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Sample records for nanostructured metallic materials

  1. Leading research on super metal. 3. Amorphous and nanostructured metallic materials; Super metal no sendo kenkyu. 3. Kogata buzai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Very fine structure control technique for amorphous and nanostructured metallic materials was reviewed to exceed the marginal performance of small metallic member materials. In Japan, high strength alloys and anticorrosion alloys are currently developed as an amorphous structure control technique, and ultra fine powder production and nano-compaction molding are studied for nanostructured materials. Fabrication of amorphous alloy wire materials and metal glass in USA are also introduced. Fabrication of metallic nanocrystals deposited within gas phase in Germany are attracting attention. The strength and abrasion resistance are remarkably enhanced by making nanostructured crystals and dispersing them. It may be most suitable to utilize amorphous and nanostructured metallic materials for earth-friendly materials having anticorrosion, and catalyst and biomaterial affinities, and also for magnetic materials. It is important for controlling micro-structures to clarify the formation mechanism of structures. For their processing techniques, the diversity and possibility are suggested, as to the condensation and solidification of gaseous and liquid phase metals, the molding and processing of very fine solid phase alloys, and the manufacturing members by heat treatment. 324 refs., 109 figs., 21 tabs.

  2. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard M [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  3. Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    with macroscopic reinforcements such as fiber, clay, glass mineral and other fillers. The nano-alloyed polymers are particularly useful for producing...applications, including space-sur- vivable materials and seals, gaskets, cosmetics , and personal care. 25 Claims, 10 Drawing Sheets B-3 U.S. Patent Mar...the incorporation of fluorinated nanostructured chemicals onto the surface of a secondary material (such as Ti02 , CaC03 , glass or mineral

  4. Metal Nanoparticles and Carbon-Based Nanostructures as Advanced Materials for Cathode Application in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Calandra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the most advanced methods for the fabrication of cathodes for dye-sensitized solar cells employing nanostructured materials. The attention is focused on metal nanoparticles and nanostructured carbon, among which nanotubes and graphene, whose good catalytic properties make them ideal for the development of counter electrode substrates, transparent conducting oxide, and advanced catalyst materials.

  5. Nanostructured metal oxide-based materials as advanced anodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao Bin; Chen, Jun Song; Hng, Huey Hoon; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2012-04-21

    The search for new electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) has been an important way to satisfy the ever-growing demands for better performance with higher energy/power densities, improved safety and longer cycle life. Nanostructured metal oxides exhibit good electrochemical properties, and they are regarded as promising anode materials for high-performance LIBs. In this feature article, we will focus on three different categories of metal oxides with distinct lithium storage mechanisms: tin dioxide (SnO(2)), which utilizes alloying/dealloying processes to reversibly store/release lithium ions during charge/discharge; titanium dioxide (TiO(2)), where lithium ions are inserted/deinserted into/out of the TiO(2) crystal framework; and transition metal oxides including iron oxide and cobalt oxide, which react with lithium ions via an unusual conversion reaction. For all three systems, we will emphasize that creating nanomaterials with unique structures could effectively improve the lithium storage properties of these metal oxides. We will also highlight that the lithium storage capability can be further enhanced through designing advanced nanocomposite materials containing metal oxides and other carbonaceous supports. By providing such a rather systematic survey, we aim to stress the importance of proper nanostructuring and advanced compositing that would result in improved physicochemical properties of metal oxides, thus making them promising negative electrodes for next-generation LIBs.

  6. Metal oxide nanostructures with hierarchical morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lao, Jing Yu; Banerjee, Debasish

    2007-11-13

    The present invention relates generally to metal oxide materials with varied symmetrical nanostructure morphologies. In particular, the present invention provides metal oxide materials comprising one or more metallic oxides with three-dimensionally ordered nanostructural morphologies, including hierarchical morphologies. The present invention also provides methods for producing such metal oxide materials.

  7. The process of nanostructuring of metal (iron) matrix in composite materials for directional control of the mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemtsova, Elena; Yurchuk, Denis; Smirnov, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    We justified theoretical and experimental bases of synthesis of new class of highly nanostructured composite nanomaterials based on metal matrix with titanium carbide nanowires as dispersed phase. A new combined method for obtaining of metal iron-based composite materials comprising the powder metallurgy processes and the surface design of the dispersed phase is considered. The following stages of material synthesis are investigated: (1) preparation of porous metal matrix; (2) surface structuring of the porous metal matrix by TiC nanowires; (3) pressing and sintering to give solid metal composite nanostructured materials based on iron with TiC nanostructures with size 1-50 nm. This material can be represented as the material type "frame in the frame" that represents iron metal frame reinforcing the frame of different chemical compositions based on TiC. Study of material functional properties showed that the mechanical properties of composite materials based on iron with TiC dispersed phase despite the presence of residual porosity are comparable to the properties of the best grades of steel containing expensive dopants and obtained by molding. This will solve the problem of developing a new generation of nanostructured metal (iron-based) materials with improved mechanical properties for the different areas of technology.

  8. The Process of Nanostructuring of Metal (Iron Matrix in Composite Materials for Directional Control of the Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Zemtsova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We justified theoretical and experimental bases of synthesis of new class of highly nanostructured composite nanomaterials based on metal matrix with titanium carbide nanowires as dispersed phase. A new combined method for obtaining of metal iron-based composite materials comprising the powder metallurgy processes and the surface design of the dispersed phase is considered. The following stages of material synthesis are investigated: (1 preparation of porous metal matrix; (2 surface structuring of the porous metal matrix by TiC nanowires; (3 pressing and sintering to give solid metal composite nanostructured materials based on iron with TiC nanostructures with size 1–50 nm. This material can be represented as the material type “frame in the frame” that represents iron metal frame reinforcing the frame of different chemical compositions based on TiC. Study of material functional properties showed that the mechanical properties of composite materials based on iron with TiC dispersed phase despite the presence of residual porosity are comparable to the properties of the best grades of steel containing expensive dopants and obtained by molding. This will solve the problem of developing a new generation of nanostructured metal (iron-based materials with improved mechanical properties for the different areas of technology.

  9. Bulk Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, C. C.; Langdon, T. G.; Lavernia, E. J.

    2017-09-01

    This paper will address three topics of importance to bulk nanostructured materials. Bulk nanostructured materials are defined as bulk solids with nanoscale or partly nanoscale microstructures. This category of nanostructured materials has historical roots going back many decades but has relatively recent focus due to new discoveries of unique properties of some nanoscale materials. Bulk nanostructured materials are prepared by a variety of severe plastic deformation methods, and these will be reviewed. Powder processing to prepare bulk nanostructured materials requires that the powders be consolidated by typical combinations of pressure and temperature, the latter leading to coarsening of the microstructure. The thermal stability of nanostructured materials will also be discussed. An example of bringing nanostructured materials to applications as structural materials will be described in terms of the cryomilling of powders and their consolidation.

  10. Magnetocaloric properties of metallic nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khurram S. Khattak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A compilation of magnetocaloric properties of metallic nanostructures with Curie temperature (TC between 260 and 340 K has been tabulated. The tabulated data show that nanostructure plays an important role in enhancing the magnetocaloric properties of a material, namely by reducing the peak of magnetic entropy, but broadening of the magnetocaloric effect curve with an average of 10 K sliding window for Curie temperature. A second table lists all bulk metallic and intermetallic materials, in which there is no nanostructural data, with an entropy change of at least 20 J/kg K and a Curie temperature between 260 and 340 K. We propose that further experiments should be made on the nanostructured form of these materials.

  11. Complex Nanostructures from Materials based on Metal-Organic Frameworks for Electrochemical Energy Storage and Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Bu Yuan; Yu, Xin Yao; Wu, Hao Bin; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2017-09-27

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have drawn tremendous attention because of their abundant diversity in structure and composition. Recently, there has been growing research interest in deriving advanced nanomaterials with complex architectures and tailored chemical compositions from MOF-based precursors for electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Here, a comprehensive overview of the synthesis and energy-related applications of complex nanostructures derived from MOF-based precursors is provided. After a brief summary of synthetic methods of MOF-based templates and their conversion to desirable nanostructures, delicate designs and preparation of complex architectures from MOFs or their composites are described in detail, including porous structures, single-shelled hollow structures, and multishelled hollow structures, as well as other unusual complex structures. Afterward, their applications are discussed as electrode materials or catalysts for lithium-ion batteries, hybrid supercapacitors, water-splitting devices, and fuel cells. Lastly, the research challenges and possible development directions of complex nanostructures derived from MOF-based-templates for electrochemical energy storage and conversion applications are outlined. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Nanostructured Metal Oxides Based Enzymatic Electrochemical Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari, Anees A.; Alhoshan, M.; M. S. AlSalhi; Aldwayyan, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    The unique electrocatalytic properties of the metal oxides and the ease of metal oxide nanostructured fabrication make them extremely interesting materials for electrochemical enzymatic biosensor applications. The application of nanostructured metal oxides in such sensing devices has taken off rapidly and will surely continue to expand. This article provides a review on current research status of electrochemical enzymatic biosensors based on various new types of nanostructured metal oxides su...

  13. Ultra-strong and damage tolerant metallic bulk materials: A lesson from nanostructured pearlitic steel wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenwarter, A; Völker, B; Kapp, M W; Li, Y; Goto, S; Raabe, D; Pippan, R

    2016-09-14

    Structural materials used for safety critical applications require high strength and simultaneously high resistance against crack growth, referred to as damage tolerance. However, the two properties typically exclude each other and research efforts towards ever stronger materials are hampered by drastic loss of fracture resistance. Therefore, future development of novel ultra-strong bulk materials requires a fundamental understanding of the toughness determining mechanisms. As model material we use today's strongest metallic bulk material, namely, a nanostructured pearlitic steel wire, and measured the fracture toughness on micron-sized specimens in different crack growth directions and found an unexpected strong anisotropy in the fracture resistance. Along the wire axis the material reveals ultra-high strength combined with so far unprecedented damage tolerance. We attribute this excellent property combination to the anisotropy in the fracture toughness inducing a high propensity for micro-crack formation parallel to the wire axis. This effect causes a local crack tip stress relaxation and enables the high fracture toughness without being detrimental to the material's strength.

  14. Composite materials formed with anchored nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-03-10

    A method of forming nano-structure composite materials that have a binder material and a nanostructure fiber material is described. A precursor material may be formed using a mixture of at least one metal powder and anchored nanostructure materials. The metal powder mixture may be (a) Ni powder and (b) NiAl powder. The anchored nanostructure materials may comprise (i) NiAl powder as a support material and (ii) carbon nanotubes attached to nanoparticles adjacent to a surface of the support material. The process of forming nano-structure composite materials typically involves sintering the mixture under vacuum in a die. When Ni and NiAl are used in the metal powder mixture Ni.sub.3Al may form as the binder material after sintering. The mixture is sintered until it consolidates to form the nano-structure composite material.

  15. Ultra-strong and damage tolerant metallic bulk materials: A lesson from nanostructured pearlitic steel wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenwarter, A.; Völker, B.; Kapp, M. W.; Li, Y.; Goto, S.; Raabe, D.; Pippan, R.

    2016-09-01

    Structural materials used for safety critical applications require high strength and simultaneously high resistance against crack growth, referred to as damage tolerance. However, the two properties typically exclude each other and research efforts towards ever stronger materials are hampered by drastic loss of fracture resistance. Therefore, future development of novel ultra-strong bulk materials requires a fundamental understanding of the toughness determining mechanisms. As model material we use today’s strongest metallic bulk material, namely, a nanostructured pearlitic steel wire, and measured the fracture toughness on micron-sized specimens in different crack growth directions and found an unexpected strong anisotropy in the fracture resistance. Along the wire axis the material reveals ultra-high strength combined with so far unprecedented damage tolerance. We attribute this excellent property combination to the anisotropy in the fracture toughness inducing a high propensity for micro-crack formation parallel to the wire axis. This effect causes a local crack tip stress relaxation and enables the high fracture toughness without being detrimental to the material’s strength.

  16. Nanostructured Materials for Magnetoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Mikailzade, Faik

    2013-01-01

    This book provides an up-to-date review of nanometer-scale magnetism and focuses on the investigation of the basic properties of magnetic nanostructures. It describes a wide range of physical aspects together with theoretical and experimental methods. A broad overview of the latest developments in this emerging and fascinating field of nanostructured materials is given with emphasis on the practical understanding and operation of submicron devices based on nanostructured magnetic materials.

  17. Anchored nanostructure materials and method of fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2012-11-27

    Anchored nanostructure materials and methods for their fabrication are described. The anchored nanostructure materials may utilize nano-catalysts that include powder-based or solid-based support materials. The support material may comprise metal, such as NiAl, ceramic, a cermet, or silicon or other metalloid. Typically, nanoparticles are disposed adjacent a surface of the support material. Nanostructures may be formed as anchored to nanoparticles that are adjacent the surface of the support material by heating the nano-catalysts and then exposing the nano-catalysts to an organic vapor. The nanostructures are typically single wall or multi-wall carbon nanotubes.

  18. Nanostructured electronic and magnetic materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R V Ramanujan

    2003-02-01

    Research and development in nanostructured materials is one of the most intensely studied areas in science. As a result of concerted R & D efforts, nanostructured electronic and magnetic materials have achieved commercial success. Specific examples of novel industrially important nanostructured electronic and magnetic materials are provided. Advantages of nanocrystalline magnetic materials in the context of both materials and devices are discussed. Several high technology examples of the use of nanostructured magnetic materials are presented. Methods of processing nanostructured materials are described and the examples of sol gel, rapid solidification and powder injection moulding as potential processing methods for making nanostructured materials are outlined. Some opportunities and challenges are discussed.

  19. Synthesis of nanostructured materials by using metal-cyanide coordination polymers and their lithium storage properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Ping; Shen, Laifa; Luo, Haifeng; Li, Hongsen; Xu, Guiyin; Zhang, Xiaogang

    2013-11-21

    Herein, we demonstrate a novel and simple two-step process for preparing LiCoO2 nanocrystals by using a Prussian blue analogue Co3[Co(CN)6]2 as a precursor. The resultant LiCoO2 nanoparticles possess single crystalline nature and good uniformity with an average size of ca. 360 nm. The unique nanostructure of LiCoO2 provides relatively shorter Li(+) diffusion pathways, thus facilitating the fast kinetics of electrochemical reactions. As a consequence, high reversible capacity, excellent cycling stability and rate capability are achieved with these nanocrystals as cathodes for lithium storage. The LiCoO2 nanocrystals deliver specific capacities of 154.5, 135.8, 119, and 100.3 mA h g(-1) at 0.2, 0.4, 1, and 2 C rates, respectively. Even at a high current density of 4 C, a reversible capacity of 87 mA h g(-1) could be maintained. Importantly, a capacity retention of 83.4% after 100 cycles is achieved at a constant discharge rate of 1 C. Furthermore, owing to facile control of the morphology and size of Prussian blue analogues by varying process parameters, as well as the tailored design of multi-component metal-cyanide hybrid coordination polymers, with which we have successfully prepared porous Fe2O3@NixCo3-xO4 nanocubes, one of the potential anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, such a simple and scalable approach could also be applied to the synthesis of other nanomaterials for energy storage devices.

  20. Nanostructured materials in potentiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düzgün, Ali; Zelada-Guillén, Gustavo A; Crespo, Gastón A; Macho, Santiago; Riu, Jordi; Rius, F Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Potentiometry is a very simple electrochemical technique with extraordinary analytical capabilities. It is also well known that nanostructured materials display properties which they do not show in the bulk phase. The combination of the two fields of potentiometry and nanomaterials is therefore a promising area of research and development. In this report, we explain the fundamentals of potentiometric devices that incorporate nanostructured materials and we highlight the advantages and drawbacks of combining nanomaterials and potentiometry. The paper provides an overview of the role of nanostructured materials in the two commonest potentiometric sensors: field-effect transistors and ion-selective electrodes. Additionally, we provide a few recent examples of new potentiometric sensors that are based on receptors immobilized directly onto the nanostructured material surface. Moreover, we summarize the use of potentiometry to analyze processes involving nanostructured materials and the prospects that the use of nanopores offer to potentiometry. Finally, we discuss several difficulties that currently hinder developments in the field and some future trends that will extend potentiometry into new analytical areas such as biology and medicine.

  1. Fabrication of complex metallic nanostructures by nanoskiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiaobing; Rioux, Robert M; Whitesides, George M

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes the use of nanoskiving to fabricate complex metallic nanostructures by sectioning polymer slabs containing small, embedded metal structures. This method begins with the deposition of thin metallic films on an epoxy substrate by e-beam evaporation or sputtering. After embedding the thin metallic film in an epoxy matrix, sectioning (in a plane perpendicular or parallel to the metal film) with an ultramicrotome generates sections (which can be as thin as 50 nm) of epoxy containing metallic nanostructures. The cross-sectional dimensions of the metal wires embedded in the resulting thin epoxy sections are controlled by the thickness of the evaporated metal film (which can be as small as 20 nm) and the thickness of the sections cut by the ultramicrotome; this work uses a standard 45 degrees diamond knife and routinely generates slabs 50 nm thick. The embedded nanostructures can be transferred to, and positioned on, planar or curved substrates by manipulating the thin polymer film. Removal of the epoxy matrix by etching with an oxygen plasma generates free-standing metallic nanostructures. Nanoskiving can fabricate complex nanostructures that are difficult or impossible to achieve by other methods of nanofabrication. These include multilayer structures, structures on curved surfaces, structures that span gaps, structures in less familiar materials, structures with high aspect ratios, and large-area structures comprising two-dimensional periodic arrays. This paper illustrates one class of application of these nanostructures: frequency-selective surfaces at mid-IR wavelengths.

  2. Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Andrew J.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2007-12-04

    A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

  3. Graphene-Metal Oxide Hybrid Nanostructured Materials for Electrocatalytic Sensing and Sustainable Energy Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halder, Arnab; Zhang, Minwei; Chi, Qijin

    2016-01-01

    technology and sensor applications. In particular, graphene-metal oxide nanohybrid materials have been introduced as a new basis for preparation of low cost and highly efficient electrocatalysts for energy storage and conversion as well as for electrochemical sensing applications. By combining graphene...... graphene supported electrocatalysts. This review includes an introduction to graphene-metal oxide based nanohybrid materials, different synthetic strategies for the preparation of graphene/metal oxide nanocomposites and their structural characterization, and an overview of various electrochemical......Graphene based materials have attracted tremendous attention, attributed to their unique physicochemical properties and versatile applications. In general, these materials are very promising candidates for the development of next-generation electrochemical systems for energy and environmental...

  4. Coherent control near metallic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efimov, Ilya [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Efimov, Anatoly [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We study coherent control in the vicinity of metallic nanostructures. Unlike in the case of control in gas or liquid phase, the collective response of electrons in a metallic nanostructure can significantly enhance different frequency components of the control field. This enhancement strongly depends on the geometry of the nanostructure and can substantially modify the temporal profile of the local control field. The changes in the amplitude and phase of the control field near the nanostructure are studied using linear response theory. The inverse problem of finding the external electromagnetic field to generate the desired local control field is considered and solved.

  5. Zero-dimensional nanostructured material with metallic bismuth nanoparticles: a new route for thermoelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Roland; Treguer, Mona; Saboungi, Marie-Louise

    2011-03-01

    The thermoelectric figure of merit ZT has so far not exceeded the value ZT=3 need to compete with mechanical energy conversion systems. However, theoretical work has shown that it is possible to reach values of ZT higher than this. One of the most promising routes is nanostructured materials, which offer the opportunity to tailor physical properties such as electrical and heat transport, due to the effects of electron filtering and phonon confinement. Dresselhaus et al. (ref.?) were among the first to show that 2D and 1D structures are capable of reaching ZT values higher than 2. The thermoelectric materials of current interest are in the form of nanotubes, nanodots and, more generally, superlattices composed of a matrix and nanoparticles. In our work we synthesize a periodic network of bismuth nanoparticles in a matrix of mesoporous Si O2 . We find that in this form bismuth transforms from a rhombohedral to a cubic structure, with improved filtering of electrons and phonons.

  6. A silica sol-gel design strategy for nanostructured metallic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Scott C; Perkins, Matthew R; Adams, Ashley M; Kamperman, Marleen; Burns, Andrew A; Arora, Hitesh; Herz, Erik; Suteewong, Teeraporn; Sai, Hiroaki; Li, Zihui; Werner, Jörg; Song, Juho; Werner-Zwanziger, Ulrike; Zwanziger, Josef W; Grätzel, Michael; DiSalvo, Francis J; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2012-03-18

    Batteries, fuel cells and solar cells, among many other high-current-density devices, could benefit from the precise meso- to macroscopic structure control afforded by the silica sol-gel process. The porous materials made by silica sol-gel chemistry are typically insulators, however, which has restricted their application. Here we present a simple, yet highly versatile silica sol-gel process built around a multifunctional sol-gel precursor that is derived from the following: amino acids, hydroxy acids or peptides; a silicon alkoxide; and a metal acetate. This approach allows a wide range of biological functionalities and metals--including noble metals--to be combined into a library of sol-gel materials with a high degree of control over composition and structure. We demonstrate that the sol-gel process based on these precursors is compatible with block-copolymer self-assembly, colloidal crystal templating and the Stöber process. As a result of the exceptionally high metal content, these materials can be thermally processed to make porous nanocomposites with metallic percolation networks that have an electrical conductivity of over 1,000 S cm(-1). This improves the electrical conductivity of porous silica sol-gel nanocomposites by three orders of magnitude over existing approaches, opening applications to high-current-density devices.

  7. Computational analysis of the effects of gain material inclusion in engineered metal nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jinsong; Pachter, Ruth

    2012-03-01

    Compensation for loss by introducing gain media in optical metamaterials was suggested by Ramakrishna and Pendry (Phys. Rev. B, 67, 201101, 2003). In this work, applying finite-difference-time-domain simulations, we analyzed an Au nanorod (AuNR) structure, as well as fishnet nanostructures with varying positioning of the gain medium. Transmittance, reflection and absorption spectra for an AuNR nanostructure incorporating InP quantum dots (QDs) and of a fishnet nanostructure incorporating InAs QDs have shown that despite limitations, results are encouraging in increasing the transmittance upon gain medium incorporation in the passive regime.

  8. Synthesis of vertically aligned metal oxide nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Roqan, Iman S.

    2016-03-03

    Metal oxide nanostructure and methods of making metal oxide nanostructures are provided. The metal oxide nanostructures can be 1 -dimensional nanostructures such as nanowires, nanofibers, or nanotubes. The metal oxide nanostructures can be doped or undoped metal oxides. The metal oxide nanostructures can be deposited onto a variety of substrates. The deposition can be performed without high pressures and without the need for seed catalysts on the substrate. The deposition can be performed by laser ablation of a target including a metal oxide and, optionally, a dopant. In some embodiments zinc oxide nanostructures are deposited onto a substrate by pulsed laser deposition of a zinc oxide target using an excimer laser emitting UV radiation. The zinc oxide nanostructure can be doped with a rare earth metal such as gadolinium. The metal oxide nanostructures can be used in many devices including light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

  9. Characterization and electrochemical activities of nanostructured transition metal nitrides as cathode materials for lithium sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosavati, Negar; Salley, Steven O.; Ng, K. Y. Simon

    2017-02-01

    The Lithium Sulfur (Li-S) battery system is one of the most promising candidates for electric vehicle applications due to its higher energy density when compared to conventional lithium ion batteries. However, there are some challenges facing Li-S battery commercialization, such as: low active material utilization, high self-discharge rate, and high rate of capacity fade. In this work, a series of transition metal nitrides: Tungsten nitride (WN), Molybdenum Nitride (Mo2N), and Vanadium Nitride (VN) was investigated as cathode materials for lithium polysulfide conversion reactions. Capacities of 697, 569, and 264 mAh g-1 were observed for WN, Mo2N, VN, respectively, with 8 mg cm-2 loading, after 100 cycles at a 0.1 C rate. WN higher electrochemical performance may be attributed to a strong reversible reaction between nitrides and polysulfide, which retains the sulfur species on the electrode surface, and minimizes the active material and surface area loss. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was performed to gain a better understanding of the mechanism underlying each metal nitride redox reactions.

  10. Energy transfer in nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughn, Chelsea

    Energy transport and loss are critical to the performance of optoelectronic devices such as photovoltaics and terahertz imaging devices. Nanostructured materials provide many opportunities to tailor transport and loss parameters for specific device applications. However, it has been very difficult to correlate specific nanoscale structural parameters with changes in these performance metrics. I report the development of new ways of using time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) to probe charge and energy transport and loss dynamics. These techniques are applied to several types of nanostructured materials, including bulk semiconductors with defects, self-assembled quantum dots and colloidal quantum dots. First, GaAs/InP double heterostructures grown via metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) were characterized with TRPL. TRPL is typically used to extract minority carrier lifetimes, but we discovered that the measured lifetime depended critically on the intensity of the exciting laser. We developed a Shockley-Read-Hall model to extract trap state densities from intensity-dependent TRPL measurements. Second, we characterized energy and charge transfer between InAs quantum dots and ErAs nanoinclusions within III-V heterostructures. Using intensity- and temperature-dependent TRPL, we confirmed tunneling as the dominant mechanism of charge transport and characterized the electronic structure of the ErAs nanoparticles. Finally, we characterized energy transport in colloidal quantum dot cascade structures. These cascade structures utilize Forster Resonance Energy Transfer and trap state recycling to funnel excitons from donor layers to acceptor layers and suggest a promising method for avoiding losses associated with surface trap states. Collectively, the analysis of these disparate material types advances our understanding of energy dynamics in nanostructured materials and improves our ability to design the next generation of photovoltaic and optoelectronic

  11. Nanostructured metal foams: synthesis and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luther, Erik P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tappan, Bryce [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mueller, Alex [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mihaila, Bogdan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Volz, Heather [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cardenas, Andreas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Papin, Pallas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veauthier, Jackie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stan, Marius [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Fabrication of monolithic metallic nanoporous materials is difficult using conventional methodology. Here they report a relatively simple method of synthesizing monolithic, ultralow density, nanostructured metal foams utilizing self-propagating combustion synthesis of novel metal complexes containing high nitrogen energetic ligands. Nanostructured metal foams are formed in a post flame-front dynamic assembly with densities as low as 0.011 g/cc and surface areas as high as 270 m{sup 2}/g. They have produced metal foams via this method of titanium, iron, cobalt, nickel, zirconium, copper, palladium, silver, hafnium, platinum and gold. Microstructural features vary as a function of composition and process parameters. Applications for the metal foams are discussed including hydrogen absorption in palladium foams. A model for the sorption kinetics of hydrogen in the foams is presented.

  12. Metal oxide nanostructures as gas sensing devices

    CERN Document Server

    Eranna, G

    2011-01-01

    Metal Oxide Nanostructures as Gas Sensing Devices explores the development of an integrated micro gas sensor that is based on advanced metal oxide nanostructures and is compatible with modern semiconductor fabrication technology. This sensor can then be used to create a compact, low-power, handheld device for analyzing air ambience. The book first covers current gas sensing tools and discusses the necessity for miniaturized sensors. It then focuses on the materials, devices, and techniques used for gas sensing applications, such as resistance and capacitance variations. The author addresses th

  13. Osteoblastic cell behavior on nanostructured metal implants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guehennec, L Le; Martin, F.; Lopez-Heredia, M.A.; Louarn, G.; Amouriq, Y.; Cousty, J.; Layrolle, P.

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: Surface modifications at the nanometric scale may promote protein adsorption, cell adhesion and thus favor the osseointegration of metal implants. The behavior of osteoblastic cells was studied on mirror-polished (Smooth-SS) and nanostructured (Nano-SS) stainless steel surfaces. MATERIALS & ME

  14. Nanostructured Electrode Materials Derived from Metal-Organic Framework Xerogels for High-Energy-Density Asymmetric Supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Asif; Zou, Ruqiang; Wang, Qingfei; Xia, Wei; Tabassum, Hassina; Qiu, Bin; Zhao, Ruo

    2016-01-27

    This work successfully demonstrates metal-organic framework (MOF) derived strategy to prepare nanoporous carbon (NPC) with or without Fe3O4/Fe nanoparticles by the optimization of calcination temperature as highly active electrode materials for asymmetric supercapacitors (ASC). The nanostructured Fe3O4/Fe/C hybrid shows high specific capacitance of 600 F/g at a current density of 1 A/g and excellent capacitance retention up to 500 F/g at 8 A/g. Furthermore, hierarchically NPC with high surface area also obtained from MOF gels displays excellent electrochemical performance of 272 F/g at 2 mV/s. Considering practical applications, aqueous ASC (aASC) was also assembled, which shows high energy density of 17.496 Wh/kg at the power density of 388.8 W/kg. The high energy density and excellent capacity retention of the developed materials show great promise for the practical utilization of these energy storage devices.

  15. Compositions of graphene materials with metal nanostructures and microstructures and methods of making and using including pressure sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Ye

    2017-01-26

    Composition comprising at least one graphene material and at least one metal. The metal can be in the form of nanoparticles as well as microflakes, including single crystal microflakes. The metal can be intercalated in the graphene sheets. The composition has high conductivity and flexibility. The composition can be made by a one-pot synthesis in which a graphene material precursor is converted to the graphene material, and the metal precursor is converted to the metal. A reducing solvent or dispersant such as NMP can be used. Devices made from the composition include a pressure sensor which has high sensitivity. Two two- dimension materials can be combined to form a hybrid material.

  16. Nanostructured metal sulfides for energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Xianhong; Tan, Huiteng; Yan, Qingyu

    2014-09-07

    Advanced electrodes with a high energy density at high power are urgently needed for high-performance energy storage devices, including lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and supercapacitors (SCs), to fulfil the requirements of future electrochemical power sources for applications such as in hybrid electric/plug-in-hybrid (HEV/PHEV) vehicles. Metal sulfides with unique physical and chemical properties, as well as high specific capacity/capacitance, which are typically multiple times higher than that of the carbon/graphite-based materials, are currently studied as promising electrode materials. However, the implementation of these sulfide electrodes in practical applications is hindered by their inferior rate performance and cycling stability. Nanostructures offering the advantages of high surface-to-volume ratios, favourable transport properties, and high freedom for the volume change upon ion insertion/extraction and other reactions, present an opportunity to build next-generation LIBs and SCs. Thus, the development of novel concepts in material research to achieve new nanostructures paves the way for improved electrochemical performance. Herein, we summarize recent advances in nanostructured metal sulfides, such as iron sulfides, copper sulfides, cobalt sulfides, nickel sulfides, manganese sulfides, molybdenum sulfides, tin sulfides, with zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional morphologies for LIB and SC applications. In addition, the recently emerged concept of incorporating conductive matrices, especially graphene, with metal sulfide nanomaterials will also be highlighted. Finally, some remarks are made on the challenges and perspectives for the future development of metal sulfide-based LIB and SC devices.

  17. The Development of Metal Oxide Chemical Sensing Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. W.; VanderWal,R. L.; Xu, J. C.; Evans, L. J.; Berger, G. M.; Kulis, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses sensor development based on metal oxide nanostructures and microsystems technology. While nanostructures such as nanowires show significant potential as enabling materials for chemical sensors, a number of significant technical challenges remain. This paper discusses development to address each of these technical barriers: 1) Improved contact and integration of the nanostructured materials with microsystems in a sensor structure; 2) Control of nanostructure crystallinity to allow control of the detection mechanism; and 3) Widening the range of gases that can be detected by fabricating multiple nanostructured materials. A sensor structure composed of three nanostructured oxides aligned on a single microsensor has been fabricated and tested. Results of this testing are discussed and future development approaches are suggested. It is concluded that while this work lays the foundation for further development, these are the beginning steps towards realization of repeatable, controlled sensor systems using oxide based nanostructures.

  18. Metal plasmas for the fabrication of nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2006-09-21

    A review is provided covering metal plasma production, theenergetic condensation of metal plasmas, and the formation ofnanostructures using such plasmas. Plasma production techniques includepulsed laser ablation, filtered cathodic arcs, and various forms ofionized physical vapor deposition, namely magnetron sputtering withionization of sputtered atoms in radio frequency discharges,self-sputtering, and high power impulse magnetron sputtering. Thediscussion of energetic condensation focuses on the control of kineticenergy by biasing and also includes considerations of the potentialenergy and the processes occurring at subplantation and implantation. Inthe final section on nanostructures, two different approaches arediscussed. In the top-down approach, the primary nanostructures arelithographically produced and metal plasma is used to coat or filltrenches and vias. Additionally, multilayers with nanosize periods(nanolaminates) can be produced. In the bottom-up approach, thermodynamicforces are used to fabricate nanocomposites and nanoporous materials bydecomposition and dealloying.

  19. Nanostructured conductive polymeric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleh, Mohammed H.

    Conductive polymer composites (CPCs) are a suitable alternative to metals in many applications due to their light-weight, corrosion resistance, low cost, ease of processing and design flexibility. CPCs have been formulated using different types of conductive fillers. In this PhD thesis, the focus is on CPCs for electrostatic discharge (ESD) protection and electromagnetic interference (EMI) attenuation. Despite the versatility of conductive fillers, carbon black (CB) has been the dominant filler to make CPCs for ESD protection applications because CB/polymer composites have a cost advantage over all other CPCs. For EMI shielding, stainless steel fibres and metal coated fibers are the preferred fillers, however CPCs made of those fibers are not the dominant EMI shielding materials. Metal coated and polymer plated polymers are the most widely used EMI shielding options. The limited use of CPCs in the EMI shielding market is because the high filler loading required to formulate a composite with an adequate level of shielding remarkably increases the composite price. In order to increase the competitiveness of CPCs, percolation threshold should be minimized as much as possible and composites with high EMI shielding capabilities at low filler loading should be formulated because all conductive fillers are expensive compared to polymers. In this thesis, two different methodologies to reduce percolation threshold in CPCs have been successfully developed and a CPC with exceptional EMI shielding capability has been formulated using copper nanowires as conductive filler. The first percolation threshold reduction technique is based on the selective localization of CB at the interface of immiscible polymer blend. The technique requires adding a copolymer that prefers the blend's interface and for which CB nanoparticles has the highest affinity. The second method is based on producing a CPC powder and then using this powder as a conductive filler to produce composite by dry

  20. Phase structuring in metal alloys: Ultrasound-assisted top-down approach to engineering of nanostructured catalytic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepanov, Pavel V; Andreeva, Daria V

    2017-03-01

    High intensity ultrasound (HIUS) is a novel and efficient tool for top-down nanostructuring of multi-phase metal systems. Ultrasound-assisted structuring of the phase in metal alloys relies on two main mechanisms including interfacial red/ox reactions and temperature driven solid state phase transformations which affect surface composition and morphology of metals. Physical and chemical properties of sonication medium strongly affects the structuring pathways as well as morphology and composition of catalysts. HIUS can serve as a simple, fast, and effective approach for the tuning of structure and surface properties of metal particles, opening the new perspectives in design of robust and efficient catalysts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A silica sol-gel design strategy for nanostructured metallic materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warren, S.C.; Perkins, M.R.; Adams, A.M.; Kamperman, M.M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Batteries, fuel cells and solar cells, among many other high-current-density devices, could benefit from the precise meso- to macroscopic structure control afforded by the silica sol–gel process. The porous materials made by silica sol–gel chemistry are typically insulators, however, which has restr

  2. Nanostructure studies of strongly correlated materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jiang; Natelson, Douglas

    2011-09-01

    Strongly correlated materials exhibit an amazing variety of phenomena, including metal-insulator transitions, colossal magnetoresistance, and high temperature superconductivity, as strong electron-electron and electron-phonon couplings lead to competing correlated ground states. Recently, researchers have begun to apply nanostructure-based techniques to this class of materials, examining electronic transport properties on previously inaccessible length scales, and applying perturbations to drive systems out of equilibrium. We review progress in this area, particularly emphasizing work in transition metal oxides (Fe(3)O(4), VO(2)), manganites, and high temperature cuprate superconductors. We conclude that such nanostructure-based studies have strong potential to reveal new information about the rich physics at work in these materials.

  3. Inorganic nanostructured materials for high performance electrochemical supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng; Sun, Shouheng; You, Xiao-Zeng

    2014-02-21

    Electrochemical supercapacitors (ES) are a well-known energy storage system that has high power density, long life-cycle and fast charge-discharge kinetics. Nanostructured materials are a new generation of electrode materials with large surface area and short transport/diffusion path for ions and electrons to achieve high specific capacitance in ES. This mini review highlights recent developments of inorganic nanostructure materials, including carbon nanomaterials, metal oxide nanoparticles, and metal oxide nanowires/nanotubes, for high performance ES applications.

  4. Metal chalcogenide nanostructures for renewable energy applications

    CERN Document Server

    Qurashi, Ahsanulhaq

    2014-01-01

    This first ever reference book that focuses on metal chalcogenide semiconductor nanostructures for renewable energy applications encapsulates the state-of-the-art in multidisciplinary research on the metal chalcogenide semiconductor nanostructures (nanocrystals, nanoparticles, nanorods, nanowires,  nanobelts, nanoflowers, nanoribbons and more).  The properties and synthesis of a class of nanomaterials is essential to renewable energy manufacturing and this book focuses on the synthesis of metal chalcogendie nanostructures, their growth mechanism, optical, electrical, and other important prop

  5. Spin currents in metallic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czeschka, Franz Dominik

    2011-09-05

    A pure spin current, i.e., a flow of angular momentum without accompanying net charge current, is a key ingredient in the field of spintronics. In this thesis, we experimentally investigated two different concepts for pure spin current sources suggested by theory. The first is based on a time-dependent magnetization precession which ''pumps'' a pure spin current into an adjacent non-magnetic conductor. Our experiments quantitatively corroborated important predictions expected theoretically for this approach, including the dependence of the spin current on the sample geometry and the microwave power. Even more important, we could show for the first time that the spin pumping concept is viable in a large variety of ferromagnetic materials and that it only depends on the magnetization damping. Therefore, our experiments established spin pumping as generic phenomenon and demonstrated that it is a powerful way to generate pure spin currents. The second theoretical concept is based on the conversion of charge currents into spin currents in non-magnetic nanostructures via the spin Hall effect. We experimentally investigated this approach in H-shaped, metallic nanodevices, and found that the predictions are linked to requirements not realizable with the present experimental techniques, neither in sample fabrication nor in measurement technique. Indeed, our experimental data could be consistently understood by a spin-independent transport model describing the transition from diffusive to ballistic transport. In addition, the implementation of advanced fabrication and measurement techniques allowed to discover a new non-local phenomenon, the non-local anisotropic magnetoresistance. Finally, we also studied spin-polarized supercurrents carried by spin-triplet Cooper pairs. We found that low resistance interfaces are a key requirement for further experiments in this direction. (orig.)

  6. METALLIC AND HYBRID NANOSTRUCTURES: FUNDAMENTALS AND APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murph, S.

    2012-05-02

    This book chapter presents an overview of research conducted in our laboratory on preparation, optical and physico-chemical properties of metallic and nanohybrid materials. Metallic nanoparticles, particularly gold, silver, platinum or a combination of those are the main focus of this review manuscript. These metallic nanoparticles were further functionalized and used as templates for creation of complex and ordered nanomaterials with tailored and tunable structural, optical, catalytic and surface properties. Controlling the surface chemistry on/off metallic nanoparticles allows production of advanced nanoarchitectures. This includes coupled or encapsulated core-shell geometries, nano-peapods, solid or hollow, monometallic/bimetallic, hybrid nanoparticles. Rational assemblies of these nanostructures into one-, two- and tridimensional nano-architectures is described and analyzed. Their sensing, environmental and energy related applications are reviewed.

  7. Nanostructured materials for thermoelectric applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bux, Sabah K; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Kaner, Richard B

    2010-11-28

    Recent studies indicate that nanostructuring can be an effective method for increasing the dimensionless thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) in materials. Most of the enhancement in ZT can be attributed to large reductions in the lattice thermal conductivity due to increased phonon scattering at interfaces. Although significant gains have been reported, much higher ZTs in practical, cost-effective and environmentally benign materials are needed in order for thermoelectrics to become effective for large-scale, wide-spread power and thermal management applications. This review discusses the various synthetic techniques that can be used in the production of bulk scale nanostructured materials. The advantages and disadvantages of each synthetic method are evaluated along with guidelines and goals presented for an ideal thermoelectric material. With proper optimization, some of these techniques hold promise for producing high efficiency devices.

  8. Carbon Nanotubes and Other Nanostructures as Support Material for Nanoparticulate Noble-Metal Catalysts in Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mikkel Juul; Veltzé, Sune; Skou, Eivind Morten

    In polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) a fuel - usually hydrogen - and oxygen are combined to produce electricity and water in an electrochemical process, which is commonly carried out at 60-80 °C. For oxygen reduction and fuel oxidation to occur at such low temperatures platinum...... at high electrical potentials encountered occasionally in fuel cells. Other nanostructures of carbon are being investigated as alternatives to carbon black as they have several beneficial properties. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MW-CNT) are an example of one type of these promising materials. Like...

  9. Electrochemical fabrication of metallic nanostructured electrodes for electroanalytical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plowman, Blake J; Bhargava, Suresh K; O'Mullane, Anthony P

    2011-12-21

    The use of electrodeposited metal-based nanostructures for electroanalytical applications has recently received widespread attention. There are several approaches to creating nanostructured materials through electrochemical routes that include facile electrodeposition at either untreated or modified electrodes, or through the use of physical or chemical templating methods. This allows the shape, size and composition of the nanomaterial to be readily tuned for the application of interest. The use of such materials is particularly suited to electroanalytical applications. In this mini-review an overview of recently developed nanostructured materials developed through electrochemical routes is presented as well as their electroanalytical applications in areas of biological and environmental importance.

  10. Nanostructured materials for water desalination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humplik, T; Lee, J; O' Hern, S C; Fellman, B A; Karnik, R; Wang, E N [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States); Baig, M A; Hassan, S F; Atieh, M A; Rahman, F; Laoui, T, E-mail: tlaoui@kfupm.edu.sa, E-mail: karnik@mit.edu, E-mail: enwang@mit.edu [Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Chemical Engineering and Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-07-22

    Desalination of seawater and brackish water is becoming an increasingly important means to address the scarcity of fresh water resources in the world. Decreasing the energy requirements and infrastructure costs of existing desalination technologies remains a challenge. By enabling the manipulation of matter and control of transport at nanometer length scales, the emergence of nanotechnology offers new opportunities to advance water desalination technologies. This review focuses on nanostructured materials that are directly involved in the separation of water from salt as opposed to mitigating issues such as fouling. We discuss separation mechanisms and novel transport phenomena in materials including zeolites, carbon nanotubes, and graphene with potential applications to reverse osmosis, capacitive deionization, and multi-stage flash, among others. Such nanostructured materials can potentially enable the development of next-generation desalination systems with increased efficiency and capacity. (topical review)

  11. Nanostructured materials for water desalination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humplik, T.; Lee, J.; O'Hern, S. C.; Fellman, B. A.; Baig, M. A.; Hassan, S. F.; Atieh, M. A.; Rahman, F.; Laoui, T.; Karnik, R.; Wang, E. N.

    2011-07-01

    Desalination of seawater and brackish water is becoming an increasingly important means to address the scarcity of fresh water resources in the world. Decreasing the energy requirements and infrastructure costs of existing desalination technologies remains a challenge. By enabling the manipulation of matter and control of transport at nanometer length scales, the emergence of nanotechnology offers new opportunities to advance water desalination technologies. This review focuses on nanostructured materials that are directly involved in the separation of water from salt as opposed to mitigating issues such as fouling. We discuss separation mechanisms and novel transport phenomena in materials including zeolites, carbon nanotubes, and graphene with potential applications to reverse osmosis, capacitive deionization, and multi-stage flash, among others. Such nanostructured materials can potentially enable the development of next-generation desalination systems with increased efficiency and capacity.

  12. Nanostructured materials for water desalination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humplik, T; Lee, J; O'Hern, S C; Fellman, B A; Baig, M A; Hassan, S F; Atieh, M A; Rahman, F; Laoui, T; Karnik, R; Wang, E N

    2011-07-22

    Desalination of seawater and brackish water is becoming an increasingly important means to address the scarcity of fresh water resources in the world. Decreasing the energy requirements and infrastructure costs of existing desalination technologies remains a challenge. By enabling the manipulation of matter and control of transport at nanometer length scales, the emergence of nanotechnology offers new opportunities to advance water desalination technologies. This review focuses on nanostructured materials that are directly involved in the separation of water from salt as opposed to mitigating issues such as fouling. We discuss separation mechanisms and novel transport phenomena in materials including zeolites, carbon nanotubes, and graphene with potential applications to reverse osmosis, capacitive deionization, and multi-stage flash, among others. Such nanostructured materials can potentially enable the development of next-generation desalination systems with increased efficiency and capacity.

  13. Plasmonic effects in metal-semiconductor nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Toropov, Alexey A

    2015-01-01

    Metal-semiconductor nanostructures represent an important new class of materials employed in designing advanced optoelectronic and nanophotonic devices, such as plasmonic nanolasers, plasmon-enhanced light-emitting diodes and solar cells, plasmonic emitters of single photons, and quantum devices operating in infrared and terahertz domains. The combination of surface plasmon resonances in conducting structures, providing strong concentration of an electromagnetic optical field nearby, with sharp optical resonances in semiconductors, which are highly sensitive to external electromagnetic fields, creates a platform to control light on the nanoscale. The design of the composite metal-semiconductor system imposes the consideration of both the plasmonic resonances in metal and the optical transitions in semiconductors - a key issue being their resonant interaction providing a coupling regime. In this book the reader will find descriptions of electrodynamics of conducting structures, quantum physics of semiconducto...

  14. Method of fabrication of anchored nanostructure materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2013-11-26

    Methods for fabricating anchored nanostructure materials are described. The methods include heating a nano-catalyst under a protective atmosphere to a temperature ranging from about 450.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. and contacting the heated nano-catalysts with an organic vapor to affix carbon nanostructures to the nano-catalysts and form the anchored nanostructure material.

  15. Metallic Nanostructures Based on DNA Nanoshapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boxuan Shen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Metallic nanostructures have inspired extensive research over several decades, particularly within the field of nanoelectronics and increasingly in plasmonics. Due to the limitations of conventional lithography methods, the development of bottom-up fabricated metallic nanostructures has become more and more in demand. The remarkable development of DNA-based nanostructures has provided many successful methods and realizations for these needs, such as chemical DNA metallization via seeding or ionization, as well as DNA-guided lithography and casting of metallic nanoparticles by DNA molds. These methods offer high resolution, versatility and throughput and could enable the fabrication of arbitrarily-shaped structures with a 10-nm feature size, thus bringing novel applications into view. In this review, we cover the evolution of DNA-based metallic nanostructures, starting from the metallized double-stranded DNA for electronics and progress to sophisticated plasmonic structures based on DNA origami objects.

  16. Emerging Science and Research Opportunities for Metals and Metallic Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handwerker, Carol A.; Pollock, Tresa M.

    2014-07-01

    During the next decade, fundamental research on metals and metallic nanostructures (MMNs) has the potential to continue transforming metals science into innovative materials, devices, and systems. A workshop to identify emerging and potentially transformative research areas in MMNs was held June 13 and 14, 2012, at the University of California Santa Barbara. There were 47 attendees at the workshop (listed in the Acknowledgements section), representing a broad range of academic institutions, industry, and government laboratories. The metals and metallic nanostructures (MMNs) workshop aimed to identify significant research trends, scientific fundamentals, and recent breakthroughs that can enable new or enhanced MMN performance, either alone or in a more complex materials system, for a wide range of applications. Additionally, the role that MMN research can play in high-priority research and development (R&D) areas such as the U.S. Materials Genome Initiative, the National Nanotechnology Initiative, the Advanced Manufacturing Initiative, and other similar initiatives that exist internationally was assessed. The workshop also addressed critical issues related to materials research instrumentation and the cyberinfrastructure for materials science research and education, as well as science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce development, with emphasis on the United States but with an appreciation that similar challenges and opportunities for the materials community exist internationally. A central theme of the workshop was that research in MMNs has provided and will continue to provide societal benefits through the integration of experiment, theory, and simulation to link atomistic, nanoscale, microscale, and mesoscale phenomena across time scales for an ever-widening range of applications. Within this overarching theme, the workshop participants identified emerging research opportunities that are categorized and described in more detail in the

  17. Nanostructured materials in electrochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eftekhari, Ali (ed.) [Avicenna Institute of Technology, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Providing the unique and vital link between the worlds of electrochemistry and nanomaterials, this reference and handbook covers advances in electrochemistry through the nanoscale control of electrode structures, as well as advances in nanotechnology through electrochemical synthesis strategies. It demonstrates how electrochemical methods are of great scientific and commercial interest due to their low cost and high efficiency, and includes the synthesis of nanowires, nanoparticles, nanoporous and layered nanomaterials of various compositions, as well as their applications - ranging from superior electrode materials to energy storage, biosensors, and electroanalytical devices. (orig.)

  18. Plasmonic hydrogen sensing with nanostructured metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadell, Carl; Syrenova, Svetlana; Langhammer, Christoph

    2014-12-23

    In this review, we discuss the evolution of localized surface plasmon resonance and surface plasmon resonance hydrogen sensors based on nanostructured metal hydrides, which has accelerated significantly during the past 5 years. We put particular focus on how, conceptually, plasmonic resonances can be used to study metal-hydrogen interactions at the nanoscale, both at the ensemble and at the single-nanoparticle level. Such efforts are motivated by a fundamental interest in understanding the role of nanosizing on metal hydride formation processes in the quest to develop efficient solid-state hydrogen storage materials with fast response times, reasonable thermodynamics, and acceptable long-term stability. Therefore, a brief introduction to the thermodynamics of metal hydride formation is also given. However, plasmonic hydrogen sensors not only are of academic interest as research tool in materials science but also are predicted to find more practical use as all-optical gas detectors in industrial and medical applications, as well as in a future hydrogen economy, where hydrogen is used as a carbon free energy carrier. Therefore, the wide range of different plasmonic hydrogen sensor designs already available is reviewed together with theoretical efforts to understand their fundamentals and optimize their performance in terms of sensitivity. In this context, we also highlight important challenges to be addressed in the future to take plasmonic hydrogen sensors from the laboratory to real applications in devices, including poisoning/deactivation of the active materials, sensor lifetime, and cross-sensitivity toward other gas species.

  19. Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Frank (Bud) Bridges, University of California-Santa Cruz

    2010-08-05

    The two-and-a-half day symposium on the "Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials" will be the first comprehensive meeting on this topic held under the auspices of a major U.S. professional society. Spring MRS Meetings provide a natural venue for this symposium as they attract a broad audience of researchers that represents a cross-section of the state-of-the-art regarding synthesis, structure-property relations, and applications of nanostructured materials. Close interactions among the experts in local structure measurements and materials researchers will help both to identify measurement needs pertinent to real-world materials problems and to familiarize the materials research community with the state-of-the-art local structure measurement techniques. We have chosen invited speakers that reflect the multidisciplinary and international nature of this topic and the need to continually nurture productive interfaces among university, government and industrial laboratories. The intent of the symposium is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for discussion and exchange of ideas on the recent progress in quantitative characterization of structural order in nanomaterials using different experimental techniques and theory. The symposium is expected to facilitate discussions on optimal approaches for determining atomic structure at the nanoscale using combined inputs from multiple measurement techniques.

  20. Nanostructured materials in electroanalysis of pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahi, A; Karimian, K; Heli, H

    2016-03-15

    Basic strategies and recent developments for the enhancement of the sensory performance of nanostructures in the electroanalysis of pharmaceuticals are reviewed. A discussion of the properties of nanostructures and their application as modified electrodes for drug assays is presented. The electrocatalytic effect of nanostructured materials and their application in determining low levels of drugs in pharmaceutical forms and biofluids are discussed.

  1. Metallic nanostructures for efficient LED lighting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano, G.; Rodriguez, S. R. K.; Verschuuren, M. A.; Rivas, Gomez

    2016-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are driving a shift toward energy-efficient illumination. Nonetheless, modifying the emission intensities, colors and directionalities of LEDs in specific ways remains a challenge often tackled by incorporating secondary optical components. Metallic nanostructures suppor

  2. Synthesis and applications of graphene-based noble metal nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoliang Tan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphene and its derivatives, such as graphene oxide (GO and reduced graphene oxide (rGO, are ideal platforms for constructing graphene-based nanostructures for various applications. Hybrid materials of noble metal nanocrystal-decorated GO or rGO with novel or enhanced properties and functions have been extensively explored recently. In this mini-review, various approaches for synthesis of graphene-templated noble metal nanomaterials are discussed. In particular, those novel synthetic strategies and interesting architectures are highlighted. Moreover, the applications of graphene-based noble metal nanostructures in fuel cells, electrochemical sensors, and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS will be briefly introduced.

  3. Thermo-plasmonics of Irradiated Metallic Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Haiyan

    the size, morphology and composition of metallic nanostructures, the absorption of light can be maximized, resulting in a substantial temperature elevation in a nanoscopic volume. Applications of these nanoscopic sources of heat can be found in various contexts including localized cancer therapy, drug...... of particle temperatures by simple detection of the phase boundary located far away from the particle. Two types of nanostructures were investigated using this assay: colloidal gold nanoparticles (rods and spheres) and e-beam printed metallic composite nanostructures. Chapter 5 presents the quantifications......-beam composite nanostructures, these including discs, triangles, stars and a dimer. The highest surface temperature elevation occurs on the nanostructure with the highest absorption efficiency at the laser irradiation wavelength, regardless of the size or the morphology. We also demonstrate that substantial heat...

  4. Friction and Wear Behaviors of Nanostructured Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong HAN; Yusheng ZHANG; Ke LU

    2008-01-01

    Nanostructured (ns) materials, i.e., polycrystalline materials with grain sizes in the nanometer regime (typically below 100 nm), have drawn considerable attention in the past decades due to their unique properties such as high strength and hardness. Wear resistance of ns materials, one of the most important properties for engineering materials, has been extensively investigated in the past decades. Obvious differences have been identified in friction and wear behaviors Between the ns materials and their corresponding coarse-grained (cg) counterparts, consistently correlating with their unique structure characteristics and mechanical properties. On the other hand, the superior tribological properties of ns materials illustrate their potential applications under contact loads. The present overview will summarize the important progresses achieved on friction and wear behaviors of ns metallic materials, including ultrafine-grained (ufg) materials in recent years. Tribological properties and effects on friction and wear behaviors of ns materials will be discussed under different wear conditions including abrasive wear, sliding wear, and fretting wear. Their correlations with mechanical properties will be analyzed. Perspectives on development of this field will be highlighted as well.

  5. Hollow Nanostructured Anode Materials for Li-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hollow nanostructured anode materials lie at the heart of research relating to Li-ion batteries, which require high capacity, high rate capability, and high safety. The higher capacity and higher rate capability for hollow nanostructured anode materials than that for the bulk counterparts can be attributed to their higher surface area, shorter path length for Li+ transport, and more freedom for volume change, which can reduce the overpotential and allow better reaction kinetics at the electrode surface. In this article, we review recent research activities on hollow nanostructured anode materials for Li-ion batteries, including carbon materials, metals, metal oxides, and their hybrid materials. The major goal of this review is to highlight some recent progresses in using these hollow nanomaterials as anode materials to develop Li-ion batteries with high capacity, high rate capability, and excellent cycling stability.

  6. Stabilizing nanostructures in metals using grain and twin boundary architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, K.

    2016-05-01

    Forming alloys with impurity elements is a routine method for modifying the properties of metals. An alternative approach involves the incorporation of interfaces into the crystalline lattice to enhance the metal's properties without changing its chemical composition. The introduction of high-density interfaces in nanostructured materials results in greatly improved strength and hardness; however, interfaces at the nanoscale show low stability. In this Review, I discuss recent developments in the stabilization of nanostructured metals by modifying the architectures of their interfaces. The amount, structure and distribution of several types of interfaces, such as high- and low-angle grain boundaries and twin boundaries, are discussed. I survey several examples of materials with nanotwinned and nanolaminated structures, as well as with gradient nanostructures, describing the techniques used to produce such samples and tracing their exceptional performances back to the nanoscale architectures of their interfaces.

  7. Plasmonic properties and applications of metallic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Yurong

    Plasmonic properties and the related novel applications are studied on various types of metallic nano-structures in one, two, or three dimensions. For 1D nanostructure, the motion of free electrons in a metal-film with nanoscale thickness is confined in its normal dimension and free in the other two. Describing the free-electron motion at metal-dielectric surfaces, surface plasmon polariton (SPP) is an elementary excitation of such motions and is well known. When further perforated with periodic array of holes, periodicity will introduce degeneracy, incur energy-level splitting, and facilitate the coupling between free-space photon and SPP. We applied this concept to achieve a plasmonic perfect absorber. The experimentally observed reflection dip splitting is qualitatively explained by a perturbation theory based on the above concept. If confined in 2D, the nanostructures become nanowires that intrigue a broad range of research interests. We performed various studies on the resonance and propagation of metal nanowires with different materials, cross-sectional shapes and form factors, in passive or active medium, in support of corresponding experimental works. Finite- Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) simulations show that simulated results agrees well with experiments and makes fundamental mode analysis possible. Confined in 3D, the electron motions in a single metal nanoparticle (NP) leads to localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) that enables another novel and important application: plasmon-heating. By exciting the LSPR of a gold particle embedded in liquid, the excited plasmon will decay into heat in the particle and will heat up the surrounding liquid eventually. With sufficient exciting optical intensity, the heat transfer from NP to liquid will undergo an explosive process and make a vapor envelop: nanobubble. We characterized the size, pressure and temperature of the nanobubble by a simple model relying on Mie calculations and continuous medium assumption. A

  8. Metal Oxide Nanostructures and Their Gas Sensing Properties: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Jin-Huai Liu; Ling-Tao Kong; Shao-Bo Liu; Fan-Li Meng; Jin-Yun Liu; Zhen Jin; Yu-Feng Sun

    2012-01-01

    Metal oxide gas sensors are predominant solid-state gas detecting devices for domestic, commercial and industrial applications, which have many advantages such as low cost, easy production, and compact size. However, the performance of such sensors is significantly influenced by the morphology and structure of sensing materials, resulting in a great obstacle for gas sensors based on bulk materials or dense films to achieve highly-sensitive properties. Lots of metal oxide nanostructures have b...

  9. Understanding the biological responses of nanostructured metals and surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Terry C.; Reiss, Rebecca A.

    2014-08-01

    Metals produced by Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) offer distinct advantages for medical applications such as orthopedic devices, in part because of their nanostructured surfaces. We examine the current theoretical foundations and state of knowledge for nanostructured biomaterials surface optimization within the contexts that apply to bulk nanostructured metals, differentiating how their microstructures impact osteogenesis, in particular, for Ultrafine Grained (UFG) titanium. Then we identify key gaps in the research to date, pointing out areas which merit additional focus within the scientific community. For example, we highlight the potential of next-generation DNA sequencing techniques (NGS) to reveal gene and non-coding RNA (ncRNA) expression changes induced by nanostructured metals. While our understanding of bio-nano interactions is in its infancy, nanostructured metals are already being marketed or developed for medical devices such as dental implants, spinal devices, and coronary stents. Our ability to characterize and optimize the biological response of cells to SPD metals will have synergistic effects on advances in materials, biological, and medical science.

  10. Metal oxide nanostructures and their applications

    OpenAIRE

    Dar, Ghulam Nabi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, researchers on nanoparticles and nanostructures has received a great deal of attention not only in the area of synthesis and characterization but also in their potential application in various high-technological applications. Nanomaterials are widely used not only for environmental and biological applications but also for electronic and sensing applications. Among various classes of nanomaterials, the metal oxide nanostructures possess particular important because of their significa...

  11. Syntheses and Assemblies of Noble Metal Nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Ziegler, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Shape and size control as well as the control of the assembly of nanostructures are current challenges in nano sciences. Focussing on metal nanostructures all of these aspects have been addressed in the frame of the present work. It was possible to develop a new aqueous seeded growth method that produces gold nanoparticles with adjustable diameters over a large range of sizes. The spherical particles obtained show very low polydispersities and a good long term stability. Furthermore it was po...

  12. 3-D eigenmode calculation of metallic nano-structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bandlow

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In the calculation of eigenfrequencies of 3-D metallic nanostructures occurs the challenge that the material parameters depend on the desired eigenfrequency. We propose a formulation where this leads to a polynomial eigenvalue problem which can be tackled by different solving strategies. A comparison between a Newton-type method and a Jacobi-Davidson algorithm is given.

  13. Commercial Implementation of Model-Based Manufacturing of Nanostructured Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, Terry C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-24

    Computational modeling is an essential tool for commercial production of nanostructured metals. Strength is limited by imperfections at the high strength levels that are achievable in nanostructured metals. Processing to achieve homogeneity at the micro- and nano-scales is critical. Manufacturing of nanostructured metals is intrinsically a multi-scale problem. Manufacturing of nanostructured metal products requires computer control, monitoring and modeling. Large scale manufacturing of bulk nanostructured metals by Severe Plastic Deformation is a multi-scale problem. Computational modeling at all scales is essential. Multiple scales of modeling must be integrated to predict and control nanostructural, microstructural, macrostructural product characteristics and production processes.

  14. Helical metallic micro- and nanostructures: fabrication and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lichun; Zhang, Liqiu; Kim, Sang Min; Park, Sungho

    2014-07-01

    Metal elements occupy more than 70% of the positions in the periodic table, and their use has accelerated human civilization due to their invaluable chemical and physical characteristics. With the rapid development of metals, various structures of microscopic metal particles have been fabricated and investigated as functional materials in scientific research and practical applications. The phrase `structure determines properties' has been widely acknowledged as a golden rule in chemistry and materials science, especially when the size of small particles is in the micro- or nanoscale dimension. Helical metallic micro- and nanostructures with complex shapes have recently emerged and may be used for various useful applications such as photonics, sensors, actuators, micro-/nanorobotics, and micro-/nanoelectronics, based on their unique mechanical, electrical, and electromagnetic properties. This review paper specifically focuses on the fabrication and application of helical metallic structures with a size ranging from the micro- to nanoscale. The unusual spatial distribution of active atoms in helical metallic micro- and nanostructures and their helical morphology could offer new opportunities for applications beyond those of other conventional metallic and nonmetallic micro- and nanostructures.

  15. Nanostructured Electrode Materials for Electrochemical Capacitor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojin Choi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The advent of novel organic and inorganic nanomaterials in recent years, particularly nanostructured carbons, conducting polymers, and metal oxides, has enabled the fabrication of various energy devices with enhanced performance. In this paper, we review in detail different nanomaterials used in the fabrication of electrochemical capacitor electrodes and also give a brief overview of electric double-layer capacitors, pseudocapacitors, and hybrid capacitors. From a materials point of view, the latest trends in electrochemical capacitor research are also discussed through extensive analysis of the literature and by highlighting notable research examples (published mostly since 2013. Finally, a perspective on next-generation capacitor technology is also given, including the challenges that lie ahead.

  16. Nonlocal optical response in metallic nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Raza, Søren; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Wubs, Martijn; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2014-01-01

    This review provides a broad overview of the studies and effects of nonlocal response in metallic nanostructures. In particular, we thoroughly present the nonlocal hydrodynamic model and the recently introduced generalized nonlocal optical response (GNOR) model. The influence of nonlocal response on plasmonic excitations is studied in key metallic geometries, such as spheres and dimers, and we derive new consequences due to the GNOR model. Finally, we propose several trajectories for future w...

  17. Nanostructured materials and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Logothetidis, Stergios

    2012-01-01

    This book applies nanostructures and nanomaterials to energy and organic electronics, offering advanced deposition and processing methods and theoretical and experimental aspects for nanoparticles, nanotubes and thin films for organic electronics applications.

  18. Theory of Quantum Transport in Metallic and Hybrid Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Glatz, Andreas; Vinokur, Valerii M

    2006-01-01

    There is a major development emerging at the intersection of modern physics, computer science, and materials science, which struggles to squeeze more devices into a restricted volume and constitutes a central focus of modern nanotechnology. Utilizing the metal-based hybrid nanostructures may offer significant advantages over those exploiting purely semiconductor materials. First, the chemistry of metals is typically simpler than that of semiconductors. Second, the electric properties of metals are much less sensitive to the structural defects and impurities than those of semiconductors. Next, metallic devices allow better electric and thermal contacts. And, last but by no means least, the high electron velocity in metals promises to accelerate enormously operation rates with respect to those in semiconductor-based devices. The book reflects scientific developments in the physics of metallic compounds based nanodevices presented at the NATO-sponsored Workshop on nanophysics held in St. Petersburg, Russia in th...

  19. Controlling optical response of metallic nanostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigorenko, Ilya [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    In this talk I am going to discuss the direct and inverse problems in nanoplasmonics in classical, and in particular quantum regimes of excitations. The inverse problem in nanoplasmonics is aimed to control the eigenspectrum, excitations,and other physical properties of nanosized quantum systems via controlling their size, shape, and structural composition. Using a combination of modern modeling techniques and optimization procedures, one can succeed to solve the inverse problem, namely, to find a nanostructure which has the desired functionality, or to find optimal control field in the presence of known nanostructured metallic surface.

  20. Segmented metallic nanostructures, homogeneous metallic nanostructures and methods for producing same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Stanislaus; Koenigsmann, Christopher

    2017-04-18

    The present invention includes a method of producing a segmented 1D nanostructure. The method includes providing a vessel containing a template wherein on one side of the template is a first metal reagent solution and on the other side of the template is a reducing agent solution, wherein the template comprises at least one pore; allowing a first segment of a 1D nanostructure to grow within a pore of the template until a desired length is reached; replacing the first metal reagent solution with a second metal reagent solution; allowing a second segment of a 1D nanostructure to grow from the first segment until a desired length is reached, wherein a segmented 1D nanostructure is produced.

  1. Nanoprobes, nanostructured materials and solid state materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Houping

    2005-07-01

    Novel templates have been developed to prepare nanostructured porous materials through nonsurfactant templated pathway. And new applications of these materials, such as drug delivery and molecular imprinting, have been explored. The relationship between template content and pore structure has been investigated. The composition and pore structures were studied in detail using IR, TGA, SEM, TEM, BET and XRD. The obtained mesoporous materials have tunable diameters in the range of 2--12 nm. Due to the many advantages of this nonsurfactant templated pathway, such as environment friendly and biocompatibility, controlled release of antibiotics in the nanoporous materials were studied. The in vitro release properties were found to depend on the silica structures which were well tuned by varying the template content. A controlled long-term release pattern of vancomycin was achieved when the template content was 30 wt% or lower. Nanoscale electrochemical probes with dimensions as small as 50 nm in diameter and 1--2 mum in length were fabricated using electron beam deposition on the apex of conventional micron size electrodes. The electroactive region was limited to the extreme tip of the nanoprobe by coating with an insulating polymer and re-opening of the coating at the extreme tip. The novel nanoelectrodes thus prepared were employed to probe neurons in mouse brain slice and the results suggest that the nanoprobes were capable of recording neuronal excitatory postsynaptic potential signals. Interesting solid state chemistry was found in oxygenated iron phthalocyanine. Their Mossbauer spectra show the formation of four oxygenated species apart from the unoxygenated parent compound. The oxygen-bridged compounds formed in the solid matrix bear no resemblance to the one formed by solution chemistry. Tentative assignment of species has been made with the help of Mossbauer and IR spectroscopy. An effort to modify aniline trimer for potential nanoelectronics applications and to

  2. Hierarchically Nanostructured Materials for Sustainable Environmental Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zheng; Guo, Yanbing; Liu, Cai-Hong; Gao, Pu-Xian

    2013-11-01

    This article presents a comprehensive overview of the hierarchical nanostructured materials with either geometry or composition complexity in environmental applications. The hierarchical nanostructures offer advantages of high surface area, synergistic interactions and multiple functionalities towards water remediation, environmental gas sensing and monitoring as well as catalytic gas treatment. Recent advances in synthetic strategies for various hierarchical morphologies such as hollow spheres and urchin-shaped architectures have been reviewed. In addition to the chemical synthesis, the physical mechanisms associated with the materials design and device fabrication have been discussed for each specific application. The development and application of hierarchical complex perovskite oxide nanostructures have also been introduced in photocatalytic water remediation, gas sensing and catalytic converter. Hierarchical nanostructures will open up many possibilities for materials design and device fabrication in environmental chemistry and technology.

  3. Hierarchically nanostructured materials for sustainable environmental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zheng; Guo, Yanbing; Liu, Cai-Hong; Gao, Pu-Xian

    2013-01-01

    This review presents a comprehensive overview of the hierarchical nanostructured materials with either geometry or composition complexity in environmental applications. The hierarchical nanostructures offer advantages of high surface area, synergistic interactions, and multiple functionalities toward water remediation, biosensing, environmental gas sensing and monitoring as well as catalytic gas treatment. Recent advances in synthetic strategies for various hierarchical morphologies such as hollow spheres and urchin-shaped architectures have been reviewed. In addition to the chemical synthesis, the physical mechanisms associated with the materials design and device fabrication have been discussed for each specific application. The development and application of hierarchical complex perovskite oxide nanostructures have also been introduced in photocatalytic water remediation, gas sensing, and catalytic converter. Hierarchical nanostructures will open up many possibilities for materials design and device fabrication in environmental chemistry and technology. PMID:24790946

  4. Hierarchically Nanostructured Materials for Sustainable Environmental Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng eRen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a comprehensive overview of the hierarchical nanostructured materials with either geometry or composition complexity in environmental applications. The hierarchical nanostructures offer advantages of high surface area, synergistic interactions and multiple functionalities towards water remediation, environmental gas sensing and monitoring as well as catalytic gas treatment. Recent advances in synthetic strategies for various hierarchical morphologies such as hollow spheres and urchin-shaped architectures have been reviewed. In addition to the chemical synthesis, the physical mechanisms associated with the materials design and device fabrication have been discussed for each specific application. The development and application of hierarchical complex perovskite oxide nanostructures have also been introduced in photocatalytic water remediation, gas sensing and catalytic converter. Hierarchical nanostructures will open up many possibilities for materials design and device fabrication in environmental chemistry and technology.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of different metal oxide nanostructures by simple electrolysis based oxidation of metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dinesh Pratap; Srivastava, Onkar Nath

    2009-09-01

    We report the Synthesis of different metal oxide (Cu2O, SnO2, Fe3O4 and PbO2) nanostructures by simple electrolysis based oxidation of metals (Cu, Sn, Fe and Pb). We have utilized the two electrode set up for the electrolysis and used different metal electrodes as anode and platinum as cathode. The synthesized nanomaterials were delaminated in the electrolyte. The microstructural characterization of synthesized materials in electrolytes after electrolysis at different electrode potentials revealed that the nanostructures strongly depend on the applied voltage between the electrodes. Various nanostructures (nanothreads, nanowires, nanocubes, nanotetrapods and hexagons-like) of metal oxides have been synthesized by this method. In case of copper electrode we have found nanothreads and nanowires of cuprous oxide. Tin electrode resulted nanothreads, nanotetrapod and nanocube like structures of tin oxide. Iron electrode resulted, nanowire like structures of iron oxide and lead sheet transformed into hexagon like and six petals like structures of lead oxide.

  6. Application opportunities for nanostructured materials and coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, M. [Connecticut Univ., Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Metallurgy

    1995-12-01

    Nanostructured materials have the potential to change materials science as we know it today significantly, as well as to provide a new generation of materials with a quantum improvement in properties. While many interesting properties have been generated in the laboratory, there is still much work to be done before there are production applications for nanostructured materials and coatings in gas turbine engines and similar demanding strength- and temperature-limited applications. This paper (1) describes the need for improved materials in gas turbine engines, (2) summarizes the improved physical and mechanical properties that have been reported for nanostructured materials, (3) discusses a research and development methodology that has the potential for accelerating technology implementation, and (4) describes high pay-off applications. (orig.)

  7. Nanostructured metal-polyaniline composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsing-Lin; Li, Wenguang; Bailey, James A.; Gao, Yuan

    2010-08-31

    Metal-polyaniline (PANI) composites are provided together with a process of preparing such composites by an electrodeless process. The metal of the composite can have nanoscale structural features and the composites can be used in applications such as catalysis for hydrogenation reactions and for analytical detection methods employing SERS.

  8. Polymer Nanocomposites Containing Anisotropic Metal Nanostructures as Internal Strain Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Ruggeri

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Polymer/metal nanocomposite containing intrinsically anisotropic metal nanostructures such as metal nanorods and nanowires appeared extremely more sensitive and responsive to mechanical stimuli than nanocomposites containing spherical nanoparticles. After uniaxial stretching of the supporting polymer matrix (poly(vinyl alcohol, the elongated silver nanostructures embedded at low concentration into the polymer matrix (<1 wt % of Ag assume the direction of the drawing, yielding materials with a strong dichroic response of the absorption behavior. Accordingly, the film changed its color when observed under linearly polarized light already at moderate drawings. The results obtained suggest that nanocomposite films have potential in applications such as color polarizing filters, radiation responsive polymeric objects and smart flexible films in packaging applications.

  9. Hardening by annealing and softening by deformation in nanostructured metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, X.; Hansen, N.; Tsuji, N.

    2006-01-01

    -dislocation and dislocation-interface reactions, such that heat treatment reduces the generation and interaction of dislocations, leading to an increase in strength and a reduction in ductility. A subsequent deformation step may restore the dislocation structure and facilitate the yielding process when the metal is stressed......We observe that a nanostructured metal can be hardened by annealing and softened when subsequently deformed, which is in contrast to the typical behavior of a metal. Microstructural investigation points to an effect of the structural scale on fundamental mechanisms of dislocation....... As a consequence, the strength decreases and the ductility increases. These observations suggest that for materials such as the nanostructured aluminum studied here, deformation should be used as an optimizing procedure instead of annealing....

  10. Shockwave Consolidation of Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Taylor, Patrick; Nemir, David

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology based thermoelectric materials are considered attractive for developing highly efficient thermoelectric devices. Nano-structured thermoelectric materials are predicted to offer higher ZT over bulk materials by reducing thermal conductivity and increasing electrical conductivity. Consolidation of nano-structured powders into dense materials without losing nanostructure is essential towards practical device development. Using the gas atomization process, amorphous nano-structured powders were produced. Shockwave consolidation is accomplished by surrounding the nanopowder-containing tube with explosives and then detonating. The resulting shock wave causes rapid fusing of the powders without the melt and subsequent grain growth. We have been successful in generating consolidated nano-structured bismuth telluride alloy powders by using the shockwave technique. Using these consolidated materials, several types of thermoelectric power generating devices have been developed. Shockwave consolidation is anticipated to generate large quantities of nanostructred materials expeditiously and cost effectively. In this paper, the technique of shockwave consolidation will be presented followed by Seebeck Coefficient and thermal conductivity measurements of consolidated materials. Preliminary results indicate a substantial increase in electrical conductivity due to shockwave consolidation technique.

  11. Nanoscale metal-organic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carné, Arnau; Carbonell, Carlos; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Metal-organic materials are found to be a fascinating novel class of functional nanomaterials. The limitless combinations between inorganic and organic building blocks enable researchers to synthesize 0- and 1-D metal-organic discrete nanostructures with varied compositions, morphologies and sizes, fabricate 2-D metal-organic thin films and membranes, and even structure them on surfaces at the nanometre length scale. In this tutorial review, the synthetic methodologies for preparing these miniaturized materials as well as their potential properties and future applications are discussed. This review wants to offer a panoramic view of this embryonic class of nanoscale materials that will be of interest to a cross-section of researchers working in chemistry, physics, medicine, nanotechnology, materials chemistry, etc., in the next years.

  12. Thermo-plasmonics of Irradiated Metallic Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Haiyan

    Thermo-plasmonics is an emerging field in photonics which aims at harnessing the kinetic energy of light to generate nanoscopic sources of heat. Localized surface plasmons (LSP) supported by metallic nanostructures greatly enhance the interactions of light with the structure. By engineering...... the size, morphology and composition of metallic nanostructures, the absorption of light can be maximized, resulting in a substantial temperature elevation in a nanoscopic volume. Applications of these nanoscopic sources of heat can be found in various contexts including localized cancer therapy, drug......-plasmonic simulations as well as the ImageJ program “Mosaic”, used for single particle tracking. Chapter 4 presents the experimental details of the lipid bilayer based temperature mapping technique based on a lipid bilayer containing fluorophores with a phase dependent partitioning. This assay allowed quantification...

  13. Hybrid nanostructured materials for high-performance electrochemical capacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Guihua

    2013-03-01

    The exciting development of advanced nanostructured materials has driven the rapid growth of research in the field of electrochemical energy storage (EES) systems which are critical to a variety of applications ranging from portable consumer electronics, hybrid electric vehicles, to large industrial scale power and energy management. Owing to their capability to deliver high power performance and extremely long cycle life, electrochemical capacitors (ECs), one of the key EES systems, have attracted increasing attention in the recent years since they can complement or even replace batteries in the energy storage field, especially when high power delivery or uptake is needed. This review article describes the most recent progress in the development of nanostructured electrode materials for EC technology, with a particular focus on hybrid nanostructured materials that combine carbon based materials with pseudocapacitive metal oxides or conducting polymers for achieving high-performance ECs. This review starts with an overview of EES technologies and the comparison between various EES systems, followed by a brief description of energy storage mechanisms for different types of EC materials. This review emphasizes the exciting development of both hybrid nanomaterials and novel support structures for effective electrochemical utilization and high mass loading of active electrode materials, both of which have brought the energy density of ECs closer to that of batteries while still maintaining their characteristic high power density. Last, future research directions and the remaining challenges toward the rational design and synthesis of hybrid nanostructured electrode materials for next-generation ECs are discussed. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Surface analysis of nanostructured carbonaceous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wepasnick, Kevin Andrew

    The characterization of surfaces is central to understanding its interaction with other materials. Current ground-breaking research in interfacial science is focusing on surfaces which have a nanoscopic-size to their structuring. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been explored extensively. However, to utilize these materials in commercial and scientific applications, the surfaces are often modified to tailor specific properties, such as dispersion, sorption, and reactivity. The focus of this thesis is to apply surface analytical techniques to explore the chemical and structural characteristics of modified nanostructured surfaces. Specifically studied are the covalent surface modifications of CNTs by strategies that involve the direct incorporation of specific elements into the graphene sidewalls by commonly used wet chemical oxidants. These resulting CNTs are then evaluated in terms of their change in surface chemistry and structure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to characterize the surface oxidation, while chemical derivatization techniques in conjunction with XPS afforded the concentration of carboxyl, carbonyl, and hydroxyl groups on the CNT surface. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was able to provide detailed structural information on the modified CNT, including the extent of sidewall damage. Results indicate that the distribution of oxygen-containing functional groups was insensitive to the reaction conditions, but was dependent upon the identity of the oxidant. These trends in functional group concentration were then applied to determining environmental properties, specifically divalent metal cation sorption. Consistently, the increases in COOH functional groups result in an increase in sorption capacity of divalent metal cations, such as Zn2+ and Cd2+. Furthermore, the interactions of size-selected metal and metal-oxide nanoclusters with graphite surfaces were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning tunneling

  15. Electrodynamical enhancement of optical transitions in semiconductor and metal-semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rupasov, Valery I. [ALTAIR Center LLC, Shrewsbury, MA 01545 (United States) and Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: rupasov@townisp.com

    2007-03-19

    Semiconductor and metal-semiconductor nanostructures are shown to exhibit electrodynamical resonances analogous to the Froehlich resonance for metal nanoparticles in a dielectric host. If the transition frequency of an optical transition in the nanostructure core coincides with one of the resonance frequencies of the nanostructure, the strength of the optical transition is dramatically enhanced by up to 4-6 orders of magnitude. The resonance frequencies are determined by dielectric permittivities of materials of host and nanostructure, and by sizes of the nanostructure. That enables to tune the resonance frequencies to desired values in an extremely wide spectral range-from ultraviolet to terahertz, engineering thus optical properties of high-efficiency nanostructured optical materials for numerous applications.

  16. Hydrogen storage in nanostructured materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assfour, Bassem

    2011-02-28

    Hydrogen is an appealing energy carrier for clean energy use. However, storage of hydrogen is still the main bottleneck for the realization of an energy economy based on hydrogen. Many materials with outstanding properties have been synthesized with the aim to store enough amount of hydrogen under ambient conditions. Such efforts need guidance from material science, which includes predictive theoretical tools. Carbon nanotubes were considered as promising candidates for hydrogen storage applications, but later on it was found to be unable to store enough amounts of hydrogen under ambient conditions. New arrangements of carbon nanotubes were constructed and hydrogen sorption properties were investigated using state-of-the-art simulation methods. The simulations indicate outstanding total hydrogen uptake (up to 19.0 wt.% at 77 K and 5.52wt.% at 300 K), which makes these materials excellent candidates for storage applications. This reopens the carbon route to superior materials for a hydrogen-based economy. Zeolite imidazolate frameworks are subclass of MOFs with an exceptional chemical and thermal stability. The hydrogen adsorption in ZIFs was investigated as a function of network geometry and organic linker exchange. Ab initio calculations performed at the MP2 level to obtain correct interaction energies between hydrogen molecules and the ZIF framework. Subsequently, GCMC simulations are carried out to obtain the hydrogen uptake of ZIFs at different thermodynamic conditions. The best of these materials (ZIF-8) is found to be able to store up to 5 wt.% at 77 K and high pressure. We expected possible improvement of hydrogen capacity of ZIFs by substituting the metal atom (Zn{sup 2+}) in the structure by lighter elements such as B or Li. Therefore, we investigated the energy landscape of LiB(IM)4 polymorphs in detail and analyzed their hydrogen storage capacities. The structure with the fau topology was shown to be one of the best materials for hydrogen storage. Its

  17. Nanostructured core-shell electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Long-bo; Yuan, Xing-zhong; Liang, Jie; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Hou; Zeng, Guang-ming

    2016-11-01

    Core-shell nanostructure represents a unique system for applications in electrochemical energy storage devices. Owing to the unique characteristics featuring high power delivery and long-term cycling stability, electrochemical capacitors (ECs) have emerged as one of the most attractive electrochemical storage systems since they can complement or even replace batteries in the energy storage field, especially when high power delivery or uptake is needed. This review aims to summarize recent progress on core-shell nanostructures for advanced supercapacitor applications in view of their hierarchical architecture which not only create the desired hierarchical porous channels, but also possess higher electrical conductivity and better structural mechanical stability. The core-shell nanostructures include carbon/carbon, carbon/metal oxide, carbon/conducting polymer, metal oxide/metal oxide, metal oxide/conducting polymer, conducting polymer/conducting polymer, and even more complex ternary core-shell nanoparticles. The preparation strategies, electrochemical performances, and structural stabilities of core-shell materials for ECs are summarized. The relationship between core-shell nanostructure and electrochemical performance is discussed in detail. In addition, the challenges and new trends in core-shell nanomaterials development have also been proposed.

  18. Surface plasmon resonance in super-periodic metal nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Haisheng

    Surface plasmon resonances in periodic metal nanostructures have been investigated over the past decade. The periodic metal nanostructures have served as new technology platforms in fields such as biological and chemical sensing. An existing method to determine the surface plasmon resonance properties of these metal nanostructures is the measurement of the light transmission or reflection from these nanostructures. The measurement of surface plasmon resonances in either the transmission or reflection allows one to resolve the surface plasmon resonance in metal nanostructures. In this dissertation, surface plasmon resonances in a new type of metal nanostructures were investigated. The new nanostructures were created by patterning traditional periodic nanohole and nanoslit arrays into diffraction gratings. The patterned nanohole and 11anoslit arrays have two periods in the structures. The new nanostructures are called "super-periodic" nanostructures. With rigorous finite difference time domain (FDTD) numerical simulations, surface plasmon resonances in super-periodic nanoslit and nanohole arrays were investigated. It was found that by creating a super-period in periodic metal nanostructures, surface plasmon radiations can be observed in the non-zero order diffractions. This discovery presents a new method of characterizing the surface plasmon resonances in metal nanostructures. Super-periodic gold nanoslit and nanohole arrays were fabricated with the electron beam lithography technique. The surface plasmon resonances were measured in the first order diffraction by using a CCD. The experimental results confirm well with the FDTD numerical simulations.

  19. Nonlocal optical response in metallic nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Søren; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I; Wubs, Martijn; Asger Mortensen, N

    2015-05-13

    This review provides a broad overview of the studies and effects of nonlocal response in metallic nanostructures. In particular, we thoroughly present the nonlocal hydrodynamic model and the recently introduced generalized nonlocal optical response (GNOR) model. The influence of nonlocal response on plasmonic excitations is studied in key metallic geometries, such as spheres and dimers, and we derive new consequences due to the GNOR model. Finally, we propose several trajectories for future work on nonlocal response, including experimental setups that may unveil further effects of nonlocal response.

  20. Nonlocal optical response in metallic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raza, Søren; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Wubs, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    This review provides a broad overview of the studies and effects of nonlocal response in metallic nanostructures. In particular, we thoroughly present the nonlocal hydrodynamic model and the recently introduced generalized nonlocal optical response (GNOR) model. The influence of nonlocal response...... on plasmonic excitations is studied in key metallic geometries, such as spheres and dimers, and we derive new consequences due to the GNOR model. Finally, we propose several trajectories for future work on nonlocal response, including experimental setups that may unveil further effects of nonlocal response....

  1. Enhanced Second Harmonic Generation from Coupled Asymmetric Plasmonic Metal Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Yildiz, Bilge Can; Abak, Musa Kurtulus; Coskun, Sahin; Unalan, Husnu Emrah; Bek, Alpan

    2014-01-01

    We show that second harmonic generation can be enhanced by Fano resonant coupling of asymmetric plasmonic metal nanostructures. We develop a theoretical model examining the effects of electromagnetic interaction between two metal nanostructures on the second harmonic generation. We compare the second harmonic generation efficiency of a single plasmonic metal nanostructure with that of two coupled ones. We show that second harmonic generation from a single metal nanostructure can be enhanced about 30 times by attaching a second metal nanostructure with a 10 times higher quality factor than that of the first one. The origin of this enhancement is Fano resonant coupling of the two metal nanostructures. We support our findings on Fano enhancement of second harmonic generation by an experimental study of a coupled plasmonic system composed of a silver nanoparticle and a silver nanowire on glass surface in which the ratio of the quality factors are also estimated to be around 10 times.

  2. Metal films with imprinted nanostructures by template stripping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, René Lynge; Pors, Anders; Dreier, Jes

    We present a novel template stripping procedure for fabricating metal films with imprinted nanostructures. The basic idea is to deposit a gold film onto a nano-structured substrate and subsequently strip the film from the substrate surface thereby revealing imprinted nanostructures in the film...... result is a thin gold film with imprinted nano-cavities....

  3. UV fluorescence enhancement from nanostructured aluminum materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanari, Danielle E.; Dean, Nathan; Poston, Pete E.; Blair, Steve; Harris, Joel M.

    2016-09-01

    Interest in label-free detection of biomolecules has given rise to the need for UV plasmonic materials. DNA bases and amino acid residues have electronic resonances in the UV which allow for sensitive detection of these species by surface-enhanced UV fluorescence spectroscopy. Electrochemical roughening has been used extensively to generate plasmonically-active metal surfaces that produce localized enhancement of excitation and emission of electromagnetic radiation from surface-bound molecules. Electrochemically roughened gold and silver surfaces produce enhancement in the visible and near-IR regions, but to the best of our knowledge, application of this technique for producing UV-enhancing substrates has not been reported. Using electropolishing of aluminum, we are able to generate nanostructured surfaces that produce enhanced spectroscopic detection of molecules in the UV. Aluminum is a natural choice for substrate composition as it exhibits a relatively large quality factor in the UV. We have fabricated electropolished aluminum films with nanometer scale roughness and have studied UV-excited fluorescence enhancement from submonolayer coverage of tryptophan on these substrates using a UV-laser based spectrometer. Quantitative dosing by dip-coating was used to deposit known surface concentrations of the aromatic amino acid tryptophan, so that fluorescence enhancement could be evaluated. Compared to a dielectric substrate (surface-oxidized silicon), we observe a 180-fold enhancement in the total fluorescence emitted by tryptophan on electropolished aluminum under photobleaching conditions, allowing detection of sub-monolayer coverages of molecules essential for development of biosensor technologies.

  4. Quantum electrodynamics and plasmonic resonance of metallic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingliang; Xiang, Hongping; Zhang, Xu; Lu, Gang

    2016-04-01

    Plasmonic resonance of a metallic nanostructure results from coherent motion of its conduction electrons driven by incident light. At the resonance, the induced dipole in the nanostructure is proportional to the number of the conduction electrons, hence 107 times larger than that in an atom. The interaction energy between the induced dipole and fluctuating virtual field of the incident light can reach a few tenths of an eV. Therefore, the classical electromagnetism dominating the field may become inadequate. We propose that quantum electrodynamics (QED) may be used as a fundamental theory to describe the interaction between the virtual field and the oscillating electrons. Based on QED, we derive analytic expressions for the plasmon resonant frequency, which depends on three easily accessible material parameters. The analytic theory reproduces very well the experimental data, and can be used in rational design of materials for plasmonic applications.

  5. Quantum electrodynamics and plasmonic resonance of metallic nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingliang; Xiang, Hongping; Zhang, Xu; Lu, Gang

    2016-04-20

    Plasmonic resonance of a metallic nanostructure results from coherent motion of its conduction electrons driven by incident light. At the resonance, the induced dipole in the nanostructure is proportional to the number of the conduction electrons, hence 10(7) times larger than that in an atom. The interaction energy between the induced dipole and fluctuating virtual field of the incident light can reach a few tenths of an eV. Therefore, the classical electromagnetism dominating the field may become inadequate. We propose that quantum electrodynamics (QED) may be used as a fundamental theory to describe the interaction between the virtual field and the oscillating electrons. Based on QED, we derive analytic expressions for the plasmon resonant frequency, which depends on three easily accessible material parameters. The analytic theory reproduces very well the experimental data, and can be used in rational design of materials for plasmonic applications.

  6. Dynamic Plastic Deformation (DPD): A Novel Technique for Synthesizing Bulk Nanostructured Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    While some superior properties of nanostructured materials (with structural scales below 100 nm) have attracted numerous interests of material scientists, technique development for synthesizing nanostructured metals and alloys in 3-dimensional (3D) bulk forms is still challenging despite of extensive investigations over decades.Here we report a novel synthesis technique for bulk nanostructured metals based on plastic deformation at high Zener-Hollomon parameters (high strain rates or low temperatures), i.e., dynamic plastic deformation (DPD).The basic concept behind this approach will be addressed together with a few examples to demonstrate the capability and characteristics of this method. Perspectives and future developments of this technique will be highlighted.

  7. (Plasmonic Metal Core)/(Semiconductor Shell) Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Caihong

    Over the past several years, integration of metal nanocrystals that can support localized surface plasmon has been demonstrated as one of the most promising methods to the improvement of the light-harvesting efficiency of semiconductors. Ag and Au nanocrystals have been extensively hybridized with semiconductors by either deposition or anchoring. However, metal nanocrystals tend to aggregate, reshape, detach, or grow into large nanocrystals, leading to a loss of the unique properties seen in the original nanocrystals. Fortunately, core/shell nanostructures, circumventing the aforementioned problems, have been demonstrated to exhibit superior photoactivities. To further improve the light-harvesting applications of (plasmonic metal core)/(semiconductor shell) nanostructures, it is vital to understand the plasmonic and structural evolutions during the preparation processes, design novel hybrid nanostructures, and improve their light-harvesting performances. In this thesis, I therefore studied the plasmonic and structural evolutions during the formation of (Ag core)/(Ag2S shell) nanostructures. Moreover, I also prepared (noble metal core)/(TiO2 shell) nanostructures and investigated their plasmonic properties and photon-harvesting applications. Clear understanding of the sulfidation process can enable fine control of the plasmonic properties as well as the structural composition of Ag/Ag 2S nanomaterials. Therefore, I investigated the plasmonic and structural variations during the sulfidation process of Ag nanocubes both experimentally and numerically. The sulfidation reactions were carried out at both the ensemble and single-particle levels. Electrodynamic simulations were also employed to study the variations of the plasmonic properties and plasmon modes. Both experiment and simulation results revealed that sulfidation initiates at the vertices of Ag nanocubes. Ag nanocubes are then gradually truncated and each nanocube becomes a nanosphere eventually. The cubic

  8. The first bulk nanostructured metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadeshia, H K D H

    2013-02-01

    Nanotechnology has become an overused adjective, but there has been justified excitement in the context of structural materials. A class of iron alloys has been discovered in which a high density of strong interfaces can be created by heat-treatment alone. The packing of interfaces is so large, and the fact that there is an intrinsic work hardening mechanism in the structure, leads to remarkable properties. The genesis of this structure, its commercialization, the new science associated with the discovery, and its limitations are all explored in this short review.

  9. Nanostructured materials in the food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, Mary Ann; Sanguansri, Peerasak

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology involves the application, production, and processing of materials at the nanometer scale. Biological- and physical-inspired approaches, using both conventional and innovative food processing technologies to manipulate matter at this scale, provide the food industry with materials with new functionalities. Understanding the assembly behavior of native and modified food components is essential in developing nanostructured materials. Functionalized nanostructured materials are finding applications in many sectors of the food industry, including novel nanosensors, new packaging materials with improved mechanical and barrier properties, and efficient and targeted nutrient delivery systems. An improved understanding of the benefits and the risks of the technology based on sound scientific data will help gain the acceptance of nanotechnology by the food industry. New horizons for nanotechnology in food science may be achieved by further research on nanoscale structures and methods to control interactions between single molecules.

  10. Photoemission from optoelectronic materials and their nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Ghatak, Kamakhya Prasad; Bhattacharya, Sitangshu

    2009-01-01

    This monograph investigates photoemission from optoelectronic materials and their nanostructures. It contains open-ended research problems which form an integral part of the text and are useful for graduate courses as well as aspiring Ph.D.'s and researchers..

  11. Block copolymer template-directed synthesis of well-ordered metallic nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vukovic, Ivana; ten Brinke, Gerrit; Loos, Katja; Dekker, Henk; Malová, Darina; Hoogendoorn, Sander

    2013-01-01

    3D nanostructured inorganic materials appear as promising candidates for various practical applications. Here we focus on metal nanofoams, a class of 3D nanomaterials uniquely combining the properties of metals and nanoporous materials, and review the recent developments in their preparation methods

  12. Metal-polymer composites comprising nanostructures and applications thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsing-Lin; Jeon, Sea Ho; Mack, Nathan H.

    2011-08-02

    Metal-polymer composites, and methods of making and use thereof, said composites comprising a thermally-cured dense polyaniline substrate; an acid dopant; and, metal nanostructure deposits wherein the deposits have a morphology dependent upon the acid dopant.

  13. Hybrid nanostructures of metal/two-dimensional nanomaterials for plasmon-enhanced applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuanhua; Zhu, Jinmeng; Wei, Bingqing

    2016-06-07

    Hybrid nanostructures composed of graphene or other two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials and plasmonic metal components have been extensively studied. The unusual properties of 2D materials are associated with their atomically thin thickness and 2D morphology, and many impressive structures enable the metal nanomaterials to establish various interesting hybrid nanostructures with outstanding plasmonic properties. In addition, the hybrid nanostructures display unique optical characteristics that are derived from the close conjunction of plasmonic optical effects and the unique physicochemical properties of 2D materials. More importantly, the hybrid nanostructures show several plasmonic electrical effects including an improved photogeneration rate, efficient carrier transfer, and a plasmon-induced "hot carrier", playing a significant role in enhancing device performance. They have been widely studied for plasmon-enhanced optical signals, photocatalysis, photodetectors (PDs), and solar cells. In this review, the developments in the field of metal/2D hybrid nanostructures are comprehensively described. Preparation of hybrid nanostructures is first presented according to the 2D material type, as well as the metal nanomaterial morphology. The plasmonic properties and the enabled applications of the hybrid nanostructures are then described. Lastly, possible future research in this promising field is discussed.

  14. Surface plasmon polaritons in artificial metallic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, Jayson Lawrence

    Surface plasmon polaritons have been the focus of intense research due to their many unique properties such as high electromagnetic field localization, extreme sensitivity to surface conditions, and subwavelength confinement of electromagnetic waves. The area of potential impact is vast and includes promising advancements in photonic circuits, high speed photodetection, hyperspectral imaging, spectroscopy, enhanced solar cells, ultra-small scale lithography, and microscopy. My research has focused on utilizing these properties to design and demonstrate new phenomena and implement real-world applications using artificial metallic nanostructures. Artificial metallic nanostructures employed during my research begin as thin planar gold films which are then lithographically patterned according to previously determined dimensions. The result is a nanopatterned device which can excite surface plasmon polaritons on its surface under specific conditions. Through my research I characterized the optical properties of these devices for further insight into the interesting properties of surface plasmon polaritons. Exploration of these properties led to advancements in biosensing, development of artificial media to enhance and control light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, and hybrid plasmonic cavities. Demonstrations from these advancements include: label-free immunosensing of Plasmodium in a whole blood lysate, low part-per-trillion detection of microcystin-LR, enhanced refractive index sensitivity of novel resonant plasmonic devices, a defect-based plasmonic crystal, spontaneous emission modification of colloidal quantum dots, and coupling of plasmonic and optical Fabry-Perot resonant modes in a hybrid cavity.

  15. Nanostructures formed on carbon-based materials with different levels of crystallinity using oxygen plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Tae-Jun [Institute for Multidisciplinary Convergence of Matter, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Wonjin; Lee, Heon Ju [Institute for Multidisciplinary Convergence of Matter, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Kyu Hwan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Myoung-Woon, E-mail: mwmoon@kist.re.kr [Institute for Multidisciplinary Convergence of Matter, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-01

    Nanostructure formation was explored for various carbon-based materials, such as diamond, carbon fiber, polyethylene terephthalate and poly (methyl methacrylate), which have different levels of crystallinity, ranging from perfect crystal to polymeric amorphous. After treatment of oxygen plasma glow discharge, the nanostructures on these carbon-based materials were found to evolve via preferential etching due to the co-deposition of metal elements sputtered from the metal cathode plate. Local islands or clusters formed by the metal co-deposition have a low etching rate compared to pristine regions on each material, resulting in anisotropic patterns on the carbon-based materials. This pattern formation mechanism was confirmed by covering the cathode or preventing the co-deposition of metallic sources with a polymeric material. Regardless of the level of crystallinity of the carbon-based materials, no patterns were observed on the surfaces covered with the polymeric material, and the surfaces were uniformly etched. It was found that the materials with low crystallinity had a high etching rate due to low carbon atom density, which thus easily formed high-aspect-ratio nanostructures for the same plasma treatment duration. - Highlight: • Reactive ion etching & metal deposition were occurred in oxygen plasma treatment. • High-aspect-ratio nanostructures can be fabricated on carbon-based materials. • Materials with low crystallinity easily formed high-aspect-ratio nanostructure. • Amount of etching inhibitors affects the pattern formation and configuration.

  16. Gas sensors based on nanostructured materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Cadena, Giselle; Riu, Jordi; Rius, F Xavier

    2007-11-01

    Gas detection is important for controlling industrial and vehicle emissions, household security and environmental monitoring. In recent decades many devices have been developed for detecting CO(2), CO, SO(2), O(2), O(3), H(2), Ar, N(2), NH(3), H(2)O and several organic vapours. However, the low selectivity or the high operation temperatures required when most gas sensors are used have prompted the study of new materials and the new properties that come about from using traditional materials in a nanostructured mode. In this paper, we have reviewed the main research studies that have been made of gas sensors that use nanomaterials. The main quality characteristics of these new sensing devices have enabled us to make a critical review of the possible advantages and drawbacks of these nanostructured material-based sensors.

  17. Direct writing of metal nanostructures: lithographic tools for nanoplasmonics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, Graham J

    2011-03-22

    Continued progress in the fast-growing field of nanoplasmonics will require the development of new methods for the fabrication of metal nanostructures. Optical lithography provides a continually expanding tool box. Two-photon processes, as demonstrated by Shukla et al. (doi: 10.1021/nn103015g), enable the fabrication of gold nanostructures encapsulated in dielectric material in a simple, direct process and offer the prospect of three-dimensional fabrication. At higher resolution, scanning probe techniques enable nanoparticle particle placement by localized oxidation, and near-field sintering of nanoparticulate films enables direct writing of nanowires. Direct laser "printing" of single gold nanoparticles offers a remarkable capability for the controlled fabrication of model structures for fundamental studies, particle-by-particle. Optical methods continue to provide a powerful support for research into metamaterials.

  18. Quantum dot behavior in transition metal dichalcogenides nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gang; Zhang, Zhuo-Zhi; Li, Hai-Ou; Song, Xiang-Xiang; Deng, Guang-Wei; Cao, Gang; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2017-08-01

    Recently, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) semiconductors have been utilized for investigating quantum phenomena because of their unique band structures and novel electronic properties. In a quantum dot (QD), electrons are confined in all lateral dimensions, offering the possibility for detailed investigation and controlled manipulation of individual quantum systems. Beyond the definition of graphene QDs by opening an energy gap in nanoconstrictions, with the presence of a bandgap, gate-defined QDs can be achieved on TMDCs semiconductors. In this paper, we review the confinement and transport of QDs in TMDCs nanostructures. The fabrication techniques for demonstrating two-dimensional (2D) materials nanostructures such as field-effect transistors and QDs, mainly based on e-beam lithography and transfer assembly techniques are discussed. Subsequently, we focus on electron transport through TMDCs nanostructures and QDs. With steady improvement in nanoscale materials characterization and using graphene as a springboard, 2D materials offer a platform that allows creation of heterostructure QDs integrated with a variety of crystals, each of which has entirely unique physical properties.

  19. Giant magnetoresistive nanostructured materials by electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, No Sang

    NiFe/Cu and CoFe/Cu multilayers and NiFe compositional modulated alloys (CMA) electrodeposited by newly developed flow-through electrochemical reactor. Sub-micron (Ni)Cu and nano-size (CoFe)Cu granular alloys have been electrodeposited by magneto-electrodeposition method. These two methods eliminate the problems confronted by conventional methods and provide a new direction in fabrication of nanostructured materials by electrodeposition. Prior to fabrication of GMR materials, electrodeposition kinetics of individual metals (Co, NiFe, Cu) were studied. In Co electrodeposition and dissolution from sulfate bath, substrates have a great impact on the initial growth mode of film. On polycrystalline platinum metal, cobalt film grew in hemispherical shape (nodule) where it grew in right conical shape on amorphous glass carbon. In NiFe alloys electrodeposition, the effects of applied current density, solution composition, substrate and solution hydrodynamics on current efficiency, film composition, crystal structure, corrosion resistant, and magnetic properties of NiFe alloys from all-chloride and citrate-sulfate-chloride bath have been studied. Citrate ions enhance the anomalous codeposition phenomena in NiFe electrodeposition. In crystal structure studies on electrodeposited. NiFe, the narrow mixed phase solid region was noted around 50% Fe. In addition, the smallest grain size were also observed in that region. In corrosion studies, the maximum corrosion resistance was observed at 50% Fe in naturally aerated 0.5 M NaCl. In Ni/Cu and Co/Cu multilayers by single bath technique, the optimum deposition potential ranges of pure copper and nickel (cobalt) were determined to minimize copper codeposition during nickel (cobalt) deposition and to minimize cobalt dissolution during copper deposition. Well defined laminated NiFe/Cu and CoFe/Cu multilayers and NiFe compositional modulated alloys (CMA) were successfully electrodeposited by utilizing flow-through electrochemical

  20. A Comprehensive Review of Glucose Biosensors Based on Nanostructured Metal-Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Mahbubur Rahman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology has opened new and exhilarating opportunities for exploring glucose biosensing applications of the newly prepared nanostructured materials. Nanostructured metal-oxides have been extensively explored to develop biosensors with high sensitivity, fast response times, and stability for the determination of glucose by electrochemical oxidation. This article concentrates mainly on the development of different nanostructured metal-oxide [such as ZnO, Cu(I/(II oxides, MnO2, TiO2, CeO2, SiO2, ZrO2, and other metal-oxides] based glucose biosensors. Additionally, we devote our attention to the operating principles (i.e., potentiometric, amperometric, impedimetric and conductometric of these nanostructured metal-oxide based glucose sensors. Finally, this review concludes with a personal prospective and some challenges of these nanoscaled sensors.

  1. A comprehensive review of glucose biosensors based on nanostructured metal-oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Mahbubur; Ahammad, A J Saleh; Jin, Joon-Hyung; Ahn, Sang Jung; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology has opened new and exhilarating opportunities for exploring glucose biosensing applications of the newly prepared nanostructured materials. Nanostructured metal-oxides have been extensively explored to develop biosensors with high sensitivity, fast response times, and stability for the determination of glucose by electrochemical oxidation. This article concentrates mainly on the development of different nanostructured metal-oxide [such as ZnO, Cu(I)/(II) oxides, MnO(2), TiO(2), CeO(2), SiO(2), ZrO(2,) and other metal-oxides] based glucose biosensors. Additionally, we devote our attention to the operating principles (i.e., potentiometric, amperometric, impedimetric and conductometric) of these nanostructured metal-oxide based glucose sensors. Finally, this review concludes with a personal prospective and some challenges of these nanoscaled sensors.

  2. Hybridized Nano-Structure Composed of Metal and Polydiacetylene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. Oikawa; A. Masuhara; T. Onodera; H. Kasai; H. Nakanishi

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Polydiacetylene (PDA) is one of the promising candidates for organic third-order nonlinear optical (NLO) material, due to fast optical responsibility and easy processability in comparison with semiconductors etc. The magnitude of NLO property, however, is not still sufficient for the devices applications. Neeves, et al[1] theoretically predicted the enhancement of NLO property for core-shell type hybridized nanocrystal (NC) composed of PDA and metal. In the present study, we have prepared the two kinds of core-shell type hybridized nano-structure, and investigated their optical properties.

  3. Core-Shell and Segmented Polymer-Metal Composite Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahav, Michal; Weiss, Emily; Xu, Qiaobing; Whitesides, George M.

    2008-01-01

    Composite nanostructures (~200 nm wide and several μm long) of metal and polyaniline (PANI) in two new variations of core-shell (PANI-Au) and segmented (Au-PANI and Ni-Au-PANI) architectures were fabricated electrochemically within anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes. Control over the structure of these composites (including the length of the gold shells in the core-shell structures) was accomplished by adjusting the time and rate of electrodeposition, and the pH of the solution from which the materials were grown. Exposure of the core-shell structures to oxygen plasma removed the PANI and yielded aligned gold nanotubes. In the segmented structures, a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of thioaniline nucleated the growth of PANI on top of metal nanorods, and acted as an adhesion layer between the metal and PANI components. PMID:16968046

  4. Combination of lightweight elements and nanostructured materials for batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Cheng, Fangyi

    2009-06-16

    In a society that increasingly relies on mobile electronics, demand is rapidly growing for both primary and rechargeable batteries that power devices from cell phones to vehicles. Existing batteries utilize lightweight active materials that use electrochemical reactions of ions such as H(+), OH(-) and Li(+)/Mg(2+) to facilitate energy storage and conversion. Ideal batteries should be inexpensive, have high energy density, and be made from environmentally friendly materials; batteries based on bulk active materials do not meet these requirements. Because of slow electrode process kinetics and low-rate ionic diffusion/migration, most conventional batteries demonstrate huge gaps between their theoretical and practical performance. Therefore, efforts are underway to improve existing battery technologies and develop new electrode reactions for the next generation of electrochemical devices. Advances in electrochemistry, surface science, and materials chemistry are leading to the use of nanomaterials for efficient energy storage and conversion. Nanostructures offer advantages over comparable bulk materials in improving battery performance. This Account summarizes our progress in battery development using a combination of lightweight elements and nanostructured materials. We highlight the benefits of nanostructured active materials for primary zinc-manganese dioxide (Zn-Mn), lithium-manganese dioxide (Li-Mn), and metal (Mg, Al, Zn)-air batteries, as well as rechargeable lithium ion (Li-ion) and nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) batteries. Through selected examples, we illustrate the effect of structure, shape, and size on the electrochemical properties of electrode materials. Because of their numerous active sites and facile electronic/ionic transfer and diffusion, nanostructures can improve battery efficiency. In particular, we demonstrate the properties of nanostructured active materials including Mg, Al, Si, Zn, MnO(2), CuV(2)O(6), LiNi(0.8)Co(0.2)O(2), LiFePO(4), Fe(2)O(3

  5. The development of biopolymer-based nanostructured materials : plastics, gels, IPNs and nanofoams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soest, van J.J.G.

    2006-01-01

    The ability to design products with structural features on a nanometric scale is a major technology driver in materials research Nanostructured materials are defined as materials with structural features on a sub-micron scale determining specific properties They consist of materials such as metals,

  6. The development of biopolymer-based nanostructured materials : plastics, gels, IPNs and nanofoams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soest, van J.J.G.

    2006-01-01

    The ability to design products with structural features on a nanometric scale is a major technology driver in materials research Nanostructured materials are defined as materials with structural features on a sub-micron scale determining specific properties They consist of materials such as metals,

  7. Magnetic Nanostructures and Spintronic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pechan, Michael [Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States)

    2016-01-26

    Over the 28 years of this grant, the PI explored magnetodynamics and magnetostatics in wide-ranging topics such as spin-glasses, exchange springs, exchange bias, perpendicular anisotropy, multiferroics, metal organic frameworks, magnetic vortices, core/shell nanoparticles and laterally confined spin waves. There was even a foray into superconductivity following the Woodstock of Physics in 1987. The work was performed in the context of an undergraduate and Masters program utilizing electron magnetic resonance as a primary research tool, although developments were also made in magneto-optical Kerr effect, torque and vibrating sample magnetometry. The work was largely done in collaboration with scientists from other universities and industrial laboratories both within the US and internationally.

  8. Organic phase synthesis of noble metal-zinc chalcogenide core-shell nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prashant; Diab, Mahmud; Flomin, Kobi; Rukenstein, Pazit; Mokari, Taleb

    2016-10-15

    Multi-component nanostructures have been attracting tremendous attention due to their ability to form novel materials with unique chemical, optical and physical properties. Development of hybrid nanostructures that are composed of metal-semiconductor components using a simple approach is of interest. Herein, we report a robust and general organic phase synthesis of metal (Au or Ag)-Zinc chalcogenide (ZnS or ZnSe) core-shell nanostructures. This synthetic protocol also enabled the growth of more compositionally complex nanostructures of Au-ZnSxSe1-x alloys and Au-ZnS-ZnSe core-shell-shell. The optical and structural properties of these hybrid nanostructures are also presented.

  9. Nanostructures from hydrogen implantation of metals.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McWatters, Bruce Ray (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Causey, Rion A.; DePuit, Ryan J.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Ong, Markus D.

    2009-09-01

    This study investigates a pathway to nanoporous structures created by hydrogen implantation in aluminum. Previous experiments for fusion applications have indicated that hydrogen and helium ion implantations are capable of producing bicontinuous nanoporous structures in a variety of metals. This study focuses specifically on hydrogen and helium implantations of aluminum, including complementary experimental results and computational modeling of this system. Experimental results show the evolution of the surface morphology as the hydrogen ion fluence increases from 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} to 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}. Implantations of helium at a fluence of 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} produce porosity on the order of 10 nm. Computational modeling demonstrates the formation of alanes, their desorption, and the resulting etching of aluminum surfaces that likely drives the nanostructures that form in the presence of hydrogen.

  10. Leafy nanostructure PANI for material of supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XI Dong

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructure conducting polyaniline(PANI has great potential applications in supercapacitor electrode materials.In this paper,we report a template-free approach to synthesize PANI by a galvanostatic current procedure with a three-electrode configuration directly on indium-doped tin-oxide substrates (ITO.The morphology of product was characterized by Hitachi S-4800 field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM.Due to the nanostructure,the specific capacitance of PANI film with the thickness of 100nm were measured as high as 829 F/g and 667 F/g at a charge-discharge current density of 1 A/g and 10 A/g respectively.After 500 cycle charge-discharge test employed at the current density of 20 A/g the PANI film still had a 95.1% capacitance retention.

  11. Landau damping of surface plasmons in metal nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Shahbazyan, Tigran V

    2016-01-01

    We develop a quantum-mechanical theory for Landau damping of surface plasmons in metal nanostructures larger that the characteristic length for nonlocal effects. We show that the electron surface scattering, which facilitates plasmon decay in small nanostructures, can be incorporated into the metal dielectric function on par with phonon and impurity scattering. The derived surface scattering rate is determined by the plasmon local field polarization relative to the metal surface, and is highly sensitive to the system geometry. We illustrate our model by providing analytical results for surface scattering rate in some common shape nanostructures.

  12. Electrochemical Synthesis and Characterization of Nanostructured Chalcogenide Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Chong Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructured materials have attracted extensive attention due to their small dimension and enhanced properties compared to bulk materials, and their large range of potential applications in energy harvesting devices. Among these materials, nanostructured chalcogenides play an important role in thermoelectric and solar cell devices. Electrochemical techniques have drawn attention as an improved method for synthesizing nanostructured chalcogenide materials, since they provide a cost-effective...

  13. The origins of strengthening in nanostructured metals and alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris, D. G.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured metals and alloys have a variety of chemical and physical properties that are greatly modified by the nano-scale of their microstructure. At the same time, these materials generally show very high strength, although ductility or toughness may not be good. Strength increases as the microstructure scale reduces from the macro-micro level and even finer, but sometimes the strength appears to fall as the structure scale approaches the nano level. These strength variations are examined here, and the mechanisms responsible for both strengthening and weakening are discussed. The fall in ductility and toughness as materials become nanostructured is a complex topic that requires extensive analysis, but this will not be treated in the present overview.

    Los metales y aleaciones nanoestructuradas muestran una serie de propiedades químicas y físicas fuertemente modificadas cuando su microestructura entra en la escala nano. A la vez, estos materiales muestran generalmente alta resistencia pero mediocre ductilidad o tenacidad. La resistencia aumenta cuando baja la escala de la microestructura desde el nivel micro hacia el nivel nano, pero a veces la resistencia parece reducir por las microestructuras mas finas. Se examinan aquí todas estas variaciones y se discuten los mecanismos responsables del endurecimiento y ablandamiento. Los cambios de ductilidad o tenacidad cuando la microestructura entra en la escala nano necesitan un análisis detallado que no se trata en este articulo.

  14. Laser Nanostructurization of the Metal and Alloy Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanavin, Andrei; Kozlovskaya, Natalia; Krokhin, Oleg; Zavestovskaya, Irina

    2010-10-01

    The results from experimental and theoretical investigation of material pulsed laser treatment aimed at obtaining nano- and microstructured surface are presented. An experiment has been performed on the modification of indium surface using a solid-state diode-pumped laser. It has been shown that nano- and micro-size structures are formed under laser melting and fast crystallization of the metal surface. The kinetics of the crystallization of metals under superfast cooling. The distribution function for crystalline nuclei dimensions is analytically found within the framework of the classical kinetic equation in case of superfast temperature changing. The average number of particles in the crystalline nuclei and relative volume of the crystalline phase are determined as functions of thermodynamic and laser treatment regime parameters. Good agreement is observed with experimental results for ultrashort laser pulses induced micro- and nanostructures production.

  15. Thermal and Thermoelectric Properties of Nanostructured Materials and Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hao-Hsiang

    Many modern technologies are enabled by the use of thin films and/or nanostructured composite materials. For example, many thermoelectric devices, solar cells, power electronics, thermal barrier coatings, and hard disk drives contain nanostructured materials where the thermal conductivity of the material is a critical parameter for the device performance. At the nanoscale, the mean free path and wavelength of heat carriers may become comparable to or smaller than the size of a nanostructured material and/or device. For nanostructured materials made from semiconductors and insulators, the additional phonon scattering mechanisms associated with the high density of interfaces and boundaries introduces additional resistances that can significantly change the thermal conductivity of the material as compared to a macroscale counterpart. Thus, better understanding and control of nanoscale heat conduction in solids is important scientifically and for the engineering applications mentioned above. In this dissertation, I discuss my work in two areas dealing with nanoscale thermal transport: (1) I describe my development and advancement of important thermal characterization tools for measurements of thermal and thermoelectric properties of a variety of materials from thin films to nanostructured bulk systems, and (2) I discuss my measurements on several materials systems done with these characterization tools. First, I describe the development, assembly, and modification of a time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) system that we use to measure the thermal conductivity and the interface thermal conductance of a variety of samples including nanocrystalline alloys of Ni-Fe and Co-P, bulk metallic glasses, and other thin films. Next, a unique thermoelectric measurement system was designed and assembled for measurements of electrical resistivity and thermopower of thermoelectric materials in the temperature range of 20 to 350 °C. Finally, a commercial Anter Flashline 3000 thermal

  16. Multifunctional, Nanostructured Metal Rubber Protective Films for Space Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NanoSonic has developed revolutionary nanostructured, yet macroscale, multifunctional Metal RubberTM films. In support of NASA's Vision for Space Exploration, low...

  17. Direct photocatalysis of supported metal nanostructures for organic synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiayan; Jaatinen, Esa; Sarina, Sarina; Zhu, Huai Yong

    2017-07-01

    Many organic synthesis systems use thermal catalysis to achieve higher product efficiency, and it is of interest to drive reactions by light irradiation at moderate reaction conditions. Other than semiconductors, recent reports have shown that metal nanostructures can be used as direct photocatalysts to drive chemical reactions. In this review, we summarize recent progress in direct photocatalysis in organic synthesis using plasmonic and non-plasmonic metal nanostructures. It starts with a comprehensive introduction to surface plasmons and the role of interband transitions in non-plasmonic metal nanostructures. The application of metal nanostructures in organic synthesis is systematically reviewed, followed by the reaction mechanisms; the role of light-excited energetic electrons, enhanced electromagnetic fields and the photothermal effect are detailed. The influence of light intensity and wavelength is discussed, as well as the critical parameters of photocatalyst design. Finally, the outlook and future opportunities of this new exciting field will be discussed.

  18. Optical transmission theory for metal-insulator-metal periodic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard-Dionne, Andre-Pierre; Meunier, Michel

    2017-01-01

    A semi-analytical formalism for the optical properties of a metal-insulator-metal periodic nanostructure using coupled-mode theory is presented. This structure consists in a dielectric layer in between two metallic layers with periodic one-dimensional nanoslit corrugation. The model is developed using multiple-scattering formalism, which defines transmission and reflection coefficients for each of the interface as a semi-infinite medium. Total transmission is then calculated using a summation of the multiple paths of light inside the structure. This method allows finding an exact solution for the transmission problem in every dimension regime, as long as a sufficient number of diffraction orders and guided modes are considered for the structure. The resonant modes of the structure are found to be related to the metallic slab only and to a combination of both the metallic slab and dielectric layer. This model also allows describing the resonant behavior of the system in the limit of a small dielectric layer, for which discontinuities in the dispersion curves are found. These discontinuities result from the out-of-phase interference of the different diffraction orders of the system, which account for field interaction for both inner interfaces of the structure.

  19. Mechanical Spectroscopy of Nanostructured Composite Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mari, Daniele; Schaller, Robert; Mazaheri, Mehdi, E-mail: daniele.mari@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Complexe, Groupe de Spectroscopie Mecanique, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-07-06

    The thermo-mechanical behavior of different nano-structured composite materials, which were processed within the SAPHIR European Integrated Project, has been characterized by mechanical spectroscopy. The obtained results show clearly that creep resistance of fine grain ceramics such as zirconia can be improved by carbon nano-tube (CNT) reinforcements. On the other hand the elastic modulus and the damping capacity of aluminum matrix composites were increased by SiC nano-particle additions. It has also been observed that CNT additions are responsible for a better thermal stability of polymer such as ABS (Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene) used in automotive industry.

  20. Single-Molecule Investigations of Morphology and Mass Transport Dynamics in Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Daniel A.; Park, Seok Chan; Tran-Ba, Khanh-Hoa; Ito, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    Nanostructured materials such as mesoporous metal oxides and phase-separated block copolymers form the basis for new monolith, membrane, and thin film technologies having applications in energy storage, chemical catalysis, and separations. Mass transport plays an integral role in governing the application-specific performance characteristics of many such materials. The majority of methods employed in their characterization provide only ensemble data, often masking the nanoscale, molecular-level details of materials morphology and mass transport. Single-molecule fluorescence methods offer direct routes to probing these characteristics on a single-molecule/single-nanostructure basis. This article provides a review of single-molecule studies focused on measurements of anisotropic diffusion, adsorption, partitioning, and confinement in nanostructured materials. Experimental methods covered include confocal and wide-field fluorescence microscopy. The results obtained promise to deepen our understanding of mass transport mechanisms in nanostructures, thus aiding in the realization of advanced materials systems.

  1. Metal/Semiconductor hybrid nanostructures for plasmon-enhanced applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ruibin; Li, Benxia; Fang, Caihong; Wang, Jianfang

    2014-08-20

    Hybrid nanostructures composed of semiconductor and plasmonic metal components are receiving extensive attention. They display extraordinary optical characteristics that are derived from the simultaneous existence and close conjunction of localized surface plasmon resonance and semiconduction, as well as the synergistic interactions between the two components. They have been widely studied for photocatalysis, plasmon-enhanced spectroscopy, biotechnology, and solar cells. In this review, the developments in the field of (plasmonic metal)/semiconductor hybrid nanostructures are comprehensively described. The preparation of the hybrid nanostructures is first presented according to the semiconductor type, as well as the nanostructure morphology. The plasmonic properties and the enabled applications of the hybrid nanostructures are then elucidated. Lastly, possible future research in this burgeoning field is discussed.

  2. Metallic nanostructures in a polymer matrix and substrate fabrication and structural characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhowmik, Siddhartha; Holm, Arliena; Ostroverkhova, Oksana; Atre, Sundar [Oregon State University, Oregon Nanoscience and Microtechnologies Institute, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Metal nanostructures are of considerable interest in the field of plasmonics and metamaterials and could have a wider impact if they are successfully embedded in a stable, inert and flexible polymer matrix. Fabrication of such structures is challenging for a variety of reasons including thermal stability, material compatibility with processing steps and general handling of material. In this work we have demonstrated the fabrication of metal nanostructures and embedded them in a polymer. Furthermore, these structures were fabricated on a flexible polymer membrane and detached from a carrier substrate. Characterization of these structures was performed with SEM, TEM and EDS. (orig.)

  3. Metallic glass nanostructures of tunable shape and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanhui; Liu, Jingbei; Sohn, Sungwoo; Li, Yanglin; Cha, Judy J; Schroers, Jan

    2015-04-22

    Metals of hybrid nano-/microstructures are of broad technological and fundamental interests. Manipulation of shape and composition on the nanoscale, however, is challenging, especially for multicomponent alloys such as metallic glasses. Although top-down approaches have demonstrated nanomoulding, they are limited to very few alloy systems. Here we report a facile method to synthesize metallic glass nanoarchitectures that can be applied to a broad range of glass-forming alloys. This strategy, using multitarget carousel oblique angle deposition, offers the opportunity to achieve control over size, shape and composition of complex alloys at the nanoscale. As a consequence, nanostructures of programmable three-dimensional shapes and tunable compositions are realized on wafer scale for metallic glasses including the marginal glass formers. Realizing nanostructures in a wide compositional range allows chemistry optimization for technological usage of metallic glass nanostructures, and also enables the fundamental study on size, composition and fabrication dependences of metallic glass properties.

  4. Electrochemical synthesis of nanostructured materials for electrochemical energy conversion and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gao-Ren; Xu, Han; Lu, Xue-Feng; Feng, Jin-Xian; Tong, Ye-Xiang; Su, Cheng-Yong

    2013-05-21

    Electrochemical synthesis represents a highly efficient method for the fabrication of nanostructured energy materials, and various nanostructures, such as nanorods, nanowires, nanotubes, nanosheets, dendritic nanostructures, and composite nanostructures, can be easily fabricated with advantages of low cost, low synthetic temperature, high purity, simplicity, and environmental friendliness. The electrochemical synthesis, characterization, and application of electrochemical energy nanomaterials have advanced greatly in the past few decades, allowing an increasing understanding of nanostructure-property-performance relationships. Herein, we highlight some recent progress in the electrochemical synthesis of electrochemical energy materials with the assistance of additives and templates in solution or grafted onto metal or conductive polymer supports, with special attention to the effects on surface morphologies, structures and, more importantly, electrochemical performance. The methodology for preparing novel electrochemical energy nanomaterials and their potential applications has been summarized. Finally, we outline our personal perspectives on the electrochemical synthesis and applications of electrochemical energy nanomaterials.

  5. Geometrically induced surface polaritons in planar nanostructured metallic cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, P. S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Intravia, F [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dalvit, Diego A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-14

    We examine the modal structure and dispersion of periodically nanostructured planar metallic cavities within the scattering matrix formulation. By nanostructuring a metallic grating in a planar cavity, artificial surface excitations or spoof plasmon modes are induced with dispersion determined by the periodicity and geometric characteristics of the grating. These spoof surface plasmon modes are shown to give rise to new cavity polaritonic modes at short mirror separations that modify the density of modes in nanostructured cavities. The increased modal density of states form cavity polarirons have a large impact on the fluctuation induced electromagnetic forces and enhanced hear transfer at short separations.

  6. Complex-Morphology Metal-Based Nanostructures: Fabrication, Characterization, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Gentile

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to their peculiar qualities, metal-based nanostructures have been extensively used in applications such as catalysis, electronics, photography, and information storage, among others. New applications for metals in areas such as photonics, sensing, imaging, and medicine are also being developed. Significantly, most of these applications require the use of metals in the form of nanostructures with specific controlled properties. The properties of nanoscale metals are determined by a set of physical parameters that include size, shape, composition, and structure. In recent years, many research fields have focused on the synthesis of nanoscale-sized metallic materials with complex shape and composition in order to optimize the optical and electrical response of devices containing metallic nanostructures. The present paper aims to overview the most recent results—in terms of fabrication methodologies, characterization of the physico-chemical properties and applications—of complex-morphology metal-based nanostructures. The paper strongly focuses on the correlation between the complex morphology and the structures’ properties, showing how the morphological complexity (and its nanoscale control can often give access to a wide range of innovative properties exploitable for innovative functional device production. We begin with an overview of the basic concepts on the correlation between structural and optical parameters of nanoscale metallic materials with complex shape and composition, and the possible solutions offered by nanotechnology in a large range of applications (catalysis, electronics, photonics, sensing. The aim is to assess the state of the art, and then show the innovative contributions that can be proposed in this research field. We subsequently report on innovative, versatile and low-cost synthesis techniques, suitable for providing a good control on the size, surface density, composition and geometry of the metallic

  7. Localized surface plasmon resonance induced structure-property relationships of metal nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilayurganapathy, Subramanian

    The confluence of nanotechnology and plasmonics has led to new and interesting phenomena. The industrial need for fast, efficient and miniature devices which constantly push the boundaries on device performance tap into the happy marriage between these diverse fields. Designing devices for real life application that give superior performance when compared with existing ones are enabled by a better understanding of their structure-property relationships. Among all the design constraints, without doubt, the shape and size of the nanostructure along with the dielectric medium surrounding it has the maximum influence on the response and thereby the performance of the device. Hence a careful study of the above mentioned parameters is of utmost importance in designing efficient devices. In this dissertation, we synthesize and study the optical properties of nanostructures of different shapes and size. In particular, we estimated the plasmonic near field enhancement via surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and 2-photon Photoemission electron microscopy (2P-PEEM). We synthesized the nanostructures using four different techniques. One synthesis technique, the thermal growth method was employed to grow interesting Ag and Au nanostructures on Si. The absence of toxic chemicals during nanostructure synthesis via the thermal growth technique opens up myriad possibilities for applications in the fields of biomedical science, bioengineering, drug delivery among others along with the huge advantage of being environment friendly. The other three synthesis techniques (ion implantation, Electrodeposition and FIB lithography) were chosen with the specific goal of designing novel plasmonic metal, metal hybrid nanostructures as photocathode materials in next generation light sources. The synthesis techniques for these novel nanostructures were dictated by the requirement of high quantum efficiency, robustness under constant irradiation and coherent unidirectional electron emission

  8. Nanostructure of Metallic Particles in Light Water Reactor Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Edgar C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mausolf, Edward J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mcnamara, Bruce K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Soderquist, Chuck Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schwantes, Jon M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-11

    The extraordinary nano-structure of metallic particles in light water reactor fuels points to possible high reactivity through increased surface area and a high concentration of high energy defect sites. We have analyzed the metallic epsilon particles from a high burn-up fuel from a boiling water reactor using transmission electron microscopy and have observed a much finer nanostructure in these particles than has been reported previously. The individual round particles that varying in size between ~20 and ~50 nm appear to consist of individual crystallites on the order of 2-3 nm in diameter. It is likely that in-reactor irradiation induce displacement cascades results in the formation of the nano-structure. The composition of these metallic phases is variable yet the structure of the material is consistent with the hexagonal close packed structure of epsilon-ruthenium. These findings suggest that unusual catalytic behavior of these materials might be expected, particularly under accident conditions.

  9. Suppression of infrared absorption in nanostructured metals by controlling Faraday inductance and electron path length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang Eon

    2016-02-08

    Nanostructured metals have been intensively studied for optical applications over the past few decades. However, the intrinsic loss of metals has limited the optical performance of the metal nanostructures in diverse applications. In particular, light concentration in metals by surface plasmons or other resonances causes substantial absorption in metals. Here, we avoid plasmonic excitations for low loss and investigate methods to further suppress loss in nanostructured metals. We demonstrate that parasitic absorption in metal nanostructures can be significantly reduced over a broad band by increasing the Faraday inductance and the electron path length. For an example structure, the loss is reduced in comparison to flat films by more than an order of magnitude over most of the very broad spectrum between short and long wavelength infrared. For a photodetector structure, the fraction of absorption in the photoactive material increases by two orders of magnitude and the photoresponsivity increases by 15 times because of the selective suppression of metal absorption. These findings could benefit many metal-based applications that require low loss such as photovoltaics, photoconductive detectors, solar selective surfaces, infrared-transparent defrosting windows, and other metamaterials.

  10. Hollow metal nanostructures for enhanced plasmonics: synthesis, local plasmonic properties and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genç, Aziz; Patarroyo, Javier; Sancho-Parramon, Jordi; Bastús, Neus G.; Puntes, Victor; Arbiol, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    Metallic nanostructures have received great attention due to their ability to generate surface plasmon resonances, which are collective oscillations of conduction electrons of a material excited by an electromagnetic wave. Plasmonic metal nanostructures are able to localize and manipulate the light at the nanoscale and, therefore, are attractive building blocks for various emerging applications. In particular, hollow nanostructures are promising plasmonic materials as cavities are known to have better plasmonic properties than their solid counterparts thanks to the plasmon hybridization mechanism. The hybridization of the plasmons results in the enhancement of the plasmon fields along with more homogeneous distribution as well as the reduction of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) quenching due to absorption. In this review, we summarize the efforts on the synthesis of hollow metal nanostructures with an emphasis on the galvanic replacement reaction. In the second part of this review, we discuss the advancements on the characterization of plasmonic properties of hollow nanostructures, covering the single nanoparticle experiments, nanoscale characterization via electron energy-loss spectroscopy and modeling and simulation studies. Examples of the applications, i.e. sensing, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, photothermal ablation therapy of cancer, drug delivery or catalysis among others, where hollow nanostructures perform better than their solid counterparts, are also evaluated.

  11. Hollow metal nanostructures for enhanced plasmonics: synthesis, local plasmonic properties and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genç Aziz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Metallic nanostructures have received great attention due to their ability to generate surface plasmon resonances, which are collective oscillations of conduction electrons of a material excited by an electromagnetic wave. Plasmonic metal nanostructures are able to localize and manipulate the light at the nanoscale and, therefore, are attractive building blocks for various emerging applications. In particular, hollow nanostructures are promising plasmonic materials as cavities are known to have better plasmonic properties than their solid counterparts thanks to the plasmon hybridization mechanism. The hybridization of the plasmons results in the enhancement of the plasmon fields along with more homogeneous distribution as well as the reduction of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR quenching due to absorption. In this review, we summarize the efforts on the synthesis of hollow metal nanostructures with an emphasis on the galvanic replacement reaction. In the second part of this review, we discuss the advancements on the characterization of plasmonic properties of hollow nanostructures, covering the single nanoparticle experiments, nanoscale characterization via electron energy-loss spectroscopy and modeling and simulation studies. Examples of the applications, i.e. sensing, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, photothermal ablation therapy of cancer, drug delivery or catalysis among others, where hollow nanostructures perform better than their solid counterparts, are also evaluated.

  12. Nanostructured Metal Oxides and Sulfides for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue; Huang, Jia-Qi; Zhang, Qiang; Mai, Liqiang

    2017-02-03

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries with high energy density and long cycle life are considered to be one of the most promising next-generation energy-storage systems beyond routine lithium-ion batteries. Various approaches have been proposed to break down technical barriers in Li-S battery systems. The use of nanostructured metal oxides and sulfides for high sulfur utilization and long life span of Li-S batteries is reviewed here. The relationships between the intrinsic properties of metal oxide/sulfide hosts and electrochemical performances of Li-S batteries are discussed. Nanostructured metal oxides/sulfides hosts used in solid sulfur cathodes, separators/interlayers, lithium-metal-anode protection, and lithium polysulfides batteries are discussed respectively. Prospects for the future developments of Li-S batteries with nanostructured metal oxides/sulfides are also discussed.

  13. Electrical Breakdown Characteristic of Nanostructured W-Cu Contacts Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Junbo; CHEN Wen'ge; DING Bingjun

    2006-01-01

    Nanostructured (NS) W- Cu composite powder was prepared by mechanical alloying ( MA ), and nanostructured bulk of W- Cu contact material was fabricated by hot press sintering in an electrical vacuum furnace. The microstructure, electric conductivity, hardness and break down voltage of NS W-Cu alloys were measured and compared to those of conventional W- Cu alloys prepared by powder metallurgy. The experimental results show that microstructural refinement and uniformity can improve the breakdown behavior and the electric arc stability of nanostructured W- Cu contacts materials. Also, the nanostructured W- Cu contact material shows the characteristic of spreading electric arcs, which is of benefit to electric arc erosion.

  14. Nanostructure materials for biosensing and bioimaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Wing Cheung

    not fully understand, three possible factors are concluded after systematic researches: (i) an increase of the absolute mass in each binding event, (ii) an increase in the bulk refractive index of the analyte, and (iii) coupling between the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of metallic nanoparticles and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the sensing film. Indeed, the role of plasmonic coupling in sensitivity enhancement is still an open question. In order to obtain a better understanding of this phenomenon, at the end of part I, extended studies were performed to investigate how the LSPR properties of metallic nanoparticle labels correlate with the enhancement factor. For this purpose, gold nanorods (Au-NRs) were chosen as the amplification labels because of the easy tunability of LSPR peak of Au-NR. After reading the "Result and Discussion" section, the readers will have better understanding of "plasmonic coupling" between the sensing film and the metallic labels with suitable operating laser source. In the second part of the thesis, the bioimaging part, the application of nanostructure materials in live cancer cell imaging and small animal imaging were demonstrated. There are different types of imaging technique available in laboratories and clinics: optical imaging, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), thermography and ultrasound imaging. Although such imaging techniques have been well developed and used over a decade, improving the sensitivity, enhancing the contrast, decreasing the acquisition time and reducing the toxicity of the contrast agent are highly desirable. For optical imaging, the scientists discovered that the use of near infrared fluorescence materials can assist the surgeon to locate the tumor, the nerve and the lymph node more accurately. For CT scan, the use of Au-NR as the contrast agent can improve the sensitivity. Iron oxide nanoparticle or gadolinium ion containing

  15. Final Technical Progress Report NANOSTRUCTURED MAGNETIC MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles M. Falco

    2012-09-13

    This report describes progress made during the final phase of our DOE-funded program on Nanostructured Magnetic Materials. This period was quite productive, resulting in the submission of three papers and presentation of three talks at international conferences and three seminars at research institutions. Our DOE-funded research efforts were directed toward studies of magnetism at surfaces and interfaces in high-quality, well-characterized materials prepared by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) and sputtering. We have an exceptionally well-equipped laboratory for these studies, with: Thin film preparation equipment; Characterization equipment; Equipment to study magnetic properties of surfaces and ultra-thin magnetic films and interfaces in multi-layers and superlattices.

  16. Silk fibroin nanostructured materials for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitropoulos, Alexander N.

    Nanostructured biopolymers have proven to be promising to develop novel biomedical applications where forming structures at the nanoscale normally occurs by self-assembly. However, synthesizing these structures can also occur by inducing materials to transition into other forms by adding chemical cross-linkers, changing pH, or changing ionic composition. Understanding the generation of nanostructures in fluid environments, such as liquid organic solvents or supercritical fluids, has not been thoroughly examined, particularly those that are based on protein-based block-copolymers. Here, we examine the transformation of reconstituted silk fibroin, which has emerged as a promising biopolymer due to its biocompatibility, biodegradability, and ease of functionalization, into submicron spheres and gel networks which offer applications in tissue engineering and advanced sensors. Two types of gel networks, hydrogels and aerogels, have small pores and large surface areas that are defined by their structure. We design and analyze silk nanoparticle formation using a microfluidic device while offering an application for drug delivery. Additionally, we provide a model and characterize hydrogel formation from micelles to nanoparticles, while investigating cellular response to the hydrogel in an in vitro cell culture model. Lastly, we provide a second model of nanofiber formation during near-critical and supercritical drying and characterize the silk fibroin properties at different drying pressures which, when acting as a stabilizing matrix, shows to improve the activity of entrapped enzymes dried at different pressures. This work has created new nanostructured silk fibroin forms to benefit biomedical applications that could be applied to other fibrous proteins.

  17. Sub-Nanostructured Non Transition Metal Complex Grids for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Orhan Talu; Dr. Surendra N. Tewari

    2007-10-27

    This project involved growing sub-nanostructured metal grids to increase dynamic hydrogen storage capacity of metal hydride systems. The nano particles of any material have unique properties unlike its bulk form. Nano-structuring metal hydride materials can result in: {sm_bullet}Increased hydrogen molecule dissociation rate, {sm_bullet} Increased hydrogen atom transport rate, {sm_bullet} Decreased decrepitation caused by cycling, {sm_bullet} Increased energy transfer in the metal matrix, {sm_bullet} Possible additional contribution by physical adsorption, and {sm_bullet} Possible additional contribution by quantum effects The project succeeded in making nano-structured palladium using electrochemical growth in templates including zeolites, mesoporous silica, polycarbonate films and anodized alumina. Other metals were used to fine-tune the synthesis procedures. Palladium was chosen to demonstrate the effects of nano-structuring since its bulk hydrogen storage capacity and kinetics are well known. Reduced project funding was not sufficient for complete characterization of these materials for hydrogen storage application. The project team intends to seek further funding in the future to complete the characterization of these materials for hydrogen storage.

  18. Gold nanostructure materials in diabetes management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Satyabrata; Pal, Arttatrana; Mohanta, Jagdeep; Sagar Satapathy, Smith

    2017-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia, and is now one of the most non-communicable diseases globally and can be lethal if not properly controlled. Prolonged exposure to chronic hyperglycemia, without proper management, can lead to various vascular complications and represents the main cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetes patients. Studies have indicated that major long-term complications of diabetes arise from persistent oxidative-nitrosative stress and dysregulation in multiple metabolic pathways. Presently, the main focus for diabetes management is to optimize the available techniques to ensure adequate blood sugar level, blood pressure and lipid profile, thereby minimizing the diabetes complications. In this regard, nanomedicine utilizing gold nanostructures has great potential and seems to be a promising option. The present review highlights the basic concepts and up-to-date literature survey of gold nanostructure materials in management of diabetes in several ways, which include sensing, imaging, drug delivery and therapy. The work can be of interest to various researchers working on basic and applied sciences including nanosciences.

  19. Nanostructured photovoltaic materials using block polymer assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastroianni, Sarah Elizabeth

    Despite its potential as an abundant, sustainable alternative to non-renewable energy sources, solar energy currently is underutilized. Photovoltaics, which convert energy from sunlight into electricity, commonly are made from inorganic semiconductor materials that require expensive manufacturing and processing techniques. Alternatively, organic materials can be used to produce flexible and lightweight organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices, which can be prepared using solution-based processing techniques. However, OPV devices are limited by low efficiencies and short lifetimes compared to their inorganic counterparts. In OPV systems, charge carriers are generated in the active layer via the separation of excitons (electron-hole pairs) at interfaces between donor and acceptor materials. Because excitons have a limited diffusion length (˜10 nm), they may recombine before reaching a donor-acceptor interface if domain sizes are large. This exciton recombination can limit device efficiency; thus, the design parameters for improved active layer morphologies include large interfacial areas, small size scales, and continuous conducting pathways. Currently, most OPV devices are prepared by blending donor and acceptor materials in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) devices, often resulting in non-ideal, process-dependent morphologies. Alternatively, the self-assembly of block polymers (BP)s offers a reproducible means to generate nanostructured active layers. The work presented in this dissertation examines the synthetic approaches to preparing BPs containing different electroactive materials: non-conjugated, amorphous poly(vinyl-m-triphenylamine) [PVmTPA] and conjugated poly(3-alkythiophene) [P3AT] p-type materials as well as fullerene-based n-type materials. The synthesis and self-assembly of a model poly(methyl methacrylate)- b-PVmTPA system is presented. This work was extended to synthesize PVmTPA BPs with complementary poly(methyl methacrylate- co-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) [P

  20. Nanostructured Materials for Li-Ion Batteries and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xifei Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This Special Issue “Nanostructured Materials for Li-Ion Batteries and Beyond” of Nanomaterials is focused on advancements in the synthesis, optimization, and characterization of nanostructured materials, with an emphasis on the application of nanomaterials for building high performance Li-ion batteries (LIBs and future systems.[...

  1. Energy Conversion Application of Chemicurrents Induced in Metal-Semiconductor Nanostructured Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasari, Suhas Kiran

    Hydrogen is one the most attractive and suitable energy systems for generation of power in the future with high efficiencies and renewable properties. Nanoscale materials, because of their surface and physical properties are the promising candidates for the development of high performance energy conversion devices, essential components to ensure the efficient operation of the infrastructure and to facilitate the wide spread implementation of hydrogen technologies. This work realizes the use of solid state energy conversion concept to develop metal-semiconductor, metal-oxide architecture devices for electrolyte free conversion of chemical energy to electrical energy by hydrogen oxidation process. This investigation addresses the synthesis of these nanostructure devices by selection of suitable system material combinations, electrical and surface morphological characterization leading to the successful implementation in generation of chemicurrents. Also, the hydrogen oxidation process on each nanostructure device is elucidated with the help of corresponding mechanisms and the performance of each system developed was evaluated based on the resulting output efficiency. The two systems (metal-semiconductor and metal-oxide) realized, showed excellent chemical to electrical energy conversion abilities. Compared to metal-semiconductor nanostructure devices, metal-oxide systems exhibited better energy conversion abilities for indefinitely long duration of time at room temperature. The electron yield observed in considered metal-oxide systems can be sufficient for their use in practical applications. A continued realization of these metal-oxide systems with different material combinations would lead to more ecologically friendly and sustainable energy economics.

  2. The emerging multiple metal nanostructures for enhancing the light trapping of thin film organic photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Wallace C H

    2014-10-18

    Recently, various metal nanostructures have been introduced into organic solar cells (OSCs) for performance enhancement. Here, we review the recent progress in OSCs incorporated with multiple metal nanostructures including various metal nanopatterns and metal nanomaterials. Multiple physical effects arise from these incorporated nanostructures, which require careful distinction. Changes induced by the metal nanostructures are examined in detail from the optical and electrical aspects. With the comprehensive understanding of the physical mechanisms for various metal nanostructures, further improvement in device performance and emerging applications can be expected for the new class of nanostructure-incorporated OSCs.

  3. Nanostructured transition metal oxides useful for water oxidation catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Heinz M; Jiao, Feng

    2013-12-24

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising a nanostructured transition metal oxide capable of oxidizing two H.sub.2O molecules to obtain four protons. In some embodiments of the invention, the composition further comprises a porous matrix wherein the nanocluster of the transition metal oxide is embedded on and/or in the porous matrix.

  4. Magnetoresistive properties of nanostructured magnetic metals, manganites, and magnetic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solin, N. I.; Romashev, L. N.; Naumov, S. V.; Saranin, A. A.; Zotov, A. V.; Olyanich, D. A.; Kotlyar, V. G.; Utas, O. A.

    2016-02-01

    We consider methods for controlling magnetoresistive parameters of magnetic metal superlattices, manganites, and magnetic semiconductors. By reducing the thickness of ferromagnetic layers in superlattices (e.g., Fe layers in Fe/Cr superlattices), it is possible to form superparamagnetic clustered-layered nanostructures with a magnetoresistance weakly depending on the direction of the external magnetic field, which is very important for applications of such type of materials. Producing Mn vacancies and additionally annealing lanthanum manganites in the oxygen atmosphere, it is possible to increase their magnetoresistance by more than four orders of magnitude. By changing the thickness of p- n junction in the structure of ferromagnetic semiconductors, their magnetoresistance can be increased by 2-3 orders of magnitude.

  5. Nanostructural self-organization and dynamic adaptation of metal-polymer tribosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashkov, Yu. K.

    2017-02-01

    The results of investigating the effect of nanosize modifiers of a polymer matrix on the nanostructural self-organization of polymer composites and dynamic adaptation of metal-polymer tribosystems, which considerably affect the wear resistance of polymer composite materials, have been analyzed. It has been shown that the physicochemical nanostructural self-organization processes are developed in metal-polymer tribosystems with the formation of thermotropic liquid-crystal structures of the polymer matrix, followed by the transition of the system to the stationary state with a negative feedback that ensures dynamic adaptation of the tribosystem to given operating conditions.

  6. Modeling plasticity of materials with nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudinova, N. R.

    2017-02-01

    A new approach to modeling of the plasticity of materials with the particle size in the range from 3 to 20 nm (nanostructure) has been proposed. It is based on classical thermodynamic approach employing the surface tension of nanoparticles. Its main advantage is the minimum number of physical parameters in use. In the context of the proposed model, we calculated the dependence of the melting temperature on the nanoparticle size which is consistent with experimental data. The volume density of the surface energy of nanoparticles was also determined. This energy is assumed to be a significant part of the internal energy during deformation Yield point was interpreted as the result of changes of grains surface energy during the deformation. The obtained yield point dependence on the grain size was related to the Hall–Petch law, and this resulted in confirmation of the hypothesis on the crucial role of surface tension forces in the initial stage of plastic deformation of nanomaterials.

  7. Computational Materials: Modeling and Simulation of Nanostructured Materials and Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.

    2003-01-01

    The paper provides details on the structure and implementation of the Computational Materials program at the NASA Langley Research Center. Examples are given that illustrate the suggested approaches to predicting the behavior and influencing the design of nanostructured materials such as high-performance polymers, composites, and nanotube-reinforced polymers. Primary simulation and measurement methods applicable to multi-scale modeling are outlined. Key challenges including verification and validation of models are highlighted and discussed within the context of NASA's broad mission objectives.

  8. Simulation of mechanical properties and residual stress of nanostructural coatings based on transition metals nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilyuk, Alexander L.; Shaposhnikov, Victor L.; Filonov, Andrew B.; Anischik, Victor M.; Uglov, Vladimir V.; Kuleshov, Andrew K.; Danilyuk, Maxim A.

    2008-07-01

    Physical properties of novel nanostructural coatings, formed by ion-plasmous flux from solid solutions of transition and refractory metals (Ti, Zr, Cr) have been intensively studied to enhance characteristics of tool materials. We have developed the modeling technique for effective predictions of internal stresses and calculation of elastic properties of nanostructural coatings composed of metal nitrides. Quantum-mechanical modeling of microstructure, elastic constants, bulk modulus and residual stress for binary and ternary metal nitride clusters have been performed. The dependences of these characteristics on the crystal structure deformations have been investigated. The essential modification of elastic constants and bulk moduli with changes in lattice constants and stoichiometric composition has been observed. The influence of elastically stressed state of sample on X-ray diffraction intensity has been examined by using the exponential model. The model of residual stress distribution identifying in depth of wear-resistant nanostructural coating from the data of diffraction experiments has been developed.

  9. Fast Surface Dynamics of Metallic Glass Enable Superlatticelike Nanostructure Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L.; Cao, C. R.; Shi, J. A.; Lu, Z.; Sun, Y. T.; Luo, P.; Gu, L.; Bai, H. Y.; Pan, M. X.; Wang, W. H.

    2017-01-01

    Contrary to the formation of complicated polycrystals induced by general crystallization, a modulated superlatticelike nanostructure, which grows layer by layer from the surface to the interior of a Pd40Ni10Cu30P20 metallic glass, is observed via isothermal annealing below the glass transition temperature. The generation of the modulated nanostructure can be solely controlled by the annealing temperature, and it can be understood based on the fast dynamic and liquidlike behavior of the glass surface. The observations have implications for understanding the glassy surface dynamics and pave a way for the controllable fabrication of a unique and sophisticated nanostructure on a glass surface to realize the properties' modification.

  10. Debye screening length effects of nanostructured materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ghatak, Kamakhya Prasad

    2014-01-01

    This monograph solely investigates the Debye Screening Length (DSL) in semiconductors and their nano-structures. The materials considered are quantized structures of non-linear optical, III-V, II-VI, Ge, Te, Platinum Antimonide, stressed materials, Bismuth, GaP, Gallium Antimonide, II-V and Bismuth Telluride respectively. The DSL in opto-electronic materials and their quantum confined counterparts is studied in the presence of strong light waves and intense electric fields on the basis of newly formulated electron dispersion laws that control the studies of such quantum effect devices. The suggestions for the experimental determination of 2D and 3D DSL and the importance of measurement of band gap in optoelectronic materials under intense built-in electric field in nano devices and strong external photo excitation (for measuring photon induced physical properties) have also been discussed in this context. The influence of crossed electric and quantizing magnetic fields on the DSL and the DSL in heavily doped ...

  11. Advanced Micro/Nanostructures for Lithium Metal Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Li, Nian-Wu; Cheng, Xin-Bing; Yin, Ya-Xia; Zhang, Qiang; Guo, Yu-Guo

    2017-03-01

    Owning to their very high theoretical capacity, lithium metal anodes are expected to fuel the extensive practical applications in portable electronics and electric vehicles. However, unstable solid electrolyte interphase and lithium dendrite growth during lithium plating/stripping induce poor safety, low Coulombic efficiency, and short span life of lithium metal batteries. Lately, varies of micro/nanostructured lithium metal anodes are proposed to address these issues in lithium metal batteries. With the unique surface, pore, and connecting structures of different nanomaterials, lithium plating/stripping processes have been regulated. Thus the electrochemical properties and lithium morphologies have been significantly improved. These micro/nanostructured lithium metal anodes shed new light on the future applications for lithium metal batteries.

  12. DOE/BES/NSET annual report on growth of metal and semiconductor nanostructures using localized photocatalysts.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, Raid Edward; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Shelnutt, John Allen; Yang, Yi; Nuttall, H. Eric; Watt, Richard K.; Singl, Anup K.; Challa, Sivakumar R.; Wang, Zhongchun; van Swol, Frank B.; Pereira, Eulalia; Qiu, Yan; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Xu, Huifang; Medforth, Craig J.; Song, Yujiang

    2003-10-01

    Our overall goal is to understand and develop a novel light-driven approach to the controlled growth of unique metal and semiconductor nanostructures and nanomaterials. In this photochemical process, bio-inspired porphyrin-based photocatalysts reduce metal salts in aqueous solutions at ambient temperatures to provide metal nucleation and growth centers. Photocatalyst molecules are pre-positioned at the nanoscale to control the location and morphology of the metal nanostructures grown. Self-assembly, chemical confinement, and molecular templating are some of the methods used for nanoscale positioning of the photocatalyst molecules. When exposed to light, the photocatalyst molecule repeatedly reduces metal ions from solution, leading to deposition and the synthesis of the new nanostructures and nanostructured materials. Studies of the photocatalytic growth process and the resulting nanostructures address a number of fundamental biological, chemical, and environmental issues and draw on the combined nanoscience characterization and multi-scale simulation capabilities of the new DOE Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, the University of New Mexico, and Sandia National Laboratories. Our main goals are to elucidate the processes involved in the photocatalytic growth of metal nanomaterials and provide the scientific basis for controlled synthesis. The nanomaterials resulting from these studies have applications in nanoelectronics, photonics, sensors, catalysis, and micromechanical systems. The proposed nanoscience concentrates on three thematic research areas: (1) the creation of nanoscale structures for realizing novel phenomena and quantum control, (2) understanding nanoscale processes in the environment, and (3) the development and use of multi-scale, multi-phenomena theory and simulation. Our goals for FY03 have been to understand the role of photocatalysis in the synthesis of dendritic platinum nanostructures grown from aqueous surfactant solutions under ambient

  13. Controlled thermal sintering of a metal-metal oxide-carbon ternary composite with a multi-scale hollow nanostructure for use as an anode material in Li-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwan Jin; Zhang, Kan; Choi, Jae-Man; Song, Min Sang; Park, Jong Hyeok

    2014-03-11

    We report a synthetic scheme for preparing a SnO2-Sn-carbon triad inverse opal porous material using the controlled sintering of Sn precursor-infiltrated polystyrene (PS) nanobead films. Because the uniform PS nanobead film, which can be converted into carbon via a sintering step, uptakes the precursor solution, the carbon can be uniformly distributed throughout the Sn-based anode material. Moreover, the partial carbonization of the PS nanobeads under a controlled Ar/oxygen environment not only produces a composite material with an inverse opal-like porous nanostructure but also converts the Sn precursor/PS into a SnO2-Sn-C triad electrode.

  14. Thermal Characterization of Nanostructures and Advanced Engineered Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Vivek Kumar

    Continuous downscaling of Si complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology and progress in high-power electronics demand more efficient heat removal techniques to handle the increasing power density and rising temperature of hot spots. For this reason, it is important to investigate thermal properties of materials at nanometer scale and identify materials with the extremely large or extremely low thermal conductivity for applications as heat spreaders or heat insulators in the next generation of integrated circuits. The thin films used in microelectronic and photonic devices need to have high thermal conductivity in order to transfer the dissipated power to heat sinks more effectively. On the other hand, thermoelectric devices call for materials or structures with low thermal conductivity because the performance of thermoelectric devices is determined by the figure of merit Z=S2sigma/K, where S is the Seebeck coefficient, K and sigma are the thermal and electrical conductivity, respectively. Nanostructured superlattices can have drastically reduced thermal conductivity as compared to their bulk counterparts making them promising candidates for high-efficiency thermoelectric materials. Other applications calling for thin films with low thermal conductivity value are high-temperature coatings for engines. Thus, materials with both high thermal conductivity and low thermal conductivity are technologically important. The increasing temperature of the hot spots in state-of-the-art chips stimulates the search for innovative methods for heat removal. One promising approach is to incorporate materials, which have high thermal conductivity into the chip design. Two suitable candidates for such applications are diamond and graphene. Another approach is to integrate the high-efficiency thermoelectric elements for on-spot cooling. In addition, there is strong motivation for improved thermal interface materials (TIMs) for heat transfer from the heat-generating chip

  15. Noble-metal nanostructures on carburized W(110).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Magdalena; Memmel, Norbert; Bertel, Erminald

    2011-07-01

    Noble metal nanostructures of Au, Ag and Cu were prepared on two types of carbon-modified W(110) surfaces-R(15 × 12) and R(15 × 3)-and investigated by means of scanning tunneling microscopy. For all deposited metals qualitatively the same behaviour is observed: On the R(15 × 12)-template always isotropic clusters are formed. In contrast, on the R(15 × 3)-substrate the anisotropy of the nanostructures can be tuned from clusters at low temperatures via thin nanowires to thicker nanobars at high deposition temperatures. At intermediate temperatures on the R(15 × 3) the anisotropic Au nanowires arrange themselves into straight lines along domain boundaries induced by deposition of the Au metal. Similarities and differences to Au nanostructures as recently reported by Varykhalov et al. [A. Varykhalov, O. Rader, W. Gudat. Physical Review B 77, 035412 (2008).] are discussed.

  16. Nanostructured polymeric materials for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Di-Jia [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States; Yu, Luping [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a new class of hydrogen storage adsorbent, nanostructured porous organic polymers (POPs), through collaboration between Argonne National Laboratory and The University of Chicago. POPs have excellent thermal stability and tolerance to gas contaminants such as moisture. They also have low skeleton density and high intrinsic porosity via covalent bonds, capable of maintaining specific surface area (SSA) during high pressure pelletizing for better volumetric density. Furthermore, they can be produced at a commercial scale with the existing industrial infrastructure. The team’s approach focused on improving hydrogen uptake capacity and the heat of adsorption by enhancing SSA, porosity control, and framework-adsorbate interactions through rational design and synthesis at the molecular level. The design principles aim at improving the following attributes of the polymers: (a) high SSA to provide sufficient interface with H2; (b) narrow pore diameter to enhance van der Waals interactions in the confined space; and (c) “metallic” features, either through π- conjugation or metal doping, to promote electronic orbital interactions with hydrogen.

  17. Electrically conductive gold- and copper-metallized DNA origami nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yanli; Pearson, Anthony C; Gates, Elisabeth P; Uprety, Bibek; Davis, Robert C; Harb, John N; Woolley, Adam T

    2013-03-12

    This work demonstrates the use of a circuit-like DNA origami structure as a template to fabricate conductive gold and copper nanostructures on Si surfaces. We improved over previous results by using multiple Pd seeding steps to increase seed uniformity and density. Our process has also been characterized through atomic force microscopy, particle size distribution analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. We found that four successive Pd seeding steps yielded the best results for electroless metal plating on DNA origami. Electrical resistance measurements were done on both Au- and Cu-metallized nanostructures, with each showing ohmic behavior. Gold-plated DNA origami structures made under optimal conditions had an average resistivity of 7.0 × 10(-5) Ω·m, whereas copper-metallized structures had a resistivity as low as 3.6 × 10(-4) Ω·m. Importantly, this is the first demonstration of electrically conductive Cu nanostructures fabricated on either DNA or DNA origami templates. Although resistivities for both gold and copper samples were larger than those of the bulk metal, these metal nanostructures have the potential for use in electrically connecting small structures. In addition, these metallized objects might find use in surface-enhanced Raman scattering experiments.

  18. Understanding and tuning nanostructured materials for chemical energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Guoqiang

    The conversion of energy that employs chemical reaction is termed chemical energy conversion. In my dissertation, I have focused on chemical energy conversion systems involving energetic materials and lithium ion batteries, where performance is strongly dependent on the properties of materials and their architecture. The objective of this study is to enhance our understanding and tuning of nanostructured materials that might find application toward energetic materials and electrode materials in lithium ion batteries. Rapid heating diagnostics tools, i.e. temperature-jump techniques, have been used to study the ignition of aluminum nanoparticles, nanothermite reaction mechanism and metal oxides nanoparticles decomposition under rapid heating conditions (˜105-106 K/s). Time-resolved mass spectra results support the hypothesis that Al containing species diffuse outwards through the oxide shell. Low effective activation energies were found for metal oxides nanoparticles decomposition at high heating rates, implying the mass transfer control at high heating rates. The role of oxygen release from oxidizer in nanothermite reactions have been examined for several different systems, including some using microsized oxidizer (i.e., nano-Al/micro-I 2O5). In particular, for periodate based nanothermites, direct evidence from high heating rate SEM and mass spectrometry results support that direct gas phase oxygen release from oxidizer decomposition is critical in its ignition and combustion. Efforts have also been made to synthesize nanostructured materials for nanoenergetic materials and lithium ion batteries applications. Hollow CuO spheres were synthesized by aerosol spray pyrolysis, employing a gas blowing mechanism for the formation of hollow structure during aerosol synthesis. The materials synthesized as oxidizers in nanothermite demonstrated superior performance, and of particular note, periodate salts based nanothermite demonstrated the best gas generating performance

  19. Nanostructured lithium sulfide materials for lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Kyu; Lee, Yun Jung; Sun, Yang-Kook

    2016-08-01

    Upon the maturation and saturation of Li-ion battery technologies, the demand for the development of energy storage systems with higher energy densities has surged to meet the needs of key markets such as electric vehicles. Among the many next generation high-energy storage options, the Lisbnd S battery system is considered particularly close to mass commercialization because of its low cost and the natural abundance of sulfur. In this review, we focus on nanostructured Li2S materials for Lisbnd S batteries. Due to a lithium source in its molecular structure, Li2S can be coupled with various Li-free anode materials, thereby giving it the potential to surmount many of the problems related with a Li-metal anode. The hurdles that impede the full utilization of Li2S materials include its high activation barrier and the low electrical conductivity of bulk Li2S particles. Various strategies that can be used to assist the activation process and facilitate electrical transport are analyzed. To provide insight into the opportunities specific to Li2S materials, we highlight some major advances and results that have been achieved in the development of metal Li-free full cells and all-solid-state cells based on Li2S cathodes.

  20. Methods of making metal oxide nanostructures and methods of controlling morphology of same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Stanislaus S; Hongjun, Zhou

    2012-11-27

    The present invention includes a method of producing a crystalline metal oxide nanostructure. The method comprises providing a metal salt solution and providing a basic solution; placing a porous membrane between the metal salt solution and the basic solution, wherein metal cations of the metal salt solution and hydroxide ions of the basic solution react, thereby producing a crystalline metal oxide nanostructure.

  1. Nanostructured films of metal particles obtained by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muniz-Miranda, M., E-mail: muniz@unifi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica “U. Schiff”, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Gellini, C. [Dipartimento di Chimica “U. Schiff”, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Giorgetti, E.; Margheri, G.; Marsili, P. [Istituto Sistemi Complessi (CNR), Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Lascialfari, L.; Becucci, L. [Dipartimento di Chimica “U. Schiff”, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Trigari, S. [Istituto Sistemi Complessi (CNR), Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Giammanco, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica “E. Fermi”, Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2013-09-30

    Colloidal dispersions of silver and gold nanoparticles were obtained in pure water by ablation with nanosecond pulsed laser. Then, by filtration of the metal particles on alumina, we fabricated nanostructured films, whose surface morphology was examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and related to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) after adsorption of adenine. - Highlights: • Ag and Au colloidal nanoparticles were obtained by laser ablation. • Nanostructured Ag and Au films were fabricated by filtration of metal nanoparticles. • Surface morphology of metal films was investigated by atomic force microscopy. • Surface-enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) of adenine on metal films were obtained. • SERS enhancements were related to the surface roughness of the metal films.

  2. Computational design of surfaces, nanostructures and optoelectronic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Kamal

    Properties of engineering materials are generally influenced by defects such as point defects (vacancies, interstitials, substitutional defects), line defects (dislocations), planar defects (grain boundaries, free surfaces/nanostructures, interfaces, stacking faults) and volume defects (voids). Classical physics based molecular dynamics and quantum physics based density functional theory can be useful in designing materials with controlled defect properties. In this thesis, empirical potential based molecular dynamics was used to study the surface modification of polymers due to energetic polyatomic ion, thermodynamics and mechanics of metal-ceramic interfaces and nanostructures, while density functional theory was used to screen substituents in optoelectronic materials. Firstly, polyatomic ion-beams were deposited on polymer surfaces and the resulting chemical modifications of the surface were examined. In particular, S, SC and SH were deposited on amorphous polystyrene (PS), and C2H, CH3, and C3H5 were deposited on amorphous poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) using molecular dynamics simulations with classical reactive empirical many-body (REBO) potentials. The objective of this work was to elucidate the mechanisms by which the polymer surface modification took place. The results of the work could be used in tailoring the incident energy and/or constituents of ion beam for obtaining a particular chemistry inside the polymer surface. Secondly, a new Al-O-N empirical potential was developed within the charge optimized many body (COMB) formalism. This potential was then used to examine the thermodynamic stability of interfaces and mechanical properties of nanostructures composed of aluminum, its oxide and its nitride. The potentials were tested for these materials based on surface energies, defect energies, bulk phase stability, the mechanical properties of the most stable bulk phase, its phonon properties as well as with a genetic algorithm based evolution theory of

  3. Size-dependent density of nanoparticles and nanostructured materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanda, Karuna Kar, E-mail: nanda@mrc.iisc.ernet.in [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 12 (India)

    2012-10-01

    We discuss the size-dependent density of nanoparticles and nanostructured materials keeping the recent experimental results in mind. The density is predicted to increase with decreasing size for nanoparticles but it can decrease with size for nanostructured materials that corroborates the experimental results reported in the literature. -- Highlights: ► Density of nanoparticles depends mainly on the size-dependent lattice parameter. ► Density is predicted to increase with decreasing size for nanoparticles. ► Density decreases with size for nanostructured materials.

  4. High-capacity nanostructured germanium-containing materials and lithium alloys thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graetz, Jason A.; Fultz, Brent T.; Ahn, Channing; Yazami, Rachid

    2010-08-24

    Electrodes comprising an alkali metal, for example, lithium, alloyed with nanostructured materials of formula Si.sub.zGe.sub.(z-1), where 0capacities, cycle lives, and/or cycling rates compared with similar electrodes made from graphite. These electrodes are useful as anodes for secondary electrochemical cells, for example, batteries and electrochemical supercapacitors.

  5. Metallic carbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, M.L.; Crespi, V.H.; Louie, S.G.S.; Zettl, A.K.

    1999-11-30

    Novel metallic forms of planar carbon are described, as well as methods of designing and making them. Nonhexagonal arrangements of carbon are introduced into a graphite carbon network essentially without destroying the planar structure. Specifically a form of carbon comprising primarily pentagons and heptagons, and having a large density of states at the Fermi level is described. Other arrangements of pentagons and heptagons that include some hexagons, and structures incorporating squares and octagons are additionally disclosed. Reducing the bond angle symmetry associated with a hexagonal arrangement of carbons increases the likelihood that the carbon material will have a metallic electron structure.

  6. Irradiation Induced Microstructure Evolution in Nanostructured Materials: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenbo; Ji, Yanzhou; Tan, Pengkang; Zang, Hang; He, Chaohui; Yun, Di; Zhang, Chi; Yang, Zhigang

    2016-02-06

    Nanostructured (NS) materials may have different irradiation resistance from their coarse-grained (CG) counterparts. In this review, we focus on the effect of grain boundaries (GBs)/interfaces on irradiation induced microstructure evolution and the irradiation tolerance of NS materials under irradiation. The features of void denuded zones (VDZs) and the unusual behavior of void formation near GBs/interfaces in metals due to the interactions between GBs/interfaces and irradiation-produced point defects are systematically reviewed. Some experimental results and calculation results show that NS materials have enhanced irradiation resistance, due to their extremely small grain sizes and large volume fractions of GBs/interfaces, which could absorb and annihilate the mobile defects produced during irradiation. However, there is also literature reporting reduced irradiation resistance or even amorphization of NS materials at a lower irradiation dose compared with their bulk counterparts, since the GBs are also characterized by excess energy (compared to that of single crystal materials) which could provide a shift in the total free energy that will lead to the amorphization process. The competition of these two effects leads to the different irradiation tolerance of NS materials. The irradiation-induced grain growth is dominated by irradiation temperature, dose, ion flux, character of GBs/interface and nanoprecipitates, although the decrease of grain sizes under irradiation is also observed in some experiments.

  7. Nanofabrication of Metallic Nanostructures and Integration with Light Detection Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liang

    Metallic nanostructures have been investigated with various applications especially for integration with light detection devices. The incident light can be manipulated by those nanostructures to enhance light absorption therefor improve device performance. However, previous studies focused on optical design. The electrical properties of these integrated light detection devices have not been fully considered. The photon generated carriers transport and collection are critical for light detection devices as well. An optimized device platform considering from both the optical and electrical aspects to fully utilize these nanostructures is highly desired for future light detection devices. This dissertation targeted on three objectives, beginning with the fabrication process development of various nanostructures on different substrates. High quality nanostructures were achieved with minimum 20nm gap and 45nm line width. The second objective was developing the metallic fishnet nanostructures integrated Schottky contact a-Si solar cell to improve both light absorption and photon generated carrier collection. The fishnet was designed as the light trapping structure and 2D connected top contact to collect carriers. The third objective was developing metallic nanostructures integrated GeSn photodetectors. The H shape nano antennas were integrated on GeSn photodetectors. Multiple resonant absorption peaks at infrared range were observed using spectroscopic ellipsometry. However, there was no obvious photoresponse value improvement of developed solar cells and H shape antennas integrated GeSn photodetectors. For further investigation, interdigitated electrodes integrated GeSn photodetectors were designed. With less carrier transit time, the responsivity value of the integrated Ge0.991Sn0.009 photodetector was 72muA/W at 1.55mum at room temperature which was 6 times higher comparing to device without integration. Meanwhile, with the increased carrier life time by decreasing

  8. Novel thermal properties of nanostructured materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eastman, J. A.

    1999-01-13

    A new class of heat transfer fluids, termed nanofluids, has been developed by suspending nanocrystalline particles in liquids. Due to the orders-of-magnitude larger thermal conductivities of solids compared to those of liquids such as water, significantly enhanced thermal properties are obtained with nanofluids. For example, an approximately 20% improvement in effective thermal conductivity is observed when 5 vol.% CuO nanoparticles are added to water. Even more importantly, the heat transfer coefficient of water under dynamic flow conditions is increased more than 15% with the addition of less than 1 vol.% CuO particles. The use of nanofluids could impact many industrial sectors, including transportation, energy supply and production, electronics, textiles, and paper production by, for example, decreasing pumping power needs or reducing heat exchanger sizes. In contrast to the enhancement in effective thermal transport rates that is obtained when nanoparticles are suspended in fluids, nanocrystalline coatings are expected to exhibit reduced thermal conductivities compared to coarse-grained coatings. Reduced thermal conductivities are predicted to arise because of a reduction in the mean free path of phonons due to presence of grain boundaries. This behavior, combined with improved mechanical properties, makes nanostructured zirconia coatings excellent candidates for future applications as thermal barriers. Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin films are being produced by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition techniques. Preliminary results have indicated that the thermal conductivity is reduced by approximately a factor-of-two at room temperature in 10 nm grain-sized YSZ compared to coarse-grained or single crystal YSZ.

  9. Functional Metal Oxide Nanostructures: Their Synthesis, Characterization, and Energy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Aparna

    in oxidation reactions and adsorption of heavy metal. Spontaneous formation of OMS-2 nanospheres was possible by tuning reaction parameters in the ultrasonic atomization process. In the second part, a microwave-hydrothermal route has been developed for the synthesis of 1D cobalt compounds (Chapter 5). These compounds are transformed to spinel type Co3O4 nanorods. The effects of solvents, cobalt sources, and microwave radiation time in the formation of 1D cobalt oxide nanostructures were studied in detail. These materials are catalytically active for CO oxidation and styrene oxidation reactions. Magnesia-yttria nanocomposites with controlled nanoscale grain sizes and homogenous microstructures are useful as IR transparent materials. A simple cost-effective sucrose based sol-gel route was devised for making MgO-Y 2O3 nanocomposites. Grain growth in these nanocomposites was systematically evaluated using transmission electron microscopy studies.

  10. Nanostructured Metal Oxide Sorbents for the Collection and Recovery of Uranium from Seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Warner, Cynthia L.; Mackie, Katherine E.; Warner, Marvin G.; Gill, Gary A.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2016-02-07

    The ability to collect uranium from seawater offers the potential for a long-term green fuel supply for nuclear energy. However, extraction of uranium, and other trace minerals, is challenging due to the high ionic strength and low mineral concentrations in seawater. Herein we evaluate the use of nanostructured metal oxide sorbents for the collection and recovery of uranium from seawater. Chemical affinity, chemical adsorption capacity and kinetics of preferred sorbent materials were evaluated. High surface area manganese and iron oxide nanomaterials showed excellent performance for uranium collection from seawater. Inexpensive nontoxic carbonate solutions were demonstrated to be an effective and environmental benign method of stripping the uranium from the metal oxide sorbents. Various formats for the utilization of the nanostructured metals oxide sorbent materials are discussed including traditional and nontraditional methods such as magnetic separation. Keywords: Uranium, nano, manganese, iron, sorbent, seawater, magnetic, separations, nuclear energy

  11. Second and Third Harmonic Generation in Metal-Based Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    free and bound charges that give rise to second and third harmonic generation in metallic nanostructures. Eqs.(29) are also applicable to dielectrics...arbitrary frequencies", Rev. Mexicana de Fisica 49, 231 (2003). [53] E. L. Linder, "Effect of electron pressure on plasma electron oscillations", Phys

  12. Direct ArF laser photopatterning of metal oxide nanostructures prepared by the sol-gel route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridaoui, Hassan; Wieder, Fernand; Ponche, Arnaud; Soppera, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.soppera@uha.fr [Institut de Science des Materiaux de Mulhouse (IS2M), CNRS-LRC 7228, Universite de Haute Alsace, 15 rue Jean Starcky, Mulhouse (France)

    2010-02-10

    We developed specific negative tone resists suitable for preparing periodic inorganic nanostructures by ArF photolithography. This approach is based on the sol-gel chemistry of modified metal alkoxides followed by DUV laser irradiation. Patterning at the nanoscale was demonstrated by using an achromatic interferometer operating at 193 nm. In a second step, thermal treatment could be used to obtain metal oxide nanostructures (ZrO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}). Such thermal treatment did not affect the integrity of the nanostructures. The DUV-induced modifications of the physico-chemical properties of the sol-gel thin film were followed by ellipsometry, XPS and AFM. The crystalline structure of the material after thermal treatment was proved by DRX analysis. Examples of periodic nanostructures are given in order to illustrate the possibilities opened by this new route that provides a convenient method to create transparent, robust, high refractive index nanostructures compatible with a wide variety of substrates.

  13. The influence of nanostructured materials on biointerfacial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koegler, Peter; Clayton, Andrew; Thissen, Helmut; Santos, Gil Nonato C; Kingshott, Peter

    2012-12-01

    Control over biointerfacial interactions in vitro and in vivo is the key to many biomedical applications: from cell culture and diagnostic tools to drug delivery, biomaterials and regenerative medicine. The increasing use of nanostructured materials is placing a greater demand on improving our understanding of how these new materials influence biointerfacial interactions, including protein adsorption and subsequent cellular responses. A range of nanoscale material properties influence these interactions, and material toxicity. The ability to manipulate both material nanochemistry and nanotopography remains challenging in its own right, however, a more in-depth knowledge of the subsequent biological responses to these new materials must occur simultaneously if they are ever to be affective in the clinic. We highlight some of the key technologies used for fabrication of nanostructured materials, examine how nanostructured materials influence the behavior of proteins and cells at surfaces and provide details of important analytical techniques used in this context.

  14. Application of Nanostructures in Electrochromic Materials and Devices: Recent Progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin Min; Sun, Xiao Wei; Jiao, Zhihui

    2010-11-26

    The recent progress in application of nanostructures in electrochromic materials and devices is reviewed. ZnO nanowire array modified by viologen and WO₃, crystalline WO₃ nanoparticles and nanorods, mesoporous WO₃ and TiO₂, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) nanotubes, Prussian blue nanoinks and nanostructures in switchable mirrors are reviewed. The electrochromic properties were significantly enhanced by applying nanostructures, resulting in faster switching responses, higher stability and higher optical contrast. A perspective on the development trends in electrochromic materials and devices is also proposed.

  15. Application of Nanostructures in Electrochromic Materials and Devices: Recent Progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Min Wang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The recent progress in application of nanostructures in electrochromic materials and devices is reviewed. ZnO nanowire array modified by viologen and WO3, crystalline WO3 nanoparticles and nanorods, mesoporous WO3 and TiO2, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene nanotubes, Prussian blue nanoinks and nanostructures in switchable mirrors are reviewed. The electrochromic properties were significantly enhanced by applying nanostructures, resulting in faster switching responses, higher stability and higher optical contrast. A perspective on the development trends in electrochromic materials and devices is also proposed.

  16. Band structure engineering strategies of metal oxide semiconductor nanowires and related nanostructures: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piyadasa, Adimali; Wang, Sibo; Gao, Pu-Xian

    2017-07-01

    The electronic band structure of a solid state semiconductor determines many of its physical and chemical characteristics such as electrical, optical, physicochemical, and catalytic activity. Alteration or modification of the band structure could lead to significant changes in these physical and chemical characteristics, therefore we introduce new mechanisms of creating novel solid state materials with interesting properties. Over the past three decades, research on band structure engineering has allowed development of various methods to modify the band structure of engineered materials. Compared to bulk counterparts, nanostructures generally exhibit higher band structure modulation capabilities due to the quantum confinement effect, prominent surface effect, and higher strain limit. In this review we will discuss various band structure engineering strategies in semiconductor nanowires and other related nanostructures, mostly focusing on metal oxide systems. Several important strategies of band structure modulation are discussed in detail, such as doping, alloying, straining, interface and core-shell nanostructuring.

  17. High volume production of nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Edward B.; Morrell, Jonathan S.; Seals, Roland D.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2009-10-13

    A system and method for high volume production of nanoparticles, nanotubes, and items incorporating nanoparticles and nanotubes. Microwave, radio frequency, or infrared energy vaporizes a metal catalyst which, as it condenses, is contacted by carbon or other elements such as silicon, germanium, or boron to form agglomerates. The agglomerates may be annealed to accelerate the production of nanotubes. Magnetic or electric fields may be used to align the nanotubes during their production. The nanotubes may be separated from the production byproducts in aligned or non-aligned configurations. The agglomerates may be formed directly into tools, optionally in compositions that incorporate other materials such as abrasives, binders, carbon-carbon composites, and cermets.

  18. Advanced nanostructured materials for energy storage and conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, Gregory S.

    Due to a global effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to utilize renewable sources of energy, much effort has been directed towards creating new alternatives to fossil fuels. Identifying novel materials for energy storage and conversion can enable radical changes to the current fuel production infrastructure and energy utilization. The use of engineered nanostructured materials in these systems unlocks unique catalytic activity in practical configurations. In this work, research efforts have been focused on the development of nanostructured materials to address the need for both better energy conversion and storage, with applications toward Li-O2 battery electrocatalysts, electrocatalytic generation of H2, conversion of furfural to useful chemicals and fuels, and Li battery anode materials. Highly-active alpha-MnO2 materials were synthesized for use as bifunctional oxygen reduction (ORR) and evolution (OER) catalysts in Li-O2 batteries, and were evaluated under operating conditions with a novel in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy configuration. Through detailed analysis of local coordination and oxidation states of Mn atoms at key points in the electrochemical cycle, a self-switching behavior affecting the bifunctional activity was identified and found to be critical. In an additional study of materials for lithium batteries, nanostructured TiO2 anode materials doped with first-row transition metals were synthesized and evaluated for improving battery discharge capacity and rate performance, with Ni and Co doping at low levels found to cause the greatest enhancement. In addition to battery technology research, I have also sought to find inexpensive and earth-abundant electrocatalysts to replace state-of-the-art Pt/C in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), a systematic computational study of Cu-based bimetallic electrocatalysts was performed. During the screening of dilute surface alloys of Cu mixed with other first-row transition metals, materials with

  19. Synthesis of branched metal nanostructures with controlled architecture and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Nancy

    On account of their small size, metal nanoparticles are proven to be outstanding catalysts for numerous chemical transformations and represent promising platforms for applications in the fields of electronics, chemical sensing, medicine, and beyond. Many properties of metal nanoparticles are size-dependent and can be further manipulated through their shape and architecture (e.g., spherical vs. branched). Achieving morphology control of nanoparticles through solution-based techniques has proven challenging due to limited knowledge of morphology development in nanosyntheses. To overcome these complications, a systematic examination of the local ligand environment of metal precursors on nanostructure formation was undertaken to evaluate its contribution to nanoparticle nucleation rate and subsequent growth processes. Specifically, this thesis will provide evidence from ex situ studies---Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis)---that support the hypothesis that strongly coordinated ligands delay burst-like nucleation to generate spherical metal nanoparticles and ligands with intermediate binding affinity regulate the gradual reduction of metal precursors to promote aggregated assembly of nanodendrites. These ex situ studies were coupled with a new in situ perspective, providing detailed understanding of metal precursor transformation, its direct relation to nanoparticle morphology development, and the ligand influence towards the formation of structurally complex metal nanostructures, using in situ synchrotron X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Ultra Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (USAXS). The principles extracted from the study of monometallic nanostructure formation were also found to be generally applicable to the synthesis of bimetallic nanostructures, e.g., Pd-Pt architectures, with either core-shell or alloyed structures that were readily achieved by ligand selection. These outcomes provide a direct connection between fundamental

  20. Gas Sensors Based on One Dimensional Nanostructured Metal-Oxides: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. M. A. Haseeb

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently one dimensional (1-D nanostructured metal-oxides have attracted much attention because of their potential applications in gas sensors. 1-D nanostructured metal-oxides provide high surface to volume ratio, while maintaining good chemical and thermal stabilities with minimal power consumption and low weight. In recent years, various processing routes have been developed for the synthesis of 1-D nanostructured metal-oxides such as hydrothermal, ultrasonic irradiation, electrospinning, anodization, sol-gel, molten-salt, carbothermal reduction, solid-state chemical reaction, thermal evaporation, vapor-phase transport, aerosol, RF sputtering, molecular beam epitaxy, chemical vapor deposition, gas-phase assisted nanocarving, UV lithography and dry plasma etching. A variety of sensor fabrication processing routes have also been developed. Depending on the materials, morphology and fabrication process the performance of the sensor towards a specific gas shows a varying degree of success. This article reviews and evaluates the performance of 1-D nanostructured metal-oxide gas sensors based on ZnO, SnO2, TiO2, In2O3, WOx, AgVO3, CdO, MoO3, CuO, TeO2 and Fe2O3. Advantages and disadvantages of each sensor are summarized, along with the associated sensing mechanism. Finally, the article concludes with some future directions of research.

  1. Formation of heteroepitaxy in different shapes of Au-CdSe metal-semiconductor hybrid nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Krishna Kanta; Pradhan, Narayan; Patra, Amitava

    2013-10-25

    Formation of heteroepitaxy and designing different-shaped heterostructured nanomaterials of metal and semiconductor in solution remains a frontier area of research. However, it is evident that the synthesis of such materials is not straightforward and needs a selective approach to retain both metal and semiconductor identities in the reaction system during heterostructure formation. Herein, the epitaxial growth of semiconductor CdSe on selected facets of metal Au seeds is reported and different shapes (flower, tetrapod, and core/shell) hetero-nanostructures are designed. These results are achieved by controlling the reaction parameters, and by changing the sequence and timing for introduction of different reactant precursors. Direct evidence of the formation of heteroepitaxy between {111} facets of Au and (0001) of wurtzite CdSe is observed during the formation of these three heterostructures. The mechanism of the evolution of these hetero-nanostructures and formation of their heteroepitaxy with the planes having minimum lattice mismatch are also discussed. This shape-control growth mechanism in hetero-nanostructures should be helpful to provide more information for establishing the fundamental study of heteroepitaxial growth for designing new nanomaterials. Such metal-semiconductor nanostructures may have great potential for nonlinear optical properties, in photovoltaic devices, and as chemical sensors.

  2. Gas sensors based on one dimensional nanostructured metal-oxides: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafat, M M; Dinan, B; Akbar, Sheikh A; Haseeb, A S M A

    2012-01-01

    Recently one dimensional (1-D) nanostructured metal-oxides have attracted much attention because of their potential applications in gas sensors. 1-D nanostructured metal-oxides provide high surface to volume ratio, while maintaining good chemical and thermal stabilities with minimal power consumption and low weight. In recent years, various processing routes have been developed for the synthesis of 1-D nanostructured metal-oxides such as hydrothermal, ultrasonic irradiation, electrospinning, anodization, sol-gel, molten-salt, carbothermal reduction, solid-state chemical reaction, thermal evaporation, vapor-phase transport, aerosol, RF sputtering, molecular beam epitaxy, chemical vapor deposition, gas-phase assisted nanocarving, UV lithography and dry plasma etching. A variety of sensor fabrication processing routes have also been developed. Depending on the materials, morphology and fabrication process the performance of the sensor towards a specific gas shows a varying degree of success. This article reviews and evaluates the performance of 1-D nanostructured metal-oxide gas sensors based on ZnO, SnO(2), TiO(2), In(2)O(3), WO(x), AgVO(3), CdO, MoO(3), CuO, TeO(2) and Fe(2)O(3). Advantages and disadvantages of each sensor are summarized, along with the associated sensing mechanism. Finally, the article concludes with some future directions of research.

  3. Photoexcitation of volume plasmons in metallic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrhold, Katja; Goesele, Ulrich [Max-Planck-Institut, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany); Christiansen, Silke [Institut fuer Photonische Technologien, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    It has long been known that a vanishing permittivity enables longitudinal electromagnetic waves. The corresponding collective eigenmodes called volume plasmons should not be dipole excitable in classical electrodynamics. Thus, the typical volume modes are known to be excitable via particle beams solely. We investigated typical scattering problems for an incident plane wave determined via the Helmholtz-equation which can be solved analytically for special geometries. The analytical solution for a spherical scatterer by Gustav Mie was extended to spherical core-shell structures by Aden. Remarkably, in the case of metallic nanoshell structures the Mie extinction efficiencies have a local maximum at the natural plasma frequency corresponding to the photoexcitation of a volume plasmon. This volume mode is independent of both the shell's aspect ratio and the core material. For explanation we present a simple physical picture which is supported by analytical examples on silver and gold shells. Additionally we use finite element simulations to show a potpourri of particles which likewise enable the photoexcitation of volume modes.

  4. Nanostructured metal chalcogenides: synthesis, modification, and applications in energy conversion and storage devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Min-Rui; Xu, Yun-Fei; Jiang, Jun; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2013-04-07

    Advanced energy conversion and storage (ECS) devices (including fuel cells, photoelectrochemical water splitting cells, solar cells, Li-ion batteries and supercapacitors) are expected to play a major role in the development of sustainable technologies that alleviate the energy and environmental challenges we are currently facing. The successful utilization of ECS devices depends critically on synthesizing new nanomaterials with merits of low cost, high efficiency, and outstanding properties. Recent progress has demonstrated that nanostructured metal chalcogenides (MCs) are very promising candidates for efficient ECS systems based on their unique physical and chemical properties, such as conductivity, mechanical and thermal stability and cyclability. In this review, we aim to provide a summary on the liquid-phase synthesis, modifications, and energy-related applications of nanostructured metal chalcogenide (MC) materials. The liquid-phase syntheses of various MC nanomaterials are primarily categorized with the preparation method (mainly 15 kinds of methods). To obtain optimized, enhanced or even new properties, the nanostructured MC materials can be modified by other functional nanomaterials such as carbon-based materials, noble metals, metal oxides, or MCs themselves. Thus, this review will then be focused on the recent strategies used to realize the modifications of MC nanomaterials. After that, the ECS applications of the MC/modified-MC nanomaterials have been systematically summarized based on a great number of successful cases. Moreover, remarks on the challenges and perspectives for future MC research are proposed (403 references).

  5. Nanostructured Energetic Materials with Sol-Gel Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gash, A; Satcher, J; Simpson, R; Clapsaddle, B

    2003-11-25

    The utilization of sol-gel chemical methodology to prepare nanostructured energetic materials as well as the concepts of nanoenergetics is described. The preparation and characterization of two totally different compositions is detailed. In one example, nanostructured aerogel and xerogel composites of sol-gel iron (III) oxide and ultra fine grained aluminum (UFG Al) are prepared, characterized, and compared to a conventional micron-sized Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al thermite. The exquisite degree of mixing and intimate nanostructuring of this material is illustrated using transmission and scanning electron microscopies (TEM and SEM). The nanocomposite material has markedly different energy release (burn rate) and thermal properties compared to the conventional composite, results of which will be discussed. Small-scale safety characterization was performed aerogels and xerogels of the nanostructured thermite. The second nanostructured energetic material consists of a nanostructured hydrocarbon resin fuel network with fine ammonium perchlorate (NH{sub 4}ClO{sub 4}) oxidizer present.

  6. Phthalocyanine-Carbon Nanostructure Materials Assembled through Supramolecular Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottari, Giovanni; Suanzes, Juan A; Trukhina, Olga; Torres, Tomas

    2011-04-21

    The use of self-assembly for the construction of materials based on phthalocyanines and carbon nanostructures-fullerenes, single-walled carbon nanotubes, and graphene-has demonstrated to be a versatile strategy for the preparation of novel, multifunctional systems. Photophysical studies carried out on these photo- and electroactive supramolecular ensembles have revealed the occurrence of an efficient photoinduced electron-transfer process, thus paving the way for the utilization of these materials as active components in optoelectronic devices. This Perspective highlights the recent progress in the preparation of such materials and the potential use of these systems for the construction of nanostructured materials with singular physicochemical properties.

  7. Electronic properties of hybrid metal-discotic liquid crystal nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsall, R. W.; Pecchia, A.; Bourlange, A.; Movaghar, B.; Evans, S. D.; Hickey, B. J.; Boden, N.

    2003-04-01

    A new class of hybrid organic/inorganic nanostructures, comprising self-organised discotic liquid crystal layers deposited on ultrathin metal films, has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Calculations show that the periodic self-organised molecular layer gives rise to a new, hybrid electronic bandstructure, resulting in modulation of the metal film conductivity. In situ conductivity measurements during deposition of such self-organised layers confirm that the metal film conductivity is altered. Theoretical modeling also shows that the AC conductivity should show structure related to the carrier trapping and one-dimensional transport features of the self-organised layer.

  8. Hydrogen Storage in Nanostructured Light Metal Hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, S.

    2009-01-01

    The global energy issues can be solved by the abundantly available hydrogen on earth. Light metals are a compact and safe medium for storing hydrogen. This makes them attractive for vehicular use. Unfortunately, hydrogen uptake and release is slow in light metals at practical temperature and pressur

  9. Tunable plasmon resonances in anisotropic metal nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penninkhof, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    Coherent oscillations of free electrons in a metal, localized in a small volume or at an interface between a metal and a dielectric medium, have attracted a lot of attention in the past decades. These so-called surface plasmons have special optical properties that can be used in many applications ra

  10. Hydrogen Storage in Nanostructured Light Metal Hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, S.

    2009-01-01

    The global energy issues can be solved by the abundantly available hydrogen on earth. Light metals are a compact and safe medium for storing hydrogen. This makes them attractive for vehicular use. Unfortunately, hydrogen uptake and release is slow in light metals at practical temperature and

  11. Tunable plasmon resonances in anisotropic metal nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penninkhof, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    Coherent oscillations of free electrons in a metal, localized in a small volume or at an interface between a metal and a dielectric medium, have attracted a lot of attention in the past decades. These so-called surface plasmons have special optical properties that can be used in many applications

  12. Recent Progress in Metal-Organic Frameworks and Their Derived Nanostructures for Energy and Environmental Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhiqiang; Xu, Wangwang; Cui, Xiaodan; Wang, Ying

    2017-04-22

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), as a very promising category of porous materials, have attracted increasing interest from research communities due to their extremely high surface areas, diverse nanostructures, and unique properties. In recent years, there is a growing body of evidence to indicate that MOFs can function as ideal templates to prepare various nanostructured materials for energy and environmental cleaning applications. Recent progress in the design and synthesis of MOFs and MOF-derived nanomaterials for particular applications in lithium-ion batteries, sodium-ion batteries, supercapacitors, dye-sensitized solar cells, and heavy-metal-ion detection and removal is reviewed herein. In addition, the remaining major challenges in the above fields are discussed and some perspectives for future research efforts in the development of MOFs are also provided. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Review on recent progress of nanostructured anode materials for Li-ion batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Goriparti, Subrahmanyam

    2014-07-01

    This review highlights the recent research advances in active nanostructured anode materials for the next generation of Li-ion batteries (LIBs). In fact, in order to address both energy and power demands of secondary LIBs for future energy storage applications, it is required the development of innovative kinds of electrodes. Nanostructured materials based on carbon, metal/semiconductor, metal oxides and metal phosphides/nitrides/sulfides show a variety of admirable properties for LIBs applications such as high surface area, low diffusion distance, high electrical and ionic conductivity. Therefore, nanosized active materials are extremely promising for bridging the gap towards the realization of the next generation of LIBs with high reversible capacities, increased power capability, long cycling stability and free from safety concerns. In this review, anode materials are classified, depending on their electrochemical reaction with lithium, into three groups: intercalation/de-intercalation, alloy/de-alloy and conversion materials. Furthermore, the effect of nanoscale size and morphology on the electrochemical performance is presented. Synthesis of the nanostructures, lithium battery performance and electrode reaction mechanisms are also discussed. To conclude, the main aim of this review is to provide an organic outline of the wide range of recent research progresses and perspectives on nanosized active anode materials for future LIBs.

  14. ZnS nanostructure arrays: a developing material star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaosheng; Wu, Limin; Hu, Linfeng

    2011-02-01

    Semiconductor nanostructure arrays are of great scientific and technical interest because of the strong non-linear and electro-optic effects that occur due to carrier confinement in three dimensions. The use of such nanostructure arrays with tailored geometry, array density, and length-diameter-ratio as building blocks are expected to play a crucial role in future nanoscale devices. With the unique properties of a direct wide-bandgap semiconductor, such as the presence of polar surfaces, excellent transport properties, good thermal stability, and high electronic mobility, ZnS nanostructure arrays has been a developing material star. The research on ZnS nanostructure arrays has seen remarkable progress over the last five years due to the unique properties and important potential applications of nanostructure arrays, which are summarized here. Firstly, a survey of various methods to the synthesis of ZnS nanostructure arrays will be introduced. Next recent efforts on exploiting the unique properties and applications of ZnS nanostructure arrays are discussed. Potential future directions of this research field are also highlighted.

  15. Assembly and Characterization of Coordination Polymer Nanostructural Materials at Interfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Molecular self-assembly of one-/two-dimensional (1D/2D) nanostructures has recently received great interest because the specific structures of crystals determine their unique physical and chemical properties. Coordination polymers contain two central components, connectors and linkers. Transition metal ions are often used as versatile connectors, with coordination numbers ranging from 2 to 7 dependant on the oxidation states of the metal ions. Multidentate ligands are often used as linkers, wh...

  16. One-dimensional Nanostructured Materials From Organic Precursor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. F. Cai

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction One-dimensional nanostructured materials, such as nanowires, nanobelts, nanotubes and nanocables have been attracting a great research interest in the last decade due to their superior electrical, optical, mechanical and thermal properties, and many methods have been explored to synthesis of the materials, e.g., arc discharge, laser ablation, chemical vapor deposition, thermal evaporation, sol-gel method, template method and so on. In this work, we present a novel and simple method to one-dimensional nanostructured materials by pyrolysis of organic precursor.

  17. Chemical Control of Plasmons in Metal Chalcogenide and Metal Oxide Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattox, Tracy M; Ye, Xingchen; Manthiram, Karthish; Schuck, P James; Alivisatos, A Paul; Urban, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-14

    The field of plasmonics has grown to impact a diverse set of scientific disciplines ranging from quantum optics and photovoltaics to metamaterials and medicine. Plasmonics research has traditionally focused on noble metals; however, any material with a sufficiently high carrier density can support surface plasmon modes. Recently, researchers have made great gains in the synthetic (both intrinsic and extrinsic) control over the morphology and doping of nanoscale oxides, pnictides, sulfides, and selenides. These synthetic advances have, collectively, blossomed into a new, emerging class of plasmonic metal chalcogenides that complement traditional metallic materials. Chalcogenide and oxide nanostructures expand plasmonic properties into new spectral domains and also provide a rich suite of chemical controls available to manipulate plasmons, such as particle doping, shape, and composition. New opportunities in plasmonic chalcogenide nanomaterials are highlighted in this article, showing how they may be used to fundamentally tune the interaction and localization of electromagnetic fields on semiconductor surfaces in a way that enables new horizons in basic research and energy-relevant applications.

  18. Formation of nanostructures under femtosecond laser ablation of metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashitkov, S I; Romashevskii, S A; Komarov, P S; Burmistrov, A A; Agranat, M B [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zhakhovskii, V V [All-Russian Institute of Automatics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Inogamov, N A [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-30

    We present the results of studying the morphology of the modified surface of aluminium, nickel and tantalum after ablation of the surface layer by a femtosecond laser pulse. The sizes of characteristic elements of a cellular nanostructure are found to correlate with thermo-physical properties of the material and the intensity of laser radiation. (superstrong light fields)

  19. Creation of Metal and Semiconductor Nanostructures Using DPN Nanolithography Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    polymers, including polypyrroles and polythiophenes , can be polymerized electrochemically. To create nanostructures of conducting polymers using DPN...surface and monitor the Figure 1. DPN of thiols on Au. From changes in tunneling current between a metal tip and a conducting Piner et. al, Science 283...surface. Si wafers coated with a tin layer of native oxide provides enough conductivity for the reduction of the precursor ions. This development

  20. Nanostructured materials with biomimetic recognition abilities for chemical sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Sadia Zafar; Mustafa, Ghulam; Samardzic, Renata; Wangchareansak, Thipvaree; Lieberzeit, Peter A.

    2012-06-01

    Binding features found in biological systems can be implemented into man-made materials to design nanostructured artificial receptor matrices which are suitable, e.g., for chemical sensing applications. A range of different non-covalent interactions can be utilized based on the chemical properties of the respective analyte. One example is the formation of coordinative bonds between a polymerizable ligand (e.g., N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) and a metal ion (e.g., Cu(II)). Optimized molecularly imprinted sensor layers lead to selectivity factors of at least 2 compared to other bivalent ions. In the same way, H-bonds can be utilized for such sensing purposes, as shown in the case of Escherichia coli. The respective molecularly imprinted polymer leads to the selectivity factor of more than 5 between the W and B strains, respectively. Furthermore, nanoparticles with optimized Pearson hardness allow for designing sensors to detect organic thiols in air. The `harder' MoS2 yields only about 40% of the signals towards octane thiol as compared to the `softer' Cu2S. However, both materials strongly prefer molecules with -SH functionality over others, such as hydrocarbon chains. Finally, selectivity studies with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) reveal that artificial receptors yield selectivities between WGA and bovine serum albumin that are only about a factor of 2 which is smaller than natural ligands.

  1. Photothermal ablation therapy for cancer based on metal nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ROZANOVA; Nadejda

    2009-01-01

    Besides conventional surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, which all tend to have side-effects and damage normal tissues, new medical strategies, such as photothermal sensitization and photo-thermal ablation therapy (PTA) with near-IR laser light, have been explored for treating cancer. Much of the current excitement surrounding nanoscience is directly connected to the promise of new nanotechnology for cancer diagnosis and therapy. The basic principle behind PTA is that heat generated from light can be used to destroy cancer cells. Strong optical absorption and high efficiency of photothermal conversion at the cancer sites are critical to the success of PTA. Because of their unique optical properties, e.g., strong surface plasmon resonance (SPR) absorption, noble metal nanomaterials, such as gold and silver, have been found to significantly enhance photothermal conversion for PTA applications. Substantial effort has been made to develop metal nanostructures with optimal structural and photothermal properties. Ideal metal nanostructures should have strong and tunable SPR, be easy to deliver, have low toxicity, and be convenient for bioconjugation for actively targeting specific cancer cells. This review would highlight some gold nanostructures with various shapes and properties, including nanoparticles (NPs), nanorods (NRs), nanoshells, nanocages, and hollow nanospheres, which have been studied for PTA applications. Among these structures, hollow gold nanospheres (HGNs) exhibit arguably the best combined properties because of their small size (30―50 nm), spherical shape, and strong, narrow, and tunable SPR absorption.

  2. Photothermal ablation therapy for cancer based on metal nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ROZANOVA Nadejda; ZHANG JinZhong

    2009-01-01

    Besides conventional surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, which all tend to have side-effects and damage normal tissues, new medical strategies, such as photothermal sensitization and photothermal ablation therapy (PTA) with near-IR laser light, have been explored for treating cancer. Much of the current excitement surrounding nanoscience is directly connected to the promise of new nanotechnology for cancer diagnosis and therapy. The basic principle behind PTA is that heat generated from light can be used to destroy cancer cells. Strong optical absorption and high efficiency of photothermal conversion at the cancer sites are critical to the success of PTA. Because of their unique optical properties, e.g., strong surface plasmon resonance (SPR) absorption, noble metal nanomaterials, such as gold and silver, have been found to significantly enhance photothermal conversion for PTA applications. Substantial effort has been made to develop metal nanostructures with optimal structural and photothermal properties. Ideal metal nanostructures should have strong and tunable SPR, be easy to deliver, have low toxicity, and be convenient for bioconjugation for actively targeting specific cancer cells. This review would highlight some gold nanostructures with various shapes and properties, including nanoparticles (NPs), nanorods (NRs), nanoshells, nanocages, and hollow nanospheres, which have been studied for PTA applications. Among these structures, hollow gold nanospheres (HGNs) exhibit arguably the best combined properties because of their small size (30-50 nm), spherical shape, and strong, narrow, and tunable SPR absorption.

  3. Modeling of space environment impact on nanostructured materials. General principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronina, Ekaterina; Novikov, Lev

    2016-07-01

    In accordance with the resolution of ISO TC20/SC14 WG4/WG6 joint meeting, Technical Specification (TS) 'Modeling of space environment impact on nanostructured materials. General principles' which describes computer simulation methods of space environment impact on nanostructured materials is being prepared. Nanomaterials surpass traditional materials for space applications in many aspects due to their unique properties associated with nanoscale size of their constituents. This superiority in mechanical, thermal, electrical and optical properties will evidently inspire a wide range of applications in the next generation spacecraft intended for the long-term (~15-20 years) operation in near-Earth orbits and the automatic and manned interplanetary missions. Currently, ISO activity on developing standards concerning different issues of nanomaterials manufacturing and applications is high enough. Most such standards are related to production and characterization of nanostructures, however there is no ISO documents concerning nanomaterials behavior in different environmental conditions, including the space environment. The given TS deals with the peculiarities of the space environment impact on nanostructured materials (i.e. materials with structured objects which size in at least one dimension lies within 1-100 nm). The basic purpose of the document is the general description of the methodology of applying computer simulation methods which relate to different space and time scale to modeling processes occurring in nanostructured materials under the space environment impact. This document will emphasize the necessity of applying multiscale simulation approach and present the recommendations for the choice of the most appropriate methods (or a group of methods) for computer modeling of various processes that can occur in nanostructured materials under the influence of different space environment components. In addition, TS includes the description of possible

  4. Composite thin film materials on the basis of silver nanostructures on polymer matrix by methods of chemical metallization and self-assembling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoptsov, Evgeniy; Agabekov, Vladimir; Binhussain, Mohammed A.; Egorov, Dmitriy; Ropot, Piotr

    2014-08-01

    The techniques of formation of thin metallic coatings by deposition of silver nanoparticles (NPs) from solution onto the surface of glass and silicon substrates modified by polyelectrolytes were developed. The possibilities of the adsorption of individual silver particles, as well as creation of continuous films on their basis, were shown. The transmission, absorption and reflection spectra of obtained coatings were investigated. The most promising structure for metamaterials creation from the list of formed one was determined—solid thin film of Ag NPs on a glass substrate modified by polyethylenimine.

  5. Three-dimensional crystalline and homogeneous metallic nanostructures using directed assembly of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Cihan; Cetin, Arif E; Goutzamanidis, Georgia; Huang, Jun; Somu, Sivasubramanian; Altug, Hatice; Wei, Dongguang; Busnaina, Ahmed

    2014-05-27

    Directed assembly of nano building blocks offers a versatile route to the creation of complex nanostructures with unique properties. Bottom-up directed assembly of nanoparticles have been considered as one of the best approaches to fabricate such functional and novel nanostructures. However, there is a dearth of studies on making crystalline, solid, and homogeneous nanostructures. This requires a fundamental understanding of the forces driving the assembly of nanoparticles and precise control of these forces to enable the formation of desired nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate that colloidal nanoparticles can be assembled and simultaneously fused into 3-D solid nanostructures in a single step using externally applied electric field. By understanding the influence of various assembly parameters, we showed the fabrication of 3-D metallic materials with complex geometries such as nanopillars, nanoboxes, and nanorings with feature sizes as small as 25 nm in less than a minute. The fabricated gold nanopillars have a polycrystalline nature, have an electrical resistivity that is lower than or equivalent to electroplated gold, and support strong plasmonic resonances. We also demonstrate that the fabrication process is versatile, as fast as electroplating, and scalable to the millimeter scale. These results indicate that the presented approach will facilitate fabrication of novel 3-D nanomaterials (homogeneous or hybrid) in an aqueous solution at room temperature and pressure, while addressing many of the manufacturing challenges in semiconductor nanoelectronics and nanophotonics.

  6. Atomic layer deposition of nanostructured materials

    CERN Document Server

    Pinna, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition, formerly called atomic layer epitaxy, was developed in the 1970s to meet the needs of producing high-quality, large-area fl at displays with perfect structure and process controllability. Nowadays, creating nanomaterials and producing nanostructures with structural perfection is an important goal for many applications in nanotechnology. As ALD is one of the important techniques which offers good control over the surface structures created, it is more and more in the focus of scientists. The book is structured in such a way to fi t both the need of the expert reader (du

  7. Nanostructured materials, production and application in construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KUDRYAVTSEV Pavel Gennadievich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers characteristics of water-soluble high module silicate systems: based on polysilicates of alkali element called liquid glasses and the chains of their transformations from the lowest oligomers into the highest ones with further formation colloid solutions – silica sol. The authors describe the potentialities of the use of such systems as binders or modifying additives to produce different nanostructured silicate polymer concretes. There are examples of prospective application of liquid glass and water solutions of high module silicates in industrial areas and construction. Quantum-chemical calculations of the structure and properties of tetraphenylarsonium are given and heterogeneity of its functional groups is shown.

  8. Semiconductor to metallic transition and polaron conduction in nanostructured cobalt ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Atta ur; Rafiq, M A; Hasan, M M [Nanostructured Materials and Devices Group, Department of Chemicals and Materials Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, PO Nilore, Islamabad, 45650 (Pakistan); Karim, S; Maaz, K; Siddique, M, E-mail: fac221@pieas.edu.pk [Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, PO Nilore, Islamabad, 45650 (Pakistan)

    2011-04-27

    In this paper we report semiconductor to metal transition and polaron conduction in nanostructured cobalt ferrite. The material was prepared by the coprecipitation technique. Average particle size was determined to be {approx}10 nm by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope analysis. A detailed electrical characterization was performed in the frequency range 20 Hz-2 MHz and temperature range between 300 and 400 K. Nanostructured cobalt ferrite exhibits semiconductor behaviour from 300 to 330 K. From 330 to 400 K it has metallic behaviour. The change at {approx}330 K is attributed to a change in cation distribution as obtained from Moessbauer spectroscopy. The ac conductivity of cobalt ferrite followed {sigma}{sub ac} {approx} {omega}{sup s} dependence. The observed variation of the exponent 's' with temperature suggests that overlapping large polaron tunnelling is the dominant conduction mechanism from 300 to 400 K and in the frequency range 20 Hz-2 MHz.

  9. Potential applications of nanostructured materials in nuclear waste management.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braterman, Paul S. (The University of North Texas, Denton, TX); Phol, Phillip Isabio; Xu, Zhi-Ping (The University of North Texas, Denton, TX); Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Yang, Yi (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Bryan, Charles R.; Yu, Kui; Xu, Huifang (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Wang, Yifeng; Gao, Huizhen

    2003-09-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained from a Laboratory Directed Research & Development (LDRD) project entitled 'Investigation of Potential Applications of Self-Assembled Nanostructured Materials in Nuclear Waste Management'. The objectives of this project are to (1) provide a mechanistic understanding of the control of nanometer-scale structures on the ion sorption capability of materials and (2) develop appropriate engineering approaches to improving material properties based on such an understanding.

  10. Nanostructured Ion Storage Electrode Materials for Lithium Batteries and Supercapacitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.R.S.Prabaharan

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Performance of lithium-ion batteries, electrochemical capacitors, and other electric-energy storage devices is not only determined simply by macroscopic chemical composition of their electrode, but also strongly affected by shape and size of the active materials. Nanostructured materials are distinguished from conventional polycrystalline materials by the nanometer size of the structural units that compose them, and they often exhibit properties that are drastically different from the conventi...

  11. Method and apparatus for ion sequestration and a nanostructured metal phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Li, Xiaohong; Parker, Kent E.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2010-04-06

    A nanostructured substance, a process for sequestration of ionic waste, and an ion-sequestration apparatus are disclosed in the specification. The nanostructured substance can comprise a Lewis acid transition metal bound to a phosphate, wherein the phosphate comprises a primary structural component of the substance and the Lewis acid transition metal is a reducing agent. The nanostructured substance has a Brunner-Emmet-Teller (BET) surface area greater than or equal to approximately 100 m.sup.2/g, and a distribution coefficient for an analyte, K.sub.d, greater than or equal to approximately 5000 ml/g. The process can comprise contacting a fluid and a nanostructured metal phosphate. The apparatus can comprise a vessel and a nanostructured metal phosphate. The vessel defines a volume wherein a fluid contacts the nanostructured metal phosphate.

  12. Platinum Group Metals New Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Ming; ZHANG Jiankang; WANG Saibei; HU Jieqiong; LIU Manmen; CHEN Yongtai; ZHANG Jiming; YANG Youcai; YANG Yunfeng; ZHANG Guoquan

    2012-01-01

    Platinum group metals (PGM) include six elements,namely Pt,Pd,Rh,Ir,Os and Ru.PGM and their alloys are the important fundamental materials for modern industry and national defense construction,they have special physical and chemical properties,widely used in metallurgy,chemical,electric,electronic,information,energy,environmental protection,aviation,aerospace,navigation and other high technology industry.Platinum group metals and their alloys,which have good plasticity and processability,can be processed to electrical contact materials,resistance materials,solder,electronic paste,temperature-measurement materials,elastic materials,magnetic materials and high temperature structural materials.

  13. Rescaling metal molybdate nanostructures with biopolymer for energy storage having high capacitance with robust cycle stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakshi, Manickam; Barmi, Maryam J; Jones, Robert T

    2017-03-14

    Hybrid capacitors can replace or complement batteries, while storing energy through ion adsorption and fast surface redox reactions. There is a growing demand in developing nanostructured materials as electrodes for hybrid systems that can enhance the specific capacitance by ion desolvation in the nanopores. Here, we demonstrate that rescaling the pore diameter with the aid of biopolymer at an optimal level during the synthesis of metal molybdate leads to high capacitance 124 F g(-1) giving robust capacitance retention of 80% over 2000 cycles for a constructed device (activated carbon vs. metal molybdate). The presence of biopolymer (l-glutamic acid) in the metal molybdate acts as a complexing agent of the metal ion while enhancing the mass transport and hence it's improved electrochemical performance. However, XPS and other elemental analyses illustrated no evidence for N doping but traces of other surface functional groups (i.e. C and O) could be present on the molybdate surface. The biopolymer synthetic approach has the advantage of yielding nanostructured material with a relatively narrow pore size distribution controlled by l-glutamic acid. This study will provide a generic route to rescale other metal molybdate, phosphate or oxide counterparts and be an added value to the database.

  14. Nanostructured Materials Developed for Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Fahey, Stephen D.; Gennett, Thomas; Tin, Padetha

    2004-01-01

    There has been considerable investigation recently regarding the potential for the use of nanomaterials and nanostructures to increase the efficiency of photovoltaic devices. Efforts at the NASA Glenn Research Center have involved the development and use of quantum dots and carbon nanotubes to enhance inorganic and organic cell efficiencies. Theoretical results have shown that a photovoltaic device with a single intermediate band of states resulting from the introduction of quantum dots offers a potential efficiency of 63.2 percent. A recent publication extended the intermediate band theory to two intermediate bands and calculated a limiting efficiency of 71.7 percent. The enhanced efficiency results from converting photons of energy less than the band gap of the cell by an intermediate band. The intermediate band provides a mechanism for low-energy photons to excite carriers across the energy gap by a two-step process.

  15. Morphological and physical - chemical issues of metal nanostructures used in medical field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duceac, L. D.; Velenciuc, N.; Dobre, E. C.

    2016-06-01

    In recent years applications of nanotechnology integrated into nanomedicine and bio-nanotechnology have attracted the attention of many researchers from different fields. Processes from chemical engineering especially nanostructured materials play an important role in medical and pharmaceutical development. Fundamental researches focused on finding simple, easily accomplished synthesis methods, morphological aspects and physico-chemical advanced characterization of nanomaterials. More over, by controlling synthesis conditions textural characteristics and physicochemical properties such as particle size, shape, surface, porosity, aggregation degree and composition can be tailored. Low cytotoxicity and antimicrobial effects of these nanostructured materials makes them be applied in medicine field. The major advantage of metal based nanoparticles is the use either for their antimicrobial properties or as drug-carriers having the potential to be active at low concentrations against infectious agents.

  16. Extraction of Nanostructured Metal Oxides from the Furnace Dust for the Realization of Low Cost Solar Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girisun, T. C. Sabari; Babeela, C.; Vidhya, V.

    This article reports the simple one step process for the extraction of nanostructured metal oxides from the industrial waste (EOFD) for the realization of low cost solar applications. By hydrothermal technique with NaOH and H2SO4, valuable metals were obtained in the form of metal oxides. The identification of compounds and structural characterization were carried out through XRD and SEM analysis. Thus the metal oxides derived could be helpful to reduce the burden on the environment from the electric oil furnace dust, increase the development of the source nano material and reduce the cost of raw materials for solar cell applications.

  17. Noble Metal Nanostructures Influence of Structure and Environment on Their Optical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondřej Kvítek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical properties of nanostructured materials, isolated nanoparticles, and structures composed of both metals and semiconductors are broadly discussed. Fundamentals of the origin of surface plasmons as well as the surface plasmon resonance sensing are described and documented on a number of examples. Localized plasmon sensing and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy are subjected to special interest since those techniques are inherently associated with the direct application of plasmonic structures. The possibility of tailoring the optical properties of ultra-thin metal layers via controlling their shape and morphology by postdeposition annealing is documented. Special attention is paid to the contribution of bimetallic particles and layers as well as metal structures encapsulated in semiconductors and dielectrics to the optical response. The opportunity to tune the properties of materials over a large scale of values opens up entirely new application possibilities of optical active structures. The nature of surface plasmons predetermines noble metal nanostructures to be promising great materials for development of modern label-free sensing methods based on plasmon resonance—SPR and LSPR sensing.

  18. Metal sulfide and rare-earth phosphate nanostructures and methods of making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Stanislaus; Zhang, Fen

    2016-06-28

    The present invention provides a method of producing a crystalline rare earth phosphate nanostructure. The method comprising: providing a rare earth metal precursor solution and providing a phosphate precursor solution; placing a porous membrane between the metal precursor solution and the phosphate precursor solution, wherein metal cations of the metal precursor solution and phosphate ions of the phosphate precursor solution react, thereby producing a crystalline rare earth metal phosphate nanostructure.

  19. Self-assembled peptide nanostructures for functional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardan Ekiz, Melis; Cinar, Goksu; Aref Khalily, Mohammad; Guler, Mustafa O.

    2016-10-01

    Nature is an important inspirational source for scientists, and presents complex and elegant examples of adaptive and intelligent systems created by self-assembly. Significant effort has been devoted to understanding these sophisticated systems. The self-assembly process enables us to create supramolecular nanostructures with high order and complexity, and peptide-based self-assembling building blocks can serve as suitable platforms to construct nanostructures showing diverse features and applications. In this review, peptide-based supramolecular assemblies will be discussed in terms of their synthesis, design, characterization and application. Peptide nanostructures are categorized based on their chemical and physical properties and will be examined by rationalizing the influence of peptide design on the resulting morphology and the methods employed to characterize these high order complex systems. Moreover, the application of self-assembled peptide nanomaterials as functional materials in information technologies and environmental sciences will be reviewed by providing examples from recently published high-impact studies.

  20. Coulomb sink effect on coarsening of metal nanostructures on surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong HAN; Feng LIU

    2008-01-01

    We discuss Coulomb effects on the coarsening of metal nanostructures on surfaces. We have proposed a new concept of a "Coulomb sink" [Phys. Rev. Lett., 2004, 93: 106102] to elucidate the effect of Coulomb charging on the coarsening of metal mesas grown on semiconductor surfaces. A charged mesa, due to its reduced chemical potential, acts as a Coulomb sink and grows at the expense of neighboring neu-tral mesas. The Coulomb sink provides a potentially useful method for the controlled fabrication of metal nanostructures. In this article, we will describe in detail the proposed physical models, which can explain qualitatively the most salient fea-tures of coarsening of charged Pb mesas on the Si(111) sur-face, as observed by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). We will also describe a method of precisely fabricating large-scale nanocrystals with well-defined shape and size. By using the Coulomb sink effect, the artificial center-full-hol-lowed or half-hollowed nanowells can be created.

  1. Nanostructured Mo-based electrode materials for electrochemical energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xianluo; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Mei, Yueni; Huang, Yunhui

    2015-04-21

    The development of advanced energy storage devices is at the forefront of research geared towards a sustainable future. Nanostructured materials are advantageous in offering huge surface to volume ratios, favorable transport features, and attractive physicochemical properties. They have been extensively explored in various fields of energy storage and conversion. This review is focused largely on the recent progress in nanostructured Mo-based electrode materials including molybdenum oxides (MoO(x), 2 ≤ x ≤ 3), dichalconides (MoX2, X = S, Se), and oxysalts for rechargeable lithium/sodium-ion batteries, Mg batteries, and supercapacitors. Mo-based compounds including MoO2, MoO3, MoO(3-y) (0 energy storage systems because of their unique physicochemical properties, such as conductivity, mechanical and thermal stability, and cyclability. In this review, we aim to provide a systematic summary of the synthesis, modification, and electrochemical performance of nanostructured Mo-based compounds, as well as their energy storage applications in lithium/sodium-ion batteries, Mg batteries, and pseudocapacitors. The relationship between nanoarchitectures and electrochemical performances as well as the related charge-storage mechanism is discussed. Moreover, remarks on the challenges and perspectives of Mo-containing compounds for further development in electrochemical energy storage applications are proposed. This review sheds light on the sustainable development of advanced rechargeable batteries and supercapacitors with nanostructured Mo-based electrode materials.

  2. Micro-and nano-structured conducting polymeric materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Gewu; CHEN Feng'en; WU Xufeng; QU Liangti; ZHANG Jiaxin; SHI Gaoquan

    2005-01-01

    Conducting polymeric materials with micro-/nano-structures have potential applications in fabrication of various optical, electronic, sensing and electrochemical devices. This is mainly because these materials not only possess the characteristics of conducting polymers, but also have special functions based on their micro- or nano-structures. In this review, we summarize the recent work on "soft" and "hard" template-guided syntheses of micro-/nano-structured conducting polymers and open up the prospects of the main trends in this field.

  3. Design of Novel Metal Nanostructures for Broadband Solar Energy Conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine A. Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar power holds great potential as an alternative energy source, but current photovoltaic cells have much room for improvement in cost and efficiency. Our objective was to develop metal nanostructures whose surface plasmon resonance (SPR spectra closely match the solar spectrum to enhance light absorption and scattering. We employed the finite-difference time-domain simulation method to evaluate the effect of varying key parameters. A novel nanostructure with SPR absorption matching a region of the solar spectrum (300 to 1500 nm that contains 90% of solar energy was successfully designed. This structure consists of a large gold-silica core-shell structure with smaller gold nanoparticles and nanorods on its surface. Such complex nanostructures are promising for broad and tunable absorption spectra. In addition, we investigated the SPR of silver nanoparticle arrays, which can achieve scattering close to the solar spectrum. We demonstrated an improvement in efficiency of over 30% with optimal nanoparticle radius and periods of 75 nm and 325 nm, respectively. In combination, our studies enable high-efficiency, tunable, and cost-effective enhancement of both light absorption and scattering, which has potential applications in solar energy conversion as well as biomedical imaging.

  4. Nanostructure of gel-derived aluminosilicate materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkó, Katalin; Hüsing, Nicola; Goerigk, Günter; Peterlik, Herwig

    2008-02-01

    In the present work, aluminosilicate aerogels prepared under various conditions were compared with respect to their nanostructures and porosity. The purpose of this investigation was to find a suitable way to predict the final product structure and to tailor a required texture. Several Al and Si precursors (Al nitrate, Al isopropoxide, Al acetate, tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), and sodium silicate) were used in our examinations; the solvent content (water and alcohols), surfactants, as well as the catalysts were varied. In addition, the aerogels were subjected to various heat treatments. Hybrid aerogels were synthesized by the addition of different polymers (poly(acrylic acid), polyvinyl acetate, and polydimethylsiloxane). Aluminosilicate and hybrid aerogel structures were investigated by 27Al MAS NMR, SAXS, SEM, and porosity measurements. Loose fractal structures with a good porosity and high Al incorporation can be achieved from TEOS and Al nitrate or isopropoxide via a sol-gel preparation route. The use of Al acetate led to compact aerogel structures independently of the Si precursor, the pH, and the catalyst.

  5. Localized surface plasmon of quasi-one-dimensional metallic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingzhao

    2007-05-01

    The plasmon resonance of noble metal nanoparticles provides interesting optical properties in the visible and near-infrared region, and is highly tunable by varying the shape and the composition of the nanoparticles. The rod-like gold nanostructures can be synthesized by a seed-mediated method in aqueous surfactant solutions. Starting from different types of gold seeds, either single crystalline gold nanorods or penta-fold twinned gold bipyramids can be synthesized in decent yield with silver(I) added into the growth solution. These nanostructures have pronounced plasmon resonance varying in the 1˜2 eV range. The bipyramids are strikingly monodisperse in shape, which leads to the sharpest ensemble longitudinal plasmon resonance reported so far for metal colloid solutions. A mechanism based on the underpotential deposition of silver was thus suggested to explain the essential role of Ag(I) in the growth process. The optical spectra of the gold colloids were simulated with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The results show excellent agreement with recent experimental optical spectra. The local field enhancement (|E|/|E0|) was studied at the plasmon resonance. Sharper structural features produce more significant enhancement and the largest enhancement of more than a factor of 200 is seen around the poles of the bipyramid. A large internal field enhancement by more than a factor of 30 is found for the bipyramids, which suggests that they will exhibit very strong optical nonlinearities. The plasmon can be further tuned by introducing the core/shell nanostructures such as metal/metal or metal/semiconductor nanorods. Following a simple procedure, a homogeneous layer of silver with 1-4 nm thickness can be plated onto the gold nanorods, which shifts the longitudinal plasmon mode of the nanorods toward blue. The silver layer can be converted to semiconductors silver sulfide or selenide, with the longitudinal plasmon resonance tuned toward red. The metal

  6. Near-field effects and energy transfer in hybrid metal-oxide nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Herr

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the big challenges of the 21st century is the utilization of nanotechnology for energy technology. Nanoscale structures may provide novel functionality, which has been demonstrated most convincingly by successful applications such as dye-sensitized solar cells introduced by M. Grätzel. Applications in energy technology are based on the transfer and conversion of energy. Following the example of photosynthesis, this requires a combination of light harvesting, transfer of energy to a reaction center, and conversion to other forms of energy by charge separation and transfer. This may be achieved by utilizing hybrid nanostructures, which combine metallic and nonmetallic components. Metallic nanostructures can interact strongly with light. Plasmonic excitations of such structures can cause local enhancement of the electrical field, which has been utilized in spectroscopy for many years. On the other hand, the excited states in metallic structures decay over very short lifetimes. Longer lifetimes of excited states occur in nonmetallic nanostructures, which makes them attractive for further energy transfer before recombination or relaxation sets in. Therefore, the combination of metallic nanostructures with nonmetallic materials is of great interest. We report investigations of hybrid nanostructured model systems that consist of a combination of metallic nanoantennas (fabricated by nanosphere lithography, NSL and oxide nanoparticles. The oxide particles were doped with rare-earth (RE ions, which show a large shift between absorption and emission wavelengths, allowing us to investigate the energy-transfer processes in detail. The main focus is on TiO2 nanoparticles doped with Eu3+, since the material is interesting for applications such as the generation of hydrogen by photocatalytic splitting of water molecules. We use high-resolution techniques such as confocal fluorescence microscopy for the investigation of energy-transfer processes. The

  7. Near-field effects and energy transfer in hybrid metal-oxide nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Ulrich; Kuerbanjiang, Balati; Benel, Cahit; Papageorgiou, Giorgos; Goncalves, Manuel; Boneberg, Johannes; Leiderer, Paul; Ziemann, Paul; Marek, Peter; Hahn, Horst

    2013-01-01

    One of the big challenges of the 21st century is the utilization of nanotechnology for energy technology. Nanoscale structures may provide novel functionality, which has been demonstrated most convincingly by successful applications such as dye-sensitized solar cells introduced by M. Grätzel. Applications in energy technology are based on the transfer and conversion of energy. Following the example of photosynthesis, this requires a combination of light harvesting, transfer of energy to a reaction center, and conversion to other forms of energy by charge separation and transfer. This may be achieved by utilizing hybrid nanostructures, which combine metallic and nonmetallic components. Metallic nanostructures can interact strongly with light. Plasmonic excitations of such structures can cause local enhancement of the electrical field, which has been utilized in spectroscopy for many years. On the other hand, the excited states in metallic structures decay over very short lifetimes. Longer lifetimes of excited states occur in nonmetallic nanostructures, which makes them attractive for further energy transfer before recombination or relaxation sets in. Therefore, the combination of metallic nanostructures with nonmetallic materials is of great interest. We report investigations of hybrid nanostructured model systems that consist of a combination of metallic nanoantennas (fabricated by nanosphere lithography, NSL) and oxide nanoparticles. The oxide particles were doped with rare-earth (RE) ions, which show a large shift between absorption and emission wavelengths, allowing us to investigate the energy-transfer processes in detail. The main focus is on TiO2 nanoparticles doped with Eu(3+), since the material is interesting for applications such as the generation of hydrogen by photocatalytic splitting of water molecules. We use high-resolution techniques such as confocal fluorescence microscopy for the investigation of energy-transfer processes. The experiments are

  8. Quantitative Electron Tomography for Nanostructured Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedrich, H.

    2009-01-01

    The controlled assembly of materials on the nanoscale has been a major focus of research across many scientific disciplines. In the nanometer size range, materials characteristics can be tuned not only by composition but more importantly by size and shape of constituent phases, giving rise to except

  9. Composite, nanostructured, super-hydrophobic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Urso, Brian R.; Simpson, John T.

    2007-08-21

    A hydrophobic disordered composite material having a protrusive surface feature includes a recessive phase and a protrusive phase, the recessive phase having a higher susceptibility to a preselected etchant than the protrusive phase, the composite material having an etched surface wherein the protrusive phase protrudes from the surface to form a protrusive surface feature, the protrusive feature being hydrophobic.

  10. Diffusion and surface alloying of gradient nanostructured metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenbo Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gradient nanostructures (GNSs have been optimized in recent years for desired performance. The diffusion behavior in GNS metals is crucial for understanding the diffusion mechanism and relative characteristics of different interfaces that provide fundamental understanding for advancing the traditional surface alloying processes. In this paper, atomic diffusion, reactive diffusion, and surface alloying processes are reviewed for various metals with a preformed GNS surface layer. We emphasize the promoted atomic diffusion and reactive diffusion in the GNS surface layer that are related to a higher interfacial energy state with respect to those in relaxed coarse-grained samples. Accordingly, different surface alloying processes, such as nitriding and chromizing, have been modified significantly, and some diffusion-related properties have been enhanced. Finally, the perspectives on current research in this field are discussed.

  11. Growth and magnetization study of transition metal doped GaN nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Shalini; Kang, Hun; Park, Eun-Hyun [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kane, Matthew H.; Ferguson, Ian T. [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Atlanta, GA (United States); Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    This work presents the MOCVD growth and characterization of optically active GaN nanostructures which have been doped with the transition metals manganese and iron for potential spintronic applications. Introduction of both these transition metals in GaN nanostructures enhanced the nucleation of the nanostructures resulting in reduced lateral dimensions and increased nanostructure density. Both Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}N and Ga{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}N nanostructures showed hysteresis behaviour at 5 K. Further VSM measurements on Ga{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}N nanostructures at 300 K showed a hysteresis curve with a reduced coercive filed and displayed superparamagnetic behaviour. These magnetically active nanostructures are promising and provide an incentive to further study them with the aim of eventually utilizing them in spintronic applications and improving device efficiency. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Ignition of Propellants Through Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-31

    case gaseous O2 was introduced in a coaxial flow at a rate of 7 Lit/min with a swirl motion in order to produce an effective fuel and oxidizer mixing...system should be robust, efficient , reliable, simple, low cost, and flexible. Also, an ignition system should initiate combustion under a broad range...discovered that the SWCNT material does not ignite well if wet, so we encapsulated the material to protect it from the fuel spray. To improve the

  13. Two-photon reduction: a cost-effective method for fabrication of functional metallic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Sahar; Cao, YaoYu; Lin, Han; Jia, BaoHua

    2017-03-01

    Metallic nanostructures have underpinned plasmonic-based advanced photonic devices in a broad range of research fields over the last decade including physics, engineering, material science and bioscience. The key to realizing functional plasmonic resonances that can manipulate light at the optical frequencies relies on the creation of conductive metallic structures at the nanoscale with low structural defects. Currently, most plasmonic nanostructures are fabricated either by electron beam lithography (EBL) or by focused ion beam (FIB) milling, which are expensive, complicated and time-consuming. In comparison, the direct laser writing (DLW) technique has demonstrated its high spatial resolution and cost-effectiveness in three-dimensional fabrication of micro/nanostructures. Furthermore, the recent breakthroughs in superresolution nanofabrication and parallel writing have significantly advanced the fabrication resolution and throughput of the DLW method and made it one of the promising future nanofabrication technologies with low-cost and scalability. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of the state-of-the-art DLW fabrication technology for nanometer scale metallic structures. The fabrication mechanisms, different material choices, fabrication capability, including resolution, conductivity and structure surface smoothness, as well as the characterization methods and achievable devices for different applications are presented. In particular, the development trends of the field and the perspectives for future opportunities and challenges are provided at the end of the review. It has been demonstrated that the quality of the metallic structures fabricated using the DLW method is excellent compared with other methods providing a new and enabling platform for functional nanophotonic device fabrication.

  14. Two-photon reduction: a cost-effective method for fabrication of functional metallic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Sahar; Cao, YaoYu; Lin, Han; Jia, BaoHua

    2017-03-01

    Metallic nanostructures have underpinned plasmonic-based advanced photonic devices in a broad range of research fields over the last decade including physics, engineering, material science and bioscience. The key to realizing functional plasmonic resonances that can manipulate light at the optical frequencies relies on the creation of conductive metallic structures at the nanoscale with low structural defects. Currently, most plasmonic nanostructures are fabricated either by electron beam lithography (EBL) or by focused ion beam (FIB) milling, which are expensive, complicated and time-consuming. In comparison, the direct laser writing (DLW) technique has demonstrated its high spatial resolution and cost-effectiveness in three-dimensional fabrication of micro/nanostructures. Furthermore, the recent breakthroughs in superresolution nanofabrication and parallel writing have significantly advanced the fabrication resolution and throughput of the DLW method and made it one of the promising future nanofabrication technologies with low-cost and scalability. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of the state-of-the-art DLW fabrication technology for nanometer scale metallic structures. The fabrication mechanisms, different material choices, fabrication capability, including resolution, conductivity and structure surface smoothness, as well as the characterization methods and achievable devices for different applications are presented. In particular, the development trends of the field and the perspectives for future opportunities and challenges are provided at the end of the review. It has been demonstrated that the quality of the metallic structures fabricated using the DLW method is excellent compared with other methods providing a new and enabling platform for functional nanophotonic device fabrication.

  15. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, Rudolph G.; Martinez, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds.

  16. Helical nanostructure of tubular metal-organic complex synthesized by sonochemical process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Tubular metal-organic complex (C2H9N2)2(C2H10N2)0.5[MoO2(OC6H4O)2] has been synthesized. The title complex crystallizes in the tetragonal system, space group P4(2)/n with a = 25.214(8), c = 7.484(4) ?, and Z = 8. The X-ray structural analysis of the complex reveals tube-like framework which is stabilized by hydrogen bond. Chiral anions [Mo(V)O2(OC6H4O)2]3? of the complex have two types of isomers(λ /δ configuration). Helical nanostructure of this metal-organic complex was formed using a sonochemical method. Sonocation may lead to the transformation from the bulk tubular complex to the helical nanostructure. The as-synthesized nanohelices were all double-stranded and left- and right-handed nanohelices were both formed. The helical nanostructure is a new morphology of inorganic-organic hybrid materials on the nanoscale level and the exact formation mechanism of these helices still needs further investigation.

  17. An investigation into carbon nanostructured materials as catalyst support in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veltzé, Sune

    black support materials for low platinum containing electrocatalyst. This is partly due to their high electronic conductivity. Partly due to their high surface area needed for the dispersion of nanoparticulate metal-clusters. In addition carbon nano-structures (CNF, SWCNT, MWCNT etc.) are more durable...... dispersion methods as the weak Van der Waals forces prevent the solvatisation and dispersion carbon nano structured materials. As the dispersion of SWCNT, MWCNT and CNF exhibit colloidal dispersion behaviour, the usual methods of consist solvatisation in organic solvents, mixture of water and an organic...

  18. Using metal nanostructures to form hydrocarbons from carbon dioxide, water and sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Shen, Mengyan; Huo, Haibin; Ren, Haizhou; Johnson, Michael

    2011-12-01

    Based on experimental results, we propose a mechanism that allows the use of metal nanostructures to synthesize hydrocarbons and carbohydrates from carbon dioxide, water and sunlight. When sunlight impinges on cobalt nanostructures in a glass chamber, its intensity is greatly enhanced around the tips of the nanostructures through surface plasmon excitations focusing effect, and it then photodissociates the water and carbon dioxide molecules through enhanced photon absorptions of ions around the tips of the nanostructures. The photodissociated molecules in excited states remain on the cobalt nanostructure surfaces and various hydrocarbons and carbohydrates then will be formed around the surfaces at temperatures much lower than 100 oC.

  19. Laser Propagation in Nanostructured Ultra-Low-Density Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Colvin, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Yogo, A [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering; Kemp, G. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Matsukuma, H. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering; Tanaka, N. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering; Zhang, Z. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering; Koga, K. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering; Tosaki, S. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering; Nishimura, H. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering

    2016-03-15

    The nanostructure of very-low-density aerogels (< 10 mg/cm3) affects the laser heating and propagation of the subsequent heat front. Simulations treat these materials as an atomistic medium without any structure differentiating between near-solid-density material and voids. Thus, simulations fail to predict the effects of the aerogel’s physical micro or nanostructure on the laser-matter interaction. We have designed an experiment using the GEKKO XII laser and ILE diagnostics to characterize the ionization-wave propagation and x-ray yield from aerogel and mass-matched gaseous targets as the laser passes through each. By design, the gas and aerogel targets will have identical densities and identical effective ionization states.

  20. 纳米金属玻璃%Nanostructured Metallic Glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚李; 金朝晖

    2016-01-01

    Both“grain boundaries” and“grains” are amorphous in a nanoglass, as proposed originally by Dr. Herbert Gleiter, a German scientist. Nanostructures introduced into traditional bulk metallic glass in such a way make novel properties achievable, underlying potential applications in a number of new material domains. Up to now, several nanoglasses have been synthesized via inert-gas condensation or magnetron sputtering techniques. They exhibit outstanding macroscopic tensile plasticity, unusual ferromagnetism, high catalytic performance and good biocompatibility. The advantages have been demonstrated recently not only by experiments, but also by theoretical considerations, in particular, along with atomistic simulations.%纳米金属玻璃是指“界面”及“晶粒”均处于非晶状态的一类纳米结构金属材料,最早由德国著名材料学家Herbert Gleiter博士提出,目的是在块体金属玻璃中引入纳米结构,得到传统金属玻璃所不具备的理化和机械性能。通过惰性气体冷凝法、磁控溅射沉积法等制备手段,迄今已成功合成了数种纳米金属玻璃。它们被证实具有较高的宏观拉伸塑性、独特的铁磁性、高效的催化性能和优异的生物兼容性。除了对纳米金属玻璃制备及性能做简要介绍外,同时也回顾了纳米金属玻璃在原子尺度计算方面所取得的研究进展。实验和理论研究均表明纳米金属玻璃的确具有超越传统金属玻璃的优势。

  1. Magnetic Cluster States in Nanostructured Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diandra Leslie-Pelecky

    2008-06-13

    The goal of this work is to fabricate model nanomaterials with different types of disorder and use atomic-scale characterization and macroscopic magnetization measurements to understand better how specific types of disorder affects macroscopic magnetic behavior. This information can be used to produce magnetic nanomaterials with specific properties for applications such as permanent magnets, soft magnetic material for motors and biomedical applications.

  2. Realization of New and Enhanced Materials Properties Through Nanostructural Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-15

    by modifying limits of integration over certain orientational variables [1,64,66]. Typical agreement between theory and experiment is shown below...must be different to realize an entropy enhancement, our preliminary experiments indicate that the difference can be realized in 400 ! , 5 . 3146-C168(75...Lecture: "Rational Desing of Nanostructured Organic Electro-Optic Materials". Conference-January 15-20, 2006--Conference on Photoresponsive Organics and

  3. Nanostructured Electrode Materials for Fuel Cells and Supercapacitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.Sugimoto; T.Saida; Y.Takasu

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Owing to its electrochemical stability, catalytic activity and high electrical conductivity, ruthenium-based oxides have been realized in electrochemistry as excellent electrode materials with applications ranging from electrocatalysts for industrial electrolysis to high power energy storage. Recent studies have suggested that RuOx may have an active role in electrocatalysts for fuel cells.We have been engaged in the fundamental and practical study of nanostructured RuO2-based electrodes[1-5]....

  4. Hybrid Aluminum Composite Materials Based on Carbon Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana S. Koltsova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated formation of carbon nanofibers grown by chemical deposition (CVD method using an acetylene-hydrogen mixture on the surface of micron-sized aluminum powder particles. To obtain uniform distribution of the carbon nanostructures on the particles we deposited nickel catalyst on the surface by spraying from the aqueous solution of nickel nitrate. It was found that increasing the time of the synthesis lowers the rate of growth of carbon nanostructures due to the deactivation of the catalyst. The Raman spectroscopy measurements confirm the presence of disordered carbon corresponding to CNFs in the specimen. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed the presence of aluminum carbide in the hot pressed samples. An aluminum composite material prepared using 1 wt.% CNFs obtained by uniaxial cold pressing and sintering showed 30% increase in the hardness compared to pure aluminum, whereas the composites prepared by hot pressing showed 80% increase in the hardness. Composite materials have satisfactory ductility. Thus, the aluminum based material reinforced with carbon nanostructures should be appropriate for creating high-strength and light compacts for aerospace and automotive applications and power engineering.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7355

  5. Electron Field Emission from Nanostructured Carbon Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sanju

    2005-03-01

    Fabricating small structures has almost become fashionable and the rationale is that reducing one or more dimensions below some critical length changes the systems' physical properties drastically, where nanocrystalline diamond (n-D) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the class of advanced carbon materials serve model examples. Emission of electrons at room temperature - cold electron emitters - are of vital importance for a variety of vacuum microelectronic devices - electron microscopes, photo multipliers, X-ray generators, lamps, and flat panel displays and microwave cathodes. Electron emitters may lead to otherwise difficult to obtain advantages in performance and/or design. This is the driving force to investigate the carbon-related materials as cold cathodes. In this talk, the performance of various forms of carbon in thin film form including diamond, n-D, and vertically aligned CNTs as cold cathodes for their potential use in field emission displays (FEDs) in terms of I-V characteristics and corresponding spatial imaging will be presented. Physics based models such as, NEA, surface modification, geometric enhancement, and microstructure alteration due to particle bombardment, and doping, will be described to support the experimental observations of electron field enhancement (low turn-on voltage, high current and emission site density) and its reliability from the abovementioned carbon-related materials. Other vacuum device applications such as thermionic power generators will be mentioned briefly.

  6. Building one-dimensional oxide nanostructure arrays on conductive metal substrates for lithium-ion battery anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jian; Li, Yuanyuan; Liu, Jinping; Huang, Xintang

    2011-01-01

    Lithium ion battery (LIB) is potentially one of the most attractive energy storage devices. To meet the demands of future high-power and high-energy density requirements in both thin-film microbatteries and conventional batteries, it is challenging to explore novel nanostructured anode materials instead of conventional graphite. Compared to traditional electrodes based on nanostructure powder paste, directly grown ordered nanostructure array electrodes not only simplify the electrode processing, but also offer remarkable advantages such as fast electron transport/collection and ion diffusion, sufficient electrochemical reaction of individual nanostructures, enhanced material-electrolyte contact area and facile accommodation of the strains caused by lithium intercalation and de-intercalation. This article provides a brief overview of the present status in the area of LIB anodes based on one-dimensional nanostructure arrays growing directly on conductive inert metal substrates, with particular attention to metal oxides synthesized by an anodized alumina membrane (AAM)-free solution-based or hydrothermal methods. Both the scientific developments and the techniques and challenges are critically analyzed.

  7. X-ray characterisation of nanostructured materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette

    austenite produced using a novel method showed that CrN formed even at temperatures below 450± where the mobility of Cr is very low. 3) Carbon nanotubes, a non-crystalline material with a periodic structure. It was shown that the mean bulk structural properties of the nanotubes can be obtained from XRPD...... of the experi- mental XRPD patterns, the need for new interpretation methods has arisen. The method described in the present thesis is by no means new, in fact it was developed by Debye in 1915. However, the Debye method it is rather computationally heavy, so in practise it is only applicable to the X-ray char...

  8. Nanostructural Materials for Energy Storage Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronislaw Buczek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess of carbonaceous monoliths used for adsorption cooling systems. The carbonaceous monoliths prepared from coal precursors are obtained. The porous structure of monoliths was evaluated on the basis of nitrogen adsorption-desorption data. The investigated monoliths have significantly developed microporous structure. The large specific area of carbonaceous monoliths (about 2000 m2/g and volume of micropores are observed. Methanol adsorption isotherms and heat of wetting using methanol was determined. Results show that monoliths materials are high adsorption capacity of methanol and heat of wetting, which can improve of heat exchange and efficiency in processes of refrigeration and air conditioning.

  9. Metal oxide core shell nanostructures as building blocks for efficient light emission (SISGR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jane P [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Dorman, James [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Cheung, Cyrus [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-01-12

    The objective of this research is to synthesize core-shell nano-structured metal oxide materials and investigate their structural, electronic and optical properties to understand the microscopic pathways governing the energy conversion process, thereby controlling and improving their efficiency. Specifically, the goal is to use a single metal oxide core-shell nanostructure and a single excitation source to generate photons with long emission lifetime over the entire visible spectrum and when controlled at the right ratio, generating white light. In order to achieve this goal, we need to control the energy transfer between light emitting elements, which dictates the control of their interatomic spacing and spatial distribution. We developed an economical wet chemical process to form the nanostructured core and to control the thickness and composition of the shell layers. With the help from using DOE funded synchrotron radiation facility, we delineated the growth mechanism of the nano-structured core and the shell layers, thereby enhancing our understanding of structure-property relation in these materials. Using the upconversion luminescence and the lifetime measurements as effective feedback to materials sysnthes is and integration, we demonstrated improved luminescence lifetimes of the core-shell nano-structures and quantified the optimal core-multi-shell structure with optimum shell thickness and composition. We developed a rare-earths co-doped LaPO4 core-multishell structure in order to produce a single white light source. It was decided that the mutli-shell method would produce the largest increase in luminescence efficiency while limiting any energy transfer that may occur between the dopant ions. All samples resulted in emission spectra within the accepted range of white light generation based on the converted CIE color coordinates. The white light obtained varied between warm and cool white depending on the layering architecture, allowing for the

  10. Metal free structural colours via disordered nanostructures with nm resolution and full CYMK colour spectrum

    KAUST Repository

    Bonifazi, Marcella

    2017-02-28

    Structural colours represents a research area of great interest, due to a wide field of application ranging from micro-security to biomimetic materials. At present metallic substrate are heavily employed and only a partial spectra of colours can be realised. We propose a novel, metal-free technology that exploits the complex scattering from a disordered three-dimensional dielectric material on a silicon substrate. We reproduce experimentally the full spectrum of CMYK colours, including variations in intensity. Our resolution lies in the nm range, limited only by the electron beam lithography fabrication process. We demonstrate that this technique is extremely robust, suitable for flexible and reusable substrates. Full of these notable proprieties these nano-structures fits perfectly with the requirements of a real-world technology.

  11. Metallic Tungsten Nanostructures and Highly Nanostructured Thin Films by Deposition of Tungsten Oxide and Subsequent Reduction in a Single Hot-Wire CVD Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harks, P.P.R.M.L.; Houweling, Z.S.; de Jong, M.M.; Kuang, Y; Geus, J.W.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis of metallic tungsten nanostructures and highly nanostructured thin films is presented. Crystalline tungsten oxide nanostructures are deposited on glassy carbon substrates kept at 700 100 8C by oxidizing resistively heated tungsten filaments in an air flow under subatmospheric pressures

  12. Metallic nanostructure formation limited by the surface hydrogen on silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrine, Kathryn A; Teplyakov, Andrew V

    2010-08-03

    Constant miniaturization of electronic devices and interfaces needed to make them functional requires an understanding of the initial stages of metal growth at the molecular level. The use of metal-organic precursors for metal deposition allows for some control of the deposition process, but the ligands of these precursor molecules often pose substantial contamination problems. One of the ways to alleviate the contamination problem with common copper deposition precursors, such as copper(I) (hexafluoroacetylacetonato) vinyltrimethylsilane, Cu(hfac)VTMS, is a gas-phase reduction with molecular hydrogen. Here we present an alternative method to copper film and nanostructure growth using the well-defined silicon surface. Nearly ideal hydrogen termination of silicon single-crystalline substrates achievable by modern surface modification methods provides a limited supply of a reducing agent at the surface during the initial stages of metal deposition. Spectroscopic evidence shows that the Cu(hfac) fragment is present upon room-temperature adsorption and reacts with H-terminated Si(100) and Si(111) surfaces to deposit metallic copper. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to follow the initial stages of copper nucleation and the formation of copper nanoparticles, and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) confirms the presence of hfac fragments on the surfaces of nanoparticles. As the surface hydrogen is consumed, copper nanoparticles are formed; however, this growth stops as the accessible hydrogen is reacted away at room temperature. This reaction sets a reference for using other solid substrates that can act as reducing agents in nanoparticle growth and metal deposition.

  13. Nanostructured energetic materials derived from sol-gel chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, R L; Tillotson, T M; Hrubesh, L W; Gash, A E

    2000-03-15

    Initiation and detonation properties are dramatically affected by an energetic material's microstructural properties. Sol-gel chemistry allows intimacy of mixing to be controlled and dramatically improved over existing methodologies. One material goal is to create very high power energetic materials which also have high energy densities. Using sol-gel chemistry we have made a nanostructured composite energetic material. Here a solid skeleton of fuel, based on resorcinol-formaldehyde, has nanocrystalline ammonium perchlorate, the oxidizer, trapped within its pores. At optimum stoichiometry it has approximately the energy density of HMX. Transmission electron microscopy indicated no ammonium perchlorate crystallites larger than 20 nm while near-edge soft x-ray absorption microscopy showed that nitrogen was uniformly distributed, at least on the scale of less than 80 nm. Small-angle neutron scattering studies were conducted on the material. Those results were consistent with historical ones for this class of nanostructured materials. The average skeletal primary particle size was on the order of 2.7 nm, while the nanocomposite showed the growth of small 1 nm size crystals of ammonium perchlorate with some clustering to form particles greater than 10 nm.

  14. Scaling Laws for van der Waals Interactions in Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobre, Vivekanand; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2014-03-01

    Van der Waals (vdW) forces originate from interactions between fluctuating multipoles in matter and play a significant role in the structure and stability of nanostructured materials. Many models used to describe vdW interactions in nanomaterials are based on a simple pairwise-additive approximation, neglecting the strong electrodynamic response effects caused by long-range fluctuations in matter. We develop and utilize an efficient microscopic method to demonstrate that vdW interactions in nanomaterials act at distances greater than typically assumed, and can be characterized by different scaling laws depending on the dimensionality and size of the system. Specifically, we study the behaviour of vdW interactions in single-layer and multilayer graphene, fullerenes of varying size, single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons. As a function of nanostructure size, the van der Waals coefficients follow unusual trends for all of the considered systems, and deviate significantly from the conventionally employed pairwise-additive picture. We propose that the peculiar van der Waals interactions in nanostructured materials could be exploited to control their self-assembly.

  15. Surface modification of microfibrous materials with nanostructured carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasnikova, Irina V., E-mail: tokareva@catalysis.ru [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, pr. Ac. Lavrentieva, 5, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin av., 30, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Mishakov, Ilya V.; Vedyagin, Aleksey A. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, pr. Ac. Lavrentieva, 5, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin av., 30, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Bauman, Yury I. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, pr. Ac. Lavrentieva, 5, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Korneev, Denis V. [State Research Center of Virology and Biotechnology VECTOR, Koltsovo, Novosibirsk Region 630559 (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The surface of fiberglass cloth, carbon and basalt microfibers was modified with carbon nanostructured coating via catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) of 1,2-dichloroethane. Incipient wetness impregnation and solution combustion synthesis (SCS) methods were used to deposit nickel catalyst on the surface of microfibrous support. Prepared NiO/support samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis and temperature-programmed reduction. The samples of resulted hybrid materials were studied by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopies as well as by low-temperature nitrogen adsorption. The nature of the support was found to have considerable effect on the CCVD process peculiarities. High yield of nanostructured carbon with largest average diameter of nanofibers within the studied series was observed when carbon microfibers were used as a support. This sample characterized with moderate surface area (about 80 m{sup 2}/g after 2 h of CCVD) shows the best anchorage effect. Among the mineral supports, fiberglass tissue was found to provide highest carbon yield (up to 3.07 g/g{sub FG}) and surface area (up to 344 m{sup 2}/g) due to applicability of SCS method for Ni deposition. - Highlights: • The microfibers of different nature were coated with nanostructured carbon layer. • Features of CNF growth and characteristics of hybrid materials were studied. • Appropriate anchorage of CNF layer on microfiber’s surface was demonstrated.

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of Nanostructure Transition Metal Oxides Extracted from Industrial Waste (EOFD) by Hydrothermal Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girisun, T. C. Sabari; Babeela, C.; Vidhya, V.

    2011-10-01

    Electric oil furnace dust (EOFD) is a solid waste generated in the collection of particulate material during steelmaking process in electric and oil furnaces. Over 7 million metric tons dust produced per annum in worldwide creates deep impacts like soil, ground water and ecology pollutions. This article reports the simple one step process for the extraction of nanostructured metal oxides from the industrial waste (EOFD) for the realization of low cost solar applications. By hydrothermal technique valuable metals were obtained in the form of metal oxides. Initially the presence of metals was identified by ICP analysis. XRD analysis confirms the formation of nano structured titanium oxide (TiO) along with traces of iron oxide (Fe2O3). The surface morphology and the particle size were analyzed by SEM analysis. Thus the metal oxides derived could be helpful to reduce the burden on the environment, increase the development of the source nano material and reduce the cost of raw materials for solar cell applications.

  17. Synthesis and Characterization of Mixed Metal Oxide Nanocomposite Energetic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gash, A; Pantoya, M; Jr., J S; Zhao, L; Shea, K; Simpson, R; Clapsaddle, B

    2003-11-18

    In the field of composite energetic materials, properties such as ingredient distribution, particle size, and morphology, affect both sensitivity and performance. Since the reaction kinetics of composite energetic materials are typically controlled by the mass transport rates between reactants, one would anticipate new and potentially exceptional performance from energetic nanocomposites. We have developed a new method of making nanostructured energetic materials, specifically explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, using sol-gel chemistry. A novel sol-gel approach has proven successful in preparing metal oxide/silicon oxide nanocomposites in which the metal oxide is the major component. Two of the metal oxides are tungsten trioxide and iron(III) oxide, both of which are of interest in the field of energetic materials. Furthermore, due to the large availability of organically functionalized silanes, the silicon oxide phase can be used as a unique way of introducing organic additives into the bulk metal oxide materials. As a result, the desired organic functionality is well dispersed throughout the composite material on the nanoscale. By introducing a fuel metal into the metal oxide/silicon oxide matrix, energetic materials based on thermite reactions can be fabricated. The resulting nanoscale distribution of all the ingredients displays energetic properties not seen in its microscale counterparts due to the expected increase of mass transport rates between the reactants. The synthesis and characterization of these metal oxide/silicon oxide nanocomposites and their performance as energetic materials will be discussed.

  18. Ultrafast photoinduced processes in fullerene-metal nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekalin, Sergey; Kompanets, Victor; Starodubtsev, Nickolai

    2006-01-01

    Investigation of photo-induced processes in Sn nanocrystals covered by a submonolayer of C 60 anions was performed with femtosecond pump-probe method. Samples in thin films were excited by 150 fs laser pulse at 400 nm (10 9 W/cm2). Dynamics of difference transmission and reflection has been measured in the spectral range of 1 100-1700 nm. The dynamics of relaxation are quite different for various nanostructures depending on the deposition mode and the ratio of tin and fullerene content. Relaxation, observed in the samples, is explained by electron transfer from excited anions to metal followed by energy transfer from excited C 60 molecules to anions in the ground state.

  19. Efficient and Robust Thermoelectric Power Generation Device Using Hot-Pressed Metal Contacts on Nanostructured Half-Heusler Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Giri; Poudel, Bed

    2016-12-01

    We report an efficient thermoelectric device with power density of 8.9 W/cm2 and efficiency of 8.9% at 678°C temperature difference using hot-pressed titanium metal contact layers on nanostructured half-Heusler materials. The high power density and efficiency are due to the efficient nanostructured materials and very low contact resistance of 1 μΩ cm2 between the titanium layer and half-Heusler material. Moreover, the bonding strength between the titanium and half-Heusler is more than 50 MPa, significantly higher compared with conventional contact metallization methods. The low contact resistance and high bonding strength are due to thin-layer diffusion of titanium (600°C). The low contact resistance and high bonding strength result in a stable and efficient power generation device with great potential for use in recovery of waste heat, e.g., in automotive and industrial applications.

  20. Novel hybrid nanostructured materials of magnetite nanoparticles and pectin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Saurabh [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247 667 (India); Dutta, Raj Kumar, E-mail: duttafcy@iitr.ernet.i [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247 667 (India)

    2011-04-15

    A novel hybrid nanostructured material comprising superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) and pectin was synthesized by crosslinking with Ca{sup 2+} ions to form spherical calcium pectinate nanostructures, referred as MCPs, which were typically found to be 100-150 nm in size in dried condition, confirmed from transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The uniform size distribution was revealed from dynamic light scattering measurement. In aqueous medium the MCPs showed swelling behavior with an average size of 400 nm. A mechanism of formation of spherical MCPs is outlined constituting a MNP-pectin interface encapsulated by calcium pectinate at the periphery, by using an array of characterization techniques like zeta potential, thermogravimetry, Fourier transformed infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The MCPs were stable in simulated gastrointestinal fluid and ensured minimal loss of magnetic material. They exhibited superparamagnetic behavior, confirmed from zero field cooled and field cooled profiles and showed high saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of 46.21 emu/g at 2.5 T and 300 K. M{sub s} decreased with increasing precursor pectin concentrations, attributed to quenching of magnetic moments by formation of a magnetic dead layer on the MNPs. - Research highlights: > In the present investigation we have developed a facile route to synthesize a novel, low cost calcium pectinate nanostructure functionalized with SPIONs (magnetite nanoparticles). > Though there are sufficient scientific illustrations on polymer as well as biopolymers coated on SPIONs for various biomedical applications, the one presented here, is novel of its kind as it is considered to offer a new dimension to the magnetic responsive properties of calcium pectinate nanomaterials towards biomedical applications, especially as a potential carrier for magnetically targeted drug delivery to colon specific sites. > The synthesis of these nanostructured

  1. Rare earth based nanostructured materials: synthesis, functionalization, properties and bioimaging and biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Alberto; Becerro, Ana I.; Carrillo-Carrión, Carolina; Núñez, Nuria O.; Zyuzin, Mikhail V.; Laguna, Mariano; González-Mancebo, Daniel; Ocaña, Manuel; Parak, Wolfgang J.

    2017-06-01

    Rare earth based nanostructures constitute a type of functional materials widely used and studied in the recent literature. The purpose of this review is to provide a general and comprehensive overview of the current state of the art, with special focus on the commonly employed synthesis methods and functionalization strategies of rare earth based nanoparticles and on their different bioimaging and biosensing applications. The luminescent (including downconversion, upconversion and permanent luminescence) and magnetic properties of rare earth based nanoparticles, as well as their ability to absorb X-rays, will also be explained and connected with their luminescent, magnetic resonance and X-ray computed tomography bioimaging applications, respectively. This review is not only restricted to nanoparticles, and recent advances reported for in other nanostructures containing rare earths, such as metal organic frameworks and lanthanide complexes conjugated with biological structures, will also be commented on.

  2. Scientific and Technological Foundations for Scaling Production of Nanostructured Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Terry C.; Davis, Casey F.; Rovira, Peter M.; Hayne, Mathew L.; Campbell, Gordon S.; Grzenia, Joel E.; Stock, Paige J.; Meagher, Rilee C.; Rack, Henry J.

    2017-05-01

    Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) has been explored in a wide range of metals and alloys. However, there are only a few industrial scale implementations of SPD for commercial alloys. To demonstrate and evolve technology for producing ultrafine grain metals by SPD, a Nanostructured Metals Manufacturing Testbed (NMMT) has been established in Golden, Colorado. Machines for research scale and pilot scale Equal Channel Angular Pressing-Conform (ECAP-C) technology have been configured in the NMMT to systematically evaluate and evolve SPD processing and advance the foundational science and technology for manufacturing. We highlight the scientific and technological areas that are critical for scale up of continuous SPD of aluminum, copper, magnesium, titanium, and iron-based alloys. Key areas that we will address in this presentation include the need for comprehensive analysis of starting microstructures, data on operating deformation mechanisms, high pressure thermodynamics and phase transformation kinetics, tribological behaviors, temperature dependence of lubricant properties, adaptation of tolerances and shear intensity to match viscoplastic behaviors, real-time process monitoring, and mechanics of billet/tooling interactions.

  3. Thermal properties of graphene and nanostructured carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balandin, Alexander A.

    2011-08-01

    Recent years have seen a rapid growth of interest by the scientific and engineering communities in the thermal properties of materials. Heat removal has become a crucial issue for continuing progress in the electronic industry, and thermal conduction in low-dimensional structures has revealed truly intriguing features. Carbon allotropes and their derivatives occupy a unique place in terms of their ability to conduct heat. The room-temperature thermal conductivity of carbon materials span an extraordinary large range -- of over five orders of magnitude -- from the lowest in amorphous carbons to the highest in graphene and carbon nanotubes. Here, I review the thermal properties of carbon materials focusing on recent results for graphene, carbon nanotubes and nanostructured carbon materials with different degrees of disorder. Special attention is given to the unusual size dependence of heat conduction in two-dimensional crystals and, specifically, in graphene. I also describe the prospects of applications of graphene and carbon materials for thermal management of electronics.

  4. High capacity and high rate capability of nanostructured CuFeO 2 anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lin; Wang, Jia-Zhao; Zhu, Xue-Bin; Gao, Xuan-Wen; Liu, Hua-Kun

    Non-toxic, cheap, nanostructured ternary transition metal oxide CuFeO 2 was synthesised using a simple sol-gel method at different temperatures. The effects of the processing temperature on the particle size and electrochemical performance of the nanostructured CuFeO 2 were investigated. The electrochemical results show that the sample synthesised at 650 °C shows the best cycling performance, retaining a specific capacity of 475 mAh g -1 beyond 100 cycles, with a capacity fading of less than 0.33% per cycle. The electrode also exhibits good rate capability in the range of 0.5 C-4 C. At the high rate of 4 C, the reversible capacity of CuFeO 2 is around 170 mAh g -1. It is believed that the ternary transition metal oxide CuFeO 2 is quite acceptable compared with other high performance nanostructured anode materials.

  5. Advanced Nanostructured Anode Materials for Sodium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qidi; Zhao, Chenglong; Lu, Yaxiang; Li, Yunming; Zheng, Yuheng; Qi, Yuruo; Rong, Xiaohui; Jiang, Liwei; Qi, Xinguo; Shao, Yuanjun; Pan, Du; Li, Baohua; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Chen, Liquan

    2017-09-19

    Sodium-ion batteries (NIBs), due to the advantages of low cost and relatively high safety, have attracted widespread attention all over the world, making them a promising candidate for large-scale energy storage systems. However, the inherent lower energy density to lithium-ion batteries is the issue that should be further investigated and optimized. Toward the grid-level energy storage applications, designing and discovering appropriate anode materials for NIBs are of great concern. Although many efforts on the improvements and innovations are achieved, several challenges still limit the current requirements of the large-scale application, including low energy/power densities, moderate cycle performance, and the low initial Coulombic efficiency. Advanced nanostructured strategies for anode materials can significantly improve ion or electron transport kinetic performance enhancing the electrochemical properties of battery systems. Herein, this Review intends to provide a comprehensive summary on the progress of nanostructured anode materials for NIBs, where representative examples and corresponding storage mechanisms are discussed. Meanwhile, the potential directions to obtain high-performance anode materials of NIBs are also proposed, which provide references for the further development of advanced anode materials for NIBs. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. MPS/CAS Partner Group on Nanostructured Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Ke; Manfred Rühle

    2004-01-01

    @@ As one of the first Partner Groups which were initiated to foster scientific exchange and interaction between the Max Pianck Society (MPS) and the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), the Partner Group led by Lu Ke was established on April 1, 1999.During the past five years, the group has received substantial support from the CAS for equipment and from the MPS for personnel and travel expenses. Extensive and productive collaborations between the research staff and students of the Partner Group with several professors (departments) in the Max Planck Institute for Metals Research (MPI-MF) have led to significant advances in synthesis,mechanical properties, melting and superheating of nanostructured metals. The research is well recognized internationally and a substantial number of publications in high quality, peer-reviewed journals (including Science and Physical Review Letters) have resulted.

  7. Metal nanoparticles in DBS card materials modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metelkin, A.; Frolov, G.; Kuznetsov, D.; Kolesnikov, E.; Chuprunov, K.; Kondakov, S.; Osipov, A.; Samsonova, J.

    2015-11-01

    In the recent years the method of collecting and storing Dried Blood Spots (DBS) on special cellulose membrane (paper) has gained wide popularity. But possible damage of biosamples caused by microorganisms in case of their incomplete drying is a disadvantage of the method. It can be overcome by treating sample-collection membranes with colloidal solutions of metal nanoparticles, having antibacterial effect. The team studied antibacterial properties of nonwoven material samples with various coatings (alcohol sols of copper, aluminium, iron, titanium, silver and vanadium nanoparticles). Colloidal solutions of nanoparticles were obtained by means of electroerosion method with further low-temperature plasma condensation. Antibacterial activity of fiberglass and cellulose membrane samples with nanoparticle coatings was studied using B. cereus and plaque bacteria cultures. It was revealed that nanostructured coatings can suppress bacterial activity; in addition they can diffuse from the membrane surface into medium which leads to widening the areas of inhibiting testing cultures’ growth. Thus, membrane materials treatment with alcohol-sols of metal nanoparticles can be seen as promising for conferring antibacterial properties to DBS carriers.

  8. Applications of Nanostructured Carbon Materials in Constructions: The State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Nan Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The most recent studies on the applications of nanostructured carbon materials, including carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers, and graphene oxides, in constructions are presented. First, the preparation of nanostructured carbon/infrastructure material composites is summarized. This part is mainly focused on how the nanostructured carbon materials were mixed with cementitious or asphalt matrix to realize a good dispersion condition. Several methods, including high speed melting mixing, surface treatment, and aqueous solution with surfactants and sonication, were introduced. Second, the applications of the carbon nanostructured materials in constructions such as mechanical reinforcement, self-sensing detectors, self-heating element for deicing, and electromagnetic shielding component were systematically reviewed. This paper not only helps the readers understand the preparation process of the carbon nanostructured materials/infrastructure material composites but also sheds some light on the state-of-the-art applications of carbon nanostructured materials in constructions.

  9. Theory for self-consistent interplay between light and nanomaterials strongly modified by metallic nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Akira; Osono, Katsuya; Nobuhiro, Atsushi; Mizumoto, Yoshihiko; Torimoto, Tsukasa; Ishihara, Hajime

    2013-03-28

    The design of the interplay between light and nanomaterials by the effect of localized-surface-plasmon resonance in metallic nanostructures is a fascinating subject, and recently, a lot of research has been carried out from both fundamental and applicational points of view. In this paper, we demonstrate the theories for describing the self-consistent interplay between the electronic states in the nanomaterials, the localized surface plasmons in the metallic nanostructures, and the light field, which provides insight into how the photoexcitation processes are modified through microscopic energy exchanges. As examples of such demonstrations, we show two cases, i.e., the interaction between a single metallic nanosphere and a quantum dot, and that between metallic nanostructures forming a nanogap and dimer molecules, where a peculiar dependence of photoexcitation processes on the distance between the metallic nanostructure and the absorbers arises depending on the respective characteristics of their interplay.

  10. In situ transmission electron microscopy experimentation of nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alducin, Diego

    Due to the remarkable mechanical and electrical properties some nanostructured materials possess, it is important to be able to quantitatively characterize how these materials react under different types of stimulus. In situ transmission electron microscopy is a unique technique that allows the user to fully observe and record the crystallographic behavior of such materials undergoing a variety of tests. The crystallographic orientations silver nanowires were mapped in order to understand the structure and facets due to its geometry. Measuring the toughness and yield of the material led us to understand the anisotropic behavior of AgNWs. Depending on whether a load is applied to either a boundary between facets or on a facet will change the mechanical strength of the nanowire. By measuring the resistivity of the this material during deformation has also led us to understand that the intrinsic defects in the crystal structure of nanowires will change the way the material reacts to an electric potential. We have been also able to completely map the crystallographic orientations of very complex geometries of gold nanoparticles and characterize the weak forces involved in the manipulation if these nanoparticles. Finally, the elasticity of MoS2 was tested and found to be exponentially dependent upon the thickness of the nanosheets. However, the resistivity of this material does not seem to be affected by any type of deformation it is subjected to. The complete categorization of how materials interact with external stimulus while comparing the changes observed in its crystal structure is essential to understanding the underlying properties of nanostructured materials, which would not be possible without in situ transmisison electron microscopy experimentation.

  11. Self-assembled peptide nanostructures for functional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekiz, Melis Sardan; Cinar, Goksu; Khalily, Mohammad Aref; Guler, Mustafa O

    2016-10-07

    Nature is an important inspirational source for scientists, and presents complex and elegant examples of adaptive and intelligent systems created by self-assembly. Significant effort has been devoted to understanding these sophisticated systems. The self-assembly process enables us to create supramolecular nanostructures with high order and complexity, and peptide-based self-assembling building blocks can serve as suitable platforms to construct nanostructures showing diverse features and applications. In this review, peptide-based supramolecular assemblies will be discussed in terms of their synthesis, design, characterization and application. Peptide nanostructures are categorized based on their chemical and physical properties and will be examined by rationalizing the influence of peptide design on the resulting morphology and the methods employed to characterize these high order complex systems. Moreover, the application of self-assembled peptide nanomaterials as functional materials in information technologies and environmental sciences will be reviewed by providing examples from recently published high-impact studies.

  12. Nanostructured materials: A novel approach to enhanced performance. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korth, G.E.; Froes, F.H.; Suryanarayana, C. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Nanostuctured materials are an emerging class of materials that can exhibit physical and mechanical characteristics often exceeding those exhibited by conventional course grained materials. A number of different techniques can be employed to produce these materials. In this program, the synthesis methods were (a) mechanical alloying , (b) physical vapor deposition, and (c) plasma processing. The physical vapor deposition and plasma processing were discontinued after initial testing with subsequent efforts focused on mechanical alloying. The major emphasis of the program was on the synthesis, consolidation, and characterization of nanostructured Al-Fe, Ti-Al, Ti-Al-Nb, and Fe-Al by alloying intermetallics with a view to increase their ductilities. The major findings of this project are reported.

  13. Tunable nanostructured composite with built-in metallic wire-grid electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micheli, Davide, E-mail: davide.micheli@uniroma1.it; Pastore, Roberto; Marchetti, Mario [Department of Astronautics, Electrical and Energy Engineering, University of Rome Sapienza Via Eudossiana, 18, 00184 – Rome (Italy); Gradoni, Gabriele [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Paint Branch Drive, MD-20740 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    In this paper, the authors report an experimental demonstration of microwave reflection tuning in carbon nanostructure-based composites by means of an external voltage supplied to the material. DC bias voltages are imparted through a metal wire-grid. The magnitude of the reflection coefficient is measured upon oblique plane-wave incidence. Increasing the bias from 13 to 700 V results in a lowering of ∼20 dB, and a “blueshift” of ∼600 MHz of the material absorption resonance. Observed phenomena are ascribed to a change of the dielectric response of the carbon material. Inherently, the physical role of tunneling between nanofillers (carbon nanotubes) is discussed. Achievements aim at the realization of a tunable absorber. There are similar studies in literature that focus on tunable metamaterials operating at either optical or THz wavelengths.

  14. Tunable nanostructured composite with built-in metallic wire-grid electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Micheli

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the authors report an experimental demonstration of microwave reflection tuning in carbon nanostructure-based composites by means of an external voltage supplied to the material. DC bias voltages are imparted through a metal wire-grid. The magnitude of the reflection coefficient is measured upon oblique plane-wave incidence. Increasing the bias from 13 to 700 V results in a lowering of ∼20 dB, and a “blueshift” of ∼600 MHz of the material absorption resonance. Observed phenomena are ascribed to a change of the dielectric response of the carbon material. Inherently, the physical role of tunneling between nanofillers (carbon nanotubes is discussed. Achievements aim at the realization of a tunable absorber. There are similar studies in literature that focus on tunable metamaterials operating at either optical or THz wavelengths.

  15. Semiconductive Nanostructures - Materials for Spinelectronics: New Data Bank Requirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paata J Kervalishvili

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscience, the interdisciplinary science that draws on physics, chemistry, biology, and computational mathematics, is still in its infancy. Control and manipulation on a nanometric scale allow the fabrication of nanostructures, the properties of which are mainly determined by quantum mechanics and differ considerably from that of the common crystalline state. Nanostructures constructed from inorganic solids such as semiconductors have new electronic and optical properties because of their size and quantization effects [1, 2]. The quantization effects reflect the fundamental characteristics of structures as soon as their size falls below a certain limit. An example of the simplest nanostructure is the quantum dot formed from the energy well of certain semiconductor materials with 5-10nm thickness sandwiched between other semiconductors with normal properties. Quantum dots, for example, have led to important novel technology for lasers, optical sensors, and other electronic devices. The application of nanolayers to data storage, switching, lighting, and other devices can lead to substantially new hardware, for example, energy cells, and eventually to the quantum-based internet. Nanoscience and nanotechnology encompass the development of nano-spinelectronics, spinelectronics materials production, and nano-spinelectronic measuring devices and technologies. Nano-spinelectronics, based on usage of magnetic semiconductors, represents a new and emerging area of science and engineering of the 21st century. It is a primary example of the creation and enhancement of new materials and devices for information technologies, operating with charge and spin degrees of freedom of carriers, free from present-day limitations. This new multi-disciplinary direction of science and technology is very much in need of support from new data banks, which will function as a source of new ideas and approaches.

  16. Surfactant Assisted Hydrothermal Synthesis of CdSe Nanostructural Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ganganagappa Nagaraju; Cujjarahalli Thimmanna Chandrappa

    2012-01-01

    CdSe/CTAB composite nanostructural materials were successfully synthesized at 160-200℃ for 2 days through a facile surfactant (cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide-CTAB) assisted hydrothermal method us- ing cadmium acetate and sodium selenate as precursor. The obtained products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analysis. Optical properties were studied by photoluminescence and UV-visible spectroscopy and morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy.

  17. A Comprehensive Review of One-Dimensional Metal-Oxide Nanostructure Photodetectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bando Yoshio

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional (1D metal-oxide nanostructures are ideal systems for exploring a large number of novel phenomena at the nanoscale and investigating size and dimensionality dependence of nanostructure properties for potential applications. The construction and integration of photodetectors or optical switches based on such nanostructures with tailored geometries have rapidly advanced in recent years. Active 1D nanostructure photodetector elements can be configured either as resistors whose conductions are altered by a charge-transfer process or as field-effect transistors (FET whose properties can be controlled by applying appropriate potentials onto the gates. Functionalizing the structure surfaces offers another avenue for expanding the sensor capabilities. This article provides a comprehensive review on the state-of-the-art research activities in the photodetector field. It mainly focuses on the metal oxide 1D nanostructures such as ZnO, SnO2, Cu2O, Ga2O3, Fe2O3, In2O3, CdO, CeO2, and their photoresponses. The review begins with a survey of quasi 1D metal-oxide semiconductor nanostructures and the photodetector principle, then shows the recent progresses on several kinds of important metal-oxide nanostructures and their photoresponses and briefly presents some additional prospective metal-oxide 1D nanomaterials. Finally, the review is concluded with some perspectives and outlook on the future developments in this area.

  18. Soft nanostructured films for directing the assembly of functional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, D.; Kang, M.; Leal, C.

    2017-04-01

    Lipids are a class of biological small molecules with hydrophilic and hydrophobic constituents forming the structural membranes in cells. Over the past century an extensive understanding of lipid biology and biophysics has been developed illuminating lipids as an intricate, highly tunable, and hierarchical soft-matter system. In addition to serving as cell membrane models, lipids have been investigated as microphase separated structures in aqueous solutions. In terms of applications lipids have been realized as powerful structural motifs for the encapsulation and cellular delivery of genetic material. More recently, lipids have also revealed promise as thin film materials, exhibiting long-range periodic nano-scale order and tunable orientation. In this review we summarize the pertinent understanding of lipid nanostructure development in bulk aqueous systems followed by the current and potential perturbations to these results induced by introduction of a substrate. These effects are punctuated by a summary of our published results in the field of lipid thin films with added nucleic acids and key results introducing hard materials into lipid nanostructured substrates.

  19. Preparation and reactivity of gasless nanostructured energetic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukyan, Khachatur V; Shuck, Christopher E; Rogachev, Alexander S; Mukasyan, Alexander S

    2015-04-02

    High-Energy Ball Milling (HEBM) is a ball milling process where a powder mixture placed in the ball mill is subjected to high-energy collisions from the balls. Among other applications, it is a versatile technique that allows for effective preparation of gasless reactive nanostructured materials with high energy density per volume (Ni+Al, Ta+C, Ti+C). The structural transformations of reactive media, which take place during HEBM, define the reaction mechanism in the produced energetic composites. Varying the processing conditions permits fine tuning of the milling-induced microstructures of the fabricated composite particles. In turn, the reactivity, i.e., self-ignition temperature, ignition delay time, as well as reaction kinetics, of high energy density materials depends on its microstructure. Analysis of the milling-induced microstructures suggests that the formation of fresh oxygen-free intimate high surface area contacts between the reagents is responsible for the enhancement of their reactivity. This manifests itself in a reduction of ignition temperature and delay time, an increased rate of chemical reaction, and an overall decrease of the effective activation energy of the reaction. The protocol provides a detailed description for the preparation of reactive nanocomposites with tailored microstructure using short-term HEBM method. It also describes a high-speed thermal imaging technique to determine the ignition/combustion characteristics of the energetic materials. The protocol can be adapted to preparation and characterization of a variety of nanostructured energetic composites.

  20. Micro-/nanostructured multicomponent molecular materials: design, assembly, and functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dongpeng

    2015-03-23

    Molecule-based micro-/nanomaterials have attracted considerable attention because their properties can vary greatly from the corresponding macro-sized bulk systems. Recently, the construction of multicomponent molecular solids based on crystal engineering principles has emerged as a promising alternative way to develop micro-/nanomaterials. Unlike single-component materials, the resulting multicomponent systems offer the advantages of tunable composition, and adjustable molecular arrangement, and intermolecular interactions within their solid states. The study of these materials also supplies insight into how the crystal structure, molecular components, and micro-/nanoscale effects can influence the performance of molecular materials. In this review, we describe recent advances and current directions in the assembly and applications of crystalline multicomponent micro-/nanostructures. Firstly, the design strategies for multicomponent systems based on molecular recognition and crystal engineering principles are introduced. Attention is then focused on the methods of fabrication of low-dimensional multicomponent micro-/nanostructures. Their new applications are also outlined. Finally, we briefly discuss perspectives for the further development of these molecular crystalline micro-/nanomaterials.

  1. Probe beam deflection studies of nanostructured catalyst materials for fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, G; Bruno, M M; Planes, G A; Rodriguez, J L; Barbero, C A; Pastor, E

    2008-11-28

    Probe beam deflection (PBD) techniques, both as cyclic voltadeflectometry (CVD) and chronodeflectometry (CD), were applied for the first time to the study of the electrochemistry of nanostructured Pt materials which are commonly used as electrocatalysts in fuel cells. The electrochemical surface reactions, including faradaic processes, double layer charging and specific anion adsorption were easily detected. Quantitative analysis of the chronodeflectometric data made possible to elucidate the dynamics of double layer charging in such materials and to determine the potential of zero charge (pzc) of the metal present either as a monolithic mesoporous material or as metal nanoparticles supported on carbon. The electro-oxidation of CO, adsorbed on nanostructured Pt, was also studied by CVD and CD being able to detect the formation of CO2 and H3O+ related with the nucleation and growth process which controls the rate of CO stripping. The interplay of Pt oxide formation and COad electrooxidation, both in potential and time, was detected indicating possible application of the technique to other electrocatalysts.

  2. Simulation of metallic nanostructures for emission of THz radiation using the lateral photo-Dember effect

    CERN Document Server

    McBryde, Duncan; Daniell, Geoff J; Chung, Aaron L; Mihoubi, Zakaria; Quarterman, Adrian H; Wilcox, Keith G; Tropper, Anne C; Apostolopoulos, Vasilis; 10.1109/irmmw-THz.2011.6104994

    2012-01-01

    A 2D simulation for the lateral photo-Dember effect is used to calculate the THz emission of metallic nanostructures due to ultrafast diffusion of carriers in order to realize a series of THz emitters.

  3. Nanostructures for Electronic and Sensing Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project will develop sensors and electronic components from metal oxide based nanotubes and nanowires. These nanostructured materials will be grown...

  4. Synthesis and characterization of metal (Core) - layered double hydroxide (Shell) nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Woo C.

    Layered double hydroxides (LDH) which belong to a class of inorganic ceramic layered materials have been studied since the mid-19th century for a variety of applications including catalysis, anion exchange, adsorbents and antacid, but more recently as a potential drug and gene delivery platform. Drug delivery platforms based on nano-sized geometries are nanovectors which promise a revolutionary impact on the therapy and imaging of various types of cancers and diseases. To date, various polymeric platforms have been the focus of intense research, but the development of inorganic, bio-hybrid nanoparticles for therapeutics and molecular imaging are at a stage of infancy. The hybridization of LDH with bioactive agents or the fabrication of metal (Core)---LDH (Shell) nanostructures could have many beneficial effects including multimodality, active targetability, and efficacy. For example, Core---Shell nanostructures may be designed to have a high scattering optical cross-section for imaging, but may also be tailored to strongly absorb near infrared (NIR) light for hyperthermic ablation. The central theme of this thesis was to demonstrate proof-of-concept of spherical silver and gold metal (Core)---LDH (Shell) nanostructures that have uniform size distribution and are agglomeration free. The effects of processing parameters on the characteristics of LDH as well as LDH-coated spherical metal (Ag, Au) nanoparticles have been evaluated using X-ray Diffraction, Dynamic Light Scattering, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry, and Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometry to arrive at appropriate process windows. The core---shell nanostructures were also characterized for their optical properties in the ultra---violet---visible region, and the data were compared with simulated data, computed by using a quasi static model from Mie scattering theory. Moreover, in order to achieve a strong plasmon resonance

  5. Metallic nanospheres embedded in nanowires initiated on nanostructures and methods for synthesis thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Saleem [Albuquerque, NM; Tringe, Joseph W [Walnut Creek, CA; Vanamu, Ganesh [Sunnyvale, CA; Prinja, Rajiv [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-01-10

    A nanostructure includes a nanowire having metallic spheres formed therein, the spheres being characterized as having at least one of about a uniform diameter and about a uniform spacing there between. A nanostructure in another embodiment includes a substrate having an area with a nanofeature; and a nanowire extending from the nanofeature, the nanowire having metallic spheres formed therein, the spheres being characterized as having at least one of about a uniform diameter and about a uniform spacing there between. A method for forming a nanostructure is also presented. A method for reading and writing data is also presented. A method for preparing nanoparticles is also presented.

  6. Growth of Carbon Nanostructure Materials Using Laser Vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehozeky, S.

    2000-01-01

    Since the potential applications of carbon nanotubes (CNT) was discovered in many fields, such as non-structure electronics, lightweight composite structure, and drug delivery, CNT has been grown by many techniques in which high yield single wall CNT has been produced by physical processes including arc vaporization and laser vaporization. In this presentation, the growth mechanism of the carbon nanostructure materials by laser vaporization is to be discussed. Carbon nanoparticles and nanotubes have been synthesized using pulsed laser vaporization on Si substrates in various temperatures and pressures. Two kinds of targets were used to grow the nanostructure materials. One was a pure graphite target and the other one contained Ni and Co catalysts. The growth temperatures were 600-1000 C and the pressures varied from several torr to 500 torr. Carbon nanoparticles were observed when a graphite target was used, although catalysts were deposited on substrates before growing carbon films. When the target contains catalysts, carbon nanotubes (CNT) are obtained. The CNT were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, optical absorption and transmission, and Raman spectroscopy. The temperature-and pressure-dependencies of carbon nanotubes' growth rate and size were investigated.

  7. Nanomanufacturing : nano-structured materials made layer-by-layer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, James V.; Cheng, Shengfeng; Grest, Gary Stephen; Tjiptowidjojo, Kristianto (University of New Mexico); Reedy, Earl David, Jr.; Fan, Hongyou; Schunk, Peter Randall; Chandross, Michael Evan; Roberts, Scott A.

    2011-10-01

    Large-scale, high-throughput production of nano-structured materials (i.e. nanomanufacturing) is a strategic area in manufacturing, with markets projected to exceed $1T by 2015. Nanomanufacturing is still in its infancy; process/product developments are costly and only touch on potential opportunities enabled by growing nanoscience discoveries. The greatest promise for high-volume manufacturing lies in age-old coating and imprinting operations. For materials with tailored nm-scale structure, imprinting/embossing must be achieved at high speeds (roll-to-roll) and/or over large areas (batch operation) with feature sizes less than 100 nm. Dispersion coatings with nanoparticles can also tailor structure through self- or directed-assembly. Layering films structured with these processes have tremendous potential for efficient manufacturing of microelectronics, photovoltaics and other topical nano-structured devices. This project is designed to perform the requisite R and D to bring Sandia's technology base in computational mechanics to bear on this scale-up problem. Project focus is enforced by addressing a promising imprinting process currently being commercialized.

  8. Novel hybrid nanostructured materials of magnetite nanoparticles and pectin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Saurabh; Dutta, Raj Kumar

    2011-04-01

    A novel hybrid nanostructured material comprising superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) and pectin was synthesized by crosslinking with Ca2+ ions to form spherical calcium pectinate nanostructures, referred as MCPs, which were typically found to be 100-150 nm in size in dried condition, confirmed from transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The uniform size distribution was revealed from dynamic light scattering measurement. In aqueous medium the MCPs showed swelling behavior with an average size of 400 nm. A mechanism of formation of spherical MCPs is outlined constituting a MNP-pectin interface encapsulated by calcium pectinate at the periphery, by using an array of characterization techniques like zeta potential, thermogravimetry, Fourier transformed infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The MCPs were stable in simulated gastrointestinal fluid and ensured minimal loss of magnetic material. They exhibited superparamagnetic behavior, confirmed from zero field cooled and field cooled profiles and showed high saturation magnetization (Ms) of 46.21 emu/g at 2.5 T and 300 K. Ms decreased with increasing precursor pectin concentrations, attributed to quenching of magnetic moments by formation of a magnetic dead layer on the MNPs.

  9. Nanostructured metal particle-modified electrodes for electrocatalytic and sensor applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ramasamy Ramaraj

    2006-11-01

    Nanotechnology has become one of the most exciting frontier fields in analytical chemistry. The huge interest in nanomaterials, for example in chemical sensors and catalysis, is driven by their many desirable properties. Although metal is a poor catalyst in bulk form, nanometre-sized particles can exhibit excellent catalytic activity due to their relative high surface area-to-volume ratio and their interface-dominated properties, which significantly differ from those of the bulk material. The integration of metal nanoparticles into thin film of permselective membrane is particularly important for various applications, for example in biological sensing and in electrocatalysis. We have already established different techniques to design permselective membrane-coated chemically modified electrodes with incorporated redox molecules for electrocatalytic, electrochromic and sensor applications. Recently, we have prepared nanostructured platinum and copper (represented Mnano, M = Pt and Cu) modified GC/Nafion electrodes (GC/Nf/Mnano) and characterized by using AFM, XPS, XRD and electrochemical techniques. The nanostructured Mnano modified electrodes were utilized for efficient electrocatalytic selective oxidation of neurotransmitter molecules in the presence of interfering species such as ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA). It has been also shown that the modified electrodes could be used as sensors for the detection of submicromolar concentrations of biomolecules with practical applications to real samples such as blood plasma and dopamine hydrochloride injection solution. The GC/Cunano electrode has been used for catalytic reduction of oxygen.

  10. Nanostructured powders and their industrial application. Materials Research Society symposium proceedings Volume 520

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaucage, G.; Mark, J.E.; Burns, G.T.; Hua, D.W. [eds.

    1998-07-01

    This new volume from the MRS brings together industrial and academic researchers involved in the synthesis and use of nanostructured powders such as fumed silica, pyrolytic titania and precipitated silica, as well as less conventional nanostructured powders such as exfoliated clays. Similarities and differences among these various fields of study and application are featured. In some ways, the volume is a continuation of the ``Better Ceramics Through Chemistry'' series. One main difference, however, is that this volume focused on the industrial use of these materials. Topics include: overview of nanopowder technology; physical aspects of nanostructured powders; synthesis of nanostructured powders; and applications of nanostructured powders.

  11. Strong, ductile, and thermally stable Cu-based metal-intermetallic nanostructured composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusoe, Keith J.; Vijayan, Sriram; Bissell, Thomas R.; Chen, Jie; Morley, Jack E.; Valencia, Leopolodo; Dongare, Avinash M.; Aindow, Mark; Lee, Seok-Woo

    2017-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) and nanocrystalline metals (NMs) have been extensively investigated due to their superior strengths and elastic limits. Despite these excellent mechanical properties, low ductility at room temperature and poor microstructural stability at elevated temperatures often limit their practical applications. Thus, there is a need for a metallic material system that can overcome these performance limits of BMGs and NMs. Here, we present novel Cu-based metal-intermetallic nanostructured composites (MINCs), which exhibit high ultimate compressive strengths (over 2 GPa), high compressive failure strain (over 20%), and superior microstructural stability even at temperatures above the glass transition temperature of Cu-based BMGs. Rapid solidification produces a unique ultra-fine microstructure that contains a large volume fraction of Cu5Zr superlattice intermetallic compound; this contributes to the high strength and superior thermal stability. Mechanical and microstructural characterizations reveal that substantial accumulation of phase boundary sliding at metal/intermetallic interfaces accounts for the extensive ductility observed.

  12. Strong, ductile, and thermally stable Cu-based metal-intermetallic nanostructured composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusoe, Keith J.; Vijayan, Sriram; Bissell, Thomas R.; Chen, Jie; Morley, Jack E.; Valencia, Leopolodo; Dongare, Avinash M.; Aindow, Mark; Lee, Seok-Woo

    2017-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) and nanocrystalline metals (NMs) have been extensively investigated due to their superior strengths and elastic limits. Despite these excellent mechanical properties, low ductility at room temperature and poor microstructural stability at elevated temperatures often limit their practical applications. Thus, there is a need for a metallic material system that can overcome these performance limits of BMGs and NMs. Here, we present novel Cu-based metal-intermetallic nanostructured composites (MINCs), which exhibit high ultimate compressive strengths (over 2 GPa), high compressive failure strain (over 20%), and superior microstructural stability even at temperatures above the glass transition temperature of Cu-based BMGs. Rapid solidification produces a unique ultra-fine microstructure that contains a large volume fraction of Cu5Zr superlattice intermetallic compound; this contributes to the high strength and superior thermal stability. Mechanical and microstructural characterizations reveal that substantial accumulation of phase boundary sliding at metal/intermetallic interfaces accounts for the extensive ductility observed. PMID:28067334

  13. Quantum materials. Lateral semiconductor nanostructures, hybrid systems and nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heitmann, Detlef (ed.) [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physik

    2010-07-01

    Semiconductor nanostructures are ideal systems to tailor the physical properties via quantum effects, utilizing special growth techniques, self-assembling, wet chemical processes or lithographic tools in combination with tuneable external electric and magnetic fields. Such systems are called ''Quantum Materials''.The electronic, photonic, and phononic properties of these systems are governed by size quantization and discrete energy levels. The charging is controlled by the Coulomb blockade. The spin can be manipulated by the geometrical structure, external gates and by integrating hybrid ferromagnetic emitters.This book reviews sophisticated preparation methods for quantum materials based on III-V and II-VI semiconductors and a wide variety of experimental techniques for the investigation of these interesting systems. It highlights selected experiments and theoretical concepts and gives such a state-of-the-art overview about the wide field of physics and chemistry that can be studied in these systems. (orig.)

  14. Structural refinement and deformation mechanisms in nanostructured metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, K.; Hansen, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Deformation mechanisms in metals deformed to ultrahigh strains are analyzed based on a general pattern of grain subdivision down to structural scales 10 nm. The materials analyzed are medium- to high-stacking fault energy face-centered cubic and body-centered cubic metals with different loading...... conditions. The analysis points to dislocation glide as the dominant deformation mechanism at different length scales supplemented by a limited amount of twinning at the finest scales. With decreasing deformation temperature and increasing strain rate, the contribution of twinning increases...

  15. Nanostructure sensitization of transition metal oxides for visible-light photocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjun Chen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To better utilize the sunlight for efficient solar energy conversion, the research on visible-light active photocatalysts has recently attracted a lot of interest. The photosensitization of transition metal oxides is a promising approach for achieving effective visible-light photocatalysis. This review article primarily discusses the recent progress in the realm of a variety of nanostructured photosensitizers such as quantum dots, plasmonic metal nanostructures, and carbon nanostructures for coupling with wide-bandgap transition metal oxides to design better visible-light active photocatalysts. The underlying mechanisms of the composite photocatalysts, e.g., the light-induced charge separation and the subsequent visible-light photocatalytic reaction processes in environmental remediation and solar fuel generation fields, are also introduced. A brief outlook on the nanostructure photosensitization is also given.

  16. Hybrid metal-dielectric nanostructures for advanced light-field manipulation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staude, Isabelle; Guo, Rui; Rusak, Evgenia; Dominguez, Jason; Decker, Manuel; Rockstuhl, Carsten; Brener, Igal; Neshev, Dragomir N.; Pertsch, Thomas; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2017-02-01

    All-dielectric and plasmonic nanostructures have complementary advantages regarding their capabilities for controlling light fields at the nanoscale [1]. While all-dielectric nanostructures can provide near-unity efficiency, plasmonic nanostructures are more compact and offer strong near-field enhancement. Combination of photonic nanostructures of both types offers a promising route towards compact optical elements that unify low absorption losses with small footprints, while at the same time providing a high versatility in engineering the optical response of the hybrid system towards specific functionalities. This talk aims to review our recent progress in coupling designed plasmonic nanoantennas to high-index dielectric nanostructures. Following a general analysis of coupling of plasmonic and high-refractive-index dielectric nanoresonators, various specific hybrid nanostructure designs will be discussed. For the fabrication of designed hybrid metal-dielectric nanostructures we use a two-step electron-beam lithography (EBL) procedure [2]. The first step of EBL is used in combination with reactive-ion etching to define the dielectric nanostructures. The second step of EBL is followed by evaporation of gold and a lift-off process, and serves to define the plasmonic elements. Between the two steps, a precision alignment procedure is performed in order to allow for the precise positioning of the gold nanostructures with respect to the silicon nanostructures. Using this approach, we realize and optically characterize various hybrid metal-dielectric nanostructures designed to support a range of novel functionalities, including directional emission enhancement [2] and on-chip light routing. [1] E. Rusak et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 105, 221109 (2014). [2] R. Guo et al., ACS Photonics 3, 349-353 (2016).

  17. Attosecond nanotechnology: NEMS of energy storage and nanostructural transformations in materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beznosyuk, Sergey A.; Zhukovsky, Mark S.; Maslova, Olga A.

    2015-10-01

    The attosecond technology of the nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS) energy storage as active center fast transformation of nanostructures in materials is considered. The self-organizing relaxation of the NEMS active center containing nanocube of 256-atoms limited by planes (100) in the FCC lattice matrix of 4d-transition metals (Ru, Rh, Pd) is described by the quantum NEMS-kinetics (NK) method. Typical for these metals change of the NEMS active center physicochemical characteristics during the time of relaxation is presented. There are three types of intermediate quasistationary states of the NEMS active center. Their forms are plainly distinguishable. The full relaxed NEMS active centers (Ru256, Rh256, Pd256) accumulate next storage energies: ERu = 2.27 eV/at, ERh = 1.67 eV/at, EPd = 3.02 eV/at.

  18. EPR and magnetism of the nanostructured natural carbonaceous material shungite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustyniak-Jabłokow, Maria Aldona; Yablokov, Yurii V.; Andrzejewski, Bartłomiej; Kempiński, Wojciech; Łoś, Szymon; Tadyszak, Krzysztof; Yablokov, Mikhail Y.; Zhikharev, Valentin A.

    2010-04-01

    The X-band EPR and magnetic susceptibility in the temperature range 4.2-300 K study of the shungite-I, natural nanostructured material from the deposit of Shunga are reported. Obtained results allow us to assign the EPR signal to conduction electrons, estimate their number, N P, and evaluate the Pauli paramagnetism contribution to shungite susceptibility. A small occupation (~5%) of the localized nonbonding π states in the zigzag edges of the open-ended graphene-like layers and/or on σ ( sp 2+ x ) orbitals in the curved parts of the shungite globules has been also revealed. The observed temperature dependence of the EPR linewidth can be explained by the earlier considered interaction of conduction π electrons with local phonon modes associated with the vibration of peripheral carbon atoms of the open zigzag-type edges and with peripheral carbon atoms cross-linking different nanostructures. The relaxation time T 2 and diffusion time T D are found to have comparable values (2.84 × 10-8 and 1.73 × 10-8 s at 5.2 K, respectively), and similar dependence on temperature. The magnetic measurements have revealed the suppression of orbital diamagnetism due to small amount of large enough fragments of the graphene layers.

  19. Water-evaporation-induced electricity with nanostructured carbon materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Guobin; Xu, Ying; Ding, Tianpeng; Li, Jia; Yin, Jun; Fei, Wenwen; Cao, Yuanzhi; Yu, Jin; Yuan, Longyan; Gong, Li; Chen, Jian; Deng, Shaozhi; Zhou, Jun; Guo, Wanlin

    2017-01-30

    Water evaporation is a ubiquitous natural process that harvests thermal energy from the ambient environment. It has previously been utilized in a number of applications including the synthesis of nanostructures and the creation of energy-harvesting devices. Here, we show that water evaporation from the surface of a variety of nanostructured carbon materials can be used to generate electricity. We find that evaporation from centimetre-sized carbon black sheets can reliably generate sustained voltages of up to 1 V under ambient conditions. The interaction between the water molecules and the carbon layers and moreover evaporation-induced water flow within the porous carbon sheets are thought to be key to the voltage generation. This approach to electricity generation is related to the traditional streaming potential, which relies on driving ionic solutions through narrow gaps, and the recently reported method of moving ionic solutions across graphene surfaces, but as it exploits the natural process of evaporation and uses cheap carbon black it could offer advantages in the development of practical devices.

  20. Water-evaporation-induced electricity with nanostructured carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Guobin; Xu, Ying; Ding, Tianpeng; Li, Jia; Yin, Jun; Fei, Wenwen; Cao, Yuanzhi; Yu, Jin; Yuan, Longyan; Gong, Li; Chen, Jian; Deng, Shaozhi; Zhou, Jun; Guo, Wanlin

    2017-05-01

    Water evaporation is a ubiquitous natural process that harvests thermal energy from the ambient environment. It has previously been utilized in a number of applications including the synthesis of nanostructures and the creation of energy-harvesting devices. Here, we show that water evaporation from the surface of a variety of nanostructured carbon materials can be used to generate electricity. We find that evaporation from centimetre-sized carbon black sheets can reliably generate sustained voltages of up to 1 V under ambient conditions. The interaction between the water molecules and the carbon layers and moreover evaporation-induced water flow within the porous carbon sheets are thought to be key to the voltage generation. This approach to electricity generation is related to the traditional streaming potential, which relies on driving ionic solutions through narrow gaps, and the recently reported method of moving ionic solutions across graphene surfaces, but as it exploits the natural process of evaporation and uses cheap carbon black it could offer advantages in the development of practical devices.

  1. Silicon-embedded copper nanostructure network for high energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Tianyue

    2016-03-15

    Provided herein are nanostructure networks having high energy storage, electrochemically active electrode materials including nanostructure networks having high energy storage, as well as electrodes and batteries including the nanostructure networks having high energy storage. According to various implementations, the nanostructure networks have high energy density as well as long cycle life. In some implementations, the nanostructure networks include a conductive network embedded with electrochemically active material. In some implementations, silicon is used as the electrochemically active material. The conductive network may be a metal network such as a copper nanostructure network. Methods of manufacturing the nanostructure networks and electrodes are provided. In some implementations, metal nanostructures can be synthesized in a solution that contains silicon powder to make a composite network structure that contains both. The metal nanostructure growth can nucleate in solution and on silicon nanostructure surfaces.

  2. Material parameter identification on metal matrix composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jansen van Rensburg, GJ

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Tests were done on the compressive behaviour of different metal matrix composite materials. These extremely hard engineering materials consist of ceramic particles embedded in a metal alloy binder. Due to the high stiffness and brittle nature...

  3. A systematic investigation of the charging effect in scanning electron microscopy for metal nanostructures on insulating substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatabø, R; Coste, A; Greve, M M

    2017-03-01

    Scanning electron microscopy is perhaps the most important method for investigating and characterizing nanostructures. A well-known challenge in scanning electron microscopy is the investigation of insulating materials. As insulating materials do not provide a path to ground they accumulate charge, evident as image drift and image distortions. In previous work, we have seen that sample charging in arrays of metal nanoparticles on glass substrates leads to a shrinkage effect, resulting in a measurement error in the nanoparticle dimension of up to 15% at 10 kV and a probe current of 80 ± 10 pA. In order to investigate this effect in detail, we have fabricated metal nanostructures on insulating borosilicate glass using electron beam lithography. Electron beam lithography allows us to tailor the design of our metal nanostructures and the area coverage. The measurements are carried out using two commonly available secondary electron detectors in scanning electron microscopes, namely, an InLens- and an Everhart-Thornley detector. We identify and discriminate several contributions to the effect by varying microscope settings, including the size of the aperture, the beam current, the working distance and the acceleration voltage. We image metal nanostructures of various sizes and geometries, investigating the influence of scan-direction of the electron beam and secondary electron detector used for imaging. The relative measurement error, which we measure as high as 20% for some settings, is found to depend on the acceleration voltage and the type of secondary electron detector used for imaging. In particular, the Everhart-Thornley detectors lower sensitivity to SE1 electrons increase the magnitude of the shrinkage of up to 10% relative to the InLens measurements. Finally, a method for estimating charge balance in insulating samples is presented.

  4. Novel non-platinum metal catalyst material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel non-platinum metal catalyst material for use in low temperature fuel cells and electrolysers and to fuel cells and electrolysers comprising the novel non-platinum metal catalyst material. The present invention also relates to a novel method for synthesizing...... the novel non-platinum metal catalyst material....

  5. Multifunctional, flexible electronic systems based on engineered nanostructured materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hyunhyub; Kapadia, Rehan; Takei, Kuniharu; Takahashi, Toshitake; Zhang, Xiaobo; Javey, Ali

    2012-08-31

    The development of flexible electronic systems has been extensively researched in recent years, with the goal of expanding the potential scope and market of modern electronic devices in the areas of computation, communications, displays, sensing and energy. Uniquely, the use of soft polymeric substrates enables the incorporation of advanced features beyond mechanical bendability and stretchability. In this paper, we describe several functionalities which can be achieved using engineered nanostructured materials. In particular, reversible binding, self-cleaning, antireflective and shape-reconfigurable properties are introduced for the realization of multifunctional, flexible electronic devices. Examples of flexible systems capable of spatial mapping and/or responding to external stimuli are also presented as a new class of user-interactive devices.

  6. SIMULATION OF SYNTHESIS OF CLUSTER-ASSEMBLED NANOSTRUCTURED MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S.Byshkin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A model is described to simulate the formation of nanostructured materials by cluster beam deposition. Clusters are modelled by spherical balls with a given size distribution function, which fall to the substrate and stick to the growing structure. The mobility of clusters along the film surface is modelled by introduction of a critical angle at which a falling ball meets a ball that belongs to the structure. When the falling ball touches one of the balls in the structure at an angle smaller than the critical one, it sticks to the film; otherwise the ball rolls along the surface till it meets other balls. It is shown that a variety of structures similar to those observed experimentally can be produced. The density of the model structures, percolation thresholds and the surface roughness are analyzed.

  7. Fabrication of large area homogeneous metallic nanostructures for optical sensing using colloidal lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, René Lynge; Pors, Anders; Dreier, Jes;

    2010-01-01

    We propose a simple and reproducible method for fabricating large area metal films with inter-connected nanostructures using a combination of colloidal lithography, metal deposition and a template stripping technique. The method is generic in the sense that it is possible to produce a variety...... to fabricate metal films with inter-connected nanostructures consisting of either partial spherical shells or the inverted structures: spherical cavities. The substrates are characterized by optical reflectance and transmittance spectroscopy. We demonstrate, in the case of partial spherical shells...

  8. Self-Assembly of Metal Oxides into Three-Dimensional Nanostructures: Synthesis and Application in Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanostructured metal (Fe, Co, Mn, Cr, Mo) oxides were fabricated under microwave irradiation conditions in pure water without using any reducing or capping reagent. The metal oxides self-assembled into octahedron, spheres, triangular rods, pine, and hexagonal snowflake-like thre...

  9. Ultrathin Two-Dimensional Nanostructured Materials for Highly Efficient Water Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wang; Zhou, Kun

    2017-08-01

    Water oxidation, also known as the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), is a crucial process in energy conversion and storage, especially in water electrolysis. The critical challenge of the electrochemical water splitting technology is to explore alternative precious-metal-free catalysts for the promotion of the kinetically sluggish OER. Recently, emerging two-dimensional (2D) ultrathin materials with abundant accessible active sites and improved electrical conductivity provide an ideal platform for the synthesis of promising OER catalysts. This Review focuses on the most recent advances in ultrathin 2D nanostructured materials for enhanced electrochemical activity of the OER. The design, synthesis and performance of such ultrathin 2D nanomaterials-based OER catalysts and their property-structure relationships are discussed, providing valuable insights to the exploration of novel OER catalysts with high efficiency and low overpotential. The potential research directions are also proposed in the research field. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Digestive ripening: a synthetic method par excellence for core-shell, alloy, and composite nanostructured materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srilakshmi P Bhaskar; Balaji R Jagirdar

    2012-11-01

    The solvated metal atom dispersion (SMAD) method has been used for the synthesis of colloids of metal nanoparticles. It is a top-down approach involving condensation of metal atoms in low temperature solvent matrices in a SMADreactor maintained at 77 K.Warming of the matrix results in a slurry ofmetal atoms that interact with one another to form particles that grow in size. The organic solvent solvates the particles and acts as a weak capping agent to halt/slow down the growth process to a certain extent. This as-prepared colloid consists of metal nanoparticles that are quite polydisperse. In a process termed as digestive ripening, addition of a capping agent to the as-prepared colloid which is polydisperse renders it highly monodisperse either under ambient or thermal conditions. In this, as yet not well-understood process, smaller particles grow and the larger ones diminish in size until the system attains uniformity in size and a dynamic equilibrium is established. Using the SMAD method in combination with digestive ripening process, highly monodisperse metal, core-shell, alloy, and composite nanoparticles have been synthesized. This article is a review of our contributions together with some literature reports on this methodology to realize various nanostructured materials.

  11. Preparation and properties on hollow nano-structured smoke material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang-cui; Dai, Meng-yan; Fang, Guo-feng; Shi, Wei-dong; Cheng, Xiang; Liu, Hai-feng; Zhang, Tong

    2013-09-01

    In recent years, the weapon systems of laser guidance and infrared (IR) imaging guidance have been widely used in modern warfare because of their high precision and strong anti-interference. Notwithstanding, military smoke, as a rapid and effective passive jamming means, can effectively counteract the attack of enemy precision-guided weapons by scattering and absorbability. Conventional smoke has good attenuation capability only to visible light (0.4-0.76 μm), but hardly any effect to other electromagnetic wave band. The weapon systems of laser guidance and IR imaging guidance usually work in broad band, including near IR (1-3 μm), middle IR (3-5 μm), far IR (8-14 μm), and so on. Accordingly, exploiting and using new efficient obscurant materials, which is one of the important factors that develop smoke technology, have become a focus and attracted more interests around the world. Then nano-structured materials that are developing very quickly have turned into our new choice. Hollow nano-structured materials (HNSM) have many special properties because of their nano-size wall-thickness and sub-micron grain-size. After a lot of HNSM were synthesized in this paper, their physical and chemical properties, including grain size, phase composition, microstructure, optical properties and resistivity were tested and analysed. Then the experimental results of the optical properties showed that HNSM exhibit excellent wave-absorbing ability in ultraviolet, visible and infrared regions. On the basis of the physicochemmical properties, HNSM are firstly applied in smoke technology field. And the obscuration performance of HNSM smoke was tested in smoke chamber. The testing waveband included 1.06μm and 10.6μm laser, 3-5μm and 8-14μm IR radiation. Then the main parameters were obtained, including the attenuation rate, the transmission rate, the mass extinction coefficient, the efficiency obscuring time, and the sedimentation rate, etc. The main parameters of HNSM smoke were

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of Mixed Metal Oxide Nanocomposite Energetic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clapsaddle, B; Gash, A; Plantier, K; Pantoya, M; Jr., J S; Simpson, R

    2004-04-27

    In the field of composite energetic materials, properties such as ingredient distribution, particle size, and morphology affect both sensitivity and performance. Since the reaction kinetics of composite energetic materials are typically controlled by the mass transport rates between reactants, one would anticipate new and potentially exceptional performance from energetic nanocomposites. We have developed a new method of making nanostructured energetic materials, specifically explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, using sol-gel chemistry. A novel sol-gel approach has proven successful in preparing metal oxide/silicon oxide nanocomposites in which the metal oxide is the major component. By introducing a fuel metal, such as aluminum, into the metal oxide/silicon oxide matrix, energetic materials based on thermite reactions can be fabricated. Two of the metal oxides are tungsten trioxide and iron(III) oxide, both of which are of interest in the field of energetic materials. In addition, due to the large availability of organically functionalized silanes, the silicon oxide phase can be used as a unique way of introducing organic additives into the bulk metal oxide materials. These organic additives can cause the generation of gas upon ignition of the materials, therefore resulting in a composite material that can perform pressure/volume work. Furthermore, the desired organic functionality is well dispersed throughout the composite material on the nanoscale with the other components, and is therefore subject to the same increased reaction kinetics. The resulting nanoscale distribution of all the ingredients displays energetic properties not seen in its microscale counterparts due to the expected increase of mass transport rates between the reactants. The synthesis and characterization of iron(III) oxide/organosilicon oxide nanocomposites and their performance as energetic materials will be discussed.

  13. Mesoporous metal oxide graphene nanocomposite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Kou, Rong; Wang, Donghai

    2016-05-24

    A nanocomposite material formed of graphene and a mesoporous metal oxide having a demonstrated specific capacity of more than 200 F/g with particular utility when employed in supercapacitor applications. A method for making these nanocomposite materials by first forming a mixture of graphene, a surfactant, and a metal oxide precursor, precipitating the metal oxide precursor with the surfactant from the mixture to form a mesoporous metal oxide. The mesoporous metal oxide is then deposited onto a surface of the graphene.

  14. Nanoengineering a library of metallic nanostructures using a single microfluidic reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastián, Víctor; Jensen, Klavs F

    2016-08-18

    Microfluidic synthesis in a microfabricated reactor enables fast and facile synthesis of a wide library of metallic nanostructures: monometallic, bimetallic, anisotropic growth and heterostructures. Specific nanostructures are realized by selection of flow pattern and synthesis parameters. The technique is shown to have advantages over conventional batch technologies. Not only does it allow faster scalable synthesis, but also realization of nanostructures hitherto not reported such as Pt-Ru, Pt-Ni and Pt-Co nanodendrites, Pt-Pd heterostructures, Ag-Pd core-shell NPs, Au-Pd nanodumbbells and Au-Pd nanosheets.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of ZnO nanostructures on noble-metal coated substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dikovska, A.Og. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tsarigradsko Chaussee, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Atanasova, G.B. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev str., bl. 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Avdeev, G.V. [Rostislaw Kaischew Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev str., bl. 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Nedyalkov, N.N. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tsarigradsko Chaussee, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • ZnO nanostructures were fabricated on Au–Ag alloy coated silicon substrates by applying pulsed laser deposition. • Morphology of the ZnO nanostructures was related to the Au–Ag alloy content in the catalyst layer. • Increasing the Ag content in Au–Ag catalyst layer changes the morphology of the ZnO nanostructures from nanorods to nanobelts. - Abstract: In this work, ZnO nanostructures were fabricated on noble-metal (Au, Ag and Au–Ag alloys) coated silicon substrates by applying pulsed laser deposition. The samples were prepared at a substrate temperature of 550 °C, an oxygen pressure of 5 Pa, and a laser fluence of 2 J cm{sup −2} – process parameters usually used for deposition of smooth and dense thin films. The metal layer's role is substantial for the preparation of nanostructures. Heating of the substrate changed the morphology of the metal layer and, subsequently, nanoparticles were formed. The use of different metal particles resulted in different morphologies and properties of the ZnO nanostructures synthesized. The morphology of the ZnO nanostructures was related to the Au–Ag alloy's content of the catalyst layer. It was found that the morphology of the ZnO nanostructures evolved from nanorods to nanobelts as the ratio of Au/Ag in the alloy catalyst was varied. The use of a small quantity of Ag in the Au–Ag catalyst (Au{sub 3}Ag) layer resulted predominantly in the deposition of ZnO nanorods. A higher Ag content in the catalyst alloy (AuAg{sub 2}) layer resulted in the growth of a dense structure of ZnO nanobelts.

  16. Laser-induced synthesis of a nanostructured polymer-like metal-carbon complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakelian, S.; Kutrovskaya, S.; Kucherik, A.; Osipov, A.; Povolotckaia, A.; Povolotskiy, A.; Manshina, A.

    2016-04-01

    Synthesis of nanotructured metal-carbon materials by laser irradiation is an actual branch of laser physics and nanotechnology. Laser sources with different pulse duration allow changing the heating rate with realization of different transition scenarios and synthesis materials with various physical properties. We study the process of the formation of nanostructured metal-clusters and complexes using laser irradiation of colloidal systems which were consisted of carbon micro- nanoparticles and nanoparticles of noble metals. For carbon nanoparticles synthesis we use the method of laser ablation in liquid. For the realization of different regimes of laser surface modification of the target (glassycarbon and shungite) and the formation of micro- nanoparticles in a liquid the YAG:Nd laser with a pulse duration from 0.5 ms up to 20 ms (pulse energy up to 50J) was applied. We have used the CW-laser with moderate intensity in liquid (water or ethanol) for nanoparticle of noble metals synthesis. Thus, colloidal systems were obtained by using CW-laser with λ = 1.06 μm, I ~ 105-6 W/cm2, and t = 10 min. The average size of resulting particles was approximately about 10 to 100 nm. The nanoparticle obtaining was provided in the colloidal solution with different laser parameters. In this work we have investigated the mechanism of the metal-carbon cluster formation during the process of irradiation of colloidal system which were consisted of separate carbon, silver and gold nanoparticles. This system was irradiated by nanosecond laser (100 ns) with average power up to 50W.

  17. Ultrafast nonlinear optical processes in metal-dielectric nanocomposites and nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwang-Hyon

    2012-04-13

    This work reports results of a theoretical study of nonlinear optical processes in metal-dielectric nanocomposites used for the increase of the nonlinear coefficients and for plasmonic field enhancement. The main results include the study of the transient saturable nonlinearity in dielectric composites doped with metal nanoparticles, its physical mechanism as well its applications in nonlinear optics. For the study of the transient response, a time-depending equation for the dielectric function of the nanocomposite using the semi-classical two-temperature model is derived. By using this approach, we study the transient nonlinear characteristics of these materials in comparison with preceding experimental measurements. The results show that these materials behave as efficient saturable absorbers for passive mode-locking of lasers in the spectral range from the visible to near IR. We present results for the modelocked dynamics in short-wavelength solid-state and semiconductor disk lasers; in this spectral range other efficient saturable absorbers do not exist. We suggest a new mechanism for the realization of slow light phenomenon by using glasses doped with metal nanoparticles in a pump-probe regime near the plasmonic resonance. Furthermore, we study femtosecond plasmon generation by mode-locked surface plasmon polariton lasers with Bragg reflectors and metal-gain-absorber layered structures. In the final part of the thesis, we present results for high-order harmonic generation near a metallic fractal rough surface. The results show a possible reduction of the pump intensities by three orders of magnitudes and two orders of magnitudes higher efficiency compared with preceding experimental results by using bow-tie nanostructures.

  18. Hybrid nanostructured coatings for corrosion protection of base metals: a sustainability perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Robert V.; Patil, Vikas; Andrews, Justin L.; Aldinger, Jeffrey P.; Yadav, Ganapati D.; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2015-03-01

    In this topical review article, we attempt to capture recent advances in the development of sustainable hybrid nanocomposite coatings for the corrosion inhibition of structural metals. Spurred primarily by the urgent imperative of replacing hexavalent chromium but also driven by concerns regarding the environmental impact of organic solvents, materials criticality considerations, the need to maintain structural integrity and function under extreme environments, and a renewed impetus towards lightweighting, the design of new coating concepts has seen an explosion of activity. We discuss varying modes of corrosion inhibition and the drive towards multicomponent nanostructured coatings that synergistically unite multiple modes of corrosion inhibition within a single coating system. Nanocomposite coatings in which nanoparticles of one phase are dispersed within a continuous phase, usually a polymeric matrix, provide a modular design approach to multifunctional coatings provided fundamental challenges such as dispersion and compatibility can be resolved. By dint of their high surface-to-volume ratios, the incorporation of nanoparticles profoundly modifies the adjacent polymeric matrix, giving rise to an ‘interphase’ region with modified properties, at relatively low filler loadings. The implications of incorporating metallic, porous metal oxide, and carbon nanomaterials (graphene and carbon nanotubes) within polymeric matrices are explored with an emphasis on active corrosion inhibition. The availability of high-quality nanoparticles that are either electroactive (e.g., metals, graphene, carbon nanotubes, etc.) or are capable of serving as reservoirs for active corrosion inhibitors (e.g., porous silicon oxide, layered double hydroxides, halloysite) provides unprecedented functionality and opportunities for multifunctional coatings. The review emphasizes mechanistic considerations where these have been elucidated with a view towards developing systematic design

  19. Nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2013-10-15

    Nanocomposite materials comprising a metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene material. The nanocomposite materials exhibit a specific capacity of at least twice that of the metal oxide material without the graphene at a charge/discharge rate greater than about 10 C.

  20. Surface modification of plasmonic nanostructured materials with thiolated oligonucleotides in 10 seconds using selective microwave heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abel, B.; Aslan, K. [Morgan State University, Department of Chemistry, 1700 East Cold Spring Lane, Baltimore, MD 21251 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    This study demonstrates the proof-of-principle of rapid surface modification of plasmonic nanostructured materials with oligonucleotides using low power microwave heating. Due to their interesting optical and electronic properties, silver nanoparticle films (SNFs, 2 nm thick) deposited onto glass slides were used as the model plasmonic nanostructured materials. Rapid surface modification of SNFs with oligonucleotides was carried out using two strategies (1) Strategy 1: for ss-oligonucleotides, surface hybridization and (2) Strategy 2: for ds-oligonucleotides, solution hybridization, where the samples were exposed to 10, 15, 30 and 60 seconds microwave heating. To assess the efficacy of our new rapid surface modification technique, identical experiments carried out without the microwave heating (i.e., conventional method), which requires 24 hours for the completion of the identical steps. It was found that SNFs can be modified with ss- and ds-oligonucleotides in 10 seconds, which typically requires several hours of incubation time for the chemisorption of thiol groups on to the planar metal surface using conventional techniques. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Nanostructured materials on 3D nickel foam as electrocatalysts for water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Nitin K; Jin, Haneul; Kim, Byeongyoon; Lee, Kwangyeol

    2017-08-31

    Highly efficient and low-cost electrocatalysts are essential for water spitting via electrolysis in an economically viable fashion. However, the best catalytic performance is found with noble metal-based electrocatalysts, which presents a formidable obstacle for the commercial success of electrolytic water splitting-based H2 production due to their relatively high cost and scarcity. Therefore, the development of alternative inexpensive earth-abundant electrode materials with excellent electrocatalytic properties is of great urgency. In general, efficient electrocatalysts must possess several key characteristics such as low overpotential, good electrocatalytic activity, high stability, and low production costs. Direct synthesis of nanostructured catalysts on a conducting substrate may potentially improve the performance of the resultant electrocatalysts because of their high catalytic surface areas and the synergistic effect between the electrocatalyst and the conductive substrate. In this regard, three dimensional (3D) nickel foams have been advantageously utilized as electrode substrates as they offer a large active surface area and a highly conductive continuous porous 3D network. In this review, we discuss the most recent developments in nanostructured materials directly synthesized on 3D nickel foam as potential electrode candidates for electrochemical water electrolysis, namely, the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We also provide perspectives and outlooks for catalysts grown directly on 3D conducting substrates for future sustainable energy technologies.

  2. When lithography meets self-assembly: a review of recent advances in the directed assembly of complex metal nanostructures on planar and textured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Robert A.; Menumerov, Eredzhep; Neretina, Svetlana

    2017-07-01

    One of the foremost challenges in nanofabrication is the establishment of a processing science that integrates wafer-based materials, techniques, and devices with the extraordinary physicochemical properties accessible when materials are reduced to nanoscale dimensions. Such a merger would allow for exacting controls on nanostructure positioning, promote cooperative phenomenon between adjacent nanostructures and/or substrate materials, and allow for electrical contact to individual or groups of nanostructures. With neither self-assembly nor top-down lithographic processes being able to adequately meet this challenge, advancements have often relied on a hybrid strategy that utilizes lithographically-defined features to direct the assembly of nanostructures into organized patterns. While these so-called directed assembly techniques have proven viable, much of this effort has focused on the assembly of periodic arrays of spherical or near-spherical nanostructures comprised of a single element. Work directed toward the fabrication of more complex nanostructures, while still at a nascent stage, has nevertheless demonstrated the possibility of forming arrays of nanocubes, nanorods, nanoprisms, nanoshells, nanocages, nanoframes, core-shell structures, Janus structures, and various alloys on the substrate surface. In this topical review, we describe the progress made in the directed assembly of periodic arrays of these complex metal nanostructures on planar and textured substrates. The review is divided into three broad strategies reliant on: (i) the deterministic positioning of colloidal structures, (ii) the reorganization of deposited metal films at elevated temperatures, and (iii) liquid-phase chemistry practiced directly on the substrate surface. These strategies collectively utilize a broad range of techniques including capillary assembly, microcontact printing, chemical surface modulation, templated dewetting, nanoimprint lithography, and dip-pen nanolithography and

  3. Nanostructure and hydrogen spillover of bridged metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Cheng-Si; Yu, Ming-Sheng; Wang, Cheng-Yu; Liao, Pin-Yen; Chen, Hsin-Lung; Jeng, U-Ser; Tzeng, Yi-Ren; Chung, Tsui-Yun; Wu, Hsiu-Chu

    2009-02-04

    The metal-organic frameworks (MOF) with low and medium specific surface areas (SSA) were shown to be able to adsorb hydrogen via bridged spillover at room temperature (RT) up to an amount of full coverage of hydrogen in the MOF. Anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering was employed to investigate the key relationship between the structures and storage properties of the involved materials. It was found that the tunable imperfect lattice defects and the 3D pore network in the MOF crystal are the most critical structures for RT hydrogen uptake rather than the known micropores in the crystal, SSA, and Pt catalyst structure.

  4. Electrical, thermal, catalytic and magnetic properties of nano-structured materials and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zuwei

    Nanotechnology is a subject that studies the fabrication, properties, and applications of materials on the nanometer-scale. Top-down and bottom-up approaches are commonly used in nano-structure fabrication. The top-down approach is used to fabricate nano-structures from bulk materials by lithography, etching, and polishing etc. It is commonly used in mechanical, electronic, and photonic devices. Bottom-up approaches fabricate nano-structures from atoms or molecules by chemical synthesis, self-assembly, and deposition, such as sol-gel processing, molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), focused ion beam (FIB) milling/deposition, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and electro-deposition etc. Nano-structures can have several different dimensionalities, including zero-dimensional nano-structures, such as fullerenes, nano-particles, quantum dots, nano-sized clusters; one-dimensional nano-structures, such as carbon nanotubes, metallic and semiconducting nanowires; two-dimensional nano-structures, such as graphene, super lattice, thin films; and three-dimensional nano-structures, such as photonic structures, anodic aluminum oxide, and molecular sieves. These nano-structured materials exhibit unique electrical, thermal, optical, mechanical, chemical, and magnetic properties in the quantum mechanical regime. Various techniques can be used to study these properties, such as scanning probe microscopy (SPM), scanning/transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM), micro Raman spectroscopy, etc. These unique properties have important applications in modern technologies, such as random access memories, display, solar energy conversion, chemical sensing, and bio-medical devices. This thesis includes four main topics in the broad area of nanoscience: magnetic properties of ferro-magnetic cobalt nanowires, plasmonic properties of metallic nano-particles, photocatalytic properties of titanium dioxide nanotubes, and electro-thermal-optical properties of carbon nanotubes. These materials and their

  5. Electron Beam Induced Artifacts During in situ TEM Deformation of Nanostructured Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Rohit; Rentenberger, Christian; Rajagopalan, Jagannathan

    2015-11-01

    A critical assumption underlying in situ transmission electron microscopy studies is that the electron beam (e-beam) exposure does not fundamentally alter the intrinsic deformation behavior of the materials being probed. Here, we show that e-beam exposure causes increased dislocation activation and marked stress relaxation in aluminum and gold films spanning a range of thicknesses (80-400 nanometers) and grain sizes (50-220 nanometers). Furthermore, the e-beam induces anomalous sample necking, which unusually depends more on the e-beam diameter than intensity. Notably, the stress relaxation in both aluminum and gold occurs at beam energies well below their damage thresholds. More remarkably, the stress relaxation and/or sample necking is significantly more pronounced at lower accelerating voltages (120 kV versus 200 kV) in both the metals. These observations in aluminum and gold, two metals with highly dissimilar atomic weights and properties, indicate that e-beam exposure can cause anomalous behavior in a broad spectrum of nanostructured materials, and simultaneously suggest a strategy to minimize such artifacts.

  6. Development of Methods for Surface Modification of Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, David A.

    The surfaces of a material become increasingly more influential when the dimensions are reduced, because a larger percentage of the atoms are exposed on the surface. The surface environment of nanostructured materials dictates both physical properties and function, but is synthetically challenging to control. Although the desired functionality is commonly introduced via post-synthetic modification, it would be advantageous to minimize the number of synthetic steps by having specific function installed in the precursor. This work describes efforts to investigate new precursor complexes for the synthesis of nanoparticles, in addition to electrochemical studies on single monolayer films for electrocatalysis. Chapter 2 focuses on the preparation of magnetic nanoaparticles, and the synthesis of a polymerizable surfactant, stacac, to be used to generate composite materials. Although an iron complex of stacac could be used as a precursor for magnetic nanoparticles, favorable composite materials could only be produced by introduction of stacac after isolation of magnetic nanoparticles. Chapter 3 describes the synthesis of Au(I) complexes with various thiourea-based ligands, to be used as precursors for gold nanoparticles. The experimental conditions were varied and parameters were found where addition of a reducing agent generated solution-stable gold nanoparticles in a reproducible manner. It was determined that only aggregated gold nanoparticles were produced when Au(I) complexes were generated in situ and the use of crystalline precursors resulted in soluble gold nanoparticles. Chapter 4 discusses the preparation of electrocatalysts for the oxidation of water with a focus on accurately determining the active surface area. A monolayer of cobalt was prepared on a gold electrode by underpotential deposition and used as an electrocatalyst for water oxidation. Because the surface area of gold can be measured directly, deposition of a single monolayer produced negligible

  7. Some aspects of applying nanostructured materials in air filtration, water filtration and electrical engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmer, Dusan; Vincent, Ivo; Lovecka, Lenka; Kazda, Tomas; Giurg, Adam; Skorvan, Ondrej

    2017-05-01

    Nanostructures prepared from nanofibres and nanostructured composites prepared from nanofibres and fillers are gradually becoming increasingly demanded materials for applications in various industrial branches connected with catalysis, environment protection (air filtration, waste water treatment, sound absorption), in biological engineering, electronics (battery separators, electrode materials), etc. Selected applications of these materials prepared in the company SPUR a.s. are summed up in the following presentation.

  8. Solving the nanostructure problem: exemplified on metallic alloy nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkov, Valeri; Prasai, Binay; Ren, Yang; Shan, Shiyao; Luo, Jin; Joseph, Pharrah; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2014-08-01

    With current technology moving rapidly toward smaller scales nanometer-size materials, hereafter called nanometer-size particles (NPs), are being produced in increasing numbers and explored for various useful applications ranging from photonics and catalysis to detoxification of wastewater and cancer therapy. Nature also is a prolific producer of useful NPs. Evidence can be found in ores on the ocean floor, minerals and soils on land and in the human body that, when water is excluded, is mostly made of proteins that are 6-10 nm in size and globular in shape. Precise knowledge of the 3D atomic-scale structure, that is how atoms are arranged in space, is a crucial prerequisite for understanding and so gaining more control over the properties of any material, including NPs. In the case of bulk materials such knowledge is fairly easy to obtain by Bragg diffraction experiments. Determining the 3D atomic-scale structure of NPs is, however, still problematic spelling trouble for science and technology at the nanoscale. Here we explore this so-called ``nanostructure problem'' from a practical point of view arguing that it can be solved when its technical, that is the inapplicability of Bragg diffraction to NPs, and fundamental, that is the incompatibility of traditional crystallography with NPs, aspects are both addressed properly. As evidence we present a successful and broadly applicable, 6-step approach to determining the 3D atomic-scale structure of NPs based on a suitable combination of a few experimental and computational techniques. This approach is exemplified on 5 nm sized PdxNi100-x particles (x = 26, 56 and 88) explored for catalytic applications. Furthermore, we show how once an NP atomic structure is determined precisely, a strategy for improving NP structure-dependent properties of particular interest to science and technology can be designed rationally and not subjectively as frequently done now.With current technology moving rapidly toward smaller scales

  9. Fabrication of a nanostructured gold-polymer composite material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, K; Witcomb, M; Scurrell, M

    2006-07-01

    A facile synthesis route is described for the preparation of a poly-(o-aminophenol)-gold nanoparticle composite material by polymerization of o-aminophenol (AP) monomer using HAuCl(4) as the oxidant. The synthesis was carried out in a methanol medium so that it could serve a dual solvent role, a solvent for both the AP and the water solution of HAuCl(4). It was found that oxidative polymerization of AP leads to the formation of poly-AP with a diameter of 50+/-10nm, while the reduction of AuCl(4) (-) results in the formation of gold nanoparticles ( approximately 2nm). The gold nanoparticles were uniformly dispersed and highly stabilized throughout the macromolecular chain that formed a uniform metal-polymer composite material. The resultant composite material was characterized by means of different techniques, such as UV-vis, IR and Raman spectroscopy, which offered the information about the chemical structure of polymer, whereas electron microscopy images provided information regarding the morphology of the composite material and the distribution of the metal particles in the composite material.

  10. Nanostructured Solar Irradiation Control Materials for Solar Energy Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jinho; Marshall, I. A.; Torrico, M. N.; Taylor, C. R.; Ely, Jeffry; Henderson, Angel Z.; Kim, J.-W.; Sauti, G.; Gibbons, L. J.; Park, C.; Lowther, S. E.; Lillehei, P. T.; Bryant, R. G.

    2012-01-01

    Tailoring the solar absorptivity (alpha(sub s)) and thermal emissivity (epsilon(sub T)) of materials constitutes an innovative approach to solar energy control and energy conversion. Numerous ceramic and metallic materials are currently available for solar absorbance/thermal emittance control. However, conventional metal oxides and dielectric/metal/dielectric multi-coatings have limited utility due to residual shear stresses resulting from the different coefficient of thermal expansion of the layered materials. This research presents an alternate approach based on nanoparticle-filled polymers to afford mechanically durable solar-absorptive and thermally-emissive polymer nanocomposites. The alpha(sub s) and epsilon(sub T) were measured with various nano inclusions, such as carbon nanophase particles (CNPs), at different concentrations. Research has shown that adding only 5 wt% CNPs increased the alpha(sub s) and epsilon(sub T) by a factor of about 47 and 2, respectively, compared to the pristine polymer. The effect of solar irradiation control of the nanocomposite on solar energy conversion was studied. The solar irradiation control coatings increased the power generation of solar thermoelectric cells by more than 380% compared to that of a control power cell without solar irradiation control coatings.

  11. Fabrication of metal suspending nanostructures by nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and isotropic reactive ion. etching (RIE)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE GuoYong; ZHANG Jin; ZHANG YongYi; ZHANG YingYing; ZHU Tao; LIU ZhongFan

    2009-01-01

    We report herein e rational approach for fabricating metal suspending nanostructures by nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and isotropic reactive ion etching (RIE). The approach comprises three principal steps:(1) mold fabrication, (2) structure replication by NIL, and (3) suspending nanostructures creation by isotropic RIE. Using this approach, suspending nanostructures with Au, Au/Ti or Ti/Au bilayers, and Au/TilAu sandwiched structures are demonstrated. For Au nanostructures, straight suspending nanostructurea can be obtained when the thickness of Au film is up to 50 nm for nano-bridge and 90 nm for nano-finger patterns. When the thickness of Au is below 50 nm for nano-bridge and 90 nm for nano-finger, the Au suspending nanostructures bend upward as a result of the mismatch of thermal expansion between the thin Au films and Si substrate. This leads to residual stresses in the thin Au films. For Au/Ti or Ti/Au bilayers nanostructures, the cantilevers bend toward Au film, since Au has a larger thermal expansion coefficient than that of Ti. While in the case of sandwich structures, straight suspending nanostructures are obtained, this may be due to the balance of residual stress between the thin films.

  12. Metal-insulator and charge ordering transitions in oxide nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sujay Kumar

    Strongly correlated oxides are a class of materials wherein interplay of various degrees of freedom results in novel electronic and magnetic phenomena. Vanadium oxides are widely studied correlated materials that exhibit metal-insulator transitions (MIT) in a wide temperature range from 70 K to 380 K. In this Thesis, results from electrical transport measurements on vanadium dioxide (VO2) and vanadium oxide bronze (MxV 2O5) (where M: alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metal cations) are presented and discussed. Although the MIT in VO2 has been studied for more than 50 years, the microscopic origin of the transition is still debated since a slew of external parameters such as light, voltage, and strain are found to significantly alter the transition. Furthermore, recent works on electrically driven switching in VO2 have shown that the role of Joule heating to be a major cause as opposed to electric field. We explore the mechanisms behind the electrically driven switching in single crystalline nanobeams of VO2 through DC and AC transport measurements. The harmonic analysis of the AC measurement data shows that non-uniform Joule heating causes electronic inhomogeneities to develop within the nanobeam and is responsible for driving the transition in VO2. Surprisingly, field assisted emission mechanisms such as Poole-Frenkel effect is found to be absent and the role of percolation is also identified in the electrically driven transition. This Thesis also provides a new insight into the mechanisms behind the electrolyte gating induced resistance modulation and the suppression of MIT in VO2. We show that the metallic phase of VO2 induced by electrolyte gating is due to an electrochemical process and can be both reversible and irreversible under different conditions. The kinetics of the redox processes increase with temperature; a complete suppression of the transition and the stabilization of the metallic phase are achievable by gating in the rutile metallic phase

  13. Thermoelectric properties and nanostructures of materials prepared from rice husk ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pukird, S.; Tipparach, U.; Kasian, P. [Ubon Ratchathani Univ., Ubon Ratchathani (Thailand). Dept. of Physics; Limsuwan, P. [King Mongkut' s Univ. of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok (Thailand). Dept. of Physics

    2009-07-01

    Thailand produces large amounts of agricultural residues such as rice husk and coconut shells. Rice husk is considered to be a potential source for solar grade silicon. Studies have shown that reasonably pure polycrystalline silicon can be prepared from rice husk white ash by a metallothermic reduction process. This paper reported on a study that investigated the thermoelectric properties of ceramic material prepared by mixing silica from rice husk ash and carbon obtained from coconut shell charcoal. The thermoelectric properties of the materials were examined along with their microstructures. The materials were made from burning rice husk ash and coconut shell at different temperatures and then doped with metal oxides. Pellets were heated at temperature of 700 degrees C for 1-3 hours. The voltage on both sides of the pellets was observed. The electromotive force was found when different temperatures were applied on both sides of the pellet specimens. The Seebeck coefficient was then calculated. The results showed that these materials can be used as thermoelectric devices. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-rays (EDX) were used to investigate the source of materials and the products on the substrates. The images of SEM and EDX showed nanostructures of materials such as nanowires, nanorods and nanoparticles of the products and sources. 22 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.

  14. Designing deoxidation inhibiting encapsulation of metal oxide nanostructures for fluidic and biological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Moumita; Ghosh, Siddharth; Seibt, Michael; Schaap, Iwan A. T.; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Mohan Rao, G.

    2016-12-01

    Due to their photoluminescence, metal oxide nanostructures such as ZnO nanostructures are promising candidates in biomedical imaging, drug delivery and bio-sensing. To apply them as label for bio-imaging, it is important to study their structural stability in a bio-fluidic environment. We have explored the effect of water, the main constituent of biological solutions, on ZnO nanostructures with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and photoluminescence (PL) studies which show ZnO nanorod degeneration in water. In addition, we propose and investigate a robust and inexpensive method to encapsulate these nanostructures (without structural degradation) using bio-compatible non-ionic surfactant in non-aqueous medium, which was not reported earlier. This new finding is an immediate interest to the broad audience of researchers working in biophysics, sensing and actuation, drug delivery, food and cosmetics technology, etc.

  15. Vertically Aligned Nanostructured Arrays of Inorganic Materials: Synthesis, Distinctive Physical Phenomena, and Device Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Jesus Manuel

    The manifestation of novel physical phenomena upon scaling materials to finite size has inspired new device concepts that take advantage of the distinctive electrical, mechanical, and optical, properties of nanostructures. The development of fabrication approaches for the preparation of their 1D nanostructured form, such as nanowires and nanotubes, has contributed greatly to advancing fundamental understanding of these systems, and has spurred the integration of these materials in novel electronics, photonic devices, power sources, and energy scavenging constructs. Significant progress has been achieved over the last decade in the preparation of ordered arrays of carbon nanotubes, II---VI and III---V semiconductors, and some binary oxides such as ZnO. In contrast, relatively less attention has been focused on layered materials with potential for electrochemical energy storage. Here, we describe the catalyzed vapor transport growth of vertical arrays of orthorhombic V2O 5 nanowires. In addition, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy is used to precisely probe the alignment, uniformity in crystal growth direction, and electronic structure of single-crystalline V2O5 nanowire arrays prepared by a cobalt-catalyzed vapor transport process. The dipole selection rules operational for core-level electron spectroscopy enable angle-dependant NEXAFS spectroscopy to be used as a sensitive probe of the anisotropy of these systems and provides detailed insight into bond orientation and the symmetry of the frontier orbital states. The experimental spectra are matched to previous theoretical predictions and allow experimental verification of features such as the origin of the split-off conduction band responsible for the n-type conductivity of V2O5 and the strongly anisotropic nature of vanadyl-oxygen-derived (V=O) states thought to be involved in catalysis. We have also invested substantial effort in obtaining shape and size control of metal oxide

  16. Nanostructured Semiconductor Materials for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Cavallo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Since O’Regan and Grätzel’s first report in 1991, dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs appeared immediately as a promising low-cost photovoltaic technology. In fact, though being far less efficient than conventional silicon-based photovoltaics (being the maximum, lab scale prototype reported efficiency around 13%, the simple design of the device and the absence of the strict and expensive manufacturing processes needed for conventional photovoltaics make them attractive in small-power applications especially in low-light conditions, where they outperform their silicon counterparts. Nanomaterials are at the very heart of DSSC, as the success of its design is due to the use of nanostructures at both the anode and the cathode. In this review, we present the state of the art for both n-type and p-type semiconductors used in the photoelectrodes of DSSCs, showing the evolution of the materials during the 25 years of history of this kind of devices. In the case of p-type semiconductors, also some other energy conversion applications are touched upon.

  17. Interfacial engineering of two-dimensional nano-structured materials by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuiykov, Serge; Kawaguchi, Toshikazu; Hai, Zhenyin; Karbalaei Akbari, Mohammad; Heynderickx, Philippe M.

    2017-01-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is an enabling technology which provides coating and material features with significant advantages compared to other existing techniques for depositing precise nanometer-thin two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures. It is a cyclic process which relies on sequential self-terminating reactions between gas phase precursor molecules and a solid surface. ALD is especially advantageous when the film quality or thickness is critical, offering ultra-high aspect ratios. ALD provides digital thickness control to the atomic level by depositing film one atomic layer at a time, as well as pinhole-free films even over a very large and complex areas. Digital control extends to sandwiches, hetero-structures, nano-laminates, metal oxides, graded index layers and doping, and it is perfect for conformal coating and challenging 2D electrodes for various functional devices. The technique's capabilities are presented on the example of ALD-developed ultra-thin 2D tungsten oxide (WO3) over the large area of standard 4" Si substrates. The discussed advantages of ALD enable and endorse the employment of this technique for the development of hetero-nanostructure 2D semiconductors with unique properties.

  18. Recent advances in MoS2 nanostructured materials for energy and environmental applications - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theerthagiri, J.; Senthil, R. A.; Senthilkumar, B.; Reddy Polu, Anji; Madhavan, J.; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2017-08-01

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), a layered transition metal dichalcogenide with an analogous structure to graphene, has attracted enormous attention worldwide owing to its use in a variety of applications such as energy storage, energy conversion, environmental remediation and sensors. MoS2 and graphene have almost similar functional properties such as high charge carrier transport, high wear resistance and good mechanical strength and friction. However, MoS2 is advantageous over graphene due to its low-cost, abundancy, tailorable morphologies and tuneable band gap with good visible light absorption properties. In this review, we have focussed mainly on recent advances in MoS2 nanostructured materials for the applications in the broad area of energy and environment. Special attention has been paid to their applications in dye-sensitized solar cells, supercapacitor, Li-ion battery, hydrogen evolution reaction, photocatalysis for the degradation of organic pollutants, chemical/bio sensors and gas sensors. Finally, the challenges to design MoS2 nanostructures suitable for energy and environmental applications are also highlighted.

  19. Nanostructured transition metal oxides for energy storage and conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang

    Lithium-ion batteries, supercapacitors and photovoltaic devices have been widely considered as the three major promising alternatives of fossil fuels facing upcoming depletion to power the 21th century. The conventional film configuration of electrochemical electrodes hardly fulfills the high energy and efficiency requirements because heavy electroactive material deposition restricts ion diffusion path, and lowers power density and fault tolerance. In this thesis, I demonstrate that novel nanoarchitectured transition metal oxides (TMOs), e.g. MnO2, V2O 5, and ZnO, and their relevant nanocomposites were designed, fabricated and assembled into devices to deliver superior electrochemical performances such as high energy and power densities, and rate capacity. These improvements could be attributed to the significant enhancement of surface area, shortened ion diffusion distances and facile penetration of electrolyte solution into open structures of networks as well as to the pseudocapacitance domination. The utilization of ForcespinningRTM, a newly developed nanofiber processing technology, for large-scale energy storage and conversion applications is emphasized. This process simplifies the tedious multi-step hybridization synthesis and facilitates the contradiction between the micro-batch production and the ease of large-scale manufacturing. Key Words: Transition metal oxides, energy storage and conversion, ForcespinningRTM, pseudocapacitance domination, high rate capacity

  20. Nanostructured Lead Compounds in Electrode Materials of a Lead-Acid Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Kuzmenko

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The nanostructure and phase composition of the electrode material of lead-acid batteries, formed by chemical transformations with involvement of sulfuric acid solutions of various concentrations, water and carbon dioxide have been studied.

  1. Nanostructured energetic materials using sol-gel methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tillotson, T M; Simpson, R L; Hrubesh, L W; Gash, A E; Thomas, I M; Poco, J F

    2000-09-27

    The fundamental differences between energetic composites and energetic materials made from a monomolecular approach are the energy density attainable and the energy release rates. For the past 4 years, we have been exploiting sol-gel chemistry as a route to process energetic materials on a microstructural scale. At the last ISA conference, we described four specific sol-gel approaches to fabricating energetic materials and presented our early work and results on two methods - solution crystallization and powder addition. Here, we detail our work on a third approach, energetic nanocomposites. Synthesis of thermitic types of energetic nanocomposites are presented using transition and main group metal-oxide skeletons. Results on characterization of structure and performance will also be given.

  2. Progress of the Application of Mesoporous Silica-Supported Heteropolyacids in Heterogeneous Catalysis and Preparation of Nanostructured Metal Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heyong He

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous silica molecular sieves are a kind of unique catalyst support due to their large pore size and high surface area. Several methods have been developed to immobilize heteropolyacids (HPAs inside the channels of these mesoporous silicas. The mesoporous silica-supported HPA materials have been widely used as recyclable catalysts in heterogeneous systems. They have shown high catalytic activities and shape selectivities in some reactions, compared to the parent HPAs in homogeneous systems. This review summarizes recent progress in the field of mesoporous silica-supported HPAs applied in the heterogeneous catalysis area and preparation of nanostructured metal oxides using HPAs as precursors and mesoporous silicas as hard templates.

  3. Evaluation of first-row transition metal oxides supported on clay minerals for catalytic growth of carbon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoufis, Theodoros [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Jankovic, Lubos [Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Gournis, Dimitrios [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece)], E-mail: dgourni@cc.uoi.gr; Trikalitis, Pantelis N. [Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, GR-71409 Heraklion (Greece); Bakas, Thomas [Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece)], E-mail: tbakas@cc.uoi.gr

    2008-08-25

    In the present work we employed various transition metals (Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn) loaded on different smectite clays (laponite and montmorillonite) as catalysts in synthesis of carbon nanostructures (mainly nanotubes) and we report the effect of the nature of the catalytic centers and type of aluminosilicate layers in the morphology, quality and structure on the final products. Owing to their unique swelling, ion-exchange and intercalation properties smectite clays were easily, uniformly and reproducibly loaded with metal cations. Different homoionic forms of montmorillonite and laponite were prepared containing first-row transition metals and the synthesis of carbon nanostructures was carried out at 700 deg. C using an acetylene/nitrogen mixture. A variety of analytical techniques (XRD, Raman, SEM, TEM and thermal analysis) were used to fully characterize the final materials. Iron-, cobalt-, nickel- and manganese-exchanged clays showed to be effective catalysts for the production of carbon nanotubes, while acetylene decomposition over copper-exchanged clays resulted to the creation of carbon spheres. The resulting hybrid systems are particularly attractive for polymer reinforcing applications since the combined action of clay-carbon nanotubes in polymer matrixes can provide outstanding properties to the resulting composite materials.

  4. Nucleation engineered growth/formation of core-shell and hollow metal nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehra, Kamalesh; Verma, Manoj; Kumar, P. Senthil

    2016-05-01

    Herein, we present a simple yet versatile single step aqueous synthesis procedure for precisely controlling the formation of hollow as well as core-shell metal nanostructures. Modern refined Turkevich protocol has been effectively utilized so as to mechanistically understand the step-by-step autocatalytic process in the monodisperse synthesis of such exotic shaped metal nanostructures. Au core with Ag shell nanoparticles were optimized by the careful addition of Ag+ ions to the pristine gold nanoparticles, the negative charge on which efficiently attracts the Ag+-cations towards their surface and simultaneously reducing them, thereby consolidating the thin shell formation with ease. The shell thickness could as well be tuned by either changing the metal seed or cation concentration. Hollow Au nanostructures were obtained by the inverse addition of Au3+-anions to the as-prepared Ag nanoparticles, thus initiating the galvanic replacement process, wherein the concurrent oxidation of Ag0 and reduction of Au3+ takes place in a cohesive manner, resulting in the final etched nanoring / porous like morphology. The structure-property functional relationship of these artificial metal nanostructures were systematically studied utilizing optical absorption and microscopy techniques.

  5. RISK REDUCTION VIA GREENER SYNTHESIS OF NOBLE METAL NANOSTRUCTURES AND NANOCOMPOSITES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqueous preparation of nanoparticles using vitamins B2 and C which can function both as reducing and capping agents are described. Bulk and shape-controlled synthesis of noble nanostructures via microwave (MW)-assisted spontaneous reduction of noble metal salts using a-D-glucose,...

  6. Tailoring dislocation structures and mechanical properties of nanostructured metals produced by plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Xiaoxu

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a dislocation structure associated with low-angle dislocation boundaries and interior dislocations is a common and characteristic feature in nanostructured metals produced by plastic deformation, and plays an important role in determining both the strength and ductility of the nan...

  7. Dual-color encoded DNAzyme nanostructures for multiplexed detection of intracellular metal ions in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenjiao; Liang, Wenbing; Li, Daxiu; Yuan, Ruo; Xiang, Yun

    2016-11-15

    The detection of intracellular metal ions is of great importance in understanding metal homeostasis in cells and related diseases, and yet it remains a significant challenge to achieve this goal. Based on a new self-assembled and dual-color encoded DNAzyme nanostructure, we describe here an approach for multiplexed sensing of UO2(2+) and Pb(2+) in living cells. The fluorescently quenched nanoprobes can be prepared by simple thermal annealing of four ssDNAs containing the metal ion-dependent enzymatic and substrate sequences. The self-assembly formation of the nanostructures are verified by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The target metal ions can cleave the substrate sequences in the DNAzyme nanostructures to recover fluorescent emissions at different wavelengths for sensitive and selective in vitro multiplexed detection of UO2(2+) and Pb(2+) with the detection limits of 0.6nM and 3.9nM, respectively. Importantly, we demonstrate that these nanoprobes are stable in cell lysates and can enter cells without the aid of any transfection agents for simultaneous imaging intracellular UO2(2+) and Pb(2+). Moreover, the nanoprobes offer excellent biocompatibility and non-cytotoxicity. With these unique features, the dual-color encoded nanostructures presented here can thus offer new opportunities for multiplexed detection of specific intracellular species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Green synthesis and structural control of metal and mineral nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian

    is efficiency which in large part comes down to the efficiency of the catalyst. Global issues arising from the use and reliance on fossil fuels urges the transition to sustainable alternatives and the development of new highly efficient nanomaterials. The efficiency depends on structure so controlling size......, their formation mechanisms studied, and their application as catalysts in relevant systems tested. Solution synthesis of nanomaterials offers large-scale, mild production but control of size, shape and composition is often challenging. This may be improved by expanding the understanding of the complex processes...... control of gold nanostructures provided controlled synthesis of not only spherical gold nanoparticles of 8-80 nm but also graphene oxide templated preparation of flat, ring-shaped gold nanostructures up to 1 μm in diameter mainly exposing (111) facets. Increased efficiency of new platinum nanocatalysts...

  9. Bias polarity-sensitive electrical failure characteristics of ZnSe nanowire in metal-semiconductor-metal nanostructure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Tan; Yanguo Wang

    2014-01-01

    The effect of bias polarity on the electrical breakdown behavior of the single ZnSe nanowire (NW) in the metal-semiconductor-metal (M-S-M) nanostructure under high current density and high bias conditions has been studied in the present paper. The experimental results show that the failure of the ZnSe NW in M-S-M nanostructure was sensitive to bias polarity since the NW commonly collapsed at the negatively biased Au metal electrode due to high Joule heat produced in NW at the reversely biased Schottky barrier. Thus, the electrical breakdown behavior of the ZnSe NW was highly dominated by the cathode-controlled mode due to the high resistance of the depletion region of ZnSe NW at the reversely biased Schottky contact.

  10. Modeling and characterization of the elastic behavior of interfaces in nanostructured materials: From an atomistic description to a continuum approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingreville, Remi

    Steady technological progresses in all fields of nanoscale technology and probe technology have enabled the synthesis, the assembly, the development, the characterization and the improvement of nanostructured materials. The lack of understanding of their macroscopic behavior is a major roadblock for inserting these materials into engineering applications. Partially due to these rapid advances in nano-scale and nano-structured materials, there has been a resurgence of interest in surface elastic properties such as surface energy, surface stresses, and surface elastic stiffness. Because of the large surface-to-volume ratio in nano-materials, surface elastic properties become more prominent. They have strong influence on the overall thermo-mechanical behavior of the nano-materials. In this dissertation, an innovative approach combining continuum mechanics and atomistic simulations is exposed to develop a nanomechanics theory for modeling and predicting the macroscopic behavior of nanomaterials. This nanomechanics theory exhibits the simplicity of the continuum formulation while taking into account the discrete atomic structure and interaction near surfaces/interfaces. There are four primary objectives to this dissertation. First, theory of interfaces is revisited to better understand its behavior and effects on the overall behavior of nanostructures. Second, atomistic tools are provided in order to efficiently determine the properties of free surfaces and interfaces. Interface properties are reported in this work, with comparison to both theoretical and experimental characterizations of interfaces. Specifically, we report surface elastic properties of groups 10--11 transition metals as well as properties for low-CSL grain boundaries in copper. Third, we propose a continuum framework that casts the atomic level information into continuum quantities that can be used to analyze, model and simulate macroscopic behavior of nanostructured materials. In particular, we study

  11. Fabrication of bioinspired nanostructured materials via colloidal self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Han

    ultimate strains than nacre and pure GO paper (also synthesized by filtration). Specifically, it exhibits ˜30 times higher fracture energy than filtrated graphene paper and nacre, ˜100 times tougher than filtrated GO paper. Besides reinforced nanocomposites, we further explored the self-assembly of spherical colloids and the templating nanofabrication of moth-eye-inspired broadband antireflection coatings. Binary crystalline structures can be easily accomplished by spin-coating double-layer nonclose-packed colloidal crystals as templates, followed by colloidal templating. The polymer matrix between self-assembled colloidal crystal has been used as a sacrificial template to define the resulting periodic binary nanostructures, including intercalated arrays of silica spheres and polymer posts, gold nanohole arrays with binary sizes, and dimple-nipple antireflection coatings. The binary-structured antireflection coatings exhibit better antireflective properties than unitary coatings. Natural optical structures and nanocomposites teach us a great deal on how to create high performance artificial materials. The bottom-up technologies developed in this thesis are scalable and compatible with standard industrial processes, promising for manufacturing high-performance materials for the benefits of human beings.

  12. Characterization of minerals, metals and materials

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Jiann-Yang; Bai, Chengguang; Carpenter, John; Cai, Mingdong; Firrao, Donato; Kim, Byoung-Gon

    2012-01-01

    This state-of-the-art reference contains chapters on all aspects of the characterization of minerals, metals, and materials. The title presents papers from one of the largest yearly gatherings of materials scientists in the world and thoroughly discusses the characterization of minerals, metals, and materials The scope includes current industrial applications and research and developments in the following areas:  Characterization of Ferrous Metals Characterization of Non-Ferrous Materials Characterization of Minerals and Ceramics Character

  13. On the size-dependent magnetism and all-optical magnetization switching of transition-metal silicide nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glushkov, G. I.; Tuchin, A. V.; Popov, S. V.; Bityutskaya, L. A., E-mail: me144@phys.vsu.ru [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Theoretical investigations of the electronic structure, synthesis, and all-optical magnetization switching of transition-metal silicide nanostructures are reported. The magnetic moment of the nanostructures is studied as a function of the silicide cluster size and configuration. The experimentally demonstrated magnetization switching of nanostructured nickel silicide by circularly polarized light makes it possible to create high-speed storage devices with high density data recording.

  14. Nano-structured noble metal catalysts based on hexametallate architecture for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, Todd H.

    2015-09-15

    Nano-structured noble metal catalysts based on hexametallate lattices, of a spinel block type, and which are resistant to carbon deposition and metal sulfide formation are provided. The catalysts are designed for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels to synthesis gas. The hexametallate lattices are doped with noble metals (Au, Pt, Rh, Ru) which are atomically dispersed as isolated sites throughout the lattice and take the place of hexametallate metal ions such as Cr, Ga, In, and/or Nb. Mirror cations in the crystal lattice are selected from alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, and the lanthanide metals, so as to reduce the acidity of the catalyst crystal lattice and enhance the desorption of carbon deposit forming moieties such as aromatics. The catalysts can be used at temperatures as high as 1000.degree. C. and pressures up to 30 atmospheres. A method for producing these catalysts and applications of their use also is provided.

  15. Quantitative Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Electronic and Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankovich, Andrew B.

    Electronic and nanostructured materials have been investigated using advanced scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) techniques. The first topic is the microstructure of Ga and Sb-doped ZnO. Ga-doped ZnO is a candidate transparent conducting oxide material. The microstructure of GZO thin films grown by MBE under different growth conditions and different substrates were examined using various electron microscopy (EM) techniques. The microstructure, prevalent defects, and polarity in these films strongly depend on the growth conditions and substrate. Sb-doped ZnO nanowires have been shown to be the first route to stable p-type ZnO. Using Z-contrast STEM, I have showed that an unusual microstructure of Sb-decorated head-to-head inversion domain boundaries and internal voids contain all the Sb in the nanowires and cause the p-type conduction. InGaN thin films and InGaN / GaN quantum wells (QW) for light emitting diodes are the second topic. Low-dose Z-contrast STEM, PACBED, and EDS on InGaN QW LED structures grown by MOCVD show no evidence for nanoscale composition variations, contradicting previous reports. In addition, a new extended defect in GaN and InGaN was discovered. The defect consists of a faceted pyramid-shaped void that produces a threading dislocation along the [0001] growth direction, and is likely caused by carbon contamination during growth. Non-rigid registration (NRR) and high-precision STEM of nanoparticles is the final topic. NRR is a new image processing technique that corrects distortions arising from the serial nature of STEM acquisition that previously limited the precision of locating atomic columns and counting the number of atoms in images. NRR was used to demonstrate sub-picometer precision in STEM images of single crystal Si and GaN, the best achieved in EM. NRR was used to measure the atomic surface structure of Pt nanoacatalysts and Au nanoparticles, which revealed new bond length variation phenomenon of surface atoms. In

  16. Synthesis and Electrochemical Sensing Toward Heavy Metals of Bunch-like Bismuth Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Large-scale bunch-like bismuth (Bi nanostructures were the first time to be synthesized via two-step electrochemical deposition. The growth mechanism of the nanostructures was discussed. Such a designed bunch-like Bi electrode has high sensitivity to detect the heavy metal ions due to its unique three-dimensional structures and strong ability of adsorbing the heavy metal ions. The bunch-like Bi electrode’s detection of heavy metals was statically performed using anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV. The detection in the Pb(II concentration range of 2.5–50 μg/l was also performed. Based on the experimental results, this bunch-like Bi electrode can be considered as an interesting alternative to common mercury electrodes and bismuth film electrodes for possible use in electrochemical studies and electroanalytical applications.

  17. Shape-controlled continuous synthesis of metal nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Victor; Smith, Christopher D.; Jensen, Klavs F.

    2016-03-01

    A segmented flow-based microreactor is used for the continuous production of faceted nanocrystals. Flow segmentation is proposed as a versatile tool to manipulate the reduction kinetics and control the growth of faceted nanostructures; tuning the size and shape. Switching the gas from oxygen to carbon monoxide permits the adjustment in nanostructure growth from 1D (nanorods) to 2D (nanosheets). CO is a key factor in the formation of Pd nanosheets and Pt nanocubes; operating as a second phase, a reductant, and a capping agent. This combination confines the growth to specific structures. In addition, the segmented flow microfluidic reactor inherently has the ability to operate in a reproducible manner at elevated temperatures and pressures whilst confining potentially toxic reactants, such as CO, in nanoliter slugs. This continuous system successfully synthesised Pd nanorods with an aspect ratio of 6; thin palladium nanosheets with a thickness of 1.5 nm; and Pt nanocubes with a 5.6 nm edge length, all in a synthesis time as low as 150 s.A segmented flow-based microreactor is used for the continuous production of faceted nanocrystals. Flow segmentation is proposed as a versatile tool to manipulate the reduction kinetics and control the growth of faceted nanostructures; tuning the size and shape. Switching the gas from oxygen to carbon monoxide permits the adjustment in nanostructure growth from 1D (nanorods) to 2D (nanosheets). CO is a key factor in the formation of Pd nanosheets and Pt nanocubes; operating as a second phase, a reductant, and a capping agent. This combination confines the growth to specific structures. In addition, the segmented flow microfluidic reactor inherently has the ability to operate in a reproducible manner at elevated temperatures and pressures whilst confining potentially toxic reactants, such as CO, in nanoliter slugs. This continuous system successfully synthesised Pd nanorods with an aspect ratio of 6; thin palladium nanosheets with a

  18. Modeling nanostructural surface modifications in metal cutting by an approach of thermodynamic irreversibility: Derivation and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchkremer, S.; Klocke, F.

    2017-01-01

    Performance and operational safety of many metal parts in engineering depend on their surface integrity. During metal cutting, large thermomechanical loads and high gradients of the loads concerning time and location act on the surfaces and may yield significant structural material modifications, which alter the surface integrity. In this work, the derivation and validation of a model of nanostructural surface modifications in metal cutting are presented. For the first time in process modeling, initiation and kinetics of these modifications are predicted using a thermodynamic potential, which considers the interdependent developments of plastic work, dissipation, heat conduction and interface energy as well as the associated productions and flows of entropy. The potential is expressed based on the free Helmholtz energy. The irreversible thermodynamic state changes in the workpiece surface are homogenized over the volume in order to bridge the gap between discrete phenomena involved with the initiation and kinetics of dynamic recrystallization and its macroscopic implications for surface integrity. The formulation of the thermodynamic potential is implemented into a finite element model of orthogonal cutting of steel AISI 4140. Close agreement is achieved between predicted nanostructures and those obtained in transmission electron microscopical investigations of specimen produced in cutting experiments.

  19. Metal-silica sol-gel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiegman, Albert E. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to a single phase metal-silica sol-gel glass formed by the co-condensation of a transition metal with silicon atoms where the metal atoms are uniformly distributed within the sol-gel glass as individual metal centers. Any transition metal may be used in the sol-gel glasses. The present invention also relates to sensor materials where the sensor material is formed using the single phase metal-silica sol-gel glasses. The sensor materials may be in the form of a thin film or may be attached to an optical fiber. The present invention also relates to a method of sensing chemicals using the chemical sensors by monitoring the chromatic change of the metal-silica sol-gel glass when the chemical binds to the sensor. The present invention also relates to oxidation catalysts where a metal-silica sol-gel glass catalyzes the reaction. The present invention also relates to a method of performing oxidation reactions using the metal-silica sol-gel glasses. The present invention also relates to organopolymer metal-silica sol-gel composites where the pores of the metal-silica sol-gel glasses are filled with an organic polymer polymerized by the sol-gel glass.

  20. Nanostructured Inorganic Materials at Work in Electrochemical Sensing and Biofuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaovi Holade

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The future of analytical devices, namely (biosensors, which are currently impacting our everyday life, relies on several metrics such as low cost, high sensitivity, good selectivity, rapid response, real-time monitoring, high-throughput, easy-to-make and easy-to-handle properties. Fortunately, they can be readily fulfilled by electrochemical methods. For decades, electrochemical sensors and biofuel cells operating in physiological conditions have concerned biomolecular science where enzymes act as biocatalysts. However, immobilizing them on a conducting substrate is tedious and the resulting bioelectrodes suffer from stability. In this contribution, we provide a comprehensive, authoritative, critical, and readable review of general interest that surveys interdisciplinary research involving materials science and (bioelectrocatalysis. Specifically, it recounts recent developments focused on the introduction of nanostructured metallic and carbon-based materials as robust “abiotic catalysts” or scaffolds in bioelectrochemistry to boost and increase the current and readout signals as well as the lifetime. Compared to biocatalysts, abiotic catalysts are in a better position to efficiently cope with fluctuations of temperature and pH since they possess high intrinsic thermal stability, exceptional chemical resistance and long-term stability, already highlighted in classical electrocatalysis. We also diagnosed their intrinsic bottlenecks and highlighted opportunities of unifying the materials science and bioelectrochemistry fields to design hybrid platforms with improved performance.

  1. Structure-Interaction Effects In Novel Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Nam B.

    Recent advances in experimental and computational methods have opened up new directions in graphene fundamental studies. In addition to understanding the basic properties of this material and its quasi-one dimensional structures, significant efforts are devoted to describing their long ranged dispersive interactions. Other two-dimensional materials, such as silicene, germanene, and transition metal dichalcogenides, are also being investigated aiming at finding complementary to graphene systems with other "wonder" properties. The focus of this work is to utilize first principles simulations methods to build our basic knowledge of structure-interaction relations in two-dimensional materials and design their properties. In particular, mechanical folding and extended defects in zigzag and armchair graphene nanoribbons can be used to modulate their electronic and spin polarization characteristics and achieve different stacking patterns. Our simulations concerning zigzag silicene nanoribbons show width-dependent antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic transitions unlike the case of zigzag graphene nanoribbons, which are always antiferromagnetic. Heterostructures, build by stacking graphene, silicene, and MoS2, are also investigated. It is found that hybridization alters the electronic properties of the individual layers and new flexural and breathing phonon modes display unique behaviors in the heterostructure compositions. Anchored to SiC substrate graphene nanoribbons are also proposed as possible systems to be used in graphene electronics. Our findings are of importance not only for fundamental science, but they could also be used for future experimental developments.

  2. Nanostructuring of Fused Silica Assisted by Laser-shaped Metal Triangles Using a Nanosecond Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Pierre; Grüner, Christoph; Ehrhardt, Martin; Bayer, Lukas; Zimmer, Klaus

    Self-organized processes are of special interest for the laser-induced nanostructuring of surfaces. In this study we combined two self-organized processes: the microsphere lithography and the molten phase transformation for the nanostructuring of dielectrics. A fused silica substrate was covered with periodically ordered polystyrene (PS) spheres and the system was subsequently covered with 30 nm chromium. Afterwards the PS spheres were removed and the bare and resultant periodic Cr triangles were irradiated in two steps using a KrF excimer laser. First step: A low laser fluence treatment results in a melting and shape transformation of the triangles. Second step: A high laser fluence treatment of the pre-treated surface results in a nanostructuring of the dielectric surface (and removal of the metal). The surface topography was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, the different steps were simulated and compared with the experimental results.

  3. Comparision between different metal oxide nanostructures and nanocomposites for sensing, energy generation, and energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willander, Magnus; Alnoor, Hatim; Elhag, Sami; Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain; Nour, Eiman Satti; Nur, Omer

    2016-02-01

    Highlights from research on different nanocomposites and nanostructures for sensing and other energy related applications will be presented. The synthesized nanostructures and nanocomposites presented here were all obtained using the low temperature (textile and paper. We here present results from different metal oxide nanostructures employed for chemical sensing and some innovative energy related applications. Efficient sensitive and selective sensing of dopamine, melamine, and glucose are presented as some examples of self-powered sensors utilizing the electrochemical phenomenon i.e. transferring chemical energy into electrical signal. Further the use of nanomaterials for developing selfpowered devices utilizing mechanical ambient energy is presented via piezoelectric and triboelectric effects. Here the self-powered devices and systems were relying on utilizing the electormechanical phenomenon i.e. transferring ambient mechanical energy into useful electrical energy. Finally the visibility of nanomaterials prepared by the low temperature chemical synthesis as possible low cost replacement of Pt electrodes for hydrogen production is briefly presented and discussed.

  4. Enhancement of local electromagnetic fields in plasmonic crystals of coaxial metallic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Masanobu; Ikeda, Naoki; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa

    2012-01-01

    We have experimentally and numerically examined resonant modes in plasmonic crystals (PlCs) of coaxial metallic nanostructures. Resonance enhancements of local electromagnetic (EM) fields were evaluated quantitatively. We clarified that a local mode induced in the coaxial metallic structure shows the most significant field enhancement. The enhancement factors are comprehensively discussed by comparison with other PlCs, indicating that the coaxial PlC provides a locally intense electric field and EM power flux in the annular slit of 50-nm metallic gaps.

  5. Nanostructured material for advanced energy storage : magnesium battery cathode development.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigmund, Wolfgang M. (University of Florida, Gainesville, FL); Woan, Karran V. (University of Florida, Gainesville, FL); Bell, Nelson Simmons

    2010-11-01

    Magnesium batteries are alternatives to the use of lithium ion and nickel metal hydride secondary batteries due to magnesium's abundance, safety of operation, and lower toxicity of disposal. The divalency of the magnesium ion and its chemistry poses some difficulties for its general and industrial use. This work developed a continuous and fibrous nanoscale network of the cathode material through the use of electrospinning with the goal of enhancing performance and reactivity of the battery. The system was characterized and preliminary tests were performed on the constructed battery cells. We were successful in building and testing a series of electrochemical systems that demonstrated good cyclability maintaining 60-70% of discharge capacity after more than 50 charge-discharge cycles.

  6. Nanostructure multilayer dielectric materials for capacitors and insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbee, Jr., Troy W.; Johnson, Gary W.

    1998-04-21

    A capacitor is formed of at least two metal conductors having a multilayer dielectric and opposite dielectric-conductor interface layers in between. The multilayer dielectric includes many alternating layers of amorphous zirconium oxide (ZrO.sub.2) and alumina (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3). The dielectric-conductor interface layers are engineered for increased voltage breakdown and extended service life. The local interfacial work function is increased to reduce charge injection and thus increase breakdown voltage. Proper material choices can prevent electrochemical reactions and diffusion between the conductor and dielectric. Physical vapor deposition is used to deposit the zirconium oxide (ZrO.sub.2) and alumina (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3) in alternating layers to form a nano-laminate.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of nanostructured titanate materials by the hydrothermal treatment method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doong, Ruey-an; Kao, I-ling

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of one-dimensional (1-D) tubular and fibrous nanostructured materials have recently received highly attention. Various morphologies of 1-D nanostructured titanate materials including nanosheets, nanotubes, nanowires, and nanoribbons have recently been successfully synthesized using the alkaline hydrothermal method. In spite of the controversy of the chemical structures and formation mechanisms, titanate nanostructures have attracted much attention on applications of dye-sensitized solar cell, hydrogen sensing, lithium storage and photocatalysis because of their unique features of high specific surface area, ion-exchange capacity and aspect ratio, and unique optical and electrochemical properties. The morphology and microstructure of titanate nanostructures are highly dependent on the preparation conditions. In this review, we highlight the synthesis of TiO(2)-derived nanomaterials under various hydrothermal conditions. The patents for fabrication of various morphologies of nanostructures are also introduced. Effects of preparation parameters including hydrothermal temperature, duration, alkaline concentration, starting materials, and post-treatment on the morphology and microstructure of titanate nanomaterials are reviewered. In addition, the microwave-assisted method for fabrication of 1-D titanate nanostructures is discussed and compared. The applications of titanate nanomaterials in photocatalysis, ion-exchange, and lithium storages are also introduced.

  8. Nanostructured metal-polyaniline composites and applications thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsing-Lin; Li, Wenguang; Bailey, James A.; Gao, Yuan

    2012-10-02

    Metal-polyaniline (PANI) composites are provided together with a process of preparing such composites by an electrodeless process. The metal of the composite can have nanoscale structural features and the composites can be used in applications such as catalysis for hydrogenation reactions and for analytical detection methods employing SERS.

  9. Saccharide-based Approach to Green Metallic Nanostructure Synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Sørensen, Karsten Holm; Jensen, Palle Skovhus

    A green approach to solution synthesis of metallic nanoparticles has been developed using harmless and bioapplicable chemicals as well as moderate temperatures. Metal precursors are reduced by glucose/buffers and sterically stabilized by starch. The saccharide based procedure is highly diverse...

  10. Nanostructure of metallic particles in light water reactor used nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Edgar C., E-mail: edgar.buck@pnnl.gov; Mausolf, Edward J.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • An extraordinary nano-structure has been observed in the noble metal particles that form in UO{sub 2} reactor fuels. • The composition of the particles was highly variable with low levels of uranium and plutonium present in the particles. • This nano-structure may play an important role in the behavior of nuclear fuels under accident conditions. - Abstract: An extraordinary nano-structure has been observed in the metallic (Mo–Tc–Ru–Rh–Pd) particles that are known to form during irradiated in light water nuclear reactor fuels. This structure points possible high catalytic reactivity through the occurrence of a very high surface area as well as defect sites. We have analyzed separated metallic particles from dissolved high burn-up spent nuclear fuel using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The larger particles vary in diameter between ∼10 and ∼300 nm and possess a hexagonally close packed epsilon-ruthenium structure. These particles are not always single crystals but often consist of much smaller crystallites on the order of 1–3 nm in diameter with evidence suggesting the occurrence of some amorphous regions. It is possible that neutron irradiation and fission product recoils generated the unusual small crystallite size. The composition of the metallic particles was variable with low levels of uranium present in some of the particles. We hypothesize that the uranium may have induced the formation of the amorphous (or frustrated) metal structure. This unique nano-structure may play an important role in the environmental behavior of nuclear fuels.

  11. Quantum Simulations of Materials and Nanostructures (Q-SIMAN). Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galli, Giulia [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Bai, Zhaojun [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Ceperley, David [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Cai, Wei [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Gygi, Francois [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Marzari, Nicola [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Pickett, Warren [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Spaldin, Nicola [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Fattebert, Jean-Luc [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schwegler, Eric [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-09-16

    The focus of this SciDAC SAP (Scientific Application) is the development and use of quantum simulations techniques to understand materials and nanostructures at the microscopic level, predict their physical and chemical properties, and eventually design integrated materials with targeted properties. (Here the word ‘materials’ is used in a broad sense and it encompasses different thermodynamic states of matter, including solid, liquids and nanostructures.) Therefore our overarching goal is to enable scientific discoveries in the field of condensed matter and advanced materials through high performance computing.

  12. Interfacial scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) of chalcogenide/metal hybrid nanostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saad, Mahmoud M.; Abdallah, Tamer [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Abbassia, Cairo (Egypt); Easawi, Khalid; Negm, Sohair [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Faculty of Engineering (Shoubra), Benha University (Egypt); Talaat, Hassan, E-mail: hassantalaat@hotmail.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Abbassia, Cairo (Egypt)

    2015-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Comparing band gaps values obtained optically with STS. • Comparing direct imaging with calculated dimensions. • STS determination of the interfacial band bending of metal/chalcogenide. - Abstract: The electronic structure at the interface of chalcogenide/metal hybrid nanostructure (CdSe–Au tipped) had been studied by UHV scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) technique at room temperature. This nanostructure was synthesized by a phase transfer chemical method. The optical absorption of this hybrid nanostructure was recorded, and the application of the effective mass approximation (EMA) model gave dimensions that were confirmed by the direct measurements using the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as well as the high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The energy band gap obtained by STS agrees with the values obtained from the optical absorption. Moreover, the STS at the interface of CdSe–Au tipped hybrid nanostructure between CdSe of size about 4.1 ± 0.19 nm and Au tip of size about 3.5 ± 0.29 nm shows a band bending about 0.18 ± 0.03 eV in CdSe down in the direction of the interface. Such a result gives a direct observation of the electron accumulation at the interface of CdSe–Au tipped hybrid nanostructure, consistent with its energy band diagram. The presence of the electron accumulation at the interface of chalcogenides with metals has an important implication for hybrid nanoelectronic devices and the newly developed plasmon/chalcogenide photovoltaic solar energy conversion.

  13. Chemical degradation of trimethyl phosphate as surrogate for organo-phosporus pesticides on nanostructured metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Štengl, Václav, E-mail: stengl@iic.cas.cz; Henych, Jiří; Grygar, Tomáš; Pérez, Raúl

    2015-01-15

    Nanostructured TiO{sub 2} and mixed oxides of Ti and Fe, Hf, In, Mn or Zr -were prepared by homogeneous hydrolysis of aqueous solution of metal sulphates with urea. The oxides were characterised by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, particle size distribution, surface area and porosity. The oxide materials consists of a few nanometre primary crystals (mainly anatase) arranged in a few micrometre regular spherical agglomerates with specific surface area 133–511 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. The FTIR diffuse spectroscopy was used for monitoring chemical degradation of trimethylphosphate (TMP) as a surrogate for organo-phosphorus pesticides under ambient and higher temperatures. Undoped TiO{sub 2} and Ti,Mn-mixed oxide were most active in cleavage (hydrolysis) of CH{sub 3}O from TMP at room temperature and 100 °C. Cleavage of CH{sub 3}O in the other studied mixed oxides was not complete until temperature exceeds the boiling point of TMP.

  14. Liposomes versus metallic nanostructures: differences in the process of knowledge translation in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fajardo-Ortiz D

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available David Fajardo-Ortiz,1 Luis Duran,1 Laura Moreno,1 Héctor Ochoa,2 Víctor M Castaño1,3,41Faculty of Medicine of the National Autonomous University of Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico; 2El Colegio de la Frontera Sur, San Cristobal de las Casas, Mexico; 3Molecular Material Department, Applied Physics and Advanced Technology Center, National Autonomous University of Mexico, Juriquilla, Mexico; 4Advanced Technology Center, CIATEQ, Queretaro, MexicoAbstract: This research maps the knowledge translation process for two different types of nanotechnologies applied to cancer: liposomes and metallic nanostructures (MNs. We performed a structural analysis of citation networks and text mining supported in controlled vocabularies. In the case of liposomes, our results identify subnetworks (invisible colleges associated with different therapeutic strategies: nanopharmacology, hyperthermia, and gene therapy. Only in the pharmacological strategy was an organized knowledge translation process identified, which, however, is monopolized by the liposomal doxorubicins. In the case of MNs, subnetworks are not differentiated by the type of therapeutic strategy, and the content of the documents is still basic research. Research on MNs is highly focused on developing a combination of molecular imaging and photothermal therapy.Keywords: nanotechnology, citation network analysis, basic research, clinics, health care

  15. Singlet-Oxygen Generation From Individual Semiconducting and Metallic Nanostructures During Near-Infrared Laser Trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Bennett E.; Roder, Paden B.; Hanson, Jennifer L.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Devaraj, Arun; Perea, Daniel E.; Kim, Woo-Joong; Kilcoyne, Arthur L.; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2015-03-13

    Photodynamic therapy has been used for several decades in the treatment of solid tumors through the generation of reactive singlet-oxygen species (1O2). Recently, nanoscale metallic and semiconducting materials have been reported to act as photosensitizing agents with additional diagnostic and therapeutic functionality. To date there have been no reports of observing the generation of singlet-oxygen at the level of single nanostructures, particularly at near infrared (NIR) wavelengths. Here we demonstrate that NIR laser-tweezers can be used to observe the formation of singlet-oxygen produced from individual silicon and gold nanowires via use of a commercially available reporting dye. The laser trap also induces 2-photon photoexcitation of the dye following a chemical reaction with singlet oxygen. Corresponding 2-photon emission spectra confirms the generation of singlet oxygen from individual silicon nanowires at room temperature (30°C), suggesting a range of applications in understanding the impact of 1O2 on individual cancer cells.

  16. Half-metallicity and ferromagnetism in penta-AlN2 nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiao; Fan, Xinyu; Wei, Yanpei; Liu, Haiying; Li, Shujuan; Zhao, Peng; Chen, Gang

    2016-09-01

    We have performed a detailed first-principles study of the penta-AlN2 nanostructure in the Cairo pentagonal tiling geometry, which is dynamically stable due to the absence of imaginary mode in the calculated phonon spectrum. The formation energy and the fragment cohesive energy analyses, the molecular dynamics simulations, and the mechanical property studies also support the structural stability. It could withstand the temperature as high as 1400 K and sustain the strain up to 16.1% against structural collapse. The slightly buckled penta-AlN2 is found to be a ferromagnetic semiconductor. The strain of ~9% could drive the structural transition from the buckled to the planar. Interestingly, the strain of >7% would change the conducting properties to show half-metallic characters. Furthermore, it could be also used to continuously enhance the magnetic coupling strength, rendering penta-AlN2 as a robust ferromagnetic material. These studies shed light on the possibilities in synthesizing penta-AlN2 and present many unique properties, which are worth of further studying on both theory and experiment.

  17. Ablation and nanostructuring of metals by femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashitkov, S I; Komarov, P S; Ovchinnikov, A V; Struleva, E V; Agranat, M B [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zhakhovskii, V V [All-Russian Institute of Automatics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Inogamov, N A [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-30

    Using an interferometric continuous monitoring technique, we have investigated the motion of the surface of an aluminium target in the case of femtosecond laser ablation at picosecond time delays relative to the instant of laser exposure. Measurements of the temporal target dispersion dynamics, molecular dynamics simulation results and the morphology of the ablation crater have demonstrated a thermomechanical (spall) nature of the disruption of the condensed phase due to the cavitation-driven formation and growth of vapour phase nuclei upon melt expansion, followed by the formation of surface nanostructures upon melt solidification. The tensile strength of heated aluminium in a condensed state has been determined experimentally at an expansion rate of ∼10{sup 9} s{sup -1}. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  18. A study of the conductive properties of nanostructured metal oxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Olembert, Andre A.

    Fuel cells which were first employed in spacecraft, producing both electricity and water for astronaut consumption during the mid-1960's, are part of the ongoing pursuit for renewable energy sources, and environmentally compatible electric power generation. Recent enhancements in design and materials might establish fuel cells in a sustainable hydrogen energy economy (SHEE) as viable alternatives to the internal combustion engine. In tune with our principal objectives, this study investigates the conductive properties of metal-oxide thin films by developing a new deposition technique called dual channel ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (DC-USP). The DC-USP process has proved to be a reliable and cost-effective method to fabricate thin films. Extending the DC-USP technique, we have created a novel mixed ionic electronic conductor (MIEC) composed of two metal-oxides: lanthanum strontium ferrite and copper-doped bismuth vanadate (LSF.40:BiCuVOx.10). When the two materials are mixed, their grain boundary regions are heavily defected because of the dissimilarity of the two crystal structures, which maintain their integrity in the formed heterogenous composite. Oxygen ion diffusion occurs as it migrates through an ionic crystal, hopping from defect site to defect site. Furthermore, a nanostructured material - with crystallite grains less than 100 nm in diameter - will improve oxygen diffusion by increasing the density of defect sites. The rate of diffusion is increased as well as the quantity of diffusion pathways. Ultimately, as the ionic current density is increased, the total efficiency (nuSOFCtotal) of the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) can be improved. Therefore, the LSF-40:BiCuVOx.10 material can contribute to solve the major outstanding problem of the three-phase boundary (TPB) that limits the oxygen reduction reaction to within a microscopic region near the cathode-electrolyte interface in the SOFC device. Materials were tested and analyzed using atomic force microscopy

  19. Emerging Multifunctional Metal-Organic Framework Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Wen, Hui-Min; Cui, Yuanjing; Zhou, Wei; Qian, Guodong; Chen, Banglin

    2016-10-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), also known as coordination polymers, represent an interesting type of solid crystalline materials that can be straightforwardly self-assembled through the coordination of metal ions/clusters with organic linkers. Owing to the modular nature and mild conditions of MOF synthesis, the porosities of MOF materials can be systematically tuned by judicious selection of molecular building blocks, and a variety of functional sites/groups can be introduced into metal ions/clusters, organic linkers, or pore spaces through pre-designing or post-synthetic approaches. These unique advantages enable MOFs to be used as a highly versatile and tunable platform for exploring multifunctional MOF materials. Here, the bright potential of MOF materials as emerging multifunctional materials is highlighted in some of the most important applications for gas storage and separation, optical, electric and magnetic materials, chemical sensing, catalysis, and biomedicine. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. The Effects of Surface Properties of Nanostructured Bone Repair Materials on Their Performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology has been expected to be an extraordinarily promising method for bone repair. Meanwhile, the promise of nanobiomaterials for therapeutic applications has been widely reported, and a lot of studies have been made in terms of repairing bone using nanomaterials accompanied by rapid development of nanotechnology. Compared with conventional biomaterials, nanostructured implants have been shown to possess positive effects on cellular functions because of their unique surface properties, such as nanotopography, increased wettability, larger surface area, and microenvironment similar to extracellular matrix. Moreover, many positive cellular responses have been found to take place at the interface between nanostructured implants and host bone. In this paper, we will give a review about the effects of surface properties of nanostructured bone repair materials on their performances in terms of several aspects and a detailed interpretation or introduction on the specific cellular recognitions at the interface between nanostructured implants and host bone.

  1. Towards the Industrial Application of Spark Ablation for Nanostructured Functional Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfeiffer, T.V.

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructuring of functional materials is an essential part in the design of energy related devices – but the industrial tools we have to make these materials are lacking. This dissertation explores the green, flexible, and scalable spark discharge process for the fabrication of complex

  2. Towards the Industrial Application of Spark Ablation for Nanostructured Functional Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfeiffer, T.V.

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructuring of functional materials is an essential part in the design of energy related devices – but the industrial tools we have to make these materials are lacking. This dissertation explores the green, flexible, and scalable spark discharge process for the fabrication of complex nanostructu

  3. Consolidation of nanostructured metal powders by rapid forging: Processing, modeling, and subsequent mechanical behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, G. R.; Milligan, W. W.

    1997-03-01

    Easterling (AAE) hot-isostatic press (HIP) model. The experiments and modeling indicated that creep was the dominant densification mechanism in these materials, even at relatively low temperatures and high loading rates. The results of this investigation suggest the possibility of a commercially viable nanostructured metal, which is easily processed to large strains at moderate temperatures, yet maintains high strength at room temperature without the necessity of heat treatment or mechanical working.

  4. Spoof polariton enhanced modal density of states in planar nanostructured metallic cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Davids, P S; Dalvit, D A R

    2014-01-01

    Spoof surface modes on nanostructured metallic surfaces are known to have tailorable dispersion dependent on the geometric characteristics of the periodic pattern. Here we examine the spoof plasmon dispersion on an isolated grating and a grating-planar mirror cavity configuration. The spoof polariton dispersion in the cavity is obtained using the scattering matrix approach, and the related differential modal density of states is introduced to obtain the mode dispersion and classify the cavity polariton modes. The grating-mirror cavity geometry is an example of periodically nanostructured metals above a planar ground plane. The properties discussed here are relevant for applications ranging from thin electromagnetic perfect absorbers to near-field radiative heat transfer.

  5. Fabrication of metal oxide nanostructures based on Atomic Force Microscopy lithography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU XiaoYang; CHENG Gang; WANG ShuJie; DAI ShuXi; WAN ShaoMing; ZHANG XingTang; DU ZuLiang

    2008-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) mechanical lithography is a simple but significant method for nanofabrication. In this work, we used this method to construct nanos-tructures on Pt/Cu bilayer metal electrodes under ambient conditions in air. The influence of various scratch parameters, such as the applied force, scan velocity and circle times, on the lithography patterns was investigated. The Pt-Cu-CuxO-Cu-Pt nanostructure was constructed by choosing suitable scratch parameters and oxidation at room temperature. The properties of the scratched regions were also investigated by friction force microscopy and conductive AFM (C-AFM). The/-Vcurves show symmetric and linear properties, and Ohmic contacts were formed. These results indicate that AFM mechanical lithography is a powerful tool for fabricating novel metal-semiconductor nanoelectronic devices.

  6. Preparation of Nanostructured Microporous Metal Foams through Flow Induced Electroless Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galip Akay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Monolithic nanostructured metallic porous structures with a hierarchy of pore size ranging from ca. 10 μm to 1 nm are processed for use as microreactors. The technique is based on flow induced electroless deposition of metals on a porous template known as PolyHIPE Polymer. The process is conducted in a purpose built flow reactor using a processing protocol to allow uniform and efficient metal deposition under flow. Nickel chloride and sodium hypophosphite were used as the metal and reducing agent, respectively. Electroless deposition occurs in the form of grains with a composition of NixPy in which the grain size range was ca. 20–0.2 μm depending on the composition of the metal deposition solution. Structure formation in the monoliths starts with heat treatment above 600°C resulting in the formation of a 3-dimensional network of capillary-like porous structures which form the walls of large arterial pores. These monoliths have a dense but porous surface providing mechanical strength for the monolith. The porous capillary-like arterial pore walls provide a large surface area for any catalytic activity. The mechanisms of metal deposition and nanostructure formation are evaluated using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, XRD, BET-surface area, and mercury intrusion porosimetry.

  7. Photonic Nanostructures Patterned by Thermal Nanoimprint Directly into Organo-Metal Halide Perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourdavoud, Neda; Wang, Si; Mayer, André; Hu, Ting; Chen, Yiwang; Marianovich, André; Kowalsky, Wolfgang; Heiderhoff, Ralf; Scheer, Hella-Christin; Riedl, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Photonic nanostructures are created in organo-metal halide perovskites by thermal nanoimprint lithography at a temperature of 100 °C. The imprinted layers are significantly smoothened compared to the initially rough, polycrystalline layers and the impact of surface defects is substantially mitigated upon imprint. As a case study, 2D photonic crystals are shown to afford lasing with ultralow lasing thresholds at room temperature.

  8. Growth and BZO-doping of the nanostructured YBCO thin films on buffered metal substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huhtinen, H.; Irjala, M.; Paturi, P.;

    2010-01-01

    The growth of the nanostructured YBa2Cu3O6+x (YBCO) films is investigated for the first time on biaxially textured NiW substrates used in coated conductor technology. The optimization process of superconducting layers is made in wide magnetic field and temperature range in order to understand...... the vortex pinning structure and mechanism in our films prepared from nanostructured material. Structural analysis shows that growth mechanism in YBCO films grown on NiW is completely different when compared to YBCO on STO. Films on NiW are much rougher, there is huge in-plane variation of YBCO crystals...

  9. Luminescence enhancement of rare earth ions by metal nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.A.Denisenko

    2009-01-01

    Well-ordered metal structures,i.e.arrays of nanosized tips on silver surface for studies of the luminescence enhancement of absorbed media with rare earth ions were used.These arrays were prepared by the metal evaporation on track membranes.Calculations of resonance frequencies of tips regarded as semispheroids were done taking into account the interaction between dipoles of tips.They were used to discuss experimental results for media with Eu(NO3)3·6H2O salt basing on data for bulk silver dielectric function.

  10. Metallic materials for mechanical damping capacity applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crăciun, R. C.; Stanciu, S.; Cimpoeșu, R.; (Dragoș Ursanu, A. I.; Manole, V.; Paraschiv, P.; Chicet, D. L.

    2016-08-01

    Some metallic materials exhibit good damping capacity of mechanical energy into thermal energy. This property along with the others metallic characteristics make this materials interesting for a big number of applications. These materials can be used as bumpers in different applications including automotive field. Beside grey cast iron and shape memory alloys few new metallic materials are presented for the supposition of high damping capacity. We analyze the causes that increase the internal friction of some metallic materials and possibilities to enhance this property through different mechanical, physical or chemical methods. Shape memory alloys, especially those based on copper, present a different damping capacity on martensite, austenite or transition state. In the transformation range M ↔A, which in case of copper base shape memory alloys is quite large, the metallic intelligent materials present a high internal friction, almost comparable with natural rubber behavior that can transform mechanical energy into thermal energy till a certain value of the external solicitation. These materials can be used as noise or small vibrations bumpers or even as shock absorbers in automotive industry.

  11. Surface plasmon microscopy with low-cost metallic nanostructures for biosensing I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Nathan; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Otto, Lauren

    2012-02-01

    The field of plasmonics aims to manipulate light over dimensions smaller than the optical wavelength by exploiting surface plasmon resonances in metallic films. Typically, surface plasmons are excited by illuminating metallic nanostructures. For meaningful research in this exciting area, the fabrication of high-quality nanostructures is critical, and in an undergraduate setting, low-cost methods are desirable. Careful optical characterization of the metallic nanostructures is also required. Here, we present the use of novel, inexpensive nanofabrication techniques and the development of a customized surface plasmon microscopy setup for interdisciplinary undergraduate experiments in biosensing, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, and surface plasmon imaging. A Bethel undergraduate student performs the nanofabrication in collaboration with the University of Minnesota. The rewards of mentoring undergraduate students in cooperation with a large research university are numerous, exposing them to a wide variety of opportunities. This research also interacts with upper-level, open-ended laboratory projects, summer research, a semester-long senior research experience, and will enable a large range of experiments into the future.

  12. Au-Biocompatible metallic nanostructures in metalloprotein electrochemistry and electrocatalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Palle Skovhus; Engelbrekt, Christian; Sørensen, Karsten Holm

    2012-01-01

    Molecular scale metallic nanoparticles coated by molecular monolayers and immobilized on single-crystal Au-electrode surfaces are efficient catalysts in metalloprotein voltammetry. Nanoparticles prepared by a new ‘‘green’’ method also exhibit strong electrocatalysis in both protein electrochemistry...

  13. Cascaded plasmon-plasmon coupling mediated energy transfer across stratified metal-dielectric nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golmakaniyoon, Sepideh; Hernandez-Martinez, Pedro Ludwig; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Sun, Xiao Wei

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon (SP) coupling has been successfully applied to nonradiative energy transfer via exciton-plasmon-exciton coupling in conventionally sandwiched donor-metal film-acceptor configurations. However, these structures lack the desired efficiency and suffer poor photoemission due to the high energy loss. Here, we show that the cascaded exciton-plasmon-plasmon-exciton coupling in stratified architecture enables an efficient energy transfer mechanism. The overlaps of the surface plasmon modes at the metal-dielectric and dielectric-metal interfaces allow for strong cross-coupling in comparison with the single metal film configuration. The proposed architecture has been demonstrated through the analytical modeling and numerical simulation of an oscillating dipole near the stratified nanostructure of metal-dielectric-metal-acceptor. Consistent with theoretical and numerical results, experimental measurements confirm at least 50% plasmon resonance energy transfer enhancement in the donor-metal-dielectric-metal-acceptor compared to the donor-metal-acceptor structure. Cascaded plasmon-plasmon coupling enables record high efficiency for exciton transfer through metallic structures. PMID:27698422

  14. Zinc-oxide-based nanostructured materials for heterostructure solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobkov, A. A.; Maximov, A. I.; Moshnikov, V. A., E-mail: vamoshnikov@mail.ru; Somov, P. A.; Terukov, E. I. [St. Petersburg Electrotechnical University LETI (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    Results obtained in the deposition of nanostructured zinc-oxide layers by hydrothermal synthesis as the basic method are presented. The possibility of controlling the structure and morphology of the layers is demonstrated. The important role of the procedure employed to form the nucleating layer is noted. The faceted hexagonal nanoprisms obtained are promising for the fabrication of solar cells based on oxide heterostructures, and aluminum-doped zinc-oxide layers with petal morphology, for the deposition of an antireflection layer. The results are compatible and promising for application in flexible electronics.

  15. Emergence of One-Dimensional Wires of Free Carriers in Transition-Metal-Dichalcogenide Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibertini, Marco; Marzari, Nicola

    2015-09-01

    We highlight the emergence of metallic states in two-dimensional transition-metal-dichalcogenide nanostructures-nanoribbons, islands, and inversion domain boundaries-as a widespread and universal phenomenon driven by the polar discontinuities occurring at their edges or boundaries. We show that such metallic states form one-dimensional wires of electrons or holes, with a free charge density that increases with the system size, up to complete screening of the polarization charge, and can also be controlled by the specific edge or boundary configurations, e.g., through chemisorption of hydrogen or sulfur atoms at the edges. For triangular islands, local polar discontinuities occur even in the absence of a total dipole moment for the island and lead to an accumulation of free carriers close to the edges, providing a consistent explanation of previous experimental observations. To further stress the universal character of these mechanisms, we show that polar discontinuities give rise to metallic states also at inversion domain boundaries. These findings underscore the potential of engineering transition-metal-dichalcogenide nanostructures for manifold applications in nano- and optoelectronics, spintronics, catalysis, and solar-energy harvesting.

  16. Splitting the surface wave in metal/dielectric nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Song; Wu Jian

    2011-01-01

    We investigate a modified surface wave splitter with a double-layer structure, which consists of symmetrical metallic grating and an asymmetrical dielectric, using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation method.The metal/dielectric interface structure at this two-side aperture can support bound waves of different wavelengths,thus guiding waves in opposite directions. The covered dielectric films play an important role in the enhancement and confinement of the diffraction wave by the waveguide modes. The simulation result shows that the optical intensities of the guided surface wave at wavelengths of 760-nm and 1000-nm are about 100 times and 4~5 times those of the weaker side, respectively, which means that the surface wave is split by the proposed device.

  17. NANOSTRUCTURED METAL OXIDE CATALYSTS VIA BUILDING BLOCK SYNTHESES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig E. Barnes

    2013-03-05

    A broadly applicable methodology has been developed to prepare new single site catalysts on silica supports. This methodology requires of three critical components: a rigid building block that will be the main structural and compositional component of the support matrix; a family of linking reagents that will be used to insert active metals into the matrix as well as cross link building blocks into a three dimensional matrix; and a clean coupling reaction that will connect building blocks and linking agents together in a controlled fashion. The final piece of conceptual strategy at the center of this methodology involves dosing the building block with known amounts of linking agents so that the targeted connectivity of a linking center to surrounding building blocks is obtained. Achieving targeted connectivities around catalytically active metals in these building block matrices is a critical element of the strategy by which single site catalysts are obtained. This methodology has been demonstrated with a model system involving only silicon and then with two metal-containing systems (titanium and vanadium). The effect that connectivity has on the reactivity of atomically dispersed titanium sites in silica building block matrices has been investigated in the selective oxidation of phenols to benezoquinones. 2-connected titanium sites are found to be five times as active (i.e. initial turnover frequencies) than 4-connected titanium sites (i.e. framework titanium sites).

  18. Could Nano-Structured Materials Enable the Improved Pressure Vessels for Deep Atmospheric Probes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, D.; Fuentes, A.; Bienstock, B.; Arnold, J. O.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the use of Nano-Structured Materials to enable pressure vessel structures for deep atmospheric probes is shown. The topics include: 1) High Temperature/Pressure in Key X-Environments; 2) The Case for Use of Nano-Structured Materials Pressure Vessel Design; 3) Carbon based Nanomaterials; 4) Nanotube production & purification; 5) Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes; 6) CNT-composites: Example (Polymer); 7) Effect of Loading sequence on Composite with 8% by volume; 8) Models for Particulate Reinforced Composites; 9) Fullerene/Ti Composite for High Strength-Insulating Layer; 10) Fullerene/Epoxy Composite for High Strength-Insulating Layer; 11) Models for Continuous Fiber Reinforced Composites; 12) Tensile Strength for Discontinuous Fiber Composite; 13) Ti + SWNT Composites: Thermal/Mechanical; 14) Ti + SWNT Composites: Tensile Strength; and 15) Nano-structured Shell for Pressure Vessels.

  19. Liquid metal technology of synthesis of AlOOH anisotropic nanostructured aerogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Sh. Askhadullin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available New method for production of aerogel nanostructures (using the example of AlOOH aerogel with involvement of liquid metals is examined. In contrast with conventional sol–gel method for producing aerogels the role performed by the alcohol (aqueous solution is played in the new method by liquid metal in which the base of the future aerogel structure dissociates and assembling of the nanostructure takes place within the gas phase covering the liquid metal. The latter obstacle fundamentally distinguishes the liquid metal method from the conventional technology of aerogel synthesis. Assembling the aerogel structure in the sol–gel method takes place as the result of removal of liquid phase at supercritical parameters which ultimately determines the cost of the products. In the liquid-metal method there is no need to remove the liquid phase, because assembling of fractal nanostructure occurs in the gas phase. Liquid-metal aerogel production method is realized at low (usually atmospheric pressure without the need to use hazardous and corrosive reagents, and the heat released in the reaction is sufficient for maintaining the desired synthesis temperature. Results of studies of synthesis and properties of ultraporous aluminum oxyhydroxide Al2O3⋅n(H2O (AlOOH aerogel produced using the method of selective oxidation of Ga–Al and Bi–Al binary liquid metal fusions by water steam are presented in the present paper. Studies of aerogel properties were performed using methods of scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, synchronous differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry (DSC/TG, as well as by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX spectroscopy. It was established on the basis of the microstructure analysis performed that the aerogel has space-oriented fibrous nanostructure with “tensile” type anisotropy and fiber diameters varying from 5nm to 15nm. It follows from XRD studies that AlOOH aerogel remains to be amorphous up to 1000

  20. Dual focused coherent beams for three-dimensional optical trapping and continuous rotation of metallic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaohao; Cheng, Chang; Zhang, Yao; Lei, Hongxiang; Li, Baojun

    2016-07-01

    Metallic nanoparticles and nanowires are extremely important for nanoscience and nanotechnology. Techniques to optically trap and rotate metallic nanostructures can enable their potential applications. However, because of the destabilizing effects of optical radiation pressure, the optical trapping of large metallic particles in three dimensions is challenging. Additionally, the photothermal issues associated with optical rotation of metallic nanowires have far prevented their practical applications. Here, we utilize dual focused coherent beams to realize three-dimensional (3D) optical trapping of large silver particles. Continuous rotation of silver nanowires with frequencies measured in several hertz is also demonstrated based on interference-induced optical vortices with very low local light intensity. The experiments are interpreted by numerical simulations and calculations.

  1. Electric-field-induced low temperature oxidation of metal and semiconductor nanostructures; Feldinduzierte Tieftemperaturoxidation nanoskaliger Metall- und Halbleiterstrukturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, Carsten

    2008-10-14

    At the surface of almost all metals and semiconductors oxide formation occurs when exposed to atmosphere. The oxidation reaction proceeds along a number of partial reaction steps with the reacting species usually being charged. Thus, electric fields change the driving force and therefore the kinetics of the reaction. This effect occurs very pronounced at free-standing nanoscale objects, since their strongly curved surface yields electric fields of the order of volts per nanometer even if only moderate voltages are applied. This experimental study focuses on the characterisation of the influence of electric fields on the oxidation behaviour of free-standing nanoscale tips. Tungsten, aluminium and silicon where used as model systems. Oxygen was provided as H{sub 2}O or as O{sub 2}, and experiments where carried out at a temperature of 296 K. It is shown that the oxidation behaviour of nanoscale tips under the influence of an electric field changes dramatically if H{sub 2}O is available for the reaction. There exists a critical electric field above which field-induced oxidation is observed. The critical field strength is of the order of some volts per nanometer and shows a specific dependence on the partial pressure of H{sub 2}O. Below the critical field strength the oxidation reaction is kinetically hindered. A detailed investigation of the partial reaction steps reveals that a reaction of H{sub 2}O at the oxide-vapour-interface is rate limiting for field-induced oxidation. Comparing the oxidation behaviour of the investigated model systems, it is concluded that field-induced oxidation is an universal, material independent effect. The critical field strength determines the region of kinetic stability against oxidation and thus gives a restriction for nanostructure applications. (orig.)

  2. Electrochemistry, a technique to prepare redox nano-structured composite materials (polymer/nano-particles) - Characterizations - Applications; L'electrochimie, un outil pour elaborer des materiaux composites redox nanostructures (polymere/nanoparticules) - Caracterisations - Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chardon-Noblat, S. [Grenoble-1 Univ. Joseph Fourier, Lab. d' Electrochimie Organique et de Photochimie Redox, UMR 5630, Institut de Chimie Moleculaire de Grenoble, FR CNRS 2607, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2006-07-01

    In this work is presented at first the preparation by an electrochemical way of bi functional nano-structured composite materials. It is shown that with the pulsed electrolysis techniques, it is possible to obtain metallic particles whose size and organization are controlled at the nano-scopic scale in redox matrices. Then, are presented the physico-chemical characterizations of these nano-objects (coupled in situ or ex situ at the electrochemistry). The first results relative to the catalytic activation of CO{sub 2} with these materials used as composite cathodes are indicated. (O.M.)

  3. Synthesis of carbon materials via the cold compression of aromatic molecules and carbon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgibbons, Thomas C.

    Carbon's ability for catenation makes it a remarkable element and allows for many interesting and surprising properties and structures. Carbon can exist in one of its two thermodynamically stable bulk crystals, graphite or diamond, one of its several nanostructures: fullerene, nanotube, or graphene, or as an amorphous material with a mixed bonding pattern. Carbon also has an ability to bond heteroatoms such as hydrogen which can increase its properties and structures even further. Pressure has been shown to be able to drastically change the bonding in and structure of carbon based materials. In this dissertation I will present how pressure can be used to synthesize new amorphous hydrogenated carbons and how a battery of analytical techniques can be used to elicit the microstructure of the carbon networks. This microstructure can then be related back to the reaction conditions and more importantly the starting small molecule. This work has been expanded to looking for a molecular analogue to the cold compressed graphite system by investigating the high pressure stability and reactivity of 2-D polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. This work was followed by discovering the failure of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes at high static pressures. When the tubes fail they transform into nano-graphitic polyhedra. It has been found that metallic tubes preferentially collapse, leaving the semiconducting tubes intact for the most part. Finally, the most influential work performed in my dissertation has been related to the kinetically controlled solid state reaction of molecular benzene to form diamond nanothreads. These nanothreads pack into hexagonal bundles without axial order. A combination of Raman spectroscopy, x-ray and neutron scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and first principles calculations were performed to confirm their existence. The three data chapters in this dissertation are enhanced by an introduction to carbon based materials and high pressure chemistry

  4. Synthesis and characterization of hierarchically porous metal, metal oxide, and carbon monoliths with highly ordered nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grano, Amy Janine

    Hierarchically porous materials are of great interest in such applications as catalysis, separations, fuel cells, and advanced batteries. One such way of producing these materials is through the process of nanocasting, in which a sacrificial template is replicated and then removed to form a monolithic replica. This replica consists of mesopores, which can be ordered or disordered, and bicontinuous macropores, which allow flow throughout the length of the monolith. Hierarchically porous metal oxide and carbon monoliths with an ordered mesopores system are synthesized for the first time via nanocasting. These replicas were used as supports for the deposition of silver particles and the catalytic efficiency was evaluated. The ordered silica template used in producing these monoliths was also used for an in-situ TEM study involving metal nanocasting, and an observation of the destruction of the silica template during nanocasting made. Two new methods of removing the silica template were developed and applied to the synthesis of copper, nickel oxide, and zinc oxide monoliths. Finally, hollow fiber membrane monoliths were examined via x-ray tomography in an attempt to establish the presence of this structure throughout the monolith.

  5. The Interaction of Bacteria with Engineered Nanostructured Polymeric Materials: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Armentano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In spite of great advances in biomaterials research and development, a significant proportion of medical devices undergo bacterial colonization and become the target of an implant-related infection. We present a review of the two major classes of antibacterial nanostructured materials: polymeric nanocomposites and surface-engineered materials. The paper describes antibacterial effects due to the induced material properties, along with the principles of bacterial adhesion and the biofilm formation process. Methods for antimicrobial modifications of polymers using a nanocomposite approach as well as surface modification procedures are surveyed and discussed, followed by a concise examination of techniques used in estimating bacteria/material interactions. Finally, we present an outline of future sceneries and perspectives on antibacterial applications of nanostructured materials to resist or counteract implant infections.

  6. The Interaction of Bacteria with Engineered Nanostructured Polymeric Materials: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armentano, Ilaria; Arciola, Carla Renata; Fortunati, Elena; Ferrari, Davide; Mattioli, Samantha; Amoroso, Concetta Floriana; Rizzo, Jessica; Kenny, Jose M.; Imbriani, Marcello; Visai, Livia

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In spite of great advances in biomaterials research and development, a significant proportion of medical devices undergo bacterial colonization and become the target of an implant-related infection. We present a review of the two major classes of antibacterial nanostructured materials: polymeric nanocomposites and surface-engineered materials. The paper describes antibacterial effects due to the induced material properties, along with the principles of bacterial adhesion and the biofilm formation process. Methods for antimicrobial modifications of polymers using a nanocomposite approach as well as surface modification procedures are surveyed and discussed, followed by a concise examination of techniques used in estimating bacteria/material interactions. Finally, we present an outline of future sceneries and perspectives on antibacterial applications of nanostructured materials to resist or counteract implant infections. PMID:25025086

  7. Ceramic nanostructures and methods of fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Morrell, Jonathan S [Knoxville, TN

    2009-11-24

    Structures and methods for the fabrication of ceramic nanostructures. Structures include metal particles, preferably comprising copper, disposed on a ceramic substrate. The structures are heated, preferably in the presence of microwaves, to a temperature that softens the metal particles and preferably forms a pool of molten ceramic under the softened metal particle. A nano-generator is created wherein ceramic material diffuses through the molten particle and forms ceramic nanostructures on a polar site of the metal particle. The nanostructures may comprise silica, alumina, titania, or compounds or mixtures thereof.

  8. Novel applications exploiting the thermal properties of nanostructured materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eastman, J. A.

    1998-11-20

    A new class of heat transfer fluids, termed nanofluids, has been developed by suspending nanocrystalline particles in liquids. Due to the orders-of-magnitude larger thermal conductivities of solids compared to those of liquids such as water, significantly enhanced thermal properties are obtained with nanofluids. The use of nanofluids could impact many industrial sectors, including transportation, energy supply and production, electronics, textiles, and paper production by, for example, decreasing pumping power needs or reducing heat exchanger sizes. In contrast to the enhancement in effective thermal transport rates that is obtained when nanoparticles are suspended in fluids, nanocrystalline coatings are expected to exhibit reduced thermal conductivities compared to coarse-grained coatings. Reduced thermal conductivities are predicted to arise because of a reduction in the mean free path of phonons due to presence of grain boundaries. This behavior, combined with improved mechanical properties, makes nanostructured zirconia coatings excellent candidates for future applications as thermal barriers.

  9. Nanostructured composite materials of cerium oxide and barium cerate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, D. A.; Pikalova, E. Yu.; Demin, A. K.; Khrustov, V. R.; Nikolaenko, I. V.; Nikonov, A. V.; Malkov, V. B.; Antonov, B. D.

    2013-02-01

    Nanosized powders with a composition of (1- x)Ce0.8Sm0.2O2-δ- xBace0.8Sm0.2O3-δ ( x = 0, 0.3, and 1) were obtained by self-ignition combustion synthesis (SICS) from the appropriate nitrates and various organic fuels (glycine, glycerol, citric acid, and a mixture of citric acid and ethylene glycol). The most finely dispersed powders formed when the concentration of the perovskite phase in the system decreased or when glycerol or citric acid-enthyleneglycol mixture was used as a fuel during SICS. A procedure for the preparation of powders and nanostructured ceramics was developed and their electric properties were studied.

  10. Development of Nanostructured Materials with Improved Radiation Tolerance for Advanced Nuclear Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinghang Zhang; K. Ted Hartwig

    2009-08-12

    This project will explore the fundamental mechanisms through which interfaces in nanolayered structures and grain boundaries of bulk nanomaterials are able to attract and rapidly eliminate point defects and unwanted foreign species. Candidate materials that will be studied include both nanostructured multilayer composites synthesized by magnetron sputtering and structural bulk nanomaterials produced by severed plastic deformation, equal channel angular extrusion.

  11. Electrospray-assisted synthesis methods of nanostructured materials for Li-ion batteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valvo, M.

    2010-01-01

    This PhD thesis focuses on the synthesis of nanostructured materials via an aerosol-assisted route based on electrospraying of liquid precursors. Electrospraying is a powerful technique for the production of nearly-monodispersed, highly-charged droplets. The possibility of tailoring the droplet

  12. Electrospray-assisted synthesis methods of nanostructured materials for Li-ion batteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valvo, M.

    2010-01-01

    This PhD thesis focuses on the synthesis of nanostructured materials via an aerosol-assisted route based on electrospraying of liquid precursors. Electrospraying is a powerful technique for the production of nearly-monodispersed, highly-charged droplets. The possibility of tailoring the droplet size

  13. Development of Nanostructured Materials with Improved Radiation Tolerance for Advanced Nuclear Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinghang Zhang; K. Ted Hartwig

    2009-08-12

    This project will explore the fundamental mechanisms through which interfaces in nanolayered structures and grain boundaries of bulk nanomaterials are able to attract and rapidly eliminate point defects and unwanted foreign species. Candidate materials that will be studied include both nanostructured multilayer composites synthesized by magnetron sputtering and structural bulk nanomaterials produced by severed plastic deformation, equal channel angular extrusion.

  14. Design, fabrication, and characterization of metallic nanostructures for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and plasmonic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qingzhen

    Metal/dielectric nanostructures have the ability to sustain coherent electron oscillations known as surface plasmons. Due to their capability of localizing and guiding light in sub-wavelength metal nanostructures beyond diffraction limits, surface plasmon-based photonics, or “plasmonics” has opened new physical phenomena and lead to novel applications in metamaterials, optoelectronics, surface enhanced spectroscopy and biological sensing. This dissertation centers on design, fabrication, characterization of metallic nanostructures and their applications in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and actively tunable plasmonics. Metal-dielectric nanostructures are the building blocks for photonic metamaterials. One valuable design guideline for metamaterials is the Babinet’s principle, which governs the optical properties of complementary nanostructures. However, most complementary metamaterials are designed for the far infrared region or beyond, where the optical absorption of metal is small. We have developed a novel dual fabrication method, capable of simultaneously producing optically thin complementary structures. From experimental measurements and theoretical simulations, we showed that Babinet’s principle qualitatively holds in the visible region for the optically thin complements. The complementary structure is also a good platform to study subtle differences between nanoparticles and nanoholes in SERS (a surface sensitive technique, which can enhance the conventional Raman cross-section by 106˜108 fold, thus very useful for highly sensitive biochemical sensing). Through experimental measurement and theoretical analysis, we showed that the SERS enhancement spectrum (plot of SERS enhancement versus excitation wavelengths), dominated by local near-field, for nanoholes closely follows their far-field optical transmission spectrum. However, the enhancement spectrum for nanoparticles red-shifts significantly from their far-field optical extinction

  15. Detection of trace heavy metal ions in water by nanostructured porous Si biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtenberg, Giorgi; Massad-Ivanir, Naama; Segal, Ester

    2015-07-07

    A generic biosensing platform, based on nanostructured porous Si (PSi), Fabry-Pérot thin films, for label-free monitoring of heavy metal ions in aqueous solutions by enzymatic activity inhibition, is described. First, we show a general detection assay by immobilizing horseradish peroxidase (HRP) within the oxidized PSi nanostructure and monitor its catalytic activity in real time by reflective interferometric Fourier transform spectroscopy. Optical studies reveal the high specificity and sensitivity of the HRP-immobilized PSi towards three metal ions (Ag(+) > Pb(2+) > Cu(2+)), with a detection limit range of 60-120 ppb. Next, we demonstrate the concept of specific detection of Cu(2+) ions (as a model heavy metal) by immobilizing Laccase, a multi-copper oxidase, within the oxidized PSi. The resulting biosensor allows for specific detection and quantification of copper ions in real water samples by monitoring the Laccase relative activity. The optical biosensing results are found to be in excellent agreement with those obtained by the gold standard analytical technique (ICP-AES) for all water samples. The main advantage of the presented biosensing concept is the ability to detect heavy metal ions at environmentally relevant concentrations using a simple and portable experimental setup, while the specific biosensor design can be tailored by varying the enzyme type.

  16. Nanoarchitectured Design of Porous Materials and Nanocomposites from Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneti, Yusuf Valentino; Tang, Jing; Salunkhe, Rahul R; Jiang, Xuchuan; Yu, Aibing; Wu, Kevin C-W; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2017-03-01

    The emergence of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as a new class of crystalline porous materials is attracting considerable attention in many fields such as catalysis, energy storage and conversion, sensors, and environmental remediation due to their controllable composition, structure and pore size. MOFs are versatile precursors for the preparation of various forms of nanomaterials as well as new multifunctional nanocomposites/hybrids, which exhibit superior functional properties compared to the individual components assembling the composites. This review provides an overview of recent developments achieved in the fabrication of porous MOF-derived nanostructures including carbons, metal oxides, metal chalcogenides (metal sulfides and selenides), metal carbides, metal phosphides and their composites. Finally, the challenges and future trends and prospects associated with the development of MOF-derived nanomaterials are also examined. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Semiclassical theory of nonclocal plasmonic excitation in metallic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toscano, Giuseppe

    sharp tips, where the classical model gives divergent results. We apply this concept to the study of a groove structure for SERS applications, and we evaluate the maximum enhancement factor that is possible to achieve with this structure. Finally, we present a new formulation of the hydrodynamic...... equation, that has the same form of the ordinary wave equation in the local model. This formulation allows us to study the propagation in plasmonic waveguides in the hydrodynamic model. We calculate the dispersion relations for the cylindrical, V-groove, and L-groove waveguides. We evaluate the ultimate....... These are the typical sizes of the nanoplasmonics structures, that can be fabricated nowadays. The model we propose is the hydrodynamic Drude model, a semiclassical model that describes the free-electron gas in a metal as a Fermi gas subject to the electromagnetic force, as defined by the Navier-Stokes like equation...

  18. Optical and Electrical Properties of Nanostructured Metallic Electrical Contacts

    CERN Document Server

    Toranzos, Victor J; Mochán, W Luis; Zerbino, Jorge O

    2016-01-01

    We study the optical and electrical properties of silver films with a graded thickness obtained through metallic evaporation in vacuum on a tilted substrate to evaluate their use as semitransparent electrical contacts. We measure their ellipsometric coefficients, optical transmissions and electrical conductivity for different widths, and we employ an efficient recursive method to calculate their macroscopic dielectric function, their optical properties and their microscopic electric fields. The topology of very thin films corresponds to disconnected islands, while very wide films are simply connected. For intermediate widths the film becomes semicontinuous, multiply connected, and its microscopic electric field develops hotspots at optical resonances which appear near the percolation threshold of the conducting phase, yielding large ohmic losses that increase the absorptance above that of a corresponding homogeneous film. Optimizing the thickness of the film to maximize its transmittance above the percolation...

  19. First-principles simulation of light propagation and exciton dynamics in metal cluster nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisinetskaya, Polina G.; Röhr, Merle I. S.; Mitrić, Roland

    2016-06-01

    We present a theoretical approach for the simulation of the electric field and exciton propagation in ordered arrays constructed of molecular-sized noble metal clusters bound to organic polymer templates. In order to describe the electronic coupling between individual constituents of the nanostructure we use the ab initio parameterized transition charge method which is more accurate than the usual dipole-dipole coupling. The electronic population dynamics in the nanostructure under an external laser pulse excitation is simulated by numerical integration of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation employing the fully coupled Hamiltonian. The solution of the TDSE gives rise to time-dependent partial point charges for each subunit of the nanostructure, and the spatio-temporal electric field distribution is evaluated by means of classical electrodynamics methods. The time-dependent partial charges are determined based on the stationary partial and transition charges obtained in the framework of the TDDFT. In order to treat large plasmonic nanostructures constructed of many constituents, the approximate self-consistent iterative approach presented in (Lisinetskaya and Mitrić in Phys Rev B 89:035433, 2014) is modified to include the transition-charge-based interaction. The developed methods are used to study the optical response and exciton dynamics of Ag3+ and porphyrin-Ag4 dimers. Subsequently, the spatio-temporal electric field distribution in a ring constructed of ten porphyrin-Ag4 subunits under the action of circularly polarized laser pulse is simulated. The presented methodology provides a theoretical basis for the investigation of coupled light-exciton propagation in nanoarchitectures built from molecular size metal nanoclusters in which quantum confinement effects are important.

  20. Nanostructured Perovskite LaCo1-xMnxO3 as Bifunctional Catalysts for Rechargeable Metal-Air Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiaoming; Li, Bing; Wuu, Delvin; Sumboja, Afriyanti; An, Tao; Hor, T. S. Andy; Zong, Yun; Liu, Zhaolin

    2015-09-01

    Bifunctional catalyst that is active for both oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is one of the most important components of rechargeable metal-air batteries. Nanostructured perovskite bifunctional catalysts comprising La, Co and Mn(LaCo1-xMnxO3, LCMO) are synthesized by hydrothermal methods. The morphology, structure and electrochemical activity of the perovskite bifunctional catalysts are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and rotating disk electrode (RDE) techniques. Nanorod, nanodisc and nanoparticle are typical morphologies of LCMO. The electrocatalytic activity of LCMO is significantly improved by the addition of conductive materials such as carbon nanotube. To demonstrate the practical utilization, LCMO in the composition of LaCo0.8Mn0.2O3(LCMO82) is used as air cathode catalysts for rechargeable zinc-air batteries. The battery prototype can sustain 470 h or 40 discharge-charge cycles equivalent.

  1. Surface Chemistry of Nano-Structured Mixed Metal Oxide Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-11

    Low Temperature Synthesis and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Titanium Carbide with Tunable Porous Architectures, Chemistry of Materials, (01...of the C–H bond to form carboxyl, both of which decompose via a COd 2 intermediate to evolve CO2 and H2. High surface area, porous titanium carbide films...characterization of nanocrystalline titanium carbide with tunable porous architectures” Chem. Mater. 22, 319-329 (2010). http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/cm902184m 3

  2. Recent advances in multistep solution nanosynthesis of nanostructured three-dimensional complexes of semiconductive materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huajun Zhou; Z. Ryan Tian

    2013-01-01

    Constructing simply nanostructured zero-, one-, and two-dimensional crystallites into three-dimensional multifunctional assemblies and systems at low-cost is essential and highly challenging in materials science and engineering. Compared to the simply nanostructured components, a three-dimensional (3D) complex made with a precisely controlled spatial organization of all structural nanocomponents can enable us to concert functionalities from all the nanocomponents. Methodologically, so doing in nm-scales via a solution chemistry route may be much easier and less expensive than via other mechanisms. Hence, we discuss herein some recent advances in multistep solution syntheses of nanostructured 3D complexes of semiconductors with a focus mainly on their synthetic strategies and detailed mechanisms.

  3. Nanostructured material surfaces--preparation, effect on cellular behavior, and potential biomedical applications: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guduru, Deepak; Niepel, Marcus; Vogel, Jürgen; Groth, Thomas

    2011-10-01

    Nanostructures play important roles in vivo, where nanoscaled features of extracellular matrix (ECM) components influence cell behavior and resultant tissue formation. This review summarizes some of the recent developments in fostering new concepts and approaches to nanofabrication, such as top-down and bottom-up and combinations of the two. As in vitro investigations demonstrate that man-made nanotopography can be used to control cell reactions to a material surface, its potential application in implant design and tissue engineering becomes increasingly evident. Therefore, we present recent progress in directing cell fate in the field of cell mechanics, which has grown rapidly over the last few years, and in various tissue-engineering applications. The main focus is on the initial responses of cells to nanostructured surfaces and subsequent influences on cellular functions. Specific examples are also given to illustrate the potential nanostructures may have for biomedical applications and regenerative medicine.

  4. Precursor Mediated Synthesis of Nanostructured Silicas: From Precursor-Surfactant Ion Pairs to Structured Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hesemann

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of nanostructured anionic-surfactant-templated mesoporous silica (AMS recently appeared as a new strategy for the formation of nanostructured silica based materials. This method is based on the use of anionic surfactants together with a co-structure-directing agent (CSDA, mostly a silylated ammonium precursor. The presence of this CSDA is necessary in order to create ionic interactions between template and silica forming phases and to ensure sufficient affinity between the two phases. This synthetic strategy was for the first time applied in view of the synthesis of surface functionalized silica bearing ammonium groups and was then extended on the formation of materials functionalized with anionic carboxylate and bifunctional amine-carboxylate groups. In the field of silica hybrid materials, the “anionic templating” strategy has recently been applied for the synthesis of silica hybrid materials from cationic precursors. Starting from di- or oligosilylated imidazolium and ammonium precursors, only template directed hydrolysis-polycondensation reactions involving complementary anionic surfactants allowed accessing structured ionosilica hybrid materials. The mechanistic particularity of this approach resides in the formation of precursor-surfactant ion pairs in the hydrolysis-polycondensation mixture. This review gives a systematic overview over the various types of materials accessed from this cooperative ionic templating approach and highlights the high potential of this original strategy for the formation of nanostructured silica based materials which appears as a complementary strategy to conventional soft templating approaches.

  5. A review of nanostructured lithium ion battery materials via low temperature synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiajun

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured materials afford us new opportunities to improve the current technology for synthesizing Li ion batteries. Generating nanomaterials with new properties via an inexpensive approach offers a tremendous potential for realizing high performance Li-ion batteries. In this review, I mainly summarize some of the recent progress made, and describe the patents awarded on synthesizing nanostructured cathode materials for these batteries via low temperature wet- chemistry methods. From an economical view, such syntheses, especially hydrothermal synthesis, may offer the opportunities for significantly lowering the cost of manufacturing battery materials, while conferring distinct environmental advantages. Recent advances in in-situ (real time) X-ray diffraction for studying hydrothermal synthesis have great potential for bettering the rational design of advanced lithium-electrode materials. The development of this technique also will be discussed.

  6. Optical and electrical properties of nanostructured metallic electrical contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toranzos, Victor J.; Ortiz, Guillermo P.; Mochán, W. Luis; Zerbino, Jorge O.

    2017-01-01

    We study the optical and electrical properties of silver films with a graded thickness obtained through metallic evaporation in vacuum on a tilted substrate to evaluate their use as semitransparent electrical contacts. We measure their ellipsometric coefficients, optical transmissions and electrical conductivity for different widths, and we employ an efficient recursive method to calculate their macroscopic dielectric function, their optical properties and their microscopic electric fields. The topology of very thin films corresponds to disconnected islands, while very wide films are simply connected. For intermediate widths the film becomes semicontinuous, multiply connected, and its microscopic electric field develops hotspots at optical resonances which appear near the percolation threshold of the conducting phase, yielding large ohmic losses that increase the absorptance above that of a corresponding homogeneous film. Optimizing the thickness of the film to maximize its transmittance above the percolation threshold of the conductive phase we obtained a film with transmittance T  =  0.41 and a sheet resistance Rs\\text{max}≈ 2.7 Ω . We also analyze the observed emission frequency shift of porous silicon electroluminescent devices when Ag films are used as solid electrical contacts in replacement of electrolytic ones.

  7. Nanostructured and nanolayer coatings based on nitrides of the metals structure study and structure and composition standard samples set development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Chabina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Researches by methods of analytical microscopy and the x-ray analysis have allowed to develop a set of standard samples of composition and structure of the strengthening nanostructured and nanolayer coatings for control of the strengthening nanostructured and nanolayer coatings based on nitrides of the metals used to protect critical parts of the compressor of the gas turbine engine from dust erosion, corrosion and oxidation.

  8. Quantifying protein adsorption and function at nanostructured materials: enzymatic activity of glucose oxidase at GLAD structured electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Uffe B; Ferapontova, Elena E; Sutherland, Duncan S

    2012-07-31

    Nanostructured materials strongly modulate the behavior of adsorbed proteins; however, the characterization of such interactions is challenging. Here we present a novel method combining protein adsorption studies at nanostructured quartz crystal microbalance sensor surfaces (QCM-D) with optical (surface plasmon resonance SPR) and electrochemical methods (cyclic voltammetry CV) allowing quantification of both bound protein amount and activity. The redox enzyme glucose oxidase is studied as a model system to explore alterations in protein functional behavior caused by adsorption onto flat and nanostructured surfaces. This enzyme and such materials interactions are relevant for biosensor applications. Novel nanostructured gold electrode surfaces with controlled curvature were fabricated using colloidal lithography and glancing angle deposition (GLAD). The adsorption of enzyme to nanostructured interfaces was found to be significantly larger compared to flat interfaces even after normalization for the increased surface area, and no substantial desorption was observed within 24 h. A decreased enzymatic activity was observed over the same period of time, which indicates a slow conformational change of the adsorbed enzyme induced by the materials interface. Additionally, we make use of inherent localized surface plasmon resonances in these nanostructured materials to directly quantify the protein binding. We hereby demonstrate a QCM-D-based methodology to quantify protein binding at complex nanostructured materials. Our approach allows label free quantification of protein binding at nanostructured interfaces.

  9. Fabrication of metal suspending nanostructures by nanoimprint lithography(NIL) and isotropic reactive ion etching(RIE)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    We report herein a rational approach for fabricating metal suspending nanostructures by nanoimprint lithography(NIL) and isotropic reactive ion etching(RIE).The approach comprises three principal steps:(1) mold fabrication,(2) structure replication by NIL,and(3) suspending nanostructures creation by isotropic RIE.Using this approach,suspending nanostructures with Au,Au/Ti or Ti/Au bilayers,and Au/Ti/Au sandwiched structures are demonstrated.For Au nanostructures,straight suspending nanostructures can be obtained when the thickness of Au film is up to 50 nm for nano-bridge and 90 nm for nano-finger patterns.When the thickness of Au is below 50 nm for nano-bridge and 90 nm for nano-finger,the Au suspending nanostructures bend upward as a result of the mismatch of thermal expansion between the thin Au films and Si substrate.This leads to residual stresses in the thin Au films.For Au/Ti or Ti/Au bilayers nanostructures,the cantilevers bend toward Au film,since Au has a larger thermal expansion coefficient than that of Ti.While in the case of sandwich structures,straight suspending nanostructures are obtained,this may be due to the balance of residual stress between the thin films.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of nanostructured ternary zinc manganese oxide as novel supercapacitor material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahoo, Asit; Sharma, Yogesh, E-mail: yksptfpt@iitr.ernet.in

    2015-01-15

    Nanostructured ZnMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} is prepared by easy and cost effective urea combustion method, and characterized by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and surface area analyzer. The prepared ZnMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} (ZMO) is found to be crystalline and mesoporous in nature with homogenously distributed pores. The supercapacitive properties of the synthesized materials are studied using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge–discharge cycling and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 2 M KOH solution employing three-electrode system. The FESEM analysis reveals nearly spherical morphology of ZMO which is found to be beneficial for improved supercapacitive performance. Cyclic voltammetry shows unsymmetrical charge–discharge curves with the capacitance value of 160 (±5) Fg{sup −1}. The galvanostatic charge–discharge cycles exhibit good electrochemical stability of ZMO. The coulombic efficiency of ZMO is found to be almost 100% till 500 charge–discharge cycles. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies confirm the structural stability and further complement the findings of cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic cycling. The improved supercapacitive behavior of nano ZMO is ascribed to the unique morphology that consists of interlinked almost spherical nano particles. This interlinked assembly of ZMO nano particles with porous structure (homogeneous pores 10–30 nm) probably facilitates the ion kinetics at electrode-electrolyte interface. - Highlights: • Novel electrode material for supercapacitor: Mn-based Ternary metal oxide. • ZnMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} is synthesized by cost effective urea combustion technique. • Unique architecture consisting of homogeneous pores (10–30 nm) distribution. • Homogeneous pores distribution plays vital role over surface area. • Nano-ZnMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} exhibits specific capacitance of 160 Fg{sup −1}.

  11. Swift heavy ions for materials engineering and nanostructuring

    CERN Document Server

    Avasthi, Devesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Ion beams have been used for decades for characterizing and analyzing materials. Now energetic ion beams are providing ways to modify the materials in unprecedented ways. This book highlights the emergence of high-energy swift heavy ions as a tool for tailoring the properties of materials with nanoscale structures. Swift heavy ions interact with materials by exciting/ionizing electrons without directly moving the atoms. This opens a new horizon towards the 'so-called' soft engineering. The book discusses the ion beam technology emerging from the non-equilibrium conditions and emphasizes the power of controlled irradiation to tailor the properties of various types of materials for specific needs.

  12. Nanostructured titanium-based materials for medical implants: Modeling and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Levashov, Evgeny; Valiev, Ruslan Z.

    2014-01-01

    . Computational methods of nanostructure properties simulation and various approaches to the computational, "virtual" testing and numerical optimization of these materials are discussed. Applications of atomistic methods, continuum micromechanics and crystal plasticity as well as analytical models to the analysis...... of the reserves of the improvement of materials for medical implants are demonstrated. Examples of successful development of a nanomaterial-based medical implants are presented. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  13. Nanostructured metal-oxide-conducting polymer based ultracapacitors for energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Navjot Kaur

    Ultracapacitors often called supercapacitors or electrochemical double layer capacitors are emerging with a potential reflecting great advancement in the energy storage systems over past several last years. Traditional and commercially used electrical energy storage technology consists of mainly the batteries. Capacitors and ultracapacitors offer limited utility by trade off between energy density and power density. Batteries, fuel cells deliver high energy density while electrostatic capacitor and ultracapacitors provide high power density. Research on future energy storage device with optimum combination of high energy and power density has gained momentum over recent few years. Ultracapacitors provide a tantalizing capability to achieve high energy while maintaining high power density device which can bridge the gap between batteries and conventional capacitors This research is focused on the synthesis of conducting polymers as well as its composites with the metal oxides as electrodes, their electrochemical and structural characterizations for use in ultracapacitor devices and modeling. An innovative aspect of this research is the use of the nanorods, nanotubes and similar nanotemplates in order to introduce the morphological changes in the electroactive electrodes. Using these approaches, this research aims at high surface area for dense energy storage through ion intercalation and oxidation state changes. For the nanocomposite electrode materials synthesis, electrochemical, chemical and solution methods have been used. For nanostructuring, thin film templates of TiO2 (titanium dioxide) nanotubes, ZnO (zinc oxide) nanorods and nanowires have been synthesized using hydrothermal and electro-etching techniques. Various electroactive electrode materials in this research are investigated. The materials system studied in this work are nanocomposites of ZnO, TiO2, Ppy (polypyrrole), MnO2 (manganese dioxide), Pedot (Poly (3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene). Further

  14. Ab Initio Studies of Metal Hexaboride Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Kevin M.

    Metal hexaborides are refractory ceramics with several qualities relevant to materials design, such as low work functions, high hardness, low thermal expansion coefficients, and high melting points, among many other properties of interest for industrial applications. Thermal and mechanical stability is a common feature provided by the covalently-bonded network boron atoms, and electronic properties can vary significantly with the resident metal. While these materials are currently employed as electron emitters and abrasives, promising uses of these materials also include catalytic applications for chemical dissociation reactions of various molecules such as hydrogen, water and carbon monoxide, for example. However, these extensions require a thorough understanding of particular mechanical and electronic properties. This dissertation is a collection of studies focused on understanding the behavior of metal hexaboride materials using computational modeling methods to investigate materials properties of these from both classical and quantum mechanical points of view. Classical modeling is performed using molecular dynamics methods with interatomic potentials obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Atomic mean-square displacements from the quasi-harmonic approximation and lattice energetic data are produced with DFT for developing the potentials. A generalized method was also developed for the inversion of cohesive energy curves of crystalline materials; pairwise interatomic potentials are extracted using detailed geometrical descriptions of the atomic interactions and a list of atomic displacements and degeneracies. The surface structure of metal hexaborides is studied with DFT using several model geometries to describe the terminal cation layouts, and these provide a basis for further studies on metal hexaboride interactions with hydrogen. The surface electronic structure calculations show that segregated regions of metal and boron

  15. Material Removes Heavy Metal Ions From Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, Warren H., Jr.; Street, Kenneth W.; Hill, Carol; Savino, Joseph M.

    1995-01-01

    New high capacity ion-exchange polymer material removes toxic metal cations from contaminated water. Offers several advantages. High sensitivities for such heavy metals as lead, cadmium, and copper and capable of reducing concentrations in aqueous solutions to parts-per-billion range. Removes cations even when calcium present. Material made into variety of forms, such as thin films, coatings, pellets, and fibers. As result, adapted to many applications to purify contaminated water, usually hard wherever found, whether in wastewater-treatment systems, lakes, ponds, industrial plants, or homes. Another important feature that adsorbed metals easily reclaimed by either destructive or nondestructive process. Other tests show ion-exchange polymer made inexpensively; easy to use; strong, flexible, not easily torn; and chemically stable in storage, in aqueous solutions, and in acidic or basic solution.

  16. Noble metal nanostructures for double plasmon resonance with tunable properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petr, M.; Kylián, O.; Kuzminova, A.; Kratochvíl, J.; Khalakhan, I.; Hanuš, J.; Biederman, H.

    2017-02-01

    We report and compare two vacuum-based strategies to produce Ag/Au materials characterized by double plasmon resonance peaks: magnetron sputtering and method based on the use of gas aggregation sources (GAS) of nanoparticles. It was observed that the double plasmon resonance peaks may be achieved by both of these methods and that the intensities of individual localized surface plasmon resonance peaks may be tuned by deposition conditions. However, in the case of sputter deposition it was necessary to introduce a separation dielectric interlayer in between individual Ag and Au nanoparticle films which was not the case of films prepared by GAS systems. The differences in the optical properties of sputter deposited bimetallic Ag/Au films and coatings consisted of individual Ag and Au nanoparticles produced by GAS is ascribed to the divers mechanisms of nanoparticles formation.

  17. Modeling of nonlinear microscopy of localized field enhancements in random metal nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beermann, Jonas; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Coello, Victor

    2006-01-01

    Nonlinear microscopy of localized field enhancements in random metal nanostructures with a tightly focused laser beam scanning over a sample surface is modeled by making use of analytic representations of the Green dyadic in the near- and far-field regions, with the latter being approximated...... by the part describing the scattering via excitation of surface plasmon polaritons. The developed approach is applied to scanning second-harmonic (SH) microscopy of small gold spheres placed randomly on a gold surface. We calculate self-consistent fundamental harmonic (FH) and SH field distributions...

  18. Modelling the formation of nanostructures on metal surface induced by femtosecond laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djouder, M. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Universite Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-ouzou, BP 17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Itina, T.E. [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR CNRS 5516/Universite Jean Monnet, 18 rue de Professeur Benoit Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Deghiche, D. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Universite Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-ouzou, BP 17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Lamrous, O., E-mail: omarlamrous@mail.ummto.dz [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Universite Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-ouzou, BP 17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria)

    2012-01-15

    We employ the particle-in-cell method to simulate the mechanisms of femtosecond (fs) laser interactions with a metallic target. The theoretical approach considers the solid as a gas of free electrons in a lattice of immobile ions and the laser fluences close to the ablation threshold. At first moments of the interaction, our simulations mapped out different nanostructures. We carefully characterized the rippling phase and found that its morphology is dependent on the distribution of the electron density and the period of the ripples depends on the laser intensity. The simulation method provides new insights into the mechanisms that are responsible for surface grating formation.

  19. Hemispherical Shell Nanostructures from Metal-Stripped Embossed Alumina on Aluminum Templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter; Albrektsen, Ole; Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    2011-01-01

    aluminum/ alumina (Al/Al2O3) templates as a novel and versatile nanofabrication procedure, and we demonstrate explicitly how to exploit the technique for developing large-area hexagonally close-packed hemispherical shell nanostructures by stripping noble metal layers from embossed templates fabricated from...... anodized Al. Utilizing for this process the linear relationship between anodization voltage and the resulting interpore distance in the formed oxide, it is possible to tune the radius of curvature of the resulting hemispherical shells continuously, which in turn results in tunable optical properties...

  20. Micro- and Nanostructured Metal Oxide Chemical Sensors for Volatile Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alim, M. A.; Penn, B. G.; Currie, J. R., Jr.; Batra, A. K.; Aggarwal, M. D.

    2008-01-01

    Aeronautic and space applications warrant the development of chemical sensors which operate in a variety of environments. This technical memorandum incorporates various kinds of chemical sensors and ways to improve their performance. The results of exploratory investigation of the binary composite polycrystalline thick-films such as SnO2-WO3, SnO2-In2O3, SnO2-ZnO for the detection of volatile organic compound (isopropanol) are reported. A short review of the present status of the new types of nanostructured sensors such as nanobelts, nanorods, nanotube, etc. based on metal oxides is presented.

  1. Metal Surface Modification for Obtaining Nano- and Sub-Nanostructured Protective Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledovskykh, Volodymyr; Vyshnevska, Yuliya; Brazhnyk, Igor; Levchenko, Sergiy

    2017-03-01

    Regularities of the phase protective layer formation in multicomponent systems involving inhibitors with different mechanism of protective action have been investigated. It was shown that optimization of the composition of the inhibition mixture allows to obtain higher protective efficiency owing to improved microstructure of the phase layer. It was found that mechanism of the film formation in the presence of NaNO2-PHMG is due to deposition of slightly soluble PHMG-Fe complexes on the metal surface. On the basis of the proposed mechanism, the advanced surface engineering methods for obtaining nanoscaled and sub-nanostructured functional coatings may be developed.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of inorganic nanostructured materials for advanced energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jin

    to the challenges. The understanding of the synergistic effect between electrolyte decomposition and electrode decomposition, nevertheless, is conspicuously lacking. To better understand the reaction chemistries in lithium oxygen batteries, I designed, synthesized, and studied heteronanostructure-based carbon-free inorganic electrodes, as well as carbon electrodes whose surfaces protected by metal oxide thin films. The new types of electrodes prove to be highly effective in minimizing parasitic reactions, reducing operation overpotentials and boosting battery lifetimes. The improved stability and well-defined electrode morphology also enabled detailed studies on the formation and decomposition of Li2O 2. To summarize, this dissertation presented the synthesis and characterization of inorganic nanostructured materials for advanced energy storage. On a practical level, the new types of materials allow for the immediate advancement of the energy storage technology. On a fundamental level, it helped to better understand reaction chemistries and fading mechanisms of battery electrodes.

  3. Facile general route toward tunable Magnéli nanostructures and their use as thermoelectric metal oxide/carbon nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portehault, David; Maneeratana, Vasana; Candolfi, Christophe; Oeschler, Niels; Veremchuk, Igor; Grin, Yuri; Sanchez, Clément; Antonietti, Markus

    2011-11-22

    Engineering nanoscale interfaces is a requisite for harnessing electrical and thermal transports within nanostructured materials, especially those destined for thermoelectric applications requiring an unusual combination of low thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity. Nanocomposites open up possibilities in this area, but are still bound to a very narrow range of materials. Here, we report a new approach combining the sol-gel process toward hybrid materials with spark plasma sintering (SPS) to yield functional nanocomposites based on substoichiometric titanium oxides Ti(n)O(2n-1), so-called Magnéli phases. The potential of this new approach is demonstrated by three results. First, multiple Ti(n)O(2n-1) compounds (n = 3, 4, 5, 6, 8) are obtained for the first time as sole nano-Magnéli crystalline phases with controlled specific surface areas from 55 to 300 m(2)·g(-1), classified as potential thermoelectric n-type metal oxides and paving the way toward advanced systems for energy-harvesting devices and optoelectronics. Second, this work combines the use of sol-gel and SPS processes to yield percolated nanocomposites based on metal oxide nanoparticles embedded in a carbon matrix with low electrical resistivity (2 × 10(-4) Ω·m for a Ti(4)O(7) compound) and reduced thermal conductivity (1 W·m(-1)·K(-1)) with respect to bulk phases. Finally, the discovered materials are reliable with thermoelectric figures of merit (ZT = 0.08) relatively high for n-type Ti-O-based systems and metal oxides. Thereby this study represents a proof of concept for the development of promising, cheaper, and more efficient thermoelectric conversion devices.

  4. RNA as a stable polymer to build controllable and defined nanostructures for material and biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Lee, Taek; Dziubla, Thomas; Pi, Fengmei; Guo, Sijin; Xu, Jing; Li, Chan; Haque, Farzin; Liang, Xing-Jie; Guo, Peixuan

    2015-10-01

    The value of polymers is manifested in their vital use as building blocks in material and life sciences. Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is a polynucleic acid, but its polymeric nature in materials and technological applications is often overlooked due to an impression that RNA is seemingly unstable. Recent findings that certain modifications can make RNA resistant to RNase degradation while retaining its authentic folding property and biological function, and the discovery of ultra-thermostable RNA motifs have adequately addressed the concerns of RNA unstability. RNA can serve as a unique polymeric material to build varieties of nanostructures including nanoparticles, polygons, arrays, bundles, membrane, and microsponges that have potential applications in biomedical and material sciences. Since 2005, more than a thousand publications on RNA nanostructures have been published in diverse fields, indicating a remarkable increase of interest in the emerging field of RNA nanotechnology. In this review, we aim to: delineate the physical and chemical properties of polymers that can be applied to RNA; introduce the unique properties of RNA as a polymer; review the current methods for the construction of RNA nanostructures; describe its applications in material, biomedical and computer sciences; and, discuss the challenges and future prospects in this field.

  5. Experimental observation of the spin Hall effect of light on a metal film nanostructure via weak measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Xinxing; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2011-01-01

    We theorize the spin Hall effect of light (SHEL) on a metal film nanostructure and demonstrate it experimentally via weak measurements. To reveal the SHEL on nanostructure, we establish a general model to describe the relationship between the spin-orbit coupling and the structural parameters of the nanostructure. We reveal that the spin-orbit coupling in the SHEL can be effectively modulated by adjusting the thickness of the metal film. Our findings show that the transverse displacement is sensitive to the thickness of metal film in certain range for horizontal polarization due to the large ratio of Fresnel coefficients. In addition, we find that the transverse shift takes on a large negative value as a consequence of the combined contributions of the ratio and the phase difference of Fresnel coefficients.

  6. [The application of the nanostructured bioplastic material for the plastic reconstruction of perforations in the nasal septum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'eva, M V; Akimov, A V; Bagautdinov, A A

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to estimate the effectiveness of the application of the nanostructured bioplastic material for the plastic reconstruction of perforations in the nasal septum. A total of 80 patients were recruited for the study. Half of them underwent plastic reconstruction of perforations in the nasal septum with the application of the nanostructured bioplastic material. Forty patients were treated using no biotransplants. The functional state of nasal cavity mucosa was evaluated before and after surgery. It is concluded that the nanostructured bioplastic material used in the present study ensures efficacious reconstruction of nasal septum integrity after plastic correction of septal perforations.

  7. Enhancement of Radiation Tolerance by Interfaces in Nanostructured Metallic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. a...flexible construction of various types (coherent vs. incoherent) of interfaces as well as accurate control of the thickness of individual layers. Cu/Nb...Phillpot, H. Gleiter, Acta Materialia, 50 (2002) 5005-5020. [7] K. Lu, L. Lu, S. Suresh, Science, 324 (2009) 349-352. [8] S. Ogata , J. Li, S. Yip

  8. Hierarchical plasmonic-metal/semiconductor micro/nanostructures: green synthesis and application in catalytic reduction of p-nitrophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shuyan; Jia, Xiaoxia; Li, Zhengdao; Chen, Yanli

    2012-03-01

    Hierarchical micro/nano arrays can offer both the advantages of nano-sized building blocks and micro- or submicrometer-sized ordered arrays, therefore representing one kind of potential functional materials and having received enormous attention for a wealth of applications. In this study, four-dimensionally flower-like CuO micro/nanostructures decorated by Au nanoparticles are synthesized via an environmentally friendly route assisted by polyethylene glycol. Experiments reveal that the product demonstrates high catalytic performance for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol using NaBH4 as the reducing agent, which could be attributed to the rich Au/CuO interfaces in the samples. Compared to the pure noble metal catalysts, the obtained sample is quite economic. In terms of methodology and cost-effectiveness, this study proposes an economically useful and green method to produce a highly efficient metal-based catalyst. It is also a good example for the organic combination of green chemistry and functional materials.

  9. Bias polarity-sensitive electrical failure characteristics of ZnSe nanowire in metal–semiconductor–metal nanostructure

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The effect of bias polarity on the electrical breakdown behavior of the single ZnSe nanowire (NW) in the metal–semiconductor–metal (M–S–M) nanostructure under high current density and high bias conditions has been studied in the present paper. The experimental results show that the failure of the ZnSe NW in M–S–M nanostructure was sensitive to bias polarity since the NW commonly collapsed at the negatively biased Au metal electrode due to high Joule heat produced in NW at the reversely biased...

  10. Synthesis and characterization of large specific surface area nanostructured amorphous silica materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez-Linares, Francisco; Roque-Malherbe, Rolando M A

    2006-04-01

    Large specific surface area materials attract wide attention because of their applications in adsorption, catalysis, and nanotechnology. In the present study, we describe the synthesis and characterization of nanostructured amorphous silica materials. These materials were obtained by means of a modification of the Stobe-Fink-Bohn (SFB) method. The morphology and essential features of the synthesized materials have been studied using an automated surface area and pore size analyzer and scanning electron microscopy. The existence of a micro/mesoporous structure in the obtained materials has been established. It was also found that the obtained particle packing materials show large specific surface area up to 1,600 m2/g. (To our best knowledge, there is no any reported amorphous silica material with such a higher specific surface area.) The obtained materials could be useful in the manufacture of adsorbents, catalyst supports, and other nanotechnological applications.

  11. One-dimensional carbon nanotube/SnO2/noble metal nanoparticle hybrid nanostructure: synthesis, characterization, and electrochemical sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Youxing; Guo, Shaojun; Zhu, Chengzhou; Dong, Shaojun; Wang, Erkang

    2010-08-02

    Herein we report a facile and efficient method for self-assembling noble-metal nanoparticles (NPs) to the surface of SnO(2)-coated carbon nanotubes (CNT@SnO(2)) to construct CNT@SnO(2)/noble metal NP hybrids. By using SnCl(4) as the precursor of the SnO(2) shell on the surface of CNTs, the hydrolysis speed of SnCl(4) was slowed down in ethanol containing a trace amount of urea and water. The coaxial nanostructure of CNT@SnO(2) was confirmed by using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that the coating layer of SnO(2) was homogeneous with the mean thickness of 8 nm. The CNT@SnO(2)/noble-metal NP hybrids were obtained by mixing noble-metal NPs with as-prepared CNT@SnO(2) coaxial nanocables by means of a self-assembly strategy. With the amino group terminated, the CNT@SnO(2) coaxial nanocable can readily adsorb the as-prepared noble-metal NPs (Au, Ag, Au-Pt, and Au-Pd NPs). The presence of an amino group at the surface of SnO(2) was proved by use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In addition, H(2)O(2) sensing by amperometric methods could serve as detection models for investigating the electrocatalytic ability of as-prepared hybrid materials. It was found that wide linear ranges and low detection limits were obtained by using the enzyme-free CNT@SnO(2)@Au-Pt modified electrode, which indicated the potential utilizations of the hybrid based on CNT@SnO(2) for electrochemical sensing.

  12. One-Dimensional Metal-Oxide Nanostructures for Solar Photocatalytic Water-Splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengyun; Song, Longfei; Zhang, Hongchao; Luo, Linqu; Wang, Dong; Tang, Jie

    2017-08-01

    Because of their unique physical and chemical properties, one-dimensional (1-D) metal-oxide nanostructures have been extensively applied in the areas of gas sensors, electrochromic devices, nanogenerators, and so on. Solar water-splitting has attracted extensive research interest because hydrogen generated from solar-driven water splitting is a clean, sustainable, and abundant energy source that not only solves the energy crisis, but also protects the environment. In this comprehensive review, the main synthesis methods, properties, and especially prominent applications in solar water splitting of 1-D metal-oxides, including titanium dioxide (TiO2), zinc oxide (ZnO), tungsten trioxide (WO3), iron oxide (Fe2O3), and copper oxide (CuO) are fully discussed.

  13. Synthesis of nanostructured metal–, semiconductor–, and metal/semiconductor–mordenite composites from geothermal waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar E. Jaime-Acuña

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Successful synthesis of metal–, semiconductor–, and metal/semiconductor–mordenite nanocomposites, using geothermal solid waste as precursor is reported. Powders of nanostructured composites, consisting of metal and/or semiconductor nanoparticles grown on a mordenite-type zeolitic matrix surface, were synthesized by a one-step solvent-free and organic template-free process. The developed methodology is capable of controlling and tuning the final properties of composites from their synthesis and is also reproducible and repeatable. For comparison and demonstration of the application of the final products, dye photocatalysis degradation tests were done using commercial TiO2 as reference (degradation reached ∼75% in 215 min, k = 0.004 min−1, [M]–S–MOR samples revealed better performance (≥95% in 100 min, k = 0.009 min−1.

  14. Fabrication of metal oxide nanostructures based on Atomic Force Microscopy lithography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) mechanical lithography is a simple but significant method for nanofabrication. In this work, we used this method to construct nanos- tructures on Pt/Cu bilayer metal electrodes under ambient conditions in air. The influence of various scratch parameters, such as the applied force, scan velocity and circle times, on the lithography patterns was investigated. The Pt-Cu-CuxO-Cu-Pt nanostructure was constructed by choosing suitable scratch parameters and oxidation at room temperature. The properties of the scratched regions were also investigated by friction force microscopy and conductive AFM (C-AFM). The I-V curves show symmetric and linear properties, and Ohmic contacts were formed. These results indicate that AFM mechanical lithography is a powerful tool for fabricating novel metal-semiconductor nanoelectronic devices.

  15. Nanostructured silicon for photonics from materials to devices

    CERN Document Server

    Gaburro, Z; Daldosso, N

    2006-01-01

    The use of light to channel signals around electronic chips could solve several current problems in microelectronic evolution including: power dissipation, interconnect bottlenecks, input/output from/to optical communication channels, poor signal bandwidth, etc. It is unfortunate that silicon is not a good photonic material: it has a poor light-emission efficiency and exhibits a negligible electro-optical effect. Silicon photonics is a field having the objective of improving the physical properties of silicon; thus turning it into a photonic material and permitting the full convergence of elec

  16. Hierarchical nanostructured NiCo2O4 as an efficient bifunctional non-precious metal catalyst for rechargeable zinc-air batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabu, Moni; Ketpang, Kriangsak; Shanmugam, Sangaraju

    2014-02-01

    A nickel-doped cobalt oxide spinel structure is a promising non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction in rechargeable metal-air batteries and water electrolyzers operating with alkaline electrolytes. One dimensional NiCo2O4 (NCO) nanostructures were prepared by using a simple electrospinning technique with two different metal precursors (metal nitrate/PAN and metal acetylacetonate/PAN). The effect of precursor concentration on the morphologies was investigated. Single-phase, NCO with an average diameter of 100 nm, porous interconnected fibrous morphology was revealed by FESEM and FETEM analysis. The hierarchical nanostructured 1D-spinel NiCo2O4 materials showed a remarkable electrocatalytic activity towards oxygen reduction and evolution in an aqueous alkaline medium. The extraordinary bi-functional catalytic activity towards both ORR and OER was observed by the low over potential (0.84 V), which is better than that of noble metal catalysts [Pt/C (1.16 V), Ru/C (1.01 V) and Ir/C (0.92 V)], making them promising cathode materials for metal-air batteries. Furthermore, the rechargeable zinc-air battery with NCO-A1 as a bifunctional electrocatalyst displays high activity and stability during battery discharge, charge, and cycling processes.A nickel-doped cobalt oxide spinel structure is a promising non-precious metal electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction in rechargeable metal-air batteries and water electrolyzers operating with alkaline electrolytes. One dimensional NiCo2O4 (NCO) nanostructures were prepared by using a simple electrospinning technique with two different metal precursors (metal nitrate/PAN and metal acetylacetonate/PAN). The effect of precursor concentration on the morphologies was investigated. Single-phase, NCO with an average diameter of 100 nm, porous interconnected fibrous morphology was revealed by FESEM and FETEM analysis. The hierarchical nanostructured 1D-spinel NiCo2O4 materials showed a

  17. Imparting biomolecules to a metal-organic framework material by controlled DNA tetrahedron encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yongmei; Wei, Benmei; Duan, Ruixue; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Boya; Hakeem, Abdul; Liu, Nannan; Ou, Xiaowen; Xu, Shaofang; Chen, Zhifei; Lou, Xiaoding; Xia, Fan

    2014-08-04

    Recently, the incorporation of biomolecules in Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) attracts many attentions because of controlling the functions, properties and stability of trapped molecules. Although there are few reports on protein/MOFs composites and their applications, none of DNA/MOFs composite is reported, as far as we know. Here, we report a new composite material which is self-assembled from 3D DNA (guest) and pre-synthesized MOFs (host) by electrostatic interactions and hydrophilic interactions in a well-dispersed fashion. Its biophysical characterization is well analyzed by fluorescence spectroscopy, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This new composite material keeps 3D DNA nanostructure more stable than only 3D DNA nanostructure in DI water at room temperature, and stores amounts of genetic information. It will make DNA as a guest for MOFs and MOFs become a new platform for the development of DNA nanotechnology.

  18. Thermal radiative properties of metamaterials and other nanostructured materials: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ceji FU; Zhuomin M. ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    The ability to manufacture, control, and manipulate structures at extremely small scales is the hallmark of modem technologies, including microelec-tronics, MEMS/NEMS, and nano-biotechnology. Along with the advancement of microfabrication technology, more and more investigations have been performed in recent years to understand the influence of microstructures on radiative properties. The key to the enhancement of performance is through the modification of the reflection and transmission properties of electromagnetic waves and thermal emission spectra using one-, two-, or three-dimensional micro/nanostructures. This review focuses on recent developments in metamaterials-manmade mate-rials with exotic optical properties, and other nanostruc-tured materials, such as gratings and photonic crystals, for application in radiative energy transfer and energy conversion systems.

  19. In situ neutron scattering study of nanostructured PbTe-PbS bulk thermoelectric material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Fei [Temple University; Schmidt, Robert D [ORNL; Case, Eldon D [Michigan State University, East Lansing; An, Ke [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructures play an important role in thermoelectric materials. Their thermal stability, such as phase change and evolution at elevated temperatures, is thus of great interest to the thermoelectric community. In this study, in situ neutron diffraction was used to examine the phase evolution of nanostructured bulk PbTe-PbS materials fabricated using hot pressing and pulsed electrical current sintering (PECS). The PbS second phase was observed in all samples in the as-pressed condition. The temperature dependent lattice parameter and phase composition data show an initial formation of PbS precipitates followed by a redissolution during heating. The redissolution process started around 570 600 K, and completed at approximately 780 K. During cooling, the PECS sample followed a reversible curve while the heating/cooling behavior of the hot pressed sample was irreversible.

  20. Removal of Heavy Metals from Drinking Water by Magnetic Carbon Nanostructures Prepared from Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Muneeb Ur Rahman Khattak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals contamination of drinking water has significant adverse effects on human health due to their toxic nature. In this study a new adsorbent, magnetic graphitic nanostructures were prepared from watermelon waste. The adsorbent was characterized by different instrumental techniques (surface area analyzer, FTIR, XRD, EDX, SEM, and TG/DTA and was used for the removal of heavy metals (As, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn from water. The adsorption parameters were determined for heavy metals adsorption using Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. The adsorption kinetics and effect of time, pH, and temperature on heavy metal ions were also determined. The best fits were obtained for Freundlich isotherm. The percent adsorption showed a decline at high pH. Best fit was obtained with second-order kinetics model for the kinetics experiments. The values of ΔH° and ΔG° were negative while that of ΔS° was positive. The prepared adsorbent has high adsorption capacities and can be efficiently used for the removal of heavy metals from water.

  1. Novel Nanostructured Electrodes Obtained by Pyrolysis of Composite Polymeric Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amato, Letizia; Schulte, Lars; Heiskanen, Arto

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we compare pyrolyzed carbon derived from the photoresist SU‐8 alone or in combination with polystyrene and poly(styrene)‐block‐poly(dimethylsiloxane) copolymer (PS‐b‐PDMS), to be used as novel materials for micro‐ and nanoelectrodes. The pyrolyzed carbon films are evaluated with sca...

  2. Functional Scanning Probe Imaging of Nanostructured Solar Energy Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giridharagopal, Rajiv; Cox, Phillip A; Ginger, David S

    2016-09-20

    From hybrid perovskites to semiconducting polymer/fullerene blends for organic photovoltaics, many new materials being explored for energy harvesting and storage exhibit performance characteristics that depend sensitively on their nanoscale morphology. At the same time, rapid advances in the capability and accessibility of scanning probe microscopy methods over the past decade have made it possible to study processing/structure/function relationships ranging from photocurrent collection to photocarrier lifetimes with resolutions on the scale of tens of nanometers or better. Importantly, such scanning probe methods offer the potential to combine measurements of local structure with local function, and they can be implemented to study materials in situ or devices in operando to better understand how materials evolve in time in response to an external stimulus or environmental perturbation. This Account highlights recent advances in the development and application of scanning probe microscopy methods that can help address such questions while filling key gaps between the capabilities of conventional electron microscopy and newer super-resolution optical methods. Focusing on semiconductor materials for solar energy applications, we highlight a range of electrical and optoelectronic scanning probe microscopy methods that exploit the local dynamics of an atomic force microscope tip to probe key properties of the solar cell material or device structure. We discuss how it is possible to extract relevant device properties using noncontact scanning probe methods as well as how these properties guide materials development. Specifically, we discuss intensity-modulated scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (IM-SKPM), time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy (trEFM), frequency-modulated electrostatic force microscopy (FM-EFM), and cantilever ringdown imaging. We explain these developments in the context of classic atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods that exploit the physics of

  3. Microporous Metal Organic Materials for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. G. Sankar; Jing Li; Karl Johnson

    2008-11-30

    We have examined a number of Metal Organic Framework Materials for their potential in hydrogen storage applications. Results obtained in this study may, in general, be summarized as follows: (1) We have identified a new family of porous metal organic framework materials with the compositions M (bdc) (ted){sub 0.5}, {l_brace}M = Zn or Co, bdc = biphenyl dicarboxylate and ted = triethylene diamine{r_brace} that adsorb large quantities of hydrogen ({approx}4.6 wt%) at 77 K and a hydrogen pressure of 50 atm. The modeling performed on these materials agree reasonably well with the experimental results. (2) In some instances, such as in Y{sub 2}(sdba){sub 3}, even though the modeling predicted the possibility of hydrogen adsorption (although only small quantities, {approx}1.2 wt%, 77 K, 50 atm. hydrogen), our experiments indicate that the sample does not adsorb any hydrogen. This may be related to the fact that the pores are extremely small or may be attributed to the lack of proper activation process. (3) Some samples such as Zn (tbip) (tbip = 5-tert butyl isophthalate) exhibit hysteresis characteristics in hydrogen sorption between adsorption and desorption runs. Modeling studies on this sample show good agreement with the desorption behavior. It is necessary to conduct additional studies to fully understand this behavior. (4) Molecular simulations have demonstrated the need to enhance the solid-fluid potential of interaction in order to achieve much higher adsorption amounts at room temperature. We speculate that this may be accomplished through incorporation of light transition metals, such as titanium and scandium, into the metal organic framework materials.

  4. Elastomer-Carbon Nanostructure Composites as Prospective Materials for Flexible Robotic Tactile Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Knite, M; Podiņš, G; Zīke, S; Zavickis, J

    2008-01-01

    Our recent achievements in the design, processing and studies of physical properties of elastomer – nano-structured carbon composites as prospective compressive strain sensor materials for robotic tactile elements are presented. Composites made of polyisoprene matrix and high-structured carbon black or multi-wall carbon nano-tube filler have been designed and manufactured to develop completely flexible conductive polymer nano-composites for tactile sensing elements. Electrical resistance of t...

  5. Sustainable Non-Metallic Building Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Tretsiakova-McNally

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Buildings are the largest energy consumers and greenhouse gases emitters, both in the developed and developing countries. In continental Europe, the energy use in buildings alone is responsible for up to 50% of carbon dioxide emission. Urgent changes are, therefore, required relating to energy saving, emissions control, production and application of materials, use of renewable resources, and to recycling and reuse of building materials. In addition, the development of new eco-friendly building materials and practices is of prime importance owing to the growing environmental concerns. This review reflects the key tendencies in the sector of sustainable building materials of a non-metallic nature that have occurred over the past decade or so.

  6. Block copolymer based composition and morphology control in nanostructured hybrid materials for energy conversion and storage: solar cells, batteries, and fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Orilall, M. Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The development of energy conversion and storage devices is at the forefront of research geared towards a sustainable future. However, there are numerous issues that prevent the widespread use of these technologies including cost, performance and durability. These limitations can be directly related to the materials used. In particular, the design and fabrication of nanostructured hybrid materials is expected to provide breakthroughs for the advancement of these technologies. This tutorial review will highlight block copolymers as an emerging and powerful yet affordable tool to structure-direct such nanomaterials with precise control over structural dimensions, composition and spatial arrangement of materials in composites. After providing an introduction to materials design and current limitations, the review will highlight some of the most recent examples of block copolymer structure-directed nanomaterials for photovoltaics, batteries and fuel cells. In each case insights are provided into the various underlying fundamental chemical, thermodynamic and kinetic formation principles enabling general and relatively inexpensive wet-polymer chemistry methodologies for the efficient creation of multiscale functional materials. Examples include nanostructured ceramics, ceramic-carbon composites, ceramic-carbon-metal composites and metals with morphologies ranging from hexagonally arranged cylinders to three-dimensional bi-continuous cubic networks. The review ends with an outlook towards the synthesis of multicomponent and hierarchical multifunctional hybrid materials with different nano-architectures from self-assembly of higher order blocked macromolecules which may ultimately pave the way for the further development of energy conversion and storage devices. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  7. Block copolymer based composition and morphology control in nanostructured hybrid materials for energy conversion and storage: solar cells, batteries, and fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orilall, M Christopher; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2011-02-01

    The development of energy conversion and storage devices is at the forefront of research geared towards a sustainable future. However, there are numerous issues that prevent the widespread use of these technologies including cost, performance and durability. These limitations can be directly related to the materials used. In particular, the design and fabrication of nanostructured hybrid materials is expected to provide breakthroughs for the advancement of these technologies. This tutorial review will highlight block copolymers as an emerging and powerful yet affordable tool to structure-direct such nanomaterials with precise control over structural dimensions, composition and spatial arrangement of materials in composites. After providing an introduction to materials design and current limitations, the review will highlight some of the most recent examples of block copolymer structure-directed nanomaterials for photovoltaics, batteries and fuel cells. In each case insights are provided into the various underlying fundamental chemical, thermodynamic and kinetic formation principles enabling general and relatively inexpensive wet-polymer chemistry methodologies for the efficient creation of multiscale functional materials. Examples include nanostructured ceramics, ceramic-carbon composites, ceramic-carbon-metal composites and metals with morphologies ranging from hexagonally arranged cylinders to three-dimensional bi-continuous cubic networks. The review ends with an outlook towards the synthesis of multicomponent and hierarchical multifunctional hybrid materials with different nano-architectures from self-assembly of higher order blocked macromolecules which may ultimately pave the way for the further development of energy conversion and storage devices.

  8. SOME PROGRESS IN NANOSTRUCTURED LUMINESCENT MATERIALS%纳米发光材料研究的若干进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周永慧; 林君; 张洪杰

    2001-01-01

    本文综述了纳米发光材料的研究进展情况,着重总结了(稀土)掺杂型纳米发光材料的制备方法和表征手段,同时介绍了这些纳米发光材料的性质和应用,并对其未来发展趋势进行了展望。%The progress in nanostructured luminescent materials has been reviewed in this paper.Emphases are laid on the synthesis and characterization methods of (rare earth) doped nanostructured luminescent materials.In the meanwhile,the properties and applications of the nanostructured luminescent materials are introduced,and the future development trends for the nanostructured luminescent materials are forecasted in brief.

  9. Nanostructured Composite Materials for High Temperature Thermoelectric Energy Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    Mechanical Testing Measurements were made of the Young’s modulus and toughness of half-Heusler bulk materials with compositions [Zro.5Hfo...will be optimized to meet the needs of engineered devices. A microhardness tester will be used to obtain hardness measurements and determine the...modulus of elasticity for thermoelectric samples. These tests will be used to assess homogeneity of mechanical properties as a function of processing

  10. Nanostructured materials for biological imaging and chemical sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Yıldırım, Adem

    2014-01-01

    Cataloged from PDF version of thesis. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 116-139). Thesis (Ph. D.): Bilkent University, Materials Science and Nanotechnology Program, İhsan Doğramacı Bilkent University, 2014. In the recent years, the design and synthesis of fluorescent nanoparticles for biological and chemical sensing applications have received considerable attention due to the excellent photostability and emission intensity of fluorescent nanoparticles and the intri...

  11. A Self-Templating Scheme for the Synthesis of Nanostructured Transition Metal Chalcogenide Electrodes for Capacitive Energy Storage

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Chuan

    2015-06-11

    Due to their unique structural features including well-defined interior voids, low density, low coefficients of thermal expansion, large surface area and surface permeability, hollow micro/nanostructured transition metal sulfides with high conductivity have been investigated as new class of electrode materials for pseudocapacitor applications. Herein, we report a novel self-templating strategy to fabricate well-defined single and double-shell NiCo2S4 hollow spheres, as a promising electrode material for pseudocapacitors. The surfaces of the NiCo2S4 hollow spheres consist of self-assembled 2D mesoporous nanosheets. This unique morphology results in a high specific capacitance (1257 F g-1 at 2 A g-1), remarkable rate performance (76.4% retention of initial capacitance from 2 A g-1 to 60 A g-1) and exceptional reversibility with a cycling efficiency of 93.8% and 87% after 10,000 and 20,000 cycles, respectively, at a high current density of 10 A g-1. The cycling stability of our ternary chalcogenides is comparable to carbonaceous electrode materials, but with much higher specific capacitance (higher than any previously reported ternary chalcogenide), suggesting that these unique chalcogenide structures have potential application in next-generation commercial pseudocapacitors.

  12. High resolution backscattering studies of nanostructured magnetic and semiconducting materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, A. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Dept. Fisica, Estrada Nac. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)]. E-mail: afonseca@itn.pt; Franco, N. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Dept. Fisica, Estrada Nac. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Alves, E. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Dept. Fisica, Estrada Nac. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Barradas, N.P. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Dept. Fisica, Estrada Nac. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Leitao, J.P. [Departamento de Fisica da Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Sobolev, N.A. [Departamento de Fisica da Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Banhart, D.F. [Z. E. Elektronenmikroskopie, Universitaet Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Presting, H. [Daimler-Chrysler Forschungszentrum, 89081 Ulm (Germany); Ulyanov, V.V. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Nikiforov, A.I. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2005-12-15

    Low dimension structures raises inevitably new technological challenges in materials science. The new structures must fulfill stringent requirements in composition, crystalline quality and interface sharpness among others. We present and discuss the results of Si/Ge quantum structures and FePt/C multilayer structures deposited at different temperatures by ion beam sputtering. Evidence for the presence of FePt nanoparticles embedded in the C matrix and Ge islands in Ge/Si multilayers structures was found. Size and stoichiometry of the nanoparticles and the multilayer periodicity was obtained using Rutherford backscattering at grazing angles of incidence. The strain state of the single crystalline layers was determined by tilt axis channelling.

  13. Nano-structured carbon materials for improved biosensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razumiene, J., E-mail: julija.razumiene@bchi.vu.lt [Institute of Biochemistry, Vilnius University, Mokslininku 12, Vilnius 08662 (Lithuania); Sakinyte, I. [Institute of Biochemistry, Vilnius University, Mokslininku 12, Vilnius 08662 (Lithuania); Barkauskas, J. [Faculty of Chemistry, Vilnius University, Naugarduko 24, Vilnius 03225 (Lithuania); Baronas, R. [Faculty of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius University, Naugarduko 24, Vilnius 03225 (Lithuania)

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Novel protocols of graphite oxidation were used for successful synthesis of GOPs. • Newly synthesized GOPs were applicable for electrode design in reagentless bioelectrocatalytic systems operating on direct electron transfer. • We show that bioelectrocatalytic processes strongly depend on functionalities, morphology and structural features of GOPs. - Abstract: A set of oxidized graphite samples have been newly synthesized using different protocols. Atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller analysis revealed the changes in structure and functionalities of obtained graphite oxidation products (GOPs) compared to pristine graphite. The substances have been tested as electrode materials applicable for bioelectrocatalytic systems using pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (PQQ-GDH). The application of GOPs allowed achieving the direct electron transfer (DET) from active site of PQQ-GDH to the electrode surface. Needless of additional electron transfer (ET) mediating compounds highly improved features of the biosensors. The efficiency of the biosensors has been evaluated for all types of biosensors varied from 32 μA/cm{sup 2} to 64 μA/cm{sup 2} using as electrode materials GOP1 and thermally reduced graphite oxide (TRGO), respectively. TRGO containing function groups (according TGA, ∼6% of the weight loss) and smallest particles (average diameter was ∼11 nm and the average height was ∼0.5 nm) exhibited the higher efficiency for ET acceleration in the biosensor acting on principle of DET.

  14. Thermoelectric and thermospintronic transport in Dirac material-based nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Po-Hao

    The growing need for power due to the rapid developments of the technologies has urged both engineers and scientists to study more sustainable types of energy. On the other hand, the improvement of our abilities although enable us, for example, to double the number of transistors in a dense integrated circuit approximately every two years (Moore's law), comes with side effect due to overheating. Taking advantage of thermoelectric effect has thus become one of the obvious solutions for the problems. But due to the poor efficiency of electricity-heat conversion, there are still challenges to be overcome in order to fully utilize the idea. In the past few years, the realization of graphene along with the discoveries of topological insulators (TI) which are both considered as Dirac material (DM) have offer alternative routs for improving the energy conversion efficiency through different approaches as well as novel quantum effects of materials themselves for investigation. The aim of this thesis is to present contributions to improving the efficiency of thermoelectric conversion as well as analyzing spin transport phenomena that occur in nano-devices. This thesis spans the areas of thermoelectric (TE) effect, spin-Seebeck effect (SSE) and the spin transport on the 3D topological insulator (TI). The different methods have been applied ranging from tight-binding (TB) approximation to density function theory (DFT) combined with non-equilibrium function (NEGF) techniques.

  15. Scalability of Phase Change Materials in Nanostructure Template

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The scalability of In2Se3, one of the phase change materials, is investigated. By depositing the material onto a nanopatterned substrate, individual In2Se3 nanoclusters are confined in the nanosize pits with well-defined shape and dimension permitting the systematic study of the ultimate scaling limit of its use as a phase change memory element. In2Se3 of progressively smaller volume is heated inside a transmission electron microscope operating in diffraction mode. The volume at which the amorphous-crystalline transition can no longer be observed is taken as the ultimate scaling limit, which is approximately 5 nm3 for In2Se3. The physics for the existence of scaling limit is discussed. Using phase change memory elements in memory hierarchy is believed to reduce its energy consumption because they consume zero leakage power in memory cells. Therefore, the phase change memory applications are of great importance in terms of energy saving.

  16. Lanthanide Metal-Organic Framework Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ping-Yen; Green, Mark A.; Briber, Robert M.

    2009-03-01

    A series of lanthanide metal-organic framework materials (MOF) with variable organic linkages including benzene-dicarboxylic acid (BDC); 1,3,5-benzene-tricarboxylic acid (BTC); and 1,3,5-tris(4-carboxyphenyl)benzene (BTB) have been synthesized. The low density and high porosity of MOFs make them candidates molecular sieve or hydrogen storage materials. The crystal structures have been determined using a combination of single crystal X-ray diffractometer and synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction work. Holmium with the BDC ligand material (Ho-BDC) crystallizes in a monoclinic C2/c space group, with lattice parameters of a = 17.06 å, b = 10.67 å, c = 10.57 å, b = 96.12^o. The crystal structure of Ho-BTC is in tetragonal P 41 2 2 space group and Ho-BTB is in a triclinic P-1 space group. A comprehensive examination of Ho-MOF with different ligands by x-ray and thermogravimetric analysis shows that there is a stable nanoporous structure for dehydrated Ho-BTC up to 250^oC. The same phenomenon is not observed in the Ho-BDC and Ho-BTB materials. The collapsed structure with BDC and BTB indicates the stability of dehydrated samples is strongly related to the interactions between the metal and the organic linkers.

  17. Forecasting method of fatigue life test data for metal materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张怀亮; 邱显焱; 谭冠军

    2001-01-01

    GM(1, 1) model of grey system theory is used to forecast fatigue life test data for metal materials. The method can reduce test time and save test cost, and reliability indexes of metal materials can be obtained quickly. The results of an example show that grey system theory has a high precision for forecasting fatigue life test data for metal materials. A valuable method is put forward, which can effectively reduce the fatigue life test time for metal materials.

  18. Poly(3-hexylthiophene) nanostructured materials for organic electronics applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, M P; Magurudeniya, H D; Rainbolt, E A; Huang, P; Dissanayake, D S; Biewer, M C; Stefan, M C

    2014-02-01

    Semiconducting polymers have been developed during the last few decades and are currently used in various organic electronics applications. Regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) is the most employed semiconducting polymer for organic electronics applications. The development of living Grignard metathesis polymerization (GRIM) allowed the synthesis of P3HT with well-defined molecular weights and functional end groups. A large number of block copolymers containing P3HT have been reported, and their opto-electronic properties have been investigated. The performance of P3HT homopolymer and block copolymers in field-effect transistors and bulk heterojunction solar cells are discussed in this review. The morphology of the P3HT materials is also discussed.

  19. Nanostructured carbon materials decorated with organophosphorus moieties: synthesis and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagiotti, Giacomo; Langè, Vittoria; Ligi, Cristina; Caporali, Stefano; Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio; Flis, Anna; Pietrusiewicz, K Michał; Ghini, Giacomo; Brandi, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    A new synthetic approach for the production of carbon nanomaterials (CNM) decorated with organophosphorus moieties is presented. Three different triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO) derivatives were used to decorate oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (ox-MWCNTs) and graphene platelets (GPs). The TPPOs chosen bear functional groups able to react with the CNMs by Tour reaction (an amino group), nitrene cycloaddition (an azido group) or CuAAC reaction (one terminal C–C triple bond). All the adducts were characterized by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, TEM, XPS, elemental analysis and ICP-AES. The cycloaddition of nitrene provided the higher loading on ox-MWCNTs and GPs as well, while the Tour approach gave best results with nanotubes (CNTs). Finally, we investigated the possibility to reduce the TPPO functionalized CNMs to the corresponding phosphine derivatives and applied one of the materials produced as heterogeneous organocatalyst in a Staudinger ligation reaction.

  20. Real-time observation of ultrafast Rabi oscillations between excitons and plasmons in metal/molecular aggregate hybrid nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerullo G.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate ultrafast coherent manipulation of the normal mode splitting in metal/molecular-aggregate nanostructures by real-time observation of Rabi oscillations between excitons and surface-plasmon-polaritons. Oscillations in exciton density on a 10-fs timescale control the Rabi splitting.