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Sample records for nanostructures ldrd project

  1. Final report on LDRD Project: Quantum confinement and light emission in silicon nanostructures

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    Guilinger, T.R.; Kelly, M.J.; Follstaedt, D.M. [and others

    1995-02-01

    Electrochemically formed porous silicon (PS) was reported in 1991 to exhibit visible photoluminescence. This discovery could lead to the use of integrated silicon-based optoelectronic devices. This LDRD addressed two general goals for optical emission from Si: (1) investigate the mechanisms responsible for light emission, and (2) tailor the microstructure and composition of the Si to obtain photoemission suitable for working devices. PS formation, composition, morphology, and microstructure have been under investigation at Sandia for the past ten years for applications in silicon-on-insulator microelectronics, micromachining, and chemical sensors. The authors used this expertise to form luminescent PS at a variety of wavelengths and have used analytical techniques such as in situ Raman and X-ray reflectivity to investigate the luminescence mechanism and quantify the properties of the porous silicon layer. Further, their experience with ion implantation in Si lead to an investigation into alternate methods of producing Si nanostructures that visibly luminesce.

  2. FY 2014 LDRD Annual Report Project Summaries

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    Tomchak, Dena [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The FY 2014 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL's technical capabilities can support future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to INL - it provides a means for the laboratory to pursue novel scientific and engineering research in areas that are deemed too basic or risky for programmatic investments. This research enahnces technical capabilities at the laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities for skill building and partnership development.

  3. Idaho National Laboratory Annual Report FY 2013 LDRD Project Summaries

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    Dena Tomchak

    2014-03-01

    The FY 2013 LDRD Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL’s technical capabilities support the current and future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to INL—it provides a means for the Laboratory to maintain scientific and technical vitality while funding highly innovative, high-risk science and technology research and development (R&D) projects. The program enhances technical capabilities at the Laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities to explore proof-of-principle ideas, advanced studies of innovative concepts, and preliminary technical analyses. Established by Congress in 1991, the LDRD Program proves its benefit each year through new programs, intellectual property, patents, copyrights, national and international awards, and publications.

  4. LDRD project 151362 : low energy electron-photon transport.

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    Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Bondi, Robert James; Crawford, Martin James

    2013-09-01

    At sufficiently high energies, the wavelengths of electrons and photons are short enough to only interact with one atom at time, leading to the popular %E2%80%9Cindependent-atom approximation%E2%80%9D. We attempted to incorporate atomic structure in the generation of cross sections (which embody the modeled physics) to improve transport at lower energies. We document our successes and failures. This was a three-year LDRD project. The core team consisted of a radiation-transport expert, a solid-state physicist, and two DFT experts.

  5. THz transceiver characterization : LDRD project 139363 final report.

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    Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Wanke, Michael Clement; Cich, Michael Joseph; Reno, John Louis; Fuller, Charles T.; Wendt, Joel Robert; Lee, Mark; Grine, Albert D.

    2009-09-01

    LDRD Project 139363 supported experiments to quantify the performance characteristics of monolithically integrated Schottky diode + quantum cascade laser (QCL) heterodyne mixers at terahertz (THz) frequencies. These integrated mixers are the first all-semiconductor THz devices to successfully incorporate a rectifying diode directly into the optical waveguide of a QCL, obviating the conventional optical coupling between a THz local oscillator and rectifier in a heterodyne mixer system. This integrated mixer was shown to function as a true heterodyne receiver of an externally received THz signal, a breakthrough which may lead to more widespread acceptance of this new THz technology paradigm. In addition, questions about QCL mode shifting in response to temperature, bias, and external feedback, and to what extent internal frequency locking can improve stability have been answered under this project.

  6. Selected Examples of LDRD Projects Supporting Test Ban Treaty Verification and Nonproliferation

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    Jackson, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Al-Ayat, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Walter, W. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-02-23

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at the DOE National Laboratories was established to ensure the scientific and technical vitality of these institutions and to enhance the their ability to respond to evolving missions and anticipate national needs. LDRD allows the Laboratory directors to invest a percentage of their total annual budget in cutting-edge research and development projects within their mission areas. We highlight a selected set of LDRD-funded projects, in chronological order, that have helped provide capabilities, people and infrastructure that contributed greatly to our ability to respond to technical challenges in support of test ban treaty verification and nonproliferation.

  7. Final report on LDRD project : advanced optical trigger systems.

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    Roose, Lars D.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Mar, Alan; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Sullivan, Charles Thomas; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Bauer, Thomas M. (LMATA Government Services, LLC., Albuquerque, NM); Peake, Gregory Merwin; Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Montano, Victoria A. (LMATA Government Services, LLC., Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-09-01

    are difficult to scale and manufacture with the required uniformity. As a promising alternative to multiple discrete edge-emitting lasers, a single wafer of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be lithographically patterned to achieve the desired layout of parallel line-shaped emitters, in which adjacent lasers utilize identical semiconductor material and thereby achieve a degree of intrinsic optical uniformity. Under this LDRD project, we have fabricated arrays of uncoupled circular-aperture VCSELs to approximate a line-shaped illumination pattern, achieving optical fill factors ranging from 2% to 30%. We have applied these VCSEL arrays to demonstrate single and dual parallel line-filament triggering of PCSS devices. Moreover, we have developed a better understanding of the illumination requirements for stable triggering of multiple-filament PCSS devices using VCSEL arrays. We have found that reliable triggering of multiple filaments requires matching of the turn-on time of adjacent VCSEL line-shaped-arrays to within approximately 1 ns. Additionally, we discovered that reliable triggering of PCSS devices at low voltages requires more optical power than we obtained with our first generation of VCSEL arrays. A second generation of higher-power VCSEL arrays was designed and fabricated at the end of this LDRD project, and testing with PCSS devices is currently underway (as of September 2008).

  8. Confined cooperative self-assembly and synthesis of optically and electrically active nanostructures : final LDRD report

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    Coker, Eric Nicholas; Haddad, Raid Edward (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Fan, Hongyou; Ta, Anh (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Bai, Feng (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Huang, Jian Yu

    2011-10-01

    In this project, we developed a confined cooperative self-assembly process to synthesize one-dimensional (1D) j-aggregates including nanowires and nanorods with controlled diameters and aspect ratios. The facile and versatile aqueous solution process assimilates photo-active macrocyclic building blocks inside surfactant micelles, forming stable single-crystalline high surface area nanoporous frameworks with well-defined external morphology defined by the building block packing. Characterizations using TEM, SEM, XRD, N{sub 2} and NO sorption isotherms, TGA, UV-vis spectroscopy, and fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy indicate that the j-aggregate nanostructures are monodisperse and may further assemble into hierarchical arrays with multi-modal functional pores. The nanostructures exhibit enhanced and collective optical properties over the individual chromophores. This project was a small footprint research effort which, nonetheless, produced significant progress towards both the stated goal as well as unanticipated research directions.

  9. Final report on LDRD project 52722 : radiation hardened optoelectronic components for space-based applications.

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    Hargett, Terry W. (L& M Technologies, Inc.); Serkland, Darwin Keith; Blansett, Ethan L.; Geib, Kent Martin; Sullivan, Charles Thomas; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Wrobel, Theodore Frank; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Klem, John Frederick; Medrano, Melissa R.; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Karpen, Gary D.; Montano, Victoria A. (L& M Technologies, Inc.)

    2003-12-01

    This report describes the research accomplishments achieved under the LDRD Project 'Radiation Hardened Optoelectronic Components for Space-Based Applications.' The aim of this LDRD has been to investigate the radiation hardness of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and photodiodes by looking at both the effects of total dose and of single-event upsets on the electrical and optical characteristics of VCSELs and photodiodes. These investigations were intended to provide guidance for the eventual integration of radiation hardened VCSELs and photodiodes with rad-hard driver and receiver electronics from an external vendor for space applications. During this one-year project, we have fabricated GaAs-based VCSELs and photodiodes, investigated ionization-induced transient effects due to high-energy protons, and measured the degradation of performance from both high-energy protons and neutrons.

  10. FY05 LDRD Final Report Molecular Radiation Biodosimetry LDRD Project Tracking Code: 04-ERD-076

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    Jones, I M; A.Coleman, M; Lehmann, J; Manohar, C F; Marchetti, F; Mariella, R; Miles, R; Nelson, D O; Wyrobek, A J

    2006-02-03

    been, these methods are not suitable. The best current option for triage radiation biodosimetry is self-report of time to onset of emesis after the event, a biomarker that is subject to many false positives. The premise of this project is that greatly improved radiation dosimetry can be achieved by research and development directed toward detection of molecular changes induced by radiation in cells or other biological materials. Basic research on the responses of cells to radiation at the molecular level, particularly of message RNA and proteins, has identified biomolecules whose levels increase (or decrease) as part of cellular responses to radiation. Concerted efforts to identify markers useful for triage and clinical applications have not been reported as yet. Such studies would scan responses over a broad range of doses, below, at and above the threshold of clinical significance in the first weeks after exposure, and would collect global proteome and/or transcriptome information on all tissue samples accessible to either first responders or clinicians. For triage, the goal is to identify those needing medical treatment. Treatment will be guided by refined dosimetry. Achieving this goal entails determining whether radiation exposure was below or above the threshold of concern, using one sample collected within days of an event, with simple devices that first responders either use or distribute for self-testing. For the clinic, better resolution of dose and tissue damage is needed to determine the nature and time sensitivity of therapy, but multiple sampling times may be acceptable and clinical staff and equipment can be utilized. Two complementary areas of research and development are needed once candidate biomarkers are identified, validation of the biomarker responses and validation of devices/instrumentation for detection of responses. Validation of biomarkers per se is confirmation that the dose, time, and tissue specific responses meet the reporting

  11. LDRD final report on Bloch Oscillations in two-dimensional nanostructure arrays for high frequency applications.

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    Lyo, Sungkwun Kenneth; Pan, Wei; Reno, John Louis; Wendt, Joel Robert; Barton, Daniel Lee

    2008-09-01

    We have investigated the physics of Bloch oscillations (BO) of electrons, engineered in high mobility quantum wells patterned into lateral periodic arrays of nanostructures, i.e. two-dimensional (2D) quantum dot superlattices (QDSLs). A BO occurs when an electron moves out of the Brillouin zone (BZ) in response to a DC electric field, passing back into the BZ on the opposite side. This results in quantum oscillations of the electron--i.e., a high frequency AC current in response to a DC voltage. Thus, engineering a BO will yield continuously electrically tunable high-frequency sources (and detectors) for sensor applications, and be a physics tour-de-force. More than a decade ago, Bloch oscillation (BO) was observed in a quantum well superlattice (QWSL) in short-pulse optical experiments. However, its potential as electrically biased high frequency source and detector so far has not been realized. This is partially due to fast damping of BO in QWSLs. In this project, we have investigated the possibility of improving the stability of BO by fabricating lateral superlattices of periodic coupled nanostructures, such as metal grid, quantum (anti)dots arrays, in high quality GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As heterostructures. In these nanostructures, the lateral quantum confinement has been shown theoretically to suppress the optical-phonon scattering, believed to be the main mechanism for fast damping of BO in QWSLs. Over the last three years, we have made great progress toward demonstrating Bloch oscillations in QDSLs. In the first two years of this project, we studied the negative differential conductance and the Bloch radiation induced edge-magnetoplasmon resonance. Recently, in collaboration with Prof. Kono's group at Rice University, we investigated the time-domain THz magneto-spectroscopy measurements in QDSLs and two-dimensional electron systems. A surprising DC electrical field induced THz phase flip was observed. More measurements are planned to investigate this

  12. FPGAs in High Perfomance Computing: Results from Two LDRD Projects.

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    Underwood, Keith D; Ulmer, Craig D.; Thompson, David; Hemmert, Karl Scott

    2006-11-01

    Field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) have been used as alternative computational de-vices for over a decade; however, they have not been used for traditional scientific com-puting due to their perceived lack of floating-point performance. In recent years, there hasbeen a surge of interest in alternatives to traditional microprocessors for high performancecomputing. Sandia National Labs began two projects to determine whether FPGAs wouldbe a suitable alternative to microprocessors for high performance scientific computing and,if so, how they should be integrated into the system. We present results that indicate thatFPGAs could have a significant impact on future systems. FPGAs have thepotentialtohave order of magnitude levels of performance wins on several key algorithms; however,there are serious questions as to whether the system integration challenge can be met. Fur-thermore, there remain challenges in FPGA programming and system level reliability whenusing FPGA devices.4 AcknowledgmentArun Rodrigues provided valuable support and assistance in the use of the Structural Sim-ulation Toolkit within an FPGA context. Curtis Janssen and Steve Plimpton provided valu-able insights into the workings of two Sandia applications (MPQC and LAMMPS, respec-tively).5

  13. LDRD final report on adaptive-responsive nanostructures for sensing applications.

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    Shelnutt, John Allen; van Swol, Frank B.; Wang, Zhongchun; Medforth, Craig J.

    2005-11-01

    Functional organic nanostructures such as well-formed tubes or fibers that can easily be fabricated into electronic and photonic devices are needed in many applications. Especially desirable from a national security standpoint are nanostructures that have enhanced sensitivity for the detection of chemicals and biological (CB) agents and other environmental stimuli. We recently discovered the first class of highly responsive and adaptive porphyrin-based nanostructures that may satisfy these requirements. These novel porphyrin nanostructures, which are formed by ionic self-assembly of two oppositely charged porphyrins, may function as conductors, semiconductors, or photoconductors, and they have additional properties that make them suitable for device fabrication (e.g., as ultrasensitive colorimetric CB microsensors). Preliminary studies with porphyrin nanotubes have shown that these nanostructures have novel optical and electronic properties, including strong resonant light scattering, quenched fluorescence, and electrical conductivity. In addition, they are photochemically active and capable of light-harvesting and photosynthesis; they may also have nonlinear optical properties. Remarkably, the nanotubes and potentially other porphyrin nanostructure are mechanically responsive and adaptive (e.g., the rigidity of the micrometers-long nanotubes is altered by light, ultrasound, or chemicals) and they self-heal upon removal the environmental stimulus. Given the tremendous degree of structural variation possible in the porphyrin subunits, additional types of nanostructures and greater control over their morphology can be anticipated. Molecular modification also provides a means of controlling their electronic, photonic, and other functional properties. In this work, we have greatly broadened the range of ionic porphyrin nanostructures that can be made, and determined the optical and responsivity properties of the nanotubes and other porphyrin nanostructures. We have

  14. FY08 LDRD Final Report A New Method for Wave Propagation in Elastic Media LDRD Project Tracking Code: 05-ERD-079

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    Petersson, A

    2009-01-29

    The LDRD project 'A New Method for Wave Propagation in Elastic Media' developed several improvements to the traditional finite difference technique for seismic wave propagation, including a summation-by-parts discretization which is provably stable for arbitrary heterogeneous materials, an accurate treatment of non-planar topography, local mesh refinement, and stable outflow boundary conditions. This project also implemented these techniques in a parallel open source computer code called WPP, and participated in several seismic modeling efforts to simulate ground motion due to earthquakes in Northern California. This research has been documented in six individual publications which are summarized in this report. Of these publications, four are published refereed journal articles, one is an accepted refereed journal article which has not yet been published, and one is a non-refereed software manual. The report concludes with a discussion of future research directions and exit plan.

  15. Final report on LDRD project: Simulation/optimization tools for system variability analysis

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    R. L. Bierbaum; R. F. Billau; J. E. Campbell; K. D. Marx; R. J. Sikorski; B. M. Thompson; S. D. Wix

    1999-10-01

    >This work was conducted during FY98 (Proposal Number 98-0036) and FY99 (Proposal Number 99-0818) under the auspices of the Sandia National Laboratories Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program. Electrical simulation typically treats a single data point in the very large input space of component properties. For electrical simulation to reach its full potential as a design tool, it must be able to address the unavoidable variability and uncertainty in component properties. Component viability is strongly related to the design margin (and reliability) of the end product. During the course of this project, both tools and methodologies were developed to enable analysis of variability in the context of electrical simulation tools. Two avenues to link relevant tools were also developed, and the resultant toolset was applied to a major component.

  16. Final LDRD Report for Projects # 52797 and # 93362: Rational Understanding and Control of the Magnetic Behavior of Nanoparticles.

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    Zhang, Z. John

    2006-11-01

    This is the final LDRD report for projects # 52797 and # 93362 that funded a five year research program directed by Prof. Z. John Zhang at the Georgia Institute of Technology Chemistry Department. Prof. Zhang was awarded this funding after winning a Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering (PECASE) in 2001 with Sandia as the DOE sponsoring lab. The project PI was Blake Simmons and the PM was Alfredo Morales. The page intentionally left blank

  17. Final Report for LDRD Project on Rapid Problem Setup for Mesh-Based Simulation (Rapsodi)

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    Brown, D L; Henshaw, W; Petersson, N A; Fast, P; Chand, K

    2003-02-07

    Under LLNL Exploratory Research LDRD funding, the Rapsodi project developed rapid setup technology for computational physics and engineering problems that require computational representations of complex geometry. Many simulation projects at LLNL involve the solution of partial differential equations in complex 3-D geometries. A significant bottleneck in carrying out these simulations arises in converting some specification of a geometry, such as a computer-aided design (CAD) drawing to a computationally appropriate 3-D mesh that can be used for simulation and analysis. Even using state-of-the-art mesh generation software, this problem setup step typically has required weeks or months, which is often much longer than required to carry out the computational simulation itself. The Rapsodi project built computational tools and designed algorithms that help to significantly reduce this setup time to less than a day for many realistic problems. The project targeted rapid setup technology for computational physics and engineering problems that use mixed-element unstructured meshes, overset meshes or Cartesian-embedded boundary (EB) meshes to represent complex geometry. It also built tools that aid in constructing computational representations of geometry for problems that do not require a mesh. While completely automatic mesh generation is extremely difficult, the amount of manual labor required can be significantly reduced. By developing novel, automated, component-based mesh construction procedures and automated CAD geometry repair and cleanup tools, Rapsodi has significantly reduced the amount of hand crafting required to generate geometry and meshes for scientific simulation codes.

  18. RF/microwave properties of nanotubes and nanowires : LDRD Project 105876 final report.

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    Scrymgeour, David; Lee, Mark; Hsu, Julia W. P.; Highstrete, Clark

    2009-09-01

    LDRD Project 105876 was a research project whose primary goal was to discover the currently unknown science underlying the basic linear and nonlinear electrodynamic response of nanotubes and nanowires in a manner that will support future efforts aimed at converting forefront nanoscience into innovative new high-frequency nanodevices. The project involved experimental and theoretical efforts to discover and understand high frequency (MHz through tens of GHz) electrodynamic response properties of nanomaterials, emphasizing nanowires of silicon, zinc oxide, and carbon nanotubes. While there is much research on DC electrical properties of nanowires, electrodynamic characteristics still represent a major new frontier in nanotechnology. We generated world-leading insight into how the low dimensionality of these nanomaterials yields sometimes desirable and sometimes problematic high-frequency properties that are outside standard model electron dynamics. In the cases of silicon nanowires and carbon nanotubes, evidence of strong disorder or glass-like charge dynamics was measured, indicating that these materials still suffer from serious inhomogeneities that limit there high frequency performance. Zinc oxide nanowires were found to obey conventional Drude dynamics. In all cases, a significant practical problem involving large impedance mismatch between the high intrinsic impedance of all nanowires and nanotubes and high-frequency test equipment had to be overcome.

  19. A configuration space toolkit for automated spatial reasoning: Technical results and LDRD project final report

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    Xavier, P.G.; LaFarge, R.A.

    1997-02-01

    A robot`s configuration space (c-space) is the space of its kinematic degrees of freedom, e.g., the joint-space of an arm. Sets in c-space can be defined that characterize a variety of spatial relationships, such as contact between the robot and its environment. C-space techniques have been fundamental to research progress in areas such as motion planning and physically-based reasoning. However, practical progress has been slowed by the difficulty of implementing the c-space abstraction inside each application. For this reason, we proposed a Configuration Space Toolkit of high-performance algorithms and data structures meeting these needs. Our intent was to develop this robotics software to provide enabling technology to emerging applications that apply the c-space abstraction, such as advanced motion planning, teleoperation supervision, mechanism functional analysis, and design tools. This final report presents the research results and technical achievements of this LDRD project. Key results and achievements included (1) a hybrid Common LISP/C prototype that implements the basic C-Space abstraction, (2) a new, generic, algorithm for constructing hierarchical geometric representations, and (3) a C++ implementation of an algorithm for fast distance computation, interference detection, and c-space point-classification. Since the project conclusion, motion planning researchers in Sandia`s Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center have been using the CSTk libcstk.so C++ library. The code continues to be used, supported, and improved by projects in the ISRC.

  20. Final report on LDRD project : biodiesel production from vegetable oils using slit-channel reactors.

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    Kalu, E. Eric (FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL); Chen, Ken Shuang

    2008-01-01

    This report documents work done for a late-start LDRD project, which was carried out during the last quarter of FY07. The objective of this project was to experimentally explore the feasibility of converting vegetable (e.g., soybean) oils to biodiesel by employing slit-channel reactors and solid catalysts. We first designed and fabricated several slit-channel reactors with varying channel depths, and employed them to investigate the improved performance of slit-channel reactors over traditional batch reactors using a NaOH liquid catalyst. We then evaluated the effectiveness of several solid catalysts, including CaO, ZnO, MgO, ZrO{sub 2}, calcium gluconate, and heteropolyacid or HPA (Cs{sub 2.5}H{sub 0.5}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}), for catalyzing the soybean oil-to-biodiesel transesterification reaction. We found that the slit-channel reactor performance improves as channel depth decreases, as expected; and the conversion efficiency of a slit-channel reactor is significantly higher when its channel is very shallow. We further confirmed CaO as having the highest catalytic activity among the solid catalysts tested, and we demonstrated for the first time calcium gluconate as a promising solid catalyst for converting soybean oil to biodiesel, based on our preliminary batch-mode conversion experiments.

  1. Diode Laser Diagnostics for Gas Species and Soot in Large Fires: LDRD Project Final Report

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    Christopher R. Shaddix; Sarah W. Allendorf; Gary L. Hubbard; David K. Ottesen; Louis A. Gritzo

    2001-06-01

    The thermal hazard posed by a fire to a weapon or other engineered system is a consequence of combined radiation and convection from high-temperature soot and gases. The development of advanced, predictive models of this hazard requires detailed knowledge of the transient chemical structure and soot distributions within real-scale fires. At present, there are no measurements, and hence limited understanding, of transient gaseous species generation and transport in large, fully turbulent fires. As part of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to develop such an experimental capability, near-infrared tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) has been identified as the most promising diagnostic technique for making these measurements. In order to develop this capability, significant efforts were applied to choosing optimal species and transitions for detection, to developing an effective multiplexing strategy for several lasers undergoing wavelength modulation spectroscopy with fast laser ramp scans, to developing a methodology for multipassing the TDL beams across a small probe volume, and finally, to designing a water-cooled, fiber-coupled probe for performing these measurements locally within large pool fires. All of these challenges were surmounted during the course of this project, and in the end a preliminary, unique dataset of combined water vapor, acetylene, and soot concentrations was obtained from a 1-m diameter JP-8 pool fire.

  2. Nanostructured Catalytic Reactors for Air Purification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I project proposes the development of lightweight compact nanostructured catalytic reactors for air purification from toxic gaseous organic...

  3. Nanostructured Catalytic Reactors for Air Purification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase II project proposes the development of lightweight compact nanostructured catalytic reactors for air purification from toxic gaseous organic...

  4. Nanostructures for Electronic and Sensing Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project will develop sensors and electronic components from metal oxide based nanotubes and nanowires. These nanostructured materials will be grown...

  5. Final Report for LDRD Project 02-FS-009 Gigapixel Surveillance Camera

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    Marrs, R E; Bennett, C L

    2010-04-20

    The threats of terrorism and proliferation of weapons of mass destruction add urgency to the development of new techniques for surveillance and intelligence collection. For example, the United States faces a serious and growing threat from adversaries who locate key facilities underground, hide them within other facilities, or otherwise conceal their location and function. Reconnaissance photographs are one of the most important tools for uncovering the capabilities of adversaries. However, current imaging technology provides only infrequent static images of a large area, or occasional video of a small area. We are attempting to add a new dimension to reconnaissance by introducing a capability for large area video surveillance. This capability would enable tracking of all vehicle movements within a very large area. The goal of our project is the development of a gigapixel video surveillance camera for high altitude aircraft or balloon platforms. From very high altitude platforms (20-40 km altitude) it would be possible to track every moving vehicle within an area of roughly 100 km x 100 km, about the size of the San Francisco Bay region, with a gigapixel camera. Reliable tracking of vehicles requires a ground sampling distance (GSD) of 0.5 to 1 m and a framing rate of approximately two frames per second (fps). For a 100 km x 100 km area the corresponding pixel count is 10 gigapixels for a 1-m GSD and 40 gigapixels for a 0.5-m GSD. This is an order of magnitude beyond the 1 gigapixel camera envisioned in our LDRD proposal. We have determined that an instrument of this capacity is feasible.

  6. Reduced order models for thermal analysis : final report : LDRD Project No. 137807.

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    Hogan, Roy E., Jr.; Gartling, David K.

    2010-09-01

    This LDRD Senior's Council Project is focused on the development, implementation and evaluation of Reduced Order Models (ROM) for application in the thermal analysis of complex engineering problems. Two basic approaches to developing a ROM for combined thermal conduction and enclosure radiation problems are considered. As a prerequisite to a ROM a fully coupled solution method for conduction/radiation models is required; a parallel implementation is explored for this class of problems. High-fidelity models of large, complex systems are now used routinely to verify design and performance. However, there are applications where the high-fidelity model is too large to be used repetitively in a design mode. One such application is the design of a control system that oversees the functioning of the complex, high-fidelity model. Examples include control systems for manufacturing processes such as brazing and annealing furnaces as well as control systems for the thermal management of optical systems. A reduced order model (ROM) seeks to reduce the number of degrees of freedom needed to represent the overall behavior of the large system without a significant loss in accuracy. The reduction in the number of degrees of freedom of the ROM leads to immediate increases in computational efficiency and allows many design parameters and perturbations to be quickly and effectively evaluated. Reduced order models are routinely used in solid mechanics where techniques such as modal analysis have reached a high state of refinement. Similar techniques have recently been applied in standard thermal conduction problems e.g. though the general use of ROM for heat transfer is not yet widespread. One major difficulty with the development of ROM for general thermal analysis is the need to include the very nonlinear effects of enclosure radiation in many applications. Many ROM methods have considered only linear or mildly nonlinear problems. In the present study a reduced order model is

  7. LDRD FY2004 Annual Report

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    Kotta, P. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kline, K. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2005-02-28

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program is our primary means for pursuing innovative, long-term, high-risk, and potentially high-payoff research that supports the missions of the Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and the National Nuclear Security Administration in national security, homeland security, energy security, environmental management, bioscience and healthcare technology, and breakthroughs in fundamental science and technology. The LDRD Program was authorized by Congress in 1991 and is administered by the Laboratory Science and Technology Office. The accomplishments described in this Annual Report demonstrate how the LDRD portfolio is strongly aligned with these missions and contributes to the Laboratory’s success in meeting its goals. The LDRD budget of $69.8 million for FY2004 sponsored 220 projects. These projects were selected through an extensive peer-review process to ensure the highest scientific and technical quality and mission relevance. Each year, the number of meritorious proposals far exceeds the funding available, making the selection a challenging one indeed. Our ongoing investments in LDRD have reaped long-term rewards for the Laboratory and the Nation. Many Laboratory programs trace their roots to research thrusts that began several years ago under LDRD sponsorship. In addition, many LDRD projects contribute to more than one mission area, leveraging the Laboratory’s multidisciplinary team approach to science and technology. Safeguarding the Nation from terrorist activity and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction will be an enduring mission of this Laboratory, for which LDRD will continue to play a vital role. The LDRD Program is a success story. Our projects continue to win national recognition for excellence through prestigious awards, papers published in peer-reviewed journals, and patents granted. With its reputation for sponsoring innovative projects, the LDRD Program is also a major vehicle

  8. LDRD Annual Report FY2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sketchley, J A; Kotta, P; De Yoreo, J; Jackson, K; van Bibber, K

    2007-03-20

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program, authorized by Congress in 1991 and administered by the Laboratory Science and Technology Office, is our primary means for pursuing innovative, long-term, high-risk, and potentially high-payoff research that supports the missions of the Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and National Nuclear Security Administration in national security, energy security, environmental management, bioscience and technology to improve human health, and breakthroughs in fundamental science and technology. The accomplishments described in this Annual Report demonstrate the strong alignment of the LDRD portfolio with these missions and contribute to the Laboratory's success in meeting its goals. The LDRD budget of $92 million for FY2006 sponsored 188 projects. These projects were selected through an extensive peer-review process to ensure the highest scientific quality and mission relevance. Each year, the number of deserving proposals far exceeds the funding available, making the selection a tough one indeed. Our ongoing investments in LDRD have reaped long-term rewards for the Laboratory and the nation. Many Laboratory programs trace their roots to research thrusts that began several years ago under LDRD sponsorship. In addition, many LDRD projects contribute to more than one mission area, leveraging the Laboratory's multidisciplinary team approach to science and technology. Safeguarding the nation from terrorist activity and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction will be an enduring mission of this Laboratory, for which LDRD will continue to play a vital role. The LDRD Program is a success story. Our projects continue to win national recognition for excellence through prestigious awards, papers published in peer-reviewed journals, and patents granted. With its reputation for sponsoring innovative projects, the LDRD Program is also a major vehicle for attracting and retaining the best and the

  9. Final report on LDRD project : coupling strategies for multi-physics applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Moffat, Harry K.; Carnes, Brian; Hooper, Russell Warren; Pawlowski, Roger P.

    2007-11-01

    Many current and future modeling applications at Sandia including ASC milestones will critically depend on the simultaneous solution of vastly different physical phenomena. Issues due to code coupling are often not addressed, understood, or even recognized. The objectives of the LDRD has been both in theory and in code development. We will show that we have provided a fundamental analysis of coupling, i.e., when strong coupling vs. a successive substitution strategy is needed. We have enabled the implementation of tighter coupling strategies through additions to the NOX and Sierra code suites to make coupling strategies available now. We have leveraged existing functionality to do this. Specifically, we have built into NOX the capability to handle fully coupled simulations from multiple codes, and we have also built into NOX the capability to handle Jacobi Free Newton Krylov simulations that link multiple applications. We show how this capability may be accessed from within the Sierra Framework as well as from outside of Sierra. The critical impact from this LDRD is that we have shown how and have delivered strategies for enabling strong Newton-based coupling while respecting the modularity of existing codes. This will facilitate the use of these codes in a coupled manner to solve multi-physic applications.

  10. Final report for LDRD project 11-0783 : directed robots for increased military manpower effectiveness.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Wagner, John S.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon; Morrow, James Dan

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this LDRD is to develop technology allowing warfighters to provide high-level commands to their unmanned assets, freeing them to command a group of them or commit the bulk of their attention elsewhere. To this end, a brain-emulating cognition and control architecture (BECCA) was developed, incorporating novel and uniquely capable feature creation and reinforcement learning algorithms. BECCA was demonstrated on both a mobile manipulator platform and on a seven degree of freedom serial link robot arm. Existing military ground robots are almost universally teleoperated and occupy the complete attention of an operator. They may remove a soldier from harm's way, but they do not necessarily reduce manpower requirements. Current research efforts to solve the problem of autonomous operation in an unstructured, dynamic environment fall short of the desired performance. In order to increase the effectiveness of unmanned vehicle (UV) operators, we proposed to develop robots that can be 'directed' rather than remote-controlled. They are instructed and trained by human operators, rather than driven. The technical approach is modeled closely on psychological and neuroscientific models of human learning. Two Sandia-developed models are utilized in this effort: the Sandia Cognitive Framework (SCF), a cognitive psychology-based model of human processes, and BECCA, a psychophysical-based model of learning, motor control, and conceptualization. Together, these models span the functional space from perceptuo-motor abilities, to high-level motivational and attentional processes.

  11. LDRD project final report : hybrid AI/cognitive tactical behavior framework for LVC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djordjevich, Donna D.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon; Brannon, Nathan Gregory; Hart, Brian E.; Hart, Derek H.; Little, Charles Quentin; Oppel, Fred John III; Linebarger, John Michael; Parker, Eric Paul

    2012-01-01

    This Lab-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) sought to develop technology that enhances scenario construction speed, entity behavior robustness, and scalability in Live-Virtual-Constructive (LVC) simulation. We investigated issues in both simulation architecture and behavior modeling. We developed path-planning technology that improves the ability to express intent in the planning task while still permitting an efficient search algorithm. An LVC simulation demonstrated how this enables 'one-click' layout of squad tactical paths, as well as dynamic re-planning for simulated squads and for real and simulated mobile robots. We identified human response latencies that can be exploited in parallel/distributed architectures. We did an experimental study to determine where parallelization would be productive in Umbra-based force-on-force (FOF) simulations. We developed and implemented a data-driven simulation composition approach that solves entity class hierarchy issues and supports assurance of simulation fairness. Finally, we proposed a flexible framework to enable integration of multiple behavior modeling components that model working memory phenomena with different degrees of sophistication.

  12. LDRD FY 2014 Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anita Gianotto; Dena Tomchak

    2013-08-01

    As required by DOE Order 413.2B the FY 2014 Program Plan is written to communicate ares of investment and approximate amounts being requested for the upcoming fiscal year. The program plan also includes brief highlights of current or previous LDRD projects that have an opportunity to impact our Nation's current and future energy challenges.

  13. LDRD final report on synthesis of shape-and size-controlled platinum and platinum alloy nanostructures on carbon with improved durability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelnutt, John Allen; Garcia, Robert M.; Song, Yujiang; Moreno, Andres M.; Stanis, Ronald J.

    2008-10-01

    This project is aimed to gain added durability by supporting ripening-resistant dendritic platinum and/or platinum-based alloy nanostructures on carbon. We have developed a new synthetic approach suitable for directly supporting dendritic nanostructures on VXC-72 carbon black (CB), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The key of the synthesis is to creating a unique supporting/confining reaction environment by incorporating carbon within lipid bilayer relying on a hydrophobic-hydrophobic interaction. In order to realize size uniformity control over the supported dendritic nanostructures, a fast photocatalytic seeding method based on tin(IV) porphyrins (SnP) developed at Sandia was applied to the synthesis by using SnP-containing liposomes under tungsten light irradiation. For concept approval, one created dendritic platinum nanostructure supported on CB was fabricated into membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) for durability examination via potential cycling. It appears that carbon supporting is essentially beneficial to an enhanced durability according to our preliminary results.

  14. Dynamic compression of synthetic diamond windows (final report for LDRD project 93531).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Daniel H.,

    2008-09-01

    Diamond is an attractive dynamic compression window for many reasons: high elastic limit,large mechanical impedance, and broad transparency range. Natural diamonds, however, aretoo expensive to be used in destructive experiments. Chemical vapor deposition techniquesare now able to produce large single-crystal windows, opening up many potential dynamiccompression applications. This project studied the behavior of synthetic diamond undershock wave compression. The results suggest that synthetic diamond could be a usefulwindow in this field, though complete characterization proved elusive.3

  15. FY2014 LBNL LDRD Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Darren [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE’s National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE’s missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation. The LDRD program supports Berkeley Lab’s mission in many ways. First, because LDRD funds can be allocated within a relatively short time frame, Berkeley Lab researchers can support the mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) and serve the needs of the nation by quickly responding to forefront scientific problems. Second, LDRD enables Berkeley Lab to attract and retain highly qualified scientists and to support their efforts to carry out worldleading research. In addition, the LDRD program also supports new projects that involve graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, thus contributing to the education mission of Berkeley Lab.

  16. Coordinating robot motion, sensing, and control in plans. LDRD project final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xavier, P.G.; Brown, R.G.; Watterberg, P.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center

    1997-08-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a framework for robotic planning and execution that provides a continuum of adaptability with respect to model incompleteness, model error, and sensing error. For example, dividing robot motion into gross-motion planning, fine-motion planning, and sensor-augmented control had yielded productive research and solutions to individual problems. Unfortunately, these techniques could only be combined by hand with ad hoc methods and were restricted to systems where all kinematics are completely modeled in planning. The original intent was to develop methods for understanding and autonomously synthesizing plans that coordinate motion, sensing, and control. The project considered this problem from several perspectives. Results included (1) theoretical methods to combine and extend gross-motion and fine-motion planning; (2) preliminary work in flexible-object manipulation and an implementable algorithm for planning shortest paths through obstacles for the free-end of an anchored cable; (3) development and implementation of a fast swept-body distance algorithm; and (4) integration of Sandia`s C-Space Toolkit geometry engine and SANDROS motion planer and improvements, which yielded a system practical for everyday motion planning, with path-segment planning at interactive speeds. Results (3) and (4) have either led to follow-on work or are being used in current projects, and they believe that (2) will eventually be also.

  17. Characterizing the emissivity of materials under dynamic compression (final report for LDRD project 79877).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Daniel H.

    2007-10-01

    Temperature measurements are crucial to equation of state development, but difficult to perform reliably. In the case of infrared pyrometry, a large uncertainty comes from the fact that sample emissivity (the deviation from a blackbody) is unknown. In this project, a method for characterizing the emissivity of shocked materials was developed. By coupling infrared radiation from the National Synchrotron Light Source to a gas gun system, broad spectrum emissivity changes were studied to a peak stress of 8 GPa. Emissivity measurements were performed on standard metals (Al, Cr, Cu, and Pt) as well as a high emissivity coating developed at Sandia.

  18. Final LDRD report :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Blythe G.; Rajasekhara, Shreyas; Enos, David George; Dingreville, Remi Philippe Michel; Doyle, Barney Lee; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Weiner, Ruth F.

    2013-09-01

    We present the results of a three-year LDRD project focused on understanding microstructural evolution and related property changes in Zr-based nuclear cladding materials towards the development of high fidelity predictive simulations for long term dry storage. Experiments and modeling efforts have focused on the effects of hydride formation and accumulation of irradiation defects. Key results include: determination of the influence of composition and defect structures on hydride formation; measurement of the electrochemical property differences between hydride and parent material for understanding and predicting corrosion resistance; in situ environmental transmission electron microscope observation of hydride formation; development of a predictive simulation for mechanical property changes as a function of irradiation dose; novel test method development for microtensile testing of ionirradiated material to simulate the effect of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties; and successful demonstration of an Idaho National Labs-based sample preparation and shipping method for subsequent Sandia-based analysis of post-reactor cladding.

  19. Intelligent tools and process development for robotic edge finishing: LDRD project final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, C.L.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes a project undertaken to develop an agile automated, high-precision edge finishing system, for fabricating precision parts. The project involved re-designing and adding additional capabilities to an existing finishing work-cell. The resulting work-cell may serve as prototype for production systems to be integrated in highly flexible automated production lines. The system removes burrs formed in the machining process and produces precision chamfers. The system uses an expert system to predict the burr size from the machining history. Within the CAD system, tool paths are generated for burr removal and chamfer formation. Then, the optimal grinding process is automatically selected from a database of processes. The tool trajectory and the selected process definition is then downloaded to a robotic control system to execute the operation. The robotic control system implements a hybrid fuzzy logic-classical control scheme to achieve the desired performance goals regardless of tolerance and fixturing errors. This report describes the system architecture and the system`s performance.

  20. Final report on LDRD project : single-photon-sensitive imaging detector arrays at 1600 nm.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childs, Kenton David; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Klem, John Frederick; Sheng, Josephine Juin-Jye; Patel, Rupal K.; Bolles, Desta; Bauer, Tom M.; Koudelka, Robert

    2006-11-01

    The key need that this project has addressed is a short-wave infrared light detector for ranging (LIDAR) imaging at temperatures greater than 100K, as desired by nonproliferation and work for other customers. Several novel device structures to improve avalanche photodiodes (APDs) were fabricated to achieve the desired APD performance. A primary challenge to achieving high sensitivity APDs at 1550 nm is that the small band-gap materials (e.g., InGaAs or Ge) necessary to detect low-energy photons exhibit higher dark counts and higher multiplication noise compared to materials like silicon. To overcome these historical problems APDs were designed and fabricated using separate absorption and multiplication (SAM) regions. The absorption regions used (InGaAs or Ge) to leverage these materials 1550 nm sensitivity. Geiger mode detection was chosen to circumvent gain noise issues in the III-V and Ge multiplication regions, while a novel Ge/Si device was built to examine the utility of transferring photoelectrons in a silicon multiplication region. Silicon is known to have very good analog and GM multiplication properties. The proposed devices represented a high-risk for high-reward approach. Therefore one primary goal of this work was to experimentally resolve uncertainty about the novel APD structures. This work specifically examined three different designs. An InGaAs/InAlAs Geiger mode (GM) structure was proposed for the superior multiplication properties of the InAlAs. The hypothesis to be tested in this structure was whether InAlAs really presented an advantage in GM. A Ge/Si SAM was proposed representing the best possible multiplication material (i.e., silicon), however, significant uncertainty existed about both the Ge material quality and the ability to transfer photoelectrons across the Ge/Si interface. Finally a third pure germanium GM structure was proposed because bulk germanium has been reported to have better dark count properties. However, significant

  1. LDRD Final Report - Investigations of the impact of the process integration of deposited magnetic films for magnetic memory technologies on radiation-hardened CMOS devices and circuits - LDRD Project (FY99)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MYERS,DAVID R.; JESSING,JEFFREY R.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; SHANEYFELT,MARTY R.

    2000-01-01

    This project represented a coordinated LLNL-SNL collaboration to investigate the feasibility of developing radiation-hardened magnetic non-volatile memories using giant magnetoresistance (GMR) materials. The intent of this limited-duration study was to investigate whether giant magnetoresistance (GMR) materials similar to those used for magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) were process compatible with functioning CMOS circuits. Sandia's work on this project demonstrated that deposition of GMR materials did not affect the operation nor the radiation hardness of Sandia's rad-hard CMOS technology, nor did the integration of GMR materials and exposure to ionizing radiation affect the magnetic properties of the GMR films. Thus, following deposition of GMR films on rad-hard integrated circuits, both the circuits and the films survived ionizing radiation levels consistent with DOE mission requirements. Furthermore, Sandia developed techniques to pattern deposited GMR films without degrading the completed integrated circuits upon which they were deposited. The present feasibility study demonstrated all the necessary processing elements to allow fabrication of the non-volatile memory elements onto an existing CMOS chip, and even allow the use of embedded (on-chip) non-volatile memories for system-on-a-chip applications, even in demanding radiation environments. However, funding agencies DTRA, AIM, and DARPA did not have any funds available to support the required follow-on technology development projects that would have been required to develop functioning prototype circuits, nor were such funds available from LDRD nor from other DOE program funds.

  2. 1999 LDRD Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rita Spencer; Kyle Wheeler

    2000-06-01

    This is the FY 1999 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  3. Tiger LDRD final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steich, D J; Brugger, S T; Kallman, J S; White, D A

    2000-02-01

    This final report describes our efforts on the Three-Dimensional Massively Parallel CEM Technologies LDRD project (97-ERD-009). Significant need exists for more advanced time domain computational electromagnetics modeling. Bookkeeping details and modifying inflexible software constitute a vast majority of the effort required to address such needs. The required effort escalates rapidly as problem complexity increases. For example, hybrid meshes requiring hybrid numerics on massively parallel platforms (MPPs). This project attempts to alleviate the above limitations by investigating flexible abstractions for these numerical algorithms on MPPs using object-oriented methods, providing a programming environment insulating physics from bookkeeping. The three major design iterations during the project, known as TIGER-I to TIGER-III, are discussed. Each version of TIGER is briefly discussed along with lessons learned during the development and implementation. An Application Programming Interface (API) of the object-oriented interface for Tiger-III is included in three appendices. The three appendices contain the Utilities, Entity-Attribute, and Mesh libraries developed during the project. The API libraries represent a snapshot of our latest attempt at insulated the physics from the bookkeeping.

  4. Final report for LDRD project {open_quotes}A new approach to protein function and structure prediction{close_quotes}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, C.A.

    1997-03-01

    This report describes the research performed under the laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) grant {open_quotes}A new approach to protein function and structure prediction{close_quotes}, funded FY94-6. We describe the goals of the research, motivate and list our improvements to the state of the art in multiple sequence alignment and phylogeny (evolutionary tree) construction, but leave technical details to the six publications resulting from this work. At least three algorithms for phylogeny construction or tree consensus have been implemented and used by researchers outside of Sandia.

  5. Final report for LDRD project {open_quotes}A new approach to protein function and structure prediction{close_quotes}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, C.A.

    1997-03-01

    This report describes the research performed under the laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) grant {open_quotes}A new approach to protein function and structure prediction{close_quotes}, funded FY94-6. We describe the goals of the research, motivate and list our improvements to the state of the art in multiple sequence alignment and phylogeny (evolutionary tree) construction, but leave technical details to the six publications resulting from this work. At least three algorithms for phylogeny construction or tree consensus have been implemented and used by researchers outside of Sandia.

  6. Hardness Assurance for Low-Energy Proton-Induced Single-Event Effects: Final report for LDRD Project 173134

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodds, Nathaniel Anson [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This report briefly summarizes three publications that resulted from a two-year LDRD. The three publications address a recently emerging reliability issue: namely, that low-energy protons (LEPs) can cause single-event effects (SEEs) in highly scaled microelectronics. These publications span from low to high technology readiness levels. In the first, novel experiments were used to prove that proton direct ionization is the dominant mechanism for LEP-induced SEEs. In the second, a simple method was developed to calculate expected on-orbit error rates for LEP effects. This simplification was enabled by creating (and characterizing) an accelerated space-like LEP environment in the laboratory. In the third publication, this new method was applied to many memory circuits from the 20-90 nm technology nodes to study the general importance of LEP effects, in terms of their contribution to the total on-orbit SEE rate.

  7. "Bottom-up" meets "top-down" : self-assembly to direct manipulation of nanostructures on length scales from atoms to microns.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swartzentruber, Brian Shoemaker

    2009-04-01

    This document is the final SAND Report for the LDRD Project 102660 - 'Bottomup' meets 'top-down': Self-assembly to direct manipulation of nanostructures on length scales from atoms to microns - funded through the Strategic Partnerships investment area as part of the National Institute for Nano-Engineering (NINE) project.

  8. 2007 LDRD ANNUAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, T

    2008-12-16

    I am pleased to present the fiscal year 2007 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) annual report. This represents the first year that SRNL has been eligible for LDRD participation and our results to date demonstrate we are off to an excellent start. SRNL became a National Laboratory in 2004, and was designated the 'Corporate Laboratory' for the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) in 2006. As you will see, we have made great progress since these designations. The LDRD program is one of the tools SRNL is using to enable achievement of our strategic goals for the DOE. The LDRD program allows the laboratory to blend a strong basic science component into our applied technical portfolio. This blending of science with applied technology provides opportunities for our scientists to strengthen our capabilities and delivery. The LDRD program is vital to help SRNL attract and retain leading scientists and engineers who will help build SRNL's future and achieve DOE mission objectives. This program has stimulated our research staff creativity, while realizing benefits from their participation. This investment will yield long term dividends to the DOE in its Environmental Management, Energy, and National Security missions.

  9. Potential applications of nanostructured materials in nuclear waste management.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braterman, Paul S. (The University of North Texas, Denton, TX); Phol, Phillip Isabio; Xu, Zhi-Ping (The University of North Texas, Denton, TX); Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Yang, Yi (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Bryan, Charles R.; Yu, Kui; Xu, Huifang (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Wang, Yifeng; Gao, Huizhen

    2003-09-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained from a Laboratory Directed Research & Development (LDRD) project entitled 'Investigation of Potential Applications of Self-Assembled Nanostructured Materials in Nuclear Waste Management'. The objectives of this project are to (1) provide a mechanistic understanding of the control of nanometer-scale structures on the ion sorption capability of materials and (2) develop appropriate engineering approaches to improving material properties based on such an understanding.

  10. Final report for LDRD project 11-0029 : high-interest event detection in large-scale multi-modal data sets : proof of concept.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, Brandon Robinson

    2011-09-01

    Events of interest to data analysts are sometimes difficult to characterize in detail. Rather, they consist of anomalies, events that are unpredicted, unusual, or otherwise incongruent. The purpose of this LDRD was to test the hypothesis that a biologically-inspired anomaly detection algorithm could be used to detect contextual, multi-modal anomalies. There currently is no other solution to this problem, but the existence of a solution would have a great national security impact. The technical focus of this research was the application of a brain-emulating cognition and control architecture (BECCA) to the problem of anomaly detection. One aspect of BECCA in particular was discovered to be critical to improved anomaly detection capabilities: it's feature creator. During the course of this project the feature creator was developed and tested against multiple data types. Development direction was drawn from psychological and neurophysiological measurements. Major technical achievements include the creation of hierarchical feature sets created from both audio and imagery data.

  11. 2013 SRNL LDRD Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McWhorter, S.

    2014-03-07

    This report demonstrates the execution of our LDRD program within the objectives and guidelines outlined by the Department of Energy (DOE) through the DOE Order 413.2b. The projects described within the report align purposefully with SRNL’s strategic vision and provide great value to the DOE. The diversity exhibited in the research and development projects underscores the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) mission and enhances that mission by developing the technical capabilities and human capital necessary to support future DOE-EM national needs. As a multiprogram national laboratory, SRNL is applying those capabilities to achieve tangible results for the nation in National Security, Environmental Stewardship, Clean Energy and Nuclear Materials Management.

  12. Compositional ordering and stability in nanostructured, bulk thermoelectric alloys.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hekmaty, Michelle A.; Faleev, S.; Medlin, Douglas L.; Leonard, F.; Lensch-Falk, J.; Sharma, Peter Anand; Sugar, J. D.

    2009-09-01

    Thermoelectric materials have many applications in the conversion of thermal energy to electrical power and in solid-state cooling. One route to improving thermoelectric energy conversion efficiency in bulk material is to embed nanoscale inclusions. This report summarize key results from a recently completed LDRD project exploring the science underpinning the formation and stability of nanostructures in bulk thermoelectric and the quantitative relationships between such structures and thermoelectric properties.

  13. LDRD Report: Scheduling Irregular Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boman, Erik G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-01

    This LDRD project was a campus exec fellowship to fund (in part) Donald Nguyen’s PhD research at UT-Austin. His work has focused on parallel programming models, and scheduling irregular algorithms on shared-memory systems using the Galois framework. Galois provides a simple but powerful way for users and applications to automatically obtain good parallel performance using certain supported data containers. The naïve user can write serial code, while advanced users can optimize performance by advanced features, such as specifying the scheduling policy. Galois was used to parallelize two sparse matrix reordering schemes: RCM and Sloan. Such reordering is important in high-performance computing to obtain better data locality and thus reduce run times.

  14. Final Report for LDRD Project 05-ERD-050: "Developing a Reactive Chemistry Capability for the NARAC Operational Model (LODI)"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron-Smith, P; Grant, K; Connell, P

    2008-02-11

    In support of the National Security efforts of LLNL, this project addressed the existing imbalance between dispersion and chemical capabilities of LODI (Lagrangian Operational Dispersion Integrator--the NARAC operational dispersion model). We have demonstrated potentially large effects of atmospheric chemistry on the impact of chemical releases (e.g., industrial chemicals and nerve agents). Prior to our work, LODI could only handle chains of first-order losses (exponential decays) that were independent of time and space, limiting NARAC's capability to respond when reactive chemistry is important. We significantly upgraded the chemistry and aerosol capability of LODI to handle (1) arbitrary networks of chemical reactions, (2) mixing and reactions with ambient species, (3) evaporation and condensation of aerosols, and (4) heat liberated from chemical reactions and aerosol condensation (which can cause a cold and dense plume hugging the ground to rise into the atmosphere, then descend to the ground again as droplets). When this is made operational, it will significantly improve NARAC's ability to respond to terrorist attacks and industrial accidents that involve reactive chemistry, including many chemical agents and toxic industrial chemicals (TICS). As a dual-use, the resulting model also has the potential to be a state-of-the-art air-quality model. Chemical releases are the most common type of airborne hazardous release and many operational applications involve such scenarios. The new capability we developed is therefore relevant to the needs of the Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Department of Defense (DoD).

  15. Final report on grand challenge LDRD project : a revolution in lighting : building the science and technology base for ultra-efficient solid-state lighting.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, Robert Guild; Mitchell, Christine Charlotte; Follstaedt, David Martin; Lee, Stephen Roger; Shul, Randy John; Fischer, Arthur Joseph; Chow, Weng Wah Dr.; Myers, Samuel Maxwell, Jr.; Thoma, Steven George; Gee, James Martin; Coltrin, Michael Elliott; Burdick, Brent A.; Salamone, Angelo, L., Jr.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Elliott, Russell D.; Campbell, Jonathan M.; Abrams, Billie Lynn; Wendt, Joel Robert; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Simpson, Regina Lynn; Kurtz, Steven Ross; Cole, Phillip James; Fullmer, Kristine Wanta; Seager, Carleton Hoover; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Biefeld, Robert Malcolm; Kerley, Thomas M.; Norman, Adam K.; Tallant, David Robert; Woessner, Stephen Matthew; Figiel, Jeffrey James; Moffat, Harry K.; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Emerson, John Allen; Kaplar, Robert James; Wilcoxon, Jess Patrick; Waldrip, Karen Elizabeth; Rohwer, Lauren Elizabeth Shea; Cross, Karen Charlene; Wright, Alan Francis; Gonzales, Rene Marie; Salinger, Andrew Gerhard; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Garcia, Marie L.; Allen, Mark S.; Southwell, Edwin T. (Perspectives, Sedona, AZ); Bauer, Tom M.; Monson, Mary Ann; Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Creighton, James Randall; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Simmons, Jerry A.; Boyack, Kevin W.; Jones, Eric Daniel; Moran, Michael P.; Pinzon, Marcia J. (Perspectives, Sedona, AZ); Pinson, Ariane O. (Perspectives, Sedona, AZ); Miksovic, Ann E. (Perspectives, Sedona, AZ); Wang, George T.; Ashby, Carol Iris Hill; Missert, Nancy A.; Koleske, Daniel David; Rahal, Nabeel M.

    2004-06-01

    This SAND report is the final report on Sandia's Grand Challenge LDRD Project 27328, 'A Revolution in Lighting -- Building the Science and Technology Base for Ultra-Efficient Solid-state Lighting.' This project, which for brevity we refer to as the SSL GCLDRD, is considered one of Sandia's most successful GCLDRDs. As a result, this report reviews not only technical highlights, but also the genesis of the idea for Solid-state Lighting (SSL), the initiation of the SSL GCLDRD, and the goals, scope, success metrics, and evolution of the SSL GCLDRD over the course of its life. One way in which the SSL GCLDRD was different from other GCLDRDs was that it coincided with a larger effort by the SSL community - primarily industrial companies investing in SSL, but also universities, trade organizations, and other Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories - to support a national initiative in SSL R&D. Sandia was a major player in publicizing the tremendous energy savings potential of SSL, and in helping to develop, unify and support community consensus for such an initiative. Hence, our activities in this area, discussed in Chapter 6, were substantial: white papers; SSL technology workshops and roadmaps; support for the Optoelectronics Industry Development Association (OIDA), DOE and Senator Bingaman's office; extensive public relations and media activities; and a worldwide SSL community website. Many science and technology advances and breakthroughs were also enabled under this GCLDRD, resulting in: 55 publications; 124 presentations; 10 book chapters and reports; 5 U.S. patent applications including 1 already issued; and 14 patent disclosures not yet applied for. Twenty-six invited talks were given, at prestigious venues such as the American Physical Society Meeting, the Materials Research Society Meeting, the AVS International Symposium, and the Electrochemical Society Meeting. This report contains a summary of these science and technology

  16. LDRD 2014 Annual Report: Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatton, Diane [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is required to provide a program description and overview of its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) to the Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with DOE Order 413.2B dated April 19, 2006. This report provides a detailed look at the scientific and technical activities for each of the LDRD projects funded by BNL in FY 2014, as required. In FY 2014, the BNL LDRD Program funded 40 projects, 8 of which were new starts, at a total cost of $9.6M.

  17. LDRD 2015 Annual Report: Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatton, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is required to provide a program description and overview of its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) to the Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with DOE Order 413.2B dated April 19, 2006. This report provides a detailed look at the scientific and technical activities for each of the LDRD projects funded by BNL in FY 2015, as required. In FY 2015, the BNL LDRD Program funded 43 projects, 12 of which were new starts, at a total cost of $9.5M.

  18. Computational Biology: A Strategic Initiative LDRD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barksy, D; Colvin, M

    2002-02-07

    The goal of this Strategic Initiative LDRD project was to establish at LLNL a new core capability in computational biology, combining laboratory strengths in high performance computing, molecular biology, and computational chemistry and physics. As described in this report, this project has been very successful in achieving this goal. This success is demonstrated by the large number of referred publications, invited talks, and follow-on research grants that have resulted from this project. Additionally, this project has helped build connections to internal and external collaborators and funding agencies that will be critical to the long-term vitality of LLNL programs in computational biology. Most importantly, this project has helped establish on-going research groups in the Biology and Biotechnology Research Program, the Physics and Applied Technology Directorate, and the Computation Directorate. These groups include three laboratory staff members originally hired as post-doctoral researchers for this strategic initiative.

  19. SRNL LDRD ANNUAL REPORT 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, T

    2008-12-29

    The Laboratory Director is pleased to have the opportunity to present the 2008 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) annual report. This is my first opportunity to do so, and only the second such report that has been issued. As will be obvious, SRNL has built upon the excellent start that was made with the LDRD program last year, and researchers have broken new ground in some important areas. In reviewing the output of this program this year, it is clear that the researchers implemented their ideas with creativity, skill and enthusiasm. It is gratifying to see this level of participation, because the LDRD program remains a key part of meeting SRNL's and DOE's strategic goals, and helps lay a solid scientific foundation for SRNL as the premier applied science laboratory. I also believe that the LDRD program's results this year have demonstrated SRNL's value as the EM Corporate Laboratory, having advanced knowledge in a spectrum of areas, including reduction of the technical risks of cleanup, separations science, packaging and transportation of nuclear materials, and many others. The research in support of Energy Security and National and Homeland Security has been no less notable. SRNL' s researchers have shown again that the nascent LDRD program is a sound investment for DOE that will pay off handsomely for the nation as time goes on.

  20. LDRD 149045 final report distinguishing documents.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Scott A.

    2010-09-01

    This LDRD 149045 final report describes work that Sandians Scott A. Mitchell, Randall Laviolette, Shawn Martin, Warren Davis, Cindy Philips and Danny Dunlavy performed in 2010. Prof. Afra Zomorodian provided insight. This was a small late-start LDRD. Several other ongoing efforts were leveraged, including the Networks Grand Challenge LDRD, and the Computational Topology CSRF project, and the some of the leveraged work is described here. We proposed a sentence mining technique that exploited both the distribution and the order of parts-of-speech (POS) in sentences in English language documents. The ultimate goal was to be able to discover 'call-to-action' framing documents hidden within a corpus of mostly expository documents, even if the documents were all on the same topic and used the same vocabulary. Using POS was novel. We also took a novel approach to analyzing POS. We used the hypothesis that English follows a dynamical system and the POS are trajectories from one state to another. We analyzed the sequences of POS using support vector machines and the cycles of POS using computational homology. We discovered that the POS were a very weak signal and did not support our hypothesis well. Our original goal appeared to be unobtainable with our original approach. We turned our attention to study an aspect of a more traditional approach to distinguishing documents. Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) turns documents into bags-of-words then into mixture-model points. A distance function is used to cluster groups of points to discover relatedness between documents. We performed a geometric and algebraic analysis of the most popular distance functions and made some significant and surprising discoveries, described in a separate technical report.

  1. LDRD 2016 Annual Report: Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatton, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-03-31

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is required to provide a program description and overview of its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) to the Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with DOE Order 413.2C dated October 22, 2015. This report provides a detailed look at the scientific and technical activities for each of the LDRD projects funded by BNL in FY 2016, as required. In FY 2016, the BNL LDRD Program funded 48 projects, 21 of which were new starts, at a total cost of $11.5M. The investments that BNL makes in its LDRD program support the Laboratory’s strategic goals. BNL has identified four Critical Outcomes that define the Laboratory’s scientific future and that will enable it to realize its overall vision. Two operational Critical Outcomes address essential operational support for that future: renewal of the BNL campus; and safe, efficient laboratory operations.

  2. Neurons to algorithms LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Aimone, James Bradley; Warrender, Christina E.; Trumbo, Derek

    2013-09-01

    Over the last three years the Neurons to Algorithms (N2A) LDRD project teams has built infrastructure to discover computational structures in the brain. This consists of a modeling language, a tool that enables model development and simulation in that language, and initial connections with the Neuroinformatics community, a group working toward similar goals. The approach of N2A is to express large complex systems like the brain as populations of a discrete part types that have specific structural relationships with each other, along with internal and structural dynamics. Such an evolving mathematical system may be able to capture the essence of neural processing, and ultimately of thought itself. This final report is a cover for the actual products of the project: the N2A Language Specification, the N2A Application, and a journal paper summarizing our methods.

  3. Self-Assembled Nanostructured Health Monitoring Sensors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the proposed NASA SBIR program is to design, fabricate and evaluate the performance of self-assembled nanostructured sensors for the health...

  4. Multifunctional, Nanostructured Metal Rubber Protective Films for Space Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NanoSonic has developed revolutionary nanostructured, yet macroscale, multifunctional Metal RubberTM films. In support of NASA's Vision for Space Exploration, low...

  5. Final report for %22High performance computing for advanced national electric power grid modeling and integration of solar generation resources%22, LDRD Project No. 149016.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reno, Matthew J.; Riehm, Andrew Charles; Hoekstra, Robert John; Munoz-Ramirez, Karina; Stamp, Jason Edwin; Phillips, Laurence R.; Adams, Brian M.; Russo, Thomas V.; Oldfield, Ron A.; McLendon, William Clarence, III; Nelson, Jeffrey Scott; Hansen, Clifford W.; Richardson, Bryan T.; Stein, Joshua S.; Schoenwald, David Alan; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.

    2011-02-01

    Design and operation of the electric power grid (EPG) relies heavily on computational models. High-fidelity, full-order models are used to study transient phenomena on only a small part of the network. Reduced-order dynamic and power flow models are used when analysis involving thousands of nodes are required due to the computational demands when simulating large numbers of nodes. The level of complexity of the future EPG will dramatically increase due to large-scale deployment of variable renewable generation, active load and distributed generation resources, adaptive protection and control systems, and price-responsive demand. High-fidelity modeling of this future grid will require significant advances in coupled, multi-scale tools and their use on high performance computing (HPC) platforms. This LDRD report demonstrates SNL's capability to apply HPC resources to these 3 tasks: (1) High-fidelity, large-scale modeling of power system dynamics; (2) Statistical assessment of grid security via Monte-Carlo simulations of cyber attacks; and (3) Development of models to predict variability of solar resources at locations where little or no ground-based measurements are available.

  6. Shock compression of liquid helium and helium-hydrogen mixtures : development of a cryogenic capability for shock compression of liquid helium on Z, final report for LDRD Project 141536.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Andrew J.; Knudson, Marcus D.; Shelton, Keegan P.; Hanson, David Lester

    2010-10-01

    This final report on SNL/NM LDRD Project 141536 summarizes progress made toward the development of a cryogenic capability to generate liquid helium (LHe) samples for high accuracy equation-of-state (EOS) measurements on the Z current drive. Accurate data on He properties at Mbar pressures are critical to understanding giant planetary interiors and for validating first principles density functional simulations, but it is difficult to condense LHe samples at very low temperatures (<3.5 K) for experimental studies on gas guns, magnetic and explosive compression devices, and lasers. We have developed a conceptual design for a cryogenic LHe sample system to generate quiescent superfluid LHe samples at 1.5-1.8 K. This cryogenic system adapts the basic elements of a continuously operating, self-regulating {sup 4}He evaporation refrigerator to the constraints of shock compression experiments on Z. To minimize heat load, the sample holder is surrounded by a double layer of thermal radiation shields cooled with LHe to 5 K. Delivery of LHe to the pumped-He evaporator bath is controlled by a flow impedance. The LHe sample holder assembly features modular components and simplified fabrication techniques to reduce cost and complexity to levels required of an expendable device. Prototypes have been fabricated, assembled, and instrumented for initial testing.

  7. Final LDRD report :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosini, Andrea; Miller, James Edward; Allendorf, Mark D.; Coker, Eric Nicholas; Ermanoski, Ivan; Hogan, Roy E.,; McDaniel, Anthony H.

    2014-01-01

    Despite rapid progress, solar thermochemistry remains high risk; improvements in both active materials and reactor systems are needed. This claim is supported by studies conducted both prior to and as part of this project. Materials offer a particular large opportunity space as, until recently, very little effort apart from basic thermodynamic analysis was extended towards understanding this most fundamental component of a metal oxide thermochemical cycle. Without this knowledge, system design was hampered, but more importantly, advances in these crucial materials were rare and resulted more from intuition rather than detailed insight. As a result, only two basic families of potentially viable solid materials have been widely considered, each of which has significant challenges. Recent efforts towards applying an increased level of scientific rigor to the study of thermochemical materials have provided a much needed framework and insights toward developing the next generation of highly improved thermochemically active materials. The primary goal of this project was to apply this hard-won knowledge to rapidly advance the field of thermochemistry to produce a material within 2 years that is capable of yielding CO from CO2 at a 12.5 % reactor efficiency. Three principal approaches spanning a range of risk and potential rewards were pursued: modification of known materials, structuring known materials, and identifying/developing new materials for the application. A newly developed best-of-class material produces more fuel (9x more H2, 6x more CO) under milder conditions than the previous state of the art. Analyses of thermochemical reactor and system efficiencies and economics were performed and a new hybrid concept was reported. The larger case for solar fuels was also further refined and documented.

  8. Transportation Energy Pathways LDRD.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barter, Garrett.; Reichmuth, David.; Westbrook, Jessica; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Yoshimura, Ann S.; Peterson, Meghan B.; West, Todd H.; Manley, Dawn Kataoka; Guzman, Katherine Dunphy; Edwards, Donna M.; Hines, Valerie Ann-Peters

    2012-09-01

    This report presents a system dynamics based model of the supply-demand interactions between the USlight-duty vehicle (LDV) fleet, its fuels, and the corresponding primary energy sources through the year2050. An important capability of our model is the ability to conduct parametric analyses. Others have reliedupon scenario-based analysis, where one discrete set of values is assigned to the input variables and used togenerate one possible realization of the future. While these scenarios can be illustrative of dominant trendsand tradeoffs under certain circumstances, changes in input values or assumptions can have a significantimpact on results, especially when output metrics are associated with projections far into the future. Thistype of uncertainty can be addressed by using a parametric study to examine a range of values for the inputvariables, offering a richer source of data to an analyst.The parametric analysis featured here focuses on a trade space exploration, with emphasis on factors thatinfluence the adoption rates of electric vehicles (EVs), the reduction of GHG emissions, and the reduction ofpetroleum consumption within the US LDV fleet. The underlying model emphasizes competition between13 different types of powertrains, including conventional internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, flex-fuel vehicles (FFVs), conventional hybrids(HEVs), plug-in hybrids (PHEVs), and battery electric vehicles(BEVs).We find that many factors contribute to the adoption rates of EVs. These include the pace of technologicaldevelopment for the electric powertrain, battery performance, as well as the efficiency improvements inconventional vehicles. Policy initiatives can also have a dramatic impact on the degree of EV adoption. Theconsumer effective payback period, in particular, can significantly increase the market penetration rates ifextended towards the vehicle lifetime.Widespread EV adoption can have noticeable impact on petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas

  9. Enhanced Micellar Catalysis LDRD.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betty, Rita G.; Tucker, Mark D; Taggart, Gretchen; Kinnan, Mark K.; Glen, Crystal Chanea; Rivera, Danielle; Sanchez, Andres; Alam, Todd Michael

    2012-12-01

    The primary goals of the Enhanced Micellar Catalysis project were to gain an understanding of the micellar environment of DF-200, or similar liquid CBW surfactant-based decontaminants, as well as characterize the aerosolized DF-200 droplet distribution and droplet chemistry under baseline ITW rotary atomization conditions. Micellar characterization of limited surfactant solutions was performed externally through the collection and measurement of Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS) images and Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (cryo-TEM) images. Micellar characterization was performed externally at the University of Minnesotas Characterization Facility Center, and at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source facility. A micellar diffusion study was conducted internally at Sandia to measure diffusion constants of surfactants over a concentration range, to estimate the effective micelle diameter, to determine the impact of individual components to the micellar environment in solution, and the impact of combined components to surfactant phase behavior. Aerosolized DF-200 sprays were characterized for particle size and distribution and limited chemical composition. Evaporation rates of aerosolized DF-200 sprays were estimated under a set of baseline ITW nozzle test system parameters.

  10. LDRD final report : autotuning for scalable linear algebra.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heroux, Michael Allen; Marker, Bryan (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX)

    2011-09-01

    This report summarizes the progress made as part of a one year lab-directed research and development (LDRD) project to fund the research efforts of Bryan Marker at the University of Texas at Austin. The goal of the project was to develop new techniques for automatically tuning the performance of dense linear algebra kernels. These kernels often represent the majority of computational time in an application. The primary outcome from this work is a demonstration of the value of model driven engineering as an approach to accurately predict and study performance trade-offs for dense linear algebra computations.

  11. ICF Program: LDRD-ER Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenzer, S H

    2004-02-05

    In the 01-ERD-107 LDRD-ER project, we have performed novel Thomson scattering experiments at the Trident and Omega laser facilities and provided high quality spectral data. These results have led to the development of the first quantitative understanding of laser-plasma interactions for NIF plasmas. For this purpose an green/ultraviolet probe laser, built for Nova in 1998 [1] and successfully used to measure both temperature and plasma wave amplitudes [2], has been deployed on Omega. The Thomson scattering diagnostics has been used twofold: (1) it provided independent measurements of the plasma electron and ion temperature, the plasma flow velocity, or the electron distribution function; (2) it provided measurements of the primary plasma wave and their secondary non-linear decay wave products. These experiments at Omega provide definitive quantitative results on the nonlinear saturation of stimulated Raman scattering for green (2{omega}) beams. In addition, the experiments on the Trident laser have led to a quantitative understanding of the stimulated Brillouin scattering in low-Z plasmas. A nonlinear frequency detuning model has successfully explained all the experimental observable including the SBS reflectivity. This model has been implemented into the laser-plasma interaction code pF3D as a tool to design and optimize NIF target experiments with SBS and SRS losses included. The development of quantitative models for SBS and SRS for various regimes has now been adopted as part of the WBS1 project within the ICF program.

  12. Inorganic Nanostructured High-Temperature Magnet Wires Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will develop a high-temperature tolerant electrically-insulating coating for magnet wires. The Phase I program will result in a flexible, inorganic...

  13. Advancing the Fundamental Understanding of Fission: 2014 LDRD 20120077DR Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Morgan C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tovesson, Fredrik K. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sierk, Arnold John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-02-06

    The following slides were presented as part of the LDRD 20120077DR Progress Appraisal Review held Tuesday, February 4, 2014. This is part of an ongoing project assessment the previous of which was documented in LA-UR-13-21182. This presentation documents the progress made against the goals agreed to as part of the 2013 review.

  14. Quantitative 3D electromagnetic field determination of 1D nanostructures from single projection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phatak, C.; Knoop, L. de; Houdellier, F.; Gatel, C.; Hÿtch, M. J.; Masseboeuf, A.

    2016-05-01

    One-dimensional (1D) nanostructures have been regarded as the most promising building blocks for nanoelectronics and nanocomposite material systems as well as for alternative energy applications. Although they result in confinement of a material, their properties and interactions with other nanostructures are still very much three-dimensional (3D) in nature. In this work, we present a novel method for quantitative determination of the 3D electromagnetic fields in and around 1D nanostructures using a single electron wave phase image, thereby eliminating the cumbersome acquisition of tomographic data. Using symmetry arguments, we have reconstructed the 3D magnetic field of a nickel nanowire as well as the 3D electric field around a carbon nanotube field emitter, from one single projection. The accuracy of quantitative values determined here is shown to be a better fit to the physics at play than the value obtained by conventional analysis. Moreover the 3D reconstructions can then directly be visualized and used in the design of functional 3D architectures built using 1D nanostructures.

  15. Final Report for LDRD Project 02-ERD-069: Discovering the Unknown Mechanism(s) of Virulence in a BW, Class A Select Agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chain, P; Garcia, E

    2003-02-06

    The goal of this proposed effort was to assess the difficulty in identifying and characterizing virulence candidate genes in an organism for which very limited data exists. This was accomplished by first addressing the finishing phase of draft-sequenced F. tularensis genomes and conducting comparative analyses to determine the coding potential of each genome; to discover the differences in genome structure and content, and to identify potential genes whose products may be involved in the F. tularensis virulence process. The project was divided into three parts: (1) Genome finishing: This part involves determining the order and orientation of the consensus sequences of contigs obtained from Phrap assemblies of random draft genomic sequences. This tedious process consists of linking contig ends using information embedded in each sequence file that relates the sequence to the original cloned insert. Since inserts are sequenced from both ends, we can establish a link between these paired-ends in different contigs and thus order and orient contigs. Since these genomes carry numerous copies of insertion sequences, these repeated elements ''confuse'' the Phrap assembly program. It is thus necessary to break these contigs apart at the repeated sequences and individually join the proper flanking regions using paired-end information, or using results of comparisons against a similar genome. Larger repeated elements such as the small subunit ribosomal RNA operon require verification with PCR. Tandem repeats require manual intervention and typically rely on single nucleotide polymorphisms to be resolved. Remaining gaps require PCR reactions and sequencing. Once the genomes have been ''closed'', low quality regions are addressed by resequencing reactions. (2) Genome analysis: The final consensus sequences are processed by combining the results of three gene modelers: Glimmer, Critica and Generation. The final gene models are submitted to

  16. Final report on LDRD project : elucidating performance of proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells via computational modeling with experimental discovery and validation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chao Yang (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Pasaogullari, Ugur (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Noble, David R.; Siegel, Nathan P.; Hickner, Michael A.; Chen, Ken Shuang

    2006-11-01

    In this report, we document the accomplishments in our Laboratory Directed Research and Development project in which we employed a technical approach of combining experiments with computational modeling and analyses to elucidate the performance of hydrogen-fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). In the first part of this report, we document our focused efforts on understanding water transport in and removal from a hydrogen-fed PEMFC. Using a transparent cell, we directly visualized the evolution and growth of liquid-water droplets at the gas diffusion layer (GDL)/gas flow channel (GFC) interface. We further carried out a detailed experimental study to observe, via direct visualization, the formation, growth, and instability of water droplets at the GDL/GFC interface using a specially-designed apparatus, which simulates the cathode operation of a PEMFC. We developed a simplified model, based on our experimental observation and data, for predicting the onset of water-droplet instability at the GDL/GFC interface. Using a state-of-the-art neutron imaging instrument available at NIST (National Institute of Standard and Technology), we probed liquid-water distribution inside an operating PEMFC under a variety of operating conditions and investigated effects of evaporation due to local heating by waste heat on water removal. Moreover, we developed computational models for analyzing the effects of micro-porous layer on net water transport across the membrane and GDL anisotropy on the temperature and water distributions in the cathode of a PEMFC. We further developed a two-phase model based on the multiphase mixture formulation for predicting the liquid saturation, pressure drop, and flow maldistribution across the PEMFC cathode channels. In the second part of this report, we document our efforts on modeling the electrochemical performance of PEMFCs. We developed a constitutive model for predicting proton conductivity in polymer electrolyte membranes and compared

  17. Efficient Probability of Failure Calculations for QMU using Computational Geometry LDRD 13-0144 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Scott A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ebeida, Mohamed Salah [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Romero, Vicente J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swiler, Laura Painton [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rushdi, Ahmad A. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Abdelkader, Ahmad [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This SAND report summarizes our work on the Sandia National Laboratory LDRD project titled "Efficient Probability of Failure Calculations for QMU using Computational Geometry" which was project #165617 and proposal #13-0144. This report merely summarizes our work. Those interested in the technical details are encouraged to read the full published results, and contact the report authors for the status of the software and follow-on projects.

  18. Nanoporous Silica Templated HeteroEpitaxy: Final LDRD Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burckel, David Bruce; Koleske, Daniel; Rowen, Adam M.; Williams, John Dalton; Fan, Hongyou; Arrington, Christian Lew

    2006-11-01

    This one-year out-of-the-box LDRD was focused on exploring the use of porous growth masks as a method for defect reduction during heteroepitaxial crystal growth. Initially our goal was to investigate porous silica as a growth mask, however, we expanded the scope of the research to include several other porous growth masks on various size scales, including mesoporous carbon, and the UV curable epoxy, SU-8. Use of SU-8 as a growth mask represents a new direction, unique in the extensive literature of patterned epitaxial growth, and presents the possibility of providing a single step growth mask. Additional research included investigation of pore viability via electrochemical deposition into high aspect ratio photoresist patterns and pilot work on using SU-8 as a DUV negative resist, another significant potential result. While the late start nature of this project pushed some of the initial research goals out of the time table, significant progress was made. 3 Acknowledgements This work was performed in part at the Nanoscience @ UNM facility, a member of the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network, which is supported by the National Science Foundation (Grant ECS 03-35765). Sandia is multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United Stated Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This work was supported under the Sandia LDRD program (Project 99405). 4

  19. Final LDRD report : advanced plastic scintillators for neutron detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vance, Andrew L.; Mascarenhas, Nicholas; O' Bryan, Greg; Mrowka, Stanley

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of a one-year, feasibility-scale LDRD project that was conducted with the goal of developing new plastic scintillators capable of pulse shape discrimination (PSD) for neutron detection. Copolymers composed of matrix materials such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and blocks containing trans-stilbene (tSB) as the scintillator component were prepared and tested for gamma/neutron response. Block copolymer synthesis utilizing tSBMA proved unsuccessful so random copolymers containing up to 30% tSB were prepared. These copolymers were found to function as scintillators upon exposure to gamma radiation; however, they did not exhibit PSD when exposed to a neutron source. This project, while falling short of its ultimate goal, demonstrated the possible utility of single-component, undoped plastics as scintillators for applications that do not require PSD.

  20. LDRD Highlights at the National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alayat, R. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-10

    To meet the nation’s critical challenges, the Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories have always pushed the boundaries of science, technology, and engineering. The Atomic Energy Act of 1954 provided the basis for these laboratories to engage in the cutting edge of science and technology and respond to technological surprises, while retaining the best scientific and technological minds. To help re-energize this commitment, in 1991 the U.S. Congress authorized the national laboratories to devote a relatively small percentage of their budget to creative and innovative work that serves to maintain their vitality in disciplines relevant to DOE missions. Since then, this effort has been formally called the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. LDRD has been an essential mechanism to enable the laboratories to address DOE’s current and future missions with leading-edge research proposed independently by laboratory technical staff, evaluated through expert peer-review committees, and funded by the individual laboratories consistent with the authorizing legislation and the DOE LDRD Order 413.2C.

  1. Tracking of Nuclear Production using Indigenous Species: Final LDRD Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Todd Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Electronic and Nanostructured Materials; Alam, Mary Kathleen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Energetics Characterization Dept.; McIntyre, Sarah K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Electronic and Nanostructured Materials; Volk, David [Univ. of Texas, Galveston, TX (United States). Medical Branch; Neerathilingam, Muniasamy [Univ. of Texas, Galveston, TX (United States). Medical Branch; Luxon, Bruce A. [Univ. of Texas, Galveston, TX (United States). Medical Branch; Ansari, G. A. Shakeel [Univ. of Texas, Galveston, TX (United States). Medical Branch

    2009-10-01

    Our LDRD research project sought to develop an analytical method for detection of chemicals used in nuclear materials processing. Our approach is distinctly different than current research involving hardware-based sensors. By utilizing the response of indigenous species of plants and/or animals surrounding (or within) a nuclear processing facility, we propose tracking 'suspicious molecules' relevant to nuclear materials processing. As proof of concept, we have examined TBP, tributylphosphate, used in uranium enrichment as well as plutonium extraction from spent nuclear fuels. We will compare TBP to the TPP (triphenylphosphate) analog to determine the uniqueness of the metabonomic response. We show that there is a unique metabonomic response within our animal model to TBP. The TBP signature can further be delineated from that of TPP. We have also developed unique methods of instrumental transfer for metabonomic data sets.

  2. Tracking of Nuclear Production using Indigenous Species: Final LDRD Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Todd Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Electronic and Nanostructured Materials; Alam, Mary Kathleen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Energetics Characterization Dept.; McIntyre, Sarah K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Electronic and Nanostructured Materials; Volk, David [Univ. of Texas, Galveston, TX (United States). Medical Branch; Neerathilingam, Muniasamy [Univ. of Texas, Galveston, TX (United States). Medical Branch; Luxon, Bruce A. [Univ. of Texas, Galveston, TX (United States). Medical Branch; Ansari, G. A. Shakeel [Univ. of Texas, Galveston, TX (United States). Medical Branch

    2009-10-01

    Our LDRD research project sought to develop an analytical method for detection of chemicals used in nuclear materials processing. Our approach is distinctly different than current research involving hardware based sensors. By utilizing the response of indigenous species of plants and/or animals surrounding (or within) a nuclear processing facility, we propose tracking 'suspicious molecules' relevant to nuclear materials processing. As proof of concept, we have examined TBP, tributylphosphate, used in uranium enrichment as well as plutonium extraction from spent nuclear fuels. We will compare TBP to the TPP (triphenylphosphate) analog to determine the uniqueness of the metabonomic response. We show that there is a unique metabonomic response within our animal model to TBP. The TBP signature can further be delineated from that of TPP. We have also developed unique methods of instrumental transfer for metabonomic data sets.

  3. LDRD final report : robust analysis of large-scale combinatorial applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, Robert D.; Morrison, Todd (University of Colorado, Denver, CO); Hart, William Eugene; Benavides, Nicolas L. (Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA); Greenberg, Harvey J. (University of Colorado, Denver, CO); Watson, Jean-Paul; Phillips, Cynthia Ann

    2007-09-01

    Discrete models of large, complex systems like national infrastructures and complex logistics frameworks naturally incorporate many modeling uncertainties. Consequently, there is a clear need for optimization techniques that can robustly account for risks associated with modeling uncertainties. This report summarizes the progress of the Late-Start LDRD 'Robust Analysis of Largescale Combinatorial Applications'. This project developed new heuristics for solving robust optimization models, and developed new robust optimization models for describing uncertainty scenarios.

  4. Multi-attribute criteria applied to electric generation energy system analysis LDRD.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuswa, Glenn W.; Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Drennen, Thomas E.; Zuffranieri, Jason V.; Paananen, Orman Henrie; Jones, Scott A.; Ortner, Juergen G. (DLR, German Aerospace, Cologne); Brewer, Jeffrey D.; Valdez, Maximo M.

    2005-10-01

    This report began with a Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to improve Sandia National Laboratories multidisciplinary capabilities in energy systems analysis. The aim is to understand how various electricity generating options can best serve needs in the United States. The initial product is documented in a series of white papers that span a broad range of topics, including the successes and failures of past modeling studies, sustainability, oil dependence, energy security, and nuclear power. Summaries of these projects are included here. These projects have provided a background and discussion framework for the Energy Systems Analysis LDRD team to carry out an inter-comparison of many of the commonly available electric power sources in present use, comparisons of those options, and efforts needed to realize progress towards those options. A computer aid has been developed to compare various options based on cost and other attributes such as technological, social, and policy constraints. The Energy Systems Analysis team has developed a multi-criteria framework that will allow comparison of energy options with a set of metrics that can be used across all technologies. This report discusses several evaluation techniques and introduces the set of criteria developed for this LDRD.

  5. FY07 LDRD Final Report Precision, Split Beam, Chirped-Pulse, Seed Laser Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Crane, J K; Beach, R J; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-11-12

    The goal of this LDRD ER was to develop a robust and reliable technology to seed high-energy laser systems with chirped pulses that can be amplified to kilo-Joule energies and recompressed to sub-picosecond pulse widths creating extremely high peak powers suitable for petawatt class physics experiments. This LDRD project focused on the development of optical fiber laser technologies compatible with the current long pulse National Ignition Facility (NIF) seed laser. New technologies developed under this project include, high stability mode-locked fiber lasers, fiber based techniques for reduction of compressed pulse pedestals and prepulses, new compact stretchers based on chirped fiber Bragg gratings (CFBGs), new techniques for manipulation of chirped pulses prior to amplification and new high-energy fiber amplifiers. This project was highly successful and met virtually all of its goals. The National Ignition Campaign has found the results of this work to be very helpful. The LDRD developed system is being employed in experiments to engineer the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) front end and the fully engineered version of the ARC Front End will employ much of the technology and techniques developed here.

  6. Laser Spray Fabrication for Net-Shape Rapid Product Realization LDRD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwood, C.L.; Ensz, M.T.; Greene, D.L.; Griffith, M.L.; Harwell, L.D.; Jeantette, F.P.; Keicher, D.M.; Oliver, M.S.; Reckaway, D.E.; Romero, J.A.; Schlienger, M.E.; Smugeresky, J.D.

    1999-04-01

    The primary purpose of this LDRD project was to characterize the laser deposition process and determine the feasibility of fabricating complex near-net shapes directly from a CAD solid model. Process characterization provided direction in developing a system to fabricate complex shapes directly from a CAD solid model. Our goal for this LDRD was to develop a system that is robust and provides a significant advancement to existing technologies (e.g., polymeric-based rapid prototyping, laser welding). Development of the process will allow design engineers to produce functional models of their designs directly from CAD files. The turnaround time for complex geometrical shaped parts will be hours instead of days and days instead of months. With reduced turnaround time, more time can be spent on the product-design phase to ensure that the best component design is achieved. Maturation of this technology will revolutionize the way the world produces structural components.

  7. 2014 SRNL LDRD Annual Report, Rev. 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcwhorter, S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-03-15

    Laboratory Directed Research and Development is a congressionally authorized program that provides the ‘innovation inspiration’ from which many of the Laboratory’s multi-discipline advancements are made in both science and engineering technology. The program is the backbone for insuring that scientific, technical and engineering capabilities can meet current and future needs. It is an important tool in reducing the probability of technological surprise by allowing laboratory technical staff room to innovate and keep abreast of scientific breakthroughs. Drawing from the synergism among the EM and NNSA missions, and work from other federal agencies ensures that LDRD is the key element in maintaining the vitality of SRNL’s technical programs. The LDRD program aims to position the Laboratory for new business in clean energy, national security, nuclear materials management and environmental stewardship by leveraging the unique capabilities of the Laboratory to yield foundational scientific research in core business areas, while aligning with SRS strategic initiatives and maintaining a vision for ultimate DOE applications.

  8. LDRD Final Report: Surrogate Nuclear Reactions and the Origin of the Heavy Elements (04-ERD-057)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escher, J E; Bernstein, L A; Bleuel, D; Burke, J; Church, J A; Dietrich, F S; Forssen, C; Gueorguiev, V; Hoffman, R D

    2007-02-23

    Research carried out in the framework of the LDRD project ''Surrogate Nuclear Reactions and the Origin of the Heavy Elements'' (04-ERD-057) is summarized. The project was designed to address the challenge of determining cross sections for nuclear reactions involving unstable targets, with a particular emphasis on reactions that play a key role in the production of the elements between Iron and Uranium. This report reviews the motivation for the research, introduces the approach employed to address the problem, and summarizes the resulting scientific insights, technical findings, and related accomplishments.

  9. Small space object imaging : LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, Mark R.; Valley, Michael T.; Kearney, Sean Patrick

    2009-10-01

    We report the results of an LDRD effort to investigate new technologies for the identification of small-sized (mm to cm) debris in low-earth orbit. This small-yet-energetic debris presents a threat to the integrity of space-assets worldwide and represents significant security challenge to the international community. We present a nonexhaustive review of recent US and Russian efforts to meet the challenges of debris identification and removal and then provide a detailed description of joint US-Russian plans for sensitive, laser-based imaging of small debris at distances of hundreds of kilometers and relative velocities of several kilometers per second. Plans for the upcoming experimental testing of these imaging schemes are presented and a preliminary path toward system integration is identified.

  10. Ultra-Lightweight High Efficiency Nanostructured Materials and Coatings for Deep Space Mission Environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NanoSonic has developed a nanostructured spray self-assembly manufacturing method that has resulted in ultra-lightweight (< 0.4g/cc) textile interconnects for...

  11. Obstacle detection for autonomous navigation : an LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, Denise D.

    2004-03-01

    This report summarizes the analytical and experimental efforts for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled 'Obstacle Detection for Autonomous Navigation'. The principal goal of this project was to develop a mathematical framework for obstacle detection. The framework provides a basis for solutions to many complex obstacle detection problems critical to successful autonomous navigation. Another goal of this project was to characterize sensing requirements in terms of physical characteristics of obstacles, vehicles, and terrain. For example, a specific vehicle traveling at a specific velocity over a specific terrain requires a sensor with a certain range of detection, resolution, field-of-view, and sufficient sensitivity to specific obstacle characteristics. In some cases, combinations of sensors were required to distinguish between different hazardous obstacles and benign terrain. In our framework, the problem was posed as a multidimensional, multiple-hypothesis, pattern recognition problem. Features were extracted from selected sensors that allow hazardous obstacles to be distinguished from benign terrain and other types of obstacles. Another unique thrust of this project was to characterize different terrain classes with respect to both positive (e.g., rocks, trees, fences) and negative (e.g., holes, ditches, drop-offs) obstacles. The density of various hazards per square kilometer was statistically quantified for different terrain categories (e.g., high desert, ponderosa forest, and prairie). This quantification reflects the scale, or size, and mobility of different types of vehicles. The tradeoffs between obstacle detection, position location, path planning, and vehicle mobility capabilities were also to be characterized.

  12. Precision guided parachute LDRD final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilkey, J.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Aided Navigation and Remote Sensing Dept.

    1996-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of the Precision Guided Parachute LDRD, a two year program at Sandia National Laboratories which developed a Global Positioning System (GPS) guided parachute capable of autonomous flight and landings. A detailed computer model of a gliding parachute was developed for software only simulations. A hardware in-the-loop simulator was developed and used for flight package system integration and design validation. Initial parachute drop tests were conducted at Sandia`s Coyote Canyon Cable Facility, followed by a series of airdrops using Ross Aircraft`s Twin Otter at the Burris Ranch Drop Zone. Final flights demonstrated in-flight wind estimation and the capability to fly a commanded heading. In the past, the cost and logistical complexity of an initial navigation system ruled out actively guiding a parachute. The advent of the low-cost, light-weight Global Positioning System (GPS) has eliminated this barrier. By using GPS position and velocity measurements, a guided parachute can autonomously steer itself to a targeted point on the ground through the use of control drums attached to the control lanyards of the parachute. By actively correcting for drop point errors and wind drift, the guidance accuracy of this system should be on the order of GPS position errors. This would be a significant improvement over unguided airdrops which may have errors of a mile or more.

  13. Self organizing software research : LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osbourn, Gordon Cecil

    2004-01-01

    We have made progress in developing a new statistical mechanics approach to designing self organizing systems that is unique to SNL. The primary application target for this ongoing research has been the development of new kinds of nanoscale components and hardware systems. However, this research also enables an out of the box connection to the field of software development. With appropriate modification, the collective behavior physics ideas for enabling simple hardware components to self organize may also provide design methods for a new class of software modules. Our current physics simulations suggest that populations of these special software components would be able to self assemble into a variety of much larger and more complex software systems. If successful, this would provide a radical (disruptive technology) path to developing complex, high reliability software unlike any known today. This high risk, high payoff opportunity does not fit well into existing SNL funding categories, as it is well outside of the mainstreams of both conventional software development practices and the nanoscience research area that spawned it. This LDRD effort was aimed at developing and extending the capabilities of self organizing/assembling software systems, and to demonstrate the unique capabilities and advantages of this radical new approach for software development.

  14. LDRD final report : a lightweight operating system for multi-core capability class supercomputers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Suzanne Marie; Hudson, Trammell B. (OS Research); Ferreira, Kurt Brian; Bridges, Patrick G. (University of New Mexico); Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Levenhagen, Michael J.; Brightwell, Ronald Brian

    2010-09-01

    The two primary objectives of this LDRD project were to create a lightweight kernel (LWK) operating system(OS) designed to take maximum advantage of multi-core processors, and to leverage the virtualization capabilities in modern multi-core processors to create a more flexible and adaptable LWK environment. The most significant technical accomplishments of this project were the development of the Kitten lightweight kernel, the co-development of the SMARTMAP intra-node memory mapping technique, and the development and demonstration of a scalable virtualization environment for HPC. Each of these topics is presented in this report by the inclusion of a published or submitted research paper. The results of this project are being leveraged by several ongoing and new research projects.

  15. LDRD Final Report: Global Optimization for Engineering Science Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HART,WILLIAM E.

    1999-12-01

    For a wide variety of scientific and engineering problems the desired solution corresponds to an optimal set of objective function parameters, where the objective function measures a solution's quality. The main goal of the LDRD ''Global Optimization for Engineering Science Problems'' was the development of new robust and efficient optimization algorithms that can be used to find globally optimal solutions to complex optimization problems. This SAND report summarizes the technical accomplishments of this LDRD, discusses lessons learned and describes open research issues.

  16. Building more powerful less expensive supercomputers using Processing-In-Memory (PIM) LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Richard C.

    2009-09-01

    This report details the accomplishments of the 'Building More Powerful Less Expensive Supercomputers Using Processing-In-Memory (PIM)' LDRD ('PIM LDRD', number 105809) for FY07-FY09. Latency dominates all levels of supercomputer design. Within a node, increasing memory latency, relative to processor cycle time, limits CPU performance. Between nodes, the same increase in relative latency impacts scalability. Processing-In-Memory (PIM) is an architecture that directly addresses this problem using enhanced chip fabrication technology and machine organization. PIMs combine high-speed logic and dense, low-latency, high-bandwidth DRAM, and lightweight threads that tolerate latency by performing useful work during memory transactions. This work examines the potential of PIM-based architectures to support mission critical Sandia applications and an emerging class of more data intensive informatics applications. This work has resulted in a stronger architecture/implementation collaboration between 1400 and 1700. Additionally, key technology components have impacted vendor roadmaps, and we are in the process of pursuing these new collaborations. This work has the potential to impact future supercomputer design and construction, reducing power and increasing performance. This final report is organized as follow: this summary chapter discusses the impact of the project (Section 1), provides an enumeration of publications and other public discussion of the work (Section 1), and concludes with a discussion of future work and impact from the project (Section 1). The appendix contains reprints of the refereed publications resulting from this work.

  17. Interface physics in microporous media : LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaklin, Melissa A.; Knutson, Chad E.; Noble, David R.; Aragon, Alicia R.; Chen, Ken Shuang; Giordano, Nicholas J. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Brooks, Carlton, F.; Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Liu, Yihong (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2008-09-01

    This document contains a summary of the work performed under the LDRD project entitled 'Interface Physics in Microporous Media'. The presence of fluid-fluid interfaces, which can carry non-zero stresses, distinguishes multiphase flows from more readily understood single-phase flows. In this work the physics active at these interfaces has been examined via a combined experimental and computational approach. One of the major difficulties of examining true microporous systems of the type found in filters, membranes, geologic media, etc. is the geometric uncertainty. To help facilitate the examination of transport at the pore-scale without this complication, a significant effort has been made in the area of fabrication of both two-dimensional and three-dimensional micromodels. Using these micromodels, multiphase flow experiments have been performed for liquid-liquid and liquid-gas systems. Laser scanning confocal microscopy has been utilized to provide high resolution, three-dimensional reconstructions as well as time resolved, two-dimensional reconstructions. Computational work has focused on extending lattice Boltzmann (LB) and finite element methods for probing the interface physics at the pore scale. A new LB technique has been developed that provides over 100x speed up for steady flows in complex geometries. A new LB model has been developed that allows for arbitrary density ratios, which has been a significant obstacle in applying LB to air-water flows. A new reduced order model has been developed and implemented in finite element code for examining non-equilibrium wetting in microchannel systems. These advances will enhance Sandia's ability to quantitatively probe the rich interfacial physics present in microporous systems.

  18. LDRD final report: Physical simulation of nonisothermal multiphase multicomponent flow in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, M.J.; Hopkins, P.L.; Shadid, J.N.

    1997-07-01

    This document reports on the accomplishments of a laboratory-directed research and development (LDRD) project whose objective was to initiate a research program for developing a fundamental understanding of multiphase multicomponent subsurface transport in heterogeneous porous media and to develop parallel processing computational tools for numerical simulation of such problems. The main achievement of this project was the successful development of a general-purpose, unstructured grid, multiphase thermal simulator for subsurface transport in heterogeneous porous media implemented for use on massively parallel (MP) computers via message-passing and domain decomposition techniques. The numerical platform provides an excellent base for new and continuing project development in areas of current interest to SNL and the DOE complex including, subsurface nuclear waste disposal and cleanup, groundwater availability and contamination studies, fuel-spill transport for accident analysis, and DNAPL transport and remediation.

  19. Idaho National Laboratory LDRD Annual Report FY 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dena Tomchak

    2013-03-01

    This report provides a glimpse into our diverse research and development portfolio, wwhich encompasses both advanced nuclear science and technology and underlying technologies. IN keeping with the mission, INL's LDRD program fosters technical capabilities necessary to support current and future DOE-Office of Nuclear Energy research and development needs.

  20. Multi-target camera tracking, hand-off and display LDRD 158819 final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Robert J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Modern security control rooms gather video and sensor feeds from tens to hundreds of cameras. Advanced camera analytics can detect motion from individual video streams and convert unexpected motion into alarms, but the interpretation of these alarms depends heavily upon human operators. Unfortunately, these operators can be overwhelmed when a large number of events happen simultaneously, or lulled into complacency due to frequent false alarms. This LDRD project has focused on improving video surveillance-based security systems by changing the fundamental focus from the cameras to the targets being tracked. If properly integrated, more cameras shouldn't lead to more alarms, more monitors, more operators, and increased response latency but instead should lead to better information and more rapid response times. For the course of the LDRD we have been developing algorithms that take live video imagery from multiple video cameras, identifies individual moving targets from the background imagery, and then displays the results in a single 3D interactive video. In this document we summarize the work in developing this multi-camera, multi-target system, including lessons learned, tools developed, technologies explored, and a description of current capability.

  1. Multi-Target Camera Tracking, Hand-off and Display LDRD 158819 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Robert J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Robotic and Security Systems Dept.

    2014-10-01

    Modern security control rooms gather video and sensor feeds from tens to hundreds of cameras. Advanced camera analytics can detect motion from individual video streams and convert unexpected motion into alarms, but the interpretation of these alarms depends heavily upon human operators. Unfortunately, these operators can be overwhelmed when a large number of events happen simultaneously, or lulled into complacency due to frequent false alarms. This LDRD project has focused on improving video surveillance-based security systems by changing the fundamental focus from the cameras to the targets being tracked. If properly integrated, more cameras shouldn’t lead to more alarms, more monitors, more operators, and increased response latency but instead should lead to better information and more rapid response times. For the course of the LDRD we have been developing algorithms that take live video imagery from multiple video cameras, identify individual moving targets from the background imagery, and then display the results in a single 3D interactive video. In this document we summarize the work in developing this multi-camera, multi-target system, including lessons learned, tools developed, technologies explored, and a description of current capability.

  2. Multi-Target Camera Tracking, Hand-off and Display LDRD 158819 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Robert J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Robotic and Security Systems Dept.

    2014-10-01

    Modern security control rooms gather video and sensor feeds from tens to hundreds of cameras. Advanced camera analytics can detect motion from individual video streams and convert unexpected motion into alarms, but the interpretation of these alarms depends heavily upon human operators. Unfortunately, these operators can be overwhelmed when a large number of events happen simultaneously, or lulled into complacency due to frequent false alarms. This LDRD project has focused on improving video surveillance based security systems by changing the fundamental focus from the cameras to the targets being tracked. If properly integrated, more cameras shouldn’t lead to more alarms, more monitors, more operators, and increased response latency but instead should lead to better information and more rapid response times. For the course of the LDRD we have been developing algorithms that takes live video imagery from multiple video cameras, identifies individual moving targets from the background imagery, and then displays the results in a single 3D interactive video. In this document we summarize the work in developing this multi-camera, multi-target system, including lessons learned, tools developed, technologies explored, and a description of currently capability.

  3. Multi-target camera tracking, hand-off and display LDRD 158819 final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Robert J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Modern security control rooms gather video and sensor feeds from tens to hundreds of cameras. Advanced camera analytics can detect motion from individual video streams and convert unexpected motion into alarms, but the interpretation of these alarms depends heavily upon human operators. Unfortunately, these operators can be overwhelmed when a large number of events happen simultaneously, or lulled into complacency due to frequent false alarms. This LDRD project has focused on improving video surveillance-based security systems by changing the fundamental focus from the cameras to the targets being tracked. If properly integrated, more cameras shouldn't lead to more alarms, more monitors, more operators, and increased response latency but instead should lead to better information and more rapid response times. For the course of the LDRD we have been developing algorithms that takes live video imagery from multiple video cameras, identifies individual moving targets from the background imagery, and then displays the results in a single 3D interactive video. In this document we summarize the work in developing this multi-camera, multi-target system, including lessons learned, tools developed, technologies explored, and a description of currently capability.

  4. Numerical analysis of tunable parametric terahertz devices based on graphene nanostructures using the projection method and autonomous blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeeva, G. S.; Golovanov, O. A.; Kouzaev, G. A.

    2017-07-01

    A rigorous mathematical model for graphene-based parametric devices based on the Maxwell`s equations, where the graphene surface conductivity is determined as the nonlinear function on the electric field intensity, is developed. The projection method is applied to solve the 2D nonlinear diffraction boundary problem. Using the computational algorithm based on autonomous blocks with the Floquet channels, a parametric THz device based on a multilayer graphene-dielectric nanostructure is numerically modeled. The numerical analysis shows that this graphene-based device, simulated here at a 14.15 THz, can demonstrate the parametric amplification of signals. The instability regions of the parametric generation in this tunable THz device are calculated depending on the magnitude and frequency of the pumping TEM-wave by computing the determinant of an obtained system of linearized equations.

  5. Retrospective on the Seniors' Council Tier 1 LDRD portfolio.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballard, William Parker

    2012-04-01

    This report describes the Tier 1 LDRD portfolio, administered by the Seniors Council between 2003 and 2011. 73 projects were sponsored over the 9 years of the portfolio at a cost of $10.5 million which includes $1.9M of a special effort in directed innovation targeted at climate change and cyber security. Two of these Tier 1 efforts were the seeds for the Grand Challenge LDRDs in Quantum Computing and Next Generation Photovoltaic conversion. A few LDRDs were terminated early when it appeared clear that the research was not going to succeed. A great many more were successful and led to full Tier 2 LDRDs or direct customer sponsorship. Over a dozen patents are in various stages of prosecution from this work, and one project is being submitted for an R and D 100 award.

  6. LDRD final report on new homogeneous catalysts for direct olefin epoxidation (LDRD 52591).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, Karen (University of Washington); Smythe, Nicole A. (University of Washington); Moore, Joshua T.; Stewart, Constantine A.; Kemp, Richard Alan; Miller, James Edward; Kornienko, Alexander (New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology); Denney, Melanie C. (University of Washington); Cetto, Kara L. (University of Washington)

    2006-02-01

    This report summarizes our findings during the study of a novel homogeneous epoxidation catalyst system that uses molecular oxygen as the oxidant, a ''Holy Grail'' in catalysis. While olefins (alkenes) that do not contain allylic hydrogens can be epoxidized directly using heterogeneous catalysts, most olefins cannot, and so a general, atom-efficient route is desired. While most of the work performed on this LDRD has been on pincer complexes of late transition metals, we also scouted out metal/ligand combinations that were significantly different, and unfortunately, less successful. Most of the work reported here deals with phosphorus-ligated Pd hydrides [(PCP)Pd-H]. We have demonstrated that molecular oxygen gas can insert into the Pd-H bond, giving a structurally characterized Pd-OOH species. This species reacts with oxygen acceptors such as olefins to donate an oxygen atom, although in various levels of selectivity, and to generate a [(PCP)Pd-OH] molecule. We discovered that the active [(PCP)Pd-H] active catalyst can be regenerated by addition of either CO or hydrogen. The demonstration of each step of the catalytic cycle is quite significant. Extensions to the pincer-Pd chemistry by attaching a fluorinated tail to the pincer designed to be used in solvents with higher oxygen solubilities are also presented.

  7. Final Report on Project 01-ERD-017 ''Smart Nanostructures From Computer Simulations''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman, J C; Williamson, A J

    2004-02-13

    This project had two main objectives. The first major goal was to develop new, powerful computational simulation capabilities. It was important that these tools have the combination of the accuracy needed to describe the quantum mechanical nature of nanoscale systems and the efficiency required to be applied to realistic, experimentally derived materials. The second major goal was to apply these computational methods to calculate and predict the properties of quantum dots--initially composed of silicon, but then of other elements--which could be used to build novel nanotechnology devices. The driving factor of our purpose has been that, through the development and successful application of these tools, we would generate a new capability at LLNL that could be used to make nanostructured materials ''smarter'', e.g., by selectively predicting how to engineering specific, desired properties. To carry out the necessary work to successfully complete this project and deliver on our goals, we established a two-pronged effort from the beginning: (1) to work on developing new, more efficient algorithms and quantum simulation tools, and (2) to solve problems and make predictions regarding properties of quantum dots which were being studied experimentally here at Livermore.

  8. LDRD final report : mesoscale modeling of dynamic loading of heterogeneous materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, Joshua; Dingreville, Remi Philippe Michel; Voth, Thomas Eugene; Furnish, Michael David

    2013-12-01

    Material response to dynamic loading is often dominated by microstructure (grain structure, porosity, inclusions, defects). An example critically important to Sandia's mission is dynamic strength of polycrystalline metals where heterogeneities lead to localization of deformation and loss of shear strength. Microstructural effects are of broad importance to the scientific community and several institutions within DoD and DOE; however, current models rely on inaccurate assumptions about mechanisms at the sub-continuum or mesoscale. Consequently, there is a critical need for accurate and robust methods for modeling heterogeneous material response at this lower length scale. This report summarizes work performed as part of an LDRD effort (FY11 to FY13; project number 151364) to meet these needs.

  9. Final LDRD report : development of advanced UV light emitters and biological agent detection strategies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figiel, Jeffrey James; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Banas, Michael Anthony; Farrow, Darcie; Armstrong, Andrew M.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Schmitt, Randal L.

    2007-12-01

    We present the results of a three year LDRD project which has focused on the development of novel, compact, ultraviolet solid-state sources and fluorescence-based sensing platforms that apply such devices to the sensing of biological and nuclear materials. We describe our development of 270-280 nm AlGaN-based semiconductor UV LEDs with performance suitable for evaluation in biosensor platforms as well as our development efforts towards the realization of a 340 nm AlGaN-based laser diode technology. We further review our sensor development efforts, including evaluation of the efficacy of using modulated LED excitation and phase sensitive detection techniques for fluorescence detection of bio molecules and uranyl-containing compounds.

  10. Nanoporous films for epitaxial growth of single crystal semiconductor materials : final LDRD report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowen, Adam M.; Koleske, Daniel David; Fan, Hongyou; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Burckel, David Bruce; Williams, John Dalton; Arrington, Christian L.; Steen, William Arthur

    2007-10-01

    This senior council Tier 1 LDRD was focused on exploring the use of porous growth masks as a method for defect reduction during heteroepitaxial crystal growth. Initially our goal was to investigate porous silica as a growth mask, however, we expanded the scope of the research to include several other porous growth masks on various size scales, including mesoporous carbon, photolithographically patterned SU-8 and carbonized SU-8 structures. Use of photolithographically defined growth templates represents a new direction, unique in the extensive literature of patterned epitaxial growth, and presents the possibility of providing a single step growth mask. Additional research included investigation of pore viability via electrochemical deposition into high aspect ratio photoresist. This project was a small footprint research effort which, nonetheless, produced significant progress towards both the stated goal as well as unanticipated research directions.

  11. Final LDRD report :ultraviolet water purification systems for rural environments and mobile applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banas, Michael Anthony; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Ruby, Douglas Scott; Ross, Michael P.; Nelson, Jeffrey Scott; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Boucher, Ray

    2005-11-01

    We present the results of a one year LDRD program that has focused on evaluating the use of newly developed deep ultraviolet LEDs in water purification. We describe our development efforts that have produced an LED-based water exposure set-up and enumerate the advances that have been made in deep UV LED performance throughout the project. The results of E. coli inactivation with 270-295 nm LEDs are presented along with an assessment of the potential for applying deep ultraviolet LED-based water purification to mobile point-of-use applications as well as to rural and international environments where the benefits of photovoltaic-powered systems can be realized.

  12. Precision formed micro magnets: LDRD project summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHRISTENSON,TODD R.; GARINO,TERRY J.; VENTURINI,EUGENE L.

    2000-02-01

    A microfabrication process is described that provides for the batch realization of miniature rare earth based permanent magnets. Prismatic geometry with features as small as 5 microns, thicknesses up through several hundred microns and with submicron tolerances may be accommodated. The processing is based on a molding technique using deep x-ray lithography as a means to generate high aspect-ratio precision molds from PMMA (poly methyl methacrylate) used as an x-ray photoresist. Subsequent molding of rare-earth permanent magnet (REPM) powder combined with a thermosetting plastic binder may take place directly in the PMMA mold. Further approaches generate an alumina form replicated from the PMMA mold that becomes an intermediate mold for pressing higher density REPM material and allows for higher process temperatures. Maximum energy products of 3--8 MGOe (Mega Gauss Oersted, 1 MGOe = 100/4{pi} kJ/m{sup 3}) are obtained for bonded isotropic forms of REPM with dimensions on the scale of 100 microns and up to 23 MGOe for more dense anisotropic REPM material using higher temperature processing. The utility of miniature precision REPMs is revealed by the demonstration of a miniature multipole brushless DC motor that possesses a pole-anisotropic rotor with dimensions that would otherwise prohibit multipole magnetization using a multipole magnetizing fixture at this scale. Subsequent multipole assembly also leads to miniaturized Halbach arrays, efficient magnetic microactuators, and mechanical spring-like elements which can offset miniaturized mechanical scaling behavior.

  13. Final report for the mobile node authentication LDRD project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalski, John T.; Lanzone, Andrew J.

    2005-09-01

    In hostile ad hoc wireless communication environments, such as battlefield networks, end-node authentication is critical. In a wired infrastructure, this authentication service is typically facilitated by a centrally-located ''authentication certificate generator'' such as a Certificate Authority (CA) server. This centralized approach is ill-suited to meet the needs of mobile ad hoc networks, such as those required by military systems, because of the unpredictable connectivity and dynamic routing. There is a need for a secure and robust approach to mobile node authentication. Current mechanisms either assign a pre-shared key (shared by all participating parties) or require that each node retain a collection of individual keys that are used to communicate with other individual nodes. Both of these approaches have scalability issues and allow a single compromised node to jeopardize the entire mobile node community. In this report, we propose replacing the centralized CA with a distributed CA whose responsibilities are shared between a set of select network nodes. To that end, we develop a protocol that relies on threshold cryptography to perform the fundamental CA duties in a distributed fashion. The protocol is meticulously defined and is implemented it in a series of detailed models. Using these models, mobile wireless scenarios were created on a communication simulator to test the protocol in an operational environment and to gather statistics on its scalability and performance.

  14. LDRD final report on new homogeneous and supported oligomerization catalysts (LDRD 42461).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hascall, Anthony G.; Kemp, Richard Alan

    2004-11-01

    The overall purpose of this LDRD is multifold. First, we are interested in preparing new homogeneous catalysts that can be used in the oligomerization of ethylene and in understanding commercially important systems better. Second, we are interested in attempting to support these new homogeneous catalysts in the pores of nano- or mesoporous materials in order to force new and unusual distributions of a-olefins to be formed during the oligomerization. Thus the overall purpose is to try to prepare new catalytic species and to possibly control the active site architecture in order to yield certain desired products during a catalytic reaction, much like nature does with enzymes. In order to rationally synthesize catalysts it is imperative to comprehend the function of the various components of the catalyst. In heterogeneous systems, it is of utmost importance to know how a support interacts with the active site of the catalyst. In fact, in the catalysis world this lack of fundamental understanding of the relationship between active site and support is the single largest reason catalysis is considered an 'empirical' or 'black box' science rather than a well-understood one. In this work we will be preparing novel ethylene oligomerization catalysts, which are normally P-O chelated homogeneous complexes, with new ligands that replace P with a stable carbene. We will also examine a commercially catalyst system and investigate the active site in it via X-ray crystallography. We will also attempt to support these materials inside the pores of nano- and mesoporous materials. Essentially, we will be tailoring the size and scale of the catalyst active site and its surrounding environment to match the size of the molecular product(s) we wish to make. The overall purpose of the study will be to prepare new homogeneous catalysts, and if successful in supporting them to examine the effects that steric constraints and pore structures can have on growing oligomer

  15. Risk assessment meta tool LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchard, Ann Marie; Osbourn, Gordon Cecil

    2006-12-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a risk analysis meta tool--a tool that enables security analysts both to combine and analyze data from multiple other risk assessment tools on demand. Our approach was based on the innovative self-assembling software technology under development by the project team. This technology provides a mechanism for the user to specify his intentions at a very high level (e.g., equations or English-like text), and then the code self-assembles itself, taking care of the implementation details. The first version of the meta tool focused specifically in importing and analyzing data from Joint Conflict and Tactical Simulation (JCATS) force-on-force simulation. We discuss the problem, our approach, technical risk, and accomplishments on this project, and outline next steps to be addressed with follow-on funding.

  16. Development of nanostructured and surface modified semiconductors for hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Julia, W. P.

    2008-09-01

    -reflection coating for multicrystalline Si solar cells. An important component of this project is the collaboration with Dr. Dave Ginley's group at NREL. The NREL efforts, which are funded by NREL's LDRD program, focus on measuring device performance, external quantum efficiency, photoconductance through highly specialized non-contact time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) measurements, and vapor phase deposition of oxide materials. The close collaboration with NREL enables us to enter this competitive field in such short time. Joint publications and presentations have resulted from this fruitful collaboration. To this date, 5 referred journal papers have resulted from this project, with 2 more in preparation. Several invited talks and numerous contributed presentations in international conferences are also noted. Sandia has gained the reputation of being one of forefront research groups on nanostructured hybrid solar cells.

  17. Vapor-liquid phase behavior of the iodine-sulfur water-splitting process : LDRD final report for FY03.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, Robert W.; Larson, Richard S.; Lutz, Andrew E.

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a one-year LDRD project that was undertaken to better understand the equilibrium behavior of the iodine-water-hydriodic acid system at elevated temperature and pressure. We attempted to extend the phase equilibrium database for this system in order to facilitate development of the iodine-sulfur water-splitting process to produce hydrogen to a commercial scale. The iodine-sulfur cycle for thermochemical splitting of water is recognized as the most efficient such process and is particularly well suited to coupling to a high-temperature source of process heat. This study intended to combine experimental measurements of vapor-liquid-liquid equilibrium and equation-of-state modeling of equilibrium solutions using Sandia's Chernkin software. Vapor-liquid equilibrium experiments were conducted to a limited extent. The Liquid Chernkin software that was developed as part of an earlier LDRD project was enhanced and applied to model the non-ideal behavior of the liquid phases.

  18. ParaText : scalable solutions for processing and searching very large document collections : final LDRD report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crossno, Patricia Joyce; Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Stanton, Eric T.; Shead, Timothy M.

    2010-09-01

    This report is a summary of the accomplishments of the 'Scalable Solutions for Processing and Searching Very Large Document Collections' LDRD, which ran from FY08 through FY10. Our goal was to investigate scalable text analysis; specifically, methods for information retrieval and visualization that could scale to extremely large document collections. Towards that end, we designed, implemented, and demonstrated a scalable framework for text analysis - ParaText - as a major project deliverable. Further, we demonstrated the benefits of using visual analysis in text analysis algorithm development, improved performance of heterogeneous ensemble models in data classification problems, and the advantages of information theoretic methods in user analysis and interpretation in cross language information retrieval. The project involved 5 members of the technical staff and 3 summer interns (including one who worked two summers). It resulted in a total of 14 publications, 3 new software libraries (2 open source and 1 internal to Sandia), several new end-user software applications, and over 20 presentations. Several follow-on projects have already begun or will start in FY11, with additional projects currently in proposal.

  19. Automated visual direction : LDRD 38623 final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    Mobile manipulator systems used by emergency response operators consist of an articulated robot arm, a remotely driven base, a collection of cameras, and a remote communications link. Typically the system is completely teleoperated, with the operator using live video feedback to monitor and assess the environment, plan task activities, and to conduct the operations via remote control input devices. The capabilities of these systems are limited, and operators rarely attempt sophisticated operations such as retrieving and utilizing tools, deploying sensors, or building up world models. This project has focused on methods to utilize this video information to enable monitored autonomous behaviors for the mobile manipulator system, with the goal of improving the overall effectiveness of the human/robot system. Work includes visual servoing, visual targeting, utilization of embedded video in 3-D models, and improved methods of camera utilization and calibration.

  20. 4-wave mixing for phase-matching free nonlinear optics in quantum cascade structures : LDRD 08-0346 final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Weng Wah; Wanke, Michael Clement; Allen, Dan G.; Yang, Zhenshan; Waldmueller, Ines

    2010-10-01

    Optical nonlinearities and quantum coherences have the potential to enable efficient, high-temperature generation of coherent THz radiation. This LDRD proposal involves the exploration of the underlying physics using intersubband transitions in a quantum cascade structure. Success in the device physics aspect will give Sandia the state-of-the-art technology for high-temperature THz quantum cascade lasers. These lasers are useful for imaging and spectroscopy in medicine and national defense. Success may have other far-reaching consequences. Results from the in-depth study of coherences, dephasing and dynamics will eventually impact the fields of quantum computing, optical communication and cryptology, especially if we are successful in demonstrating entangled photons or slow light. An even farther reaching development is if we can show that the QC nanostructure, with its discrete atom-like intersubband resonances, can replace the atom in quantum optics experiments. Having such an 'artificial atom' will greatly improve flexibility and preciseness in experiments, thereby enhancing the discovery of new physics. This is because we will no longer be constrained by what natural can provide. Rather, one will be able to tailor transition energies and optical matrix elements to enhance the physics of interest. This report summarizes a 3-year LDRD program at Sandia National Laboratories exploring optical nonlinearities in intersubband devices. Experimental and theoretical investigations were made to develop a fundamental understanding of light-matter interaction in a semiconductor system and to explore how this understanding can be used to develop mid-IR to THz emitters and nonclassical light sources.

  1. Final Report for the Virtual Reliability Realization System LDRD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DELLIN, THEODORE A.; HENDERSON, CHRISTOPHER L.; O' TOOLE, EDWARD J.

    2000-12-01

    Current approaches to reliability are not adequate to keep pace with the need for faster, better and cheaper products and systems. This is especially true in high consequence of failure applications. The original proposal for the LDRD was to look at this challenge and see if there was a new paradigm that could make reliability predictions, along with a quantitative estimate of the risk in that prediction, in a way that was faster, better and cheaper. Such an approach would be based on the underlying science models that are the backbone of reliability predictions. The new paradigm would be implemented in two software tools: the Virtual Reliability Realization System (VRRS) and the Reliability Expert System (REX). The three-year LDRD was funded at a reduced level for the first year ($120K vs. $250K) and not renewed. Because of the reduced funding, we concentrated on the initial development of the expertise system. We developed an interactive semiconductor calculation tool needed for reliability analyses. We also were able to generate a basic functional system using Microsoft Siteserver Commerce Edition and Microsoft Sequel Server. The base system has the capability to store Office documents from multiple authors, and has the ability to track and charge for usage. The full outline of the knowledge model has been incorporated as well as examples of various types of content.

  2. Robust Planning for Autonomous Navigation of Mobile Robots in Unstructured, Dynamic Environments: An LDRD Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EISLER, G. RICHARD

    2002-08-01

    This report summarizes the analytical and experimental efforts for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled ''Robust Planning for Autonomous Navigation of Mobile Robots In Unstructured, Dynamic Environments (AutoNav)''. The project goal was to develop an algorithmic-driven, multi-spectral approach to point-to-point navigation characterized by: segmented on-board trajectory planning, self-contained operation without human support for mission duration, and the development of appropriate sensors and algorithms to navigate unattended. The project was partially successful in achieving gains in sensing, path planning, navigation, and guidance. One of three experimental platforms, the Minimalist Autonomous Testbed, used a repetitive sense-and-re-plan combination to demonstrate the majority of elements necessary for autonomous navigation. However, a critical goal for overall success in arbitrary terrain, that of developing a sensor that is able to distinguish true obstacles that need to be avoided as a function of vehicle scale, still needs substantial research to bring to fruition.

  3. Real-time discriminatory sensors for water contamination events :LDRD 52595 final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borek, Theodore Thaddeus III (; ); Carrejo-Simpkins, Kimberly; Wheeler, David Roger; Adkins, Douglas Ray; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Irwin, Adriane Nadine; Lewis, Patrick Raymond; Goodin, Andrew M.; Shelmidine, Gregory J.; Dirk, Shawn M.; Chambers, William Clayton; Mowry, Curtis Dale (1722 Micro-Total-Analytical Systems); Showalter, Steven Kedrick

    2005-10-01

    The gas-phase {mu}ChemLab{trademark} developed by Sandia can detect volatile organics and semi-volatiles organics via gas phase sampling . The goal of this three year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project was to adapt the components and concepts used by the {mu}ChemLab{trademark} system towards the analysis of water-borne chemicals of current concern. In essence, interfacing the gas-phase {mu}ChemLab{trademark} with water to bring the significant prior investment of Sandia and the advantages of microfabrication and portable analysis to a whole new world of important analytes. These include both chemical weapons agents and their hydrolysis products and disinfection by-products such as Trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). THMs and HAAs are currently regulated by EPA due to health issues, yet water utilities do not have rapid on-site methods of detection that would allow them to adjust their processes quickly; protecting consumers, meeting water quality standards, and obeying regulations more easily and with greater confidence. This report documents the results, unique hardware and devices, and methods designed during the project toward the goal stated above. It also presents and discusses the portable field system to measure THMs developed in the course of this project.

  4. Massive graph visualization : LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wylie, Brian Neil; Moreland, Kenneth D.

    2007-10-01

    Graphs are a vital way of organizing data with complex correlations. A good visualization of a graph can fundamentally change human understanding of the data. Consequently, there is a rich body of work on graph visualization. Although there are many techniques that are effective on small to medium sized graphs (tens of thousands of nodes), there is a void in the research for visualizing massive graphs containing millions of nodes. Sandia is one of the few entities in the world that has the means and motivation to handle data on such a massive scale. For example, homeland security generates graphs from prolific media sources such as television, telephone, and the Internet. The purpose of this project is to provide the groundwork for visualizing such massive graphs. The research provides for two major feature gaps: a parallel, interactive visualization framework and scalable algorithms to make the framework usable to a practical application. Both the frameworks and algorithms are designed to run on distributed parallel computers, which are already available at Sandia. Some features are integrated into the ThreatView{trademark} application and future work will integrate further parallel algorithms.

  5. Covert air vehicle 2003 LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spletzer, Barry Louis; Callow, Diane Schafer; Salton, Jonathan Robert; Fischer, Gary John

    2003-11-01

    This report describes the technical work carried out under a 2003 Laboratory Directed Research and Development project to develop a covert air vehicle. A mesoscale air vehicle that mimics a bird offers exceptional mobility and the possibility of remaining undetected during flight. Although some such vehicles exist, they are lacking in key areas: unassisted landing and launching, true mimicry of bird flight to remain covert, and a flapping flight time of any real duration. Current mainstream technology does not have the energy or power density necessary to achieve bird like flight for any meaningful length of time; however, Sandia has unique combustion powered linear actuators with the unprecedented high energy and power density needed for bird like flight. The small-scale, high-pressure valves and small-scale ignition to make this work have been developed at Sandia. We will study the feasibility of using this to achieve vehicle takeoff and wing flapping for sustained flight. This type of vehicle has broad applications for reconnaissance and communications networks, and could prove invaluable for military and intelligence operations throughout the world. Initial tests were conducted on scaled versions of the combustion-powered linear actuator. The tests results showed that heat transfer and friction effects dominate the combustion process at 'bird-like' sizes. The problems associated with micro-combustion must be solved before a true bird-like ornithopter can be developed.

  6. FY08 LDRD Final Report Regional Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bader, D C; Chin, H; Caldwell, P M

    2009-05-19

    An integrated, multi-model capability for regional climate change simulation is needed to perform original analyses to understand and prepare for the impacts of climate change on the time and space scales that are critical to California's future environmental quality and economic prosperity. Our intent was to develop a very high resolution regional simulation capability to address consequences of climate change in California to complement the global modeling capability that is supported by DOE at LLNL and other institutions to inform national and international energy policies. The California state government, through the California Energy Commission (CEC), institutionalized the State's climate change assessment process through its biennial climate change reports. The bases for these reports, however, are global climate change simulations for future scenarios designed to inform international policy negotiations, and are primarily focused on the global to continental scale impacts of increasing emissions of greenhouse gases. These simulations do not meet the needs of California public and private officials who will make major decisions in the next decade that require an understanding of climate change in California for the next thirty to fifty years and its effects on energy use, water utilization, air quality, agriculture and natural ecosystems. With the additional development of regional dynamical climate modeling capability, LLNL will be able to design and execute global simulations specifically for scenarios important to the state, then use those results to drive regional simulations of the impacts of the simulated climate change for regions as small as individual cities or watersheds. Through this project, we systematically studied the strengths and weaknesses of downscaling global model results with a regional mesoscale model to guide others, particularly university researchers, who are using the technique based on models with less complete

  7. Characterize and Model Final Waste Formulations and Offgas Solids from Thermal Treatment Processes - FY-98 Final Report for LDRD 2349

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessinger, Glen Frank; Nelson, Lee Orville; Grandy, Jon Drue; Zuck, Larry Douglas; Kong, Peter Chuen Sun; Anderson, Gail

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of LDRD #2349, Characterize and Model Final Waste Formulations and Offgas Solids from Thermal Treatment Processes, was to develop a set of tools that would allow the user to, based on the chemical composition of a waste stream to be immobilized, predict the durability (leach behavior) of the final waste form and the phase assemblages present in the final waste form. The objectives of the project were: • investigation, testing and selection of thermochemical code • development of auxiliary thermochemical database • synthesis of materials for leach testing • collection of leach data • using leach data for leach model development • thermochemical modeling The progress toward completion of these objectives and a discussion of work that needs to be completed to arrive at a logical finishing point for this project will be presented.

  8. Automated Algorithms for Quantum-Level Accuracy in Atomistic Simulations: LDRD Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Crozier, Paul; Moore, Stan Gerald; Swiler, Laura Painton; Stephens, John Adam; Trott, Christian Robert; Foiles, Stephen Martin; Tucker, Garritt J. (Drexel University)

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes the result of LDRD project 12-0395, titled "Automated Algorithms for Quantum-level Accuracy in Atomistic Simulations." During the course of this LDRD, we have developed an interatomic potential for solids and liquids called Spectral Neighbor Analysis Poten- tial (SNAP). The SNAP potential has a very general form and uses machine-learning techniques to reproduce the energies, forces, and stress tensors of a large set of small configurations of atoms, which are obtained using high-accuracy quantum electronic structure (QM) calculations. The local environment of each atom is characterized by a set of bispectrum components of the local neighbor density projected on to a basis of hyperspherical harmonics in four dimensions. The SNAP coef- ficients are determined using weighted least-squares linear regression against the full QM training set. This allows the SNAP potential to be fit in a robust, automated manner to large QM data sets using many bispectrum components. The calculation of the bispectrum components and the SNAP potential are implemented in the LAMMPS parallel molecular dynamics code. Global optimization methods in the DAKOTA software package are used to seek out good choices of hyperparameters that define the overall structure of the SNAP potential. FitSnap.py, a Python-based software pack- age interfacing to both LAMMPS and DAKOTA is used to formulate the linear regression problem, solve it, and analyze the accuracy of the resultant SNAP potential. We describe a SNAP potential for tantalum that accurately reproduces a variety of solid and liquid properties. Most significantly, in contrast to existing tantalum potentials, SNAP correctly predicts the Peierls barrier for screw dislocation motion. We also present results from SNAP potentials generated for indium phosphide (InP) and silica (SiO 2 ). We describe efficient algorithms for calculating SNAP forces and energies in molecular dynamics simulations using massively parallel computers

  9. Advancements in sensing and perception using structured lighting techniques :an LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novick, David Keith; Padilla, Denise D.; Davidson, Patrick A. Jr. (.; .); Carlson, Jeffrey J.

    2005-09-01

    This report summarizes the analytical and experimental efforts for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled ''Advancements in Sensing and Perception using Structured Lighting Techniques''. There is an ever-increasing need for robust, autonomous ground vehicles for counterterrorism and defense missions. Although there has been nearly 30 years of government-sponsored research, it is undisputed that significant advancements in sensing and perception are necessary. We developed an innovative, advanced sensing technology for national security missions serving the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and other government agencies. The principal goal of this project was to develop an eye-safe, robust, low-cost, lightweight, 3D structured lighting sensor for use in broad daylight outdoor applications. The market for this technology is wide open due to the unavailability of such a sensor. Currently available laser scanners are slow, bulky and heavy, expensive, fragile, short-range, sensitive to vibration (highly problematic for moving platforms), and unreliable for outdoor use in bright sunlight conditions. Eye-safety issues are a primary concern for currently available laser-based sensors. Passive, stereo-imaging sensors are available for 3D sensing but suffer from several limitations : computationally intensive, require a lighted environment (natural or man-made light source), and don't work for many scenes or regions lacking texture or with ambiguous texture. Our approach leveraged from the advanced capabilities of modern CCD camera technology and Center 6600's expertise in 3D world modeling, mapping, and analysis, using structured lighting. We have a diverse customer base for indoor mapping applications and this research extends our current technology's lifecycle and opens a new market base for outdoor 3D mapping. Applications include precision mapping, autonomous navigation, dexterous

  10. Superhydrophilic nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Zormpa, Vasileia; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-05-12

    An embodiment of a superhydrophilic nanostructure includes nanoparticles. The nanoparticles are formed into porous clusters. The porous clusters are formed into aggregate clusters. An embodiment of an article of manufacture includes the superhydrophilic nanostructure on a substrate. An embodiment of a method of fabricating a superhydrophilic nanostructure includes applying a solution that includes nanoparticles to a substrate. The substrate is heated to form aggregate clusters of porous clusters of the nanoparticles.

  11. Quantitative adaptation analytics for assessing dynamic systems of systems: LDRD Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauthier, John H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). System Readiness & Sustainment Technologies (6133, M/S 1188); Miner, Nadine E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Military & Energy Systems Analysis (6114, M/S 1188); Wilson, Michael L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Resilience and Regulatory Effects (6921, M/S 1138); Le, Hai D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). System Readiness & Sustainment Technologies (6133, M/S 1188); Kao, Gio K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Networked System Survivability & Assurance (5629, M/S 0671); Melander, Darryl J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Software Systems R& D (9525, M/S 1188); Longsine, Dennis Earl [Sandia National Laboratories, Unknown, Unknown; Vander Meer, Jr., Robert C. [SAIC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Our society is increasingly reliant on systems and interoperating collections of systems, known as systems of systems (SoS). These SoS are often subject to changing missions (e.g., nation- building, arms-control treaties), threats (e.g., asymmetric warfare, terrorism), natural environments (e.g., climate, weather, natural disasters) and budgets. How well can SoS adapt to these types of dynamic conditions? This report details the results of a three year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project aimed at developing metrics and methodologies for quantifying the adaptability of systems and SoS. Work products include: derivation of a set of adaptability metrics, a method for combining the metrics into a system of systems adaptability index (SoSAI) used to compare adaptability of SoS designs, development of a prototype dynamic SoS (proto-dSoS) simulation environment which provides the ability to investigate the validity of the adaptability metric set, and two test cases that evaluate the usefulness of a subset of the adaptability metrics and SoSAI for distinguishing good from poor adaptability in a SoS. Intellectual property results include three patents pending: A Method For Quantifying Relative System Adaptability, Method for Evaluating System Performance, and A Method for Determining Systems Re-Tasking.

  12. Soot formation, transport, and radiation in unsteady diffusion flames : LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suo-Anttila, Jill Marie (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Williams, Timothy C.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Jensen, Kirk A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Blevins, Linda Gail; Kearney, Sean Patrick (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Schefer, Robert W.

    2004-10-01

    Fires pose the dominant risk to the safety and security of nuclear weapons, nuclear transport containers, and DOE and DoD facilities. The thermal hazard from these fires primarily results from radiant emission from high-temperature flame soot. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the local transport and chemical phenomena that determine the distributions of soot concentration, optical properties, and temperature in order to develop and validate constitutive models for large-scale, high-fidelity fire simulations. This report summarizes the findings of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project devoted to obtaining the critical experimental information needed to develop such constitutive models. A combination of laser diagnostics and extractive measurement techniques have been employed in both steady and pulsed laminar diffusion flames of methane, ethylene, and JP-8 surrogate burning in air. For methane and ethylene, both slot and coannular flame geometries were investigated, as well as normal and inverse diffusion flame geometries. For the JP-8 surrogate, coannular normal diffusion flames were investigated. Soot concentrations, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) signals, hydroxyl radical (OH) LIF, acetylene and water vapor concentrations, soot zone temperatures, and the velocity field were all successfully measured in both steady and unsteady versions of these various flames. In addition, measurements were made of the soot microstructure, soot dimensionless extinction coefficient (&), and the local radiant heat flux. Taken together, these measurements comprise a unique, extensive database for future development and validation of models of soot formation, transport, and radiation.

  13. LDRD final report backside localization of open and shorted IC interconnections LDRD Project (FY98 and FY 99)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, E.I. Jr.; Tangyunyong, P.; Benson, D.A.; Barton, D.L.

    2000-01-01

    Two new failure analysis techniques have been developed for backside and front side localization of open and shorted interconnections on ICs. These scanning optical microscopy techniques take advantage of the interactions between IC defects and localized heating using a focused infrared laser ({lambda} = 1,340 nm). Images are produced by monitoring the voltage changes across a constant current supply used to power the IC as the laser beam is scanned across the sample. The methods utilize the Seebeck Effect to localize open interconnections and Thermally-Induced Voltage Alteration (TIVA) to detect shorts. Initial investigations demonstrated the feasibility of TIVA and Seebeck Effect Imaging (SEI). Subsequent improvements have greatly increased the sensitivity of the TIVA/SEI system, reducing the acquisition times by more than 20X and localizing previously unobserved defects. The interaction physics describing the signal generation process and several examples demonstrating the localization of opens and shorts are described. Operational guidelines and limitations are also discussed. The system improvements, non-linear response of IC defects to heating, modeling of laser heating and examples using the improved system for failure analysis are presented.

  14. Nanostructured Superhydrophobic Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a research project that deals with the nanostructured superhydrophobic (SH) powders developed at ORNL. This project seeks to (1) improve powder quality; (2) identify binders for plastics, fiberglass, metal (steel being the first priority), wood, and other products such as rubber and shingles; (3) test the coated product for coating quality and durability under operating conditions; and (4) application testing and production of powders in quantity.

  15. Final LDRD report : development of sample preparation methods for ChIPMA-based imaging mass spectrometry of tissue samples.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maharrey, Sean P.; Highley, Aaron M.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.; Wiese-Smith, Deneille

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this short-term LDRD project was to acquire the tools needed to use our chemical imaging precision mass analyzer (ChIPMA) instrument to analyze tissue samples. This effort was an outgrowth of discussions with oncologists on the need to find the cellular origin of signals in mass spectra of serum samples, which provide biomarkers for ovarian cancer. The ultimate goal would be to collect chemical images of biopsy samples allowing the chemical images of diseased and nondiseased sections of a sample to be compared. The equipment needed to prepare tissue samples have been acquired and built. This equipment includes an cyro-ultramicrotome for preparing thin sections of samples and a coating unit. The coating unit uses an electrospray system to deposit small droplets of a UV-photo absorbing compound on the surface of the tissue samples. Both units are operational. The tissue sample must be coated with the organic compound to enable matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and matrix enhanced secondary ion mass spectrometry (ME-SIMS) measurements with the ChIPMA instrument Initial plans to test the sample preparation using human tissue samples required development of administrative procedures beyond the scope of this LDRD. Hence, it was decided to make two types of measurements: (1) Testing the spatial resolution of ME-SIMS by preparing a substrate coated with a mixture of an organic matrix and a bio standard and etching a defined pattern in the coating using a liquid metal ion beam, and (2) preparing and imaging C. elegans worms. Difficulties arose in sectioning the C. elegans for analysis and funds and time to overcome these difficulties were not available in this project. The facilities are now available for preparing biological samples for analysis with the ChIPMA instrument. Some further investment of time and resources in sample preparation should make this a useful tool for chemical imaging applications.

  16. Low-Altitude Airbursts and the Impact Threat - Final LDRD Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boslough, Mark B.; Crawford, David A.

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this nine-week project was to advance the understanding of low-altitude airbursts by developing the means to model them at extremely high resolution in order to span the scales of entry physics as well as blast wave and plume formation. Small asteroid impacts on Earth are a recognized hazard, but the full nature of the threat is still not well understood. We used shock physics codes to discover emergent phenomena associated with low-altitude airbursts such as the Siberian Tunguska event of 1908 and the Egyptian glass-forming event 29 million years ago. The planetary defense community is beginning to recognize the significant threat from such airbursts. Low-altitude airbursts are the only class of impacts that have a significant probability of occurring within a planning time horizon. There is roughly a 10% chance of a megaton-scale low-altitude airburst event in the next decade.The first part of this LDRD final project report is a preprint of our proceedings paper associated with the plenary presentation at the Hypervelocity Impact Society 2007 Symposium in Williamsburg, Virginia (International Journal of Impact Engineering, in press). The paper summarizes discoveries associated with a series of 2D axially-symmetric CTH simulations. The second part of the report contains slides from an invited presentation at the American Geophysical Union Fall 2007 meeting in San Francisco. The presentation summarizes the results of a series of 3D oblique impact simulations of the 1908 Tunguska explosion. Because of the brevity of this late-start project, the 3D results have not yet been written up for a peer-reviewed publication. We anticipate the opportunity to eventually run simulations that include the actual topography at Tunguska, at which time these results will be published.3

  17. Spatial and temporal resolution of fluid flows: LDRD final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tieszen, S.R.; O`Hern, T.J.; Schefer, R.W.; Perea, L.D.

    1998-02-01

    This report describes a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) activity to develop a diagnostic technique for simultaneous temporal and spatial resolution of fluid flows. The goal is to obtain two orders of magnitude resolution in two spatial dimensions and time simultaneously. The approach used in this study is to scale up Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) to acquire meter-size images at up to 200 frames/sec. Experiments were conducted in buoyant, fully turbulent, non-reacting and reacting plumes with a base diameter of one meter. The PIV results were successful in the ambient gas for all flows, and in the plume for non-reacting helium and reacting methane, but not reacting hydrogen. No PIV was obtained in the hot combustion product region as the seed particles chosen vaporized. Weak signals prevented PLIF in the helium. However, in reacting methane flows, PLIF images speculated to be from Poly-Aromatic-Hydrocarbons were obtained which mark the flame sheets. The results were unexpected and very insightful. A natural fluorescence from the seed particle vapor was also noted in the hydrogen tests.

  18. Chemiresistor microsensors for in-situ monitoring of volatile organic compounds : final LDRD report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Michael Loren; Hughes, Robert Clark; Kooser, Ara S.; McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Wright, Jerome L.; Davis, Chad Edward

    2003-09-01

    This report provides a summary of the three-year LDRD (Laboratory Directed Research and Development) project aimed at developing microchemical sensors for continuous, in-situ monitoring of volatile organic compounds. A chemiresistor sensor array was integrated with a unique, waterproof housing that allows the sensors to be operated in a variety of media including air, soil, and water. Numerous tests were performed to evaluate and improve the sensitivity, stability, and discriminatory capabilities of the chemiresistors. Field tests were conducted in California, Nevada, and New Mexico to further test and develop the sensors in actual environments within integrated monitoring systems. The field tests addressed issues regarding data acquisition, telemetry, power requirements, data processing, and other engineering requirements. Significant advances were made in the areas of polymer optimization, packaging, data analysis, discrimination, design, and information dissemination (e.g., real-time web posting of data; see www.sandia.gov/sensor). This project has stimulated significant interest among commercial and academic institutions. A CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) was initiated in FY03 to investigate manufacturing methods, and a Work for Others contract was established between Sandia and Edwards Air Force Base for FY02-FY04. Funding was also obtained from DOE as part of their Advanced Monitoring Systems Initiative program from FY01 to FY03, and a DOE EMSP contract was awarded jointly to Sandia and INEEL for FY04-FY06. Contracts were also established for collaborative research with Brigham Young University to further evaluate, understand, and improve the performance of the chemiresistor sensors.

  19. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2016 Annual Summary of Completed Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-03-30

    ORNL FY 2016 Annual Summary of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) Completed Projects. The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at ORNL operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2C, “Laboratory Directed Research and Development” (October 22, 2015), which establishes DOE’s requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. The LDRD program funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. ORNL reports its status to DOE in March of each year.

  20. From Idea to Innovation: The Role of LDRD Investments in Sandia's Recent Successful B61 Experiments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrowsmith, Marie Danielle [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program, authorized by U.S. Congress in 1991, enables Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories to devote a small portion of their research funding to high-risk and potentially high-payoff research. Because it is high-risk, LDRD-supported research may not lead to immediate mission impacts; however, many successes at DOE labs can be traced back to investments in LDRD. LDRD investments have a history of enabling significant payoffs for long-running DOE and NNSA missions and for providing anticipatory new technologies that ultimately become critical to future missions. Many of Sandia National Laboratories’ successes can be traced back to investments in LDRD. Capabilities from three LDRDs were critical to recent tests of the B61-12 gravity bomb—tests that would previously have only been performed experimentally.

  1. Integrated superhard and metallic coatings for MEMS : LDRD 57300 final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Maboudian, Roya (University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA.)

    2004-12-01

    Two major research areas pertinent to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) materials and material surfaces were explored and developed in this 5-year PECASE LDRD project carried out by Professor Roya Maboudian and her collaborators at the University of California at Berkeley. In the first research area, polycrystalline silicon carbide (poly-SiC) was developed as a structural material for MEMS. This material is potentially interesting for MEMS because compared to polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon), the structural material in Sandia National Laboratories' SUMMiTV process, it may exhibit high wear resistance, high temperature operation and a high Young's modulus to density ratio. Each of these characteristics may extend the usefulness of MEMS in Sandia National Laboratories' applications. For example, using polycrystalline silicon, wear is an important issue in microengines, temperature degradation is of concern in thermal actuators and the characteristics of resonators can be extended with the same lithography technology. Two methods of depositing poly-SiC from a 1,3-disilabutane source at 650 C to 800 C by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) were demonstrated. These include a blanket method in which the material is made entirely out of poly-SiC and a method to coat previously released and fabricated polysilicon MEMS. This deposition method is much simpler to use than previous methods such as high temperature LPCVD and atmospheric CVD. Other major processing issues that were surmounted in this LDRD with the poly-SiC film include etching, doping, and residual strain control. SiC is inert and as such is notoriously difficult to etch. Here, an HBr-based chemistry was demonstrated for the first time to make highly selective etching of SiC at high etch rates. Nitrogen was incorporated from an NH3 gas source, resulting in high conductivity films. Residual strain and strain gradient were shown to depend on deposition parameters, and can be made

  2. Network discovery, characterization, and prediction : a grand challenge LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kegelmeyer, W. Philip, Jr.

    2010-11-01

    This report is the final summation of Sandia's Grand Challenge LDRD project No.119351, 'Network Discovery, Characterization and Prediction' (the 'NGC') which ran from FY08 to FY10. The aim of the NGC, in a nutshell, was to research, develop, and evaluate relevant analysis capabilities that address adversarial networks. Unlike some Grand Challenge efforts, that ambition created cultural subgoals, as well as technical and programmatic ones, as the insistence on 'relevancy' required that the Sandia informatics research communities and the analyst user communities come to appreciate each others needs and capabilities in a very deep and concrete way. The NGC generated a number of technical, programmatic, and cultural advances, detailed in this report. There were new algorithmic insights and research that resulted in fifty-three refereed publications and presentations; this report concludes with an abstract-annotated bibliography pointing to them all. The NGC generated three substantial prototypes that not only achieved their intended goals of testing our algorithmic integration, but which also served as vehicles for customer education and program development. The NGC, as intended, has catalyzed future work in this domain; by the end it had already brought in, in new funding, as much funding as had been invested in it. Finally, the NGC knit together previously disparate research staff and user expertise in a fashion that not only addressed our immediate research goals, but which promises to have created an enduring cultural legacy of mutual understanding, in service of Sandia's national security responsibilities in cybersecurity and counter proliferation.

  3. Sensor Based Process Control (SBPC) Laboratories Directed Research and Development (LDRD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wronosky, J.B.

    1993-03-01

    This report describes the activities and results of an LDRD entitled Sensor Based Process Control. This research examined the needs of the plating industry for monitor and control capabilities with particular emphasis on water effluent from rinse baths. A personal computer-based monitor and control development system was used as a test bed.

  4. High-efficiency high-energy Ka source for the critically-required maximum illumination of x-ray optics on Z using Z-petawatt-driven laser-breakout-afterburner accelerated ultrarelativistic electrons LDRD .

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sefkow, Adam B.; Bennett, Guy R.

    2010-09-01

    Under the auspices of the Science of Extreme Environments LDRD program, a <2 year theoretical- and computational-physics study was performed (LDRD Project 130805) by Guy R Bennett (formally in Center-01600) and Adam B. Sefkow (Center-01600): To investigate novel target designs by which a short-pulse, PW-class beam could create a brighter K{alpha} x-ray source than by simple, direct-laser-irradiation of a flat foil; Direct-Foil-Irradiation (DFI). The computational studies - which are still ongoing at this writing - were performed primarily on the RedStorm supercomputer at Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque site. The motivation for a higher efficiency K{alpha} emitter was very clear: as the backlighter flux for any x-ray imaging technique on the Z accelerator increases, the signal-to-noise and signal-to-background ratios improve. This ultimately allows the imaging system to reach its full quantitative potential as a diagnostic. Depending on the particular application/experiment this would imply, for example, that the system would have reached its full design spatial resolution and thus the capability to see features that might otherwise be indiscernible with a traditional DFI-like x-ray source. This LDRD began FY09 and ended FY10.

  5. Noncontact surface thermometry for microsystems: LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abel, Mark (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Beecham, Thomas (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Graham, Samuel (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Kearney, Sean Patrick; Serrano, Justin Raymond; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2006-10-01

    We describe a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort to develop and apply laser-based thermometry diagnostics for obtaining spatially resolved temperature maps on working microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). The goal of the effort was to cultivate diagnostic approaches that could adequately resolve the extremely fine MEMS device features, required no modifications to MEMS device design, and which did not perturb the delicate operation of these extremely small devices. Two optical diagnostics were used in this study: microscale Raman spectroscopy and microscale thermoreflectance. Both methods use a low-energy, nonperturbing probe laser beam, whose arbitrary wavelength can be selected for a diffraction-limited focus that meets the need for micron-scale spatial resolution. Raman is exploited most frequently, as this technique provides a simple and unambiguous measure of the absolute device temperature for most any MEMS semiconductor or insulator material under steady state operation. Temperatures are obtained from the spectral position and width of readily isolated peaks in the measured Raman spectra with a maximum uncertainty near {+-}10 K and a spatial resolution of about 1 micron. Application of the Raman technique is demonstrated for V-shaped and flexure-style polycrystalline silicon electrothermal actuators, and for a GaN high-electron-mobility transistor. The potential of the Raman technique for simultaneous measurement of temperature and in-plane stress in silicon MEMS is also demonstrated and future Raman-variant diagnostics for ultra spatio-temporal resolution probing are discussed. Microscale thermoreflectance has been developed as a complement for the primary Raman diagnostic. Thermoreflectance exploits the small-but-measurable temperature dependence of surface optical reflectivity for diagnostic purposes. The temperature-dependent reflectance behavior of bulk silicon, SUMMiT-V polycrystalline silicon films and metal surfaces is

  6. Analytic device including nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2015-07-02

    A device for detecting an analyte in a sample comprising: an array including a plurality of pixels, each pixel including a nanochain comprising: a first nanostructure, a second nanostructure, and a third nanostructure, wherein size of the first nanostructure is larger than that of the second nanostructure, and size of the second nanostructure is larger than that of the third nanostructure, and wherein the first nanostructure, the second nanostructure, and the third nanostructure are positioned on a substrate such that when the nanochain is excited by an energy, an optical field between the second nanostructure and the third nanostructure is stronger than an optical field between the first nanostructure and the second nanostructure, wherein the array is configured to receive a sample; and a detector arranged to collect spectral data from a plurality of pixels of the array.

  7. Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) on Mono-uranium Nitride Fuel Development for SSTAR and Space Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, J; Ebbinghaus, B; Meiers, T; Ahn, J

    2006-02-09

    The US National Energy Policy of 2001 advocated the development of advanced fuel and fuel cycle technologies that are cleaner, more efficient, less waste-intensive, and more proliferation resistant. The need for advanced fuel development is emphasized in on-going DOE-supported programs, e.g., Global Nuclear Energy Initiative (GNEI), Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), and GEN-IV Technology Development. The Directorates of Energy & Environment (E&E) and Chemistry & Material Sciences (C&MS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are interested in advanced fuel research and manufacturing using its multi-disciplinary capability and facilities to support a design concept of a small, secure, transportable, and autonomous reactor (SSTAR). The E&E and C&MS Directorates co-sponsored this Laboratory Directed Research & Development (LDRD) Project on Mono-Uranium Nitride Fuel Development for SSTAR and Space Applications. In fact, three out of the six GEN-IV reactor concepts consider using the nitride-based fuel, as shown in Table 1. SSTAR is a liquid-metal cooled, fast reactor. It uses nitride fuel in a sealed reactor vessel that could be shipped to the user and returned to the supplier having never been opened in its long operating lifetime. This sealed reactor concept envisions no fuel refueling nor on-site storage of spent fuel, and as a result, can greatly enhance proliferation resistance. However, the requirement for a sealed, long-life core imposes great challenges to research and development of the nitride fuel and its cladding. Cladding is an important interface between the fuel and coolant and a barrier to prevent fission gas release during normal and accidental conditions. In fabricating the nitride fuel rods and assemblies, the cladding material should be selected based on its the coolant-side corrosion properties, the chemical/physical interaction with the nitride fuel, as well as their thermal and neutronic properties. The US NASA space reactor, the

  8. FY07 LDRD Final Report Synthesis under High Pressure and Temperature of New Metal Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowhurst, J C; Sadigh, B; Aberg, D; Zaug, J M; Goncharov, A F

    2008-09-23

    The original aim of this LDRD was to determine with unprecedented precision the melting curve of iron to geophysically relevant pressures. In the course of developing much of the technology and techniques required to obtain this information we have encountered and studied novel chemical reactions some of whose products are stable or metastable under ambient conditions. Specifically we have synthesized nitrides of the platinum group metals including platinum, iridium, and palladium. We have also carried out in depth first principles theoretical investigations into the nature of these materials. We believed that the scientific impact of continuing this work would be greater than that of the original goals of this project. Indeed the work has led to a number of high profile publications with additional publications in preparation. While nitrides of the transition metals are generally of tremendous technological importance, those of the noble metals in particular have enjoyed much experimental and theoretical attention in the very short time since they were first synthesized. The field was and clearly remains open for further study. While the scientific motivation for this research is different from that originally proposed, many of the associated methods in which we have now gained experience are similar or identical. These include use of the diamond anvil cell combined with technologies to generate high temperatures, the in-situ technique of Raman scattering using our purpose-built, state-of-the-art system, analytical techniques for determining the composition of recovered samples such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and finally synchrotron-based techniques such as x-ray diffraction for structural and equation of state determinations. Close interactions between theorists and experimentalists has and will continue to allow our group to rapidly and reliably interpret complicated results on the structure and dynamics of these compounds and also additional novel

  9. Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    with macroscopic reinforcements such as fiber, clay, glass mineral and other fillers. The nano-alloyed polymers are particularly useful for producing...applications, including space-sur- vivable materials and seals, gaskets, cosmetics , and personal care. 25 Claims, 10 Drawing Sheets B-3 U.S. Patent Mar...the incorporation of fluorinated nanostructured chemicals onto the surface of a secondary material (such as Ti02 , CaC03 , glass or mineral

  10. Nanostructured photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lan; Tan, H. Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-01-01

    Energy and the environment are two of the most important global issues that we currently face. The development of clean and sustainable energy resources is essential to reduce greenhouse gas emission and meet our ever-increasing demand for energy. Over the last decade photovoltaics, as one of the leading technologies to meet these challenges, has seen a continuous increase in research, development and investment. Meanwhile, nanotechnology, which is considered to be the technology of the future, is gradually revolutionizing our everyday life through adaptation and incorporation into many traditional technologies, particularly energy-related technologies, such as photovoltaics. While the record for the highest efficiency is firmly held by multijunction III-V solar cells, there has never been a shortage of new research effort put into improving the efficiencies of all types of solar cells and making them more cost effective. In particular, there have been extensive and exciting developments in employing nanostructures; features with different low dimensionalities, such as quantum wells, nanowires, nanotubes, nanoparticles and quantum dots, have been incorporated into existing photovoltaic technologies to enhance their performance and/or reduce their cost. Investigations into light trapping using plasmonic nanostructures to effectively increase light absorption in various solar cells are also being rigorously pursued. In addition, nanotechnology provides researchers with great opportunities to explore the new ideas and physics offered by nanostructures to implement advanced solar cell concepts such as hot carrier, multi-exciton and intermediate band solar cells. This special issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics contains selected papers on nanostructured photovoltaics written by researchers in their respective fields of expertise. These papers capture the current excitement, as well as addressing some open questions in the field, covering topics including the

  11. LDRD final report on massively-parallel linear programming : the parPCx system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parekh, Ojas (Emory University, Atlanta, GA); Phillips, Cynthia Ann; Boman, Erik Gunnar

    2005-02-01

    This report summarizes the research and development performed from October 2002 to September 2004 at Sandia National Laboratories under the Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project ''Massively-Parallel Linear Programming''. We developed a linear programming (LP) solver designed to use a large number of processors. LP is the optimization of a linear objective function subject to linear constraints. Companies and universities have expended huge efforts over decades to produce fast, stable serial LP solvers. Previous parallel codes run on shared-memory systems and have little or no distribution of the constraint matrix. We have seen no reports of general LP solver runs on large numbers of processors. Our parallel LP code is based on an efficient serial implementation of Mehrotra's interior-point predictor-corrector algorithm (PCx). The computational core of this algorithm is the assembly and solution of a sparse linear system. We have substantially rewritten the PCx code and based it on Trilinos, the parallel linear algebra library developed at Sandia. Our interior-point method can use either direct or iterative solvers for the linear system. To achieve a good parallel data distribution of the constraint matrix, we use a (pre-release) version of a hypergraph partitioner from the Zoltan partitioning library. We describe the design and implementation of our new LP solver called parPCx and give preliminary computational results. We summarize a number of issues related to efficient parallel solution of LPs with interior-point methods including data distribution, numerical stability, and solving the core linear system using both direct and iterative methods. We describe a number of applications of LP specific to US Department of Energy mission areas and we summarize our efforts to integrate parPCx (and parallel LP solvers in general) into Sandia's massively-parallel integer programming solver PICO (Parallel Interger and

  12. Exploration of cloud computing late start LDRD #149630 : Raincoat. v. 2.1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echeverria, Victor T.; Metral, Michael David; Leger, Michelle A.; Gabert, Kasimir Georg; Edgett, Patrick Garrett; Thai, Tan Q.

    2010-09-01

    This report contains documentation from an interoperability study conducted under the Late Start LDRD 149630, Exploration of Cloud Computing. A small late-start LDRD from last year resulted in a study (Raincoat) on using Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) to enhance security in a hybrid cloud environment. Raincoat initially explored the use of OpenVPN on IPv4 and demonstrates that it is possible to secure the communication channel between two small 'test' clouds (a few nodes each) at New Mexico Tech and Sandia. We extended the Raincoat study to add IPSec support via Vyatta routers, to interface with a public cloud (Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2)), and to be significantly more scalable than the previous iteration. The study contributed to our understanding of interoperability in a hybrid cloud.

  13. Final LDRD report : infrared detection and power generation using self-assembled quantum dots.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cederberg, Jeffrey George; Ellis, Robert; Shaner, Eric Arthur

    2008-02-01

    Alternative solutions are desired for mid-wavelength and long-wavelength infrared radiation detection and imaging arrays. We have investigated quantum dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) as a possible solution for long-wavelength infrared (8 to 12 {mu}m) radiation sensing. This document provides a summary for work done under the LDRD 'Infrared Detection and Power Generation Using Self-Assembled Quantum Dots'. Under this LDRD, we have developed QDIP sensors and made efforts to improve these devices. While the sensors fabricated show good responsivity at 80 K, their detectivity is limited by high noise current. Following efforts concentrated on how to reduce or eliminate this problem, but with no clear path was identified to the desired performance improvements.

  14. Development of highly integrated magetically and electrostatically actuated micropumps : LDRD 64709 final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosnowchik, Brian D. (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Galambos, Paul C.; Hendrix, Jason R. (Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL); Zwolinski, Andrew (Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL)

    2003-12-01

    The pump and actuator systems designed and built in the SUMMiT{trademark} process, Sandia's surface micromachining polysilicon MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) fabrication technology, on the previous campus executive program LDRD (SAND2002-0704P) with FSU/FAMU (Florida State University/Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University) were characterized in this LDRD. These results demonstrated that the device would pump liquid against the flow resistance of a microfabricated channel, but the devices were determined to be underpowered for reliable pumping. As a result a new set of SUMMiT{trademark} pumps with actuators that generate greater torque will be designed and submitted for fabrication. In this document we will report details of dry actuator/pump assembly testing, wet actuator/pump testing, channel resistance characterization, and new pump/actuator design recommendations.

  15. Final LDRD report : science-based solutions to achieve high-performance deep-UV laser diodes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Andrew M.; Miller, Mary A.; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Alessi, Leonard J.; Smith, Michael L.; Henry, Tanya A.; Westlake, Karl R.; Cross, Karen Charlene; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Lee, Stephen Roger

    2011-12-01

    We present the results of a three year LDRD project that has focused on overcoming major materials roadblocks to achieving AlGaN-based deep-UV laser diodes. We describe our growth approach to achieving AlGaN templates with greater than ten times reduction of threading dislocations which resulted in greater than seven times enhancement of AlGaN quantum well photoluminescence and 15 times increase in electroluminescence from LED test structures. We describe the application of deep-level optical spectroscopy to AlGaN epilayers to quantify deep level energies and densities and further correlate defect properties with AlGaN luminescence efficiency. We further review our development of p-type short period superlattice structures as an approach to mitigate the high acceptor activation energies in AlGaN alloys. Finally, we describe our laser diode fabrication process, highlighting the development of highly vertical and smooth etched laser facets, as well as characterization of resulting laser heterostructures.

  16. Injection-locked composite lasers for mm-wave modulation : LDRD 117819 final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Joel Robert; Vawter, Gregory Allen; Raring, James; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Alford, Charles Fred (Sandia Staffing Alliance, LLC, Albuquerque, NM); Skogen, Erik J.; Chow, Weng Wah; Cajas, Florante G. (LMATA Government Services, LLC, Albuquerque, NM); Overberg, Mark E.; Torres, David L. (LMATA Government Services, LLC, Albuquerque, NM); Peake, Gregory Merwin

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes a 3-year LDRD program at Sandia National Laboratories exploring mutual injection locking of composite-cavity lasers for enhanced modulation responses. The program focused on developing a fundamental understanding of the frequency enhancement previously demonstrated for optically injection locked lasers. This was then applied to the development of a theoretical description of strongly coupled laser microsystems. This understanding was validated experimentally with a novel 'photonic lab bench on a chip'.

  17. Exploratory Project: Rigid nanostructured organic polymer monolith for in situ collection and analysis of plant metabolites from soil matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tharayil, Nishanth [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    2016-06-29

    -template imprinting approach for the selective capture of less abundant plant metabolites from a crowded soil/litter leachate. Our results suggests that i) the root exudate pattern of plants is highly dependent on the nutrient status of the plant, with greater specificity of root exudation occurring in growing medium with low available form of nutrients, ii) the chemical composition of root exudation is a function of the distance of sampling from the source-roots, with the composition of root exudation being more enriched in polar metabolites farther from the source-roots, iii) Further we demonstrated that the compounds present in real root exudates diffuse farther from the source roots than those in artificial root exudates that are traditionally used. Thus, our project highlights how the soil matrix is instrumental in modifying the chemical composition of root exudates, and highlights that, apart from the plant physiology, the specificity and function of root exudates is also modified by environmental factors.

  18. Quantum computing accelerator I/O : LDRD 52750 final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Modine, Normand Arthur; Ganti, Anand; Pierson, Lyndon George; Tigges, Christopher P.

    2003-12-01

    In a superposition of quantum states, a bit can be in both the states '0' and '1' at the same time. This feature of the quantum bit or qubit has no parallel in classical systems. Currently, quantum computers consisting of 4 to 7 qubits in a 'quantum computing register' have been built. Innovative algorithms suited to quantum computing are now beginning to emerge, applicable to sorting and cryptanalysis, and other applications. A framework for overcoming slightly inaccurate quantum gate interactions and for causing quantum states to survive interactions with surrounding environment is emerging, called quantum error correction. Thus there is the potential for rapid advances in this field. Although quantum information processing can be applied to secure communication links (quantum cryptography) and to crack conventional cryptosystems, the first few computing applications will likely involve a 'quantum computing accelerator' similar to a 'floating point arithmetic accelerator' interfaced to a conventional Von Neumann computer architecture. This research is to develop a roadmap for applying Sandia's capabilities to the solution of some of the problems associated with maintaining quantum information, and with getting data into and out of such a 'quantum computing accelerator'. We propose to focus this work on 'quantum I/O technologies' by applying quantum optics on semiconductor nanostructures to leverage Sandia's expertise in semiconductor microelectronic/photonic fabrication techniques, as well as its expertise in information theory, processing, and algorithms. The work will be guided by understanding of practical requirements of computing and communication architectures. This effort will incorporate ongoing collaboration between 9000, 6000 and 1000 and between junior and senior personnel. Follow-on work to fabricate and evaluate appropriate experimental nano/microstructures will be

  19. DNA nanostructure meets nanofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guomei; Surwade, Sumedh P; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Haitao

    2013-04-07

    Recent advances in DNA nanotechnology have made it possible to construct DNA nanostructures of almost arbitrary shapes with 2-3 nm of precision in their dimensions. These DNA nanostructures are ideal templates for bottom-up nanofabrication. This review highlights the challenges and recent advances in three areas that are directly related to DNA-based nanofabrication: (1) fabrication of large scale DNA nanostructures; (2) pattern transfer from DNA nanostructure to an inorganic substrate; and (3) directed assembly of DNA nanostructures.

  20. LDRD final report on a unified linear reference system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza, J. Jr.; Mackoy, R.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Decision Support Systems Software Engineering Dept.; Fletcher, D.R. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Alliance for Transportation Research

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of the project was to describe existing deficiencies in Geographic Information Systems for transportation (GIS-T) applications and prescribe solutions that would benefit the transportation community in general. After an in-depth literature search and much consultation with noted transportation experts, the need for a common linear reference system that integrated and supported the planning and operational needs of the transportation community became very apparent. The focus of the project was set on a unified linear reference system and how to go about its requirements definition, design, implementation, and promulgation to the transportation community.

  1. Advances in radiation modeling in ALEGRA :a final report for LDRD-67120, efficient implicit mulitgroup radiation calculations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Kurecka, Christopher J. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI); McClarren, Ryan (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI); Brunner, Thomas A.; Holloway, James Paul (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI)

    2005-11-01

    The original LDRD proposal was to use a nonlinear diffusion solver to compute estimates for the material temperature that could then be used in a Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) calculation. At the end of the first year of the project, it was determined that this was not going to be effective, partially due to the concept, and partially due to the fact that the radiation diffusion package was not as efficient as it could be. The second, and final year, of the project focused on improving the robustness and computational efficiency of the radiation diffusion package in ALEGRA. To this end, several new multigroup diffusion methods have been developed and implemented in ALEGRA. While these methods have been implemented, their effectiveness of reducing overall simulation run time has not been fully tested. Additionally a comprehensive suite of verification problems has been developed for the diffusion package to ensure that it has been implemented correctly. This process took considerable time, but exposed significant bugs in both the previous and new diffusion packages, the linear solve packages, and even the NEVADA Framework's parser. In order to manage this large suite of problem, a new tool called Tampa has been developed. It is a general tool for automating the process of running and analyzing many simulations. Ryan McClarren, at the University of Michigan has been developing a Spherical Harmonics capability for unstructured meshes. While still in the early phases of development, this promises to bridge the gap in accuracy between a full transport solution using IMC and the diffusion approximation.

  2. Advances in radiation modeling in ALEGRA :a final report for LDRD-67120, efficient implicit mulitgroup radiation calculations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Kurecka, Christopher J. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI); McClarren, Ryan (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI); Brunner, Thomas A.; Holloway, James Paul (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI)

    2005-11-01

    The original LDRD proposal was to use a nonlinear diffusion solver to compute estimates for the material temperature that could then be used in a Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) calculation. At the end of the first year of the project, it was determined that this was not going to be effective, partially due to the concept, and partially due to the fact that the radiation diffusion package was not as efficient as it could be. The second, and final year, of the project focused on improving the robustness and computational efficiency of the radiation diffusion package in ALEGRA. To this end, several new multigroup diffusion methods have been developed and implemented in ALEGRA. While these methods have been implemented, their effectiveness of reducing overall simulation run time has not been fully tested. Additionally a comprehensive suite of verification problems has been developed for the diffusion package to ensure that it has been implemented correctly. This process took considerable time, but exposed significant bugs in both the previous and new diffusion packages, the linear solve packages, and even the NEVADA Framework's parser. In order to manage this large suite of problem, a new tool called Tampa has been developed. It is a general tool for automating the process of running and analyzing many simulations. Ryan McClarren, at the University of Michigan has been developing a Spherical Harmonics capability for unstructured meshes. While still in the early phases of development, this promises to bridge the gap in accuracy between a full transport solution using IMC and the diffusion approximation.

  3. FY04 LDRD Final Report Stroke Sensor Development Using Microdot Sensor Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, J C; Wilson, T S; Alvis, R M; Paulson, C N; Setlur, U S; McBride, M T; Brown, S B; Bearinger, J P; Colston, B W

    2005-11-15

    major thrust area for the Medical Technology Program (M-division). Through MTP, LLNL has a sizable investment and recognizable expertise in stroke treatment research. The proposed microdot array sensor for stroke will complement this existing program in which mechanical devices are being designed for removing the thrombus. The following list of stroke projects and their relative status shows that MTP has a proven track record of taking ideas to industry: The goal of this LDRD funded project was to develop and demonstrate a minimally invasive optical fiber-based sensor for rapid and in-vivo measurements of multiple stroke biomarkers (e.g. pH and enzyme). The development of this sensor also required the development of a new fabrication technology for attaching indicator chemistries to optical fibers. A benefit of this work is to provide clinicians with a tool to assess vascular integrity of the region beyond the thrombus to determine whether or not it is safe to proceed with the removal of the clot. Such an assessment could extend the use of thrombolytic drug treatment to acute stroke victims outside the current rigid temporal limitation of 3 hours. Furthermore, this sensor would also provide a tool for use with emerging treatments involving the use of mechanical devices for removing the thrombus. The sensor effectively assesses the risk for reperfusion injury.

  4. LDRD final report on nanovehicle light-driven propulsion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Anup K.; van Swol, Frank B.; Shelnutt, John Allen; Medforth, Craig J.; Song, Yujiang

    2004-12-01

    Having demonstrated the possibility of constructing nanoscale metallic vehicular bodies as described in last year's proposal, our goals have been to make uniform preparations of the metallized lipid assemblies and to determine the feasibility of powering these nanostructures with biological motors that are activated and driven by visible light. We desired that the propulsion system be constructed entirely by self-assembly and powered by a photocatalytic process partially already built into the nanovehicle. The nanovehicle we desire to build is composed of both natural biological components (ATPase, kinesin-microtubules) and biomimetic components (platinized liposomes, photosynthetic membrane) as functional units. The vehicle's body was originally envisioned to be composed of a surfactant liposomal bilayer coated with platinum nanoparticles, but instead of the expected nanoparticles we were able to grow dendritic 2-nm thick platinum sheets on the liposomes. Now, we have shown that it is possible to completely enclose the liposomes with sheeting to form porous platinum spheres, which show good structural stability as evidenced by their ability to survive the stresses of electron-microscopy sample preparation. Our goals were to control the synthesis of the platinized liposomes well enough to make uniform preparations of the coated individual liposomes and to develop the propulsion system for these nanovehicles a hydrogen-evolving artificial photosynthetic system in the liposomal bilayer that generates the pH gradient across the membrane that is necessary to drive the synthesis of ATP by ATP-synthase incorporated in the membrane. ATP produced would fuel the molecular motor (kinesin) attached to the vehicle, needing only light, storable ADP, phosphate, and an electron donor to be produced by ATP-synthase in the membrane. These research goals appear to be attainable, but growing the uniform preparations of the liposomes coated with dendritic platinum sheeting

  5. Behavior-aware decision support systems : LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, Gary B.; Homer, Jack (Homer Consulting); Chenoweth, Brooke N.; Backus, George A.; Strip, David R.

    2007-11-01

    As Sandia National Laboratories serves its mission to provide support for the security-related interests of the United States, it is faced with considering the behavioral responses that drive problems, mitigate interventions, or lead to unintended consequences. The effort described here expands earlier works in using healthcare simulation to develop behavior-aware decision support systems. This report focuses on using qualitative choice techniques and enhancing two analysis models developed in a sister project.

  6. FY05 LDRD Final Report, A Revolution in Biological Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, H N; Bajt, S; Balhorn, R; Barty, A; Barsky, D; Bogan, M; Chung, S; Frank, M; Hau-Riege, S; Ishii, H; London, R; Marchesini, S; Noy, A; Segelke, B; Szoke, A; Szoke, H; Trebes, J; Wootton, A; Hajdu, J; Bergh, M; Caleman, C; Huldt, G; Lejon, S; der Spoel, D v; Howells, M; He, H; Spence, J; Nugent, K; Ingerman, E

    2006-01-20

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are currently under development and will provide a peak brightness more than 10 orders of magnitude higher than modern synchrotrons. The goal of this project was to perform the fundamental research to evaluate the possibility of harnessing these unique x-ray sources to image single biological particles and molecules at atomic resolution. Using a combination of computational modeling and experimental verification where possible, they showed that it should indeed be possible to record coherent scattering patterns from single molecules with pulses that are shorter than the timescales for the degradation of the structure due to the interaction with those pulses. They used these models to determine the effectiveness of strategies to allow imaging using longer XFEL pulses and to design validation experiments to be carried out at interim ultrafast sources. They also developed and demonstrated methods to recover three-dimensional (3D) images from coherent diffraction patterns, similar to those expected from XFELs. The images of micron-sized test objects are the highest-resolution 3D images of any noncrystalline material ever formed with x-rays. The project resulted in 14 publications in peer-reviewed journals and four records of invention.

  7. LDRD final report on continuous wave intersubband terahertz sources.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samora, Sally; Mangan, Michael A.; Foltynowicz, Robert J.; Young, Erik W.; Fuller, Charles T.; Stephenson, Larry L.; Reno, John Louis; Wanke, Michael Clement; Hudgens, James J.

    2005-02-01

    There is a general lack of compact electromagnetic radiation sources between 1 and 10 terahertz (THz). This a challenging spectral region lying between optical devices at high frequencies and electronic devices at low frequencies. While technologically very underdeveloped the THz region has the promise to be of significant technological importance, yet demonstrating its relevance has proven difficult due to the immaturity of the area. While the last decade has seen much experimental work in ultra-short pulsed terahertz sources, many applications will require continuous wave (cw) sources, which are just beginning to demonstrate adequate performance for application use. In this project, we proposed examination of two potential THz sources based on intersubband semiconductor transitions, which were as yet unproven. In particular we wished to explore quantum cascade lasers based sources and electronic based harmonic generators. Shortly after the beginning of the project, we shifted our emphasis to the quantum cascade lasers due to two events; the publication of the first THz quantum cascade laser by another group thereby proving feasibility, and the temporary shut down of the UC Santa Barbara free-electron lasers which were to be used as the pump source for the harmonic generation. The development efforts focused on two separate cascade laser thrusts. The ultimate goal of the first thrust was for a quantum cascade laser to simultaneously emit two mid-infrared frequencies differing by a few THz and to use these to pump a non-linear optical material to generate THz radiation via parametric interactions in a specifically engineered intersubband transition. While the final goal was not realized by the end of the project, many of the completed steps leading to the goal will be described in the report. The second thrust was to develop direct THz QC lasers operating at terahertz frequencies. This is simpler than a mixing approach, and has now been demonstrated by a few groups

  8. Autonomous intelligent assembly systems LDRD 105746 final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Robert J.

    2013-04-01

    This report documents a three-year to develop technology that enables mobile robots to perform autonomous assembly tasks in unstructured outdoor environments. This is a multi-tier problem that requires an integration of a large number of different software technologies including: command and control, estimation and localization, distributed communications, object recognition, pose estimation, real-time scanning, and scene interpretation. Although ultimately unsuccessful in achieving a target brick stacking task autonomously, numerous important component technologies were nevertheless developed. Such technologies include: a patent-pending polygon snake algorithm for robust feature tracking, a color grid algorithm for uniquely identification and calibration, a command and control framework for abstracting robot commands, a scanning capability that utilizes a compact robot portable scanner, and more. This report describes this project and these developed technologies.

  9. FY07 LDRD Final Report Neutron Capture Cross-Section Measurements at DANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, W; Agvaanluvsan, U; Wilk, P; Becker, J; Wang, T

    2008-02-08

    We have measured neutron capture cross sections intended to address defense science problems including mix and the Quantification of Margins and Uncertainties (QMU), and provide details about statistical decay of excited nuclei. A major part of this project included developing the ability to produce radioactive targets. The cross-section measurements were made using the white neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, the detector array called DANCE (The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) and targets important for astrophysics and stockpile stewardship. DANCE is at the leading edge of neutron capture physics and represents a major leap forward in capability. The detector array was recently built with LDRD money. Our measurements are a significant part of the early results from the new experimental DANCE facility. Neutron capture reactions are important for basic nuclear science, including astrophysics and the statistics of the {gamma}-ray cascades, and for applied science, including stockpile science and technology. We were most interested in neutron capture with neutron energies in the range between 1 eV and a few hundred keV, with targets important to basic science, and the s-process in particular. Of particular interest were neutron capture cross-section measurements of rare isotopes, especially radioactive isotopes. A strong collaboration between universities and Los Alamos due to the Academic Alliance was in place at the start of our project. Our project gave Livermore leverage in focusing on Livermore interests. The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory did not have a resident expert in cross-section measurements; this project allowed us to develop this expertise. For many radionuclides, the cross sections for destruction, especially (n,{gamma}), are not well known, and there is no adequate model that describes neutron capture. The modeling problem is significant because, at low energies where capture reactions are important, the neutron

  10. Development of efficient, integrated cellulosic biorefineries : LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teh, Kwee-Yan; Hecht, Ethan S.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Buffleben, George M.; Dibble, Dean C.; Lutz, Andrew E.

    2010-09-01

    Cellulosic ethanol, generated from lignocellulosic biomass sources such as grasses and trees, is a promising alternative to conventional starch- and sugar-based ethanol production in terms of potential production quantities, CO{sub 2} impact, and economic competitiveness. In addition, cellulosic ethanol can be generated (at least in principle) without competing with food production. However, approximately 1/3 of the lignocellulosic biomass material (including all of the lignin) cannot be converted to ethanol through biochemical means and must be extracted at some point in the biochemical process. In this project we gathered basic information on the prospects for utilizing this lignin residue material in thermochemical conversion processes to improve the overall energy efficiency or liquid fuel production capacity of cellulosic biorefineries. Two existing pretreatment approaches, soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA) and the Arkenol (strong sulfuric acid) process, were implemented at Sandia and used to generated suitable quantities of residue material from corn stover and eucalyptus feedstocks for subsequent thermochemical research. A third, novel technique, using ionic liquids (IL) was investigated by Sandia researchers at the Joint Bioenergy Institute (JBEI), but was not successful in isolating sufficient lignin residue. Additional residue material for thermochemical research was supplied from the dilute-acid simultaneous saccharification/fermentation (SSF) pilot-scale process at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The high-temperature volatiles yields of the different residues were measured, as were the char combustion reactivities. The residue chars showed slightly lower reactivity than raw biomass char, except for the SSF residue, which had substantially lower reactivity. Exergy analysis was applied to the NREL standard process design model for thermochemical ethanol production and from a prototypical dedicated biochemical process, with process data

  11. LDRD Project 52523 final report :Atomic layer deposition of highly conformal tribological coatings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungk, John Michael (University of Minnesota); Dugger, Michael Thomas; George, Steve M. (University of Colorado); Prasad, Somuri V.; Grubbs, Robert K.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mayer, Thomas Michael; Scharf, Thomas W.; Goeke, Ronald S.; Gerberich, William W. (University of Minnesota)

    2005-10-01

    Friction and wear are major concerns in the performance and reliability of micromechanical (MEMS) devices. While a variety of lubricant and wear resistant coatings are known which we might consider for application to MEMS devices, the severe geometric constraints of many micromechanical systems (high aspect ratios, shadowed surfaces) make most deposition methods for friction and wear-resistance coatings impossible. In this program we have produced and evaluate highly conformal, tribological coatings, deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD), for use on surface micromachined (SMM) and LIGA structures. ALD is a chemical vapor deposition process using sequential exposure of reagents and self-limiting surface chemistry, saturating at a maximum of one monolayer per exposure cycle. The self-limiting chemistry results in conformal coating of high aspect ratio structures, with monolayer precision. ALD of a wide variety of materials is possible, but there have been no studies of structural, mechanical, and tribological properties of these films. We have developed processes for depositing thin (<100 nm) conformal coatings of selected hard and lubricious films (Al2O3, ZnO, WS2, W, and W/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanolaminates), and measured their chemical, physical, mechanical and tribological properties. A significant challenge in this program was to develop instrumentation and quantitative test procedures, which did not exist, for friction, wear, film/substrate adhesion, elastic properties, stress, etc., of extremely thin films and nanolaminates. New scanning probe and nanoindentation techniques have been employed along with detailed mechanics-based models to evaluate these properties at small loads characteristic of microsystem operation. We emphasize deposition processes and fundamental properties of ALD materials, however we have also evaluated applications and film performance for model SMM and LIGA devices.

  12. Final report for the Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) control plane security LDRD project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torgerson, Mark Dolan; Michalski, John T.; Tarman, Thomas David; Black, Stephen P.; Pierson, Lyndon George

    2003-09-01

    As rapid Internet growth continues, global communications becomes more dependent on Internet availability for information transfer. Recently, the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) introduced a new protocol, Multiple Protocol Label Switching (MPLS), to provide high-performance data flows within the Internet. MPLS emulates two major aspects of the Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) technology. First, each initial IP packet is 'routed' to its destination based on previously known delay and congestion avoidance mechanisms. This allows for effective distribution of network resources and reduces the probability of congestion. Second, after route selection each subsequent packet is assigned a label at each hop, which determines the output port for the packet to reach its final destination. These labels guide the forwarding of each packet at routing nodes more efficiently and with more control than traditional IP forwarding (based on complete address information in each packet) for high-performance data flows. Label assignment is critical in the prompt and accurate delivery of user data. However, the protocols for label distribution were not adequately secured. Thus, if an adversary compromises a node by intercepting and modifying, or more simply injecting false labels into the packet-forwarding engine, the propagation of improperly labeled data flows could create instability in the entire network. In addition, some Virtual Private Network (VPN) solutions take advantage of this 'virtual channel' configuration to eliminate the need for user data encryption to provide privacy. VPN's relying on MPLS require accurate label assignment to maintain user data protection. This research developed a working distributive trust model that demonstrated how to deploy confidentiality, authentication, and non-repudiation in the global network label switching control plane. Simulation models and laboratory testbed implementations that demonstrated this concept were developed, and results from this research were transferred to industry via standards in the Optical Internetworking Forum (OIF).

  13. Two dimensional point of use fuel cell : a final LDRD project report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Hickner, Michael A. (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Gross, Matthew L. (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA)

    2011-03-01

    The Proliferation Assessment (program area - Things Thin) within the Defense Systems and Assessment Investment Area desires high energy density and long-lived power sources with moderate currents (mA) that can be used as building blocks in platforms for the continuous monitoring of chemical, biological, and radiological agents. Fuel cells can be an optimum choice for a power source because of the high energy densities that are possible with liquid fuels. Additionally, power generation and fuel storage can be decoupled in a fuel cell for independent control of energy and power density for customized, application-driven power solutions. Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) are explored as a possible concept to develop into ultrathin or two-dimensional power sources. New developments in nanotechnology, advanced fabrication techniques, and materials science are exploited to create a planar DMFC that could be co-located with electronics in a chip format. Carbon nanotubes and pyrolyzed polymers are used as building block electrodes - porous, mechanically compliant current collectors. Directed assembly methods including surface functionalization and layer-by-layer deposition with polyelectrolytes are used to pattern, build, and add functionality to these electrodes. These same techniques are used to incorporate nanoscale selective electrocatalyst into the carbon electrodes to provide a high density of active electron transfer sites for the methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions. The resulting electrodes are characterized in terms of their physical properties, electrocatalytic function, and selectivity to better understand how processing impacts their performance attributes. The basic function of a membrane electrode assembly is demonstrated for several prototype devices.

  14. Molecular dynamics of gases and vapors in nanoporous solids. Final LDRD project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohl, P.I.

    1996-08-01

    This report provides a study of gases in microporous solids using molecular modeling. The theory of gas transport in porous materials as well as the molecular modeling literature is briefly reviewed. Work complete is described and analyzed with retard to the prevailing theory. The work covers two simple subjects, construction of porous solid models and diffusion of He, H{sub 2}, Ar and CH{sub 4} down a pressure gradient across the material models as in typical membrane permeation experiments. The broader objective is to enhance our capability to efficiently and accurately develop, produce and apply microporous materials.

  15. Final report for LDRD Project 93633 : new hash function for data protection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draelos, Timothy John; Dautenhahn, Nathan; Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Tolk, Keith Michael; Orman, Hilarie (PurpleStreak, Inc.); Walker, Andrea Mae; Malone, Sean; Lee, Eric; Neumann, William Douglas; Cordwell, William R.; Torgerson, Mark Dolan; Anderson, Eric; Lanzone, Andrew J.; Collins, Michael Joseph; McDonald, Timothy Scott; Caskey, Susan Adele

    2009-03-01

    The security of the widely-used cryptographic hash function SHA1 has been impugned. We have developed two replacement hash functions. The first, SHA1X, is a drop-in replacement for SHA1. The second, SANDstorm, has been submitted as a candidate to the NIST-sponsored SHA3 Hash Function competition.

  16. Geomechanics of penetration : experimental and computational approaches : final report for LDRD project 38718.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, Robert Douglas; Holcomb, David Joseph; Gettemy, Glen L.; Fossum, Arlo Frederick; Rivas, Raul R.; Bronowski, David R.; Preece, Dale S.

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of the present work is to increase our understanding of which properties of geomaterials most influence the penetration process with a goal of improving our predictive ability. Two primary approaches were followed: development of a realistic, constitutive model for geomaterials and designing an experimental approach to study penetration from the target's point of view. A realistic constitutive model, with parameters based on measurable properties, can be used for sensitivity analysis to determine the properties that are most important in influencing the penetration process. An immense literature exists that is devoted to the problem of predicting penetration into geomaterials or similar man-made materials such as concrete. Various formulations have been developed that use an analytic or more commonly, numerical, solution for the spherical or cylindrical cavity expansion as a sort of Green's function to establish the forces acting on a penetrator. This approach has had considerable success in modeling the behavior of penetrators, both as to path and depth of penetration. However the approach is not well adapted to the problem of understanding what is happening to the material being penetrated. Without a picture of the stress and strain state imposed on the highly deformed target material, it is not easy to determine what properties of the target are important in influencing the penetration process. We developed an experimental arrangement that allows greater control of the deformation than is possible in actual penetrator tests, yet approximates the deformation processes imposed by a penetrator. Using explosive line charges placed in a central borehole, we loaded cylindrical specimens in a manner equivalent to an increment of penetration, allowing the measurement of the associated strains and accelerations and the retrieval of specimens from the more-or-less intact cylinder. Results show clearly that the deformation zone is highly concentrated near the borehole, with almost no damage occurring beyond 1/2 a borehole diameter. This implies penetration is not strongly influenced by anything but the material within a diameter or so of the penetration. For penetrator tests, target size should not matter strongly once target diameters exceed some small multiple of the penetrator diameter. Penetration into jointed rock should not be much affected unless a discontinuity is within a similar range. Accelerations measured at several points along a radius from the borehole are consistent with highly-concentrated damage and energy absorption; At the borehole wall, accelerations were an order of magnitude higher than at 1/2 a diameter, but at the outer surface, 8 diameters away, accelerations were as expected for propagation through an elastic medium. Accelerations measured at the outer surface of the cylinders increased significantly with cure time for the concrete. As strength increased, less damage was observed near the explosively-driven borehole wall consistent with the lower energy absorption expected and observed for stronger concrete. As it is the energy absorbing properties of a target that ultimately stop a penetrator, we believe this may point the way to a more readily determined equivalent of the S number.

  17. Final report LDRD project 105816 : model reduction of large dynamic systems with localized nonlinearities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehoucq, Richard B.; Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Hetmaniuk, Ulrich L. (University of Washington, Seattle, WA); Dohrmann, Clark R.

    2009-10-01

    Advanced computing hardware and software written to exploit massively parallel architectures greatly facilitate the computation of extremely large problems. On the other hand, these tools, though enabling higher fidelity models, have often resulted in much longer run-times and turn-around-times in providing answers to engineering problems. The impediments include smaller elements and consequently smaller time steps, much larger systems of equations to solve, and the inclusion of nonlinearities that had been ignored in days when lower fidelity models were the norm. The research effort reported focuses on the accelerating the analysis process for structural dynamics though combinations of model reduction and mitigation of some factors that lead to over-meshing.

  18. FY09 Final Report for LDRD Project: Understanding Viral Quasispecies Evolution through Computation and Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, C

    2009-11-12

    In FY09 they will (1) complete the implementation, verification, calibration, and sensitivity and scalability analysis of the in-cell virus replication model; (2) complete the design of the cell culture (cell-to-cell infection) model; (3) continue the research, design, and development of their bioinformatics tools: the Web-based structure-alignment-based sequence variability tool and the functional annotation of the genome database; (4) collaborate with the University of California at San Francisco on areas of common interest; and (5) submit journal articles that describe the in-cell model with simulations and the bioinformatics approaches to evaluation of genome variability and fitness.

  19. Final report : LDRD project 79824 carbon nanotube sorting via DNA-directed self-assembly.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, David B; Leung, Kevin; Rempe, Susan B.; Dossa, Paul D.; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Martin, Marcus Gary

    2007-10-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have shown great promise in novel applications in molecular electronics, biohazard detection, and composite materials. Commercially synthesized nanotubes exhibit a wide dispersion of geometries and conductivities, and tend to aggregate. Hence the key to using these materials is the ability to solubilize and sort carbon nanotubes according to their geometric/electronic properties. One of the most effective dispersants is single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), but there are many outstanding questions regarding the interaction between nucleic acids and SWNTs. In this work we focus on the interactions of SWNTs with single monomers of nucleic acids, as a first step to answering these outstanding questions. We use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to calculate the binding energy of six different nucleotide monophosphates (NMPs) to a (6,0) single-wall carbon nanotube in aqueous solution. We find that the binding energies are generally favorable, of the order of a few kcal/mol. The binding energies of the different NMPs were very similar in salt solution, whereas we found a range of binding energies for NMPs in pure water. The binding energies are sensitive to the details of the association of the sodium ions with the phosphate groups and also to the average conformations of the nucleotides. We use electronic structure (Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Moller-Plesset second order perturbation to uncorrelated Hartree Fock theory (MP2)) methods to complement the classical force field study. With judicious choices of DFT exchange correlation functionals, we find that DFT, MP2, and classical force field predictions are in qualitative and even quantitative agreement; all three methods should give reliable and valid predictions. However, in one important case, the interactions between ions and metallic carbon nanotubes--the SWNT polarization-induced affinity for ions, neglected in most classical force field studies, is found to be extremely large (on the order of electron volts) and may have important consequences for various SWNT applications. Finally, the adsorption of NMPs onto single-walled carbon nanotubes were studied experimentally. The nanotubes were sonicated in the presence of the nucleotides at various weight fractions and centrifuged before examining the ultraviolet absorbance of the resulting supernatant. A distinct Langmuir adsorption isotherm was obtained for each nucleotide. All of the nucleotides differ in their saturation value as well as their initial slope, which we attribute to differences both in nucleotide structure and in the binding ability of different types or clusters of tubes. Results from this simple system provide insights toward development of dispersion and separation methods for nanotubes: strongly binding nucleotides are likely to help disperse, whereas weaker ones may provide selectivity that may be beneficial to a separation process.

  20. Final report on LDRD project : narrow-linewidth VCSELs for atomic microsystems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Weng Wah; Geib, Kent Martin; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Serkland, Darwin Keith

    2011-09-01

    Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) are well suited for emerging photonic microsystems due to their low power consumption, ease of integration with other optical components, and single frequency operation. However, the typical VCSEL linewidth of 100 MHz is approximately ten times wider than the natural linewidth of atoms used in atomic beam clocks and trapped atom research, which degrades or completely destroys performance in those systems. This report documents our efforts to reduce VCSEL linewidths below 10 MHz to meet the needs of advanced sub-Doppler atomic microsystems, such as cold-atom traps. We have investigated two complementary approaches to reduce VCSEL linewidth: (A) increasing the laser-cavity quality factor, and (B) decreasing the linewidth enhancement factor (alpha) of the optical gain medium. We have developed two new VCSEL devices that achieved increased cavity quality factors: (1) all-semiconductor extended-cavity VCSELs, and (2) micro-external-cavity surface-emitting lasers (MECSELs). These new VCSEL devices have demonstrated linewidths below 10 MHz, and linewidths below 1 MHz seem feasible with further optimization.

  1. Bulk Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, C. C.; Langdon, T. G.; Lavernia, E. J.

    2017-09-01

    This paper will address three topics of importance to bulk nanostructured materials. Bulk nanostructured materials are defined as bulk solids with nanoscale or partly nanoscale microstructures. This category of nanostructured materials has historical roots going back many decades but has relatively recent focus due to new discoveries of unique properties of some nanoscale materials. Bulk nanostructured materials are prepared by a variety of severe plastic deformation methods, and these will be reviewed. Powder processing to prepare bulk nanostructured materials requires that the powders be consolidated by typical combinations of pressure and temperature, the latter leading to coarsening of the microstructure. The thermal stability of nanostructured materials will also be discussed. An example of bringing nanostructured materials to applications as structural materials will be described in terms of the cryomilling of powders and their consolidation.

  2. Polymer Masks for nanostructuring of graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shvets, Violetta

    This PhD project is a part of Center for Nanostructured Graphene (CNG) activities. The aim of the project is to develop a new lithography method for creation of highly ordered nanostructures with as small as possible feature and period sizes. The method should be applicable for graphene...... polymer masks is developed. Mask fabrication is realized by microtoming of 30-60 nm thin sections from pre-aligned polymer monoliths with different morphologies. The resulting polymer masks are then transferred to both silicon and graphene substrates. Hexagonally packed hole patterns with 10 nm hole...... diameter and 20 nm periodicity are successfully transferred to both substrates. The method allowed to realize the first ever transfer of moiré patterns to silicon. Furthermore, in collaboration with CNG, device with nanostructured graphene are fabricated and electrical measurements made on these devices...

  3. Transmissive infrared frequency selective surfaces and infrared antennas : final report for LDRD 105749.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Joel Robert; Hadley, G. Ronald; Samora, Sally; Loui, Hung; Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto; Davids, Paul; Kemme, Shanalyn A.; Basilio, Lorena I.; Johnson, William Arthur; Peters, David William

    2009-09-01

    Plasmonic structures open up new opportunities in photonic devices, sometimes offering an alternate method to perform a function and sometimes offering capabilities not possible with standard optics. In this LDRD we successfully demonstrated metal coatings on optical surfaces that do not adversely affect the transmission of those surfaces at the design frequency. This technology could be applied as an RF noise blocking layer across an optical aperture or as a method to apply an electric field to an active electro-optic device without affecting optical performance. We also demonstrated thin optical absorbers using similar patterned surfaces. These infrared optical antennas show promise as a method to improve performance in mercury cadmium telluride detectors. Furthermore, these structures could be coupled with other components to lead to direct rectification of infrared radiation. This possibility leads to a new method for infrared detection and energy harvesting of infrared radiation.

  4. Bioagent detection using miniaturized NMR and nanoparticle amplification : final LDRD report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clewett, C. F. M.; Adams, David Price; Fan, Hongyou; Williams, John D.; Sillerud, Laurel O.; Alam, Todd Michael; Aldophi, Natalie L. (New Mexico Resonance, Albuquerque, NM); McDowell, Andrew F. (New Mexico Resonance, Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-11-01

    This LDRD program was directed towards the development of a portable micro-nuclear magnetic resonance ({micro}-NMR) spectrometer for the detection of bioagents via induced amplification of solvent relaxation based on superparamagnetic nanoparticles. The first component of this research was the fabrication and testing of two different micro-coil ({micro}-coil) platforms: namely a planar spiral NMR {micro}-coil and a cylindrical solenoid NMR {micro}-coil. These fabrication techniques are described along with the testing of the NMR performance for the individual coils. The NMR relaxivity for a series of water soluble FeMn oxide nanoparticles was also determined to explore the influence of the nanoparticle size on the observed NMR relaxation properties. In addition, The use of commercially produced superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for amplification via NMR based relaxation mechanisms was also demonstrated, with the lower detection limit in number of SPIONs per nanoliter (nL) being determined.

  5. Main group adducts of carbon dioxide and related chemistry (LDRD 149938).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, Brian M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Kemp, Richard Alan; Stewart, Constantine A.; Dickie, Diane A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-11-01

    This late-start LDRD was broadly focused on the synthetic attempts to prepare novel ligands as complexing agents for main group metals for the sequestration of CO{sub 2}. In prior work we have shown that certain main group (p block elements) metals such as tin and zinc, when ligated to phosphinoamido- ligands, can bind CO{sub 2} in a novel fashion. Rather than simple insertion into the metal-nitrogen bonds to form carbamates, we have seen the highly unusual complexation of CO{sub 2} in a mode that is more similar to a chemical 'adduct' rather than complexation schemes that have been observed previously. The overarching goal in this work is to prepare more of these complexes that can (a) sequester (or bind) CO{sub 2} easily in this adduct form, and (b) be stable to chemical or electrochemical reduction designed to convert the CO{sub 2} to useful fuels or fuel precursors. The currently used phosphinoamido- ligands appear at this point to be less-stable than desired under electrochemical reduction conditions. This instability is believed due to the more delicate, reactive nature of the ligand framework system. In order to successfully capture and convert CO{sub 2} to useful organics, this instability must be addressed and solved. Work described in the late-start LDRD was designed to screen a variety of ligand/metal complexes that a priori are believed to be more stable to polar solvents and possible mild hydrolytic conditions than are the phosphinoamido-ligands. Results from ligand syntheses and metal complexation studies are reported.

  6. Advanced Magnetic Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Sellmyer, David

    2006-01-01

    Advanced Magnetic Nanostructures is devoted to the fabrication, characterization, experimental investigation, theoretical understanding, and utilization of advanced magnetic nanostructures. Focus is on various types of 'bottom-up' and 'top-down' artificial nanostructures, as contrasted to naturally occurring magnetic nanostructures, such as iron-oxide inclusions in magnetic rocks, and to structures such as perfect thin films. Chapter 1 is an introduction into some basic concepts, such as the definitions of basic magnetic quantities. Chapters 2-4 are devoted to the theory of magnetic nanostructures, Chapter 5 deals with the characterization of the structures, and Chapters 6-10 are devoted to specific systems. Applications of advanced magnetic nanostructures are discussed in Chapters11-15 and, finally, the appendix lists and briefly discusses magnetic properties of typical starting materials. Industrial and academic researchers in magnetism and related areas such as nanotechnology, materials science, and theore...

  7. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard M [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  8. Nanostructured Materials for Magnetoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Mikailzade, Faik

    2013-01-01

    This book provides an up-to-date review of nanometer-scale magnetism and focuses on the investigation of the basic properties of magnetic nanostructures. It describes a wide range of physical aspects together with theoretical and experimental methods. A broad overview of the latest developments in this emerging and fascinating field of nanostructured materials is given with emphasis on the practical understanding and operation of submicron devices based on nanostructured magnetic materials.

  9. Filtered Rayleigh scattering diagnostic for multi-parameter thermal-fluids measurements : LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beresh, Steven Jay; Grasser, Thomas W.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Schefer, Robert W.

    2004-01-01

    Simulation-based life-cycle-engineering and the ASCI program have resulted in models of unprecedented size and fidelity. The validation of these models requires high-resolution, multi-parameter diagnostics. Within the thermal-fluids disciplines, the need for detailed, high-fidelity measurements exceeds the limits of current engineering sciences capabilities and severely tests the state of the art. The focus of this LDRD is the development and application of filtered Rayleigh scattering (FRS) for high-resolution, nonintrusive measurement of gas-phase velocity and temperature. With FRS, the flow is laser-illuminated and Rayleigh scattering from naturally occurring sources is detected through a molecular filter. The filtered transmission may be interpreted to yield point or planar measurements of three-component velocities and/or thermodynamic state. Different experimental configurations may be employed to obtain compromises between spatial resolution, time resolution, and the quantity of simultaneously measured flow variables. In this report, we present the results of a three-year LDRD-funded effort to develop FRS combustion thermometry and Aerosciences velocity measurement systems. The working principles and details of our FRS opto-electronic system are presented in detail. For combustion thermometry we present 2-D, spatially correlated FRS results from nonsooting premixed and diffusion flames and from a sooting premixed flame. The FRS-measured temperatures are accurate to within {+-}50 K (3%) in a premixed CH4-air flame and within {+-}100 K for a vortex-strained diluted CH4-air diffusion flame where the FRS technique is severely tested by large variation in scattering cross section. In the diffusion flame work, FRS has been combined with Raman imaging of the CH4 fuel molecule to correct for the local light scattering properties of the combustion gases. To our knowledge, this is the first extension of FRS to nonpremixed combustion and the first use of joint FRS

  10. Nanostructures of zinc oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Lin Wang

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Zinc oxide (ZnO is a unique material that exhibits semiconducting, piezoelectric, and pyroelectric multiple properties. Using a solid-vapor phase thermal sublimation technique, nanocombs, nanorings, nanohelixes/nanosprings, nanobows, nanobelts, nanowires, and nanocages of ZnO have been synthesized under specific growth conditions. These unique nanostructures unambiguously demonstrate that ZnO is probably the richest family of nanostructures among all materials, both in structures and properties. The nanostructures could have novel applications in optoelectronics, sensors, transducers, and biomedical science because it is bio-safe.

  11. High accuracy integrated global positioning system/inertial navigation system LDRD: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, T.E.; Meindl, M.A.; Fellerhoff, J.R.

    1997-03-01

    This report contains the results of a Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to investigate the integration of Global Positioning System (GPS) and inertial navigation system (INS) technologies toward the goal of optimizing the navigational accuracy of the combined GPSANS system. The approach undertaken is to integrate the data from an INS, which has long term drifts, but excellent short term accuracy, with GPS carrier phase signal information, which is accurate to the sub-centimeter level, but requires continuous tracking of the GPS signals. The goal is to maintain a sub-meter accurate navigation solution while the vehicle is in motion by using the GPS measurements to estimate the INS navigation errors and then using the refined INS data to aid the GPS carrier phase cycle slip detection and correction and bridge dropouts in the GPS data. The work was expanded to look at GPS-based attitude determination, using multiple GPS receivers and antennas on a single platform, as a possible navigation aid. Efforts included not only the development of data processing algorithms and software, but also the collection and analysis of GPS and INS flight data aboard a Twin Otter aircraft. Finally, the application of improved navigation system accuracy to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) target location is examined.

  12. Biomimetic air sampling for detection of low concentrations of molecules and bioagents : LDRD 52744 final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Robert Clark

    2003-12-01

    Present methods of air sampling for low concentrations of chemicals like explosives and bioagents involve noisy and power hungry collectors with mechanical parts for moving large volumes of air. However there are biological systems that are capable of detecting very low concentrations of molecules with no mechanical moving parts. An example is the silkworm moth antenna which is a highly branched structure where each of 100 branches contains about 200 sensory 'hairs' which have dimensions of 2 microns wide by 100 microns long. The hairs contain about 3000 pores which is where the gas phase molecules enter the aqueous (lymph) phase for detection. Simulations of diffusion of molecules indicate that this 'forest' of hairs is 'designed' to maximize the extraction of the vapor phase molecules. Since typical molecules lose about 4 decades in diffusion constant upon entering the liquid phase, it is important to allow air diffusion to bring the molecule as close to the 'sensor' as possible. The moth acts on concentrations as low as 1000 molecules per cubic cm. (one part in 1e16). A 3-D collection system of these dimensions could be fabricated by micromachining techniques available at Sandia. This LDRD addresses the issues involved with extracting molecules from air onto micromachined structures and then delivering those molecules to microsensors for detection.

  13. Final Report on Institutional Computing Project s15_hilaserion, “Kinetic Modeling of Next-Generation High-Energy, High-Intensity Laser-Ion Accelerators as an Enabling Capability”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, Brian James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Yin, Lin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stark, David James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-06

    This proposal sought of order 1M core-hours of Institutional Computing time intended to enable computing by a new LANL Postdoc (David Stark) working under LDRD ER project 20160472ER (PI: Lin Yin) on laser-ion acceleration. The project was “off-cycle,” initiating in June of 2016 with a postdoc hire.

  14. Nanostructured CNx (0

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongiorno, G; Blomqvist, M; Piseri, P; Milani, P; Lenardi, C; Ducati, C; Caruso, T; Rudolf, P; Wachtmeister, S; Csillag, S; Coronel, E

    2005-01-01

    Nanostructured CNx thin films were prepared by supersonic cluster beam deposition (SCBD) and systematically characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The incorporat

  15. Self-assembled nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jin Z; Liu, Jun; Chen, Shaowei; Liu, Gang-yu

    2003-01-01

    Nanostructures refer to materials that have relevant dimensions on the nanometer length scales and reside in the mesoscopic regime between isolated atoms and molecules in bulk matter. These materials have unique physical properties that are distinctly different from bulk materials. Self-Assembled Nanostructures provides systematic coverage of basic nanomaterials science including materials assembly and synthesis, characterization, and application. Suitable for both beginners and experts, it balances the chemistry aspects of nanomaterials with physical principles. It also highlights nanomaterial-based architectures including assembled or self-assembled systems. Filled with in-depth discussion of important applications of nano-architectures as well as potential applications ranging from physical to chemical and biological systems, Self-Assembled Nanostructures is the essential reference or text for scientists involved with nanostructures.

  16. Nanostructured electronic and magnetic materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R V Ramanujan

    2003-02-01

    Research and development in nanostructured materials is one of the most intensely studied areas in science. As a result of concerted R & D efforts, nanostructured electronic and magnetic materials have achieved commercial success. Specific examples of novel industrially important nanostructured electronic and magnetic materials are provided. Advantages of nanocrystalline magnetic materials in the context of both materials and devices are discussed. Several high technology examples of the use of nanostructured magnetic materials are presented. Methods of processing nanostructured materials are described and the examples of sol gel, rapid solidification and powder injection moulding as potential processing methods for making nanostructured materials are outlined. Some opportunities and challenges are discussed.

  17. Process Development for Nanostructured Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Photovoltaic manufacturing is an emerging industry that promises a carbon-free, nearly limitless source of energy for our nation. However, the high-temperature manufacturing processes used for conventional silicon-based photovoltaics are extremely energy-intensive and expensive. This high cost imposes a critical barrier to the widespread implementation of photovoltaic technology. Argonne National Laboratory and its partners recently invented new methods for manufacturing nanostructured photovoltaic devices that allow dramatic savings in materials, process energy, and cost. These methods are based on atomic layer deposition, a thin film synthesis technique that has been commercialized for the mass production of semiconductor microelectronics. The goal of this project was to develop these low-cost fabrication methods for the high efficiency production of nanostructured photovoltaics, and to demonstrate these methods in solar cell manufacturing. We achieved this goal in two ways: 1) we demonstrated the benefits of these coatings in the laboratory by scaling-up the fabrication of low-cost dye sensitized solar cells; 2) we used our coating technology to reduce the manufacturing cost of solar cells under development by our industrial partners.

  18. Nanostructures having high performance thermoelectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong; Majumdar, Arunava; Hochbaum, Allon I; Chen, Renkun; Delgado, Raul Diaz

    2014-05-20

    The invention provides for a nanostructure, or an array of such nanostructures, each comprising a rough surface, and a doped or undoped semiconductor. The nanostructure is an one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructure, such a nanowire, or a two-dimensional (2-D) nanostructure. The nanostructure can be placed between two electrodes and used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  19. Analysis of electromagnetic scattering by nearly periodic structures: an LDRD report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, William Arthur; Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Wilton, Donald R. (University of Houston, Houston, TX); Basilio, Lorena I.; Peters, David William; Capolino, F. (University of Houston, Houston, TX)

    2006-10-01

    In this LDRD we examine techniques to analyze the electromagnetic scattering from structures that are nearly periodic. Nearly periodic could mean that one of the structure's unit cells is different from all the others--a defect. It could also mean that the structure is truncated, or butted up against another periodic structure to form a seam. Straightforward electromagnetic analysis of these nearly periodic structures requires us to grid the entire structure, which would overwhelm today's computers and the computers in the foreseeable future. In this report we will examine various approximations that allow us to continue to exploit some aspects of the structure's periodicity and thereby reduce the number of unknowns required for analysis. We will use the Green's Function Interpolation with a Fast Fourier Transform (GIFFT) to examine isolated defects both in the form of a source dipole over a meta-material slab and as a rotated dipole in a finite array of dipoles. We will look at the numerically exact solution of a one-dimensional seam. In order to solve a two-dimensional seam, we formulate an efficient way to calculate the Green's function of a 1d array of point sources. We next formulate ways of calculating the far-field due to a seam and due to array truncation based on both array theory and high-frequency asymptotic methods. We compare the high-frequency and GIFFT results. Finally, we use GIFFT to solve a simple, two-dimensional seam problem.

  20. Selective Functionalization of Tailored Nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slingenbergh, Winand; Boer, Sanne K. de; Cordes, Thorben; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.; Hosson, Jeff Th.M. De; Dorp, Willem F. van

    2012-01-01

    The controlled positioning of nanostructures with active molecular components is of importance throughout nanoscience and nanotechnology. We present a novel three-step method to produce nanostructures that are selectively decorated with functional molecules. We use fluorophores and nanoparticles to

  1. Nanostructured materials in potentiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düzgün, Ali; Zelada-Guillén, Gustavo A; Crespo, Gastón A; Macho, Santiago; Riu, Jordi; Rius, F Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Potentiometry is a very simple electrochemical technique with extraordinary analytical capabilities. It is also well known that nanostructured materials display properties which they do not show in the bulk phase. The combination of the two fields of potentiometry and nanomaterials is therefore a promising area of research and development. In this report, we explain the fundamentals of potentiometric devices that incorporate nanostructured materials and we highlight the advantages and drawbacks of combining nanomaterials and potentiometry. The paper provides an overview of the role of nanostructured materials in the two commonest potentiometric sensors: field-effect transistors and ion-selective electrodes. Additionally, we provide a few recent examples of new potentiometric sensors that are based on receptors immobilized directly onto the nanostructured material surface. Moreover, we summarize the use of potentiometry to analyze processes involving nanostructured materials and the prospects that the use of nanopores offer to potentiometry. Finally, we discuss several difficulties that currently hinder developments in the field and some future trends that will extend potentiometry into new analytical areas such as biology and medicine.

  2. Micromachining with Nanostructured Cutting Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the brief is to explain how nanostructured tools can be used to machine materials at the microscale.  The aims of the brief are to explain to readers how to apply nanostructured tools to micromachining applications. This book describes the application of nanostructured tools to machining engineering materials and includes methods for calculating basic features of micromachining. It explains the nature of contact between tools and work pieces to build a solid understanding of how nanostructured tools are made.

  3. Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Andrew J.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2007-12-04

    A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

  4. Synthesis of porphyrin nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyou; Bai, Feng

    2014-10-28

    The present disclosure generally relates to self-assembly methods for generating porphyrin nanostructures. For example, in one embodiment a method is provided that includes preparing a porphyrin solution and a surfactant solution. The porphyrin solution is then mixed with the surfactant solution at a concentration sufficient for confinement of the porphyrin molecules by the surfactant molecules. In some embodiments, the concentration of the surfactant is at or above its critical micelle concentration (CMC), which allows the surfactant to template the growth of the nanostructure over time. The size and morphology of the nanostructures may be affected by the type of porphyrin molecules used, the type of surfactant used, the concentration of the porphyrin and surfactant the pH of the mixture of the solutions, and the order of adding the reagents to the mixture, to name a few variables.

  5. Injection moulding antireflective nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Alexander Bruun; Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik; Mortensen, N. Asger

    in an injection moulding process, to fabricate the antireflective surfaces. The cycle-time was 35 s. The injection moulded structures had a height of 125 nm, and the visible spectrum reflectance of injection moulded black polypropylene surfaces was reduced from 4.5±0.5% to 2.5±0.5%. The gradient of the refractive...... index of the nanostructured surfaces was estimated from atomic force micrographs and the theoretical reflectance was calculated using the transfer matrix method and effective medium theory. The measured reflectance shows good agreement with the theory of graded index antireflective nanostructures...

  6. Nanostructured Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guanying; Ning, Zhijun; Ågren, Hans

    2016-01-01

    We are glad to announce the Special Issue “Nanostructured Solar Cells”, published in Nanomaterials. This issue consists of eight articles, two communications, and one review paper, covering major important aspects of nanostructured solar cells of varying types. From fundamental physicochemical investigations to technological advances, and from single junction solar cells (silicon solar cell, dye sensitized solar cell, quantum dots sensitized solar cell, and small molecule organic solar cell) to tandem multi-junction solar cells, all aspects are included and discussed in this issue to advance the use of nanotechnology to improve the performance of solar cells with reduced fabrication costs.

  7. Nanostructured Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guanying; Ning, Zhijun; Ågren, Hans

    2016-08-09

    We are glad to announce the Special Issue "Nanostructured Solar Cells", published in Nanomaterials. This issue consists of eight articles, two communications, and one review paper, covering major important aspects of nanostructured solar cells of varying types. From fundamental physicochemical investigations to technological advances, and from single junction solar cells (silicon solar cell, dye sensitized solar cell, quantum dots sensitized solar cell, and small molecule organic solar cell) to tandem multi-junction solar cells, all aspects are included and discussed in this issue to advance the use of nanotechnology to improve the performance of solar cells with reduced fabrication costs.

  8. Nanostructured piezoelectric energy harvesters

    CERN Document Server

    Briscoe, Joe

    2014-01-01

    This book covers a range of devices that use piezoelectricity to convert mechanical deformation into electrical energy and relates their output capabilities to a range of potential applications. Starting with a description of the fundamental principles and properties of piezo- and ferroelectric materials, where applications of bulk materials are well established, the book shows how nanostructures of these materials are being developed for energy harvesting applications. The authors show how a nanostructured device can be produced, and put in context some of the approaches that are being invest

  9. Nanostructured intense-laser cleaner

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xiao Feng; Kong, Qing; Wang, Ping Xiao; Yu, Qin; Gu, Yan Jan; Qu, Jun Fan

    2016-01-01

    A nanostructured target is proposed to enhance an intense-laser contrast: when a laser prepulse is injected on a nanostructured solid target surface, the prepulse is absorbed effectively by the nanostructured surface. The nanostructure size should be less than the laser wavelength. After the prepulse absorption, the front part of the main pulse destroys the microstructure and makes the surface a flat plasma mirror. The body of the main pulse is reflected almost perfectly. Compared with the plasma mirrors, the nanostructured surface is effective for the absorption of the intense laser prepulse, higher than 10^14 W/cm2. By the nanostructured laser cleaner, the laser pulse contrast increases about a hundredfold. The nanostructured laser cleaner works well for near-future intense lasers.

  10. Magnetic Nano-structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚永德

    2004-01-01

    Fabrication of magnetic nano-structures with dots array and wires has been paid attention recently due to the application of high-density magnetic recording. In this study, we fabricated the magnetic dots array and wires through several ways that ensure the arrangement of magnetic dots and wires to be the structures we designed. Their magnetic properties are studied experimentally.

  11. Atomically Traceable Nanostructure Fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Josh B; Dick, Don D; McDonnell, Stephen J; Bischof, Maia; Fu, Joseph; Owen, James H G; Owen, William R; Alexander, Justin D; Jaeger, David L; Namboodiri, Pradeep; Fuchs, Ehud; Chabal, Yves J; Wallace, Robert M; Reidy, Richard; Silver, Richard M; Randall, John N; Von Ehr, James

    2015-07-17

    Reducing the scale of etched nanostructures below the 10 nm range eventually will require an atomic scale understanding of the entire fabrication process being used in order to maintain exquisite control over both feature size and feature density. Here, we demonstrate a method for tracking atomically resolved and controlled structures from initial template definition through final nanostructure metrology, opening up a pathway for top-down atomic control over nanofabrication. Hydrogen depassivation lithography is the first step of the nanoscale fabrication process followed by selective atomic layer deposition of up to 2.8 nm of titania to make a nanoscale etch mask. Contrast with the background is shown, indicating different mechanisms for growth on the desired patterns and on the H passivated background. The patterns are then transferred into the bulk using reactive ion etching to form 20 nm tall nanostructures with linewidths down to ~6 nm. To illustrate the limitations of this process, arrays of holes and lines are fabricated. The various nanofabrication process steps are performed at disparate locations, so process integration is discussed. Related issues are discussed including using fiducial marks for finding nanostructures on a macroscopic sample and protecting the chemically reactive patterned Si(100)-H surface against degradation due to atmospheric exposure.

  12. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-01-01

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06157a

  13. Complex WS 2 nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitby, R. L. D.; Hsu, W. K.; Lee, T. H.; Boothroyd, C. B.; Kroto, H. W.; Walton, D. R. M.

    2002-06-01

    A range of elegant tubular and conical nanostructures has been created by template growth of (WS 2) n layers on the surfaces of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles. The structures exhibit remarkably perfect straight segments together with interesting complexities at the intersections, which are discussed here in detail in order to enhance understanding of the structural features governing tube growth.

  14. Fabrication and Multiprobe Electrical Characterization of Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Mikkel Buster

    2013-01-01

    Engineering of graphene for modifying electrical properties, such as opening an electronic band gap, has been shown both theoretically and experimentally by creating periodic holes in the graphene sheet, however at the price of lower carrier mobility. Such holes can be made with special fabrication...... to the current direction. The results show a decrease in carrier mobility with increasing number of rows, but does not indicate a band gap opening with holes sizes of 50 nm and a pitch of 100 nm, which suggests that smaller holes and pitch are necessary for creating band gap in graphene. Electrical...... characterization of graphene and other nanostructures usually involves lithographic processing which can alter or damage fragile materials, and metal electrodes are permanently placed to the sample. This project presents a fast method for electrical characterization for graphene and other nanostructures by the use...

  15. Eyeglass Large Aperture, Lightweight Space Optics FY2000 - FY2002 LDRD Strategic Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyde, R

    2003-02-10

    differences in their requirements and implementations, the fundamental difficulty in utilizing large aperture optics is the same for all of these applications: It is extremely difficult to design large aperture space optics which are both optically precise and can meet the practical requirements for launch and deployment in space. At LLNL we have developed a new concept (Eyeglass) which uses large diffractive optics to solve both of these difficulties; greatly reducing both the mass and the tolerance requirements for large aperture optics. During previous LDRD-supported research, we developed this concept, built and tested broadband diffractive telescopes, and built 50 cm aperture diffraction-limited diffractive lenses (the largest in the world). This work is fully described in UCRL-ID-136262, Eyeglass: A Large Aperture Space Telescope. However, there is a large gap between optical proof-of-principle with sub-meter apertures, and actual 50 meter space telescopes. This gap is far too large (both in financial resources and in spacecraft expertise) to be filled internally at LLNL; implementation of large aperture diffractive space telescopes must be done externally using non-LLNL resources and expertise. While LLNL will never become the primary contractor and integrator for large space optical systems, our natural role is to enable these devices by developing the capability of producing very large diffractive optics. Accordingly, the purpose of the Large Aperture, Lightweight Space Optics Strategic Initiative was to develop the technology to fabricate large, lightweight diffractive lenses. The additional purpose of this Strategic Initiative was, of course, to demonstrate this lens-fabrication capability in a fashion compellingly enough to attract the external support necessary to continue along the path to full-scale space-based telescopes. During this 3 year effort (FY2000-FY2002) we have developed the capability of optically smoothing and diffractively-patterning thin meter

  16. Nanostructured Super-Black Optical Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA faces difficulties in imaging and characterizing faint astrophysical objects within the glare of brighter stellar sources. Achieving a very low background...

  17. Nanostructured electrodes for Solar Power Generation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The key to achieving high-power solar arrays for NASA applications is the development of high-efficiency, thin-film solar cells that can be fabricated directly on...

  18. Wide Bandgap Nanostructured Space Photovoltaics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Firefly, in collaboration with Rochester Institute of Technology, proposes an STTR program for the development of a wide-bandgap GaP-based space solar cell capable...

  19. Nanostructured Super-Black Optical Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Need: NASA faces challenges in imaging and characterizing faint astrophysical objects within the glare of brighter stellar sources. Achieving a very low background...

  20. Synthesis of ferroelectric nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roervik, Per Martin

    2008-12-15

    The increasing miniaturization of electric and mechanical components makes the synthesis and assembly of nanoscale structures an important step in modern technology. Functional materials, such as the ferroelectric perovskites, are vital to the integration and utility value of nanotechnology in the future. In the present work, chemical methods to synthesize one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of ferroelectric perovskites have been studied. To successfully and controllably make 1D nanostructures by chemical methods it is very important to understand the growth mechanism of these nanostructures, in order to design the structures for use in various applications. For the integration of 1D nanostructures into devices it is also very important to be able to make arrays and large-area designed structures from the building blocks that single nanostructures constitute. As functional materials, it is of course also vital to study the properties of the nanostructures. The characterization of properties of single nanostructures is challenging, but essential to the use of such structures. The aim of this work has been to synthesize high quality single-crystalline 1D nanostructures of ferroelectric perovskites with emphasis on PbTiO3 , to make arrays or hierarchical nanostructures of 1D nanostructures on substrates, to understand the growth mechanisms of the 1D nanostructures, and to investigate the ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties of the 1D nanostructures. In Paper I, a molten salt synthesis route, previously reported to yield BaTiO3 , PbTiO3 and Na2Ti6O13 nanorods, was re-examined in order to elucidate the role of volatile chlorides. A precursor mixture containing barium (or lead) and titanium was annealed in the presence of NaCl at 760 degrees Celsius or 820 degrees Celsius. The main products were respectively isometric nanocrystalline BaTiO3 and PbTiO3. Nanorods were also detected, but electron diffraction revealed that the composition of the nanorods was

  1. Synthesis of ferroelectric nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roervik, Per Martin

    2008-12-15

    The increasing miniaturization of electric and mechanical components makes the synthesis and assembly of nanoscale structures an important step in modern technology. Functional materials, such as the ferroelectric perovskites, are vital to the integration and utility value of nanotechnology in the future. In the present work, chemical methods to synthesize one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures of ferroelectric perovskites have been studied. To successfully and controllably make 1D nanostructures by chemical methods it is very important to understand the growth mechanism of these nanostructures, in order to design the structures for use in various applications. For the integration of 1D nanostructures into devices it is also very important to be able to make arrays and large-area designed structures from the building blocks that single nanostructures constitute. As functional materials, it is of course also vital to study the properties of the nanostructures. The characterization of properties of single nanostructures is challenging, but essential to the use of such structures. The aim of this work has been to synthesize high quality single-crystalline 1D nanostructures of ferroelectric perovskites with emphasis on PbTiO3 , to make arrays or hierarchical nanostructures of 1D nanostructures on substrates, to understand the growth mechanisms of the 1D nanostructures, and to investigate the ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties of the 1D nanostructures. In Paper I, a molten salt synthesis route, previously reported to yield BaTiO3 , PbTiO3 and Na2Ti6O13 nanorods, was re-examined in order to elucidate the role of volatile chlorides. A precursor mixture containing barium (or lead) and titanium was annealed in the presence of NaCl at 760 degrees Celsius or 820 degrees Celsius. The main products were respectively isometric nanocrystalline BaTiO3 and PbTiO3. Nanorods were also detected, but electron diffraction revealed that the composition of the nanorods was

  2. Remark on the Regularities of Kato's Solutions to Navier-Stokes Equations with Initial Data in Ld(Rd)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    Motivated by the results of J.Y.Chemin in "J.Anal.Math.,77,1999,27-50" and G.Furioli et al in "Revista Mat.Iberoamer.,16,2002,605-667",the author considers further regularities of the mild solutions to Navier-Stokes equation with initial data u0∈Ld(Rd).In particular,it is proved that if u∈C([0,T*); Ld(Rd)) is a mild solution of (NSv),then u(t,x) -evt△u0∈(L)∞ ((0,T); (B)1/d/2,∞)∩(L)1((0,T);(B)3/d/2,∞) for any T<T*.

  3. Simulations of the interaction of intense petawatt laser pulses with dense Z-pinch plasmas : final report LDRD 39670.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, Dale Robert (Mission Research Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); MacFarlane, Joseph John (Prism Computational Sciences, Madison, WI); Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Campbell, Robert B.

    2004-11-01

    We have studied the feasibility of using the 3D fully electromagnetic implicit hybrid particle code LSP (Large Scale Plasma) to study laser plasma interactions with dense, compressed plasmas like those created with Z, and which might be created with the planned ZR. We have determined that with the proper additional physics and numerical algorithms developed during the LDRD period, LSP was transformed into a unique platform for studying such interactions. Its uniqueness stems from its ability to consider realistic compressed densities and low initial target temperatures (if required), an ability that conventional PIC codes do not possess. Through several test cases, validations, and applications to next generation machines described in this report, we have established the suitability of the code to look at fast ignition issues for ZR, as well as other high-density laser plasma interaction problems relevant to the HEDP program at Sandia (e.g. backlighting).

  4. Final LDRD report : enhanced spontaneous emission rate in visible III-nitride LEDs using 3D photonic crystal cavities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Arthur Joseph; Subramania, Ganapathi S.; Coley, Anthony J.; Lee, Yun-Ju; Li, Qiming; Wang, George T.; Luk, Ting Shan; Koleske, Daniel David; Fullmer, Kristine Wanta

    2009-09-01

    The fundamental spontaneous emission rate for a photon source can be modified by placing the emitter inside a periodic dielectric structure allowing the emission to be dramatically enhanced or suppressed depending on the intended application. We have investigated the relatively unexplored realm of interaction between semiconductor emitters and three dimensional photonic crystals in the visible spectrum. Although this interaction has been investigated at longer wavelengths, very little work has been done in the visible spectrum. During the course of this LDRD, we have fabricated TiO{sub 2} logpile photonic crystal structures with the shortest wavelength band gap ever demonstrated. A variety of different emitters with emission between 365 nm and 700 nm were incorporated into photonic crystal structures. Time-integrated and time-resolved photoluminescence measurements were performed to measure changes to the spontaneous emission rate. Both enhanced and suppressed emission were demonstrated and attributed to changes to the photonic density of states.

  5. Vortices and nanostructured superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book provides expert coverage of modern and novel aspects of the study of vortex matter, dynamics, and pinning in nanostructured and multi-component superconductors. Vortex matter in superconducting materials is a field of enormous beauty and intellectual challenge, which began with the theoretical prediction of vortices by A. Abrikosov (Nobel Laureate). Vortices, vortex dynamics, and pinning are key features in many of today’s human endeavors: from the huge superconducting accelerating magnets and detectors at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, which opened new windows of knowledge on the universe, to the tiny superconducting transceivers using Rapid Single Flux Quanta, which have opened a revolutionary means of communication. In recent years, two new features have added to the intrinsic beauty and complexity of the subject: nanostructured/nanoengineered superconductors, and the discovery of a range of new materials showing multi-component (multi-gap) superconductivity. In this book, leading researche...

  6. Electrons in Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flindt, Christian

    2007-01-01

    or a few electrons. Such few-electron devices are expected to form the building blocks of future electrical circuits and it is thus necessary to develop a thorough theoretical understanding of the physics of electrons in nanostructures. Re- garding applications there is a particular interest......-based communication. The statistical description of electron transport through nanostructures is based on rate equations, and the primary contribution of the thesis in that respect is the development of a method that allows for the calculation of the distribution of electrons passing through a device. The method......This thesis concerns theoretical aspects of electrons in man-made nanostruc- tures. Advances in nanofabrication technology during recent decades have made it possible to produce electrical devices on the nano-scale, whose func- tionality is determined by the quantum mechanical nature of a single...

  7. Hybrid phonons in nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Ridley, Brian K

    2017-01-01

    Crystalline semiconductor nanostructures have special properties associated with electrons and lattice vibrations and their interaction, and this is the topic of the book. The result of spatial confinement of electrons is indicated in the nomenclature of nonostructures: quantum wells, quantum wires, and quantum dots. Confinement also has a profound effect on lattice vibrations and an account of this is the prime focus. The documentation of the confinement of acoustic modes goes back to Lord Rayleigh’s work in the late nineteenth century, but no such documentation exists for optical modes. Indeed, it is only comparatively recently that any theory of the elastic properties of optical modes exists, and the account given in the book is comprehensive. A model of the lattice dynamics of the diamond lattice is given that reveals the quantitative distinction between acoustic and optical modes and the difference of connection rules that must apply at an interface. The presence of interfaces in nanostructures forces ...

  8. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  9. Ductility of Nanostructured Bainite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Morales-Rivas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured bainite is a novel ultra-high-strength steel-concept under intensive current research, in which the optimization of its mechanical properties can only come from a clear understanding of the parameters that control its ductility. This work reviews first the nature of this composite-like material as a product of heat treatment conditions. Subsequently, the premises of ductility behavior are presented, taking as a reference related microstructures: conventional bainitic steels, and TRIP-aided steels. The ductility of nanostructured bainite is then discussed in terms of work-hardening and fracture mechanisms, leading to an analysis of the three-fold correlation between ductility, mechanically-induced martensitic transformation, and mechanical partitioning between the phases. Results suggest that a highly stable/hard retained austenite, with mechanical properties close to the matrix of bainitic ferrite, is advantageous in order to enhance ductility.

  10. Processing Nanostructured Structural Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    aspects of the processing of nanostructured ceramics, viz. • • • The production of a flowable and compactable dry nanopowder suitable for use in... composition due to the different synthesis routes used. Therefore, ‘industry-standard’ dispersants can cause flocculation rather than dispersion...stabilised zirconia (3-YSZ) were no higher than for conventional, micron-sized material of the same composition . However, detailed crystallographic

  11. Characterization of Nanostructured Polymer Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-23

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0059 Characterization of Nanostructured Polymer Films RODNEY PRIESTLEY TRUSTEES OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY Final Report 12/23/2014...Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 06/01/2012-08/31/2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Characterization of Nanostructured Polymer Films 5a. CONTRACT...properties is due to the film morphology, i.e., the films are nanostructured . The aim of this proposal was to understand the mechanism of film formation and

  12. Fabrication of zein nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecha, Jarupat

    The concerns on the increase of polluting plastic wastes as well as the U.S. dependence on imported petrochemical products have driven an attention towards alternative biodegradable polymers from renewable resources. Zein protein, a co-product from ethanol production from corn, is a good candidate. This research project aims to increase zein value by adopting nanotechnology for fabricating advanced zein packaging films and zein microfluidic devices. Two nanotechnology approaches were focused: the polymer nanoclay nanocomposite technique where the nanocomposite structures were created in the zein matrix, and the soft lithography and the microfluidic devices where the micro and nanopatterns were created on the zein film surfaces. The polymer nanoclay nanocomposite technique was adopted in the commonly used zein film fabrication processes which were solvent casting and extrusion blowing methods. The two methods resulted in partially exfoliated nanocomposite structures. The impact of nanoclays on the physical properties of zein films strongly depended on the film preparation techniques. The impact of nanoclay concentration was more pronounced in the films made by extrusion blowing technique than by the solvent casting technique. As the processability limitation for the extrusion blowing technique of the zein sample containing hight nanoclay content, the effect of the nanoclay content on the rheological properties of zein hybrid resins at linear and nonlinear viscoelastic regions were further investigated. A pristine zein resin exhibited soft solid like behavior. On the other hand, the zein hybrid with nanoclay content greater than 5 wt.% showed more liquid like behavior, suggesting that the nanoclays interrupted the entangled zein network. There was good correspondence between the experimental data and the predictions of the Wagner model for the pristine zein resins. However, the model failed to predict the steady shear properties of the zein nanoclay nanocomposite

  13. Eyeglass Large Aperture, Lightweight Space Optics FY2000 - FY2002 LDRD Strategic Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyde, R

    2003-02-10

    differences in their requirements and implementations, the fundamental difficulty in utilizing large aperture optics is the same for all of these applications: It is extremely difficult to design large aperture space optics which are both optically precise and can meet the practical requirements for launch and deployment in space. At LLNL we have developed a new concept (Eyeglass) which uses large diffractive optics to solve both of these difficulties; greatly reducing both the mass and the tolerance requirements for large aperture optics. During previous LDRD-supported research, we developed this concept, built and tested broadband diffractive telescopes, and built 50 cm aperture diffraction-limited diffractive lenses (the largest in the world). This work is fully described in UCRL-ID-136262, Eyeglass: A Large Aperture Space Telescope. However, there is a large gap between optical proof-of-principle with sub-meter apertures, and actual 50 meter space telescopes. This gap is far too large (both in financial resources and in spacecraft expertise) to be filled internally at LLNL; implementation of large aperture diffractive space telescopes must be done externally using non-LLNL resources and expertise. While LLNL will never become the primary contractor and integrator for large space optical systems, our natural role is to enable these devices by developing the capability of producing very large diffractive optics. Accordingly, the purpose of the Large Aperture, Lightweight Space Optics Strategic Initiative was to develop the technology to fabricate large, lightweight diffractive lenses. The additional purpose of this Strategic Initiative was, of course, to demonstrate this lens-fabrication capability in a fashion compellingly enough to attract the external support necessary to continue along the path to full-scale space-based telescopes. During this 3 year effort (FY2000-FY2002) we have developed the capability of optically smoothing and diffractively-patterning thin meter

  14. Sonoelectrochemical Approach Towards Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burda, Clemens; Qiu, Xiaofeng

    2006-03-01

    We will report on the sonoelectrochemical synthesis of nanostructured semiconductor materials. The talk will focus on the control of the nanostructure size, shape, and composition using sonolectrochemistry as a versatile synthesis tool. The synthesis of targeted nanostructures requires thorough control of the redox chemistry during the growth process. The composition of the product can be controlled by changing the initial metal-ligand concentration. Futhermore, the properties of the novel materials will be discussed. Powder X-ray diffraction of the products confirmed the compositional change in the nanomaterials. Control of the involved sonoelectrochemistry also allows for the formation of highly monodispersed 1-D Nanorods. Qiu, Xiaofeng; Lou, Yongbing; Samia, Anna C. S.; Devadoss, Anando; Burgess, James D.; Dayal, Smita; Burda, Clemens. PbTe nanorods by sonoelectrochemistry. Angewandte Chemie, International Edition (2005), 44(36), 5855-5857. Qiu, Xiaofeng; Burda, Clemens; Fu, Ruiling; Pu, Lin; Chen, Hongyuan; Zhu, Junjie. Heterostructured Bi2Se3 Nanowires with Periodic Phase Boundaries. Journal of the American Chemical Society (2004), 126(50), 16276-16277.

  15. Fabrication of Nanostructured Polymer Surfaces and Characterization of their Wetting Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nis Korsgaard

    micro- and nanostructuring of commerical injection molding tools to create the desired surface structures directly in the molding process. The aim of this project was to enable the fabrication of surfaces with controlled wetting by injection molding. During the project, I have demonstrated improvements....... • Simulations of wetting transitions. • Clean room fabrication of functional surfaces, and production of micro- and nanostructured mold inserts. • Injection molding of micro- and nanostructured polymer parts on a commercial injection molding machine. • Co-invented a patented technique for microstructuring steel...

  16. Coherent control near metallic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efimov, Ilya [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Efimov, Anatoly [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We study coherent control in the vicinity of metallic nanostructures. Unlike in the case of control in gas or liquid phase, the collective response of electrons in a metallic nanostructure can significantly enhance different frequency components of the control field. This enhancement strongly depends on the geometry of the nanostructure and can substantially modify the temporal profile of the local control field. The changes in the amplitude and phase of the control field near the nanostructure are studied using linear response theory. The inverse problem of finding the external electromagnetic field to generate the desired local control field is considered and solved.

  17. PREFACE: Nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Richard E.

    2003-10-01

    We can define nanostructured surfaces as well-defined surfaces which contain lateral features of size 1-100 nm. This length range lies well below the micron regime but equally above the Ångstrom regime, which corresponds to the interatomic distances on single-crystal surfaces. This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter presents a collection of twelve papers which together address the fabrication, characterization, properties and applications of such nanostructured surfaces. Taken together they represent, in effect, a status report on the rapid progress taking place in this burgeoning area. The first four papers in this special issue have been contributed by members of the European Research Training Network ‘NanoCluster’, which is concerned with the deposition, growth and characterization of nanometre-scale clusters on solid surfaces—prototypical examples of nanoscale surface features. The paper by Vandamme is concerned with the fundamentals of the cluster-surface interaction; the papers by Gonzalo and Moisala address, respectively, the optical and catalytic properties of deposited clusters; and the paper by van Tendeloo reports the application of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to elucidate the surface structure of spherical particles in a catalyst support. The fifth paper, by Mendes, is also the fruit of a European Research Training Network (‘Micro-Nano’) and is jointly contributed by three research groups; it reviews the creation of nanostructured surface architectures from chemically-synthesized nanoparticles. The next five papers in this special issue are all concerned with the characterization of nanostructured surfaces with scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The papers by Bolotov, Hamilton and Dunstan demonstrate that the STM can be employed for local electrical measurements as well as imaging, as illustrated by the examples of deposited clusters, model semiconductor structures and real

  18. Three-Dimensional Composite Nanostructures for Lean NOx Emission Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Pu-Xian

    2013-07-31

    This final report to the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for DE-EE0000210 covers the period from October 1, 2009 to July 31, 2013. Under this project, DOE awarded UConn about $1,248,242 to conduct the research and development on a new class of 3D composite nanostructure based catalysts for lean NOx emission control. Much of the material presented here has already been submitted to DOE/NETL in quarterly technical reports. In this project, through a scalable solution process, we have successfully fabricated a new class of catalytic reactors, i.e., the composite nanostructure array (nano-array) based catalytic converters. These nanocatalysts, distinct from traditional powder washcoat based catalytic converters, directly integrate monolithic substrates together with nanostructures with well-defined size and shape during the scalable hydrothermal process. The new monolithic nanocatalysts are demonstrated to be able to save raw materials including Pt-group metals and support metal oxides by an order of magnitude, while perform well at various oxidation (e.g., CO oxidation and NO oxidation) and reduction reactions (H{sub 2} reduction of NOx) involved in the lean NOx emissions. The size, shape and arrangement of the composite nanostructures within the monolithic substrates are found to be the key in enabling the drastically reduced materials usage while maintaining the good catalytic reactivity in the enabled devices. The further understanding of the reaction kinetics associated with the unique mass transport and surface chemistry behind is needed for further optimizing the design and fabrication of good nanostructure array based catalytic converters. On the other hand, the high temperature stability, hydrothermal aging stability, as well as S-poisoning resistance have been investigated in this project on the nanocatalysts, which revealed promising results toward good chemical and mechanical robustness, as well as S

  19. Optics Performance at 1(omega), 2 (omega), and 3 (omega): Final Report on LDRD Project 03-ERD-071

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honig, J; Adams, J; Carr, C; Demos, S; Feit, M; Mehta, N; Norton, M; Nostrand, M; Rubenchik, A; Spaeth, M

    2006-02-08

    The interaction of intense laser light with dielectric materials is a fundamental applied science problem that is becoming increasingly important with the rapid development of ever more powerful lasers. To better understand the behavior of optical components in large fusion-class laser systems, we are systematically studying the interaction of high-fluence, high-power laser light with high-quality optical components, with particular interest on polishing/finishing and stress-induced defects and surface contamination. We focus on obtaining comparable measurements at three different wavelengths, 1{omega} (1053 nm), 2{omega} (527 nm), and 3{omega} (351 nm).

  20. Metastability and Delta-Phase Retention in Plutonium Alloys Final Report of LDRD Project 01-ERD-029

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, J; Schwartz, A J; Blobaum, K M; Krenn, C R; Wall, M A; Wolfer, W G; Haslam, J J; Moore, K T

    2004-02-11

    The {delta} to {alpha}' phase transformation in Pu-Ga alloys is intriguing for both scientific and technological reasons. On cooling, the ductile fcc {delta}-phase transforms martensitically to the brittle monoclinic {alpha}'-phase at approximately -120 C (depending on composition). This exothermic transformation involves a 20% volume contraction and a significant increase in resistivity. The reversion of {alpha}' to {delta} involves a large temperature hysteresis beginning just above room temperature. In an attempt to better understand the underlying thermodynamics and kinetics responsible for these unusual features, we have investigated the {delta} {leftrightarrow} {alpha}' phase transformations in a Pu-0.6 wt% Ga alloy using a combination of experimental and modeling techniques.

  1. Final report on LDRD project: A phenomenological model for multicomponent transport with simultaneous electrochemical reactions in concentrated solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHEN,KEN S.; EVANS,GREGORY H.; LARSON,RICHARD S.; NOBLE,DAVID R.; HOUF,WILLIAM G.

    2000-01-01

    A phenomenological model was developed for multicomponent transport of charged species with simultaneous electrochemical reactions in concentrated solutions, and was applied to model processes in a thermal battery cell. A new general framework was formulated and implemented in GOMA (a multidimensional, multiphysics, finite-element computer code developed and being enhanced at Sandia) for modeling multidimensional, multicomponent transport of neutral and charged species in concentrated solutions. The new framework utilizes the Stefan-Maxwell equations that describe multicomponent diffusion of interacting species using composition-insensitive binary diffusion coefficients. The new GOMA capability for modeling multicomponent transport of neutral species was verified and validated using the model problem of ternary gaseous diffusion in a Stefan tube. The new GOMA-based thermal battery computer model was verified using an idealized battery cell in which concentration gradients are absent; the full model was verified by comparing with that of Bernardi and Newman (1987) and validated using limited thermal battery discharge-performance data from the open literature (Dunning 1981) and from Sandia (Guidotti 1996). Moreover, a new Liquid Chemkin Software Package was developed, which allows the user to handle manly aspects of liquid-phase kinetics, thermodynamics, and transport (particularly in terms of computing properties). Lastly, a Lattice-Boltzmann-based capability was developed for modeling pore- or micro-scale phenomena involving convection, diffusion, and simplified chemistry; this capability was demonstrated by modeling phenomena in the cathode region of a thermal battery cell.

  2. A complexity science-based framework for global joint operations analysis to support force projection: LDRD Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawton, Craig R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). System Sustainment & Readiness Technologies Dept.

    2015-01-01

    The military is undergoing a significant transformation as it modernizes for the information age and adapts to address an emerging asymmetric threat beyond traditional cold war era adversaries. Techniques such as traditional large-scale, joint services war gaming analysis are no longer adequate to support program evaluation activities and mission planning analysis at the enterprise level because the operating environment is evolving too quickly. New analytical capabilities are necessary to address modernization of the Department of Defense (DoD) enterprise. This presents significant opportunity to Sandia in supporting the nation at this transformational enterprise scale. Although Sandia has significant experience with engineering system of systems (SoS) and Complex Adaptive System of Systems (CASoS), significant fundamental research is required to develop modeling, simulation and analysis capabilities at the enterprise scale. This report documents an enterprise modeling framework which will enable senior level decision makers to better understand their enterprise and required future investments.

  3. Adaptive Optics Views of the Hubble Deep Fields Final report on LLNL LDRD Project 03-ERD-002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max, C E; Gavel, D; Pennington, D; Gibbard, S; van Dam, M; Larkin, J; Koo, D; Raschke, L; Melbourne, J

    2007-02-17

    We used laser guide star adaptive optics at the Lick and Keck Observatories to study active galactic nuclei and galaxies, with emphasis on those in the early Universe. The goals were to observe large galaxies like our own Milky Way in the process of their initial assembly from sub-components, to identify central active galactic nuclei due to accreting black holes in galaxy cores, and to measure rates of star formation and evolution in galaxies. In the distant universe our focus was on the GOODS and GEMS fields (regions in the Northern and Southern sky that include the Hubble Deep Fields) as well as the Extended Groth Strip and COSMOS fields. Each of these parts of the sky has been intensively studied at multiple wavelengths by the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, the XMM Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and several ground-based telescopes including the Very Large Array radio interferometer, in order to gain an unbiased view of a significant statistical sample of galaxies in the early universe.

  4. Exploring pulse shaping for Z using graded-density impactors on gas guns (final report for LDRD project 79879).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furnish, Michael David; Reinhart, William Dodd; Anderson, William W. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Vogler, Tracy John; Hixson, Rob (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Kipp, Marlin E.

    2005-10-01

    While isentropic compression experiment (ICE) techniques have proved useful in deducing the high-pressure compressibility of a wide range of materials, they have encountered difficulties where large-volume phase transitions exist. The present study sought to apply graded-density impactor methods for producing isentropic loading to planar impact experiments to selected such problems. Cerium was chosen due to its 20% compression between 0.7 and 1.0 GPa. A model was constructed based on limited earlier dynamic data, and applied to the design of a suite of experiments. A capability for handling this material was installed. Two experiments were executed using shock/reload techniques with available samples, loading initially to near the gamma-alpha transition, then reloading. As well, two graded-density impactor experiments were conducted with alumina. A method for interpreting ICE data was developed and validated; this uses a wavelet construction for the ramp wave and includes corrections for the ''diffraction'' of wavelets by releases or reloads reflected from the sample/window interface. Alternate methods for constructing graded-density impactors are discussed.

  5. Final Report on LDRD project 130784 : functional brain imaging by tunable multi-spectral Event-Related Optical Signal (EROS).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speed, Ann Elizabeth; Spahn, Olga Blum; Hsu, Alan Yuan-Chun

    2009-09-01

    Functional brain imaging is of great interest for understanding correlations between specific cognitive processes and underlying neural activity. This understanding can provide the foundation for developing enhanced human-machine interfaces, decision aides, and enhanced cognition at the physiological level. The functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) based event-related optical signal (EROS) technique can provide direct, high-fidelity measures of temporal and spatial characteristics of neural networks underlying cognitive behavior. However, current EROS systems are hampered by poor signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and depth of measure, limiting areas of the brain and associated cognitive processes that can be investigated. We propose to investigate a flexible, tunable, multi-spectral fNIRS EROS system which will provide up to 10x greater SNR as well as improved spatial and temporal resolution through significant improvements in electronics, optoelectronics and optics, as well as contribute to the physiological foundation of higher-order cognitive processes and provide the technical foundation for miniaturized portable neuroimaging systems.

  6. A Complexity Science-Based Framework for Global Joint Operations Analysis to Support Force Projection: LDRD Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawton, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    The military is undergoing a significant transformation as it modernizes for the information age and adapts to address an emerging asymmetric threat beyond traditional cold war era adversaries. Techniques such as traditional large-scale, joint services war gaming analysis are no longer adequate to support program evaluation activities and mission planning analysis at the enterprise level because the operating environment is evolving too quickly. New analytical capabilities are necessary to address modernization of the Department of Defense (DoD) enterprise. This presents significant opportunity to Sandia in supporting the nation at this transformational enterprise scale. Although Sandia has significant experience with engineering system of systems (SoS) and Complex Adaptive System of Systems (CASoS), significant fundamental research is required to develop modeling, simulation and analysis capabilities at the enterprise scale. This report documents an enterprise modeling framework which will enable senior level decision makers to better understand their enterprise and required future investments.

  7. Final report on LDRD project: Semiconductor surface-emitting microcavity laser spectroscopy for analysis of biological cells and microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourley, P.L.; McDonald, A.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nanostructure and Semiconductor Physics Dept.; Gourley, M.F. [Washington Hospital Center, DC (United States); Bellum, J. [Coherent Technologies, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1997-08-01

    This article discusses a new intracavity laser technique that uses living or fixed cells as an integral part of the laser. The cells are placed on a GaAs based semiconductor wafer comprising one half of a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser. After placement, the cells are covered with a dielectric mirror to close the laser cavity. When photo-pumped with an external laser, this hybrid laser emits coherent light images and spectra that depend sensitively on the cell size, shape, and dielectric properties. The light spectra can be used to identify different cell types and distinguish normal and abnormal cells. The laser can be used to study single cells in real time as a cell-biology lab-on-a-chip, or to study large populations of cells by scanning the pump laser at high speed. The laser is well-suited to be integrated with other micro-optical or micro-fluidic components to lead to micro-optical-mechanical systems for analysis of fluids, particulates, and biological cells.

  8. Intermediate Bandgap Solar Cells From Nanostructured Silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, Marcie [Bandgap Engineering, Lincoln, MA (United States)

    2014-10-30

    This project aimed to demonstrate increased electronic coupling in silicon nanostructures relative to bulk silicon for the purpose of making high efficiency intermediate bandgap solar cells using silicon. To this end, we formed nanowires with controlled crystallographic orientation, small diameter, <111> sidewall faceting, and passivated surfaces to modify the electronic band structure in silicon by breaking down the symmetry of the crystal lattice. We grew and tested these silicon nanowires with <110>-growth axes, which is an orientation that should produce the coupling enhancement.

  9. Mechanical Spectroscopy of Nanostructured Composite Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mari, Daniele; Schaller, Robert; Mazaheri, Mehdi, E-mail: daniele.mari@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Complexe, Groupe de Spectroscopie Mecanique, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-07-06

    The thermo-mechanical behavior of different nano-structured composite materials, which were processed within the SAPHIR European Integrated Project, has been characterized by mechanical spectroscopy. The obtained results show clearly that creep resistance of fine grain ceramics such as zirconia can be improved by carbon nano-tube (CNT) reinforcements. On the other hand the elastic modulus and the damping capacity of aluminum matrix composites were increased by SiC nano-particle additions. It has also been observed that CNT additions are responsible for a better thermal stability of polymer such as ABS (Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene) used in automotive industry.

  10. Semiconductors and semimetals nanostructured systems

    CERN Document Server

    Willardson, Robert K; Beer, Albert C; Reed, Mark A

    1992-01-01

    This is the first available volume to consolidate prominent topics in the emerging field of nanostructured systems. Recent technological advancements have led to a new era of nanostructure physics, allowing for the fabrication of nanostructures whose behavior is dominated by quantum interference effects. This new capability has enthused the experimentalist and theorist alike. Innumerable possibilities have now opened up for physical exploration and device technology on the nanoscale. This book, with contributions from five pioneering researchers, will allow the expert and novice alike to explore a fascinating new field.Provides a state-of-the-art review of quantum-scale artificially nanostructured electronic systemsIncludes contributions by world-known experts in the fieldOpens the field to the non-expert with a concise introductionFeatures discussions of:Low-dimensional condensed matter physicsProperties of nanostructured, ultrasmall electronic systemsMesoscopic physics and quantum transportPhysics of 2D ele...

  11. Peroxidases in nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria eCarmona-Ribeiro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidases are enzymes catalyzing redox reactions that cleave peroxides. Their active redox centers have heme, cysteine thiols, selenium, manganese and other chemical moieties. Peroxidases and their mimetic systems have several technological and biomedical applications such as environment protection, energy production, bioremediation, sensors and immunoassays design and drug delivery devices. The combination of peroxidases or systems with peroxidase-like activity with nanostructures such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, thin films, liposomes, micelles, nanoflowers, nanorods and others is often an efficient strategy to improve catalytic activity, targeting and reusability.

  12. EDITORIAL: Nanostructured solar cells Nanostructured solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenham, Neil C.; Grätzel, Michael

    2008-10-01

    Conversion into electrical power of even a small fraction of the solar radiation incident on the Earth's surface has the potential to satisfy the world's energy demands without generating CO2 emissions. Current photovoltaic technology is not yet fulfilling this promise, largely due to the high cost of the electricity produced. Although the challenges of storage and distribution should not be underestimated, a major bottleneck lies in the photovoltaic devices themselves. Improving efficiency is part of the solution, but diminishing returns in that area mean that reducing the manufacturing cost is absolutely vital, whilst still retaining good efficiencies and device lifetimes. Solution-processible materials, e.g. organic molecules, conjugated polymers and semiconductor nanoparticles, offer new routes to the low-cost production of solar cells. The challenge here is that absorbing light in an organic material produces a coulombically bound exciton that requires dissociation at a donor-acceptor heterojunction. A thickness of at least 100 nm is required to absorb the incident light, but excitons only diffuse a few nanometres before decaying. The problem is therefore intrinsically at the nano-scale: we need composite devices with a large area of internal donor-acceptor interface, but where each carrier has a pathway to the respective electrode. Dye-sensitized and bulk heterojunction cells have nanostructures which approach this challenge in different ways, and leading research in this area is described in many of the articles in this special issue. This issue is not restricted to organic or dye-sensitized photovoltaics, since nanotechnology can also play an important role in devices based on more conventional inorganic materials. In these materials, the electronic properties can be controlled, tuned and in some cases completely changed by nanoscale confinement. Also, the techniques of nanoscience are the natural ones for investigating the localized states, particularly at

  13. Plasma Spray Forming of Nanostructured Composite Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The nanostructure composite coating is obtained via plasma spraying of Al2O3-13 wt pct TiO2 powder. Brittle and hard lamella results from melted nanostructured powder. Ductile nanostructured matrix forms from unmelted nanostructured particles. Through the adjustment of constituent and nanostructure, hardness/strength and toughness/ductility are balanced and overall properties of the structure composite are achieved.

  14. Mechanical design of DNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Carlos E; Su, Hai-Jun; Marras, Alexander E; Zhou, Lifeng; Johnson, Joshua

    2015-04-14

    Structural DNA nanotechnology is a rapidly emerging field that has demonstrated great potential for applications such as single molecule sensing, drug delivery, and templating molecular components. As the applications of DNA nanotechnology expand, a consideration of their mechanical behavior is becoming essential to understand how these structures will respond to physical interactions. This review considers three major avenues of recent progress in this area: (1) measuring and designing mechanical properties of DNA nanostructures, (2) designing complex nanostructures based on imposed mechanical stresses, and (3) designing and controlling structurally dynamic nanostructures. This work has laid the foundation for mechanically active nanomachines that can generate, transmit, and respond to physical cues in molecular systems.

  15. Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor Project: Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program FY 2002 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, David Andrew; Dolan, Thomas James; Miller, Gregory Kent; Moore, Richard Leroy; Terry, William Knox; Ougouag, Abderrafi Mohammed-El-Ami; Oh, Chang H; Gougar, Hans D

    2002-11-01

    This report documents the results of our research in FY-02 on pebble-bed reactor technology under our Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled the Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor. The MPBR is an advanced reactor concept that can meet the energy and environmental needs of future generations under DOE’s Generation IV initiative. Our work is focused in three areas: neutronics, core design and fuel cycle; reactor safety and thermal hydraulics; and fuel performance.

  16. Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor Project: Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program FY 2002 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, David Andrew; Dolan, Thomas James; Miller, Gregory Kent; Moore, Richard Leroy; Terry, William Knox; Ougouag, Abderrafi Mohammed-El-Ami; Oh, Chang H; Gougar, Hans D

    2002-11-01

    This report documents the results of our research in FY-02 on pebble-bed reactor technology under our Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled the Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor. The MPBR is an advanced reactor concept that can meet the energy and environmental needs of future generations under DOE’s Generation IV initiative. Our work is focused in three areas: neutronics, core design and fuel cycle; reactor safety and thermal hydraulics; and fuel performance.

  17. Alternative nanostructures for thermophones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Nathanael; Aliev, Ali; Baughman, Ray

    2015-03-01

    There is a large promise for thermophones in high power sonar arrays, flexible loudspeakers, and noise cancellation devices. So far, freestanding aerogel-like carbon nanotube sheets demonstrate the best performance as a thermoacoustic heat source. However, the limited accessibility of large size freestanding carbon nanotube sheets and other even more exotic materials published recently, hampers the field. We present here new alternative materials for a thermoacoustic heat source with high energy conversion efficiency, additional functionalities, environmentally friendly and cost effective production technologies. We discuss the thermoacoustic performance of alternative nanoscale materials and compare their spectral and power dependencies of sound pressure in air. The study presented here focuses on engineering thermal gradients in the vicinity of nanostructures and subsequent heat dissipation processes from the interior of encapsulated thermoacoustic projectors. Applications of thermoacoustic projectors for high power SONAR arrays, sound cancellation, and optimal thermal design, regarding enhanced energy conversion efficiency, are discussed.

  18. Defects in semiconductor nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vijay A Singh; Manoj K Harbola; Praveen Pathak

    2008-02-01

    Impurities play a pivotal role in semiconductors. One part in a million of phosphorous in silicon alters the conductivity of the latter by several orders of magnitude. Indeed, the information age is possible only because of the unique role of shallow impurities in semiconductors. Although work in semiconductor nanostructures (SN) has been in progress for the past two decades, the role of impurities in them has been only sketchily studied. We outline theoretical approaches to the electronic structure of shallow impurities in SN and discuss their limitations. We find that shallow levels undergo a SHADES (SHAllow-DEep-Shallow) transition as the SN size is decreased. This occurs because of the combined effect of quantum confinement and reduced dielectric constant in SN. Level splitting is pronounced and this can perhaps be probed by ESR and ENDOR techniques. Finally, we suggest that a perusal of literature on (semiconductor) cluster calculations carried out 30 years ago would be useful.

  19. Magnetism in carbon nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Hagelberg, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Magnetism in carbon nanostructures is a rapidly expanding field of current materials science. Its progress is driven by the wide range of applications for magnetic carbon nanosystems, including transmission elements in spintronics, building blocks of cutting-edge nanobiotechnology, and qubits in quantum computing. These systems also provide novel paradigms for basic phenomena of quantum physics, and are thus of great interest for fundamental research. This comprehensive survey emphasizes both the fundamental nature of the field, and its groundbreaking nanotechnological applications, providing a one-stop reference for both the principles and the practice of this emerging area. With equal relevance to physics, chemistry, engineering and materials science, senior undergraduate and graduate students in any of these subjects, as well as all those interested in novel nanomaterials, will gain an in-depth understanding of the field from this concise and self-contained volume.

  20. Biogenic nanostructured silica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Silicon is by far the most abundant element in the earth crust and also is an essential element for higher plants, yet its biology and mechanisms in plant tolerance of biotic and abiotic stresses are poorly understood. Based on the molecular mechanisms of the biosilicification in marine organisms such as diatoms and sponges, the cell wall template-mediated self-assembly of nanostructured silica in marine organisms and higher plants as well as the related organic molecules are discussed. Understanding of the templating and structure-directed effects of silicon-processing organic molecules not only offers the clue for synthesizing silicon-based materials, but also helps to recognize the anomaly of silicon in plant biology.

  1. Ldrd-2015-00076 -- Validation Study Of The SRNL Vacuum Aerosol Contaminant Extractor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegfried, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-14

    SRNL recently developed a prototype device for the IAEA to prepare particulate samples collected on swipes for laboratory analysis. The Vacuum Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (VacACE) utilizes electrostatic precipitation in lieu of the impaction or ultrasonic solvent extraction methods presently employed by the IAEA to place particles of interest on carbon planchets for investigation. The project was funded by the Intentional Safeguards Projects Office (ISPO) with scope for device design and fabrication, but no scope for validation or testing. Without documented validation of the tool, sample processing and subsequent analysis fidelity cannot be assured. The goal of this project was to determine collection efficacy in a rigorous fashion, demonstrate proof of concept with standardized particulates, and produce a validated VacACE sampling protocol.

  2. Diagnostic development for determining the joint temperature/soot statistics in hydrocarbon-fueled pool fires : LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casteneda, Jaime N.; Frederickson, Kraig; Grasser, Thomas W.; Hewson, John C.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Luketa, Anay Josephine

    2009-09-01

    A joint temperature/soot laser-based optical diagnostic was developed for the determination of the joint temperature/soot probability density function (PDF) for hydrocarbon-fueled meter-scale turbulent pool fires. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort was in support of the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program which seeks to produce computational models for the simulation of fire environments for risk assessment and analysis. The development of this laser-based optical diagnostic is motivated by the need for highly-resolved spatio-temporal information for which traditional diagnostic probes, such as thermocouples, are ill-suited. The in-flame gas temperature is determined from the shape of the nitrogen Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) signature and the soot volume fraction is extracted from the intensity of the Laser-Induced Incandescence (LII) image of the CARS probed region. The current state of the diagnostic will be discussed including the uncertainty and physical limits of the measurements as well as the future applications of this probe.

  3. Magnetocaloric properties of metallic nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khurram S. Khattak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A compilation of magnetocaloric properties of metallic nanostructures with Curie temperature (TC between 260 and 340 K has been tabulated. The tabulated data show that nanostructure plays an important role in enhancing the magnetocaloric properties of a material, namely by reducing the peak of magnetic entropy, but broadening of the magnetocaloric effect curve with an average of 10 K sliding window for Curie temperature. A second table lists all bulk metallic and intermetallic materials, in which there is no nanostructural data, with an entropy change of at least 20 J/kg K and a Curie temperature between 260 and 340 K. We propose that further experiments should be made on the nanostructured form of these materials.

  4. Nanostructured materials and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Logothetidis, Stergios

    2012-01-01

    This book applies nanostructures and nanomaterials to energy and organic electronics, offering advanced deposition and processing methods and theoretical and experimental aspects for nanoparticles, nanotubes and thin films for organic electronics applications.

  5. Quantum optics with semiconductor nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Jahnke, Frank

    2012-01-01

    A guide to the theory, application and potential of semiconductor nanostructures in the exploration of quantum optics. It offers an overview of resonance fluorescence emission.$bAn understanding of the interaction between light and matter on a quantum level is of fundamental interest and has many applications in optical technologies. The quantum nature of the interaction has recently attracted great attention for applications of semiconductor nanostructures in quantum information processing. Quantum optics with semiconductor nanostructures is a key guide to the theory, experimental realisation, and future potential of semiconductor nanostructures in the exploration of quantum optics. Part one provides a comprehensive overview of single quantum dot systems, beginning with a look at resonance fluorescence emission. Quantum optics with single quantum dots in photonic crystal and micro cavities are explored in detail, before part two goes on to review nanolasers with quantum dot emitters. Light-matter interaction...

  6. Engineered Nanostructured MEA Technology for Low Temperature Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yimin

    2009-07-16

    The objective of this project is to develop a novel catalyst support technology based on unique engineered nanostructures for low temperature fuel cells which: (1) Achieves high catalyst activity and performance; (2) Improves catalyst durability over current technologies; and (3) Reduces catalyst cost. This project is directed at the development of durable catalysts supported by novel support that improves the catalyst utilization and hence reduce the catalyst loading. This project will develop a solid fundamental knowledge base necessary for the synthetic effort while at the same time demonstrating the catalyst advantages in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs).

  7. Synthesis of vertically aligned metal oxide nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Roqan, Iman S.

    2016-03-03

    Metal oxide nanostructure and methods of making metal oxide nanostructures are provided. The metal oxide nanostructures can be 1 -dimensional nanostructures such as nanowires, nanofibers, or nanotubes. The metal oxide nanostructures can be doped or undoped metal oxides. The metal oxide nanostructures can be deposited onto a variety of substrates. The deposition can be performed without high pressures and without the need for seed catalysts on the substrate. The deposition can be performed by laser ablation of a target including a metal oxide and, optionally, a dopant. In some embodiments zinc oxide nanostructures are deposited onto a substrate by pulsed laser deposition of a zinc oxide target using an excimer laser emitting UV radiation. The zinc oxide nanostructure can be doped with a rare earth metal such as gadolinium. The metal oxide nanostructures can be used in many devices including light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

  8. Strategic partnerships final LDRD report : nanocomposite materials for efficient solar hydrogen production.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corral, Erica L. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Miller, James Edward; Walker, Luke S. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Evans, Lindsey R.

    2012-05-01

    This 'campus executive' project sought to advance solar thermochemical technology for producing the chemical fuels. The project advanced the common interest of Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Arizona in creating a sustainable and viable alternative to fossil fuels. The focus of this effort was in developing new methods for creating unique monolithic composite structures and characterizing their performance in thermochemical production of hydrogen from water. The development and processing of the materials was undertaken in the Materials Science and Engineering Department at the University of Arizona; Sandia National Laboratories performed the thermochemical characterization. Ferrite/yttria-stabilized zirconia composite monoliths were fabricated and shown to have exceptionally high utilization of the ferrite for splitting CO{sub 2} to obtain CO (a process analogous to splitting H{sub 2}O to obtain H{sub 2}).

  9. LDRD final report : leveraging multi-way linkages on heterogeneous data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Kolda, Tamara Gibson (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2010-09-01

    This report is a summary of the accomplishments of the 'Leveraging Multi-way Linkages on Heterogeneous Data' which ran from FY08 through FY10. The goal was to investigate scalable and robust methods for multi-way data analysis. We developed a new optimization-based method called CPOPT for fitting a particular type of tensor factorization to data; CPOPT was compared against existing methods and found to be more accurate than any faster method and faster than any equally accurate method. We extended this method to computing tensor factorizations for problems with incomplete data; our results show that you can recover scientifically meaningfully factorizations with large amounts of missing data (50% or more). The project has involved 5 members of the technical staff, 2 postdocs, and 1 summer intern. It has resulted in a total of 13 publications, 2 software releases, and over 30 presentations. Several follow-on projects have already begun, with more potential projects in development.

  10. Chemically enabled nanostructure fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Fengwei

    The first part of the dissertation explored ways of chemically synthesizing new nanoparticles and biologically guided assembly of nanoparticle building blocks. Chapter two focuses on synthesizing three-layer composite magnetic nanoparticles with a gold shell which can be easily functionalized with other biomolecules. The three-layer magnetic nanoparticles, when functionalized with oligonucleotides, exhibit the surface chemistry, optical properties, and cooperative DNA binding properties of gold nanoparticle probes, while maintaining the magnetic properties of the Fe3O4 inner shell. Chapter three describes a new method for synthesizing nanoparticles asymmetrically functionalized with oligonucleotides and the use of these novel building blocks to create satellite structures. This synthetic capability allows one to introduce valency into such structures and then use that valency to direct particle assembly events. The second part of the thesis explored approaches of nanostructure fabrication on substrates. Chapter four focuses on the development of a new scanning probe contact printing method, polymer pen lithography (PPL), which combines the advantages of muCp and DPN to achieve high-throughput, flexible molecular printing. PPL uses a soft elastomeric tip array, rather than tips mounted on individual cantilevers, to deliver inks to a surface in a "direct write" manner. Arrays with as many as ˜11 million pyramid-shaped pens can be brought into contact with substrates and readily leveled optically in order to insure uniform pattern development. Chapter five describes gel pen lithography, which uses a gel to fabricate pen array. Gel pen lithography is a low-cost, high-throughput nanolithography method especially useful for biomaterials patterning and aqueous solution patterning which makes it a supplement to DPN and PPL. Chapter 6 shows a novel form of optical nanolithography, Beam Pen Lithography (BPL), which uses an array of NSOM pens to do nanoscale optical

  11. A Design Tool for Nanostructures with Tunable Thermal Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    inorganic materials (mainly nanostructures: Si nanowire and thin film, single-walled carbon naotube (SWCNT) and single layer graphene) and bulk...distributions need to be simulated to accurate capture the dispersion characteristics of the individual material phases. In this project, a simpler and...filed. With varying mass ratio phonon dispersion mismatch can be tuned and significant change can be obtained for phonon transmission. Figure 4(c

  12. Ultrahard magnetic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahota, P. K.; Liu, Y.; Skomski, R.; Manchanda, P.; Zhang, R.; Franchin, M.; Fangohr, H.; Hadjipanayis, G. C.; Kashyap, A.; Sellmyer, D. J.

    2012-04-01

    The performance of hard-magnetic nanostructures is investigated by analyzing the size and geometry dependence of thin-film hysteresis loops. Compared to bulk magnets, weight and volume are much less important, but we find that the energy product remains the main figure of merit down to very small features sizes. However, hysteresis loops are much easier to control on small length scales, as epitomized by Fe-Co-Pt thin films with magnetizations of up to 1.78 T and coercivities of up to 2.52 T. Our numerical and analytical calculations show that the feature size and geometry have a big effect on the hysteresis loop. Layered soft regions, especially if they have a free surface, are more harmful to coercivity and energy product than spherical inclusions. In hard-soft nanocomposites, an additional complication is provided by the physical properties of the hard phases. For a given soft phase, the performance of a hard-soft composite is determined by the parameter (Ms - Mh)/Kh.

  13. Magnetic anisotropy in nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenbach, M

    2001-01-01

    method for solving the LDA Kohn-Sham equation. This extended code allows us to perform fully relativistic calculations to enable us to investigate the spin orbit coupling effects leading to anisotropies and potentially non collinear ordering of magnetic moments in these systems of magnetic inclusions in copper. With this approach we find that depending on the orientation of the atoms along the 100 or 110 direction in copper the ground state orientation of the magnetic moments in the chain is either perpendicular or parallel to the chain direction, when the magnetic dipolar interaction energy is added to the final ab initio result. In this thesis we investigate the effect of magnetic anisotropies in nanostructured materials. The main emphasis in our work presented here is on systems that have an underlying one dimensional structure, like nanowires or atomic chains. In a simple classical one dimensional model we show the rich ground state structure of magnetic orientations one might expect to find in such syste...

  14. Phonon engineering for nanostructures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubry, Sylvie (Stanford University); Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sullivan, John Patrick; Peebles, Diane Elaine; Hurley, David H. (Idaho National Laboratory); Shinde, Subhash L.; Piekos, Edward Stanley; Emerson, John Allen

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the physics of phonon transport at small length scales is increasingly important for basic research in nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, nanomechanics, and thermoelectrics. We conducted several studies to develop an understanding of phonon behavior in very small structures. This report describes the modeling, experimental, and fabrication activities used to explore phonon transport across and along material interfaces and through nanopatterned structures. Toward the understanding of phonon transport across interfaces, we computed the Kapitza conductance for {Sigma}29(001) and {Sigma}3(111) interfaces in silicon, fabricated the interfaces in single-crystal silicon substrates, and used picosecond laser pulses to image the thermal waves crossing the interfaces. Toward the understanding of phonon transport along interfaces, we designed and fabricated a unique differential test structure that can measure the proportion of specular to diffuse thermal phonon scattering from silicon surfaces. Phonon-scale simulation of the test ligaments, as well as continuum scale modeling of the complete experiment, confirmed its sensitivity to surface scattering. To further our understanding of phonon transport through nanostructures, we fabricated microscale-patterned structures in diamond thin films.

  15. Photoresponsive nanostructured membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, P.

    2016-07-26

    The perspective of adding stimuli-response to isoporous membranes stimulates the development of separation devices with pores, which would open or close under control of environment chemical composition, temperature or exposure to light. Changes in pH and temperature have been previously investigated. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the preparation of photoresponsive isoporous membranes, applying self-assembly non-solvent induced phase separation to a new light responsive block copolymer. First, we optimized the membrane formation by using poly(styrene-b-anthracene methyl methacrylate-b-methylmethacrylate) (PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA) copolymer, identifying the most suitable solvent, copolymer block length, and other parameters. The obtained final triblock copolymer membrane morphologies were characterized using atomic force and electron microscopy. The microscopic analysis reveals that the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer can form both lamellar and ordered hexagonal nanoporous structures on the membrane top layer in appropriate solvent compositions. The nanostructured membrane emits fluorescence due to the presence of the anthracene mid-block. On irradiation of light the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer membranes has an additional stimuli response. The anthracene group undergoes conformational changes by forming [4 + 4] cycloadducts and this alters the membrane\\'s water flux and solute retention. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  16. FY05 LDRD Fianl Report Investigation of AAA+ protein machines that participate in DNA replication, recombination, and in response to DNA damage LDRD Project Tracking Code: 04-LW-049

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawicka, D; de Carvalho-Kavanagh, M S; Barsky, D; Venclovas, C

    2006-12-04

    The AAA+ proteins are remarkable macromolecules that are able to self-assemble into nanoscale machines. These protein machines play critical roles in many cellular processes, including the processes that manage a cell's genetic material, but the mechanism at the molecular level has remained elusive. We applied computational molecular modeling, combined with advanced sequence analysis and available biochemical and genetic data, to structurally characterize eukaryotic AAA+ proteins and the protein machines they form. With these models we have examined intermolecular interactions in three-dimensions (3D), including both interactions between the components of the AAA+ complexes and the interactions of these protein machines with their partners. These computational studies have provided new insights into the molecular structure and the mechanism of action for AAA+ protein machines, thereby facilitating a deeper understanding of processes involved in DNA metabolism.

  17. THERMODYNAMIC AND KINETIC MODELING OF ADVANCED NUCLEAR FUELS - FINAL LDRD-ER REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchi, P

    2011-11-28

    This project enhanced our theoretical capabilities geared towards establishing the basic science of a high-throughput protocol for the development of advanced nuclear fuel that should couple modern computational materials modeling and simulation tools, fabrication and characterization capabilities, and targeted high throughput performance testing experiments. The successful conclusion of this ER project allowed us to upgrade state-of-the-art modeling codes, and apply these modeling tools to ab initio energetics and thermodynamic assessments of phase diagrams of various mixtures of actinide alloys, propose a tool for optimizing composition of complex alloys for specific properties, predict diffusion behavior in diffusion couples made of actinide and transition metals, include one new equation in the LLNL phase-field AMPE code, and predict microstructure evolution during alloy coring. In FY11, despite limited funding, the team also initiated an experimental activity, with collaboration from Texas A&M University by preparing samples of nuclear fuels in bulk forms and for diffusion couple studies and metallic matrices, and performing preliminary characterization.

  18. Method of fabrication of anchored nanostructure materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2013-11-26

    Methods for fabricating anchored nanostructure materials are described. The methods include heating a nano-catalyst under a protective atmosphere to a temperature ranging from about 450.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. and contacting the heated nano-catalysts with an organic vapor to affix carbon nanostructures to the nano-catalysts and form the anchored nanostructure material.

  19. Nanostructured materials in electroanalysis of pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahi, A; Karimian, K; Heli, H

    2016-03-15

    Basic strategies and recent developments for the enhancement of the sensory performance of nanostructures in the electroanalysis of pharmaceuticals are reviewed. A discussion of the properties of nanostructures and their application as modified electrodes for drug assays is presented. The electrocatalytic effect of nanostructured materials and their application in determining low levels of drugs in pharmaceutical forms and biofluids are discussed.

  20. Fabrication of nanowires and nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Piraux, L.

    2009-01-01

    We report on different approaches that we have adopted and developed for the fabrication of nanowires and nanostructures. Methods based on template synthesis and on self organization seem to be the most promising for the fabrication of nanomaterials and nanostructures due to their easiness and low...... cost. The development of a supported nanoporous alumina template and the possibility of using this template to combine electrochemical synthesis with lithographic methods open new ways for the fabrication of complex nanostructures. The numerous advantages of the supported template and its compatibility...... with microelectronic processes make it an ideal candidate for further integration into large-scale fabrication of various nanowire-based devices. © 2009 Springer-Verlag....

  1. Interfacing nanostructures to biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-09-04

    Disclosed herein are methods and materials by which nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes, nanorods, etc. are bound to lectins and/or polysaccharides and prepared for administration to cells. Also disclosed are complexes comprising glycosylated nanostructures, which bind selectively to cells expressing glycosylated surface molecules recognized by the lectin. Exemplified is a complex comprising a carbon nanotube functionalized with a lipid-like alkane, linked to a polymer bearing repeated .alpha.-N-acetylgalactosamine sugar groups. This complex is shown to selectively adhere to the surface of living cells, without toxicity. In the exemplified embodiment, adherence is mediated by a multivalent lectin, which binds both to the cells and the .alpha.-N-acetylgalactosamine groups on the nanostructure.

  2. Zinc stannate nanostructures: hydrothermal synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunandan Baruah and Joydeep Dutta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured binary semiconducting metal oxides have received much attention in the last decade owing to their unique properties rendering them suitable for a wide range of applications. In the quest to further improve the physical and chemical properties, an interest in ternary complex oxides has become noticeable in recent times. Zinc stannate or zinc tin oxide (ZTO is a class of ternary oxides that are known for their stable properties under extreme conditions, higher electron mobility compared to its binary counterparts and other interesting optical properties. The material is thus ideal for applications from solar cells and sensors to photocatalysts. Among the different methods of synthesizing ZTO nanostructures, the hydrothermal method is an attractive green process that is carried out at low temperatures. In this review, we summarize the conditions leading to the growth of different ZTO nanostructures using the hydrothermal method and delve into a few of its applications reported in the literature.

  3. Nanostructure Neutron Converter Layer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); Thibeault, Sheila A. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods for making a neutron converter layer are provided. The various embodiment methods enable the formation of a single layer neutron converter material. The single layer neutron converter material formed according to the various embodiments may have a high neutron absorption cross section, tailored resistivity providing a good electric field penetration with submicron particles, and a high secondary electron emission coefficient. In an embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by sequential supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In another embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by simultaneous supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In a further embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by in-situ metalized aerogel nanostructure development.

  4. Scalable Entity-Based Modeling of Population-Based Systems, Final LDRD Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleary, A J; Smith, S G; Vassilevska, T K; Jefferson, D R

    2005-01-27

    The goal of this project has been to develop tools, capabilities and expertise in the modeling of complex population-based systems via scalable entity-based modeling (EBM). Our initial focal application domain has been the dynamics of large populations exposed to disease-causing agents, a topic of interest to the Department of Homeland Security in the context of bioterrorism. In the academic community, discrete simulation technology based on individual entities has shown initial success, but the technology has not been scaled to the problem sizes or computational resources of LLNL. Our developmental emphasis has been on the extension of this technology to parallel computers and maturation of the technology from an academic to a lab setting.

  5. Final report for the endowment of simulator agents with human-like episodic memory LDRD.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speed, Ann Elizabeth; Lippitt, Carl Edward; Thomas, Edward Victor; Xavier, Patrick Gordon; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schaller, Mark J.; Schoenwald, David Alan

    2003-12-01

    This report documents work undertaken to endow the cognitive framework currently under development at Sandia National Laboratories with a human-like memory for specific life episodes. Capabilities have been demonstrated within the context of three separate problem areas. The first year of the project developed a capability whereby simulated robots were able to utilize a record of shared experience to perform surveillance of a building to detect a source of smoke. The second year focused on simulations of social interactions providing a queriable record of interactions such that a time series of events could be constructed and reconstructed. The third year addressed tools to promote desktop productivity, creating a capability to query episodic logs in real time allowing the model of a user to build on itself based on observations of the user's behavior.

  6. FY08 LDRD Final Report LOCAL: Locality-Optimizing Caching Algorithms and Layouts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstrom, P

    2009-02-27

    This project investigated layout and compression techniques for large, unstructured simulation data to reduce bandwidth requirements and latency in simulation I/O and subsequent post-processing, e.g. data analysis and visualization. The main goal was to eliminate the data-transfer bottleneck - for example, from disk to memory and from central processing unit to graphics processing unit - through coherent data access and by trading underutilized compute power for effective bandwidth and storage. This was accomplished by (1) designing algorithms that both enforce and exploit compactness and locality in unstructured data, and (2) adapting offline computations to a novel stream processing framework that supports pipelining and low-latency sequential access to compressed data. This report summarizes the techniques developed and results achieved, and includes references to publications that elaborate on the technical details of these methods.

  7. Engineering the magnetic anisotropy of atomic-scale nanostructure under electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wanjiao; Ding, Hang-Chen; Tong, Wen-Yi; Gong, Shi-Jing; Wan, Xiangang; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2015-02-01

    Atomic-scale magnetic nanostructures are promising candidates for future information processing devices. Utilizing external electric field to manipulate their magnetic properties is an especially thrilling project. Here, by carefully identifying the different contributions of each atomic orbital to the magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) of the ferromagnetic metal films, we argue that it is possible to engineer both the MAE and the magnetic response to the electric field of atomic-scale magnetic nanostructures. Taking the iron monolayer as a matrix, we propose several interesting iron nanostructures with dramatically different magnetic properties. Such nanostructures could exhibit a strong magnetoelectric effect. Our work may open new avenues to the artificial design of electrically controlled magnetic devices.

  8. Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichhardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reichhardt, Cynthia J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Libal, Andras J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

  9. Optical transitions in semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rupasov, Valery I. [ALTAIR Center LLC, Shrewsbury, MA 01545 (United States) and Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: rupasov@townisp.com

    2007-03-19

    Employing the Maxwell equations and conventional boundary conditions for the radiation field on the nanostructure interfaces, we compute the radiative spontaneous decay rate of optical transitions in spherical semiconductor nanocrystals, core-shell nanocrystals and nanostructures comprising more than one shell. We also show that the coupling between optical transitions localized in the shell of core-shell nanocrystals and radiation field is determined by both conventional electro-multipole momenta and electro-multipole 'inverse' momenta. The latter are proportional to the core radius even for interband transitions that should result in very strong optical transitions.

  10. Nanostructuring of Solar Cell Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    Solar energy is by far the most abundant renewable energy source available, but the levelized cost of solar energy is still not competitive with that of fossil fuels. Therefore there is a need to improve the power conversion effciency of solar cells without adding to the production cost. The main...... objective of this PhD thesis is to develop nanostructured silicon (Si) solar cells with higher power conversion efficiency using only scalable and cost-efficient production methods. The nanostructures, known as 'black silicon', are fabricated by single-step, maskless reactive ion etching and used as front...

  11. Designed supramolecular assemblies for biosensors and photoactive devices. LDRD final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, X.Z.; Shelnutt, J.A.; Hobbs, J.D.; Cesarano, J.

    1997-02-01

    The objective of this project is the development of a new class of supramolecular assemblies for applications in biosensors and biodevices. The supramolecular assemblies are based on membranes and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films composed of naturally-occurring or synthetic lipids, which contain electrically and/or photochemically active components. The LB films are deposited onto electrically-active materials (metal, semiconductors). The active components film components (lipo-porphyrins) at the surface function as molecular recognition sites for sensing proteins and other biomolecules, and the porphyrins and other components (e.g., fullerenes) incorporated into the films serve as photocatalysts and vectorial electron-transport agents. Computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) methods are used to tailor the structure of these film components to optimize function. Molecular modeling is also used to predict the location, orientation, and motion of these molecular components within the films. The result is a variety of extended, self-assembled molecular structures that serve as devices for sensing proteins and biochemicals or as other bioelectronic devices.

  12. Controlled placement and orientation of nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alex K; Yuzvinsky, Thomas D; Fennimore, Adam M

    2014-04-08

    A method for controlled deposition and orientation of molecular sized nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) on substrates is disclosed. The method comprised: forming a thin layer of polymer coating on a substrate; exposing a selected portion of the thin layer of polymer to alter a selected portion of the thin layer of polymer; forming a suspension of nanostructures in a solvent, wherein the solvent suspends the nanostructures and activates the nanostructures in the solvent for deposition; and flowing a suspension of nanostructures across the layer of polymer in a flow direction; thereby: depositing a nanostructure in the suspension of nanostructures only to the selected portion of the thin layer of polymer coating on the substrate to form a deposited nanostructure oriented in the flow direction. By selectively employing portions of the method above, complex NEMS may be built of simpler NEMSs components.

  13. Mesoscale wide-bandwidth linear magnetic actuators : an LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Lawrence Anthony

    2004-02-01

    As MEMS transducers are scaled up in size, the threshold is quickly crossed to where magnetoquasistatic (MQS) transducers are superior for force production compared to electroquasistatic (EQS) transducers. Considerable progress has been made increasing the force output of MEMS EQS transducers, but progress with MEMS MQS transducers has been more modest. A key reason for this has been the difficulty implementing efficient lithographically-fabricated magnetic coil structures. The contribution of this study is a planar multilayer polyphase coil architecture which provides for the lithographic implementation of efficient stator windings suitable for linear magnetic machines. A millimeter-scale linear actuator with complex stator windings was fabricated using this architecture. The stators of the actuator were fabricated using a BCB/Cu process, which does not require replanarization of the wafer between layers. The prototype stator was limited to thin copper layers (3 {micro}m) due to the use of evaporated metal at the time of fabrication. Two layers of metal were implemented in the prototype, but the winding architecture naturally supports additional metal layer pairs. It was found in laboratory tests that the windings can support very high current densities of 4 x 10{sup 9}A/m{sup 2} without damage. Force production normal to the stator was calculated to be 0.54 N/A. For thin stators such as this one, force production increases approximately linearly with the thickness of the windings and a six-layer stator fabricated using a newly implemented electroplated BCB/Cu process (six layers of 15 {micro}m thick metal) is projected to produce approximately 8.8 N/A.

  14. Silver nanostructures synthesis via optically induced electrochemical deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pan; Liu, Na; Yu, Haibo; Wang, Feifei; Liu, Lianqing; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Wang, Yuechao; Li, Wen Jung

    2016-06-01

    We present a new digitally controlled, optically induced electrochemical deposition (OED) method for fabricating silver nanostructures. Projected light patterns were used to induce an electrochemical reaction in a specialized sandwich-like microfluidic device composed of one indium tin oxide (ITO) glass electrode and an optically sensitive-layer-covered ITO electrode. Silver polyhedral nanoparticles, triangular and hexagonal nanoplates, and nanobelts were controllably synthesized in specific positions at which projected light was illuminated. The silver nanobelts had rectangular cross-sections with an average width of 300 nm and an average thickness of 100 nm. By controlling the applied voltage, frequency, and time, different silver nanostructure morphologies were obtained. Based on the classic electric double-layer theory, a dynamic process of reduction and crystallization can be described in terms of three phases. Because it is template- and surfactant-free, the digitally controlled OED method facilitates the easy, low cost, efficient, and flexible synthesis of functional silver nanostructures, especially quasi-one-dimensional nanobelts.

  15. Thermoelectric effects in magnetic nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hatami, M.; Bauer, G.E.W.; Zhang, Q.; Kelly, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    We model and evaluate the Peltier and Seebeck effects in magnetic multilayer nanostructures by a finite-element theory of thermoelectric properties. We present analytical expressions for the thermopower and the current-induced temperature changes due to Peltier cooling/heating. The thermopower of a

  16. Computer Code for Nanostructure Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filikhin, Igor; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2009-01-01

    Due to their small size, nanostructures can have stress and thermal gradients that are larger than any macroscopic analogue. These gradients can lead to specific regions that are susceptible to failure via processes such as plastic deformation by dislocation emission, chemical debonding, and interfacial alloying. A program has been developed that rigorously simulates and predicts optoelectronic properties of nanostructures of virtually any geometrical complexity and material composition. It can be used in simulations of energy level structure, wave functions, density of states of spatially configured phonon-coupled electrons, excitons in quantum dots, quantum rings, quantum ring complexes, and more. The code can be used to calculate stress distributions and thermal transport properties for a variety of nanostructures and interfaces, transport and scattering at nanoscale interfaces and surfaces under various stress states, and alloy compositional gradients. The code allows users to perform modeling of charge transport processes through quantum-dot (QD) arrays as functions of inter-dot distance, array order versus disorder, QD orientation, shape, size, and chemical composition for applications in photovoltaics and physical properties of QD-based biochemical sensors. The code can be used to study the hot exciton formation/relation dynamics in arrays of QDs of different shapes and sizes at different temperatures. It also can be used to understand the relation among the deposition parameters and inherent stresses, strain deformation, heat flow, and failure of nanostructures.

  17. Some properties of electrochemical nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Santos; P Quaino; German Soldano; W Schmickler

    2009-09-01

    The physical and electronic properties of several platinum nanostructures have been investigated by density functional calculations. Particular attention has been paid to the structure of the -band. Our results predict, that nanowires and small platinum clusters supported on Au(111) should be excellent catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction; a monolayer of platinum on Au(111) should also be better than pure platinum.

  18. A transparent nanostructured optical biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuan; Li, Xiang; Que, Long

    2014-05-01

    Herein we report a new transparent nanostructured Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) device. The unique features of the nanostructured optical device can be summarized as the following: (i) optically transparent nanostructured optical device; (ii) simple and inexpensive for fabrication; (iii) easy to be fabricated and scaled up as an arrayed format. These features overcome the existing barriers for the current nanopore-based interferometric optical biosensors by measuring the transmitted optical signals rather than the reflected optical signals, thereby facilitating the optical testing significantly for the arrayed biosensors and thus paving the way for their potential for high throughput biodetection applications. The optically transparent nanostructures (i.e., anodic aluminum oxide nanopores) inside the FPI devices are fabricated from 2.2 microm thick lithographically patterned Al thin film on an indium tin oxide (ITO) glass substrate using a two-step anodization process. Utilizing the binding between Protein A and porcine immunoglobulin G (IgG) as a model, the detection of the bioreaction between biomolecules has been demonstrated successfully. Experiments found that the lowest detection concentration of proteins is in the range of picomolar level using current devices, which can be easily tuned into the range of femtomolar level by optimizing the performance of devices.

  19. Thermoelectric effects in magnetic nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hatami, M.; Bauer, G.E.W.; Zhang, Q.; Kelly, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    We model and evaluate the Peltier and Seebeck effects in magnetic multilayer nanostructures by a finite-element theory of thermoelectric properties. We present analytical expressions for the thermopower and the current-induced temperature changes due to Peltier cooling/heating. The thermopower of a

  20. Semiconductor nanostructures in biological applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexson, Dimitri [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Chen Hongfeng [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Cho, Michael [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Dutta, Mitra [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Li Yang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Shi, Peng [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Raichura, Amit [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Ramadurai, Dinakar [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Parikh, Shaunak [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Stroscio, Michael A [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Vasudev, Milana [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States)

    2005-07-06

    Semiconductor nanostructures in biological applications are discussed. Results are presented on the use of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots both as biological tags and as structures that interact with and influence biomolecules. Results are presented on the use of semiconducting carbon nanotubes in biological applications. (topical review)

  1. Thermal response of nanostructured tungsten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kajita, Shin; De Temmerman, G.; Morgan, Thomas; van Eden, Stein; de Kruif, Thijs; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2014-01-01

    The thermal response of nanostructured tungsten, which was fabricated in the linear divertor simulator NAGDIS-II, was investigated using pulsed plasma in the MAGNUM-PSI device and by using high powered laser pulses. The temperature evolution in response to the pulses was measured with an infrared fa

  2. Peer-to-peer architectures for exascale computing : LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorobeychik, Yevgeniy; Mayo, Jackson R.; Minnich, Ronald G.; Armstrong, Robert C.; Rudish, Donald W.

    2010-09-01

    platforms. P2P architectures give us a starting point for crafting applications and system software for exascale. In the context of the Internet, P2P applications (e.g., file sharing, botnets) have already solved this problem for 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} nodes. Usually based on a fractal distributed hash table structure, these systems have proven robust in practice to constant and unpredictable outages, failures, and even subversion. For example, a recent estimate of botnet turnover (i.e., the number of machines leaving and joining) is about 11% per week. Nonetheless, P2P networks remain effective despite these failures: The Conficker botnet has grown to {approx} 5 x 10{sup 6} peers. Unlike today's system software and applications, those for next-generation exascale machines cannot assume a static structure and, to be scalable over millions of nodes, must be decentralized. P2P architectures achieve both, and provide a promising model for 'fault-oblivious computing'. This project aimed to study the dynamics of P2P networks in the context of a design for exascale systems and applications. Having no single point of failure, the most successful P2P architectures are adaptive and self-organizing. While there has been some previous work applying P2P to message passing, little attention has been previously paid to the tightly coupled exascale domain. Typically, the per-node footprint of P2P systems is small, making them ideal for HPC use. The implementation on each peer node cooperates en masse to 'heal' disruptions rather than relying on a controlling 'master' node. Understanding this cooperative behavior from a complex systems viewpoint is essential to predicting useful environments for the inextricably unreliable exascale platforms of the future. We sought to obtain theoretical insight into the stability and large-scale behavior of candidate architectures, and to work toward leveraging Sandia's Emulytics platform to test promising candidates

  3. Peer-to-peer architectures for exascale computing : LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorobeychik, Yevgeniy; Mayo, Jackson R.; Minnich, Ronald G.; Armstrong, Robert C.; Rudish, Donald W.

    2010-09-01

    platforms. P2P architectures give us a starting point for crafting applications and system software for exascale. In the context of the Internet, P2P applications (e.g., file sharing, botnets) have already solved this problem for 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} nodes. Usually based on a fractal distributed hash table structure, these systems have proven robust in practice to constant and unpredictable outages, failures, and even subversion. For example, a recent estimate of botnet turnover (i.e., the number of machines leaving and joining) is about 11% per week. Nonetheless, P2P networks remain effective despite these failures: The Conficker botnet has grown to {approx} 5 x 10{sup 6} peers. Unlike today's system software and applications, those for next-generation exascale machines cannot assume a static structure and, to be scalable over millions of nodes, must be decentralized. P2P architectures achieve both, and provide a promising model for 'fault-oblivious computing'. This project aimed to study the dynamics of P2P networks in the context of a design for exascale systems and applications. Having no single point of failure, the most successful P2P architectures are adaptive and self-organizing. While there has been some previous work applying P2P to message passing, little attention has been previously paid to the tightly coupled exascale domain. Typically, the per-node footprint of P2P systems is small, making them ideal for HPC use. The implementation on each peer node cooperates en masse to 'heal' disruptions rather than relying on a controlling 'master' node. Understanding this cooperative behavior from a complex systems viewpoint is essential to predicting useful environments for the inextricably unreliable exascale platforms of the future. We sought to obtain theoretical insight into the stability and large-scale behavior of candidate architectures, and to work toward leveraging Sandia's Emulytics platform to test promising candidates

  4. Preparation and photocatalytic activities of 3D flower-like CuO nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qingfei, Fan; Qi, Lan; Meili, Zhang; Ximei, Fan; Zuowan, Zhou; Chaoliang, Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Hierarchical 3D flower-like CuO nanostructures on the Cu substrates were synthesized by a wet chemical method and subsequent heat treatment. The synthesis, structure and morphologies of obtained samples under different concentrations of Na2S2O3 were investigated in detail and the possible growth mechanisms of the 3D flower-like CuO nanostructures were discussed. Na2S2O3 plays a key role in the generation of the 3D flower-like CuO nanostructures. When the concentration of Na2S2O3 is more than 0.4 mol/L, the 3D flower-like CuO nanostructures can be prepared on the Cu foils. The photocatalytic performances were studied by analyzing the degradation of methyl orange (MO) in aqueous solution in the presence of hydroxide water (H2O2). The 3D flower-like CuO nanostructures exhibit higher photocatalytic activity (96.2% degradation rate) than commercial CuO particles (36.3% degradation rate). The origin of the higher photocatalytic activity of the 3D flower-like CuO nanostructures was also discussed. Project supported by the High-Tech Research and Development Program of China (No. 2009AA03Z427).

  5. Composite materials formed with anchored nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-03-10

    A method of forming nano-structure composite materials that have a binder material and a nanostructure fiber material is described. A precursor material may be formed using a mixture of at least one metal powder and anchored nanostructure materials. The metal powder mixture may be (a) Ni powder and (b) NiAl powder. The anchored nanostructure materials may comprise (i) NiAl powder as a support material and (ii) carbon nanotubes attached to nanoparticles adjacent to a surface of the support material. The process of forming nano-structure composite materials typically involves sintering the mixture under vacuum in a die. When Ni and NiAl are used in the metal powder mixture Ni.sub.3Al may form as the binder material after sintering. The mixture is sintered until it consolidates to form the nano-structure composite material.

  6. Complex Nanostructures by Pulsed Droplet Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noboyuki Koguchi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available What makes three dimensional semiconductor quantum nanostructures so attractive is the possibility to tune their electronic properties by careful design of their size and composition. These parameters set the confinement potential of electrons and holes, thus determining the electronic and optical properties of the nanostructure. An often overlooked parameter, which has an even more relevant effect on the electronic properties of the nanostructure, is shape. Gaining a strong control over the electronic properties via shape tuning is the key to access subtle electronic design possibilities. The Pulsed Dropled Epitaxy is an innovative growth method for the fabrication of quantum nanostructures with highly designable shapes and complex morphologies. With Pulsed Dropled Epitaxy it is possible to combine different nanostructures, namely quantum dots, quantum rings and quantum disks, with tunable sizes and densities, into a single multi-function nanostructure, thus allowing an unprecedented control over electronic properties.

  7. Raman Studies of Carbon Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorio, Ado; Souza Filho, Antonio G.

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews recent advances on the use of Raman spectroscopy to study and characterize carbon nanostructures. It starts with a brief survey of Raman spectroscopy of graphene and carbon nanotubes, followed by recent developments in the field. Various novel topics, including Stokes-anti-Stokes correlation, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy in two dimensions, phonon coherence, and high-pressure and shielding effects, are presented. Some consequences for other fields—quantum optics, near-field electromagnetism, archeology, materials and soil sciences—are discussed. The review ends with a discussion of new perspectives on Raman spectroscopy of carbon nanostructures, including how this technique can contribute to the development of biotechnological applications and nanotoxicology.

  8. Dry release of suspended nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsén, Esko Sebastian; Davis, Zachary James; Dong, M.;

    2004-01-01

    A dry release method for fabrication of suspended nanostructures is presented. The technique has been combined with an anti-stiction treatment for fabrication of nanocantilever based nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). The process combines a dry release method, using a supporting layer of photo......A dry release method for fabrication of suspended nanostructures is presented. The technique has been combined with an anti-stiction treatment for fabrication of nanocantilever based nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). The process combines a dry release method, using a supporting layer......, the technique enables long time storage and transportation of produced devices without the risk of stiction. By combining the dry release method with a plasma deposited anti-stiction coating both fabrication induced stiction, which is mainly caused by capillary forces originating from the dehydration...

  9. Nanostructured materials for thermoelectric applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bux, Sabah K; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Kaner, Richard B

    2010-11-28

    Recent studies indicate that nanostructuring can be an effective method for increasing the dimensionless thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) in materials. Most of the enhancement in ZT can be attributed to large reductions in the lattice thermal conductivity due to increased phonon scattering at interfaces. Although significant gains have been reported, much higher ZTs in practical, cost-effective and environmentally benign materials are needed in order for thermoelectrics to become effective for large-scale, wide-spread power and thermal management applications. This review discusses the various synthetic techniques that can be used in the production of bulk scale nanostructured materials. The advantages and disadvantages of each synthetic method are evaluated along with guidelines and goals presented for an ideal thermoelectric material. With proper optimization, some of these techniques hold promise for producing high efficiency devices.

  10. Optical Characterization of Nanostructured Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feidenhans'l, Nikolaj Agentoft

    spectrum; the new method only evaluates the color of the reflected light using a standard RGB color camera. Color scatterometry provides the combined advantages of spectroscopic scatterometry, which provides fast evaluations, and imaging scatterometry that provides an overview image from which small...... implementation, a range of complementing characterization methods is needed to perform high-speed quality control of the nanostructures. This thesis concerns the development of a new method for fast in-line characterization of periodic nanostructures. The focus is on optical scatterometry, which uses inverse......, with trapezoidal profiles approximately ~200 nm high and with periods between 600 nm and 5000 nm. The heights and filling factors are determined with an accuracy of ~8 %, while the sidewall slopes have larger uncertainties due to a lower influence on the reflected light. The thesis also evaluates the use...

  11. Nanostructured Biomaterials and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Parratt

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Some of the most important advances in the life sciences have come from transitioning to thinking of materials and their properties on the nanoscale rather than the macro or even microscale. Improvements in imaging technology have allowed us to see nanofeatures that directly impact chemical and mechanical properties of natural and man-made materials. Now that these can be imaged and quantified, substantial advances have been made in the fields of biomimetics, tissue engineering, and drug delivery. For the first time, scientists can determine the importance of nanograins and nanoasperities in nacre, direct the nucleation of apatite and the growth of cells on nanostructured scaffolds, and pass drugs tethered to nanoparticles through the blood-brain barrier. This review examines some of the most interesting materials whose nanostructure and hierarchical organization have been shown to correlate directly with favorable properties and their resulting applications.

  12. Nanostructured materials for water desalination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humplik, T; Lee, J; O' Hern, S C; Fellman, B A; Karnik, R; Wang, E N [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States); Baig, M A; Hassan, S F; Atieh, M A; Rahman, F; Laoui, T, E-mail: tlaoui@kfupm.edu.sa, E-mail: karnik@mit.edu, E-mail: enwang@mit.edu [Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Chemical Engineering and Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-07-22

    Desalination of seawater and brackish water is becoming an increasingly important means to address the scarcity of fresh water resources in the world. Decreasing the energy requirements and infrastructure costs of existing desalination technologies remains a challenge. By enabling the manipulation of matter and control of transport at nanometer length scales, the emergence of nanotechnology offers new opportunities to advance water desalination technologies. This review focuses on nanostructured materials that are directly involved in the separation of water from salt as opposed to mitigating issues such as fouling. We discuss separation mechanisms and novel transport phenomena in materials including zeolites, carbon nanotubes, and graphene with potential applications to reverse osmosis, capacitive deionization, and multi-stage flash, among others. Such nanostructured materials can potentially enable the development of next-generation desalination systems with increased efficiency and capacity. (topical review)

  13. Nanostructured materials for water desalination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humplik, T.; Lee, J.; O'Hern, S. C.; Fellman, B. A.; Baig, M. A.; Hassan, S. F.; Atieh, M. A.; Rahman, F.; Laoui, T.; Karnik, R.; Wang, E. N.

    2011-07-01

    Desalination of seawater and brackish water is becoming an increasingly important means to address the scarcity of fresh water resources in the world. Decreasing the energy requirements and infrastructure costs of existing desalination technologies remains a challenge. By enabling the manipulation of matter and control of transport at nanometer length scales, the emergence of nanotechnology offers new opportunities to advance water desalination technologies. This review focuses on nanostructured materials that are directly involved in the separation of water from salt as opposed to mitigating issues such as fouling. We discuss separation mechanisms and novel transport phenomena in materials including zeolites, carbon nanotubes, and graphene with potential applications to reverse osmosis, capacitive deionization, and multi-stage flash, among others. Such nanostructured materials can potentially enable the development of next-generation desalination systems with increased efficiency and capacity.

  14. Nanostructured materials for water desalination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humplik, T; Lee, J; O'Hern, S C; Fellman, B A; Baig, M A; Hassan, S F; Atieh, M A; Rahman, F; Laoui, T; Karnik, R; Wang, E N

    2011-07-22

    Desalination of seawater and brackish water is becoming an increasingly important means to address the scarcity of fresh water resources in the world. Decreasing the energy requirements and infrastructure costs of existing desalination technologies remains a challenge. By enabling the manipulation of matter and control of transport at nanometer length scales, the emergence of nanotechnology offers new opportunities to advance water desalination technologies. This review focuses on nanostructured materials that are directly involved in the separation of water from salt as opposed to mitigating issues such as fouling. We discuss separation mechanisms and novel transport phenomena in materials including zeolites, carbon nanotubes, and graphene with potential applications to reverse osmosis, capacitive deionization, and multi-stage flash, among others. Such nanostructured materials can potentially enable the development of next-generation desalination systems with increased efficiency and capacity.

  15. Nanostructures for Organic Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goszczak, Arkadiusz Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    The experimental work in this thesis is focused on the fabrication of nanostructures that can be implemented in organic solar cell (OSC) architecture for enhancement of the device performance. Solar devices made from organic material are gaining increased attention, compared to their inorganic...... counterparts, due to the promising advantages, such as transparency, flexibility, ease of processing etc. But their efficiencies cannot be compared to the inorganic ones. Boosting the efficiency of OSCs by nanopatterning has thus been puzzling many researchers within the past years. Therefore various methods...... technique. Resist imprinted Al dimples drag the main focus showing increase in absorption and efficiency enhancement in poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) and Phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl (PCBM) BHJ devices. Not limited to this, nanostructures by imprinting the organic layer of P3HT:PCBM and imprinted...

  16. Chiroplasmonic DNA-based nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconello, Alessandro; Besteiro, Lucas V.; Govorov, Alexander O.; Willner, Itamar

    2017-09-01

    Chiroplasmonic properties of nanoparticles, organized using DNA-based nanostructures, have attracted both theoretical and experimental interest. Theory suggests that the circular dichroism spectra accompanying chiroplasmonic nanoparticle assemblies are controlled by the sizes, shapes, geometries and interparticle distances of the nanoparticles. In this Review, we present different methods to assemble chiroplasmonic nanoparticle or nanorod systems using DNA scaffolds, and we discuss the operations of dynamically reconfigurable chiroplasmonic nanostructures. The chiroplasmonic properties of the different systems are characterized by circular dichroism and further supported by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy or cryo-transmission electron microscopy imaging and theoretical modelling. We also outline the applications of chiroplasmonic assemblies, including their use as DNA-sensing platforms and as functional systems for information processing and storage. Finally, future perspectives in applying chiroplasmonic nanoparticles as waveguides for selective information transfer and their use as ensembles for chiroselective synthesis are discussed. Specifically, we highlight the upscaling of the systems to device-like configurations.

  17. Nanostructured Substrates for Optical Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Kemling, Jonathan W.; Qavi, Abraham J.; Bailey, Ryan C.; Suslick, Kenneth S

    2011-01-01

    Sensors that change color have the advantages of versatility, ease of use, high sensitivity, and low cost. The recent development of optically based chemical sensing platforms has increasingly employed substrates manufactured with advanced processing or fabrication techniques to provide precise control over shape and morphology of the sensor micro- and nano-structure. New sensors have resulted with improved capabilities for a number of sensing applications, including the detection of biomolec...

  18. Dielectric nanostructures with high laser damage threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, C. Y.; Hong, L. Y.; Deng, J.; Khoo, E. H.; Liu, Z.; Wu, R. F.; Teng, J. H.

    2017-02-01

    Dielectric-based metamaterials are proposed to be the ideal candidates for low-loss, high-efficiency devices. However, to employ dielectric nanostructures for high-power applications, the dielectric material must have a high laser-induced damaged threshold (LIDT) value. In this work, we investigated the LIDT values of dielectric nanostructures for high-power fiber laser applications. Consequently, we found that the fabricated SiO2 nanostructured lens can withstand laser fluence exceeding 100 J/cm2.

  19. Nanostructured Metal Oxides Based Enzymatic Electrochemical Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari, Anees A.; Alhoshan, M.; M. S. AlSalhi; Aldwayyan, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    The unique electrocatalytic properties of the metal oxides and the ease of metal oxide nanostructured fabrication make them extremely interesting materials for electrochemical enzymatic biosensor applications. The application of nanostructured metal oxides in such sensing devices has taken off rapidly and will surely continue to expand. This article provides a review on current research status of electrochemical enzymatic biosensors based on various new types of nanostructured metal oxides su...

  20. Integration of Natural Polymers and Synthetic Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-20

    11/2014 Final Report August 15 2011- August 15 2014 INTEGRATION OF NATURAL POLYMERS AND SYNTHETIC NANOSTRUCTURES FA9550-11-1-0233 Vladimir V. Tsukruk...inorganic nanostructures . We employ fabrication techniques including layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition, vacuum-assisted self-assembly, and spin-assisted...writing. U U U UU 1 Final Performance Report August 2011 - August 2014 FA9550-11-1-0233: INTEGRATION OF NATURAL POLYMERS AND SYNTHETIC NANOSTRUCTURES

  1. Metal chalcogenide nanostructures for renewable energy applications

    CERN Document Server

    Qurashi, Ahsanulhaq

    2014-01-01

    This first ever reference book that focuses on metal chalcogenide semiconductor nanostructures for renewable energy applications encapsulates the state-of-the-art in multidisciplinary research on the metal chalcogenide semiconductor nanostructures (nanocrystals, nanoparticles, nanorods, nanowires,  nanobelts, nanoflowers, nanoribbons and more).  The properties and synthesis of a class of nanomaterials is essential to renewable energy manufacturing and this book focuses on the synthesis of metal chalcogendie nanostructures, their growth mechanism, optical, electrical, and other important prop

  2. Application of smart nanostructures in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jingjing; Qi, Xiaoxue; Miao, Yuqing; Wu, Hai-Long; He, Nongyue; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2010-09-01

    Smart nanostructures are sensitive to various environmental or biological parameters. They offer great potential for numerous biomedical applications such as monitoring, diagnoses, repair and treatment of human biological systems. The present work introduces smart nanostructures for biomedical applications. In addition to drug delivery, which has been extensively reported and reviewed, increasing interest has been observed in using smart nanostructures to develop various novel techniques of sensing, imaging, tissue engineering, biofabrication, nanodevices and nanorobots for the improvement of healthcare.

  3. Physical electrochemistry of nanostructured devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisquert, Juan

    2008-01-07

    This Perspective reviews recent developments in experimental techniques and conceptual methods applied to the electrochemical properties of metal-oxide semiconductor nanostructures and organic conductors, such as those used in dye-sensitized solar cells, high-energy batteries, sensors, and electrochromic devices. The aim is to provide a broad view of the interpretation of electrochemical and optoelectrical measurements for semiconductor nanostructures (sintered colloidal particles, nanorods, arrays of quantum dots, etc.) deposited or grown on a conducting substrate. The Fermi level displacement by potentiostatic control causes a broad change of physical properties such as the hopping conductivity, that can be investigated over a very large variation of electron density. In contrast to traditional electrochemistry, we emphasize that in nanostructured devices we must deal with systems that depart heavily from the ideal, Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics, due to broad distributions of states (energy disorder) and interactions of charge carriers, therefore the electrochemical analysis must be aided by thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. We discuss in detail the most characteristic densities of states, the chemical capacitance, and the transport properties, specially the chemical diffusion coefficient, mobility, and generalized Einstein relation.

  4. Structural optimization of nanostructured aluminum for enhancing mechanical properties and formability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kidmose, Jacob

    The aim of this project is i) to optimize processing parameters of accumulative roll bonding (ARB) to produce a nanostructure of a commercial pure aluminium (Al1050), ii) to apply post-ARB process treatments in the form of thermal annealing or plastic deformation to tailor the structure and mecha...

  5. Development of Nanostructured Materials with Improved Radiation Tolerance for Advanced Nuclear Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinghang Zhang; K. Ted Hartwig

    2009-08-12

    This project will explore the fundamental mechanisms through which interfaces in nanolayered structures and grain boundaries of bulk nanomaterials are able to attract and rapidly eliminate point defects and unwanted foreign species. Candidate materials that will be studied include both nanostructured multilayer composites synthesized by magnetron sputtering and structural bulk nanomaterials produced by severed plastic deformation, equal channel angular extrusion.

  6. Development of Nanostructured Materials with Improved Radiation Tolerance for Advanced Nuclear Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinghang Zhang; K. Ted Hartwig

    2009-08-12

    This project will explore the fundamental mechanisms through which interfaces in nanolayered structures and grain boundaries of bulk nanomaterials are able to attract and rapidly eliminate point defects and unwanted foreign species. Candidate materials that will be studied include both nanostructured multilayer composites synthesized by magnetron sputtering and structural bulk nanomaterials produced by severed plastic deformation, equal channel angular extrusion.

  7. Final report: high resolution lensless 3D imaging of nanostructures with coherent x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, Chris [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2011-04-14

    This project helped pioneer the core capabilities of coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) using X rays at synchrotron light source facilities. We developed an apparatus that was used for CDI at the Advanced Light Source, and applied it to 2D and 3D imaging of nanostructures. We also explored a number of conceptual and computational issues on the reconstruction of CDI data.

  8. Sub-Nanostructured Non Transition Metal Complex Grids for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Orhan Talu; Dr. Surendra N. Tewari

    2007-10-27

    This project involved growing sub-nanostructured metal grids to increase dynamic hydrogen storage capacity of metal hydride systems. The nano particles of any material have unique properties unlike its bulk form. Nano-structuring metal hydride materials can result in: {sm_bullet}Increased hydrogen molecule dissociation rate, {sm_bullet} Increased hydrogen atom transport rate, {sm_bullet} Decreased decrepitation caused by cycling, {sm_bullet} Increased energy transfer in the metal matrix, {sm_bullet} Possible additional contribution by physical adsorption, and {sm_bullet} Possible additional contribution by quantum effects The project succeeded in making nano-structured palladium using electrochemical growth in templates including zeolites, mesoporous silica, polycarbonate films and anodized alumina. Other metals were used to fine-tune the synthesis procedures. Palladium was chosen to demonstrate the effects of nano-structuring since its bulk hydrogen storage capacity and kinetics are well known. Reduced project funding was not sufficient for complete characterization of these materials for hydrogen storage application. The project team intends to seek further funding in the future to complete the characterization of these materials for hydrogen storage.

  9. Reactor and method for production of nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Kim, Jeong H.; Kumar, Vivekanand

    2017-04-25

    A reactor and method for production of nanostructures, including metal oxide nanowires or nanoparticles, are provided. The reactor includes a regulated metal powder delivery system in communication with a dielectric tube; a plasma-forming gas inlet, whereby a plasma-forming gas is delivered substantially longitudinally into the dielectric tube; a sheath gas inlet, whereby a sheath gas is delivered into the dielectric tube; and a microwave energy generator coupled to the dielectric tube, whereby microwave energy is delivered into a plasma-forming gas. The method for producing nanostructures includes providing a reactor to form nanostructures and collecting the formed nanostructures, optionally from a filter located downstream of the dielectric tube.

  10. Anchored nanostructure materials and method of fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2012-11-27

    Anchored nanostructure materials and methods for their fabrication are described. The anchored nanostructure materials may utilize nano-catalysts that include powder-based or solid-based support materials. The support material may comprise metal, such as NiAl, ceramic, a cermet, or silicon or other metalloid. Typically, nanoparticles are disposed adjacent a surface of the support material. Nanostructures may be formed as anchored to nanoparticles that are adjacent the surface of the support material by heating the nano-catalysts and then exposing the nano-catalysts to an organic vapor. The nanostructures are typically single wall or multi-wall carbon nanotubes.

  11. Nanostructures having crystalline and amorphous phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-04-28

    The present invention includes a nanostructure, a method of making thereof, and a method of photocatalysis. In one embodiment, the nanostructure includes a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase in contact with the crystalline phase. Each of the crystalline and amorphous phases has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes a nanoparticle comprising a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase. The amorphous phase is in a selected amount. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes crystalline titanium dioxide and amorphous titanium dioxide in contact with the crystalline titanium dioxide. Each of the crystalline and amorphous titanium dioxide has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale.

  12. Particle Lithography Enables Fabrication of Multicomponent Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-feng; Swartz, Logan A.; Li, Jie-Ren; Liu, Yang; Liu, Gang-yu

    2014-01-01

    Multicomponent nanostructures with individual geometries have attracted much attention because of their potential to carry out multiple functions synergistically. The current work reports a simple method using particle lithography to fabricate multicomponent nanostructures of metals, proteins, and organosiloxane molecules, each with its own geometry. Particle lithography is well-known for its capability to produce arrays of triangular-shaped nanostructures with novel optical properties. This paper extends the capability of particle lithography by combining a particle template in conjunction with surface chemistry to produce multicomponent nanostructures. The advantages and limitations of this approach will also be addressed. PMID:24707328

  13. Caltech campus executive LDRD.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Knudsen, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    The environment most brain systems of humans and other animals are almost constantly confronted with is complex and continuously changing, with each time step updating a potentially bewildering set of opportunities and demands for action. Far from the controlled, discrete trials used in most neuro- and psychological investigations, behavior outside the lab at Caltech is a seamless and continuous process of monitoring (and error correction) of ongoing action, and of evaluating persistence in the current activity with respect to opportunities to switch tasks as alternatives become available. Prior work on frontopolar and prefrontal task switching, use tasks within the same modality (View a stream of symbols on a screen and perform certain response mappings depending on task rules). However, in these task switches the effector is constant: only the mapping of visual symbols to the specific button changes. In this task, the subjects are choosing what kinds of future action decisions they want to perform, where they can control either which body part will act, or which direction they will orient an instructed body action. An effector choice task presents a single target and the subject selects which effector to use to reach the target (eye or hand). While the techniques available for humans can be less spatially resolved compared to non-human primate neural data, they do allow for experimentation on multiple brain areas with relative ease. Thus, we address a broader network of areas involved in motor decisions. We aim to resolve a current dispute regarding the specific functional roles of brain areas that are often co-activated in studies of decision tasks, dorsal premotor cortex(PMd) and posterior parietal cortex(PPC). In one model, the PPC distinctly drives intentions for action selection, whereas PMd stimulation results in complex multi-joint movements without any awareness of, nor subjective feeling of, willing the elicited movement, thus seems to merely help execute the chosen action.

  14. Final LDRD report :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronawitter, Coleman X.; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Mao, Samuel S.

    2012-01-01

    The distinction between electricity and fuel use in analyses of global power consumption statistics highlights the critical importance of establishing efficient synthesis techniques for solar fuelsthose chemicals whose bond energies are obtained through conversion processes driven by solar energy. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) processes show potential for the production of solar fuels because of their demonstrated versatility in facilitating optoelectronic and chemical conversion processes. Tandem PEC-photovoltaic modular configurations for the generation of hydrogen from water and sunlight (solar water splitting) provide an opportunity to develop a low-cost and efficient energy conversion scheme. The critical component in devices of this type is the PEC photoelectrode, which must be optically absorptive, chemically stable, and possess the required electronic band alignment with the electrochemical scale for its charge carriers to have sufficient potential to drive the hydrogen and oxygen evolution reactions. After many decades of investigation, the primary technological obstacle remains the development of photoelectrode structures capable of efficient conversion of light with visible frequencies, which is abundant in the solar spectrum. Metal oxides represent one of the few material classes that can be made photoactive and remain stable to perform the required functions.

  15. LDRD final report :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brost, Randolph C.; McLendon, William Clarence,

    2013-01-01

    Modeling geospatial information with semantic graphs enables search for sites of interest based on relationships between features, without requiring strong a priori models of feature shape or other intrinsic properties. Geospatial semantic graphs can be constructed from raw sensor data with suitable preprocessing to obtain a discretized representation. This report describes initial work toward extending geospatial semantic graphs to include temporal information, and initial results applying semantic graph techniques to SAR image data. We describe an efficient graph structure that includes geospatial and temporal information, which is designed to support simultaneous spatial and temporal search queries. We also report a preliminary implementation of feature recognition, semantic graph modeling, and graph search based on input SAR data. The report concludes with lessons learned and suggestions for future improvements.

  16. Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jin [University of California Santa Cruz; Zhao, Yiping [University of Georgia at Athens

    2014-12-05

    In this entire project period from 2005-2014, we have made significant progress in developing novel nanostructures of metal oxides (MOs) for solar hydrogen generation based on photoelectrochemical (PEC). Materials investigated are focused on 1D and 0D MO nanostructures of TiO2, WO3, ZnO, and Fe2O3 in conjunction with quantum dot (QD) sensitization and chemical doping (N or H) to alter their electronic band structures for both visible light absorption and for facilitating interfacial charge transport. In addition, we have used plasmonic metal nanostructures to enhance the PEC performance by improving light absorption of QDs via enhanced scattering of the plamonic metal. Most importantly, we have discovered a multipronged strategy for improving PEC performance: using plasmonic metal nanostructure to enhance light absorption, QDs to improve charge transfer, and chemical doping to increase charge transport in metal oxides for PEC. The combination is critical for overall high efficiency of PEC. This strategy is developed and demonstrated for the first time to our best knowledge.

  17. Modeling energy transport in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattamatta, Arvind

    Heat transfer in nanostructures differ significantly from that in the bulk materials since the characteristic length scales associated with heat carriers, i.e., the mean free path and the wavelength, are comparable to the characteristic length of the nanostructures. Nanostructure materials hold the promise of novel phenomena, properties, and functions in the areas of thermal management and energy conversion. Example of thermal management in micro/nano electronic devices is the use of efficient nanostructured materials to alleviate 'hot spots' in integrated circuits. Examples in the manipulation of heat flow and energy conversion include nanostructures for thermoelectric energy conversion, thermophotovoltaic power generation, and data storage. One of the major challenges in Metal-Oxide Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) devices is to study the 'hot spot' generation by accurately modeling the carrier-optical phonon-acoustic phonon interactions. Prediction of hotspot temperature and position in MOSFET devices is necessary for improving thermal design and reliability of micro/nano electronic devices. Thermoelectric properties are among the properties that may drastically change at nanoscale. The efficiency of thermoelectric energy conversion in a material is measured by a non-dimensional figure of merit (ZT) defined as, ZT = sigmaS2T/k where sigma is the electrical conductivity, S is the Seebeck coefficient, T is the temperature, and k is the thermal conductivity. During the last decade, advances have been made in increasing ZT using nanostructures. Three important topics are studied with respect to energy transport in nanostructure materials for micro/nano electronic and thermoelectric applications; (1) the role of nanocomposites in improving the thermal efficiency of thermoelectric devices, (2) the interfacial thermal resistance for the semiconductor/metal contacts in thermoelectric devices and for metallic interconnects in micro/nano electronic devices, (3) the

  18. Nanomanufacturing : nano-structured materials made layer-by-layer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, James V.; Cheng, Shengfeng; Grest, Gary Stephen; Tjiptowidjojo, Kristianto (University of New Mexico); Reedy, Earl David, Jr.; Fan, Hongyou; Schunk, Peter Randall; Chandross, Michael Evan; Roberts, Scott A.

    2011-10-01

    Large-scale, high-throughput production of nano-structured materials (i.e. nanomanufacturing) is a strategic area in manufacturing, with markets projected to exceed $1T by 2015. Nanomanufacturing is still in its infancy; process/product developments are costly and only touch on potential opportunities enabled by growing nanoscience discoveries. The greatest promise for high-volume manufacturing lies in age-old coating and imprinting operations. For materials with tailored nm-scale structure, imprinting/embossing must be achieved at high speeds (roll-to-roll) and/or over large areas (batch operation) with feature sizes less than 100 nm. Dispersion coatings with nanoparticles can also tailor structure through self- or directed-assembly. Layering films structured with these processes have tremendous potential for efficient manufacturing of microelectronics, photovoltaics and other topical nano-structured devices. This project is designed to perform the requisite R and D to bring Sandia's technology base in computational mechanics to bear on this scale-up problem. Project focus is enforced by addressing a promising imprinting process currently being commercialized.

  19. Nanoparticle modifications of photodefined nanostructures for energy applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polsky, Ronen; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Burckel, David Bruce; Brozik, Susan Marie; Washburn, Cody M.; Wheeler, David Roger

    2011-10-01

    The advancement of materials technology towards the development of novel 3D nanostructures for energy applications has been a long-standing challenge. The purpose of this project was to explore photolithographically defineable pyrolyzed photoresist carbon films for possible energy applications. The key attributes that we explored were as follows: (1) Photo-interferometric fabrication methods to produce highly porous (meso, micro, and nano) 3-D electrode structures, and (2) conducting polymer and nanoparticle-modification strategies on these structures to provide enhanced catalytic capabilities and increase conductivity. The resulting electrodes were then explored for specific applications towards possible use in battery and energy platforms.

  20. Bioenergy/Biotechnology projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napper, Stan [Louisiana Tech Univ., Ruston, LA (United States); Palmer, James [Louisiana Tech Univ., Ruston, LA (United States); Wilson, Chester [Louisiana Tech Univ., Ruston, LA (United States); Guilbeau, Eric [Louisiana Tech Univ., Ruston, LA (United States); Allouche, Erez [Louisiana Tech Univ., Ruston, LA (United States)

    2012-06-30

    This report describes the progress of five different projects. The first is an enzyme immobilization study of cellulase to reduce costs of the cellulosic ethanol process. High reusability and use of substrates applicable to large scale production were focus areas for this study. The second project was the development of nanostructured catalysts for conversion of syngas to diesel. Cobalt nanowire catalyst was used in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The third project describes work on developing a microfluidic calorimeter to measure reaction rates of enzymes. The fourth project uses inorganic polymer binders that have the advantage of a lower carbon footprint than Portland cement while also providing excellent performance in elevated temperature, high corrosion resistance, high compressive and tensile strengths, and rapid strength gains. The fifth project investigates the potential of turbines in drop structures (such as sewer lines in tall buildings) to recover energy.

  1. Solar Cells Having a Nanostructured Antireflection Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    An solar cell having a surface in a first material is provided, the optical device having a non-periodic nanostructure formed in the surface, the nanostructure comprising a plurality of cone -haped structures wherein the cones are distributed non-periodically on the surface and have a random heig...

  2. Recent achievements in nanostructured photovoltaic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlyap, Halyna M; Laptev, Viktor I

    2011-06-01

    This mini-review summarizes some key interesting applications and perspectives of nanostructured devices for future nanoelectronics, among them are photonic circuits, carbon nanostructures for chemisensors, unique Ag-Cu-nanocluster contacts for high-effective solar cells. Recent patents in the field are also discussed.

  3. Processing of Nanostructured Devices Using Microfabrication Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W (Inventor); Xu, Jennifer C (Inventor); Evans, Laura J (Inventor); Kulis, Michael H (Inventor); Berger, Gordon M (Inventor); Vander Wal, Randall L (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods that incorporate nanostructures into microdevices are discussed herein. These systems and methods can allow for standard microfabrication techniques to be extended to the field of nanotechnology. Sensors incorporating nanostructures can be fabricated as described herein, and can be used to reliably detect a range of gases with high response.

  4. Multi-periodic nanostructures for photon control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kluge, Christian; Adam, Jost; Barié, Nicole;

    2014-01-01

    We propose multi-periodic nanostructures yielded by superposition of multiple binary gratings for wide control over photon emission in thin-film devices. We present wavelength- and angle-resolved photoluminescence measurements of multi-periodically nanostructured organic light-emitting layers...

  5. Vertically aligned nanostructure scanning probe microscope tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillorn, Michael A.; Ilic, Bojan; Melechko, Anatoli V.; Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Simpson, Michael L.

    2006-12-19

    Methods and apparatus are described for cantilever structures that include a vertically aligned nanostructure, especially vertically aligned carbon nanofiber scanning probe microscope tips. An apparatus includes a cantilever structure including a substrate including a cantilever body, that optionally includes a doped layer, and a vertically aligned nanostructure coupled to the cantilever body.

  6. Metal oxide nanostructures with hierarchical morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lao, Jing Yu; Banerjee, Debasish

    2007-11-13

    The present invention relates generally to metal oxide materials with varied symmetrical nanostructure morphologies. In particular, the present invention provides metal oxide materials comprising one or more metallic oxides with three-dimensionally ordered nanostructural morphologies, including hierarchical morphologies. The present invention also provides methods for producing such metal oxide materials.

  7. Nucleation theory and growth of nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrovskii, Vladimir G

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor nanostructures such as nanowires are promising building blocks of future nanoelectronic, nanophotonic and nanosensing devices. Their physical properties are primarily determined by the epitaxy process which is rather different from the conventional thin film growth. This book shows how the advanced nucleation theory can be used in modeling of growth properties, morphology and crystal phase of such nanostructures.

  8. Nanostructuring steel for injection molding tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Azawi, A.; Smistrup, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    and ion beam etching are combined to nanostructure the planar surface of a steel wafer. Injection molded plastic parts with enhanced surface properties, like anti-reflective, superhydrophobic and structural colors can be achieved by micro-and nanostructuring the surface of the steel molds. We investigate...

  9. Quantum Pumping and Adiabatic Transport in Nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, G.M.M.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis consists of a theoretical exploration of quantum transport phenomena and quantum dynamics in nanostructures. Specifically, we investigate adiabatic quantum pumping of charge in several novel types of nanostructures involving open quantum dots or graphene. For a bilayer of graphene we fin

  10. Enhanced photochromism in nanostructured molybdenum trioxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beydaghyan, Gisia; Doiron, Serge; Haché, Alain; Ashrit, P. V.

    2009-08-01

    We present evidence of enhancement of photochromism in nanostructured thin films of molybdenum oxide fabricated by glancing angle deposition. The strong correlation of coloration response with the internal surface area of the films provides evidence of the importance of nanostructuring on the photochromic effect and the vital role played by the availability of water in the photochromic mechanism.

  11. Energy transfer in nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughn, Chelsea

    Energy transport and loss are critical to the performance of optoelectronic devices such as photovoltaics and terahertz imaging devices. Nanostructured materials provide many opportunities to tailor transport and loss parameters for specific device applications. However, it has been very difficult to correlate specific nanoscale structural parameters with changes in these performance metrics. I report the development of new ways of using time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) to probe charge and energy transport and loss dynamics. These techniques are applied to several types of nanostructured materials, including bulk semiconductors with defects, self-assembled quantum dots and colloidal quantum dots. First, GaAs/InP double heterostructures grown via metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) were characterized with TRPL. TRPL is typically used to extract minority carrier lifetimes, but we discovered that the measured lifetime depended critically on the intensity of the exciting laser. We developed a Shockley-Read-Hall model to extract trap state densities from intensity-dependent TRPL measurements. Second, we characterized energy and charge transfer between InAs quantum dots and ErAs nanoinclusions within III-V heterostructures. Using intensity- and temperature-dependent TRPL, we confirmed tunneling as the dominant mechanism of charge transport and characterized the electronic structure of the ErAs nanoparticles. Finally, we characterized energy transport in colloidal quantum dot cascade structures. These cascade structures utilize Forster Resonance Energy Transfer and trap state recycling to funnel excitons from donor layers to acceptor layers and suggest a promising method for avoiding losses associated with surface trap states. Collectively, the analysis of these disparate material types advances our understanding of energy dynamics in nanostructured materials and improves our ability to design the next generation of photovoltaic and optoelectronic

  12. Nanostructures, systems, and methods for photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Steven Y.; Jarvi, Thomas D.

    2015-12-08

    The present invention generally relates to nanostructures and compositions comprising nanostructures, methods of making and using the nanostructures, and related systems. In some embodiments, a nanostructure comprises a first region and a second region, wherein a first photocatalytic reaction (e.g., an oxidation reaction) can be carried out at the first region and a second photocatalytic reaction (e.g., a reduction reaction) can be carried out at the second region. In some cases, the first photocatalytic reaction is the formation of oxygen gas from water and the second photocatalytic reaction is the formation of hydrogen gas from water. In some embodiments, a nanostructure comprises at least one semiconductor material, and, in some cases, at least one catalytic material and/or at least one photosensitizing agent.

  13. Femtosecond laser nanostructuring of silver film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Ye; Ma, Guohong [Shanghai University, Department of Physics, Shanghai (China); Shanghai University, Laboratory for Microstructures, Shanghai (China); He, Min; Bian, Huadong; Yan, Xiaona [Shanghai University, Department of Physics, Shanghai (China); Lu, Bo [Shanghai University, Laboratory for Microstructures, Shanghai (China)

    2012-03-15

    In this paper, we report an evolution of surface morphology of silver film irradiated by a 1 kHz femtosecond laser. By SEM observations, it is noted that different nanostructures with respective surface features depend highly on the number of pulses and the laser fluence. Especially when the laser fluence is below the threshold fluence of film breakdown, a textured nanostructure including many nanobumps and nanocavities will appear on the surface of silver film. In order to determine an optimal regime for nanostructuring silver film and to further study the underlying mechanism, we perform a quantitative analysis of laser fluence and pulse number. The results show that this nanostructure formation should be due to a sequential process of laser melting, vapor bubbles bursting, heat stress confinement, and subsequent material redistribution. As a potential application, we find this nanostructured silver film can be used as the active substrate for surface enhanced Raman scattering effect. (orig.)

  14. Thermo-plasmonics of Irradiated Metallic Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Haiyan

    the size, morphology and composition of metallic nanostructures, the absorption of light can be maximized, resulting in a substantial temperature elevation in a nanoscopic volume. Applications of these nanoscopic sources of heat can be found in various contexts including localized cancer therapy, drug...... of particle temperatures by simple detection of the phase boundary located far away from the particle. Two types of nanostructures were investigated using this assay: colloidal gold nanoparticles (rods and spheres) and e-beam printed metallic composite nanostructures. Chapter 5 presents the quantifications......-beam composite nanostructures, these including discs, triangles, stars and a dimer. The highest surface temperature elevation occurs on the nanostructure with the highest absorption efficiency at the laser irradiation wavelength, regardless of the size or the morphology. We also demonstrate that substantial heat...

  15. Neutralization of H- at Nanostructured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obreshkov, Boyan; Thumm, Uwe

    2006-05-01

    The charge transfer rates and the neutralization probabilities for hydrogen anions colliding with nanostructured (vicinal) surfaces are obtained by direct numerical integration of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for the motion of the active electron in the field of the projectile-surface compound. The electronic structure of the surface is calculated from a Thomas-Fermi - von Weizsaecker statistical model with local density approximation for the exchange-correlation energy. In fixed-ion approximation, the decay rate of the electronic state of the anion in front of the surface is obtained by projecting the density of states of the collision system onto the unperturbed projectile level. The ion neutralization probability is calculated from this static width within a rate equation approach for a set of broken-straight-line collision trajectories for kinetic energies of 1 keV. The dependence of decay rates and neutralization probabilities on the surface morphology and the scattering trajectories, and a comparison of our numerical results with the experiments will be discussed.

  16. Nanostructured polymeric materials for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Di-Jia [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States; Yu, Luping [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a new class of hydrogen storage adsorbent, nanostructured porous organic polymers (POPs), through collaboration between Argonne National Laboratory and The University of Chicago. POPs have excellent thermal stability and tolerance to gas contaminants such as moisture. They also have low skeleton density and high intrinsic porosity via covalent bonds, capable of maintaining specific surface area (SSA) during high pressure pelletizing for better volumetric density. Furthermore, they can be produced at a commercial scale with the existing industrial infrastructure. The team’s approach focused on improving hydrogen uptake capacity and the heat of adsorption by enhancing SSA, porosity control, and framework-adsorbate interactions through rational design and synthesis at the molecular level. The design principles aim at improving the following attributes of the polymers: (a) high SSA to provide sufficient interface with H2; (b) narrow pore diameter to enhance van der Waals interactions in the confined space; and (c) “metallic” features, either through π- conjugation or metal doping, to promote electronic orbital interactions with hydrogen.

  17. Covalent crosslinking of carbon nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Urmimala Maitra; M Pandeeswar; T Govindaraju

    2012-05-01

    Covalent crosslinking of carbon nanostructures of different dimensionalities such as nanodiamond, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and graphene can yield useful homo- and hetero-binary conjugates. Binary conjugation of the nanocarbons has been achieved by introducing symmetrical amide-linkages between acid (-COOH) functionalized nanocarbons and a diamine-linker. The binary conjugates have been characterized by using transmission electron microscopy as well as infrared, Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopies. Dispersions of covalently crosslinked binary conjugates of nanocarbons could be obtained in dimethyl formamide (DMF). Composites of the binary conjugates with polymer can be readily prepared by using the DMF suspensions.

  18. Wetting properties of nanostructured surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos-Canut, S. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee et Nanostructures (UMR CNRS 5586), Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)]. E-mail: ramos@lpmcn.univ-lyon1.fr

    2006-04-15

    Swift heavy ion irradiation is a powerful tool to tailor surfaces under controlled conditions at a nanometric scale. The growing importance of nanostructured surfaces for a wide variety of applications and fundamental investigations is now well established. In this paper I will mainly discuss the interest of such surfaces for investigations concerning solid-liquid interfaces. The role played by topographical defects on wetting properties of solid surfaces, and both the dissipative and the confinement effects on the interface will be demonstrated by simple examples.

  19. Modeling of biological nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristea, P. D.; Tuduce, Rodica; Arsene, O.; Dinca, Alina; Fulga, F.; Nicolau, D. V.

    2010-02-01

    The paper presents a methodology using atom or amino acid hydrophobicities to describe the surface properties of proteins in order to predict their interactions with other proteins and with artificial nanostructured surfaces. A standardized pattern is built around each surface atom of the protein for a radius depending on the molecule type and size. The atom neighborhood is characterized in terms of the hydrophobicity surface density. A clustering algorithm is used to classify the resulting patterns and to identify the possible interactions. The methodology has been implemented in a software package based on Java technology deployed in a Linux environment.

  20. Imaging edges of nanostructured graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Jens; Cagliani, Alberto; Booth, T. J.

    . Such nanostructuring can be done experimentally, but especially characterization at atomic level is a huge challenge. High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) is used to characterize the atomic structure of graphene. We optimized the imaging conditions used for the FEI Titan ETEM. To reduce the knock-on damage of the carbon atoms...... be achieved, which allows us to resolve the second order reflection of graphene and to visualize the atomic structure in HRTEM. With this tool we tackle the challenge of imaging the introduced “defects” and their atomic structure....

  1. Group III-nitrides nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Caro, M.; Ramírez-López, M.; Rojas-Ramírez, J. S.; Martínez-Velis, I.; Casallas-Moreno, Y.; Gallardo-Hernández, S.; Babu, B. J.; Velumani, S.; López-López, M.

    2012-02-01

    We report on the growth and characterization of self-assembled InGaN columnar nanostructures grown by gas source molecular beam epitaxy (GSMBE) on Si(111) substrates. At a zero concentration of Ga, InN nanocolumns (NCs) were successfully grown. In the case of InGaN, the surface morphology is dependent on composition; however, in general, InGaN samples exhibit columnar features. At concentrations near 50%, the samples show phase separation; this result is explained in terms of solid phase immiscibility.

  2. All-Polymer Microfluidic Systems with integrated Nanostructures for Cell Handling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matschuk, Maria

    There is an increasing need for mass-production of nanostructures with high precision at polymer surfaces, for example to reduce the reflection of light, to reduce the adhesion of smudge, for optical data storage (e.g. Blu-ray discs), and for biological applications. In this project the effects...... of the polymer melt, interfacial effects like wetting and friction play a major role in injection molding of high aspect ratio nanostructures. The interfacial energy between mold and polymer needs to allow filling as well as demolding which are opposing properties: On the one hand, insufficient wetting...... lithography was found to improve the replication quality substantially. Large scale defects of the overall patterned surface were fully removed while regular nanoscale defects decreased significantly. Optimized injection molding conditions allowed the replication of highly ordered nanostructures of controlled...

  3. Resonance-induced absorption enhancement in colloidal quantum dot solar cells using nanostructured electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahpeykar, Seyed Milad; Xiong, Qiuyang; Wang, Xihua

    2014-10-20

    The application of nanostructured indium-doped tin oxide (ITO) electrodes as diffraction gratings for light absorption enhancement in colloidal quantum dot solar cells is numerically investigated using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation. Resonant coupling of the incident diffracted light with supported waveguide modes in light absorbing layer at particular wavelengths predicted by grating far-field projection analysis is shown to provide superior near-infrared light trapping for nanostructured devices as compared to the planar structure. Among various technologically feasible nanostructures, the two-dimensional nano-branch array is demonstrated as the most promising polarization-independent structure and proved to be able to maintain its performance despite structural imperfections common in fabrication.

  4. Templated Self Assemble of Nano-Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suo, Zhigang [Harvard University

    2013-04-29

    This project will identify and model mechanisms that template the self-assembly of nanostructures. We focus on a class of systems involving a two-phase monolayer of molecules adsorbed on a solid surface. At a suitably elevated temperature, the molecules diffuse on the surface to reduce the combined free energy of mixing, phase boundary, elastic field, and electrostatic field. With no template, the phases may form a pattern of stripes or disks. The feature size is on the order of 1-100 nm, selected to compromise the phase boundary energy and the long-range elastic or electrostatic interaction. Both experimental observations and our theoretical simulations have shown that the pattern resembles a periodic lattice, but has abundant imperfections. To form a perfect periodic pattern, or a designed aperiodic pattern, one must introduce a template to guide the assembly. For example, a coarse-scale pattern, lithographically defined on the substrate, will guide the assembly of the nanoscale pattern. As another example, if the molecules on the substrate surface carry strong electric dipoles, a charged object, placed in the space above the monolayer, will guide the assembly of the molecular dipoles. In particular, the charged object can be a mask with a designed nanoscale topographic pattern. A serial process (e.g., e-beam lithography) is necessary to make the mask, but the pattern transfer to the molecules on the substrate is a parallel process. The technique is potentially a high throughput, low cost process to pattern a monolayer. The monolayer pattern itself may serve as a template to fabricate a functional structure. This project will model fundamental aspects of these processes, including thermodynamics and kinetics of self-assembly, templated self-assembly, and self-assembly on unconventional substrates. It is envisioned that the theory will not only explain the available experimental observations, but also motivate new experiments.

  5. Lifetime of Nano-Structured Black Silicon for Photovoltaic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk;

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present recent results of lifetime optimization for nano-structured black silicon and its photovoltaic applications. Black silicon nano-structures provide significant reduction of silicon surface reflection due to highly corrugated nanostructures with excellent light trapping......, respectively. This is promising for use of black silicon RIE nano-structuring in a solar cell process flow...

  6. Dispersion and separation of nanostructured carbon in organic solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Brian J. (Inventor); Raffaelle, Ryne P. (Inventor); Ruf, Herbert J. (Inventor); Evans, Christopher M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to dispersions of nanostructured carbon in organic solvents containing alkyl amide compounds and/or diamide compounds. The invention also relates to methods of dispersing nanostructured carbon in organic solvents and methods of mobilizing nanostructured carbon. Also disclosed are methods of determining the purity of nanostructured carbon.

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of magnetic nanostructured thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guan Zhi-Qiang; Yutaka Abe; Jiang Dong-Hua; Lin Hai; Yoshitake Yamazakia; Wu Chen-Xu

    2004-01-01

    @@ Using Monte Carlo simulation, we have compared the magnetic properties between nanostructured thin films and two-dimensional crystalline solids. The dependence of nanostructured properties on the interaction between particles that constitute the nanostructured thin films is also studied. The result shows that the parameters in the interaction potential have an important effect on the properties of nanostructured thin films at the transition temperatures.

  8. Lifetime of Nano-Structured Black Silicon for Photovoltaic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk;

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present recent results of lifetime optimization for nano-structured black silicon and its photovoltaic applications. Black silicon nano-structures provide significant reduction of silicon surface reflection due to highly corrugated nanostructures with excellent light trapping pro......, respectively. This is promising for use of black silicon RIE nano-structuring in a solar cell process flow...

  9. Biocompatibility of plasma nanostructured biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slepičková Kasálková, N. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Slepička, P., E-mail: petr.slepicka@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Bačáková, L. [Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic); Sajdl, P. [Department of Power Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Švorčík, V. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-07-15

    Many areas of medicine such as tissue engineering requires not only mastery of modification techniques but also thorough knowledge of the interaction of cells with solid state substrates. Plasma treatment can be used to effective modification, nanostructuring and therefore can significantly change properties of materials. In this work the biocompatibility of the plasma nanostructured biopolymers substrates was studied. Changes in surface chemical structure were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphology pristine and modified samples were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The surface wettability was determined by goniometry from contact angle. Biocompatibility was determined by in vitro tests, the rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were cultivated on the pristine and plasma modified biopolymer substrates. Their adhesion, proliferation, spreading and homogeneous distribution on polymers was monitored. It was found that the plasma treatment leads to rapid decrease of contact angle for all samples. Contact angle decreased with increasing time of modification. XPS measurements showed that plasma treatment leads to changes in ratio of polar and non-polar groups. Plasma modification was accompanied by a change of surface morphology. Biological tests found that plasma treatment have positive effect on cells adhesion and proliferation cells and affects the size of cell’s adhesion area. Changes in plasma power or in exposure time influences the number of adhered and proliferated cells and their distribution on biopolymer surface.

  10. Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Frank (Bud) Bridges, University of California-Santa Cruz

    2010-08-05

    The two-and-a-half day symposium on the "Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials" will be the first comprehensive meeting on this topic held under the auspices of a major U.S. professional society. Spring MRS Meetings provide a natural venue for this symposium as they attract a broad audience of researchers that represents a cross-section of the state-of-the-art regarding synthesis, structure-property relations, and applications of nanostructured materials. Close interactions among the experts in local structure measurements and materials researchers will help both to identify measurement needs pertinent to real-world materials problems and to familiarize the materials research community with the state-of-the-art local structure measurement techniques. We have chosen invited speakers that reflect the multidisciplinary and international nature of this topic and the need to continually nurture productive interfaces among university, government and industrial laboratories. The intent of the symposium is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for discussion and exchange of ideas on the recent progress in quantitative characterization of structural order in nanomaterials using different experimental techniques and theory. The symposium is expected to facilitate discussions on optimal approaches for determining atomic structure at the nanoscale using combined inputs from multiple measurement techniques.

  11. EDITORIAL: Nanostructures + Light = 'New Optics'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheludev, Nikolay; Shalaev, Vladimir

    2005-02-01

    Suddenly, at the end of the last century, classical optics and classical electrodynamics became fashionable again. Fields that several generations of researchers thought were comprehensively covered by the famous Born and Wolf textbook and were essentially dead as research subjects were generating new excitement. In accordance with Richard Feynman’s famous quotation on nano-science, the optical community suddenly discovered that 'there is plenty of room at the bottom'—mixing light with small, meso- and nano-structures could generate new physics and new mind-blowing applications. This renaissance began when the concept of band structure was imported from electronics into the domain of optics and led to the development of what is now a massive research field dedicated to two- and three-dimensional photonic bandgap structures. The field was soon awash with bright new ideas and discoveries that consolidated the birth of the 'new optics'. A revision of some of the basic equations of electrodynamics led to the suspicion that we had overlooked the possibility that the triad of wave vector, electric field and magnetic field, characterizing propagating waves, do not necessarily form a right-handed set. This brought up the astonishing possibilities of sub-wavelength microscopy and telescopy where resolution is not limited by diffraction. The notion of meta-materials, i.e. artificial materials with properties not available in nature, originated in the microwave community but has been widely adopted in the domain of optical research, thanks to rapidly improving nanofabrication capabilities and the development of sub-wavelength scanning imaging techniques. Photonic meta-materials are expected to open a gateway to unprecedented electromagnetic properties and functionality unattainable from naturally occurring materials. The structural units of meta-materials can be tailored in shape and size; their composition and morphology can be artificially tuned, and inclusions can be

  12. Silicon-embedded copper nanostructure network for high energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Tianyue

    2016-03-15

    Provided herein are nanostructure networks having high energy storage, electrochemically active electrode materials including nanostructure networks having high energy storage, as well as electrodes and batteries including the nanostructure networks having high energy storage. According to various implementations, the nanostructure networks have high energy density as well as long cycle life. In some implementations, the nanostructure networks include a conductive network embedded with electrochemically active material. In some implementations, silicon is used as the electrochemically active material. The conductive network may be a metal network such as a copper nanostructure network. Methods of manufacturing the nanostructure networks and electrodes are provided. In some implementations, metal nanostructures can be synthesized in a solution that contains silicon powder to make a composite network structure that contains both. The metal nanostructure growth can nucleate in solution and on silicon nanostructure surfaces.

  13. Sequence-specific recognition of DNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusling, David A; Fox, Keith R

    2014-05-15

    DNA is the most exploited biopolymer for the programmed self-assembly of objects and devices that exhibit nanoscale-sized features. One of the most useful properties of DNA nanostructures is their ability to be functionalized with additional non-nucleic acid components. The introduction of such a component is often achieved by attaching it to an oligonucleotide that is part of the nanostructure, or hybridizing it to single-stranded overhangs that extend beyond or above the nanostructure surface. However, restrictions in nanostructure design and/or the self-assembly process can limit the suitability of these procedures. An alternative strategy is to couple the component to a DNA recognition agent that is capable of binding to duplex sequences within the nanostructure. This offers the advantage that it requires little, if any, alteration to the nanostructure and can be achieved after structure assembly. In addition, since the molecular recognition of DNA can be controlled by varying pH and ionic conditions, such systems offer tunable properties that are distinct from simple Watson-Crick hybridization. Here, we describe methodology that has been used to exploit and characterize the sequence-specific recognition of DNA nanostructures, with the aim of generating functional assemblies for bionanotechnology and synthetic biology applications.

  14. Engineering optical properties using plasmonic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Venkata Ananth

    Plasmonic nanostructures can be engineered to take on unusual optical properties not found in natural materials. The optical responses of plasmonic materials are functions of the structural parameters and symmetry of the nanostructures, material parameters of the nanostructure and its surroundings and the incidence angle, frequency and polarization state of light. The scattering and hence the visibility of an object could be reduced by coating it with a plasmonic material. In this thesis, presented is an optical frequency scattering cancelation device composed of a silicon nanorod coated by a plasmonic gold nanostructure. The principle of operation was theoretically analyzed using Mie theory and the device design was verified by extensive numerical simulations. The device was fabricated using a combination of nanofabrication techniques such as electron beam lithography and focused ion beam milling. The optical responses of the scattering cancelation device and a control sample of bare silicon rod were directly visualized using near-field microscopy coupled with heterodyne interferometric detection. The experimental results were analyzed and found to match very well with theoretical prediction from numerical simulations thereby validating the design principles and our implementation. Plasmonic nanostructures could be engineered to exhibit unique optical properties such as Fano resonance characterized by narrow asymmetrical lineshape. We present dynamic tuning and symmetry lowering of Fano resonances in plasmonic nanostructures fabricated on flexible substrates. The tuning of Fano resonance was achieved by application of uniaxial mechanical stress. The design of the nanostructures was facilitated by extensive numerical simulations and the symmetry lowering was analyzed using group theoretical methods. The nanostructures were fabricated using electron beam lithography and optically characterized for various mechanical stress. The experimental results were in good

  15. Nanostructured organic and hybrid solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weickert, Jonas; Dunbar, Ricky B.; Hesse, Holger C.; Wiedemann, Wolfgang; Schmidt-Mende, Lukas [Department of Physics and Center for NanoScience (CeNS), Ludwig-Maximilians University (LMU) Munich, Amalienstr. 54, 80799 Munich (Germany)

    2011-04-26

    This progress report highlights recent developments in nanostructured organic and hybrid solar cells. The authors discuss novel approaches to control the film morphology in fully organic solar cells and the design of nanostructured hybrid solar cells. The motivation and recent results concerning fabrication and effects on device physics are emphasized. The aim of this review is not to give a summary of all recent results in organic and hybrid solar cells, but rather to focus on the fabrication, device physics, and light trapping properties of nanostructured organic and hybrid devices. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Nanostructured transparent conducting oxide electrochromic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milliron, Delia; Tangirala, Ravisubhash; Llordes, Anna; Buonsanti, Raffaella; Garcia, Guillermo

    2016-05-17

    The embodiments described herein provide an electrochromic device. In an exemplary embodiment, the electrochromic device includes (1) a substrate and (2) a film supported by the substrate, where the film includes transparent conducting oxide (TCO) nanostructures. In a further embodiment, the electrochromic device further includes (a) an electrolyte, where the nanostructures are embedded in the electrolyte, resulting in an electrolyte, nanostructure mixture positioned above the substrate and (b) a counter electrode positioned above the mixture. In a further embodiment, the electrochromic device further includes a conductive coating deposited on the substrate between the substrate and the mixture. In a further embodiment, the electrochromic device further includes a second substrate positioned above the mixture.

  17. Electron Microscopy of Nanostructures in Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Købler, Carsten

    with cells is therefore increasingly more relevant from both an engineering and a toxicological viewpoint. My work involves developing and exploring electron microscopy (EM) for imaging nanostructures in cells, for the purpose of understanding nanostructure-cell interactions in terms of their possibilities...... in science and concerns in toxicology. In the present work, EM methods for imaging nanostructure-cell interactions have been explored, and the complex interactions documented and ordered. In particular the usability of the focused ion beam scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) was explored. Using EM...

  18. Designing fractal nanostructured biointerfaces for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengchao; Wang, Shutao

    2014-06-06

    Fractal structures in nature offer a unique "fractal contact mode" that guarantees the efficient working of an organism with an optimized style. Fractal nanostructured biointerfaces have shown great potential for the ultrasensitive detection of disease-relevant biomarkers from small biomolecules on the nanoscale to cancer cells on the microscale. This review will present the advantages of fractal nanostructures, the basic concept of designing fractal nanostructured biointerfaces, and their biomedical applications for the ultrasensitive detection of various disease-relevant biomarkers, such microRNA, cancer antigen 125, and breast cancer cells, from unpurified cell lysates and the blood of patients.

  19. Nanostructured thin films and coatings functional properties

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Sam

    2010-01-01

    The second volume in ""The Handbook of Nanostructured Thin Films and Coatings"" set, this book focuses on functional properties, including optical, electronic, and electrical properties, as well as related devices and applications. It explores the large-scale fabrication of functional thin films with nanoarchitecture via chemical routes, the fabrication and characterization of SiC nanostructured/nanocomposite films, and low-dimensional nanocomposite fabrication and applications. The book also presents the properties of sol-gel-derived nanostructured thin films as well as silicon nanocrystals e

  20. Ceramic nanostructures and methods of fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Morrell, Jonathan S [Knoxville, TN

    2009-11-24

    Structures and methods for the fabrication of ceramic nanostructures. Structures include metal particles, preferably comprising copper, disposed on a ceramic substrate. The structures are heated, preferably in the presence of microwaves, to a temperature that softens the metal particles and preferably forms a pool of molten ceramic under the softened metal particle. A nano-generator is created wherein ceramic material diffuses through the molten particle and forms ceramic nanostructures on a polar site of the metal particle. The nanostructures may comprise silica, alumina, titania, or compounds or mixtures thereof.

  1. Reconfigurable optical assembly of nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelongo, Yunuen; Yetisen, Ali K.; Butt, Haider; Yun, Seok-Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Arrangements of nanostructures in well-defined patterns are the basis of photonic crystals, metamaterials and holograms. Furthermore, rewritable optical materials can be achieved by dynamically manipulating nanoassemblies. Here we demonstrate a mechanism to configure plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) in polymer media using nanosecond laser pulses. The mechanism relies on optical forces produced by the interference of laser beams, which allow NPs to migrate to lower-energy configurations. The resulting NP arrangements are stable without any external energy source, but erasable and rewritable by additional recording pulses. We demonstrate reconfigurable optical elements including multilayer Bragg diffraction gratings, volumetric photonic crystals and lenses, as well as dynamic holograms of three-dimensional virtual objects. We aim to expand the applications of optical forces, which have been mostly restricted to optical tweezers. Holographic assemblies of nanoparticles will allow a new generation of programmable composites for tunable metamaterials, data storage devices, sensors and displays.

  2. Hybrid lipid-based nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayani, Yasaman

    Biological membranes serve several important roles, such as structural support of cells and organelles, regulation of ionic and molecular transport, barriers to non-mediated transport, contact between cells within tissues, and accommodation of membrane proteins. Membrane proteins and other vital biomolecules incorporated into the membrane need a lipid membrane to function. Due to importance of lipid bilayers and their vital function in governing many processes in the cell, the development of various models as artificial lipid membranes that can mimic cell membranes has become a subject of great interest. Using different models of artificial lipid membranes, such as liposomes, planar lipid bilayers and supported or tethered lipid bilayers, we are able to study many biophysical processes in biological membranes. The ability of different molecules to interact with and change the structure of lipid membranes can be also investigated in artificial lipid membranes. An important application of lipid bilayer-containing interfaces is characterization of novel membrane proteins for high throughput drug screening studies to investigate receptor-drug interactions and develop biosensor systems. Membrane proteins need a lipid bilayer environment to preserve their stability and functionality. Fabrication of materials that can interact with biomolecules like proteins necessitates the use of lipid bilayers as a mimic of cell membranes. The objective of this research is to develop novel hybrid lipid-based nanostructures mimicking biological membranes. Toward this aim, two hybrid biocompatible structures are introduced: lipid bilayer-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and hydrogel-anchored liposomes with double-stranded DNA anchors. These structures have potential applications in biosensing, drug targeting, drug delivery, and biophysical studies of cell membranes. In the first developed nanostructure, lipid molecules are covalently attached to the surfaces of MWCNTs, and

  3. Engineered nanoporous and nanostructured films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel L. Plawsky

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous and nanostructured films have become increasingly important to the microelectronics and photonics industries. They provide a route to low dielectric constant materials that will enable future generations of powerful microprocessors. They are the only route to achieving materials with refractive indices less than 1.2, a key feature for the future development of photonic crystal devices, enhanced omni-directional reflectors, enhanced anti-reflection coatings and black-body absorbers. In addition, these films exhibit tremendous potential for separations, catalytic, biomedical and heat transfer applications. This article will review two primary techniques for manufacturing these films, evaporation induced self-assembly and oblique or glancing angle deposition, and will discuss some of the film properties critical to their use in the microelectronics and photonics industries.

  4. Dimensional crossover in semiconductor nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Matthew P.; Chatterjee, Rusha; Si, Jixin; Jankó, Boldizsár; Kuno, Masaru

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in semiconductor nanostructure syntheses provide unprecedented control over electronic quantum confinement and have led to extensive investigations of their size- and shape-dependent optical/electrical properties. Notably, spectroscopic measurements show that optical bandgaps of one-dimensional CdSe nanowires are substantially (approximately 100 meV) lower than their zero-dimensional counterparts for equivalent diameters spanning 5-10 nm. But what, exactly, dictates the dimensional crossover of a semiconductor's electronic structure? Here we probe the one-dimensional to zero-dimensional transition of CdSe using single nanowire/nanorod absorption spectroscopy. We find that carrier electrostatic interactions play a fundamental role in establishing dimensional crossover. Moreover, the critical length at which this transition occurs is governed by the aspect ratio-dependent interplay between carrier confinement and dielectric contrast/confinement energies.

  5. Nanostructured systems with GMR behaviour

    CERN Document Server

    Bergenti, I; Savini, L; Bonetti, E; Bosco, E; Baricco, M

    2002-01-01

    Fe/Fe-oxide core-shell systems obtained by inert-gas condensation and Au sub 8 sub 0 Fe sub 2 sub 0 nanostructured alloys prepared by fast-quenching techniques followed by thermal treatment have been studied by polarised small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The particle-size distribution was derived from the fit of the scattering curves. In the core-shell samples, the results support the model of a magnetic iron core surrounded by a surface layer (oxide shell) with a reduced magnetisation. The SANS measurements on the Au sub 8 sub 0 Fe sub 2 sub 0 alloys do not show any appreciable magnetic signal, indicating that the iron precipitates have a superparamagnetic behaviour. Thermal treatment induces the formation of small precipitates of atomic size. (orig.)

  6. Nanostructured systems with GMR behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergenti, I.; Deriu, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Universita di Parma (Italy); Savini, L.; Bonetti, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Universita di Bologna (Italy); Bosco, E.; Baricco, M. [Dipartimento di Chimica I.F.M. and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Universita di Torino (Italy)

    2002-07-01

    Fe/Fe-oxide core-shell systems obtained by inert-gas condensation and Au{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} nanostructured alloys prepared by fast-quenching techniques followed by thermal treatment have been studied by polarised small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The particle-size distribution was derived from the fit of the scattering curves. In the core-shell samples, the results support the model of a magnetic iron core surrounded by a surface layer (oxide shell) with a reduced magnetisation. The SANS measurements on the Au{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} alloys do not show any appreciable magnetic signal, indicating that the iron precipitates have a superparamagnetic behaviour. Thermal treatment induces the formation of small precipitates of atomic size. (orig.)

  7. Hemocompatibility of polymeric nanostructured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszczak, Victoria; Smith, Barbara S; Popat, Ketul C

    2013-01-01

    Tissue integration is an important property when inducing transplant tolerance, however, the hemocompatibility of the biomaterial surface also plays an important role in the ultimate success of the implant. Therefore, in order to induce transplant tolerance, it is critical to understand the interaction of blood components with the material surfaces. In this study, we have investigated the adsorption of key blood serum proteins, in vitro adhesion and activation of platelets and clotting kinetics of whole blood on flat polycaprolactone (PCL) surfaces, nanowire (NW) surfaces and nanofiber (NF) surfaces. Previous studies have shown that polymeric nanostructured surfaces improve cell adhesion, proliferation and viability; however it is unclear how these polymeric nanostructured surfaces interact with the blood and its components. Protein adsorption results indicate that while there were no significant differences in total albumin (ALB) adsorption on PCL, NW and NF surfaces, NW surfaces had higher total fibrinogen (FIB) and immunoglobulin-G (IgG) adsorption compared to NF and PCL surfaces. In contrast, NF surfaces had higher surface FIB and IgG adsorption compared to PCL and NW surfaces. Platelet adhesion and viability studies show more adhesion and clustering of platelets on the NF surfaces as compared to PCL and NW surfaces. Platelet activation studies reveal that NW surfaces have the highest percentage of unactivated platelets, whereas NF surfaces have the highest percentage of fully activated platelets. Whole blood clotting results indicate that NW surfaces maintain an increased amount of free hemoglobin during the clotting process compared to PCL and NF surface, indicating less clotting and slower rate of clotting on their surfaces.

  8. Hierarchically Nanostructured Materials for Sustainable Environmental Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zheng; Guo, Yanbing; Liu, Cai-Hong; Gao, Pu-Xian

    2013-11-01

    This article presents a comprehensive overview of the hierarchical nanostructured materials with either geometry or composition complexity in environmental applications. The hierarchical nanostructures offer advantages of high surface area, synergistic interactions and multiple functionalities towards water remediation, environmental gas sensing and monitoring as well as catalytic gas treatment. Recent advances in synthetic strategies for various hierarchical morphologies such as hollow spheres and urchin-shaped architectures have been reviewed. In addition to the chemical synthesis, the physical mechanisms associated with the materials design and device fabrication have been discussed for each specific application. The development and application of hierarchical complex perovskite oxide nanostructures have also been introduced in photocatalytic water remediation, gas sensing and catalytic converter. Hierarchical nanostructures will open up many possibilities for materials design and device fabrication in environmental chemistry and technology.

  9. Metallic Nanostructures Based on DNA Nanoshapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boxuan Shen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Metallic nanostructures have inspired extensive research over several decades, particularly within the field of nanoelectronics and increasingly in plasmonics. Due to the limitations of conventional lithography methods, the development of bottom-up fabricated metallic nanostructures has become more and more in demand. The remarkable development of DNA-based nanostructures has provided many successful methods and realizations for these needs, such as chemical DNA metallization via seeding or ionization, as well as DNA-guided lithography and casting of metallic nanoparticles by DNA molds. These methods offer high resolution, versatility and throughput and could enable the fabrication of arbitrarily-shaped structures with a 10-nm feature size, thus bringing novel applications into view. In this review, we cover the evolution of DNA-based metallic nanostructures, starting from the metallized double-stranded DNA for electronics and progress to sophisticated plasmonic structures based on DNA origami objects.

  10. Optical Biosensors Based on Semiconductor Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl J. Martín-Palma

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing availability of semiconductor-based nanostructures with novel and unique properties has sparked widespread interest in their use in the field of biosensing. The precise control over the size, shape and composition of these nanostructures leads to the accurate control of their physico-chemical properties and overall behavior. Furthermore, modifications can be made to the nanostructures to better suit their integration with biological systems, leading to such interesting properties as enhanced aqueous solubility, biocompatibility or bio-recognition. In the present work, the most significant applications of semiconductor nanostructures in the field of optical biosensing will be reviewed. In particular, the use of quantum dots as fluorescent bioprobes, which is the most widely used application, will be discussed. In addition, the use of some other nanometric structures in the field of biosensing, including porous semiconductors and photonic crystals, will be presented.

  11. Second harmonic spectroscopy of semiconductor nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, John Erland; Yu, Ping; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Semiconductor nanostructures and their application to optoelectronic devices have attracted much attention recently. Lower-dimensional structures, and in particular quantum dots, are highly anisotropic resulting in broken symmetry as compared to their bulk counterparts. This is not only reflected...

  12. Packaging glass with hierarchically nanostructured surface

    KAUST Repository

    He, Jr-Hau

    2017-08-03

    An optical device includes an active region and packaging glass located on top of the active region. A top surface of the packaging glass includes hierarchical nanostructures comprised of honeycombed nanowalls (HNWs) and nanorod (NR) structures extending from the HNWs.

  13. Probing plasmonic nanostructures by photons and electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Harald; Kneipp, Janina

    2015-01-01

    We discuss recent developments for studying plasmonic metal nanostructures. Exploiting photons and electrons opens up new capabilities to probe the complete plasmon spectrum including bright and dark modes and related local optical fields at subnanometer spatial resolution. This comprehensive...

  14. Plant-derived nanostructures: types and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant-derived nanostructures and nanoparticles (NPs) have functional applications in numerous disciplines such as health care, food and feed, cosmetics, biomedical science, energy science, drug-gene delivery, environmental health, and so on. Consequently, it is imperative for res...

  15. Metallic nanostructures for efficient LED lighting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano, G.; Rodriguez, S. R. K.; Verschuuren, M. A.; Rivas, Gomez

    2016-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are driving a shift toward energy-efficient illumination. Nonetheless, modifying the emission intensities, colors and directionalities of LEDs in specific ways remains a challenge often tackled by incorporating secondary optical components. Metallic nanostructures suppor

  16. Sulfated glycopeptide nanostructures for multipotent protein activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sungsoo S.; Fyrner, Timmy; Chen, Feng; Álvarez, Zaida; Sleep, Eduard; Chun, Danielle S.; Weiner, Joseph A.; Cook, Ralph W.; Freshman, Ryan D.; Schallmo, Michael S.; Katchko, Karina M.; Schneider, Andrew D.; Smith, Justin T.; Yun, Chawon; Singh, Gurmit; Hashmi, Sohaib Z.; McClendon, Mark T.; Yu, Zhilin; Stock, Stuart R.; Hsu, Wellington K.; Hsu, Erin L.; Stupp , Samuel I. (NWU)

    2017-06-19

    Biological systems have evolved to utilize numerous proteins with capacity to bind polysaccharides for the purpose of optimizing their function. A well-known subset of these proteins with binding domains for the highly diverse sulfated polysaccharides are important growth factors involved in biological development and tissue repair. We report here on supramolecular sulfated glycopeptide nanostructures, which display a trisulfated monosaccharide on their surfaces and bind five critical proteins with different polysaccharide-binding domains. Binding does not disrupt the filamentous shape of the nanostructures or their internal β-sheet backbone, but must involve accessible adaptive configurations to interact with such different proteins. The glycopeptide nanostructures amplified signalling of bone morphogenetic protein 2 significantly more than the natural sulfated polysaccharide heparin, and promoted regeneration of bone in the spine with a protein dose that is 100-fold lower than that required in the animal model. These highly bioactive nanostructures may enable many therapies in the future involving proteins.

  17. Nanostructures for Electrical Energy Storage (NEES) EFRC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Nanostructures for Electrical Energy Storage (NEES) EFRC is a multi-institutional research center, one of 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers established by the...

  18. Carbon Nanostructures Containing Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (POSS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potsi, Georgia; Rossos, Andreas; Kouloumpis, Antonios; Antoniou, Myrsini K.; Spyrou, Konstantinos; Karakassides, Michael A.; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra

    2015-01-01

    This mini review describes the synthesis and properties of carbon nanostructures containing organic-inorganic cage-like polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). The physical and chemical functionalization of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, graphene oxide, carbon nanotubes, and fullerenes

  19. Comparative Incorporation of PNA into DNA Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronnie O. Pedersen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA has shown great promise as a building material for self-assembling nanoscale structures. To further develop the potential of this technology, more methods are needed for functionalizing DNA-based nanostructures to increase their chemical diversity. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA holds great promise for realizing this goal, as it conveniently allows for inclusion of both amino acids and peptides in nucleic acid-based structures. In this work, we explored incorporation of a positively charged PNA within DNA nanostructures. We investigated the efficiency of annealing a lysine-containing PNA probe with complementary, single-stranded DNA sequences within nanostructures, as well as the efficiency of duplex invasion and its dependence on salt concentration. Our results show that PNA allows for toehold-free strand displacement and that incorporation yield depends critically on binding site geometry. These results provide guidance for the design of PNA binding sites on nucleic acid nanostructures with an eye towards optimizing fabrication yield.

  20. Plasmonic Nanostructures: Tailoring Light-matter Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Sanshui

    2012-01-01

    The flow of light can be molded by plasmonic structures within the nanoscale. In this talk, plasmonic nanostructures for suppressing light transmission, improving light absorption and enhancing photoemissions are to be presented....

  1. Acoustic Phonon Thermal Transport through a Nanostructure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wen-Xia; LIU Tian-Yu; LIU Chang-Long

    2006-01-01

    @@ Using the scattering matrix method, we investigate the thermal transport in a nanostructure at low temperatures.It is found that phonon transport exhibits some novel and interesting features: resonant transmission, resonant reflection, and small thermal conductance.

  2. Carbon Nanostructures Containing Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (POSS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potsi, Georgia; Rossos, Andreas; Kouloumpis, Antonios; Antoniou, Myrsini K.; Spyrou, Konstantinos; Karakassides, Michael A.; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra

    2015-01-01

    This mini review describes the synthesis and properties of carbon nanostructures containing organic-inorganic cage-like polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). The physical and chemical functionalization of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, graphene oxide, carbon nanotubes, and fullerenes

  3. Hierarchically nanostructured materials for sustainable environmental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zheng; Guo, Yanbing; Liu, Cai-Hong; Gao, Pu-Xian

    2013-01-01

    This review presents a comprehensive overview of the hierarchical nanostructured materials with either geometry or composition complexity in environmental applications. The hierarchical nanostructures offer advantages of high surface area, synergistic interactions, and multiple functionalities toward water remediation, biosensing, environmental gas sensing and monitoring as well as catalytic gas treatment. Recent advances in synthetic strategies for various hierarchical morphologies such as hollow spheres and urchin-shaped architectures have been reviewed. In addition to the chemical synthesis, the physical mechanisms associated with the materials design and device fabrication have been discussed for each specific application. The development and application of hierarchical complex perovskite oxide nanostructures have also been introduced in photocatalytic water remediation, gas sensing, and catalytic converter. Hierarchical nanostructures will open up many possibilities for materials design and device fabrication in environmental chemistry and technology. PMID:24790946

  4. Hierarchically Nanostructured Materials for Sustainable Environmental Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng eRen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a comprehensive overview of the hierarchical nanostructured materials with either geometry or composition complexity in environmental applications. The hierarchical nanostructures offer advantages of high surface area, synergistic interactions and multiple functionalities towards water remediation, environmental gas sensing and monitoring as well as catalytic gas treatment. Recent advances in synthetic strategies for various hierarchical morphologies such as hollow spheres and urchin-shaped architectures have been reviewed. In addition to the chemical synthesis, the physical mechanisms associated with the materials design and device fabrication have been discussed for each specific application. The development and application of hierarchical complex perovskite oxide nanostructures have also been introduced in photocatalytic water remediation, gas sensing and catalytic converter. Hierarchical nanostructures will open up many possibilities for materials design and device fabrication in environmental chemistry and technology.

  5. Porphyrin-Based Nanostructures for Photocatalytic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingzhi Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Well-defined organic nanostructures with controllable size and morphology are increasingly exploited in optoelectronic devices. As promising building blocks, porphyrins have demonstrated great potentials in visible-light photocatalytic applications, because of their electrical, optical and catalytic properties. From this perspective, we have summarized the recent significant advances on the design and photocatalytic applications of porphyrin-based nanostructures. The rational strategies, such as texture or crystal modification and interfacial heterostructuring, are described. The applications of the porphyrin-based nanostructures in photocatalytic pollutant degradation and hydrogen evolution are presented. Finally, the ongoing challenges and opportunities for the future development of porphyrin nanostructures in high-quality nanodevices are also proposed.

  6. Magnetically applied pressure-shear : a new technique for direct strength measurement at high pressure (final report for LDRD project 117856).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamppa, Derek C.; Haill, Thomas A.; Alexander, C. Scott; Asay, James Russell

    2010-09-01

    A new experimental technique to measure material shear strength at high pressures has been developed for use on magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) drive pulsed power platforms. By applying an external static magnetic field to the sample region, the MHD drive directly induces a shear stress wave in addition to the usual longitudinal stress wave. Strength is probed by passing this shear wave through a sample material where the transmissible shear stress is limited to the sample strength. The magnitude of the transmitted shear wave is measured via a transverse VISAR system from which the sample strength is determined.

  7. Final report on LDRD project: Low-cost Pd-catalyzed metallization technology for rapid prototyping of electronic substrates and devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, K.S.; Morgan, W.P.; Zich, J.L.

    1998-02-01

    A low-cost, thermally-activated, palladium-catalyzed metallization process was developed for rapid prototyping of polymeric electronic substrates and devices. The process was successfully applied in producing adhesiveless copper/polyimide laminates with high peel strengths and thick copper coating; copper/polyimide laminates are widely used in fabricating interconnects such as printed wiring boards (PWBs) and flexible circuits. Also successfully metallized using this low-cost metallization process were: (1) scaled-down models of radar-and-communication antenna and waveguide; (2) scaled-down model of pulsed-power-accelerator electrode; (3) three-dimensional micro-porous, open-cell vitreous carbon foams. Moreover, additive patterned metallization was successfully achieved by selectively printing or plotting the catalyst ink only on areas where metallization is desired, and by uniform thermal activation. Additive patterned metallization eliminates the time-consuming, costly and environmentally-unfriendly etching process that is routinely carried out in conventional subtractive patterned metallization. A metallization process via ultraviolet (UV) irradiation activation was also demonstrated. In this process palladium-catalyst solution is first uniformly coated onto the substrate. A masking pattern is used to cover the areas where metallization is not wanted. UV irradiation is applied uniformly to activate the palladium catalyst and to cure the polymer carrier in areas that are not covered by the mask. Metal is then deposited by electroless plating only or by a combination of electroless and electrolytic plating. This UV-activation technique is particularly useful in additive fine-line patterned metallization. Lastly, computer models for electrolytic and electroless plating processes were developed to provide guidance in plating-process design.

  8. A progress report on the LDRD project entitled {open_quotes}Microelectronic silicon-based chemical sensors: Ultradetection of high value molecules{close_quotes}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, R.C.

    1996-09-01

    This work addresses a new kind of silicon based chemical sensor that combines the reliability and stability of silicon microelectronic field effect devices with the highly selective and sensitive immunoassay. The sensor works on the principle that thin SiN layers on lightly doped Si can detect pH changes rapidly and reversibly. The pH changes affect the surface potential, and that can be quickly determined by pulsed photovoltage measurements. To detect other species, chemically sensitive films were deposited on the SiN where the presence of the chosen analyte results in pH changes through chemical reactions. A invention of a cell sorting device based on these principles is also described. A new method of immobilizing enzymes using Sandia`s sol-gel glasses is documented and biosensors based on the silicon wafer and an amperometric technique are detailed.

  9. Final Report of LDRD Project Number 34693: Building Conscious Machines Based Upon the Architecture of Visual Cortex in the Primate Brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KOCH, CHRISTOF

    2003-01-01

    Our research plan is two-fold: first, we have extended our biological model of bottom-up visual attention with several recently characterized cortical interactions that are known to be responsible for human performance in certain visual tasks, and second, we have used an eyetracking system for collecting human eye movement data, from which we can calibrate the new additions to the model. We acquired an infrared video eyetracking system, which we are using to record observers' eye position with high temporal (120Hz) and spatial ({+-} 0.25 deg visual angle) accuracy. We collected eye movement scan paths from observers as they view computer-generated fractals, rural and urban outdoor scenes, and overhead satellite imagery. We found that, with very high statistical significance (10 to 12 z-scores), the saliency model accurately predicts locations that human observers will find interesting. We adopted our model of short-range interactions among overlapping spatial orientation channels to better predict bottom-up stimulus-driven attention in humans. This enhanced model is even more accurate in its predictions of human observers' eye movements. We are currently incorporating biologically plausible long-range interactions among orientation channels, which will aid in the detection of elongated contours such as rivers, roads, airstrips, and other man-made structures.

  10. Final report on LDRD project: Low-cost Pd-catalyzed metallization technology for rapid prototyping of electronic substrates and devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, K.S.; Morgan, W.P.; Zich, J.L.

    1998-02-01

    A low-cost, thermally-activated, palladium-catalyzed metallization process was developed for rapid prototyping of polymeric electronic substrates and devices. The process was successfully applied in producing adhesiveless copper/polyimide laminates with high peel strengths and thick copper coating; copper/polyimide laminates are widely used in fabricating interconnects such as printed wiring boards (PWBs) and flexible circuits. Also successfully metallized using this low-cost metallization process were: (1) scaled-down models of radar-and-communication antenna and waveguide; (2) scaled-down model of pulsed-power-accelerator electrode; (3) three-dimensional micro-porous, open-cell vitreous carbon foams. Moreover, additive patterned metallization was successfully achieved by selectively printing or plotting the catalyst ink only on areas where metallization is desired, and by uniform thermal activation. Additive patterned metallization eliminates the time-consuming, costly and environmentally-unfriendly etching process that is routinely carried out in conventional subtractive patterned metallization. A metallization process via ultraviolet (UV) irradiation activation was also demonstrated. In this process palladium-catalyst solution is first uniformly coated onto the substrate. A masking pattern is used to cover the areas where metallization is not wanted. UV irradiation is applied uniformly to activate the palladium catalyst and to cure the polymer carrier in areas that are not covered by the mask. Metal is then deposited by electroless plating only or by a combination of electroless and electrolytic plating. This UV-activation technique is particularly useful in additive fine-line patterned metallization. Lastly, computer models for electrolytic and electroless plating processes were developed to provide guidance in plating-process design.

  11. Metal oxide nanostructures and their applications

    OpenAIRE

    Dar, Ghulam Nabi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, researchers on nanoparticles and nanostructures has received a great deal of attention not only in the area of synthesis and characterization but also in their potential application in various high-technological applications. Nanomaterials are widely used not only for environmental and biological applications but also for electronic and sensing applications. Among various classes of nanomaterials, the metal oxide nanostructures possess particular important because of their significa...

  12. Gold nanostructures and methods of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin Z [Santa Cruz, CA; Schwartzberg, Adam [Santa Cruz, CA; Olson, Tammy Y [Santa Cruz, CA

    2012-03-20

    The invention is drawn to novel nanostructures comprising hollow nanospheres and nanotubes for use as chemical sensors, conduits for fluids, and electronic conductors. The nanostructures can be used in microfluidic devices, for transporting fluids between devices and structures in analytical devices, for conducting electrical currents between devices and structure in analytical devices, and for conducting electrical currents between biological molecules and electronic devices, such as bio-microchips.

  13. Syntheses and Assemblies of Noble Metal Nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Ziegler, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Shape and size control as well as the control of the assembly of nanostructures are current challenges in nano sciences. Focussing on metal nanostructures all of these aspects have been addressed in the frame of the present work. It was possible to develop a new aqueous seeded growth method that produces gold nanoparticles with adjustable diameters over a large range of sizes. The spherical particles obtained show very low polydispersities and a good long term stability. Furthermore it was po...

  14. ZnO nanostructures and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Xiaowei, Sun

    2011-01-01

    This book focuses on the various functional properties and potential applications of one-dimensional ZnO nanostructures, from basic principles to our most recent discoveries. It comprises experimental analysis of various properties of ZnO nanostructures, preparation techniques, research methods, and some promising applications. The areas of focus include ZnO-based gas/biochemical sensing devices, field emitters, solar cells, light-emitting diodes, e-papers, and single-nanowire-based transistors.

  15. Zinc Oxide Nanostructured Biosensor for Glucose Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X. W.Sun; J.X. Wang; A. Wei

    2008-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocombs were fabricated by vapor phase transport, and nanorods and hierarchical nanodisk structures by aqueous thermal decomposition. Glucose biosensors were constructed using these ZnO nanostructures as supporting materials for glucose oxidase (GOx) loading. These ZnO glucose biosensors showed a high sensitivity for glucose detection and high affinity of GOx to glucose as well as the low detection limit. The results demonstrate that ZnO nanostructures have potential applications in biosensors.

  16. Gold nanostructures and methods of use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jin Z [Santa Cruz, CA; Schwartzberg, Adam [Santa Cruz, CA; Olson, Tammy Y [Santa Cruz, CA

    2012-03-20

    The invention is drawn to novel nanostructures comprising hollow nanospheres and nanotubes for use as chemical sensors, conduits for fluids, and electronic conductors. The nanostructures can be used in microfluidic devices, for transporting fluids between devices and structures in analytical devices, for conducting electrical currents between devices and structure in analytical devices, and for conducting electrical currents between biological molecules and electronic devices, such as bio-microchips.

  17. Gold nanostructures and methods of use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jin Z.; Schwartzberg, Adam; Olson, Tammy Y.

    2016-03-01

    The invention is drawn to novel nanostructures comprising hollow nanospheres and nanotubes for use as chemical sensors, conduits for fluids, and electronic conductors. The nanostructures can be used in microfluidic devices, for transporting fluids between devices and structures in analytical devices, for conducting electrical currents between devices and structure in analytical devices, and for conducting electrical currents between biological molecules and electronic devices, such as bio-microchips.

  18. Fabrication of complex metallic nanostructures by nanoskiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiaobing; Rioux, Robert M; Whitesides, George M

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes the use of nanoskiving to fabricate complex metallic nanostructures by sectioning polymer slabs containing small, embedded metal structures. This method begins with the deposition of thin metallic films on an epoxy substrate by e-beam evaporation or sputtering. After embedding the thin metallic film in an epoxy matrix, sectioning (in a plane perpendicular or parallel to the metal film) with an ultramicrotome generates sections (which can be as thin as 50 nm) of epoxy containing metallic nanostructures. The cross-sectional dimensions of the metal wires embedded in the resulting thin epoxy sections are controlled by the thickness of the evaporated metal film (which can be as small as 20 nm) and the thickness of the sections cut by the ultramicrotome; this work uses a standard 45 degrees diamond knife and routinely generates slabs 50 nm thick. The embedded nanostructures can be transferred to, and positioned on, planar or curved substrates by manipulating the thin polymer film. Removal of the epoxy matrix by etching with an oxygen plasma generates free-standing metallic nanostructures. Nanoskiving can fabricate complex nanostructures that are difficult or impossible to achieve by other methods of nanofabrication. These include multilayer structures, structures on curved surfaces, structures that span gaps, structures in less familiar materials, structures with high aspect ratios, and large-area structures comprising two-dimensional periodic arrays. This paper illustrates one class of application of these nanostructures: frequency-selective surfaces at mid-IR wavelengths.

  19. Nanostructured conductive polymers for advanced energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ye; Peng, Lele; Ding, Yu; Zhao, Yu; Yu, Guihua

    2015-10-07

    Conductive polymers combine the attractive properties associated with conventional polymers and unique electronic properties of metals or semiconductors. Recently, nanostructured conductive polymers have aroused considerable research interest owing to their unique properties over their bulk counterparts, such as large surface areas and shortened pathways for charge/mass transport, which make them promising candidates for broad applications in energy conversion and storage, sensors, actuators, and biomedical devices. Numerous synthetic strategies have been developed to obtain various conductive polymer nanostructures, and high-performance devices based on these nanostructured conductive polymers have been realized. This Tutorial review describes the synthesis and characteristics of different conductive polymer nanostructures; presents the representative applications of nanostructured conductive polymers as active electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors and lithium-ion batteries and new perspectives of functional materials for next-generation high-energy batteries, meanwhile discusses the general design rules, advantages, and limitations of nanostructured conductive polymers in the energy storage field; and provides new insights into future directions.

  20. Hybrid Nanostructured Textile Bioelectrode for Unobtrusive Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Pratyush

    Coronary heart disease, cardiovascular diseases and strokes are the leading causes of mortality in United States of America. Timely point-of-care health diagnostics and therapeutics for person suffering from these diseases can save thousands of lives. However, lack of accessible minimally intrusive health monitoring systems makes timely diagnosis difficult and sometimes impossible. To remedy this problem, a textile based nano-bio-sensor was developed and evaluated in this research. The sensor was made of novel array of vertically standing nanostructures that are conductive nano-fibers projecting from a conductive fabric. These sensor electrodes were tested for the quality of electrical contact that they made with the skin based on the fundamental skin impedance model and electromagnetic theory. The hybrid nanostructured dry electrodes provided large surface area and better contact with skin that improved electrode sensitivity and reduced the effect of changing skin properties, which are the problems usually faced by conventional dry textile electrodes. The dry electrodes can only register strong physiological signals because of high background noise levels, thus limiting the use of existing dry electrodes to heart rate measurement and respiration. Therefore, dry electrode systems cannot be used for recording complete ECG waveform, EEG or measurement of bioimpedance. Because of their improved sensitivity these hybrid nanostructured dry electrodes can be applied to measurement of ECG and bioimpedance with very low baseline noise. These textile based electrodes can be seamlessly integrated into garments of daily use such as vests and bra. In combination with embedded wireless network device that can communicate with smart phone, laptop or GPRS, they can function as wearable wireless health diagnostic systems.

  1. Commercial Implementation of Model-Based Manufacturing of Nanostructured Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, Terry C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-24

    Computational modeling is an essential tool for commercial production of nanostructured metals. Strength is limited by imperfections at the high strength levels that are achievable in nanostructured metals. Processing to achieve homogeneity at the micro- and nano-scales is critical. Manufacturing of nanostructured metals is intrinsically a multi-scale problem. Manufacturing of nanostructured metal products requires computer control, monitoring and modeling. Large scale manufacturing of bulk nanostructured metals by Severe Plastic Deformation is a multi-scale problem. Computational modeling at all scales is essential. Multiple scales of modeling must be integrated to predict and control nanostructural, microstructural, macrostructural product characteristics and production processes.

  2. Titanate and titania nanostructures and nanostructure assemblies, and methods of making same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Stanislaus S.; Mao, Yuanbing

    2016-06-14

    The invention relates to nanomaterial's and assemblies including, a micrometer-scale spherical aggregate comprising: a plurality of one-dimensional nanostructures comprising titanium and oxygen, wherein the one-dimensional nanostructures radiate from a hollow central core thereby forming a spherical aggregate.

  3. Titanate and titania nanostructures and nanostructure assemblies, and methods of making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Stanislaus S; Mao, Yuanbing

    2013-05-14

    The invention relates to nanomaterials and assemblies including, a micrometer-scale spherical aggregate comprising: a plurality of one-dimensional nanostructures comprising titanium and oxygen, wherein the one-dimensional nanostructures radiate from a hollow central core thereby forming a spherical aggregate.

  4. Inhibition of Biofilm Formation Using Novel Nanostructured Surfaces Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Biofilms are ubiquitous in the environment. Few surfaces resist biofilm formation, most promote it. Biofilm formation poses problems in water systems as they can...

  5. Nanostructured InGaP Solar Cells Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Current matching constraints can severely limit the design and overall performance of conventional serially-connected multijunction solar cells. The goal of this...

  6. Nanostructured InGaP Solar Cells Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The operating conditions of conventional multijunction solar cells are severely limited by the current matching requirements of serially connected devices. The goal...

  7. Nanostructures for Advanced Imaging and Detector Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We have developed carbon nanotube formulations primarily geared towards enhanced stray light control on a variety of instruments.  IRAD has supported...

  8. Development and analysis of superconductors with projected nanostructured pinning centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Carlos A.; Rodrigues, D.

    2004-08-01

    The present work has the main objective to study the influence of the proximity effect on the superconducting properties of materials with pinning center dimensions comparable to the coherence length. Artificial Pinning Centers (APC) of Cu(Sn) were introduced into the Nb 3Sn superconducting phase using successive bundlings followed by swaging and wire drawing. Three superconductor wires were produced using the internal tin method. After fabrication, the samples were heat treated to optimize the superconducting phase formation. Microstructural and superconducting characterization of the samples were realized. The results showed the influence of the proximity effect on Tc, Jc and Bc2.

  9. Nanostructured Tungsten Rhenium Components for Propulsion Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Revolutionizing the space propulsion industry through innovative, relatively low-cost, manufacturing techniques is extremely needed. Specifically, advancements are...

  10. Nanostructured Humidity Sensor for Spacecraft Life Support Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Humidity is a critical variable for monitoring and control on extended duration missions because it can affect the operation and efficiency of closed loop life...

  11. Hydrogen Storage and Production Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, Abhijit [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Biris, A. S. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Mazumder, M. K. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Karabacak, T. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Kannarpady, Ganesh [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States); Sharma, R. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2011-07-31

    This is the final technical report. This report is a summary of the project. The goal of our project is to improve solar-to-hydrogen generation efficiency of the PhotoElectroChemical (PEC) conversion process by developing photoanodes with high absorption efficiency in the visible region of the solar radiation spectrum and to increase photo-corrosion resistance of the electrode for generating hydrogen from water. To meet this goal, we synthesized nanostructured heterogeneous semiconducting photoanodes with a higher light absorption efficiency compared to that of TiO2 and used a corrosion protective layer of TiO2. While the advantages of photoelectrochemical (PEC) production of hydrogen have not yet been realized, the recent developments show emergence of new nanostructural designs of photoanodes and choices of materials with significant gains in photoconversion efficiency.

  12. High-efficiency photovoltaics based on semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Paul K.L. [University of California, San Diego; Yu, Edward T. [University of Texas at Austin; Wang, Deli [University of California, San Diego

    2011-10-31

    The objective of this project was to exploit a variety of semiconductor nanostructures, specifically semiconductor quantum wells, quantum dots, and nanowires, to achieve high power conversion efficiency in photovoltaic devices. In a thin-film device geometry, the objectives were to design, fabricate, and characterize quantum-well and quantum-dot solar cells in which scattering from metallic and/or dielectric nanostructures was employed to direct incident photons into lateral, optically confined paths within a thin (~1-3um or less) device structure. Fundamental issues concerning nonequilibrium carrier escape from quantum-confined structures, removal of thin-film devices from an epitaxial growth substrate, and coherent light trapping in thin-film photovoltaic devices were investigated. In a nanowire device geometry, the initial objectives were to engineer vertical nanowire arrays to optimize optical confinement within the nanowires, and to extend this approach to core-shell heterostructures to achieve broadspectrum absorption while maintaining high opencircuit voltages. Subsequent work extended this approach to include fabrication of nanowire photovoltaic structures on low-cost substrates.

  13. Nanostructure Determination by Co-Refining Models to Multiple Datasets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billinge, Simon

    2011-05-31

    The results of the work are contained in the publications resulting from the grant (which are listed below). Here I summarize the main findings from the last period of the award, 2006-2007: • Published a paper in Science with Igor Levin outlining the “Nanostructure Problem”, our inability to solve structure at the nanoscale. • Published a paper in Nature demonstrating the first ever ab-initio structure determination of a nanoparticle from atomic pair distribution function (PDF) data. • Published one book and 3 overview articles on PDF methods and the nanostructure problem. • Completed a project that sought to find a structural response to the presence of the so-called “intermediate phase” in network glasses which appears close to the rigidity percolation threshold in these systems. The main result was that we did not see convincing evidence for this, which drew into doubt the idea that GexSe1-x glasses were a model system exhibiting rigidity percolation.

  14. Nanostructured bioceramics for maxillofacial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamopoulos, Othon; Papadopoulos, Triantafillos

    2007-08-01

    Biomaterials science and technology have been expanding tremendously the recent years. The results of this evolution are obvious in maxillofacial applications especially with the contemporary development of Nanotechnology. Among biomaterials, bioceramics possess a specific field due to various interactions with the biological tissues. The combination of bioceramics and nanotechnology has resulted in enhanced skeletal interactions in maxillofacial applications. Nanotechnology secures better mechanical properties and more effective biological interactions with jaws. The main production methods for the synthesis of nanostructured materials include plasma arcing, chemical vapour deposition, sol-gel and precipitation. The bioceramics in Dentistry comprise inert, bioactive, resorbable and composite systems. The purpose of the present article is to describe the available nanotechnology methods and how these could be addressed to synthesise maxillofacial bioceramics with advanced properties for better biological applications. Additionally, it describes specific clinical applications in maxillofacial surgery of these biomaterials--either by themselves or in combination with others--that can be promising candidates for bone tissue engineering. Such applications include replacement of lost teeth, filling of jaws defects or reconstruction of mandible and temporomandibular joint.

  15. Nonlinear scattering in plasmonic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Shi-Wei

    2016-09-01

    Nonlinear phenomena provide novel light manipulation capabilities and innovative applications. Recently, we discovered nonlinear saturation on single-particle scattering of gold nanospheres by continuous-wave laser excitation and innovatively applied to improve microscopic resolution down to λ/8. However, the nonlinearity was limited to the green-orange plasmonic band of gold nanosphere, and the underlying mechanism has not yet been fully understood. In this work, we demonstrated that nonlinear scattering exists for various material/geometry combinations, thus expanding the applicable wavelength range. For near-infrared, gold nanorod is used, while for blue-violet, silver nanospheres are adopted. In terms of mechanism, the nonlinearity may originate from interband/intraband absorption, hot electron, or hot lattice, which are spectrally mixed in the case of gold nanosphere. For gold nanorod and silver nanosphere, nonlinear scattering occurs at plasmonic resonances, which are spectrally far from interband/intraband absorptions, so they are excluded. We found that the nonlinear index is much larger than possible contributions from hot electrons in literature. Therefore, we conclude that hot lattice is the major mechanism. In addition, we propose that similar to z-scan, which is the standard method to characterize nonlinearity of a thin sample, laser scanning microscopy should be adopted as the standard method to characterize nonlinearity from a nanostructure. Our work not only provides the physical mechanism of the nonlinear scattering, but also paves the way toward multi-color superresolution imaging based on non-bleaching plasmonic scattering.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Nanostructure Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    Nanoscale structures, such as nanowires and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), are often grown in gaseous or plasma environments. Successful growth of these structures is defined by achieving a specified crystallinity or chirality, size or diameter, alignment, etc., which in turn depend on gas mixture ratios. pressure, flow rate, substrate temperature, and other operating conditions. To date, there has not been a rigorous growth model that addresses the specific concerns of crystalline nanowire growth, while demonstrating the correct trends of the processing conditions on growth rates. Most crystal growth models are based on the Burton, Cabrera, and Frank (BCF) method, where adatoms are incorporated into a growing crystal at surface steps or spirals. When the supersaturation of the vapor is high, islands nucleate to form steps, and these steps subsequently spread (grow). The overall bulk growth rate is determined by solving for the evolving motion of the steps. Our approach is to use a phase field model to simulate the growth of finite sized nanowire crystals, linking the free energy equation with the diffusion equation of the adatoms. The phase field method solves for an order parameter that defines the evolving steps in a concentration field. This eliminates the need for explicit front tracking/location, or complicated shadowing routines, both of which can be computationally expensive, particularly in higher dimensions. We will present results demonstrating the effect of process conditions, such as substrate temperature, vapor supersaturation, etc. on the evolving morphologies and overall growth rates of the nanostructures.

  17. NANOSTRUCTURES OF FUNCTIONAL BLOCK COPOLYMERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guojun Liu

    2000-01-01

    Nanostructure fabrication from block copolymers in my group normally involves polymer design, synthesis, selfassembly, selective domain crosslinking, and sometimes selective domain removal. Preparation of thin films with nanochannels was used to illustrate the strategy we took. In this particular case, a linear triblock copolymer polyisopreneblock-poly(2-cinnamoylethyl methacrylate)-block-poly(t-butyl acrylate), PI-b-PCEMA-b-PtBA, was used. Films, 25 to50μm thick, were prepared from casting on glass slides a toluene solution of PI-b-PCEMA-b-PtBA and PtBA homopolymer,hPtBA, where hPtBA is shorter than the PtBA block. At the hPtBA mass fraction of 20% relative to the triblock or the total PtBA (hPtBA and PtBA block) volume fraction of 0.44, hPtBA and PtBA formed a seemingly continuous phase in the matrix of PCEMA and PI. Such a block segregation pattern was locked in by photocrosslinking the PCEMA domain. Nanochannels were formed by extracting out hPtBA with solvent. Alternatively, larger channels were obtained from extracting out hPtBA and hydrolyzing the t-butyl groups of the PtBA block. Such membranes were not liquid permeable but had gas permeability constants ~6 orders of magnitude higher than that of low-density polyethylene films.

  18. Semiconductor nanostructures for artificial photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong

    2012-02-01

    Nanowires, with their unique capability to bridge the nanoscopic and macroscopic worlds, have already been demonstrated as important materials for different energy conversion. One emerging and exciting direction is their application for solar to fuel conversion. The generation of fuels by the direct conversion of solar energy in a fully integrated system is an attractive goal, but no such system has been demonstrated that shows the required efficiency, is sufficiently durable, or can be manufactured at reasonable cost. One of the most critical issues in solar water splitting is the development of a suitable photoanode with high efficiency and long-term durability in an aqueous environment. Semiconductor nanowires represent an important class of nanostructure building block for direct solar-to-fuel application because of their high surface area, tunable bandgap and efficient charge transport and collection. Nanowires can be readily designed and synthesized to deterministically incorporate heterojunctions with improved light absorption, charge separation and vectorial transport. Meanwhile, it is also possible to selectively decorate different oxidation or reduction catalysts onto specific segments of the nanowires to mimic the compartmentalized reactions in natural photosynthesis. In this talk, I will highlight several recent examples in this lab using semiconductor nanowires and their heterostructures for the purpose of direct solar water splitting.

  19. Nanostructured surfaces of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, Eriberto; Sbricoli, Luca; Guazzo, Riccardo; Tocco, Ilaria; Roman, Marco; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Stellini, Edoardo; Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Sivolella, Stefano; Zavan, Barbara

    2013-01-17

    The structural and functional fusion of the surface of the dental implant with the surrounding bone (osseointegration) is crucial for the short and long term outcome of the device. In recent years, the enhancement of bone formation at the bone-implant interface has been achieved through the modulation of osteoblasts adhesion and spreading, induced by structural modifications of the implant surface, particularly at the nanoscale level. In this context, traditional chemical and physical processes find new applications to achieve the best dental implant technology. This review provides an overview of the most common manufacture techniques and the related cells-surface interactions and modulation. A Medline and a hand search were conducted to identify studies concerning nanostructuration of implant surface and their related biological interaction. In this paper, we stressed the importance of the modifications on dental implant surfaces at the nanometric level. Nowadays, there is still little evidence of the long-term benefits of nanofeatures, as the promising results achieved in vitro and in animals have still to be confirmed in humans. However, the increasing interest in nanotechnology is undoubted and more research is going to be published in the coming years.

  20. Nanostructured Surfaces of Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Sivolella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural and functional fusion of the surface of the dental implant with the surrounding bone (osseointegration is crucial for the short and long term outcome of the device. In recent years, the enhancement of bone formation at the bone-implant interface has been achieved through the modulation of osteoblasts adhesion and spreading, induced by structural modifications of the implant surface, particularly at the nanoscale level. In this context, traditional chemical and physical processes find new applications to achieve the best dental implant technology. This review provides an overview of the most common manufacture techniques and the related cells-surface interactions and modulation. A Medline and a hand search were conducted to identify studies concerning nanostructuration of implant surface and their related biological interaction. In this paper, we stressed the importance of the modifications on dental implant surfaces at the nanometric level. Nowadays, there is still little evidence of the long-term benefits of nanofeatures, as the promising results achieved in vitro and in animals have still to be confirmed in humans. However, the increasing interest in nanotechnology is undoubted and more research is going to be published in the coming years.

  1. Nanostructures from Synthetic Genetic Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alexander I; Beuron, Fabienne; Peak-Chew, Sew-Yeu; Morris, Edward P; Herdewijn, Piet; Holliger, Philipp

    2016-06-16

    Nanoscale objects of increasing complexity can be constructed from DNA or RNA. However, the scope of potential applications could be enhanced by expanding beyond the moderate chemical diversity of natural nucleic acids. Here, we explore the construction of nano-objects made entirely from alternative building blocks: synthetic genetic polymers not found in nature, also called xeno nucleic acids (XNAs). Specifically, we describe assembly of 70 kDa tetrahedra elaborated in four different XNA chemistries (2'-fluro-2'-deoxy-ribofuranose nucleic acid (2'F-RNA), 2'-fluoroarabino nucleic acids (FANA), hexitol nucleic acids (HNA), and cyclohexene nucleic acids (CeNA)), as well as mixed designs, and a ∼600 kDa all-FANA octahedron, visualised by electron microscopy. Our results extend the chemical scope for programmable nanostructure assembly, with implications for the design of nano-objects and materials with an expanded range of structural and physicochemical properties, including enhanced biostability. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Computational advances in nanostructure determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, Christopher Lyn

    The atomic pair distribution function (PDF) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques fill a hole in conventional crystallographic analysis, which resolves the average long-range structure of a material but inadequately determines deviations from the average. These techniques provide structural information on the sub-nanometer scale and are helping characterize modern materials. Despite their successes, PDF and EXAFS often fall short of adequately describing complex nanostructured materials. Parallel PDF and EXAFS refinement, or corefinement, is one attempt at extending the applicability of these techniques. Corefinement combines the best parts of PDF and EXAFS, the chemical-specific and short-range detail of EXAFS and the short and intermediate-range information from the PDF. New ab initio methods are also being employed to find structures from the PDF. These techniques use the bond length information encoded in the PDF to assemble structures without a model. On another front, new software has been developed to introduce the PDF method to a larger community. Broad awareness of the PDF technique will help drive its future development.

  3. Nanostructures Using Anodic Aluminum Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valmianski, Ilya; Monton, Carlos M.; Pereiro, Juan; Basaran, Ali C.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2013-03-01

    We present two fabrication methods for asymmetric mesoscopic dot arrays over macroscopic areas using anodic aluminum oxide templates. In the first approach, metal is deposited at 45o to the template axis to partially close the pores and produce an elliptical shadow-mask. In the second approach, now underway, nanoimprint lithography on a polymer intermediary layer is followed by reactive ion etching to generate asymmetric pore seeds. Both these techniques are quantified by an analysis of the lateral morphology and lattice of the pores or dots using scanning electron microscopy and a newly developed MATLAB based code (available for free download at http://ischuller.ucsd.edu). The code automatically provides a segmentation of the measured area and the statistics of morphological properties such as area, diameter, and eccentricity, as well as the lattice properties such as number of nearest neighbors, and unbiased angular and radial two point correlation functions. Furthermore, novel user defined statistics can be easily obtained. We will additionally present several applications of these methods to superconducting, ferromagnetic, and organic nanostructures. This work is supported by AFOSR FA9550-10-1-0409

  4. Glad nanostructured arrays with enhanced carrier collection and light trapping for photoconductive and photovoltaic device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansizoglu, Hilal

    Solar energy harvesting has been of great interest for researchers over the past 50 years. Main emphasis has been on developing high quality materials with low defect density and proper band gaps. However, high cost of bulk materials and insufficient light absorption in thin films led to utilization of semiconductor nanostructures in photovoltaics and photonics. Light trapping abilities of nanostructures can provide high optical absorption whereas core/shell nanostructured arrays can allow enhanced charge carrier collection. However, most of the nanofabrication methods that can produce uniform nanostructure geometries are limited in materials, dimensions, and not compatible with industrial production systems. Therefore, it is essential to develop innovative low-cost fabrication approaches that can address these issues. The primary goal of this project is to investigate light trapping and carrier collection properties of glancing angle deposited (GLAD) nanostructured arrays for high-efficiency, low-cost photoconductive and photovoltaic devices using characterization techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-vis-NIR) spectroscopy and time resolved photocurrent measurements. Indium sulfide (In2S3) has been chosen as a model material system in this study. GLAD nanostructured arrays of vertical rods, screws, springs, zigzags and tilted rods were fabricated and characterized. A strong dependence of optical absorption on the shapes of nanostructures is observed from UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. A simulation study using finite difference time domain (FDTD) shows that introducing 3D geometry results in diffuse scattering of light and leads to high optical absorption. Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to determine a simple and scalable fabrication technique for conformal and uniform shell coatings. The results suggest that an atomic flux with angular distribution, which can be

  5. Fabrication of nanostructures and nanostructure based interfaces for biosensor application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Devesh

    Nanoparticles have applications from electronics, composites, drug-delivery, imaging and sensors etc. Fabricating and controlling shape and size of nanoparticles and also controlling the positioning of these particles in 1, 2 or 3-d structures is of most interest. The underlying theme of this study is to develop simple and efficient techniques to fabricate nanoparticles from polymers, and also achieve control in shape, size and functionalization of nanoparticles, while applying them in biosensor applications. First part of the dissertation studies the fabrication of nanostructures using anodized alumina membrane as template. It discusses the fabrication design for injecting polystyrene nanoparticles inside the pores of anodized alumina membranes and heating the membrane to coalesce the particles into tapered nanoparticles. Various parameters like temperature and amount of injected particles can vary the size and shape of fabricated nanoparticles. Later it focuses on the fabrication of metallic nanostructures using the alumina membranes without the aid of the injection system. It utilizes the difference in the functionality of the pore edges of cleaved alumina membrane with respect to the pore walls to first deposit charged polymers using layer-by-layer deposition followed by deposition of nickel. Second part of this study involves immobilization of enzymes for biosensor applications. It describes a biosensor interface developed by immobilization of tyrosinase using layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition process. The interface was modified with functional nanoparticles and their influence on the response of biosensor was studied. Tyrosinase sensor was further extended to develop a novel biosensor which was used to study real time inhibition of NEST, a subunit of the medically relevant membrane protein, neuropathy target esterase. The biosensor was developed to give real time monitoring of dose dependent decrease in activity of NEST. Final part of this study emphasizes on

  6. Project 2010 Project Management

    CERN Document Server

    Happy, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The ideal on-the-job reference guide for project managers who use Microsoft Project 2010. This must-have guide to using Microsoft Project 2010 is written from a real project manager's perspective and is packed with information you can use on the job. The book explores using Project 2010 during phases of project management, reveals best practices, and walks you through project flow from planning through tracking to closure. This valuable book follows the processes defined in the PMBOK Guide, Fourth Edition , and also provides exam prep for Microsoft's MCTS: Project 2010 certification.: Explains

  7. Semiconductor nanostructures for optoelectronic devices processing, characterization and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Gyu-Chul

    2012-01-01

    This book summarizes the current state of semiconductor nanodevice development, examining nanowires, nanorods, hybrid semiconductor nanostructures, wide bandgap nanostructures for visible light emitters and graphene and describing their device applications.

  8. Shockwave Consolidation of Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Taylor, Patrick; Nemir, David

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology based thermoelectric materials are considered attractive for developing highly efficient thermoelectric devices. Nano-structured thermoelectric materials are predicted to offer higher ZT over bulk materials by reducing thermal conductivity and increasing electrical conductivity. Consolidation of nano-structured powders into dense materials without losing nanostructure is essential towards practical device development. Using the gas atomization process, amorphous nano-structured powders were produced. Shockwave consolidation is accomplished by surrounding the nanopowder-containing tube with explosives and then detonating. The resulting shock wave causes rapid fusing of the powders without the melt and subsequent grain growth. We have been successful in generating consolidated nano-structured bismuth telluride alloy powders by using the shockwave technique. Using these consolidated materials, several types of thermoelectric power generating devices have been developed. Shockwave consolidation is anticipated to generate large quantities of nanostructred materials expeditiously and cost effectively. In this paper, the technique of shockwave consolidation will be presented followed by Seebeck Coefficient and thermal conductivity measurements of consolidated materials. Preliminary results indicate a substantial increase in electrical conductivity due to shockwave consolidation technique.

  9. Nanostructuring of PEG-fibrinogen polymeric scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisman, Ilya; Seliktar, Dror; Bianco-Peled, Havazelet

    2010-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that nanostructuring of scaffolds for tissue engineering has a major impact on their interactions with cells. The current investigation focuses on nanostructuring of a biocompatible, biosynthetic polymeric hydrogel scaffold made from crosslinked poly(ethylene glycol)-fibrinogen conjugates. Nanostructuring was achieved by the addition of the block copolymer Pluronic F127, which self-assembles into nanometric micelles at certain concentrations and temperatures. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy experiments detected F127 micelles, both embedded within PEGylated fibrinogen hydrogels and in solution. The density of the F127 micelles, as well as their ordering, increased with increasing block copolymer concentration. The mechanical properties of the nanostructured hydrogels were investigated using stress-sweep rheological testing. These tests revealed a correlation between the block copolymer concentration and the storage modulus of the composite hydrogels. In vitro cellular assays confirmed that the increased modulus of the hydrogels did not limit the ability of the cells to form extensions and become spindled within the three-dimensional (3-D) hydrogel culture environment. Thus, altering the nanostructure of the hydrogel may be used as a strategy to control cellular behavior in 3-D through changes in mechanical properties of the environment.

  10. Mueller matrix imaging ellipsometry for nanostructure metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shiyuan; Du, Weichao; Chen, Xiuguo; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Chuanwei

    2015-06-29

    In order to achieve effective process control, fast, inexpensive, nondestructive and reliable nanometer scale feature measurements are extremely useful in high-volume nanomanufacturing. Among the possible techniques, optical scatterometry is relatively ideal due to its high throughput, low cost, and minimal sample damage. However, this technique is inherently limited by the illumination spot size of the instrument and the low efficiency in construction of a map of the sample over a wide area. Aiming at these issues, we introduce conventional imaging techniques to optical scatterometry and combine them with Mueller matrix ellipsometry based scatterometry, which is expected to be a powerful tool for the measurement of nanostructures in future high-volume nanomanufacturing, and propose to apply Mueller matrix imaging ellipsometry (MMIE) for nanostructure metrology. Two kinds of nanostructures were measured using an in-house developed Mueller matrix imaging ellipsometer in this work. The experimental results demonstrate that we can achieve Mueller matrix measurement and analysis for nanostructures with pixel-sized illumination spots by using MMIE. We can also efficiently construct parameter maps of the nanostructures over a wide area with pixel-sized lateral resolution by performing parallel ellipsometric analysis for all the pixels of interest.

  11. Mapping the stochastic response of nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattamatta, Subrahmanyam; Elliott, Ryan S.; Tadmor, Ellad B.

    2014-04-01

    Nanostructures are technological devices constructed on a nanometer length scale more than a thousand times thinner than a human hair. Due to the unique properties of matter at this scale, such devices offer great potential for creating novel materials and behaviors that can be leveraged to benefit mankind. This paper addresses a particular challenge involved in the design of nanostructures-their stochastic or apparently random response to external loading. This is because fundamentally the function that relates the energy of a nanostructure to the arrangement of its atoms is extremely nonconvex, with each minimum corresponding to a possible equilibrium state that may be visited as the system responds to loading. Traditional atomistic simulation techniques are not capable of systematically addressing this complexity. Instead, we construct an equilibrium map (EM) for the nanostructure, analogous to a phase diagram for bulk materials, which fully characterizes its response. Using the EM, definitive predictions can be made in limiting cases and the spectrum of responses at any desired loading rate can be obtained. The latter is important because standard atomistic methods are fundamentally limited, by computational feasibility, to simulations of loading rates that are many orders of magnitude faster than reality. In contrast, the EM-based approach makes possible the direct simulation of nanostructure experiments. We demonstrate the method's capabilities and its surprisingly complex results for the case of a nanoslab of nickel under compression.

  12. User-Friendly End Station at the ALS for Nanostructure Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. J. Himpsel; P. Alivisatos; T. Callcott; J. Carlisle; J. D. Denlinger; D. E. Eastman; D. Ederer; Z. Hussain; L.J. Terminello; T. Van Buuren; R. S. Williams

    2006-07-05

    This is a construction project for an end station at the ALS, which is optimized for measuring NEXAFS of nanostructures with fluorescence detection. Compared to the usual electron yield detection, fluorescence is able to probe buried structures and is sensitive to dilute species, such as nanostructures supported on a substrate. Since the quantum yield for fluorescence is 10{sup -4}-10{sup -5} times smaller than for electrons in the soft x-ray regime, such an end station requires bright undulator beamlines at the ALS. In order to optimize the setup for a wide range of applications, two end stations were built: (1) A simple, mobile chamber with efficient photon detection (>10{sup 4} times the solid angle collection of fluorescence spectrographs) and a built-in magnet for MCD measurements at EPU beamlines (Fig. 1 left). It allows rapid mapping the electronic states of nanostructures (nanocrystals, nanowires, tailored magnetic materials, buried interfaces, biologically-functionalized surfaces). It was used with BL 8.0 (linear polarized undulator) and BL 4.0 (variable polarization). (2) A sophisticated, stationary end station operating at Beamline 8.0 (Fig. 1 right). It contains an array of surface characterization instruments and a micro-focus capability for scanning across graded samples (wedges for thickness variation, stoichiometry gradients, and general variations of the sample preparation conditions for optimizing nanostructures).

  13. The Synthesis of Nanostructured WC-Based Hardmetals Using Mechanical Alloying and Their Direct Consolidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Al-Aqeeli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten carbide- (WC- based hardmetals or cemented carbides represent an important class of materials used in a wide range of industrial applications which primarily include cutting/drilling tools and wear resistant components. The introduction and processing of nanostructured WC-based cemented carbides and their subsequent consolidation to produce dense components have been the subject of several investigations. One of the attractive means of producing this class of materials is by mechanical alloying technique. However, one of the challenging issues in obtaining the right end-product is the possible loss of the nanocrystallite sizes due to the undesirable grain growth during powder sintering step. Many research groups have engaged in multiple projects aiming at exploring the right path of consolidating the nanostructured WC-based powders without substantially loosing the attained nanostructure. The present paper highlights some key issues related to powder synthesis and sintering of WC-based nanostructured materials using mechanical alloying. The path of directly consolidating the powders using nonconventional consolidation techniques will be addressed and some light will be shed on the advantageous use of such techniques. Cobalt-bonded hardmetals will be principally covered in this work along with an additional exposure of the use of other binders in the WC-based hardmetals.

  14. R&D for computational cognitive and social models : foundations for model evaluation through verification and validation (final LDRD report).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slepoy, Alexander; Mitchell, Scott A.; Backus, George A.; McNamara, Laura A.; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2008-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is investing in projects that aim to develop computational modeling and simulation applications that explore human cognitive and social phenomena. While some of these modeling and simulation projects are explicitly research oriented, others are intended to support or provide insight for people involved in high consequence decision-making. This raises the issue of how to evaluate computational modeling and simulation applications in both research and applied settings where human behavior is the focus of the model: when is a simulation 'good enough' for the goals its designers want to achieve? In this report, we discuss two years' worth of review and assessment of the ASC program's approach to computational model verification and validation, uncertainty quantification, and decision making. We present a framework that extends the principles of the ASC approach into the area of computational social and cognitive modeling and simulation. In doing so, we argue that the potential for evaluation is a function of how the modeling and simulation software will be used in a particular setting. In making this argument, we move from strict, engineering and physics oriented approaches to V&V to a broader project of model evaluation, which asserts that the systematic, rigorous, and transparent accumulation of evidence about a model's performance under conditions of uncertainty is a reasonable and necessary goal for model evaluation, regardless of discipline. How to achieve the accumulation of evidence in areas outside physics and engineering is a significant research challenge, but one that requires addressing as modeling and simulation tools move out of research laboratories and into the hands of decision makers. This report provides an assessment of our thinking on ASC Verification and Validation, and argues for further extending V&V research in the physical and engineering sciences toward a broader program of model

  15. Electrochemical Fabrication and Electrocatalytic Properties of Nanostructured Mesoporous Platinum Microelectrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mengyan NIE; Joanne M. Elliott

    2005-01-01

    Electrodeposition from a lyotropic liquid crystal template medium was used to produce nanostructured platinum microelectrodes with high specific surface area and high mass transport efficiency. Compared to polished and conventional platinized microelectrodes, well-ordered nanostructured platinum microelectrodes exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic properties for oxygen and ascorbic acid, whilst well-ordered nanostructured platinum microelectrodes offered improved electrocatalytic properties for oxygen reduction compared to disordered nanostructured platinum microelectrodes.

  16. Plasma induced by pulsed laser and fabrication of silicon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Wei-Qi; Dong, Tai-Ge; Wang, Gang; Liu, Liu Shi-Rong; Huang, Zhong-Mei; Miao, Xin-Jian; Lv, Quan; Qin, Chao-Jian

    2015-08-01

    It is interesting that in preparing process of nanosilicon by pulsed laser, the periodic diffraction pattern from plasmonic lattice structure in the Purcell cavity due to interaction between plasmons and photons is observed. This kind of plasmonic lattice structure confined in the cavity may be similar to the Wigner crystal structure. Emission manipulation on Si nanostructures fabricated by the plasmonic wave induced from pulsed laser is studied by using photoluminescence spectroscopy. The electronic localized states and surface bonding are characterized by several emission bands peaked near 600 nm and 700 nm on samples prepared in oxygen or nitrogen environment. The electroluminescence wavelength is measured in the telecom window on silicon film coated by ytterbium. The enhanced emission originates from surface localized states in band gap due to broken symmetry from some bonds on surface bulges produced by plasmonic wave in the cavity. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11264007 and 61465003).

  17. Nanostructured materials: A novel approach to enhanced performance. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korth, G.E.; Froes, F.H.; Suryanarayana, C. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Nanostuctured materials are an emerging class of materials that can exhibit physical and mechanical characteristics often exceeding those exhibited by conventional course grained materials. A number of different techniques can be employed to produce these materials. In this program, the synthesis methods were (a) mechanical alloying , (b) physical vapor deposition, and (c) plasma processing. The physical vapor deposition and plasma processing were discontinued after initial testing with subsequent efforts focused on mechanical alloying. The major emphasis of the program was on the synthesis, consolidation, and characterization of nanostructured Al-Fe, Ti-Al, Ti-Al-Nb, and Fe-Al by alloying intermetallics with a view to increase their ductilities. The major findings of this project are reported.

  18. Metal films with imprinted nanostructures by template stripping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, René Lynge; Pors, Anders; Dreier, Jes

    We present a novel template stripping procedure for fabricating metal films with imprinted nanostructures. The basic idea is to deposit a gold film onto a nano-structured substrate and subsequently strip the film from the substrate surface thereby revealing imprinted nanostructures in the film...... result is a thin gold film with imprinted nano-cavities....

  19. Noncovalent interaction of carbon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umadevi, Deivasigamani; Panigrahi, Swati; Sastry, Garikapati Narahari

    2014-08-19

    The potential application of carbon nanomaterials in biology and medicine increases the necessity to understand the nature of their interactions with living organisms and the environment. The primary forces of interaction at the nano-bio interface are mostly noncovalent in nature. Quantifying such interactions and identifying various factors that influence such interactions is a question of outstanding fundamental interest in academia and industry. In this Account, we have summarized our recent studies in understanding the noncovalent interactions of carbon nanostructures (CNSs), which were obtained by employing first-principles calculations on various model systems representing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene. Bestowed with an extended sp(2) carbon network, which is a common feature in all of these nanostructures, they exhibit π-π interactions with aromatic molecules (benzene, naphthalene, nucleobases, amino acids), cation-π type of interactions with metal ions, anion-π interactions with anions, and other XH···π type of interactions with various small molecules (H2O, NH3, CH4, H2, etc.). CNTs are wrapped-up forms of two-dimensional graphene, and hence, it is interesting to compare the binding abilities of these two allotropes that differ in their curvature. The chirality and curvature of CNSs appear to play a major role in determining the structural, energetic, and functional properties. Flat graphene shows stronger noncovalent interactions than the curved nanotubes toward various substrates. Understanding the interactions of CNSs with organic molecules and biomolecules has gained a great deal of research interest because of their potential applications in various fields. Aromatic hydrocarbons show a strong propensity to interact with CNSs via the π-π mode of interaction rather than CH···π interaction. As DNA sequencing appears to be one of the most important potential applications of carbon nanomaterials, the study of CNS

  20. Vibron and phonon hybridization in dielectric nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Thomas C; Signorell, Ruth

    2011-04-05

    Plasmon hybridization theory has been an invaluable tool in advancing our understanding of the optical properties of metallic nanostructures. Through the prism of molecular orbital theory, it allows one to interpret complex structures as "plasmonic molecules" and easily predict and engineer their electromagnetic response. However, this formalism is limited to conducting particles. Here, we present a hybridization scheme for the external and internal vibrations of dielectric nanostructures that provides a straightforward understanding of the infrared signatures of these particles through analogy to existing hybridization models of both molecular orbitals and plasmons extending the range of applications far beyond metallic nanostructures. This method not only provides a qualitative understanding, but also allows for the quantitative prediction of vibrational spectra of complex nanoobjects from well-known spectra of their primitive building blocks. The examples of nanoshells illustrate how spectral features can be understood in terms of symmetry, number of nodal planes, and scale parameters.

  1. Nanostructures for all-polymer microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matschuk, Maria; Bruus, Henrik; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2010-01-01

    We present a process for fabricating nanostructured surfaces with feature sizes down to at least 50 nm and aspect ratios of 1:1 by injection molding. We explored the effects of mold coatings and injection molding conditions on the final nanostructure quality. A plasma-polymerized fluorocarbon based...... antistiction coating was found to improve the replication fidelity (shape and depth) of nanoscale features substantially. Arrays of holes of 50 nm diameter/35 nm depth and 100 nm/100 nm diameter, respectively, were mass-produced in cyclic olefin copolymer (Topas 5013) by injection molding. Polymer microfluidic...... channel chip parts resulted from a separate injection molding process. The microfluidic chip part and the nanostructured chip part were successfully bonded to form a sealed microfluidic system using air plasma assisted thermal bonding....

  2. Nanowires and nanostructures fabrication using template methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Vlad, A.;

    2009-01-01

    One of the great challenges of today is to find reliable techniques for the fabrication of nanomaterials and nanostructures. Methods based on template synthesis and on self organization are the most promising due to their easiness and low cost. This paper focuses on the electrochemical synthesis ...... of nanowires and nanostructures using nanoporous host materials such as supported anodic aluminum considering it as a key template for nanowires based devices. New ways are opened for applications by combining such template synthesis methods with nanolithographic techniques.......One of the great challenges of today is to find reliable techniques for the fabrication of nanomaterials and nanostructures. Methods based on template synthesis and on self organization are the most promising due to their easiness and low cost. This paper focuses on the electrochemical synthesis...

  3. Transport and dynamics of nanostructured graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunst, Tue

    This thesis is concerned with the heating and electronic properties of nanoscale devices based on nanostructured graphene. As electronic devices scale down to nanometer dimensions, the operation depends on the detailed atomic structure. Emerging carbon nano-materials such as graphene, carbon...... nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons, exhibit promising electronic and heat transport properties. Much research addresses the electron mobility of pristine graphene devices. However, the thermal transport properties, as well as the effects of e-ph interaction, in nanoscale devices, based on nanostructured...... graphene, have received much less attention. This thesis contributes to the understanding of the thermal properties of nanostructured graphene. The computational analysis is based on DFT/TB-NEGF. We show how a regular nanoperforation of a graphene layer - a graphene antidot lattice (GAL) - may...

  4. Nanostructured scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoming; Wang, Lu; Fan, Yubo; Feng, Qingling; Cui, Fu-Zhai; Watari, Fumio

    2013-08-01

    It has been demonstrated that nanostructured materials, compared with conventional materials, may promote greater amounts of specific protein interactions, thereby more efficiently stimulating new bone formation. It has also been indicated that, when features or ingredients of scaffolds are nanoscaled, a variety of interactions can be stimulated at the cellular level. Some of those interactions induce favorable cellular functions while others may leads to toxicity. This review presents the mechanism of interactions between nanoscaled materials and cells and focuses on the current research status of nanostructured scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Firstly, the main requirements for bone tissue engineering scaffolds were discussed. Then, the mechanism by which nanoscaled materials promote new bone formation was explained, following which the current research status of main types of nanostructured scaffolds for bone tissue engineering was reviewed and discussed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Biomimetic gyroid nanostructures exceeding their natural origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zongsong; Turner, Mark D.; Gu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Using optical two-beam lithography with improved resolution and enhanced mechanical strength, we demonstrate the replication of gyroid photonic nanostructures found in the butterfly Callophrys rubi. These artificial structures are shown to have size, controllability, and uniformity that are superior to those of their biological counterparts. In particular, the elastic Young’s modulus of fabricated nanowires is enhanced by up to 20%. As such, the circular dichroism enabled by the gyroid nanostructures can operate in the near-ultraviolet wavelength region, shorter than that supported by the natural butterfly wings of C. rubi. This fabrication technique provides a unique tool for extracting three-dimensional photonic designs from nature and will aid the investigation of biomimetic nanostructures. PMID:27386542

  6. Application opportunities for nanostructured materials and coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, M. [Connecticut Univ., Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Metallurgy

    1995-12-01

    Nanostructured materials have the potential to change materials science as we know it today significantly, as well as to provide a new generation of materials with a quantum improvement in properties. While many interesting properties have been generated in the laboratory, there is still much work to be done before there are production applications for nanostructured materials and coatings in gas turbine engines and similar demanding strength- and temperature-limited applications. This paper (1) describes the need for improved materials in gas turbine engines, (2) summarizes the improved physical and mechanical properties that have been reported for nanostructured materials, (3) discusses a research and development methodology that has the potential for accelerating technology implementation, and (4) describes high pay-off applications. (orig.)

  7. Silicon nanostructures for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fei; Cao, Zhaohui; Ji, Xiaoyuan; Chu, Binbin; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of nanotechnology suggests new and exciting opportunities for early diagnosis and therapy of cancer. During the recent years, silicon-based nanomaterials featuring unique properties have received great attention, showing high promise for myriad biological and biomedical applications. In this review, we will particularly summarize latest representative achievements on the development of silicon nanostructures as a powerful platform for cancer early diagnosis and therapy. First, we introduce the silicon nanomaterial-based biosensors for detecting cancer markers (e.g., proteins, tumor-suppressor genes and telomerase activity, among others) with high sensitivity and selectivity under molecular level. Then, we summarize in vitro and in vivo applications of silicon nanostructures as efficient nanoagents for cancer therapy. Finally, we discuss the future perspective of silicon nanostructures for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  8. Biomimetic gyroid nanostructures exceeding their natural origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zongsong; Turner, Mark D; Gu, Min

    2016-05-01

    Using optical two-beam lithography with improved resolution and enhanced mechanical strength, we demonstrate the replication of gyroid photonic nanostructures found in the butterfly Callophrys rubi. These artificial structures are shown to have size, controllability, and uniformity that are superior to those of their biological counterparts. In particular, the elastic Young's modulus of fabricated nanowires is enhanced by up to 20%. As such, the circular dichroism enabled by the gyroid nanostructures can operate in the near-ultraviolet wavelength region, shorter than that supported by the natural butterfly wings of C. rubi. This fabrication technique provides a unique tool for extracting three-dimensional photonic designs from nature and will aid the investigation of biomimetic nanostructures.

  9. Oriented nanostructures for energy conversion and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Cao, Guozhong; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Donghai; Dubois, Dan; Zhou, Xiaodong; Graff, Gordon L; Pederson, Larry R; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2008-01-01

    Recently, the role of nanostructured materials in addressing the challenges in energy and natural resources has attracted wide attention. In particular, oriented nanostructures demonstrate promising properties for energy harvesting, conversion, and storage. In this Review, we highlight the synthesis and application of oriented nanostructures in a few key areas of energy technologies, namely photovoltaics, batteries, supercapacitors, and thermoelectrics. Although the applications differ from field to field, a common fundamental challenge is to improve the generation and transport of electrons and ions. We highlight the role of high surface area to maximize the surface activity and discuss the importance of optimum dimension and architecture, controlled pore channels, and alignment of the nanocrystalline phase to optimize the transport of electrons and ions. Finally, we discuss the challenges in attaining integrated architectures to achieve the desired performance. Brief background information is provided for the relevant technologies, but the emphasis is focused mainly on the nanoscale effects of mostly inorganic-based materials and devices.

  10. 2009 Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures GRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai-Sheng Wang

    2009-07-19

    For over thirty years, this Gordon Conference has been the premiere meeting for the field of cluster science, which studies the phenomena that arise when matter becomes small. During its history, participants have witnessed the discovery and development of many novel materials, including C60, carbon nanotubes, semiconductor and metal nanocrystals, and nanowires. In addition to addressing fundamental scientific questions related to these materials, the meeting has always included a discussion of their potential applications. Consequently, this conference has played a critical role in the birth and growth of nanoscience and engineering. The goal of the 2009 Gordon Conference is to continue the forward-looking tradition of this meeting and discuss the most recent advances in the field of clusters, nanocrystals, and nanostructures. As in past meetings, this will include new topics that broaden the field. In particular, a special emphasis will be placed on nanomaterials related to the efficient use, generation, or conversion of energy. For example, we anticipate presentations related to batteries, catalysts, photovoltaics, and thermoelectrics. In addition, we expect to address the controversy surrounding carrier multiplication with a session in which recent results addressing this phenomenon will be discussed and debated. The atmosphere of the conference, which emphasizes the presentation of unpublished results and lengthy discussion periods, ensures that attendees will enjoy a valuable and stimulating experience. Because only a limited number of participants are allowed to attend this conference, and oversubscription is anticipated, we encourage all interested researchers from academia, industry, and government institutions to apply as early as possible. An invitation is not required. We also encourage all attendees to submit their latest results for presentation at the poster sessions. We anticipate that several posters will be selected for 'hot topic' oral

  11. Spin currents in metallic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czeschka, Franz Dominik

    2011-09-05

    A pure spin current, i.e., a flow of angular momentum without accompanying net charge current, is a key ingredient in the field of spintronics. In this thesis, we experimentally investigated two different concepts for pure spin current sources suggested by theory. The first is based on a time-dependent magnetization precession which ''pumps'' a pure spin current into an adjacent non-magnetic conductor. Our experiments quantitatively corroborated important predictions expected theoretically for this approach, including the dependence of the spin current on the sample geometry and the microwave power. Even more important, we could show for the first time that the spin pumping concept is viable in a large variety of ferromagnetic materials and that it only depends on the magnetization damping. Therefore, our experiments established spin pumping as generic phenomenon and demonstrated that it is a powerful way to generate pure spin currents. The second theoretical concept is based on the conversion of charge currents into spin currents in non-magnetic nanostructures via the spin Hall effect. We experimentally investigated this approach in H-shaped, metallic nanodevices, and found that the predictions are linked to requirements not realizable with the present experimental techniques, neither in sample fabrication nor in measurement technique. Indeed, our experimental data could be consistently understood by a spin-independent transport model describing the transition from diffusive to ballistic transport. In addition, the implementation of advanced fabrication and measurement techniques allowed to discover a new non-local phenomenon, the non-local anisotropic magnetoresistance. Finally, we also studied spin-polarized supercurrents carried by spin-triplet Cooper pairs. We found that low resistance interfaces are a key requirement for further experiments in this direction. (orig.)

  12. Controllable synthesis of conducting polypyrrole nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuetong; Zhang, Jin; Song, Wenhui; Liu, Zhongfan

    2006-01-26

    Wire-, ribbon-, and sphere-like nanostructures of polypyrrole have been synthesized by solution chemistry methods in the presence of various surfactants (anionic, cationic, or nonionic surfactant) with various oxidizing agents [ammonium persulfate (APS) or ferric chloride (FeCl3), respectively]. The surfactants and oxidizing agents used in this study have played a key role in tailoring the nanostructures of polypyrrole during the polymerization. It is inferred that the lamellar structures of a mesophase are formed by self-assembly between the cations of a long chain cationic surfactant [cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) or dodeyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB)] and anions of oxidizing agent APS. These layered mesostructures are presumed to act as templates for the formation of wire- and ribbon-like polypyrrole nanostructures. In contrast, if a short chain cationic surfactant octyltrimethylammonium bromide (OTAB) or nonionic surfactant poly(ethylene glycol) mono-p-nonylphenyl ether (Opi-10) is used, sphere-like polypyrrole nanostructures are obtained, whichever of the oxidizing agents mentioned above is used. In this case, micelles resulting from self-assembly among surfactant molecules are envisaged to serve as the templates while the polymerization happens. It is also noted that, if anionic surfactant sodium dodeyl surfate (SDS) is used, no characteristic nanostructures of polypyrrole were observed. This may be attributed to the doping effect of anionic surfactants into the resulting polypyrrole chains, and as a result, micelles self-assembled among surfactant molecules are broken down during the polymerization. The effects of monomer concentration, surfactant concentration, and surfactant chain length on the morphologies of the resulting polypyrrole have been investigated in detail. The molecular structures, composition, and electrical properties of the nanostructured polypyrrole have also been investigated in this study.

  13. DNA nanostructure immobilization to lithographic DNA arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrete, Omar D.

    Although DNA is well known for its genetic role in biology, DNA has also been sought-after as a material for the self-assembly of biological and electronic devices. Examples of DNA nanostructure construction include DNA tiled self-assembly and DNA Origami, where by controlling the sequence and concentration of DNA molecules, the rational design of geometric DNA nanostructures is possible. The assembly of DNA nanostructures takes place in solution and thus they are in disorder and require further organization to construct circuitry or devices. Hence, it is essential for future applications of this technology to develop methods to direct the placement of DNA nanostructures on a surface. To address this challenge my research examines the use of DNA microarrays to capture DNA nanostructures via DNA hybridization. Modern DNA arrays offer a high-density of sequence-specific molecular recognition sites where the addressable placement of DNA nanostructures can be achieved. Using Maskless Array Synthesizer (MAS) technology, I have characterized photolithographic DNA arrays for the hybridization of DNA complexes like large DNA molecules (> 1 kb), DNA-gold nanoparticle conjugates, and DNA Origami. Although modern photolithographic DNA arrays can possess a high-density of sequence (106/cm2), the printed DNA areas are on the order of tens of microns. Thus, I have also developed a method to reduce the DNA array spot size to nanoscale dimensions through the combined use of electron beam lithography with photolithographic DNA synthesis. This work addresses the key elements towards developing a surface patterning technology that takes advantage of DNA base-pairing for both molecular sub-assembly and surface patterning.

  14. Simple Approach to Superamphiphobic Overhanging Silicon Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajendra; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Bøggild, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Superhydrophobic silicon nanostructures were fabricated by anisotropic etching of silicon coated with a thin hydrophobic layer. At certain etch parameters, overhanging nanostructures form at the apexes of the rod-shaped tips, This leads to superoleophobic behavior for several oily liquids...... with contact angles up to 152 degrees and roll-off angle down to 8 degrees. Such nonlithographic nanoscale overhanging Structures can also be added to silicon nanograss by deposition of a thin SiO2 layer, which equips the silicon rods with 100-300 nm sized overhanging Structures. This is a simple, fast...

  15. Modeling light trapping in nanostructured solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, Vivian E; Polman, Albert; Atwater, Harry A

    2011-12-27

    The integration of nanophotonic and plasmonic structures with solar cells offers the ability to control and confine light in nanoscale dimensions. These nanostructures can be used to couple incident sunlight into both localized and guided modes, enhancing absorption while reducing the quantity of material. Here we use electromagnetic modeling to study the resonances in a solar cell containing both plasmonic metal back contacts and nanostructured semiconductor top contacts, identify the local and guided modes contributing to enhanced absorption, and optimize the design. We then study the role of the different interfaces and show that Al is a viable plasmonic back contact material.

  16. Functional nanostructures on injection molded plastic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Alicia Charlotte; Søgaard, Emil; Andersen, Nis Korsgaard

    Nanotechnology can be used to make inexpensive plastic parts with functional surfaces. The plastic parts can be molded using a standard injection molding process. The nanostructures are directly transferred from the surface of the molding tool to the surface of the molded plastic part during...... the molding process. The main advantage with this method is that surface treatments and chemical additives are avoided, which minimizes health risks and simplifies recycling. Another advantage is that the unique technology enables nanostructuring of free form molded parts. The functional surfaces can have...

  17. Glutathione-triggered drug release from nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, Alfonso; Somoza, Álvaro

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of drugs can be improved with the use of different carriers, such as those based on nanoparticles. The nanostructures loaded with the therapeutic molecules should be able to reach the target cells and, what is more, release the drugs efficiently. Ideally, the drugs should be delivered only in the target cells, and not along their way to the cells. For these reasons several approaches have been developed to control the release of the drugs at the desired sites. In this review article we have summarized the reports that describe the use of glutathione to trigger the release of the therapeutic molecules from different nanostructures.

  18. MBE growth of Quantum nanostructures for optoelectronics

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) is a powerful tech-nique for the fabrication of several self-assembled III-V nanostructures such as quantum rings, quantum dots, (Garcia 2013) and quantum wires that can cover a wide range of the spectrum from 0.98 ¿m to 1.6 ¿m. The possibility of performing in-situ, real-time, measurements of accumulated stress (¿¿) dur-ing growth of these nanostructures enables to achieve a deep understanding of the growth processes. For example, whereas quantum rings (QR) f...

  19. Geometry induced entanglement transitions in nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Coe, J P; D'Amico, I

    2010-01-01

    We model quantum dot nanostructures using a one-dimensional system of two interacting electrons. We show that strong and rapid variations may be induced in the spatial entanglement by varying the nanostructure geometry. We investigate the position-space information entropy as an indicator of the entanglement in this system. We also consider the expectation value of the Coulomb interaction and the ratio of this expectation to the expectation of the confining potential and their link to the entanglement. We look at the first derivative of the entanglement and the position-space information entropy to infer information about a possible quantum phase transition.

  20. Controlling optical response of metallic nanostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigorenko, Ilya [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    In this talk I am going to discuss the direct and inverse problems in nanoplasmonics in classical, and in particular quantum regimes of excitations. The inverse problem in nanoplasmonics is aimed to control the eigenspectrum, excitations,and other physical properties of nanosized quantum systems via controlling their size, shape, and structural composition. Using a combination of modern modeling techniques and optimization procedures, one can succeed to solve the inverse problem, namely, to find a nanostructure which has the desired functionality, or to find optimal control field in the presence of known nanostructured metallic surface.

  1. Metal oxide nanostructures as gas sensing devices

    CERN Document Server

    Eranna, G

    2011-01-01

    Metal Oxide Nanostructures as Gas Sensing Devices explores the development of an integrated micro gas sensor that is based on advanced metal oxide nanostructures and is compatible with modern semiconductor fabrication technology. This sensor can then be used to create a compact, low-power, handheld device for analyzing air ambience. The book first covers current gas sensing tools and discusses the necessity for miniaturized sensors. It then focuses on the materials, devices, and techniques used for gas sensing applications, such as resistance and capacitance variations. The author addresses th

  2. Screening effect on nanostructure of charged gel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiyama, M; Annaka, M; Hino, M

    2004-01-01

    Charge screening effects on nanostructures of N-isopropylacrylamide-sodium acrylate (NIPA-SA) and -acrylic acid (NIPA-AAc) gels are investigated with small-angle neutron scattering. The NIPA-SA and NIPA-AAc gels with low water content exhibit microphase separations with different dimensions....... The dehydrated NIPA-SA gel also makes the microphase separation but the dehydrated NIPA-AAc gel does not. These results indicate that ionic circumstance around charged bases strongly affects the nanostructures both of the dehydrated gel and the gel with low water content. (C) 2004 Elsevier B. V. All rights...

  3. Nanocoatings size effect in nanostructured films

    CERN Document Server

    Aliofkhazraei, Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    Size effect in structures has been taken into consideration over the last years. In comparison with coatings with micrometer-ranged thickness, nanostructured coatings usually enjoy better and appropriate properties, such as strength and resistance. These coatings enjoy unique magnetic properties and are used with the aim of producing surfaces resistant against erosion, lubricant system, cutting tools, manufacturing hardened sporadic alloys, being resistant against oxidation and corrosion. This book reviews researches on fabrication and classification of nanostructured coatings with focus on size effect in nanometric scale. Size effect on electrochemical, mechanical and physical properties of nanocoatings are presented.

  4. Surface nanostructuring of TiO{sub 2} thin films by ion beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero-Gomez, P. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Sevilla, c/Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Palmero, A. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Sevilla, c/Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain)], E-mail: alberto.palmero@icmse.csic.es; Yubero, F. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Sevilla, c/Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Vinnichenko, M.; Kolitsch, A. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, POB 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Gonzalez-Elipe, A.R. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Sevilla, c/Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain)

    2009-04-15

    This work reports a procedure to modify the surface nanostructure of TiO{sub 2} anatase thin films through ion beam irradiation with energies in the keV range. Irradiation with N{sup +} ions leads to the formation of a layer with voids at a depth similar to the ion-projected range. By setting the ion-projected range a few tens of nanometers below the surface of the film, well-ordered nanorods appear aligned with the angle of incidence of the ion beam. Slightly different results were obtained by using heavier (S{sup +}) and lighter (B{sup +}) ions under similar conditions.

  5. Apodized grating coupler using fully-etched nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hua; Li, Chong; Li, Zhi-Yong; Guo, Xia

    2016-08-01

    A two-dimensional apodized grating coupler for interfacing between single-mode fiber and photonic circuit is demonstrated in order to bridge the mode gap between the grating coupler and optical fiber. The grating grooves of the grating couplers are realized by columns of fully etched nanostructures, which are utilized to digitally tailor the effective refractive index of each groove in order to obtain the Gaussian-like output diffractive mode and then enhance the coupling efficiency. Compared with that of the uniform grating coupler, the coupling efficiency of the apodized grating coupler is increased by 4.3% and 5.7%, respectively, for the nanoholes and nanorectangles as refractive index tunes layer. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61222501, 61335004, and 61505003), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20111103110019), the Postdoctoral Science Foundation of Beijing Funded Project, China (Grant No. Q6002012201502), and the Science and Technology Research Project of Jiangxi Provincial Education Department, China (Grant No. GJJ150998).

  6. Emerging plasmonic nanostructures for controlling and enhancing photoluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Jiyeon; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2017-07-01

    Localised surface plasmon resonance endows plasmonic nanostructures with unique, powerful properties such as photoluminescence enhancement, which is a phenomenon based on the interaction between light and a metal nanostructure. In particular, photoluminescence modulation and enhancement are of importance to many research fields such as photonics, plasmonics and biosensing. In this minireview, we introduce basic principles of plasmonic-nanostructure photoluminescence and recently reported plasmonic nanostructures exhibiting surface-enhanced fluorescence and direct photoluminescence, with one-photon photoluminescence being of particular interest. Gaining insights into these systems not only helps understand the fundamental concepts of plasmonic nanostructures but also advances and extends their applications.

  7. DNA nanostructure-based imaging probes and drug carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Pengfei; Jiang, Qiao; Wang, Zhen-Gang; Li, Na; Yu, Haiyin; Ding, Baoquan

    2014-09-01

    Self-assembled DNA nanostructures are well-defined nanoscale shapes, with uniform sizes, precise spatial addressability, and excellent biocompatibility. With these features, DNA nanostructures show great potential for biomedical applications; various DNA-based biomedical imaging probes or payload delivery carriers have been developed. In this review, we summarize the recent developments of DNA-based nanostructures as tools for diagnosis and cancer therapy. The biological effects that are brought about by DNA nanostructures are highlighted by in vitro and in vivo imaging, antitumor drug delivery, and immunostimulatory therapy. The challenges and perspectives of DNA nanostructures in the field of nanomedicine are discussed.

  8. Hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanostructures - revew article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunandan Baruah and Joydeep Dutta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional nanostructures exhibit interesting electronic and optical properties due to their low dimensionality leading to quantum confinement effects. ZnO has received lot of attention as a nanostructured material because of unique properties rendering it suitable for various applications. Amongst the different methods of synthesis of ZnO nanostructures, the hydrothermal method is attractive for its simplicity and environment friendly conditions. This review summarizes the conditions leading to the growth of different ZnO nanostructures using hydrothermal technique. Doping of ZnO nanostructures through hydrothermal method are also highlighted.

  9. Nanoscale topographical replication of graphene architecture by manufactured DNA nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Youngkwon; Shin, Jihoon; Seo, Soonbeom; Park, Sung Ha; Ahn, Joung Real

    2015-03-01

    Despite many studies on how geometry can be used to control the electronic properties of graphene, certain limitations to fabrication of designed graphene nanostructures exist. Here, we demonstrate controlled topographical replication of graphene by artificial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) nanostructures. Owing to the high degree of geometrical freedom of DNA nanostructures, we controlled the nanoscale topography of graphene. The topography of graphene replicated from DNA nanostructures showed enhanced thermal stability and revealed an interesting negative temperature coefficient of sheet resistivity when underlying DNA nanostructures were denatured at high temperatures.

  10. Segmented metallic nanostructures, homogeneous metallic nanostructures and methods for producing same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Stanislaus; Koenigsmann, Christopher

    2017-04-18

    The present invention includes a method of producing a segmented 1D nanostructure. The method includes providing a vessel containing a template wherein on one side of the template is a first metal reagent solution and on the other side of the template is a reducing agent solution, wherein the template comprises at least one pore; allowing a first segment of a 1D nanostructure to grow within a pore of the template until a desired length is reached; replacing the first metal reagent solution with a second metal reagent solution; allowing a second segment of a 1D nanostructure to grow from the first segment until a desired length is reached, wherein a segmented 1D nanostructure is produced.

  11. Catalyst-nanostructure interaction in the growth of 1-D ZnO nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchers, C; Müller, S; Stichtenoth, D; Schwen, D; Ronning, C

    2006-02-02

    Vapor-liquid-solid is a well-established process in catalyst guided growth of 1-D nanostructures, i.e., nanobelts and nanowires. The catalyst particle is generally believed to be in the liquid state during growth, and is the site for impinging molecules. The crystalline structure of the catalyst may not have any influence on the structure of the grown nanostructures. In this work, using Au guided growth of ZnO, we show that the interfaces between the catalyst droplet and the nanostructure grow in well-defined mutual crystallographic relationships. The nanostructure defines the crystallographic orientation of the solidifying Au droplet. Possible alloy, intermetallic, or eutectic phase formation during catalysis are elucidated with the help of a proposed ternary Au-Zn-O phase diagram.

  12. Surface plasmon resonance in super-periodic metal nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Haisheng

    Surface plasmon resonances in periodic metal nanostructures have been investigated over the past decade. The periodic metal nanostructures have served as new technology platforms in fields such as biological and chemical sensing. An existing method to determine the surface plasmon resonance properties of these metal nanostructures is the measurement of the light transmission or reflection from these nanostructures. The measurement of surface plasmon resonances in either the transmission or reflection allows one to resolve the surface plasmon resonance in metal nanostructures. In this dissertation, surface plasmon resonances in a new type of metal nanostructures were investigated. The new nanostructures were created by patterning traditional periodic nanohole and nanoslit arrays into diffraction gratings. The patterned nanohole and 11anoslit arrays have two periods in the structures. The new nanostructures are called "super-periodic" nanostructures. With rigorous finite difference time domain (FDTD) numerical simulations, surface plasmon resonances in super-periodic nanoslit and nanohole arrays were investigated. It was found that by creating a super-period in periodic metal nanostructures, surface plasmon radiations can be observed in the non-zero order diffractions. This discovery presents a new method of characterizing the surface plasmon resonances in metal nanostructures. Super-periodic gold nanoslit and nanohole arrays were fabricated with the electron beam lithography technique. The surface plasmon resonances were measured in the first order diffraction by using a CCD. The experimental results confirm well with the FDTD numerical simulations.

  13. Precursor Derived Nanostructured Si-C-X Materials for Nuclear Applications. Final Report, October 2010 - September 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordia, Rajendra [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Tomar, Vikas [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Henager, Chuck [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-04-08

    Polymer derived ceramic route is an attractive approach to make structural materials with unique nanostructures that have very desirable high temperature properties. Processing techniques to make a variety of needed shapes and forms (e.g. coatings, matrices for fiber reinforced composites, porous ceramics) have been developed. With appropriate high temperature processing, the precursors can be converted to nano-crystalline materials. In this collaborative project, we investigated the processing, stability and properties of nanostructured Si-C materials, derived from polymeric precursors, and their performance under conditions appropriate for nuclear energy applications. All the milestones of the project were accomplished. Some of the results are being currently analyzed and additional papers being prepared in which support from NEUP will be acknowledged. So far, eight peer-reviewed papers have been published and one invention disclosure made. In this report, we summarize the major findings of this project.

  14. Nanostructure Diffraction Gratings for Integrated Spectroscopy and Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Junpeng (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present disclosure pertains to metal or dielectric nanostructures of the subwavelength scale within the grating lines of optical diffraction gratings. The nanostructures have surface plasmon resonances or non-plasmon optical resonances. A linear photodetector array is used to capture the resonance spectra from one of the diffraction orders. The combined nanostructure super-grating and photodetector array eliminates the use of external optical spectrometers for measuring surface plasmon or optical resonance frequency shift caused by the presence of chemical and biological agents. The nanostructure super-gratings can be used for building integrated surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrometers. The nanostructures within the diffraction grating lines enhance Raman scattering signal light while the diffraction grating pattern of the nanostructures diffracts Raman scattering light to different directions of propagation according to their wavelengths. Therefore, the nanostructure super-gratings allows for the use of a photodetector array to capture the surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra.

  15. The Development of Metal Oxide Chemical Sensing Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. W.; VanderWal,R. L.; Xu, J. C.; Evans, L. J.; Berger, G. M.; Kulis, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses sensor development based on metal oxide nanostructures and microsystems technology. While nanostructures such as nanowires show significant potential as enabling materials for chemical sensors, a number of significant technical challenges remain. This paper discusses development to address each of these technical barriers: 1) Improved contact and integration of the nanostructured materials with microsystems in a sensor structure; 2) Control of nanostructure crystallinity to allow control of the detection mechanism; and 3) Widening the range of gases that can be detected by fabricating multiple nanostructured materials. A sensor structure composed of three nanostructured oxides aligned on a single microsensor has been fabricated and tested. Results of this testing are discussed and future development approaches are suggested. It is concluded that while this work lays the foundation for further development, these are the beginning steps towards realization of repeatable, controlled sensor systems using oxide based nanostructures.

  16. FY06 LDRD Final Report Next-generation x-ray optics: focusing hard x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pivovaroff, M; Soufli, R

    2007-03-01

    The original goal of our research was to open up a new class of scientific experiments by increasing the power of newly available x-ray sources by orders of magnitude. This was accomplished by developing a new generation of x-ray optics, based on hard x-ray (10-200 keV) reflective and diffractive focusing elements. The optical systems we envision begin with a core reflective optic, which has the ability to capture and concentrate x-rays across a wide range of energies and angles band, combined with diffractive optics, based on large-scale multilayer structures, that will further enhance the spatial, spectral and temporal resolving power of the system. Enabling technologies developed at LLNL such as precise mounting of thermally formed substrates, smoothing techniques and multilayer films of ultra-high reflectance and precision were crucial in the development and demonstration of our research objectives. Highlights of this phase of the project include: the design and fabrication of a concentrator optic for the Pleiades Thomson X-ray source located at LLNL, smoothing of glass substrates through application of polyimide films, and the design, fabrication and testing of novel volume multilayers structures. Part of our research into substrate smooth led to the development of a new technique (patent pending) to construct high-quality, inexpensive x-ray optics. This innovation resulted in LLNL constructing a x-ray optic for the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) and allowed LLNL to join the international experiment.

  17. Status of LDRD-DR 20070518 development of a magnetically driven target for thermo-nuclear burn studies (u)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watt, Robert G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Atchison, W L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Colgate, S A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goforth, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Griego, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Guzik, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holtkamp, D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Idzorek, G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kirkpatrick, R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menikoff, R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Meyer, R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oona, H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reardon, P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rousculp, C L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sgro, A G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tabaka, L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-20

    This project is developing a magnetically driven cylindrical confinement system for the creation of a small region of material existing under extreme conditions. Using a Ranchero High Explosive Pulsed Power generator (HEPP) with maximum current ranging from 25- 50 MA depending on the load, a current driven Al cylinder will impact a series of nested, less massive Au shells. Each subsequent shell's inner surface velocity will increase due to it's smaller mass by the ratio 2.01( 1+ m{sub i+ 1}/m i), along with radial convergence. Attaining this ideal result requires highly efficient energy transfer which in turn requires plastic cushions. The final velocity of the last sequential shell will be used to drive a central experimental package in which extreme material conditions will be produced. The inexpensive nature of HEPP and the extreme conditions attainable allow many studies to be conducted in regimes not currently available in the laboratory. One potential central experimental package consists of a cylindrical Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target; a cylindrical Au pusher surrounding frozen DT. This target is used as a design tool. The ICF conditions achieved with such a target would be similar to those created in a double shell ignition capsule at the National Ignition Facility. The system being developed has a range of potential applications.

  18. Controlling light with resonant plasmonic nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waele, R. de

    2009-01-01

    Plasmons are collective oscillations of free electrons in a metal. At optical frequencies plasmons enable nanoscale confinement of light in metal nanostructures. This ability has given rise to many applications in e.g. photothermal cancer treatment, light trapping in photovoltaic cells, and sensing.

  19. Osteoblastic cell behavior on nanostructured metal implants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guehennec, L Le; Martin, F.; Lopez-Heredia, M.A.; Louarn, G.; Amouriq, Y.; Cousty, J.; Layrolle, P.

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: Surface modifications at the nanometric scale may promote protein adsorption, cell adhesion and thus favor the osseointegration of metal implants. The behavior of osteoblastic cells was studied on mirror-polished (Smooth-SS) and nanostructured (Nano-SS) stainless steel surfaces. MATERIALS & ME

  20. Nanostructured imaging surface plasmon resonance biosensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joshi, Sweccha

    2017-01-01

    The testing and further development of a prototype nanostructured imaging surface plasmon resonance (iSPR) biosensor, with a focus on surface modification and detailed characterization of the biosensor chip and in-field and at-line applicability in the food industry is described. Furthermore, a simp