the interaction of isolated needle-like domains created in an array via local switching using a biased scanning probe microscope (SPM tip and visualized via piezoelectric force microscopy (PFM at the non-polar cuts of MgO-doped lithium niobate (MgOLN crystals. It has been found that the domain interaction leads to the intermittent quasiperiodic and chaotic behavior of the domain length in the array in a manner similar to that of polar cuts, but with greater spacing between the points of bias application and voltage amplitudes. It has also been found that the polarization reversal at the non-polar cuts and domain interaction significantly depend on humidity. The spatial distribution of the surface potential measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy in the vicinity of the charged domain walls revealed the decrease of the domain length as a result of the partial backswitching after pulse termination. The phase diagram of switching behavior as a function of tip voltage and spacing between the points of bias application has been plotted. The obtained results provide new insight into the problem of the domain interaction during forward growth and can provide a basis for useful application in nanodomain engineering and development of non-linear optical frequency converters, data storage, and computing devices.

  11. Accurate determination of the anisotropy factors and the phase differences of Raman polarizabilities in some uniaxial crystals: the case of lithium niobate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djiedeu, N; Mohamadou, B; Bourson, P; Aillerie, M

    2009-01-07

    The present study highlights self-consistently helpful improvements dedicated to overcoming the difficulty resulting from the fitting procedure of integrated Raman intensities recorded according to the rotation crystal method described earlier. To this end, the anisotropy factors of Raman polarizabilities and the corresponding relative phases are determined within the framework of the exact mathematical derivation of the phase factors. These are the relevant parameters of the Raman efficiency relations which are numerically difficult to obtain from the fitting of the integrated areas. The present theoretical approach is then applied to the modes of the A(1) and Ey symmetry species of the lithium niobate (LN) crystal point group. All the expressions of the Raman absolute intensities of the A(1) and Ey irreducible representations initially imply three parameters to be determined from the fitting computations. However, from the derived analytical expressions of the phase differences, the number of parameters involved in the fitting procedure is reduced from 3 to 2, thus improving the statistics of the numerical treatment.

  12. Characterization and control of the electro-optic phase dispersion in lithium niobate modulators for wide spectral band interferometry applications in the mid-infrared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidmann, S; Ulliac, G; Courjal, N; Martin, G

    2017-05-10

    Mid-infrared wideband modulation (3.2-3.7 μm) is achieved in an electro-optic Y-junction using lithium niobate waveguides in TE polarized light. Comparison between external (scanning mirror) and internal (electro-optical) modulation allows studying the chromatic polynomial dependence of the relative phase. Internal modulation consists on a V AC ramp up to 370 V at 0.25 Hz, applied over 14 mm long electrodes with 14 μm separation. The overall V π L π obtained is 17.5 V·cm, meaning that using a 300 V generator we can actively scan and track the whole L-band (3.4-4.1 μm) wideband fringes. We observe a dramatic reduction of the coherence length under electro-optic modulation, which is attributed to a strong nonlinear dependence of the electro-optic effect on the wavelength upon application of such high voltages. We study the effect of applying a V DC offset, from -50  V to 200 V (50 V step). We characterize this dispersion and propose an improved dispersion model that is used to show active dispersion compensation in wideband fringe modulation in the mid-infrared. This can be useful for long baseline interferometry or pulse compression applications when light propagates along fibers, in order to compensate for chromatic effects that induce differential dispersion or pulse spreading, respectively.

  13. Nanostructured metal oxide-based materials as advanced anodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao Bin; Chen, Jun Song; Hng, Huey Hoon; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2012-04-21

    The search for new electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) has been an important way to satisfy the ever-growing demands for better performance with higher energy/power densities, improved safety and longer cycle life. Nanostructured metal oxides exhibit good electrochemical properties, and they are regarded as promising anode materials for high-performance LIBs. In this feature article, we will focus on three different categories of metal oxides with distinct lithium storage mechanisms: tin dioxide (SnO(2)), which utilizes alloying/dealloying processes to reversibly store/release lithium ions during charge/discharge; titanium dioxide (TiO(2)), where lithium ions are inserted/deinserted into/out of the TiO(2) crystal framework; and transition metal oxides including iron oxide and cobalt oxide, which react with lithium ions via an unusual conversion reaction. For all three systems, we will emphasize that creating nanomaterials with unique structures could effectively improve the lithium storage properties of these metal oxides. We will also highlight that the lithium storage capability can be further enhanced through designing advanced nanocomposite materials containing metal oxides and other carbonaceous supports. By providing such a rather systematic survey, we aim to stress the importance of proper nanostructuring and advanced compositing that would result in improved physicochemical properties of metal oxides, thus making them promising negative electrodes for next-generation LIBs.

  14. Comprehensive Enhancement of Nanostructured Lithium-Ion Battery Cathode Materials via Conformal Graphene Dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Kan-Sheng [Department of Materials; Xu, Rui [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Luu, Norman S. [Department of Materials; Secor, Ethan B. [Department of Materials; Hamamoto, Koichi [Department of Materials; Li, Qianqian [Department of Materials; Kim, Soo [Department of Materials; Sangwan, Vinod K. [Department of Materials; Balla, Itamar [Department of Materials; Guiney, Linda M. [Department of Materials; Seo, Jung-Woo T. [Department of Materials; Yu, Xiankai [Department of Materials; Liu, Weiwei [Department of Materials; Wu, Jinsong [Department of Materials; Wolverton, Chris [Department of Materials; Dravid, Vinayak P. [Department of Materials; Barnett, Scott A. [Department of Materials; Lu, Jun [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Amine, Khalil [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Hersam, Mark C. [Department of Materials

    2017-03-01

    Efficient energy storage systems based on lithium-ion batteries represent a critical technology across many sectors including consumer electronics, electrified transportation, and a smart grid accommodating intermittent renewable energy sources. Nanostructured electrode materials present compelling opportunities for high-performance lithium-ion batteries, but inherent problems related to the high surface area to volume ratios at the nanometer-scale have impeded their adoption for commercial applications. Here, we demonstrate a materials and processing platform that realizes high-performance nanostructured lithium manganese oxide (nano-LMO) spinel cathodes with conformal graphene coatings as a conductive additive. The resulting nanostructured composite cathodes concurrently resolve multiple problems that have plagued nanoparticle-based lithium-ion battery electrodes including low packing density, high additive content, and poor cycling stability. Moreover, this strategy enhances the intrinsic advantages of nano-LMO, resulting in extraordinary rate capability and low temperature performance. With 75% capacity retention at a 20C cycling rate at room temperature and nearly full capacity retention at -20 degrees C, this work advances lithium-ion battery technology into unprecedented regimes of operation.

  15. Comprehensive Enhancement of Nanostructured Lithium-Ion Battery Cathode Materials via Conformal Graphene Dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kan-Sheng; Xu, Rui; Luu, Norman S; Secor, Ethan B; Hamamoto, Koichi; Li, Qianqian; Kim, Soo; Sangwan, Vinod K; Balla, Itamar; Guiney, Linda M; Seo, Jung-Woo T; Yu, Xiankai; Liu, Weiwei; Wu, Jinsong; Wolverton, Chris; Dravid, Vinayak P; Barnett, Scott A; Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil; Hersam, Mark C

    2017-04-12

    Efficient energy storage systems based on lithium-ion batteries represent a critical technology across many sectors including consumer electronics, electrified transportation, and a smart grid accommodating intermittent renewable energy sources. Nanostructured electrode materials present compelling opportunities for high-performance lithium-ion batteries, but inherent problems related to the high surface area to volume ratios at the nanometer-scale have impeded their adoption for commercial applications. Here, we demonstrate a materials and processing platform that realizes high-performance nanostructured lithium manganese oxide (nano-LMO) spinel cathodes with conformal graphene coatings as a conductive additive. The resulting nanostructured composite cathodes concurrently resolve multiple problems that have plagued nanoparticle-based lithium-ion battery electrodes including low packing density, high additive content, and poor cycling stability. Moreover, this strategy enhances the intrinsic advantages of nano-LMO, resulting in extraordinary rate capability and low temperature performance. With 75% capacity retention at a 20C cycling rate at room temperature and nearly full capacity retention at -20 °C, this work advances lithium-ion battery technology into unprecedented regimes of operation.

  16. Study of light-induced processes in lithium niobate crystals with femtosecond light pulses; Untersuchung lichtinduzierter Prozesse in Lithiumniobat-Kristallen mit Femtosekunden-Lichtpulsen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, O.

    2005-12-15

    For the realization of many applications with LiNbO{sub 3} a deeper understanding of nonlinear processes for high light intensities and the charge-carrier dynamics on short time scales is necessary. For the study in this thesis femtosecond pulses with a lifetime of {tau}{approx}200 fs are applied. By pump pulses ({lambda}{sub p}=388 nm) absorption changes are caused, which are detected time-resolvedly by probe pulses ({lambda}{sub r}=776 nm) respectively continuous light ({lambda}{sub r}=785 nm). For the absorption centers absorption cross sections of {sigma}{sub YY}{approx}9.2 x 10{sup -22} m{sup 2} for ordinarily {sigma}{sub Z}Z{approx}6.0 x 10{sup -22} m{sup 2} for extraordinarily polarized light of the wavelength {lambda}{sub r}=776 nm result.Polarization and wavelength dependence as well as the comparison with nanosecond pulses suggest that the absorption centers are small polarons, which exist already 400 fs after the excitation of the charge carriers. At holographic pump probe studies, which are sensitive both for absorption and for refractive-index changes, gratings with two pump pulses are generated and read out by one pump pulse. The time dependence of the diffraction efficiency of the transient grating in LiNbO{sub 3} exhibits first a symmetric maximum, the time width of which is compatible with the expectations from model calculations. Thereafter the diffraction efficiency decreases to a constant value in the picosecond range and decreases further on the nanosecond time scale. By illumination of iron-doped lithium niobate crystals with 1.5 {mu}m femtosecond pulses permanent refractive-index changes in the range {delta}n{approx}10{sup -3} ({lambda}=633 nm) are generated.

  17. Synthesis of MoS(2)-C one-dimensional nanostructures with improved lithium storage properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chaofeng; Wang, Zhiyu; Guo, Zaiping; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2012-07-25

    Uniform one-dimensional (1D) MoS2-C composite nanostructures including nanorods and nanotubes have been produced through a sulfidation reaction in H2S flow using MoOx/polyaniline hybrid nanostructures as the precursor. These MoS2-C 1D nanostructures exhibit greatly enhanced electrochemical performance as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. Typically, stable capacity retention of 776 mA h g(-1) can be achieved after 100 cycles for MoS2-C nanotubes. Even cycled at a high current density of 1000 mA g(-1), these structures can still deliver high capacities of 450-600 mA h g(-1). The unique 1D nanostructure and the extra carbon in the hybrid structure are beneficial to the greatly improved electrochemical performance of these MoS2-C nanocomposites.

  18. Current Advances in TiO2-Based Nanostructure Electrodes for High Performance Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Madian

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The lithium ion battery (LIB has proven to be a very reliably used system to store electrical energy, for either mobile or stationary applications. Among others, TiO2-based anodes are the most attractive candidates for building safe and durable lithium ion batteries with high energy density. A variety of TiO2 nanostructures has been thoroughly investigated as anodes in LIBs, e.g., nanoparticles, nanorods, nanoneedles, nanowires, and nanotubes discussed either in their pure form or in composites. In this review, we present the recent developments and breakthroughs demonstrated to synthesize safe, high power, and low cost nanostructured titania-based anodes. The reader is provided with an in-depth review of well-oriented TiO2-based nanotubes fabricated by anodic oxidation. Other strategies for modification of TiO2-based anodes with other elements or materials are also highlighted in this report.

  19. Visualization of ferroelectric domain structures in lithium niobate by means of confocal nonlinear microscopy; Visualisierung ferroelektrischer Domaenenstrukturen in Lithiumniobat mittels konfokaler nichtlinearer Mikroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berth, Gerhard

    2010-07-01

    In the field of integrated optics nonlinear-optical effects play a central role. A typical example for the commercial use of such phenomena is the frequency conversion. A deciding parameter is here the phase matching, which determines the quantity of the constructive interaction range of contributing optical fields. In view of a high efficiency of such processes the dispersion of a crystal must be balanced for the contributing frequencies. In nonlinear components on the base of optical waveguides the principle of the ''quasi-phase matching'' is applied, which uses the microdomain inversion. Phase jumps occuring at the domain boundaries compensate in the mean the different phase velocities. The application range of such periodical structures depends essentially on sharpness, homogeneity, depth extent, and period of the domain structure. The nonlinear confocal laser scanning microscopy makes a mapping of this transferred ferroelectric domain structure possible. Primary aim of this thesis is the characterization and mapping of the transferred ferroelectric domain structure in lithium niobate. A modularly kept confocal microscope makes here a nonlinear analysis in reflection and transmission geometry possible. In both geometries systematic studies as function of important process parameters were performed. It was shown that because of the larger nonlinear coherence length in the transmission modus the SHG ensues above all in forward direction. By depth-resolved studies at Z-cut PPLN structured between the surface region and the volume crystal a flippling of the SHG contrast could be observed. In samples with circular pole structure additionally in the crystal a transition to a hexagonal structure took place. In the Ti:PPLN strip waveguide a strong and specific increasement of the nonlinear signal of the domain walls was discovered. Here also the usual SHG surface contrast between dhe domains and the boundaries is inverted. Also differently processed

  20. High-pressure phase behaviors of ZnTiO3: ilmenite-perovskite transition, decomposition of perovskite into constituent oxides, and perovskite-lithium niobate transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaogi, M.; Abe, K.; Yusa, H.; Kojitani, H.; Mori, D.; Inaguma, Y.

    2015-06-01

    High-pressure high-temperature phase transitions of ZnTiO3 ilmenite were examined using multianvil apparatus up to 25.5 GPa and 1,500 °C and diamond anvil cell to 26.5 GPa and about 2,000 °C. Combined results of the multianvil quench experiments and in situ diamond anvil cell experiments indicated that at about 10 GPa and 1,200 °C ZnTiO3 ilmenite transforms to orthorhombic perovskite which is converted to lithium niobate phase on release of pressure. The boundary of the ilmenite-provskite transition is expressed by P(GPa) = 15.9 - 0.005 T (°C). The high-pressure experiments also indicated that at 20-24 GPa and 1,000-1,400 °C ZnTiO3 orthorhombic perovskite dissociates into rocksalt-type ZnO + baddeleyite-type TiO2 which are recovered, respectively, as wurtzite-type ZnO and α-PbO2-type TiO2 at 1 atm. The boundary of the perovskite dissociation is expressed by P(GPa) = 8.7 + 0.011 T (°C). Molar volume changes of ZnTiO3 at ambient conditions were estimated as -4.7 % for the ilmenite-perovskite transition and -3.5 % for the perovskite decomposition into the oxides. The absence of CaIrO3-type postperovskite in ZnTiO3 is consistent with that dissociation of ZnTiO3 perovskite into the oxides has the larger molar volume change than -1 to -2 % of the perovskite-postperovskite transition in various ABO3 compounds and with previous data that ABO3 perovskites with relatively ionic B-O bonds do not transform to the postperovskite. The transition behaviors of ZnTiO3 are similar to those of MnTiO3 and FeTiO3, but ZnTiO3 perovskite dissociates into the constituent oxides.

  1. High-capacity nanostructured germanium-containing materials and lithium alloys thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graetz, Jason A.; Fultz, Brent T.; Ahn, Channing; Yazami, Rachid

    2010-08-24

    Electrodes comprising an alkali metal, for example, lithium, alloyed with nanostructured materials of formula Si.sub.zGe.sub.(z-1), where 0

  2. Lithium and Sodium Insertion in Nanostructured Titanates : Experiments and simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, K.

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured materials are featured by providing a variety of favourable electrical properties, as the reduced ion and electron transport paths enable significant enhancement on (de)intercalation rates and hence high power. For TiO2 anatase, nano-sizing results in a curved open cell voltage

  3. Nanostructured Electrolytes for Stable Lithium Electrodeposition in Secondary Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Zhengyuan; Nath, Pooja; Lu, Yingying; Tikekar, Mukul D.; Archer, Lynden A.

    2015-11-17

    Secondary batteries based on lithium are the most important energy storage technology for contemporary portable devices. The lithium ion battery (LIB) in widespread commercial use today is a compromise technology. It compromises high energy, high power, and design flexibility for long cell operating lifetimes and safety. Materials science, transport phenomena, and electrochemistry in the electrodes and electrolyte that constitute such batteries are areas of active study worldwide because significant improvements in storage capacity and cell lifetime are required to meet new demands, including the electrification of transportation and for powering emerging autonomous aircraft and robotics technologies. By replacing the carbonaceous host material used as the anode in an LIB with metallic lithium, rechargeable lithium metal batteries (LMBs) with higher storage capacity and compatibility with low-cost, high-energy, unlithiated cathodes such as sulfur, manganese dioxide, carbon dioxide, and oxygen become possible. Large-scale, commercial deployment of LMBs are today limited by safety concerns associated with unstable electrodeposition and lithium dendrite formation during cell recharge. LMBs are also limited by low cell operating lifetimes due to parasitic chemical reactions between the electrode and electrolyte. These concerns are greater in rechargeable batteries that utilize other, more earth abundant metals such as sodium and to some extent even aluminum. Inspired by early theoretical works, various strategies have been proposed for alleviating dendrite proliferation in LMBs. A commonly held view among these early studies is that a high modulus, solid-state electrolyte that facilitates fast ion transport, is nonflammable, and presents a strong-enough physical barrier to dendrite growth is a requirement for any commercial LMB. Unfortunately, poor room-temperature ionic conductivity, challenging processing, and the high cost of ceramic electrolytes that meet the

  4. Nanostructured electrolytes for stable lithium electrodeposition in secondary batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Zhengyuan; Nath, Pooja; Lu, Yingying; Tikekar, Mukul D; Archer, Lynden A

    2015-11-17

    Secondary batteries based on lithium are the most important energy storage technology for contemporary portable devices. The lithium ion battery (LIB) in widespread commercial use today is a compromise technology. It compromises high energy, high power, and design flexibility for long cell operating lifetimes and safety. Materials science, transport phenomena, and electrochemistry in the electrodes and electrolyte that constitute such batteries are areas of active study worldwide because significant improvements in storage capacity and cell lifetime are required to meet new demands, including the electrification of transportation and for powering emerging autonomous aircraft and robotics technologies. By replacing the carbonaceous host material used as the anode in an LIB with metallic lithium, rechargeable lithium metal batteries (LMBs) with higher storage capacity and compatibility with low-cost, high-energy, unlithiated cathodes such as sulfur, manganese dioxide, carbon dioxide, and oxygen become possible. Large-scale, commercial deployment of LMBs are today limited by safety concerns associated with unstable electrodeposition and lithium dendrite formation during cell recharge. LMBs are also limited by low cell operating lifetimes due to parasitic chemical reactions between the electrode and electrolyte. These concerns are greater in rechargeable batteries that utilize other, more earth abundant metals such as sodium and to some extent even aluminum. Inspired by early theoretical works, various strategies have been proposed for alleviating dendrite proliferation in LMBs. A commonly held view among these early studies is that a high modulus, solid-state electrolyte that facilitates fast ion transport, is nonflammable, and presents a strong-enough physical barrier to dendrite growth is a requirement for any commercial LMB. Unfortunately, poor room-temperature ionic conductivity, challenging processing, and the high cost of ceramic electrolytes that meet the

  5. Nanostructured Electrolytes for Stable Lithium Electrodeposition in Secondary Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Tu, Zhengyuan

    2015-11-17

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. ConspectusSecondary batteries based on lithium are the most important energy storage technology for contemporary portable devices. The lithium ion battery (LIB) in widespread commercial use today is a compromise technology. It compromises high energy, high power, and design flexibility for long cell operating lifetimes and safety. Materials science, transport phenomena, and electrochemistry in the electrodes and electrolyte that constitute such batteries are areas of active study worldwide because significant improvements in storage capacity and cell lifetime are required to meet new demands, including the electrification of transportation and for powering emerging autonomous aircraft and robotics technologies. By replacing the carbonaceous host material used as the anode in an LIB with metallic lithium, rechargeable lithium metal batteries (LMBs) with higher storage capacity and compatibility with low-cost, high-energy, unlithiated cathodes such as sulfur, manganese dioxide, carbon dioxide, and oxygen become possible. Large-scale, commercial deployment of LMBs are today limited by safety concerns associated with unstable electrodeposition and lithium dendrite formation during cell recharge. LMBs are also limited by low cell operating lifetimes due to parasitic chemical reactions between the electrode and electrolyte. These concerns are greater in rechargeable batteries that utilize other, more earth abundant metals such as sodium and to some extent even aluminum.Inspired by early theoretical works, various strategies have been proposed for alleviating dendrite proliferation in LMBs. A commonly held view among these early studies is that a high modulus, solid-state electrolyte that facilitates fast ion transport, is nonflammable, and presents a strong-enough physical barrier to dendrite growth is a requirement for any commercial LMB. Unfortunately, poor room-temperature ionic conductivity, challenging processing, and the high cost

  6. A Tunable 3D Nanostructured Conductive Gel Framework Electrode for High-Performance Lithium Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ye; Zhang, Jun; Bruck, Andrea M; Zhang, Yiman; Li, Jing; Stach, Eric A; Takeuchi, Kenneth J; Marschilok, Amy C; Takeuchi, Esther S; Yu, Guihua

    2017-06-01

    This study develops a tunable 3D nanostructured conductive gel framework as both binder and conductive framework for lithium ion batteries. A 3D nanostructured gel framework with continuous electron pathways can provide hierarchical pores for ion transport and form uniform coatings on each active particle against aggregation. The hybrid gel electrodes based on a polypyrrole gel framework and Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles as a model system in this study demonstrate the best rate performance, the highest achieved mass ratio of active materials, and the highest achieved specific capacities when considering total electrode mass, compared to current literature. This 3D nanostructured gel-based framework represents a powerful platform for various electrochemically active materials to enable the next-generation high-energy batteries. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Récuperation d'horloge d'un signal OTDM à 640 Gbit/s transmis sur 50 km par boucle à verrouillage de phase opto-électronique utilisant un dispositif en Niobate de Lithium à inversion de domaines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez, F.; Ware, Agis C.; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo

    2008-01-01

    L'extraction d'horloge d'un signal OTDM à 640 Gbit/s, transmis sur 50 km, à partir d'une boucle à verrouillage de phase utilisant l'effet non-linéaire de mélange à trois ondes dans un composant de niobate de lithium à inversion de domaines a été mise en oeuvre.......L'extraction d'horloge d'un signal OTDM à 640 Gbit/s, transmis sur 50 km, à partir d'une boucle à verrouillage de phase utilisant l'effet non-linéaire de mélange à trois ondes dans un composant de niobate de lithium à inversion de domaines a été mise en oeuvre....

  8. High power 4.7 V nanostructured spinel lithium manganese nickel oxide lithium-ion battery cathode materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunduraci, Muharrem

    Nanostructured LiMn1.5+deltaNi0.5-deltaO 4 spinel powders were synthesized by a solution based chemistry method called modified Pechini. The impacts of processing parameters such as synthesis temperature, oxygen-partial-pressure and mole ratio of ethylene glycol to citric acid on the morphology, structure and properties of spinel materials have been studied thoroughly via various in-situ and ex-situ characterization techniques. Later, these parameters were tied with the electrochemical properties of spinel electrodes. After optimization of processing steps and glycol/acid ratio, a unique mesoporous morphology with interconnected nanoparticles were successfully obtained. Such morphology was found to be very conducive to achieve high power density lithium-ion battery spinel cathodes. This was attributed to (i) large number of mesoporosities that favor electrolyte penetration, thereby enabling better wetting of spinel cathodes and faster lithium ion transfer at electrolyte/cathode interface and (ii) particle interconnectivity that allows continuous electron transport, which becomes highly critical especially at high current rates. The synthesis temperature and oxygen-partial-pressure were found to affect the structure significantly. Depending on the ordering/disordering of transition metal ions on octahedral sites, spinels were assigned to either ordered P4 332 or disordered Fd3m space groups. The spinel of the two symmetry groups differed significantly in fast discharge rate capability. In an effort to identify the origin of this electrochemical disparity, intensive characterizations of both structures were undertaken (in-situ: XRD, Impedance spectroscopy, Raman; ex-situ: XRD, FTIR, TGA, electronic conductivity and lithium diffusivity and more). The poor performance of the ordered phase was attributed to its intrinsic properties, namely lower electronic conductivity and lithium diffusion coefficient (DLi). Regarding the former, the mechanism of electron conduction in

  9. Mesoporous wormholelike carbon with controllable nanostructure for lithium ion batteries application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xiaoqing; Li, Xinxi; Li, Zhenghui; Zhang, Guoqing; Wu, Dingcai

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Wormholelike carbon (WMC) with controllable nanostructure is prepared by sol–gel method. • The reversible capacity of WMC is much higher than that of many other reported nanocarbons. • The effect of pore diameter on Li storage capacity is investigated. - Abstract: A class of mesoporous wormholelike carbon (WMC) with controllable nanostructure was prepared by sol–gel method and then used as the anode material of lithium-ion batteries. Based on the experimental results, it is found that the nanostructure of the as-prepared WMC plays an important role in the electrochemical performances. A suitable mesopore size is necessary for a high performance carbon-based anode material since it can not only guarantee effective mass transport channels but also provide large surface area. As a result, F30 with a mesopore size of 4.4 nm coupled with high surface area of 1077 m 2 g −1 shows a reversible capacity of 630 mAh g −1 , much higher than commercial graphite and many other reported nanocarbons

  10. Raspberry-like Nanostructured Silicon Composite Anode for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shan; Tong, Zhenkun; Nie, Ping; Liu, Gao; Zhang, Xiaogang

    2017-06-07

    Adjusting the particle size and nanostructure or applying carbon materials as the coating layers is a promising method to hold the volume expansion of Si for its practical application in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Herein, the mild carbon coating combined with a molten salt reduction is precisely designed to synthesize raspberry-like hollow silicon spheres coated with carbon shells (HSi@C) as the anode materials for LIBs. The HSi@C exhibits a remarkable electrochemical performance; a high reversible specific capacity of 886.2 mAh g -1 at a current density of 0.5 A g -1 after 200 cycles is achieved. Moreover, even after 500 cycles at a current density of 2.0 A g -1 , a stable capacity of 516.7 mAh g -1 still can be obtained.

  11. Spherical nanostructured Si/C composite prepared by spray drying technique for lithium ion batteries anode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Libao [Energy Science and Technology Laboratory, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xie Xiaohua [Energy Science and Technology Laboratory, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang Baofeng [Department of Chemical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wang Ke [Energy Science and Technology Laboratory, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Xie Jingying [Energy Science and Technology Laboratory, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China) and Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)]. E-mail: jyxie@mail.sim.ac.cn

    2006-07-15

    Spherical nanostructured Si/C composite was prepared by spray drying technique, followed by heat treatment, in which nanosized silicon and fine graphite particles were homogeneously embedded in carbon matrix pyrolyzed by phenol formaldehyde resin. Cyclic voltammetry tests showed two pairs of redox peaks corresponding to lithiation and delithiation of Si/C composite. The Si/C composite exhibited a reversible capacity of 635 mAh g{sup -1} and good cycle performance used in lithium ion batteries. To improve cycle performance of this Si/C composite further, the carbon-coated Si/C composite was synthesized by the second spray drying and heat treatment processing. The cycle performance of carbon-coated Si/C composite was improved significantly, which was attributed to the formation of stable SEI passivation layers on the outer surface of carbon shell which protected the bared silicon from exposing to electrolyte directly.

  12. Fabrication of Nanostructured TiO2 Using a Solvothermal Reaction for Lithium-ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jicai Liang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured TiO2 was successfully synthesized via a facile one-pot solvothermal reaction followed by calcina‐ tion. Hydrolysis and polycondensation of titanium butox‐ ide (Ti(OR4 were performed in the presence of sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS. The morphologies, crystallinity and compositions of obtained samples were identified by the methods of X-ray diffraction (XRD, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. It was found that the nanostructured TiO2 with an average diameter of 10±5 nm had the crystal type of anatase. A good specific surface was also obtained by the standard multipoint BET method (119.2 m2/g. As the anode materials for the lithium-ion batteries (LIBs, the anatase phase TiO2 demonstrated a relatively high gravi‐ metric specific capacity of 264.8 mAh g-1. The reversible capacity of TiO2 remained 196.4 mAh g-1 at a rate of 0.2 ̊C after 100 cycles. It indicated that this kind of TiO2 possessed a good electrochemical performance.

  13. Nanoparticle Decorated Ultrathin Porous Nanosheets as Hierarchical Co3O4 Nanostructures for Lithium Ion Battery Anode Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mujtaba, Jawayria; Sun, Hongyu; Huang, Guoyong

    2016-01-01

    We report a facile synthesis of a novel cobalt oxide (Co3O4) hierarchical nanostructure, in which crystalline core-amorphous shell Co3O4 nanoparticles with a bimodal size distribution are uniformly dispersed on ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets. When tested as anode materials for lithium ion batteries......, the as-prepared Co3O4 hierarchical electrodes delivered high lithium storage properties comparing to the other Co3O4 nanostructures, including a high reversible capacity of 1053.1 mAhg-1 after 50 cycles at a current density of 0.2 C (1 C = 890 mAg-1), good cycling stability and rate capability....

  14. Hydrothermal carbon-based nanostructured hollow spheres as electrode materials for high-power lithium-sulfur batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Nicolas; Sakaushi, Ken; Yu, Linghui; Giebeler, Lars; Eckert, Jürgen; Titirici, Magdalena M

    2013-04-28

    Carbon hollow spheres were produced using a sustainable approach, i.e. hydrothermal carbonization, using monosaccharides as carbon precursors and silica nanoparticles as hard-templates. Hydrothermal carbonization is an eco-efficient and cost-effective route to synthesize nanostructured carbonaceous materials from abundant biomass-derived molecules. After further thermal treatment under an inert atmosphere and removal of the silica-based core by chemical etching, porous hollow spheres depicting 5-8 nm thin shells were obtained. Subsequently, carbon-sulfur composites were synthesized via a melt diffusion method and used as nanostructured composites for cathodes in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) cells. The morphology of the hollow spheres was controlled and optimized to achieve improved electrochemical properties. Both high specific energies and high specific powers were obtained, due to the unique nanostructure of the hollow spheres. These results revealed that using optimized carbonaceous materials, it is possible to design sustainable Li-S cells showing promising electrochemical properties.

  15. Electrosorption in lithium-sulfur batteries: modeling of solvation and adsorption at nanostructured cathodes

    OpenAIRE

    Lück, Jessica; Danner, Timo; Latz, Arnulf

    2016-01-01

    Since the energy density of lithium-ion batteries is reaching its ceiling so that improvements are just of minor nature, researchers have moved their focus to systems beyond lithium-ion. One of the most promising candidates besides the lithium-air technology for future energy storage both for automotive and stationary applications are lithium-sulfur batteries. The use of sulfur as an active material offers many benefits compared to lithium-ion systems. First of all sulfur is expec...

  16. Lithium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskula, B.W.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, world lithium consumption was estimated to have been about 25 kt (25,000 st) of lithium contained in minerals and compounds, a 10-percent increase from 2010. U.S. consumption was estimated to have been about 2 kt (2,200 st) of contained lithium, a 100-percent increase from 2010. The United States was estimated to be the fourth-ranked consumer of lithium and remained the leading importer of lithium carbonate and the leading producer of value-added lithium materials. One company, Chemetall Foote Corp. (a subsidiary of Chemetall GmbH of Germany), produced lithium compounds from domestic brine resources near Silver Peak, NV.

  17. Lithium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Dwight C.; Stillings, Lisa L.; Jaskula, Brian W.; Munk, LeeAnn; McCauley, Andrew D.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Lithium, the lightest of all metals, is used in air treatment, batteries, ceramics, glass, metallurgy, pharmaceuticals, and polymers. Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries are particularly important in efforts to reduce global warming because they make it possible to power cars and trucks from renewable sources of energy (for example, hydroelectric, solar, or wind) instead of by burning fossil fuels. Today, lithium is extracted from brines that are pumped from beneath arid sedimentary basins and extracted from granitic pegmatite ores. The leading producer of lithium from brine is Chile, and the leading producer of lithium from pegmatites is Australia. Other potential sources of lithium include clays, geothermal brines, oilfield brines, and zeolites. Worldwide resources of lithium are estimated to be more than 39 million metric tons, which is enough to meet projected demand to the year 2100. The United States is not a major producer at present but has significant lithium resources.

  18. Mesoporous SnO2-carbon core–shell nanostructures with superior electrochemical performance for lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L B; Yin, X M; Mei, L; Li, C C; Lei, D N; Zhang, M; Li, Q H; Xu, Z; Xu, C M; Wang, T H

    2012-01-01

    SnO 2 -carbon nanostructure composites are prepared by a simple hydrothermal method. The composite exhibits unique structure, which consists of a mesoporous SnO 2 core assembled of very small nanoparticles and a carbon shell with 10 nm thickness. The mesoporous SnO 2 -carbon core–shell nanostructures manifest superior electrochemical performance as an anode material for lithium ion batteries. The reversible specific capacity of the composite is about 908 mAh g −1 for the first cycle and it can retain about 680 mAh g −1 after 40 charge/discharge cycles at a current density of 0.3 C. Moreover, it shows excellent rate capability even at the high rate of 4.5 C. The enhanced performance was attributed to the mesoporous structure and a suitable carbon coating. (paper)

  19. Confocal Microscopy on Light-emitting Nanostructures and X-ray Imaging Detectors Based on Color Centers in Lithium Fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonfigli, F.; Almaviva, S.; Montereali, R. M.

    2010-01-01

    Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) is a versatile and powerful optical instrument which is gaining a strong increase of interest for biological investigations and also for the characterization of materials, microstructures and devices. We exploit its capability for the characterization of light-emitting micro and nano-structures based on color centers in lithium fluoride. CLSM was successfully used as an advanced optical reading system to detect X-ray micro-radiographies of biological specimens stored in LiF imaging detectors.

  20. One-step synthesis of SnCo nanoconfined in hierarchical carbon nanostructures for lithium ion battery anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jian; Liu, Dongye; Zhang, Xiang; Zhao, Naiqin; Shi, Chunsheng; Liu, En-Zuo; He, Fang; Ma, Liying; Li, Qunying; Li, Jiajun; He, Chunnian

    2017-10-26

    A new strategy for the one-step synthesis of a 0D SnCo nanoparticles-1D carbon nanotubes-3D hollow carbon submicrocube cluster (denoted as SnCo@CNT-3DC) hierarchical nanostructured material was developed via a simple chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process with the assistance of a water-soluble salt (NaCl). The adopted NaCl not only acted as a cubic template for inducing the formation of the 3D hollow carbon submicrocube cluster but also provides a substrate for the SnCo catalysts impregnation and CNT growth, ultimately leading to the successful construction of the unique 0D-1D-3D structured SnCo@CNT-3DC during the CVD of C 2 H 2 . When utilized as a lithium-ion battery anode, the SnCo@CNT-3DC composite electrode demonstrated an excellent rate performance and cycling stability for Li-ion storage. Specifically, an impressive reversible capacity of 826 mA h g -1 after 100 cycles at 0.1 A g -1 and a high rate capacity of 278 mA h g -1 even after 1000 cycles at 5 A g -1 were achieved. This remarkable electrochemical performance could be ascribed to the unique hierarchical nanostructure of SnCo@CNT-3DC, which guarantees a deep permeation of electrolytes and a shortened lithium salt diffusion pathway in the solid phase as well as numerous hyperchannels for electron transfer.

  1. Systematic hardness studies on lithium niobate crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Chai (1995) lists a value of 5 on the Moh scale for the hardness of LiNbO3. Using a conversion formula given ... mentioned that Knoop and Vickers hardness values generally agree to within 5% (Mott 1956). Brown et al ... In the present communication, we report a detailed study of the load-dependence of hardness on two ...

  2. Systematic hardness studies on lithium niobate crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    vary from sample to sample, but is not related to the deformation mechanism in the crystal. Such load depend- ence has been observed in a variety of materials like metals (Mott 1956), ionic crystals (Pratap and Hari Babu. 1980; Thirmal Rao and Sirdeshmukh 1991; Sirdeshmukh et al 1995; Sangaiah and Kishan Rao 1993), ...

  3. Nanostructured Phosphorus Doped Silicon/Graphite Composite as Anode for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shiqiang; Cheong, Ling-Zhi; Wang, Deyu; Shen, Cai

    2017-07-19

    Silicon as the potential anode material for lithium-ion batteries suffers from huge volume change (up to 400%) during charging/discharging processes. Poor electrical conductivity of silicon also hinders its long-term cycling performance. Herein, we report a two-step ball milling method to prepare nanostructured P-doped Si/graphite composite. Both P-doped Si and coated graphite improved the conductivity by providing significant transport channels for lithium ions and electrons. The graphite skin is able to depress the volume expansion of Si by forming a stable SEI film. The as-prepared composite anode having 50% P-doped Si and 50% graphite exhibits outstanding cyclability with a specific capacity of 883.4 mAh/g after 200 cycles at the current density of 200 mA/g. The cost-effective materials and scalable preparation method make it feasible for large-scale application of the P-doped Si/graphite composite as anode for Li-ion batteries.

  4. Cu-SnO2 nanostructures obtained via galvanic replacement control as high performance anodes for lithium-ion storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tuan Loi; Park, Duckshin; Hur, Jaehyun; Son, Hyung Bin; Park, Min Sang; Lee, Seung Geol; Kim, Ji Hyeon; Kim, Il Tae

    2018-01-01

    SnO2 has been considered as a promising anode material for lithium ion batteries (LIBs) because of its high theoretical capacity (782 mAh g-1). However, the reaction between lithium ions and Sn causes a large volume change, resulting in the pulverization of the anode, a loss of contact with the current collector, and a deterioration in electrochemical performance. Several strategies have been proposed to mitigate the drastic volume changes to extend the cyclic life of SnO2 materials. Herein, novel composites consisting of Cu and SnO2 were developed via the galvanic replacement reaction. The reaction was carried out at 180 °C for different durations and triethylene glycol was used as the medium solvent. The structure, morphology, and composition of the composites were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The reaction time affected the particle size, which in turn affected the reaction kinetics. Furthermore, the novel nanostructures contained an inactive metal phase (Cu), which acted both as the buffer space against the volume change of Sn during the alloying reaction and as the electron conductor, resulting in a lower impedance of the composites. When evaluated as potential anodes for LIBs, the composite electrodes displayed extraordinary electrochemical performance with a high capacity and Coulombic efficiency, an excellent cycling stability, and a superior rate capability compared to a Sn electrode.

  5. Development of Pseudocapacitive Properties in Nanostructured LiMn2O4 as a Fast Charging Cathode for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesel, Benjamin

    Pseudocapacitive materials provide a high energy density solution to fast charging, long cycle life energy storage. This work explores the pseudocapacitive characteristics and attempts to optimize nanostructured LiMn2O 4 for use as a cathode material in fast charging, long cycle lifetime lithium ion batteries. Because slow kinetics in traditional batteries is linked to long lithium ion diffusion lengths through micron sized grains, the key to achieving pseudocapacitance in most materials is through nanostructuring to reduced diffusion distance. One of the most effective methods for producing nanostructures is through nanocrystal/polymer templating, which produces a porous structure with interconnected nanoscale walls capable of intercalating lithium ions at pseudocapactive rates. To make a full pseudocapacitive lithium ion battery a reality, however, a pseudocapacitive material of each electrode type, anode and cathode, must be paired. To date, many pseudocapacitive materials have been identified, but nearly all of them are redox active in a voltage range more suitable for anode materials. Recently, we identified a pseudocapacitive cathode material, nanostructured LiMn2O4 which shows impressive rate capabilities. Unfortunately, the improvements came at the cost of energy density, which decreased significantly with decreasing crystallite size. Kinetics for different crystallite sizes, however, increased suddenly below a certain critical crystallite size. We found that this critical crystallite size, below which pseudocapacitance occurred, was linked to a suppression of phase transition in nanoscale LiMn2O4. To address the capacity loss due to dissolution in high surface area nanostructured LiMn 2O4 powders, a sol-gel templating method which formed dissolution resistant surfaces was employed. The resulting materials had long needle-like morphology and showed higher capacity and less dissolution than a similarly sized material synthesized with a different structure

  6. Spectroscopic investigations of nanostructured LiNbO3 doped with Eu3+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hreniak, D.; Speghini, A.; Bettinelli, M.; Strek, W.

    2006-01-01

    Structural and optical properties of the sol-gel derived nanocrystalline lithium niobate (LiNbO 3 ) powders doped with Eu 3+ ions have been studied. In particular, the influence of the sizes of nanoparticles controlled by temperature on the structural and luminescence properties has been investigated. Emission bands corresponding to 5 D emission became more resolved with increasing nanocrystal size and changed to a typical Eu 3+ :LiNbO 3 single crystal spectrum for nanocrystals having an average size of more than 40 nm. Nonlinear optical properties of nanostructured LiNbO 3 have been confirmed by simple observation of second harmonic generation effect (SHG). The possibility of using nanostructured LiNbO 3 doped with rare-earth ions as self-doubling elements in integrated optoelectronic devices has been discussed

  7. Nanostructured titanium nitride as a novel cathode for high performance lithium/dissolved polysulfide batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosavati, Negar; Chitturi, Venkateswara Rao; Salley, Steven O.; Ng, K. Y. Simon

    2016-07-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Lisbnd S) batteries could potentially revolutionize the rechargeable battery market due to their high energy density and low cost. However, low active material utilization, electrode volumetric expansion and a high rate of capacity fade due to the dissolution of lithium polysulfide intermediates in the liquid electrolyte are the main challenges facing further Lisbnd S battery development. Here, we enhanced Lisbnd S batteries active material utilization and decreased the volumetric expansion by using the lithium/dissolved polysulfide configuration. Moreover, a novel class of cathode materials, Titanium Nitride (TiN), was developed for polysulfide conversion reactions. The surface chemical environment of the TiN has been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The existence of Ssbnd Tisbnd N bonding at the cathode electrode surface was observed, which indicates the strong interactions between TiN and polysulfides. Therefore, the TiN electrode retains the sulfur species on the cathode surface, minimizing the active material and surface area loss and consequently, improves the capacity retention. The resultant cells demonstrated a high initial capacity of 1524 mAh g-1 and a good capacity retention for 100 cycles at a C/10 current rate.

  8. Characterization and electrochemical activities of nanostructured transition metal nitrides as cathode materials for lithium sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosavati, Negar; Salley, Steven O.; Ng, K. Y. Simon

    2017-02-01

    The Lithium Sulfur (Li-S) battery system is one of the most promising candidates for electric vehicle applications due to its higher energy density when compared to conventional lithium ion batteries. However, there are some challenges facing Li-S battery commercialization, such as: low active material utilization, high self-discharge rate, and high rate of capacity fade. In this work, a series of transition metal nitrides: Tungsten nitride (WN), Molybdenum Nitride (Mo2N), and Vanadium Nitride (VN) was investigated as cathode materials for lithium polysulfide conversion reactions. Capacities of 697, 569, and 264 mAh g-1 were observed for WN, Mo2N, VN, respectively, with 8 mg cm-2 loading, after 100 cycles at a 0.1 C rate. WN higher electrochemical performance may be attributed to a strong reversible reaction between nitrides and polysulfide, which retains the sulfur species on the electrode surface, and minimizes the active material and surface area loss. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was performed to gain a better understanding of the mechanism underlying each metal nitride redox reactions.

  9. Synthesis of One Dimensional Li2MoO4 Nanostructures and Their Electrochemical Performance as Anode Materials for Lithium-ion Batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xudong; Zhao, Yanming; Dong, Youzhong; Fan, Qinghua; Kuang, Quan; Liang, Zhiyong; Lin, Xinghao; Han, Wei; Li, Qidong; Wen, Mingming

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • One dimensional Li 2 MoO 4 nanostructures including nanorods and nanotubes have been successfully fabricated via a simple sol-gel method firstly. • Possible crystal formation mechanisms are proposed for these one dimensional Li 2 MoO 4 nanostructures. • These one dimensional Li 2 MoO 4 nanostructure electrode materials present outstanding rate abilities and cycle capabilities in electrochemical performance compared to the carbon-free powder sample when evaluated as anode materials for Lithium-ion batteries. • The carbon-coated Li 2 MoO 4 nanotube electrode improves the charging/discharging capacities of graphite even after applying 60 cycles at very high current density. - Abstract: One dimensional Li 2 MoO 4 nanostructures including nanorods and nanotubes have been successfully fabricated via a simple sol-gel method adding Li 2 CO 3 and MoO 3 powders into distilled water with citric acid as an assistant agent and carbon source. Our experimental results show that the formation of the one dimensional nanostructure morphology is evaporation and crystallization process with self-adjusting into a rod-like hexagonal cross-section structure, while the citric acid played an important role during the formation of Li 2 MoO 4 nanotubes under the acidic environment by capping, stabilizing the {1010} facet of Li 2 MoO 4 structure and controlling the concentration of H + (pH value) of the aqueous solution. Finally, basic electrochemical performance of these one dimensional Li 2 MoO 4 nanostructures including nanorods and nanotubes evaluated as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are discussed, for comparison, the properties of carbon-free powder sample synthesized by solid-state reaction are also displayed. Experimental results show that different morphology and carbon-coating on the surface have an important influence on electrochemical performance

  10. Rod-like hierarchical Sn/SnOx@C nanostructures with enhanced lithium storage properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juan; Chen, Sanmei; Tang, Jingjing; Tian, Hangyu; Bai, Tao; Zhou, Xiangyang

    2018-03-01

    Rod-like hierarchical Sn/SnOx@C nanostructures have been designed and synthesized via calcining resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin coated Sn-based metal-organic frameworks. The rod-like hierarchical Sn/SnOx@C nanostructures are made of a great number of carbon-wrapped primary Sn/SnOx nanospheres of 100-200 nm in diameter. The as-prepared hierarchical Sn/SnOx@C nanocomposite manifests a high initial reversible capacity of 1177 mAh g-1 and remains 1001 mAh g-1 after 240 cycles at a current density of 200 mA g-1. It delivers outstanding high-rate performance with a reversible capacity of 823 mAh g-1 even at a high current density of 1000 mA g-1. The enhanced electrochemical performances of the Sn/SnOx@C electrode are mainly attributed to the synergistic effect of the unique hierarchical micro/nanostructures and the protective carbon layer.

  11. Three-Dimensional Carbon Nanostructures for Advanced Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiwon Kang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructural materials have gained the spotlight as promising anode materials for energy storage; they exhibit unique physico-chemical properties such as large surface area, short Li+ ion diffusion length, and high electrical conductivity, in addition to their long-term stability. However, carbon-nanostructured materials have issues with low areal and volumetric densities for the practical applications in electric vehicles, portable electronics, and power grid systems, which demand higher energy and power densities. One approach to overcoming these issues is to design and apply a three-dimensional (3D electrode accommodating a larger loading amount of active anode materials while facilitating Li+ ion diffusion. Furthermore, 3D nanocarbon frameworks can impart a conducting pathway and structural buffer to high-capacity non-carbon nanomaterials, which results in enhanced Li+ ion storage capacity. In this paper, we review our recent progress on the design and fabrication of 3D carbon nanostructures, their performance in Li-ion batteries (LIBs, and their implementation into large-scale, lightweight, and flexible LIBs.

  12. Carbon nanostructures modified LiFePO4 cathodes for lithium ion battery applications: optimized porosity and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Lama; Singh Lalia, Boor; Hashaikeh, Raed

    2016-12-01

    Lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) battery cathode was fabricated without using any metallic current collector and polymeric binder. Carbon nanostructures (CNS) were used as microbinders for LiFePO4 particles and at the same time as a 3D current collector. A facile and cost effective method of fabricating composite cathodes of CNS and LiFePO4 was developed. Thick electrodes with high loading of active material (20-25 mg cm-2) were obtained that are almost 2-3 folds higher than commercial electrodes. SEM images confirm that the 3D CNS conductive network encapsulated the LiFePO4 particles homogenously facilitating the charge transfer at the electrode-CNS interface. The composition, scan rate and porosity of the paper-like cathode were sequentially varied and their influence was systematically monitored by means of linear sweep cyclic voltammetry and AC electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Addition of CNS improved the electrode’s bulk electronic conductivity, mechanical integrity, surface area and double layer capacitance, yet compromised the charge transfer resistance at the electrode-electrolyte interface. Based on a range of the tested binder-free electrodes, this study proposes that electrodes with 20 wt% CNS having 49 ± 2.5% porosity had realized best improvements of two folds and four folds in the electronic conductivity and diffusion coefficient, respectively.

  13. An investigation on the effect of deposition parameters on nanostructured electrode of lithium ion batteries and their performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorri, Mehrdad; Zamani, Cyrus; Babaei, Alireza

    2018-01-01

    Nanostructured plate-like manganese cobalt oxide (MCO) was synthesized as the anode material for lithium-ion batteries. Under basic conditions and using a molar ratio of OH- /NO3-= 1.5, crystallite size of 14 nm was found for samples calcined at 350°C. The electrodes were fabricated by mixing MCO as the active material, Super P carbon as the conducting material and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as the binder in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) solvent. The slurry was coated onto a copper foil substrate. The aim of this investigation is the assessment of deposition parameters on different plausible defects (such as agglomeration/blisters, pinholes/divots, cracks and non-uniform coating) and also electrical behavior of the deposited layer. Because of high degree of agglomeration, mortar method was found to be ineffective while mixing using magnetic stirrer was proved to be more appropriate in terms of final rheology. The optimum value for the binder was found to be 2.73 wt% of the NMP solvent. Effective drying was achieved using hotplate followed by oven drying. SEM analysis revealed the disappearance of the surface cracks when samples are pressed after drying stage.

  14. Exploring Critical Factors Affecting Strain Distribution in 1D Silicon-Based Nanostructures for Lithium-Ion Battery Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Yoonkook; Sim, Soojin; Ma, Hyunsoo; Choi, Min; Son, Yeonguk; Park, Noejung; Cho, Jaephil; Park, Minjoon

    2018-03-07

    Despite the advantage of high capacity, the practical use of the silicon anode is still hindered by large volume expansion during the severe pulverization lithiation process, which results in electrical contact loss and rapid capacity fading. Here, a combined electrochemical and computational study on the factor for accommodating volume expansion of silicon-based anodes is shown. 1D silicon-based nanostructures with different internal spaces to explore the effect of spatial ratio of voids and their distribution degree inside the fibers on structural stability are designed. Notably, lotus-root-type silicon nanowires with locally distributed void spaces can improve capacity retention and structural integrity with minimum silicon pulverization during lithium insertion and extraction. The findings of this study indicate that the distribution of buffer spaces, electrochemical surface area, as well as Li diffusion property significantly influence cycle performance and rate capability of the battery, which can be extended to other silicon-based anodes to overcome large volume expansion. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Alloying in an Intercalation Host: Metal Titanium Niobates as Anodes for Rechargeable Alkali-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Suman; Swain, Diptikanta; Araujo, Rafael B; Shi, Songxin; Ahuja, Rajeev; Row, Tayur N Guru; Bhattacharyya, Aninda J

    2018-02-02

    We discuss here a unique flexible non-carbonaceous layered host, namely, metal titanium niobates (M-Ti-niobate, M: Al 3+ , Pb 2+ , Sb 3+ , Ba 2+ , Mg 2+ ), which can synergistically store both lithium ions and sodium ions via a simultaneous intercalation and alloying mechanisms. M-Ti-niobate is formed by ion exchange of the K + ions, which are specifically located inside galleries between the layers formed by edge and corner sharing TiO 6 and NbO 6 octahedral units in the sol-gel synthesized potassium titanium niobate (KTiNbO 5 ). Drastic volume changes (approximately 300-400 %) typically associated with an alloying mechanism of storage are completely tackled chemically by the unique chemical composition and structure of the M-Ti-niobates. The free space between the adjustable Ti/Nb octahedral layers easily accommodates the volume changes. Due to the presence of an optimum amount of multivalent alloying metal ions (50-75 % of total K + ) in the M-Ti-niobate, an efficient alloying reaction takes place directly with ions and completely eliminates any form of mechanical degradation of the electroactive particles. The M-Ti-niobate can be cycled over a wide voltage range (as low as 0.01 V) and displays remarkably stable Li + and Na + ion cyclability (>2 Li + /Na + per formula unit) for widely varying current densities over few hundreds to thousands of successive cycles. The simultaneous intercalation and alloying storage mechanisms is also studied within the density functional theory (DFT) framework. DFT expectedly shows a very small variation in the volume of Al-titanium niobate following lithium alloying. Moreover, the theoretical investigations also conclusively support the occurrence of the alloying process of Li ions with the Al ions along with the intercalation process during discharge. The M-Ti-niobates studied here demonstrate a paradigm shift in chemical design of electrodes and will pave the way for the development of a multitude of improved electrodes

  16. Solvothermal preparation of micro/nanostructured TiO{sub 2} with enhanced lithium storage capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jie [School of Physics and Mechanical & Electronical Engineering, Hubei University of Education, Wuhan, 430205 (China); Wang, Chao [Department of Architecture and Material Engineering, Hubei University of Education, Wuhan, 430205 (China); Zheng, Ping; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Gongxuan [College of Chemistry and Life Science, Hubei University of Education, Wuhan, 430205 (China); Tang, Chengchun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130 (China); Wu, Tian, E-mail: twu@whu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Mechanical & Electronical Engineering, Hubei University of Education, Wuhan, 430205 (China); College of Chemistry and Life Science, Hubei University of Education, Wuhan, 430205 (China); Department of Architecture and Material Engineering, Hubei University of Education, Wuhan, 430205 (China)

    2017-04-01

    Facile and controllable preparation of TiO{sub 2} is of prime importance to elaborately tailor and then fully exploit its intriguing functionalities in energy storage, catalysis and environmental remediation. Herein, a solvothermal method combined with post annealing is conducted, in which the hydrolysis of tetrabutyl titanate is controlled by the in-situ generated water during solvothermal treatment. By controlling synthetic conditions (i.e. reactant ratio, solvothermal temperature and reaction time), we manage to tailor the morphologies of TiO{sub 2}. Specially, three typical structures (nanoparticle, nanoneedle and nanorod) are studied to reveal the growth mechanism and the effects of the synthesis conditions. Nanoneedle-structured TiO{sub 2} shows higher specific capacity and enhanced cycle stability as anode material for lithium ion batteries. - Highlights: • Controllable preparation of nano-TiO{sub 2} is achieved by a solvothermal method. • TiO{sub 2} morphology is tailored by tuning reactant ratio, temperature and duration. • Needle structured TiO{sub 2} shows enhanced lithium storage capability.

  17. One-Step Pyro-Synthesis of a Nanostructured Mn3O4/C Electrode with Long Cycle Stability for Rechargeable Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaruqi, Muhammad Hilmy; Gim, Jihyeon; Kim, Sungjin; Song, Jinju; Duong, Pham Tung; Jo, Jeonggeun; Baboo, Joseph Paul; Xiu, Zhiliang; Mathew, Vinod; Kim, Jaekook

    2016-02-01

    A nanostructured Mn 3 O 4 /C electrode was prepared by a one-step polyol-assisted pyro-synthesis without any post-heat treatments. The as-prepared Mn 3 O 4 /C revealed nanostructured morphology comprised of secondary aggregates formed from carbon-coated primary particles of average diameters ranging between 20 and 40 nm, as evidenced from the electron microscopy studies. The N 2 adsorption studies reveal a hierarchical porous feature in the nanostructured electrode. The nanostructured morphology appears to be related to the present rapid combustion strategy. The nanostructured porous Mn 3 O 4 /C electrode demonstrated impressive electrode properties with reversible capacities of 666 mAh g -1 at a current density of 33 mA g -1 , good capacity retentions (1141 mAh g -1 with 100 % Coulombic efficiencies at the 100 th cycle), and rate capabilities (307 and 202 mAh g -1 at 528 and 1056 mA g -1 , respectively) when tested as an anode for lithium-ion battery applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Meduri, Praveen; Sumanasekera, Gamini

    2014-12-30

    An anode material for lithium-ion batteries is provided that comprises an elongated core structure capable of forming an alloy with lithium; and a plurality of nanostructures placed on a surface of the core structure, with each nanostructure being capable of forming an alloy with lithium and spaced at a predetermined distance from adjacent nanostructures.

  19. Rational design and synthesis of yolk-shell ZnGa2O4@C nanostructure with enhanced lithium storage properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Nao; Xia, Yuguo; Han, Yanyang; Jiao, Xiuling; Chen, Dairong

    2018-03-01

    The ability to create hybrid nanostructure with synergistic effect and confined morphology to achieve high performance and long-term stability is high desirable in lithium ion batteries. Although transition metal oxides as anode material reveal high theoretical capacities, the significant volume changes during repeated lithium insertion and extraction cause pulverization of electrode materials, resulting in rapid fade in capacity. Herein, yolk-shell nanostructure of ZnGa2O4 encapsulated by amorphous carbon is rationally designed and synthesized through two-step surface coating followed by thermal treatment and etching process. It is noteworthy that ZnGa2O4@C with yolk-shell structure is superior to pristine ZnGa2O4 and ZnGa2O4@C with core-shell structure in term of lithium storage. The stable reversible capacity of yolk-shell ZnGa2O4@C can be retained at 657.2 mAh g-1 at current density of 1 A g-1 after completion of 300 cycles, which also reveals superior rate performance. The appropriate carbon shell and void space involved in the yolk-shell structure are considered to be the crucial factor in accommodating volume expansion as well as preserving the structural integrity of yolk-shell ZnGa2O4@C.

  20. Novel flame synthesis of nanostructured α-Fe2O3 electrode as high-performance anode for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Roller, Justin; Maric, Radenka

    2018-02-01

    Nanostructured electrodes have significant potential for enhancing the kinetics of lithium storage in secondary batteries. A simple and economical manufacturing approach of these electrodes is crucial to the development and application of the next generation lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries. In this study, nanostructured α-Fe2O3 electrode is fabricated by a novel one-step flame combustion synthesis method, namely Reactive Spray Deposition Technology (RSDT). This process possesses the merits of simplicity and low cost. The structure and morphology of the electrode are investigated with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Electrochemical performance of the nanostructured α-Fe2O3 electrodes as the anodes for Li-ion batteries is evaluated by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in coin-type half-cells. The as-prepared electrodes demonstrate superior cyclic performance at high current rate, which delivers a high reversible capacity of 1239.2 mAh g-1 at 1 C after 500 cycles. In addition, a discharge capacity of 513.3 mAh g-1 can be achieved at 10 C.

  1. Nanostructured Cu2O thin film electrodes prepared by electrodeposition for rechargeable lithium batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijani, S.; Gabas, M.; Martinez, L.; Ramos-Barrado, J.R.; Morales, J.; Sanchez, L.

    2007-01-01

    Uniform films of Cu 2 O with thickness below 1 μm were prepared from a Cu(II) lactate solution. The deposits were compact and of high purity with the particle size varying from 60 to 400 nm. They were tested as electrodes in lithium batteries and their electrochemical response was consistent with the Cu 2 O + 2e - + 2Li + ↔ 2Cu + Li 2 O reaction. Nevertheless, the reversibility of this reaction was dependent on thickness. Kinetic factors associated with the poor electronic conductivity of Cu 2 O could account for the relevance of the influence of film thickness. The thinnest film, about 300 nm thick, exhibited the best electrochemical performance by sustaining a specific capacity as high as 350 Ah kg -1

  2. Nanostructured nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon derived from polyacrylonitrile for advanced lithium sulfur batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ying; Zhao, Xiaohui; Chauhan, Ghanshyam S. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Research Institute for Green Energy Convergence Technology, Gyeongsang National University, 501 Jinju-daero, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jou-Hyeon, E-mail: jhahn@gnu.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering and Research Institute for Green Energy Convergence Technology, Gyeongsang National University, 501 Jinju-daero, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Engineering and Convergence Technology and RIGET, Gyeongsang National University, 501 Jinju-daero, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-01

    Graphical abstract: Well-ordered nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon materials were prepared by in-situ polymerization of polyacrylonitrile in SBA-15 template. The composite of sulfur and nitrogen-doped carbon was successfully used as a cathode material for lithium sulfur battery. - Highlights: • N-doped mesoporous carbons were prepared with PAN as carbon source. • Highly ordered pore system facilitates sulfur loading. • Ladder-type carbon matrix provides good structural stability for confining sulfur. • N-doping ensures an improved absorbability of soluble polysulfides. - Abstract: Nitrogen doping in carbon matrix can effectively improve the wettability of electrolyte and increase electric conductivity of carbon by ensuring fast transfer of ions. We synthesized a series of nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbons (CPANs) via in situ polymerization of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) in SBA-15 template followed by carbonization at different temperatures. Carbonization results in the formation of ladder structure which enhances the stability of the matrix. In this study, CPAN-800, carbon matrix synthesized by the carbonization at 800 °C, was found to possess many desirable properties such as high specific surface area and pore volume, moderate nitrogen content, and highly ordered mesoporous structure. Therefore, it was used to prepare S/CPAN-800 composite as cathode material in lithium sulfur (Li-S) batteries. The S/CPAN-800 composite was proved to be an excellent material for Li-S cells which delivered a high initial discharge capacity of 1585 mAh g{sup −1} and enhanced capacity retention of 862 mAh g{sup −1} at 0.1 C after 100 cycles.

  3. Nanostructured nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon derived from polyacrylonitrile for advanced lithium sulfur batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ying; Zhao, Xiaohui; Chauhan, Ghanshyam S.; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Well-ordered nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon materials were prepared by in-situ polymerization of polyacrylonitrile in SBA-15 template. The composite of sulfur and nitrogen-doped carbon was successfully used as a cathode material for lithium sulfur battery. - Highlights: • N-doped mesoporous carbons were prepared with PAN as carbon source. • Highly ordered pore system facilitates sulfur loading. • Ladder-type carbon matrix provides good structural stability for confining sulfur. • N-doping ensures an improved absorbability of soluble polysulfides. - Abstract: Nitrogen doping in carbon matrix can effectively improve the wettability of electrolyte and increase electric conductivity of carbon by ensuring fast transfer of ions. We synthesized a series of nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbons (CPANs) via in situ polymerization of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) in SBA-15 template followed by carbonization at different temperatures. Carbonization results in the formation of ladder structure which enhances the stability of the matrix. In this study, CPAN-800, carbon matrix synthesized by the carbonization at 800 °C, was found to possess many desirable properties such as high specific surface area and pore volume, moderate nitrogen content, and highly ordered mesoporous structure. Therefore, it was used to prepare S/CPAN-800 composite as cathode material in lithium sulfur (Li-S) batteries. The S/CPAN-800 composite was proved to be an excellent material for Li-S cells which delivered a high initial discharge capacity of 1585 mAh g −1 and enhanced capacity retention of 862 mAh g −1 at 0.1 C after 100 cycles.

  4. Single potential electrodeposition of nanostructured battery materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, James Matthew

    The increasing reliance on portable electronics is continuing to fuel research in the area of low power lithium-ion batteries, while a new surge in research for high power lithium-ion batteries has been sparked by the demand for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) and plug-in electric vehicles (PEV). To compete with current lead-acid battery chemistry, a few of the shortcomings of lithium-ion battery chemistry need to be addressed. The three main drawbacks of lithium-ion batteries for this application are: (1) low power density, (2) safety, and (3) the high cost of manufacturing. This dissertation covers the development of a low cost fabrication technique for an alternative anode material with high surface area geometries. The anode material is safer than the conventional anode material in lithium-ion batteries and the high surface area geometries permit higher power densities to be achieved. Electrodeposition is an inexpensive alternative method for synthesizing materials for electronics, energy conversion and energy storage applications relative to traditional solid state techniques. These techniques led to expensive device fabrication. Unlike most solid state synthesis routes, electrodeposition can usually be performed from common solutions and at moderate conditions. Three other benefits of using electrodeposition are: (1) it allows precise control of composition and crystallinity, (2) it provides the ability to deposit on complex shapes, and (3) it can deposit materials with nanoscale dimensions. The use of electrodeposition for alternative anode materials results in the deposition of the material directly onto the current collector that is used for the battery testing and applications without the need of additional binders and with excellent electrical contact. While this improves the characterization of the material and lowers the weight of the non-active materials within a battery, it also allows the anode to be deposited onto current collectors with

  5. Electrochemically oxidized electronic and ionic conducting nanostructured block copolymers for lithium battery electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shrayesh N; Javier, Anna E; Balsara, Nitash P

    2013-07-23

    Block copolymers that can simultaneously conduct electronic and ionic charges on the nanometer length scale can serve as innovative conductive binder material for solid-state battery electrodes. The purpose of this work is to study the electronic charge transport of poly(3-hexylthiophene)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (P3HT-PEO) copolymers electrochemically oxidized with lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide (LiTFSI) salt in the context of a lithium battery charge/discharge cycle. We use a solid-state three-terminal electrochemical cell that enables simultaneous conductivity measurements and control over electrochemical doping of P3HT. At low oxidation levels (ratio of moles of electrons removed to moles of 3-hexylthiophene moieties in the electrode), the electronic conductivity (σe,ox) increases from 10(-7) S/cm to 10(-4) S/cm. At high oxidation levels, σe,ox approaches 10(-2) S/cm. When P3HT-PEO is used as a conductive binder in a positive electrode with LiFePO4 active material, P3HT is electrochemically active within the voltage window of a charge/discharge cycle. The electronic conductivity of the P3HT-PEO binder is in the 10(-4) to 10(-2) S/cm range over most of the potential window of the charge/discharge cycle. This allows for efficient electronic conduction, and observed charge/discharge capacities approach the theoretical limit of LiFePO4. However, at the end of the discharge cycle, the electronic conductivity decreases sharply to 10(-7) S/cm, which means the "conductive" binder is now electronically insulating. The ability of our conductive binder to switch between electronically conducting and insulating states in the positive electrode provides an unprecedented route for automatic overdischarge protection in rechargeable batteries.

  6. Controllable synthesis of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanostructures with good cycling performance and rate capacity in lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Ling, E-mail: yuling1987@yeah.net [Sinan School, State Key Laboratory for Chemistry (China); Chen, Yuejiao; Feng, Dandan; Li, Qiuhong, E-mail: liqiuhong2004@hotmail.com [Hunan University, Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Optoelectronic Devices of Ministry of Education, State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics (China)

    2013-08-15

    The structure modification of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nano-parachute (i.e., nanosheets with part of nanowires as backbones) grown directly on conducting Ni foam substrates was successfully realized via a facile solution route followed by calcinations. By adjusting [OH{sup -}] value, two kinds of (Co(CO{sub 3}){sub 0.5}(OH){sub 0.11}H{sub 2}O) nanostructures (nanoarray and parachute-like) were obtained. Compared with other Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanosheets, such nano-parachute not only inherits the advantages of nanosheet but also shows enormous net space between nanobuilding units. A possible formation mechanism for the two structures has been proposed. As anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, this sheet-like morphology on Ni foam exhibited enhanced lithium storage capacity.

  7. Fe3O4/C composite with hollow spheres in porous 3D-nanostructure as anode material for the lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhao; Su, Danyang; Yang, Jinping; Wang, Jing

    2017-09-01

    3d transition-metal oxides, especially Fe3O4, as anode materials for the lithium-ion batteries have been attracting intensive attentions in recent years due to their high energy capacity and low toxicity. A new Fe3O4/C composite with hollow spheres in porous three-dimensional (3D) nanostructure, which was synthesized by a facile solvothermal method using FeCl3·6H2O and porous spongy carbon as raw materials. The specific surface area and microstructures of composite were characterized by nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm method, FE-SEM and HR-TEM. A homogeneous distribution of hollow Fe3O4 spheres (diameter ranges from 120 nm to 150 nm) in the spongy carbon (pore size > 200 nm) conductive 3D-network significantly reduced the lithium-ion diffusion length and increased the electrochemical reaction area, and further more enhanced the lithium ion battery performance, such as discharge capacity and cycle life. As an anode material for the lithium-ion battery, the title composite exhibit excellent electrochemical properties. The Fe3O4/C composite electrode achieved a relatively high reversible specific capacity of 1450.1 mA h g-1 in the first cycle at 100 mA g-1, and excellent rate capability (69% retention at 1000 mA g-1) with good cycle stability (only 10% loss after 100 cycles).

  8. Carbon-coated Si nanoparticles/reduced graphene oxide multilayer anchored to nanostructured current collector as lithium-ion battery anode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhengjiao; Guo, Pengqian; Liu, Boli; Xie, Wenhe; Liu, Dequan; He, Deyan, E-mail: hedy@lzu.edu.cn

    2017-02-28

    Silicon is the most promising anode material for the next-generation lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). However, the large volume change during lithiation/delithiation and low intrinsic conductivity hamper its electrochemical performance. Here we report a well-designed LIB anode in which carbon-coated Si nanoparticles/reduced graphene oxide (Si/rGO) multilayer was anchored to nanostructured current collector with stable mechanical support and rapid electron conduction. Furthermore, we improved the integral stability of the electrode through introducing amorphous carbon. The designed anode exhibits superior cyclability, its specific capacity remains above 800 mAh g{sup −1} after 350 cycles at a current density of 2.0 A g{sup −1}. The excellent electrochemical performance can be attributed to the fact that the Si/rGO multilayer is reinforced by the nanostructured current collector and the formed amorphous carbon, which can maintain the structural and electrical integrities of the electrode.

  9. Carbon-coated Si nanoparticles/reduced graphene oxide multilayer anchored to nanostructured current collector as lithium-ion battery anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhengjiao; Guo, Pengqian; Liu, Boli; Xie, Wenhe; Liu, Dequan; He, Deyan

    2017-02-01

    Silicon is the most promising anode material for the next-generation lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). However, the large volume change during lithiation/delithiation and low intrinsic conductivity hamper its electrochemical performance. Here we report a well-designed LIB anode in which carbon-coated Si nanoparticles/reduced graphene oxide (Si/rGO) multilayer was anchored to nanostructured current collector with stable mechanical support and rapid electron conduction. Furthermore, we improved the integral stability of the electrode through introducing amorphous carbon. The designed anode exhibits superior cyclability, its specific capacity remains above 800 mAh g-1 after 350 cycles at a current density of 2.0 A g-1. The excellent electrochemical performance can be attributed to the fact that the Si/rGO multilayer is reinforced by the nanostructured current collector and the formed amorphous carbon, which can maintain the structural and electrical integrities of the electrode.

  10. Pulsed laser deposited Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructured thin film on graphene as anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khamlich, S., E-mail: skhamlich@gmail.com [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Nuru, Z.Y. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Bello, A.; Fabiane, M.; Dangbegnon, J.K.; Manyala, N. [Department of Physics, SARChI Chair in Carbon Technology and Materials, Institute of Applied Materials, University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa); Maaza, M. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa)

    2015-07-15

    Graphical abstract: A different approach for the fabrication of an anode material system that comprises pulsed laser-deposited (PLD) Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} grown on few layer graphene (FLG) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was used. The electrochemical performance of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructured thin film was improved by FLG, which make it a promising candidate for future lithium-ion batteries application. - Highlights: • Pulsed laser deposition technique was used to deposit Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} on few-layer graphene (FLG). • FLG improved the electrochemical performance of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructured thin film. • Good stable cycle of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FLG/Ni electrode make it one of the promise anode materials for future lithium-ion batteries. - Abstract: Pulsed laser deposition technique was used to deposit Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructured thin film on a chemical vapor deposited few-layer graphene (FLG) on nickel (Ni) substrate for application as anode material for lithium-ion batteries. The experimental results show that graphene can effectively enhance the electrochemical property of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. For Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film deposited on Ni (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ni), a discharge capacity of 747.8 mA h g{sup −1} can be delivered during the first lithiation process. After growing Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film on FLG/Ni, the initial discharge capacity of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FLG/Ni was improved to 1234.5 mA h g{sup −1}. The reversible lithium storage capacity of the as-grown material is 692.2 mA h g{sup −1} after 100 cycles, which is much higher than that of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ni (111.3 mA h g{sup −1}). This study reveals the differences between the two material systems and emphasizes the role of the graphene layers in improving the electrochemical stability of the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructured thin film.

  11. Surface nanostructuring of LiNbO3 by high-density electronic excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Said, A.S.; Wilhelm, R.A.; Facsko, S.; Trautmann, C.

    2013-01-01

    Lithium niobate (LiNbO 3 ) single crystals were irradiated with high energy gold ions (0.5–2.2 GeV) at the UNILAC (GSI) and with 150-keV highly charged xenon ions from an EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap, HZDR). The surfaces of the irradiated crystals were analyzed by scanning force microscopy showing very similar topographic changes. Swift heavy ions and slow highly charged ions produce hillock-like nanostructures on the surface. In both cases, the energy deposition of the ions is characterized by dense localized electronic excitations and efficient transfer to the lattice. Furthermore, the irradiation results in a shift in the band gap energy as evidenced by UV–Vis absorption spectroscopy. Specific modifications (e.g. hillock size, energy loss threshold) induced by slow highly charged ions are discussed in comparison with effects due to the electronic energy loss by swift heavy ions

  12. Surface nanostructuring of LiNbO{sub 3} by high-density electronic excitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Said, A.S., E-mail: elsaid@kfupm.edu.sa [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), 01328 Dresden (Germany); Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Nuclear and Radiation Physics Lab, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, 35516 Mansoura (Egypt); Wilhelm, R.A. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), 01328 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Facsko, S. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), 01328 Dresden (Germany); Trautmann, C. [GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    Lithium niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}) single crystals were irradiated with high energy gold ions (0.5–2.2 GeV) at the UNILAC (GSI) and with 150-keV highly charged xenon ions from an EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap, HZDR). The surfaces of the irradiated crystals were analyzed by scanning force microscopy showing very similar topographic changes. Swift heavy ions and slow highly charged ions produce hillock-like nanostructures on the surface. In both cases, the energy deposition of the ions is characterized by dense localized electronic excitations and efficient transfer to the lattice. Furthermore, the irradiation results in a shift in the band gap energy as evidenced by UV–Vis absorption spectroscopy. Specific modifications (e.g. hillock size, energy loss threshold) induced by slow highly charged ions are discussed in comparison with effects due to the electronic energy loss by swift heavy ions.

  13. Simultaneous modulation of surface composition, oxygen vacancies and assembly in hierarchical Co3O4 mesoporous nanostructures for lithium storage and electrocatalytic oxygen evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Hongyu; Zhao, Yanyan; Mølhave, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    in superior electrochemical properties when used as the anode materials for lithium-ion batteries and as an electrocatalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction. The excellent electrochemical performance is attributed to the synergistic effects of novel hierarchical morphology, crystal structure of the active......We developed a facile solution reductive method to simultaneously tune the surface composition, oxygen vacancies and three dimensional assembly in Co3O4 hierarchical nanostructures. The controllable surface composition, oxygen vacancies together with hierarchical micro/nanoarchitectures resulted...... materials, the improvement of intrinsic conductivity and inner surface area induced by the oxygen vacancies. The present strategy not only provides a facile method to assemble novel hierarchical architectures, but also paves a way to control surface structures (chemical composition and crystal defects...

  14. A Tremella-Like Nanostructure of Silicon@void@graphene-Like Nanosheets Composite as an Anode for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Hongwei; Li, Fang; Xu, Shuxian; Li, Ziang; Chai, Xiaoyan; He, Chuanxin; Li, Yongliang; Liu, Jianhong

    2016-12-01

    Graphene coating is receiving discernable attention to overcome the significant challenges associated with large volume changes and poor conductivity of silicon nanoparticles as anodes for lithium-ion batteries. In this work, a tremella-like nanostructure of silicon@void@graphene-like nanosheets (Si@void@G) composite was successfully synthesized and employed as a high-performance anode material with high capacity, cycling stability, and rate capacity. The Si nanoparticles were first coated with a sacrificial SiO2 layer; then, the nitrogen-doped (N-doped) graphene-like nanosheets were formed on the surface of Si@SiO2 through a one-step carbon-thermal method, and the SiO2 layer was removed subsequently to obtain the Si@void@G composite. The performance improvement is mainly attributed to the good conductivity of N-doped graphene-like nanosheets and the unique design of tremella nanostructure, which provides a void space to allow for the Si nanoparticles expanding upon lithiation. The resulting electrode delivers a capacity of 1497.3 mAh g(-1) at the current density of 0.2 A g(-1) after 100 cycles.

  15. Hybrid nanostructured microporous carbon-mesoporous carbon doped titanium dioxide/sulfur composite positive electrode materials for rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegeye, Tilahun Awoke; Kuo, Chung-Feng Jeffrey; Wotango, Aselefech Sorsa; Pan, Chun-Jern; Chen, Hung-Ming; Haregewoin, Atetegeb Meazah; Cheng, Ju-Hsiang; Su, Wei-Nien; Hwang, Bing-Joe

    2016-08-01

    Herein, we design hybrid nanostructured microporous carbon-mesoporous carbon doped titanium dioxide/sulfur composite (MC-Meso C-doped TiO2/S) as a positive electrode material for lithium-sulfur batteries. The hybrid MC-Meso C-doped TiO2 host material is produced by a low-cost, hydrothermal and annealing process. The resulting conductive material shows dual microporous and mesoporous behavior which enhances the effective trapping of sulfur and polysulfides. The hybrid MC-Meso C-doped TiO2/S composite material possesses rutile TiO2 nanotube structure with successful carbon doping while sulfur is uniformly distributed in the hybrid MC-Meso C-doped TiO2 composite materials after the melt-infusion process. The electrochemical measurement of the hybrid material also shows improved cycle stability and rate performance with high sulfur loading (61.04%). The material delivers an initial discharge capacity of 802 mAh g-1 and maintains it at 578 mAh g-1 with a columbic efficiency greater than 97.1% after 140 cycles at 0.1 C. This improvement is thought to be attributed to the unique hybrid nanostructure of the MC-Meso C-doped TiO2 host and the good dispersion of sulfur in the narrow pores of the MC spheres and the mesoporous C-doped TiO2 support.

  16. Porous α-Fe2O3 nanostructures and their lithium storage properties as full cell configuration against LiFePO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veluri, P. S.; Shaligram, A.; Mitra, S.

    2015-10-01

    A two step approach for synthesis of porous α-Fe2O3 nanostructures has been realized via polyol method by complexing iron oxalate with ethylene glycol. Crystalline Fe2O3 samples with different porosities are obtained by calcination of Fe-Ethylene glycol complex at various temperatures. The as-prepared porous Fe2O3 structures exhibit promising lithium storage performance at high current rates. It is observed that the calcination temperature and the resultant porosity have a significant effect on capacity and cycling stability. Samples calcined at high temperature (600 °C) demonstrates stable cycle life with capacity retention of 1077 mAh g-1 at 500 mA g-1 current rate after 50 charge-discharge cycles. Samples calcined at temperatures of 500 and 600 °C display stable cycle life and high rate capability with reversible capacity of 930 mAh g-1 and 688 mAh g-1 at 5 A g-1, respectively. Impregnation of electrodes with electrolyte before cell fabrication shows enhanced electrochemical performance. The viability of Fe2O3 porous nanostructures as prospective anode material examined against commercial LiFePO4 cathode shows promising electrochemical performance.

  17. A General and Mild Approach to Controllable Preparation of Manganese-Based Micro- and Nanostructured Bars for High Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guo; Li, Sheng; Zhang, Weixin; Yang, Zeheng; Liu, Shulin; Fan, Xiaoming; Chen, Fei; Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Weibo; Yang, Shihe; Li, Mei

    2016-03-07

    One-dimensional (1D) micro- and nanostructured electrode materials with controllable phase and composition are appealing materials for use in lithium-ion batteries with high energy and power densities, but they are challenging to prepare. Herein, a novel ethanol-water mediated co-precipitation method by a chimie douce route (synthesis conducted under mild conditions) has been exploited to selectively prepare an extensive series of manganese-based electrode materials, manifesting the considerable generalizability and efficacy of the method. Moreover, by simply tuning the mixed solvent and reagents, transition metal oxide bars with differing aspect ratios and compositions were prepared with an unprecedented uniformity. Application prospects are demonstrated by Li-rich 0.5 Li2 MnO3 ⋅0.5 LiNi1/3 Co1/3 Mn1/3 O2 bars, which demonstrate excellent reversible capacity and rate capability thanks to the steerable nature of the synthesis and material quality. This work opens a new route to 1D micro- and nanostructured materials by customizing the precipitating solvent to orchestrate the crystallization process. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Electrochemical reactivity of ilmenite FeTiO3, its nanostructures and oxide-carbon nanocomposites with lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Tao; Glushenkov, Alexey M.; Rahman, Md Mokhlesur; Chen, Ying

    2013-01-01

    The electrochemical reactivity of the ball-milled ilmenite FeTiO 3 and ilmenite nanoflowers with lithium has been investigated. The electrode assembled with the ilmenite nanoflowers delivers better electrochemical performance than that of the milled material during charging and discharging in the potential range of 0.01 and 3 V vs. Li/Li + . The ilmenite nanoflowers demonstrate the capacity of ca. 650 mAh g −1 during the first discharge, and a reversible capacity of approximately 200 mAh g −1 in the course of the first 50 cycles. The possible reaction mechanism between ilmenite and lithium was studied using cyclic voltammetry and transmission electron microscopy. The first discharge involves the formation of an irreversible phase, which is either LiTiO 2 or LiFeO 2 . Subsequently, the extraction–insertion of lithium happens in a reversible manner. It was also observed that the lithium storage might be significantly improved if the electrode was prepared in the form of a nanocomposite of FeTiO 3 with carbon

  19. Next-generation nanostructured lithium-ion cathode materials: critical challenges for new directions in R&D

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ozoemena, K

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available the readership an understanding of the critical scientific challenges faced by the existing cathode materials used in LIBs and the critical roles engineered nanostructures can play in the realisation of next-generation LIBs for the ever-emerging technologies....

  20. Construction of nanostructures for selective lithium ion conduction using self-assembled molecular arrays in supramolecular solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    In the development of innovative molecule-based materials, the identification of the structural features in supramolecular solids and the understanding of the correlation between structure and function are important factors. The author investigated the development of supramolecular solid electrolytes by constructing ion conduction paths using a supramolecular hierarchical structure in molecular crystals because the ion conduction path is an attractive key structure due to its ability to generate solid-state ion diffusivity. The obtained molecular crystals exhibited selective lithium ion diffusion via conduction paths consisting of lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide (LiTFSA) and small molecules such as ether or amine compounds. In the present review, the correlation between the crystal structure and ion conductivity of the obtained molecular crystals is addressed based on the systematic structural control of the ionic conduction paths through the modification of the component molecules. The relationship between the crystal structure and ion conductivity of the molecular crystals provides a guideline for the development of solid electrolytes based on supramolecular solids exhibiting rapid and selective lithium ion conduction.

  1. Multi-functional integration of pore P25@C@MoS{sub 2} core-double shell nanostructures as robust ternary anodes with enhanced lithium storage properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Biao [School of Materials Science and Engineering and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300350 (China); Zhao, Naiqin [School of Materials Science and Engineering and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300350 (China); Collaborative Innovation Centre of Chemical Science and Engineering, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wei, Chaopeng; Zhou, Jingwen; He, Fang; Shi, Chunsheng; He, Chunnian [School of Materials Science and Engineering and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300350 (China); Liu, Enzuo, E-mail: ezliu@tju.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300350 (China); Collaborative Innovation Centre of Chemical Science and Engineering, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • P25@carbon supported MoS{sub 2} composite was prepared by a one-step process. • The distribution and interaction of C, MoS{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} are systematically examined. • The enjoyable features of the three components are complementarily integrated. • The smart ternary electrode exhibits excellent cycling stability and rate capability. - Abstract: Ternary anodes have attracted more and more attention due to the characteristic advantages resulting from the effect integration of three different materials on the lithium storage mechanism with functional interfaces interaction. However, clarifying the distribution and interaction of carbon, MoS{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} in the MoS{sub 2}/C/TiO{sub 2} composite, which is helpful for the understanding of the formation and lithium storage mechanism of the ternary anodes, is a well-known challenge. Herein, a novel pore core-double shell nanostructure of P25@carbon network supported few-layer MoS{sub 2} nanosheet (P25@C@FL-MoS{sub 2}) is successfully synthesized by a one-pot hydrothermal approach. The distribution and interaction of the carbon, MoS{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2} in the obtained P25@C@FL-MoS{sub 2} hybrid are systematically characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis et al. It is found that the carbon serves as binder, which supports few-layer MoS{sub 2} shell and coats the P25 core via Ti−O−C bonds at the same time. Such multi-functional integration with smart structure and strong interfacial contact generates favorable structure stability and interfacial pseudocapacity-like storage mechanism. As a consequence, superior cycling and rate capacity of the muti-functional integration ternary P25@C@FL-MoS{sub 2} anode are achieved.

  2. Nanostructured TiO2/carbon nanosheet hybrid electrode for high-rate thin-film lithium-ion batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Moitzheim, Sébastien; Nimisha, C S; Deng, Shaoren; Cott, Daire J; Detavernier, Christophe; Vereecken, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous nanostructured electrodes using carbon nanosheets (CNS) and TiO2 exhibit high electronic and ionic conductivity. In order to realize the chip level power sources, it is necessary to employ microelectronic compatible techniques for the fabrication and characterization of TiO2-CNS thin-film electrodes. To achieve this, vertically standing CNS grown through a catalytic free approach on a TiN/SiO2/Si substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) was ...

  3. Self-assembled 3-D flower-shaped SnO2 nanostructures with improved electrochemical performance for lithium storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Rong; Gu Yingan; Li Yaoqi; Zheng Jie; Li Xingguo

    2010-01-01

    Flower-shaped SnO 2 nanoplates were successfully synthesized via a simple hydrothermal treatment of a mixture of tin(II) dichloride dihydrate (SnCl 2 .2H 2 O) and sodium citrate (Na 3 C 6 H 5 O 7 .2H 2 O) in alkali solution. The obtained SnO 2 nanoplates were less than 5 nm thick and self-assembled into flower-shaped nanostructures. The introduction of citrate was essential for the preparation of the SnO 2 nanoplates. The nanoscale shape and self-assembled architecture of SnO 2 nanoparticles were mainly controlled by the alkalinity of the solution. When the self-assembled SnO 2 nanostructures were used as anode materials in Li-ion batteries, they exhibit a reversible capacity of 670 mA h g -1 after 30 cycles and an average capacity fading of 0.95% per cycle after the second cycle. The good electrochemical performance of the SnO 2 sample prepared via the hydrothermal synthesis indicates the possibility of fabricating specific self-assembled three-dimensional nanostructures for Li-ion batteries.

  4. Nanostructured Iron and Manganese Oxide Electrode Materials for Lithium Batteries: Influence of Chemical and Physical Properties on Electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Jessica L.

    The widespread use of portable electronics and growing interest in electric and hybrid vehicles has generated a mass market for batteries with increased energy densities and enhanced electrochemical performance. In order to address a variety of applications, commercially fabricated secondary lithium-ion batteries employ transition metal oxide based electrodes, the most prominent of which include lithium nickel manganese cobalt oxide (LiNixMn yCo1-x-yO2), lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4), and lithium manganese oxide (LiMn 2O4). Transition metal oxides are of particular interest as cathode materials due to their robust framework for lithium intercalation, potential for high energy density, and utilization of earth-abundant elements (i.e. iron and manganese) leading to decreased toxicity and cost-effective battery production on industrial scales. Specifically, this research focuses on MgFe2O4, AgxMn8O16, and AgFeO 2 transition metal oxides for use as electrode materials in lithium-based batteries. The electrode materials are prepared via co-precipitation, reflux, and hydrothermal methods and characterized by several techniques (XRD, SEM, BET, TGA, DSC, XPS, Raman, etc.). The low-temperature syntheses allowed for precise manipulation of structural, compositional, and/or functional properties of MgFe2O4, AgxMn8 O16, and AgFeO2 which have been shown to influence electrochemical behavior. In addition, advanced in situ and ex situ characterization techniques are employed to study the lithiation/de-lithiation process and establish valid redox mechanisms. With respect to both chemical and physical properties, the influence of MgFe2O4 particle size and morphology on electrochemical behavior was established using ex situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging. Based on composition, tunneled AgxMn8O16 nanorods, prepared with distinct Ag+ contents and crystallite sizes, display dramatic differences in ion-transport kinetics due to

  5. Nanostructured CuO thin film electrodes prepared by spray pyrolysis: a simple method for enhancing the electrochemical performance of CuO in lithium cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, Julian; Sanchez, Luis; Martin, Francisco; Ramos-Barrado, Jose R.; Sanchez, Miguel

    2004-01-01

    Nanostructured CuO thin films were prepared by using a spray pyrolysis method, copper acetate as precursor and stainless steel as substrate. The textural and structural properties of the films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The SEM images revealed thorough coating of the substrate and thickness of 450-1250 nm; the average particle size as determined from the AFM images ranged from 30 to 160 nm. The XRD patterns revealed the formation of CuO alone and the XPS spectra confirmed the presence of Cu 2+ as the main oxidation state on the surface. The films were tested as electrodes in lithium cells and their electrochemical properties evaluated from galvanostatic and step potential electrochemical spectroscopy (SPES) measurements. The discharge STEP curves exhibited various peaks consistent with the processes CuO Cu 2 O Cu and with decomposition of the electrolyte, a reversible process in the light of the AFM images. The best electrode exhibited capacity values of 625 Ah kg -1 over more than 100 cycles. This value, which involves a CuO Cu reversible global reaction, is ca. 50% higher than that reported for bulk CuO. The nanosize of the particles and the good adherence of the active material to the substrate are thought to be the key factors accounting for the enhanced electrochemical activity found

  6. Tailoring nanostructured MnO2 as anodes for lithium ion batteries with high reversible capacity and initial Coulombic efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lifeng; Song, Jiajia; Liu, Yi; Yuan, Xiaoyan; Guo, Shouwu

    2018-03-01

    Developing high energy storage lithium ion batteries (LIBs) using manganese oxides as anodes is an attractive challenge due to their high theoretical capacity and abundant resources. However, the manganese oxides anodes still suffer from the low initial Coulombic efficiency and poor rate performance. Herein, we demonstrate that nano-sized morphological engineering is a facile and effective strategy to improve the electrochemical performance of the manganese dioxide (MnO2) for LIBs. The tailored MnO2 nanoparticles (NPs) exhibit high reversible capacity (1095 mAh g-1 at 100 mA g-1), high initial Coulombic efficiency (94.5%) and good rate capability (464 mAh g-1 at 2000 mA g-1). The enhanced electrochemical performance of MnO2 NPs can be attributed to the presences of numerous electrochemically active sites and interspaces among the NPs.

  7. Catalytic oxidation of soot over alkaline niobates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecchi, G.; Cabrera, B.; Buljan, A.; Delgado, E.J.; Gordon, A.L.; Jimenez, R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► No previous reported studies about alkaline niobates as catalysts for soot oxidation. ► NaNbO 3 and KNbO 3 perovskite-type oxides show lower activation energy than other lanthanoid perovskite-type oxides. ► The alkaline niobate does not show deactivation by metal loss. - Abstract: The lack of studies in the current literature about the assessment of alkaline niobates as catalysts for soot oxidation has motivated this research. In this study, the synthesis, characterization and assessment of alkaline metal niobates as catalysts for soot combustion are reported. The solids MNbO 3 (M = Li, Na, K, Rb) are synthesized by a citrate method, calcined at 450 °C, 550 °C, 650 °C, 750 °C, and characterized by AAS, N 2 adsorption, XRD, O 2 -TPD, FTIR and SEM. All the alkaline niobates show catalytic activity for soot combustion, and the activity depends basically on the nature of the alkaline metal and the calcination temperature. The highest catalytic activity, expressed as the temperature at which combustion of carbon black occurs at the maximum rate, is shown by KNbO 3 calcined at 650 °C. At this calcination temperature, the catalytic activity follows an order dependent on the atomic number, namely: KNbO 3 > NaNbO 3 > LiNbO 3 . The RbNbO 3 solid do not follow this trend presumably due to the perovskite structure was not reached. The highest catalytic activity shown by of KNbO 3 , despite the lower apparent activation energy of NaNbO 3 , stress the importance of the metal nature and suggests the hypothesis that K + ions are the active sites for soot combustion. It must be pointed out that alkaline niobate subjected to consecutive soot combustion cycles does not show deactivation by metal loss, due to the stabilization of the alkaline metal inside the perovskite structure.

  8. Surface Modification of LiMn2O4 for Lithium Batteries by Nanostructured LiFePO4 Phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sadeghi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available LiMn2O4 spinel cathode materials have been successfully synthesized by solid-state reaction. Surface of these particles was modified by nanostructured LiFePO4 via sol gel dip coating method. Synthesized products were characterized by thermally analyzed thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX. The results of electrochemical tests showed that the charge/discharge capacities improved and charge retention of battery enhanced. This improved electrochemical performance is caused by LiFePO4 phosphate layer on surfaces of LiMn2O4 cathode particles.

  9. Influence of surroundings on photorefractive effect in lithium niobate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarjanyi, Norbert, E-mail: tarjanyi@fyzika.uniza.sk [Department of Physics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Zilina, Univerzitna 1, Zilina, 01026 (Slovakia); Turek, Ivan [Berlinska 4, Zilina, 01008 (Slovakia)

    2012-11-01

    In the paper results of the investigation of the influence of electric properties of the environment surrounding LiNbO{sub 3} crystals on photorefractive effect induced in these crystals by Gaussian Ar{sup +} laser beam with various intensities are presented. We show spatial and temporal dependences of changes of the refractive index obtained experimentally in LiNbO{sub 3}: Fe and LiNbO{sub 3}: Fe:Mn samples surrounded by media with different electric conductivities and different permittivities (water, air, water solution of CaCl{sub 2}). The space and time dependences of the refractive index changes induced by the Ar{sup +} laser beam are observed by means of the Mach-Zehnder interferometer using light from HeNe laser. The experimentally obtained results are in a good agreement with those following from numerical calculations using the manifold mirroring method. The agreement between calculated and experimental results indicates that the polarization charge at the photorefractive crystal/surrounding medium boundary significantly influences the photorefractive process in the crystal. The experimentally observed slow spontaneous decrease of the refractive index change in a sample placed into a slightly conducting medium (air) after switching off the beam also indicates that the polarization charge in the sample's surroundings affects the photorefraction.

  10. Photovoltaic effect in reduced crystals of lithium niobate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belabaev, K.G.; Markov, V.B.; Odulov, S.G.

    1979-01-01

    The photovoltaic current and the values of compensating field in the LiNbO 3 crystals with different content of Fe addition and different reduction degree in the hydrogen media are measured. The photovoltaic current is shown to increase together with the Fe concentration growth and with the increase of reduction durability as well. Simultaneously the compensating field increases with the Fe concentration growth, but decreases while the reduction degree grows. The dependences obtained are used to explain some peculiarities of the holographic record in the reduces crystals

  11. Ion implantation and ion beam analysis of lithium niobate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, G.W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on implantations of He and Ti made into LiNbO 3 and the H and Li profiles determined by elastic recoil detection (ERD) techniques. The loss of Li and gain of H depends upon the supply of surface H (surface contaminants or ambient atmosphere). For 50 KeV He implants into LiNbO 3 through a 200 Angstrom Al film, the small Li loss is governed by the interface H. This is also the case for He implants into uncoated LiNbO 3 in a beam line with low hydrocarbon surface contamination; similar implants under conditions of greater hydrocarbon deposition result in proportionally larger Li loss and H gain in the implant damage region. The exchange is possible only for those He energies, i.e., 50 keV, where the damage profile intersects the surface. For Ti implants Li is lost with little H gain. For this case the Li loss is believed to result from radiation-enhanced diffusion. Where He implantation is used to establish waveguiding in LiNbO 3 , the presence or absence of H in the implanted region is crucial with regard to refractive index stability, due to the replacement of H by Li from the bulk

  12. ERDA study of H incorporated into lithium niobate optical layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budnar, M.; Zorko, B.; Pelicon, P.; Spirkova-Hradilova, J.; Kolarova-Nekvindova, P.; Turcicova, H.

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen concentration depth profiles in the proton-exchange treated LiNbO 3 samples were determined by means of the ERDA (elastic recoil detection analysis) method. The ERDA measurements with 1.8 MeV helium ions were performed using reflection geometry with Al foils used for the separation of the recoiled nuclei from the scattered projectiles. The study clearly showed that the substitutional (H:Li) mechanism, which prevails in the Z-cuts, is accompanied by interstitial diffusion of H into the substrates for the X-cuts. It was also confirmed that the post-exchange annealing not only stabilized the optical properties of the samples, but enlarged the differences between both crystallographically different types of the wafers, leading to more diffused H-profiles for the Z-cuts than for the X-cuts. Plasma treatment of the Z-cut leads to shallower hydrogen containing layers than those in the APE (annealed proton exchange) ones

  13. Optical properties of reduced lithium niobate single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Ajay; Mansingh, Abhai

    1990-12-01

    The optical transmission of LiNbO3 single crystals has been measured in the wavelength range 200-900 nm, for different degrees of reduction, to study the effect of reduction on the optical characteristics of LiNbO3 near the fundamental absorption edge. The optical transitions in LiNbO3 were found to be indirect and the band gap decreased with increasing degree of reduction. The band observed at 2.48 eV in the absorption spectrum in heavily reduced samples has been attributed to the formation of polarons, and the theoretical model of Reik and Heese [J. Chem. Solids 28, 581 (1967)] for small polarons is used to correlate the optical and electrical properties.

  14. ERDA study of H incorporated into lithium niobate optical layers

    CERN Document Server

    Budnev, N M; Pelicon, P; Spirkova-Hradilova, J; Kolarova-Nekvindova, P; Turcicova, H

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen concentration depth profiles in the proton-exchange treated LiNbO/sub 3/ samples were determined by means of the ERDA (elastic recoil detection analysis) method. The ERDA measurements with 1.8 MeV helium ions were performed using reflection geometry with Al foils used for the separation of the recoiled nuclei from the scattered projectiles. The study clearly showed that the substitutional (H:Li) mechanism, which prevails in the Z-cuts, is accompanied by interstitial diffusion of H into the substrates for the X-cuts. It was also confirmed that the post-exchange annealing not only stabilized the optical properties of the samples, but enlarged the differences between both crystallographically different types of the wafers, leading to more diffused H-profiles for the Z-cuts than for the X-cuts. Plasma treatment of the Z-cut leads to shallower hydrogen containing layers than those in the APE (annealed proton exchange) ones. (7 refs).

  15. Fabrication of periodically poled lithium niobate chips for optical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Optical parametric conversion is an attractive technique for generating coherent tunable radiation or ... momentum conservation. The phase ... Several techniques were developed for producing PPLN chips. Some of them are periodic modification during crystal growth [6], surface impurity diffusion [7], electron beam writing ...

  16. Growth of Ti or Fe doped lithium niobate single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Kim, J.N.; Ro, J.H.; Kim, J.W.; Jeen, G.S.; Kim, Y.C.; Lee, H.S.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reprots a study of the growth of Ti or Fe doped LiNbO 3 single crystals by Czochralski method and its physical properties. On the basis of this study we have developed a growth procedure that produces a high yield of twin-free boules. The quality is better for crystals that are lightly doped with Ti than for those of high concentrations. However there are no significant quality differences among the crystals with concentrations of less than 0.5wt% of Fe. The crystals are characterized by optical absorption and magnetic susceptibility. Undoped crystals show the magnetic susceptibility of -10x10 -6 cgs, which is diamagnetic. The crystals with 0.01wt% and 0.5wt% of ferromagnetic susceptibilities of 2.6x1a -6 cgs, and 80x10 -6 cgs, respectively. Therefore, Fe-doped crystals are paramagnetic. Very small changes of magnetic susceptibilities have been observed in the Ti-doped crystals. (Author)

  17. Two-dimensional sandwich-like Ag coated silicon-graphene-silicon nanostructures for superior lithium storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Weiqi; Cui, Yansu; Zhan, Liang; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Yongzheng; Wang, Yanli; Song, Yan

    2017-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) sandwich-like Ag coated silicon-graphene-silicon (Ag@Si-rGO-Si) nanosheets are designed and synthesized as a novel anode material for superior lithium storage. The mesoporous Si nanofilm grows tightly on the two sides of reduced graphene oxide (rGO), and Ag nanoparticles with a size of 10-50 nm are further coated on the surface of porous Si nanofilm. Such unique features not only provide a short pathway for rapid Li+ diffusion and electron transportation, but also can act as a buffering effect to effectively inhibit the huge volume expansion of pure Si during the repeated lithiation/delithiation process. Meanwhile, a conductive network is constructed by the embedded graphene coupled with Ag nanoparticles to overcome the shortage of pure Si with low electrical conductivity. The resultant 2D sandwich-like Ag@Si-rGO-Si electrode exhibits a high reversible capability (1382 mAh g-1 at 0.1 A g-1 after 100 cycles), long cycle stability (952 mAh g-1 at 1 A g-1 after 500 cycles) and excellent high-rate performance (863 mAh g-1 at 2 A g-1, 565 mAh g-1 at 5 A g-1).

  18. Use of low-temperature nanostructured CuO thin films deposited by spray-pyrolysis in lithium cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, J.; Sanchez, L.; Martin, F.; Ramos-Barrado, J.R.; Sanchez, M.

    2005-01-01

    Nanostructured CuO thin films were prepared by spray pyrolysis of aqueous copper acetate solutions at temperatures over 200-300 deg C range. The textural and structural properties of the films were determined by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Although the sole crystalline phase detected in the film was CuO, XPS spectra revealed a more complex surface structure due to the presence of undecomposed copper acetate that can be easily removed by Ar + ion sputtering. The heating temperature was found to have little limited effect on the particle size and thickness of the films, which, however, increased significantly increasing deposition time. The film with the smallest grain size exhibited an excellent electrochemical response in Li battery electrodes and was capable of supplying sustained specific capacity as high as 625 A h kg -1 (50% greater than that delivered by bulk CuO and close to the theoretical capacity for the CuO Cu reaction) upon extensive cycling

  19. Tantalo-Niobate from the Apollo-17 Regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhov, A. V.; Kartashov, P. M.; Rybchuk, A. P.; Gornostaeva, T. A.; Bogatikov, O. A.

    2018-01-01

    Particles of tantalo-niobate of the ferrotantalite-manganotantalite series are discovered for the first time in two lunar regolith fragments delivered by the Apollo-17 mission. Allochtonous and autochtonous mineralization that accompanies tantalo-niobate in the regolith is described. An attempt is made to explain the formation of tantalite in anorthosites of the continental region of the Moon.

  20. Terahertz birefringence of potassium niobate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antsygin, V. D.; Mamrashev, A. A.; Nikolaev, N. A.

    2018-03-01

    We present terahertz optical properties (refractive indices and absorption coefficients) of potassium niobate crystals measured by time-domain spectroscopy in the range of 0.2-2.0 THz. We observe average refractive indices nx = 5.25, ny = 4.8, nz = 5.9 for corresponding optical axes X, Y, Z with the large birefringence of Δn = nz - ny = 1.1. We report rising absorption coefficient at higher frequencies (α ∼ 50 cm-1 at 1 THz for all three axes) while the dichroism is not pronounced. Somewhat higher absorption compared to the previous results could be attributed to some polydomain structure remaining in the crystal.

  1. Balancing surface adsorption and diffusion of lithium-polysulfides on nonconductive oxides for lithium?sulfur battery design

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, Xinyong; Wang, Jianguo; Liu, Chong; Wang, Haotian; Yao, Hongbin; Zheng, Guangyuan; Seh, Zhi Wei; Cai, Qiuxia; Li, Weiyang; Zhou, Guangmin; Zu, Chenxi; Cui, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Lithium?sulfur batteries have attracted attention due to their six-fold specific energy compared with conventional lithium-ion batteries. Dissolution of lithium polysulfides, volume expansion of sulfur and uncontrollable deposition of lithium sulfide are three of the main challenges for this technology. State-of-the-art sulfur cathodes based on metal-oxide nanostructures can suppress the shuttle-effect and enable controlled lithium sulfide deposition. However, a clear mechanistic understandin...

  2. Lithium insertion in nanostructured titanates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghols, W.J.H.

    2010-01-01

    Upon nano-sizing of insertion compounds several significant changes in Li-insertion behavior have been observed for sizes below approximately 50 nm. Although the origins of the phenomena are interrelated, the changes can be divided in three main observations. (1) The formation of new phases, leading

  3. A new lithium-ion battery using 3D-array nanostructured graphene-sulfur cathode and silicon oxide-based anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, Almudena; Di Lecce, Daniele; Elia, Giuseppe Antonio; Caballero, Álvaro; Morales, Julián; Hassoun, Jusef

    2018-02-28

    In this work we report an efficient lithium-ion battery using enhanced sulfur-based cathode and silicon oxide-based anode as novel energy-storage system. The sulfur-carbon composite, exploiting graphene carbon with 3D array (3DG-S), is synthesized by reduction step and microwave-assisted solvothermal technique and fully characterized in terms of structure, morphology, thereby revealing suitable features for lithium-cell application. Electrochemical tests indicate the 3DG-S electrode as very stable and performing cathode in lithium half-cell, with capacity ranging from 1200 to 1000 mAh g-1 at C/10 and 1C rates, respectively. Remarkably, the Li-alloying anode, namely a LiySiOx-C prepared by the sol-gel method and lithiated by surface treatment, shows a suitable performance in lithium half-cell using an electrolyte designed for lithium-sulfur battery. The LiySiOx-C/3DG-S battery reveals very promising results with a capacity of about 460 mAh gS-1 delivered at average voltage of about 1.5 V over 200 cycles, suggesting the characterized materials as suitable candidates for low-cost and high-energy storage application. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Nano-Composite Cathodes for High Performance Lithium Ion Microbatteries, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TPL Inc. proposes to develop a novel, high performance, nanostructured cathode material for lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries. The proposed approach will modify lithium...

  5. Electric conductivity of lead iron niobate

    OpenAIRE

    Zieleniec, K.; Milata, M.; Wojcik, K.

    2002-01-01

    Results of d.c. electric conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements for PFN, PFN+Li ceramic samples and PFN single crystals are presented. Marked influence of doping with lithium on the value of electric conductivity, and on the type of electric conductance has been found.

  6. Nanostructured Sn{sub 30}Co{sub 30}C{sub 40} alloys for lithium-ion battery negative electrodes prepared by horizontal roller milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, P.P. [Secteur des Sciences, Université de Moncton, campus de Shippagan, Shippagan, N.B. E8S 1P6 (Canada); Le, Dinh-Ba [3M Co., 3M Center, St. Paul, MN 55144-1000 (United States); Todd, A.D.W. [NRC Institute for National Measurements Standards, Ottawa, ON K1A 0R6 (Canada); Martine, M.L. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW) Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstrasse 20, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Trussler, S. [Dept. of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, N.S. B3H 3J5 (Canada); Obrovac, M.N. [Dept. of Chemistry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, N.S. B3H 4R2 (Canada); Dahn, J.R., E-mail: jeff.dahn@dal.ca [Dept. of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, N.S. B3H 3J5 (Canada); Dept. of Chemistry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, N.S. B3H 4R2 (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    Highlights: • Horizontal roller milling used to prepare nanostructured alloys for Li-ion batteries. • Sn{sub 30}Co{sub 30}C{sub 40} prepared by horizontal roller milling shows excellent properties. • Horizontal roller milling is an economical alternative to other methods. • Nanostructured Sn{sub 30}Co{sub 30}C{sub 40} by horizontal roller milling. - Abstract: Horizontal roller milling was used to prepare Sn{sub 30}Co{sub 30}C{sub 40} electrode materials. By varying the milling conditions, it was possible to obtain nanostructured materials whose X-ray diffraction patterns mimicked the diffraction pattern of the same material obtained by vertical-axis attritor milling or by co-sputtering. Electrochemical testing showed that composite electrodes made from each of the prepared materials showed stable charge–discharge capacity for at least 100 charge discharge cycles and displayed stable differential capacity versus potential profiles. Small angle neutron scattering results showed that samples prepared by roller milling and by attriting showed similar nanostructure with Co–Sn grains of about 60 Å in a carbon matrix.

  7. In situ TEM investigation of congruent phase transition and structural evolution of nanostructured silicon/carbon anode for lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong-Min; Li, Xiaolin; Wang, Zhiguo; Xu, Wu; Liu, Jun; Gao, Fei; Kovarik, Libor; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Howe, Jane; Burton, David J; Liu, Zhongyi; Xiao, Xingcheng; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Baer, Donald R

    2012-03-14

    It is well-known that upon lithiation, both crystalline and amorphous Si transform to an armorphous Li(x)Si phase, which subsequently crystallizes to a (Li, Si) crystalline compound, either Li(15)Si(4) or Li(22)Si(5). Presently, the detailed atomistic mechanism of this phase transformation and the degradation process in nanostructured Si are not fully understood. Here, we report the phase transformation characteristic and microstructural evolution of a specially designed amorphous silicon (a-Si) coated carbon nanofiber (CNF) composite during the charge/discharge process using in situ transmission electron microscopy and density function theory molecular dynamic calculation. We found the crystallization of Li(15)Si(4) from amorphous Li(x)Si is a spontaneous, congruent phase transition process without phase separation or large-scale atomic motion, which is drastically different from what is expected from a classic nucleation and growth process. The a-Si layer is strongly bonded to the CNF and no spallation or cracking is observed during the early stages of cyclic charge/discharge. Reversible volume expansion/contraction upon charge/discharge is fully accommodated along the radial direction. However, with progressive cycling, damage in the form of surface roughness was gradually accumulated on the coating layer, which is believed to be the mechanism for the eventual capacity fade of the composite anode during long-term charge/discharge cycling. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  8. Lithium Intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Kesebir

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Lithium has been commonly used for the treatment of several mood disorders particularly bipolar disorder in the last 60 years. Increased intake and decreased excretion of lithium are the main causes for the development of lithium intoxication. The influence of lithium intoxication on body is evaluated as two different groups; reversible or irreversible. Irreversible damage is usually related with the length of time passed as intoxicated. Acute lithium intoxication could occur when an overdose of lithium is received mistakenly or for the purpose of suicide. Patients may sometimes take an overdose of lithium for self-medication resulting in acute intoxication during chronic, while others could develop chronic lithium intoxication during a steady dose treatment due to a problem in excretion of drug. In such situations, it is crucial to be aware of risk factors, to recognize early clinical symptoms and to conduct a proper medical monitoring. In order to justify or exclude the diagnosis, quantitative evaluation of lithium in blood and toxicologic screening is necessary. Following the monitoring schedules strictly and urgent intervention in case of intoxication would definitely reduce mortality and sequela related with lithium intoxication. In this article, the etiology, frequency, definition, clinical features and treatment approaches to the lithium intoxication have been briefly reviewed.

  9. Lithium-ion batteries advances and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pistoia, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    Lithium-Ion Batteries features an in-depth description of different lithium-ion applications, including important features such as safety and reliability. This title acquaints readers with the numerous and often consumer-oriented applications of this widespread battery type. Lithium-Ion Batteries also explores the concepts of nanostructured materials, as well as the importance of battery management systems. This handbook is an invaluable resource for electrochemical engineers and battery and fuel cell experts everywhere, from research institutions and universities to a worldwi

  10. Ion-nanostructure interaction. Comparing simulation and experiment towards surface structuring using nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland-Moritz, Henry

    2016-10-18

    Nanotechnology is a buzzword in context of the proceeding miniaturization of devices and their components. Nanoparticles (NPs) can nowadays easily be synthesized from different material compositions by different chemical and physical processes. However, most of these techniques work close to or at the thermal equilibrium. One subsequent approach to tune materials beyond equilibrium conditions is ion beam irradiation. An important effect of this approach is sputtering. Sputtering is enhanced in NPs compared to their bulk counterparts due to their large surface-to-volume ratio, especially when the ion range matches the NP size. In this work, the sputtering effects of Ar{sup +} and Ga{sup +} ion irradiated Au nanoparticles are investigated in detail by Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and a variety of experiments. The sputtering of Ar{sup +} and Ga{sup +} irradiated Au NPs was investigated as a function of ion energy, NP size and impact parameter by the MC code iradina and MD code parcas. The simulation results are directly compared to experiments using high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of Au NPs on top of Si, whereat the sputter yields are significantly enhanced compared to the MC simulations. Additionally, the interaction of NPs and substrate were investigated by Rutherford backscatter spectrometry (RBS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). A new MC code was developed to study the redeposition of sputtered atoms of Ga{sup +} irradiated Au NP arrays on neighboring NPs. The redeposition can lead to growth of NPs with diameters of 1 nm in vicinity of ∝50 nm NP. These simulations are directly compared to an in situ experiment. Nanostructures, spherical NPs as well as nanowires (NWs) are used as irradiation masks to structure lithium niobate (LNO) using the ion beam enhanced etching (IBEE) technique. The aspect ratio of the obtained structures can be enhanced by a second IBEE step

  11. Superhydrophilic nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Zormpa, Vasileia; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-05-12

    An embodiment of a superhydrophilic nanostructure includes nanoparticles. The nanoparticles are formed into porous clusters. The porous clusters are formed into aggregate clusters. An embodiment of an article of manufacture includes the superhydrophilic nanostructure on a substrate. An embodiment of a method of fabricating a superhydrophilic nanostructure includes applying a solution that includes nanoparticles to a substrate. The substrate is heated to form aggregate clusters of porous clusters of the nanoparticles.

  12. Lithium Poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baird-Gunning, Jonathan; Lea-Henry, Tom; Hoegberg, Lotte C G

    2017-01-01

    Lithium is a commonly prescribed treatment for bipolar affective disorder. However, treatment is complicated by lithium's narrow therapeutic index and the influence of kidney function, both of which increase the risk of toxicity. Therefore, careful attention to dosing, monitoring, and titration i...

  13. Lithium nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azab, Abed N; Shnaider, Alla; Osher, Yamima; Wang, Dana; Bersudsky, Yuly; Belmaker, R H

    2015-12-01

    Reports of toxic effects on the kidney of lithium treatment emerged very soon after lithium therapy was introduced. Lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is usually self-limiting or not clinically dangerous. Some reports of irreversible chronic kidney disease and renal failure were difficult to attribute to lithium treatment since chronic kidney disease and renal failure exist in the population at large. In recent years, large-scale epidemiological studies have convincingly shown that lithium treatment elevates the risk of chronic kidney disease and renal failure. Most patients do not experience renal side effects. The most common side effect of polyuria only weakly predicts increasing creatinine or reduced kidney function. Among those patients who do experience decrease in creatinine clearance, some may require continuation of lithium treatment even as their creatinine increases. Other patients may be able to switch to a different mood stabilizer medication, but kidney function may continue to deteriorate even after lithium cessation. Most, but not all, evidence today recommends using a lower lithium plasma level target for long-term maintenance and thereby reducing risks of severe nephrotoxicity.

  14. Nanostructured superconductors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moshchalkov, V. V; Fritzsche, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    ... through nanostructuring and for developing a variety of novel fluxonics devices based on vortex manipulation. Nanostructuring can, in fact, create such conditions for the flux pinning by arrays of nanofabricated antidots or magnetic dots, which could maximize the second important superconducting critical parameter (critical current) up to its theoretical limit ...

  15. Rare-Earth Tantalates and Niobates Single Crystals: Promising Scintillators and Laser Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renqin Dou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rare-earth tantalates, with high density and monoclinic structure, and niobates with monoclinic structure have been paid great attention as potential optical materials. In the last decade, we focused on the crystal growth technology of rare-earth tantalates and niobates and studied their luminescence and physical properties. A series of rare-earth tantalates and niobates crystals have been grown by the Czochralski method successfully. In this work, we summarize the research results on the crystal growth, scintillation, and laser properties of them, including the absorption and emission spectra, spectral parameters, energy levels structure, and so on. Most of the tantalates and niobates exhibit excellent luminescent properties, rich physical properties, and good chemical stability, indicating that they are potential outstanding scintillators and laser materials.

  16. Lithium neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suraya, Y; Yoong, K Y

    2001-09-01

    Inspite of the advent of newer antimanic drugs, lithium carbonate remains widely used in the treatment and prevention of manic-depressive illness. However care has to be exercised due to its low therapeutic index. The central nervous system and renal system are predominantly affected in acute lithium intoxication and is potentially lethal. The more common side effect involves the central nervous system. It occurs early and is preventable. We describe three cases of lithium toxicity admitted to Johor Bahru Hospital, with emphasis on its neurological preponderance.

  17. Theoretical Study of Si(x)Ge(y)Li(z)- (x=4-10, y=1-10, z=0-10) Clusters for Designing of Novel Nanostructured Materials to be Utilized as Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-16

    as anodes for Lithium-ion batteries Final Report Nancy Perez-Peralta and Mario Sanchez-Vazquez Abstract In order to find out if silicon ...capacity (372 mA h g -1 ) together with its rate capability and long life. Silicon has recently become very popular as a potential anode material for...However, silicon anodes have limited applications because of the large volume change upon lithium cations insertion or extraction. Silicon nanowires

  18. Theoretical Study of Si(x) Ge(y)Li(z) (x=4-10, y=1-10, z=0-10) Clusters for Designing of Novel Nanostructured Materials to be Utilized as Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-16

    good capacity (372 mA h g -1 ) together with its rate capability and long life. Silicon has recently become very popular as a potential anode ...ghaphite). 1-4 However, silicon anodes have limited applications because of the large volume change upon lithium cations insertion or extraction. Silicon ...This result actually gives an explanation to the large volume change of silicon anodes upon lithium cations insertion. The latter study suggests that

  19. Conoscopic study of strontium-barium niobate single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, Aleksandr; Grechishkin, Rostislav; Malyshkina, Olga; Malyshkin, Yury; Dec, Jan; Łukasiewicz, Tadeusz; Ivanova, Aleksandra

    2013-12-01

    Optically transparent single crystals of strontium-barium niobate, SrxBa1-xNb2O6, of different compositions (x = 0.26...0.7) were examined with the aid of conoscopic light interference figures. A regular change of the isochrome concentric ring number and diameters consistent with the temperature variation of the value of birefringence is demonstrated by direct observations of polar cuts of optically uniaxial samples. Anomalous violations of the conventional (uniaxial) interference patterns occur occasionaly in some samples being indicative of the existence of biaxial trait in their behaviour even though no voltage is applied. These features may depend on annealing treatments at elevated temperatures. The results of the study show that conoscopic images may serve as a sensitive indicator of the structural state of SBN crystals related to the effects of stress-induced change of optical anisotropy and temperature dependent birefringence parameters.

  20. Laser irradiation in Nd3+ doped strontium barium niobate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haro-Gonzalez, P.; Martin, I. R.; Arbelo-Jorge, E.; Gonzalez-Perez, S.; Caceres, J. M.; Nunez, P.

    2008-01-01

    A local nanocrystalline formation in a neodymium doped strontium barium niobate (SBN) glass has been obtained under argon laser irradiation. The intense emission around 880 nm, originated from the 4 F 3/2 ( 4 F 5/2 ) thermalized level when the glass structure changes to a glass ceramic structure due to the irradiation of the laser beam, has been studied. The intensities and lifetimes change from this level inside and outside the irradiated area made by the laser excitation. They have been analyzed and demonstrated that the desvitrification process has been successfully achieved. These results confirm that nanocrystals of SBN have been created by the laser action confirming that the transition from glass to glass ceramic has been completed. These results are in agreement with the emission properties of nanocrystals of the bulk glass ceramic sample. The present study also suggests that the SBN nanocrystal has a potential application as temperature detector

  1. Laser induced Erasable Patterns in a N* Liquid Crystal on an Iron Doped Lithium Niobate (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-12

    exposure experiments. For further investigations, samples were transferred to a conventional transmitted light polarized optical microscope , equipped...colored appearance of the image). The sample was then transferred to a conventional polarized optical microscope and investigated with transmitted light ...K. Kushnir, V. Reshetnyak, F. Ciciulla, A. Zaltron, C. Sada, and F. Simoni, “ Light -induced electric field generated by photovoltaic substrates

  2. New ways for the optimization of the photorefractive response of lithium niobate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luennemann, M.

    2003-11-01

    In the framework of this thesis three different approaches for the increasement of the photorefractive response of LiNbO 3 crystals are pursued: First an extremely large external electric field is applied as additional charge driver in order to support the photorefractive process and to improve the characteristic quantities. Furthermore the photorefractive properties of LiNbO 3 crystals doped with manganese are studied, because iron-doped crystals exhibit a relatively low practical upper limit of the doping concentration. The third approach for the optimization of the photorefractive response in LiNbO 3 crystals is the sensibilization of LiNbO 3 :Fe for infrared light by a temperature-dependent absorption change

  3. Design of Hybrid Silicon and Lithium Niobate Active Region for Electro-optical Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    ground electrodes To simulate the optical portion of the modulator, a 2-D COMSOL Multiphysics® eigenvalue mode solver coupled to a static...electrode gap couple the optical and RF simulation results. To simulate the RF mode formed by the CPW, another COMSOL Multiphysics® eigenvalue mode

  4. Integrated optical electric field sensor based on a Bragg grating in lithium niobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runde, D.; Brunken, S.; Rüter, C. E.; Kip, D.

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate a new sensor concept for the measurement of oscillating electric fields that is based on Bragg gratings in LiNbO3:Ti channel waveguides. This miniaturized sensor that works in a retroreflective scheme does not require metallic electrodes and can be directly immersed in an oscillating electric field. The electric field induces a shift of the Bragg wavelength of the reflection grating that is due to the electro-optic effect. The operating point of the sensor is chosen by adjusting the laser wavelength to the slope of the spectral reflectivity function of the grating. In this way the magnitude of an external electric field is measured precisely as the amplitude of modulated reflected light intensity by using a lock-in amplifier. The sensor principle is demonstrated by detecting low-frequency electric fields ranging from 50 V/cm to 5 kV/cm without any conducting parts of the sensor head. Furthermore, the ability of the sensor to determine the three-dimensional orientation of an external electric field by a single rotation along the waveguide direction is demonstrated.

  5. Cascaded quadratic soliton compression of high-power femtosecond fiber lasers in Lithium Niobate crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Moses, Jeffrey; Wise, Frank W.

    2008-01-01

    The output of a high-power femtosecond fiber laser is typically 300 fs with a wavelength around $\\lambda=1030-1060$ nm. Our numerical simulations show that cascaded quadratic soliton compression in bulk LiNbO$_3$ can compress such pulses to below 100 fs.......The output of a high-power femtosecond fiber laser is typically 300 fs with a wavelength around $\\lambda=1030-1060$ nm. Our numerical simulations show that cascaded quadratic soliton compression in bulk LiNbO$_3$ can compress such pulses to below 100 fs....

  6. The electro-optical shutter with the small aperture on lithium niobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishtop, Victor; Li, Anton; Litvinova, Man; Tolstov, Eugene; Stroganov, Vladimir I.; Starichenko, Gennadiy

    2005-06-01

    In the paper is considered possibility of changing image intensity by electric field. In anisotropy crystals it is possible to observe conoscopic figures. Dark cross is observed in teh center of figure if electric field in crystal is absent. The angle size of central dark area is approximately 1 degree. When electric field is enclosed to crystal it becomes biaxial. In this case conoscopic figure have light area in the central part. If image is placed in a central part of the figure then it is not visible when electric field is absent. And image becomes visible when electric field is not equal to zero.

  7. Design considerations for quasi-phase-matching in doubly resonant lithium niobate hexagonal microresonators

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sono, Tleyane J

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available . Such nonlinear optical hexagonal micro-resonators are proposed as a platform for second harmonic generation (SHG) by the combined mechanisms of total internal reflection (TIR) and quasi-phase-matching (QPM). The proposed scheme for SHG via TIR-QPM in a hexagonal...

  8. Photochemical Reaction Patterns on Heterostructures of ZnO on Periodically Poled Lithium Niobate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manpuneet; Liu, Qianlang; Crozier, Peter A; Nemanich, Robert J

    2016-10-05

    The internal electric field in LiNbO 3 provides a driving force for heterogeneous photocatalytic reactions, where photoexcited holes or electrons can participate in redox reactions on positive (+c) and negative (-c) domain surfaces and at the domain boundaries. One method to characterize the surface chemical reactivity is to measure photoinduced Ag deposition by immersing the LiNbO 3 in an aqueous AgNO 3 solution and illuminating with above bandgap light. Reduction of Ag + ions leads to the formation of Ag nanoparticles at the surface, and a high density of Ag nanoparticles indicates enhanced surface photochemical reactions. In this study, an n-type semiconducting ZnO layer is deposited on periodically poled LiNbO 3 (PPLN) to modulate the surface electronic properties and impact the surface redox reactions. After plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of 1, 2, 4, and 10 nm ZnO thin films on PPLN substrates, the substrates were immersed in aqueous AgNO 3 and illuminated with above band gap UV light. The Ag nanoparticle density increased for 1 and 2 nm ZnO/PPLN heterostructures, indicating an enhanced electron density at the ZnO/PPLN surface. However, increasing the ZnO thickness beyond 2 nm resulted in a decrease in the Ag nanoparticle density. The increase in nanoparticle density is related to the photoexcited charge density at the ZnO/PPLN interface and the presence of a weakly adsorbed Stern layer at the ZnO surface. The decrease in the nanoparticle density for thicker ZnO is attributed to photoexcited electron screening in the ZnO layer that suppresses electron flow from the LiNbO 3 to ZnO surface.

  9. Free-Standing Copper Nanowire Network Current Collector for Improving Lithium Anode Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lei-Lei; Ge, Jin; Yang, Jun-Nan; Chen, Si-Ming; Yao, Hong-Bin; Zhou, Fei; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-07-13

    Lithium metal is one of the most attractive anode materials for next-generation lithium batteries due to its high specific capacity and low electrochemical potential. However, the poor cycling performance and serious safety hazards, caused by the growth of dendritic and mossy lithium, has long hindered the application of lithium metal based batteries. Herein, we reported a rational design of free-standing Cu nanowire (CuNW) network to suppress the growth of dendritic lithium via accommodating the lithium metal in three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures. We demonstrated that as high as 7.5 mA h cm(-2) of lithium can be plated into the free-standing copper nanowire (CuNW) current collector without the growth of dendritic lithium. The lithium metal anode based on the CuNW exhibited high Coulombic efficiency (average 98.6% during 200 cycles) and outstanding rate performance owing to the suppression of lithium dendrite growth and high conductivity of CuNW network. Our results demonstrate that the rational nanostructural design of current collector could be a promising strategy to improve the performance of lithium metal anode enabling its application in next-generation lithium-metal based batteries.

  10. Three-dimensional ZnO hierarchical nanostructures: Solution phase synthesis and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Ahmad, Mashkoor; Sun, Hongyu

    2017-01-01

    nanostructures in photocatalysis, field emission, electrochemical sensor, and lithium ion batteries. Throughout the discussion, the relationship between the device performance and the microstructures of 3D ZnO hierarchical nanostructures will be highlighted. This review concludes with a personal perspective...

  11. New, dense, and fast scintillators based on rare-earth tantalo-niobates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voloshyna, O.V.; Boiaryntseva, I.A.; Baumer, V.N.; Ivanov, A.I.; Korjik, M.V.; Sidletskiy, O.Ts.

    2014-01-01

    Samples of undoped yttrium and gadolinium tantalo-niobates with common formulae RE(Nb x Ta 1−x )O 4 , where RE=Y or Gd and x=0–1, have been obtained by solid-state reaction. Systematic study of structural, luminescent, and scintillation properties of these compounds was carried out. Lattice parameters and space groups of the mixed compounds were identified. UV- and X-ray luminescence spectra, as well as relative light outputs and scintillation decay times are measured. Gadolinium tantalo-niobate with the formulae GdNb 0.2 Ta 0.8 O 4 showed the light output around 13 times larger than PbWO 4 and fast decay with time constant 12 ns without additional slow component. Gadolinium tantalo-niobates may be considered as promising materials for high energy physics due to extremely high density, substantial light output, and fast decay. -- Highlights: •Structural, optical and scintillation properties of the rare earth tantalo-niobates were studied. •Light output shows about gradual increase with Nb content in GdTa x Nb 1−x O 4 . •Light output increases by 2–7 times relatively to yttrium tantalate and niobate in YTa x Nb 1−x O 4 . •GdTa 0.8 Nb 0.2 O 4 demonstrates the most promising scintillation parameters

  12. Sintering of Lead-Free Piezoelectric Sodium Potassium Niobate Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Malič

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The potassium sodium niobate, K0.5Na0.5NbO3, solid solution (KNN is considered as one of the most promising, environment-friendly, lead-free candidates to replace highly efficient, lead-based piezoelectrics. Since the first reports of KNN, it has been recognized that obtaining phase-pure materials with a high density and a uniform, fine-grained microstructure is a major challenge. For this reason the present paper reviews the different methods for consolidating KNN ceramics. The difficulties involved in the solid-state synthesis of KNN powder, i.e., obtaining phase purity, the stoichiometry of the perovskite phase, and the chemical homogeneity, are discussed. The solid-state sintering of stoichiometric KNN is characterized by poor densification and an extremely narrow sintering-temperature range, which is close to the solidus temperature. A study of the initial sintering stage revealed that coarsening of the microstructure without densification contributes to a reduction of the driving force for sintering. The influences of the (K + Na/Nb molar ratio, the presence of a liquid phase, chemical modifications (doping, complex solid solutions and different atmospheres (i.e., defect chemistry on the sintering are discussed. Special sintering techniques, such as pressure-assisted sintering and spark-plasma sintering, can be effective methods for enhancing the density of KNN ceramics. The sintering behavior of KNN is compared to that of a representative piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT.

  13. Sintering of Lead-Free Piezoelectric Sodium Potassium Niobate Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malič, Barbara; Koruza, Jurij; Hreščak, Jitka; Bernard, Janez; Wang, Ke; Fisher, John G.; Benčan, Andreja

    2015-01-01

    The potassium sodium niobate, K0.5Na0.5NbO3, solid solution (KNN) is considered as one of the most promising, environment-friendly, lead-free candidates to replace highly efficient, lead-based piezoelectrics. Since the first reports of KNN, it has been recognized that obtaining phase-pure materials with a high density and a uniform, fine-grained microstructure is a major challenge. For this reason the present paper reviews the different methods for consolidating KNN ceramics. The difficulties involved in the solid-state synthesis of KNN powder, i.e., obtaining phase purity, the stoichiometry of the perovskite phase, and the chemical homogeneity, are discussed. The solid-state sintering of stoichiometric KNN is characterized by poor densification and an extremely narrow sintering-temperature range, which is close to the solidus temperature. A study of the initial sintering stage revealed that coarsening of the microstructure without densification contributes to a reduction of the driving force for sintering. The influences of the (K + Na)/Nb molar ratio, the presence of a liquid phase, chemical modifications (doping, complex solid solutions) and different atmospheres (i.e., defect chemistry) on the sintering are discussed. Special sintering techniques, such as pressure-assisted sintering and spark-plasma sintering, can be effective methods for enhancing the density of KNN ceramics. The sintering behavior of KNN is compared to that of a representative piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT). PMID:28793702

  14. Synthesis and characterization of bismuth zinc niobate pyrochlore nanopowders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Maria Zanetti

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth zinc niobate pyrochlores Bi1.5ZnNb1.5O7 (alpha-BZN, and Bi2(Zn1/3Nb2/32O 7 (beta-BZN have been synthesized by chemical method based on the polymeric precursors. The pyrochlore phase was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, infrared spectroscopy, and X ray diffraction. Powder and sintered pellets morphology was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The study of alpha-BZN phase formation reveals that, at 500 °C, the pyrochlore phase was already present while a single-phased nanopowder was obtained after calcination at 700 °C. The crystallization mechanism of the beta-BZN is quite different, occurring through the crystallization of alpha-BZN and BiNbO4 intermediary phases. Both compositions yielded soft agglomerated powders. alpha-BZN pellets, sintered at 800 °C for 2 hours, presented a relative density of 97.3% while those of beta-BZN, sintered at 900 °C for 2 hours, reached only 91.8%. Dielectric constant and dielectric loss, measured at 1 MHz, were 150 and 4 x/10-4 for a-BZN, and 97 and 8 x 10-4 for beta-BZN.

  15. Multifunctional Carbon Nanostructures for Advanced Energy Storage Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiran Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructures—including graphene, fullerenes, etc.—have found applications in a number of areas synergistically with a number of other materials. These multifunctional carbon nanostructures have recently attracted tremendous interest for energy storage applications due to their large aspect ratios, specific surface areas, and electrical conductivity. This succinct review aims to report on the recent advances in energy storage applications involving these multifunctional carbon nanostructures. The advanced design and testing of multifunctional carbon nanostructures for energy storage applications—specifically, electrochemical capacitors, lithium ion batteries, and fuel cells—are emphasized with comprehensive examples.

  16. Novel lithium iron phosphate materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovic, Jelena

    2011-06-15

    Conventional energy sources are diminishing and non-renewable, take million years to form and cause environmental degradation. In the 21st century, we have to aim at achieving sustainable, environmentally friendly and cheap energy supply by employing renewable energy technologies associated with portable energy storage devices. Lithium-ion batteries can repeatedly generate clean energy from stored materials and convert reversely electric into chemical energy. The performance of lithium-ion batteries depends intimately on the properties of their materials. Presently used battery electrodes are expensive to be produced; they offer limited energy storage possibility and are unsafe to be used in larger dimensions restraining the diversity of application, especially in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and electric vehicles (EVs). This thesis presents a major progress in the development of LiFePO4 as a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. Using simple procedure, a completely novel morphology has been synthesized (mesocrystals of LiFePO4) and excellent electrochemical behavior was recorded (nanostructured LiFePO4). The newly developed reactions for synthesis of LiFePO4 are single-step processes and are taking place in an autoclave at significantly lower temperature (200 deg. C) compared to the conventional solid-state method (multi-step and up to 800 deg. C). The use of inexpensive environmentally benign precursors offers a green manufacturing approach for a large scale production. These newly developed experimental procedures can also be extended to other phospho-olivine materials, such as LiCoPO4 and LiMnPO4. The material with the best electrochemical behavior (nanostructured LiFePO4 with carbon coating) was able to deliver a stable 94% of the theoretically known capacity.

  17. Lithium in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskula, B.W.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, estimated world lithium consumption was about 28 kt (31,000 st) of lithium contained in minerals and compounds, an 8 percent increase from that of 2011. Estimated U.S. consumption was about 2 kt (2,200 st) of contained lithium, the same as that of 2011. The United States was thought to rank fourth in consumption of lithium and remained the leading importer of lithium carbonate and the leading producer of value-added lithium materials. One company, Rockwood Lithium Inc., produced lithium compounds from domestic brine resources near Silver Peak, NV.

  18. Lightning arrestor connector lead magnesium niobate qualification pellet test procedures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuohig, W. (Honeywell FM& T, Kansas City, MO); Mahoney, Patrick A.; Tuttle, Bruce Andrew; Wheeler, Jill Susanne

    2009-02-01

    Enhanced knowledge preservation for DOE DP technical component activities has recently received much attention. As part of this recent knowledge preservation effort, improved documentation of the sample preparation and electrical testing procedures for lead magnesium niobate--lead titanate (PMN/PT) qualification pellets was completed. The qualification pellets are fabricated from the same parent powders used to produce PMN/PT lightning arrestor connector (LAC) granules at HWF&T. In our report, the procedures for fired pellet surface preparation, electrode deposition, electrical testing and data recording are described. The dielectric measurements described in our report are an information only test. Technical reasons for selecting the electrode material, electrode size and geometry are presented. The electrical testing is based on measuring the dielectric constant and dissipation factor of the pellet during cooling from 280 C to 220 C. The most important data are the temperature for which the peak dielectric constant occurs (Curie Point temperature) and the peak dielectric constant magnitude. We determined that the peak dielectric constant for our procedure would be that measured at 1 kHz at the Curie Point. Both the peak dielectric constant and the Curie point parameters provide semi-quantitative information concerning the chemical and microstructural homogeneity of the parent material used for the production of PMN/PT granules for LACs. Finally, we have proposed flag limits for the dielectric data for the pellets. Specifically, if the temperature of the peak dielectric constant falls outside the range of 250 C {+-} 30 C we propose that a flag limit be imposed that will initiate communication between production agency and design agency personnel. If the peak dielectric constant measured falls outside the range 25,000 {+-} 10,000 we also propose that a flag limit be imposed.

  19. Synthesis, characterisation and electrochemical intercalation kinetics of nanostructured aluminium-doped Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2 cathode material for lithium ion battery

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jafta, CJ

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemistry and intercalation kinetics of nanostructured Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2 (LMNC) and its aluminium-doped counterpart Li[Li0.2Mn0.52Ni0.13Co0.13Al0.02]O2 (LMNCA) are reported. FESEM and AFM images showed the LMNCA to be slightly...

  20. Crystallization of Reduced Strontium and Barium Niobate Perovskites from Borate Fluxes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessen, B.; Sunshine, S.A.; Siegrist, T.; Jimenez, R.

    1991-01-01

    Single crystals of three AxNbO3 (A = Sr, Ba) reduced niobate cubic perovskites have been obtained by recrystallization of reduced ternary ceramic precursors from borate fluxes under high-vacuum. Product formation could be influenced by variation of the alkaline-earth metal oxide content of the flux,

  1. Optical planar waveguide in sodium-doped calcium barium niobate crystals by carbon ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jin-Hua, E-mail: zhaojinhuazjh@gmail.com [School of Science, Shandong Jianzhu University, Jinan 250101 (China); Qin, Xi-Feng; Wang, Feng-Xiang; Fu, Gang; Wang, Hui-Lin [School of Science, Shandong Jianzhu University, Jinan 250101 (China); Wang, Xue-Lin [School of Physics, Key Laboratory of Particle Physics and Particle Irradiation, Ministry of Education, and State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2013-07-15

    There is great interest in niobate crystals which belong to the tetragonal tungsten bronze (TTB) families owing to their intriguing properties. As one representative of such crystals, CBN (calcium barium niobate) has attracted rapidly growing attention. Because it has a higher Curie temperature than SBN (strontium barium niobate), possesses outstanding ferroelectric and it possesses optical properties. In addition, doped with sodium, CBN will show a higher Curie temperature than pure CBN. We report on the fabrication and characterization of optical planar waveguide in x-cut sodium-doped calcium barium niobate crystal by using C ion implantation. The guided-mode properties at the wavelength of 633 and 1539 nm are investigated through prism-coupling measurements, respectively. By applying direct end-face coupling arrangement, the near-field optical intensity distribution of waveguide modes is measured at 633 nm. For comparison, the modal profile of the same guided mode is also numerically calculated by the finite difference beam-propagation method via computer software BeamPROP. The transmission spectra of the waveguide before and after ion implantation treatments were investigated also. Our experiment results reveal that the waveguide could propagate light with transverse magnetic polarized direction only and it is assumed that the polarization selectivity of CBN crystal may responsible for this phenomenon.

  2. Giant piezoelectricity in potassium-sodium niobate lead-free ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaopeng; Wu, Jiagang; Xiao, Dingquan; Zhu, Jianguo; Cheng, Xiaojing; Zheng, Ting; Zhang, Binyu; Lou, Xiaojie; Wang, Xiangjian

    2014-02-19

    Environment protection and human health concern is the driving force to eliminate the lead from commercial piezoelectric materials. In 2004, Saito et al. [ Saito et al., Nature , 2004 , 432 , 84 . ] developed an alkali niobate-based perovskite solid solution with a peak piezoelectric constant d33 of 416 pC/N when prepared in the textured polycrystalline form, intriguing the enthusiasm of developing high-performance lead-free piezoceramics. Although much attention has been paid on the alkali niobate-based system in the past ten years, no significant breakthrough in its d33 has yet been attained. Here, we report an alkali niobate-based lead-free piezoceramic with the largest d33 of ∼490 pC/N ever reported so far using conventional solid-state method. In addition, this material system also exhibits excellent integrated performance with d33∼390-490 pC/N and TC∼217-304 °C by optimizing the compositions. This giant d33 of the alkali niobate-based lead-free piezoceramics is ascribed to not only the construction of a new rhombohedral-tetragonal phase boundary but also enhanced dielectric and ferroelectric properties. Our finding may pave the way for "lead-free at last".

  3. Safe disposal of radioactive iodide ions from solutions by Ag2O grafted sodium niobate nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Wanjun; Li, Xingliang; Liu, Guoping; Yu, Qianhong; Xie, Xiang; Wei, Hongyuan; Jian, Yuan

    2016-01-14

    Radioactive iodine isotopes are released into the environment by the nuclear industry and medical research institutions using radioactive materials, and have negative effects on organisms living within the ecosystem. Thus, safe disposal of radioactive iodine is necessary and crucial. For this reason, the uptake of iodide ions was investigated in Ag2O nanocrystal grafted sodium niobate nanofibers, which were prepared by forming a well-matched phase coherent interface between them. The resulting composite was applied as an efficient adsorbent for I(-) anions by forming an AgI precipitate, which also remained firmly attached to the substrates. Due to their one-dimensional morphology, the new adsorbents can be easily dispersed in liquids and readily separated after purification. This significantly enhances the adsorption efficiency and reduces the separation costs. The change in structure from the pristine sodium niobate to Ag2O anchored sodium niobate and to the used adsorbent was examined by using various characterization techniques. The effects of Ag(+) concentration, pH, equilibration time, ionic strength and competing ions on the iodide ion removal ability of the composite were studied. The Ag2O nanocrystal grafted sodium niobate adsorbent showed a high adsorption capacity and excellent selectivity for I(-) anions in basic solutions. Our results are useful for the further development of improved adsorbents for removing I(-) anions from basic wastewater.

  4. Flexible Piezoelectric Touch Sensor by Alignment of Lead-Free Alkaline Niobate Microcubes in PDMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deutz, D.B.; Mascarenhas, N.T.; Schelen, J.B.J.; Leeuw, D.M. de; Zwaag, S. van der; Groen, P.

    2017-01-01

    A highly sensitive, lead-free, and flexible piezoelectric touch sensor is reported based on composite films of alkaline niobate K0.485Na0.485Li0.03NbO3 (KNLN) powders aligned in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix. KNLN powder is fabricated by solid-state sintering and consists of microcubes. The

  5. Flexible Piezoelectric Touch Sensor by Alignment of Lead-Free Alkaline Niobate Microcubes in PDMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deutz, D.B.; Mascarenhas, N.T.; Schelen, J.B.J.; de Leeuw, D.M.; van der Zwaag, S.; Groen, W.A.

    2017-01-01

    A highly sensitive, lead-free, and flexible piezoelectric touch sensor is reported based on composite films of alkaline niobate K0.485Na0.485Li0.03NbO3 (KNLN) powders aligned in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix. KNLN powder is fabricated by

  6. Complex Hollow Nanostructures: Synthesis and Energy-Related Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Le; Hu, Han; Wu, Hao Bin; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2017-04-01

    Hollow nanostructures offer promising potential for advanced energy storage and conversion applications. In the past decade, considerable research efforts have been devoted to the design and synthesis of hollow nanostructures with high complexity by manipulating their geometric morphology, chemical composition, and building block and interior architecture to boost their electrochemical performance, fulfilling the increasing global demand for renewable and sustainable energy sources. In this Review, we present a comprehensive overview of the synthesis and energy-related applications of complex hollow nanostructures. After a brief classification, the design and synthesis of complex hollow nanostructures are described in detail, which include hierarchical hollow spheres, hierarchical tubular structures, hollow polyhedra, and multi-shelled hollow structures, as well as their hybrids with nanocarbon materials. Thereafter, we discuss their niche applications as electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries and hybrid supercapacitors, sulfur hosts for lithium-sulfur batteries, and electrocatalysts for oxygen- and hydrogen-involving energy conversion reactions. The potential superiorities of complex hollow nanostructures for these applications are particularly highlighted. Finally, we conclude this Review with urgent challenges and further research directions of complex hollow nanostructures for energy-related applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Lithium and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and thyroid and kidney functions is recommended. Sleep deprivation while caring for a newborn (whether nursing or ... and may not be due to the lithium use. There are no reports that suggest lithium use ...

  8. Nanostructured Networks for Energy Storage: Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes (VACNT as Current Collectors for High-Power Li4Ti5O12(LTO//LiMn2O4(LMO Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Pawlitzek

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As a concept for electrode architecture in high power lithium ion batteries, self-supported nanoarrays enable ultra-high power densities as a result of their open pore geometry, which results in short and direct Li+-ion and electron pathways. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNT on metallic current collectors with low interface resistance are used as current collectors for the chemical solution infiltration of electroactive oxides to produce vertically aligned carbon nanotubes decorated with in situ grown LiMn2O4 (LMO and Li4Ti5O12 (LTO nanoparticles. The production processes steps (catalyst coating, VACNT chemical vapor deposition (CVD, infiltration, and thermal transformation are all scalable, continuous, and suitable for niche market production to achieve high oxide loadings up to 70 wt %. Due to their unique transport structure, as-prepared nanoarrays achieve remarkably high power densities up to 2.58 kW kg−1, which is based on the total electrode mass at 80 C for LiMn2O4//Li4Ti5O12 full cells. The tailoring of LTO and LMO nanoparticle size (~20–100 nm and VACNT length (array height: 60–200 µm gives insights into the rate-limiting steps at high current for these kinds of nanoarray electrodes at very high C-rates of up to 200 C. The results reveal the critical structural parameters for achieving high power densities in VACNT nanoarray full cells.

  9. Solid-State Lithium-Sulfur Batteries Operated at 37 °C with Composites of Nanostructured Li7La3Zr2O12/Carbon Foam and Polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xinyong; Liu, Yayuan; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Guangmin; Zhao, Jie; Lin, Dingchang; Zu, Chenxi; Sheng, Ouwei; Zhang, Wenkui; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Cui, Yi

    2017-05-10

    An all solid-state lithium-ion battery with high energy density and high safety is a promising solution for a next-generation energy storage system. High interface resistance of the electrodes and poor ion conductivity of solid-state electrolytes are two main challenges for solid-state batteries, which require operation at elevated temperatures of 60-90 °C. Herein, we report the facile synthesis of Al 3+ /Nb 5+ codoped cubic Li 7 La 3 Zr 2 O 12 (LLZO) nanoparticles and LLZO nanoparticle-decorated porous carbon foam (LLZO@C) by the one-step Pechini sol-gel method. The LLZO nanoparticle-filled poly(ethylene oxide) electrolyte shows improved conductivity compared with filler-free samples. The sulfur composite cathode based on LLZO@C can deliver an attractive specific capacity of >900 mAh g -1 at the human body temperature 37 °C and a high capacity of 1210 and 1556 mAh g -1 at 50 and 70 °C, respectively. In addition, the solid-state Li-S batteries exhibit high Coulombic efficiency and show remarkably stable cycling performance.

  10. Lithium batteries; Les accumulateurs au lithium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This workshop on lithium batteries is divided into 4 sections dealing with: the design and safety aspects, the cycling, the lithium intercalation and its modeling, and the electrolytes. These 4 sections represent 19 papers and are completed by a poster session which corresponds to 17 additional papers. (J.S.)

  11. An overview—Functional nanomaterials for lithium rechargeable batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage, and fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hua Kun

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Nanomaterials play important role in lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage and fuel cells. - Highlights: • Nanomaterials play important role for lithium rechargeable batteries. • Nanostructured materials increase the capacitance of supercapacitors. • Nanostructure improves the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of hydrogen storage materials. • Nanomaterials enhance the electrocatalytic activity of the catalysts in fuel cells. - Abstract: There is tremendous worldwide interest in functional nanostructured materials, which are the advanced nanotechnology materials with internal or external dimensions on the order of nanometers. Their extremely small dimensions make these materials unique and promising for clean energy applications such as lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage, fuel cells, and other applications. This paper will highlight the development of new approaches to study the relationships between the structure and the physical, chemical, and electrochemical properties of functional nanostructured materials. The Energy Materials Research Programme at the Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, the University of Wollongong, has been focused on the synthesis, characterization, and applications of functional nanomaterials, including nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanowires, nanoporous materials, and nanocomposites. The emphases are placed on advanced nanotechnology, design, and control of the composition, morphology, nanostructure, and functionality of the nanomaterials, and on the subsequent applications of these materials to areas including lithium ion batteries, supercapacitors, hydrogen storage, and fuel cells

  12. Lithium use in batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Lithium has a number of uses but one of the most valuable is as a component of high energy-density rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. Because of concerns over carbon dioxide footprint and increasing hydrocarbon fuel cost (reduced supply), lithium may become even more important in large batteries for powering all-electric and hybrid vehicles. It would take 1.4 to 3.0 kilograms of lithium equivalent (7.5 to 16.0 kilograms of lithium carbonate) to support a 40-mile trip in an electric vehicle before requiring recharge. This could create a large demand for lithium. Estimates of future lithium demand vary, based on numerous variables. Some of those variables include the potential for recycling, widespread public acceptance of electric vehicles, or the possibility of incentives for converting to lithium-ion-powered engines. Increased electric usage could cause electricity prices to increase. Because of reduced demand, hydrocarbon fuel prices would likely decrease, making hydrocarbon fuel more desirable. In 2009, 13 percent of worldwide lithium reserves, expressed in terms of contained lithium, were reported to be within hard rock mineral deposits, and 87 percent, within brine deposits. Most of the lithium recovered from brine came from Chile, with smaller amounts from China, Argentina, and the United States. Chile also has lithium mineral reserves, as does Australia. Another source of lithium is from recycled batteries. When lithium-ion batteries begin to power vehicles, it is expected that battery recycling rates will increase because vehicle battery recycling systems can be used to produce new lithium-ion batteries.

  13. Enriched lithium collection from lithium plasma flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karchevsky, A.I.; Laz'ko, V.S.; Muromkin, Y.A.; Pashkovsky, V.G.; Ustinov, A.L.; Dolgolenko, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    In order to understand the physical processes concerned with the selective heating by ion cyclotron resonance and with the subsequent collection of heated particles, experiments were carried out with the extraction of lithium samples, enriched with 6 Li isotopes. Probe and integral extractors allow to collect enriched Li at the end of the selective heating region. Surface density distribution on the collector and local isotopic content of lithium are measured, as a function of the screen height and the retarding potential. Dependence of the collected amount of lithium and of its isotopic content on the value of the magnetic field is also measured. 4 figs., 2 tabs., 5 refs

  14. Characterization of Lithium Polysulfide Salts in Homopolymers and Block Copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dunyang; Wujcik, Kevin; Balsara, Nitash

    Ion-conducting polymers are important for solid-state batteries due to the promise of better safety and the potential to produce higher energy density batteries. Nanostructured block copolymer electrolytes can provide high ionic conductivity and mechanical strength through microphase separation. One of the potential use of block copolymer electrolytes is in lithium-sulfur batteries, a system that has high theoretical energy density wherein the reduction of sulfur leads to the formation of lithium polysulfide intermediates. In this study we investigate the effect of block copolymer morphology on the speciation and transport properties of the polysulfides. The morphology and conductivities of polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (SEO) containing lithium polysulfides were studies using small-angle X-ray scattering and ac impedance spectroscopy. UV-vis spectroscopy is being used to determine nature of the polysulfide species in poly(ethylene oxide) and SEO. Department of Energy, Soft Matter Electron Microscopy Program and Battery Materials Research Program.

  15. Giant Piezoelectricity and High Curie Temperature in Nanostructured Alkali Niobate Lead-Free Piezoceramics through Phase Coexistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bo; Wu, Haijun; Wu, Jiagang; Xiao, Dingquan; Zhu, Jianguo; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2016-11-30

    Because of growing environmental concerns, the development of lead-free piezoelectric materials with enhanced properties has become of great interest. Here, we report a giant piezoelectric coefficient (d 33 ) of 550 pC/N and a high Curie temperature (T C ) of 237 °C in (1-x-y)K 1-w Na w Nb 1-z Sb z O 3- xBiFeO 3- yBi 0.5 Na 0.5 ZrO 3 (KN w NS z -xBF-yBNZ) ceramics by optimizing x, y, z, and w. Atomic-resolution polarization mapping by Z-contrast imaging reveals the intimate coexistence of rhombohedral (R) and tetragonal (T) phases inside nanodomains, that is, a structural origin for the R-T phase boundary in the present KNN system. Hence, the physical origin of high piezoelectric performance can be attributed to a nearly vanishing polarization anisotropy and thus low domain wall energy, facilitating easy polarization rotation between different states under an external field.

  16. Nanostructured Mo-based electrode materials for electrochemical energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xianluo; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Mei, Yueni; Huang, Yunhui

    2015-04-21

    The development of advanced energy storage devices is at the forefront of research geared towards a sustainable future. Nanostructured materials are advantageous in offering huge surface to volume ratios, favorable transport features, and attractive physicochemical properties. They have been extensively explored in various fields of energy storage and conversion. This review is focused largely on the recent progress in nanostructured Mo-based electrode materials including molybdenum oxides (MoO(x), 2 ≤ x ≤ 3), dichalconides (MoX2, X = S, Se), and oxysalts for rechargeable lithium/sodium-ion batteries, Mg batteries, and supercapacitors. Mo-based compounds including MoO2, MoO3, MoO(3-y) (0 nanostructured Mo-based compounds, as well as their energy storage applications in lithium/sodium-ion batteries, Mg batteries, and pseudocapacitors. The relationship between nanoarchitectures and electrochemical performances as well as the related charge-storage mechanism is discussed. Moreover, remarks on the challenges and perspectives of Mo-containing compounds for further development in electrochemical energy storage applications are proposed. This review sheds light on the sustainable development of advanced rechargeable batteries and supercapacitors with nanostructured Mo-based electrode materials.

  17. Experimental lithium system experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atwood, J.M.; Berg, J.D.; Kolowith, R.; Miller, W.C.

    1984-01-01

    The Experimental Lithium System is a test loop built to support design and operation of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility. ELS has achieved over 15,000 hours of safe and reliable operation. An extensive test program has demonstrated satisfactory performance of the system components, including an electromagnetic pump, lithium jet target, and vacuum system. Data on materials corrosion and behavior of lithium impurities are also presented. (author)

  18. Ultrashort pulse chirp measurement via transverse second-harmonic generation in strontium barium niobate crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trull, J.; Wang, B.; Parra, A.; Vilaseca, R.; Cojocaru, C.; Sola, I.; Krolikowski, W.; Sheng, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Pulse compression in dispersive strontium barium niobate crystal with a random size and distribution of the anti-parallel orientated nonlinear domains is observed via transverse second harmonic generation. The dependence of the transverse width of the second harmonic trace along the propagation direction allows for the determination of the initial chirp and duration of pulses in the femtosecond regime. This technique permits a real-time analysis of the pulse evolution and facilitates fast in-situ correction of pulse chirp acquired in the propagation through an optical system

  19. Processing and characterization of lead-free ceramics on the base of sodium-potassium niobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politova, E. D.; Golubko, N. V.; Kaleva, G. M.; Mosunov, A. V.; Sadovskaya, N. V.; Stefanovich, S. Yu.; Kiselev, D. A.; Kislyuk, A. M.; Panda, P. K.

    Lead-free sodium-potassium niobate-based piezoelectric materials are most intensively studied in order to replace the widely used Pb-based ones. In this work, the effects of modification of compositions by donor and acceptor dopants in the A- and B-sites of perovskite lattice on structure, dielectric, ferroelectric, and piezoelectric properties of ceramics from Morphotropic Phase Boundary in the (1-x)(K0.5Na0.5)NbO3-xBaTiO3 system and in compositions with x=0.05 and 0.06 additionally doped by Ni3+ cations have been studied.

  20. Electret-based Unsteady Thermal Energy Harvester using Potassium Tantalate Niobate Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hong; Morimoto, Kenichi; Suzuki, Yuji

    2016-11-01

    An electret-based unsteady thermal energy harvester is proposed using potassium tantalate niobate (KTa1-xNbxO3, KTN) as a dielectric for the capacitor. By connecting in series the capacitor and an electret serving as a permanent voltage source, the capacitance change with temperature fluctuations alters the amount of induced charges thereby produces the external current. By using KTN having extremely-large temperature coefficient of permittivity together with the CYTOP electret, the output power of 572 nJ has been obtained from one heating cycle, which corresponds to 20 times higher output power than the previous result with BaTiO3.

  1. Structural, topographical and electrical properties of cerium doped strontium barium niobate (Ce:SBN60) ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raj, S. Gokul [Department of Physics, C. Kandaswami Naidu College For Men (CKNC), Annanagar, Chennai-600102 (India); Mathivanan, V.; Mohan, R. [Department of Physics, Presidency College, Chennai – 600005 (India); Kumar, G. Ramesh, E-mail: rameshvandhai@gmail.com; Yathavan, S. [Department of Physics, University College of Engineering Arni, Anna University Chennai, Arni-632317 (India)

    2016-05-06

    Tungsten bronze type cerium doped strontium barium niobate (Ce:SBN - Sr{sub 0.6}B{sub 0.4}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 6}) ceramics were synthesized by solid state process. Cerium was used as dopant to improve its electrical properties. Influence of Ce{sup +} ions on the photoluminescence properties was investigated in detail. The grain size topographical behavior of SBN powders and their associated abnormal grain growth (AGG) were completely analyzed through SEM studies. Finally dielectric, measurement discusses about the broad phase transition observed due to cerium dopant The results were discussed in detail.

  2. Conoscopic interferometry for probing electro-optic coefficients of strontium calcium barium niobate crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ankai; Gao, CH. Y.; Xu, J. Q.; Zhang, H. J.; Sun, Sh. Q.

    2011-07-01

    The relation between the linear electro-optic effect and conoscopic interference has been investigated in a biased electro-optic crystal strontium calcium barium niobate (CSBN). Based on the change of interference patterns with applied field, an interferometric method for probing electro-optic coefficients of electro-optic crystals has been proposed. In our case, the linear electro-optic coefficients of CSBN:50 was first probed at γ33=(141.0±0.5)×10 -12 m/V and γ13=(85.0±0.5)×10 -12 m/V.

  3. Preparation and photocatalytic property of potassium niobate K6Nb10.8O30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Gaoke; Zou Xi; Gong Jie; He Fangsheng; Zhang Hao; Zhang Qiang; Liu Ying; Yang Xia; Hu Bo

    2006-01-01

    The TB-type potassium niobate K 6 Nb 10.8 O 30 was synthesized by a simple solid-state reaction method. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) were used to characterize the structure of the photocatalyst. The photocatalyst K 6 Nb 10.8 O 30 shows high photocatalytic activity to photodegrade acid red G under UV irradiation. The influences of catalyst dosage, initial concentration of acid red G on the photocatalytic reaction were investigated. The kinetics of photocatalytic degradation of acid red G follows the first order kinetics

  4. Theoretical analysis of surface acoustic wave propagating properties of Y-cut nano lithium niobate film on silicon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The surface acoustic wave (SAW propagating characteristics of Y-cut nano LiNbO3 (LN film on SiO2/LN substrate have been theoretically calculated. The simulated results showed a shear horizontal (SH SAW with enhanced electromechanical coupling factor K2 owing to a dimensional effect of the nanoscale LN film. However, a Rayleigh SAW and two other resonances related to thickness vibrations caused spurious responses for wideband SAW devices. These spurious waves could be fully suppressed by properly controlling structural parameters including the electrode layer height, thickness, and the Euler angle (θ of the LN thin film. Finally, a pure SH SAW was obtained with a wide θ range, from 0° to 5° and 165° to 180°. The largest K2 achieved for the pure SH SAW was about 35.1%. The calculated results demonstrate the promising application of nano LN film to the realization of ultra-wideband SAW devices.

  5. Theoretical analysis of surface acoustic wave propagating properties of Y-cut nano lithium niobate film on silicon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jing, E-mail: jingchen0408@hotmail.com; Zhang, Qiaozhen; Han, Tao; Zhou, Liu; Tang, Gongbin; Liu, Boquan; Ji, Xiaojun [Department of Instrument Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-08-15

    The surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagating characteristics of Y-cut nano LiNbO{sub 3} (LN) film on SiO{sub 2}/LN substrate have been theoretically calculated. The simulated results showed a shear horizontal (SH) SAW with enhanced electromechanical coupling factor K{sup 2} owing to a dimensional effect of the nanoscale LN film. However, a Rayleigh SAW and two other resonances related to thickness vibrations caused spurious responses for wideband SAW devices. These spurious waves could be fully suppressed by properly controlling structural parameters including the electrode layer height, thickness, and the Euler angle (θ) of the LN thin film. Finally, a pure SH SAW was obtained with a wide θ range, from 0° to 5° and 165° to 180°. The largest K{sup 2} achieved for the pure SH SAW was about 35.1%. The calculated results demonstrate the promising application of nano LN film to the realization of ultra-wideband SAW devices.

  6. Holographic recording in a doubly doped lithium niobate crystal with two wavelengths: a blue laser diode and a green laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komori, Yuichi; Ishii, Yukihiro

    2010-08-01

    A doubly-doped LiNbO3 (LN) crystal has been well used as a nonvolatile two-wavelength recording material. By using two levels of the crystal, two-kind holograms can be recorded on one crystal; a hologram is recorded with a 405-nm blue laser diode (LD) for a deep Mn level, and another hologram is with a 532-nm green laser for a shallow Fe level. The recording capacity doubles. A 780-nm LD is non-volatile reconstructing source since the LD line is insensitive to both levels. Multiplexed reconstructed images are demonstrated by using a sharp angular selectivity of a volume LN crystal keeping Bragg condition with spherical reconstructions.

  7. Type-I cascaded quadratic soliton compression in lithium niobate: Compressing femtosecond pulses from high-power fiber lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Wise, Frank W.

    2010-01-01

    The output pulses of a commercial high-power femtosecond fiber laser or amplifier are typically around 300–500 fs with wavelengths of approximately 1030 nm and tens of microjoules of pulse energy. Here, we present a numerical study of cascaded quadratic soliton compression of such pulses in LiNbO3...

  8. Growth of large size lithium niobate single crystals of high quality by tilting-mirror-type floating zone method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarker, Abdur Razzaque, E-mail: razzaque_ru2000@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, University of Rajshahi (Bangladesh)

    2016-05-15

    Large size high quality LiNbO{sub 3} single crystals were grown successfully by tilting-mirror-type floating zone (TMFZ) technique. The grown crystals were characterized by X-ray diffraction, etch pits density measurement, Impedance analysis, Vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) and UV-Visible spectrometry. The effect of mirror tilting during growth on the structural, electrical, optical properties and defect density of the LiNbO{sub 3} crystals were investigated. It was found that the defect density in the crystals reduced for tilting the mirror in the TMFZ method. The chemical analysis revealed that the grown crystals were of high quality with uniform composition. The single crystals grown by TMFZ method contains no low-angle grain boundaries, indicating that they can be used for high efficiency optoelectronic devices. (author)

  9. Anomalous dispersion in Lithium Niobate one-dimensional waveguide array in the near-infrared wavelength range

    OpenAIRE

    Apetrei, Alin Marian; Rambu, Alicia Petronela; Minot, Christophe; Moison, Jean-Marie; Belabas, Nadia; Tascu, Sorin

    2016-01-01

    Knowing the dispersion regime (normal vs anomalous) is important for both an isolated waveguide and a waveguide array. We investigate by the Finite Element Method the dispersion properties of a LiNbO3 waveguides array using two techniques. The first one assumes the Coupled Mode Theory in a 2-waveguide system. The other one uses the actual diffraction curve determined in a 7-waveguide system. In both approaches we find that by decreasing the array period, one passes from normal dispersion by a...

  10. Refractive-index changes in lithium niobate crystals by radiation damages; Brechungsindexaenderungen in Lithiumniobat-Kristallen durch Strahlenschaeden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamani Meymian, Mohammad Reza

    2007-12-18

    For the study in this thesis {sup 3}He{sup 2+} ions with the energy of about 40 MeV were applied. The results of these studies show a timely very stable anisotrope refractive-index change in the range of some 10{sup -3}. The radiation damages caused by ions cause a decreasement of the ordinary refractive index n{sub o} and an increasement of the extra-ordinary refractive index n{sub e}. While the absolute values for {delta}n{sub o} and {delta}n{sub e} are nearly equal the birefringence of the material (n{sub e}-n{sub o}) smaller. The generated refractive-index change is dose dependent and the curve {delta}n has at increasing dose a strongly nonlinear slope with a characteristic stage at the radiation dose of about 2 x 10{sup 20} ions/m{sup 2}.

  11. Advanced Magnetic Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Sellmyer, David

    2006-01-01

    Advanced Magnetic Nanostructures is devoted to the fabrication, characterization, experimental investigation, theoretical understanding, and utilization of advanced magnetic nanostructures. Focus is on various types of 'bottom-up' and 'top-down' artificial nanostructures, as contrasted to naturally occurring magnetic nanostructures, such as iron-oxide inclusions in magnetic rocks, and to structures such as perfect thin films. Chapter 1 is an introduction into some basic concepts, such as the definitions of basic magnetic quantities. Chapters 2-4 are devoted to the theory of magnetic nanostructures, Chapter 5 deals with the characterization of the structures, and Chapters 6-10 are devoted to specific systems. Applications of advanced magnetic nanostructures are discussed in Chapters11-15 and, finally, the appendix lists and briefly discusses magnetic properties of typical starting materials. Industrial and academic researchers in magnetism and related areas such as nanotechnology, materials science, and theore...

  12. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard M [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  13. Nanostructured Materials for Magnetoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Mikailzade, Faik

    2013-01-01

    This book provides an up-to-date review of nanometer-scale magnetism and focuses on the investigation of the basic properties of magnetic nanostructures. It describes a wide range of physical aspects together with theoretical and experimental methods. A broad overview of the latest developments in this emerging and fascinating field of nanostructured materials is given with emphasis on the practical understanding and operation of submicron devices based on nanostructured magnetic materials.

  14. Synthesis of lithium ferrites from polymetallic carboxylates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STEFANIA STOLERIU

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Lithium ferrite was prepared by the thermal decomposition of three polynuclear complex compounds containing as ligands the anions of malic, tartaric and gluconic acid: (NH42[Fe2.5Li0.5(C4H4O53(OH4(H2O2]×4H2O (I, (NH46[Fe2.5Li0.5(C4H4O63(OH8]×2H2O (II and (NH42[Fe2.5Li0.5(C6H11O73(OH7] (III. The polynuclear complex precursors were characterized by chemical analysis, IR and UV–Vis spectra, magnetic measurements and thermal analysis. The obtained lithium ferrites were characterized by XRD, scanning electron microscopy, IR spectra and magnetic measurements. The single α-Li0.5Fe2.5O4 phase was obtained by thermal decomposition of the tartarate complex annealed at 700 °C for 1 h. The magnetization value ≈ 50 emu g-1 is lower than that obtained for the bulk lithium ferrite due to the nanostructural character of the ferrite. The particle size was smaller than 100 nm.

  15. Nanostructured metal sulfides for energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Xianhong; Tan, Huiteng; Yan, Qingyu

    2014-09-07

    Advanced electrodes with a high energy density at high power are urgently needed for high-performance energy storage devices, including lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and supercapacitors (SCs), to fulfil the requirements of future electrochemical power sources for applications such as in hybrid electric/plug-in-hybrid (HEV/PHEV) vehicles. Metal sulfides with unique physical and chemical properties, as well as high specific capacity/capacitance, which are typically multiple times higher than that of the carbon/graphite-based materials, are currently studied as promising electrode materials. However, the implementation of these sulfide electrodes in practical applications is hindered by their inferior rate performance and cycling stability. Nanostructures offering the advantages of high surface-to-volume ratios, favourable transport properties, and high freedom for the volume change upon ion insertion/extraction and other reactions, present an opportunity to build next-generation LIBs and SCs. Thus, the development of novel concepts in material research to achieve new nanostructures paves the way for improved electrochemical performance. Herein, we summarize recent advances in nanostructured metal sulfides, such as iron sulfides, copper sulfides, cobalt sulfides, nickel sulfides, manganese sulfides, molybdenum sulfides, tin sulfides, with zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional morphologies for LIB and SC applications. In addition, the recently emerged concept of incorporating conductive matrices, especially graphene, with metal sulfide nanomaterials will also be highlighted. Finally, some remarks are made on the challenges and perspectives for the future development of metal sulfide-based LIB and SC devices.

  16. Nanostructured layers of thermoelectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Jeffrey J.; Lynch, Jared; Coates, Nelson; Forster, Jason; Sahu, Ayaskanta; Chabinyc, Michael; Russ, Boris

    2018-01-30

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to thermoelectric materials. In one aspect, a method includes providing a plurality of nanostructures. The plurality of nanostructures comprise a thermoelectric material, with each nanostructure of the plurality of nanostructures having first ligands disposed on a surface of the nanostructure. The plurality of nanostructures is mixed with a solution containing second ligands and a ligand exchange process occurs in which the first ligands disposed on the plurality of nanostructures are replaced with the second ligands. The plurality of nanostructures is deposited on a substrate to form a layer. The layer is thermally annealed.

  17. Startup of Experimental Lithium System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCauley, D.L.

    1980-06-01

    The Experimental Lithium System (ELS) is designed for full-scale testing of targets and other lithium system components for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility. The system also serves as a test bed for development of lithium purification and characterization equipment, provides experience in operation of large lithium systems, and helps guide FMIT design

  18. Growth and decomposition of Lithium and Lithium hydride on Nickel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engbæk, Jakob; Nielsen, Gunver; Nielsen, Jane Hvolbæk

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we have investigated the deposition, structure and decomposition of lithium and lithium-hydride films on a nickel substrate. Using surface sensitive techniques it was possible to quantify the deposited Li amount, and to optimize the deposition procedure for synthesizing lithium...... temperature than the decomposition of the lithium-hydride, confirming the high stability and sintering problems of lithium-hydride making the storage potential a challenge. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  19. Lithium purity and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meadows, G.E.; Keough, R.F.

    1981-02-01

    The accurate measurement of impurities in lithium is basic to the study of lithium compatibility with fusion reactor materials. In the last year the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) has had the opportunity to develop sampling and analytical techniques and to apply them in support of the Experimental Lithium System (ELS) as a part of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Project. In this paper we present the analytical results from the fill, start-up and operation of the ELS. In addition, the analysis and purification of navy surplus ingot lithium which is being considered for use in a larger system will be discussed. Finally, the analytical techniques used in our laboratory will be summarized and the results of a recent round robin lithium analysis will be presented

  20. Balancing surface adsorption and diffusion of lithium-polysulfides on nonconductive oxides for lithium-sulfur battery design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xinyong; Wang, Jianguo; Liu, Chong; Wang, Haotian; Yao, Hongbin; Zheng, Guangyuan; Seh, Zhi Wei; Cai, Qiuxia; Li, Weiyang; Zhou, Guangmin; Zu, Chenxi; Cui, Yi

    2016-04-05

    Lithium-sulfur batteries have attracted attention due to their six-fold specific energy compared with conventional lithium-ion batteries. Dissolution of lithium polysulfides, volume expansion of sulfur and uncontrollable deposition of lithium sulfide are three of the main challenges for this technology. State-of-the-art sulfur cathodes based on metal-oxide nanostructures can suppress the shuttle-effect and enable controlled lithium sulfide deposition. However, a clear mechanistic understanding and corresponding selection criteria for the oxides are still lacking. Herein, various nonconductive metal-oxide nanoparticle-decorated carbon flakes are synthesized via a facile biotemplating method. The cathodes based on magnesium oxide, cerium oxide and lanthanum oxide show enhanced cycling performance. Adsorption experiments and theoretical calculations reveal that polysulfide capture by the oxides is via monolayered chemisorption. Moreover, we show that better surface diffusion leads to higher deposition efficiency of sulfide species on electrodes. Hence, oxide selection is proposed to balance optimization between sulfide-adsorption and diffusion on the oxides.

  1. Synthesis and applications of MOF-derived porous nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Hui Yap

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Metal organic frameworks (MOFs represent a class of porous material which is formed by strong bonds between metal ions and organic linkers. By careful selection of constituents, MOFs can exhibit very high surface area, large pore volume, and excellent chemical stability. Research on synthesis, structures and properties of various MOFs has shown that they are promising materials for many applications, such as energy storage, gas storage, heterogeneous catalysis and sensing. Apart from direct use, MOFs have also been used as support substrates for nanomaterials or as sacrificial templates/precursors for preparation of various functional nanostructures. In this review, we aim to present the most recent development of MOFs as precursors for the preparation of various nanostructures and their potential applications in energy-related devices and processes. Specifically, this present survey intends to push the boundaries and covers the literatures from the year 2013 to early 2017, on supercapacitors, lithium ion batteries, electrocatalysts, photocatalyst, gas sensing, water treatment, solar cells, and carbon dioxide capture. Finally, an outlook in terms of future challenges and potential prospects towards industrial applications are also discussed. Keywords: Metal organic frameworks, Porous nanostructures, Supercapacitors, Lithium ion batteries, Heterogeneous catalyst

  2. Nitrogen-modified carbon nanostructures derived from metal-organic frameworks as high performance anodes for Li-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Cai; Zhao, Chongchong; Xin, Fengxia; Cao, Can; Han, Wei-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report preparation of nitrogen-modified nanostructure carbons through carbonization of Cu-based metal organic nanofibers at 700 °C under argon gas atmosphere. After removal of copper through chemical treatment with acids, pure N-modified nanostructure carbon with a nitrogen content of 8.62 wt% is obtained. When use as anodes for lithium-ion battery, the nanostructure carbon electrode has a discharge capacity of 853.1 mAh g −1 measured at a current of 500 mA g −1 after 800 cycles.

  3. Single potassium niobate nano/microsized particles as local mechano-optical Brownian probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, Flavio M.; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Magrez, Arnaud; Forró, László; Jeney, Sylvia

    2016-03-01

    Perovskite alkaline niobates, due to their strong nonlinear optical properties, including birefringence and the capability to produce second-harmonic generation (SHG) signals, attract a lot of attention as potential candidates for applications as local nano/microsized mechano-optical probes. Here, we report on an implementation of photonic force microscopy (PFM) to explore the Brownian motion and optical trappability of monocrystalline potassium niobate (KNbO3) nano/microsized particles having sizes within the range of 50 to 750 nm. In particular, we exploit the anisotropic translational diffusive regime of the Brownian motion to quantify thermal fluctuations and optical forces of singly-trapped KNbO3 particles within the optical trapping volume of a PFM microscope. We also show that, under near-infrared (NIR) excitation of the highly focused laser beam of the PFM microscope, a single optically-trapped KNbO3 particle reveals a strong SHG signal manifested by a narrow peak (λem = 532 nm) at half the excitation wavelength (λex = 1064 nm). Moreover, we demonstrate that the thus induced SHG emission can be used as a local light source that is capable of optically exciting molecules of an organic dye, Rose Bengal (RB), which adhere to the particle surface, through the mechanism of luminescence energy transfer (LET).Perovskite alkaline niobates, due to their strong nonlinear optical properties, including birefringence and the capability to produce second-harmonic generation (SHG) signals, attract a lot of attention as potential candidates for applications as local nano/microsized mechano-optical probes. Here, we report on an implementation of photonic force microscopy (PFM) to explore the Brownian motion and optical trappability of monocrystalline potassium niobate (KNbO3) nano/microsized particles having sizes within the range of 50 to 750 nm. In particular, we exploit the anisotropic translational diffusive regime of the Brownian motion to quantify thermal

  4. Synthesis and Structures of Reduced Niobates with Four Perovskite-like Layers and Their Semiconducting Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, W.; Ohkawa, H.; Naito, M.; Sugahara, Y.; Kuroda, K.

    1999-12-01

    Carriers were successfully doped into RbCa2NaNb4O13 by the substitution of Sr2+ for Na+, yielding electroconducting niobates with a layered structure consisting of four perovskite-like layers. Single-phase products of polycrystalline RbCa2Na1-xSrxNb4O13 (x=0.2 and 0.4) were synthesized by the solid-state reaction of RbCa2Nb3O10, Sr5Nb4O15, Nb2O5, and Nb metal. The solid solutions were indexed based on a tetragonal structure, corresponding to the end-member RbCa2NaNb4O13. With the increase in the amount of strontium substitution, an expansion of the c-axis was observed while the a-axis was essentially constant. The products showed semiconducting properties.

  5. Optical properties of Er3+-doped strontium barium niobate nanocrystals obtained by thermal treatment in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haro-Gonzalez, P.; Lahoz, F.; Gonzalez-Platas, J.; Caceres, J.M.; Gonzalez-Perez, S.; Marrero-Lopez, D.; Capuj, N.; Martin, I.R.

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of the optical properties of Er 3+ ions in strontium barium niobate glass and glass ceramics have been carried out. The glasses have been fabricated using a melt-quenching method, and the glass ceramic samples have been obtained from the glass precursor by a thermal treatment. The ceramic samples formed by a glassy phase, and a crystalline phase contains nanocrystals of Sr 1-x Ba x Nb 2 O 6 (SBN) doped with Er 3+ ions with a mean size of ∼50 nm, as confirmed with XRD. Green up-conversion emission has been obtained under excitation at 800 nm, and the temporal evolution of this emission has been reported with the purpose of determining the involved up-conversion mechanism. These optical measures have confirmed that the Er 3+ ions have been incorporated into the SBN matrix, after a thermal treatment, which produced an increment of the up-conversion efficiency

  6. Electronic and Optical Properties of Sodium Niobate: A Density Functional Theory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fritsch

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, much effort has been devoted to replace the most commonly used piezoelectric ceramic lead zirconate titanate Pb[ZrxTi1−x]O3 (PZT with a suitable lead-free alternative for memory or piezoelectric applications. One possible alternative to PZT is sodium niobate as it exhibits electrical and mechanical properties that make it an interesting material for technological applications. The high-temperature simple cubic perovskite structure undergoes a series of structural phase transitions with decreasing temperature. However, particularly the phases at room temperature and below are not yet fully characterised and understood. Here, we perform density functional theory calculations for the possible phases at room temperature and below and report on the structural, electronic, and optical properties of the different phases in comparison to experimental findings.

  7. Pickering emulsions prepared by layered niobate K₄Nb₆O₁₇ intercalated with organic cations and photocatalytic dye decomposition in the emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakato, Teruyuki; Ueda, Hiroaki; Hashimoto, Sachika; Terao, Ryosuke; Kameyama, Miyuki; Mouri, Emiko

    2012-08-01

    We investigated emulsions stabilized with particles of layered hexaniobate, known as a semiconductor photocatalyst, and photocatalytic degradation of dyes in the emulsions. Hydrophobicity of the niobate particles was adjusted with the intercalation of alkylammonium ions into the interlayer spaces to enable emulsification in a toluene-water system. After the modification of interlayer space with hexylammonium ions, the niobate stabilized water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions in a broad composition range. Optical microscopy showed that the niobate particles covered the surfaces of emulsion droplets and played a role of emulsifying agents. The niobate particles also enabled the generation of oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions in a limited composition range. Modification with dodecylammonium ions, which turned the niobate particles more hydrophobic, only gave w/o emulsions, and the particles were located not only at the toluene-water interface but also inside the toluene continuous phase. On the other hand, interlayer modification with butylammonium ions led to the formation of o/w emulsions. When porphyrin dyes were added to the system, the cationic dye was adsorbed on niobate particles at the emulsion droplets whereas the lipophilic dye was dissolved in toluene. Upon UV irradiation, both of the dyes were degraded photocatalytically. When the cationic and lipophilic porphyrin molecules were simultaneously added to the emulsions, both of the dyes were photodecomposed nonselectively.

  8. Scoping studies: behavior and control of lithium and lithium aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeppson, D W

    1982-01-01

    The HEDL scoping studies examining the behavior of lithium and lithium aerosols have been conducted to determine and examine potential safety and environmental issues for postulated accident conditions associated with the use of lithium as a fusion reactor blanket and/or coolant. Liquid lithium reactions with air, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and concretes have been characterized. The effectiveness of various powder extinguishing agents and methods of application were determined for lithium-air reactions. The effectiveness of various lithium aerosol collection methods were determined and the volatilization and transport of radioactive metals potentially associated with lithium-air reactions were evaluated. Liquid lithium atmosphere reactions can be safely controlled under postulated accident conditions, but special handling practices must be provided. Lithium-concrete reactions should be avoided because of the potential production of high temperatures, corrosive environment and hydrogen. Carbon microspheres are effective in extinguishing well established lithium-air reactions for the lithium quantities tested (up to 10 kg). Large mass loading of lithium aerosols can be efficiently collected with conventional air cleaning systems. Potentially radioactive species (cobalt, iron and manganese) will be volatilized in a lithium-air reaction in contact with neutron activated stainless steel.

  9. Lithium battery management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Thomas J [Waukesha, WI

    2012-05-08

    Provided is a system for managing a lithium battery system having a plurality of cells. The battery system comprises a variable-resistance element electrically connected to a cell and located proximate a portion of the cell; and a device for determining, utilizing the variable-resistance element, whether the temperature of the cell has exceeded a predetermined threshold. A method of managing the temperature of a lithium battery system is also included.

  10. Solid-state lithium battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihlefeld, Jon; Clem, Paul G; Edney, Cynthia; Ingersoll, David; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Fenton, Kyle Ross

    2014-11-04

    The present invention is directed to a higher power, thin film lithium-ion electrolyte on a metallic substrate, enabling mass-produced solid-state lithium batteries. High-temperature thermodynamic equilibrium processing enables co-firing of oxides and base metals, providing a means to integrate the crystalline, lithium-stable, fast lithium-ion conductor lanthanum lithium tantalate (La.sub.1/3-xLi.sub.3xTaO.sub.3) directly with a thin metal foil current collector appropriate for a lithium-free solid-state battery.

  11. Raman spectra of lithium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, V. S.; Bi, Dongxue; Voinov, Y. P.; Vodchits, A. I.; Gorshunov, B. P.; Yurasov, N. I.; Yurasova, I. I.

    2017-11-01

    The paper is devoted to the results of investigating the spontaneous Raman scattering spectra in the lithium compounds crystals in a wide spectral range by the fibre-optic spectroscopy method. We also present the stimulated Raman scattering spectra in the lithium hydroxide and lithium deuteride crystals obtained with the use of powerful laser source. The symmetry properties of the lithium hydroxide, lithium hydroxide monohydrate and lithium deuteride crystals optical modes were analyzed by means of the irreducible representations of the point symmetry groups. We have established the selection rules in the Raman and infrared absorption spectra of LiOH, LiOH·H2O and LiD crystals.

  12. Injection moulding antireflective nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Alexander Bruun; Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik; Mortensen, N. Asger

    We present a method for injection moulding antireflective nanostructures on large areas, for high volume production. Nanostructured black silicon masters were fabricated by mask-less reactive ion etching, and electroplated with nickel. The nickel shim was antistiction coated and used in an inject......We present a method for injection moulding antireflective nanostructures on large areas, for high volume production. Nanostructured black silicon masters were fabricated by mask-less reactive ion etching, and electroplated with nickel. The nickel shim was antistiction coated and used...... in an injection moulding process, to fabricate the antireflective surfaces. The cycle-time was 35 s. The injection moulded structures had a height of 125 nm, and the visible spectrum reflectance of injection moulded black polypropylene surfaces was reduced from 4.5±0.5% to 2.5±0.5%. The gradient of the refractive...

  13. Self-assembled nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jin Z; Liu, Jun; Chen, Shaowei; Liu, Gang-yu

    2003-01-01

    Nanostructures refer to materials that have relevant dimensions on the nanometer length scales and reside in the mesoscopic regime between isolated atoms and molecules in bulk matter. These materials have unique physical properties that are distinctly different from bulk materials. Self-Assembled Nanostructures provides systematic coverage of basic nanomaterials science including materials assembly and synthesis, characterization, and application. Suitable for both beginners and experts, it balances the chemistry aspects of nanomaterials with physical principles. It also highlights nanomaterial-based architectures including assembled or self-assembled systems. Filled with in-depth discussion of important applications of nano-architectures as well as potential applications ranging from physical to chemical and biological systems, Self-Assembled Nanostructures is the essential reference or text for scientists involved with nanostructures.

  14. Nanostructured CNx (0

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongiorno, G; Blomqvist, M; Piseri, P; Milani, P; Lenardi, C; Ducati, C; Caruso, T; Rudolf, P; Wachtmeister, S; Csillag, S; Coronel, E

    Nanostructured CNx thin films were prepared by supersonic cluster beam deposition (SCBD) and systematically characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The

  15. Silver niobates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanirbergenov, B.; Rozhenko, S.P.

    1979-01-01

    By means of determination of residual concentrations and pH measurements investigated are the AgNO 3 -KNbO 3 -H 2 O, AgNO 3 -K 3 NbO 4 -H 2 O, AgNO 3 -K 8 Nb 16 O 19 -H 2 O systems and established is formation of meta-, ortho-and hexaniobates of silver. AgNbO 3 x H 2 O, Ag 8 Nb 6 O 19 x 6H 2 O and Ag 3 NbO 3 x 2.5H 2 O are separated from aqueous solution. Using the methods of differential-thermal, thermogravimetric and X-ray-phase analyses it is shown that silver metaniobate transforms into the crystal state at 530 deg C. Ortho- and hexaniobate of silver decompose at 500 deg C with formation of silver metaniobate and metal silver

  16. Solid Lithium Ion Conductors (SLIC) for Lithium Solid State Batteries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To identify the most lithium-ion conducting solid electrolytes for lithium solid state batteries from the emerging types of solid electrolytes, based on a...

  17. New Nanostructured Li 2 S/Silicon Rechargeable Battery with High Specific Energy

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2010-04-14

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries are important energy storage devices; however, the specific energy of existing lithium ion batteries is still insufficient for many applications due to the limited specific charge capacity of the electrode materials. The recent development of sulfur/mesoporous carbon nanocomposite cathodes represents a particularly exciting advance, but in full battery cells, sulfur-based cathodes have to be paired with metallic lithium anodes as the lithium source, which can result in serious safety issues. Here we report a novel lithium metal-free battery consisting of a Li 2S/mesoporous carbon composite cathode and a silicon nanowire anode. This new battery yields a theoretical specific energy of 1550 Wh kg ?1, which is four times that of the theoretical specific energy of existing lithium-ion batteries based on LiCoO2 cathodes and graphite anodes (∼410 Wh kg?1). The nanostructured design of both electrodes assists in overcoming the issues associated with using sulfur compounds and silicon in lithium-ion batteries, including poor electrical conductivity, significant structural changes, and volume expansion. We have experimentally realized an initial discharge specific energy of 630 Wh kg ?1 based on the mass of the active electrode materials. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  18. Hydrogen Outgassing from Lithium Hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Smith, R A; Balazs1, B; McLean II, W

    2006-04-20

    Lithium hydride is a nuclear material with a great affinity for moisture. As a result of exposure to water vapor during machining, transportation, storage and assembly, a corrosion layer (oxide and/or hydroxide) always forms on the surface of lithium hydride resulting in the release of hydrogen gas. Thermodynamically, lithium hydride, lithium oxide and lithium hydroxide are all stable. However, lithium hydroxides formed near the lithium hydride substrate (interface hydroxide) and near the sample/vacuum interface (surface hydroxide) are much less thermally stable than their bulk counterpart. In a dry environment, the interface/surface hydroxides slowly degenerate over many years/decades at room temperature into lithium oxide, releasing water vapor and ultimately hydrogen gas through reaction of the water vapor with the lithium hydride substrate. This outgassing can potentially cause metal hydriding and/or compatibility issues elsewhere in the device. In this chapter, the morphology and the chemistry of the corrosion layer grown on lithium hydride (and in some cases, its isotopic cousin, lithium deuteride) as a result of exposure to moisture are investigated. The hydrogen outgassing processes associated with the formation and subsequent degeneration of this corrosion layer are described. Experimental techniques to measure the hydrogen outgassing kinetics from lithium hydride and methods employing the measured kinetics to predict hydrogen outgassing as a function of time and temperature are presented. Finally, practical procedures to mitigate the problem of hydrogen outgassing from lithium hydride are discussed.

  19. Synthesis and lithium storage properties of Zn, Co and Mg doped SnO2 Nano materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Palaniyandy, Nithyadharseni

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we show that magnesium and cobalt doped SnO2 (Mg-SnO2 and Co-SnO2) nanostructures have profound influence on the discharge capacity and coulombic efficiency of lithium ion batteries (LIBs) employing pure SnO2 and zinc doped SnO2 (Zn...

  20. PHYSICAL AND ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES ENHANCEMENT OF RARE-EARTH DOPED-POTASSIUM SODIUM NIOBATE (KNN: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akmal Mat Harttat Maziati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline niobate mainly potassium sodium niobate, (KxNa1-x NbO3 (abreviated as KNN has long attracted attention as piezoelectric materials as its high Curie temperature (Tc and piezoelectric properties. The volatility of alkaline element (K, Na is, however detrimental to the stoichiometry of KNN, contributing to the failure to achieve high-density structure and lead to the formation of intrinsic defects. By partially doping of several rare-earth elements, the inherent defects could be improved significantly. Therefore, considerable attempts have been made to develop doped-KNN based ceramic materials with high electrical properties. In this paper, these research activities are reviewed, including dopants type and doping role in KNN perovskite structure.

  1. Hollow Micro-/Nanostructures: Synthesis and Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Lou, Xiong Wen (David)

    2008-11-03

    Hollow micro-nanostructures are of great interest in many current and emerging areas of technology. Perhaps the best-known example of the former is the use of fly-ash hollow particles generated from coal power plants as partial replacement for Portland cement, to produce concrete with enhanced strength and durability. This review is devoted to the progress made in the last decade in synthesis and applications of hollow micro-nanostructures. We present a comprehensive overview of synthetic strategies for hollow structures. These strategies are broadly categorized into four themes, which include well-established approaches, such as conventional hard-templating and soft-templating methods, as well as newly emerging methods based on sacrificial templating and template-free synthesis. Success in each has inspired multiple variations that continue to drive the rapid evolution of the field. The Review therefore focuses on the fundamentals of each process, pointing out advantages and disadvantages where appropriate. Strategies for generating more complex hollow structures, such as rattle-type and nonspherical hollow structures, are also discussed. Applications of hollow structures in lithium batteries, catalysis and sensing, and biomedical applications are reviewed. © 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA,.

  2. Lithium: for harnessing renewable energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Dwight; Jaskula, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Lithium, which has the chemical symbol Li and an atomic number of 3, is the first metal in the periodic table. Lithium has many uses, the most prominent being in batteries for cell phones, laptops, and electric and hybrid vehicles. Worldwide sources of lithium are broken down by ore-deposit type as follows: closed-basin brines, 58%; pegmatites and related granites, 26%; lithium-enriched clays, 7%; oilfield brines, 3%; geothermal brines, 3%; and lithium-enriched zeolites, 3% (2013 statistics). There are over 39 million tons of lithium resources worldwide. Of this resource, the USGS estimates there to be approximately 13 million tons of current economically recoverable lithium reserves. To help predict where future lithium supplies might be located, USGS scientists study how and where identified resources are concentrated in the Earth’s crust, and they use that knowledge to assess the likelihood that undiscovered resources also exist.

  3. Application of C60, C72 and carbon nanotubes as anode for lithium-ion batteries: A DFT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najafi, Meysam

    2017-01-01

    The application of C 60 , C 72 , CNT (8, 0) and CNT (10, 0) as anode materials for Lithium-ion batteries were investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Results show that the average values of voltage cell (V cell ) and adsorption energy (E ad ) of CNT (8, 0) and CNT (10, 0) were higher than C 60 and C 72 ca 0.327 V and 6.52 kcal/mol, respectively. The NH 2 functionalization of studied nanostructures as a strategy to improve the performance of these systems as anode materials of Lithium-ion batteries were investigated. Results show that, NH 2 functionalization of studied nanostructures increase the average values of voltage cell and adsorption energy ca 0.197 V and 8.20 kcal/mol, respectively. Obtained results propose that NH 2 functionalized C 72 and CNT (10, 0) have larger V cell and E ad values and therefore these nanostructures have higher potential as anode material for Lithium-ion battery. - Highlights: • C 60 and CNT (10, 0) as anode materials for Lithium-ion batteries were investigated. • V cell and E ad of CNT (8, 0) and CNT (10, 0) were higher than C 60 and C 72 ca. • NH 2 functionalization of C 60 improve the performance of it as anode materials of Lithium-ion batteries.

  4. Photo-induced morphological winding and unwinding motion of nanoscrolls composed of niobate nanosheets with a polyfluoroalkyl azobenzene derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabetani, Yu; Takamura, Hazuki; Uchikoshi, Akino; Hassan, Syed Zahid; Shimada, Tetsuya; Takagi, Shinsuke; Tachibana, Hiroshi; Masui, Dai; Tong, Zhiwei; Inoue, Haruo

    2016-06-01

    Photo-responsive nanoscrolls can be successfully fabricated by mixing a polyfluoroalkyl azobenzene derivative and a niobate nanosheet, which is exfoliated from potassium hexaniobate. In this study, we have found that the photo-responsive nanoscroll shows a morphological motion of winding and unwinding, which is basically due to the nanosheet sliding within the nanoscroll, by efficient photo-isomerization reactions of the intercalated azobenzene in addition to the interlayer distance change of the nanoscrolls. The relative nanosheet sliding of the nanoscroll is estimated to be ca. 280 nm from the AFM morphology analysis. The distance of the sliding motion is over 20 times that of the averaged nanosheet sliding in the azobenzene/niobate hybrid film reported previously. Photo-responsive nanoscrolls can be expected to be novel photo-activated actuators and artificial muscle model materials.Photo-responsive nanoscrolls can be successfully fabricated by mixing a polyfluoroalkyl azobenzene derivative and a niobate nanosheet, which is exfoliated from potassium hexaniobate. In this study, we have found that the photo-responsive nanoscroll shows a morphological motion of winding and unwinding, which is basically due to the nanosheet sliding within the nanoscroll, by efficient photo-isomerization reactions of the intercalated azobenzene in addition to the interlayer distance change of the nanoscrolls. The relative nanosheet sliding of the nanoscroll is estimated to be ca. 280 nm from the AFM morphology analysis. The distance of the sliding motion is over 20 times that of the averaged nanosheet sliding in the azobenzene/niobate hybrid film reported previously. Photo-responsive nanoscrolls can be expected to be novel photo-activated actuators and artificial muscle model materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1. Photo-isomerization reaction of nanoscrolls. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02177h

  5. Lithium ion battery peformance of silicon nanowires with carbon skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogart, Timothy D; Oka, Daichi; Lu, Xiaotang; Gu, Meng; Wang, Chongmin; Korgel, Brian A

    2014-01-28

    Silicon (Si) nanomaterials have emerged as a leading candidate for next generation lithium-ion battery anodes. However, the low electrical conductivity of Si requires the use of conductive additives in the anode film. Here we report a solution-based synthesis of Si nanowires with a conductive carbon skin. Without any conductive additive, the Si nanowire electrodes exhibited capacities of over 2000 mA h g(-1) for 100 cycles when cycled at C/10 and over 1200 mA h g(-1) when cycled more rapidly at 1C against Li metal. In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation reveals that the carbon skin performs dual roles: it speeds lithiation of the Si nanowires significantly, while also constraining the final volume expansion. The present work sheds light on ways to optimize lithium battery performance by smartly tailoring the nanostructure of composition of materials based on silicon and carbon.

  6. High speed fabrication of aluminum nanostructures with 10 nm spatial resolution by electrochemical replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biring, Sajal; Tsai, Kun-Tong; Sur, Ujjal Kumar; Wang, Yuh-Lin

    2008-09-03

    A high fidelity electrochemical replication technique for the rapid fabrication of Al nanostructures with 10 nm lateral resolution has been successfully demonstrated. Aluminum is electrodeposited onto a lithographically patterned Si master using a non-aqueous organic hydride bath of aluminum chloride and lithium aluminum hydride at room temperature. Chemical pretreatment of the Si surface allows a clean detachment of the replicated Al foil from the master, permitting its repetitive use for mass replication. This high throughput technique opens up new possibilities in the fabrication of Al-related nanostructures, including the growth of long range ordered anodic alumina nanochannel arrays.

  7. Composite anodes for lithium-ion batteries: status and trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian M. Julien

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Presently, the negative electrodes of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs is constituted by carbon-based materials that exhibit a limited specific capacity 372 mAh g−1 associated with the cycle between C and LiC6. Therefore, many efforts are currently made towards the technological development nanostructured materials in which the electrochemical processes occurs as intercalation, alloying or conversion reactions with a good accommodation of dilatation/contraction during cycling. In this review, attention is focused on advanced anode composite materials based on carbon, silicon, germanium, tin, titanium and conversion anode composite based on transition-metal oxides.

  8. Selective Functionalization of Tailored Nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slingenbergh, Winand; Boer, Sanne K. de; Cordes, Thorben; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.; Hosson, Jeff Th.M. De; Dorp, Willem F. van

    2012-01-01

    The controlled positioning of nanostructures with active molecular components is of importance throughout nanoscience and nanotechnology. We present a novel three-step method to produce nanostructures that are selectively decorated with functional molecules. We use fluorophores and nanoparticles to

  9. Nanostructured materials in potentiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düzgün, Ali; Zelada-Guillén, Gustavo A; Crespo, Gastón A; Macho, Santiago; Riu, Jordi; Rius, F Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Potentiometry is a very simple electrochemical technique with extraordinary analytical capabilities. It is also well known that nanostructured materials display properties which they do not show in the bulk phase. The combination of the two fields of potentiometry and nanomaterials is therefore a promising area of research and development. In this report, we explain the fundamentals of potentiometric devices that incorporate nanostructured materials and we highlight the advantages and drawbacks of combining nanomaterials and potentiometry. The paper provides an overview of the role of nanostructured materials in the two commonest potentiometric sensors: field-effect transistors and ion-selective electrodes. Additionally, we provide a few recent examples of new potentiometric sensors that are based on receptors immobilized directly onto the nanostructured material surface. Moreover, we summarize the use of potentiometry to analyze processes involving nanostructured materials and the prospects that the use of nanopores offer to potentiometry. Finally, we discuss several difficulties that currently hinder developments in the field and some future trends that will extend potentiometry into new analytical areas such as biology and medicine.

  10. SnO2-Based Nanomaterials: Synthesis and Application in Lithium-Ion Batteries and Supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinqin Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tin dioxide (SnO2 is an important n-type wide-bandgap semiconductor, and SnO2-based nanostructures are presenting themselves as one of the most important classes due to their various tunable physicochemical properties. In this paper, we firstly outline the syntheses of phase-pure SnO2 hierarchical structures with different morphologies such as nanorods, nanosheets, and nanospheres, as well as their modifications by doping and compositing with other materials. Then, we reviewed the design of SnO2-based nanostructures with improved performance in the areas of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs and supercapacitors.

  11. Micromachining with Nanostructured Cutting Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the brief is to explain how nanostructured tools can be used to machine materials at the microscale.  The aims of the brief are to explain to readers how to apply nanostructured tools to micromachining applications. This book describes the application of nanostructured tools to machining engineering materials and includes methods for calculating basic features of micromachining. It explains the nature of contact between tools and work pieces to build a solid understanding of how nanostructured tools are made.

  12. Lithium extractive metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josa, J.M.; Merino, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Nuclear Fusion National Program depends on lithium supplies. Extractive metallurgy development is subordinate to the localization and evaluation of ore resources. Nowadays lithium raw materials usable with present technology consist of pegmatite ore and brine. The Instituto Geologico y Minero Espanol (IGME) found lepidolite, ambligonite and spodrimene in pegmatite ores in different areas of Spain. However, an evaluation of resources has not been made. Different Spanish surface and underground brines are to be sampled and analyzed. If none of these contain significant levels of lithium, the Junta de Energia Nuclear (JEN) will try an agreement with IGME for ENUSA (Empresa Nacional del Uranio, S.A.) to explore pegmatite-ore bodies from different locations. Different work stages, laboratory tests, pilots plants tests and commercial plant, are foreseen, if the deposits are found. (author)

  13. Nanostructured electronic and magnetic materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Research and development in nanostructured materials is one of the most intensely studied areas in science. As a result of concerted R & D efforts, nanostructured electronic and magnetic materials have achieved commercial success. Specific examples of novel industrially important nanostructured electronic and magnetic ...

  14. Chiral Inorganic Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei; Xu, Liguang; de Moura, André F; Wu, Xiaoling; Kuang, Hua; Xu, Chuanlai; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2017-06-28

    The field of chiral inorganic nanostructures is rapidly expanding. It started from the observation of strong circular dichroism during the synthesis of individual nanoparticles (NPs) and their assemblies and expanded to sophisticated synthetic protocols involving nanostructures from metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and nanocarbons. Besides the well-established chirality transfer from bioorganic molecules, other methods to impart handedness to nanoscale matter specific to inorganic materials were discovered, including three-dimentional lithography, multiphoton chirality transfer, polarization effects in nanoscale assemblies, and others. Multiple chiral geometries were observed with characteristic scales from ångströms to microns. Uniquely high values of chiral anisotropy factors that spurred the development of the field and differentiate it from chiral structures studied before, are now well understood; they originate from strong resonances of incident electromagnetic waves with plasmonic and excitonic states typical for metals and semiconductors. At the same time, distinct similarities with chiral supramolecular and biological systems also emerged. They can be seen in the synthesis and separation methods, chemical properties of individual NPs, geometries of the nanoparticle assemblies, and interactions with biological membranes. Their analysis can help us understand in greater depth the role of chiral asymmetry in nature inclusive of both earth and space. Consideration of both differences and similarities between chiral inorganic, organic, and biological nanostructures will also accelerate the development of technologies based on chiroplasmonic and chiroexcitonic effects. This review will cover both experiment and theory of chiral nanostructures starting with the origin and multiple components of mirror asymmetry of individual NPs and their assemblies. We shall consider four different types of chirality in nanostructures and related physical, chemical, and

  15. Dissolution behavior of lithium compounds in ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Furukawa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to exchange the components which received irradiation damage during the operation at the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility, the adhered lithium, which is partially converted to lithium compounds such as lithium oxide and lithium hydroxide, should be removed from the components. In this study, the dissolution experiments of lithium compounds (lithium nitride, lithium hydroxide, and lithium oxide were performed in a candidate solvent, allowing the clarification of time and temperature dependence. Based on the results, a cleaning procedure for adhered lithium on the inner surface of the components was proposed.

  16. Nanostructured piezoelectric energy harvesters

    CERN Document Server

    Briscoe, Joe

    2014-01-01

    This book covers a range of devices that use piezoelectricity to convert mechanical deformation into electrical energy and relates their output capabilities to a range of potential applications. Starting with a description of the fundamental principles and properties of piezo- and ferroelectric materials, where applications of bulk materials are well established, the book shows how nanostructures of these materials are being developed for energy harvesting applications. The authors show how a nanostructured device can be produced, and put in context some of the approaches that are being invest

  17. Conversion Reaction-Based Oxide Nanomaterials for Lithium Ion Battery Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Seung-Ho; Lee, Soo Hong; Lee, Dong Jun; Sung, Yung-Eun; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2016-04-27

    Developing high-energy-density electrodes for lithium ion batteries (LIBs) is of primary importance to meet the challenges in electronics and automobile industries in the near future. Conversion reaction-based transition metal oxides are attractive candidates for LIB anodes because of their high theoretical capacities. This review summarizes recent advances on the development of nanostructured transition metal oxides for use in lithium ion battery anodes based on conversion reactions. The oxide materials covered in this review include oxides of iron, manganese, cobalt, copper, nickel, molybdenum, zinc, ruthenium, chromium, and tungsten, and mixed metal oxides. Various kinds of nanostructured materials including nanowires, nanosheets, hollow structures, porous structures, and oxide/carbon nanocomposites are discussed in terms of their LIB anode applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Microwave irradiation controls the manganese oxidation states of nanostructured (Li[Li0.2Mn0.52Ni0.13Co0.13Al0.02]O2) layered cathode materials for high-performance lithium ion batteries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jafta, CJ

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid synthesis procedure, combining microwave irradiation and conventional annealing process, is described for the preparation of lithium-rich manganese-rich cathode materials, Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2 (LMNC) and its aluminum...

  19. Modification of both d33 and TC in a potassium-sodium niobate ternary system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bo; Wu, Jiagang; Xiao, Dingquan; Zhu, Jianguo

    2015-12-28

    In this work, we simultaneously achieved a giant d33 and a high TC in a lead-free piezoelectric ternary system of (1-x-y)K0.48Na0.52NbO3-xBiFeO3-yBi0.5Na0.5ZrO3 {(1-x-y)KNN-xBF-yBNZ}. Owing to the rhombohedral-orthorhombic-tetragonal (R-O-T) phase coexistence and the enhanced dielectric and ferroelectric properties, the ceramics with a composition of (x = 0.006, y = 0.04) show a giant d33 of ∼428 pC N(-1) together with a TC of ∼318 °C, thereby proving that the design of ternary systems is an effective way to achieve both high d33 and high TC in KNN-based materials. In addition, a good thermal stability for piezoelectricity was also observed in these ceramics (e.g., d33 > 390 pC N(-1), T ≤ 300 °C). This is the first time such a good comprehensive performance in potassium-sodium niobate materials has been obtained. As a result, we believe that this type of material system with both giant d33 and high TC is a promising candidate for high-temperature piezoelectric devices.

  20. Phase transition characteristics and associated piezoelectricity of potassium-sodium niobate lead-free ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyu; Hu, Liang; Zhang, Qilong; Yang, Hui

    2015-08-14

    To achieve high piezoelectric activity and a wide sintering temperature range, the ceramic system concerning (1 - x)(K(0.48)Na(0.52))(Nb(0.96)Sb(0.04))O(3)-x[Bi(0.5)(Na(0.7)Ag(0.3))(0.5)](0.90) Zn(0.10)ZrO(3) was designed, and the rhombohedral-tetragonal (R-T) phase boundary can drive a high d(33). Phase transition characteristics as well as their effects on the electrical properties were investigated systematically. The R-T coexistence phase boundary (0.04 ≤ x ≤ 0.05) can be driven via modification with BNAZZ, and has been confirmed by XRD and temperature-dependent dielectric constants as well as Raman analysis, and the ceramics possess enhanced piezoelectric properties (d(33) ∼ 425 pC N(-1) and k(p) ∼ 0.43) and a high unipolar strain (∼0.3%). In addition, a wide sintering temperature range of 1050-1080 °C can warrant a large d(33) of 400-430 pC N(-1), which can benefit practical applications. As a result, the addition of BNAZZ is an effective method to improve the electrical properties (piezoelectricity and strain) and sintering behavior of potassium-sodium niobate ceramics.

  1. Microwave-assisted sintering of non-stoichiometric strontium bismuth niobate ceramic: Structural and dielectric properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Rajveer [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, New Delhi 110007 (India); Department of Physics, Atmaram Sanatan Dharma College, University of Delhi, Dhaula Kuan, New Delhi 110021 (India); Luthra, Vandna [Department of Physics, Gargi College, University of Delhi, Siri Fort Road, New Delhi 110049 (India); Tandon, R.P., E-mail: ram_tandon@hotmail.com [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, New Delhi 110007 (India)

    2016-11-01

    In recent years the microwave sintering has been utilized for the synthesis of materials in enhancement of the properties. In this paper strontium bismuth niobate (Sr{sub 0.8}Bi{sub 2.2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9}:SBN) bulk ceramic has been synthesized by microwave reactive sintering and conventional heating techniques. A relative density of 99.6% has been achieved for microwave sintered SBN, which is higher than that of (98.81%) conventionally sintered SBN. The phase formation of SBN synthesized by both processes has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The surface morphology of SBN was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The microstructure was found to be more uniform in case of SBN sintered by microwave sintering. The dielectric properties of SBN were studied as a function of frequency in the temperature range of 30–500 °C. Both the samples synthesized by two different processes were found to follow Curie–Weiss law above the transition temperature. The Curie temperature was found to be higher for microwave sintered SBN. The dielectric constant and the transition temperature were observed to be higher for SBN ceramic synthesized by microwave sintering technique. The ac and dc activation energy values were also found to be higher for microwave sintered SBN as compared to conventional sintering technique.

  2. Temperature dependent dielectric relaxation and ac-conductivity of alkali niobate ceramics studied by impedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Abhinav; Mantry, Snigdha Paramita; Fahad, Mohd.; Sarun, P. M.

    2018-05-01

    Sodium niobate (NaNbO3) ceramics is prepared by conventional solid state reaction method at sintering temperature 1150 °C for 4 h. The structural information of the material has been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The XRD analysis of NaNbO3 ceramics shows an orthorhombic structure. The FE-SEM micrograph of NaNbO3 ceramics exhibit grains with grain sizes ranging between 1 μm to 5 μm. The surface coverage and average grain size of NaNbO3 ceramics are found to be 97.6 % and 2.5 μm, respectively. Frequency dependent electrical properties of NaNbO3 is investigated from room temperature to 500 °C in wide frequency range (100 Hz-5 MHz). Dielectric constant, ac-conductivity, impedance, modulus and Nyquist analysis are performed. The observed dielectric constant (1 kHz) at transition temperature (400 °C) are 975. From conductivity analysis, the estimated activation energy of NaNbO3 ceramics is 0.58 eV at 10 kHz. The result of Nyquist plot shows that the electrical behavior of NaNbO3 ceramics is contributed by grain and grain boundary responses. The impedance and modulus spectrum asserts that the negative temperature coefficient of resistance (NTCR) behavior and non-Debye type relaxation in NaNbO3.

  3. Dielectric constant enhancement in a silicone elastomer filled with lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallone, Giuseppe; Carpi, Federico; De Rossi, Danilo; Levita, Giovanni; Marchetti, Augusto

    2007-01-01

    Lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) ferroelectric powder was used to develop a particulated composite based on a silicone elastomer matrix, with improved dielectric permittivity. The filler was characterised by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Complex dielectric permittivity (10-10 8 Hz) and tensile mechanical properties (elastic modulus and ultimate stress) of composites at various filler contents (up to 30% by vol.) were compared with those of the neat silicone elastomer. Both the dielectric constant and loss factor regularly increased with the filler content. The elastic modulus increased with a lower rate than that of the dielectric constant. Even though the addition of filler resulted in a detriment of both toughness, ultimate stress and elongation at break, a good stretchability was still retained, as elongation ratios greater than 3 were possible at the highest filler content. Several dielectric models were compared to the experimental data and the best match was achieved by the Bruggeman model, which can be used as a predictive rule for different volume contents of filler

  4. Dielectric constant enhancement in a silicone elastomer filled with lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallone, Giuseppe [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Material Science, University of Pisa, via Diotisalvi 2, I-56126 Pisa (Italy)]. E-mail: gallone@ing.unipi.it; Carpi, Federico [Interdepartmental Research Centre ' E. Piaggio' , University of Pisa, via Diotisalvi 2, I-56126 Pisa (Italy)]. E-mail: f.carpi@ing.unipi.it; De Rossi, Danilo [Interdepartmental Research Centre ' E. Piaggio' , University of Pisa, via Diotisalvi 2, I-56126 Pisa (Italy)]. E-mail: d.derossi@ing.unipi.it; Levita, Giovanni [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Material Science, University of Pisa, via Diotisalvi 2, I-56126 Pisa (Italy)]. E-mail: levita@ing.unipi.it; Marchetti, Augusto [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Material Science, University of Pisa, via Diotisalvi 2, I-56126 Pisa (Italy)]. E-mail: marchetti@ing.unipi.it

    2007-01-15

    Lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) ferroelectric powder was used to develop a particulated composite based on a silicone elastomer matrix, with improved dielectric permittivity. The filler was characterised by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Complex dielectric permittivity (10-10{sup 8} Hz) and tensile mechanical properties (elastic modulus and ultimate stress) of composites at various filler contents (up to 30% by vol.) were compared with those of the neat silicone elastomer. Both the dielectric constant and loss factor regularly increased with the filler content. The elastic modulus increased with a lower rate than that of the dielectric constant. Even though the addition of filler resulted in a detriment of both toughness, ultimate stress and elongation at break, a good stretchability was still retained, as elongation ratios greater than 3 were possible at the highest filler content. Several dielectric models were compared to the experimental data and the best match was achieved by the Bruggeman model, which can be used as a predictive rule for different volume contents of filler.

  5. Synthesis, structure and electrical properties of Mg-, Ni-codoped bismuth niobates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Koroleva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mg-, Ni-codoped bismuth niobates Bi1.6Mg0.8-xNixNb1.6O7-δ (x = 0; 0.2; 0.4; 0.6; 0.8 were obtained by conventional solid-state reaction method. It was shown that the Mg atoms are distributed at the Nb sites while the Ni atoms are distributed over the Bi- and the Nb-sites, according to the results of comparison of pycnometric and X-ray density of the Bi1.6Mg0.4Ni0.4Nb1.6O7-δ pyrochlore. In this case, about 15–20% of the vacancies are formed at the Bi sites. The obtained compounds are stable up to their melting point based on the DSC analysis data. Real dielectric permittivity ε' of the Bi1.6Mg0.8-xNixNb1.6O7-δ samples decreases from 80 to 65 with the temperature decrease from 25 to 700 °C and practically does not depend on frequency in the range of 1–1000 kHz. Oxides Bi1.6Mg0.8-xNixNb1.6O7-δ behave like insulators up to 280 °C, their conductivity increases with temperature (Ea,dc ≈ 1.3 eV, dc and with the Ni content at a given temperature.

  6. Nanocarbon networks for advanced rechargeable lithium batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Sen; Guo, Yu-Guo; Wan, Li-Jun

    2012-10-16

    Carbon is one of the essential elements in energy storage. In rechargeable lithium batteries, researchers have considered many types of nanostructured carbons, such as carbon nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and nanoporous carbon, as anode materials and, especially, as key components for building advanced composite electrode materials. Nanocarbons can form efficient three-dimensional conducting networks that improve the performance of electrode materials suffering from the limited kinetics of lithium storage. Although the porous structure guarantees a fast migration of Li ions, the nanocarbon network can serve as an effective matrix for dispersing the active materials to prevent them from agglomerating. The nanocarbon network also affords an efficient electron pathway to provide better electrical contacts. Because of their structural stability and flexibility, nanocarbon networks can alleviate the stress and volume changes that occur in active materials during the Li insertion/extraction process. Through the elegant design of hierarchical electrode materials with nanocarbon networks, researchers can improve both the kinetic performance and the structural stability of the electrode material, which leads to optimal battery capacity, cycling stability, and rate capability. This Account summarizes recent progress in the structural design, chemical synthesis, and characterization of the electrochemical properties of nanocarbon networks for Li-ion batteries. In such systems, storage occurs primarily in the non-carbon components, while carbon acts as the conductor and as the structural buffer. We emphasize representative nanocarbon networks including those that use carbon nanotubes and graphene. We discuss the role of carbon in enhancing the performance of various electrode materials in areas such as Li storage, Li ion and electron transport, and structural stability during cycling. We especially highlight the use of graphene to construct the carbon conducting

  7. Lithium thionyl chloride battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saathoff, D.J.; Venkatasetty, H.V.

    1982-10-19

    The discharge rate and internal conductivity of electrochemical cell including a lithium anode, and a cathode and an electrolyte including LiAlCl4 and SOC2 is improved by the addition of an amount of a mixture containing AlCl3 and butyl pyridinium chloride.

  8. Synthesis of lithium ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz G, D.; Bulbulian, S.

    2001-01-01

    In this work, lithium silicates were synthesised by the combustion technique, the mixtures were prepared with different molar ratios and using urea as fuel. Its characterization was realized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the percentages of its sizes were determined measuring the area under curve of the peaks in the diffractogram. (Author)

  9. Epitaxial growth of hybrid nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chaoliang; Chen, Junze; Wu, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Hua

    2018-02-01

    Hybrid nanostructures are a class of materials that are typically composed of two or more different components, in which each component has at least one dimension on the nanoscale. The rational design and controlled synthesis of hybrid nanostructures are of great importance in enabling the fine tuning of their properties and functions. Epitaxial growth is a promising approach to the controlled synthesis of hybrid nanostructures with desired structures, crystal phases, exposed facets and/or interfaces. This Review provides a critical summary of the state of the art in the field of epitaxial growth of hybrid nanostructures. We discuss the historical development, architectures and compositions, epitaxy methods, characterization techniques and advantages of epitaxial hybrid nanostructures. Finally, we provide insight into future research directions in this area, which include the epitaxial growth of hybrid nanostructures from a wider range of materials, the study of the underlying mechanism and determining the role of epitaxial growth in influencing the properties and application performance of hybrid nanostructures.

  10. Solubility of lithium deuteride in liquid lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veleckis, E.; Yonco, R.M.; Maroni, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    The solubility of LiD in liquid lithium between the eutectic and monotectic temperatures was measured using a direct sampling method. Solubilities were found to range from 0.0154 mol.% LiD at 199 0 C to 3.32 mol.% LiD at 498 0 C. The data were used in the derivation of an expression for the activity coefficient of LiD as a function of temperature and composition and an equation relating deuteride solubility and temperature, thus defining the liquidus curve. Similar equations were also derived for the Li-LiH system using the existing solubility data. Extrapolation of the liquidus curves yielded the eutectic concentrations (0.040 mol.% LiH and 0.035 mol.% LiD) and the freezing point depressions (0.23 0 C for Li-LiH and 0.20 0 C for Li-LiD) at the eutectic point. The results are compared with the literature data for hydrogen and deuterium. The implications of the relatively high solubility of hydrogen isotopes in lithium just above the melting point are discussed with respect to the cold trapping of tritium in fusion reactor blankets. (Auth.)

  11. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2012-10-02

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  12. Defects in semiconductor nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Impurities play a pivotal role in semiconductors. One part in a million of phosphorous in silicon alters the conductivity of the latter by several orders of magnitude. Indeed, the information age is possible only because of the unique role of shallow impurities in semiconductors. Although work in semiconductor nanostructures ...

  13. Nanostructures-History

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Nanostructures-History. Inspiration to Nanotechnology-. The Japanese scientist Norio Taniguchi of the Tokyo University of Science was used the term "nano-technology" in a 1974 conference, to describe semiconductor processes such as thin film His definition was, ...

  14. Preparation of 3D nanoporous copper-supported cuprous oxide for high-performance lithium ion battery anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dequan; Yang, Zhibo; Wang, Peng; Li, Fei; Wang, Desheng; He, Deyan

    2013-03-07

    Three-dimensional (3D) nanoporous architectures can provide efficient and rapid pathways for Li-ion and electron transport as well as short solid-state diffusion lengths in lithium ion batteries (LIBs). In this work, 3D nanoporous copper-supported cuprous oxide was successfully fabricated by low-cost selective etching of an electron-beam melted Cu(50)Al(50) alloy and subsequent in situ thermal oxidation. The architecture was used as an anode in lithium ion batteries. In the first cycle, the sample delivered an extremely high lithium storage capacity of about 2.35 mA h cm(-2). A high reversible capacity of 1.45 mA h cm(-2) was achieved after 120 cycles. This work develops a promising approach to building reliable 3D nanostructured electrodes for high-performance lithium ion batteries.

  15. Approach to lithium burn-up effect in lithium ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasneur, B.

    1994-01-01

    The lithium burn-up in Li 2 ZrO 3 is simulated by removing lithium under Li 2 O form and trapping it in high specific surface area powder while heating during 15 days or 1 month at moderate temperature so that lithium mobility be large enough without causing any sintering neither of the specimens nor of the powder. In a first treatment at 775 deg C during 1 month. 30% of the lithium content could be removed inducing a lithium concentration gradient in the specimen and the formation of a lithium-free monoclinic ZrO 2 skin. Improvements led to similar results at 650 deg C and 600 deg C, the latter temperatures are closer to the operating temperature of the ceramic breeder blanket of a fusion reactor. (author) 4 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  16. Scalable 2D Mesoporous Silicon Nanosheets for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Battery Anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song; Chen, Zhuo; Xu, Xingyan; Cao, Chuanbao; Xia, Min; Luo, Yunjun

    2018-02-05

    Constructing unique mesoporous 2D Si nanostructures to shorten the lithium-ion diffusion pathway, facilitate interfacial charge transfer, and enlarge the electrode-electrolyte interface offers exciting opportunities in future high-performance lithium-ion batteries. However, simultaneous realization of 2D and mesoporous structures for Si material is quite difficult due to its non-van der Waals structure. Here, the coexistence of both mesoporous and 2D ultrathin nanosheets in the Si anodes and considerably high surface area (381.6 m 2 g -1 ) are successfully achieved by a scalable and cost-efficient method. After being encapsulated with the homogeneous carbon layer, the Si/C nanocomposite anodes achieve outstanding reversible capacity, high cycle stability, and excellent rate capability. In particular, the reversible capacity reaches 1072.2 mA h g -1 at 4 A g -1 even after 500 cycles. The obvious enhancements can be attributed to the synergistic effect between the unique 2D mesoporous nanostructure and carbon capsulation. Furthermore, full-cell evaluations indicate that the unique Si/C nanostructures have a great potential in the next-generation lithium-ion battery. These findings not only greatly improve the electrochemical performances of Si anode, but also shine some light on designing the unique nanomaterials for various energy devices. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Lithium clearance in chronic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A L; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Leyssac, P P

    1989-01-01

    1. Lithium clearance measurements were made in 72 patients with chronic nephropathy of different aetiology and moderate to severely reduced renal function. 2. Lithium clearance was strictly correlated with glomerular filtration rate, and there was no suggestion of distal tubular reabsorption...... of lithium or influence of osmotic diuresis. 3. Fractional reabsorption of lithium was reduced in most patients with glomerular filtration rates below 25 ml/min. 4. Calculated fractional distal reabsorption of sodium was reduced in most patients with glomerular filtration rates below 50 ml/min. 5. Lithium...... that lithium clearance may be a measure of the delivery of sodium and water from the renal proximal tubule. With this assumption it was found that adjustment of the sodium excretion in chronic nephropathy initially takes place in the distal parts of the nephron (loop of Henle, distal tubule and collecting duct...

  18. Experimental lithium system. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolowith, R.; Berg, J.D.; Miller, W.C.

    1985-04-01

    A full-scale mockup of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility lithium system was built at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL). This isothermal mockup, called the Experimental Lithium System (ELS), was prototypic of FMIT, excluding the accelerator and dump heat exchanger. This 3.8 m 3 lithium test loop achieved over 16,000 hours of safe and reliable operation. An extensive test program demonstrated satisfactory performance of the system components, including the HEDL-supplied electromagnetic lithium pump, the lithium jet target, the purification and characterization hardware, as well as the auxiliary argon and vacuum systems. Experience with the test loop provided important information on system operation, performance, and reliability. This report presents a complete overview of the entire Experimental Lithium System test program and also includes a summary of such areas as instrumentation, coolant chemistry, vapor/aerosol transport, and corrosion

  19. Potassium Sodium Niobate-Based Lead-Free Piezoelectric Multilayer Ceramics Co-Fired with Nickel Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichiro Kawada

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although lead-free piezoelectric ceramics have been extensively studied, many problems must still be overcome before they are suitable for practical use. One of the main problems is fabricating a multilayer structure, and one solution attracting growing interest is the use of lead-free multilayer piezoelectric ceramics. The paper reviews work that has been done by the authors on lead-free alkali niobate-based multilayer piezoelectric ceramics co-fired with nickel inner electrodes. Nickel inner electrodes have many advantages, such as high electromigration resistance, high interfacial strength with ceramics, and greater cost effectiveness than silver palladium inner electrodes. However, widely used lead zirconate titanate-based ceramics cannot be co-fired with nickel inner electrodes, and silver palladium inner electrodes are usually used for lead zirconate titanate-based piezoelectric ceramics. A possible alternative is lead-free ceramics co-fired with nickel inner electrodes. We have thus been developing lead-free alkali niobate-based multilayer ceramics co-fired with nickel inner electrodes. The normalized electric-field-induced thickness strain (Smax/Emax of a representative alkali niobate-based multilayer ceramic structure with nickel inner electrodes was 360 pm/V, where Smax denotes the maximum strain and Emax denotes the maximum electric field. This value is about half that for the lead zirconate titanate-based ceramics that are widely used. However, a comparable value can be obtained by stacking more ceramic layers with smaller thicknesses. In the paper, the compositional design and process used to co-fire lead-free ceramics with nickel inner electrodes are introduced, and their piezoelectric properties and reliabilities are shown. Recent advances are introduced, and future development is discussed.

  20. Potassium Sodium Niobate-Based Lead-Free Piezoelectric Multilayer Ceramics Co-Fired with Nickel Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Shinichiro; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Hideki; Kimura, Masahiko; Ando, Akira; Omiya, Suetake; Kubodera, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    Although lead-free piezoelectric ceramics have been extensively studied, many problems must still be overcome before they are suitable for practical use. One of the main problems is fabricating a multilayer structure, and one solution attracting growing interest is the use of lead-free multilayer piezoelectric ceramics. The paper reviews work that has been done by the authors on lead-free alkali niobate-based multilayer piezoelectric ceramics co-fired with nickel inner electrodes. Nickel inner electrodes have many advantages, such as high electromigration resistance, high interfacial strength with ceramics, and greater cost effectiveness than silver palladium inner electrodes. However, widely used lead zirconate titanate-based ceramics cannot be co-fired with nickel inner electrodes, and silver palladium inner electrodes are usually used for lead zirconate titanate-based piezoelectric ceramics. A possible alternative is lead-free ceramics co-fired with nickel inner electrodes. We have thus been developing lead-free alkali niobate-based multilayer ceramics co-fired with nickel inner electrodes. The normalized electric-field-induced thickness strain (Smax/Emax) of a representative alkali niobate-based multilayer ceramic structure with nickel inner electrodes was 360 pm/V, where Smax denotes the maximum strain and Emax denotes the maximum electric field. This value is about half that for the lead zirconate titanate-based ceramics that are widely used. However, a comparable value can be obtained by stacking more ceramic layers with smaller thicknesses. In the paper, the compositional design and process used to co-fire lead-free ceramics with nickel inner electrodes are introduced, and their piezoelectric properties and reliabilities are shown. Recent advances are introduced, and future development is discussed. PMID:28793646

  1. Precisely controlled resorcinol-formaldehyde resin coating for fabricating core-shell, hollow, and yolk-shell carbon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaoliang; Liu, Shengjie; Zang, Jun; Xu, Chaofa; Zheng, Ming-Sen; Dong, Quan-Feng; Sun, Daohua; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2013-08-07

    This work provides a facile one-step sol-gel route to synthesize high-quality resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin coated nanocomposites that can be further used to fabricate desired carbon nanostructures. Colloidal particles with different morphologies and sizes can be coated with high-quality RF resin shells by the proposed cationic surfactant assisted RF resin coating strategy. The as-synthesized RF resin coated nanocomposites are ideal candidates for selective synthesis of core-shell, hollow, and yolk-shell carbon nanostructures. Based on the carboxylic functional RF resin coating, graphitic carbon nanostructures can also be synthesized by employing the graphitization catalyst. The as-synthesized carbon nanostructures show the advantageous performances in several applications. Hollow carbon spheres are potential electrode materials for lithium-sulfur batteries. Hollow graphitic spheres are promising catalyst supports for oxygen reduction reaction. And yolk-shell structured Au@HCS nanoreactors with ultrathin shells exhibit high catalytic activity and recyclability in confined catalysis.

  2. Lithium nanoparticles in lithium fluorite crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibragimova, E. M.; Mussaeva, M. A.; Kalanov, M. U.; Mukhamedshina, N. M.; Sandalov, V. N.

    2012-12-01

    Using intensive optical absorption techniques we studied formation of lithium nanoparticles in LiF crystals under 60Co-γ-irradiation in the dose range of 105-109 R at 300 K. At 106 R the F-center absorption band 4.95 eV grows up D>3 and splits into a symmetric doublet of narrow resonances similar to s1-metal nanoparticles surface plasmons. The maximal concentration 3.3·1017 cm-3 corresponds to ~14 nm distance between F-centers when they form F-F-pair and then M-center. Absorption band of divacancies 2.75 eV splits into triplet at > 107 R, when Lin nanoparticles 3.26 eV are formed. Twinned LiF lattice provides the defects ordering and assembling of Lin nanorods with the size of 8 nm related with the peak electric conductivity at 240-280 K.

  3. Membranes in Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junbo Hou

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Lithium ion batteries have proven themselves the main choice of power sources for portable electronics. Besides consumer electronics, lithium ion batteries are also growing in popularity for military, electric vehicle, and aerospace applications. The present review attempts to summarize the knowledge about some selected membranes in lithium ion batteries. Based on the type of electrolyte used, literature concerning ceramic-glass and polymer solid ion conductors, microporous filter type separators and polymer gel based membranes is reviewed.

  4. Dissociative attachment to lithium dimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadehra, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The cross sections and the rates of production of negative ions of atomic lithium by the process of dissociative electron attachment to lithium dimers are obtained by using the resonant scattering theory. Both the cross sections as well as the rates of attachment are enhanced if the lithium molecule is initially vibrationally excited. General expressions for approximately obtaining the rates of electron attachment to any vibrational level of Li 2 are presented

  5. Manganese Nanostructures and Magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simov, Kirie Rangelov

    The primary goal of this study is to incorporate adatoms with large magnetic moment, such as Mn, into two technologically significant group IV semiconductor (SC) matrices, e.g. Si and Ge. For the first time in the world, we experimentally demonstrate Mn doping by embedding nanostructured thin layers, i.e. delta-doping. The growth is observed by in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), which combines topographic and electronic information in a single image. We investigate the initial stages of Mn monolayer growth on a Si(100)(2x1) surface reconstruction, develop methods for classification of nanostructure types for a range of surface defect concentrations (1.0 to 18.2%), and subsequently encapsulate the thin Mn layer in a SC matrix. These experiments are instrumental in generating a surface processing diagram for self-assembly of monoatomic Mn-wires. The role of surface vacancies has also been studied by kinetic Monte Carlo modeling and the experimental observations are compared with the simulation results, leading to the conclusion that Si(100)(2x1) vacancies serve as nucleation centers in the Mn-Si system. Oxide formation, which happens readily in air, is detrimental to ferromagnetism and lessens the magnetic properties of the nanostructures. Therefore, the protective SC cap, composed of either Si or Ge, serves a dual purpose: it is both the embedding matrix for the Mn nanostructured thin film and a protective agent for oxidation. STM observations of partially deposited caps ensure that the nanostructures remain intact during growth. Lastly, the relationship between magnetism and nanostructure types is established by an in-depth study using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). This sensitive method detects signals even at coverages less than one atomic layer of Mn. XMCD is capable of discerning which chemical compounds contribute to the magnetic moment of the system, and provides a ratio between the orbital and spin contributions. Depending on the amount

  6. Recovery of lithium from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooi, Kenta; Miyai, Yoshitaka; Katoh, Shunsaku; Abe, Mitsuo.

    1989-01-01

    Lithium has been used for air conditioners, aluminum refining, ceramics, organic metal compounds, batteries and many other uses. Besides, attention is paid as the aluminum-lithium alloys as aircraft materials, and the raw materials for large capacity batteries and nuclear fusion reactors for the future. The amount of lithium resources has been estimated as 14 million tons, and is relatively abundant, but when the future increase of demand is considered, it is not necessarily sufficient. Japan lacks lithium resources, and the stable ensuring of the resources has become an important problem. Seawater contains lithium by 170 μg/l, and its total amount reaches 230 billion tons. The process of recovering lithium from seawater, geothermal water and natural gas brine has been actively researched since 10 years ago centering around Japan. At present, the search for the adsorbent that effectively collects lithium is the main subject. Also the recovery by coprecipitation has been investigated basically. The inorganic adsorbent for lithium is classified into aluminum type, compound antimonic acid type, layered compound type, ion sieve oxide type and others. Their lithium adsorption performance and adsorption mechanism are different remarkably, therefore, these of each group are described. (K.I.) 70 refs

  7. Synthesis of ferroelectric nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roervik, Per Martin

    2008-12-15

    The increasing miniaturization of electric and mechanical components makes the synthesis and assembly of nanoscale structures an important step in modern technology. Functional materials, such as the ferroelectric perovskites, are vital to the integration and utility value of nanotechnology in the future. In the present work, chemical methods to synthesize one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of ferroelectric perovskites have been studied. To successfully and controllably make 1D nanostructures by chemical methods it is very important to understand the growth mechanism of these nanostructures, in order to design the structures for use in various applications. For the integration of 1D nanostructures into devices it is also very important to be able to make arrays and large-area designed structures from the building blocks that single nanostructures constitute. As functional materials, it is of course also vital to study the properties of the nanostructures. The characterization of properties of single nanostructures is challenging, but essential to the use of such structures. The aim of this work has been to synthesize high quality single-crystalline 1D nanostructures of ferroelectric perovskites with emphasis on PbTiO3 , to make arrays or hierarchical nanostructures of 1D nanostructures on substrates, to understand the growth mechanisms of the 1D nanostructures, and to investigate the ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties of the 1D nanostructures. In Paper I, a molten salt synthesis route, previously reported to yield BaTiO3 , PbTiO3 and Na2Ti6O13 nanorods, was re-examined in order to elucidate the role of volatile chlorides. A precursor mixture containing barium (or lead) and titanium was annealed in the presence of NaCl at 760 degrees Celsius or 820 degrees Celsius. The main products were respectively isometric nanocrystalline BaTiO3 and PbTiO3. Nanorods were also detected, but electron diffraction revealed that the composition of the nanorods was

  8. Composition-Driven Phase Boundary and Piezoelectricity in Potassium-Sodium Niobate-Based Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ting; Wu, Jiagang; Xiao, Dingquan; Zhu, Jianguo; Wang, Xiangjian; Lou, Xiaojie

    2015-09-16

    The piezoelectricity of (K,Na)NbO3 ceramics strongly depends on the phase boundary types as well as the doped compositions. Here, we systematically studied the relationships between the compositions and phase boundary types in (K,Na) (Nb,Sb)O3-Bi0.5Na0.5AO3 (KNNS-BNA, A=Hf, Zr, Ti, Sn) ceramics; then their piezoelectricity can be readily modified. Their phase boundary types are determined by the doped elements. A rhombohedral-tetragonal (R-T) phase boundary can be driven in the compositions range of 0.035≤BNH≤0.040 and 0.035≤BNZ≤0.045; an orthorhombic-tetragonal (O-T) phase boundary is formed in the composition range of 0.005≤BNT≤0.02; and a pure O phase can be only observed regardless of BNS content (≤0.01). In addition, the phase boundary types strongly affect their corresponding piezoelectricities. A larger d33 (∼440-450 pC/N) and a higher d33* (∼742-834 pm/V) can be attained in KNNS-BNA (A=Zr and Hf) ceramics due to the involvement of R-T phase boundary, and unfortunately KNNS-BNA (A=Sn and Ti) ceramics possess a relatively poor piezoelectricity (d33≤200 and d33*piezoelectricity and phase boundary types were also discussed. We believe that comprehensive research can design more excellent ceramic systems concerning potassium-sodium niobate.

  9. Preparation and enhanced visible-light photocatalytic activity of graphitic carbon nitride/bismuth niobate heterojunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengqu; Yang, Yuxin; Guo, Yingna; Guo, Wan; Wang, Mei; Guo, Yihang; Huo, Mingxin

    2013-10-15

    A series of graphitic carbon nitride/bismuth niobate (g-C3N4/Bi5Nb3O15) heterojunctions with g-C3N4 doping level of 10-90 wt% were prepared by a facile milling-heat treatment method. The phase and chemical structures, surface compositions, electronic and optical properties as well as morphologies of the prepared g-C3N4/Bi5Nb3O15 were well-characterized. Subsequently, the photocatalytic activity and stability of g-C3N4/Bi5Nb3O15 were evaluated by the degradation of aqueous methyl orange (MO) and 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) under the visible-light irradiation. At suitable g-C3N4 doping levels, g-C3N4/Bi5Nb3O15 exhibited enhanced visible-light photocatalytic activity compared with pure g-C3N4 or Bi5Nb3O15. This excellent photocatalytic activity was revealed in terms of the extension of visible-light response and efficient separation and transportation of the photogenerated electrons and holes due to coupling of g-C3N4 and Bi5Nb3O15. Additionally, the active species yielded in the pure g-C3N4- and g-C3N4/Bi5Nb3O15-catalyzed 4-CP photodegradation systems were investigated by the free radical and hole scavenging experiments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Hierarchical nitrogen doped bismuth niobate architectures: controllable synthesis and excellent photocatalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jungang; Cao, Rui; Wang, Zheng; Jiao, Shuqiang; Zhu, Hongmin

    2012-05-30

    Nitrogen doped bismuth niobate (N-Bi(3)NbO(7)) hierarchical architectures were synthesized via a facile two-step hydrothermal process. XRD patterns revealed that the defect fluorite-type crystal structure of Bi(3)NbO(7) remained intact upon nitrogen doping. Electron microscopy showed the N-Bi(3)NbO(7) architecture has a unique peony-like spherical superstructure composed of numerous nanosheets. UV-vis spectra indicated that nitrogen doping in the compound results in a red-shift of the absorption edge from 450nm to 470nm. XPS indicated that [Bi/Nb]N bonds were formed by inducing nitrogen to replace a small amount of oxygen in Bi(3)NbO(7-x)N(x), which is explained by electronic structure calculations including energy band and density of states. Based on observations of architectures formation, a possible growth mechanism was proposed to explain the transformation of polyhedral-like nanoparticles to peony-like microflowers via an Ostwald riping mechanism followed by self-assembly. The N-Bi(3)NbO(7) architectures due to the large specific surface area and nitrogen doping exhibited higher photocatalytic activities in the decomposition of organic pollutant under visible-light irradiation than Bi(3)NbO(7) nanoparticles. Furthermore, an enhanced photocatalytic performance was also observed for Ag/N-Bi(3)NbO(7) architectures, which can be attributed to the synergetic effects between noble metal and semiconductor component. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Lithium in M67

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, L. M.; Pilachowski, Catherine

    1986-01-01

    Echelle spectra recorded at the Li I 6707-A line are reported for seven main-sequence members and one cool subgiant in M67. The spectral types of the seven dwarfs studied range from about F8 at the turnoff point to about G5. The principal result is that the average lithium abundance in the three hottest main-sequence stars is 0.45 x 10 to the -9th. Any enrichment of lithium in the gas of the Galactic disk in the last 5 Gyr therefore has not exceeded a factor of about two and probably is entirely negligible, when the corresponding results for NGC 752 and the Hyades are taken into account.

  12. Ductility of Nanostructured Bainite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Morales-Rivas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured bainite is a novel ultra-high-strength steel-concept under intensive current research, in which the optimization of its mechanical properties can only come from a clear understanding of the parameters that control its ductility. This work reviews first the nature of this composite-like material as a product of heat treatment conditions. Subsequently, the premises of ductility behavior are presented, taking as a reference related microstructures: conventional bainitic steels, and TRIP-aided steels. The ductility of nanostructured bainite is then discussed in terms of work-hardening and fracture mechanisms, leading to an analysis of the three-fold correlation between ductility, mechanically-induced martensitic transformation, and mechanical partitioning between the phases. Results suggest that a highly stable/hard retained austenite, with mechanical properties close to the matrix of bainitic ferrite, is advantageous in order to enhance ductility.

  13. Vortices and nanostructured superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book provides expert coverage of modern and novel aspects of the study of vortex matter, dynamics, and pinning in nanostructured and multi-component superconductors. Vortex matter in superconducting materials is a field of enormous beauty and intellectual challenge, which began with the theoretical prediction of vortices by A. Abrikosov (Nobel Laureate). Vortices, vortex dynamics, and pinning are key features in many of today’s human endeavors: from the huge superconducting accelerating magnets and detectors at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, which opened new windows of knowledge on the universe, to the tiny superconducting transceivers using Rapid Single Flux Quanta, which have opened a revolutionary means of communication. In recent years, two new features have added to the intrinsic beauty and complexity of the subject: nanostructured/nanoengineered superconductors, and the discovery of a range of new materials showing multi-component (multi-gap) superconductivity. In this book, leading researche...

  14. Relaxation in magnetic nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, M.A.; Folly, W.S.D.; Sinnecker, J.P.; Soriano, S.

    2005-01-01

    Nanostructured magnetic materials present a wide range of magnetic relaxation phenomena. One problem in studying nanomagnetic granular materials is the strong dependence of the relaxation with the anisotropy barrier which, even for systems with narrow size distributions, brings difficulties in the analysis of the experimental data. Molecular magnetism, with the chemists' bottom-up approach to build molecular nanostructures, provides this field with some beautiful model systems, well ordered crystals of single molecule magnets, single molecule chains, molecular magnetic multilayers and others novelties to appear. Most of these systems present slow relaxation and the study of these well-characterized nanomaterials may elucidate many features that are difficult to grasp in the non molecular materials

  15. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  16. Hybrid phonons in nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Ridley, Brian K

    2017-01-01

    Crystalline semiconductor nanostructures have special properties associated with electrons and lattice vibrations and their interaction, and this is the topic of the book. The result of spatial confinement of electrons is indicated in the nomenclature of nonostructures: quantum wells, quantum wires, and quantum dots. Confinement also has a profound effect on lattice vibrations and an account of this is the prime focus. The documentation of the confinement of acoustic modes goes back to Lord Rayleigh’s work in the late nineteenth century, but no such documentation exists for optical modes. Indeed, it is only comparatively recently that any theory of the elastic properties of optical modes exists, and the account given in the book is comprehensive. A model of the lattice dynamics of the diamond lattice is given that reveals the quantitative distinction between acoustic and optical modes and the difference of connection rules that must apply at an interface. The presence of interfaces in nanostructures forces ...

  17. Lithium reserves and resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.K.

    1978-01-01

    As a result of accelerating research efforts in the fields of secondary batteries and thermonuclear power generation, concern has been expressed in certain quarters regarding the availability, in sufficient quantities, of lithium. As part of a recent study by the National Research Council on behalf of the Energy Research and Development Administration, a subpanel was formed to consider the outlook for lithium. Principal areas of concern were reserves, resources and the 'surplus' available for energy applications after allowing for the growth in current lithium applications. Reserves and resources were categorized into four classes ranging from fully proved reserves to resources which are probably dependent upon the marketing of co-products to become economically attractive. Because of the proprietary nature of data on beneficiation and processing recoveries, the tonnages of available lithium are expressed in terms of plant feed. However, highly conservative assumptions have been made concerning mining recoveries and these go a considerable way to accounting for total losses. Western World reserves and resources of all classes are estimated at 10.6 million tonnes Li of which 3.5 million tonnes Li are located in the United States. Current United States capacity, virtually equivalent to Western World capacity, is 4700 tonnes Li and production in 1976 approximated to 3500 tonnes Li. Production for current applications is expected to grow to approx. 10,000 tonnes in year 2000 and 13,000 tonnes a decade later. The massive excess of reserves and resources over that necessary to support conventional requirements has limited the amount of justifiable exploration expenditures; on the last occasion, there was a a major increase in demand (by the USAEA) reserves and capacity were increased rapidly. There are no foreseeable reasons why this shouldn't happen again when the need is clear. (author)

  18. Prelithiated silicon nanowires as an anode for lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nian; Hu, Liangbing; McDowell, Matthew T; Jackson, Ariel; Cui, Yi

    2011-08-23

    Silicon is one of the most promising anode materials for the next-generation high-energy lithium ion battery (LIB), while sulfur and some other lithium-free materials have recently shown high promise as cathode materials. To make a full battery out of them, either the cathode or the anode needs to be prelithiated. Here, we present a method for prelithiating a silicon nanowire (SiNW) anode by a facile self-discharge mechanism. Through a time dependence study, we found that 20 min of prelithiation loads ∼50% of the full capacity into the SiNWs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies show that the nanostructure of SiNWs is maintained after prelithiation. We constructed a full battery using our prelithiated SiNW anode with a sulfur cathode. Our work provides a protocol for pairing lithium-free electrodes to make the next-generation high-energy LIB. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  19. Prelithiated Silicon Nanowires as an Anode for Lithium Ion Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Nian

    2011-08-23

    Silicon is one of the most promising anode materials for the next-generation high-energy lithium ion battery (LIB), while sulfur and some other lithium-free materials have recently shown high promise as cathode materials. To make a full battery out of them, either the cathode or the anode needs to be prelithiated. Here, we present a method for prelithiating a silicon nanowire (SiNW) anode by a facile self-discharge mechanism. Through a time dependence study, we found that 20 min of prelithiation loads ∼50% of the full capacity into the SiNWs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies show that the nanostructure of SiNWs is maintained after prelithiation. We constructed a full battery using our prelithiated SiNW anode with a sulfur cathode. Our work provides a protocol for pairing lithium-free electrodes to make the next-generation high-energy LIB. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  20. Electrochemical performance of nanocrystalline Li2CoTiO4 cathode materials for lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Meng; Zhao, Xiangyu; Ma, Liqun; Yang, Hui; Shen, Xiaodong; Bian, Yajuan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Li 2 CoTiO 4 cathode materials with tunable nanostructures were synthesized. • Small particle or grain size can increase the Li ion diffusion rate. • Li 2 CoTiO 4 with small particle size has good cycle stability and rate capability. - Abstract: Cation disordered Li 2 CoTiO 4 titanate with 3D lithium ion channels could be a promising new cathode material for lithium ion batteries due to its high theoretical capacity. Herein the Li 2 CoTiO 4 materials with tunable nanostructures were synthesized by a sol–gel method and subsequent heat treatment at different temperatures. The microstructure and electrochemical properties of the nanocrystalline Li 2 CoTiO 4 materials have been systematically investigated. The Li 2 CoTiO 4 material synthesized at lower temperature possessed smaller particle size and grain size, and allowed a higher reversible extraction of lithium ions per formula unit. Furthermore, the small particle size enabled insertion of lithium along short diffusion paths, and thus an increase of the lithium ion diffusion coefficient

  1. Plasmonic Nanostructured Cellular Automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhazraji, Emad; Ghalib, A.; Manzoor, K.; Alsunaidi, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we have investigated the scattering plasmonic resonance characteristics of silver nanospheres with a geometrical distribution that is modelled by Cellular Automata using time-domain numerical analysis. Cellular Automata are discrete mathematical structures that model different natural phenomena. Two binary one-dimensional Cellular Automata rules are considered to model the nanostructure, namely rule 30 and rule 33. The analysis produces three-dimensional scattering profiles of the entire plasmonic nanostructure. For the Cellular Automaton rule 33, the introduction of more Cellular Automata generations resulted only in slight red and blue shifts in the plasmonic modes with respect to the first generation. On the other hand, while rule 30 introduced significant red shifts in the resonance peaks at early generations, at later generations however, a peculiar effect is witnessed in the scattering profile as new peaks emerge as a feature of the overall Cellular Automata structure rather than the sum of the smaller parts that compose it. We strongly believe that these features that emerge as a result adopting the different 256 Cellular Automata rules as configuration models of nanostructures in different applications and systems might possess a great potential in enhancing their capability, sensitivity, efficiency, and power utilization.

  2. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Lithium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mose, Tina; Damkier, Per; Petersen, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Serum lithium is monitored to ensure levels within the narrow therapeutic window. This study examines the interlaboratory variation and inaccuracy of lithium monitoring in Denmark. METHODS: In 16 samples consisting of (1) control materials (n = 4), (2) pooled patient serum (n = 5), an...

  3. Mass spectrometric analysis of lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitambar, S.A.; Kavimandan, V.D.; Aggarwal, S.K.; Ramasubramanian, P.A.; Shah, P.M.; Almoula, A.I.; Acharya, S.N.; Parab, A.R.; Jain, H.C.; Mathews, C.K.; Ramaniah, M.V.

    1978-01-01

    The details of investigations carried out on the isotopic analysis of lithium using surface ionisation mass spectrometry are presented. Various parameters affecting the precision in isotopic analysis of lithium are discussed. A precision of 1% is achieved in the relative isotope abundance measurement. (author)

  4. Interaction of plasmas with lithium and tungsten fusion plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiflis, Peter Robert

    One of the largest outstanding issues in magnetic confinement fusion is the interaction of the fusion plasma with the first wall of the device; an interaction which is strongest in the divertor region. Erosion, melting, sputtering, and deformation are all concerns which inform choices of divertor material. Of the many materials proposed for use in the divertor, only a few remain as promising choices. Tungsten has been chosen as the material for the ITER divertor, and liquid lithium stands poised as its replacement in higher heat flux devices. As a refractory metal, tungsten's large melting point and thermal conductivity as well as its low sputtering yield have led to its selection as the material of choice of the ITER divertor. Experiments have reinforced this choice demonstrating tungsten's ability to withstand large heat fluxes when adequately cooled. However, tungsten has shown a propensity to nanostructure under exposure within a certain temperature range to large fluxes of helium ions. These nanostructures if disrupted into the plasma as dust by an off-normal event would cause quenching of the plasma from the generated dust. Liquid lithium, meanwhile, has gathered growing interest within the fusion community in recent years as a divertor, limiter, and alternative first wall material. Liquid lithium is attractive as a low-Z material replacement for refractory metals due to its ability to getter impurities, while also being self-healing in nature. However, concerns exist about the stability of a liquid metal surface at the edge of a fusion device. Liquid metal pools, such as the Li-DiMes probe, have shown evidence of macroscopic lithium displacement as well as droplet formation and ejection into the plasma. These issues must be mitigated in future implementations of liquid lithium divertor concepts. Rayleigh-Taylor-like (RT) and Kelvin-Helmholtz-like (KH) instabilities have been claimed as the initiators of droplet ejection, yet not enough data exists to

  5. Metabolic Side Effects of Lithium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cagdas Eker

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Lithium is an alkaline ion being used since 19th century. After its widespread use in psychiatric disorders, observed side effects caused skepticism about its therapeutic efficacy. Despite several disadvantages, lithium is one of the indispensible drugs used in affective disorders, especially in bipolar disorder. It became a necessity for physicians to recognize its side effects since lithium is still accepted as a gold standard in the treatment of bipolar disorder. Adverse effects of chronic administration of lithium on several organ systems are widely known. In this article metabolic effects of lithium on thyroid and parathyroid glands, body mass index and kidneys will be discussed along with their mechanisms, clinical findings, possible risk factors and treatment. One of the most common side effect of lithium is hypothyroidism. It has the same clinical and biochemical properties as primary hypothyroidism and observed as subclinical hypothyroidism in the first place. Hypothyroidism, even its subclinical form, may be associated with non-response or inadequate response and is indicated as a risk factor for development of rapid cycling bipolar disorder. Therefore, hypothyroidism should be screened no matter how severe it is and should be treated with thyroid hormone in the presence of clinical hypothyroidism. Weight gain due to lithium administration disturbs the compliance to treatment and negatively affects the course of the illness. Increased risk for diabetes, hypertension, ischemic heart disease and stroke because of weight gain constitute other centers of problem. Indeed, it is of importance to determine the risk factors before treatment, to follow up the weight, to re-organize nutritional habits and to schedule exercises. Another frequent problematic side effect of lithium treatment is renal dysfunction which clinically present as nephrogenic diabetes insipidus with the common symptoms of polyuria and polydipsia. Nephrogenic diabetes

  6. Optical switching systems using nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stubkjær, Kristian

    2004-01-01

    High capacity multiservice optical networks require compact and efficient switches. The potential benefits of optical switch elements based on nanostructured material are reviewed considering various material systems.......High capacity multiservice optical networks require compact and efficient switches. The potential benefits of optical switch elements based on nanostructured material are reviewed considering various material systems....

  7. The development of potassium tantalate niobate thin films for satellite-based pyroelectric detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherry, Hilary B.B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering

    1997-05-01

    Potassium tantalate niobate (KTN) pyroelectric detectors are expected to provide detectivities, of 3.7 x 1011 cmHz 1/2W-1 for satellite-based infrared detection at 90 K. The background limited detectivity for a room-temperature thermal detector is 1.8 x 1010 cmHz1/2W-1 . KTN is a unique ferroelectric for this application because of the ability to tailor the temperature of its pyroelectric response by adjusting its ratio of tantalum to niobium. The ability to fabricate high quality KTN thin films on Si-based substrates is crucial to the development of KTN pyroelectric detectors. SixNymembranes created on the Si substrate will provide the weak thermal link necessary to reach background limited detectivities. The device dimensions obtainable by thin film processing are expected to increase the ferroelectric response by 20 times over bulk fabricated KTN detectors. In addition, microfabrication techniques allow for easier array development. This is the first reported attempt at growth of KTN films on Si-based substrates. Pure phase perovskite films were grown by pulsed laser deposition on SrRuO3/Pt/Ti/SixNy/Si and SrRuO3/SixNy/Si structures; room temperature dielectric permittivities for the KTN films were 290 and 2.5, respectively. The dielectric permittivity for bulk grown, single crystal KTN is ~380. In addition to depressed dielectric permittivities, no ferroelectric hysteresis was found between 80 and 300 K for either structure. RBS, AES, TEM and multi-frequency dielectric measurements were used to investigate the origin of this apparent lack of ferroelectricity. Other issues addressed by this dissertation include: the role of oxygen and target density during pulsed laser deposition of KTN thin films; the use of YBCO, LSC and Pt as direct contact bottom electrodes to the KTN films, and the adhesion of the bottom

  8. Metastable Cu(I)-niobate semiconductor with a low-temperature, nanoparticle-mediated synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jonglak; King, Nacole; Maggard, Paul A

    2013-02-26

    A nanoparticle synthetic strategy for the preparation of a new metastable Cu(I)-niobate is described, and that involves multipored Li₃NbO₄ nanoparticles as a precursor. A hydrothermal reaction of HNbO₃ and LiOH·H₂O in PEG200 and water at ∼180 °C yields ∼15-40 nm Li₃NbO₄ particles. These particles are subsequently used in a solvothermal copper(I)-exchange reaction with excess CuCl at 150 °C. Heating these products within the used CuCl flux (mp = 430 °C) to 450 °C for 30 min yields ∼4-12 nm Cu₂Nb₈O₂₁ crystalline nanoparticles, and for a heating time of 24 h yields μm-sized, rod-shaped crystals. The new structure was characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction to have a condensed network consisting of NbO₇ polyhedra and chains of elongated CuO₄ tetrahedra. The compound thermally decomposes starting at ∼250 °C and higher temperatures, depending on the particle sizes, owing to the loss of the weakly coordinated Cu(I) cations from the structure and a concurrent disproportionation reaction at its surfaces. Thus, conventional solid-state reactions involving higher temperatures and bulk reagents have proven unsatisfactory for its synthesis. The measured bandgap size is ∼1.43-1.65 eV (indirect) and shows a dependence on the particle sizes. Electronic structure calculations based on density functional theory show that the bandgap transition results from the excitation of electrons at the band edges between filled Cu(I) 3d¹⁰-orbitals and empty Nb(V) 4d⁰-orbitals, respectively. The p-type nature of the Cu₂Nb₈O₂₁ particles was confirmed in photoelectrochemical measurements on polycrystalline films that show a strong photocathodic current under visible-light irradiation in aqueous solutions. These results demonstrate the general utility of reactive nanoscale precursors in the synthetic discovery of new Cu(I)-based semiconducting oxides and which also show promise for use in solar energy conversion applications.

  9. Semiconductors and semimetals nanostructured systems

    CERN Document Server

    Willardson, Robert K; Beer, Albert C; Reed, Mark A

    1992-01-01

    This is the first available volume to consolidate prominent topics in the emerging field of nanostructured systems. Recent technological advancements have led to a new era of nanostructure physics, allowing for the fabrication of nanostructures whose behavior is dominated by quantum interference effects. This new capability has enthused the experimentalist and theorist alike. Innumerable possibilities have now opened up for physical exploration and device technology on the nanoscale. This book, with contributions from five pioneering researchers, will allow the expert and novice alike to explore a fascinating new field.Provides a state-of-the-art review of quantum-scale artificially nanostructured electronic systemsIncludes contributions by world-known experts in the fieldOpens the field to the non-expert with a concise introductionFeatures discussions of:Low-dimensional condensed matter physicsProperties of nanostructured, ultrasmall electronic systemsMesoscopic physics and quantum transportPhysics of 2D ele...

  10. Recent advances in lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Shaw, Leon L.

    2014-12-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries have attracted much attention lately because they have very high theoretical specific energy (2500 Wh kg-1), five times higher than that of the commercial LiCoO2/graphite batteries. As a result, they are strong contenders for next-generation energy storage in the areas of portable electronics, electric vehicles, and storage systems for renewable energy such as wind power and solar energy. However, poor cycling life and low capacity retention are main factors limiting their commercialization. To date, a large number of electrode and electrolyte materials to address these challenges have been investigated. In this review, we present the latest fundamental studies and technological development of various nanostructured cathode materials for Li-S batteries, including their preparation approaches, structure, morphology and battery performance. Furthermore, the development of other significant components of Li-S batteries including anodes, electrolytes, additives, binders and separators are also highlighted. Not only does the intention of our review article comprise the summary of recent advances in Li-S cells, but also we cover some of our proposals for engineering of Li-S cell configurations. These systematic discussion and proposed directions can enlighten ideas and offer avenues in the rational design of durable and high performance Li-S batteries in the near future.

  11. Three-Dimensional ZnO Hierarchical Nanostructures: Solution Phase Synthesis and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Zinc oxide (ZnO nanostructures have been studied extensively in the past 20 years due to their novel electronic, photonic, mechanical and electrochemical properties. Recently, more attention has been paid to assemble nanoscale building blocks into three-dimensional (3D complex hierarchical structures, which not only inherit the excellent properties of the single building blocks but also provide potential applications in the bottom-up fabrication of functional devices. This review article focuses on 3D ZnO hierarchical nanostructures, and summarizes major advances in the solution phase synthesis, applications in environment, and electrical/electrochemical devices. We present the principles and growth mechanisms of ZnO nanostructures via different solution methods, with an emphasis on rational control of the morphology and assembly. We then discuss the applications of 3D ZnO hierarchical nanostructures in photocatalysis, field emission, electrochemical sensor, and lithium ion batteries. Throughout the discussion, the relationship between the device performance and the microstructures of 3D ZnO hierarchical nanostructures will be highlighted. This review concludes with a personal perspective on the current challenges and future research.

  12. Crab shells as sustainable templates from nature for nanostructured battery electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hongbin; Zheng, Guangyuan; Li, Weiyang; McDowell, Matthew T; Seh, Zhiwei; Liu, Nian; Lu, Zhenda; Cui, Yi

    2013-07-10

    Rational nanostructure design has been a promising route to address critical materials issues for enabling next-generation high capacity lithium ion batteries for portable electronics, vehicle electrification, and grid-scale storage. However, synthesis of functional nanostructures often involves expensive starting materials and elaborate processing, both of which present a challenge for successful implementation in low-cost applications. In seeking a sustainable and cost-effective route to prepare nanostructured battery electrode materials, we are inspired by the diversity of natural materials. Here, we show that crab shells with the unique Bouligand structure consisting of highly mineralized chitin-protein fibers can be used as biotemplates to fabricate hollow carbon nanofibers; these fibers can then be used to encapsulate sulfur and silicon to form cathodes and anodes for Li-ion batteries. The resulting nanostructured electrodes show high specific capacities (1230 mAh/g for sulfur and 3060 mAh/g for silicon) and excellent cycling performance (up to 200 cycles with 60% and 95% capacity retention, respectively). Since crab shells are readily available due to the 0.5 million tons produced annually as a byproduct of crab consumption, their use as a sustainable and low-cost nanotemplate represents an exciting direction for nanostructured battery materials.

  13. Irradiation effect of lithium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Kenji; Watanabe, Hitoshi

    1984-01-01

    Lithium oxide is the primary candidate material for the solid blanket of nuclear fusion reactors. The role of the blanket of nuclear fusion reactors is to produce tritium by the reaction of neutrons with lithium, to extract fusion energy as heat by moderating and thermalizing neutrons, and to shield superconducting magnets and others. Therefore, lithium oxide is exposed to neutrons, tritons and helium ions, and gamma ray, and suffers remarkable irradiation damage. This irradiation damage causes swelling and powdering, the promotion of tritium diffusion and the trapping of tritium, and exerts influence on tritium emission and the compatibility with structural materials. The research on the irradiation damage of lithium oxide is very important for the development of nuclear fusion reactors. In this research, in order to obtain the basic knowledge on the irradiation damage of lithium oxide, the irradiation damage in the lithium oxide irradiated with a reactor and a heavy ion accelerator was observed by electron spin resonance method and light absorption method. The experiment using the sintered piece and single crystal of lithium oxide and the results are reported. (Kako, I.)

  14. Irradiation-Induced Nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birtcher, R.C.; Ewing, R.C.; Matzke, Hj.; Meldrum, A.; Newcomer, P.P.; Wang, L.M.; Wang, S.X.; Weber, W.J.

    1999-08-09

    This paper summarizes the results of the studies of the irradiation-induced formation of nanostructures, where the injected interstitials from the source of irradiation are not major components of the nanophase. This phenomena has been observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in a number of intermetallic compounds and ceramics during high-energy electron or ion irradiations when the ions completely penetrate through the specimen. Beginning with single crystals, electron or ion irradiation in a certain temperature range may result in nanostructures composed of amorphous domains and nanocrystals with either the original composition and crystal structure or new nanophases formed by decomposition of the target material. The phenomenon has also been observed in natural materials which have suffered irradiation from the decay of constituent radioactive elements and in nuclear reactor fuels which have been irradiated by fission neutrons and other fission products. The mechanisms involved in the process of this nanophase formation are discussed in terms of the evolution of displacement cascades, radiation-induced defect accumulation, radiation-induced segregation and phase decomposition, as well as the competition between irradiation-induced amorphization and recrystallization.

  15. Lukewarm lithium recoil interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhaver, Eric; Cassella, Kayleigh; Estey, Brian; Feng, Yanying; Lai, Chen; Holger, Müller

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate recoil-sensitive atom interferometry with laser-cooled lithium-7 at 50 times the recoil temperature. The large bandwidth of 160-ns beam-splitter pulses drives conjugate interferometers simultaneously with nearly equal contrast. Two-photon Raman transitions spectrally resolve the outputs, which thermally expand too quickly to be spatially resolved. Two images captured during a single exposure of a camera with slow readout detects both output ports. Optical pumping to a magnetically insensitive state using the well-resolved D1 line suppresses magnetic dephasing and extends coherence time. Sensitivity comparable to interferometers utilizing large momentum transfer pulses is attainable at interrogation times on the order of 10 ms due to lithium's high recoil frequency and the increased available atom number. Vibration noise is mitigated at this time scale and is converted to amplitude noise in our detection scheme, isolating the recoil frequency from what is conventionally phase noise. These techniques relax requirements for cooling in recoil-sensitive interferometry, broadening the choice of species to particles that remain difficult to trap and cool, like electrons.

  16. A lithium superionic conductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaya, Noriaki; Homma, Kenji; Yamakawa, Yuichiro; Hirayama, Masaaki; Kanno, Ryoji; Yonemura, Masao; Kamiyama, Takashi; Kato, Yuki; Hama, Shigenori; Kawamoto, Koji; Mitsui, Akio

    2011-07-31

    Batteries are a key technology in modern society. They are used to power electric and hybrid electric vehicles and to store wind and solar energy in smart grids. Electrochemical devices with high energy and power densities can currently be powered only by batteries with organic liquid electrolytes. However, such batteries require relatively stringent safety precautions, making large-scale systems very complicated and expensive. The application of solid electrolytes is currently limited because they attain practically useful conductivities (10(-2) S cm(-1)) only at 50-80 °C, which is one order of magnitude lower than those of organic liquid electrolytes. Here, we report a lithium superionic conductor, Li(10)GeP(2)S(12) that has a new three-dimensional framework structure. It exhibits an extremely high lithium ionic conductivity of 12 mS cm(-1) at room temperature. This represents the highest conductivity achieved in a solid electrolyte, exceeding even those of liquid organic electrolytes. This new solid-state battery electrolyte has many advantages in terms of device fabrication (facile shaping, patterning and integration), stability (non-volatile), safety (non-explosive) and excellent electrochemical properties (high conductivity and wide potential window).

  17. Lithium ion conducting ionic electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angell, C.A.; Xu, K.; Liu, C.

    1996-01-16

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described which has exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100 C or lower, including room temperature. It comprises molten lithium salts or salt mixtures in which a small amount of an anionic polymer lithium salt is dissolved to stabilize the liquid against recrystallization. Further, a liquid ionic electrolyte which has been rubberized by addition of an extra proportion of anionic polymer, and which has good chemical and electrochemical stability, is described. This presents an attractive alternative to conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes which are not cationic conductors. 4 figs.

  18. Lithium - no shortage in supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    Over the last five years the face of the lithium industry has changed with new sources coming onto the market. The result of developments in supply is a buyers' market and, in the absence of major consumer developments, all things point to an increasing severely overcrowded market through the turn of the decade. As such lithium is likely to maintain charismatic appeal as developments unfold. This article provides an overview of the world's lithium industry and looks at the various market uses and potential. (author)

  19. Lithium-polymer batteries; Les batteries lithium-polymere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lascaud, St. [Electricite de France, 77 - Moret sur Loing (France). Dept. CIMA

    1999-04-01

    Lithium polymer batteries are a technological breakthrough which will improve EV`s range by a factor three. This new technology based on very thin plastic films, produced by solvent-less and a high productive process will reach low cost at industrial scale. EDF, Bollore and Schneider Electric are involved in R and D program to carry out a 2 kWh lithium polymer module by the end of year 2000. (authors)

  20. Lithium metal doped electrodes for lithium-ion rechargeable chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Gao; Battaglia, Vince; Wang, Lei

    2016-09-13

    An embodiment of the invention combines the superior performance of a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) or polyethyleneoxide (POE) binder, the strong binding force of a styrene-butadiene (SBR) binder, and a source of lithium ions in the form of solid lithium metal powder (SLMP) to form an electrode system that has improved performance as compared to PVDF/SBR binder based electrodes. This invention will provide a new way to achieve improved results at a much reduced cost.

  1. Instrinsic defect energies of lithium hydride and lithium deuteride crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, R.; Stoneham, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    A theoretical study has been made of the defect structure of lithium hydride and lithium deuteride. A potential model is obtained describing the statics and dynamics of these crystals. Intrinsic defect energies are calculated using the Harwell HADES program which is based on a generalised Mott-Littleton method. The results are in good agreement with the experimental data, and suggest that the vacancy and interstitial migration mechanisms of anions and cations are all comparable in their contribution to ionic conduction. (author)

  2. Equilibrium dissociation pressures of lithium hydride and lithium deuteride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.M.; Webb, R.E.

    1977-12-01

    The equilibrium dissociation pressures of plateau composition lithium hydride and lithium deuteride have been measured from 450 to 750 0 C. These data were used to derive the relationship of dissociation pressure with temperature over this range and to calculate several thermodynamic properties of these materials. Thermodynamic properties determined included the enthalpy, entropy, and free energy of formation; the enthalpy and entropy of fusion; and the melting points

  3. Combination of lightweight elements and nanostructured materials for batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Cheng, Fangyi

    2009-06-16

    In a society that increasingly relies on mobile electronics, demand is rapidly growing for both primary and rechargeable batteries that power devices from cell phones to vehicles. Existing batteries utilize lightweight active materials that use electrochemical reactions of ions such as H(+), OH(-) and Li(+)/Mg(2+) to facilitate energy storage and conversion. Ideal batteries should be inexpensive, have high energy density, and be made from environmentally friendly materials; batteries based on bulk active materials do not meet these requirements. Because of slow electrode process kinetics and low-rate ionic diffusion/migration, most conventional batteries demonstrate huge gaps between their theoretical and practical performance. Therefore, efforts are underway to improve existing battery technologies and develop new electrode reactions for the next generation of electrochemical devices. Advances in electrochemistry, surface science, and materials chemistry are leading to the use of nanomaterials for efficient energy storage and conversion. Nanostructures offer advantages over comparable bulk materials in improving battery performance. This Account summarizes our progress in battery development using a combination of lightweight elements and nanostructured materials. We highlight the benefits of nanostructured active materials for primary zinc-manganese dioxide (Zn-Mn), lithium-manganese dioxide (Li-Mn), and metal (Mg, Al, Zn)-air batteries, as well as rechargeable lithium ion (Li-ion) and nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) batteries. Through selected examples, we illustrate the effect of structure, shape, and size on the electrochemical properties of electrode materials. Because of their numerous active sites and facile electronic/ionic transfer and diffusion, nanostructures can improve battery efficiency. In particular, we demonstrate the properties of nanostructured active materials including Mg, Al, Si, Zn, MnO(2), CuV(2)O(6), LiNi(0.8)Co(0.2)O(2), LiFePO(4), Fe(2)O(3

  4. Review on recent progress of nanostructured anode materials for Li-ion batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Goriparti, Subrahmanyam

    2014-07-01

    This review highlights the recent research advances in active nanostructured anode materials for the next generation of Li-ion batteries (LIBs). In fact, in order to address both energy and power demands of secondary LIBs for future energy storage applications, it is required the development of innovative kinds of electrodes. Nanostructured materials based on carbon, metal/semiconductor, metal oxides and metal phosphides/nitrides/sulfides show a variety of admirable properties for LIBs applications such as high surface area, low diffusion distance, high electrical and ionic conductivity. Therefore, nanosized active materials are extremely promising for bridging the gap towards the realization of the next generation of LIBs with high reversible capacities, increased power capability, long cycling stability and free from safety concerns. In this review, anode materials are classified, depending on their electrochemical reaction with lithium, into three groups: intercalation/de-intercalation, alloy/de-alloy and conversion materials. Furthermore, the effect of nanoscale size and morphology on the electrochemical performance is presented. Synthesis of the nanostructures, lithium battery performance and electrode reaction mechanisms are also discussed. To conclude, the main aim of this review is to provide an organic outline of the wide range of recent research progresses and perspectives on nanosized active anode materials for future LIBs.

  5. Structural, electrical transport and optical studies of Li ion doped ZnO nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendran Ajay Rakkesh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we studied the morphological aspects, electrical transport and optical properties of pure and lithium ion doped semiconducting ZnO nanostructures successfully prepared by a co-precipitation method. The effect of lithium doping and various morphologies on the structural, electrical and optical properties of these nanostructures were investigated. The X-ray diffraction (XRD pattern demonstrated that the Li doped ZnO nanostructures exhibits the hexagonal wurtzite structure. A slight change in the 101 peak position was detected among the samples with various morphologies. The UV-Vis diffused reflectance spectroscopic (DRS studies showed that the band gap increases with Li doping, due to the Burstein-Moss band filling effect. Photoluminescence (PL studies confirm that the Li incorporation into ZnO material can induce oxygen enrichment of ZnO surface that leads to increase the cyan emission. This material could be used in light emitting diodes in nanoscale optoelectronic devices.

  6. Lithium ion behavior in lithium oxide by neutron scattering studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Yoshinobu; Morii, Yukio; Katano, Susumu; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Satoru; Ohno, Hideo; Nicklow, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    Lithium ion behavior in lithium oxide, Li 2 O, was studied in the temperature range from 293 K to 1120 K by the High-Resolution Powder Diffractometer (HRPD) installed in the JRR-3M. The diffraction patterns were analyzed with the RIETAN program. At room temperature, the thermal parameters related to the mean square of the amplitude of vibration of the lithium and the oxygen ions were 6 x 10 -21 m 2 and 4 x 10 -21 m 2 , respectively. AT 1120 K the thermal parameter of the lithium ion was 34 x 10 -21 m 2 . On the other hand, the parameter of the oxygen ion was 16 x 10 -21 m 2 . Inelastic neutron scattering studies for the lithium oxide single crystal were also carried out on the triple-axis neutron spectrometers installed at the JRR-2 and the HFIR. Although the value of a phonon energy of a transverse acoustic mode (Σ 3 ) at zone boundary was 30.6 meV at room temperature, this value was decreased to 25.1 meV at 700 K. This large softening was caused by anharmonicity of the crystal potential of lithium oxide. (author)

  7. Fabrication of nanowires and nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Piraux, L.

    2009-01-01

    We report on different approaches that we have adopted and developed for the fabrication of nanowires and nanostructures. Methods based on template synthesis and on self organization seem to be the most promising for the fabrication of nanomaterials and nanostructures due to their easiness and low...... cost. The development of a supported nanoporous alumina template and the possibility of using this template to combine electrochemical synthesis with lithographic methods open new ways for the fabrication of complex nanostructures. The numerous advantages of the supported template and its compatibility...

  8. Mechanical design of DNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Carlos E; Su, Hai-Jun; Marras, Alexander E; Zhou, Lifeng; Johnson, Joshua

    2015-04-14

    Structural DNA nanotechnology is a rapidly emerging field that has demonstrated great potential for applications such as single molecule sensing, drug delivery, and templating molecular components. As the applications of DNA nanotechnology expand, a consideration of their mechanical behavior is becoming essential to understand how these structures will respond to physical interactions. This review considers three major avenues of recent progress in this area: (1) measuring and designing mechanical properties of DNA nanostructures, (2) designing complex nanostructures based on imposed mechanical stresses, and (3) designing and controlling structurally dynamic nanostructures. This work has laid the foundation for mechanically active nanomachines that can generate, transmit, and respond to physical cues in molecular systems.

  9. 25th anniversary article: Understanding the lithiation of silicon and other alloying anodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Matthew T; Lee, Seok Woo; Nix, William D; Cui, Yi

    2013-09-25

    Alloying anodes such as silicon are promising electrode materials for next-generation high energy density lithium-ion batteries because of their ability to reversibly incorporate a high concentration of Li atoms. However, alloying anodes usually exhibit a short cycle life due to the extreme volumetric and structural changes that occur during lithium insertion/extraction; these transformations cause mechanical fracture and exacerbate side reactions. To solve these problems, there has recently been significant attention devoted to creating silicon nanostructures that can accommodate the lithiation-induced strain and thus exhibit high Coulombic efficiency and long cycle life. In parallel, many experiments and simulations have been conducted in an effort to understand the details of volumetric expansion, fracture, mechanical stress evolution, and structural changes in silicon nanostructures. The fundamental materials knowledge gained from these studies has provided guidance for designing optimized Si electrode structures and has also shed light on the factors that control large-volume change solid-state reactions. In this paper, we review various fundamental studies that have been conducted to understand structural and volumetric changes, stress evolution, mechanical properties, and fracture behavior of nanostructured Si anodes for lithium-ion batteries and compare the reaction process of Si to other novel anode materials. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Consistent Atomic Geometries and Electronic Structure of Five Phases of Potassium Niobate from Density-Functional Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falko Schmidt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We perform a comprehensive theoretical study of the structural and electronic properties of potassium niobate (KNbO3 in the cubic, tetragonal, orthorhombic, monoclinic, and rhombohedral phase, based on density-functional theory. The influence of different parametrizations of the exchange-correlation functional on the investigated properties is analyzed in detail, and the results are compared to available experimental data. We argue that the PBEsol and AM05 generalized gradient approximations as well as the RTPSS meta-generalized gradient approximation yield consistently accurate structural data for both the external and internal degrees of freedom and are overall superior to the local-density approximation or other conventional generalized gradient approximations for the structural characterization of KNbO3. Band-structure calculations using a HSE-type hybrid functional further indicate significant near degeneracies of band-edge states in all phases which are expected to be relevant for the optical response of the material.

  11. Self-Growth of Centimeter-Scale Single Crystals by Normal Sintering Process in Modified Potassium Sodium Niobate Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Cheol-Woo; Lee, Ho-Yong; Han, Guifang; Zhang, Shujun; Choi, Si-Young; Choi, Jong-Jin; Kim, Jong-Woo; Yoon, Woon-Ha; Choi, Joon-Hwan; Park, Dong-Soo; Hahn, Byung-Dong; Ryu, Jungho

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, an interesting phenomenon is reported. That is the self-growth of single crystals in Pb-free piezoelectric ceramics. These crystals are several centimeters in size. They are grown without any seed addition through a normal sintering process in modified potassium sodium niobate ceramics. It has been achieved by the composition designed to compensate the Na+ loss which occurs during the liquid phase sintering. The composition of the crystals is (K0.4925Na0.4925−xBa0.015+x/2)Nb0.995+xO3 [x is determined by the Na+ loss, due to Na2O volatilization]. These crystals have high piezoelectric voltage coefficients (g33, 131 10−3Vm/N), indicating that they are good candidates for piezoelectric sensors and energy harvesting devices. We hope that this report can offer the opportunity for many researchers to have an interest in these crystals. PMID:26631973

  12. Reversible Lithium Neurotoxicity: Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Lithium neurotoxicity may be reversible or irreversible. Reversible lithium neurotoxicity has been defined as cases of lithium neurotoxicity in which patients recovered without any permanent neurologic sequelae, even after 2 months of an episode of lithium toxicity. Cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity differ in clinical presentation from those of irreversible lithium neurotoxicity and have important implications in clinical practice. This review aims to study the clinical presentation of cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity. Data Sources: A comprehensive electronic search was conducted in the following databases: MEDLINE (PubMed), 1950 to November 2010; PsycINFO, 1967 to November 2010; and SCOPUS (EMBASE), 1950 to November 2010. MEDLINE and PsycINFO were searched by using the OvidSP interface. Study Selection: A combination of the following search terms was used: lithium AND adverse effects AND central nervous system OR neurologic manifestation. Publications cited include articles concerned with reversible lithium neurotoxicity. Data Extraction: The age, sex, clinical features, diagnostic categories, lithium doses, serum lithium levels, precipitating factors, and preventive measures of 52 cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity were extracted. Data Synthesis: Among the 52 cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity, patients ranged in age from 10 to 80 years and a greater number were female (P = .008). Most patients had affective disorders, schizoaffective disorders, and/or depression (P lithium levels were less than or equal to 1.5 mEq/L (P lithium, underlying brain pathology, abnormal tissue levels, specific diagnostic categories, and elderly populations were some of the precipitating factors reported for reversible lithium neurotoxicity. The preventive measures were also described. Conclusions: Reversible lithium neurotoxicity presents with a certain clinical profile and precipitating factors for which there are appropriate

  13. Reversible lithium neurotoxicity: review of the literatur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, Ivan; Phutane, Vivek H

    2012-01-01

    Lithium neurotoxicity may be reversible or irreversible. Reversible lithium neurotoxicity has been defined as cases of lithium neurotoxicity in which patients recovered without any permanent neurologic sequelae, even after 2 months of an episode of lithium toxicity. Cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity differ in clinical presentation from those of irreversible lithium neurotoxicity and have important implications in clinical practice. This review aims to study the clinical presentation of cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity. A comprehensive electronic search was conducted in the following databases: MEDLINE (PubMed), 1950 to November 2010; PsycINFO, 1967 to November 2010; and SCOPUS (EMBASE), 1950 to November 2010. MEDLINE and PsycINFO were searched by using the OvidSP interface. A combination of the following search terms was used: lithium AND adverse effects AND central nervous system OR neurologic manifestation. Publications cited include articles concerned with reversible lithium neurotoxicity. The age, sex, clinical features, diagnostic categories, lithium doses, serum lithium levels, precipitating factors, and preventive measures of 52 cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity were extracted. Among the 52 cases of reversible lithium neurotoxicity, patients ranged in age from 10 to 80 years and a greater number were female (P = .008). Most patients had affective disorders, schizoaffective disorders, and/or depression (P lithium levels were less than or equal to 1.5 mEq/L (P lithium, underlying brain pathology, abnormal tissue levels, specific diagnostic categories, and elderly populations were some of the precipitating factors reported for reversible lithium neurotoxicity. The preventive measures were also described. Reversible lithium neurotoxicity presents with a certain clinical profile and precipitating factors for which there are appropriate preventive measures. This recognition will help in early diagnosis and prompt treatment of

  14. Probing quantum effects in lithium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deemyad, Shanti; Zhang, Rong

    2018-05-01

    In periodic table lithium is the first element immediately after helium and the lightest metal. While fascinating quantum nature of condensed helium is suppressed at high densities, lithium is expected to adapt more quantum solid behavior under compression. This is due to the presence of long range interactions in metallic systems for which an increase in the de-Boer parameter (λ/σ, where σ is the minimum interatomic distance and λ is the de-Broglie wavelength) is predicted at higher densities [1,2]. Physics of dense lithium offers a rich playground to look for new emergent quantum phenomena in condensed matter and has been subject of many theoretical and experimental investigations. In this article recent progress in studying the quantum nature of dense lithium will be discussed.

  15. Lithium isotopic separation: preliminary studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, Sandra Helena Goulart de

    1998-01-01

    In order to get the separation of natural isotopes of lithium by electrolytic amalgamation, an electrolytic cell with a confined mercury cathode was used to obtain data for the design of a separation stage. The initial work was followed by the design of a moving mercury cathode electrolytic cell and three experiments with six batches stages were performed for the determination of the elementary separation factor. The value obtained, 1.053, was ill agreement: with the specialized literature. It was verified in all experiments that the lithium - 6 isotope concentrated in the amalgam phase and that the lithium - 7 isotope concentrated in the aqueous phase. A stainless-steel cathode for the decomposition of the lithium amalgam and the selective desamalgamation were also studied. In view of the results obtained, a five stages continuous scheme was proposed. (author)

  16. Structure and dehydration of layered perovskite niobate with bilayer hydrates prepared by exfoliation/self-assembly process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yufeng; Zhao, Xinhua; Ma, Hui; Ma, Shulan; Huang, Gailing; Makita, Yoji; Bai, Xuedong; Yang, Xiaojing

    2008-07-01

    The crystals of an H-form niobate of HCa 2Nb 3O 10· xH 2O ( x=0.5) being tetragonal symmetry (space group P4/ mbm) with unit cell parameters a=5.4521(6) and c=14.414(2) Å were exfoliated into nanosheets with the triple-layered perovskite structure. The colloid suspension of the nanosheets was put into dialysis membrane tubing and allowed self-assembly in a dilute KCl solution. By this method, a novel layered K-form niobate KCa 2Nb 3O 10· xH 2O ( x=1.3, typically) with bilayer hydrates in the interlayer was produced. The Rieveld refinement and transmission electron microscope (TEM)/selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) observation indicated that the orientations of the a-/ b-axis of each nanosheet as well as the c-axis are uniform, and the self-assembled compound had the same symmetry, tetragonal ( P4/ mbm) with a=5.453(2) and c=16.876(5) Å, as the H-form precursor; the exfoliation/self-assembly process does not markedly affect the two-dimensional lattice of the layer. The large basal spacing resulted from the interlayer K + ions solvated by two layers of water molecules. The interlayer bilayers-water was gradually changed to monolayer when the temperatures higher than 100 °C, and all the water molecules lost when over 600 °C. Accompanying the dehydration, the crystal structure transformed from tetragonal to orthorhombic symmetry. Water molecules may take an important role for the layer layered compound to adjust the unit cell to tetragonal symmetry.

  17. Modeling the Lithium Ion Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerfield, John

    2013-01-01

    The lithium ion battery will be a reliable electrical resource for many years to come. A simple model of the lithium ions motion due to changes in concentration and voltage is presented. The battery chosen has LiCoO[subscript 2] as the cathode, LiPF[subscript 6] as the electrolyte, and LiC[subscript 6] as the anode. The concentration gradient and…

  18. Kleptomania, mood disorder and lithium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Lopes Rocha

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available Kleptomania has been found in association with major depression in a fairly large number of reports in recent years. We describe a patient with concurrent DSM-III-R Bipolar Mood Disorder and Kleptomania, whose symptoms remitted completely, apparently in response to lithium therapy, which raised the possibility that pharmacological treatment may benefit kleptomania. Further studies are needed to establish the possible relationship between kleptomania, mood disorders and lithium therapy.

  19. Kleptomania, mood disorder and lithium

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha, Fábio Lopes; Rocha, Maria Elizabete Guimarães

    1992-01-01

    Kleptomania has been found in association with major depression in a fairly large number of reports in recent years. We describe a patient with concurrent DSM-III-R Bipolar Mood Disorder and Kleptomania, whose symptoms remitted completely, apparently in response to lithium therapy, which raised the possibility that pharmacological treatment may benefit kleptomania. Further studies are needed to establish the possible relationship between kleptomania, mood disorders and lithium therapy. Os ...

  20. Kleptomania, mood disorder and lithium

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha,Fábio Lopes; Rocha,Maria Elizabete Guimarães

    1992-01-01

    Kleptomania has been found in association with major depression in a fairly large number of reports in recent years. We describe a patient with concurrent DSM-III-R Bipolar Mood Disorder and Kleptomania, whose symptoms remitted completely, apparently in response to lithium therapy, which raised the possibility that pharmacological treatment may benefit kleptomania. Further studies are needed to establish the possible relationship between kleptomania, mood disorders and lithium therapy.

  1. Air breathing lithium power cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Joseph C.

    2014-07-15

    A cell suitable for use in a battery according to one embodiment includes a catalytic oxygen cathode; a stabilized zirconia electrolyte for selective oxygen anion transport; a molten salt electrolyte; and a lithium-based anode. A cell suitable for use in a battery according to another embodiment includes a catalytic oxygen cathode; an electrolyte; a membrane selective to molecular oxygen; and a lithium-based anode.

  2. The lithium air battery fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Imanishi, Nobuyuki; Bruce, Peter G

    2014-01-01

    Lithium air rechargeable batteries are the best candidate for a power source for electric vehicles, because of their high specific energy density. In this book, the history, scientific background, status and prospects of the lithium air system are introduced by specialists in the field. This book will contain the basics, current statuses, and prospects for new technologies. This book is ideal for those interested in electrochemistry, energy storage, and materials science.

  3. Magnetism in carbon nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Hagelberg, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Magnetism in carbon nanostructures is a rapidly expanding field of current materials science. Its progress is driven by the wide range of applications for magnetic carbon nanosystems, including transmission elements in spintronics, building blocks of cutting-edge nanobiotechnology, and qubits in quantum computing. These systems also provide novel paradigms for basic phenomena of quantum physics, and are thus of great interest for fundamental research. This comprehensive survey emphasizes both the fundamental nature of the field, and its groundbreaking nanotechnological applications, providing a one-stop reference for both the principles and the practice of this emerging area. With equal relevance to physics, chemistry, engineering and materials science, senior undergraduate and graduate students in any of these subjects, as well as all those interested in novel nanomaterials, will gain an in-depth understanding of the field from this concise and self-contained volume.

  4. Nanostructured epoxi networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Bluma G.; Silva, Adriana A.; Sollymossy, Ana Paula F.; Dahmouche, Karim

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructured epoxy materials including nanocomposites were obtained by incorporating different organic or inorganic systems. Epoxy networks containing rubber particles with nanometric size have been obtained by an appropriate functionalization of the elastomers, in order to improve the interfacial adhesion between rubber and epoxy matrix. This adhesion also conferred an improvement of the impact resistance and thermal properties. This work also presents some results related to the utilization of inorganic nanoparticles in epoxy systems, including organo clay or hybrid materials based on functionalized silsesquioxanes. The nanoscopic characterization of these materials were performed by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effect of dispersion degree of the inorganic nanoparticles on the rheological properties was also investigated. (author)

  5. Synthesis, characterization, and controlled assembly of functional nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patete, Jonathan M.

    Nanomaterials represent a particularly interesting class of materials for research, as they bridge the gap between bulk materials and atomic or molecular structures, and often exhibit both novel chemical and physical properties. These properties may be altered not only by the chemical composition of the material but also by the size and shape of the nanoparticle. More specifically, the inherent anisotropy of one-dimensional nanostructures renders them as particularly efficient for electron transport applications. These materials are also highly sought after, because their distinctive shape allows for facile incorporation into functional device configurations. My graduate research has spanned several stages of nanotechnology from the synthesis and characterization of one-dimensional metal oxide nanostructures to the assembly of metal nanoparticles for practical device engineering. In particular, I have investigated the effect of the nanoscale size regime on the electronic, magnetic, and optical properties of as-prepared nanowires composed of hexagonal yttrium manganese oxide and olivine lithium iron phosphate. As a multiferroic material, h-YMnO3 is predominately sought after for applications in data storage devices. Alternatively, nanoscale LiFePO4 has shown a lot of promise as a cathode material in advanced lithium ion battery systems. The synthesis of both materials was achieved through template-directed methods, thereby allowing for precise control over the size and morphology of the as-obtained product. Finally, purposeful, directed methods for controlling the deposition pattern of metallic nanoparticles on a two-dimensional surface will be presented, and their viability as functional optical sensors will be explored.

  6. @AuAg nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rina; Soni, R. K.

    2014-09-01

    Bimetallic and trimetallic nanoparticles have attracted significant attention in recent times due to their enhanced electrochemical and catalytic properties compared to monometallic nanoparticles. The numerical calculations using Mie theory has been carried out for three-layered metal nanoshell dielectric-metal-metal (DMM) system consisting of a particle with a dielectric core (Al@Al2O3), a middle metal Ag (Au) layer and an outer metal Au (Ag) shell. The results have been interpreted using plasmon hybridization theory. We have also prepared Al@Al2O3@Ag@Au and Al@Al2O3@AgAu triple-layered core-shell or alloy nanostructure by two-step laser ablation method and compared with calculated results. The synthesis involves temporal separations of Al, Ag, and Au deposition for step-by-step formation of triple-layered core-shell structure. To form Al@Ag nanoparticles, we ablated silver for 40 min in aluminium nanoparticle colloidal solution. As aluminium oxidizes easily in water to form alumina, the resulting structure is core-shell Al@Al2O3. The Al@Al2O3 particle acts as a seed for the incoming energetic silver particles for multilayered Al@Al2O3@Ag nanoparticles is formed. The silver target was then replaced by gold target and ablation was carried out for different ablation time using different laser energy for generation of Al@Al2O3@Ag@Au core-shell or Al@Al2O3@AgAu alloy. The formation of core-shell and alloy nanostructure was confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopy. The absorption spectra show shift in plasmon resonance peak of silver to gold in the range 400-520 nm with increasing ablation time suggesting formation of Ag-Au alloy in the presence of alumina particles in the solution.

  7. Silver copper fluoride: A novel perovskite cathode for lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wei; Amatucci, Glenn G.

    2017-09-01

    An electrochemically active nanostructured silver copper fluoride (SCF) perovskite, AgCuF3, was synthesized via a mechanochemical reaction between AgF and CuF2 precursors. Phase composition and electrochemical properties of the SCF perovskites produced under various synthetic parameters were studied. The optimum SCF perovskite sample exhibited an appreciable electrochemical performance through the use of conductive carbon matrix in a primary lithium half cell. A high specific capacity of 270 mAh g-1 was achieved at a cutoff voltage of 2 V with 190 mAh g-1 above 3 V, leading to a total volumetric energy density of 3666 Wh L-1 at >3 V and 4848 Wh L-1 at >2 V.

  8. Lithium Oxysilicate Compounds Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apblett, Christopher A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Coyle, Jaclyn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    In this study, the structure and composition of lithium silicate thin films deposited by RF magnetron co-sputtering is investigated. Five compositions ranging from Li2Si2O5 to Li8SiO6 were confirmed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and structure analysis on the evolution of non-bridging oxygens in the thin films was conducted with fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. It was found that non-bridging oxygens (NBOs) increased as the silicate network breaks apart with increasing lithium content which agrees with previous studies on lithium silicates. Thin film impurities were examined with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOFSIMS) and traced back to target synthesis. This study utilizes a unique synthesis technique for lithium silicate thin films and can be referred to in future studies on the ionic conductivity of lithium silicates formed on the surface of silicon anodes in lithium ion batteries.

  9. Nanostructured Photovoltaics for Space Power

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA NSTRF proposal entitled Nanostructured Photovoltaics for Space Power is targeted towards research to improve the current state of the art photovoltaic...

  10. Quantum optics with semiconductor nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Jahnke, Frank

    2012-01-01

    A guide to the theory, application and potential of semiconductor nanostructures in the exploration of quantum optics. It offers an overview of resonance fluorescence emission.$bAn understanding of the interaction between light and matter on a quantum level is of fundamental interest and has many applications in optical technologies. The quantum nature of the interaction has recently attracted great attention for applications of semiconductor nanostructures in quantum information processing. Quantum optics with semiconductor nanostructures is a key guide to the theory, experimental realisation, and future potential of semiconductor nanostructures in the exploration of quantum optics. Part one provides a comprehensive overview of single quantum dot systems, beginning with a look at resonance fluorescence emission. Quantum optics with single quantum dots in photonic crystal and micro cavities are explored in detail, before part two goes on to review nanolasers with quantum dot emitters. Light-matter interaction...

  11. Relaxor ferroelectricity, ferromagnetic and optical second harmonic properties in lanthanum lithium niobate (La0.05Li0.85NbO3) nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Moreno, Carlos A.; Ding, Yu; Li, Chunqiang; Portelles, Jorge; Heiras, J.; Hurtado-Macias, A.; Farias, J. R.; González-Hernández, J.; Yacamán, M. J.; López, Jorge

    2017-07-01

    Relaxor ferroelectricity, ferromagnetism and Second Harmonic Generation properties were founded and studied as a function of a reduction heat treatment at 650 °C in a Ar-5%H2 atmosphere in stoichiometric La0.05Li0.85NbO3 nanoparticles of 40 nm. A diffuse dielectric anomaly related with relaxor behavior from 25 °C to 800 °C in a frequency range from 100 Hz to 1 MHz was founded. It also shows ferromagnetic anhysterestic type and ferroelectric hysteresis loops at room temperature with a magnetic spin remnant of 2.5 × 10-3 emu/g and polarization saturation of 0.235 μC/cm2, remnant polarization of 0.141 μC/cm2, coercive field of 1.35 kV/cm, respectively. It shows very good second harmonic generation signal at 450 nm and 500 nm. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, indicate an ABO3 perovskite structure, new electronic binding energy structure for La (5s, 4d), Li (1s), Nb (4s, 3d, 4p) and oxygen (1s, 2s) and new vibrations modes on octahedron NbO6 related to multiferroic single phase nanoparticles, respectively.

  12. Effect of defect accumulation on ion-beam damage morphology by electronic excitation in lithium niobate: A MonteCarlo approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, A. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid, (CNM-CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, E-28760 Tres Cantos (Spain); Crespillo, M.L. [Centro de Microanalisis de Materiales (CMAM), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (UAM), Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Olivares, J. [Centro de Microanalisis de Materiales (CMAM), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (UAM), Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Optica, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), C/Serrano 121, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Garcia, G. [Laboratory of Synchrotron Light (CELLS-ALBA), 08290, Cerdanyola del Valles, Barcelona (Spain); Agullo-Lopez, F., E-mail: fal@uam.e [Centro de Microanalisis de Materiales (CMAM), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (UAM), Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (UAM), Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    We present a MonteCarlo approach to the non-radiative exciton-decay model recently proposed to describe ion-beam damage in LiNbO{sub 3} produced in the electronic excitation regime. It takes into account the statistical (random) spatial distribution of ion impacts on the crystal surface. The MonteCarlo approach is necessary to simulate the evolution of the damage morphology with irradiation fluence from the single track regime to the overlapping track regime. A detailed comparison between the morphologies found for sub-threshold and above threshold irradiations is presented. Moreover, a good representation of the Avrami's type kinetics for amorphization has been achieved and it is in fair accordance with experiment. For moderate fluences where homogeneous amorphous layers are generated, the new approach predicts that the amorphous and crystalline layers are separated by a diffuse (thick) boundary that includes a mixed amorphous-crystalline composition.

  13. Contributions to the crystal growth and characterization of the ferroelectric tetragonal tungsten bronze potassium-lithium niobate (K3Li2Nb5O15-KLN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podlojenov, S.

    2003-01-01

    Undoped and Mg-doped KLN single crystals of optical quality were grown by the Czochralski technique. For decreasing temperature gradients in a growing single crystal an inductive afterheater was applied. The applicability for the frequency doubling of the KLN crystals was examined by using of powder SHG-tests. There was a clear correlation between the crystal composition (Nb-content) and the intensity of the second harmonic radiation. The niobium concentration of 49 mole % in the liquid phase can be appropriated as the boundary between the crystallization of paraelectric and ferroelectric KLN phase. All the grown KLTN crystals were paraelectric. The composition of the grown crystals was determined by X-ray fluorescence analysis and the atomic absorption analysis. The axial and radial concentration profiles of K and Nb over single crystals were determined by means of electron microprobe analysis. The segregation of elements is negligibly small in the investigated KLN single crystals. But in the KLTN single crystals the segregation of Ta was estimated to be in the order of 1 mole % / 1 cm crystal length. The ferroelectric phase transition in KLN was investigated with several techniques. The ferroelectric phase transition was estimated to lie within the range of 470-480 C. The second-order phase transition was detected by temperature-dependent measurements of the dielectric constant and the birefringence. But the DTA measurements indicated small thermal effect at the same temperature region, what refers to a first-order phase transition. The refractive indices of the paraelectric and the ferroelectric KLN phase were measured with an accuracy of 4 x 10 -5 over the wavelength region of 404-1083 nm. The data indicate that second harmonic generation in ferroelectric KLN crystals is possible at the primary wavelength 910 nm with non-critical phase matching (type I). (orig.)

  14. Nanocomposites with embedded structures for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zichao

    Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) have been widely employed in portable electronics and are rapidly expanding into emerging markets such as hybrid and electric vehicles and potentially electric grid storage. These new opportunities create new challenges for LIBs and further improvement of specific energy, cycling performance and rate capability are required. A major strategy in performance enhancement for the electrode materials involves the creation of carbon composites to provide mechanical buffering of active material and to improve electrical conductivity. In the current work, a platform is developed for creating functional hybrid materials by copolymerization of organic molecules and inorganic compounds followed by thermal pyrolysis, and the approach yields nanostructured composites in which nanoparticles are uniformly embedded in a porous, partially graphitic carbon matrix. Depending upon the chemistry of the starting materials, nanocomposites with embedded structures created using the approach are attractive as anode or cathode materials for next-generation rechargeable lithium battery systems. The platform is very versatile and through ex situ conversion or utilization of multiple precursors, can be applied to various classes of materials including metal oxides (single or mixed), metals, metal sulfides, alloys, metalloids, phosphates, etc. The approach also lends itself to the development of scalable processes for production of nanostructured battery materials. Mechanistic analysis was performed and reveals that the performance enhancement of the embedded nanocomposite configuration is mainly brought about by the mechanical buffering effect offered by the carbon matrix. The active material loading was shown to be an important factor in the design of the composites as electrode materials. In addition to the polymerization-based approach, other in situ methods such as one based on spray pyrolysis are also explored and demonstrate the versatility of the in situ

  15. Synthesis of vertically aligned metal oxide nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Roqan, Iman S.

    2016-03-03

    Metal oxide nanostructure and methods of making metal oxide nanostructures are provided. The metal oxide nanostructures can be 1 -dimensional nanostructures such as nanowires, nanofibers, or nanotubes. The metal oxide nanostructures can be doped or undoped metal oxides. The metal oxide nanostructures can be deposited onto a variety of substrates. The deposition can be performed without high pressures and without the need for seed catalysts on the substrate. The deposition can be performed by laser ablation of a target including a metal oxide and, optionally, a dopant. In some embodiments zinc oxide nanostructures are deposited onto a substrate by pulsed laser deposition of a zinc oxide target using an excimer laser emitting UV radiation. The zinc oxide nanostructure can be doped with a rare earth metal such as gadolinium. The metal oxide nanostructures can be used in many devices including light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

  16. Fabrication of supported Ca-doped lanthanum niobate electrolyte layer and NiO containing anode functional layer by electrophoretic deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozza, Francesco; Bonanos, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    The technique of electrophoretic deposition (EPD) has been applied for the preparation of a dense calcium-doped lanthanum niobate electrolyte film. La0.995Ca0.005NbO4 (LCN) powder was suspended in a solution of acetylacetone, iodine and water. The effects of suspension composition and deposition...... conditions were analyzed in order to identify a suitable set of EPD process parameters. The powders were deposited on a composite substrate of LCN, NiO, binder and graphite. A dense 8 μm film of lanthanum niobate supported on a porous substrate was obtained after sintering at 1200 °C. The technique was found...... to be effective also for the deposition of a mixture of NiO and LCN powders which, after sintering, would form LCN/NiO anode functional layer. Electrochemical characterization of the supported LCN film was performed by applying a LCN/NiO counter electrode....

  17. Recent advances in lithium ion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, S.C.

    1995-01-01

    Lithium ion technology is based on the use of lithium intercalating electrodes. Carbon is the most commonly used anode material, while the cathode materials of choice have been layered lithium metal chalcogenides (LiMX{sub 2}) and lithium spinel-type compounds. Electrolytes may be either organic liquids or polymers. Although the first practical use of graphite intercalation compounds as battery anodes was reported in 1981 for molten salt cells (1) and in 1983 for ambient temperature systems (2) it was not until Sony Energytech announced a new lithium ion rechargeable cell containing a lithium ion intercalating carbon anode in 1990, that interest peaked. The reason for this heightened interest is that these cells have the high energy density, high voltage and fight weight of metallic lithium systems plus a very long cycle life, but without the disadvantages of dendrite formation on charge and the safety considerations associated with metallic lithium.

  18. Predictors of excellent response to lithium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Hellmund, Gunnar; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify sociodemographic and clinical predictors of excellent response, that is, 'cure' of future affective episodes, to lithium in monotherapy. We used nationwide registers to identify all patients with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder in psychiatric hospital settings...... who were prescribed lithium from 1995 to 2006 in Denmark (N=3762). Excellent lithium responders were defined as patients who after a stabilization lithium start-up period of 6 months, continued lithium in monotherapy without getting hospitalized. The rate of excellent response to lithium...... with somatic comorbidity had increased rates of non-response to lithium compared with patients without somatic comorbidity (HR=1.23, 95% CI: 1.00-1.52).It is concluded that the prevalence of excellent response to lithium monotherapy is low and such patients are characterized by few earlier psychiatric...

  19. Novel Electrolytes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucht, Brett L. [Univ. of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2014-12-12

    We have been investigating three primary areas related to lithium ion battery electrolytes. First, we have been investigating the thermal stability of novel electrolytes for lithium ion batteries, in particular borate based salts. Second, we have been investigating novel additives to improve the calendar life of lithium ion batteries. Third, we have been investigating the thermal decomposition reactions of electrolytes for lithium-oxygen batteries.

  20. Spectral evolution of Eu{sup 3+} doped Y{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} niobate induced by temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K-Y.; Durand, A. [CNRS, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Univ. Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Heintz, J-M.; Veillere, A. [CNRS, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Univ. Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Bordeaux INP, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Jubera, V., E-mail: veronique.jubera@u-bordeaux.fr [CNRS, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Univ. Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France)

    2016-03-15

    A Eu{sup 3+} doped Y{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} niobate powder was synthetized using a polymerizable complex route. It gave rise to nanometric particles that crystallized in the fluorine structure, corresponding to the Y{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} phase. The thermal evolution of this powder was followed up to 1600 °C, using X-ray diffraction and optical characterizations. The fluorine structure was maintained in the whole temperature range. However, spectral evolution of the samples calcined above 900 °C showed a more complex situation. Emission spectra of powders heat treated at different temperatures showed an evolution of the emission lines that can be attributed first to a better crystallization of the niobate phase and second to its partial decomposition in favor of the formation of YNbO{sub 4} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Although the Y{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} phase appeared stable up to 1650 °C, from X-ray diffraction analysis, spectral analysis showed that the local environment of the doping element is modified from 1100 °C. - Graphical abstract: Spectral evolution of Eu{sup 3+} doped Y{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} niobate induced by temperature.

  1. Facile synthesis of nanostructured transition metal oxides as electrodes for Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opra, Denis P.; Gnedenkov, Sergey V.; Sokolov, Alexander A.; Minaev, Alexander N.; Kuryavyi, Valery G.; Sinebryukhov, Sergey L.

    2017-09-01

    At all times, energy storage is one of the greatest scientific challenge. Recently, Li-ion batteries are under special attention due to high working voltage, long cycle life, low self-discharge, reliability, no-memory effect. However, commercial LIBs usage in medium- and large-scale energy storage are limited by the capacity of lithiated metal oxide cathode and unsafety of graphite anode at high-rate charge. In this way, new electrode materials with higher electrochemical performance should be designed to satisfy a requirement in both energy and power. As it known, nanostructured transition metal oxides are promising electrode materials because of their elevated specific capacity and high potential vs. Li/Li+. In this work, the perspective of an original facile technique of pulsed high-voltage plasma discharge in synthesis of nanostructured transition metal oxides as electrodes for lithium-ion batteries has been demonstrated.

  2. Chemical Immobilization Effect on Lithium Polysulfides for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Caixia; Xi, Zhucong; Guo, Dexiang; Chen, Xiangju; Yin, Longwei

    2018-01-01

    Despite great progress in lithium-sulfur batteries (LSBs), great obstacles still exist to achieve high loading content of sulfur and avoid the loss of active materials due to the dissolution of the intermediate polysulfide products in the electrolyte. Relationships between the intrinsic properties of nanostructured hosts and electrochemical performance of LSBs, especially, the chemical interaction effects on immobilizing polysulfides for LSB cathodes, are discussed in this Review. Moreover, the principle of rational microstructure design for LSB cathode materials with strong chemical interaction adsorbent effects on polysulfides, such as metallic compounds, metal particles, organic polymers, and heteroatom-doped carbon, is mainly described. According to the chemical immobilizing mechanism of polysulfide on LSB cathodes, three kinds of chemical immobilizing effects, including the strong chemical affinity between polar host and polar polysulfides, the chemical bonding effect between sulfur and the special function groups/atoms, and the catalytic effect on electrochemical reaction kinetics, are thoroughly reviewed. To improve the electrochemical performance and long cycling life-cycle stability of LSBs, possible solutions and strategies with respect to the rational design of the microstructure of LSB cathodes are comprehensively analyzed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Comparative ion insertion study into a nanostructured vanadium oxide in aqueous salt solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Q.; Ren, S. L.; Zukowski, J.; Pomeroy, M.; Soghomonian, V., E-mail: soghomon@vt.edu [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2014-07-07

    We present a comparative study for the electrochemical insertion of different cations into a nanostructured vanadium oxide material. The oxide is hydrothemally synthesized and electrically characterized by variable temperature measurements. The electrochemical reactions are performed in aqueous chloride solutions of lithium, sodium, potassium, and ammonium, and the electrochemical behavior of various cycles are correlated with visual changes in the vanadium oxide nanosheets as observed by scanning electron microscopy. We note an increase in the specific charge per cycle in the cases of sodium and ammonium ions only, correlated with minimal physical changes to the nanosheets. The differing behavior of the various ions has implications for their use in electrical energy storage applications.

  4. GISAXS View of Induced Morphological Changes in Nanostructured CeVO4 Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdy Lučić Lavčević

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured CeVO4 films, designed for applications in electrochemical cells and electrochromic devices, were obtained on glass substrates by the sol-gel process. An analysis of morphological modifications in these films, induced by ultrasonication, annealing, and introduction of lithium ions, was performed, using the grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering technique (GISAXS. The GISAXS results are discussed and related with complementary examinations of the same films in real space, performed by scanning electron microscopy on a different length scale.

  5. Lithium in the Kidney: Friend and Foe?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alsady, M.; Baumgarten, R.; Deen, P.M.T.; Groot, T. de

    2016-01-01

    Trace amounts of lithium are essential for our physical and mental health, and administration of lithium has improved the quality of life of millions of patients with bipolar disorder for >60 years. However, in a substantial number of patients with bipolar disorder, long-term lithium therapy comes

  6. Lithium. Effects on excitable cell membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeger, Egbert Johan

    1974-01-01

    LITHIUM: Effects on excitable cell membranes. Lithium salts have been used in the treatment of manic-depressive psychosis for many years but their mechanism of action is not well understood. Many workers assume that the action of lithium on catecholamine metabolism and/or on electrolyte distribution

  7. Phase transition in a rechargeable lithium battery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreyer, W.; Gaberscek, M.; Guhlke, C.; Huth, R.; Jamnik, J.

    We discuss the lithium storage process within a single-particle cathode of a lithium-ion battery. The single storage particle consists of a crystal lattice whose interstitial lattice sites may be empty or reversibly filled with lithium atoms. The resulting evolution equations describe diffusion with

  8. Self-sustained cycle of hydrolysis and etching at solution/solid interfaces: a general strategy to prepare metal oxide micro-/nanostructured arrays for high-performance electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingmeng; Zhang, Weixin; Yang, Zeheng; Gu, Heyun; Zhu, Qing; Yang, Shihe; Li, Mei

    2015-03-23

    Assembling micro-/nanostructured arrays on conducting substrates allows the integration of multiple functionalities into modern electronic devices. Herein, a novel self-sustained cycle of hydrolysis and etching (SCHE) is exploited to selectively synthesize an extensive series of metal oxide micro-/nanostructured arrays on a wide range of metal substrates, establishing the generality and efficacy of the strategy. To demonstrate the potential application of this method, the as-prepared NiO porous nanobelt array was directly used as the anode for lithium-ion batteries, exhibiting excellent capacity and rate capability. Conclusively, the SCHE strategy offers a systematic approach to design metal oxide micro-/nanostructured arrays on metal substrates, which are valuable not only for lithium-ion batteries but also for other energy conversion and storage systems and electronic devices at large. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Multiscale modelling of nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vvedensky, Dimitri D

    2004-01-01

    Most materials phenomena are manifestations of processes that are operative over a vast range of length and time scales. A complete understanding of the behaviour of materials thereby requires theoretical and computational tools that span the atomic-scale detail of first-principles methods and the more coarse-grained description provided by continuum equations. Recent efforts have focused on combining traditional methodologies-density functional theory, molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo methods and continuum descriptions-within a unified multiscale framework. This review covers the techniques that have been developed to model various aspects of materials behaviour with the ultimate aim of systematically coupling the atomistic to the continuum descriptions. The approaches described typically have been motivated by particular applications but can often be applied in wider contexts. The self-assembly of quantum dot ensembles will be used as a case study for the issues that arise and the methods used for all nanostructures. Although quantum dots can be obtained with all the standard growth methods and for a variety of material systems, their appearance is a quite selective process, involving the competition between equilibrium and kinetic effects, and the interplay between atomistic and long-range interactions. Most theoretical models have addressed particular aspects of the ordering kinetics of quantum dot ensembles, with far fewer attempts at a comprehensive synthesis of this inherently multiscale phenomenon. We conclude with an assessment of the current status of multiscale modelling strategies and highlight the main outstanding issues. (topical review)

  10. Photoresponsive nanostructured membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, Poornima

    2016-07-26

    The perspective of adding stimuli-response to isoporous membranes stimulates the development of separation devices with pores, which would open or close under control of environment chemical composition, temperature or exposure to light. Changes in pH and temperature have been previously investigated. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the preparation of photoresponsive isoporous membranes, applying self-assembly non-solvent induced phase separation to a new light responsive block copolymer. First, we optimized the membrane formation by using poly(styrene-b-anthracene methyl methacrylate-b-methylmethacrylate) (PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA) copolymer, identifying the most suitable solvent, copolymer block length, and other parameters. The obtained final triblock copolymer membrane morphologies were characterized using atomic force and electron microscopy. The microscopic analysis reveals that the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer can form both lamellar and ordered hexagonal nanoporous structures on the membrane top layer in appropriate solvent compositions. The nanostructured membrane emits fluorescence due to the presence of the anthracene mid-block. On irradiation of light the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer membranes has an additional stimuli response. The anthracene group undergoes conformational changes by forming [4 + 4] cycloadducts and this alters the membrane\\'s water flux and solute retention. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  11. The nanostructure problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billinge, S.

    2010-01-01

    Diffraction techniques are making progress in tackling the difficult problem of solving the structures of nanoparticles and nanoscale materials. The great gift of x-ray crystallography has made us almost complacent in our ability to locate the three-dimensional coordinates of atoms in a crystal with a precision of around 10 -4 nm. However, the powerful methods of crystallography break down for structures in which order only extends over a few nanometers. In fact, as we near the one hundred year mark since the birth of crystallography, we face a resilient frontier in condensed matter physics: our inability to routinely and robustly determine the structure of complex nanostructured and amorphous materials. Knowing the structure and arrangement of atoms in a solid is so fundamental to understanding its properties that the topic routinely occupies the early chapters of every solid-state physics textbook. Yet what has become clear with the emergence of nanotechnology is that diffraction data alone may not be enough to uniquely solve the structure of nanomaterials. As part of a growing effort to incorporate the results of other techniques to constrain x-ray refinements - a method called 'complex modeling' which is a simple but elegant approach for combining information from spectroscopy with diffraction data to solve the structure of several amorphous and nanostructured materials. Crystallography just works, so we rarely question how and why this is so, yet understanding the physics of diffraction can be very helpful as we consider the nanostructure problem. The relationship between the electron density distribution in three dimensions (i.e., the crystal structure) and an x-ray diffraction pattern is well established: the measured intensity distribution in reciprocal space is the square of the Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function of the electron density distribution ρ(r). The fact that we get the autocorrelation function (rather than just the density

  12. Phonon engineering for nanostructures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubry, Sylvie (Stanford University); Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sullivan, John Patrick; Peebles, Diane Elaine; Hurley, David H. (Idaho National Laboratory); Shinde, Subhash L.; Piekos, Edward Stanley; Emerson, John Allen

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the physics of phonon transport at small length scales is increasingly important for basic research in nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, nanomechanics, and thermoelectrics. We conducted several studies to develop an understanding of phonon behavior in very small structures. This report describes the modeling, experimental, and fabrication activities used to explore phonon transport across and along material interfaces and through nanopatterned structures. Toward the understanding of phonon transport across interfaces, we computed the Kapitza conductance for {Sigma}29(001) and {Sigma}3(111) interfaces in silicon, fabricated the interfaces in single-crystal silicon substrates, and used picosecond laser pulses to image the thermal waves crossing the interfaces. Toward the understanding of phonon transport along interfaces, we designed and fabricated a unique differential test structure that can measure the proportion of specular to diffuse thermal phonon scattering from silicon surfaces. Phonon-scale simulation of the test ligaments, as well as continuum scale modeling of the complete experiment, confirmed its sensitivity to surface scattering. To further our understanding of phonon transport through nanostructures, we fabricated microscale-patterned structures in diamond thin films.

  13. Nuclear spins in nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coish, W.A.; Baugh, J.

    2009-01-01

    We review recent theoretical and experimental advances toward understanding the effects of nuclear spins in confined nanostructures. These systems, which include quantum dots, defect centers, and molecular magnets, are particularly interesting for their importance in quantum information processing devices, which aim to coherently manipulate single electron spins with high precision. On one hand, interactions between confined electron spins and a nuclear-spin environment provide a decoherence source for the electron, and on the other, a strong effective magnetic field that can be used to execute local coherent rotations. A great deal of effort has been directed toward understanding the details of the relevant decoherence processes and to find new methods to manipulate the coupled electron-nuclear system. A sequence of spectacular new results have provided understanding of spin-bath decoherence, nuclear spin diffusion, and preparation of the nuclear state through dynamic polarization and more general manipulation of the nuclear-spin density matrix through ''state narrowing.'' These results demonstrate the richness of this physical system and promise many new mysteries for the future. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Nanostructured Basaltfiberconcrete Exploitational Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraykina, K. A.; Shamanov, V. A.

    2017-11-01

    The article demonstrates that the mass use of basalt fiber concrete (BFC) is constrained by insufficient study of their durability and serviceability in a variety of environments. This research is aimed at the study of the basalt fiber corrosion processes in the cement stone of BFC, the control of the new products structure formation in order to protect the reinforcing fiber from alkaline destruction and thereby improve the exploitational characteristics of the composite. The research result revealed that the modification of basaltfiber concrete by the dispersion of MWNTs contributes to the directional formation of new products in the cement matrix. The HAM additive in basaltfiberconcrete provides for the binding of portlandite to low-basic calcium hydroaluminosilicates, thus reducing the aggressive effect of the cement environment on the reinforcing fibers properties. The complex modification of BFC with nanostructured additives provides for an increase in its durability and exploitational properties (strength, frost resistance and water resistance) due to basalt fiber protection from alkali corrosion on account of the compacting of the contact zone “basalt fiber - cement stone” and designing of the new products structure and morphology of cement matrix over the fiber surface.

  15. Nanostructured Conjugated Polymers for Energy-Related Applications beyond Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jian; Zhao, Cui-E; Lin, Zong-Qiong; Gu, Pei-Yang; Zhang, Qichun

    2016-05-20

    To meet the ever-increasing requirements for the next generation of sustainable and versatile energy-related devices, conjugated polymers, which have potential advantages over small molecules and inorganic materials, are among the most promising types of green candidates. The properties of conjugated polymers can be tuned through modification of the structure and incorporation of different functional moieties. In addition, superior performances can be achieved as a result of the advantages of nanostructures, such as their large surface areas and the shortened pathways for charge transfer. Therefore, nanostructured conjugated polymers with different properties can be obtained to be applied in different energy-related organic devices. This review focuses on the application and performance of the recently reported nanostructured conjugated polymers for high-performance devices, including rechargeable lithium batteries, microbial fuel cells (MFCs), thermoelectric generators, and photocatalytic systems. The design strategies, reaction mechanisms, advantages, and limitations of nanostructured conjugated polymers are further discussed in each section. Finally, possible routes to improve the performances of the current systems are also included in the conclusion. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Electrolytes for lithium and lithium-ion batteries

    CERN Document Server

    Jow, T Richard; Borodin, Oleg; Ue, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Electrolytes for Lithium and Lithium-ion Batteries provides a comprehensive overview of the scientific understanding and technological development of electrolyte materials in the last?several years. This book covers key electrolytes such as LiPF6 salt in mixed-carbonate solvents with additives for the state-of-the-art Li-ion batteries as well as new electrolyte materials developed recently that lay the foundation for future advances.?This book also reviews the characterization of electrolyte materials for their transport properties, structures, phase relationships, stabilities, and impurities.

  17. Nanostructured catalysts for organic transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chng, Leng Leng; Erathodiyil, Nandanan; Ying, Jackie Y

    2013-08-20

    The development of green, sustainable and economical chemical processes is one of the major challenges in chemistry. Besides the traditional need for efficient and selective catalytic reactions that will transform raw materials into valuable chemicals, pharmaceuticals and fuels, green chemistry also strives for waste reduction, atomic efficiency and high rates of catalyst recovery. Nanostructured materials are attractive candidates as heterogeneous catalysts for various organic transformations, especially because they meet the goals of green chemistry. Researchers have made significant advances in the synthesis of well-defined nanostructured materials in recent years. Among these are novel approaches that have permitted the rational design and synthesis of highly active and selective nanostructured catalysts by controlling the structure and composition of the active nanoparticles (NPs) and by manipulating the interaction between the catalytically active NP species and their support. The ease of isolation and separation of the heterogeneous catalysts from the desired organic product and the recovery and reuse of these NPs further enhance their attractiveness as green and sustainable catalysts. This Account reviews recent advances in the use of nanostructured materials for catalytic organic transformations. We present a broad overview of nanostructured catalysts used in different types of organic transformations including chemoselective oxidations and reductions, asymmetric hydrogenations, coupling reactions, C-H activations, oxidative aminations, domino and tandem reactions, and more. We focus on recent research efforts towards the development of the following nanostructured materials: (i) nanostructured catalysts with controlled morphologies, (ii) magnetic nanocomposites, (iii) semiconductor-metal nanocomposites, and (iv) hybrid nanostructured catalysts. Selected examples showcase principles of nanoparticle design such as the enhancement of reactivity, selectivity

  18. Lithium-Sulfur Capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mok-Hwa; Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Xi, Kai; Kumar, R Vasant; Jung, Dae Soo; Kim, Kwang-Bum; Roh, Kwang Chul

    2018-02-21

    Although many existing hybrid energy storage systems demonstrate promising electrochemical performances, imbalances between the energies and kinetics of the two electrodes must be resolved to allow their widespread commercialization. As such, the development of a new class of energy storage systems is a particular challenge, since future systems will require a single device to provide both a high gravimetric energy and a high power density. In this context, we herein report the design of novel lithium-sulfur capacitors. The resulting asymmetric systems exhibited energy densities of 23.9-236.4 Wh kg -1 and power densities of 72.2-4097.3 W kg -1 , which are the highest reported values for an asymmetric system to date. This approach involved the use of a prelithiated anode and a hybrid cathode material exhibiting anion adsorption-desorption in addition to the electrochemical reduction and oxidation of sulfur at almost identical rates. This novel strategy yielded both high energy and power densities, and therefore establishes a new benchmark for hybrid systems.

  19. Photonic effects in natural nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey GonzáLez, Rafael Ramón; Barrera Patiã+/-O, Claudia Patricia

    Nature exhibits a great variety of structures and nanostructures. In particular the interaction light-matter has a strong dependence with the shape of the nanostructures. In some cases, in the so called structural color, ordered arrays of nanostructures play a very critical role. One of the most interesting color effects is the iridescence, the angular dependence of the observed color in some species of butterflies, insects, plants, beetles, fishes, birds and even in minerals. In the last years, iridescence has been related with photonic properties. In the present work, we present a theoretical study of the photonic properties for different patterns that exist in natural nanostructures present in wings of butterflies that exhibit iridescence. The nanostructures observed in these cases present spatial variations of the dielectric constant that are possible to model them as 1D and 2D photonic crystal. Partial photonic gaps are found as function of lattice constant, dielectric contrast and geometrical configuration. Also, disordered effects are considered. Authors would like to thank the División de Investigación Sede Bogotá for their financial support at Universidad Nacional de Colombia.

  20. Extracorporeal Treatment for Lithium Poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Decker, Brian S; Goldfarb, David S; Dargan, Paul I

    2015-01-01

    extraction of patient-level data. The workgroup concluded that lithium is dialyzable (Level of evidence=A) and made the following recommendations: Extracorporeal treatment is recommended in severe lithium poisoning (1D). Extracorporeal treatment is recommended if kidney function is impaired and the [Li......The Extracorporeal Treatments in Poisoning Workgroup was created to provide evidence-based recommendations on the use of extracorporeal treatments in poisoning. Here, the EXTRIP workgroup presents its recommendations for lithium poisoning. After a systematic literature search, clinical...... and toxicokinetic data were extracted and summarized following a predetermined format. The entire workgroup voted through a two-round modified Delphi method to reach a consensus on voting statements. A RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method was used to quantify disagreement, and anonymous votes were compiled...

  1. Lithium clearance in chronic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A L; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Leyssac, P P

    1989-01-01

    1. Lithium clearance measurements were made in 72 patients with chronic nephropathy of different aetiology and moderate to severely reduced renal function. 2. Lithium clearance was strictly correlated with glomerular filtration rate, and there was no suggestion of distal tubular reabsorption...... clearance data were independent of whether renal disease was of primarily glomerular or tubular origin and, further, were not influenced by long-term conventional antihypertensive treatment. 6. It is concluded that, even with a reduced kidney function, the data are compatible with the suggestion...... that lithium clearance may be a measure of the delivery of sodium and water from the renal proximal tubule. With this assumption it was found that adjustment of the sodium excretion in chronic nephropathy initially takes place in the distal parts of the nephron (loop of Henle, distal tubule and collecting duct...

  2. Does lithium protect against dementia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Forman, Julie Lyng; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether treatment with lithium in patients with mania or bipolar disorder is associated with a decreased rate of subsequent dementia. METHODS: Linkage of register data on prescribed lithium in all patients discharged from psychiatric health care service with a diagnosis...... to the rate of dementia during the period with one prescription of these drugs. CONCLUSIONS: Continued treatment with lithium was associated with a reduced rate of dementia in patients with bipolar disorder in contrast to continued treatment with anticonvulsants, antidepressants, or antipsychotics...... of mania or bipolar disorder and subsequent diagnoses of dementia in Denmark during a period from 1995 to 2005. RESULTS: A total of 4,856 patients with a diagnosis of a manic or mixed episode or bipolar disorder at their first psychiatric contact were included in the study. Among these patients, 2,449 were...

  3. Deuterium retention in liquid lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, M.J.; Doerner, R.P.; Luckhardt, S.C.; Conn, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of deuterium retention in samples of lithium exposed in the liquid state to deuterium plasma are reported. Retention was measured as a function of plasma ion dose in the range 6x10 19 -4x10 22 D atoms and exposure temperature between 523 and 673 K using thermal desorption spectrometry. The results are consistent with the full uptake of all deuterium ions incident on the liquid metal surface and are found to be independent of the temperature of the liquid lithium over the range explored. Full uptake, consistent with very low recycling, continues until the sample is volumetrically converted to lithium deuteride. This occurs for exposure temperatures where the gas pressure during exposure was both below and slightly above the corresponding decomposition pressure for LiD in Li. (author)

  4. Thermodynamic properties of lithium polyvanadatomolybdate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, V.L.; Zakharova, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    Equilibrium vapor pressures and some thermodynamic water characteristics depending on the composition of lithium depending on the composition of lithium polyvanadatomolybdate are determined. The dependences lg p H 2 O and ΔG H 2 O as f (T, nH 2 O) of Li 2 V 12-x Mo x O 31± ynH 2 O, where 0 ≤ x ≤ 3 are determined in the 295-343 K temperature range. The lg p H 2 O and ΔH H 2 O values of lithium polyvanadomolybdates depend on the content of molybdenym and water in the compound in a complex manner. At x=0.5 the extreme values of lg p H 2 O and ΔH H 2 O are observed, and at x=2 lg p H 2 O increases due to electron and structural phase variations

  5. Nanostructure Neutron Converter Layer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); Thibeault, Sheila A. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods for making a neutron converter layer are provided. The various embodiment methods enable the formation of a single layer neutron converter material. The single layer neutron converter material formed according to the various embodiments may have a high neutron absorption cross section, tailored resistivity providing a good electric field penetration with submicron particles, and a high secondary electron emission coefficient. In an embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by sequential supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In another embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by simultaneous supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In a further embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by in-situ metalized aerogel nanostructure development.

  6. Nanostructuring of Solar Cell Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    Solar energy is by far the most abundant renewable energy source available, but the levelized cost of solar energy is still not competitive with that of fossil fuels. Therefore there is a need to improve the power conversion effciency of solar cells without adding to the production cost. The main...... objective of this PhD thesis is to develop nanostructured silicon (Si) solar cells with higher power conversion efficiency using only scalable and cost-efficient production methods. The nanostructures, known as 'black silicon', are fabricated by single-step, maskless reactive ion etching and used as front...... texturing of different Si solar cells. Theoretically the nanostructure topology may be described as a graded refractive index in a mean-field approximation between air and Si. The optical properties of the developed black Si were simulated and experimentally measured. Total AM1.5G-weighted average...

  7. PREFACE: Self-organized nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousset, Sylvie; Ortega, Enrique

    2006-04-01

    In order to fabricate ordered arrays of nanostructures, two different strategies might be considered. The `top-down' approach consists of pushing the limit of lithography techniques down to the nanometre scale. However, beyond 10 nm lithography techniques will inevitably face major intrinsic limitations. An alternative method for elaborating ultimate-size nanostructures is based on the reverse `bottom-up' approach, i.e. building up nanostructures (and eventually assemble them to form functional circuits) from individual atoms or molecules. Scanning probe microscopies, including scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) invented in 1982, have made it possible to create (and visualize) individual structures atom by atom. However, such individual atomic manipulation is not suitable for industrial applications. Self-assembly or self-organization of nanostructures on solid surfaces is a bottom-up approach that allows one to fabricate and assemble nanostructure arrays in a one-step process. For applications, such as high density magnetic storage, self-assembly appears to be the simplest alternative to lithography for massive, parallel fabrication of nanostructure arrays with regular sizes and spacings. These are also necessary for investigating the physical properties of individual nanostructures by means of averaging techniques, i.e. all those using light or particle beams. The state-of-the-art and the current developments in the field of self-organization and physical properties of assembled nanostructures are reviewed in this issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. The papers have been selected from among the invited and oral presentations of the recent summer workshop held in Cargese (Corsica, France, 17-23 July 2005). All authors are world-renowned in the field. The workshop has been funded by the Marie Curie Actions: Marie Curie Conferences and Training Courses series named `NanosciencesTech' supported by the VI Framework Programme of the European Community, by

  8. Interfacing nanostructures to biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-09-04

    Disclosed herein are methods and materials by which nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes, nanorods, etc. are bound to lectins and/or polysaccharides and prepared for administration to cells. Also disclosed are complexes comprising glycosylated nanostructures, which bind selectively to cells expressing glycosylated surface molecules recognized by the lectin. Exemplified is a complex comprising a carbon nanotube functionalized with a lipid-like alkane, linked to a polymer bearing repeated .alpha.-N-acetylgalactosamine sugar groups. This complex is shown to selectively adhere to the surface of living cells, without toxicity. In the exemplified embodiment, adherence is mediated by a multivalent lectin, which binds both to the cells and the .alpha.-N-acetylgalactosamine groups on the nanostructure.

  9. Lithium use and primary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, James T; Solorzano, Carmen C

    2011-01-01

    To review suspected causes of lithium-induced hyperparathyroidism, disease presentation, underlying pathology, and current recommendations and trends in medical and surgical treatment. Relevant literature was reviewed. Lithium carbonate therapy has continued to be a mainstay of treatment for bipolar disease and schizoaffective disorder since its introduction into clinical use. Several metabolic consequences are associated with its long-term use, including hypercalcemia and hyperparathyroidism. Until further data become available, the surgeon should remain vigilant for the presence of pathologically active glands that may manifest their function at different times during the disease course.

  10. Lithium in LMC carbon stars

    OpenAIRE

    Hatzidimitriou, D.; Morgan, D. H.; Cannon, R. D.; Croke, B. F. W.

    2003-01-01

    Nineteen carbon stars that show lithium enrichment in their atmospheres have been discovered among a sample of 674 carbon stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Six of the Li-rich carbon stars are of J-type, i.e. with strong 13C isotopic features. No super-Li-rich carbon stars were found. The incidence of lithium enrichment among carbon stars in the LMC is much rarer than in the Galaxy, and about five times more frequent among J-type than among N-type carbon stars. The bolometric magnitudes of ...

  11. Optimizing lithium dosing in hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnason, N H; Munkner, R; Kampmann, J P

    2006-01-01

    in which we developed an algorithm based on a 2-compartment distribution without elimination. The GFR estimate led to plasma concentrations 3-4 times lower than those anticipated. In contrast, the estimates based on V(d) and the algorithm derived from pharmacokinetic modeling led to comparable loading dose...... estimates. Furthermore, the maintenance dose estimated from the central compartment (V1) led to plasma concentrations within the therapeutic range. Thus, a regimen where 12.2 mmol lithium was given after each hemodialysis session resulted in stable between-dialysis plasma lithium concentrations...

  12. Lithium treatment and risk of dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Søndergård, Lars; Forman, Julie Lyng

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: It has been suggested that lithium may have neuroprotective abilities, but it is not clear whether lithium reduces the risk of dementia. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether continued treatment with lithium reduces the risk of dementia in a nationwide study. DESIGN: An observational cohort...... study with linkage of registers of all patients prescribed lithium and diagnosed as having dementia in Denmark from January 1, 1995, through December 31, 2005. SETTING: We identified all patients treated with lithium in Denmark within community psychiatry, private specialist, and general practices...... and a random sample of 30% of the general population. Subjects A total of 16,238 persons who purchased lithium at least once and 1,487,177 persons from the general population who did not purchase lithium. Main Outcome Measure Diagnosis of dementia or Alzheimer disease during inpatient or outpatient hospital...

  13. Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichhardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reichhardt, Cynthia J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Libal, Andras J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

  14. Electrospinning: A versatile technique for making of 1D growth of nanostructured nanofibers and its applications: An experimental approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Jyoti V.; Mali, Sawanta S.; Kamble, Archana S.; Hong, Chang K.; Kim, Jin H.; Patil, Pramod S.

    2017-11-01

    One dimensional (1D) metal oxide nanostructures (1D-MONS) play a key role in the development of functional devices including energy conversion, energy storage and environmental devices. They are also used for some important biomedical products like wound dressings, filter media, drug delivery and tissue engineering. The electrospinning (ES) is the versatile technique for making of 1D growth of nanostructured nanofibers, an experimental approach and its applications. The present review is focused on the 1D growth of nanostructured nanofibers in different applications like dye sensitized solar cells, perovskite solar cells, fuel cells, lithium ion batteries, redox flow batteries, supercapacitor, photocatalytic, and gas sensors based on ZnO, TiO2, MnO2, WO3, V2O5, NiO, SnO2, Fe2O3 etc. metal oxides, their composites and carbon. This review article presents an introduction to various types of ES techniques and their technical details. Also, the advantages and disadvantages of each ES technique are summarized. The various technical details such as preparative parameters, post-deposition methods, applied electric field, solution feed rate and a distance between a tip to the collector are the key factors in order to obtain exotic 1D nanostructured materials. Also, the lucid literature survey on the growth of nanostructures of various metal oxides and application in different fields are covered in this review. Further, the future perspectives has also been discussed.

  15. Microwave exfoliated graphene oxide/TiO{sub 2} nanowire hybrid for high performance lithium ion battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishtiaque Shuvo, Mohammad Arif; Rodriguez, Gerardo; Karim, Hasanul; Lin, Yirong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States); Islam, Md Tariqul; Noveron, Juan C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States); Ramabadran, Navaneet [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California at Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Lithium ion battery (LIB) is a key solution to the demand of ever-improving, high energy density, clean-alternative energy systems. In LIB, graphite is the most commonly used anode material; however, lithium-ion intercalation in graphite is limited, hindering the battery charge rate and capacity. To date, one of the approaches in LIB performance improvement is by using porous carbon (PC) to replace graphite as anode material. PC's pore structure facilitates ion transport and has been proven to be an excellent anode material candidate in high power density LIBs. In addition, to overcome the limited lithium-ion intercalation obstacle, nanostructured anode assembly has been extensively studied to increase the lithium-ion diffusion rate. Among these approaches, high specific surface area metal oxide nanowires connecting nanostructured carbon materials accumulation have shown promising results for enhanced lithium-ion intercalation. Herein, we demonstrate a hydrothermal approach of growing TiO{sub 2} nanowires (TON) on microwave exfoliated graphene oxide (MEGO) to further improve LIB performance over PC. This MEGO-TON hybrid not only uses the high surface area of MEGO but also increases the specific surface area for electrode–electrolyte interaction. Therefore, this new nanowire/MEGO hybrid anode material enhances both the specific capacity and charge–discharge rate. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were used for materials characterization. Battery analyzer was used for measuring the electrical performance of the battery. The testing results have shown that MEGO-TON hybrid provides up to 80% increment of specific capacity compared to PC anode.

  16. Evidence for enhancement of vortex matching field above 5 T and oxygen-deficient annuli around barium-niobate nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Shigeru; Haruta, Masakazu; Ichinose, Ataru; Doi, Toshiya

    2015-10-01

    We report the dependence of critical temperature (Tc), the irreversibility line, the microstructure of nanorods with perovskite-based barium niobates (BNOs), and the c-axis length of the YBa2Cu3Oy (Y123) superconducting matrix on the BNO-doping level and growth temperature for Y123 thin films with BNO nanorods. The characteristic field (Bcr) determined from the vortex-Bose-glass-like irreversibility lines in Y123+BNO films is strongly correlated to the BNO nanorod density and the growth temperature. Despite a monotonic decrease in Tc with increasing Bcr and nanorod density, the irreversibility fields (Birr) were enhanced up to Bcr ˜ 5 T. From the Bcr value and the mean diameter of the BNO nanorod (˜10 nm), we estimate that a lower Tc matrix annulus with a diameter of 12-14 nm exists around each BNO nanorod due to the strong interface strains. Our present study suggests that generation of this lower Tc region around each BNO nanorod increases the vortex-pinning strength significantly and, moreover, may offer a new way of enhancing Birr for REBa2Cu3Oy film with nanorods.

  17. Optical properties of Er{sup 3+}-doped strontium barium niobate nanocrystals obtained by thermal treatment in glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haro-Gonzalez, P. [Dep. of Fisica Fundamental Experimental, Electronica y Sistemas, Universidad de La Laguna Avda Astrofisico Franscisco Sanchez, 38206 La Laguna, S/C de Tenerife (Spain)], E-mail: patharo@ull.es; Lahoz, F. [Dep. of Fisica Fundamental Experimental, Electronica y Sistemas, Universidad de La Laguna Avda Astrofisico Franscisco Sanchez, 38206 La Laguna, S/C de Tenerife (Spain); Gonzalez-Platas, J. [Dep. of Fisica Fundamental II, Universidad de La Laguna, 38206 La Laguna, S/C de Tenerife (Spain); Caceres, J.M. [Dep. of Edafologia y Geologia, Universidad de La Laguna, 38206 La Laguna, S/C de Tenerife (Spain); Gonzalez-Perez, S. [Dep. of Fisica Fundamental Experimental, Electronica y Sistemas, Universidad de La Laguna Avda Astrofisico Franscisco Sanchez, 38206 La Laguna, S/C de Tenerife (Spain); Marrero-Lopez, D. [Dep. of Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38206 La Laguna, S/C de Tenerife (Spain); Capuj, N. [Dep. of Fisica Basica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38206 La Laguna, S/C de Tenerife (Spain); Martin, I.R. [Dep. of Fisica Fundamental Experimental, Electronica y Sistemas, Universidad de La Laguna Avda Astrofisico Franscisco Sanchez, 38206 La Laguna, S/C de Tenerife (Spain)

    2008-05-15

    Measurements of the optical properties of Er{sup 3+} ions in strontium barium niobate glass and glass ceramics have been carried out. The glasses have been fabricated using a melt-quenching method, and the glass ceramic samples have been obtained from the glass precursor by a thermal treatment. The ceramic samples formed by a glassy phase, and a crystalline phase contains nanocrystals of Sr{sub 1-x}Ba{sub x}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 6} (SBN) doped with Er{sup 3+} ions with a mean size of {approx}50 nm, as confirmed with XRD. Green up-conversion emission has been obtained under excitation at 800 nm, and the temporal evolution of this emission has been reported with the purpose of determining the involved up-conversion mechanism. These optical measures have confirmed that the Er{sup 3+} ions have been incorporated into the SBN matrix, after a thermal treatment, which produced an increment of the up-conversion efficiency.

  18. Enhancement of Dielectric Breakdown Strength and Energy Conversion Efficiency of Niobate Glass-Ceramics by Sc2O3 Doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shi; Xiu, Shaomei; Yang, Ke; Shen, Bo; Zhai, Jiwei

    2018-01-01

    Niobate glass-ceramics K2O-SrO-Nb2O5-B2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 (KSN-BAS) doped with different amounts of Sc2O3 have been prepared through a melt quenching/controlled crystallization method, and the influence of the Sc2O3 content on their phase composition, microstructure, dielectric performance, and charge-discharge properties investigated. X-ray powder diffraction results showed that the peak positions of the KSr2Nb5O15 phase shifted to higher angle and the glass-ceramic microstructures were significantly improved by Sc2O3 addition. Based on these results, 0.5 mol.% Sc2O3 doping was found to achieve remarkable enhancement in energy storage density, which reached 9.63 ± 0.39 J/cm3 at dielectric breakdown strength of 1450.38 ± 29.01 kV/cm with high conversion efficiency of ˜ 92.1%. For pulsed power applications, discharge speed of 17 ns and power density of 0.48 MW/cm3 were obtained in the glass-ceramic with 0.5 mol.% Sc2O3. These results could provide a new design strategy for high-performance dielectric capacitors.

  19. Preparation of cube micrometer potassium niobate (KNbO3) by hydrothermal method and sonocatalytic degradation of organic dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongbo; Wei, Chunsheng; Huang, Yingying; Wang, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Cube micrometer potassium niobate (KNbO3) powder, as a high effective sonocatalyst, was prepared using hydrothermal method, and then, was characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). In order to evaluate the sonocatalytic activity of prepared KNbO3 powder, the sonocatalytic degradation of some organic dyes was studied. In addition, some influencing factors such as heat-treatment temperature and heat-treatment time on the sonocatalytic activity of prepared KNbO3 powder and catalyst added amount and ultrasonic irradiation time on the sonocatalytic degradation efficiency were examined by using UV-visible spectrophotometer and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) determination. The experimental results showed that the best sonocatalytic degradation ratio (69.23%) of organic dyes could be obtained when the conditions of 5.00 mg/L initial concentration, 1.00 g/L prepared KNbO3 powder (heat-treated at 400 °C for 60 min) added amount, 5.00 h ultrasonic irradiation (40 kHz frequency and 300 W output power), 100mL total volume and 25-28 °C temperature were adopted. Therefore, the micrometer KNbO3 powder could be considered as an effective sonocatalyst for treating non- or low-transparent organic wastewaters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Linear Thermal Expansion Measurements of Lead Magnesium Niobate (PMN) Electroceramic Material for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlmann, Paul B.; Halverson, Peter G.; Peters, Robert D.; Levine, Marie B.; VanBuren, David; Dudik, Matthew J.

    2005-01-01

    Linear thermal expansion measurements of nine samples of Lead Magnesium Niobate (PMN) electroceramic material were recently performed in support of NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph (TPF-C) mission. The TPF-C mission is a visible light coronagraph designed to look at roughly 50 stars pre- selected as good candidates for possessing earth-like planets. Upon detection of an earth-like planet, TPF-C will analyze the visible-light signature of the planet's atmosphere for specific spectroscopic indicators that life may exist there. With this focus, the project's primary interest in PMN material is for use as a solid-state actuator for deformable mirrors or compensating optics. The nine test samples were machined from three distinct boules of PMN ceramic manufactured by Xinetics Inc. Thermal expansion measurements were performed in 2005 at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in their Cryogenic Dilatometer Facility. All measurements were performed in vacuum with sample temperature actively controlled over the range of 270K to 3 10K. Expansion and contraction of the test samples with temperature was measured using a JPL developed interferometric system capable of sub-nanometer accuracy. Presented in this paper is a discussion of the sample configuration, test facilities, test method, data analysis, test results, and future plans.

  1. New functionalities of potassium tantalate niobate deflectors enabled by the coexistence of pre-injected space charge and composition gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenbin; Chao, Ju-Hung; Chen, Chang-Jiang; Campbell, Adrian L.; Henry, Michael G.; Yin, Stuart Shizhuo; Hoffman, Robert C.

    2017-10-01

    In most beam steering applications such as 3D printing and in vivo imaging, one of the essential challenges has been high-resolution high-speed multi-dimensional optical beam scanning. Although the pre-injected space charge controlled potassium tantalate niobate (KTN) deflectors can achieve speeds in the nanosecond regime, they deflect in only one dimension. In order to develop a high-resolution high-speed multi-dimensional KTN deflector, we studied the deflection behavior of KTN deflectors in the case of coexisting pre-injected space charge and composition gradient. We find that such coexistence can enable new functionalities of KTN crystal based electro-optic deflectors. When the direction of the composition gradient is parallel to the direction of the external electric field, the zero-deflection position can be shifted, which can reduce the internal electric field induced beam distortion, and thus enhance the resolution. When the direction of the composition gradient is perpendicular to the direction of the external electric field, two-dimensional beam scanning can be achieved by harnessing only one single piece of KTN crystal, which can result in a compact, high-speed two-dimensional deflector. Both theoretical analyses and experiments are conducted, which are consistent with each other. These new functionalities can expedite the usage of KTN deflection in many applications such as high-speed 3D printing, high-speed, high-resolution imaging, and free space broadband optical communication.

  2. Liquid lithium blanket processing studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbot, J.B.; Clinton, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    The sorption of tritium on yttrium from flowing molten lithium and the subsequent release of tritium from yttrium for regeneration of the metal sorbent were investigated to evaluate the feasibility of such a tritium-recovery process for a fusion reactor blanket of liquid lithium. In initial experiments with the forced convection loop, yttrium samples were contacted with lithium at 300 0 C. A mass transfer coefficient of 2.5 x 10 - cm/sec, which is more than an order of magnitude less than the value measured in earlier static experiments, was determined for the flowing lithium system. Rates of tritium release from yttrium samples were measured to evaluate possible thermal regeneration of the sorbent. Values for diffusion coefficients at 505, 800, and 900 0 C were estimated to be 1.1 x 10 -13 , 4.9 x 10 -12 , and 9.3 x 10 -10 cm 2 /sec, respectively. Tritium release from yttrium was investigated at higher temperatures and with hydrogen added to the argon sweep gas to provide a reducing atmosphere

  3. Interfacial reactions in lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zonghai; Amine, Rachid; Ma, Zi-Feng; Amine, Khalil

    2017-08-01

    The lithium-ion battery was first commercially introduced by Sony Corporation in 1991 using LiCoO2 as the cathode material and mesocarbon microbeads (MCMBs) as the anode material. After continuous research and development for 25 years, lithium-ion batteries have been the dominant energy storage device for modern portable electronics, as well as for emerging applications for electric vehicles and smart grids. It is clear that the success of lithium-ion technologies is rooted to the existence of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) that kinetically suppresses parasitic reactions between the lithiated graphitic anodes and the carbonate-based non-aqueous electrolytes. Recently, major attention has been paid to the importance of a similar passivation/protection layer on the surface of cathode materials, aiming for a rational design of high-energy-density lithium-ion batteries with extended cycle/calendar life. In this article, the physical model of the SEI, as well as recent research efforts to understand the nature and role of the SEI are summarized, and future perspectives on this important research field will also be presented.

  4. Thermoelectric effects in magnetic nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hatami, Moosa; Bauer, Gerrit E.W.; Zhang, Q.F.; Kelly, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    We model and evaluate the Peltier and Seebeck effects in magnetic multilayer nanostructures by a finite-element theory of thermoelectric properties. We present analytical expressions for the thermopower and the current-induced temperature changes due to Peltier cooling/heating. The thermopower of a

  5. Computer Code for Nanostructure Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filikhin, Igor; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2009-01-01

    Due to their small size, nanostructures can have stress and thermal gradients that are larger than any macroscopic analogue. These gradients can lead to specific regions that are susceptible to failure via processes such as plastic deformation by dislocation emission, chemical debonding, and interfacial alloying. A program has been developed that rigorously simulates and predicts optoelectronic properties of nanostructures of virtually any geometrical complexity and material composition. It can be used in simulations of energy level structure, wave functions, density of states of spatially configured phonon-coupled electrons, excitons in quantum dots, quantum rings, quantum ring complexes, and more. The code can be used to calculate stress distributions and thermal transport properties for a variety of nanostructures and interfaces, transport and scattering at nanoscale interfaces and surfaces under various stress states, and alloy compositional gradients. The code allows users to perform modeling of charge transport processes through quantum-dot (QD) arrays as functions of inter-dot distance, array order versus disorder, QD orientation, shape, size, and chemical composition for applications in photovoltaics and physical properties of QD-based biochemical sensors. The code can be used to study the hot exciton formation/relation dynamics in arrays of QDs of different shapes and sizes at different temperatures. It also can be used to understand the relation among the deposition parameters and inherent stresses, strain deformation, heat flow, and failure of nanostructures.

  6. Nanostructures for Organic Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goszczak, Arkadiusz Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    The experimental work in this thesis is focused on the fabrication of nanostructures that can be implemented in organic solar cell (OSC) architecture for enhancement of the device performance. Solar devices made from organic material are gaining increased attention, compared to their inorganic...... for organic solar cell applications, opening new patterning possibilities....

  7. Nanostructured electronic and magnetic materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Nanostructured systems are useful in tailoring the magnetic, optical and electronic properties of materials. It is obvious that .... A hysteresis effect is produced and forms a hysteresis loop, this loop is a key tool in the quantitative analysis of ..... below the secondary crystallization temperature, in controlled time. Doing so yields ...

  8. Dry release of suspended nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsén, Esko Sebastian; Davis, Zachary James; Dong, M.

    2004-01-01

    A dry release method for fabrication of suspended nanostructures is presented. The technique has been combined with an anti-stiction treatment for fabrication of nanocantilever based nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). The process combines a dry release method, using a supporting layer of photo...

  9. Application of C{sub 60}, C{sub 72} and carbon nanotubes as anode for lithium-ion batteries: A DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najafi, Meysam, E-mail: meysamnajafi2016@gmail.com

    2017-07-01

    The application of C{sub 60}, C{sub 72}, CNT (8, 0) and CNT (10, 0) as anode materials for Lithium-ion batteries were investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Results show that the average values of voltage cell (V{sub cell}) and adsorption energy (E{sub ad}) of CNT (8, 0) and CNT (10, 0) were higher than C{sub 60} and C{sub 72} ca 0.327 V and 6.52 kcal/mol, respectively. The NH{sub 2} functionalization of studied nanostructures as a strategy to improve the performance of these systems as anode materials of Lithium-ion batteries were investigated. Results show that, NH{sub 2} functionalization of studied nanostructures increase the average values of voltage cell and adsorption energy ca 0.197 V and 8.20 kcal/mol, respectively. Obtained results propose that NH{sub 2} functionalized C{sub 72} and CNT (10, 0) have larger V{sub cell} and E{sub ad} values and therefore these nanostructures have higher potential as anode material for Lithium-ion battery. - Highlights: • C{sub 60} and CNT (10, 0) as anode materials for Lithium-ion batteries were investigated. • V{sub cell} and E{sub ad} of CNT (8, 0) and CNT (10, 0) were higher than C{sub 60} and C{sub 72} ca. • NH{sub 2} functionalization of C{sub 60} improve the performance of it as anode materials of Lithium-ion batteries.

  10. Plasmonic Nanostructures for Biosensor Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadde, Akshitha

    Improving the sensitivity of existing biosensors is an active research topic that cuts across several disciplines, including engineering and biology. Optical biosensors are the one of the most diverse class of biosensors which can be broadly categorized into two types based on the detection scheme: label-based and label-free detection. In label-based detection, the target bio-molecules are labeled with dyes or tags that fluoresce upon excitation, indicating the presence of target molecules. Label-based detection is highly-sensitive, capable of single molecule detection depending on the detector type used. One method of improving the sensitivity of label-based fluorescence detection is by enhancement of the emission of the labels by coupling them with metal nanostructures. This approach is referred as plasmon-enhanced fluorescence (PEF). PEF is achieved by increasing the electric field around the nano metal structures through plasmonics. This increased electric field improves the enhancement from the fluorophores which in turn improves the photon emission from the fluorophores which, in turn, improves the limit of detection. Biosensors taking advantage of the plasmonic properties of metal films and nanostructures have emerged an alternative, low-cost, high sensitivity method for detecting labeled DNA. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensors employing noble metal nanostructures have recently attracted considerable attention as a new class of plasmonic nanosensors. In this work, the design, fabrication and characterization of plasmonic nanostructures is carried out. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations were performed using software from Lumerical Inc. to design a novel LSPR structure that exhibit resonance overlapping with the absorption and emission wavelengths of quantum dots (QD). Simulations of a composite Au/SiO2 nanopillars on silicon substrate were performed using FDTD software to show peak plasmonic enhancement at QD emission wavelength

  11. General synthesis of vanadium-based mixed metal oxides hollow nanofibers for high performance lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Juan; Yu, Xin-Yao; Paik, Ungyu

    2016-10-01

    Hollow nanostructured mixed metal oxides have recently been intensively investigated as electrode materials for energy storage and conversion due to their remarkable electrochemical properties. Although great efforts have been made, the synthesis of hollow nanostructured vanadium-based mixed metal oxides especially those with one dimensional structure is rarely reported. Vanadium-based mixed metal oxides are promising electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries with high capacity and good rate capability. Here, we develop a facile and general method for the synthesis of one dimensional MxV2O8 (M = Co, Ni, Fe) tubular structure through a simple single-spinneret electrospinning technique followed by a calcination process. As a demonstration, Co3V2O8 hollow nanofibers are evaluated as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. As expected, benefiting from their unique one dimensional tubular structure, the as-synthesized Co3V2O8 exhibits excellent electrochemical properties for lithium storage. To be specific, it can deliver a high specific capacity of 900 mAh g-1 at 5 A g-1, and long cycling stability up to 2000 cycles. The present work makes a significant contribution to the design and synthesis of mixed metal oxides with one dimensional tubular structure, as well as their potential applications in electrochemical energy storage.

  12. Control of Internal and External Short Circuits in Lithium Ion and Lithium Batteries, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has identified needs for compact high-energy-density primary and secondary batteries. Lithium and Lithium Ion cells, respectively, are meeting these needs for...

  13. Synthesis of mesoporous NiO nanospheres as anode materials for lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guanhua; Chen Yuejiao; Qu Baihua; Hu Lingling; Mei Lin; Lei Danni; Li Qing; Chen Libao; Li Qiuhong; Wang Taihong

    2012-01-01

    In this work, three-dimensional mesoporous NiO nanostructures have been synthesized by a simple ethylene glycol (EG)-mediated self-assembly route and subsequent calcination process. The synthesized nickel alkoxide precursors annealed at 300 and 500 °C exhibit different surface area, crystallinity and pore distribution, which have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms. The electrochemical properties of these NiO mesoporous nanostructures are investigated including the cycling and rate performance as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. It is indicated that mesoporous NiO nanospheres synthesized at 500 °C exhibit better electrochemical performance than that obtained at 300 °C. The NiO nanospheres annealed at 500 °C present a reversible specific capacity of 518 mAh g −1 at a current density of 0.1 A g −1 after 60 cycles. With varying the rate from 0.1 to 8.0 A g −1 , the capacity remains at 535 mAh g −1 at 2 A g −1 after 30 cycles and resumes to 582 mAh g −1 at 0.1 A g −1 after 60 cycles. The results indicate that our mesoporous NiO nanospheres are promising anode materials for lithium ion batteries.

  14. Simultaneous Perforation and Doping of Si Nanoparticles for Lithium-Ion Battery Anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Guangxin; Zhu, Bin; Li, Xiuqiang; Chen, Chuanlu; Li, Jinlei; Jin, Yan; Hu, Xiaozhen; Zhu, Jia

    2017-12-27

    Silicon nanostructures have served as promising building blocks for various applications, such as lithium-ion batteries, thermoelectrics, and solar energy conversions. Particularly, control of porosity and doping is critical for fine-tuning the mechanical, optical, and electrical properties of these silicon nanostructures. However, perforation and doping are usually separated processes, both of which are complicated and expensive. Here, we demonstrate that the porous nano-Si particles with controllable dopant can be massively produced through a facile and scalable method, combining ball-milling and acid-etching. Nano-Si with porosity as high as 45.8% can be achieved with 9 orders of magnitude of conductivity changes compared to intrinsic silicon. As an example for demonstration, the obtained nano-Si particles with 45.8% porosity and 3.7 atom % doping can serve as a promising anode for lithium-ion batteries with 2000 mA h/g retained over 100 cycles at the current density of 0.5 C, excellent rate performance with 1600 mA h/g at the current density of 5 C, and a stable cycling performance of above 1500 mA h/g retained over 940 cycles at the current density of 1 C with carbon coating.

  15. Novel Size and Surface Oxide Effects in Silicon Nanowires as Lithium Battery Anodes

    KAUST Repository

    McDowell, Matthew T.

    2011-09-14

    With its high specific capacity, silicon is a promising anode material for high-energy lithium-ion batteries, but volume expansion and fracture during lithium reaction have prevented implementation. Si nanostructures have shown resistance to fracture during cycling, but the critical effects of nanostructure size and native surface oxide on volume expansion and cycling performance are not understood. Here, we use an ex situ transmission electron microscopy technique to observe the same Si nanowires before and after lithiation and have discovered the impacts of size and surface oxide on volume expansion. For nanowires with native SiO2, the surface oxide can suppress the volume expansion during lithiation for nanowires with diameters <∼50 nm. Finite element modeling shows that the oxide layer can induce compressive hydrostatic stress that could act to limit the extent of lithiation. The understanding developed herein of how volume expansion and extent of lithiation can depend on nanomaterial structure is important for the improvement of Si-based anodes. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  16. Facile fabrication of robust TiO2@SnO2@C hollow nanobelts for outstanding lithium storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qinghua; Li, Lingxiangyu; Chen, Jizhang; Yang, Li; Hirano, Shin-ichi

    2018-02-01

    Elaborate fabrication of state-of-the-art nanostructure SnO2@C-based composites greatly contributes to alleviate the huge volume expansion issue of the SnO2 anodes. But the preparation processes of most of them are complicated and tedious, which is generally adverse to the development of SnO2@C-based composite anodes. Herein, a unique nanostructure of TiO2@SnO2@C hollow nanobelts (TiO2@SnO2@C HNBs), including the characteristics of one-dimensional architecture, sandwich protection, hollow structure, carbon coating, and a mechanically robust TiO2 support, has been fabricated by a facile approach for the first time. As anodes for lithium-ion batteries, the as-fabricated TiO2@SnO2@C HNBs exhibit an outstanding lithium storage performance, delivering capacity of 804.6 and 384. 5 mAh g-1 at 200 and even 1000 mA g-1 after 500 cycles, respectively. It is demonstrated that thus outstanding performance is mainly attributed to the unique nanostructure of TiO2@SnO2@C HNBs.

  17. Explosion of lithium-thionyl-chloride battery due to presence of lithium nitride

    OpenAIRE

    Hennesø, E.; Hedlund, Frank Huess

    2015-01-01

    An explosion of a lithium–thionyl-chloride (Li–SOCl2) battery during production (assembly) leads to serious worker injury. The accident cell batch had been in a dry-air intermediate storage room for months before being readied with thionyl chloride electrolyte. Metallic lithium can react with atmospheric nitrogen to produce lithium nitride. Nodules of lithium nitride were found to be present on the lithium foil in other cells of the accident batch. The investigation attributed the explosion t...

  18. Fabrication of zein nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecha, Jarupat

    resins. The soft lithography technique was mainly used to fabricate micro and nanostructures on zein films. Zein material well-replicated small structures with the smallest size at sub micrometer scale that resulted in interesting photonic properties. The bonding method was also developed for assembling portable zein microfluidic devices with small shape distortion. Zein-zein and zein-glass microfluidic devices demonstrated sufficient strength to facilitate fluid flow in a complex microfluidic design with no leakage. Aside from the fabrication technique development, several potential applications of this environmentally friendly microfluidic device were investigated. The concentration gradient manipulation of Rhodamine B solution in zein-glass microfluidic devices was demonstrated. The diffusion of small molecules such as fluorescent dye into the wall of the zein microfluidic channels was observed. However, with this formulation, zein microfluidic devices were not suitable for cell culture applications. This pioneer study covered a wide spectrum of the implementation of the two nanotechnology approaches to advance zein biomaterial which provided proof of fundamental concepts as well as presenting some limitations. The findings in this study can lead to several innovative research opportunities of advanced zein biomaterials with broad applications. The information from the study of zein nanocomposite structure allows the packaging industry to develop the low cost biodegradable materials with physical property improvement. The information from the study of the zein microfluidic devices allows agro-industry to develop the nanotechnology-enabled microfluidic sensors fabricated entirely from biodegradable polymer for on-site disease or contaminant detection in the fields of food and agriculture.

  19. Extraction of lithium Carbonate from Petalite Ore (Momeik District, Myanmar)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tun Tun Moe

    2011-12-01

    The methods for preparing high purity lithium carbonate which can be used for pharmaceutical applications, electronic grade crystals of lithium or to prepare battery-grade lithium metal are disclosed. Lithium carbonate as commercially produced from mineral extraction, lithium containing brines or sea water. One method for the production of pure lithium carbonate from mineral source (petalite ore) obtained from Momeik District, Myanmar is disclosed. Method for mineral processing of ore concentrate is also disclosed.

  20. A Mo2C/Carbon Nanotube Composite Cathode for Lithium-Oxygen Batteries with High Energy Efficiency and Long Cycle Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Won-Jin; Lau, Kah Chun; Shin, Chang-Dae; Amine, Khalil; Curtiss, Larry A; Sun, Yang-Kook

    2015-04-28

    Although lithium-oxygen batteries are attracting considerable attention because of the potential for an extremely high energy density, their practical use has been restricted owing to a low energy efficiency and poor cycle life compared to lithium-ion batteries. Here we present a nanostructured cathode based on molybdenum carbide nanoparticles (Mo2C) dispersed on carbon nanotubes, which dramatically increase the electrical efficiency up to 88% with a cycle life of more than 100 cycles. We found that the Mo2C nanoparticle catalysts contribute to the formation of well-dispersed lithium peroxide nanolayers (Li2O2) on the Mo2C/carbon nanotubes with a large contact area during the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). This Li2O2 structure can be decomposed at low potential upon the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) by avoiding the energy loss associated with the decomposition of the typical Li2O2 discharge products.

  1. Direct extraction of negative lithium ions from a lithium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, M.; Tsuda, H.; Sasao, M.

    1990-01-01

    Negative lithium ions (Li - ) were directly extracted from a lithium plasma in a multiline cusp plasma container. A pair of permanent magnets mounted near the extractor electrode created the filter magnetic field that separated the extraction region plasma from the main discharge plasma. The plasma electrode facing the extraction region plasma was biased with respect to the other parts of the chamber wall, which acted as discharge anodes. The larger filter magnetic field resulted larger Li - current. When the bias to the plasma electrode was several volts positive against the anode potential, extracted Li - current took the maximum for a fixed strength of the filter field. These dependences of Li - upon the filter magnetic field and the plasma electrode bias are similar to the ones of negative hydrogen ions

  2. Lithium in drinking water and suicide mortality: The interplay with lithium prescriptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helbich, M; Leitner, M; Kapusta, N

    Background Little is known about the effects of lithium intake through drinking water on suicide. This intake originates either from natural rock and soil elution and/or accumulation of lithium-based pharmaceuticals in ground water. Aims To examine the interplay between natural lithium in drinking

  3. Starting lithium prophylaxis early v. late in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Vradi, Eleni; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: No study has investigated when preventive treatment with lithium should be initiated in bipolar disorder. AIMS: To compare response rates among patients with bipolar disorder starting treatment with lithium early v. late. METHOD: Nationwide registers were used to identify all patients...... with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder in psychiatric hospital settings who were prescribed lithium during the period 1995-2012 in Denmark (n = 4714). Lithium responders were defined as patients who, following a stabilisation lithium start-up period of 6 months, continued lithium monotherapy without being admitted......-response to lithium compared with the rate for patients starting lithium later (adjusted analyses: first v. later contact: Pbipolar disorder: P

  4. Review of lithium-ion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, S.C.; Cieslak, W.R.

    1993-12-31

    The first practical use of graphite intercalation compounds (GIC) as battery anodes was reported in a 1981 patent by Basu in which a molten salt cell was described having a negative electrode that consisted of lithium intercalated in graphite. A second patent by Basu, issued in 1983, described an ambient temperature rechargeable system which also utilized lithium intercalated in graphite as the anode. Work in this area progressed at a low level, however, until interest was sparked in 1990 when Sony Corporation announced a new ``lithium-ion`` rechargeable cell containing a lithium ion intercalating carbon anode. These cells have the advantages of metallic lithium systems; i.e., high energy density, high voltage, and light weight, without the disadvantages of dendrite formation on charge and the safety considerations associated with metallic lithium. Materials other than carbon have been studied as intercalation anodes. Examples are Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, WO{sub 2} and TiS{sub 2}. Although these alternate anode materials are of interest academically and for specialty applications, they do not hold much promise for widespread general use due to their increased weight and lower cell voltage. Studies of cathode materials for lithium-ion systems have centered on the transition metal chalcogenides. A number of these materials are capable of reversibly intercalating lithium ions at a useful potential versus lithium. Both organic liquids and polymers are candidate electrolytes for this technology.

  5. Lithium-Oxygen Batteries: At a Crossroads?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, Tejs; García Lastra, Juan Maria; Siegel, Donald Jason

    2017-01-01

    In this current opinion, we critically review and discuss some of the most important recent findings in the field of rechargeable lithium-oxygen batteries. We discuss recent discoveries like the evolution of reactive singlet oxygen and the use of organic additives to bypass reactive LiO2 reaction...... intermediates, and their possible implications on the potential for commercialization of lithium-oxygen batteries. Finally, we perform a critical assessment of lithium-superoxide batteries and the reversibility of lithium-hydroxide batteries....

  6. Lithium-ion batteries fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yuping

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-Ion Batteries: Fundamentals and Applications offers a comprehensive treatment of the principles, background, design, production, and use of lithium-ion batteries. Based on a solid foundation of long-term research work, this authoritative monograph:Introduces the underlying theory and history of lithium-ion batteriesDescribes the key components of lithium-ion batteries, including negative and positive electrode materials, electrolytes, and separatorsDiscusses electronic conductive agents, binders, solvents for slurry preparation, positive thermal coefficient (PTC) materials, current col

  7. Determination of temperature dependency of material parameters for lead-free alkali niobate piezoceramics by the inverse method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ogo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sodium potassium niobate (NKN piezoceramics have been paid much attention as lead-free piezoelectric materials in high temperature devices because of their high Curie temperature. The temperature dependency of their material parameters, however, has not been determined in detail up to now. For this purpose, we exploit the so-called Inverse Method denoting a simulation-based characterization approach. Compared with other characterization methods, the Inverse Method requires only one sample shape of the piezoceramic material and has further decisive advantages. The identification of material parameters showed that NKN is mechanically softer in shear direction compared with lead zirconate titanate (PZT at room temperature. The temperature dependency of the material parameters of NKN was evaluated in the temperature range from 30 °C to 150 °C. As a result, we figured out that dielectric constants and piezoelectric constants show a monotonous and isotropic increment with increasing temperature. On the other hand, elastic stiffness constant c 44 E of NKN significantly decreased in contrast to other elastic stiffness constants. It could be revealed that the decrement of c 44 E is associated with an orthorhombic-tetragonal phase transition. Furthermore, ratio of elastic compliance constants s 44 E / s 33 E exhibited similar temperature dependent behavior to the ratio of piezoelectric constants d15/d33. It is suspected that mechanical softness in shear direction is one origin of the large piezoelectric shear mode of NKN. Our results show that NKN are suitable for high temperature devices, and that the Inverse Method should be a helpful approach to characterize material parameters under their practical operating conditions for NKN.

  8. Composite materials formed with anchored nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-03-10

    A method of forming nano-structure composite materials that have a binder material and a nanostructure fiber material is described. A precursor material may be formed using a mixture of at least one metal powder and anchored nanostructure materials. The metal powder mixture may be (a) Ni powder and (b) NiAl powder. The anchored nanostructure materials may comprise (i) NiAl powder as a support material and (ii) carbon nanotubes attached to nanoparticles adjacent to a surface of the support material. The process of forming nano-structure composite materials typically involves sintering the mixture under vacuum in a die. When Ni and NiAl are used in the metal powder mixture Ni.sub.3Al may form as the binder material after sintering. The mixture is sintered until it consolidates to form the nano-structure composite material.

  9. Lithium aluminates and tritium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera G, L.M.; Palacios G, O.; Bosch G, P.

    1997-01-01

    In this work it is studied the crystalline structure of lithium aluminates prepared by three different methods, namely: solid state reaction, humid reaction and sol-gel reaction. The analysis methods are the X-ray diffractometry and the scanning and transmission electron microscopy. This study is realized as in original materials as in irradiated materials at the TRIGA Mark reactor, to correlate the synthesis method with response of these materials to the mixed irradiation of nuclear reactor. (Author)

  10. High energy density lithium batteries

    CERN Document Server

    Aifantis, Katerina E; Kumar, R Vasant

    2010-01-01

    Cell phones, portable computers and other electronic devices crucially depend on reliable, compact yet powerful batteries. Therefore, intensive research is devoted to improving performance and reducing failure rates. Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries promise significant advancement and high application potential for hybrid vehicles, biomedical devices, and everyday appliances. This monograph provides special focus on the methods and approaches for enhancing the performance of next-generation batteries through the use of nanotechnology. Deeper understanding of the mechanisms and strategies is

  11. Optimizing lithium dosing in hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnason, N H; Munkner, R; Kampmann, J P

    2006-01-01

    We studied a 62-year-old female hemodialysis patient during initiation and maintenance of lithium carbonate therapy. Three different methods were applied to estimate the regimen: a scenario based on volume of distribution (V(d)), a scenario based on glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and a scenari...... immediately postdialysis. Further observations are necessary to obtain robust long-term safety data and to optimize the monitoring schedule....

  12. Crystallization of lithium borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goktas, A. A.; Neilson, G. F.; Weinberg, M. C.

    1992-01-01

    The glass-forming ability and crystallization behavior of lithium borate compositions, in the diborate-to-metaborate-range, were studied. In particular, the nature and sequence of formation of crystalline phases and the tendency toward devitrification were investigated as functions of temperature, thermal history and batch composition. It was found that the sequence of crystalline phase formation was sensitive to all of the three latter factors, and it was observed that under certain conditions metastable defect structures of the metaborate can appear.

  13. Chiroplasmonic DNA-based nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconello, Alessandro; Besteiro, Lucas V.; Govorov, Alexander O.; Willner, Itamar

    2017-09-01

    Chiroplasmonic properties of nanoparticles, organized using DNA-based nanostructures, have attracted both theoretical and experimental interest. Theory suggests that the circular dichroism spectra accompanying chiroplasmonic nanoparticle assemblies are controlled by the sizes, shapes, geometries and interparticle distances of the nanoparticles. In this Review, we present different methods to assemble chiroplasmonic nanoparticle or nanorod systems using DNA scaffolds, and we discuss the operations of dynamically reconfigurable chiroplasmonic nanostructures. The chiroplasmonic properties of the different systems are characterized by circular dichroism and further supported by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy or cryo-transmission electron microscopy imaging and theoretical modelling. We also outline the applications of chiroplasmonic assemblies, including their use as DNA-sensing platforms and as functional systems for information processing and storage. Finally, future perspectives in applying chiroplasmonic nanoparticles as waveguides for selective information transfer and their use as ensembles for chiroselective synthesis are discussed. Specifically, we highlight the upscaling of the systems to device-like configurations.

  14. Reactor casts light on nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garvey, C.

    2002-01-01

    Chris Garvey explains how the replacement research reactor will help scientists to design better materials by understanding how macromolecules behave. Australia is making a substantial financial commitment to providing scientists with facilities to scatter neutrons. Neutron scattering is one of the core areas of science in which the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) invests its resources. His particular interest is to find out the way nature uses macromolecules, and how the shape and interaction of macromolecules with other molecules change their function. Biologists call aggregates of macromolecules, 'nanostructures'. Neutron probes are used at ANSTO for studying nanostructures, and in particular the organisation of the protein that is used to transport oxygen in the blood. Small angle neutron scattering was also allowed to understand at microscopic level, how humidity changes the mechanical properties of fibres

  15. Imaging edges of nanostructured graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Jens; Cagliani, Alberto; Booth, T. J.

    Graphene, as the forefather of 2D-materials, attracts much attention due to its extraordinary properties like transparency, flexibility and outstanding high conductivity, together with a thickness of only one atom. However, graphene also possesses no band gap, which makes it unsuitable for many...... electronic applications like transistors. It has been shown theoretically that by nanostructuring pristine graphene, e.g. with regular holes, the electronic properties can be tuned and a band gap introduced. The size, distance and edge termination of these “defects” influence the adaptability....... Such nanostructuring can be done experimentally, but especially characterization at atomic level is a huge challenge. High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) is used to characterize the atomic structure of graphene. We optimized the imaging conditions used for the FEI Titan ETEM. To reduce the knock-on damage of the carbon atoms...

  16. Nanostructured Biomaterials and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Parratt

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Some of the most important advances in the life sciences have come from transitioning to thinking of materials and their properties on the nanoscale rather than the macro or even microscale. Improvements in imaging technology have allowed us to see nanofeatures that directly impact chemical and mechanical properties of natural and man-made materials. Now that these can be imaged and quantified, substantial advances have been made in the fields of biomimetics, tissue engineering, and drug delivery. For the first time, scientists can determine the importance of nanograins and nanoasperities in nacre, direct the nucleation of apatite and the growth of cells on nanostructured scaffolds, and pass drugs tethered to nanoparticles through the blood-brain barrier. This review examines some of the most interesting materials whose nanostructure and hierarchical organization have been shown to correlate directly with favorable properties and their resulting applications.

  17. Pressure effects on nanostructured manganites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acha, C.; Garbarino, G.; Leyva, A.G.

    2007-01-01

    We have measured the pressure sensitivity of magnetic properties on La 5/8-y Pr y Ca 3/8 MnO 3 (y=0.3) nanostructured powders. Samples were synthesized following a microwave assisted denitration process and a final heat treatment at different temperatures to control the grain size of the samples. A span in grain diameters from 40 nm to ∼1000 nm was obtained. Magnetization curves as a function of temperature were measured following different thermomagnetic histories. AC susceptibility as a function of temperature was also measured at different hydrostatic pressures (up to 10 kbar) and for different frequencies. Our results indicate that the nanostructuration plays a role of an internal pressure, producing a structural deformation with similar effects to those obtained under an external hydrostatic pressure

  18. Exceptional Lithium Storage in a Co(OH) 2 Anode: Hydride Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyunchul; Choi, Woon Ih [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics, 130 Samsung-ro, Suwon 16678, South Korea; Jang, Yoonjung; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Lee, Wontae; Park, Gwi Ok; Park, Su Bin; Yoo, Jaeseung; Hong, Jin Seok [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics, 130 Samsung-ro, Suwon 16678, South Korea; Choi, Youn-Suk [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics, 130 Samsung-ro, Suwon 16678, South Korea; Lee, Hyo Sug [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics, 130 Samsung-ro, Suwon 16678, South Korea; Bae, In Tae; Kim, Ji Man; Yoon, Won-Sub

    2018-02-26

    Current lithium ion battery technology is tied in with conventional reaction mechanisms such as insertion, conversion, and alloying reactions even though most future applications like EVs demand much higher energy densities than current ones. Exploring the exceptional reaction mechanism and related electrode materials can be critical for pushing current battery technology to a next level. Here, we introduce an exceptional reaction with a Co(OH)(2) material which exhibits an initial charge capacity of 1112 mAh g(-1), about twice its theoretical value based on known conventional conversion reaction, and retains its first cycle capacity after 30 cycles. The combined results of synchrotron X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicate that nanosized Co metal particles and LiOH are generated by conversion reaction at high voltages, and CoxHy, Li2O, and LiH are subsequently formed by hydride reaction between Co metal, LiOH, and other lithium species at low voltages, resulting in a anomalously high capacity beyond the theoretical capacity of Co(OH)(2). This is further corroborated by AIMD simulations, localized STEM, and XPS. These findings will provide not only further understanding of exceptional lithium storage of recent nanostructured materials but also valuable guidance to develop advanced electrode materials with high energy density for next-generation batteries.

  19. Inorganic Glue Enabling High Performance of Silicon Particles as Lithium Ion Battery Anode

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Li-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Silicon, as an alloy-type anode material, has recently attracted lots of attention because of its highest known Li+ storage capacity (4200 mAh/g). But lithium insertion into and extraction from silicon are accompanied by a huge volume change, up to 300, which induces a strong strain on silicon and causes pulverization and rapid capacity fading due to the loss of the electrical contact between part of silicon and current collector. Silicon nanostructures such as nanowires and nanotubes can overcome the pulverization problem, however these nano-engineered silicon anodes usually involve very expensive processes and have difficulty being applied in commercial lithium ion batteries. In this study, we report a novel method using amorphous silicon as inorganic glue replacing conventional polymer binder. This inorganic glue method can solve the loss of contact issue in conventional silicon particle anode and enables successful cycling of various sizes of silicon particles, both nano-particles and micron particles. With a limited capacity of 800 mAh/g, relatively large silicon micron-particles can be stably cycled over 200 cycles. The very cheap production of these silicon particle anodes makes our method promising and competitive in lithium ion battery industry. © 2011 The Electrochemical Society.

  20. Uniform Lithium Deposition Induced by Polyacrylonitrile Submicron Fiber Array for Stable Lithium Metal Anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jialiang; Song, Jianan; Qi, Longhao; Luo, Yuzi; Luo, Xinyi; Wu, Hui

    2017-03-29

    The lithium dendrite growth and low Coulombic efficiency (CE) during lithium plating/striping cycles are the main obstacles for practical applications of lithium metal anode. Herein, we demonstrate that polyacrylonitrile (PAN) submicron fiber array could guide the lithium ions to uniformly disperse and deposit onto current collector. The PAN submicron fiber array nearly does not increase the volume of electrode with ultralow mass. By this simple design, we achieved stable cycling of lithium metal anode with an average CE of ∼97.4% for 250 cycles at a current density of 1 mA cm -2 with total Li capacity of 1 mAh cm -2 .