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Sample records for nanostructure formation due

  1. Formation of different gold nanostructures by silk nanofibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Guangqiang [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Collaborative Innovation Center of Polymers and Polymer Composite Materials, Department of Macromolecular Science, Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Yang, Yuhong [Research Centre for Analysis and Measurement, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Yao, Jinrong; Shao, Zhengzhong [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Collaborative Innovation Center of Polymers and Polymer Composite Materials, Department of Macromolecular Science, Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Chen, Xin, E-mail: chenx@fudan.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Collaborative Innovation Center of Polymers and Polymer Composite Materials, Department of Macromolecular Science, Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China)

    2016-07-01

    Metal nanostructures that have unique size- and shape-dependent electronic, optical and chemical properties gain more and more attention in modern science and technology. In this article, we show the possibility that we are able to obtain different gold nanostructures simply with the help of silk nanofibrils. We demonstrate that only by varying the pH of the reaction solution, we get gold nanoparticles, nano-icosahedrons, nanocubes, and even microplates. Particularly, we develop a practical method for the preparation of gold microplates in acid condition in the presence of silk nanofibrils, which is impossible by using other forms of silk protein. We attribute the role of silk nanofibrils in the formation of gold nanostructure to their reduction ability from several specific amino acid residues, and the suitable structural anisotropic features to sustain the crystal growth after the reduction process. Although the main purpose of this article is to demonstrate that silk nanofibrils are able to mediate the formation of different gold nanostructure, we show the potential applications of these resulting gold nanostructures, such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and photothermal transformation effect, as same as those produced by other methods. In conclusion, we present in this communication a facile and green synthesis route to prepare various gold nanostructures with silk nanofibrils by simply varying pH in the reaction system, which has remarkable advantages in future biomedical applications. - Highlights: • Different Au nanostructures can be obtained by a facile and green protein reduction method. • Silk nanofibrils serve as both reductant and template in the formation of Au nanostructures. • Different Au nanostructures can be obtained simply by regulating the pH in the medium. • Large Au microplates can be obtained with a cheap, abundant, sustainable silk protein. • Silk/Au hybrid nanocomposites show potential application in SERS and

  2. Self-organization and nanostructure formation in chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walgraef, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    When thin films are grown on a substrate by chemical vapor deposition, the evolution of the first deposited layers may be described, on mesoscopic scales, by dynamical models of the reaction-diffusion type. For monatomic layers, such models describe the evolution of atomic coverage due to the combined effect of reaction terms representing adsorption-desorption and chemical processes and nonlinear diffusion terms that are of the Cahn-Hilliard type. This combination may lead, below a critical temperature, to the instability of uniform deposited layers. This instability triggers the formation of nanostructures corresponding to regular spatial variations of substrate coverage. Patterns wavelengths and symmetries are selected by dynamical variables and not by variational arguments. According to the balance between reaction- and diffusion-induced nonlinearities, a succession of nanostructures including hexagonal arrays of dots, stripes, and localized structures of various types may be obtained. These structures may initiate different growth mechanisms, including Volmer-Weber and Frank-Van der Merwe types of growth. The relevance of this approach to the study of deposited layers of different species is discussed.

  3. Molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo hybrid simulation for fuzzy tungsten nanostructure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, A. M.; Takayama, A.; Oda, Y.; Tamura, T.; Kobayashi, R.; Hattori, T.; Ogata, S.; Ohno, N.; Kajita, S.; Yajima, M.; Noiri, Y.; Yoshimoto, Y.; Saito, S.; Takamura, S.; Murashima, T.; Miyamoto, M.; Nakamura, H.

    2015-07-01

    For the purposes of long-term use of tungsten divertor walls, the formation process of the fuzzy tungsten nanostructure induced by exposure to the helium plasma was studied. In the present paper, the fuzzy nanostructure's formation has been successfully reproduced by the new hybrid simulation method in which the deformation of the tungsten material due to pressure of the helium bubbles was simulated by the molecular dynamics and the diffusion of the helium atoms was simulated by the random walk based on the Monte Carlo method. By the simulation results, the surface height of the fuzzy nanostructure increased only when helium retention was under the steady state. It was proven that the growth of the fuzzy nanostructure was brought about by bursting of the helium bubbles. Moreover, we suggest the following key formation mechanisms of the fuzzy nanostructure: (1) lifting in which the surface lifted up by the helium bubble changes into a convexity, (2) bursting by which the region of the helium bubble changes into a concavity, and (3) the difference of the probability of helium retention by which the helium bubbles tend to appear under the concavity. Consequently, the convex-concave surface structure was enhanced and grew to create the fuzzy nanostructure.

  4. Methanofullerene elongated nanostructure formation for enhanced organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Reyes, M. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi (Mexico)], E-mail: reyesm@cactus.iico.uaslp.mx; Lopez-Sandoval, R. [Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la presa San Jose 2055, CP 78216. San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Arenas-Alatorre, J. [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Garibay-Alonso, R. [Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la presa San Jose 2055, CP 78216. San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Carroll, D.L. [Center for Nanotechnology and Molecular Materials, Department of Physics. Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem NC 27109 (United States); Lastras-Martinez, A. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2007-11-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Z-contrast imaging we have demonstrated elongated nanostructure formation of fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) within an organic host through annealing. The annealing provides an enhanced mobility of the PCBM molecules and, with good initial dispersion, allows for the formation of exaggerated grain growth within the polymer host. We have assembled these nanostructures within the regioregular conjugated polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). This PCBM elongated nanostructure formation maybe responsible for the very high efficiencies observed, at very low loadings of PCBM (1:0.6, polymer to PCBM), in annealed photovoltaics. Moreover, our high resolution TEM and electron energy loss spectroscopy studies clearly show that the PCBM crystals remain crystalline and are unaffected by the 200-keV electron beam.

  5. Wafer-scale nanostructure formation inside vertical nano-pores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berenschot, Johan W.; Sun, Xingwu; Le The, Hai; Tiggelaar, Roald M.; de Boer, Meint J.; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Tas, Niels Roelof; Sarajlic, Edin

    We propose a wafer-scale technique for nanostructure formation inside vertically oriented, through-membrane nano-pores. It uses 50 nm monocrystalline silicon pillars as a mold, embedded in a silicon nitride membrane formed in an innovative step. The proposed technique paves the way towards advanced

  6. Wafer-scale nanostructure formation inside vertical nano-pores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berenschot, Johan W.; Sun, Xingwu; Le The, Hai; Tiggelaar, Roald M.; de Boer, Meint J.; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Tas, Niels Roelof; Sarajlic, Edin

    2017-01-01

    We propose a wafer-scale technique for nanostructure formation inside vertically oriented, through-membrane nano-pores. It uses 50 nm monocrystalline silicon pillars as a mold, embedded in a silicon nitride membrane formed in an innovative step. The proposed technique paves the way towards advanced

  7. Formation of highly organized nanostructures during the digestion of milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salentinig, Stefan; Phan, Stephanie; Khan, Jamal; Hawley, Adrian; Boyd, Ben J

    2013-12-23

    Nature's own emulsion, milk, consists of nutrients such as proteins, vitamins, salts, and milk fat with primarily triglycerides. The digestion of milk fats is the key to the survival of mammal species, yet it is surprising how little we understand this process. The lipase-catalyzed hydrolysis of dietary fats into fatty acids and monoglyceride is essential for efficient absorption of the fat by the enterocytes. Here we report the discovery of highly ordered geometric nanostructures during the digestion of dairy milk. Transitions from normal emulsion through a variety of differently ordered nanostructures were observed using time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering on a high-intensity synchrotron source and visualized by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. Water and hydrophilic molecules are transferred into the lipid phase of the milk particle, turning the lipid core gradually into a more hydrophilic environment. The formation of highly ordered lipid particles with substantial internal surface area, particularly in low-bile conditions, may indicate a compensating mechanism for maintenance of lipid absorption under compromised lipolysis conditions.

  8. Hybrid simulation research on formation mechanism of tungsten nanostructure induced by helium plasma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Atsushi M., E-mail: ito.atsushi@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Takayama, Arimichi; Oda, Yasuhiro [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Tamura, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Ryo; Hattori, Tatsunori; Ogata, Shuji [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Ohno, Noriyasu; Kajita, Shin [Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Yajima, Miyuki [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Noiri, Yasuyuki [Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Yoshimoto, Yoshihide [University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Saito, Seiki [Kushiro National College of Technology, Kushiro, Hokkaido 084-0916 (Japan); Takamura, Shuichi [Aichi Institute of Technology, 1247 Yachigusa, Yakusa-cho, Toyota 470-0392 (Japan); Murashima, Takahiro [Tohoku University, 6-3, Aramaki-Aza-Aoba, Aoba-Ward, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Miyamoto, Mitsutaka [Shimane University, Matsue, Shimane 690-8504 (Japan); Nakamura, Hiroaki [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    The generation of tungsten fuzzy nanostructure by exposure to helium plasma is one of the important problems for the use of tungsten material as divertor plates in nuclear fusion reactors. In the present paper, the formation mechanisms of the helium bubble and the tungsten fuzzy nanostructure were investigated by using several simulation methods. We proposed the four-step process which is composed of penetration step, diffusion and agglomeration step, helium bubble growth step, and fuzzy nanostructure formation step. As the fourth step, the formation of the tungsten fuzzy nanostructure was successfully reproduced by newly developed hybrid simulation combining between molecular dynamics and Monte-Carlo method. The formation mechanism of tungsten fuzzy nanostructure observed by the hybrid simulation is that concavity and convexity of the surface are enhanced by the bursting of helium bubbles in the region around the concavity.

  9. Hybrid simulation research on formation mechanism of tungsten nanostructure induced by helium plasma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Atsushi M.; Takayama, Arimichi; Oda, Yasuhiro; Tamura, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Ryo; Hattori, Tatsunori; Ogata, Shuji; Ohno, Noriyasu; Kajita, Shin; Yajima, Miyuki; Noiri, Yasuyuki; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide; Saito, Seiki; Takamura, Shuichi; Murashima, Takahiro; Miyamoto, Mitsutaka; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2015-08-01

    The generation of tungsten fuzzy nanostructure by exposure to helium plasma is one of the important problems for the use of tungsten material as divertor plates in nuclear fusion reactors. In the present paper, the formation mechanisms of the helium bubble and the tungsten fuzzy nanostructure were investigated by using several simulation methods. We proposed the four-step process which is composed of penetration step, diffusion and agglomeration step, helium bubble growth step, and fuzzy nanostructure formation step. As the fourth step, the formation of the tungsten fuzzy nanostructure was successfully reproduced by newly developed hybrid simulation combining between molecular dynamics and Monte-Carlo method. The formation mechanism of tungsten fuzzy nanostructure observed by the hybrid simulation is that concavity and convexity of the surface are enhanced by the bursting of helium bubbles in the region around the concavity.

  10. Evolution of nano-structures of silver due to rapid thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, Shyamal, E-mail: shyamal.mondal@saha.ac.in; Bhattacharyya, S. R., E-mail: shyamal.mondal@saha.ac.in [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata-700064 (India)

    2014-04-24

    This report deals with rapid thermal annealing (RTA) effect on continuous silver film on Si(100) substrate. For this purpose silver films of different thicknesses were deposited and subsequently annealed at 500 and 800 °C. The as-deposited and annealed samples were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Formations of different nano-structures have been observed. Fragmentation of formed nanoislands also observed at temperature below melting temperature.

  11. Efficiency enhancement due to self-organization of nano-structures in Cd(S, Te) solar cell material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kazunori; Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    CdTe is one of the most important solar cell materials. Its energy gap is 1.44 eV, which is ideal for solar cell application. So far, conversion efficiency of 18.3 percent has been realized, but it is lower than the Shockley-Queisser limit. In this paper, we propose computational materials design for enhancing conversion efficiency by using self-organization in Cd(Te, S) alloy semiconductor. Firstly, we performed cluster expansion of total energy of the Cd(Te, S) system and simulated self-organization of nano-structures in Cd(Te, S) by using Monte Carlo method. It is found that layered structure becomes stable by applying strain during the crystal growth. The electronic structure of the self-organized layered structure was calculated by using the hybrid method (HSE06) implemented in the VASP code to derive optical absorption coefficient. By using the calculated absorption coefficient the efficiency limit was derived based on the Shockley-Queisser theory. It is shown that the efficiency limit does not change so much due to the nano-structure formation. However, our calculation shows spatial separation between photo-generated electrons and holes. This might enhance the efficiency due to the suppression of recombination.

  12. Evaluation of the formation of a junctional DNA nanostructure through annealing curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung Won; Park, Kyung Soo; Um, Soong Ho

    2015-02-20

    During the self-assembly of different numbers of oligonucleotides comprising junctional DNA nanostructures, a change in environmental variables (e.g., temperature or salt concentration) has a substantial influence on the final products. Further, distinctive annealing temperatures of oligonucleotides are observed depending on the state of hybridization. Here, we present an evaluation of the annealing characteristics of oligonucleotides for the formation of a simple junctional DNA nanostructure using an annealing curve analysis. This method may be useful for analyzing the formation of complex junctional DNA nanostructures.

  13. Nanostructured selenium for preventing biofilm formation on polycarbonate medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Webster, Thomas J

    2012-12-01

    Biofilms are a common cause of persistent infections on medical devices as they are easy to form and hard to treat. The objective of this study was for the first time to coat selenium (a natural element in the body) nanoparticles on the surface of polycarbonate medical devices (such as those used for medical catheters) and to examine their effectiveness at preventing biofilm formation. The size and distribution of selenium coatings were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The strength of the selenium coating on polycarbonate was assessed by tape-adhesion tests followed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Results showed that selenium nanoparticles had a diameter of 50-100 nm and were well distributed on the polycarbonate surface. In addition, more than 50% of the selenium coating survived the tape-adhesion test as larger nanoparticles had less adhesion strength to the underlying polycarbonate substrate than smaller selenium nanoparticles. Most significantly, the results of this in vitro study showed that the selenium coatings on polycarbonate significantly inhibited Staphylococcus aureus growth to 8.9% and 27% when compared with an uncoated polycarbonate surface after 24 and 72 h, respectively. Importantly, this was accomplished without using antibiotics but rather with an element (selenium) that is natural to the human body. Thus, this study suggests that coating polymers (particularly, polycarbonate) with nanostructured selenium is a fast and effective way to reduce bacteria functions that lead to medical device infections. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 100A: 3205-3210, 2012.

  14. Metallic nanostructure formation limited by the surface hydrogen on silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrine, Kathryn A; Teplyakov, Andrew V

    2010-08-03

    Constant miniaturization of electronic devices and interfaces needed to make them functional requires an understanding of the initial stages of metal growth at the molecular level. The use of metal-organic precursors for metal deposition allows for some control of the deposition process, but the ligands of these precursor molecules often pose substantial contamination problems. One of the ways to alleviate the contamination problem with common copper deposition precursors, such as copper(I) (hexafluoroacetylacetonato) vinyltrimethylsilane, Cu(hfac)VTMS, is a gas-phase reduction with molecular hydrogen. Here we present an alternative method to copper film and nanostructure growth using the well-defined silicon surface. Nearly ideal hydrogen termination of silicon single-crystalline substrates achievable by modern surface modification methods provides a limited supply of a reducing agent at the surface during the initial stages of metal deposition. Spectroscopic evidence shows that the Cu(hfac) fragment is present upon room-temperature adsorption and reacts with H-terminated Si(100) and Si(111) surfaces to deposit metallic copper. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to follow the initial stages of copper nucleation and the formation of copper nanoparticles, and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) confirms the presence of hfac fragments on the surfaces of nanoparticles. As the surface hydrogen is consumed, copper nanoparticles are formed; however, this growth stops as the accessible hydrogen is reacted away at room temperature. This reaction sets a reference for using other solid substrates that can act as reducing agents in nanoparticle growth and metal deposition.

  15. Nanostructure formation in the lecithin/isooctane/water system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koifman, Naama; Schnabel-Lubovsky, Maya; Talmon, Yeshayahu

    2013-08-15

    We present here for the first time a study of the self-assembled nanostructures in the lecithin/isooctane/water system by direct-imaging techniques, namely, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM). Along the dilution line [water]/[lecithin] = 5, we identified a nanostructural development with the increase of lecithin concentration. The system changes from a single reverse micellar phase, through a reverse micellar phase coexisting with a lamellar phase, and finally to a reverse liquid crystalline cubic phase and a lamellar phase. We compared the nanostructures formed when phosphatidylcholine rather than naturally occurring lecithin is used and found that both phase behavior and nanostructure are significantly different. The use of the two complementary cryo-EM techniques proved very efficient in the nanostructural characterization of the system. We also performed small-angle X-ray scattering to confirm our findings. Since the system is very sensitive to changes in composition, the cryo-EM specimens were prepared in a Controlled Environment Vitrification System (CEVS) that has been modified for our specimen preparation needs. We were able to overcome the challenges involved in directly imaging this nonaqueous (oil-rich), concentrated complex liquid systems, thus extending the usefulness of those characterization techniques.

  16. Formation of strain-induced quantum dots in gated semiconductor nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Thorbeck

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A long-standing mystery in the field of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs is: Why are there so many unintentional dots (also known as disorder dots which are neither expected nor controllable. It is typically assumed that these unintentional dots are due to charged defects, however the frequency and predictability of the location of the unintentional QDs suggests there might be additional mechanisms causing the unintentional QDs besides charged defects. We show that the typical strains in a semiconductor nanostructure from metal gates are large enough to create strain-induced quantum dots. We simulate a commonly used QD device architecture, metal gates on bulk silicon, and show the formation of strain-induced QDs. The strain-induced QD can be eliminated by replacing the metal gates with poly-silicon gates. Thus strain can be as important as electrostatics to QD device operation operation.

  17. Formation of strain-induced quantum dots in gated semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorbeck, Ted, E-mail: tcthorbeck@wisc.edu [Quantum Measurement Division, NIST, Gaithersburg, Maryland (United States); Joint Quantum Institute and Dept. of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland (United States); Zimmerman, Neil M. [Quantum Measurement Division, NIST, Gaithersburg, Maryland (United States)

    2015-08-15

    A long-standing mystery in the field of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is: Why are there so many unintentional dots (also known as disorder dots) which are neither expected nor controllable. It is typically assumed that these unintentional dots are due to charged defects, however the frequency and predictability of the location of the unintentional QDs suggests there might be additional mechanisms causing the unintentional QDs besides charged defects. We show that the typical strains in a semiconductor nanostructure from metal gates are large enough to create strain-induced quantum dots. We simulate a commonly used QD device architecture, metal gates on bulk silicon, and show the formation of strain-induced QDs. The strain-induced QD can be eliminated by replacing the metal gates with poly-silicon gates. Thus strain can be as important as electrostatics to QD device operation operation.

  18. Formation of nanostructures under femtosecond laser ablation of metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashitkov, S I; Romashevskii, S A; Komarov, P S; Burmistrov, A A; Agranat, M B [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zhakhovskii, V V [All-Russian Institute of Automatics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Inogamov, N A [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-30

    We present the results of studying the morphology of the modified surface of aluminium, nickel and tantalum after ablation of the surface layer by a femtosecond laser pulse. The sizes of characteristic elements of a cellular nanostructure are found to correlate with thermo-physical properties of the material and the intensity of laser radiation. (superstrong light fields)

  19. Formation of heteroepitaxy in different shapes of Au-CdSe metal-semiconductor hybrid nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Krishna Kanta; Pradhan, Narayan; Patra, Amitava

    2013-10-25

    Formation of heteroepitaxy and designing different-shaped heterostructured nanomaterials of metal and semiconductor in solution remains a frontier area of research. However, it is evident that the synthesis of such materials is not straightforward and needs a selective approach to retain both metal and semiconductor identities in the reaction system during heterostructure formation. Herein, the epitaxial growth of semiconductor CdSe on selected facets of metal Au seeds is reported and different shapes (flower, tetrapod, and core/shell) hetero-nanostructures are designed. These results are achieved by controlling the reaction parameters, and by changing the sequence and timing for introduction of different reactant precursors. Direct evidence of the formation of heteroepitaxy between {111} facets of Au and (0001) of wurtzite CdSe is observed during the formation of these three heterostructures. The mechanism of the evolution of these hetero-nanostructures and formation of their heteroepitaxy with the planes having minimum lattice mismatch are also discussed. This shape-control growth mechanism in hetero-nanostructures should be helpful to provide more information for establishing the fundamental study of heteroepitaxial growth for designing new nanomaterials. Such metal-semiconductor nanostructures may have great potential for nonlinear optical properties, in photovoltaic devices, and as chemical sensors.

  20. Formation of ball-milled Fe-Mo nanostructured powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moumeni, H. [Laboratoire de Magnetisme et de Spectroscopie des Solides, LM2S, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite de Annaba, B.P. 12, 23000 Annaba-Algerie (Algeria) and Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences et de l' Ingenierie, Universite de Guelma, B.P. 401, 24000 Guelma-Algerie (Algeria)]. E-mail: hmoumeni@yahoo.fr; Alleg, S. [Laboratoire de Magnetisme et de Spectroscopie des Solides, LM2S, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite de Annaba, B.P. 12, 23000 Annaba-Algerie (Algeria); Greneche, J.M. [Laboratoire de Physique de l' Etat Condense, UMR CNRS 6087, Universite du Maine, Faculte des Sciences, F-72085, Le Mans Cedex 9 (France)

    2006-08-10

    Nanostructured Fe-6 wt.%Mo powders were prepared by mechanical alloying in a high-energy planetary ball-mill. The structural changes and the kinetics of Mo dissolution were studied by using X-ray diffraction. The crystallite size reduction down to about 11 nm is accompanied by the introduction of internal strains up to 1.1% (root-mean square strain, rms). After 24 h of milling, a bcc Fe(Mo) solid solution is formed. The kinetics of Mo dissolution into the Fe matrix during the milling process can be described by two regimes characterized by small values of Avrami parameter which do not exceed unit.

  1. Inhibition of Biofilm Formation Using Novel Nanostructured Surfaces Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Biofilms are ubiquitous in the environment. Few surfaces resist biofilm formation, most promote it. Biofilm formation poses problems in water systems as they can...

  2. Simple Formation of Nanostructured Molybdenum Disulfide Thin Films by Electrodeposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Ghosh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured molybdenum disulfide thin films were deposited on various substrates by direct current (DC electrolysis form aqueous electrolyte containing molybdate and sulfide ions. Post deposition annealing at higher temperatures in the range 450–700°C transformed the as-deposited amorphous films to nanocrystalline structure. High temperature X-ray diffraction studies clearly recorded the crystal structure transformations associated with grain growth with increase in annealing temperature. Surface morphology investigations revealed featureless structure in case of as-deposited surface; upon annealing it converts into a surface with protruding nanotubes, nanorods, or dumbbell shape nanofeatures. UV-visible and FTIR spectra confirmed about the presence of Mo-S bonding in the deposited films. Transmission electron microscopic examination showed that the annealed MoS2 films consist of nanoballs, nanoribbons, and multiple wall nanotubes.

  3. Formation of nanostructures from colloidal solutions of silicon dioxide and carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukalin, D. A.; Tuchin, A. V.; Goloshchapov, D. L.; Bityutskaya, L. A.

    2015-02-01

    The formation of nanostructures from colloidal solutions of amorphous silicon dioxide (SiO2) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in evaporating drops at room temperature has been studied. It is established that spherical aggregates with an average diameter of ˜2 μm and rodlike nanostructures with diameters within 250-300 nm and lengths of ˜4 μm are formed under these conditions. The mechanisms of covalent and van der Waals interaction between CNTs and SiO2 are considered in the framework of a phenomenological model of the active center of a closed CNT.

  4. Microwave-induced formation of platinum nanostructured networks with superior electrochemical activity and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Falong; Wang, Fangfang; Lin, Yun; Zhang, Lizhi

    2011-12-16

    Platinum nanostructured networks (PNNs) can be synthesized through the chemical reduction of H(2)PtCl(6) by benzyl alcohol under microwave irradiation without the introduction of any surfactants, templates, or seeds. The synthesis route utilizes benzyl alcohol as both the reductant and the structure-directing agent, and thus, the process is particularly simple and highly repeatable. The formation of the PNN structure was ascribed to the collision-induced fusion of Pt nanocrystals owing to the cooperative functions of microwave irradiation and benzyl alcohol. Compared with a commercial Pt/C catalyst, the as-prepared PNNs possessed superior electrochemical activity and stability on the oxidation of methanol because of the unique 3D nanostructured networks and abundant defects formed during the assembly process. This study may provide a facile microwave-induced approach for the synthesis of other 3D nanostructured noble metals or their alloys.

  5. Effect of Ag Templates on the Formation of Au-Ag Hollow/Core-Shell Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chi-Hang; Chen, Shih-Yun; Song, Jenn-Ming; Haruta, Mitsutaka; Kurata, Hiroki

    2015-12-01

    Au-Ag alloy nanostructures with various shapes were synthesized using a successive reduction method in this study. By means of galvanic replacement, twined Ag nanoparticles (NPs) and single-crystalline Ag nanowires (NWs) were adopted as templates, respectively, and alloyed with the same amount of Au(+) ions. High angle annular dark field-scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM) images observed from different rotation angles confirm that Ag NPs turned into AuAg alloy rings with an Au/Ag ratio of 1. The shifts of surface plasmon resonance and chemical composition reveal the evolution of the alloy ring formation. On the other hand, single-crystalline Ag NWs became Ag@AuAg core-shell wires instead of hollow nanostructure through a process of galvanic replacement. It is proposed that in addition to the ratio of Ag templates and Au ion additives, the twin boundaries of the Ag templates were the dominating factor causing hollow alloy nanostructures.

  6. Formation of hierarchical ZnO nanostructure on tinfoil substrate and the application on wetting repellency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Xia, Jun; Jing, Chen; Lei, Wei; Wang, Bao-ping

    2011-10-01

    Hierarchical ZnO (zinc oxide) nanostructures composed with nano-sheet and micro-flower structures (made from the nano-sheet) have been generated on tinfoil substrate via a chemical bath deposition process. Benefiting from an inherent distinct lattice constant compared with commonly used glass or other kinds of substrate, the tinfoil substrate played an important role on the formation of the hierarchical ZnO nanostructures. The resulting hierarchical ZnO surface shows excellent superhydrophobicity and extremely low water rolling angle after being modified with spin coating Teflon. The flexible and superhydrophobic characteristics of such fabricated substrate will be beneficial for applications requiring bendable and lightweight superhydrophobic substrates. In addition, the multifunctional properties of ZnO nanostructures are expected to broaden the applications to electronic and optical applications.

  7. Formation of hierarchical ZnO nanostructure on tinfoil substrate and the application on wetting repellency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jun [Southeast University, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing (China); University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Xia, Jun; Jing, Chen; Lei, Wei; Wang, Bao-ping [Southeast University, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing (China)

    2011-10-15

    Hierarchical ZnO (zinc oxide) nanostructures composed with nano-sheet and micro-flower structures (made from the nano-sheet) have been generated on tinfoil substrate via a chemical bath deposition process. Benefiting from an inherent distinct lattice constant compared with commonly used glass or other kinds of substrate, the tinfoil substrate played an important role on the formation of the hierarchical ZnO nanostructures. The resulting hierarchical ZnO surface shows excellent superhydrophobicity and extremely low water rolling angle after being modified with spin coating Teflon. The flexible and superhydrophobic characteristics of such fabricated substrate will be beneficial for applications requiring bendable and lightweight superhydrophobic substrates. In addition, the multifunctional properties of ZnO nanostructures are expected to broaden the applications to electronic and optical applications. (orig.)

  8. Flux dependent MeV self-ion-induced effects on Au nanostructures: dramatic mass transport and nanosilicide formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatak, J; Umananda Bhatta, M; Sundaravel, B; Nair, K G M; Liou, Sz-Chian; Chen, Cheng-Hsuan; Wang, Yuh-Lin; Satyam, P V

    2008-08-13

    We report a direct observation of dramatic mass transport due to 1.5 MeV Au(2+) ion impact on isolated Au nanostructures of average size ≈7.6 nm and height ≈6.9 nm that are deposited on Si(111) substrate under high flux (3.2 × 10(10)-6.3 × 10(12) ions cm(-2) s(-1)) conditions. The mass transport from nanostructures was found to extend up to a distance of about 60 nm into the substrate, much beyond their size. This forward mass transport is compared with the recoil implantation profiles using SRIM simulation. The observed anomalies with theory and simulations are discussed. At a given energy, the incident flux plays a major role in mass transport and its redistribution. The mass transport is explained on the basis of thermal effects and the creation of rapid diffusion paths in the nanoscale regime during the course of ion irradiation. The unusual mass transport is found to be associated with the formation of gold silicide nano-alloys at subsurfaces. The complexity of the ion-nanostructure interaction process is discussed with a direct observation of melting (in the form of spherical fragments on the surface) phenomena. Transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy methods have been used.

  9. Nucleation engineered growth/formation of core-shell and hollow metal nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehra, Kamalesh; Verma, Manoj; Kumar, P. Senthil

    2016-05-01

    Herein, we present a simple yet versatile single step aqueous synthesis procedure for precisely controlling the formation of hollow as well as core-shell metal nanostructures. Modern refined Turkevich protocol has been effectively utilized so as to mechanistically understand the step-by-step autocatalytic process in the monodisperse synthesis of such exotic shaped metal nanostructures. Au core with Ag shell nanoparticles were optimized by the careful addition of Ag+ ions to the pristine gold nanoparticles, the negative charge on which efficiently attracts the Ag+-cations towards their surface and simultaneously reducing them, thereby consolidating the thin shell formation with ease. The shell thickness could as well be tuned by either changing the metal seed or cation concentration. Hollow Au nanostructures were obtained by the inverse addition of Au3+-anions to the as-prepared Ag nanoparticles, thus initiating the galvanic replacement process, wherein the concurrent oxidation of Ag0 and reduction of Au3+ takes place in a cohesive manner, resulting in the final etched nanoring / porous like morphology. The structure-property functional relationship of these artificial metal nanostructures were systematically studied utilizing optical absorption and microscopy techniques.

  10. Formation of nitrile species on Ag nanostructures supported on a-Al2O3: a new corrosion route for silver exposed to the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez, R. J.; Espinós, J. P.; Afonso, C. N.

    2017-04-01

    The aging of supported Ag nanostructures upon storage in ambient conditions (air and room temperature) for 20 months has been studied. The samples are produced on glass substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD); first a 15 nm thick buffer layer of amorphous aluminum oxide (a-Al2O3) is deposited, followed by PLD of Ag. The amount of deposited Ag ranges from that leading to a discontinuous layer up to an almost-percolated layer with a thickness of nitrile species due to the reaction between NO x species from the atmosphere adsorbed at the surface of Ag, and hydrocarbons adsorbed in defects at the surface of the a-Al2O3 layer during the deposition of the Ag nanostructures by PLD that migrate to the surface of the metal with time. The nitrile formation thus results in the main oxidation mechanism and inhibits almost completely the formation of sulphate/sulphide. Finally, the optical changes upon aging offer an easy-to-use tool for following the aging process. They are dominated by an enhanced absorption in the UV side of the spectrum and a blue-shift of the surface plasmon resonance that are, respectively, related to the formation of a dielectric overlayer on the Ag nanostructure and changes in the dimensions/features of the nanostructures, both due to the oxidation process.

  11. Formation of helium induced nanostructure 'fuzz' on various tungsten grades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, M.J., E-mail: mbaldwin@ferp.ucsd.ed [Center for Energy Research and Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California-San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093-0417 (United States); Doerner, R.P. [Center for Energy Research and Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California-San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093-0417 (United States)

    2010-09-30

    The response of a variety of W material grades to nanostructure 'fuzz' formation is explored. W targets are exposed to He or D{sub 2}-0.2He plasmas in PISCES-B at 900-1320 K to below sputter threshold He{sup +} ions of energy 25-60 eV for up to 2.2 x 10{sup 4} s. SEM and XPS reveal nanoscopic reorganization of the W surface to a layer of 'fuzz' of porosity {approx}90% as determined by a 'fuzz' removal/weight loss method. The variability of 'fuzz' growth is examined at 1120 K for 1 h durations: SR, SC and doped W grades - La{sub 2}O{sub 3} (1% wt.), Re (5% and 10% wt.), and TiC (1.5% wt.) developed 2-3 {mu}m thick 'fuzz' layers, while a VPS grade developed a layer 4 {mu}m thick. An RC grade revealed additional 'fuzz' at deep (>100 {mu}m) grain boundaries. However, heat treatment up to 1900 K produced reintegration of 'fuzz' with the bulk and He release at {approx}1000 K and {approx}1400-1800 K due to depopulation from vacancy complexes.

  12. Formation of helium induced nanostructure ‘fuzz’ on various tungsten grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, M. J.; Doerner, R. P.

    2010-09-01

    The response of a variety of W material grades to nanostructure 'fuzz' formation is explored. W targets are exposed to He or D 2-0.2He plasmas in PISCES-B at 900-1320 K to below sputter threshold He + ions of energy 25-60 eV for up to 2.2 × 10 4 s. SEM and XPS reveal nanoscopic reorganization of the W surface to a layer of 'fuzz' of porosity ˜90% as determined by a 'fuzz' removal/weight loss method. The variability of 'fuzz' growth is examined at 1120 K for 1 h durations: SR, SC and doped W grades - La 2O 3 (1% wt.), Re (5% and 10% wt.), and TiC (1.5% wt.) developed 2-3 μm thick 'fuzz' layers, while a VPS grade developed a layer 4 μm thick. An RC grade revealed additional 'fuzz' at deep (>100 μm) grain boundaries. However, heat treatment up to 1900 K produced reintegration of 'fuzz' with the bulk and He release at ˜1000 K and ˜1400-1800 K due to depopulation from vacancy complexes.

  13. Characterization of Nanostructured Polymer Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-23

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0059 Characterization of Nanostructured Polymer Films RODNEY PRIESTLEY TRUSTEES OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY Final Report 12/23/2014...Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 06/01/2012-08/31/2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Characterization of Nanostructured Polymer Films 5a. CONTRACT...properties is due to the film morphology, i.e., the films are nanostructured . The aim of this proposal was to understand the mechanism of film formation and

  14. Green Formation of Spherical and Dendritic Silver Nanostructures under Microwave Irradiation without Reducing Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monir Noroozi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The rapid and green formation of spherical and dendritic silver nanostructures based on microwave irradiation time was investigated. Silver nanoparticles were successfully fabricated by reduction of Ag+ in a water medium and using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP as the stabilizing agent and without the use of any other reducing agent, and were compared with those synthesized by conventional heating method. UV–vis absorption spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS and photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS measurements, indicated that increasing the irradiation time enhanced the concentration of silver nanoparticles and slightly increased the particle size. There was a lack of large silver nanoparticles at a high concentration, but interestingly, the formation and growth of silver dendrite nanostructures appeared. Compared to conventional heating methods, the silver nanoparticle suspension produced by irradiated microwaves was more stable over a six-month period in aqueous solution without any signs of precipitation.

  15. In Situ Monitoring of Nanostructure Formation during the Digestion of Mayonnaise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salentinig, Stefan; Amenitsch, Heinz; Yaghmur, Anan

    2017-01-01

    Triglycerides in food products such as mayonnaise are a vital source of energy and essential for a complete and healthy diet. Their molecular structures consist of a glycerol backbone esterified with fatty acids on the two outer and the middle positions. During the digestion of triglycerides....... In this study, we report the discovery of highly ordered nanostructures inside of the mayonnaise emulsion droplets during in vitro digestion of mayonnaise under simulated in vivo conditions using timeresolved synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering. The formation of these structures is most likely linked...... to their function as a carrier and controlled release system for food nutrients, especially poorly water-soluble components, in the aqueous milieu of the digestive tract. This detailed understanding of nanostructure formation during the digestion of triglyceride-containing food products such as mayonnaise may have...

  16. Microscopic droplet formation and energy transport analysis of condensation on scalable superhydrophobic nanostructured copper oxide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, GuanQiu; Alhosani, Mohamed H; Yuan, ShaoJun; Liu, HaoRan; Ghaferi, Amal Al; Zhang, TieJun

    2014-12-01

    Utilization of nanotechnologies in condensation has been recognized as one opportunity to improve the efficiency of large-scale thermal power and desalination systems. High-performance and stable dropwise condensation in widely-used copper heat exchangers is appealing for energy and water industries. In this work, a scalable and low-cost nanofabrication approach was developed to fabricate superhydrophobic copper oxide (CuO) nanoneedle surfaces to promote dropwise condensation and even jumping-droplet condensation. By conducting systematic surface characterization and in situ environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) condensation experiments, we were able to probe the microscopic formation physics of droplets on irregular nanostructured surfaces. At the early stages of condensation process, the interfacial surface tensions at the edge of CuO nanoneedles were found to influence both the local energy barriers for microdroplet growth and the advancing contact angles when droplets undergo depinning. Local surface roughness also has a significant impact on the volume of the condensate within the nanostructures and overall heat transfer from the vapor to substrate. Both our theoretical analysis and in situ ESEM experiments have revealed that the liquid condensate within the nanostructures determines the amount of the work of adhesion and kinetic energy associated with droplet coalescence and jumping. Local and global droplet growth models were also proposed to predict how the microdroplet morphology within nanostructures affects the heat transfer performance of early-stage condensation. Our quantitative analysis of microdroplet formation and growth within irregular nanostructures provides the insight to guide the anodization-based nanofabrication for enhancing dropwise and jumping-droplet condensation performance.

  17. Formation of nanostructured iridium and polycluster diamond films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pashchenko P. V.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Iridium films and layered structures "iridium — diamond" were formed on Al2O3, MgO and SrTiO3 substrates. Iridium films were obtained by magnetron sputtering, and polycluster diamond films — by microwave discharge method. Structure of iridium and diamond films was studied depending on formation conditions. Application of polycluster diamond films as heatsink for hybrid microcircuit and control grid of electronic devices was considered.

  18. Controlled formation of gold nanostructures on biopolymer films upon electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mescola, Andrea; Canale, Claudio; Fragouli, Despina; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2017-10-01

    The localized formation of gold nanostructures with controlled size and shape on chitosan films doped with gold precursor upon electromagnetic irradiation of various types is demonstrated here. Such controlled formation is achieved by tuning the wavelength, the energy and the interaction time of the radiation with the composite films. In particular, the use of a single UV nanosecond laser pulse results in the formation of gold sub-micron platelets with specific crystal structure, while increasing the number of pulses, further precursor reduction and photofragmentation induce the formation of gold nanoparticles. Using x-ray radiation as an alternative energy source, the reduction of the gold precursor and the subsequent formation of particles follow a different pathway. Specifically, x-ray-induced photo-reduction triggers the selective formation of gold sub-micron platelets with a very well defined {111} crystal phase. In this case, the density of crystal platelets increases by increasing the irradiation time of the films, while no photofragmentation process is observed. The gold structures pre-formed by x-ray radiation can be fragmented by subsequent pulsed UV laser irradiation forming nanoparticles with much narrower size distribution compared to that obtained via exclusive UV irradiation. Thanks to the perfect coupling between the natural polymeric matrix and gold nanostructures, the bionanocomposite systems developed could find various applications in biomaterial science and in biosensors field.

  19. Modulation of fluorescence signals from biomolecules along nanowires due to interaction of light with oriented nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Rune Schøneberg; Alarcon-Llado, Esther; Madsen, Morten H.

    2015-01-01

    High aspect ratio nanostructures have gained increasing interest as highly sensitive platforms for biosensing. Here, well-defined biofunctionalized vertical indium arsenide nanowires are used to map the interaction of light with nanowires depending on their orientation and the excitation waveleng...

  20. Nanostructured Cadmium Sulfide: Sonochemical Synthesis, Optical Properties and Formation Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Semiconductor CdS nanoparticles were synthesized by the sonochemical reduction of a mixed aqueous solution ofCdCl2, Na2S2O3 and (CH3)2CHOH in Ar atmosphere at room temperature. The results of a detailed investigationwith X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectrum and optical absorption spec-troscopy are reported. A clearly red shift of the absorption edge and a broad absorption band related to the surfacestates of nanoparticles have been observed in the optical absorption spectra with the increasing of CdS particle size.The mechanisms of the CdS nanoparticle formation and size growth during sonochemical irradiation were discussed.This convenient method is found to be an efficient way to produce other chalcogenides as well.

  1. Analysis of the Carbon Nano-Structures Formation in Liquid Arcing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING Gang; JIA Shen-li; XING Jian; SHI Zong-qian

    2007-01-01

    Graphite electrodes were used for the direct current (DC) arc discharge in water.And high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was used to investigate the products.Based on the experimental phenomena and nano-structure products,arc plasma characteristics in water were analyzed theoretically.Two growth regions and relevant growth modes were proposed to interpret the formation mechanisms of nano-struetures by are discharge in water.Furthermore,liquid nitrogen and cross magnetic field was applied to change the arcing state respectively,and new carbon nano-struetures were obtained.Their formation mechanisms were also analyzed correspondingly.

  2. Plasma-induced formation of flower-like Ag{sub 2}O nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zen-Hung; Ho, Chun-Hsien; Lee, Szetsen, E-mail: slee@cycu.edu.tw

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Flower-like Ag{sub 2}O nanostructures. - Highlights: • Flower-like Ag{sub 2}O nanostructures were synthesized from Ag colloids using plasma. • XPS was used to monitor plasma treatment effect on Ag colloids. • SERS of methyl orange was used to monitor the plasma oxidation–reduction processes. • Photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue was performed using Ag{sub 2}O. • Ag{sub 2}O is a more efficient visible light photocatalyst than Ag colloids. - Abstract: Plasma treatment effect on Ag colloids was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) techniques. XPS showed that O{sub 2} plasma was critical in removing organic residues in Ag colloids synthesized using citric acid as a reducing agent. With O{sub 2} plasma treatment, Ag colloids were also oxidized to form flower-like Ag{sub 2}O nanostructures. The formation mechanism is proposed. The SERS spectral intensity of methyl orange (MO) adsorbed on Ag surface became deteriorated with O{sub 2} plasma treatment. Followed by H{sub 2} plasma treatment, the SERS intensity of MO on Ag regained, which indicated that Ag{sub 2}O has been reduced to Ag. Nonetheless, the reduction by H{sub 2} plasma could not bring Ag back to the original as-synthesized nanoparticle morphology. The flower-like nanostructure morphology still remained. The photocatalytic degradation reactions of methylene blue (MB) aqueous solutions were carried out using Ag colloids and Ag{sub 2}O nanostructures. The results show that Ag{sub 2}O is more efficient than Ag colloids and many other metal oxides for the photocatalytic degradation of MB in solution when utilizing visible light.

  3. Formation Regularities of Plasmonic Silver Nanostructures on Porous Silicon for Effective Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandarenka, Hanna V; Girel, Kseniya V; Bondarenko, Vitaly P; Khodasevich, Inna A; Panarin, Andrei Yu; Terekhov, Sergei N

    2016-12-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures demonstrating an activity in the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy have been fabricated by an immersion deposition of silver nanoparticles from silver salt solution on mesoporous silicon (meso-PS). The SERS signal intensity has been found to follow the periodical repacking of the silver nanoparticles, which grow according to the Volmer-Weber mechanism. The ratio of silver salt concentration and immersion time substantially manages the SERS intensity. It has been established that optimal conditions of nanostructured silver layers formation for a maximal Raman enhancement can be chosen taking into account a special parameter called effective time: a product of the silver salt concentration on the immersion deposition time. The detection limit for porphyrin molecules CuTMPyP4 adsorbed on the silvered PS has been evaluated as 10(-11) M.

  4. Deuterium-induced nanostructure formation on tungsten exposed to high-flux plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, H.Y., E-mail: donaxu@163.com [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, Mianyang, Sichuan 621907 (China); De Temmerman, G. [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Ass. EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Postbus 1207, 3430BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon CS 90046-13067, St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Luo, G.-N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Jia, Y.Z.; Yuan, Y.; Fu, B.Q.; Godfrey, A. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, W., E-mail: liuw@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Surface topography of polycrystalline tungsten (W) have been examined after exposure to a low-energy (38 eV/D), high-flux (∼1.1–1.5 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −2} s{sup −1}) deuterium plasma in the Pilot-PSI linear plasma device. The methods used were scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), positron annihilation Doppler broadening (PADB) and grazing incident X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD). After exposure to high flux D plasma, blisters and nanostructures are formed on the W surface. Generation of defects was evidenced by PADB, while high stress and mixture of phases were detected in depth of 50 nm by GI-XRD. TEM observation revealed fluctuations and disordered microstructure on the outmost surface layer. Based on these results, surface reconstruction is considered as a possible mechanism for the formation of defects and nanostructures.

  5. Role of nanostructured gold surfaces on monocyte activation and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svensson S

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Sara Svensson,1,2 Magnus Forsberg,1,2 Mats Hulander,1,2 Forugh Vazirisani,1,2 Anders Palmquist,1,2 Jukka Lausmaa,2,3 Peter Thomsen,1,2 Margarita Trobos1,21Department of Biomaterials, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; 2BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Gothenburg, Sweden; 3SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Borås, SwedenAbstract: The role of material surface properties in the direct interaction with bacteria and the indirect route via host defense cells is not fully understood. Recently, it was suggested that nanostructured implant surfaces possess antimicrobial properties. In the current study, the adhesion and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus epidermidis and human monocyte adhesion and activation were studied separately and in coculture in different in vitro models using smooth gold and well-defined nanostructured gold surfaces. Two polystyrene surfaces were used as controls in the monocyte experiments. Fluorescent viability staining demonstrated a reduction in the viability of S. epidermidis close to the nanostructured gold surface, whereas the smooth gold correlated with more live biofilm. The results were supported by scanning electron microscopy observations, showing higher biofilm tower formations and more mature biofilms on smooth gold compared with nanostructured gold. Unstimulated monocytes on the different substrates demonstrated low activation, reduced gene expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and low cytokine secretion. In contrast, stimulation with opsonized zymosan or opsonized live S. epidermidis for 1 hour significantly increased the production of reactive oxygen species, the gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10, as well as the secretion of TNF-α, demonstrating the ability of the cells to elicit a response and actively phagocytose prey. In addition, cells cultured on the smooth

  6. Shunt insufficiency due to knot formation in the peritoneal catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Gábor; Nagy, Andrea; Pataki, István; Bognar, László; Novák, László

    2013-07-30

    The authors report a rare case of the peripheral obstruction of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Premature baby was operated on hydrocephalus due to germinal matrix bleeding. After two months of implantation of venticuloperitoneal shunt peripheral insufficiency of the system was emerged. During the shunt revision extensive knot formation became visible. We simply cut the catheter above the knot and the working shunt was replaced into the abdominal cavity. The postoperative course was uneventful and the baby was free of complaints for more than one year. The pathomechanism of knot formation is not clear thus the discovery of the problem during the operation is an unexpected event. In our opinion tight knot cannot be spontaneously formed intraabdominally. Loose knots can be developed and can reduce the capacity of liquor flow. We think that the knot tightens during pulling out. Longer peritoneal catheters can precipitate multiple looping and/or axial torquations and increase the peripheral resistance of the shunt. In such cases when the pulling out is challenged conversion to laparotomy is suggested.

  7. Surface Nanostructure Formations in an AISI 316L Stainless Steel Induced by Pulsed Electron Beam Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Cai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB is an efficient technique for surface modifications of metallic materials. In the present work, the formations of surface nanostructures in an AISI 316L stainless steel induced by direct HCPEB treatment and HCPEB alloying have been investigated. After HCPEB Ti alloying, the sample surface contained a mixture of the ferrite and austenite phases with an average grain size of about 90 nm, because the addition of Ti favors the formation of ferrite. In contrast, electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD analyses revealed no structural refinement on the direct HCPEB treated sample. However, transmission electron microscope (TEM observations showed that fine cells having an average size of 150 nm without misorientations, as well as nanosized carbide particles, were formed in the surface layer after the direct HCPEB treatment. The formation of nanostructures in the 316L stainless steel is therefore attributed to the rapid solidification and the generation of different phases other than the steel substrate in the melted layer.

  8. Nanowire formation is preceded by nanotube growth in templated electrodeposition of cobalt hybrid nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden, Daniel M.; Vidu, Ruxandra; Stroeve, Pieter

    2016-11-01

    Cobalt fluted nanowires, novel nanostructures with a diameter of 200 nm consisting of a solid nanowire base and a thin, nanotubular flute shape, were grown in track-etched polycarbonate membranes via templated electrodeposition. The structures were characterized electrochemically via cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and charge stripping, and structurally via scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and focused ion beam cross-sectioning. Electrochemical and structural analysis reveals details of their deposition kinetics, structure, and morphology, and indicate possible mechanisms for their formation and control. These unique structures provide inspiration for an array of possible applications in electronics, photonics, and other fields.

  9. Modelling the formation of nanostructures on metal surface induced by femtosecond laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djouder, M. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Universite Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-ouzou, BP 17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Itina, T.E. [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR CNRS 5516/Universite Jean Monnet, 18 rue de Professeur Benoit Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Deghiche, D. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Universite Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-ouzou, BP 17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Lamrous, O., E-mail: omarlamrous@mail.ummto.dz [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Universite Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-ouzou, BP 17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria)

    2012-01-15

    We employ the particle-in-cell method to simulate the mechanisms of femtosecond (fs) laser interactions with a metallic target. The theoretical approach considers the solid as a gas of free electrons in a lattice of immobile ions and the laser fluences close to the ablation threshold. At first moments of the interaction, our simulations mapped out different nanostructures. We carefully characterized the rippling phase and found that its morphology is dependent on the distribution of the electron density and the period of the ripples depends on the laser intensity. The simulation method provides new insights into the mechanisms that are responsible for surface grating formation.

  10. Molecular dynamics in computational materials sciences: From the study of nanostructure formation to the design of fluorescent dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irle, Stephan

    2016-12-01

    On overview is given over the use of approximate density functional theory as basis for performing direct molecular dynamics simulations on ground and excited states. In the case of nanostructure formation, we discuss the relationship between fullerene, nanotube, and graphene formation. In the case of fluorescent molecules, we elucidate the importance of excited state dynamics for fluorescent properties.

  11. Nanostructural Formation of Pd-Co Bimetallic Complex on HOPG Surfaces: XPS and AFM Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisandra Arroyo-Ramírez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new single source approach was developed to synthesize Pd-Co nanoparticles using a bimetallic compound, [Et3NH]2[CoPd2(μ-4-I-3,5-Me2pz4Cl4] (CoPd2, as a molecular precursor to obtain dispersed catalyst on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG surface, in view of preparing oxygen reduction catalysts for low temperature fuel cells. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and atomic force microscopy (AFM techniques were employed to characterize the nanostructure formations and to determine the composition and morphology of the complex on the HOPG. Results of high resolution XPS analysis (HR-XPS revealed the binding energies corresponding to the atomic constituents of the precursor. When the precursor solution was placed on the surface of the HOPG, the bimetallic complex assumes a tubular structure and it appears that the surface of the HOPG offers a ground for the self-organization of nanostructural formations.

  12. Jet formation in solar atmosphere due to magnetic reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    González-Avilés, J J; Fedun, V

    2016-01-01

    Using numerical simulations, we show that jets with features of type II spicules and cold coronal jets corresponding to temperatures $10^{4}$ K can be formed due to magnetic reconnection in a scenario in presence of magnetic resistivity. For this we model the low chromosphere-corona region using the C7 equilibrium solar atmosphere model and assuming Resistive MHD rules the dynamics of the plasma. The magnetic filed configurations we analyze correspond to two neighboring loops with opposite polarity. The separation of the loops' feet determines the thickness of a current sheet that triggers a magnetic reconnection process, and the further formation of a high speed and sharp structure. We analyze the cases where the magnetic filed strength of the two loops is equal and different. In the first case, with a symmetric configuration the spicules raise vertically whereas in an asymmetric configuration the structure shows an inclination. With a number of simulations carried out under a 2.5D approach, we explore vario...

  13. FORMATION OF MOLYBDENUM OXIDE NANOSTRUCTURES CONTROLLED BY POLY(ETHYLENE OXIDE)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chirakkal V. Krishnan; Rafael Munoz-Espi; Qi Li; Christian Burger; Benjamin Chu

    2009-01-01

    Polymeric systems have played an important role as structure-directing agents and in the control of nucleation and growth of crystals.This article reviews the work of our research group in the field of the polymer-assisted crystallization of inorganic materials,mainly focused on the formation of highly ordered,porous molybdenum oxide nanostructures.Different experimental parameters including the influence of poly(ethylene oxide)-containing polymers on the morphology and structure of the products obtained from peroxomolybdate solutions are examined.Our electrochemical investigations on molybdate species are also briefly described.Finally,the importance of the precursor species in the formation of the final product is discussed.

  14. The Formation of Carbon Nanostructures via Catalytic Pyrolysis of Naphthalene under Its Autogenic Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Gang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs, spherical carbon nanocapsules (CNCs, and carbon spheres (CSs is accomplished by using the method of reactions under autogenic pressure at elevated temperatures (RAPET. A powder mixture of naphthalene and nickel acetate tetrahydrate is dissociated under its autogenic pressure. The resultant CNTs and CNCs exhibit good graphitic quality, and the diameters range from 50~200 nm. Smooth and monodisperse CSs with the diameter ranging from 5~10 μm can be obtained by pyrolysis of pure naphthalene. Our results show that the reaction temperature and catalyst proportion play a key role in the formation of carbon nanostructures with RAPET method.

  15. Controlled hydrodynamic conditions on the formation of iron oxide nanostructures synthesized by electrochemical anodization: Effect of the electrode rotation speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas-Granados, Bianca; Sánchez-Tovar, Rita; Fernández-Domene, Ramón M.; García-Antón, Jose

    2017-01-01

    Iron oxide nanostructures are of particular interest because they can be used as photocatalysts in water splitting due to their advantageous properties. Electrochemical anodization is one of the best techniques to synthesize nanostructures directly on the metal substrate (direct back contact). In the present study, a novel methodology consisting of the anodization of iron under hydrodynamic conditions is carried out in order to obtain mainly hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanostructures to be used as photocatalysts for photoelectrochemical water splitting applications. Different rotation speeds were studied with the aim of evaluating the obtained nanostructures and determining the most attractive operational conditions. The synthesized nanostructures were characterized by means of Raman spectroscopy, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, photoelectrochemical water splitting, stability against photocorrosion tests, Mott-Schottky analysis, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and band gap measurements. The results showed that the highest photocurrent densities for photoelectrochemical water splitting were achieved for the nanostructure synthesized at 1000 rpm which corresponds to a nanotubular structure reaching ∼0.130 mA cm-2 at 0.54 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). This is in agreement with the EIS measurements and Mott-Schottky analysis which showed the lowest resistances and the corresponding donor density values, respectively, for the nanostructure anodized at 1000 rpm.

  16. Ionic Liquids As Self-Assembly Guide for the Formation of Nanostructured Block Copolymer Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, Poornima

    2015-04-30

    Nanostructured block copolymer membranes were manufactured by water induced phase inversion, using ionic liquids (ILs) as cosolvents. The effect of ionic liquids on the morphology was investigated, by using polystyrene-b-poly(4-vinyl pyridine) (PS-b-PV4P) diblock as membrane copolymer matrix and imidazolium and pyridinium based ILs. The effect of IL concentration and chemical composition was evident with particular interaction with P4VP blocks. The order of block copolymer/ILs solutions previous to the membrane casting was confirmed by cryo scanning electron microscopy and the morphologies of the manufactured nanostructured membranes were characterized by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Non-protic ionic liquids facilitate the formation of hexagonal nanoporous block copolymer structure, while protic ILs led to a lamella-structured membrane. The rheology of the IL/block copolymer solutions was investigated, evaluating the storage and loss moduli. Most membranes prepared with ionic liquid had higher water flux than pure block copolymer membranes without additives.

  17. Influence of DC arc current on the formation of cobalt-based nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P B ORPE; C BALASUBRAMANIAN; S MUKHERJEE

    2017-08-01

    The synthesis of cobalt-based magnetic nanostructures using DC arc discharge technique with varying arc current is reported here. The structural, morphological, compositional and magnetic properties of thesenanostructures were studied as a function of applied arc current. Various techniques like X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, EDAX and vibrating sample magnetometry were used to carry out this studyand the results are reported here. The results clearly indicate that for a given oxygen partial pressure, an arc current of 100A favours the formation of unreacted cobalt atomic species. Also change in arc current leads to variationin phase, diversity in morphology etc. Other property changes such as thermal changes, mechanical changes etc. are not addressed here. The magnetic characterization further indicates that the anisotropy in shape plays a crucial role in deciding the magnetic properties of the nanostructured materials.We have quantified an interesting result in our experiment, that is, for a given partial pressure, 100A arc current results in unique variation in structural and magnetic properties as compared to other arc currents.

  18. Chronic Ulceration and Sinus Formation due to Foreign Body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karin Birgitte; Gottrup, Finn

    2015-01-01

    Foreign bodies like residues of suture or mesh may lead to a foreign body reaction, cavity formation and continuous secretion and perhaps ulceration. We present a more than 9 years long medical record of a 49 year old man after a simple surgical procedure. The background was a sinus formation gen...... in these cases. The knowledge of the foreign body reaction in tissue continuously needs to be reestablished in the health care system especially in areas, where implantation of foreign material is used....

  19. Effect of the milling conditions on the formation of nanostructured Fe-Co powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alleg, Safia; Bentayeb, Fatima Z.; Bensalem, Rachid; Djebbari, Chafia [Laboratoire de Magnetisme et de Spectroscopie des Solides, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite de Annaba (Algeria); Bessais, Lotfi [CNRS-Laboratoire de Chimie Metallurgique des Terres Rares-Groupe des Laboratoires de Thiais (France); Greneche, Jean M. [Laboratoire de Physique de l' Etat Condense, UMR CNRS, Universite du Maine, Le Mans cedex (France)

    2008-07-15

    Nanostructured Fe-12Co (wt%) powders were prepared by mechanical alloying in a planetary ball mill. The milling process was carried out at different milling conditions. The obtained powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectrometry and magnetic measurements. The low and high speed ball-milling conditions lead to the formation of a single and two-bcc Fe(Co) structure, respectively, having different crystallite sizes, microstrains hyperfine parameters and magnetic properties. The average hyperfine magnetic field values: left angle B right angle {sub 1}=34.8 T and left angle B right angle {sub 2} =28.2 T of the two-bcc Fe(Co) structure could be attributed to the nanocrystalline grains and to the grain boundaries, respectively. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Tharsis Formation by Chemical Plume Due to Giant Impact Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, J.; Weeraratne, D. S.; Olson, P.

    2014-12-01

    Tharsis formed early in the history of Mars, likely during the Noachian but later than the hemispheric crustal dichotomy that it partially overprints (Johnson and Phillips, 2005; Solomon et al., 2005; Wenzel et al., 2004). It has been suggested that the crustal dichotomy may have been formed by a giant impact (Andrews-Hanna et al., 2008; Marinova et al., 2008; Nimmo et al., 2008). Several models have been proposed to explain a localized orogeny, but predict multiple, evenly-spaced plumes or have instability growth and rise times which are longer than Tharsis formation. We use fluid dynamic experiments to model the differentiation process during Mars accretion using low viscosity glucose syrup solutions and an emulsion of liquid gallium for the metal-rich magma ocean and a high viscosity glucose syrup for the mantle. Our experiments demonstrate the formation of metal-silicate diapirs from metal emulsion drops that form a pond at the base of the magma ocean. The diapirs descend through the underlying mantle with trailing conduit of low viscosity silicate material. The silicate material is buoyant and eventually ascends back through the conduit. Remaining emulsion drops that do not adhere with the diapir fall through the conduit, forcing the buoyant molten silicate material to exit the conduit laterally and ascend along a new trajectory. The time elapsed between diapir formation and ascent of the chemical plume in experiments scales with the time between the formation of the crustal dichotomy on Mars and the formation of Tharsis. Our model offers an explanation for the rapid formation of Tharsis on the edge of the crustal dichotomy via a single large upwelling event followed by smaller upwellings producing and the late stages of effusive volcanism observed in the Tharsis region.

  1. Formation damage due to fines migration and its remedial methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabry Kasem Galal

    2016-12-01

    Well testing analysis and well performance analysis were done to detect formation damage and provide an overall measure of formation damage. Laboratory core flood tests had been used to determine the causes, degree, and extent of damage. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to analyze the rock samples used for the core flood test before and after the test. Core flood test had been done to evaluate the effect of acid on improving and curing damaged cores. Matrix acid stimulation on a case study from the studied field was evaluated.

  2. Formation of Hierarchical CuO Nanostructures on Copper Foil by Chemical Bath Deposition for Applications in Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felizco Jenichi Clairvaux

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hierarchical CuO nanostructures (urchin-like and grassy island structure were successfully synthesized by a simple chemical bath deposition method at low temperature of 70°C in a short reaction time of 1h. XRD analysis revealed the presence of pure crystalline monoclinic CuO. Morphological analysis revealed the formation of spherical structures composed of numerous hair-like structures. The pH of the solution was also investigated to have a great effect on the morphology of the CuO nanostructures. At lower pH, the structures tend to form urchin-like structures; while at higher pH, the structures tend to form grass-like islands. A growth mechanism was also proposed in this paper. Lastly, wettability test proved the stable superhydrophobic property of the CuO nanostructured thin film surface.

  3. Effect of the medium and the formation of nanostructures on deexcitation of electronic excitation of Eu(III) and Tb(III) chelates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveshnikova, E. B.; Dudar, S. S.; Shablya, A. V.; Ermolaev, V. L.

    2006-10-01

    The intensity I lum and lifetime τlum of the luminescence of complexes of Eu(III) and Tb(III) ions with β-diketones and o-phenanthroline in water-ethanol solutions of these ligands have been analyzed as functions of the concentrations of ligand, luminescing lanthanide ions, and added ions causing columinescence and of the solvent deuteration. It is shown that the formation of nanostructures from Ln complexes and their coarsening leads to an increase in τlum of Eu(III) and Tb(III) and that this increase is due to the suppression of both photochemical deexcitation of these ions and transfer of their electronic excitation energy to OH vibrations of water molecules. The disappearance of the dependence of I lum of Eu(III) on deuteration of water-ethanol solutions of n-methoxybenzoyltrifluoracetone + o-phenanthroline caused by adding Gd(III) ions is explained by the shift of the equilibrium of formation of complexes of Ln chelates to neutral hydrophoblic forms corresponding to the formation of nanostructures of these chelates in the solution. The differences in effect of La(III) and Gd(III) ions on I lum and τlum of Eu(III) and Tb(III) complexes are explained. It is shown that the widely discussed effect of columinescence not only results from the energy migration in mixed structures of Eu or Tb complexes and Gd complexes but is also due to a large extent to the decrease in τlum of Eu(III) or Tb(III) caused by their incorporation into nanostructures.

  4. Apatite formation on active nanostructured coating based on functionalized gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasile, Eugeniu [METAV Research and Development (Romania); Serafim, Andrada; Dragusin, Diana-Maria; Petrea, Celina; Iovu, Horia; Stancu, Izabela-Cristina, E-mail: stancu.c.i@gmail.com [University Politehnica of Bucharest, Advanced Polymer Materials Group (Romania)

    2012-06-15

    In this work, we developed a simple method of surface functionalization of polymer substrates to provide them with the ability to form biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HA) when incubated in synthetic body fluids (SBF). In a first step, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were used as surface nanostructuring units for a biocompatible polymer, poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate), known to not promote biomineralization in SBF, and under physiological conditions. The treatment of AuNPs-modified substrate with mercaptosuccinic acid leads to brushes of carboxyl-ended chains self-assembled onto the gold-polymer hybrid nanosurface. The main aim of this work was to demonstrate that these multianionic nanosurfaces would induce HA formation when incubated in solutions mimicking physiologic conditions. The formation of apatite and its morphology and composition were successfully investigated by means of high resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Emphasis was put on the nucleation of HA in areas with agglomerated carboxyl-ended functionalized nanoparticles. The results obtained in this study may unlock new applications for smart active coatings based on functionalized AuNPs, such as the induction of biomineralization.

  5. Strain-Mediated Interfacial Dynamics during Au–PbS Core–Shell Nanostructure Formation

    KAUST Repository

    Niu, Kai-Yang

    2016-05-23

    An understanding of the hierarchical nanostructure formation is of significant importance for the design of advanced functional materials. Here, we report the in situ study of lead sulfide (PbS) growth on gold (Au) nanorod seeds using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM). By tracking the formation dynamics of Au-PbS core-shell nanoparticles, we found the preferential heterogeneous nucleation of PbS on the ends of a Au nanorod prior to the development of a complete PdS shell. During PbS shell growth, drastic sulfidation of Au nanorod was observed, leading to large volume shrinkage (up to 50%) of the initial Au nanorod seed. We also captured intriguing wavy interfacial behavior, which can be explained by our DFT calculation results that the local strain gradient at the core-shell interface facilitates the mass transport and mediates reversible phase transitions of Au ↔ Au2S during the PbS shell growth. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  6. pH-regulated antimony oxychloride nanoparticle formation on titanium oxide nanostructures: a photocatalytically active heterojunction

    KAUST Repository

    Buchholcz, Balázs

    2017-02-06

    Improving the catalytic activity of heterogeneous photocatalysts has become a hot topic recently. To this end, considerable progress has been made in the efficient separation of photogenerated charge carriers by e.g. the realization of heterojunction photocatalysts. V-VI-VII compound semiconductors, namely, bismuth oxyhalides, are popular photocatalysts. However, results on antimony oxyhalides [SbOX (X = Br, Cl, I)], the very promising alternatives to the well-known BiOX photomodifiers, are scarce. Here, we report the successful decoration of titanium oxide nanostructures with 8-11 nm diameter SbOX nanoparticles for the first time ever. The product size and stoichiometry could be controlled by the pH of the reactant mixture, while subsequent calcination could transform the structure of the titanate nanotube (TiONT) support and the prepared antimony oxychloride particles. In contrast to the ease of composite formation in the SbOX/TiONT case, anatase TiO could not facilitate the formation of antimony oxychloride nanoparticles on its surface. The titanate nanotube-based composites showed activity in a generally accepted quasi-standard photocatalytic test reaction (methyl orange dye decolorization). We found that the SbOCl/TiONT synthesized at pH = 1 is the most active sample in a broad temperature range.

  7. Quantitative characterization of the influence of the nanoscale morphology of nanostructured surfaces on bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Vikram Singh

    Full Text Available Bacterial infection of implants and prosthetic devices is one of the most common causes of implant failure. The nanostructured surface of biocompatible materials strongly influences the adhesion and proliferation of mammalian cells on solid substrates. The observation of this phenomenon has led to an increased effort to develop new strategies to prevent bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation, primarily through nanoengineering the topology of the materials used in implantable devices. While several studies have demonstrated the influence of nanoscale surface morphology on prokaryotic cell attachment, none have provided a quantitative understanding of this phenomenon. Using supersonic cluster beam deposition, we produced nanostructured titania thin films with controlled and reproducible nanoscale morphology respectively. We characterized the surface morphology; composition and wettability by means of atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. We studied how protein adsorption is influenced by the physico-chemical surface parameters. Lastly, we characterized Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus adhesion on nanostructured titania surfaces. Our results show that the increase in surface pore aspect ratio and volume, related to the increase of surface roughness, improves protein adsorption, which in turn downplays bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. As roughness increases up to about 20 nm, bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are enhanced; the further increase of roughness causes a significant decrease of bacterial adhesion and inhibits biofilm formation. We interpret the observed trend in bacterial adhesion as the combined effect of passivation and flattening effects induced by morphology-dependent protein adsorption. Our findings demonstrate that bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on nanostructured titanium oxide surfaces are significantly influenced by nanoscale morphological

  8. Rock species formation due to deep-mantle melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, Ilya; Tackley, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Melting and melting migration are processes leading to chemically distinct rock species from a homogeneous substrate in the Earth mantle. Iron-rich melts and corresponding rock species are proposed to result from magma ocean progressive crystallization [Labrosse et al., 2007], and modern geophysical models of ULVZ (e.g. [Beuchert & Schmeling, 2013]) discuss their presence at around the CMB today. We perform long-term (tens of millions of years) numerical simulations of the Earth's mantle for a plausible range of CMB temperatures to understands the possibility of melting and it's consequences. Our model of melting is based on experimental data and ab initio simulations. Physical properties (liquid-solid density differences) are adjusted with data of [de Koker et al., 2013; Mosenfelder et al., 2007; Stixrude & Lithgow-Bertelloni, 2011; Thomas & Asimow, 2013]. This model is included in StagYY numerical code (e.g. [Tackley, 2008]) to simulate mass and thermal fluxes within the Earth mantle. Melt segregation (rocks' permeability and velocities) is considered using equations listed in [Abe, 1995; Solomatov, Stevenson, 1993; Martin & Nokes, 1989]. Thermal effects (adiabatic heating and viscous dissipation) are considered. Viscous dissipation term includes Darcy flux term, but omits highly non-linear Brinkman contribution [Nield, 2007]. Modeling predicts formation of melt if temperature at CMB exceeds 4000-4050K. It's segregation and reequilibration results in sufficient volumes of slightly iron-enriched melt lighter than solid counterpart and moving upward. However, it's propagation is strongly controlled by temperature. Partial melting atop the molten layer results in formation of refractory iron-poor restite which delaminates and sink down, so that a layer of iron-depleted material forms underneath the molten layer. Our model applied to homogeneous pyrolitic mantle results in formation of layers of iron-depleted material with average FeO around 4.6 mol.% and iron

  9. Nanostructure formation during relatively high temperature growth of Mn-doped GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Río-De Santiago, A.; Méndez-García, V.H. [CIACyT-UASLP, Sierra Leona Av. # 550, Lomas 2a Secc, San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. 78210, México (Mexico); Martínez-Velis, I.; Casallas-Moreno, Y.L. [Physics Department, CINVESTAV-IPN, Apdo. Postal 14470 D. F. México, México (Mexico); López-Luna, E. [CIACyT-UASLP, Sierra Leona Av. # 550, Lomas 2a Secc, San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. 78210, México (Mexico); Yu Gorbatchev, A. [IICO-UASLP, Av. Karakorum 1470, Lomas 4a. Sección, San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. 78210, México (Mexico); López-López, M. [Physics Department, CINVESTAV-IPN, Apdo. Postal 14470 D. F. México, México (Mexico); Cruz-Hernández, E., E-mail: esteban.cruz@uaslp.mx [CIACyT-UASLP, Sierra Leona Av. # 550, Lomas 2a Secc, San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. 78210, México (Mexico)

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • The formation of different kind of nanostructures in GaMnAs layers depending on Mn concentration at relative HT-MBE is reported. In this Mn% range, it is found the formation of nanogrooves, nanoleaves, and nanowires. • It is shown the progressive photoluminescence transitions from purely GaAsMn zinc blende (for Mn% = 0.01) to a mixture of zinc blende and wurtzite GaAsMn (for Mn% = 0.2). • A critical thickness for the Mn catalyst effect was determined by RHEED. - Abstract: In the present work, we report on molecular beam epitaxy growth of Mn-doped GaAs films at the relatively high temperature (HT) of 530 °C. We found that by increasing the Mn atomic percent, Mn%, from 0.01 to 0.2, the surface morphology of the samples is strongly influenced and changes from planar to corrugated for Mn% values from 0.01 to 0.05, corresponding to nanostructures on the surface with dimensions of 200–300 nm and with the shape of leave, to nanowire-like structures for Mn% values above 0.05. From reflection high-energy electron diffraction patterns, we observed the growth mode transition from two- to three-dimensional occurring at a Mn% exceeding 0.05. The optical and electrical properties were obtained from photoluminescence (PL) and Hall effect measurements, respectively. For the higher Mn concentration, besides the Mn related transitions at approximately 1.41 eV, PL spectra sharp peaks are present between 1.43 and 1.49 eV, which we related to the coexistence of zinc blende and wurtzite phases in the nanowire-like structures of this sample. At Mn% of 0.04, an increase of the carrier mobility up to a value of 1.1 × 10{sup 3} cm{sup 2}/Vs at 77 K was found, then decreases as Mn% is further increased due to the strengthening of the ionized impurity scattering.

  10. Influence of the introduction and formation of artificial pinning centers on the transport properties of nanostructured Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva, L B S; Rodrigues, C A; Bormio-Nunes, C; Oliveira, N F Jr; Rodrigues, D Jr, E-mail: lucas_sarno@ppgem.eel.usp.b, E-mail: durval@demar.eel.usp.b [Superconductivity Group, Department of Materials Engineering (DEMAR) Escola de Engenharia de Lorena (EEL), Universidade de Sao Paulo - USP Polo Urbo-Industrial, Gleba AI-6 - PO Box 116 - Lorena, SP (Brazil)

    2009-05-01

    The formation of nanostructures projected to act as pinning centers is presented as a highly promising technique for the transport properties optimization of superconductors. However, due to the necessity of nanometric dimensions of these pinning centers, the heat treatment (HT) profiles must be carefully analyzed. The present work describes a methodology to optimize the HT profiles in respect to diffusion, reaction and formation of the superconducting phases. After the HT, samples were removed for micro structural characterization. Measurements of transport properties were performed to analyze the influence of the introduction of artificial pinning centers (APC) on the superconducting phase and to find the flux pinning mechanism acting in these wires. Fitting the volumetric pinning force vs. applied magnetic field (F{sub p} vs. mu{sub o}H) curves of transport properties, we could determine the type and influence of flux pinning mechanism acting in the global behavior of the samples. It was concluded that the maximum current densities were obtained when normal phases (due to the introduction of the APCs) are the most efficient pinning centers in the global behavior of the samples. The use of HT with profile 220{sup 0}C/100h+575{sup 0}C/50h+650{sup 0}C/100h was found as the best treatment for these nanostructured superconducting wires.

  11. Jet Formation in Solar Atmosphere due to Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Avilés, J. J.; Guzmán, F. S.; Fedun, V.

    2017-02-01

    Using numerical simulations, we show that jets with features of type II spicules and cool coronal jets corresponding to temperatures of 104 K can be formed as a result of magnetic reconnection in a scenario with magnetic resistivity. For this, we model the low chromosphere–corona region using the C7 equilibrium solar atmosphere model, assuming that resistive MHD rules the dynamics of the plasma. The magnetic field configurations we analyze correspond to two neighboring loops with opposite polarity. The formation of a high-speed and sharp structure depends on the separation of the loops’ feet. We analyze the cases where the magnetic field strength of the two loops is equal and different. In the first case, with a symmetric configuration the jets rise vertically, whereas in an asymmetric configuration the structure shows an inclination. With a number of simulations carried out under a 2.5D approach, we explore various properties of the excited jets, namely, inclination, lifetime, and velocity. The parameter space involves a magnetic field strength between 20 and 40 G, and the resistivity is assumed to be uniform with a constant value of the order {10}-2{{Ω }}\\cdot m.

  12. Pattern formation due to non-linear vortex diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijngaarden, Rinke J.; Surdeanu, R.; Huijbregtse, J. M.; Rector, J. H.; Dam, B.; Einfeld, J.; Wördenweber, R.; Griessen, R.

    Penetration of magnetic flux in YBa 2Cu 3O 7 superconducting thin films in an external magnetic field is visualized using a magneto-optic technique. A variety of flux patterns due to non-linear vortex diffusion is observed: (1) Roughening of the flux front with scaling exponents identical to those observed in burning paper including two distinct regimes where respectively spatial disorder and temporal disorder dominate. In the latter regime Kardar-Parisi-Zhang behavior is found. (2) Fractal penetration of flux with Hausdorff dimension depending on the critical current anisotropy. (3) Penetration as ‘flux-rivers’. (4) The occurrence of commensurate and incommensurate channels in films with anti-dots as predicted in numerical simulations by Reichhardt, Olson and Nori. It is shown that most of the observed behavior is related to the non-linear diffusion of vortices by comparison with simulations of the non-linear diffusion equation appropriate for vortices.

  13. Mesoscopic structure formation in condensed matter due to vacuum fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Siddhartha; Gupta, Kumar S.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2015-10-01

    An observable influence of zero-point fluctuations of the vacuum electromagnetic field on bound electrons is well known in the hydrogen atom, where it produces the Lamb shift. Here, we adapt an approach used to explain the Lamb shift in terms of a slight expansion of the orbits due to interaction with the zero-point field and apply it to assemblies of N electrons that are modeled as independent atomically bound two-level systems. The effect is to stabilize a collective ground-state energy, which leads to a prediction of novel effects at room temperature for quasi-two-dimensional systems over a range of parameters in the model, namely, N , the two-level excitation energy ℏ ω and the ionization energy ℏ ω +ɛ . Some mesoscopic systems where these effects may be observable include water sheaths on protein or DNA, surfaces of gaseous nanobubbles, and the magnetic response of inhomogeneous, electronically dilute oxides. No such effects are envisaged for uniform three-dimensional systems.

  14. Study on the effect of ambient gas on nanostructure formation on metal surfaces during femtosecond laser ablation for fabrication of low-reflective surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smausz, Tomi; Csizmadia, Tamás; Tápai, Csaba; Kopniczky, Judit; Oszkó, Albert; Ehrhardt, Martin; Lorenz, Pierre; Zimmer, Klaus; Prager, Andrea; Hopp, Béla

    2016-12-01

    Nanostructure formation on bulk metals (silver, gold, copper and titanium) by femtosecond Ti-sapphire laser irradiation (775 nm, 150 fs) is studied aiming the production of low-reflectivity surfaces and the better understanding of the development process. The experiments were performed in nitrogen, air, oxygen and helium environments at atmospheric pressure. The samples were irradiated with fluences in the 0.1-2 J/cm2 range and an average pulse number of 100 falling over a given area. The reflectivity of the treated surfaces was determined by a microspectrometer in the 450-800 nm range and their morphology was studied by scanning electron microscopy. The gas ambience influenced the results via two effects: formation processes and the chemically-induced modifications of the nanostructures. In case of He the nanoparticle aggregates-otherwise generally present-are predominantly missing, which leads to a lower darkening efficiency. The presence of oxygen enhances the darkening effect for copper mostly at lower fluences, while causes a slow increase in reflectivity in the case of titanium (in case of pure oxygen) in the high fluence range. The surface morphology in case of nitrogen and air were quite similar probably due to their close molecular mass values.

  15. Understanding the wetting properties of nanostructured selenium coatings: the role of nanostructured surface roughness and air-pocket formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran PA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Phong A Tran,1,2 Thomas J Webster31Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 2The Particulate Fluid Processing Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 3Department of Chemical Engineering and Program in Bioengineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Wetting properties of biomaterials, in particular nanomaterials, play an important role, as these influence interactions with biological elements, such as proteins, bacteria, and cells. In this study, the wetting phenomenon of titanium substrates coated with selenium nanoparticles was studied using experimental and mathematical modeling tools. Importantly, these selenium-coated titanium substrates were previously reported to increase select protein adsorption (such as vitronectin and fibronectin, to decrease bacteria growth, and increase bone cell growth. Increased selenium nanoparticle coating density resulted in higher contact angles but remained within the hydrophilic regime. This trend was found in disagreement with the Wenzel model, which is widely used to understand the wetting properties of rough surfaces. The trend also did not fit well with the Cassie–Baxter model, which was developed to understand the wetting properties of composite surfaces. A modified wetting model was thus proposed in this study, to understand the contributing factors of material properties to the hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of these nanostructured selenium-coated surfaces. The analysis and model created in this study can be useful in designing and/or understanding the wetting behavior of numerous biomedical materials and in turn, biological events (such as protein adsorption as well as bacteria and mammalian cell functions.Keywords: hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity, Wenzel model, Cassie–Baxter model, free energy, implant material, proteins, cells, bacteria

  16. Self-catalytic crystal growth, formation mechanism, and optical properties of indium tin oxide nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yuan-Chang; Zhong, Hua

    2013-08-22

    In-Sn-O nanostructures with rectangular cross-sectional rod-like, sword-like, and bowling pin-like morphologies were successfully synthesized through self-catalytic growth. Mixed metallic In and Sn powders were used as source materials, and no catalyst layer was pre-coated on the substrates. The distance between the substrate and the source materials affected the size of the Sn-rich alloy particles during crystal growth in a quartz tube. This caused In-Sn-O nanostructures with various morphologies to form. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscope and a transmittance electron microscope with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer were used to investigate the elemental binding states and compositions of the as-synthesized nanostructures. The Sn doping and oxygen vacancies in the In2O3 crystals corresponded to the blue-green and yellow-orange emission bands of the nanostructures, respectively.

  17. STM study of In nanostructures formation on Ge(001) surface at different coverages and temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Zhi-Hui; Shi Dong-Xia; Pang Shi-Jin; Gao Hong-Jun

    2008-01-01

    Different In/Ge(001) nanostructures have been obtained by annealing the samples at 320℃ with different coverages of In. Annealing a sample with a critical coverage of 2.1 monolayer of In, different In/Ge(001) nanostructures can be obtained at different temperatures. It is found that thermal annealing treatments first make In atoms form elongated Ge{103}-faceted In-clusters, which will grow wider and longer with increasing temperature, and finally cover the surface completely.

  18. Formation and shape-control of hierarchical cobalt nanostructures using quaternary ammonium salts in aqueous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Ruchi; Mehra, Anurag

    2017-01-01

    Aggregation and self-assembly are influenced by molecular interactions. With precise control of molecular interactions, in this study, a wide range of nanostructures ranging from zero-dimensional nanospheres to hierarchical nanoplates and spindles have been successfully synthesized at ambient temperature in aqueous solution. The nanostructures reported here are formed by aggregation of spherical seed particles (monomers) in presence of quaternary ammonium salts. Hydroxide ions and a magnetic moment of the monomers are essential to induce shape anisotropy in the nanostructures. The cobalt nanoplates are studied in detail, and a growth mechanism based on collision, aggregation, and crystal consolidation is proposed based on a electron microscopy studies. The growth mechanism is generalized for rods, spindles, and nearly spherical nanostructures, obtained by varying the cation group in the quaternary ammonium hydroxides. Electron diffraction shows different predominant lattice planes on the edge and on the surface of a nanoplate. The study explains, hereto unaddressed, the temporal evolution of complex magnetic nanostructures. These ferromagnetic nanostructures represent an interesting combination of shape anisotropy and magnetic characteristics.

  19. Site specific isolated nanostructure array formation on a large area by broad ion beam without any mask and resist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karmakar, Prasanta, E-mail: prasantak@vecc.gov.in [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Satpati, Biswarup [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2014-06-09

    We report the formation of isolated nanostructure arrays on a large area via broad ion beam implantation without the aid of any mask or resist. Desired ions have been implanted at specific locations of the prefabricated silicon ripple or triangular structures by exploiting the variation of local ion impact angles. We have shown that the implantation of Fe ions on an O{sup +} ions induced pre fabricated triangular shaped patterned Si surface results in a self-organized periodic array of striped magnetic nanostructures having several micron length and about 50 nm width arranged with a spacial separation of ∼200 nm. The morphology, composition, crystalline structure, and magnetic property of these nanopatterns have been analyzed using high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. A geometrical model has been proposed to explain the fundamental features of such ion-induced nanopattern structures.

  20. In situ X-ray pair distribution function analysis of geopolymer gel nanostructure formation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Claire E; Provis, John L; Bloomer, Breaunnah; Henson, Neil J; Page, Katharine

    2013-06-14

    With the ever-increasing environmentally-driven demand for technologically advanced structural materials, geopolymer cement is fast becoming a viable alternative to traditional cements due to its proven engineering characteristics and the reduction in CO2 emitted during manufacturing (as much as 80% less CO2 emitted in manufacture, compared to ordinary Portland cement). Nevertheless, much remains unknown regarding the kinetics of reaction responsible for nanostructural evolution during the geopolymerisation process. Here, in situ X-ray total scattering measurements and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis are used to quantify the extent of reaction as a function of time for alkali-activated metakaolin/slag geopolymer binders, including the impact of various activators (alkali hydroxide/silicate) on the kinetics of the geopolymerisation reaction. Quantifying the reaction process in situ from X-ray PDF data collected during the initial ten hours can provide an estimate of the total reaction extent, but when combined with data obtained at longer times (128 days here) enables more accurate determination of the overall rate of reaction. To further assess the initial stages of the geopolymerisation reaction process, a pseudo-single step first order rate equation is fitted to the extent of reaction data, which reveals important mechanistic information regarding the role of free silica in the activators in the evolution of the binder systems. Hence, it is shown that in situ X-ray PDF analysis is an ideal experimental local structure tool to probe the reaction kinetics of complex reacting systems involving transitions between disordered/amorphous phases, of which geopolymerisation is an important example.

  1. Nanostructure formation on silicon surfaces by using low energy helium plasma exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, Shuichi; Kikuchi, Yusuke; Yamada, Kohei; Maenaka, Shiro; Fujita, Kazunobu; Uesugi, Yoshihiko

    2016-12-01

    A new technology for obtaining nanostructure on silicon surface for potential applications to optical devices is represented. Scanning electron microscope analysis indicated a grown nanostructure of dense forest consisting of long cylindrical needle cones with a length of approximately 300 nm and a mutual distance of approximately 200 nm. Raman spectroscopy and spectrophotometry showed a good crystallinity and photon trapping, and reduced light reflectance after helium plasma exposure. The present technique consists of a simple maskless process that circumvents the use of chemical etching liquid, and utilizes soft ion bombardment on silicon substrate, keeping a good crystallinity.

  2. Nanostructure growth by helium plasma irradiation to tungsten in sputtering regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noiri, Y., E-mail: noiri-yasuyuki13@ees.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kajita, S., E-mail: kajita@ees.nagoya-u.ac.jp [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Ohno, N. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    The formation of nanostructure on tungsten (W) surface due to Helium (He) plasma irradiation can be harmful for fusion reactors. Up to now, W nanostructure growth was investigated mainly without sputtering. Under sputtering regime, nanostructure growth competes with erosion due to sputtering. In this study, the nanostructure growth was investigated in the linear divertor simulator NAGDIS-II at incident ion energy range of 200–500 eV. The growth of nanostructures was investigated by experiments and calculations under the sputtering regime. With increasing incident ion energy, the thickness of nanostructured W layer saturated rapidly at a lower He fluence, resulting in thinner W nanostructured layer. The erosion rate of the top of the W nanostructured layer was obtained from the comparison with the numerical calculation.

  3. Nanostructure Formations and Improvement in Corrosion Resistance of Steels by Means of Pulsed Electron Beam Surface Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion of steels has long been the topic for materials scientists. It is established that surface treatment is an efficient way to improve the corrosion resistance of steels without changing the bulk properties and with low costs. In the present paper, different kinds of surface treatment techniques for steels are briefly reviewed. In particular, the surface modification involving nanostructure formations of steels by using a low energy high pulsed electron beam (LEHCPEB treatment is lightened in the case of an AISI 316L stainless steel and D2 steel. The overall results demonstrate the high potential of the LEHCPEB technique for improving the corrosion performance of steels.

  4. Dynamic modeling and scaling of nanostructure formation in the lithographically induced self-assembly and self-construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin; Chou, Stephen Y.

    2003-05-01

    We numerically studied the dynamical formation process and the scaling of the nanostructures in the lithographically induced self-assembly and self-construction of thin polymer films. Our studies show that the period of the self-assembled pillars depends on the ratio between the surface tension force and the electrostatic force. The viscosity of the polymer has no effect on the final pillar shape. When the feature width of the mold is comparable to or smaller than the most unstable disturbance wavelength of the system, the initially self-assembled pillars will merge to form a self-constructed mesa.

  5. Controlled alpha-sexithiophene nanostructure formation in standard and inverted configuration organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radziwon, Michal Jędrzej; Goszczak, Arkadiusz Jaroslaw; Fernandes Cauduro, André Luis;

    accepting C60 layers, solar cell configurations. Furthermore, a comparative study of the correlation between the α-6T morphology and device performance parameters for standard and inverted solar cell configurations is presented. The morphology of the α 6T layer is controlled by means of the substrate...... temperature during low rate (nanostructures at higher temperatures. Optical and atomic force microscopy is conducted together...

  6. Formation of tungsten oxide nanostructures by laser pyrolysis: stars, fibres and spheres

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govender, M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This report focuses on the production of multi-phase WO3 and WO3-x (where x could vary between 0.2 and 0.33) nanostructures synthesized by CO2-laser pyrolysis technique at varying laser wavelengths (9.22-10.82 mm) and power densities (17-110 W/cm2...

  7. Simulataneous Formation of InGaN Nanostructures with Varying Shapes for White Light Source Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Gasim, Anwar A.

    2012-01-01

    Varying shapes of InGaN nanostructures were simultaneously formed on silicon epitaxially. The nanowires and nanomushrooms emit violet-blue light, and broad yellow-orange-red luminescence, respectively. The combination of which is promising for white light emission.

  8. Modeling Reservoir Formation Damage due to Water Injection for Oil Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hao

    2010-01-01

    The elliptic equation for non-Fickian transport of suspension in porous media is applied to simulate the reservoir formation damage due to water injection for oil recovery. The deposition release (erosion of reservoir formation) and the suspension deposition (pore plugging) are both taken...

  9. Femtosecond laser nanostructuring of silver film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Ye; Ma, Guohong [Shanghai University, Department of Physics, Shanghai (China); Shanghai University, Laboratory for Microstructures, Shanghai (China); He, Min; Bian, Huadong; Yan, Xiaona [Shanghai University, Department of Physics, Shanghai (China); Lu, Bo [Shanghai University, Laboratory for Microstructures, Shanghai (China)

    2012-03-15

    In this paper, we report an evolution of surface morphology of silver film irradiated by a 1 kHz femtosecond laser. By SEM observations, it is noted that different nanostructures with respective surface features depend highly on the number of pulses and the laser fluence. Especially when the laser fluence is below the threshold fluence of film breakdown, a textured nanostructure including many nanobumps and nanocavities will appear on the surface of silver film. In order to determine an optimal regime for nanostructuring silver film and to further study the underlying mechanism, we perform a quantitative analysis of laser fluence and pulse number. The results show that this nanostructure formation should be due to a sequential process of laser melting, vapor bubbles bursting, heat stress confinement, and subsequent material redistribution. As a potential application, we find this nanostructured silver film can be used as the active substrate for surface enhanced Raman scattering effect. (orig.)

  10. γ-Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 magnetic hierarchically nanostructured hollow microspheres: preparation, formation mechanism, magnetic property, and application in water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing-San; Zhu, Ying-Jie

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we report the preparation of γ-Fe(2)O(3) and Fe(3)O(4) magnetic hierarchically nanostructured hollow microspheres by a solvothermal combined with precursor thermal conversion method. These γ-Fe(2)O(3) and Fe(3)O(4) magnetic hierarchically nanostructured hollow microspheres were constructed by three-dimensional self-assembly of nanosheets, forming porous nanostructures. The effects of experimental parameters including molar ratio of reactants and reaction temperature on the precursors were studied. The time-dependent experiments indicated that the Ostwald ripening was responsible for the formation of the hierarchically nanostructured hollow microspheres of the precursors. γ-Fe(2)O(3) and Fe(3)O(4) magnetic hierarchically nanostructured hollow microspheres were obtained by the thermal transformation of the precursor hollow microspheres. Both γ-Fe(2)O(3) and Fe(3)O(4) hierarchically nanostructured hollow microspheres exhibited a superparamagnetic property at room temperature and had the saturation magnetization of 44.2 and 55.4 emu/g, respectively, in the applied magnetic field of 20 KOe. Several kinds of organic pollutants including salicylic acid (SA), methylene blue (MB), and basic fuchsin (BF) were chosen as the model water pollutants to evaluate the removal abilities of γ-Fe(2)O(3) and Fe(3)O(4) magnetic hierarchically nanostructured hollow microspheres. It was found that γ-Fe(2)O(3) hierarchically nanostructured hollow microspheres showed a better adsorption ability over SA than MB and BF. However, Fe(3)O(4) hierarchically nanostructured hollow microspheres had the best performance for adsorbing MB. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Toward Ending the Guessing Game: Study of the Formation of Nanostructures Using In Situ Liquid Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Thao; Yang, Hong

    2015-12-17

    The field of synthetic nanochemistry has grown tremendously in the past three decades since the discovery of nonaqueous synthesis of monodispersed particles. Almost all classes of materials, from II-VI semiconductor to metal, alloy, and metal oxide can now be prepared in various sizes and shapes. One major challenge has been the development of a technique for direct real-time recording of data during the formation of nanostructures in liquid reaction media where nucleation and growth occur. A viable solution finally arrived with the recent development of static and flow liquid cells for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This Perspective will showcase a few selected examples in this rapidly growing area, with a focus on using the new capabilities of liquid TEM (LTEM) for quantitative study of nucleation and growth, as well as shape formation of nanocrystals in solution. A discussion on future direction is also presented.

  12. Cryogenic Electron Microscopy Studies: Structure and Formation of Self-assembled Nanostructures in Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han Seung

    Cryogenic electron microscopy (Cryo-EM) techniques are among the most powerful to characterize self-assembling soft materials (colloids, polymers, and microemulsions, etc.) at the nanometer scale, without any need for implicit models or assumptions about the structure. We can even visualize structure under dynamic conditions, capturing each stage of development. In this thesis, cryo-EM has been used to investigate the formation and structure of a variety of self-assembling soft materials. Visualization is complemented by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), dynamic light scattering, and conductivity measurements. In each case, cryo-EM provides new insights, not otherwise available, into the nanostructure development. Self-assembly phenomena at the molecular level are critical to the performance of tremendous number of applied systems ranging from personal care products to industrial products. To evaluate these self-assembled materials, multiple characterization techniques are required. We investigated aggregation behavior of cesium dodecyl sulfate (CsDS) ionic surfactant in aqueous solution. Coupled with the real space data from cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and the inverse space data from SAXS, the experimental result of CsDS in aqueous solution gave a new insight in CsDS micellar structures and their development as a function of concentration. Cryo-TEM showed the presence of the liquid-like hydrocarbon core in the CsDS micelles and relatively thick shell structures at a low CsDS concentration. The core-shell sphere structure micelle shifted to core-shell cylindrical micelle structure at high concentration. The morphology and structure of paclitaxel silicate (PTX) prodrug, encapsulated with amphiphilic poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) diblock copolymers were studied. The six different silicate PTX prodrug candidates were characterized with cryo-TEM. Direct imaging with cryo-TEM illustrated structure of prodrug

  13. Utilizing Neon Ion Microscope for GaSb nanopatterning studies: Nanostructure formation and comparison with low energy nanopatterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Atwani, Osman; Huynh, Chuong; Norris, Scott

    2016-05-01

    Low energy irradiation of GaSb surfaces has been shown to lead to nanopillar formation. Being performed ex-situ, controlling the parameters of the ion beam for controlled nanopattern formation is challenging. While mainly utilized for imaging and cutting purposes, the development of multibeam (helium/neon) ion microscopes has opened the path towards the use of these microscopes for in-situ ion irradiation and nanopatterning studies. In this study, in-situ irradiation (neon ions)/imaging (helium ions) of GaSb surfaces is performed using Carl Zeiss-neon ion microscope at low energies (5 and 10 keV). Imaging with helium ions, nanodots were shown to form at particular fluences after which are smoothed. Ex-situ imaging with SEM showed nanopore formation of size controlled by the ion energy and fluence. Compared to lower energy ex-situ neon ion irradiation at similar fluxes, where nanopillars are formed, the results demonstrated a transition in the nanostructure type and formation mechanism as the energy is changed from 2 to 5 keV. Simulations show an increase in the ballistic diffusion and a decrease in the strength of phase separation as a function of ion energy in agreement with the suppression of nanopillar formation at higher energies. Collision cascade simulations suggest a transition toward bulk-driven mechanisms.

  14. Controlled Formation of Metal@Al₂O₃ Yolk-Shell Nanostructures with Improved Thermal Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Lin, Xi-Jie; Sun, Yong-Gang; Bin, De-Shan; Cao, An-Min; Wan, Li-Jun

    2015-12-16

    Yolk-shell structured nanomaterials have shown interesting potential in different areas due to their unique structural configurations. A successful construction of such a hybrid structure relies not only on the preparation of the core materials, but also on the capability to manipulate the outside wall. Typically, for Al2O3, it has been a tough issue in preparing it into a uniform nanoshell, making the use of Al2O3-based yolk-shell structures a challenging but long-awaited task. Here, in benefit of our success in the controlled formation of Al2O3 nanoshell, we demonstrated that yolk-shell structures with metal confined inside a hollow Al2O3 nanosphere could be successfully achieved. Different metals including Au, Pt, Pd have been demonstrated, forming a typical core@void@shell structure. We showed that the key parameters of the yolk-shell structure such as the shell thickness and the cavity size could be readily tuned. Due to the protection of a surrounding Al2O3 shell, the thermal stability of the interior metal nanoparticles could be substantially improved, resulting in promising performance for the catalytic CO oxidation as revealed by our preliminary test on Au@Al2O3.

  15. Dynamics study of green AuNP formation and their basis for Au-Pt core-shell nanostructure synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Seselj, Nedjeljko; Ulstrup, Jens

    The SAMENS method (saccharide - based approach to metallic nanostructure synthesis) is a synthesis platform for metallic nanostructures. The method has been developed since 2008 and can produce nanostructures of various sizes, shapes and compositions. Recently, a new methodology for studying the ...

  16. In Situ Interferometry of MOCVD-Grown ZnO for Nucleation-Layer-Based Optimization and Nanostructure Formation Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biethan, J.-P.; Considine, L.; Pavlidis, D.

    2011-04-01

    A reliable in situ interferometry technique allowed accurate prediction of the change in ZnO morphology during growth on various substrate types. Interferometry results showed that a 40-nm-thick nucleation layer on top of GaN allows growth of smooth and monocrystalline ZnO layers, as also confirmed by x-ray diffractometry (XRD). Studies of ZnO growth on silicon indicated that the surface morphology changes during the high-temperature growth step, resulting in needle-shaped ZnO on top of a thin ZnO initial layer. The observed surface morphology change corresponded to the interferometer signature and allowed identification of nanostructure formation.

  17. Effect of Er3+ ions on the phase formation and properties of In2O3nanostructures crystallized upon microwave heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Samantha C. S.; Romeiro, Fernanda C.; de Paula, Leonardo F.; Gonçalves, Rosana F.; de Moura, Ana P.; Ferrer, Mateus M.; Longo, Elson; Patrocinio, Antonio Otavio T.; Lima, Renata C.

    2017-05-01

    Regular sized nanostructures of indium oxide (In2O3) were homogeneously grown using a facile route, i.e. a microwave-hydrothermal method combined with rapid thermal treatment in a microwave oven. The presence of Er3+ doping plays an important role in controlling the formation of cubic (bcc) and rhombohedral (rh) In2O3 phases. The samples presented broad photoluminescent emission bands in the green-orange region, which were attributed to the recombination of electrons at oxygen vacancies. The photocatalytic activities of pure bcc-In2O3 and a bcc-rh-In2O3 mixture towards the UVA degradation of methylene blue (MB) were also evaluated. The results showed that Er+3 doped In2O3 exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity with a photonic efficiency three times higher than the pure oxide. The improved performance was attributed to the higher surface area, the greater concentration of electron traps due the presence of the dopant and the possible formation of heterojunctions between the cubic and rhombohedral phases.

  18. Formation of surface nanostructures on rutile (TiO2): comparative study of low-energy cluster ion and high-energy monoatomic ion impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popok, V. N.; Jensen, J.; Vučković, S.; Mackova, A.; Trautmann, C.

    2009-10-01

    The formation of nanostructures on rutile (TiO2) surfaces formed after the implantation of kiloelectronvolt-energy Ar_n^+ cluster ions and megaelectronvolt- to gigaelectronvolt-energy multiply charged heavy ions (Iq+, Taq+ and Uq+) is studied. Despite the differences in stopping and energy transfer mechanisms between the kiloelectronvolt-energy cluster ions and megaelectronvolt-energy monoatomic ions, their impacts lead to a similar type of surface damage, namely craters. For the cluster ion implantation the craters are caused by the multiple-collision effect (dominated by nuclear stopping) and the high density of energy and momentum transferred to the target, while for the case of megaelectronvolt multiply charged ions the craters are probably formed due to the Coulomb explosion and fast energy transfer caused by the electronic stopping. At ion energies in the gigaelectronvolt range, nanosize protrusions, so-called hillocks, are observed on the surface. It is suggested that electronic stopping leads to the formation of continuous tracks and the transferred energy is high enough to melt the material along the whole projectile path. Elastic rebound of the tension between the molten and solid state phases leads to liquid flow, expansion and quenching of the melt, thus forming the hillocks. Atomic force microscopy measurements carried out under different environmental conditions (temperature and atmosphere) suggest that the damaged material at the nanosize impact spots has very different water affinity properties (higher hydrophilicity or water adsorption) compared with the non-irradiated rutile surface.

  19. Formation of Three-Way Scanning Electron Microscope Moiré on Micro/Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-way scanning electron microscope (SEM moiré was first generated using a designed three-way electron beam (EB in an SEM. The spot-type three-way SEM moiré comes from the interference between the three-way EB and the specimen grating in which the periodic cells are arranged in a triangular manner. The deformation and the structure information of the specimen grating in three directions can be simultaneously obtained from the three-way SEM moiré. The design considerations of the three-way EB were discussed. As an illustration, the three-way SEM moiré spots produced on a silicon slide were presented. The proposed three-way SEM moiré method is expected to characterize micro/nanostructures in triangular or hexagonal arrangements in three directions at the same time.

  20. Effect of the reaction conditions on the formation of the ZnO nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perillo, P. M.; Atia, M. N.; Rodríguez, D. F.

    2017-01-01

    ZnO nanorods were synthesized through a simple chemical method by reacting Zn(C2H3O2)2·2H2O and NaOH at low temperature and the effects of changing the order of addition of reactants on the morphological evolution of ZnO nanorods were investigated. The samples were characterized by using XRD, SEM, EDX, TEM, BET and Raman techniques. Optical properties of the ZnO nanostructures were too investigated by UV-Vis spectroscopy at room temperature. The hexagonal wurtzite phase of ZnO was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) for all the samples. SEM and TEM analysis indicated that different morphologies were obtained by changing the order of addition of reactants.

  1. New roots to formation of nanostructures on glass surface through anodic oxidation of sputtered aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Inoue, Song-Zhu Chu, Kenji Wada, Di Li and Hajime Haneda

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available New processes for the preparation of nanostructure on glass surfaces have been developed through anodic oxidation of sputtered aluminum. Aluminum thin film sputtered on a tin doped indium oxide (ITO thin film on a glass surface was converted into alumina by anodic oxidation. The anodic alumina gave nanometer size pore array standing vertically on the glass surface. Kinds of acids used in the anodic oxidation changed the pore size drastically. The employment of phosphoric acid solution gave several tens nanometer size pores. Oxalic acid cases produced a few tens nanometer size pores and sulfuric acid solution provided a few nanometer size pores. The number of pores in a unit area could be changed with varying the applied voltage in the anodization and the pore sizes could be increased by phosphoric acid etching. The specimen consisting of a glass substrate with the alumina nanostructures on the surface could transmit UV and visible light. An etched specimen was dipped in a TiO2 sol solution, resulting in the impregnation of TiO2 sol into the pores of alumina layer. The TiO2 sol was heated at ~400 °C for 2 h, converting into anatase phase TiO2. The specimens possessing TiO2 film on the pore wall were transparent to the light in UV–Visible region. The electro deposition technique was applied to the introduction of Ni metal into pores, giving Ni nanorod array on the glass surface. The removal of the barrier layer alumina at the bottom of the pores was necessary to attain smooth electro deposition of Ni. The photo catalytic function of the specimens possessing TiO2 nanotube array was investigated in the decomposition of acetaldehyde gas under the irradiation of UV light, showing that the rate of the decomposition was quite large.

  2. Dynamics of Green AuNP Formation and Their Application in Core-Shell Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Zhang, Jingdong; Jensen, Palle Skovhus

    The formation of gold nanoparticles in our optimized synthesis is achieved through reduction of tetrachloroauric acid in 2 - (N - morpholino)ethanesulphonic acid (MES) buffered glucose and stabilization by starch at room temperature. The formation has been followed by measuring the electrochemical...

  3. Dust particle formation due to interaction between graphite and helicon deuterium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwashita, Shinya, E-mail: shinya.iwashita@rub.de [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Nishiyama, Katsushi; Uchida, Giichiro; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Koga, Kazunori [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Shiratani, Masaharu, E-mail: siratani@ed.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    The collection of dust particles using divertor simulation helicon plasmas has been carried out to examine dust formation due to the interaction between a graphite target and deuterium plasmas, which are planned to operate in the large helical device (LHD) at the Japanese National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS). The collected dust particles are classified into three types: (i) small spherical particles below 400 nm in size, (ii) agglomerates whose primary particles have a size of about 10 nm, and (iii) large flakes above 1 {mu}m in size. These features are quite similar to those obtained through hydrogen plasma operation, indicating that the dust formation mechanisms due to the interaction between a carbon wall and a plasma of deuterium, which is the isotope of hydrogen, is probably similar to those of hydrogen.

  4. Bulk Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, C. C.; Langdon, T. G.; Lavernia, E. J.

    2017-09-01

    This paper will address three topics of importance to bulk nanostructured materials. Bulk nanostructured materials are defined as bulk solids with nanoscale or partly nanoscale microstructures. This category of nanostructured materials has historical roots going back many decades but has relatively recent focus due to new discoveries of unique properties of some nanoscale materials. Bulk nanostructured materials are prepared by a variety of severe plastic deformation methods, and these will be reviewed. Powder processing to prepare bulk nanostructured materials requires that the powders be consolidated by typical combinations of pressure and temperature, the latter leading to coarsening of the microstructure. The thermal stability of nanostructured materials will also be discussed. An example of bringing nanostructured materials to applications as structural materials will be described in terms of the cryomilling of powders and their consolidation.

  5. Formation of tungsten oxide nanostructures by laser pyrolysis: stars, fibres and spheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sideras-Haddad Elias

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this letter, the production of multi-phase WO3 and WO3- x (where x could vary between 0.1 and 0.3 nanostructures synthesized by CO2-laser pyrolysis technique at varying laser wavelengths (9.22-10.82 mm and power densities (17-110 W/cm2 is reported. The average spherical particle sizes for the wavelength variation samples ranged between 113 and 560 nm, and the average spherical particle sizes for power density variation samples ranged between 108 and 205 nm. Synthesis of W18O49 (= WO2.72 stars by this method is reported for the first time at a power density and wavelength of 2.2 kW/cm2 and 10.6 μm, respectively. It was found that more concentrated starting precursors result in the growth of hierarchical structures such as stars, whereas dilute starting precursors result in the growth of simpler structures such as wires.

  6. One-Step Formation of "Chain-Armor"-Stabilized DNA Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassinelli, Valentina; Oberleitner, Birgit; Sobotta, Jessica; Nickels, Philipp; Grossi, Guido; Kempter, Susanne; Frischmuth, Thomas; Liedl, Tim; Manetto, Antonio

    2015-06-26

    DNA-based self-assembled nanostructures are widely used to position organic and inorganic objects with nanoscale precision. A particular promising application of DNA structures is their usage as programmable carrier systems for targeted drug delivery. To provide DNA-based templates that are robust against degradation at elevated temperatures, low ion concentrations, adverse pH conditions, and DNases, we built 6-helix DNA tile tubes consisting of 24 oligonucleotides carrying alkyne groups on their 3'-ends and azides on their 5'-ends. By a mild click reaction, the two ends of selected oligonucleotides were covalently connected to form rings and interlocked DNA single strands, so-called DNA catenanes. Strikingly, the structures stayed topologically intact in pure water and even after precipitation from EtOH. The structures even withstood a temperature of 95 °C when all of the 24 strands were chemically interlocked. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Formation of nanostructured weldments in the Al-Si system using electrospark welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milligan, J.; Heard, D.W. [Aluminium Research Centre - REGAL, Department of Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, 3610 University Street, Wong Building, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2B2 (Canada); Brochu, M., E-mail: mathieu.brochu@mcgill.ca [Aluminium Research Centre - REGAL, Department of Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, 3610 University Street, Wong Building, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2B2 (Canada)

    2010-04-01

    Electrospark welding (ESW) electrodes were manufactured from three binary aluminum-silicon alloys consisting of 12 and 17 wt% silicon, produced using chill and sand casting. The electrodes were used to assess the feasibility of producing aluminum-silicon weldments consisting of nano-sized silicon particles embedded in nanostructured aluminum matrix, using the ESW process. Line tests were performed to determine the optimal processing parameters resulting in a high quality deposit. X-ray diffraction (XRD) as well as optical and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed to determine the composition and microstructure of the depositions. It was determined that a capacitance of 110 {mu}F and a voltage of 100 V resulted in the highest quality deposition. Furthermore it was determined that the ESW process was capable of producing a microstructure consisting of an extremely fine-grained silicon phase ranging from {approx}6 to 50 nm for the eutectic composition, and 10-200 nm for the hypereutectic compositions. Finally it was determined that the functional thickness limit of the aluminum-silicon deposit produced under these process parameters was 120 {mu}m.

  8. Formation of nanostructured weldments in the Al-Si system using electrospark welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, J.; Heard, D. W.; Brochu, M.

    2010-04-01

    Electrospark welding (ESW) electrodes were manufactured from three binary aluminum-silicon alloys consisting of 12 and 17 wt% silicon, produced using chill and sand casting. The electrodes were used to assess the feasibility of producing aluminum-silicon weldments consisting of nano-sized silicon particles embedded in nanostructured aluminum matrix, using the ESW process. Line tests were performed to determine the optimal processing parameters resulting in a high quality deposit. X-ray diffraction (XRD) as well as optical and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed to determine the composition and microstructure of the depositions. It was determined that a capacitance of 110 μF and a voltage of 100 V resulted in the highest quality deposition. Furthermore it was determined that the ESW process was capable of producing a microstructure consisting of an extremely fine-grained silicon phase ranging from ˜6 to 50 nm for the eutectic composition, and 10-200 nm for the hypereutectic compositions. Finally it was determined that the functional thickness limit of the aluminum-silicon deposit produced under these process parameters was 120 μm.

  9. Nanostructured TiO{sub x} film on Si substrate: room temperature formation of TiSi{sub x} nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiodi, Mirco, E-mail: chiodi@dmf.unicatt.it; Cavaliere, Emanuele; Kholmanov, Iskandar [Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Brescia, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica (Italy); Simone, Monica de; Sakho, Oumar; Cepek, Cinzia [CNR-INFM, Laboratorio Nazionale TASC (Italy); Gavioli, Luca [Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Brescia, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica (Italy)

    2010-09-15

    We present a morphologic and spectroscopic study of cluster-assembled TiO{sub x} films deposited by supersonic cluster beam source on clean silicon substrates. Data show the formation of nanometer-thick and uniform titanium silicides film at room temperature (RT). Formation of such thick TiSi{sub x} film goes beyond the classical interfacial limit set by the Ti/Si diffusion barrier. The enhancement of Si diffusion through the TiO{sub x} film is explained as a direct consequence of the porous film structure. Upon ultra high vacuum annealing beyond 600 {sup o}C, TiSi{sub 2} is formed and the oxygen present in the film is completely desorbed. The morphology of the nanostructured silicides is very stable for thermal treatments in the RT-1000 {sup o}C range, with a slight cluster size increase, resulting in a film roughness an order of magnitude smaller than other TiO{sub x}/Si and Ti/Si films in the same temperature range. The present results might have a broad impact in the development of new and simple TiSi synthesis methods that favour their integration into nanodevices.

  10. TiC nanocrystal formation from carburization of laser-grown Ti/O/C nanopowders for nanostructured ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leconte, Y; Maskrot, H; Herlin-Boime, N; Porterat, D; Reynaud, C; Gierlotka, S; Swiderska-Sroda, A; Vicens, J

    2006-01-12

    Refractory carbide ceramics (TiC and ZrC) raise interest as promising materials for high-temperature applications such as structural materials for the future generation of nuclear reactors. In this context, nanostructured ceramics are expected to exhibit improved thermomechanical properties as well as better behavior under irradiation when compared to conventional materials. It is therefore necessary to synthesize carbide nanocrystals of such materials to elaborate the ceramics. We report here the formation study of TiC nanocrystals through the direct carburization of Ti/O/C nanopowders grown by laser pyrolysis. A spray of titanium tetraisopropoxide was laser pyrolyzed with ethylene as the sensitizer, leading to Ti/O/C nanopowders with various C contents controlled by the synthesis conditions. Annealing treatments performed on these nanopowders under an inert atmosphere without any C addition enabled the formation of TiC grains through the carburization of the oxide phase by free C incorporated during the synthesis. The powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The final TiC grain size was about 80 nm, and the grains were monocrystalline. The influence of the free C content on the grain growth during the annealing step, together with its effects on the densification of the ceramics after sintering by high-pressure flash sintering, was examined. A 93% densification was finally achieved.

  11. Formation of nanostructures on HOPG surface in presence of surfactant atom during low energy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjan, M., E-mail: ranjanm@ipr.res.in; Joshi, P.; Mukherjee, S.

    2016-07-15

    Low energy ions beam often develop periodic patterns on surfaces under normal or off-normal incidence. Formation of such periodic patterns depends on the substrate material, the ion beam parameters, and the processing conditions. Processing conditions introduce unwanted contaminant atoms, which also play strong role in pattern formation by changing the effective sputtering yield of the material. In this work we have analysed the effect of Cu, Fe and Al impurities introduced during low energy Ar{sup +} ion irradiation on HOPG substrate. It is observed that by changing the species of foreign atoms the surface topography changes drastically. The observed surface topography is co-related with the modified sputtering yield of HOPG. Presence of Cu and Fe amplify the effective sputtering yield of HOPG, so that the required threshold for the pattern formation is achieved with the given fluence, whereas Al does not lead to any significant change in the effective yield and hence no pattern formation occurs.

  12. A novel lithography technique for formation of large areas of uniform nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Dey, Dibyendu; Memis, Omer G.; Katsnelson, Alex; Mohseni, Hooman

    2008-08-01

    With nanotechnology becoming widely used, many applications such as plasmonics, sensors, storage devices, solar cells, nano-filtration and artificial kidneys require the structures with large areas of uniform periodic nanopatterns. Most of the current nano-manufacturing techniques, including photolithography, electron-beam lithography, and focal ion beam milling, are either slow or expensive to be applied into the areas. Here, we demonstrate an alternative and novel lithography technique - Nanosphere Photolithography (NSP) - that generates a large area of highly uniform periodic nanoholes or nanoposts by utilizing the monolayer of hexagonally close packed (HCP) silica microspheres as super-lenses on top of photoresist. The size of the nanopatterns generated is almost independent of the sphere sizes and hence extremely uniform patterns can be obtained. We demonstrate that the method can produce hexagonally packed arrays of hole of sub-250 nm size in positive photoresist using a conventional exposure system with a broadband UV source centered at 400 nm. We also show a large area of highly uniform gold nanoholes (~180 nm) and nanoposts (~300nm) array with the period of 1 μm fabricated by the combination of lift-off and NSP. The process is not limited to gold. Similar structures have been shown with aluminum and silicon dioxide layer. The period and size of the structures can also be tuned by changing proper parameters. The technique applying self-assembled and focusing properties of micro-/nano-spheres into photolithography establishes a new paradigm for mask-less photolithography technique, allowing rapid and economical creation of large areas of periodic nanostructures with a high throughput.

  13. Mathematical modeling of the formation of surface nanostructures in thin solid films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Margo S.

    The self-assembly of quantum dots (QDs) in thin solid films is an important area of nanotechnology with many relevant applications. In the present thesis, three problems related to the growth and self-assembly of QDs are investigated. In Chapter 1, a new instability mechanism for the formation of QDs associated with strong surface energy anisotropy coupled with wetting interactions between the film and the substrate is proposed. A nonlinear anisotropic evolution equation describing the shape of a thin solid film deposited on a solid substrate is derived and the stability analysis of a planar film is performed. The wetting interactions are found to change the instability spectrum from long-wave to short-wave, leading to the possibility of the formation of stable regular arrays of QDs. Near the short-wave instability threshold, it is found that the formation of stable hexagonal arrays of QDs is possible. In Chapter 2, the effects of wetting interactions on another mechanism of QD formation are investigated. This mechanism is associated with the Asaro-Tiller-Grinfeld instability that releases epitaxial stress caused by the lattice mismatch between the film and the substrate. The elasticity problem in the long-wave approximation is solved and a nonlocal integro-differential equation governing the evolution of the film surface is derived. It is shown that wetting interactions can change instability spectrum from the spinodal decomposition type to the Turing type leading to the possibility of pattern formation. For typical semiconductor systems, hexagonal arrays of QDs are found to be unstable as a result of a subcritical bifurcation. It is shown that the QDs coarsen after formation and the coarsening dynamics are studied by numerical simulations. In Chapter 3, the formation of an epitaxial film by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), which precedes the formation of QDs, is investigated. The Burton-Cabrera-Frank theory for the growth of a stepped crystal surface is studied when

  14. Nanostructures on GaAs surfaces due to 60 keV Ar{sup +}-ion beam sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venugopal, V., E-mail: vinay.venu@gmail.com [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Division of Physics, School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Chennai Campus, Chennai 600 048 (India); Garg, Sandeep Kumar; Basu, Tanmoy [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Sinha, Om Prakash [Amity Institute of Nanotechnology, Amity University, Noida 201 303 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter-Univeristy Accelerator Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, Delhi 110 067 (India); Bhattacharyya, S.R. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Som, T. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India)

    2012-02-15

    The effect of 60 keV Ar{sup +}-ion beam sputtering on the surface topography of p-type GaAs(1 0 0) was investigated by varying angle of incidence of the ion (060 Degree-Sign ) with respect to substrate normal and the ion fluence (2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}) at an ion flux of 3.75 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}-s. For normal incidence and at a fluence of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}, holes and islands are observed with the former having an average size and density of 31 nm and 4.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} holes/cm{sup 2}, respectively. For 30 Degree-Sign and 45 Degree-Sign off-normal incidence, in general, a smooth surface appears which is unaffected by increase of fluence. At 60 Degree-Sign off-normal incidence dots are observed while for the highest fluence of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2} early stage of ripple formation along with dots is observed with amplitude of 4 nm. The applicability and limitations of the existing theories of ion induced pattern formation to account for the observed surface topographies are discussed.

  15. Dystrophic Cutaneous Calcification and Metaplastic Bone Formation due to Long Term Bisphosphonate Use in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatlı, Ali Murat; Göksu, Sema Sezgin; Arslan, Deniz; Başsorgun, Cumhur İbrahim; Coşkun, Hasan Şenol

    2013-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are widely used in the treatment of breast cancer with bone metastases. We report a case of a female with breast cancer presented with a rash around a previous mastectomy site and a discharge lesion on her right chest wall in August 2010. Biopsy of the lesion showed dystrophic calcification and metaplastic bone formation. The patient's history revealed a long term use of zoledronic acid for the treatment of breast cancer with bone metastasis. We stopped the treatment since we believed that the cutaneous dystrophic calcification could be associated with her long term bisphosphonate therapy. Adverse cutaneous events with bisphosphonates are very rare, and dystrophic calcification has not been reported previously. The dystrophic calcification and metaplastic bone formation in this patient are thought to be due to long term bisphosphonate usage. PMID:23956898

  16. Dystrophic Cutaneous Calcification and Metaplastic Bone Formation due to Long Term Bisphosphonate Use in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Murat Tatlı

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bisphosphonates are widely used in the treatment of breast cancer with bone metastases. We report a case of a female with breast cancer presented with a rash around a previous mastectomy site and a discharge lesion on her right chest wall in August 2010. Biopsy of the lesion showed dystrophic calcification and metaplastic bone formation. The patient’s history revealed a long term use of zoledronic acid for the treatment of breast cancer with bone metastasis. We stopped the treatment since we believed that the cutaneous dystrophic calcification could be associated with her long term bisphosphonate therapy. Adverse cutaneous events with bisphosphonates are very rare, and dystrophic calcification has not been reported previously. The dystrophic calcification and metaplastic bone formation in this patient are thought to be due to long term bisphosphonate usage.

  17. Thermodynamic aspects of nanostructured Ti5Si3 formation during mechanical alloying and its characterization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Sabooni; F Karimzadeh; M H Abbasi

    2012-06-01

    Mechanical alloying (MA) was used to produce Ti5Si3 intermetallic compound with nanocrystalline structure from elemental powders. The structural changes and characterization of powder particles during milling were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), particle size analyser (PSA) and microhardness measurements. MA resulted in gradual formation of disordered Ti5Si3 intermetallic compound with crystallite size of about 15 nm after 45 h of milling. Also a thermodynamic analysis of the process was carried out using Miedema model. The results showed that in the nominal composition of Ti5Si3 intermetallic phase (Si = 0.375), formation of an intermetallic compound has the lowest Gibbs free energy rather than solid solution or amorphous phases. So the MA product is the most stable phase in nominal composition of Ti5Si3. This intermetallic compound exhibits high microhardness value of about 1235 HV.

  18. Formation of sub-200 nm nanostructure on Fe film irradiated by femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kaijun; Li, Xiaohong; Xie, Changxin; Wang, Kai; Zhou, Qiang; Qiu, Rong

    2017-09-01

    In this article, we report the formation of two kinds of laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSSs) with direction perpendicular to laser polarization on the Fe films irradiated by 800 nm femtosecond laser pulses. High-spatial frequency LIPSSs (HSFLs) with periods of 150-230 nm are observed with small laser pulse number less than 100. Low-spatial frequency LIPSSs (LSFLs) with periods of 500-640 nm appear abruptly when increasing the pulse number to a specific pulse number varied with laser fluence, and the periods of LSFLs have a tendency to decrease when the pulse number exceeds some specific values varied for different laser fluences. The formation of high- and low-spatial frequency periodic structures may be related to the surface plasmon polaritons excited by laser on surface iron oxides film or iron film.

  19. Surface nanostructure formation mechanism of 45 steel induced by supersonic fine particles pombarding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dema Ba; Shining Ma; Changqing Li; Fanjun Meng

    2008-01-01

    By means of supersonic fine particles bombarding (SFPB), a nanostruetured surface layer up to 15 μm was fabricated on a 45 steel plate with ferrite and pearlite phases. To reveal the grain refinement mechanism of SFPB-treated 45 steel, microstructure features of various sections in the treated surface were systematically characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Grain size increases with an increase of depth from the treated surface. Plastic deformation and grain refinement processes are accompanied by an increase in strain. Plastic deformation in the proeuteetoid ferrite phases has precedence over the pearlite phases. Grain refinement in the ferrite phases involves: the onset of dis-location lines (Dls), dislocation tangles (DTs) and dense dislocation walls (DDWs) in the original grains; the formation of fine la-mellar and roughly equiaxed cells separated by DDWs; by dislocation annihilation and rearrangement, the transformation of DDWS into subboundaries and boundaries and the formation of submicron grains or subgrains; the successive subdivision of grains to finer and finer scale, resulting in the formation of highly misoriented nano-grains. By contrast, eutectoid cementite phase accommodated swain in a sequence as follows: onset of elongated, bended and shear deformation under deformation stress of ferrites, short and thin cementites with a width of about 20-50 nm and discontinuous length were formed. Shorter and thinner cementites were developed into ultra-fine pieces under the action of high density dislocation and strains. At the top surface, some cementites were decomposed under severe plastic deformation. Experimental evidences and analysis indicate that surface nanocrystallization of 45 steel results from dislocation activities, high swains and high strain rate are necessary for the formation of nanocrystallites.

  20. Formation of Nanostructures in Severely Deformed High-Strength Steel Induced by High-Frequency Ultrasonic Impact Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, R. K.; Malet, L.; Gao, H.; Hermans, M. J. M.; Godet, S.; Richardson, I. M.

    2015-02-01

    Surface modification by the generation of a nanostructured surface layer induced via ultrasonic impact treatment was performed at the weld toe of a welded high-strength quenched and tempered structural steel, S690QL1 (Fe-0.16C-0.2Si-0.87Mn-0.33Cr-0.21Mo (wt pct)). Such high-frequency peening techniques are known to improve the fatigue life of welded components. The nanocrystallized structure as a function of depth from the top-treated surface was characterized via a recently developed automated crystal orientation mapping in transmission electron microscopy. Based on the experimental observations, a grain refinement mechanism induced by plastic deformation during the ultrasonic impact treatment is proposed. It involves the formation of low-angle misoriented lamellae displaying a high density of dislocations followed by the subdivision of microbands into blocks and the resulting formation of polygonal submicronic grains. These submicronic grains further breakdown into nano grains. The results show the presence of retained austenite even after severe surface plastic deformation. The average grain size of the retained austenite and martensite is 17 and 35 nm, respectively. The in-grain deformation mechanisms are different in larger and smaller grains. Larger grains show long-range lattice rotations, while smaller grains show plastic deformation through grain rotation. Also the smaller nano grains exhibit the presence of short-range disorder. Surface nanocrystallization also leads to an increased fraction of low angle and low energy coincident site lattice boundaries especially in the smaller grains ( nm).

  1. Self-organized formation of metal-carbon nanostructures by hyperthermal ion deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannstein, I.K.

    2006-04-26

    The quasi-simultaneous deposition of mass-selected hyperthermal carbon and metal ions results in a variety of interesting film morphologies, depending on the metal used and the deposition conditions. The observed features are of the order of a few nanometres and are therefore interesting for future potential applications in the various fields of nanotechnology. The present study focuses on the structural analysis of amorphous carbon films containing either copper, silver, gold, or iron using amongst others Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy. The film morphologies found are as follows: copper-containing films consist of copper nanoclusters with sizes ranging from about 3 to 9 nm uniformly distributed throughout the amorphous carbon matrix. The cluster size hereby rises with the copper content of the films. The silver containing films decompose into a pure amorphous carbon film with silver agglomerates at the surface. Both, the gold- and the iron-containing films show a multilayer structure of metal-rich layers with higher cluster density separated by metal-depleted amorphous carbon layers. The layer distances are of the order of up to 15 nm in the case of gold-carbon films and 7 nm in the case of iron-carbon films. The formation of theses different structures cannot be treated in the context of conventional self-organization mechanisms basing upon thermal diffusion and equilibrium thermodynamics. Instead, an ion-induced atomic transport, sputtering effects, and the stability of small metal clusters were taken into account in order to model the structure formation processes. A similar multilayer morphology was recently also reported in the literature for metal-carbon films grown by magnetron sputtering techniques. In order to investigate, whether the mechanisms are the same as in the case of the ion beam deposited films described above, first experiments were conducted

  2. FORMATION OF CARBON NANOSTRUCTURES USING ACETYLENE, ARGON-ACETYLENE AND ARGON-HYDROGEN-ACETYLENE PLASMAS

    OpenAIRE

    Marcinauskas, Liutauras; Grigonis, Alfonsas; Valincius, Vitas

    2013-01-01

    The amorphous carbon films were deposited on silicon-metal substrates by plasma jet chemical vapor deposition (PJCVD) and plasma enchanted CVD (PECVD). PJCVD carbon films have been prepared at atmospheric pressure in argon-acetylene and argon-hydrogen-acetylene plasma mixtures. The films deposited in Ar-C2H2 plasma are attributed to graphite-like carbon films. The formation of the nanocrystalline graphite was obtained in Ar-H2-C2H2 plasma. Addition of the hydrogen gas lead to the ...

  3. Formation of nanostructure on hair surface: its characteristic optical properties and application to hair care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shunsuke; Sato, Hirayuki; Shibuichi, Satoshi; Okamoto, Masayuki; Inoue, Shigeto; Satoh, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    Uneven structures on hair fiber surface, such as lift up of cuticle or build up of hair spray ingredients, generally cause a diffuse reflection which results in a dull and unhealthy appearance. However, in the case of finer structure than wavelength of visible light, the optical properties change significantly. An application of the phenomenon to hair care products is reported in this paper. Formation of the fine structure on hair surface was achieved by only a shampoo and rinse-off conditioner system including amino-silicone. Chroma enhancement of hair and light introduction into hair fibers were observed simultaneously with formation of the fine structure on the hair surface. The light introduction phenomenon is understood in terms of "Effective Medium Approximation" (EMA). The simulation study based on EMA indicates that a very low refractive index surface is expected to be realized, which well explains the optical experimental results. When the shampoo and conditioner system developed to form the structure on fiber surface was applied to dyed hair, enhancement and long-lasting of vivid appearance was confirmed in spite of dye elution.

  4. In situ formation of organic-inorganic hybrid nanostructures for photovoltaic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Sebastian; Garnett, Oliver; Tokmoldin, Nurlan; Tsoi, Wing C; Haque, Saif A; Kim, Ji-Seon

    2014-01-01

    The performance of hybrid (organic-inorganic) photovoltaic devices is critically dependent on the thin film morphology. This work studies the film formation process using the in situ thermal decomposition of a soluble precursor to form a well-distributed network of CdS nanoparticles within a poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) polymer matrix. Resonant Raman spectroscopy is used to probe the formation of the inorganic nanoparticles and the corresponding changes in the molecular order of the polymer. We find that the CdS precursor decomposes rapidly upon heating to 160 °C, but that this has a disruptive effect on the P3HT. The extent of this disruption can be controlled by adjusting the annealing temperature, and nanowire aggregates of P3HT are found to have increased susceptibility. Atomic force microscopy reveals that at high temperatures (>200 °C), cracks form in the film, resulting in a 'plateau'-like microstructure. In order to retain the preferable 'granular' microstructure and to control the molecular disruption, low decomposition temperatures are needed. This work identifies a particular problem for optimising the hybrid thin film morphology and shows how it can be partially overcome.

  5. Water-repellent coating: formation of polymeric self-assembled monolayers on nanostructured surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Woo Kyung [Department of Chemistry and School of Molecular Science (BK21), Center for Molecular Design and Synthesis, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sangjin [Research Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnology, Department of Life Science, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Jon, Sangyong [Research Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnology, Department of Life Science, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Insung S [Department of Chemistry and School of Molecular Science (BK21), Center for Molecular Design and Synthesis, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-03

    In this paper, we suggest a facile and effective method for water-repellent coating of oxide surfaces. As a coating material, we synthesized a new random copolymer, referred to as poly(TMSMA-r-fluoroMA), by the radical polymerization of 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (TMSMA) and a fluoromonomer'' (registered) bearing methacrylate moiety (fluoroMA). The random copolymer was designed to consist of a 'surface-reactive part' (trimethoxysilyl group) for anchoring onto oxide-based surfaces and a 'functional part' (perfluoro group) for water repellency. The polymeric self-assembled monolayers (pSAMs) of poly(TMSMA-r-fluoroMA) were constructed on three different aluminum oxide substrates, such as flat, concave-textured, and nanoporous plates, and the static water contact angle of each surface before and after the formation of pSAMs was measured. The formation of pSAMs resulted in significantly enhanced hydrophobicity compared with the corresponding bare surfaces. In particular, among three poly(TMSMA-r-fluoroMA)-coated surfaces, the nanoporous plate showed the highest water-repellent property, with a static contact angle of {approx}163 deg., which is indicative of superhydrophobic surfaces.

  6. On the physics of self-organized nanostructure formation upon femtosecond laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Juergen; Varlamova, Olga; Uhlig, Sebastian; Varlamov, Sergej; Bestehorn, Michael

    2014-10-01

    We present new results on femtosecond LIPSS on silicon, fostering the dynamic model of self-organized structure formation. The first set of experiments demonstrates LIPSS formation by irradiation with a femtosecond white light continuum. The ripples are, as usual, perpendicular to the light polarization with a fluence-dependent wavelength between 500 and 700 nm. At higher dose (fluence × number of shots), the LIPSS turn to much coarser structures. The second set of experiments displays the dose dependence of pattern evolution at about threshold fluence. In contrast to the general case of multi-pulse LIPSS, where a strong dependence of the structures on the laser polarization is observed, single-shot exposition of silicon at about the ablation threshold results in a concentric pattern of very regular sub-wavelength ripples following the oval shape of the irradiated spot, without any reference to the laser polarization. When increasing the number of pulses, the usual, typical ripples develop and then coalesce into broader perpendicular structures, interlaced with remnants of the first, finer ripples.

  7. Water-repellent coating: formation of polymeric self-assembled monolayers on nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Woo Kyung; Park, Sangjin; Jon, Sangyong; Choi, Insung S.

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, we suggest a facile and effective method for water-repellent coating of oxide surfaces. As a coating material, we synthesized a new random copolymer, referred to as poly(TMSMA-r-fluoroMA), by the radical polymerization of 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (TMSMA) and a fluoromonomer® bearing methacrylate moiety (fluoroMA). The random copolymer was designed to consist of a 'surface-reactive part' (trimethoxysilyl group) for anchoring onto oxide-based surfaces and a 'functional part' (perfluoro group) for water repellency. The polymeric self-assembled monolayers (pSAMs) of poly(TMSMA-r-fluoroMA) were constructed on three different aluminum oxide substrates, such as flat, concave-textured, and nanoporous plates, and the static water contact angle of each surface before and after the formation of pSAMs was measured. The formation of pSAMs resulted in significantly enhanced hydrophobicity compared with the corresponding bare surfaces. In particular, among three poly(TMSMA-r-fluoroMA)-coated surfaces, the nanoporous plate showed the highest water-repellent property, with a static contact angle of ~163°, which is indicative of superhydrophobic surfaces.

  8. Nanoporous silicon tubes: the role of geometry in nanostructure formation and application to light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukajlović Pleština, Jelena; Đerek, Vedran; Francaviglia, Luca; Amaduzzi, Francesca; Potts, Heidi; Ivanda, Mile; Morral, Anna Fontcuberta i.

    2017-07-01

    Obtaining light emission from silicon has been the holy grail of optoelectronics over the last few decades. One of the most common methods for obtaining light emission from silicon is to reduce it to a nanoscale structure, for example by producing porous silicon. Here, we present a method for the large-area fabrication of porous silicon microtubes by the stain etching of silicon micropillar arrays. We explain and model how the formation of the microtubes is influenced by the morphology of the substrate, especially the concave or convex character of the 3D features. Light emission is demonstrated at the micro- and nanoscale respectively by photo- and cathodoluminescence. Finally, we demonstrate a 0.55 cm2 device that can work as a photodetector with 2.3% conversion efficiency under one sun illumination, and also as a broadband light emitting diode, illustrating the applicability of our results for optoelectronic applications.

  9. Cracks growth behaviors of commercial pure titanium under nanosecond laser irradiation for formation of nanostructure-covered microstructures (with sub-5-μm)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, A. F.; Wang, W. J.; Mei, X. S.; Zheng, B. X.; Yan, Z. X.

    2016-11-01

    This study reported on the formation of sub-5-μm microstructures covered on titanium by cracks growth under 10-ns laser radiation at the wavelength of 532 nm and its induced light modification for production of nanostructures. The electric field intensity and laser power density absorbed by commercial pure titanium were computed to investigate the self-trapping introduced by cracks and the effect of surface morphology on laser propagation characteristics. It is found that nanostructures can form at the surface with the curvature radius below 20 μm. Meanwhile, variable laser fluences were applied to explore the evolution of cracks on commercial pure titanium with or without melt as spot overlap number increased. Experimental study was first performed at the peak laser fluence of 1.063 J/cm2 to investigate the microstructures induced only by cracks growth. The results demonstrated that angular microstructures with size between 1.68 μm and 4.74 μm was obtained and no nanostructure covered. Then, at the peak laser fluence of 2.126 J/cm2, there were some nanostructures covered on the melt-induced curved microstructured surface. However, surface molten material submerged in the most of cracks at the spot overlap number of 744, where the old cracks disappeared. The results indicated that there was too much molten material and melting time at the peak laser fluence of 2.126 J/cm2, which was not suitable for obtainment of perfect micro-nano structures. On this basis, peak laser fluence was reduced down to 1.595 J/cm2 and the sharp sub-5 μm microstructures with nanostructures covered was obtained at spot overlap number of 3720.

  10. Formation of light-emitting Si nanostructures in SiO(2) by pulsed anneals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachurin, G A; Cherkova, S G; Marin, D V; Yankov, R A; Deutschmann, M

    2008-09-03

    Intense excimer laser pulses, flash lamp annealing and rapid thermal annealing were used to form Si nanocrystals in thin SiO(2) layers implanted with high doses of Si ions. The pulse durations were 20 ns, 20 ms and 1 s, respectively. Laser annealing produced light sources luminescing in the wavelength range of 400-600 nm. They were attributed to the Si clusters formed as a result of the fast segregation of Si atoms from the SiO(2) network. There were no indications of nanocrystal formation in the as-implanted layers after 20 ns laser pulses; however, nanocrystals formed when, before the laser annealing, the amorphous Si nanoprecipitates were prepared in the oxide layers. Evaluations show that the crystallization may proceed via melting. A photoluminescence band near 800 nm, typical of Si nanocrystals, was found after 20 ms and 1 s anneals. Calculations revealed that the annealing times in both cases were too short to provide the diffusion-limited crystal growth if one uses the values of stationary Si diffusivity in SiO(2). This points toward the existence of a transient rapid growth process at the very beginning of the anneals.

  11. Formation of light-emitting Si nanostructures in SiO{sub 2} by pulsed anneals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachurin, G A; Cherkova, S G; Marin, D V [Institute of Semiconductor Physics SO RAN, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Yankov, R A [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Deutschmann, M [Laser Zentrum Hannover, 30419 Hannover (Germany)

    2008-09-03

    Intense excimer laser pulses, flash lamp annealing and rapid thermal annealing were used to form Si nanocrystals in thin SiO{sub 2} layers implanted with high doses of Si ions. The pulse durations were 20 ns, 20 ms and 1 s, respectively. Laser annealing produced light sources luminescing in the wavelength range of 400-600 nm. They were attributed to the Si clusters formed as a result of the fast segregation of Si atoms from the SiO{sub 2} network. There were no indications of nanocrystal formation in the as-implanted layers after 20 ns laser pulses; however, nanocrystals formed when, before the laser annealing, the amorphous Si nanoprecipitates were prepared in the oxide layers. Evaluations show that the crystallization may proceed via melting. A photoluminescence band near 800 nm, typical of Si nanocrystals, was found after 20 ms and 1 s anneals. Calculations revealed that the annealing times in both cases were too short to provide the diffusion-limited crystal growth if one uses the values of stationary Si diffusivity in SiO{sub 2}. This points toward the existence of a transient rapid growth process at the very beginning of the anneals.

  12. Formation of light-emitting Si nanostructures in SiO2 by pulsed anneals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachurin, G. A.; Cherkova, S. G.; Marin, D. V.; Yankov, R. A.; Deutschmann, M.

    2008-09-01

    Intense excimer laser pulses, flash lamp annealing and rapid thermal annealing were used to form Si nanocrystals in thin SiO2 layers implanted with high doses of Si ions. The pulse durations were 20 ns, 20 ms and 1 s, respectively. Laser annealing produced light sources luminescing in the wavelength range of 400-600 nm. They were attributed to the Si clusters formed as a result of the fast segregation of Si atoms from the SiO2 network. There were no indications of nanocrystal formation in the as-implanted layers after 20 ns laser pulses; however, nanocrystals formed when, before the laser annealing, the amorphous Si nanoprecipitates were prepared in the oxide layers. Evaluations show that the crystallization may proceed via melting. A photoluminescence band near 800 nm, typical of Si nanocrystals, was found after 20 ms and 1 s anneals. Calculations revealed that the annealing times in both cases were too short to provide the diffusion-limited crystal growth if one uses the values of stationary Si diffusivity in SiO2. This points toward the existence of a transient rapid growth process at the very beginning of the anneals.

  13. Nanostructure Formation in the Nickel-Chrome Coating After Duplex Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Prohorenkova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available New results of research of the structure and phase state and mechanical properties of the coatings made of industrial composite powders based on Ni-Cr are presented and analyzed. Coatings were deposited by the plasma detonation method on the stainless steel substrate, and then they were exposed to the electron irradiation or the plasma-jet melting. TEM metallography, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray spectral analysis, X-ray structural phase analysis, determination of the microhardness and the corrosion resistance are chosen as the main research methods. It is established experimentally that before irradiation PG-19N-01 coating consists of the nanocrystalline γ-phase based on Ni and the microcrystalline CrNi3 phase. Regions of nanograins with various crystallographic lattice orientations are found in the nanocrystalline phase. The nanograin and microcrystallite sizes, the type and parameters of their lattices are defined. Deposition of the powder PG-10N-01, PG-19N-01 and PGAN-33 coatings by the plasma detonation method with the subsequent surface melting leads to the formation of multiphase dense coatings with the inter-metallic strengthening compounds, oxides and carbides. The irradiated coatings possess high microhardness, which is about 5 GPа, and corrosion resistance in sea-water.

  14. Formation and surface characterization of nanostructured Al2O3–TiO2 coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vairamuthu Raj; Mohamed Sirajudeen Mumjitha

    2014-10-01

    One pot synthesis of Al2O3–TiO2 nanoceramic coatings from environment-friendly potassium titanium oxalate (PTO) electrolyte using facile electrochemical anodization has been reported for the first time. Systematic analysis of the anodization parameters such as applied current density and concentration of the PTO electrolyte influence on the morphology of the ceramic coatings was done. The textural properties of the coatings (thickness, growth rate, coating ratio) showed a linear regime with current density and electrolyte concentration decreases up to a certain level and then decreases. The growth process, distribution of chemical elements, phase constitutions and corrosion resistance of the coatings were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Tafel polarization technique and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The relation between the corrosion resistivity of the anodic coating and the aforementioned anodization parameters is investigated. The mechanisms that are involved in the formation of the ceramic coatings are also discussed. The coatings formed from 30 g/L concentration of PTO and 0.02 A/cm2 current density show good morphology, textural properties and optimum corrosion resistance.

  15. Nanostructure and Formation Mechanism of PtWO3/C Nanocatalyst by Ethylene Glycol Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Feng; LIU Yanhong; WU Chuan

    2011-01-01

    Pt-WO3 nanoparticles uniformly dispersed on Vulcan XC-72R carbon black were prepared by an ethylene glycol method. The morphology, composition, nanosturcture, electrochemical characteristics and electrocatalytic activity were characterized, and the formation mechanism was investigated. The average particle size was 2.3 nm, the same as that of Pt/C catalyst. The W/Pt atomic ratio was 1/20, much lower than the design of 1/3. The deposition of WO3·xH2O nanoparticles on Vulcan XC-72R carbon black was found to be very difficult by TEM. From XPS and XRD, the Pt nanoparticles were formed in the colloidal solution of Na2WO4,the EG insoluble Na2WO4 resulted in the decreased relative crystallinity and increased crystalline lattice constant compared with those of Pt/C catalyst and, subsequently, the higher specific electrocatalytic activity as determined by CV. The Pt-mass and Pt-electrochemically-active-specific-surface-area based anodic peak current densities for ethanol oxidation were 422.2 mA·mg-1Pt and 0.43 mA·cm-2Pt, 1.2 and 1.1 times higher than those of Pt/C catalyst, respectively.

  16. Computer Code for Nanostructure Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filikhin, Igor; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2009-01-01

    Due to their small size, nanostructures can have stress and thermal gradients that are larger than any macroscopic analogue. These gradients can lead to specific regions that are susceptible to failure via processes such as plastic deformation by dislocation emission, chemical debonding, and interfacial alloying. A program has been developed that rigorously simulates and predicts optoelectronic properties of nanostructures of virtually any geometrical complexity and material composition. It can be used in simulations of energy level structure, wave functions, density of states of spatially configured phonon-coupled electrons, excitons in quantum dots, quantum rings, quantum ring complexes, and more. The code can be used to calculate stress distributions and thermal transport properties for a variety of nanostructures and interfaces, transport and scattering at nanoscale interfaces and surfaces under various stress states, and alloy compositional gradients. The code allows users to perform modeling of charge transport processes through quantum-dot (QD) arrays as functions of inter-dot distance, array order versus disorder, QD orientation, shape, size, and chemical composition for applications in photovoltaics and physical properties of QD-based biochemical sensors. The code can be used to study the hot exciton formation/relation dynamics in arrays of QDs of different shapes and sizes at different temperatures. It also can be used to understand the relation among the deposition parameters and inherent stresses, strain deformation, heat flow, and failure of nanostructures.

  17. Observation of nanostructured cluster formation of Tm ions in CaF{sub 2} crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drazic, G.; Kobe, S. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Cefalas, A.C. [National Hellenic Research Foundation, TPCI, 48 Vassileos Constantinou Avenue, Athens 11635 (Greece)], E-mail: ccefalas@eie.gr; Sarantopoulou, E.; Kollia, Z. [National Hellenic Research Foundation, TPCI, 48 Vassileos Constantinou Avenue, Athens 11635 (Greece)

    2008-08-25

    Transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and high-resolution scanning-transmission electron microscopy, with electron beam sizes ranging from 2 to 50 nm, were used to investigate the spatial distribution and homogeneity of doped Tm{sup 3+} ions in CaF{sub 2} host matrices with atomic resolution, in solid crystals grown from melts using the Bridgman-Stockbarger method. With the smallest size electron beam available of 2 nm, it was found that the Tm{sup 3+} ions were distributed inhomogeneously at the host sites. They took the form of sub-nm agglomerations of 3-5 atoms, rather than individual ions and the phase transition layer was 0.1 nm thick. The spatial extend of inhomogeneous Tm{sup 3+} concentration was 2.6-6 nm and originates from ionic density fluctuations in the liquid phase at the interface layer due to the local electrostatic field at the ionic sites.

  18. Formation, characterization, and flow dynamics of nanostructure modified sensitive and selective gas sensors based on porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Serdar

    Nanopore covered microporous silicon interfaces have been formed via an electrochemical etch for gas sensor applications. Rapid reversible and sensitive gas sensors have been fabricated. Both top-down and bottom-up approaches are utilized in the process. A nano-pore coated micro-porous silicon surface is modified selectively for sub-ppm detection of NH3, PH3 , NO, H2S, SO2. The selective depositions include electrolessly generated SnO2, CuxO, Au xO, NiO, and nanoparticles such as TiO2, MgO doped TiO 2, Al2O3, and ZrO2. Flow dynamics are analyzed via numerical simulations and response data. An array of sensors is formed to analyze mixed gas response. A general coating selection method for chemical sensors is established via an extrapolation on the inverse of the Hard-Soft Acid-Base concept. In Chapter 1, the current state of the porous silicon gas sensor research is reviewed. Since metal oxide thin films, and, recently, nanowires are dominantly used for sensing application, the general properties of metal oxides are also discussed in this chapter. This chapter is concluded with a discussion about commercial gas sensors and the advantages of using porous silicon as a sensing material. The PS review discussed at the beginning of this chapter is an overview of the following publication: (1) "The Potential of Porous Silicon Gas Sensors", Serdar Ozdemir, James L. Gole, Current Opinion in Solid State and Materials Science, 11, 92-100 (2007). In Chapter 2, porous silicon formation is explained in detail. Interesting results of various silicon anodization experiments are discussed. In the second part of this chapter, the microfabrication process of porous silicon conductometric gas sensors and gas testing set up are briefly introduced. In chapter 3, metal oxide nanoparticle/nanocluster formation and characterization experiments via SEM and XPS analysis are discussed. Chapter 4 is an overview of the test results for various concentrations NH3, NO, NO2 and PH3. The

  19. The formation of bronchocutaneous fistulae due to retained epicardial pacing wires: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios Patris

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporary epicardial pacing wires during open-heart surgery are routinely used both for diagnostic and treatment purposes. In complicated cases where patients are unstable or the wires are difficult to remove, the pacing wires are cut at the skin level and allowed to retract by themselves. This procedure rarely causes complications. However, there have been cases reporting that retained pacing wires are linked to the formation of sterno-bronchial fistulae, which may present a while after the date of operation and are usually infected. This review aims to study the cases presenting sterno-bronchial fistulae due to retained epicardial pacing wires and to highlight the important factors associated with these. It is important to note these complications, as fistulae may cause a variety of problems to the patient if undiagnosed and left untreated. With the aid of scans such as fistulography, fistulae can be identified and treated and will improve the patients' health dramatically.

  20. Singular deposit formation in PWR due to electrokinetic phenomena - application to SG clogging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillodo, M.; Muller, T.; Barale, M.; Foucault, M. [AREVA NP SAS, Technical Centre (France); Clinard, M.-H.; Brun, C.; Chahma, F. [AREVA NP SAS, Chemistry and Radiochemistry Group (France); Corredera, G.; De Bouvier, O. [Electricite de France, Centre d' Expertise de I' inspection dans les domaines de la Realisation et de l' Exploitation (France)

    2009-07-01

    The deposits which cause clogging of the 'foils' of the tube support plates (TSP) in Steam Generators (SG) of PWR present two characteristics which put forward that the mechanism at the origin of their formation is different from the mechanism that drives the formation of homogeneous deposits leading to the fouling of the free spans of SG tubes. Clogging occurs near the leading edge of the TSP and the deposits appear as diaphragms localized between both TSP and SG tubing materials, while the major part of the tube/TSP interstice presents little or no significant clogging. This type of deposit seems rather comparable to the ones which were reproduced in Lab tests to explain the flow rate instabilities observed on a French unit during hot shutdown in the 90's. The deposits which cause TSP clogging are owed to a discontinuity of the streaming currents in the vicinity of a surface singularity (orifices, scratches ...) which, in very low conductivity environment, produce local potential variations and/or current loop in the metallic pipe material due to electrokinetic effects. Deposits can be built by two mechanisms which may or not coexist: (i) accumulation of particles stabilized by an electrostatic attraction due to the local variation of electrokinetic potential, and (ii) crystalline growth of magnetite produced by the oxidation of ferrous ions on the anodic branch of a current loop. Lab investigations carried out by AREVA NP Technical Centre since the end of the 90's showed that this type of deposit occurs when the redox potential is higher than a critical value, and can be gradually dissolved when the potential becomes lower than this value which depends on the 'Material - Chemistry' couple. Special emphasis will be given in this paper to the TSP clogging of SG in PWR secondary coolant dealing particularly with the potential strong effect of electrokinetic phenomena in low conductive environment and in high temperature conditions

  1. Conduction Channel Formation and Dissolution Due to Oxygen Thermophoresis/Diffusion in Hafnium Oxide Memristors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Suhas; Wang, Ziwen; Huang, Xiaopeng; Kumari, Niru; Davila, Noraica; Strachan, John Paul; Vine, David; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Nishi, Yoshio; Williams, R. Stanley

    2016-12-27

    Due to the favorable operating power, endurance, speed, and density., transition-metal-oxide memristors, or resistive random-access memory (RRAM) switches, are under intense development for storage-class memory. Their commercial deployment critically depends on predictive compact models based on understanding nanoscale physiocochemical forces, which remains elusive and controversial owing to the difficulties in directly observing atomic motions during resistive switching, Here, using scanning transmission synchrotron X-ray spectromicroscopy to study in situ switching of hafnium oxide memristors, we directly observed the formation of a localized oxygen-deficiency-derived conductive channel surrounded by a low-conductivity ring of excess oxygen. Subsequent thermal annealing homogenized the segregated oxygen, resetting the cells toward their as-grown resistance state. We show that the formation and dissolution of the conduction channel are successfully modeled by radial thermophoresis and Fick diffusion of oxygen atoms driven by Joule heating. This confirmation and quantification of two opposing nanoscale radial forces that affect bipolar memristor switching are important components for any future physics-based compact model for the electronic switching of these devices.

  2. Vitamin E-TPGS stabilized self-assembled tripeptide nanostructures for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Santosh; Rai, Vartika; Mahato, Manohar; Singh, Mahak; Deka, Smriti Rekha; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembled peptides and specifically small peptide based nanostructures have been the focus of research in past decade due to their potential biological applications. In this study, we prepared a protected peptide, Boc-Pro-Phe-Gly-OMe, which self-assembled in aqueous solutions leading to the formation of nanostructures and ability to act as a drug carrier. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements showed nanostructures with average size of 119.6 nm containing hydrophobic core, wherein hydrophobic drugs, viz, eosin, aspirin and curcumin, were successfully encapsulated. These encapsulated nanostructures, were further stabilized with Vitamin E-TPGS. In-vitro drug release studies revealed the release of drugs in controlled fashion from the nanostructures. The results advocate the potential of the proposed peptide nanostructures as controlled drug delivery systems and could be used in other biomedical applications.

  3. High-efficiency nanostructured window GaAs solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Dong; Kang, Yangsen; Huo, Yijie; Chen, Yusi; Cui, Yi; Harris, James S

    2013-10-09

    Nanostructures have been widely used in solar cells due to their extraordinary optical properties. In most nanostructured cells, high short circuit current has been obtained due to enhanced light absorption. However, most of them suffer from lowered open circuit voltage and fill factor. One of the main challenges is formation of good junction and electrical contact. In particular, nanostructures in GaAs only have shown unsatisfactory performances (below 5% in energy conversion efficiency) which cannot match their ideal material properties and the record photovoltaic performances in industry. Here we demonstrate a completely new design for nanostructured solar cells that combines nanostructured window layer, metal mesa bar contact with small area, high quality planar junction. In this way, we not only keep the advanced optical properties of nanostructures such as broadband and wide angle antireflection, but also minimize its negative impact on electrical properties. High light absorption, efficient carrier collection, leakage elimination, and good lateral conductance can be simultaneously obtained. A nanostructured window cell using GaAs junction and AlGaAs nanocone window demonstrates 17% energy conversion efficiency and 0.982 V high open circuit voltage.

  4. Nanostructured photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lan; Tan, H. Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-01-01

    III-V quantum well superlattice and quantum dot solar cells, Si quantum dot tandem cells, nanostructure-enhanced dye-sensitized solar cells and nanopatterned organic solar cells. We thank all the authors and reviewers for their contribution to this special issue. Special thanks are due to the journal's Publisher, Dr Olivia Roche and the editorial and publishing staff for their help and support.

  5. Cataract Formation due to use of Deferiprone in a Patient with Thalassemia Major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbaros sahin Karagun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Thalassemias are a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive diseases characterized by hypochromic microcytic anemia and occur as a result of defective synthesis of one or more hemoglobin chains. In patients, life-threatening clinical manifestations may occur because of severe iron overload due to frequent blood transfusions. Ocular changes in patients with thalassemia are to be encountered depending on the disease itself or chelator used in the treatment, but not very often. These changes are usually cataracts, optic neuropathy, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE degeneration, RPE mottling, retinal venous tortuosity, vitreoretinal hemorrhages and obliteration of the iris pattern. Desferrioxamine that is used as the first iron-binding chelating has well-known complications such as optic neuropathy and retinal toxicity. However, Deferiprone that used more common recently has replaced the Desferrioxamine but, there is very little information in the literature about the ocular toxicity of deferiprone. In this case report, we have reported a patient with deferiprone-induced cataract formation in order to draw attention to a little-known complication of the drug. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(Suppl 1: 112-116

  6. Formation of rod-like nanostructure by aggregation of TiO2 nanoparticles with improved performances

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Weijuan Zhang; Wenkai Chang; Baozhen Cheng; Zenghe Li; Junhui Ji; Yang Zhao; Jun Nie

    2015-10-01

    To improve the performance of titanium dioxide (TiO2)-based devices, many efforts have been made to prepare nanostructures with composite of TiO2 nanoparticles and nanorods. In this work, a novel rod-like TiO2 nanostructure was obtained via a controllable hydrolysis process. Morphology and structure analysis showed that the rod-like nanostructure was a well-aligned aggregate of nearly spherical TiO2 nanoparticles. Rod-like TiO2 nanoparticle aggregates were fabricated on a primary TiO2 nanoparticle-based layer without the use of template, and formed a hierarchical TiO2 composite film together. The photocatalytic activity of the TiO2 film with rod-like nanoparticle aggregates was evaluated by the degradation of methylene blue. The antibacterial activity of fabricated hierarchical TiO2 film was assessed against Staphylococcus aureus. The photoelectrochemical property of this film as the photoanode in assemble dye-sensitized solar cell was also tested. Compared with randomly distributed nanoparticle-based TiO2 film, the hierarchical TiO2 film exhibited improved performance of photocatalysis, antibacterial activity and photoelectric conversion.

  7. Acoustic and Electrical Property Changes Due to Microbial Growth and Biofilm Formation in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the effect of microbial growth and biofilm formation on compressional waves, and complex conductivity during stimulated microbial growth. Over the 29 day duration of the experiment, compressional wave amplitudes and arrival times f...

  8. ANALYSIS OF PERIODIC NANOSTRUCTURES FORMATION ON A GOLD SURFACE UNDER EXPOSURE TO ULTRASHORT LASER PULSES NEAR THE MELTING THRESHOLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Ivanov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Study. The mechanism of surface restructuring by ultrashort laser pulses involves a lot of fast, non-equilibrium, and interrelated processes while the solid is in a transient state. As a result, the analysis of the experimental data cannot cover all the mechanisms of nanostructuring. We present a direct comparison of a simulation and experimental results of surface nanomodification induced by a single laser pulse. Method. The experimental results were obtained by using a mask projection setup with a laser wavelength equal to 248 nm and a pulse length equal to 1.6 ps. This setup is used to produce an intensity grating on a gold surface with a sinusoidal shape and a period of 500 nm. The formed structures were analyzed by a scanning and transmission electron microscope, respectively. Then a hybrid atomistic-continuum model capable of capturing the essential mechanisms responsible for the nanostructuring process was used for modeling the interaction of the laser pulse with a thick gold target. Main Results. A good agreement between simulation and experimental data justifies the proposed approach as a powerful tool revealing the physics behind the nanostructuring process at a gold surface and providing a microscopic insight into the dynamics of the structuring processes of metals in general. The presented model, therefore, is an important step towards a new computational tool in predicting materials response to an ultrashort laser pulse on the atomic scale and properties of the modified surfaces. Practical Relevance. This detailed understanding of the dynamics of the process will pave the way towards pre-designed topologies for functionalized surfaces on the nano- and micro-scales.

  9. Assessment of the nanostructure of acid-base resistant zone by the application of all-in-one adhesive systems: Super dentin formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikaido, Toru; Weerasinghe, Dinesh D S; Waidyasekera, Kanchana; Inoue, Go; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2009-01-01

    An acid-base resistant zone (ABRZ) has been shown to be created under a hybrid layer in a self-etching adhesive system at the adhesive/dentin interface. The purpose of this study was to assess the nanostructure of the ABRZ by applying all-in-one adhesive systems. Human premolar dentin was treated with one of two all-in-one adhesive systems; Clearfil Tri-S Bond and G-Bond according to the manufacturers' instructions. After placement of a resin composite, the bonded interface was vertically sectioned and subjected to an acid-base challenge. Following this, the nanostructure of the ABRZ was examined by SEM and TEM. The SEM observations of the adhesive-dentin interface after the acid-base challenge indicated that a hybrid layer less than 1 mum thick was created, and a ABRZ was formed beneath the hybrid layer for each adhesive system. The TEM observations indicated that the ABRZ contained mineral components in both adhesive systems, however, the thickness of the ABRZ was material dependent. The application of the all-in-one adhesive systems created an ABRZ at the underlying dentin, which reinforced normal dentin against dental caries. Therefore, this zone was named 'Super Dentin'. Formation of 'Super Dentin' is a new approach in caries prevention.

  10. Small bowel obstruction due to phytobezoar formation within meckel diverticulum: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazzini, V.I. Jr.; English, W.J.; Bashist, B.; Moore, E. [Columbia Univ. College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Intestinal obstruction due to a phytobezoar within a Meckel diverticulum is exceedingly rare, with only seven reported cases in the surgical literature. The most important precipitating factor is the ingestion of agents high in fiber and cellulose. Small bowel obstruction in all but one case was due to retrograde propagation of the bezoar into the small bowel lumen. We report the clinical and CT findings in such a patient following a vegetarian diet. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Effects of nanosecond-pulsed laser irradiation on nanostructure formation on the surface of thin Au films on SiO{sub 2} glass substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Ruixuan [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Shibayama, Tamaki, E-mail: shiba@ufml.caret.hokudai.ac.jp [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials Science, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Meng, Xuan; Takayanagi, Shinya [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Yoshida, Yutaka; Yatsu, Shigeo; Watanabe, Seiichi [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials Science, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    In this study, we investigated nanostructure formations on the surface of Au thin films deposited on SiO{sub 2} glass substrates after nanosecond-pulsed laser irradiation, also the correlation between the nanostructures parameters and the photoabsorption peak. Spherical Au nanoparticle/SiO{sub 2} glass nanocomposites were formed on the surface of the Au thin films deposited on the SiO{sub 2} glass substrates after nanosecond-pulsed laser irradiation in air with a wavelength of 532 nm at a repetition rate of 2 Hz and a laser energy density of 0.7 kJ/m{sup 2}. Au nanoparticles were periodically arranged on the substrates under laser irradiation perpendicular to the direction of the electrical field vector of the laser light, the average diameter of Au nanoparticles was increased from 59.3 to 67.4 nm and the average distance of the laser induced periodical structure was decreased from 1.3 to 1.0 μm as the number of laser pulses increased from 1000 to 1500. After 2000 pulses irradiation, an additional laser irradiation induced periodical structure was formed in the direction parallel to the electrical field vector of the laser. The average periodicity of this nanostructure perpendicular to the initial nanostructure was 560 nm, which is close to the wavelength of the nanosecond-pulsed laser used in this study. The average diameter of these Au nanoparticles is 41.9 nm which is smaller than that of the Au nanoparticles formed after 1000 pulses irradiation. Au nanoparticles were generally dispersed on the surface while some were embedded in the substrate. After 1500 pulses irradiation, the diameter of the Au nanoparticles on the Au(30 nm)/SiO{sub 2}(0.8 mm) is relatively larger than that of the Au nanoparticles on the Au(20 nm)/SiO{sub 2}(0.1 mm). Each of laser irradiated sample showed an own photoabsorption peak clearly in this study. Furthermore, effects of the average diameter of the Au nanoparticles on the photoabsorption peak are discussed.

  12. Acceleration of raindrops formation due to tangling-clustering instability in turbulent stratified atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Elperin, T; Krasovitov, B; Kulmala, M; Liberman, M; Rogachevskii, I; Zilitinkevich, S

    2013-01-01

    Condensation of water vapor on active cloud condensation nuclei produces micron-size water droplets. To form rain, they must grow rapidly into at least 50-100 micron-size droplets. Observations show that this process takes only 15-20 minutes. The unexplained physical mechanism of such fast growth, is crucial for understanding and modeling of rain, and known as "condensation-coalescence bottleneck in rain formation". We show that the recently discovered phenomenon of the tangling clustering instability of small droplets in temperature-stratified turbulence (Phys. Fluids 25, 085104, 2013) results in the formation of droplet clusters with drastically increased droplet number densities and strong five-orders-of-magnitude enhancement of the collision-coalescence rate inside the clusters. The mechanism of tangling clustering instability in the temperature-stratified turbulence is much more effective than the previously considered pure inertial clustering caused by the centrifugal effect of turbulent vortices. Our a...

  13. Formation of laves phase in a refractory austenitic steel due to long-term heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, L. V.; Shal'kevich, A. B.

    2011-07-01

    Steels of the Fe - Cr - Ni -Mo - Nb - Al - C system are studied by methods of phase physicochemical analysis and electron microscopy with the aim to determine the causes of changes in mechanical properties after long-term heating at a temperature of 600 - 700°C. Grain-boundary formation of particles of a Laves phase is shown to cause decrease in the impact toughness and transformation of particles of γ'-phase under conditions of creep. The effect of alloying elements on the chemical composition of the multicomponent Laves phase is studied depending on the temperatures of hardening, aging, and subsequent heating. Concentration correspondence between the chemical composition of the austenite and the intermetallic tcp phase formed in aging is discovered. A computational scheme for predicting the possibility of formation of Laves phases in multicomponent alloys is suggested.

  14. Changes in the halo formation rates due to features in the primordial spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Hazra, Dhiraj Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Features in the primordial scalar power spectrum provide a possible roadway to describe the outliers at the low multipoles in the WMAP data. Apart from the CMB angular power spectrum, these features can also alter the matter power spectrum and, thereby, the formation of the large scale structure. Carrying out a complete numerical analysis, we investigate the effects of primordial features on the formation rates of the halos. We consider a few different inflationary models that lead to features in the scalar power spectrum and an improved fit to the CMB data, and analyze the corresponding imprints on the formation of halos. Performing a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis with the WMAP seven year data and the SDSS halo power spectrum from LRG DR7 for the models of our interest, we arrive at the parameter space of the models allowed by the data. We illustrate that, inflationary potentials, such as the quadratic potential with sinusoidal modulations and the axion monodromy model, which generate certain repeated, o...

  15. Superhydrophilic nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Zormpa, Vasileia; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-05-12

    An embodiment of a superhydrophilic nanostructure includes nanoparticles. The nanoparticles are formed into porous clusters. The porous clusters are formed into aggregate clusters. An embodiment of an article of manufacture includes the superhydrophilic nanostructure on a substrate. An embodiment of a method of fabricating a superhydrophilic nanostructure includes applying a solution that includes nanoparticles to a substrate. The substrate is heated to form aggregate clusters of porous clusters of the nanoparticles.

  16. Irreversible fouling of membrane bioreactors due to formation of a non-biofilm gel layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poorasgari, Eskandar; Larsen, Poul; Zheng, Xing

    2014-01-01

    Extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS), known to contribute to fouling in membrane bio-reactors (MBRs), are generally divided into bound and free EPS. The free EPS are able to form a gel layer on the membrane active surface. The mechanisms involved in formation of such layer and its effects...... with the amount of the humic-like substances retained during filtration as predicted by gel growth theory. A low pressure backwash could re-establish the Water flux only up to 70%....

  17. Conduction Channel Formation and Dissolution Due to Oxygen Thermophoresis/Diffusion in Hafnium Oxide Memristors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suhas; Wang, Ziwen; Huang, Xiaopeng; Kumari, Niru; Davila, Noraica; Strachan, John Paul; Vine, David; Kilcoyne, A L David; Nishi, Yoshio; Williams, R Stanley

    2016-12-27

    Transition-metal-oxide memristors, or resistive random-access memory (RRAM) switches, are under intense development for storage-class memory because of their favorable operating power, endurance, speed, and density. Their commercial deployment critically depends on predictive compact models based on understanding nanoscale physicochemical forces, which remains elusive and controversial owing to the difficulties in directly observing atomic motions during resistive switching, Here, using scanning transmission synchrotron X-ray spectromicroscopy to study in situ switching of hafnium oxide memristors, we directly observed the formation of a localized oxygen-deficiency-derived conductive channel surrounded by a low-conductivity ring of excess oxygen. Subsequent thermal annealing homogenized the segregated oxygen, resetting the cells toward their as-grown resistance state. We show that the formation and dissolution of the conduction channel are successfully modeled by radial thermophoresis and Fick diffusion of oxygen atoms driven by Joule heating. This confirmation and quantification of two opposing nanoscale radial forces that affect bipolar memristor switching are important components for any future physics-based compact model for the electronic switching of these devices.

  18. Cosmic backgrounds due to the formation of the first generation of supermassive black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Biermann, Peter L; Caramete, Laurenţiu I; Harms, Benjamin C; Stanev, Todor; Tjus, Julia Becker

    2014-01-01

    The statistics of black holes and their masses strongly suggests that their mass distribution has a cutoff towards lower masses near $3 \\times 10^{6}$ M$_{\\odot}$. This is consistent with a classical formation mechanism from the agglomeration of the first massive stars in the universe. However, when the masses of the stars approach $10^{6}$ M$_{\\odot}$, the stars become unstable and collapse, possibly forming the first generation of cosmological black holes. Here we speculate that the claimed detection of an isotropic radio background may constitute evidence of the formation of these first supermassive black holes, since their data are compatible in spectrum and intensity with synchrotron emission from the remnants. The model proposed fulfills all observational conditions for the background, in terms of single-source strength, number of sources, far-infrared and gamma-ray emission. The observed high energy neutrino flux is consistent with our calculations in flux and spectrum. The proposal described in this p...

  19. Methemoglobin and sulfhemoglobin formation due to benzocaine and lidocaine in macaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, D.G.; Woodard, C.L.; Gold, M.B.; Watson, C.E.; Baskin, S.I.

    1993-05-13

    Benzocaine (BNZ) and lidocaine (LC) are commonly used topical (spray) anesthetics approved for use in humans. BNZ has structural similarities to methemoglobin (MHb) forming drugs that are current candidates for cyanide prophylaxis, while LC has been reported to increase MHb in man. We therefore, compared MHb and sulfhemoglobin (SHb) production in three groups of Macaques (Macaca mulata, Chinese rhesus and Indian rhesus, and Macaca nemistrina, Pig-tailed Macaques) after exposure to BNZ and LC. Formation of SHb, unlike MHb, is not thought to be reversible and is considered to be toxic. MHb and SHb levels were measured periodically on a CO-Oximeter. All rhesus (n=8) were dosed intratrachealy/intranasaly with 56 mg and 280 mg BNZ and with 40 mg of LC in a randomized cross-over design. Pig-tailed macaques (n=6) were dosed with BNZ intranasaly 56 mg and with 40 mg of LC. Since no differences in the peak MHb or time to peak (mean +/- SD) were observed among the three macaque subspecies, the data were pooled. LC did not cause MHb or SHb formation above baseline in any monkey.

  20. Severe upper airway obstruction due to delayed retropharyngeal hematoma formation following blunt cervical trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciceri David P

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We report a case of severe upper airway obstruction due to a retropharyngeal hematoma that presented nearly one day after a precipitating traumatic injury. Retropharyngeal hematomas are rare, but may cause life-threatening airway compromise. Case presentation A 50 year-old man developed severe dyspnea with oropharyngeal airway compression due to retropharyngeal hematoma 20 hours after presenting to the emergency department. The patient also had a fractured first cervical vertebra and was diagnosed with a left brachial plexopathy. The patient underwent emergent awake fiberoptic endotracheal intubation to provide a definitive airway. Conclusion Retropharyngeal hematoma with life-threatening airway compromise can develop hours or days after a precipitating injury. Clinicians should be alert to the potential for this delayed airway collapse, and should also be prepared to rapidly secure the airway in this patient population likely to have concomitant cervical spinal or head injuries.

  1. Formation of electric dipoles in pea stem tissue due to an electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Fatemeh; Farahani, Elham

    2016-07-01

    For examining the effect of an electrical field (DC) on pea seed, we exposed the pea seeds to electric fields with intensities 1, 4 and 7 kV/cm for 30, 230, 430 and 630 seconds. The tests were repeated three times, and each iteration had 5 seeds. Then, the seeds were moved to packaged plates. Finally, microscopic observation of the pea stem tissue showed that the application of a DC electrical field caused a deformation in the pea stem tissue. The results led us to examine the deformation of the tissue theoretically and to address that deformation as an electrostatic problem. In this regard, we modeled the pea stem based on the formation of electric dipoles. Then, theoretically, we calculated the force acting on each xylem section by coding, and the results were consistent with the experimental data.

  2. Organogel Formation Due to the Self-Assembly of Dibenzylidene Sorbitol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Elizabeth; Hall, Carol; Khan, Saad; Spontak, Richard

    2002-03-01

    Dibenzylidene sorbitol (DBS) is a small organic molecule that is capable of inducing gelation in a variety of organic solvents and polymers at low concentrations. In this study, a combination of rheological studies, electron microscopy, and computational methods were employed to probe the mechanisms involved in DBS-induced gelation. Rheological tests on DBS/poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) gels reveal that as DBS concentration is increased, the gels exhibit greater elastic moduli, shorter gelation times, and maintain their connectivity at higher temperatures. Comparison of methoxy-capped PEG gels with hydroxy-capped PEG gels reveals that polar end groups interfere with network formation resulting in slower gelation times. Electron microscopy and tomography on DBS networks in poly(ethyl methacrylate) show that at low concentrations, DBS associates into small aggregates, while at higher concentrations fibrillar growth is evident. Molecular mechanical energy calculations suggest that DBS networks may form through a combination of intermolecular hydrogen bonding and pi-interactions.

  3. Centerline Bed Elevation Profile of Sand Bed Channel due to Bar Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tholibon, D. A.; Ariffin, J.; Abdullah, J.; Muhamad, N. S.

    2016-07-01

    Numerous data on bar formation have been accumulated yet the methods to predict bar geometry especially bar height are still insufficient. Objectives of this study to determine the trend in term of a significant difference of centreline bed elevation profile along the longitudinal distance. This can be investigate by carried out an experimental work in an erodible sand bed channel using a large-scale physical river model. The study included the various hydraulic characteristics with steady flow rates and sediment supply. An experimental work consists of four matrices of flow rate and channel width with other variables namely grains size and bed slope were kept constant. Analysis have included the discussion on a significant difference of centreline bed elevation profile along the longitudinal distance. As a conclusion the higher velocity in the smaller channel width have induced erosion of the banks that resulted in elevation increase while the larger flow rates have contributed to higher elevation.

  4. Plasma treatment of ITO films for the formation of nanoparticles toward scalable production of novel nanostructure-based solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Cigang; Bailey, Louise R.; Proudfoot, Gary; Cooke, Mike [Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology, Bristol (United Kingdom); Eisenhawer, Bjoern; Jia, Guobin; Bergmann, Joachim; Falk, Fritz [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Jena (Germany); Ulyashin, Alexander [Department of Industrial Processes, SINTEF, Oslo (Norway)

    2015-01-01

    Plasma treatment of indium tin oxide (ITO) has been studied to form metallic nanoparticles (NPs) for nanostructure-based solar cells. It is demonstrated that NPs can be formed at temperatures as low as 100 C, and the size of NPs increases with temperature. An ITO layer treated at 100 C has higher transmission than that treated at 200 C for the same time. It is suggested that such NPs can be used for the conversion efficiency enhancement of ITO/Si heterojunction solar cells. It is also shown that NPs can be produced on different substrates covered by an ITO layer, such as ITO/Al foil, ITO/glass, ITO/stainless steel, and ITO/Si, where the resulting NPs were used for catalytic growth of Si nanowires (NWs). The morphology and density of Si NWs depend on a substrate. It is established that p-doped Si NWs show larger diameters, and n-doped Si NWs do not show obvious change of diameters compared to undoped Si NWs. New types of solar cell structures with combined radial and axial junctions have been proposed. As an example, p-n junction-based 3D structures using the NPs obtained from treatment of ITO film are presented. Finally, a potentially scalable process flow for fabrication of nanostructure-based solar cells is discussed. Schematic illustration of fabrication steps to produce the proposed novel solar cell with combined radial and axial junctions. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Piezoelectric ZnO nanostructure for energy harvesting

    CERN Document Server

    Leprince-Wang, Yamin

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, ZnO as an important II-VI semiconductor has attracted much attention within the scientific community over the world owing to its numerous unique and prosperous properties. This material, considered as a "future material", especially in nanostructural format, has aroused many interesting research works due to its large range of applications in electronics, photonics, acoustics, energy and sensing. The bio-compatibility, piezoelectricity & low cost fabrication make ZnO nanostructure a very promising material for energy harvesting.

  6. Reduction of Liquid Clad Formation Due to Solid State Diffusion in Clad Brazing Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Michael J.; Whitney, Mark A.; Wells, Mary A.; Winkler, Sooky

    2016-12-01

    Warm forming operations have shown promise in expanding automotive heat exchanger designs by increasing forming limits of clad brazing sheet. The impact of isothermal holds below the clad melting temperature on subsequent brazeability has not previously been studied in detail. The effect of these holds on brazeability, as measured by the clad thickness loss due to solid state diffusion of Si out of the clad layer prior to clad melting, was assessed through parallel DSC and optical microscopy measurements, as well as through the use of a previously developed model. EPMA measurements were also performed to support the other measures. Overall, the same trends were predicted by DSC, microscopy, and the theoretical model; however, the DSC predictions were unable to accurately predict remaining clad thickness prior to melting, even after correcting the data for clad-core interactions. Microscopy measurements showed very good agreement with the model predictions, although there were slight discrepancies at short hold times due to the inability of the model to account for clad loss during heating to the brazing temperature. Further microscopy measurements showed that when the heating rate is set below a critical value, there is a reduction in the clad thickness from the as-received condition.

  7. Core/shell formation and surface segregation of multi shell icosahedral silver-palladium bimetallic nanostructures: A dynamic and thermodynamic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewage, Jinasena W., E-mail: jinasena@chem.ruh.ac.lk

    2016-05-01

    Core/shell formation and surface segregation of multi shell icosahedral bimetallic silver-palladium nanostructures with the size of 55 and 147 atoms were studied by using the Molecular Dynamics simulations, and calculating Helmholtz free energy changes in the penetration of palladium atoms from shell to core, core to shell transition of silver and melting temperatures by using statistical mechanical densities of states. In 55 atoms icosahedra, two core–shell motifs, Ag{sub 13}Pd{sub 42} and Pd{sub 13}Ag{sub 42} with their isomers Pd{sub 13}(Pd{sub 29}Ag{sub 13}) and Ag{sub 13}(Ag{sub 29}Pd{sub 13}) were considered. Similarly in 147 atoms icosahedra, all mutations corresponding to the occupations of either silver atoms or palladium atoms in the core, inner shell or outer shell and their isomers generated by interchanging thirteen core atoms with thirteen atoms of the other type in the inner and outer shells were considered. It is found that the palladium-core clusters are more stable than the silver-core clusters and cohesive energy increases with the palladium composition. Phase transition of each cluster was studied by means of constant volume heat capacity. The trend in variation of melting temperature is accordance with the energy trend. Helmholtz free energy changes in palladium penetration, core to shell transition of silver and in surface mixing and segregation revealed the thermodynamic stability of the formation of Pd{sub core}Ag{sub shell} structures especially at silver rich environment and the surface segregation of silver. - Highlights: • Nanostructures of Pd{sub m}Ag{sub n} clusters for m + n = 55 and 147 have been studied. • Structures favor the formation of palladium-core surrounded by silver shell. • Calculated thermodynamic parameters confirm the energetic results. • Core/shell formation is favored at concentration of silver. • Silver segregation on surface while palladium penetration to core is observed.

  8. Study and comparison of the thermal conductivity of nanofluids and increase of heat transfer due to the effect of size of nano-flow and nano-structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Taheri Ghazvini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the thermal conductivity of nanofluids regarding the effect of size of nano-flow and nano-structure via artificial neural network has been examined. The variations of copper oxide which differ in terms of surface properties, shape and size have been used as nanoparticles in volumetric fraction of 0.001, 0.008 and 0.015. The use of these nanofluids in a heat exchanger tube that should cool a hot solution to a certain size is studied. Results from this research indicate that increase in volumetric fraction and nanofluid temperature causes increase in thermal conductivity of nanofluids which effect of temperature in higher volumetric fractions manifests more.

  9. Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum Due to Defective Glial Wedge Formation in Lhx2 Mutant Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Gregory A; Hirokawa, Karla E; Chuang, Tony M; Urbina, Cecilia; Patel, Fenil; Fong, Jeanette; Funatsu, Nobuo; Monuki, Edwin S

    2015-09-01

    Establishment of the corpus callosum involves coordination between callosal projection neurons and multiple midline structures, including the glial wedge (GW) rostrally and hippocampal commissure caudally. GW defects have been associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC). Here we show that conditional Lhx2 inactivation in cortical radial glia using Emx1-Cre or Nestin-Cre drivers results in ACC. The ACC phenotype was characterized by aberrant ventrally projecting callosal axons rather than Probst bundles, and was 100% penetrant on 2 different mouse strain backgrounds. Lhx2 inactivation in postmitotic cortical neurons using Nex-Cre mice did not result in ACC, suggesting that the mutant phenotype was not autonomous to the callosal projection neurons. Instead, ACC was associated with an absent hippocampal commissure and a markedly reduced to absent GW. Expression studies demonstrated strong Lhx2 expression in the normal GW and in its radial glial progenitors, with absence of Lhx2 resulting in normal Emx1 and Sox2 expression, but premature exit from the cell cycle based on EdU-Ki67 double labeling. These studies define essential roles for Lhx2 in GW, hippocampal commissure, and corpus callosum formation, and suggest that defects in radial GW progenitors can give rise to ACC.

  10. Mechanism underlying formation of SSC in optical glass due to dynamic impact of single diamond scratch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈江; 赵航; 张飞虎; 张元晶; 张勇

    2015-01-01

    During the grinding of optical glass, the abrasion directly affects the morphology and depth of subsurface cracks (SSC). The effect of dynamic impact of grinding abrasives on optical glass is an important issue in the field of optics manufacturing. In this work, a single diamond scratch was used to grind optical glass, and grinding parameters were collaboratively controlled to ensure that the cutting layer remained constant. A dynamometer was used to record the duration of the impact process, and the cross-section of the test piece was polished for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine the depth of the SSCs. The experimental results show that as wheel speed increases, SSC depth tends to decrease. When the wheel speed gradually increases from 500 r/min to 2500 r/min, the probability distribution curve for the maximum SSC depth shifts downward by around 80 µm. The effect of the dynamic impact of single diamond scratch is found to be an important cause of SSC formation in optical glass during grinding, i.e., the faster the grinding, the shallower the SSCs.

  11. Mechanism underlying formation of SSC in optical glass due to dynamic impact of single diamond scratch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈江; 赵航; 张飞虎; 张元晶; 张勇

    2015-01-01

    During the grinding of optical glass, the abrasion directly affects the morphology and depth of subsurface cracks(SSC). The effect of dynamic impact of grinding abrasives on optical glass is an important issue in the field of optics manufacturing. In this work, a single diamond scratch was used to grind optical glass, and grinding parameters were collaboratively controlled to ensure that the cutting layer remained constant. A dynamometer was used to record the duration of the impact process, and the cross-section of the test piece was polished for scanning electron microscopy(SEM) to determine the depth of the SSCs. The experimental results show that as wheel speed increases, SSC depth tends to decrease. When the wheel speed gradually increases from 500 r/min to 2500 r/min, the probability distribution curve for the maximum SSC depth shifts downward by around 80 μm. The effect of the dynamic impact of single diamond scratch is found to be an important cause of SSC formation in optical glass during grinding, i.e., the faster the grinding, the shallower the SSCs.

  12. Subsurface deuterium bubble formation in W due to low-energy high flux deuterium plasma exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Y. Z.; Liu, W.; Xu, B.; Qu, S. L.; Shi, L. Q.; Morgan, T. W.

    2017-03-01

    The deuterium (D) bubbles formed in W exposed to high flux D plasma were researched by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. After D plasma exposure at 500 K and 1000 K, a layer of nano-sized bubbles were homogenously distributed in W subsurface region. The D bubbles were homogenously nucleated due to the high D concentration, and the nucleation process is not related to the vacancy defects. At low temperature (500 K), D bubbles can grow by surface blistering, which caused different nano scale morphologies on different surfaces. At high temperature (1000 K), D bubbles mainly grow by vacancy clustering, which caused pinholes on the surface.

  13. Solar Wind Strahl Observations and Their Implication to the Core-Halo Formation due to Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinas, Adolfo F.

    2011-01-01

    A study of the kinetic properties of the strahl electron velocity distribution functions (VDF?s) in the solar wind is presented. This study focuses on the mechanisms that control and regulate the electron VDF?s and the stability of the strahl electrons in the solar wind; mechanisms that are not yet well understood. Various parameters are investigated such as the strahl-electron density, temperature anisotropy, and electron heat-flux. These parameters are used to investigate the stability of the strahl population. The analysis check for whether the strahl electrons are constrained by some instability (e.g., the whistler or KAW instabilities), or are maintained by other types of processes. The electron heat-flux and temperature anisotropy are determined by modeling of the 3D-VDF?s from which the moments properties of the various populations are obtained. The results of this study have profound implication on the current hypothesis about the probable formation of the solar wind halo electrons produced from the scattering of the strahl population. This hypothesis is strengthened by direct observations of the strahl electrons being scattered into the core-halo in an isolated event. The observation implies that the scattering of the strahl is not a continuous process but occurs in bursts in regions where conditions for wave growth providing the scattering are optimum. Sometimes, observations indicate that the strahl component is anisotropic (Tper/Tpal approx. 2). This provides a possible free energy source for the excitation of whistler waves as a possible scattering mechanism, however this condition is not always observed. The study is based on high time resolution data from the Cluster/PEACE electron spectrometer.

  14. Lifetime of Nano-Structured Black Silicon for Photovoltaic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk;

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present recent results of lifetime optimization for nano-structured black silicon and its photovoltaic applications. Black silicon nano-structures provide significant reduction of silicon surface reflection due to highly corrugated nanostructures with excellent light trapping......, respectively. This is promising for use of black silicon RIE nano-structuring in a solar cell process flow...

  15. Lifetime of Nano-Structured Black Silicon for Photovoltaic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk;

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present recent results of lifetime optimization for nano-structured black silicon and its photovoltaic applications. Black silicon nano-structures provide significant reduction of silicon surface reflection due to highly corrugated nanostructures with excellent light trapping pro......, respectively. This is promising for use of black silicon RIE nano-structuring in a solar cell process flow...

  16. Formation mechanism and luminescence properties of nanostructured sodium yttrium fluoride corn sticks synthesized by precipitation transformation method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田俐; 赵瑞妮; 王金晶; 陈琳; 薛建荣; 肖秋国

    2015-01-01

    Monodisperse sodium yttrium fluoride corn sticks with hexagonal nanostructure were successfully prepared by a facile and repeatable precipitation transformation method. The phase and morphology of the products were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The growth mechanism was studied, indicating that the initial generated Y(OH)3 gradually translated into YF3 and then transformed into corn stick-like H-NaYF4 nanoparticles owing to the crucial role of fluorine ions in the solution. The up-conversion (UC) luminescence properties of H-NaYF4:20%Yb3+,2%Er3+ nanocrystals were discussed. The intensive green emission in the range of 510–570 nm was attributed to the (2H11/2,4S3/2)→4I15/2 transition and the weaker red emission between 640 and 680 nm was originating from the4F9/2→4I15/2 transition.

  17. Exerimental study of the formation of Sn nanostructures from undercooled droplets as a function of impurity content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Gregory

    The classical theory of nucleation provides a fairly robust description of the nucleation behavior of liquids below their melting point. This model is based upon the assumption that the nucleus that forms in the undercooled liquid has the equilibrium structure, but recent experimental and molecular dynamic simulation results indicate that this view is too simplistic. Thus, a systematic experimental study of the nucleation and growth of Sn nanostructures in undercooled Sn and Sn alloy samples was conducted. Nucleation rates in undercooled Sn were found to monotonically increase with the concentration of impurity atoms (Co, Ni, Cu, or Ag). Results of these studies were applied to improve the reliability of Sn-Ag-Cu solder joints in microelectronic packages. Typical Pb-free solder alloys are composed of over 95% Sn, thus the nucleation and growth of Sn plays a large role in determining the reliability of Pb-free solder joints. The effects of alloy composition, volume, and pad metallization on the isothermal nucleation rate, solidification temperature and, Sn grain morphology of near eutectic Sn-Ag C4 solder bumps were examined. It was found that Sn-2.4Ag alloys on Ni pads have relatively low solidification temperatures. The appearance of a particular Sn grain morphology (interlaced Sn, shown elsewhere to have much higher resistance to electromigration degradation) was strongly correlated with solidification temperature.

  18. Magnetic Nano-structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚永德

    2004-01-01

    Fabrication of magnetic nano-structures with dots array and wires has been paid attention recently due to the application of high-density magnetic recording. In this study, we fabricated the magnetic dots array and wires through several ways that ensure the arrangement of magnetic dots and wires to be the structures we designed. Their magnetic properties are studied experimentally.

  19. Lipid Self-Assemblies and Nanostructured Emulsions for Cosmetic Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrashekhar V. Kulkarni

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A majority of cosmetic products that we encounter on daily basis contain lipid constituents in solubilized or insolubilized forms. Due to their amphiphilic nature, the lipid molecules spontaneously self-assemble into a remarkable range of nanostructures when mixed with water. This review illustrates the formation and finely tunable properties of self-assembled lipid nanostructures and their hierarchically organized derivatives, as well as their relevance to the development of cosmetic formulations. These lipid systems can be modulated into various physical forms suitable for topical administration including fluids, gels, creams, pastes and dehydrated films. Moreover, they are capable of encapsulating hydrophilic, hydrophobic as well as amphiphilic active ingredients owing to their special morphological characters. Nano-hybrid materials with more elegant properties can be designed by combining nanostructured lipid systems with other nanomaterials including a hydrogelator, silica nanoparticles, clays and carbon nanomaterials. The smart materials reviewed here may well be the future of innovative cosmetic applications.

  20. A kinetic model for the formation of hierarchical nanostructures during the evaporation of phase-forming compound solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melikhov, I. V.; Alekseeva, O. V.; Rudin, V. N.; Kozlovskaya, E. D.; Noskov, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    A kinetic model for the precipitation of a dispersed compound from solutions is formulated, based on a description of the evolution in the function of its particle distribution according to its states during precipitation. A boundary problem about the precipitation of a compound during the evaporation of a solvent from a solution under conditions in which the rate of aggregate formation is high is considered. The solution to this boundary problem can be used to describe the formation of a film of polystyrene during the evaporation of its solution in toluene and o-xylene deposited onto a substrate.

  1. Photoresponsive nanostructured membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, P.

    2016-07-26

    The perspective of adding stimuli-response to isoporous membranes stimulates the development of separation devices with pores, which would open or close under control of environment chemical composition, temperature or exposure to light. Changes in pH and temperature have been previously investigated. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the preparation of photoresponsive isoporous membranes, applying self-assembly non-solvent induced phase separation to a new light responsive block copolymer. First, we optimized the membrane formation by using poly(styrene-b-anthracene methyl methacrylate-b-methylmethacrylate) (PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA) copolymer, identifying the most suitable solvent, copolymer block length, and other parameters. The obtained final triblock copolymer membrane morphologies were characterized using atomic force and electron microscopy. The microscopic analysis reveals that the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer can form both lamellar and ordered hexagonal nanoporous structures on the membrane top layer in appropriate solvent compositions. The nanostructured membrane emits fluorescence due to the presence of the anthracene mid-block. On irradiation of light the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer membranes has an additional stimuli response. The anthracene group undergoes conformational changes by forming [4 + 4] cycloadducts and this alters the membrane\\'s water flux and solute retention. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  2. Nanostructured gadolinium-doped ceria microsphere synthesis from ion exchange resin: Multi-scale in-situ studies of solid solution formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caisso, Marie [CEA, DEN, DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Institut Européen des Membranes, UMR 5635 CNRS-ENSCM-UM2, CC047, Université Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Lebreton, Florent; Horlait, Denis [CEA, DEN, DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Picart, Sébastien [CEA, DEN, DRCP/SERA/LCAR, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Martin, Philippe M.; Bès, René [CEA, DEN, DEC/SESC/LLCC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Renard, Catherine; Roussel, Pascal [Unité de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide, UMR 8012 CNRS, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Lille BP 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Neuville, Daniel R. [Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris-CNRS, Géochimie and Cosmochimie, 1 rue Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Dardenne, Kathy; Rothe, Jörg [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (KIT-INE), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Delahaye, Thibaud, E-mail: thibaud.delahaye@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Ayral, André [Institut Européen des Membranes, UMR 5635 CNRS-ENSCM-UM2, CC047, Université Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

    2014-10-15

    In the current nano-sized material revolution, the main limitations to a large-scale deployment of nanomaterials involve health concerns related to nano-dissemination via air. Developing new chemical routes benefiting from nano-size advantages while avoiding their hazards could overcome these limitations. Addressing this need, a chemical route leading to soft nano-particle agglomerates, i.e., macroscopic precursors presenting the ability to be decomposed into nano-sized materials, was developed and applied to Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 2−δ}. Using cerium/gadolinium-loaded ion exchange resin, the Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 2−δ} solid solution formation as a function of temperature was studied in-situ through X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Temperatures corresponding to the organic skeleton decomposition and to the mixed oxide crystallization were identified. An optimal heat treatment, leading to nanostructured soft agglomerates, was established. Microsphere processing capabilities were evaluated and particle size distribution measurements were recorded. A very low fracture strength was calculated, and a nanometric particle size distribution (170 nm) was determined. - Graphical abstract: The elaboration of micro-spherical precursors leading to the formation of nano-oxide soft agglomerates was studied and approved through the use of ion exchange resin loaded with cerium and gadolinium. The formation of the solid solution was followed through in-situ measurements such as XAS, XRD, Raman, TGA and DSC. Key temperatures were identified for the formation of the mixed-oxide. Following this study, the microstructure and particle size of oxide microspheres formed highlight the formation of soft nano-arrangments. - Highlights: • Soft microspherical agglomerates able to be decomposed into nano-sized materials. • In situ study of cerium/gadolinium-loaded ion exchange resin conversion in oxide. • In situ multi-scale study

  3. Authigenic albite formation due to water-rock interactions - Case study: Magnus oilfield (UK, Northern North Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Nana; Fu, Yunjiao; Schulz, Hans-Martin; van Berk, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    It is the aim of this contribution to test whether organic-inorganic interactions could induce the formation of authigenic albite. This concept and related results are being compared with modelling scenarios which are purely based on inorganic geochemical reactions. In order to unravel the pathway of authigenic albite formation, this paper presents results of a multidisciplinary study from imaging, geochemistry, mineralogy, and hydrogeochemical modelling. The Jurassic reservoir sandstones of the Magnus oilfield (UK, North Sea) were chosen as a test site. Albite occurs with 4-18 wt.% in the Magnus sandstones and its contents vary with depth. However, albite contents increase with increasing K-feldspar contents and decreasing grain size. It occurs in three forms: (1) as lamellae in perthite, (2) as overgrowth on/in corroded feldspar, and, (3) as cloudy replacing albite patches in K-feldspar. The albite overgrowth has the highest chemical purity (100% albite) whilst albite lamellae and replacing albite patches are slightly less pure (containing 1-4% anorthite). Albite appears non-altered, and has a euhedral morphology and dull cathodoluminescence. It commonly co-occurs with corroded K-feldspar grains. The precipitation of diagenetic albite in the Magnus sandstones is attributed to deep burial 80 Ma ago and may have continued until today at temperatures between 90-120 °C. The results of hydrogeochemical modelling offer two possible pathways for the authigenic albite formation: (1) Dissolution of unstable minerals (such as kaolinite and chalcedony) coupled to reduction of ferric iron minerals by products generated during oil generation, migration and degradation; (2) Dissolution of non-end member feldspar, such as K-feldspar with 10% albite, coupled to illite formation can account for trace amounts of albite due to an elevated Na+/K+ activity ratio in the pore water.

  4. Spontaneous formation of nanostructures by surface spinodal decomposition in GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} epilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, E., E-mail: luna@pdi-berlin.de; Wu, M.; Trampert, A. [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, D-10117 Berlin (Germany); Puustinen, J.; Guina, M. [Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FI- 33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2015-05-14

    We report on the spontaneous formation of lateral composition modulations (LCMs) in Ga(As,Bi) epilayers grown by low-temperature (<300 °C) molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on GaAs(001). Both cross-section and plan-view transmission electron microscopy techniques are used to investigate the nature of the LCMs, consisting of Bi-rich cylinder-like nanostructures lying along the [001] growth direction. The observed LCMs are the consequence of a two-dimensional phase separation process occurring at the surface of the growing epilayers, and their columnar nature is consistent with a surface-directed spinodal decomposition process. Although LCMs are thermodynamically driven, we show how they can be kinetically controlled, in particular, through the As/Ga flux ratio and the substrate temperature. This is a result of LCMs developing from surface atomic diffusion processes, since the atomic dimer configurations on the surface alter adatom diffusivity. The significant role of the surface reconstructions is also discussed.

  5. Ultrasensitive photoelectrochemical determination of chromium(VI) in water samples by ion-imprinted/formate anion-incorporated graphitic carbon nitride nanostructured hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Tian; Yang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Lizhi; Gong, Jingming

    2016-07-15

    A rapid and highly sensitive photoelectrochemical (PEC) method has been proposed for the determination of trace amounts of chromium in water samples under visible-light irradiation. Here, a unique nanostructured hybrid of formate anion incorporated graphitic carbon nitride (F-g-C3N4) is smartly integrated with a Cr(VI) ion-imprinted polymer (IIP) as a photoactive electrode (denoted as IIP@F-g-C3N4). The nanohybrid of F-g-C3N4 exhibits an enhanced charge separation with substantially improved PEC responses versus g-C3N4. The newly designed IIP@F-g-C3N4 PEC sensor exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity for the determination of Cr(VI) because it offers efficient photogenerated electron reduction toward Cr(VI). The PEC analysis is highly linear over Cr(VI) concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 100.00ppb with a detection limit of 0.006ppb (S/N=3). Our approach can be used to detect Cr(VI), Cr(III) and the total chromium level in aqueous solution through oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) and the determination of the total chromium as Cr(VI). In practical applications, this low-cost and sensitive assay has been successfully applied for speciation determination of chromium in environmental water samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Microwave-assisted synthesis of narcis-like zinc oxide nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajbafvala, Amir, E-mail: akajbaf@ncsu.ed [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, 911 Partners Way, Raleigh, NC 27695-7907 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Center of Excellence for Production of Advanced Materials, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zanganeh, Saeid [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Connecticut, 371 Fairfield Way, U-2157 Storrs, CT 06269-2157 (United States); Kajbafvala, Ehsan; Zargar, H.R.; Bayati, M.R. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 16845-161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadrnezhaad, S.K., E-mail: sadrnezh@sharif.ed [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Center of Excellence for Production of Advanced Materials, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-05-14

    Through a fast, simple, low cost, surfactant-free and convenient microwave-assisted route, narcis-like ZnO nanostructures (10-15 nm size) with flower diameters in the range of 1-2.5 {mu}m were synthesized. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and room temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurements were used to characterize the produced ZnO nanostructures. The principle raw materials - ammonium hydroxide (NH{sub 4}OH) and zinc acetate dihydrate [Zn(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O] - were both inexpensive. The method was fast, simple and surfactant-free capable of producing larger quantities of zinc oxide nanostructures. Formation mechanism of narcis ZnO nanostructures has been studied due to the self-assembly of small form ZnO clusters in microwave treated precursor.

  7. Control of Y₂O₃ phase and its nanostructure formation through a very high energy mechanical milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M.K., E-mail: leeminku@kaeri.re.kr [Nuclear Materials Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Park, E.K.; Park, J.J.; Rhee, C.K. [Nuclear Materials Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-01

    The formation behavior of Y₂O₃ ceramic particles was studied by employing a very high energy ball milling (milling energy: ~165 kJ/g·hit, milling speed: 1000 rpm). Both the XRD and HRTEM studies revealed that the high impact strain energy generated during the milling caused a drastic phase transition from the original C-type cubic (space group Ia3, a=10.58 Å) to the metastable B-type monoclinic (space group C2/m, a=13.89 Å), finally followed by a partial solid-state amorphization. The cubic phase was difficult to be reduced down to smaller than 10 nm, while the monoclinic phase was stabilized at sizes smaller than 10 nm with a mean crystallite size of 7.57 nm. Consequently, the existence of Y₂O₃ at a nanoscale smaller than 10 nm is possible by forming metastable monoclinic crystals, which are strain-induced. - Graphical abstract: The fig shows the solid-state phase formation of Y₂O₃ by very high energy input into the particles during milling: ordered body-centered cubic phase (space group Ia3, a=10.58 Å) nanocrystalline monoclinic phase (space group C2/m, a=13.89 Å) disordered monoclinic phase partial amorphous phase. The formation of Y₂O₃ smaller than 10 nm was strongly dependent on whether the phase transition from cubic to monoclinic occurred. Highlights: • This paper analyses very high energy milling behavior of coarse Y₂O₃ particles. • A drastic phase transition from cubic to monoclinic occurred with a partial amorphization. • An existence of Y₂O₃ smaller than 10 nm is possible by forming strain-induced monoclinic crystals.

  8. Nanostructural Features of Silver Nanoparticles Powder Synthesized through Concurrent Formation of the Nanosized Particles of Both Starch and Silver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hebeish

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Green innovative strategy was developed to accomplish silver nanoparticles formation of starch-silver nanoparticles (St-AgNPs in the powder form. Thus, St-AgNPs were synthesized through concurrent formation of the nanosized particles of both starch and silver. The alkali dissolved starch acts as reducing agent for silver ions and as stabilizing agent for the formed AgNPs. The chemical reduction process occurred in water bath under high-speed homogenizer. After completion of the reaction, the colloidal solution of AgNPs coated with alkali dissolved starch was cooled and precipitated using ethanol. The powder precipitate was collected by centrifugation, then washed, and dried; St-AgNPs powder was characterized using state-of-the-art facilities including UV-vis spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, particle size analyzer (PS, Polydispersity index (PdI, Zeta potential (ZP, XRD, FT-IR, EDX, and TGA. TEM and XRD indicate that the average size of pure AgNPs does not exceed 20 nm with spherical shape and high concentration of AgNPs (30000 ppm. The results obtained from TGA indicates that the higher thermal stability of starch coated AgNPS than that of starch nanoparticles alone. In addition to the data obtained from EDX which reveals the presence of AgNPs and the data obtained from particle size analyzer and zeta potential determination indicate that the good uniformity and the highly stability of St-AgNPs.

  9. One-Dimensional (1D) ZnS Nanomaterials and Nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaosheng FANG; Lide ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials and nanostructures have received much attention due to their potential interest for understanding fundamental physical concepts and for applications in constructing nanoscale electric and optoelectronic devices. Zinc sulfide (ZnS) is an important semiconductor compound of Ⅱ-Ⅵ group,and the synthesis of 1D ZnS nanomaterials and nanostructures has been of growing interest owing to their promising application in nanoscale optoelectronic devices. This paper reviews the recent progress on 1D ZnS nanomaterials and nanostructures, including nanowires, nanowire arrays, nanorods, nanobelts or nanoribbons,nanocables, and hierarchical nanostructures etc. This article begins with a survey of various methods that have been developed for generating 1D nanomaterials and nanostructures, and then mainly focuses on structures,synthesis, characterization, formation mechanisms and optical property tuning, and luminescence mechanisms of 1D ZnS nanomaterials and nanostructures. Finally, this review concludes with personal views towards future research on 1D ZnS nanomaterials and nanostructures.

  10. Highly efficient photocatalytic degradation of organic dyes by Cu doped ZnO nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriakose, Sini; Satpati, Biswarup; Mohapatra, Satyabrata

    2015-10-14

    Copper doped ZnO nanostructures have been synthesized by a facile wet chemical method. Structural properties of as-synthesized nanomaterials have been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, while UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy have been used to study their optical properties. Sunlight driven photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) and methyl orange (MO) dyes in water was used to evaluate the photocatalytic activities of Cu doped ZnO nanostructures using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. The results showed that there is an optimum Cu doping level which leads to the highly enhanced photocatalytic activity of Cu doped ZnO nanostructures, as compared to pure ZnO nanostructures. A mechanism for the enhanced photocatalytic activity of Cu-ZnO nanostructures is tentatively proposed. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of Cu-ZnO nanostructures is attributed to the combined effects of improved separation of photogenerated charge carriers due to optimal Cu doping in ZnO nanostructures and the formation of ZnO-CuO nanoheterojunctions.

  11. Structural, optical and photocatalytic properties of flower-like ZnO nanostructures prepared by a facile wet chemical method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sini Kuriakose

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Flower-like ZnO nanostructures were synthesized by a facile wet chemical method. Structural, optical and photocatalytic properties of these nanostructures have been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, photoluminescence (PL and UV–vis absorption spectroscopy. SEM and TEM studies revealed flower-like structures consisting of nanosheets, formed due to oriented attachment of ZnO nanoparticles. Flower-like ZnO structures showed enhanced photocatalytic activity towards sun-light driven photodegradation of methylene blue dye (MB as compared to ZnO nanoparticles. XRD, UV–vis absorption, PL, FTIR and TEM studies revealed the formation of Zn(OH2 surface layer on ZnO nanostructures upon ageing. We demonstrate that the formation of a passivating Zn(OH2 surface layer on the ZnO nanostructures upon ageing deteriorates their efficiency to photocatalytically degrade of MB.

  12. Bulk Volume Reduction of the Kimmeridge Clay Formation, North Sea (UK Due to Compaction, Petroleum Generation and Expulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth S. Okiongbo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of petroleum generation and expulsion on shale porosity is explored by evaluating the compaction of the Kimmeridge Clay Formation (KCF within the oil window using log data and shale samples from the KCF within the depth and temperature range of ~1.5-5.0 km and 90-157ºC, respectively. Petrophysical properties e.g porosity and pore-size distribution were measured, and permeability was calculated using empirical models based on the measured porosities. Transit-time values from the sonic logs recorded at depths in the wells were the cores were recovered were calibrated against the porosities determined from the core samples. Bulk geochemical parameters e.g., Total Organic Carbon (TOC, Hydrogen Index (HI were determined. The volume reduction in the KCF within the oil window due to petroleum generation and expulsion, and compaction due to loss of pore space was determined using the geochemical and log derived porosity data emplaced into empirical relations. Porosities above the oil window range from ~15-20%, but decreased to <5% at the end of the oil window. Pore-sizes decrease from ~11 nm to between 6-8 nm at the depth range of 1.5-5.0 km. Permeability decreased from 4.8 nD to ~0.095 nD. The quantitative estimations of volume reduction within the oil window indicate that for ~8.0wt% initial TOC sediment, a bulk volume reduction of 13% of the initial volume is due to oil expulsion, and ~12% is due to loss of pore space.

  13. Temporal changes in hydraulic conductivity of sand porous media biofilters during wastewater infiltration due to biomat formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Deborah N. H.; McCray, John E.; Lowe, Kathryn S.; Siegrist, Robert L.

    2005-09-01

    Porous media biofilters (PMBs) are commonly used to treat domestic wastewater. Biomats develop at the infiltrative surface of PMBs due to continued wastewater application and create an impedance to flow. The goal of this research is to quantify the temporal evolution of normalized biomat hydraulic conductivity ( Kbm/ bbm) and effective hydraulic conductivity ( Ke). Ke is the overall hydraulic conductivity of the infiltrative zone, including biomat and unsaturated media below the biomat. Research was conducted using eight one-dimensional (1D) sand columns with gravel-free and gravel-laden infiltrative surfaces. The columns were loaded at design rates of 100-200 cm/d for 20 weeks of column operation. The Ke values for these continuously loaded columns were determined from analyses of bromide-tracer tests, falling-head permeability tests, and volumetric water content measurements during biomat development. The reduction in the Ke due to biomat formation is due to two factors: reduced hydraulic conductivity of the thin biomat, and a reduced hydraulic conductivity of the subsoil due to development of a biomat-induced unsaturated flow regime. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivities of the subsoil below the biomat ( Kss) were estimated from capillary curves and water content measurements. For observed final biomat thicknesses (less than 1 cm), the biomat hydraulic conductivity, Kbm, is three orders of magnitude smaller than the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity ( Kss). However, the relatively large thickness of the vadose zone causes the Kss to be an important contributor to the overall Ke value. For these columns, the final Ke values were approximately two orders of magnitude smaller than the original value. Because the exact thickness of the biomat ( bbm) is unknown during the flow experiments, the hydraulic conductance of the biomat zone is presented using a normalized hydraulic conductivity function ( Kbm/ bbm). A similar Kbm/ bbm is reached regardless of wastewater

  14. Highly siderophile element (HSE) abundances in the mantle of Mars are due to core formation at high pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Danielson, L. R.; Pando, K. M.; Williams, J.; Humayun, M.; Hervig, R. L.; Sharp, T. G.

    2015-04-01

    Highly siderophile elements (HSEs) can be used to understand accretion and core formation in differentiated bodies, due to their strong affinity for FeNi metal and sulfides. Coupling experimental studies of metal-silicate partitioning with analyses of HSE contents of Martian meteorites can thus offer important constraints on the early history of Mars. Here, we report new metal-silicate partitioning data for the PGEs and Au and Re across a wide range of pressure and temperature space, with three series designed to complement existing experimental data sets for HSE. The first series examines temperature effects for D(HSE) in two metallic liquid compositions—C-bearing and C-free. The second series examines temperature effects for D(Re) in FeO-bearing silicate melts and FeNi-rich alloys. The third series presents the first systematic study of high pressure and temperature effects for D(Au). We then combine our data with previously published partitioning data to derive predictive expressions for metal-silicate partitioning of the HSE, which are subsequently used to calculate HSE concentrations of the Martian mantle during continuous accretion of Mars. Our results show that at midmantle depths in an early magma ocean (equivalent to approximately 14 GPa, 2100 °C), the HSE contents of the silicate fraction are similar to those observed in the Martian meteorite suite. This is in concert with previous studies on moderately siderophile elements. We then consider model calculations that examine the role of melting, fractional crystallization, and sulfide saturation/undersaturation in establishing the range of HSE contents in Martian meteorites derived from melting of the postcore formation mantle. The core formation modeling indicates that the HSE contents can be established by metal-silicate equilibrium early in the history of Mars, thus obviating the need for a late veneer for HSE, and by extension volatile siderophile elements, or volatiles in general.

  15. Suppressing Energy Loss due to Triplet Exciton Formation in Organic Solar Cells: The Role of Chemical Structures and Molecular Packing

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Xiankai

    2017-04-21

    In the most efficient solar cells based on blends of a conjugated polymer (electron donor) and a fullerene derivative (electron acceptor),ultrafast formation of charge-transfer (CT) electronic states at the donor-acceptor interfaces and efficient separation of these CT states into free charges, lead to internal quantum efficiencies near 100%. However, there occur substantial energy losses due to the non-radiative recombinations of the charges, mediated by the loweset-energy (singlet and triplet) CT states; for example, such recombinations can lead to the formation of triplet excited electronic states on the polymer chains, which do not generate free charges. This issue remains a major factor limiting the power conversion efficiencies (PCE) of these devices. The recombination rates are, however, difficult to quantify experimentally. To shed light on these issues, here, an integrated multi-scale theoretical approach that combines molecular dynamics simulations with quantum chemistry calculations is employed in order to establish the relationships among chemical structures, molecular packing, and non-radiative recombination losses mediated by the lowest-energy charge-transfer states.

  16. Nanostructures formed on carbon-based materials with different levels of crystallinity using oxygen plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Tae-Jun [Institute for Multidisciplinary Convergence of Matter, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Wonjin; Lee, Heon Ju [Institute for Multidisciplinary Convergence of Matter, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Kyu Hwan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Myoung-Woon, E-mail: mwmoon@kist.re.kr [Institute for Multidisciplinary Convergence of Matter, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-01

    Nanostructure formation was explored for various carbon-based materials, such as diamond, carbon fiber, polyethylene terephthalate and poly (methyl methacrylate), which have different levels of crystallinity, ranging from perfect crystal to polymeric amorphous. After treatment of oxygen plasma glow discharge, the nanostructures on these carbon-based materials were found to evolve via preferential etching due to the co-deposition of metal elements sputtered from the metal cathode plate. Local islands or clusters formed by the metal co-deposition have a low etching rate compared to pristine regions on each material, resulting in anisotropic patterns on the carbon-based materials. This pattern formation mechanism was confirmed by covering the cathode or preventing the co-deposition of metallic sources with a polymeric material. Regardless of the level of crystallinity of the carbon-based materials, no patterns were observed on the surfaces covered with the polymeric material, and the surfaces were uniformly etched. It was found that the materials with low crystallinity had a high etching rate due to low carbon atom density, which thus easily formed high-aspect-ratio nanostructures for the same plasma treatment duration. - Highlight: • Reactive ion etching & metal deposition were occurred in oxygen plasma treatment. • High-aspect-ratio nanostructures can be fabricated on carbon-based materials. • Materials with low crystallinity easily formed high-aspect-ratio nanostructure. • Amount of etching inhibitors affects the pattern formation and configuration.

  17. Analytic device including nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2015-07-02

    A device for detecting an analyte in a sample comprising: an array including a plurality of pixels, each pixel including a nanochain comprising: a first nanostructure, a second nanostructure, and a third nanostructure, wherein size of the first nanostructure is larger than that of the second nanostructure, and size of the second nanostructure is larger than that of the third nanostructure, and wherein the first nanostructure, the second nanostructure, and the third nanostructure are positioned on a substrate such that when the nanochain is excited by an energy, an optical field between the second nanostructure and the third nanostructure is stronger than an optical field between the first nanostructure and the second nanostructure, wherein the array is configured to receive a sample; and a detector arranged to collect spectral data from a plurality of pixels of the array.

  18. Morphological and electrochemical cycling effects in MnO2 nanostructures by 3D electron tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei

    2014-02-12

    In this study, MnO2 nanostructures with well-controlled morphology and crystal phase are successfully prepared by chemical synthesis, and characterized by three-dimensional electron tomography for use as supercapacitor electrode materials. The growth process of the various MnO 2 nanostructures is revealed in detail, and correlated to their electrochemical performance as supercapacitor materials. The specific capacitance of MnO2 electrodes is found to be strongly correlated with the inner morphology and crystal phase of the MnO2 nanostructures. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the increased capacity with electrochemical cycling of the materials is due to the formation of defective regions embedded in the MnO2 nanostructures; these regions form during electrochemical cycling of the electrodes, resulting in increased porosity, surface area, and consequently, increased electrochemical capacity. The preparation, characterization and supercapacitor application of MnO 2 nanostructures by 3D electron tomography are studied. The electrochemical performance of MnO2 is correlated to its surface area, determined by the morphological effect, as well as the cycling effect, determined by the formation of defective regions on the nanostructures during electrochemical cycling tests. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Atomically Traceable Nanostructure Fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Josh B; Dick, Don D; McDonnell, Stephen J; Bischof, Maia; Fu, Joseph; Owen, James H G; Owen, William R; Alexander, Justin D; Jaeger, David L; Namboodiri, Pradeep; Fuchs, Ehud; Chabal, Yves J; Wallace, Robert M; Reidy, Richard; Silver, Richard M; Randall, John N; Von Ehr, James

    2015-07-17

    Reducing the scale of etched nanostructures below the 10 nm range eventually will require an atomic scale understanding of the entire fabrication process being used in order to maintain exquisite control over both feature size and feature density. Here, we demonstrate a method for tracking atomically resolved and controlled structures from initial template definition through final nanostructure metrology, opening up a pathway for top-down atomic control over nanofabrication. Hydrogen depassivation lithography is the first step of the nanoscale fabrication process followed by selective atomic layer deposition of up to 2.8 nm of titania to make a nanoscale etch mask. Contrast with the background is shown, indicating different mechanisms for growth on the desired patterns and on the H passivated background. The patterns are then transferred into the bulk using reactive ion etching to form 20 nm tall nanostructures with linewidths down to ~6 nm. To illustrate the limitations of this process, arrays of holes and lines are fabricated. The various nanofabrication process steps are performed at disparate locations, so process integration is discussed. Related issues are discussed including using fiducial marks for finding nanostructures on a macroscopic sample and protecting the chemically reactive patterned Si(100)-H surface against degradation due to atmospheric exposure.

  20. Temperature increase due to Joule heating in a nanostructured MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction over a wide current-pulse range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Boram; Lim, Sang Ho

    2011-07-01

    The temperature increase due to Joule heating in a nanopillar of a magnetic tunnel junction sandwiched by top and bottom electrodes was calculated by the finite element method. The results for the critical condition for the current-induced magnetization switching measured over a wide current-pulse range were taken from the literature. At long pulse widths, the temperature increase was solely dependent on the magnitude of the critical current density. However, no saturation in the temperature increase occurred for short pulse widths. In this case, the temperature increase additionally depended on the pulse width, so that a broad maximum occurred in the pulse width (or the critical current density) dependence of the temperature increase. The original results for the critical condition were corrected by accounting for the temperature increase and these corrected results, together with the Slonczewski equation, were used to extract an accurate value for the thermal stability factor.

  1. Processing Nanostructured Structural Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    aspects of the processing of nanostructured ceramics, viz. • • • The production of a flowable and compactable dry nanopowder suitable for use in... composition due to the different synthesis routes used. Therefore, ‘industry-standard’ dispersants can cause flocculation rather than dispersion...stabilised zirconia (3-YSZ) were no higher than for conventional, micron-sized material of the same composition . However, detailed crystallographic

  2. Ab Initio Calculations of 31P NMR Chemical Shielding Anisotropy Tensors in Phosphates: Variations Due to Ring Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd M. Alam

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Ring formation in phosphate systems is expected to influence both the magnitude and orientation of the phosphorus (31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR chemical shielding anisotropy (CSA tensor. Ab initio calculations of the 31P CSA tensor in both cyclic and acyclic phosphate clusters were performed as a function of the number of phosphate tetrahedral in the system. The calculation of the 31P CSA tensors employed the GAUSSIAN 98 implementation of the gauge-including atomic orbital (GIAO method at the Hartree-Fock (HF level. It is shown that both the 31P CSA tensor anisotropy, and the isotropic chemical shielding can be used for the identification of cyclic phosphates. The differences between the 31P CSA tensor in acyclic and cyclic phosphate systems become less pronounced with increasing number of phosphate groups within the ring. The orientation of the principal components for the 31P CSA tensor shows some variation due to cyclization, most notably with the smaller, highly strained ring systems.

  3. Ring Structure Formation in Protoplanetary Disks due to the Two-Fluid Secular Gravitational Instability: An Indicator of Dust Concentration

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Sanemichi Z

    2013-01-01

    The instability in protoplanetary disks due to gas-dust friction and self-gravity of gas and dust is investigated by linear analysis. For conditions typical of protoplanetaly disks, the instability grows, even in gravitationally stable disks, on a timescale of order $10^{4-5}$yr at a radius of order 100AU. If we ignore the dynamical feedback from dust grains in the gas equation of motion, the instability reduces to the so-called "secular gravitational instability", that was investigated previously as the instability of dust in a fixed background gas flow. In this work, we solve the equation of motion for both gas and dust consistently and find that long-wavelength perturbations are stable, in contrast to the secular gravitational instability in the simplified treatment. The instability is expected to form ring structures in protoplanetary disks. The width of the ring formed at a radius of 100 AU is a few tens of AU. Therefore, the instability is a candidate for the formation mechanism of observed ring-like st...

  4. Silk fibroin nanostructured materials for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitropoulos, Alexander N.

    Nanostructured biopolymers have proven to be promising to develop novel biomedical applications where forming structures at the nanoscale normally occurs by self-assembly. However, synthesizing these structures can also occur by inducing materials to transition into other forms by adding chemical cross-linkers, changing pH, or changing ionic composition. Understanding the generation of nanostructures in fluid environments, such as liquid organic solvents or supercritical fluids, has not been thoroughly examined, particularly those that are based on protein-based block-copolymers. Here, we examine the transformation of reconstituted silk fibroin, which has emerged as a promising biopolymer due to its biocompatibility, biodegradability, and ease of functionalization, into submicron spheres and gel networks which offer applications in tissue engineering and advanced sensors. Two types of gel networks, hydrogels and aerogels, have small pores and large surface areas that are defined by their structure. We design and analyze silk nanoparticle formation using a microfluidic device while offering an application for drug delivery. Additionally, we provide a model and characterize hydrogel formation from micelles to nanoparticles, while investigating cellular response to the hydrogel in an in vitro cell culture model. Lastly, we provide a second model of nanofiber formation during near-critical and supercritical drying and characterize the silk fibroin properties at different drying pressures which, when acting as a stabilizing matrix, shows to improve the activity of entrapped enzymes dried at different pressures. This work has created new nanostructured silk fibroin forms to benefit biomedical applications that could be applied to other fibrous proteins.

  5. Nanostructures, systems, and methods for photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Steven Y.; Jarvi, Thomas D.

    2015-12-08

    The present invention generally relates to nanostructures and compositions comprising nanostructures, methods of making and using the nanostructures, and related systems. In some embodiments, a nanostructure comprises a first region and a second region, wherein a first photocatalytic reaction (e.g., an oxidation reaction) can be carried out at the first region and a second photocatalytic reaction (e.g., a reduction reaction) can be carried out at the second region. In some cases, the first photocatalytic reaction is the formation of oxygen gas from water and the second photocatalytic reaction is the formation of hydrogen gas from water. In some embodiments, a nanostructure comprises at least one semiconductor material, and, in some cases, at least one catalytic material and/or at least one photosensitizing agent.

  6. Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    with macroscopic reinforcements such as fiber, clay, glass mineral and other fillers. The nano-alloyed polymers are particularly useful for producing...applications, including space-sur- vivable materials and seals, gaskets, cosmetics , and personal care. 25 Claims, 10 Drawing Sheets B-3 U.S. Patent Mar...the incorporation of fluorinated nanostructured chemicals onto the surface of a secondary material (such as Ti02 , CaC03 , glass or mineral

  7. Transmesenteric hernia due to double-loop formation in the small intestine: a fatal case involving a toddler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimoto, Yu; Abiru, Hitoshi; Kotani, Hirokazu; Ozeki, Munetaka; Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Tamaki, Keiji

    2012-01-10

    We report a unique case of transmesenteric hernia resulting in death, which went undiagnosed during a recent hospital visit. The victim was a 2.5-year-old girl who - with the exception of chronic constipation - had no medical history. One night she complained of abdominal pains and was taken to a pediatric hospital where doctors performed an abdominal X-ray and echography. No significant findings suggesting bowel obstruction (e.g. air-fluid levels or dilation of the bowel) were obtained on examinations and bloody feces were not observed in this particular episode. As her abdominal pain gradually attenuated, the doctor allowed her to return home. A few hours later, she lost consciousness and expired despite resuscitation efforts attempted at an emergency hospital. A subsequent autopsy revealed that the small bowel had herniated through a defect in the mesentery resulting in two consecutive and inversely forming loops, in which each loop protruded on either side of the mesentery. This rare morphological anatomy seems to have progressed in a two-step process. The girl's mild abdominal pain was likely induced by herniation and formation of the first intestinal loop, followed by severe shock occurring when the subsequent intestinal segment invaginated into the same defect forming the second loop on the opposite side of the mesentery. This case illustrates the difficulty of diagnosing transmesenteric hernia due to the presentation of unspecific symptoms; especially in infants and toddlers. Furthermore, this report demonstrates the value of a complete autopsy in cases of sudden and unexpected deaths involving children. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  9. Thermal failure of nanostructured thermal barrier coatings with cold sprayed nanostructured NiCrAlY bond coat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Q.; Li, Y.; Zhang, S.L.; Wang, X.R.; Yang, G.J.; Li, C.X.; Li, C.J. [Xi' an Jiaotong Univ., Xi' an (China)

    2008-07-01

    Nanostructured YSZ is expected to exhibit a high strain tolerability due to its low Young's modulus and consequently high durability. In this study, a porous YSZ as the thermal barrier coating was deposited by plasma spraying using an agglomerated nanostructured YSZ powder on a Ni-based superalloy Inconel 738 substrate with a cold-sprayed nanostructured NiCrAlY as the bond coat. The heat treatment in Ar atmosphere was applied to the cold-sprayed bond coat before deposition of YSZ. The isothermal oxidation and thermal cycling tests were applied to examine failure modes of plasma-sprayed nanostructured YSZ. The results showed that YSZ coating was deposited by partially melted YSZ particles. The nonmelted fraction of spray particles retains the porous nanostructure of the starting powder into the deposit. YSZ coating exhibits a bimodal microstructure consisting of nanosized particles retained from the powder and micro-columnar grains formed through the solidification of the melted fraction in spray particles. The oxidation of the bond coat occurs during the heat treatment in Ar atmosphere. The uniform oxide at the interface between the bond coat and YSZ can be formed during isothermal test. The cracks were observed at the interface between TGO/BC or TGO/YSZ after thermal cyclic test. However, the failure of TBCs mainly occurred through spalling of YSZ within YSZ coating. The failure characteristics of plasma-sprayed nanostructured YSZ are discussed based on the coating microstructure and formation of TGO on the bond coat surface. (orig.)

  10. Study of CRP immobilization on nanostructured silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simion, Monica, E-mail: moni304ro@yahoo.com [National Institute for Research and Development in Microtechnologies (IMT - Bucharest), 32B Erou Iancu Nicolae Street, 72996 Bucharest (Romania); Ruta, Lavinia L.; Matache, Mihaela [University of Bucharest, Department of Chemistry, Division of Organic Chemistry, 90-92 Panduri Street, 050663 Bucharest (Romania); Kleps, Irina; Miu, Mihaela [National Institute for Research and Development in Microtechnologies (IMT - Bucharest), 32B Erou Iancu Nicolae Street, 72996 Bucharest (Romania); Paraschivescu, Codruta C. [University of Bucharest, Department of Chemistry, Division of Organic Chemistry, 90-92 Panduri Street, 050663 Bucharest (Romania); Bragaru, Adina; Ignat, Teodora [National Institute for Research and Development in Microtechnologies (IMT - Bucharest), 32B Erou Iancu Nicolae Street, 72996 Bucharest (Romania)

    2010-05-25

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a phylogenetically highly conserved plasma protein, which is widely used as an indicator of inflammatory states due to rapid increase of its plasma concentration up to 1000 times compared to normal values. Detection of CRP levels in a rapid, simultaneous and multiplex format is therefore of great interest for diagnostics. Microarray technology could provide such a multiplex format of CRP levels detection. Different nanostructured porous silicon (PS) surfaces were obtained and used for the immobilization of CRP and anti-human CRP antibodies in order to achieve an optimum microarray assay. Comparative analysis of the attachment degree and preservation of the biomolecules activity on the silicon surfaces and functionalized glass slides is also described.

  11. Observation of the structural, optical and magnetic properties during the transformation from hexagonal NiS nano-compounds to cubic NiO nanostructures due to thermal oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linganiso, E.C., E-mail: elinganiso@csir.co.za [National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, Molecular Sciences Institute, School of Chemistry, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, Johannesburg, Wits 2050 (South Africa); Mwakikunga, B.W., E-mail: bmwakikunga@csir.co.za [National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Coville, N.J. [DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, Molecular Sciences Institute, School of Chemistry, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, Johannesburg, Wits 2050 (South Africa); Mhlanga, S.D. [Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Johannesburg, PO Box 17011, Doornfontein, 2028 Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2015-04-25

    Graphical abstract: The transition temperature of 350 °C for the formation of c-NiO from h-NiS oxidation was obtained from structural and optical property studies and by calculating the number of spins obtained from the EPR data. Vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) shows that this pure NiS has both ferromagnetic ordering and paramagnetic domains. Further, the transition temperature of −9 °C of the pure α-NiS nano-alloys was confirmed by performing electrical measurements on the as-synthesized material. - Highlights: • Single hexagonal phase NiS obtained by microwave assisted hydrothermal synthesis. • NiS nanoalloys show both ferromagnetic and paramagnetic domains by VSM. • Structural evolution of annealed NiS and temperature dependent NiS oxidation presented. • Phase transition from NiS to NiO studied and correlated to the EPR spin population data and crystallite size. • Ferromagnetic and paramagnetic ordering observed for the raw NiS nanostructures. - Abstract: Single phase α-NiS nano-compounds with uniformly distributed hierarchical networks were synthesized by a microwave-assisted hydrothermal technique. The materials were evaluated for thermal stability under an oxidative environment and at temperatures between 150 °C and 600 °C. NiS materials showed stability at 300 °C and NiO formation was observed from 350 °C to 600 °C. The annealing effect on the crystalline size and IR absorption of the annealed samples is reported by XRD and FTIR studied. The EPR properties of the annealed materials were studied and compared to the oxidized materials. The transition temperature of 350 °C for the formation of NiO from NiS oxidation was confirmed by calculating the number of spins obtained from the EPR data. Vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) shows that this pure NiS has both ferromagnetic ordering and paramagnetic domains. Further, the transition temperature of −9 °C of the pure α-NiS nano-compounds was confirmed by performing electrical

  12. Sonoelectrochemical Approach Towards Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burda, Clemens; Qiu, Xiaofeng

    2006-03-01

    We will report on the sonoelectrochemical synthesis of nanostructured semiconductor materials. The talk will focus on the control of the nanostructure size, shape, and composition using sonolectrochemistry as a versatile synthesis tool. The synthesis of targeted nanostructures requires thorough control of the redox chemistry during the growth process. The composition of the product can be controlled by changing the initial metal-ligand concentration. Futhermore, the properties of the novel materials will be discussed. Powder X-ray diffraction of the products confirmed the compositional change in the nanomaterials. Control of the involved sonoelectrochemistry also allows for the formation of highly monodispersed 1-D Nanorods. Qiu, Xiaofeng; Lou, Yongbing; Samia, Anna C. S.; Devadoss, Anando; Burgess, James D.; Dayal, Smita; Burda, Clemens. PbTe nanorods by sonoelectrochemistry. Angewandte Chemie, International Edition (2005), 44(36), 5855-5857. Qiu, Xiaofeng; Burda, Clemens; Fu, Ruiling; Pu, Lin; Chen, Hongyuan; Zhu, Junjie. Heterostructured Bi2Se3 Nanowires with Periodic Phase Boundaries. Journal of the American Chemical Society (2004), 126(50), 16276-16277.

  13. Enhanced formation of secondary air pollutants and aggravation of urban smog due to crop residue burning emissions in North India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Chinmoy; Kumar, Vinod; Sinha, Vinayak

    2013-04-01

    implications for the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere increased from an average value of 14 /s (N.F.E.) to 40 /s (F.E.) just due to CO, NOx and the measured aromatics. The observed increase in ozone was 10ppbV higher after sunrise on the day after the fire plume was sampled and driven by the sudden NOx availability at a site that normally falls in a NOx limited ozone production regime. The strong pollutant enhancements in carcinogenic aromatic hydrocarbons that are also highly reactive and fuel ozone and secondary organic aerosol formation when accompanied by the high NOx and CO levels resulting from crop residue burning in N. India, clearly highlight the need to address the practice of crop residue burning which strongly alters the composition and chemistry of the atmosphere with adverse effects on both air quality and health. This study is the first from within India to combine fast in-situ PTR-MS VOC emission tracer measurements with online measurements of primary pollutants and MODIS satellite data. Further targeted studies employing a comprehensive measurement suite of both aerosol and gas species are needed to assess the full impact of crop residue burning on atmospheric chemistry and regional air quality. Acknowledgement: We thank the IISER Mohali Atmospheric Chemistry Facility for data and the Ministry of Human Resource Development (MHRD),India and IISER Mohali for funding the facility. Vinod Kumar acknowledges the DST INSPIRE Fellowship programme. Chinmoy Sarkar thanks the Max Planck-DST India Partner Group on Tropospheric OH reactivity and VOCs for funding support.

  14. Structure and property evaluation of a vacuum plasma sprayed nanostructured tungsten-hafnium carbide bulk composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rea, K.E.; Viswanathan, V.; Kruize, A. [Surface Engineering and Nanotechnology Facility (SNF), University of Central Florida, Eng. 381, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); AMPAC, Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering (MMAE), Nanoscience and Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Eng. 381, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Hosson, J.Th.M. de [Department of Applied Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, NL-9747 AG (Netherlands); O' Dell, S.; McKechnie, T. [Plasma Processes, Inc., 4914 Moores Mill Road, Huntsville, AL 35811 (United States); Rajagopalan, S.; Vaidyanathan, R. [AMPAC, Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering (MMAE), Nanoscience and Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Eng. 381, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Seal, S. [Surface Engineering and Nanotechnology Facility (SNF), University of Central Florida, Eng. 381, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); AMPAC, Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering (MMAE), Nanoscience and Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Eng. 381, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, FL 32816 (United States)], E-mail: sseal@mail.ucf.edu

    2008-03-25

    Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) forming of tungsten-based metal matrix nanocomposites (MMCs) has shown to be a cost effective and time saving method for the formation of bulk monolithic nanostructured thermo-mechanical components. Spray drying of powder feedstock appears to have a significant effect on the improved mechanical properties of the bulk nanocomposite. The reported elastic modulus of the nanocomposite nearly doubles due to the presence of HfC nano particulates in the W matrix. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) revealed the retention of nanostructures at the select process conditions and is correlated with the enhanced mechanical properties of the nanocomposite.

  15. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of Ag–ZnO hybrid plasmonic nanostructures prepared by a facile wet chemical method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sini Kuriakose

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We report the synthesis of Ag–ZnO hybrid plasmonic nanostructures with enhanced photocatalytic activity by a facile wet-chemical method. The structural, optical, plasmonic and photocatalytic properties of the Ag–ZnO hybrid nanostructures were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, photoluminescence (PL and UV–visible absorption spectroscopy. The effects of citrate concentration and Ag nanoparticle loading on the photocatalytic activity of Ag–ZnO hybrid nanostructures towards sun-light driven degradation of methylene blue (MB have been investigated. Increase in citrate concentration has been found to result in the formation of nanodisk-like structures, due to citrate-assisted oriented attachment of ZnO nanoparticles. The decoration of ZnO nanostructures with Ag nanoparticles resulted in a significant enhancement of the photocatalytic degradation efficiency, which has been found to increase with the extent of Ag nanoparticle loading.

  16. Possibility of the formation of shock electromagnetic waves on optical cycle due to the generation of higher harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruzdev, Vitali E.; Gruzdeva, Anastasia S.

    2001-03-01

    There is considered formation and propagation of shock electromagnetic waves (SEW) of visible spectral range as possible nonlinear optical phenomenon taking place at laser intensities characteristic of femtosecond laser interaction with transparent solids. Main regularities of SHEW formation are studied on the basis of 1D model of plane-wave propagation in isotropic dielectric with nonlinear optical response. Special attention is paid to influence of color dispersion and absorption on SEW formation and propagation. Necessary conditions for appearing of SHEW are obtained, in particular, threshold amplitude is estimated. There is presented an model for numerical study of SHEW formation and propagation influenced by dispersion of linear and nonlinear pats of refractive index. Using the simulation, we studied dynamics of SHEW formation on several optical cycles near leading edge of femtosecond laser pulse propagating in transparent medium. Important observed features of SHEW are discussed.

  17. Preparation and characterization of GA/RDX nanostructured energetic composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    YUANFEI LAN; XUEBAO WANG; YUNJUN LUO

    2016-12-01

    Graphene aerogel (GA) with nano-porous structure was assembled through the formation of physical cross-links between graphene sheets by a facile sol–gel method and supercritical CO$_2$ drying process. Thenhexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) was added and trapped in the nano-porous three-dimensional networks of GA to obtain a novel GA/RDX nanostructured energetic composite. The composition, morphology andstructure of the obtained GA/RDX nanostructured energetic composite were characterized by elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen sorption tests and X-ray diffraction. Moreover, the thermal decompositioncharacteristic was investigated by thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. The results showed that GA could be a perfect aerogel matrix for the fabrication of GA/RDX nanostructured energetic composite due to itsunique nano-porous structure and attributes. It was also demonstrated that RDX homogeneously disperses in the asprepared GA/RDX nanostructured energetic composite at nanometric scale. GA showed promising catalytic effects for the thermal decomposition of RDX. After incorporating with GA, the decomposition of RDX was obviously accelerated.

  18. Synthesis of branched metal nanostructures with controlled architecture and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Nancy

    On account of their small size, metal nanoparticles are proven to be outstanding catalysts for numerous chemical transformations and represent promising platforms for applications in the fields of electronics, chemical sensing, medicine, and beyond. Many properties of metal nanoparticles are size-dependent and can be further manipulated through their shape and architecture (e.g., spherical vs. branched). Achieving morphology control of nanoparticles through solution-based techniques has proven challenging due to limited knowledge of morphology development in nanosyntheses. To overcome these complications, a systematic examination of the local ligand environment of metal precursors on nanostructure formation was undertaken to evaluate its contribution to nanoparticle nucleation rate and subsequent growth processes. Specifically, this thesis will provide evidence from ex situ studies---Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis)---that support the hypothesis that strongly coordinated ligands delay burst-like nucleation to generate spherical metal nanoparticles and ligands with intermediate binding affinity regulate the gradual reduction of metal precursors to promote aggregated assembly of nanodendrites. These ex situ studies were coupled with a new in situ perspective, providing detailed understanding of metal precursor transformation, its direct relation to nanoparticle morphology development, and the ligand influence towards the formation of structurally complex metal nanostructures, using in situ synchrotron X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Ultra Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (USAXS). The principles extracted from the study of monometallic nanostructure formation were also found to be generally applicable to the synthesis of bimetallic nanostructures, e.g., Pd-Pt architectures, with either core-shell or alloyed structures that were readily achieved by ligand selection. These outcomes provide a direct connection between fundamental

  19. Growth, structure and magnetic properties of FePt nanostructures on NaCl(001) and MgO(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liscio, F; Maret, M; Doisneau-Cottignies, B [Science et Ingenierie des Materiaux et Procedes (SIMaP), INP-Grenoble/CNRS/UJF, BP 75, 38402 Saint-Martin d' Heres (France); Makarov, D; Albrecht, M [Institute of Physics, Chemnitz University of Technology, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Roussel, H, E-mail: mireille.maret@simap.grenoble-inp.fr [Consortium des Moyens Technologiques Communs, INP-Grenoble, BP 75, 38402 Saint-Martin d' Heres (France)

    2010-02-10

    A comparison of the structural and magnetic properties of FePt nanostructures grown at different temperatures on NaCl(001) and MgO(001) substrates is presented. A strong influence of the deposition temperature on the epitaxial growth as well as on the size distribution of FePt nanostructures grown on NaCl substrates is observed. In spite of a large lattice mismatch between FePt and NaCl, a 'cube-over-cube' growth of nanostructures with a narrow size distribution was achieved at 520 K. Moreover, the growth of FePt nanostructures on NaCl(001) is not preceded by the formation of a wetting layer as observed on MgO(001). The higher degree of L1{sub 0} chemical ordering in FePt nanostructures grown on MgO(001) accompanied by the absence of L1{sub 0} variants with an in-plane tetragonal c-axis indicates that the tensile epitaxial stress induced by the MgO substrate is a key factor in the formation of the L1{sub 0} phase with an out-of-plane c-axis. Superparamagnetic behavior is revealed for the FePt nanostructures grown on NaCl(001) due to their small size and relatively poor chemical order.

  20. Growth, structure and magnetic properties of FePt nanostructures on NaCl(001) and MgO(001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liscio, F.; Makarov, D.; Maret, M.; Doisneau-Cottignies, B.; Roussel, H.; Albrecht, M.

    2010-02-01

    A comparison of the structural and magnetic properties of FePt nanostructures grown at different temperatures on NaCl(001) and MgO(001) substrates is presented. A strong influence of the deposition temperature on the epitaxial growth as well as on the size distribution of FePt nanostructures grown on NaCl substrates is observed. In spite of a large lattice mismatch between FePt and NaCl, a 'cube-over-cube' growth of nanostructures with a narrow size distribution was achieved at 520 K. Moreover, the growth of FePt nanostructures on NaCl(001) is not preceded by the formation of a wetting layer as observed on MgO(001). The higher degree of L10 chemical ordering in FePt nanostructures grown on MgO(001) accompanied by the absence of L10 variants with an in-plane tetragonal c-axis indicates that the tensile epitaxial stress induced by the MgO substrate is a key factor in the formation of the L10 phase with an out-of-plane c-axis. Superparamagnetic behavior is revealed for the FePt nanostructures grown on NaCl(001) due to their small size and relatively poor chemical order.

  1. Nanostructure Neutron Converter Layer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); Thibeault, Sheila A. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods for making a neutron converter layer are provided. The various embodiment methods enable the formation of a single layer neutron converter material. The single layer neutron converter material formed according to the various embodiments may have a high neutron absorption cross section, tailored resistivity providing a good electric field penetration with submicron particles, and a high secondary electron emission coefficient. In an embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by sequential supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In another embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by simultaneous supercritical fluid metallization of a porous nanostructure aerogel or polyimide film. In a further embodiment method a neutron converter layer may be formed by in-situ metalized aerogel nanostructure development.

  2. Synthesis of ferroelectric nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roervik, Per Martin

    2008-12-15

    respectively BaTi2O5/BaTi5O11 and Na2Ti6O13 for the two different systems, in contradiction to the previous studies. It was shown that NaCl reacted with BaO(PbO) resulting in loss of volatile BaCl2 (PbCl2 ) and formation and preferential growth of titanium oxide-rich nanorods instead of the target phase BaTiO3 (or PbTiO3 ). The molten salt synthesis route may therefore not necessarily yield nanorods of the target ternary oxide as reported previously. In addition, the importance of NaCl(g) for the growth of nanorods below the melting point of NaCl was demonstrated in a special experimental setup, where NaCl and the precursors were physically separated. In Paper II and III, a hydrothermal synthesis method to grow arrays and hierarchical nanostructures of PbTiO3 nanorods and platelets on substrates is presented. Hydrothermal treatment of an amorphous PbTiO3 precursor in the presence of a surfactant and PbTiO3 or SrTiO3 substrates resulted in the growth of PbTiO3 nanorods and platelets aligned in the crystallographic <100> orientations of the SrTiO3 substrates. PbTiO3 nanorods oriented perpendicular to the substrate surface could also be grown directly on the substrate by a modified synthesis method. The hydrothermal method described in Paper II and III was developed on the basis of the method described in Appendices I and II. In Paper IV, a template-assisted method to make PbTiO3 nanotubes is presented. An equimolar Pb-Ti sol was dropped onto porous alumina membranes and penetrated into the channels of the template. Single-phase PbTiO3 perovskite nanotubes were obtained by annealing at 700 degrees Celsius for 6 h. The nanotubes had diameters of 200 - 400 nm with a wall thickness of approximately 20 nm. Excess PbO or annealing in a Pb-containing atmosphere was not necessary in order to achieve single phase PbTiO3 nanotubes. The influence of the heating procedure and the sol concentration is discussed. In Paper V, a piezoresponse force microscopy study of single PbTiO3 nanorods is

  3. Synthesis of ferroelectric nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roervik, Per Martin

    2008-12-15

    respectively BaTi2O5/BaTi5O11 and Na2Ti6O13 for the two different systems, in contradiction to the previous studies. It was shown that NaCl reacted with BaO(PbO) resulting in loss of volatile BaCl2 (PbCl2 ) and formation and preferential growth of titanium oxide-rich nanorods instead of the target phase BaTiO3 (or PbTiO3 ). The molten salt synthesis route may therefore not necessarily yield nanorods of the target ternary oxide as reported previously. In addition, the importance of NaCl(g) for the growth of nanorods below the melting point of NaCl was demonstrated in a special experimental setup, where NaCl and the precursors were physically separated. In Paper II and III, a hydrothermal synthesis method to grow arrays and hierarchical nanostructures of PbTiO3 nanorods and platelets on substrates is presented. Hydrothermal treatment of an amorphous PbTiO3 precursor in the presence of a surfactant and PbTiO3 or SrTiO3 substrates resulted in the growth of PbTiO3 nanorods and platelets aligned in the crystallographic <100> orientations of the SrTiO3 substrates. PbTiO3 nanorods oriented perpendicular to the substrate surface could also be grown directly on the substrate by a modified synthesis method. The hydrothermal method described in Paper II and III was developed on the basis of the method described in Appendices I and II. In Paper IV, a template-assisted method to make PbTiO3 nanotubes is presented. An equimolar Pb-Ti sol was dropped onto porous alumina membranes and penetrated into the channels of the template. Single-phase PbTiO3 perovskite nanotubes were obtained by annealing at 700 degrees Celsius for 6 h. The nanotubes had diameters of 200 - 400 nm with a wall thickness of approximately 20 nm. Excess PbO or annealing in a Pb-containing atmosphere was not necessary in order to achieve single phase PbTiO3 nanotubes. The influence of the heating procedure and the sol concentration is discussed. In Paper V, a piezoresponse force microscopy study of single PbTiO3 nanorods is

  4. Monte Carlo simulations of nanoscale Ne+ ion beam sputtering: investigating the influence of surface effects, interstitial formation, and the nanostructural evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahady, Kyle; Tan, Shida; Greenzweig, Yuval; Livengood, Richard; Raveh, Amir; Rack, Philip

    2017-01-01

    We present an updated version of our Monte-Carlo based code for the simulation of ion beam sputtering. This code simulates the interaction of energetic ions with a target, and tracks the cumulative damage, enabling it to simulate the dynamic evolution of nanostructures as material is removed. The updated code described in this paper is significantly faster, permitting the inclusion of new features, namely routines to handle interstitial atoms, and to reduce the surface energy as the structure would otherwise develop energetically unfavorable surface porosity. We validate our code against the popular Monte-Carlo code SRIM-TRIM, and study the development of nanostructures from Ne+ ion beam milling in a copper target.

  5. Charge separation sensitized by advanced II-VI semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, David F. [Univ.of California, Merced, CA (United States)

    2017-04-11

    This proposal focuses on how the composition and morphology of pure and alloyed II-VI semiconductor heterostructures control their spectroscopic and dynamical properties. The proposed research will use a combination of synthesis development, electron microscopy, time-resolved electronic spectroscopy and modeling calculations to study these nanostructures. The proposed research will examine the extent to which morphology, compression due to lattice mismatch and alloy effects can be used to tune the electron and hole energies and the spectroscopic properties of II-VI heterojunctions. It will also use synthesis, optical spectroscopy and HRTEM to examine the role of lattice mismatch and hence lattice strain in producing interfacial defects, and the extent to which defect formation can be prevented by controlling the composition profile through the particles and across the interfaces. Finally, we will study the magnitude of the surface roughness in core/shell nanostructures and the role of shell thickness variability on the inhomogeneity of interfacial charge transfer rates.

  6. Self-Assembled Hierarchical Formation of Conjugated 3D Cobalt Oxide Nanobead-CNT-Graphene Nanostructure Using Microwaves for High-Performance Supercapacitor Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Singh, Rajesh Kumar; Dubey, Pawan Kumar; Singh, Dinesh Pratap; Yadav, Ram Manohar

    2015-07-15

    Here we report the electrochemical performance of a interesting three-dimensional (3D) structures comprised of zero-dimensional (0D) cobalt oxide nanobeads, one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanotubes and two-dimensional (2D) graphene, stacked hierarchically. We have synthesized 3D self-assembled hierarchical nanostructure comprised of cobalt oxide nanobeads (Co-nb), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and graphene nanosheets (GNSs) for high-performance supercapacitor electrode application. This 3D self-assembled hierarchical nanostructure Co3O4 nanobeads-CNTs-GNSs (3D:Co-nb@CG) is grown at a large scale (gram) through simple, facile, and ultrafast microwave irradiation (MWI). In 3D:Co-nb@CG nanostructure, Co3O4 nanobeads are attached to the CNT surfaces grown on GNSs. Our ultrafast, one-step approach not only renders simultaneous growth of cobalt oxide and CNTs on graphene nanosheets but also institutes the intrinsic dispersion of carbon nanotubes and cobalt oxide within a highly conductive scaffold. The 3D:Co-nb@CG electrode shows better electrochemical performance with a maximum specific capacitance of 600 F/g at the charge/discharge current density of 0.7A/g in KOH electrolyte, which is 1.56 times higher than that of Co3O4-decorated graphene (Co-np@G) nanostructure. This electrode also shows a long cyclic life, excellent rate capability, and high specific capacitance. It also shows high stability after few cycles (550 cycles) and exhibits high capacitance retention behavior. It was observed that the supercapacitor retained 94.5% of its initial capacitance even after 5000 cycles, indicating its excellent cyclic stability. The synergistic effect of the 3D:Co-nb@CG appears to contribute to the enhanced electrochemical performances.

  7. Experimental Study on Hydrocarbon Formation Due to Reactions Between Carbonates and Water or Water—Bearing Minerals in Deep Earth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翁克难; 汪本善; 等

    1999-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism of formation of abiogenetic hydrocarbons at the depth of the Earth,experimental research on reactions between carbonates and water or waterbearing minerals was carried out at the pressure of about 1GPa and the temperature range of 800-1500℃.The reactions took place in an open and nonequilibrium state.Chromatographic analyses of the gas products indicate that in the experiments there were generated CH4-dominated hydrocarbons,along with some CO2 and CO.Accordingly,we think there is no essential distinction between free-state water and hydroxy in the minerals in the process of hydrocarbon formation.This study indicates that reactions between carbonates and water or water-bearing minerals should be an important factor leading to the formation of abiogenetic hydrocarbons at the Earth's depth.

  8. DNA nanostructure meets nanofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guomei; Surwade, Sumedh P; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Haitao

    2013-04-07

    Recent advances in DNA nanotechnology have made it possible to construct DNA nanostructures of almost arbitrary shapes with 2-3 nm of precision in their dimensions. These DNA nanostructures are ideal templates for bottom-up nanofabrication. This review highlights the challenges and recent advances in three areas that are directly related to DNA-based nanofabrication: (1) fabrication of large scale DNA nanostructures; (2) pattern transfer from DNA nanostructure to an inorganic substrate; and (3) directed assembly of DNA nanostructures.

  9. Influence of NaOH on the formation and morphology of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanostructures in a solvothermal process: From hexagonal nanoplates to nanorings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang Yujie [School of Science, Minzu University of China, Beijing 100081 (China); Wang, Wenzhong, E-mail: wzhwang@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [School of Science, Minzu University of China, Beijing 100081 (China); School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Zeng Baoqing [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Zhang Guling [School of Science, Minzu University of China, Beijing 100081 (China); He Qingyu [Institute of Electronic Information Material and Apparatus, Laboratory of Quantum Information Technology, School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Fu Junli [School of Science, Minzu University of China, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanoplates and nanorings were synthesized by a simple solvothermal process. {yields} NaOH is not necessary for Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanostructure growth in a solvothermal process. {yields} Hexagonal Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanoplates were achieved with NaOH concentrations of 5-7 M. {yields} Hexagonal Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanorings were fabricated with NaOH concentrations of 9-11 M. {yields} Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanorings were fabricated by dissolving the inner part of the nanoplates with NaOH. - Abstarct: Hexagonal bismuth telluride (Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) nanoplates and nanorings were synthesized by a simple solvothermal process. The composition, morphology and size of the as-prepared products were investigated by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy in detail. The systemically experiments have been performed to investigate the effect of alkaline additive NaOH on composition and morphology of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanostructures. The results indicate that alkaline additive NaOH is not necessary for the formation of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanostructures in a solvothermal process. However, NaOH plays an important role in determining the morphology and size of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanostructures. When the experiment was carried out with NaOH concentration ranging from 5 to 7 M, hexagonal Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanoplates with edge length of 140-280 nm were synthesized. When the experiment was carried out at higher NaOH concentration of 9-11 M, hexagonal Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanorings were fabricated by dissolving the inner part of the hexagonal nanoplates with NaOH for the first time. A possible formation mechanism has been proposed based on the experimental results and analysis. This work may open a new rational route for the synthesis of hexagonal Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanorings which may have some scientific and technological applications in various functional devices.

  10. Thermoelectric effects in magnetic nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hatami, M.; Bauer, G.E.W.; Zhang, Q.; Kelly, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    We model and evaluate the Peltier and Seebeck effects in magnetic multilayer nanostructures by a finite-element theory of thermoelectric properties. We present analytical expressions for the thermopower and the current-induced temperature changes due to Peltier cooling/heating. The thermopower of a

  11. Thermoelectric effects in magnetic nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hatami, M.; Bauer, G.E.W.; Zhang, Q.; Kelly, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    We model and evaluate the Peltier and Seebeck effects in magnetic multilayer nanostructures by a finite-element theory of thermoelectric properties. We present analytical expressions for the thermopower and the current-induced temperature changes due to Peltier cooling/heating. The thermopower of a

  12. Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichhardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reichhardt, Cynthia J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Libal, Andras J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

  13. On the Ettringite Form of Sulfate Attack:Part 1. The Formation Mechanism of Secondary Ettringite in Concrete due to Sulfate Attack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Two different mechanisms have been proposed for the formation of ettringite, i.e.through-solution reaction and topochemical reaction. In this paper, the formation mechanism of secondary ettringite in concrete due to sulfate attack was reviewed and analyzed. It was deduced that the formation mechanism of secondary ettringite is mainly by topochemical mechanism. The sample made from AFm (4CaO.Al2O3.CaSO4. 12H2O) and Ca (OH)2 was immersed in 5% sodium sulfate at 20 ℃ for 20 days. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to analyze the sample. The results verified that the formation mechanism of secondary ettringite should be attributed to topochemical reaction.

  14. Fabrication of nanowires and nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Piraux, L.

    2009-01-01

    We report on different approaches that we have adopted and developed for the fabrication of nanowires and nanostructures. Methods based on template synthesis and on self organization seem to be the most promising for the fabrication of nanomaterials and nanostructures due to their easiness and low...... cost. The development of a supported nanoporous alumina template and the possibility of using this template to combine electrochemical synthesis with lithographic methods open new ways for the fabrication of complex nanostructures. The numerous advantages of the supported template and its compatibility...... with microelectronic processes make it an ideal candidate for further integration into large-scale fabrication of various nanowire-based devices. © 2009 Springer-Verlag....

  15. Facile synthesis of lead iodide nanostructures by microwave irradiation technique and their structural, morphological, photoluminescence and dielectric studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkir, Mohd.; Yahia, I. S.; AlFaify, S.; Abutalib, M. M.; Muhammad, Shabbir

    2016-04-01

    Lead iodide (PbI2) nanostructures have been synthesized by co-precipitation, hydrothermal and rapidly by microwave irradiation techniques. SEM analysis indicated the formation of well aligned nanocrystals and nanorods of average diameter between 100 nm and 400 nm. The powder X-ray diffraction and FT-Raman spectroscopic analysis confirms the formation of a 2H-PbI2 polytypic predominantly. These studies also show that there is no extra phase due to impurity in the synthesized nanostructures. The optical energy band gap of nanostructures prepared by co-precipitation, hydrothermal and microwave irradiation techniques were found to be 2.283, 2.493, 2.542 eV and 2.331. 2.350, 2.375 eV calculated from UV-Vis absorption and diffuse reflectance data, respectively, which shows a clear blue shift in the wavelength due to confinement effect. Photoluminescence spectrum was recorded at different excitation wavelengths and shows clear blue shift in the emission peak which is due to the recombination of free excitons with band to band type transition and also may be due to confinement effect. Further the dielectric studies have been performed and a good enhancement in the dielectric constant has been observed due to small size of the fabricated nanostructures in comparison to bulk material.

  16. Hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanostructures - revew article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunandan Baruah and Joydeep Dutta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional nanostructures exhibit interesting electronic and optical properties due to their low dimensionality leading to quantum confinement effects. ZnO has received lot of attention as a nanostructured material because of unique properties rendering it suitable for various applications. Amongst the different methods of synthesis of ZnO nanostructures, the hydrothermal method is attractive for its simplicity and environment friendly conditions. This review summarizes the conditions leading to the growth of different ZnO nanostructures using hydrothermal technique. Doping of ZnO nanostructures through hydrothermal method are also highlighted.

  17. Reactive nanostructured membranes for water purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Scott R; Datta, Saurav; Gui, Minghui; Coker, Eric L; Huggins, Frank E; Daunert, Sylvia; Bachas, Leonidas; Bhattacharyya, Dibakar

    2011-05-24

    Many current treatments for the reclamation of contaminated water sources are chemical-intensive, energy-intensive, and/or require posttreatment due to unwanted by-product formation. We demonstrate that through the integration of nanostructured materials, enzymatic catalysis, and iron-catalyzed free radical reactions within pore-functionalized synthetic membrane platforms, we are able to conduct environmentally important oxidative reactions for toxic organic degradation and detoxification from water without the addition of expensive or harmful chemicals. In contrast to conventional, passive membrane technologies, our approach utilizes two independently controlled, nanostructured membranes in a stacked configuration for the generation of the necessary oxidants. These include biocatalytic and organic/inorganic (polymer/iron) nanocomposite membranes. The bioactive (top) membrane contains an electrostatically immobilized enzyme for the catalytic production of one of the main reactants, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), from glucose. The bottom membrane contains either immobilized iron ions or ferrihydrite/iron oxide nanoparticles for the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to form powerful free radical oxidants. By permeating (at low pressure) a solution containing a model organic contaminant, such as trichlorophenol, with glucose in oxygen-saturated water through the membrane stack, significant contaminant degradation was realized. To illustrate the effectiveness of this membrane platform in real-world applications, membrane-immobilized ferrihydrite/iron oxide nanoparticles were reacted with hydrogen peroxide to form free radicals for the degradation of a chlorinated organic contaminant in actual groundwater. Although we establish the development of these nanostructured materials for environmental applications, the practical and methodological advances demonstrated here permit the extension of their use to applications including disinfection and/or virus inactivation.

  18. Nanograin formation and reaction-induced fracturing due to decarbonation: Implications for the microstructures of fault mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluymakers, A.; Røyne, A.

    2017-10-01

    Principal slip zones often contain highly reflective surfaces referred to as fault mirrors, shown to consist of a nanogranular coating. There is currently no consensus on how the nanograins form, or why they survive weathering on a geological time-scale. To simplify the complex system of a natural fault zone, where slip and heat generation are inherently coupled, we investigated the effect of elevated temperatures on carbonate rock surfaces, as well as their resistance to water exposure. This allows us to isolate the role of the decarbonation process in the formation of nanograins. We used cleaved crystals of Iceland spar calcite, manually polished dolomite protolith, as well as natural dolomite fault mirror surfaces. The samples were heated to 200-800 °C in a ∼5 h heating cycle, followed by slow cooling (∼12 h) to room temperature. Subsequently, we imaged the samples using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Nanograin formation on all sample surfaces was pervasive at and above 600 °C. The Foiana fault mirror samples were initially coated with aligned naturally-formed nanograins, but display a non-directional nanogranular coating after heating. The nanograins that were formed by heating rapidly recrystallized to bladed hydroxides upon exposure to deionized water, whereas the nanograins on unheated fault mirror samples remained unchanged in water. This shows that the nanograins formed by heating alone are different from those formed in fault zones, and calls for a better characterization of nanograins and their formation mechanisms. Furthermore, we find a characteristic star-shaped crack pattern associated with reacted regions of the carbonate surfaces. The existence of this pattern implies that the mechanical stresses set up by the decarbonation reaction can be sufficiently large to drive fracturing in these systems. We propose that this mechanism may contribute to grain size reduction in fault zones.

  19. Irreversible fouling of membrane bioreactors due to formation of a non-biofilm gel-like layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poorasgari, Eskandar; Larsen, Poul; Zheng, Xing

    2013-01-01

    Extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS), known to contribute to fouling in membrane bio-reactors (MBR)s, are generally divided into bound and free EPS. The free EPS are able to form a gel-like layer on the membrane active surface. The mechanisms involved in formation of such layer and its effects...... with the amount of the humic-like substances retained during filtration as predicted by gel growth theory. A low pressure backwash could re-establish the water flux only up to 70%....

  20. Formation of Anhydrite due to Interaction Between Water Soluble CO2 (aq) and Calcite Mineral During Enhanced Oil Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakravarty, Krishna Hara; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj

    2015-01-01

    place during CO2 injection in limestone reservoirs. At reservoir conditions, a considerable fraction of the injected CO2 becomes soluble in sea water. This dissolved CO2 causes dissolution of CaCO3 from the mineral surface and releases Ca2+ ions into the pore space. Excess Ca2+ ions form anhydrite fines...... injections showed a consistent correlation with the amounts of fines formation taking place in the pore space. The amount of mineral dissolution taking place was also precisely calculated using the Extended UNIQUAC model. Good correlation was also observed between calculated amounts of mineral dissolution...

  1. Nanostructured Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sholklapper, Tal Zvi [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The ability of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) to directly and efficiently convert the chemical energy in hydrocarbon fuels to electricity places the technology in a unique and exciting position to play a significant role in the clean energy revolution. In order to make SOFC technology cost competitive with existing technologies, the operating temperatures have been decreased to the range where costly ceramic components may be substituted with inexpensive metal components within the cell and stack design. However, a number of issues have arisen due to this decrease in temperature: decreased electrolyte ionic conductivity, cathode reaction rate limitations, and a decrease in anode contaminant tolerance. While the decrease in electrolyte ionic conductivities has been countered by decreasing the electrolyte thickness, the electrode limitations have remained a more difficult problem. Nanostructuring SOFC electrodes addresses the major electrode issues. The infiltration method used in this dissertation to produce nanostructure SOFC electrodes creates a connected network of nanoparticles; since the method allows for the incorporation of the nanoparticles after electrode backbone formation, previously incompatible advanced electrocatalysts can be infiltrated providing electronic conductivity and electrocatalysis within well-formed electrolyte backbones. Furthermore, the method is used to significantly enhance the conventional electrode design by adding secondary electrocatalysts. Performance enhancement and improved anode contamination tolerance are demonstrated in each of the electrodes. Additionally, cell processing and the infiltration method developed in conjunction with this dissertation are reviewed.

  2. INCREASING OF EFFICIENCY OF NATURAL GAS COMBUSTION IN STEAM BOILERS OF SMALL AND MEDIUM CAPACITY DUE TO IMPROVED MIXTURE FORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaponenko A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents methods of industrial tests of the of technical device utility model designed for boilers E-1,0-0,9G-3 QL-500, D-721 of small and medium capacity. The research is aimed at improving the efficiency of fuel combustion in the boiler furnaces due to uniform distribution of airflow when supplying it to the boiler burner

  3. Effect of NaOH molar concentration on optical and ferroelectric properties of ZnO nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chand, Prakash, E-mail: KK_PC2006@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Kurukshetra 136119 (India); Gaur, Anurag; Kumar, Ashavani [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Kurukshetra 136119 (India); Gaur, Umesh Kumar [Centre of Nanotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247667 (India)

    2015-11-30

    Highlights: • ZnO nanostructures were synthesized by hydrothermal method at different NaOH mol%. • Effects of molar concentration on structural, optical and ferroelectric properties are investigated. • A significant reduction in optical band gap has been observed by varying NaOH mol%. • Room temperature ferroelectricity has been observed for these nanostructures. - Abstract: The present study reports the effects of NaOH concentrations in hydrothermally grown ZnO nanostructures on structural, optical and ferroelectric properties at different selected NaOH molar concentrations (3–7 M). X-ray diffraction, Raman and photoluminescence analysis confirms the formation of pure phase of ZnO. FESEM images show that the average grain size of ZnO nanostructures increases from 61 to 95 nm as molar concentration increases from 3 to 7 M, respectively. Transmission electron microscope analysis also reveals that an average grain size of ZnO nanostructures increases from 34 to 55 nm as molarity increases from 3 to 7 M concentrations. A significant reduction in the optical band gap is observed from 4.41 to 3.96 eV by increasing molar concentration from 3 to 7 M, respectively. The decrease in the band gap with molar concentration could be due to the increase of density of localize state in the conduction band. Furthermore, ferroelectricity is observed in ZnO nanostructures at room temperature which is interesting and adds an additional dimension to its applications.

  4. Osteogenesis imperfecta due to mutations in non-collagenous genes: lessons in the biology of bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Joan C; Reich, Adi; Smith, Simone M

    2014-08-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta or 'brittle bone disease' has mainly been considered a bone disorder caused by collagen mutations. Within the last decade, however, a surge of genetic discoveries has created a new paradigm for osteogenesis imperfecta as a collagen-related disorder, where most cases are due to autosomal dominant type I collagen defects, while rare, mostly recessive, forms are due to defects in genes whose protein products interact with collagen protein. This review is both timely and relevant in outlining the genesis, development, and future of this paradigm shift in the understanding of osteogenesis imperfecta. Bone-restricted interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM)-like protein (BRIL) and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) defects cause types V and VI osteogenesis imperfecta via defective bone mineralization, while defects in cartilage-associated protein (CRTAP), prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1), and cyclophilin B (CYPB) cause types VII-IX osteogenesis imperfecta via defective collagen post-translational modification. Heat shock protein 47 (HSP47) and FK506-binding protein-65 (FKBP65) defects cause types X and XI osteogenesis imperfecta via aberrant collagen crosslinking, folding, and chaperoning, while defects in SP7 transcription factor, wingless-type MMTV integration site family member 1 (WNT1), trimeric intracellular cation channel type b (TRIC-B), and old astrocyte specifically induced substance (OASIS) disrupt osteoblast development. Finally, absence of the type I collagen C-propeptidase bone morphogenetic protein 1 (BMP1) causes type XII osteogenesis imperfecta due to altered collagen maturation/processing. Identification of these multiple causative defects has provided crucial information for accurate genetic counseling, inspired a recently proposed functional grouping of osteogenesis imperfecta types by shared mechanism to simplify current nosology, and has prodded investigations into common pathways in osteogenesis imperfecta. Such

  5. Electric field distribution and simulation of avalanche formation due to the passage of heavy ions in a parallel grid avalanche counter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Kanjilal; S Saha

    2009-05-01

    Electric field distributions and their role in the formation of avalanche due to the passage of heavy ions in parallel grid avalanche type wire chamber detectors are evaluated using a Monte Carlo simulation. The relative merits and demerits of parallel and crossed wire grid configurations are studied. It is found that the crossed grid geometry has marginally higher gain at larger electric fields close to the avalanche region. The spatial uniformity of response in the two wire grid configurations is also compared.

  6. Formation of nanostructure and nano-hardness characterization on the meso-scale workpiece by a novel laser indirect shock forming method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Y; Liu, H X; Wang, X; Shen, Z B; Li, P; Gu, C X; Gu, Y X; Lu, M M; Zhang, Q

    2013-04-01

    The meso-scale workpiece with greatly enhanced mechanical properties is potential to be widely used in the electronics productions and micro-electro mechanical systems. In this study, it demonstrates that the meso-scale cup-shape workpiece with good geometry can be obtained by a novel laser indirect shock forming method. After the forming process, the mechanical properties and microstructures of the formed workpiece were characterized. By transmission electron microscope observation, it was found that a mixed refined microstructure consisting of nano-scale twins embedded in nano-sized grains was produced at the center of the formed sample. Formation of these nanograins could be mainly attributed to two mechanisms: twin-twin intersections and twin∕matrix lamellae fragmentation. By nanoindentation tests, it reveals that the hardness of the sample has increased greatly after laser shock forming and the hardness increases with the laser energy. The elevated hardness originates from a considerable number of nano-scale twins and nanograins, which possess a pretty high strength due to the significant effects of grain boundary strengthening and twin boundary strengthening.

  7. Nanostructured organic solar cells defined by nanoimprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Mukti Nath

    Energy harvesting from sunlight via organic solar cells (OSCs) based on polymers as an electron donors and fullerenes as electron acceptors has been subject of intensive research due to the potential for low cost and large area devices with attractive market perspectives. One of the biggest challenges for OSCs is their low efficiency of power conversion, which is limited by quality of active layer morphology of donor-acceptor materials and interfaces between the components. Key reasons for this low efficiency include severe electron-hole recombination, which prevents charge pair propagation toward the electrodes and poor light absorptions due to thin polymer layer (˜100 nm). These problems can be dramatically alleviated if the charge-transfer polymers can be arranged as periodic nanostructures for active layer of ˜300 nm so that enough light absorption takes place and no phase overlap exists in the charge propagation path. This work reports the formation of ordered bi-continuous interdigitized active layer morphology, well defined interfaces for charge pair formation and propagation without recombination toward the electrodes. Such nanostructure arrays of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) with well defined interfaces have been fabricated using nanoimprint lithography (NIL). The molds required for NIL are fabricated using innovative low cost and non-lithographic technique which is scalable to commercial use. Simultaneous control of nanostructured and 3-D chain alignment in P3HT nanostructures (nanowires and nanopillars) defined by NIL is revealed using out-of-plane and in-plane grazing incident X-ray diffraction measurements and enhancement in anisotropic charge carrier mobility favorable to solar cells and field effect transistors (FETs) is measured making FETs. Separate acceptor deposition is required for nanostructured solar cells which is challenging due to the limitation of solvent compatibility and self shadowing effect for thermal deposition. For this purpose

  8. Intrusion of Fukushima-derived radiocaesium into subsurface water due to formation of mode waters in the North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeriyama, Hideki; Shimizu, Yugo; Setou, Takashi; Kumamoto, Yuichiro; Okazaki, Makoto; Ambe, Daisuke; Ono, Tsuneo

    2016-02-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in March 2011 released radiocaesium (137Cs and 134Cs) into the North Pacific Ocean. Meridional transects of the vertical distribution of radiocaesium in seawater were measured along 147 °E and 155 °E in October-November 2012, 19 months after the accident. These measurements revealed subsurface peaks in radiocaesium concentrations at locations corresponding to two mode waters, Subtropical Mode Water and Central Mode Water. Mode water is a layer of almost vertically homogeneous water found over a large geographical area. Here we show that repeated formation of mode water during the two winter seasons after the Fukushima accident and subsequent outcropping into surface water transported radiocaesium downward and southward to subtropical regions of the North Pacific. The total amount of Fukushima-derived 134Cs within Subtropical Mode Water, decay-corrected to April 2011, was estimated to be 4.2 ± 1.1 PBq in October-November 2012. This amount of 134Cs corresponds to 22-28% of the total amount of 134Cs released to the Pacific Ocean.

  9. GRB 980425 host: [CII], [OI] and CO lines reveal recent enhancement of star formation due to atomic gas inflow

    CERN Document Server

    Michałowski, Michał J; Wardlow, J L; Karska, A; Messias, H; van der Werf, P; Hunt, L K; Baes, M; Castro-Tirado, A J; Gentile, G; Hjorth, J; Floc'h, E Le; Martinez, R Perez; Guelbenzu, A Nicuesa; Rasmussen, J; Rizzo, J R; Rossi, A; Sanchez-Portal, M; Schady, P; Sollerman, J; Xu, D

    2016-01-01

    We have recently suggested that gas accretion can be studied using host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We obtained the first ever far-infrared (FIR) line observations of a GRB host, namely Herschel/PACS resolved [CII] 158 um and [OI] 63 um spectroscopy, as well as APEX CO(2-1) and ALMA CO(1-0) observations of the GRB 980425 host. It has elevated [CII]/FIR and [OI]/FIR ratios and higher values of star formation rate (SFR) derived from line ([CII], [OI], Ha) than from continuum (UV, IR, radio) indicators. [CII] emission exhibits a normal morphology, peaking at the galaxy center, whereas [OI] is concentrated close to the GRB position and the nearby Wolf-Rayet region. The high [OI] flux indicates high radiation field and gas density. The [CII]/CO luminosity ratio of the GRB 980425 host is close to the highest values found for local star-forming galaxies. Its CO-derived molecular gas mass is low given its SFR and metallicity, but the [CII]-derived molecular gas mass is close to the expected value. The [OI] a...

  10. Osteogenesis Imperfecta due to Mutations in Non-Collagenous Genes-Lessons in the Biology of Bone Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Joan C.; Reich, Adi; Smith, Simone M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), or “brittle bone disease”, has mainly been considered a bone disorder caused by collagen mutations. Within the last decade, however, a surge of genetic discoveries has created a new paradigm for OI as a collagen-related disorder, where autosomal dominant type I collagen defects cause most cases, while rare, mostly recessive forms are due to defects in genes whose protein products interact with collagen protein. This review is both timely and relevant in outlining the genesis, development and future of this paradigm shift in the understanding of OI. Recent Findings BRIL and PEDF defects cause types V and VI OI via defective bone mineralization, while defects in CRTAP, P3H1 and CyPB cause types VII-IX via defective collagen post-translational modification. Hsp47 and FKBP65 defects cause types X and XI OI via aberrant collagen crosslinking, folding and chaperoning, while defects in SP7, WNT1, TRIC-B and OASIS disrupt osteoblast development. Finally, absence of the type I collagen C-propeptidase BMP1 causes type XII OI due to altered collagen maturation/processing. Summary Identification of these multiple causative defects has provided crucial information for accurate genetic counseling, inspired a recently proposed functional grouping of OI types by shared mechanism to simplify current nosology, and should prod investigations into common pathways in OI. Such investigations could yield critical information on cellular and bone tissue mechanisms and translate to new mechanistic insight into clinical therapies for patients. PMID:25007323

  11. A transparent nanostructured optical biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuan; Li, Xiang; Que, Long

    2014-05-01

    Herein we report a new transparent nanostructured Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) device. The unique features of the nanostructured optical device can be summarized as the following: (i) optically transparent nanostructured optical device; (ii) simple and inexpensive for fabrication; (iii) easy to be fabricated and scaled up as an arrayed format. These features overcome the existing barriers for the current nanopore-based interferometric optical biosensors by measuring the transmitted optical signals rather than the reflected optical signals, thereby facilitating the optical testing significantly for the arrayed biosensors and thus paving the way for their potential for high throughput biodetection applications. The optically transparent nanostructures (i.e., anodic aluminum oxide nanopores) inside the FPI devices are fabricated from 2.2 microm thick lithographically patterned Al thin film on an indium tin oxide (ITO) glass substrate using a two-step anodization process. Utilizing the binding between Protein A and porcine immunoglobulin G (IgG) as a model, the detection of the bioreaction between biomolecules has been demonstrated successfully. Experiments found that the lowest detection concentration of proteins is in the range of picomolar level using current devices, which can be easily tuned into the range of femtomolar level by optimizing the performance of devices.

  12. Changes in the Physicochemical Properties of Piperine/β-Cyclodextrin due to the Formation of Inclusion Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshinari Ezawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Piperine (PP is a pungent component in black pepper that possesses useful biological activities; however it is practically insoluble in water. The aim of the current study was to prepare a coground mixture (GM of PP and β-cyclodextrin (βCD (molar ratio of PP/βCD = 1/1 and subsequently evaluate the solubility of PP and physicochemical properties of the GM. DSC thermal behavior of the GM showed the absence of melting peak of piperine. PXRD profile of the GM exhibited halo pattern and no characteristic peaks due to PP and βCD were observed. Based on Job’s plot, the PP/βCD complex in solution had a stoichiometric ratio of 1/1. Raman spectrum of the GM revealed scattering peaks assigned for the benzene ring (C=C, the methylene groups (CH2, and ether groups (C-O-C of PP that were broaden and shifted to lower frequencies. SEM micrographs showed that particles in the GM were agglomerated and had rough surface, unlike pure PP and pure βCD particles. At 15 min of dissolution testing, the amount dissolved of PP in the GM was dramatically increased (about 16 times compared to that of pure PP. Moreover the interaction between PP and βCD cavity was detected by 1H-1H NMR nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy NMR spectroscopy.

  13. High risk of fistula formation in vacuum-assisted closure therapy in patients with open abdomen due to secondary peritonitis-a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintziras, Ioannis; Miligkos, Michael; Bartsch, Detlef Klaus

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of vacuum-assisted closure therapy in patients with open abdomen due to secondary peritonitis and to identify possible risk factors of fistula formation. The hospital OPS-database (time period 2005-2014) was searched to identify patients treated with an open abdomen due to secondary peritonitis, who underwent vacuum-assisted closure therapy. Medical records were retrospectively analyzed for patients' characteristics, cause of peritonitis, duration of vacuum therapy, number of relaparotomies, fascial closure rates, and risk factors of fistula formation. Forty-three patients (19 male, 24 female) with a median age of 65 years (range 24-90 years) were identified. The major cause of secondary peritonitis was anastomotic leakage after intestinal anastomosis or bowel perforation, the median APACHE II score was 11. Median duration of VAC treatment was 12 days (range 3-88 days). Twenty of 43 (47 %) patients died from septic complications. Delayed fascial closure was obtained by suturing in 20 of 43 patients (47 %). Overall 16 of 43 (37 %) patients developed enteroatmospheric fistulas. Re-explorations after starting VAC treatment and duration of VAC therapy were significantly associated with the occurrence of enteroatmospheric fistulas (p analysis determined the optimal duration of VAC therapy to reduce the risk of fistula formation at 13 days. Long-term VAC treatment of patients with an open abdomen due to secondary peritonitis results in a relatively low fascial closure rate and a high risk of fistula formation.

  14. Shape evolution of nanostructures by thermal and ion beam processing. Modeling and atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roentzsch, L.

    2007-07-01

    Single-crystalline nanostructures often exhibit gradients of surface (and/or interface) curvature that emerge from fabrication and growth processes or from thermal fluctuations. Thus, the system-inherent capillary force can initiate morphological transformations during further processing steps or during operation at elevated temperature. Therefore and because of the ongoing miniaturization of functional structures which causes a general rise in surface-to-volume ratios, solid-state capillary phenomena will become increasingly important: On the one hand diffusion-mediated capillary processes can be of practical use in view of non-conventional nanostructure fabrication methods based on self-organization mechanisms, on the other hand they can destroy the integrity of nanostructures which can go along with the failure of functionality. Additionally, capillarity-induced shape transformations are effected and can thereby be controlled by applied fields and forces (guided or driven evolution). With these prospects and challenges at hand, formation and shape transformation of single-crystalline nanostructures due to the system-inherent capillary force in combination with external fields or forces are investigated in the frame of this dissertation by means of atomistic computer simulations. For the exploration (search, description, and prediction) of reaction pathways of nanostructure shape transformations, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations are the method of choice. Since the employed KMC code is founded on a cellular automaton principle, the spatio-temporal development of lattice-based N-particle systems (N up to several million) can be followed for time spans of several orders of magnitude, while considering local phenomena due to atomic-scale effects like diffusion, nucleation, dissociation, or ballistic displacements. In this work, the main emphasis is put on nanostructures which have a cylindrical geometry, for example, nanowires (NWs), nanorods, nanotubes etc

  15. Polymer bilayer formation due to specific interactions between beta-cyclodextrin and adamantane: a surface force study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, Eva; Kumpulainen, Atte; David, Christelle; Amiel, Catherine

    2004-11-23

    The purposes of this study are to utilize the interactions between an adamantane end-capped poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and a cationic polymer of beta-cyclodextrin to build polymer bilayers on negatively charged surfaces, and to investigate the interactions between such layers. The association of this system in solution has been studied by rheology, light scattering, and fluorescence measurements. It was found that the adamantane-terminated PEO (PEO-Ad) mixed with the beta-cyclodextrin polymer gives complexes where the interpolymer links are formed by specific inclusion of the adamantane groups in the beta-cyclodextrin cavities. This results in a higher viscosity of the solution and growth of intermolecular clusters. The interactions between surfaces coated with a cationized beta-cyclodextrin polymer across a water solution containing PEO-Ad polymers were studied by employing the interferometric surface force apparatus (SFA). In the first step, the interaction between mica surfaces coated with the cationized beta-cyclodextrin polymer in pure water was investigated. It was found that the beta-cyclodextrin polymer adsorbs onto mica and almost neutralizes the surface charge. The adsorbed layers of the beta-cyclodextrin polymer are rather compact, with a layer thickness of about 60 A (30 A per surface). Upon separation, a very weak attractive force is observed. The beta-cyclodextrin solution was then diluted by pure water by a factor of 3000 and a PEO-Ad polymer was introduced into the solution. Two different architectures of the PEO-Ad polymer were investigated: a four-arm structure and a linear structure. After the adsorption of the PEO polymer onto the beta-cyclodextrin layer reached equilibrium, the forces were measured again. It was found that the weak repulsive long-range force had disappeared and an attractive force caused the surfaces to jump into contact, and that the compressed layer thickness had increased. The attractive force is interpreted as being due to

  16. Hybrid Aluminum Composite Materials Based on Carbon Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana S. Koltsova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated formation of carbon nanofibers grown by chemical deposition (CVD method using an acetylene-hydrogen mixture on the surface of micron-sized aluminum powder particles. To obtain uniform distribution of the carbon nanostructures on the particles we deposited nickel catalyst on the surface by spraying from the aqueous solution of nickel nitrate. It was found that increasing the time of the synthesis lowers the rate of growth of carbon nanostructures due to the deactivation of the catalyst. The Raman spectroscopy measurements confirm the presence of disordered carbon corresponding to CNFs in the specimen. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed the presence of aluminum carbide in the hot pressed samples. An aluminum composite material prepared using 1 wt.% CNFs obtained by uniaxial cold pressing and sintering showed 30% increase in the hardness compared to pure aluminum, whereas the composites prepared by hot pressing showed 80% increase in the hardness. Composite materials have satisfactory ductility. Thus, the aluminum based material reinforced with carbon nanostructures should be appropriate for creating high-strength and light compacts for aerospace and automotive applications and power engineering.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7355

  17. Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehmann, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the following, a new conceptual framework for investigating nowadays’ “technical” phenomena shall be introduced, that of formats. The thesis is that processes of formatting account for our recent conditions of life, and will do so in the very next future. It are processes whose foundations have been laid in modernity and which will further unfold for the time being. These processes are embedded in the format of the value chain, a circumstance making them resilient to change. In addition, they are resilient in themselves since forming interconnected systems of reciprocal causal circuits.Which leads to an overall situation that our entire “Lebenswelt” became formatted to an extent we don’t fully realize, even influencing our very percep-tion of it.

  18. Emission inventory of NMVOC (Non Methane Volatile Organic Compounds) and simulations of ozone formation due to emissions of NO{sub x} and NMVOC in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janhaell, S.; Andersson-Skoeld, Y.

    1997-01-01

    An emission inventory, covering the different source categories of ozone precursors in Sweden, has been performed. The emissions from each category, road traffic, working machinery, other mobile sources, wood combustion, energy production, industry, domestic use and pesticides, have been separated into 81 organic compounds and NO{sub x}. The emission data have been used in model simulations to predict the ozone formation due to the emission from different source categories. Four different ambient conditions have been treated. The results from this study indicate, as expected, that the road traffic is the single most important emitter of precursors significant in regional ozone production. POCP, or Photochemical Ozone Creation Potential, defined as the change in photochemical ozone production due to a change in the emission of that particular VOC, is used to compare different VOC in connection with ozone production. In this study the POCP was calculated for the whole group of compounds emitted from a specific source category. The results indicate that there is a big variety of ozone formation ability among source categories due to differences in composition, which clearly demonstrate the importance of a detailed description of the emissions. 48 refs, 5 figs, 6 tabs

  19. Single ion induced surface nanostructures: a comparison between slow highly charged and swift heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumayr, Friedrich; Facsko, Stefan; El-Said, Ayman S; Trautmann, Christina; Schleberger, Marika

    2011-10-05

    This topical review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the formation of surface nanostructures, an intriguing phenomenon in ion-surface interaction due to the impact of individual ions. In many solid targets, swift heavy ions produce narrow cylindrical tracks accompanied by the formation of a surface nanostructure. More recently, a similar nanometric surface effect has been revealed for the impact of individual, very slow but highly charged ions. While swift ions transfer their large kinetic energy to the target via ionization and electronic excitation processes (electronic stopping), slow highly charged ions produce surface structures due to potential energy deposited at the top surface layers. Despite the differences in primary excitation, the similarity between the nanostructures is striking and strongly points to a common mechanism related to the energy transfer from the electronic to the lattice system of the target. A comparison of surface structures induced by swift heavy ions and slow highly charged ions provides a valuable insight to better understand the formation mechanisms.

  20. Electrochemical Synthesis and Characterization of Nanostructured Chalcogenide Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Chong Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructured materials have attracted extensive attention due to their small dimension and enhanced properties compared to bulk materials, and their large range of potential applications in energy harvesting devices. Among these materials, nanostructured chalcogenides play an important role in thermoelectric and solar cell devices. Electrochemical techniques have drawn attention as an improved method for synthesizing nanostructured chalcogenide materials, since they provide a cost-effective...

  1. Modification of Nanostructures via Laser Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzel, Louis Avery

    Modification of nanostructures via laser processing is of great interest for a wide range of applications such as aerospace and the storage of nuclear waste. The primary goal of this dissertation is to improve the understanding of nanostructures through two primary routes: the modification of aerogels and pulsed laser ablation in ethanol. A new class of materials, patterned aerogels, was fabricated by photopolymerizing selected regions of homogeneous aerogel monoliths using visible light. The characterization and fabrication of functionally graded, cellular and compositionally anisotropic aerogels and ceramics is discussed. Visible light was utilized due to it's minimal absorption and scattering by organic molecules and oxide nanoparticles within wet gels. This allowed for the fabrication of deeply penetrating, well resolved patterns. Similarly, nanoporous monoliths with a typical aerogel core and a mechanically robust exterior ceramic layer were synthesized from silica aerogels cross-linked with polyacrylonitrile. Simple variations of the exposure geometry allowed fabrication of a wide variety of anisotropic materials without requiring layering or bonding. Nanoparticle solutions were prepared by laser ablation of metal foils (Fe and Mo) in ethanol. Ablation of Fe generated Fe3O4 and Fe3C nanoparticles which were superparamagnetic with a saturation magnetization Ms = 124 emu/g. Zero field cooled (ZFC) measurements collected at an applied field of 50 Oe displayed a maximum magnetic susceptibility at 120 K with a broad distribution. Field cooled (FC) measurements showed a thermal hysteresis indicative of temperature dependent magnetic viscosity. Pulsed laser ablation of a Mo foil in ethanol generated inhomogeneous nanoparticles where Mo and MoC coexisted within the same aggregate. Formation of these unique nanoparticles is likely due to phase separation that occurs when a high temperature carbide phase cools after the laser pulse terminates. Similarly, magnetic

  2. Study on the nanostructure formation mechanism of hypereutectic Al–17.5Si alloy induced by high current pulsed electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Bo, E-mail: gaob@smm.neu.edu.cn [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Hu, Liang [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Li, Shi-wei [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Hao, Yi [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Zhang, Yu-dong [Laboratoire d’Etude des Textures et Applications aux Matériaux (LETAM, UMR-CNRS 7078), Université Paul Verlaine de Metz, Ile du Saulcy, Metz 57012 (France); Tu, Gan-feng [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Grosdidier, Thierry [Laboratoire d’Etude des Textures et Applications aux Matériaux (LETAM, UMR-CNRS 7078), Université Paul Verlaine de Metz, Ile du Saulcy, Metz 57012 (France)

    2015-08-15

    This work investigates the nanostructure forming mechanism of hypereutectic Al–17.5Si alloy associated with the high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) treatment with increasing number of pulses by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and SEM. The surface layers were melted and resolidified rapidly. The treated surfaces show different structural characteristics in different compositions and distribution zones. The top melted-layer zone can be divided into three zones: Si-rich, Ai-rich, and intermediate zone. The Al-rich zone has a nano-cellular microstructure with a diameter of ∼100 nm. The microstructure in the Si-rich zone consists of fine, dispersive, and spherical nano-sized Si crystals surrounded by α(Al) cells. Some superfine eutectic structures form in the boundary of the two zones. With the increase of number of pulses, the proportion of Si-rich zone to the whole top surface increases, and more cellular substructures are transformed to fine equiaxed grain. In other words, with increasing number of pulses, more Si elements diffuse to the Al-rich zone and provide heterogeneous nucleation sites, and Al grains are refined dramatically. Moreover, the relationship between the substrate Si phase and crystalline phase is determined by EBSD; that is, (1 1 1){sub Al}//(0 0 1){sub Si} with a value of disregistry δ at approximately 5%. The HCPEB technique is a versatile technique for refining the surface microstructure of hypereutectic Al–Si alloys.

  3. Acidification due to microbial dechlorination near a trichloroethene DNAPL is overcome with pH buffer or formate as electron donor: experimental demonstration in diffusion-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Jo; Maes, Nele; Springael, Dirk; Smolders, Erik

    2013-04-01

    Acidification due to microbial dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) can limit the bio-enhanced dissolution of TCE dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL). This study related the dissolution enhancement of a TCE DNAPL to the pH buffer capacity of the medium and the type of electron donor used. In batch systems, dechlorination was optimal at pH7.1-7.5, but was completely inhibited below pH6.2. In addition, dechlorination in batch systems led to a smaller pH decrease at an increasing pH buffer capacity or with the use of formate instead of lactate as electron donor. Subsequently, bio-enhanced TCE DNAPL dissolution was quantified in diffusion-cells with a 5.5 cm central sand layer, separating a TCE DNAPL layer from an aqueous top layer. Three different pH buffer capacities (2.9 mM-17.9 mM MOPS) and lactate or formate as electron donor were applied. In the lactate fed diffusion-cells, the DNAPL dissolution enhancement factor increased from 1.5 to 2.2 with an increase of the pH buffer capacity. In contrast, in the formate fed diffusion-cells, the DNAPL dissolution enhancement factor (2.4±0.3) was unaffected by the pH buffer capacity. Measurement of the pore water pH confirmed that the pH decreased less with an increased pH buffer capacity or with formate instead of lactate as electron donor. These results suggest that the significant impact of acidification on bio-enhanced DNAPL dissolution can be overcome by the amendment of a pH buffer or by applying a non acidifying electron donor like formate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. An outdoor investigation of the absorption degradation of single-junction amorphous silicon photovoltaic module due to localized heat/hot spot formation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Osayemwenre Gilbert O; Meyer Edson L; Mamphweli Sampson

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the absorbance degradation of single-junction amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) photovoltaic (PV) module, due to the presence of localized heat. The decrease in optical density is a huge challenge due to the long-term degradation of PV modules. The reduction in solar cell optical density causes a decline in its conversion efficiency. This decreases the photogenerating current, hence reduces the effective efficiency of the PV device. An infrared thermography was used for mapping the module temperature profile. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used for the absorption characterization. The rationale behind the outdoor deployment was to deduce a practical effect of hot spot formation on the module’s absorption ability.The results show a direct correlation between localized heat and the absorption degradation.

  5. Metallic Nanostructures Based on DNA Nanoshapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boxuan Shen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Metallic nanostructures have inspired extensive research over several decades, particularly within the field of nanoelectronics and increasingly in plasmonics. Due to the limitations of conventional lithography methods, the development of bottom-up fabricated metallic nanostructures has become more and more in demand. The remarkable development of DNA-based nanostructures has provided many successful methods and realizations for these needs, such as chemical DNA metallization via seeding or ionization, as well as DNA-guided lithography and casting of metallic nanoparticles by DNA molds. These methods offer high resolution, versatility and throughput and could enable the fabrication of arbitrarily-shaped structures with a 10-nm feature size, thus bringing novel applications into view. In this review, we cover the evolution of DNA-based metallic nanostructures, starting from the metallized double-stranded DNA for electronics and progress to sophisticated plasmonic structures based on DNA origami objects.

  6. Nanostructured scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoming; Wang, Lu; Fan, Yubo; Feng, Qingling; Cui, Fu-Zhai; Watari, Fumio

    2013-08-01

    It has been demonstrated that nanostructured materials, compared with conventional materials, may promote greater amounts of specific protein interactions, thereby more efficiently stimulating new bone formation. It has also been indicated that, when features or ingredients of scaffolds are nanoscaled, a variety of interactions can be stimulated at the cellular level. Some of those interactions induce favorable cellular functions while others may leads to toxicity. This review presents the mechanism of interactions between nanoscaled materials and cells and focuses on the current research status of nanostructured scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Firstly, the main requirements for bone tissue engineering scaffolds were discussed. Then, the mechanism by which nanoscaled materials promote new bone formation was explained, following which the current research status of main types of nanostructured scaffolds for bone tissue engineering was reviewed and discussed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Programmably Shaped Carbon Nanostructure from Shape-Conserving Carbonization of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feng; Sun, Wei; Ricardo, Karen B; Wang, Dong; Shen, Jie; Yin, Peng; Liu, Haitao

    2016-03-22

    DNA nanostructures are versatile templates for low cost, high resolution nanofabrication. However, due to the limited chemical stability of pure DNA structures, their applications in nanofabrication have long been limited to low temperature processes or solution phase reactions. Here, we demonstrate the use of DNA nanostructure as a template for high temperature, solid-state chemistries. We show that programmably shaped carbon nanostructures can be obtained by a shape-conserving carbonization of DNA nanostructures. The DNA nanostructures were first coated with a thin film of Al2O3 by atomic layer deposition (ALD), after which the DNA nanostructure was carbonized in low pressure H2 atmosphere at 800-1000 °C. Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) data showed that carbon nanostructures were produced and the shape of the DNA nanostructure was preserved. Conductive AFM measurement shows that the carbon nanostructures are electrically conductive.

  8. Advanced Magnetic Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Sellmyer, David

    2006-01-01

    Advanced Magnetic Nanostructures is devoted to the fabrication, characterization, experimental investigation, theoretical understanding, and utilization of advanced magnetic nanostructures. Focus is on various types of 'bottom-up' and 'top-down' artificial nanostructures, as contrasted to naturally occurring magnetic nanostructures, such as iron-oxide inclusions in magnetic rocks, and to structures such as perfect thin films. Chapter 1 is an introduction into some basic concepts, such as the definitions of basic magnetic quantities. Chapters 2-4 are devoted to the theory of magnetic nanostructures, Chapter 5 deals with the characterization of the structures, and Chapters 6-10 are devoted to specific systems. Applications of advanced magnetic nanostructures are discussed in Chapters11-15 and, finally, the appendix lists and briefly discusses magnetic properties of typical starting materials. Industrial and academic researchers in magnetism and related areas such as nanotechnology, materials science, and theore...

  9. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard M [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  10. Metal Surface Modification for Obtaining Nano- and Sub-Nanostructured Protective Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledovskykh, Volodymyr; Vyshnevska, Yuliya; Brazhnyk, Igor; Levchenko, Sergiy

    2017-03-01

    Regularities of the phase protective layer formation in multicomponent systems involving inhibitors with different mechanism of protective action have been investigated. It was shown that optimization of the composition of the inhibition mixture allows to obtain higher protective efficiency owing to improved microstructure of the phase layer. It was found that mechanism of the film formation in the presence of NaNO2-PHMG is due to deposition of slightly soluble PHMG-Fe complexes on the metal surface. On the basis of the proposed mechanism, the advanced surface engineering methods for obtaining nanoscaled and sub-nanostructured functional coatings may be developed.

  11. Nanostructured Materials for Magnetoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Mikailzade, Faik

    2013-01-01

    This book provides an up-to-date review of nanometer-scale magnetism and focuses on the investigation of the basic properties of magnetic nanostructures. It describes a wide range of physical aspects together with theoretical and experimental methods. A broad overview of the latest developments in this emerging and fascinating field of nanostructured materials is given with emphasis on the practical understanding and operation of submicron devices based on nanostructured magnetic materials.

  12. Formation of hollow nanocrystals through the nanoscale kirkendall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Yadong; Rioux, Robert M.; Erdonmez, Can K.; Hughes, Steven; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2004-03-11

    We demonstrate that hollow nanocrystals can be synthesized through a mechanism analogous to the Kirkendall Effect, in which pores form due to the difference in diffusion rates between two components in a diffusion couple. Cobalt nanocrystals are chosen as a primary example to show that their reaction in solution with oxygen, sulfur or selenium leads to the formation of hollow nanocrystals of the resulting oxide and chalcogenides. This process provides a general route to the synthesis of hollow nanostructures of large numbers of compounds. A simple extension of this process yields platinum-cobalt oxide yolk-shell nanostructures which may serve as nanoscale reactors in catalytic applications.

  13. Nanostructured materials for thermoelectric applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bux, Sabah K; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Kaner, Richard B

    2010-11-28

    Recent studies indicate that nanostructuring can be an effective method for increasing the dimensionless thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) in materials. Most of the enhancement in ZT can be attributed to large reductions in the lattice thermal conductivity due to increased phonon scattering at interfaces. Although significant gains have been reported, much higher ZTs in practical, cost-effective and environmentally benign materials are needed in order for thermoelectrics to become effective for large-scale, wide-spread power and thermal management applications. This review discusses the various synthetic techniques that can be used in the production of bulk scale nanostructured materials. The advantages and disadvantages of each synthetic method are evaluated along with guidelines and goals presented for an ideal thermoelectric material. With proper optimization, some of these techniques hold promise for producing high efficiency devices.

  14. Optical Characterization of Nanostructured Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feidenhans'l, Nikolaj Agentoft

    spectrum; the new method only evaluates the color of the reflected light using a standard RGB color camera. Color scatterometry provides the combined advantages of spectroscopic scatterometry, which provides fast evaluations, and imaging scatterometry that provides an overview image from which small...... implementation, a range of complementing characterization methods is needed to perform high-speed quality control of the nanostructures. This thesis concerns the development of a new method for fast in-line characterization of periodic nanostructures. The focus is on optical scatterometry, which uses inverse......, with trapezoidal profiles approximately ~200 nm high and with periods between 600 nm and 5000 nm. The heights and filling factors are determined with an accuracy of ~8 %, while the sidewall slopes have larger uncertainties due to a lower influence on the reflected light. The thesis also evaluates the use...

  15. Nanostructures for Organic Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goszczak, Arkadiusz Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    The experimental work in this thesis is focused on the fabrication of nanostructures that can be implemented in organic solar cell (OSC) architecture for enhancement of the device performance. Solar devices made from organic material are gaining increased attention, compared to their inorganic...... counterparts, due to the promising advantages, such as transparency, flexibility, ease of processing etc. But their efficiencies cannot be compared to the inorganic ones. Boosting the efficiency of OSCs by nanopatterning has thus been puzzling many researchers within the past years. Therefore various methods...... technique. Resist imprinted Al dimples drag the main focus showing increase in absorption and efficiency enhancement in poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) and Phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl (PCBM) BHJ devices. Not limited to this, nanostructures by imprinting the organic layer of P3HT:PCBM and imprinted...

  16. Ablation and nanostructuring of metals by femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashitkov, S I; Komarov, P S; Ovchinnikov, A V; Struleva, E V; Agranat, M B [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zhakhovskii, V V [All-Russian Institute of Automatics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Inogamov, N A [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-30

    Using an interferometric continuous monitoring technique, we have investigated the motion of the surface of an aluminium target in the case of femtosecond laser ablation at picosecond time delays relative to the instant of laser exposure. Measurements of the temporal target dispersion dynamics, molecular dynamics simulation results and the morphology of the ablation crater have demonstrated a thermomechanical (spall) nature of the disruption of the condensed phase due to the cavitation-driven formation and growth of vapour phase nuclei upon melt expansion, followed by the formation of surface nanostructures upon melt solidification. The tensile strength of heated aluminium in a condensed state has been determined experimentally at an expansion rate of ∼10{sup 9} s{sup -1}. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  17. Effects of spatial confinement on conduction electrons in semiconductor nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Germeau, Alexander

    2003-01-01

    Semiconductor nanostructures show electrical and optical properties which can be very different from bulk semiconductors. The various effects that occur due to the spatial confinement of electrons in such structures are of scientific importance. In addition, semiconductor nanostructures are very pro

  18. EFFECT OF POLY (ETHYLENE GLYCOL) ON THE FORMATION OF NANOSTRUCTURES: A FACILE SUSTAINABLE APPROACH FOR THE SYNTHESIS OF SILVER NANORODS USING MICROWAVE IRRADIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulk synthesis of silver nanorods employing poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) under microwave irradiation is reported. The formation of nanorods or particulate morphology is dependent on the PEG concentration. This greener method uses no surfactants or reducing agents and employs a b...

  19. Fabrication of nanostructures and nanostructure based interfaces for biosensor application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Devesh

    the influence of high shear rate mixer from PRIMIX, Japan on polymer particle formation. This mixer can process specific volume of liquid and subject it to high shear conditions. The mixing geometry consists of concentric cylinders, 52 mm inner turbine diameter and 58 mm vessel diameter, with inner turbine rotating at high peripheral speeds ranging from 10 m/s to 50m/s. The mixing is in turbulent regime at all the speeds. Poly-lactic acid (PLA) nanoparticles were fabricated by nanoprecipitation and emulsion diffusion process. Nanoprecipitation process was independent of shear rate at low mixing speeds and particle size went up at high speeds due to coalescence of PLA particles. Emulsion diffusion was done by making oil in water emulsion. PLA dissolved in ethyl acetate was used as oil phase. It was followed by diffusion of ethyl acetate in excess amount of DI water. It followed expected trend of smaller size at high mixing speeds but was very sensitive to mixing time where particles coalesced at longer time duration. The influence of viscosity was also studied and particles changed shape from spherical nanoparticles to micron sized open shells at high viscosity and high mixing speeds due to heating combined with mixing occurring in viscous turbulent regime.

  20. Catalyst-nanostructure interaction in the growth of 1-D ZnO nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchers, C; Müller, S; Stichtenoth, D; Schwen, D; Ronning, C

    2006-02-02

    Vapor-liquid-solid is a well-established process in catalyst guided growth of 1-D nanostructures, i.e., nanobelts and nanowires. The catalyst particle is generally believed to be in the liquid state during growth, and is the site for impinging molecules. The crystalline structure of the catalyst may not have any influence on the structure of the grown nanostructures. In this work, using Au guided growth of ZnO, we show that the interfaces between the catalyst droplet and the nanostructure grow in well-defined mutual crystallographic relationships. The nanostructure defines the crystallographic orientation of the solidifying Au droplet. Possible alloy, intermetallic, or eutectic phase formation during catalysis are elucidated with the help of a proposed ternary Au-Zn-O phase diagram.

  1. Broad range tuning of structural and optical properties of Zn x Mg1-x O nanostructures grown by vapor transport method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanjaria, Jignesh V.; Azhar, Ebraheem Ali; Yu, Hongbin

    2016-11-01

    One-dimensional (1D) Zn x Mg1-x O nanomaterials have drawn global attention due to their remarkable chemical and physical properties, and their diverse current and future technological applications. In this work, 1D ZnMgO nanostructures with different magnesium concentrations and different morphologies were grown directly on zinc oxide-coated silicon substrates by thermal evaporation of zinc oxide, magnesium boride and graphite powders. Highly well-defined Mg-rich ZnMgO nanorods with a rock salt structure and Zn-rich ZnMgO nanostructures with a wurtzite structure have been deposited individually by careful optimization of the source mixture and process parameters. Structural and optical properties of the deposited products were studied by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. Cathodoluminescence measurements demonstrate strong dominant peaks at 3.3 eV in Mg poor ZnMgO nanostructures and 4.8 eV in Mg rich nanostructures implying that the ZnMgO nanostructures can be used for the fabrication of deep UV optoelectronic devices. A mechanism for the formation and achieved diverse morphology of the ZnMgO nanostructures was proposed based on the characterization results.

  2. Preparation and Photocatalytic Activity of Potassium- Incorporated Titanium Oxide Nanostructures Produced by the Wet Corrosion Process Using Various Titanium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Yoon Lee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured potassium-incorporated Ti-based oxides have attracted much attention because the incorporated potassium can influence their structural and physico-chemical properties. With the aim of tuning the structural and physical properties, we have demonstrated the wet corrosion process (WCP as a simple method for nanostructure fabrication using various Ti-based materials, namely Ti–6Al–4V alloy (TAV, Ti–Ni (TN alloy and pure Ti, which have 90%, 50% and 100% initial Ti content, respectively. We have systematically investigated the relationship between the Ti content in the initial metal and the precise condition of WCP to control the structural and physical properties of the resulting nanostructures. The WCP treatment involved various concentrations of KOH solutions. The precise conditions for producing K-incorporated nanostructured titanium oxide films (nTOFs were strongly dependent on the Ti content of the initial metal. Ti and TAV yielded one-dimensional nanowires of K-incorporated nTOFs after treatment with 10 mol/L-KOH solution, whereas TN required a higher concentration (20 mol/L-KOH solution to produce comparable nanostructures. The obtained nanostructures revealed a blue-shift in UV absorption spectra due to the quantum confinement effects. A significant enhancement of the photocatalytic activity was observed via the chromomeric change and the intermediate formation of methylene blue molecules under UV irradiation. This study demonstrates the WCP as a simple, versatile and scalable method for the production of nanostructured K-incorporated nTOFs to be used as high-performance photocatalysts for environmental and energy applications.

  3. The Nanostructuring of Atomically Flat Ru(0001) upon Oxidation and Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goriachko, A.; Over, H.

    2016-12-01

    The O/Ru(0001) system is widely studied due to its rich phase variety of various stoichiometry and atomic arrangements, including the formation of a RuO2/Ru(0001) oxide layer. Apart from homogeneous ruthenium surfaces in certain oxidation states, also strongly heterogeneous surfaces can exist due to oxidation state's variation at the nanoscale. We report on a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) study of the nanostructuring of the oxidized Ru(0001) surface as a result of its interaction with molecular oxygen at elevated temperatures and subsequent reduction of a resulting RuO2 film by CO or HCl molecules from the gas phase in high-vacuum environment.

  4. Nb2O5 Nanostructure Evolution on Nb Surfaces via Low-Energy He(+) Ion Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakowski, Theodore Joseph; Tripathi, Jitendra Kumar; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2016-12-21

    We propose low-energy, broad-beam He(+) ion irradiation as a novel processing technique for the generation of Nb2O5 surface nanostructures due to its relative simplicity and scalability in a commercial setting. Since there have been relatively few studies involving the interaction of high-fluence, low-energy He(+) ion irradiation and Nb (or its oxidized states), this systematic study explores both effects of fluence and sample temperature during irradiation on resulting surface morphology. Detailed normal and cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies reveal subsurface He bubble formation and elucidate potential driving mechanisms for nanostructure evolution. A combination of specular optical reflectivity and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is also used to gain additional information on roughness and stoichiometry of irradiated surfaces. Our investigations show significant surface modification for all tested irradiation conditions; the resulting surface structure size and geometry have a strong dependence on both sample temperature during irradiation and total ion fluence. Optical reflectivity measurements on irradiated surfaces demonstrate increased surface roughening with increasing ion fluence, and XPS shows higher oxidation levels for samples irradiated at lower temperatures, suggesting larger surface roughness and porosity. Overall, it was found that low-energy He(+) ion irradiation is an efficient processing technique for nanostructure formation, and surface structures are highly tunable by adjusting ion fluence and Nb2O5 sample temperature during irradiation. These findings may have excellent potential applications for solar energy conversion through improved efficiency due to effective light absorption.

  5. Silicon-germanium (Sige) nanostructures production, properties and applications in electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Usami, N

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructured silicon-germanium (SiGe) provides the prospect of novel and enhanced electronic device performance. This book reviews the materials science and technology of SiGe nanostructures, including crystal growth, fabrication of nanostructures, material properties and applications in electronics.$bNanostructured silicon-germanium (SiGe) opens up the prospects of novel and enhanced electronic device performance, especially for semiconductor devices. Silicon-germanium (SiGe) nanostructures reviews the materials science of nanostructures and their properties and applications in different electronic devices. The introductory part one covers the structural properties of SiGe nanostructures, with a further chapter discussing electronic band structures of SiGe alloys. Part two concentrates on the formation of SiGe nanostructures, with chapters on different methods of crystal growth such as molecular beam epitaxy and chemical vapour deposition. This part also includes chapters covering strain engineering and mo...

  6. Sb–Te alloy nanostructures produced on a graphite surface by a simple annealing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwahara, Masashi, E-mail: kuwaco-kuwahara@aist.go.jp [Electronics and Photonics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Uratsuji, Hideaki [Shibaura Eletec Co., Yokohama 247-0006 (Japan); Abe, Maho [Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku Univ., Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Sone, Hayato; Hosaka, Sumio [Department of Electronic Engineering, Gunma Univ., Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Sakai, Joe [Groupe de Recherche en Matériaux, Microélectronique, Acoustique et Nanotechnologies (GREMAN), UMR 7347 CNRS/Université François Rabelais de Tours, Tours 37200 (France); Uehara, Yoichi [Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku Univ., Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Endo, Rie [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Tsuruoka, Tohru [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    We have produced Sb–Te alloy nanostructures from a thin Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} layer deposited on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite substrate using a simple rf-magnetron sputtering and annealing technique. The size, shape, and chemical composition of the structures were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), respectively. The shape of the nanostructures was found to depend on the annealing temperature; nanoparticles appear on the substrate by annealing at 200 °C, while nanoneedles are formed at higher temperatures. Chemical composition analysis has revealed that all the structures were in the composition of Sb:Te = 1:3, Te rich compared to the target composition Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, probably due to the higher movability of Te atoms on the substrate compared with Sb. We also tried to observe the production process of nanostructures in situ using SEM. Unfortunately, this was not possible because of evaporation in vacuum, suggesting that the formation of nanostructures is highly sensitive to the ambient pressure.

  7. Study of crater formation and its characteristics due to impact of a cluster projectile on a metal surface by molecular dynamics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naspoori, Srujan Kumar; Kammara, Kishore K.; Kumar, Rakesh

    2017-04-01

    Impingement of energetic particles/ions on material surfaces is of great interest as these impacts give rise to various interesting phenomena, such as sputtering, back-scattering, crater formation, emission of electrons and photons from material surfaces etc. Surface erosion occurring in the plasma-facing material of nuclear fusion reactors reduce their performance and this motivated the course of the current work in understanding the underlying physics of solid-particle interactions. In the present work, we have studied sputtering, crater formation and its characteristics on the surface of a plasma-facing material due to the impact of a low to high energy dust particle (a conglomerate of a few to a thousand atoms) using the molecular dynamics method. Sputtering yield, excavated atoms from the crater, crater depth, height of crater rim, radius and aspect ratio of the crater are calculated for a range of incident energies (10 eV to 10 keV), and the variation of these parameters with varying size (formed of 14, 32, 64 atoms) of dust particle at different temperatures of the target material are computed.

  8. Study of crater formation and its characteristics due to impact of a cluster projectile on a metal surface by molecular dynamics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naspoori, Srujan Kumar; Kammara, Kishore K.; Kumar, Rakesh, E-mail: rkm@iitk.ac.in

    2017-04-01

    Impingement of energetic particles/ions on material surfaces is of great interest as these impacts give rise to various interesting phenomena, such as sputtering, back-scattering, crater formation, emission of electrons and photons from material surfaces etc. Surface erosion occurring in the plasma-facing material of nuclear fusion reactors reduce their performance and this motivated the course of the current work in understanding the underlying physics of solid–particle interactions. In the present work, we have studied sputtering, crater formation and its characteristics on the surface of a plasma-facing material due to the impact of a low to high energy dust particle (a conglomerate of a few to a thousand atoms) using the molecular dynamics method. Sputtering yield, excavated atoms from the crater, crater depth, height of crater rim, radius and aspect ratio of the crater are calculated for a range of incident energies (10 eV to 10 keV), and the variation of these parameters with varying size (formed of 14, 32, 64 atoms) of dust particle at different temperatures of the target material are computed.

  9. Synthesis of palladium dendritic nanostructures on amidoxime modified polyacrylonitrile fibers through a complexing-reducing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zhichuan; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Bo; Qian, Guixiang; Tao, Tingxian, E-mail: tingxiantao@yahoo.cn

    2013-08-20

    Highlights: • We report the assembly of Pd dendritic nanostructures on amidoxime modified polyacrylonitrile fibers. • The supply rate of the metallic Pd plays a critical role in the morphology of Pd nanostructures. • The possible mechanism of Pd dendritic nanostructures on fibers was proposed. -- Abstract: In this paper, three-dimensional fern-leaf-like palladium (Pd) dendritic nanostructures were successfully synthesized on amidoxime modified polyacrylonitrile fibers via a simple and efficient complexing-reducing method. The influence of reaction time, temperature, and concentrations of N{sub 2}H{sub 4} and Fe{sup 3+} on the morphology and structure of Pd nanostructures was investigated. The results indicate that the supply rate of metallic Pd atoms plays a crucial role in the formation of the dendritic nanostructures. The formation mechanism of Pd dendritic nanostructures was proposed.

  10. Nanowires and nanostructures fabrication using template methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Vlad, A.;

    2009-01-01

    One of the great challenges of today is to find reliable techniques for the fabrication of nanomaterials and nanostructures. Methods based on template synthesis and on self organization are the most promising due to their easiness and low cost. This paper focuses on the electrochemical synthesis ...... of nanowires and nanostructures using nanoporous host materials such as supported anodic aluminum considering it as a key template for nanowires based devices. New ways are opened for applications by combining such template synthesis methods with nanolithographic techniques.......One of the great challenges of today is to find reliable techniques for the fabrication of nanomaterials and nanostructures. Methods based on template synthesis and on self organization are the most promising due to their easiness and low cost. This paper focuses on the electrochemical synthesis...

  11. Room temperature ferromagnetism in undoped and Mn doped CdO nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Sumeet [Department of Physics, Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology Allahabad, 211004 (India); Layek, Samar [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India); Yashpal, Madhu [Electron Microscope Facility Department of Anatomy Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Ojha, Animesh K., E-mail: animesh198@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology Allahabad, 211004 (India)

    2015-11-01

    Cd{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}O (x=00–0.07) nanostructures were synthesized and their structural, optical and magnetic properties were investigated. The shift of diffraction peaks towards lower angle side with increase of Mn content indicates the incorporation of Mn{sup 2+} ions into the CdO lattice. The values of optical band gaps were calculated at each value of Mn concentration. The values of band gap were increased by increasing the Mn concentrations as a direct consequence of the quantum confinement effect. The undoped CdO [Cd{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}O (x=0.00)] nanostructure shows weak ferromagnetic nature at room temperature. The ferromagnetic nature increases consistently with increase of Mn concentrations from x=0.01 to 0.05 and then slightly drops for x=0.07. As there were no magnetic impurities present in the samples, we assume that the origin of ferromagnetism in the undoped CdO nanostructures could be due to formation of CdO structure in triplet state (S=1). However, the consistent increase of magnetic nature with Mn doped (x=0.01–0.05) CdO nanostructures might be attributed to the ferromagnetic coupling between the spins and enhancement of spin concentrations due to entering of Mn atom into the lattice. The sudden drop of ferromagnetic nature at x=0.07 may be due to the presence of anti-ferromagnetic coupling. - Highlights: • Simple synthesis method is used to synthesize Cd{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}O nanostructures. • The optical band gap of Cd{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}O nanostructures is calculated. • Cd{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}O (x=0) nanostructure shows weak RTFM. • The RTFM of Cd{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}O (x=0) is explained by a model based on electronic distribution. • The RTFM nature of Cd{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}O is increased consistently from x=0.01 to 0.05.

  12. Physical electrochemistry of nanostructured devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisquert, Juan

    2008-01-07

    This Perspective reviews recent developments in experimental techniques and conceptual methods applied to the electrochemical properties of metal-oxide semiconductor nanostructures and organic conductors, such as those used in dye-sensitized solar cells, high-energy batteries, sensors, and electrochromic devices. The aim is to provide a broad view of the interpretation of electrochemical and optoelectrical measurements for semiconductor nanostructures (sintered colloidal particles, nanorods, arrays of quantum dots, etc.) deposited or grown on a conducting substrate. The Fermi level displacement by potentiostatic control causes a broad change of physical properties such as the hopping conductivity, that can be investigated over a very large variation of electron density. In contrast to traditional electrochemistry, we emphasize that in nanostructured devices we must deal with systems that depart heavily from the ideal, Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics, due to broad distributions of states (energy disorder) and interactions of charge carriers, therefore the electrochemical analysis must be aided by thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. We discuss in detail the most characteristic densities of states, the chemical capacitance, and the transport properties, specially the chemical diffusion coefficient, mobility, and generalized Einstein relation.

  13. Manipulating Surface Energy to form Compound Semiconductor Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJarld, Matthew T.

    Nanostructures have been lauded for their quantum confinement capabilities and potential applications in future devices. Compound semiconductor nanostructures are being integrated into the next generation of photovoltaic and light emitting devices to take advantage of their unique optical characteristics. Despite their promise, adoption of nanostructure based devices has been slow. This is due in large part to difficulties in effective fabrication and processing steps. By manipulating the surface energy of various components during growth, we can control the final structure and corresponding optoelectronic characteristics. Specifically I will present on GaSb quantum dots embedded in GaAs and GaAs nanowires using novel substrate and catalyst materials. GaSb quantum dots embedded in a GaAs matrix are ideal for devices that require capture of minority carriers as they exhibit a type II band offset with carrier concentration in the valence band. However, during GaAs capping, there is a strong driving force for the dot to demolish into a distribution of intact dots, rings, and GaSb material clusters. We demonstrate the ability to mitigate this effect using both chemical and kinetic means: we alter the surface chemistry via the addition of aluminum, and use droplet epitaxy as an alternative quantum dot formation method. Secondly, the growth of high quality GaAs on silicon has always been restricted due to material incompatibilities. With the emergence of increasingly smaller low power electronics, there is a demand to integrate optoelectronic devices directly on the surface of CMOS sensor stacks. Utilizing the vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism we are able to demonstrate the growth of high quality GaAs nanowires on polycrystalline substrates at low temperatures. This allows for the growth of III-V nanowire based devices directly on the metal pads of pre-packaged CMOS chips. We also investigate the potential use of bismuth as an alternative to gold for catalyzing

  14. Interface porcelain tile/PVA modified mortar: a novel nanostructure approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, Alexandra Ancelmo Piscitelli; Mansur, Herman Sander

    2009-02-01

    In ceramic tile systems, the overall result of adherence between porcelain tiles and polymer modified mortars could be explained based on the nano-order structure that is developed at the interface. Based on pull-off tests, Scanning Electron Microscopy images, and Small Angle X-ray Scattering experiments a nanostructured approach for interface tile/PVA modified mortar was built. The increase of adhesion between tile and mortar due to poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA, addition can be explained by the formation of a hybrid ceramic-polymer-ceramic interface by hydrogen bonds between PVA hydroxyl groups and silanol from tile surface and water from nanostructured C-S-H gel interlayer.

  15. Nanostructured Metal Oxide Sorbents for the Collection and Recovery of Uranium from Seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Warner, Cynthia L.; Mackie, Katherine E.; Warner, Marvin G.; Gill, Gary A.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2016-02-07

    The ability to collect uranium from seawater offers the potential for a long-term green fuel supply for nuclear energy. However, extraction of uranium, and other trace minerals, is challenging due to the high ionic strength and low mineral concentrations in seawater. Herein we evaluate the use of nanostructured metal oxide sorbents for the collection and recovery of uranium from seawater. Chemical affinity, chemical adsorption capacity and kinetics of preferred sorbent materials were evaluated. High surface area manganese and iron oxide nanomaterials showed excellent performance for uranium collection from seawater. Inexpensive nontoxic carbonate solutions were demonstrated to be an effective and environmental benign method of stripping the uranium from the metal oxide sorbents. Various formats for the utilization of the nanostructured metals oxide sorbent materials are discussed including traditional and nontraditional methods such as magnetic separation. Keywords: Uranium, nano, manganese, iron, sorbent, seawater, magnetic, separations, nuclear energy

  16. On the shear strength of tungsten nano-structures with embedded helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, R. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2013-08-01

    Modification of plastic properties of tungsten nano-structures under shear stress load due to embedded helium atoms is studied using molecular dynamics modelling. The modelling demonstrates that the yield strength of tungsten nano-structures reduces significantly with increasing embedded helium concentration. At high helium concentrations (>10 at%), the yield strength decreases to values characteristic to the pressure in helium nano-bubbles, which are formed in tungsten under such conditions and thought to be responsible for the formation of nano-fuzz on tungsten surfaces irradiated with helium plasma. It is also shown that tungsten plastic flow strongly facilitates coagulation of helium clusters to larger bubbles. The temperature dependencies of the yield strength are obtained.

  17. The Interaction of Bacteria with Engineered Nanostructured Polymeric Materials: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Armentano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In spite of great advances in biomaterials research and development, a significant proportion of medical devices undergo bacterial colonization and become the target of an implant-related infection. We present a review of the two major classes of antibacterial nanostructured materials: polymeric nanocomposites and surface-engineered materials. The paper describes antibacterial effects due to the induced material properties, along with the principles of bacterial adhesion and the biofilm formation process. Methods for antimicrobial modifications of polymers using a nanocomposite approach as well as surface modification procedures are surveyed and discussed, followed by a concise examination of techniques used in estimating bacteria/material interactions. Finally, we present an outline of future sceneries and perspectives on antibacterial applications of nanostructured materials to resist or counteract implant infections.

  18. The Interaction of Bacteria with Engineered Nanostructured Polymeric Materials: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armentano, Ilaria; Arciola, Carla Renata; Fortunati, Elena; Ferrari, Davide; Mattioli, Samantha; Amoroso, Concetta Floriana; Rizzo, Jessica; Kenny, Jose M.; Imbriani, Marcello; Visai, Livia

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In spite of great advances in biomaterials research and development, a significant proportion of medical devices undergo bacterial colonization and become the target of an implant-related infection. We present a review of the two major classes of antibacterial nanostructured materials: polymeric nanocomposites and surface-engineered materials. The paper describes antibacterial effects due to the induced material properties, along with the principles of bacterial adhesion and the biofilm formation process. Methods for antimicrobial modifications of polymers using a nanocomposite approach as well as surface modification procedures are surveyed and discussed, followed by a concise examination of techniques used in estimating bacteria/material interactions. Finally, we present an outline of future sceneries and perspectives on antibacterial applications of nanostructured materials to resist or counteract implant infections. PMID:25025086

  19. Enhanced bonding property of cold-sprayed Zn-Al coating on interstitial-free steel substrate with a nanostructured surface layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Y.L. [University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei 230026 (China); Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Advanced Technology Division, Research Institute, Baoshan Iron & Steel Co., Ltd., 655 Fujin Road, Shanghai 201900 (China); Wang, Z.B., E-mail: zbwang@imr.ac.cn [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhang, J. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhang, J.B. [Advanced Technology Division, Research Institute, Baoshan Iron & Steel Co., Ltd., 655 Fujin Road, Shanghai 201900 (China); Lu, K. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • A nanostructured surface layer was produced on hot-rolled interstitial-free steel. • Zn-Al coating was cold-sprayed on the steel plate with nanostructured surface layer. • Bonding strength of the coating on the nanostructured surface increases ∼30%. • Improved bonding property was due to promoted diffusion and hardness in surface layer. • No further increase in bonding property was achieved after annealing at 400 °C. - Abstract: By means of surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT), a gradient nanostructured surface layer was fabricated on a hot-rolled interstitial-free steel plate. A Zn-Al coating was subsequently deposited on the SMAT sample by using cold spray process. The bonding property of the coating on the SMAT substrate was compared with that on the coarse-grained (CG) sample. Stud-pull tests showed that the bonding strength in the as-sprayed SMAT sample is ∼30% higher than that in the as-sprayed CG sample. No further improvement in bonding strength was achieved in the coated SMAT sample after annealing at 400 °C, mostly due to the formation of cracks and intermetallic compounds at the coating/substrate interface in an earlier stage (<30 min) and in a final stage (>90 min), respectively. The enhanced bonding property of the Zn-Al coating on the SMAT sample might be related with the promoted atomic diffusion and hardness in the nanostructured surface layer.

  20. Nanostructures of zinc oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Lin Wang

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Zinc oxide (ZnO is a unique material that exhibits semiconducting, piezoelectric, and pyroelectric multiple properties. Using a solid-vapor phase thermal sublimation technique, nanocombs, nanorings, nanohelixes/nanosprings, nanobows, nanobelts, nanowires, and nanocages of ZnO have been synthesized under specific growth conditions. These unique nanostructures unambiguously demonstrate that ZnO is probably the richest family of nanostructures among all materials, both in structures and properties. The nanostructures could have novel applications in optoelectronics, sensors, transducers, and biomedical science because it is bio-safe.

  1. Hydrogen adsorption in carbon nanostructures compared

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schimmel, H.G.; Nijkamp, M.G.; Kearley, G.J.; Rivera, A.; de Jong, K.P.; Mulder, F.M.

    2004-01-01

    Recent reports continue to suggest high hydrogen storage capacities for some carbon nanostructures due to a stronger interaction between hydrogen and carbon. Here the interaction of hydrogen with activated charcoal, carbon nanofibers, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), and electron beam ‘opened’

  2. EDITORIAL: Nanostructured solar cells Nanostructured solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenham, Neil C.; Grätzel, Michael

    2008-10-01

    Conversion into electrical power of even a small fraction of the solar radiation incident on the Earth's surface has the potential to satisfy the world's energy demands without generating CO2 emissions. Current photovoltaic technology is not yet fulfilling this promise, largely due to the high cost of the electricity produced. Although the challenges of storage and distribution should not be underestimated, a major bottleneck lies in the photovoltaic devices themselves. Improving efficiency is part of the solution, but diminishing returns in that area mean that reducing the manufacturing cost is absolutely vital, whilst still retaining good efficiencies and device lifetimes. Solution-processible materials, e.g. organic molecules, conjugated polymers and semiconductor nanoparticles, offer new routes to the low-cost production of solar cells. The challenge here is that absorbing light in an organic material produces a coulombically bound exciton that requires dissociation at a donor-acceptor heterojunction. A thickness of at least 100 nm is required to absorb the incident light, but excitons only diffuse a few nanometres before decaying. The problem is therefore intrinsically at the nano-scale: we need composite devices with a large area of internal donor-acceptor interface, but where each carrier has a pathway to the respective electrode. Dye-sensitized and bulk heterojunction cells have nanostructures which approach this challenge in different ways, and leading research in this area is described in many of the articles in this special issue. This issue is not restricted to organic or dye-sensitized photovoltaics, since nanotechnology can also play an important role in devices based on more conventional inorganic materials. In these materials, the electronic properties can be controlled, tuned and in some cases completely changed by nanoscale confinement. Also, the techniques of nanoscience are the natural ones for investigating the localized states, particularly at

  3. The effect of Ce ion substituted OMS-2 nanostructure in catalytic activity for benzene oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jingtao; Li, Yuanzhi; Mao, Mingyang; Zhao, Xiujian; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2014-11-01

    The nanostructure of Ce doped OMS-2 plays a very important role in its catalytic property. We demonstrate by density functional theory (DFT) calculations that the unique nanostructure of the Ce ion substituted OMS-2 with Mn vacancy in the framework is beneficial for the improvement of catalytic activity, while the nanostructure of the Ce ion substituted OMS-2 without defects are detrimental to the catalytic activity. We establish a novel and facile strategy of synthesizing these unique Ce ion substituted OMS-2 nanostructure with Mn vacancies in the framework by hydrothermal redox reaction between Ce(NO3)3 and KMnO4 with KMnO4/Ce(NO3)3 at a molar ratio of 3 : 1 at 120 °C. Compared to pure OMS-2, the produced catalyst of Ce ion substituted OMS-2 ultrathin nanorods exhibits an enormous enhancement in the catalytic activity for benzene oxidation, which is evidenced by a significant decrease (ΔT50 = 100 °C, ΔT90 = 129 °C) in the reaction temperature of T50 and T90 (corresponding to the benzene conversion = 50% and 90%), which is considerably more efficient than the expensive supported noble metal catalyst (Pt/Al2O3). We combine both theoretical and experimental evidence to provide a new physical insight into the significant effect due to the defects induced by the Ce ion substitution on the catalytic activity of OMS-2. The formation of unique Ce ion substituted OMS-2 nanostructure with Mn vacancies in the framework leads to a significant enhancement of the lattice oxygen activity, thus tremendously increasing the catalytic activity.The nanostructure of Ce doped OMS-2 plays a very important role in its catalytic property. We demonstrate by density functional theory (DFT) calculations that the unique nanostructure of the Ce ion substituted OMS-2 with Mn vacancy in the framework is beneficial for the improvement of catalytic activity, while the nanostructure of the Ce ion substituted OMS-2 without defects are detrimental to the catalytic activity. We establish a novel

  4. Fabrication and characterization of one dimensional zinc oxide nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chun

    role for the GL emission. On the other hand, those ZnO tapered structures fabricated by a modified carbon thermal method with the assistance of Au catalysts display strong UV emission, indicating a good crystallization quality. The stability, structural degradation and related PL property of ZnO NWs under different environments of surface treatments have been investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and near field optical microscopy (NSOM). For high-quality ZnO NWs, the UV emission shows no change and no DL emission was generated during the structural degradation. For those ZnO NWs showing GL emission, the commonly used treatment methods e.g., post-annealing can not effectively eliminate the GL emission. The chemical stability and biocompatibility of ZnO nanostructures in simulated physiological solution (SPS) are studied by electron diffraction and HRTEM. ZnO nanostructures fabricated by the thermal evaporation method were found to survive much longer in SPS than those fabricated using a hydrothermal solution method. Calcium hydrogen phosphate amorphous layers structures have been observed to have excellent interfacial contacts with ZnO NWs. The shapes of the voids formed in the ZnO NWs are due to the interesting anisotropic etching behaviors in SPS which can be used to identify the polar directions of ZnO nanocrystals. Using hydrothermal reaction, TiO2/ZnO (TZO) nanohybrid structures have been found to form through the site-specific deposition of TiO2 on ZnO nanorods (NRs). TEM studies have revealed each ZnO NR to be assembled with one TiO2 cap at the Zn terminated (0001) surface. The polarity of the ZnO (0001) surface plays an important role in the formation of the TZO nanohybrid structures. The TZO nanohybrids contain uniform and atomically flat interfaces between ZnO and TiO2 with tunable crystal phases, which can be amorphous, anatase and rutile through annealing treatments. These nanohybrid structures demonstrate an enhanced

  5. Nanostructured CNx (0

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongiorno, G; Blomqvist, M; Piseri, P; Milani, P; Lenardi, C; Ducati, C; Caruso, T; Rudolf, P; Wachtmeister, S; Csillag, S; Coronel, E

    2005-01-01

    Nanostructured CNx thin films were prepared by supersonic cluster beam deposition (SCBD) and systematically characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The incorporat

  6. Self-assembled nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jin Z; Liu, Jun; Chen, Shaowei; Liu, Gang-yu

    2003-01-01

    Nanostructures refer to materials that have relevant dimensions on the nanometer length scales and reside in the mesoscopic regime between isolated atoms and molecules in bulk matter. These materials have unique physical properties that are distinctly different from bulk materials. Self-Assembled Nanostructures provides systematic coverage of basic nanomaterials science including materials assembly and synthesis, characterization, and application. Suitable for both beginners and experts, it balances the chemistry aspects of nanomaterials with physical principles. It also highlights nanomaterial-based architectures including assembled or self-assembled systems. Filled with in-depth discussion of important applications of nano-architectures as well as potential applications ranging from physical to chemical and biological systems, Self-Assembled Nanostructures is the essential reference or text for scientists involved with nanostructures.

  7. Shockwave Consolidation of Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Taylor, Patrick; Nemir, David

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology based thermoelectric materials are considered attractive for developing highly efficient thermoelectric devices. Nano-structured thermoelectric materials are predicted to offer higher ZT over bulk materials by reducing thermal conductivity and increasing electrical conductivity. Consolidation of nano-structured powders into dense materials without losing nanostructure is essential towards practical device development. Using the gas atomization process, amorphous nano-structured powders were produced. Shockwave consolidation is accomplished by surrounding the nanopowder-containing tube with explosives and then detonating. The resulting shock wave causes rapid fusing of the powders without the melt and subsequent grain growth. We have been successful in generating consolidated nano-structured bismuth telluride alloy powders by using the shockwave technique. Using these consolidated materials, several types of thermoelectric power generating devices have been developed. Shockwave consolidation is anticipated to generate large quantities of nanostructred materials expeditiously and cost effectively. In this paper, the technique of shockwave consolidation will be presented followed by Seebeck Coefficient and thermal conductivity measurements of consolidated materials. Preliminary results indicate a substantial increase in electrical conductivity due to shockwave consolidation technique.

  8. Mueller matrix imaging ellipsometry for nanostructure metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shiyuan; Du, Weichao; Chen, Xiuguo; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Chuanwei

    2015-06-29

    In order to achieve effective process control, fast, inexpensive, nondestructive and reliable nanometer scale feature measurements are extremely useful in high-volume nanomanufacturing. Among the possible techniques, optical scatterometry is relatively ideal due to its high throughput, low cost, and minimal sample damage. However, this technique is inherently limited by the illumination spot size of the instrument and the low efficiency in construction of a map of the sample over a wide area. Aiming at these issues, we introduce conventional imaging techniques to optical scatterometry and combine them with Mueller matrix ellipsometry based scatterometry, which is expected to be a powerful tool for the measurement of nanostructures in future high-volume nanomanufacturing, and propose to apply Mueller matrix imaging ellipsometry (MMIE) for nanostructure metrology. Two kinds of nanostructures were measured using an in-house developed Mueller matrix imaging ellipsometer in this work. The experimental results demonstrate that we can achieve Mueller matrix measurement and analysis for nanostructures with pixel-sized illumination spots by using MMIE. We can also efficiently construct parameter maps of the nanostructures over a wide area with pixel-sized lateral resolution by performing parallel ellipsometric analysis for all the pixels of interest.

  9. Mapping the stochastic response of nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattamatta, Subrahmanyam; Elliott, Ryan S.; Tadmor, Ellad B.

    2014-04-01

    Nanostructures are technological devices constructed on a nanometer length scale more than a thousand times thinner than a human hair. Due to the unique properties of matter at this scale, such devices offer great potential for creating novel materials and behaviors that can be leveraged to benefit mankind. This paper addresses a particular challenge involved in the design of nanostructures-their stochastic or apparently random response to external loading. This is because fundamentally the function that relates the energy of a nanostructure to the arrangement of its atoms is extremely nonconvex, with each minimum corresponding to a possible equilibrium state that may be visited as the system responds to loading. Traditional atomistic simulation techniques are not capable of systematically addressing this complexity. Instead, we construct an equilibrium map (EM) for the nanostructure, analogous to a phase diagram for bulk materials, which fully characterizes its response. Using the EM, definitive predictions can be made in limiting cases and the spectrum of responses at any desired loading rate can be obtained. The latter is important because standard atomistic methods are fundamentally limited, by computational feasibility, to simulations of loading rates that are many orders of magnitude faster than reality. In contrast, the EM-based approach makes possible the direct simulation of nanostructure experiments. We demonstrate the method's capabilities and its surprisingly complex results for the case of a nanoslab of nickel under compression.

  10. The effect of Ce ion substituted OMS-2 nanostructure in catalytic activity for benzene oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jingtao; Li, Yuanzhi; Mao, Mingyang; Zhao, Xiujian; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2014-12-21

    The nanostructure of Ce doped OMS-2 plays a very important role in its catalytic property. We demonstrate by density functional theory (DFT) calculations that the unique nanostructure of the Ce ion substituted OMS-2 with Mn vacancy in the framework is beneficial for the improvement of catalytic activity, while the nanostructure of the Ce ion substituted OMS-2 without defects are detrimental to the catalytic activity. We establish a novel and facile strategy of synthesizing these unique Ce ion substituted OMS-2 nanostructure with Mn vacancies in the framework by hydrothermal redox reaction between Ce(NO3)3 and KMnO4 with KMnO4/Ce(NO3)3 at a molar ratio of 3 : 1 at 120 °C. Compared to pure OMS-2, the produced catalyst of Ce ion substituted OMS-2 ultrathin nanorods exhibits an enormous enhancement in the catalytic activity for benzene oxidation, which is evidenced by a significant decrease (ΔT(50) = 100 °C, ΔT(90) = 129 °C) in the reaction temperature of T50 and T90 (corresponding to the benzene conversion = 50% and 90%), which is considerably more efficient than the expensive supported noble metal catalyst (Pt/Al2O3). We combine both theoretical and experimental evidence to provide a new physical insight into the significant effect due to the defects induced by the Ce ion substitution on the catalytic activity of OMS-2. The formation of unique Ce ion substituted OMS-2 nanostructure with Mn vacancies in the framework leads to a significant enhancement of the lattice oxygen activity, thus tremendously increasing the catalytic activity.

  11. Fast Surface Dynamics of Metallic Glass Enable Superlatticelike Nanostructure Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L.; Cao, C. R.; Shi, J. A.; Lu, Z.; Sun, Y. T.; Luo, P.; Gu, L.; Bai, H. Y.; Pan, M. X.; Wang, W. H.

    2017-01-01

    Contrary to the formation of complicated polycrystals induced by general crystallization, a modulated superlatticelike nanostructure, which grows layer by layer from the surface to the interior of a Pd40Ni10Cu30P20 metallic glass, is observed via isothermal annealing below the glass transition temperature. The generation of the modulated nanostructure can be solely controlled by the annealing temperature, and it can be understood based on the fast dynamic and liquidlike behavior of the glass surface. The observations have implications for understanding the glassy surface dynamics and pave a way for the controllable fabrication of a unique and sophisticated nanostructure on a glass surface to realize the properties' modification.

  12. A novel shape-selective fabrication of nanostructured silver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周全法; 包建春; 徐正

    2002-01-01

    A novel protection-reduction technique is developed for the preparation of silver nanoparticles, nanorods and wheatear-like supramolecular nanostructures at room temperature using silver potassium cyanide [KAg(CN)2] as a silver source, vitamin C (Vc) as a reducing agent and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a protecting agent. The concentration of KAg(CN) 2, the mole ratios of PVP/Vc and KAg(CN)2/Vc have significant effects on the formation and growth of these novel nanostructures. This method may be extended to prepare novel nanostructures of other metals.

  13. A novel shape-selective fabrication of nanostructured silver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐正; 包建春; 周全法

    2002-01-01

    A novel protection-reduction technique is developed for the preparation of silver nanoparticles, nanorods and wheatear-like supramolecular nanostructures at room temperature using silver potassium cyanide [KAg(CN)2] as a silver source, vitamin C (Vc) as a reducing agent and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a protecting agent. The concentration of KAg(CN)2, the mole ratios of PVP/Vc and KAg(CN)2/Vc have significant effects on the formation and growth of these novel nanostructures. This method may be extended to prepare novel nanostructures of other metals.

  14. Matrix-assisted energy conversion in nanostructured piezoelectric arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirbuly, Donald J.; Wang, Xianying; Wang, Yinmin

    2013-01-01

    A nanoconverter is capable of directly generating electricity through a nanostructure embedded in a polymer layer experiencing differential thermal expansion in a stress transfer zone. High surface-to-volume ratio semiconductor nanowires or nanotubes (such as ZnO, silicon, carbon, etc.) are grown either aligned or substantially vertically aligned on a substrate. The resulting nanoforest is then embedded with the polymer layer, which transfers stress to the nanostructures in the stress transfer zone, thereby creating a nanostructure voltage output due to the piezoelectric effect acting on the nanostructure. Electrodes attached at both ends of the nanostructures generate output power at densities of .about.20 nW/cm.sup.2 with heating temperatures of .about.65.degree. C. Nanoconverters arrayed in a series parallel arrangement may be constructed in planar, stacked, or rolled arrays to supply power to nano- and micro-devices without use of external batteries.

  15. Electrodeposition of nanostructured coatings and their characterization-a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Injeti Gurrappa and Leo Binder

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured materials have gained importance in recent years due to their significantly enhanced properties. In particular, electrochemistry has a special role in producing a variety of nanostructured materials. In the current review, we discuss the superiority of electrochemical deposition techniques in synthesizing various nanomaterials that exhibit improved characteristics compared with materials produced by conventional techniques, as well as their classification, synthesis routes, properties and applications. The superior properties of a nanostructured nickel coating produced by electrochemical deposition are outlined. The properties of various nanostructured coating materials produced by electrochemical techniques are also described. Finally, the importance of nanostructured coatings in industrial applications as well as their potential in future technologies is emphasized.

  16. Differential Geometry Applied to Rings and Möbius Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Benny; Willatzen, Morten; Gravesen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructure shape effects have become a topic of increasing interest due to advancements in fabrication technology. In order to pursue novel physics and better devices by tailoring the shape and size of nanostructures, effective analytical and computational tools are indispensable....... In this chapter, we present analytical and computational differential geometry methods to examine particle quantum eigenstates and eigenenergies in curved and strained nanostructures. Example studies are carried out for a set of ring structures with different radii and it is shown that eigenstate and eigenenergy...... at bending radii above 50 nm. In the second part of the chapter, a more complicated topological structure, the Möbius nanostructure, is analyzed and geometry effects for eigenstate properties are discussed including dependencies on the Möbius nanostructure width, length, thickness, and strain....

  17. A method to study in vivo stability of DNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surana, Sunaina; Bhatia, Dhiraj; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2013-11-01

    DNA nanostructures are rationally designed, synthetic, nanoscale assemblies obtained from one or more DNA sequences by their self-assembly. Due to the molecularly programmable as well as modular nature of DNA, such designer DNA architectures have great potential for in cellulo and in vivo applications. However, demonstrations of functionality in living systems necessitates a method to assess the in vivo stability of the relevant nanostructures. Here, we outline a method to quantitatively assay the stability and lifetime of various DNA nanostructures in vivo. This exploits the property of intact DNA nanostructures being uptaken by the coelomocytes of the multicellular model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. These studies reveal that the present fluorescence based assay in coelomocytes of C. elegans is an useful in vivo test bed for measuring DNA nanostructure stability.

  18. Controlled Growth of a Hierarchical Nickel Carbide "Dandelion" Nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Liang; Zhao, Wenxia; Qin, Yueling; Swihart, Mark T

    2016-07-01

    We present a new type of highly hierarchical but nonporous nanostructure with a unique "dandelion" morphology. Based on the time evolution of these Ni3 C nanostructures, we suggest a mechanism for their formation. This type of hierarchical nanocrystal, with high accessible specific surface area in a relatively large (ca. 750 nm overall diameter) stable structure, can be valuable in catalysis and related applications.

  19. Ion beam induced single phase nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rukade, Deepti A. [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Mumbai 400098 (India); Tribedi, L.C. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India); Bhattacharyya, Varsha, E-mail: varsha.b1.physics@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Mumbai 400098 (India)

    2014-06-15

    Single phase TiO{sub 2} nanostructures are fabricated by oxygen ion implantation (60 keV) at fluence ranging from 1×10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} to 1×10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} in titanium thin films deposited on fused silica substrate and subsequent thermal annealing in argon atmosphere. GAXRD and Raman spectroscopy study reveals formation of single rutile phases of TiO{sub 2}. Particle size is found to vary from 29 nm to 35 nm, establishing nanostructure formation. Nanostructure formation is also confirmed by the quantum confinement effect manifested by the blueshift of the UV–vis absorption spectra. Photoluminescence spectra show peaks corresponding to TiO{sub 2} rutile phase and reveal the presence of oxygen defects due to implantation. The controlled synthesis of single phase nanostructure is attributed to ion induced defects and post-implantation annealing. It is observed that the size of the nanostructures formed is strongly dependent on the ion fluence.

  20. Nanostructured electronic and magnetic materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R V Ramanujan

    2003-02-01

    Research and development in nanostructured materials is one of the most intensely studied areas in science. As a result of concerted R & D efforts, nanostructured electronic and magnetic materials have achieved commercial success. Specific examples of novel industrially important nanostructured electronic and magnetic materials are provided. Advantages of nanocrystalline magnetic materials in the context of both materials and devices are discussed. Several high technology examples of the use of nanostructured magnetic materials are presented. Methods of processing nanostructured materials are described and the examples of sol gel, rapid solidification and powder injection moulding as potential processing methods for making nanostructured materials are outlined. Some opportunities and challenges are discussed.

  1. Growth and anisotropic transport properties of self-assembled InAs nanostructures in InP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bierwagen, O.

    2007-12-20

    Self-assembled InAs nanostructures in InP, comprising quantum wells, quantum wires, and quantum dots, are studied in terms of their formation and properties. In particular, the structural, optical, and anisotropic transport properties of the nanostructures are investigated. The focus is a comprehending exploration of the anisotropic in-plane transport in large ensembles of laterally coupled InAs nanostructures. The self-assembled Stranski-Krastanov growth of InAs nanostructures is studied by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy on both nominally oriented and vicinal InP(001). Optical polarization of the interband transitions arising from the nanostructure type is demonstrated by photoluminescence and transmission spectroscopy. The experimentally convenient four-contact van der Pauw Hall measurement of rectangularly shaped semiconductors, usually applied to isotropic systems, is extended to yield the anisotropic transport properties. Temperature dependent transport measurements are performed in large ensembles of laterally closely spaced nanostructures. The transport of quantum wire-, quantum dash- and quantum dot containing samples is highly anisotropic with the principal axes of conductivity aligned to the <110> directions. The direction of higher mobility is [ anti 110], which is parallel to the direction of the quantum wires. In extreme cases, the anisotropies exceed 30 for electrons, and 100 for holes. The extreme anisotropy for holes is due to diffusive transport through extended states in the [ anti 110], and hopping transport through laterally localized states in the [110] direction, within the same sample. A novel 5-terminal electronic switching device based on gate-controlled transport anisotropy is proposed. The gate-control of the transport anisotropy in modulation-doped, self-organized InAs quantum wires embedded in InP is demonstrated. (orig.)

  2. Modeling energy transport in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattamatta, Arvind

    Heat transfer in nanostructures differ significantly from that in the bulk materials since the characteristic length scales associated with heat carriers, i.e., the mean free path and the wavelength, are comparable to the characteristic length of the nanostructures. Nanostructure materials hold the promise of novel phenomena, properties, and functions in the areas of thermal management and energy conversion. Example of thermal management in micro/nano electronic devices is the use of efficient nanostructured materials to alleviate 'hot spots' in integrated circuits. Examples in the manipulation of heat flow and energy conversion include nanostructures for thermoelectric energy conversion, thermophotovoltaic power generation, and data storage. One of the major challenges in Metal-Oxide Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) devices is to study the 'hot spot' generation by accurately modeling the carrier-optical phonon-acoustic phonon interactions. Prediction of hotspot temperature and position in MOSFET devices is necessary for improving thermal design and reliability of micro/nano electronic devices. Thermoelectric properties are among the properties that may drastically change at nanoscale. The efficiency of thermoelectric energy conversion in a material is measured by a non-dimensional figure of merit (ZT) defined as, ZT = sigmaS2T/k where sigma is the electrical conductivity, S is the Seebeck coefficient, T is the temperature, and k is the thermal conductivity. During the last decade, advances have been made in increasing ZT using nanostructures. Three important topics are studied with respect to energy transport in nanostructure materials for micro/nano electronic and thermoelectric applications; (1) the role of nanocomposites in improving the thermal efficiency of thermoelectric devices, (2) the interfacial thermal resistance for the semiconductor/metal contacts in thermoelectric devices and for metallic interconnects in micro/nano electronic devices, (3) the

  3. Controllable synthesis of conducting polypyrrole nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuetong; Zhang, Jin; Song, Wenhui; Liu, Zhongfan

    2006-01-26

    Wire-, ribbon-, and sphere-like nanostructures of polypyrrole have been synthesized by solution chemistry methods in the presence of various surfactants (anionic, cationic, or nonionic surfactant) with various oxidizing agents [ammonium persulfate (APS) or ferric chloride (FeCl3), respectively]. The surfactants and oxidizing agents used in this study have played a key role in tailoring the nanostructures of polypyrrole during the polymerization. It is inferred that the lamellar structures of a mesophase are formed by self-assembly between the cations of a long chain cationic surfactant [cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) or dodeyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB)] and anions of oxidizing agent APS. These layered mesostructures are presumed to act as templates for the formation of wire- and ribbon-like polypyrrole nanostructures. In contrast, if a short chain cationic surfactant octyltrimethylammonium bromide (OTAB) or nonionic surfactant poly(ethylene glycol) mono-p-nonylphenyl ether (Opi-10) is used, sphere-like polypyrrole nanostructures are obtained, whichever of the oxidizing agents mentioned above is used. In this case, micelles resulting from self-assembly among surfactant molecules are envisaged to serve as the templates while the polymerization happens. It is also noted that, if anionic surfactant sodium dodeyl surfate (SDS) is used, no characteristic nanostructures of polypyrrole were observed. This may be attributed to the doping effect of anionic surfactants into the resulting polypyrrole chains, and as a result, micelles self-assembled among surfactant molecules are broken down during the polymerization. The effects of monomer concentration, surfactant concentration, and surfactant chain length on the morphologies of the resulting polypyrrole have been investigated in detail. The molecular structures, composition, and electrical properties of the nanostructured polypyrrole have also been investigated in this study.

  4. The role of light-induced nanostructures in femtosecond laser micromachining with vector and scalar pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnatovsky, Cyril; Shvedov, Vladlen G; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2013-05-20

    In this article we compare the results of micromachining of fused silica and silicon with tightly focused scalar (viz., circularly and linearly polarized) and vector (viz., azimuthally and radially polarized) femtosecond laser pulses. We show that drilling with radially polarized pulses produces holes with smoother and better-delineated walls compared with the other polarizations used, whereas linearly polarized pulses can machine 20-nm wide single grooves in fused silica when the electric field of the pulse is aligned perpendicular to the cutting direction. The observed polarization-controlled micromachining is due to the formation of sub-diffraction-limited nanostructures that are optically produced in the multi-pulse irradiation regime.

  5. Nanostructures having high performance thermoelectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong; Majumdar, Arunava; Hochbaum, Allon I; Chen, Renkun; Delgado, Raul Diaz

    2014-05-20

    The invention provides for a nanostructure, or an array of such nanostructures, each comprising a rough surface, and a doped or undoped semiconductor. The nanostructure is an one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructure, such a nanowire, or a two-dimensional (2-D) nanostructure. The nanostructure can be placed between two electrodes and used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  6. An overview on cellulose-based material in tailoring bio-hybrid nanostructured photocatalysts for water treatment and renewable energy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mohamad Azuwa; Abd Mutalib, Muhazri; Mohd Hir, Zul Adlan; M Zain, M F; Mohamad, Abu Bakar; Jeffery Minggu, Lorna; Awang, Nor Asikin; W Salleh, W N

    2017-10-01

    A combination between the nanostructured photocatalyst and cellulose-based materials promotes a new functionality of cellulose towards the development of new bio-hybrid materials for various applications especially in water treatment and renewable energy. The excellent compatibility and association between nanostructured photocatalyst and cellulose-based materials was induced by bio-combability and high hydrophilicity of the cellulose components. The electron rich hydroxyl group of celluloses helps to promote superior interaction with photocatalyst. The formation of bio-hybrid nanostructured are attaining huge interest nowadays due to the synergistic properties of individual cellulose-based material and photocatalyst nanoparticles. Therefore, in this review we introduce some cellulose-based material and discusses its compatibility with nanostructured photocatalyst in terms of physical and chemical properties. In addition, we gather information and evidence on the fabrication techniques of cellulose-based hybrid nanostructured photocatalyst and its recent application in the field of water treatment and renewable energy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. ZnS nanostructure arrays: a developing material star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaosheng; Wu, Limin; Hu, Linfeng

    2011-02-01

    Semiconductor nanostructure arrays are of great scientific and technical interest because of the strong non-linear and electro-optic effects that occur due to carrier confinement in three dimensions. The use of such nanostructure arrays with tailored geometry, array density, and length-diameter-ratio as building blocks are expected to play a crucial role in future nanoscale devices. With the unique properties of a direct wide-bandgap semiconductor, such as the presence of polar surfaces, excellent transport properties, good thermal stability, and high electronic mobility, ZnS nanostructure arrays has been a developing material star. The research on ZnS nanostructure arrays has seen remarkable progress over the last five years due to the unique properties and important potential applications of nanostructure arrays, which are summarized here. Firstly, a survey of various methods to the synthesis of ZnS nanostructure arrays will be introduced. Next recent efforts on exploiting the unique properties and applications of ZnS nanostructure arrays are discussed. Potential future directions of this research field are also highlighted.

  8. Nanostructured Dielectric Layer for Ultrathin Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusi Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructures have been widely used in solar cells due to their extraordinary photon management properties. However, due to poor pn junction quality and high surface recombination velocity, typical nanostructured solar cells are not efficient compared with the traditional commercial solar cells. Here, we demonstrate a new approach to design, simulate, and fabricate whole-wafer nanostructures on dielectric layer on thin c-Si for solar cell light trapping. The optical simulation results show that the periodic nanostructure arrays on dielectric materials could suppress the reflection loss over a wide spectral range. In addition, by applying the nanostructured dielectric layer on 40 μm thin c-Si, the reflection loss is suppressed to below 5% over a wide spectra and angular range. Moreover, a c-Si solar cell with 2.9 μm ultrathin absorber layer demonstrates 32% improvement in short circuit current and 44% relative improvement in energy conversion efficiency. Our results suggest that nanostructured dielectric layer has the potential to significantly improve solar cell performance and avoid typical problems of defects and surface recombination for nanostructured solar cells, thus providing a new pathway towards realizing high-efficiency and low-cost c-Si solar cells.

  9. Selective Functionalization of Tailored Nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slingenbergh, Winand; Boer, Sanne K. de; Cordes, Thorben; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.; Hosson, Jeff Th.M. De; Dorp, Willem F. van

    2012-01-01

    The controlled positioning of nanostructures with active molecular components is of importance throughout nanoscience and nanotechnology. We present a novel three-step method to produce nanostructures that are selectively decorated with functional molecules. We use fluorophores and nanoparticles to

  10. Nanostructured materials in potentiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düzgün, Ali; Zelada-Guillén, Gustavo A; Crespo, Gastón A; Macho, Santiago; Riu, Jordi; Rius, F Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Potentiometry is a very simple electrochemical technique with extraordinary analytical capabilities. It is also well known that nanostructured materials display properties which they do not show in the bulk phase. The combination of the two fields of potentiometry and nanomaterials is therefore a promising area of research and development. In this report, we explain the fundamentals of potentiometric devices that incorporate nanostructured materials and we highlight the advantages and drawbacks of combining nanomaterials and potentiometry. The paper provides an overview of the role of nanostructured materials in the two commonest potentiometric sensors: field-effect transistors and ion-selective electrodes. Additionally, we provide a few recent examples of new potentiometric sensors that are based on receptors immobilized directly onto the nanostructured material surface. Moreover, we summarize the use of potentiometry to analyze processes involving nanostructured materials and the prospects that the use of nanopores offer to potentiometry. Finally, we discuss several difficulties that currently hinder developments in the field and some future trends that will extend potentiometry into new analytical areas such as biology and medicine.

  11. Modeling the influence of incident angle and deposition rate on a nanostructure grown by oblique angle deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun-Dar; Dong, Yu-Wei

    2017-02-01

    In this study, numerical approaches were applied to theoretically investigate the influence of process parameters, such as the incident angle and the deposition rate, on the nanostructural formation of thin films by oblique angle deposition (OAD). A continuum model was first developed, and the atomic diffusion, shadowing effect and steering effect were incorporated in the formation mechanisms of the surface morphology and nanostructure of the deposited films. A characteristic morphology of columnar nanorods corresponding to an OAD was well reproduced through this kinetic model. With the increase of the incident angle, the shadowing effect played a significant role in the columnar structures and the ratio of the surface area to volume was raised, implying a high level of voids in the nanostructures. When the deposition rate decreased, the porosity was notably suppressed due to the atomic diffusion in the growth process. These simulation results coincide well with many experimental observations. With the manipulation of the numerical simulations, the underlying mechanisms of the morphological formation during OAD were revealed, which also provided plentiful information to stimulate the process designs for manufacturing advanced materials.

  12. Micromachining with Nanostructured Cutting Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the brief is to explain how nanostructured tools can be used to machine materials at the microscale.  The aims of the brief are to explain to readers how to apply nanostructured tools to micromachining applications. This book describes the application of nanostructured tools to machining engineering materials and includes methods for calculating basic features of micromachining. It explains the nature of contact between tools and work pieces to build a solid understanding of how nanostructured tools are made.

  13. Aptamer-targeted DNA nanostructures for therapeutic delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoenphol, Phapanin; Bermudez, Harry

    2014-05-05

    DNA-based nanostructures have been widely used in various applications due to their structural diversity, programmability, and uniform structures. Their intrinsic biocompatibility and biodegradability further motivates the investigation of DNA-based nanostructures as delivery vehicles. Incorporating AS1411 aptamers into DNA pyramids leads to enhanced intracellular uptake and selectively inhibits the growth of cancer cells, achieved without the use of transfection reagents. Furthermore, aptamer-displaying pyramids are found to be substantially more resistant to nuclease degradation than single-stranded aptamers. These findings, along with their modularity, reinforce the potential of DNA-based nanostructures for therapeutic applications.

  14. Quantum mechanical effects analysis of nanostructured solar cell models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badea Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantum mechanical effects resulted from the inclusion of nanostructures, represented by quantum wells and quantum dots, in the i-layer of an intermediate band solar cell will be analyzed. We will discuss the role of these specific nanostructures in the increasing of the solar cells efficiency. InAs quantum wells being placed in the i-layer of a gallium arsenide (GaAs p-i-n cell, we will analyze the quantum confined regions and determine the properties of the eigenstates located therein. Also, we simulate the electroluminescence that occurs due to the nanostructured regions.

  15. Multifunctional Carbon Nanostructures for Advanced Energy Storage Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiran Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructures—including graphene, fullerenes, etc.—have found applications in a number of areas synergistically with a number of other materials. These multifunctional carbon nanostructures have recently attracted tremendous interest for energy storage applications due to their large aspect ratios, specific surface areas, and electrical conductivity. This succinct review aims to report on the recent advances in energy storage applications involving these multifunctional carbon nanostructures. The advanced design and testing of multifunctional carbon nanostructures for energy storage applications—specifically, electrochemical capacitors, lithium ion batteries, and fuel cells—are emphasized with comprehensive examples.

  16. Improving Osteoblast Response In Vitro by a Nanostructured Thin Film with Titanium Carbide and Titanium Oxides Clustered around Graphitic Carbon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Longo

    Full Text Available Recently, we introduced a new deposition method, based on Ion Plating Plasma Assisted technology, to coat titanium implants with a thin but hard nanostructured layer composed of titanium carbide and titanium oxides, clustered around graphitic carbon. The nanostructured layer has a double effect: protects the bulk titanium against the harsh conditions of biological tissues and in the same time has a stimulating action on osteoblasts.The aim of this work is to describe the biological effects of this layer on osteoblasts cultured in vitro. We demonstrate that the nanostructured layer causes an overexpression of many early genes correlated to proteins involved in bone turnover and an increase in the number of surface receptors for α3β1 integrin, talin, paxillin. Analyses at single-cell level, by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and single cell force spectroscopy, show how the proliferation, adhesion and spreading of cells cultured on coated titanium samples are higher than on uncoated titanium ones. Finally, the chemistry of the layer induces a better formation of blood clots and a higher number of adhered platelets, compared to the uncoated cases, and these are useful features to improve the speed of implant osseointegration.In summary, the nanostructured TiC film, due to its physical and chemical properties, can be used to protect the implants and to improve their acceptance by the bone.

  17. The pronounced role of impurity phases in the optical properties of Mn catalyzed ZnS nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Nosheen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the effect of Mn self-doping in Mn catalyzed ZnS nanostructures grown via vapor liquid solid mechanism, which also resulted in the formation of additional impurity minority phases like ZnO and MnO2. The synthesized ZnS nanostructures were subsequently annealed in the range of 500 °C – 700 °C in an inert environment to remove impurity phases and enhance the incorporation of dopant. Room temperature photoluminescence showed strong defect assisted luminescence. It was observed that green emission due to intrinsic defects of ZnS nanostructures was reduced in magnitude and Mn related orange/red luminescence increased in magnitude in nanostructures annealed at high temperature. The presence of impurity phases led to the observation of surface optical and interface phonon modes as observed in the Raman spectroscopy. Dielectric continuum and phonon confinement models were employed to determine the correlation lengths of the optical phonon modes.

  18. Nanoprobes, nanostructured materials and solid state materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Houping

    2005-07-01

    Novel templates have been developed to prepare nanostructured porous materials through nonsurfactant templated pathway. And new applications of these materials, such as drug delivery and molecular imprinting, have been explored. The relationship between template content and pore structure has been investigated. The composition and pore structures were studied in detail using IR, TGA, SEM, TEM, BET and XRD. The obtained mesoporous materials have tunable diameters in the range of 2--12 nm. Due to the many advantages of this nonsurfactant templated pathway, such as environment friendly and biocompatibility, controlled release of antibiotics in the nanoporous materials were studied. The in vitro release properties were found to depend on the silica structures which were well tuned by varying the template content. A controlled long-term release pattern of vancomycin was achieved when the template content was 30 wt% or lower. Nanoscale electrochemical probes with dimensions as small as 50 nm in diameter and 1--2 mum in length were fabricated using electron beam deposition on the apex of conventional micron size electrodes. The electroactive region was limited to the extreme tip of the nanoprobe by coating with an insulating polymer and re-opening of the coating at the extreme tip. The novel nanoelectrodes thus prepared were employed to probe neurons in mouse brain slice and the results suggest that the nanoprobes were capable of recording neuronal excitatory postsynaptic potential signals. Interesting solid state chemistry was found in oxygenated iron phthalocyanine. Their Mossbauer spectra show the formation of four oxygenated species apart from the unoxygenated parent compound. The oxygen-bridged compounds formed in the solid matrix bear no resemblance to the one formed by solution chemistry. Tentative assignment of species has been made with the help of Mossbauer and IR spectroscopy. An effort to modify aniline trimer for potential nanoelectronics applications and to

  19. Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Andrew J.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2007-12-04

    A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

  20. Synthesis of porphyrin nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyou; Bai, Feng

    2014-10-28

    The present disclosure generally relates to self-assembly methods for generating porphyrin nanostructures. For example, in one embodiment a method is provided that includes preparing a porphyrin solution and a surfactant solution. The porphyrin solution is then mixed with the surfactant solution at a concentration sufficient for confinement of the porphyrin molecules by the surfactant molecules. In some embodiments, the concentration of the surfactant is at or above its critical micelle concentration (CMC), which allows the surfactant to template the growth of the nanostructure over time. The size and morphology of the nanostructures may be affected by the type of porphyrin molecules used, the type of surfactant used, the concentration of the porphyrin and surfactant the pH of the mixture of the solutions, and the order of adding the reagents to the mixture, to name a few variables.

  1. Nanostructured systems with GMR behaviour

    CERN Document Server

    Bergenti, I; Savini, L; Bonetti, E; Bosco, E; Baricco, M

    2002-01-01

    Fe/Fe-oxide core-shell systems obtained by inert-gas condensation and Au sub 8 sub 0 Fe sub 2 sub 0 nanostructured alloys prepared by fast-quenching techniques followed by thermal treatment have been studied by polarised small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The particle-size distribution was derived from the fit of the scattering curves. In the core-shell samples, the results support the model of a magnetic iron core surrounded by a surface layer (oxide shell) with a reduced magnetisation. The SANS measurements on the Au sub 8 sub 0 Fe sub 2 sub 0 alloys do not show any appreciable magnetic signal, indicating that the iron precipitates have a superparamagnetic behaviour. Thermal treatment induces the formation of small precipitates of atomic size. (orig.)

  2. Nanostructured systems with GMR behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergenti, I.; Deriu, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Universita di Parma (Italy); Savini, L.; Bonetti, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Universita di Bologna (Italy); Bosco, E.; Baricco, M. [Dipartimento di Chimica I.F.M. and Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Universita di Torino (Italy)

    2002-07-01

    Fe/Fe-oxide core-shell systems obtained by inert-gas condensation and Au{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} nanostructured alloys prepared by fast-quenching techniques followed by thermal treatment have been studied by polarised small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The particle-size distribution was derived from the fit of the scattering curves. In the core-shell samples, the results support the model of a magnetic iron core surrounded by a surface layer (oxide shell) with a reduced magnetisation. The SANS measurements on the Au{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} alloys do not show any appreciable magnetic signal, indicating that the iron precipitates have a superparamagnetic behaviour. Thermal treatment induces the formation of small precipitates of atomic size. (orig.)

  3. Formation of ghost images due to meta objects on the surface of the patient's face: A pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramons, BarbaraCouto; Da Silva Izar, Bruna Raquel; Pereira, Jessica Lourdes Costa; Souza Priscilla Serna; Valerio, Cludia Scigliano; Manzi, Flavio Ricardo [Dept. of Oral Radiology, School of Dentistry, Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Tuji, Fabricio Mesquita [Federal University of Pará, Belém do Pará (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Panoramic radiographs are a relatively simple technique that is commonly used in all dental specialties. In panoramic radiographs, in addition to the formation of real images of metal objects, ghost images may also form, and these ghost images can hinder an accurate diagnosis and interfere with the accuracy of radiology reports. Dentists must understand the formation of these images in order to avoid making incorrect radiographic diagnoses. Therefore, the present study sought to present a study of the formation of panoramic radiograph ghost images caused by metal objects in the head and neck region of a dry skull, as well as to report a clinical case n order to warn dentists about ghost images and to raise awareness thereof. An understanding of the principles of the formation of ghost images in panoramic radiographs helps prevent incorrect diagnoses.

  4. Injection moulding antireflective nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Alexander Bruun; Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik; Mortensen, N. Asger

    in an injection moulding process, to fabricate the antireflective surfaces. The cycle-time was 35 s. The injection moulded structures had a height of 125 nm, and the visible spectrum reflectance of injection moulded black polypropylene surfaces was reduced from 4.5±0.5% to 2.5±0.5%. The gradient of the refractive...... index of the nanostructured surfaces was estimated from atomic force micrographs and the theoretical reflectance was calculated using the transfer matrix method and effective medium theory. The measured reflectance shows good agreement with the theory of graded index antireflective nanostructures...

  5. Nanostructured Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guanying; Ning, Zhijun; Ågren, Hans

    2016-01-01

    We are glad to announce the Special Issue “Nanostructured Solar Cells”, published in Nanomaterials. This issue consists of eight articles, two communications, and one review paper, covering major important aspects of nanostructured solar cells of varying types. From fundamental physicochemical investigations to technological advances, and from single junction solar cells (silicon solar cell, dye sensitized solar cell, quantum dots sensitized solar cell, and small molecule organic solar cell) to tandem multi-junction solar cells, all aspects are included and discussed in this issue to advance the use of nanotechnology to improve the performance of solar cells with reduced fabrication costs.

  6. Nanostructured Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guanying; Ning, Zhijun; Ågren, Hans

    2016-08-09

    We are glad to announce the Special Issue "Nanostructured Solar Cells", published in Nanomaterials. This issue consists of eight articles, two communications, and one review paper, covering major important aspects of nanostructured solar cells of varying types. From fundamental physicochemical investigations to technological advances, and from single junction solar cells (silicon solar cell, dye sensitized solar cell, quantum dots sensitized solar cell, and small molecule organic solar cell) to tandem multi-junction solar cells, all aspects are included and discussed in this issue to advance the use of nanotechnology to improve the performance of solar cells with reduced fabrication costs.

  7. Nanostructured piezoelectric energy harvesters

    CERN Document Server

    Briscoe, Joe

    2014-01-01

    This book covers a range of devices that use piezoelectricity to convert mechanical deformation into electrical energy and relates their output capabilities to a range of potential applications. Starting with a description of the fundamental principles and properties of piezo- and ferroelectric materials, where applications of bulk materials are well established, the book shows how nanostructures of these materials are being developed for energy harvesting applications. The authors show how a nanostructured device can be produced, and put in context some of the approaches that are being invest

  8. Nanostructured intense-laser cleaner

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xiao Feng; Kong, Qing; Wang, Ping Xiao; Yu, Qin; Gu, Yan Jan; Qu, Jun Fan

    2016-01-01

    A nanostructured target is proposed to enhance an intense-laser contrast: when a laser prepulse is injected on a nanostructured solid target surface, the prepulse is absorbed effectively by the nanostructured surface. The nanostructure size should be less than the laser wavelength. After the prepulse absorption, the front part of the main pulse destroys the microstructure and makes the surface a flat plasma mirror. The body of the main pulse is reflected almost perfectly. Compared with the plasma mirrors, the nanostructured surface is effective for the absorption of the intense laser prepulse, higher than 10^14 W/cm2. By the nanostructured laser cleaner, the laser pulse contrast increases about a hundredfold. The nanostructured laser cleaner works well for near-future intense lasers.

  9. Emerging advances in nanomedicine with engineered gold nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Joseph A.; Bardhan, Rizia

    2014-02-01

    Gold nanostructures possess unique characteristics that enable their use as contrast agents, as therapeutic entities, and as scaffolds to adhere functional molecules, therapeutic cargo, and targeting ligands. Due to their ease of synthesis, straightforward surface functionalization, and non-toxicity, gold nanostructures have emerged as powerful nanoagents for cancer detection and treatment. This comprehensive review summarizes the progress made in nanomedicine with gold nanostructures (1) as probes for various bioimaging techniques including dark-field, one-photon and two-photon fluorescence, photothermal optical coherence tomography, photoacoustic tomography, positron emission tomography, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering based imaging, (2) as therapeutic components for photothermal therapy, gene and drug delivery, and radiofrequency ablation, and (3) as a theranostic platform to simultaneously achieve both cancer detection and treatment. Distinct from other published reviews, this article also discusses the recent advances of gold nanostructures as contrast agents and therapeutic actuators for inflammatory diseases including atherosclerotic plaque and arthritis. For each of the topics discussed above, the fundamental principles and progress made in the past five years are discussed. The review concludes with a detailed future outlook discussing the challenges in using gold nanostructures, cellular trafficking, and translational considerations that are imperative for rapid clinical viability of plasmonic nanostructures, as well as the significance of emerging technologies such as Fano resonant gold nanostructures in nanomedicine.

  10. Polyaniline nanobelts,flower-like and rhizoid-like nanostructures by electrospinning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiao Zhen Yu; Ying Li; Mang Wang; Hong Zheng Chen

    2008-01-01

    Nanobelts,flower-like and rhizoid-like nanostructures of pure polyaniline (PANI)doped with sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid were prepared via electrospinning by using a coagulation bath as the collector after optimizing the fabrication parameters.The morphologies of these nanostructures were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM).The possible formation mechanisms were discussed.

  11. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-01-01

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06157a

  12. Complex WS 2 nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitby, R. L. D.; Hsu, W. K.; Lee, T. H.; Boothroyd, C. B.; Kroto, H. W.; Walton, D. R. M.

    2002-06-01

    A range of elegant tubular and conical nanostructures has been created by template growth of (WS 2) n layers on the surfaces of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles. The structures exhibit remarkably perfect straight segments together with interesting complexities at the intersections, which are discussed here in detail in order to enhance understanding of the structural features governing tube growth.

  13. CuO three-dimensional flowerlike nanostructures: Controlled synthesis and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xia; Guo, Yong-Gang; Liu, Wei-Min; Hao, Jing-Cheng

    2008-06-01

    CuO three-dimensional (3D) flowerlike nanostructures were successfully synthesized on copper surface by a simple solution method. CuO nanostructure was systematically studied by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray powder diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectrum. The factors to control the morphology and size of the CuO nanostructures were explored, showing that the reaction time and the concentration of starting regents play important roles in the formation of the CuO 3D nanostructures.

  14. NANOSTRUCTURE PATTERNING UNDER ENERGETIC PARTICLE BEAM IRRADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lumin [Regents of the University of Michigan; Lu, Wei [Regents of the University of Michigan

    2013-01-31

    Energetic ion bombardment can lead to the development of complex and diverse nanostructures on or beneath the material surface through induced self-organization processes. These self-organized structures have received particular interest recently as promising candidates as simple, inexpensive, and large area patterns, whose optical, electronic and magnetic properties are different from those in the bulk materials [1-5]. Compared to the low mass efficiency production rate of lithographic methods, these self-organized approaches display new routes for the fabrication of nanostructures over large areas in a short processing time at the nanoscale, beyond the limits of lithography [1,4]. Although it is believed that surface nanostructure formation is based on the morphological instability of the sputtered surface, driven by a kinetic balance between roughening and smoothing actions [6,7], the fundamental mechanisms and experimental conditions for the formation of these nanostructures has still not been well established, the formation of the 3-D naopatterns beneath the irradiated surface especially needs more exploration. During the last funding period, we have focused our efforts on irradiation-induced nanostructures in a broad range of materials. These structures have been studied primarily through in situ electron microscopy during electron or ion irradiation. In particular, we have performed studies on 3-D void/bubble lattices (in metals and CaF2), embedded sponge-like porous structure with uniform nanofibers in irradiated semiconductors (Ge, GaSb, and InSb), 2-D highly ordered pattern of nanodroplets (on the surface of GaAs), hexagonally ordered nanoholes (on the surface of Ge), and 1-D highly ordered ripple and periodic arrays (of Cu nanoparticles) [3,8-11]. The amazing common feature in those nanopatterns is the uniformity of the size of nanoelements (nanoripples, nanodots, nanovoids or nanofibers) and the distance separating them. Our research focuses on the

  15. GRB 980425 host: [C II], [O I], and CO lines reveal recent enhancement of star formation due to atomic gas inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michałowski, M. J.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Wardlow, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Accretion of gas from the intergalactic medium is required to fuel star formation in galaxies. We have recently suggested that this process can be studied using host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Aims. Our aim is to test this possibility by studying in detail the properties of gas...

  16. Nanostructured energy devices equilibrium concepts and kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Bisquert, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Due to the pressing needs of society, low cost materials for energy devices have experienced an outstanding development in recent times. In this highly multidisciplinary area, chemistry, material science, physics, and electrochemistry meet to develop new materials and devices that perform required energy conversion and storage processes with high efficiency, adequate capabilities for required applications, and low production cost. Nanostructured Energy Devices: Equilibrium Concepts and Kinetics introduces the main physicochemical principles that govern the operation of energy devices. It inclu

  17. Nonlocal optical response in metallic nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Raza, Søren; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Wubs, Martijn; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2014-01-01

    This review provides a broad overview of the studies and effects of nonlocal response in metallic nanostructures. In particular, we thoroughly present the nonlocal hydrodynamic model and the recently introduced generalized nonlocal optical response (GNOR) model. The influence of nonlocal response on plasmonic excitations is studied in key metallic geometries, such as spheres and dimers, and we derive new consequences due to the GNOR model. Finally, we propose several trajectories for future w...

  18. Top-down Fabrication Technologies for High Quality III-V Nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    III-V nanostructures have attracted substantial research effort due to their interesting physical properties and their applications in new generation of ultrafast and high efficiency nanoscale electronic and photonic components. The advances in nanofabrication methods including growth/synthesis have opened up new possibilities of realizing one dimensional (1D) nanostructures as building blocks of future nanoscale devices. For processing of semiconductor nanostructure devices, simplicity, cost...

  19. The effect of the initial rock permeability on the extent of injectivity reduction due to brine injection through fractured formation; L'effet de la permeabilite initiale sur l'importance de la reduction d'injectivite due a l'injection d'eau au travers de formations fracturees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Homadhi, E.S. [King Saud Univ., Dept. Petroleum Engineering, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2001-07-01

    The injectivity reduction with time is an important aspect in designing water injection projects. One of the main factors that affect the injectivity, due to particle invasion, is the matrix initial permeability This factor had been experimentally investigated and evaluated by many researchers, but all of their experimental works were based on linear core flow tests. However, in some field injection projects, there was a much less reduction in the injectivity with time than what was predicted by the experimental models. This incompatibility was related to the induction of fractures caused by injection at a pressure higher than the formation fracturing pressure. This study was conducted to investigate experimentally the effect of the matrix initial permeability on the extent of injectivity reduction caused by brine injection through a rock matrix with a single fracture. The injected brine contained solid particles less than 6 {mu}m or less than 20 {mu}m in size at a concentration of 9 mg/l. The early results show experimentally the huge difference in the injectivity reduction extent between flow tests carried out with closed and open fracture injection. Then, the results are presented as an injectivity index at a certain injected pore volume versus initial permeability. The slope of this relation is called reduction rate. This rate was evaluated for different cases. For the case of brine suspensions that contain small particles, the reduction rate of the injectivity index due to initial permeability variation in the case of open fracture tests was much less than that of the closed fracture tests. For the case of fracture injection of the large particles suspensions, the reduction rate was threefold higher than that of the small particles suspension. This proves that the particle size factor has an important role in determining the extent of the initial rock permeability effect on the injectivity index in fracture injection. (author)

  20. Metal plasmas for the fabrication of nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2006-09-21

    A review is provided covering metal plasma production, theenergetic condensation of metal plasmas, and the formation ofnanostructures using such plasmas. Plasma production techniques includepulsed laser ablation, filtered cathodic arcs, and various forms ofionized physical vapor deposition, namely magnetron sputtering withionization of sputtered atoms in radio frequency discharges,self-sputtering, and high power impulse magnetron sputtering. Thediscussion of energetic condensation focuses on the control of kineticenergy by biasing and also includes considerations of the potentialenergy and the processes occurring at subplantation and implantation. Inthe final section on nanostructures, two different approaches arediscussed. In the top-down approach, the primary nanostructures arelithographically produced and metal plasma is used to coat or filltrenches and vias. Additionally, multilayers with nanosize periods(nanolaminates) can be produced. In the bottom-up approach, thermodynamicforces are used to fabricate nanocomposites and nanoporous materials bydecomposition and dealloying.

  1. Water Droplet Spreading and Wicking on Nanostructured Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xue; Chen, Jiannan; Ouyang, Xiaolong; Song, Yu; Xu, Ruina; Jiang, Peixue

    2017-07-11

    Phase-change heat transfer on nanostructured surfaces is an efficient cooling method for high heat flux devices due to its superior wettability. Liquid droplet spreading and wicking effect then dominate the heat transfer. Therefore, this study investigates the flow behavior after a droplet touches a nanostructured surface focusing on the ZnO nanowire surface with three different nanowire sizes and two array types (regular and irregular). The spreading diameter and the wicking diameter are measured against time. The results show that the average spreading and wicking velocities on a regular nanostructured surface are both smaller than those on an irregular nanostructured surface and that the nanowire size affects the liquid spreading and capillary wicking.

  2. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Acetylene (C2H2: seed effect on SOA yields due to organic photochemistry in the aerosol aqueous phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Ziemann

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The lightest Non Methane HydroCarbon (NMHC, i.e., acetylene (C2H2 is found to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA. Contrary to current belief, the number of carbon atoms, n, for a NMHC to act as SOA precursor is lowered to n=2 here. The OH-radical initiated oxidation of C2H2 forms glyoxal (CHOCHO as the highest yield product, and >99% of the SOA from C2H2 is attributed to CHOCHO. SOA formation from C2H2 and CHOCHO was studied in a photochemical and a dark simulation chamber. Further, the experimental conditions were varied with respect to the chemical composition of the seed aerosols, mild acidification with sulphuric acid (SA, 3formation, and identify a potential bias in the currently available YSOA data for other SOA precursor NMHCs. We demonstrate that SOA formation via the aqueous phase is not limited to cloud droplets, but proceeds also in the absence of clouds, i.e., does not stop once a cloud droplet evaporates. Atmospheric models need to be expanded to include SOA formation from WSOC photochemistry of CHOCHO, and possibly other α-dicarbonyls, in aqueous aerosols.

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exhibits Deficient Biofilm Formation in the Absence of Class II and III Ribonucleotide Reductases Due to Hindered Anaerobic Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Anna; Pedraz, Lucas; Astola, Josep; Torrents, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lung infections by the ubiquitous and extremely adaptable opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa correlate with the formation of a biofilm, where bacteria grow in association with an extracellular matrix and display a wide range of changes in gene expression and metabolism. This leads to increased resistance to physical stress and antibiotic therapies, while enhancing cell-to-cell communication. Oxygen diffusion through the complex biofilm structure generates an oxygen concentration gradient, leading to the appearance of anaerobic microenvironments. Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) are a family of highly sophisticated enzymes responsible for the synthesis of the deoxyribonucleotides, and they constitute the only de novo pathway for the formation of the building blocks needed for DNA synthesis and repair. P. aeruginosa is one of the few bacteria encoding all three known RNR classes (Ia, II, and III). Class Ia RNRs are oxygen dependent, class II are oxygen independent, and class III are oxygen sensitive. A tight control of RNR activity is essential for anaerobic growth and therefore for biofilm development. In this work we explored the role of the different RNR classes in biofilm formation under aerobic and anaerobic initial conditions and using static and continuous-flow biofilm models. We demonstrated the importance of class II and III RNR for proper cell division in biofilm development and maturation. We also determined that these classes are transcriptionally induced during biofilm formation and under anaerobic conditions. The molecular mechanism of their anaerobic regulation was also studied, finding that the Anr/Dnr system is responsible for class II RNR induction. These data can be integrated with previous knowledge about biofilms in a model where these structures are understood as a set of layers determined by oxygen concentration and contain cells with different RNR expression profiles, bringing us a step closer to the understanding of this

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits deficient biofilm formation in the absence of class II and III ribonucleotide reductases due to hindered anaerobic growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eCrespo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lung infections by the ubiquitous and extremely adaptable opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa correlate with the formation of a biofilm, where bacteria grow in association with an extracellular matrix and display a wide range of changes in gene expression and metabolism. This leads to increased resistance to physical stress and antibiotic therapies, while enhancing cell-to-cell communication. Oxygen diffusion through the complex biofilm structure generates an oxygen concentration gradient, leading to the appearance of anaerobic microenvironments.Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs are a family of highly sophisticated enzymes responsible for the synthesis of the deoxyribonucleotides, and they constitute the only de novo pathway for the formation of the building blocks needed for DNA synthesis and repair. P. aeruginosa is one of the few bacteria encoding all three known RNR classes (Ia, II and III. Class Ia RNRs are oxygen dependent, class II are oxygen independent, and class III are oxygen sensitive. A tight control of RNR activity is essential for anaerobic growth and therefore for biofilm development.In this work we explored the role of the different RNR classes in biofilm formation under aerobic and anaerobic initial conditions and using static and continuous-flow biofilm models. We demonstrated the importance of class II and III RNR for proper cell division in biofilm development and maturation. We also determined that these classes are transcriptionally induced during biofilm formation and under anaerobic conditions. The molecular mechanism of their anaerobic regulation was also studied, finding that the Anr/Dnr system is responsible for class II RNR induction. These data can be integrated with previous knowledge about biofilms in a model where these structures are understood as a set of layers determined by oxygen concentration and contain cells with different RNR expression profiles, bringing us a step closer to the

  5. The Role of Carbides in Formation of Surface Layer on Steel X153CrMoV12 Due to Low-Pressure Nitriding (Vacuum Nitriding)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januszewicz, B.; Wołowiec, E.; Kula, P.

    2015-05-01

    The mechanism of formation of surface layer on steel X153CrMoV12 in the process of vacuum nitriding (low-pressure nitriding) in a universal vacuum furnace in an atmosphere of dissociated ammonia at a pressure of 30 × 102 Pa (30 mbar) is studied by the methods of light microscopy and measurement of microhardness. The chemical composition of the nitrided layers is determined.

  6. Fabrication and characterization of nanostructured titania films with integrated function from inorganic-organic hybrid materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawolle, Monika; Niedermeier, Martin A; Kaune, Gunar; Perlich, Jan; Lellig, Philipp; Memesa, Mine; Cheng, Ya-Jun; Gutmann, Jochen S; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2012-08-07

    Nanostructured titania films are of growing interest due to their application in future photovoltaic technologies. Therefore, a lot of effort has been put into the controlled fabrication and tailoring of titania nanostructures. The controlled sol-gel synthesis of titania, in particular in combination with block copolymer templates, is very promising because of its high control on the nanostructure, easy application and cheap processing possibilities. This tutorial review gives a short overview of the structural control of titania films gained by using templated sol-gel chemistry and shows how this approach is extended by the addition of further functionality to the films. Different expansions of the sol-gel templating are possible by the fabrication of gradient samples, by the addition of a homopolymer, by the combination with micro-fluidics and also by the application of novel precursors for low-temperature processing. Moreover, hierarchically structured titania films can be fabricated via the subsequent application of several sol-gel steps or via the inclusion of colloidal templates in a one-step process. Integrated function in the block copolymer used in the sol-gel synthesis allows for the fabrication of an integrated blocking layer or an integrated hole-conductor. Both approaches grant a one-step fabrication of two components of a working solar cell, which make them very promising towards a cheap solar cell production route. Looking to the complete solar cell, the top contact is also of great importance as it influences the function of the whole solar cell. Thus, the mechanisms acting in the top contact formation are also reviewed. For all these aspects, characterization techniques that allow for a structural investigation of nanostructures inside the active layers are important. Therefore, the characterization techniques that are used in real space as well as in reciprocal space are explained shortly as well.

  7. Nanostructured Thermoelectrics and the New Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanatzidis, Mercouri

    2012-02-01

    A comprehensive and stable energy strategy would require proportionate attention to all three legs of the ``energy stool''; supply (sources), demand (efficiency) and storage/transport (delivery). Thermoelectric materials, that convert waste thermal energy into useful electrical energy, have an important role to play in any and all these three legs. The efficacy and efficiency of thermoelectrics is reflected in the figure of merit ZT, which is directly proportional to the power factor (comprising electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient) and inversely proportional to thermal conductivity (comprising carrier and lattice contributions). The recent emergence of nanostructured thermoelectrics has ushered in a new era for bulk thermoelectrics, which show considerable promise to enhance the ``contra-indicating'' parameters of high electrical conductivity and low thermal conductivity. This is achieved by introducing nanostructures in bulk thermoelectric host materials to significantly reduce lattice thermal conductivity via effective scattering of heat carrying phonon through hierarchical architecture of nanostructured thermoelectrics. The presentation will cover recent developments, current research in our EFRC and future prospects for high performance bulk materials. Systems based on lead chalcogenides (e.g., PbTe, PbSe, PbS) present key science challenges with promising properties and are given particular emphasis. We have achieved excellent control of synthesis and crystal growth of such materials resulting in record enhancements in the figure of merit. These enhancements derive from very large reductions in lattice thermal conductivity possible with nanostructuring. We have experimentally realized concurrent synergistic effect of phonon blocking and charge transmission via the endotaxial placement of nanocrystals in thermoelectric material host. In particular, we have shown that the enhanced performance is due to nanostructuring of thermoelectric host matrix

  8. Secondary organic aerosol formation from acetylene (C2H2: seed effect on SOA yields due to organic photochemistry in the aerosol aqueous phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Ziemann

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The lightest Non Methane HydroCarbon (NMHC, i.e. acetylene (C2H2 is found to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA. Contrary to current belief, the number of carbon atoms, n, for a NMHC to act as SOA precursor is lowered to n=2 here. The OH-radical initiated oxidation of C2H2 forms glyoxal (CHOCHO as the highest yield product, and >99% of the SOA from C2H2 is attributed to CHOCHO. SOA formation from C2H2 and CHOCHO was studied in a photochemical and a dark simulation chamber. Further, the experimental conditions were varied with respect to the chemical composition of the seed aerosol, mild acidification with sulphuric acid (SA, 3formation is found enhanced by several orders of magnitude in the photochemical system. The SOA yields (YSOA ranged from 1% to 20% and did not correlate with the organic mass portion of the seed, but increased linearly with liquid water content (LWC of the seed. For fixed LWC, YSOA varied by more than a factor of five. Water soluble organic carbon (WSOC photochemistry in the liquid water associated with internally mixed inorganic/WSOC seed aerosols is found responsible for this seed effect. WSOC photochemistry enhances the SOA source from CHOCHO, while seeds containing amino acids (AA and/or SA showed among the lowest of all YSOA values, and largely suppress the photochemical enhancement on the rate of CHOCHO uptake. Our results give first evidence for the importance of heterogeneous photochemistry of CHOCHO in SOA formation, and identify a potential bias in the currently available YSOA data for other SOA precursor NMHCs. We demonstrate that SOA formation via the aqueous phase is not limited to cloud droplets, but proceeds also in the absence of clouds, i.e. does not stop once a cloud droplet evaporates. Atmospheric models need to be expanded to include SOA formation from WSOC photochemistry of CHOCHO, and possibly other α-dicarbonyls, in aqueous aerosols.

  9. Golgi fragmentation in pmn mice is due to a defective ARF1/TBCE cross-talk that coordinates COPI vesicle formation and tubulin polymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellouze, Sarah; Schäfer, Michael K; Buttigieg, Dorothée; Baillat, Gilbert; Rabouille, Catherine; Haase, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Golgi fragmentation is an early hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases but its pathophysiological relevance and molecular mechanisms are unclear. We here demonstrate severe and progressive Golgi fragmentation in motor neurons of progressive motor neuronopathy (pmn) mice due to loss of the Golgi

  10. Ordered macroporous bimetallic nanostructures: design, characterization, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lehui; Eychmüller, Alexander

    2008-02-01

    different types of ordered bimetallic nanostructures with hierarchical porosity by using a general template technique. The applications of the resulting nanostructures in catalysis and as substrates for SERS are described. Taking the ordered porous Au/Pt nanostructures as examples for applications as catalysts, the experimental results show that both the ordered hollow Au/Pt nanostructure and the ordered macroporous Au/Pt nanostructure exhibit high catalytic ability due to their special structural characteristics, and their catalytic activity is component-dependent. As for SERS applications, primary experimental results show that these ordered macroporous Au/Ag nanostructured films are highly desirable for detection of DNA bases by the SERS technique in terms of a high Raman intensity enhancement, good stability, and reproducibility, suggesting that these nanostructures may find applications in the rapid detection of DNA and DNA fragments.

  11. Vortices and nanostructured superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book provides expert coverage of modern and novel aspects of the study of vortex matter, dynamics, and pinning in nanostructured and multi-component superconductors. Vortex matter in superconducting materials is a field of enormous beauty and intellectual challenge, which began with the theoretical prediction of vortices by A. Abrikosov (Nobel Laureate). Vortices, vortex dynamics, and pinning are key features in many of today’s human endeavors: from the huge superconducting accelerating magnets and detectors at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, which opened new windows of knowledge on the universe, to the tiny superconducting transceivers using Rapid Single Flux Quanta, which have opened a revolutionary means of communication. In recent years, two new features have added to the intrinsic beauty and complexity of the subject: nanostructured/nanoengineered superconductors, and the discovery of a range of new materials showing multi-component (multi-gap) superconductivity. In this book, leading researche...

  12. Electrons in Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flindt, Christian

    2007-01-01

    or a few electrons. Such few-electron devices are expected to form the building blocks of future electrical circuits and it is thus necessary to develop a thorough theoretical understanding of the physics of electrons in nanostructures. Re- garding applications there is a particular interest......-based communication. The statistical description of electron transport through nanostructures is based on rate equations, and the primary contribution of the thesis in that respect is the development of a method that allows for the calculation of the distribution of electrons passing through a device. The method......This thesis concerns theoretical aspects of electrons in man-made nanostruc- tures. Advances in nanofabrication technology during recent decades have made it possible to produce electrical devices on the nano-scale, whose func- tionality is determined by the quantum mechanical nature of a single...

  13. Hybrid phonons in nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Ridley, Brian K

    2017-01-01

    Crystalline semiconductor nanostructures have special properties associated with electrons and lattice vibrations and their interaction, and this is the topic of the book. The result of spatial confinement of electrons is indicated in the nomenclature of nonostructures: quantum wells, quantum wires, and quantum dots. Confinement also has a profound effect on lattice vibrations and an account of this is the prime focus. The documentation of the confinement of acoustic modes goes back to Lord Rayleigh’s work in the late nineteenth century, but no such documentation exists for optical modes. Indeed, it is only comparatively recently that any theory of the elastic properties of optical modes exists, and the account given in the book is comprehensive. A model of the lattice dynamics of the diamond lattice is given that reveals the quantitative distinction between acoustic and optical modes and the difference of connection rules that must apply at an interface. The presence of interfaces in nanostructures forces ...

  14. Ductility of Nanostructured Bainite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Morales-Rivas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured bainite is a novel ultra-high-strength steel-concept under intensive current research, in which the optimization of its mechanical properties can only come from a clear understanding of the parameters that control its ductility. This work reviews first the nature of this composite-like material as a product of heat treatment conditions. Subsequently, the premises of ductility behavior are presented, taking as a reference related microstructures: conventional bainitic steels, and TRIP-aided steels. The ductility of nanostructured bainite is then discussed in terms of work-hardening and fracture mechanisms, leading to an analysis of the three-fold correlation between ductility, mechanically-induced martensitic transformation, and mechanical partitioning between the phases. Results suggest that a highly stable/hard retained austenite, with mechanical properties close to the matrix of bainitic ferrite, is advantageous in order to enhance ductility.

  15. The effect of solvent on the morphology of ZnO nanostructure assembly by dielectrophoresis and its device applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Ferrara, Vera; Pacheri Madathil, Aneesh; De Girolamo Del Mauro, Anna; Massera, Ettore; Polichetti, Tiziana; Rametta, Gabriella

    2012-07-01

    Different zinc oxide nanostructured morphologies were grown on photolithographically patterned silicon/silicon dioxide substrates by dielectrophoresis technique using different solvents, such as water and ethanol, obtaining rod-like and net-like nanostructures, respectively. The formation of continuous nanostructures was confirmed by scanning electron microscopic, atomic force microscopic images, and electrical characterizations. The rod-like zinc oxide nanostructures were observed in the 10 μm gap between the fingers in the pattern, whereas net-like nanostructures were formed independently of microgap. A qualitative study about the mechanism for the assembly of zinc oxide continuous nanostructures was presented. Devices were electrically characterized, at room temperature, in controlled environment to measure the conductance behavior in ultraviolet and humidity environment. Devices based on zinc oxide nanostructures grown in ethanol medium show better responses under both ultraviolet and humidity, because of the net-like structure with high surface-to-volume ratio.

  16. Nanostructural Effect of ZnO on Light Extraction Efficiency of Near-Ultraviolet Light-Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Jae Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ZnO nanostructures on the light output power of 375 nm near-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (NUV-LEDs was investigated by comparing one-dimensional (1D nanorods (NR-ZnO with two-dimensional (2D nanosheets (NS-ZnO. ZnO nanostructures were grown on a planar indium tin oxide (ITO by solution based method at low temperature of 90°C without degradation of the forward voltage. At an injection current of 100 mA, the light output efficiency of NUV-LED with NR-ZnO was enhanced by around 30% compared to the conventional NUV-LEDs without ZnO nanostructures. This improvement is due to the formation of a surface texturing, resulting in a larger escape cone and a multiple scattering for the photons in the NUV-LED, whereas the light output efficiency of NUV-LED with NS-ZnO was lower than that of the conventional NUV-LEDs due to the internal reflection and light absorption in the defective sites of NS-ZnO.

  17. Nanostructured Superhydrophobic Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a research project that deals with the nanostructured superhydrophobic (SH) powders developed at ORNL. This project seeks to (1) improve powder quality; (2) identify binders for plastics, fiberglass, metal (steel being the first priority), wood, and other products such as rubber and shingles; (3) test the coated product for coating quality and durability under operating conditions; and (4) application testing and production of powders in quantity.

  18. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Nickel Hydroxide Nanostructures and Flame Retardant Poly Vinyl Alcohol and Cellulose Acetate Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Yousefi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nickel hydroxide nanostructures were synthesized by a hydrothermal reaction. The effect of different precursors and surfactants on the morphology of nickel hydroxide nanostructures was investigated. Nanostructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared  spectroscopy. The influence of Ni(OH2 nanostructures on the thermal stability and flame retardancy of the poly vinyl alcohol and cellulose acetate matrix was studied using UL-94 analysis. The enhancement of thermal stability and flame retardancy of nanocomposites is due to the endothermic decomposition of Ni(OH2 and release of water which dilutes combustible gases.

  19. Coherent control near metallic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efimov, Ilya [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Efimov, Anatoly [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We study coherent control in the vicinity of metallic nanostructures. Unlike in the case of control in gas or liquid phase, the collective response of electrons in a metallic nanostructure can significantly enhance different frequency components of the control field. This enhancement strongly depends on the geometry of the nanostructure and can substantially modify the temporal profile of the local control field. The changes in the amplitude and phase of the control field near the nanostructure are studied using linear response theory. The inverse problem of finding the external electromagnetic field to generate the desired local control field is considered and solved.

  20. Subwavelength resonant nanostructured films for sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Edwards, Daniel L.; Mendoza, Albert

    2013-05-29

    We present a novel subwavelength nanostructure architecture that may be utilized for optical standoff sensing applications. The subwavelength structures are fabricated via a combination of nanoimprint lithography and metal sputtering to create metallic nanostructured films encased within a transparent media. The structures are based on the open ring resonator (ORR) architecture and have their analog in resonant LC circuits, which display a resonance frequency that is inversely proportional to the square root of the product of the inductance and capacitance. Therefore, any perturbation of the nanostructured films due to chemical or environmental effects can alter the inductive or capacitive behavior of the subwavelength features, which can shift the resonant frequency and provide an indication of the external stimulus. This shift in resonance can be interrogated remotely either actively using either laser illumination or passively using hyperspectral or multispectral sensing. These structures may be designed to be either anisotropic or isotropic, which can also provide polarization-sensitive interrogation. Due to the nanometer-scale of the structures, they can be tailored to be optically responsive in the visible or near infrared spectrum with a highly reflective resonant peak that is dependent solely on structural dimensions and material characteristics. We present experimental measurements of the optical response of these structures as a function of wavelength, polarization, and incident angle demonstrating the resonant effect in the near infrared region. Numerical modeling data showing the effect of different fabrication parameters such as structure parameters are also discussed.

  1. Formation mechanism and properties of CdS-Ag2S nanorod superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Demchenko, Denis O.; Robinson, Richard D.; Sadtler, Bryce; Erdonmez, Can K.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2008-08-11

    The mechanism of formation of recently fabricated CdS-Ag{sub 2}S nanorod superlattices is considered and their elastic properties are predicted theoretically based on experimental structural data. We consider different possible mechanisms for the spontaneous ordering observed in these 1D nanostructures, such as diffusion-limited growth and ordering due to epitaxial strain. A simplified model suggests that diffusion-limited growth partially contributes to the observed ordering, but cannot account for the full extent of the ordering alone. The elastic properties of bulk Ag{sub 2}S are predicted using a first principles method and are fed into a classical valence force field (VFF) model of the nanostructure. The VFF results show significant repulsion between Ag{sub 2}S segments, strongly suggesting that the interplay between the chemical interface energy and strain due to the lattice mismatch between the two materials drives the spontaneous pattern formation.

  2. Leafy nanostructure PANI for material of supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XI Dong

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructure conducting polyaniline(PANI has great potential applications in supercapacitor electrode materials.In this paper,we report a template-free approach to synthesize PANI by a galvanostatic current procedure with a three-electrode configuration directly on indium-doped tin-oxide substrates (ITO.The morphology of product was characterized by Hitachi S-4800 field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM.Due to the nanostructure,the specific capacitance of PANI film with the thickness of 100nm were measured as high as 829 F/g and 667 F/g at a charge-discharge current density of 1 A/g and 10 A/g respectively.After 500 cycle charge-discharge test employed at the current density of 20 A/g the PANI film still had a 95.1% capacitance retention.

  3. Functionalization of DNA Nanostructures for Cell Signaling Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Ronnie O.

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is an important cytokine responsible for a wide range of different cellular functions including extracellular matrix formation, angiogenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. We have sought to use self-assembling DNA nanostructures to influence TGF-beta signaling. The predictable Watson Crick base pairing allows for designing self-assembling nanoscale structures using oligonucleotides. We have used the method of DNA origami to assemble structures functionalized with multiple peptides that bind TGF-beta receptors outside the ligand binding domain. This allows the nanostructures to cluster TGF-beta receptors and lower the energy barrier of ligand binding thus sensitizing the cells to TGF-beta stimulation. To prove efficacy of our nanostructures we have utilized immunofluorescent staining of Smad2/4 in order to monitor TGF-beta mediated translocation of Smad2/4 to the cell nucleus. We have also utilized Smad2/4 responsive luminescence constructs that allows us to quantify TGF-beta stimulation with and without nanostructures. To functionalize our nanostructures we relied on biotin-streptavidin linkages. This introduces a multivalency that is not necessarily desirable in all designs. Therefore we have investigated alternative means of functionalization. The first approach is based on targeting DNA nanostructure by using zinc finger binding proteins. Efficacy of zinc finger binding proteins was assayed by the use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) assay and atomic force microscopy (AFM). While ELISA indicated a relative specificity of zinc finger proteins for target DNA sequences AFM showed a high degree of non-specific binding and insufficient affinity. The second approach is based on using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) incorporated in the nanostructure through base pairing. PNA is a synthetic DNA analog consisting of a backbone of repeating N-(2-aminoethyl)-glycine units to which purine and pyrimidine bases are linked by

  4. PREFACE: Nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Richard E.

    2003-10-01

    We can define nanostructured surfaces as well-defined surfaces which contain lateral features of size 1-100 nm. This length range lies well below the micron regime but equally above the Ångstrom regime, which corresponds to the interatomic distances on single-crystal surfaces. This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter presents a collection of twelve papers which together address the fabrication, characterization, properties and applications of such nanostructured surfaces. Taken together they represent, in effect, a status report on the rapid progress taking place in this burgeoning area. The first four papers in this special issue have been contributed by members of the European Research Training Network ‘NanoCluster’, which is concerned with the deposition, growth and characterization of nanometre-scale clusters on solid surfaces—prototypical examples of nanoscale surface features. The paper by Vandamme is concerned with the fundamentals of the cluster-surface interaction; the papers by Gonzalo and Moisala address, respectively, the optical and catalytic properties of deposited clusters; and the paper by van Tendeloo reports the application of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to elucidate the surface structure of spherical particles in a catalyst support. The fifth paper, by Mendes, is also the fruit of a European Research Training Network (‘Micro-Nano’) and is jointly contributed by three research groups; it reviews the creation of nanostructured surface architectures from chemically-synthesized nanoparticles. The next five papers in this special issue are all concerned with the characterization of nanostructured surfaces with scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The papers by Bolotov, Hamilton and Dunstan demonstrate that the STM can be employed for local electrical measurements as well as imaging, as illustrated by the examples of deposited clusters, model semiconductor structures and real

  5. Ring Catalog: A resource for designing self-assembling RNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlea, Lorena; Bindewald, Eckart; Sharan, Rishabh; Bartlett, Nathan; Moriarty, Daniel; Oliver, Jerome; Afonin, Kirill A; Shapiro, Bruce A

    2016-07-01

    Designing self-assembling RNA ring structures based on known 3D structural elements connected via linker helices is a challenging task due to the immense number of motif combinations, many of which do not lead to ring-closure. We describe an in silico solution to this design problem by combinatorial assembly of RNA 3-way junctions, bulges, and kissing loops, and tabulating the cases that lead to ring formation. The solutions found are made available in the form of a web-accessible Ring Catalog. As an example of a potential use of this resource, we chose a predicted RNA square structure consisting of five RNA strands and demonstrate experimentally that the self-assembly of those five strands leads to the formation of a square-like complex. This is a demonstration of a novel "design by catalog" approach to RNA nano-structure generation. The URL https://rnajunction.ncifcrf.gov/ringdb can be used to access the resource.

  6. Differences in Butadiene Adduct Formation between Rats and Mice Not Due to Selective Inhibition of CYP2E1 by Butadiene Metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianalto, Kaila M.; Hartman, Jessica H.; Boysen, Gunnar; Miller, Grover P.

    2013-01-01

    CYP2E1 metabolizes 1,3-butadiene (BD) into genotoxic and possibly carcinogenic 1,2-epoxy-3-butene (EB), 1,2:3,4-diepoxybutane (DEB), and 1,2-epoxy-3,4-butanediol (EB-diol). The dose response of DNA and protein adducts derived from BD metabolites increase linearly at low BD exposures and then saturate at higher exposures in rats, but not mice. It was hypothesized that differences in adduct formation between rodents reflect more efficient BD oxidation in mice than rats. Herein, we assessed whether BD-derived metabolites selectively inhibit rat but not mouse CYP2E1 activity using B6C3F1 mouse and Fisher 344 rat liver microsomes. Basal CYP2E1 activities toward 4-nitrophenol were similar between rodents. Through IC50 studies, EB was the strongest inhibitor (IC50 54 μM, mouse; 98 μM, rat), BD-diol considerably weaker (IC50 1200 μM, mouse; 1000 μM, rat), and DEB inhibition nonexistent (IC50 >25 mM). Kinetic studies showed that in both species EB and BD-diol inhibited 4-nitrophenol oxidation through two-site mechanisms in which inhibition constants reflected trends observed in IC50 studies. None of the reactive epoxide metabolites inactivated CYP2E1 irreversibly. Thus, there was no selective inhibition or inactivation of rat CYP2E1 by BD metabolites relative to mouse Cyp2e1, and it can be inferred that CYP2E1 activity toward BD between rodent species would similarly not be impacted by the presence of BD metabolites. Inhibition of CYP2E1 by BD metabolites is then not responsible for the reported species difference in BD metabolism, formation of BD-derived DNA and protein adducts, mutagenicity and tumorigenesis. PMID:24021170

  7. Nanostructures and pinholes on W surfaces exposed to high flux D plasma at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Y.Z., E-mail: jaja880816@aliyun.com [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, W., E-mail: liuw@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Xu, B. [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Luo, G.-N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Li, C.; Fu, B.Q. [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); De Temmerman, G. [FOM Institute DIFFER-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN Nieuwegein (Netherlands); ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-Sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2015-08-15

    Nanostructures and pinholes formed on tungsten surface exposed to high fluxes (10{sup 24} m{sup −2} s{sup −1}) deuterium ions at 943 K and 1073 K were studied by scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. Nanostructure formation is observed at 943 K and 1073 K, and exhibits a strong dependence on the surface orientation. With increasing fluence, pinholes appear on the surface and are mainly observed on grains with surface normal near [1 1 1]. The pinholes are speculated to be caused by the rupture of bubbles formed near the surface. The formation of pinholes has no obvious relationship with the surface nanostructures.

  8. Insights into the Synthesis of Layered Double Hydroxide (LDH) Nanoparticles: Part 2. Formation Mechanisms of LDH

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Xiaodi; Dey, Sandwip K.

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates the effect of (co)intercalated anion compositions on nanostructure evolution to understand the formation mechanisms of layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoparticles following coprecipitation and hydrothermal treatments (HT). Initially, the room temperature coprecipitation resulted in amorphous primary nanoparticles that agglomerated at the edges due to low surface charge densities. The reversibility of such agglomeration was determined by the crystalline quality upon HT...

  9. Assessing the osteoblast transcriptome in a model of enhanced bone formation due to constitutive G{sub s}–G protein signaling in osteoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattanachanya, Lalita, E-mail: lalita_md@yahoo.com [Endocrine Research Unit, Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok (Thailand); Wang, Liping, E-mail: lipingwang05@yahoo.com [Endocrine Research Unit, Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Millard, Susan M., E-mail: susan.millard@mater.uq.edu.au [Endocrine Research Unit, Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Lu, Wei-Dar, E-mail: weidar_lu@yahoo.com [Endocrine Research Unit, Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); O’Carroll, Dylan, E-mail: dylancocarroll@gmail.com [Endocrine Research Unit, Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hsiao, Edward C., E-mail: Edward.Hsiao@ucsf.edu [Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Conklin, Bruce R., E-mail: bconklin@gladstone.ucsf.edu [Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, San Francisco, CA (United States); Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nissenson, Robert A., E-mail: Robert.Nissenson@ucsf.edu [Endocrine Research Unit, Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in osteoblasts (OBs) is an important regulator of bone formation. We previously described a mouse model expressing Rs1, an engineered constitutively active G{sub s}-coupled GPCR, under the control of the 2.3 kb Col I promoter. These mice showed a dramatic age-dependent increase in trabecular bone of femurs. Here, we further evaluated the effects of enhanced G{sub s} signaling in OBs on intramembranous bone formation by examining calvariae of 1- and 9-week-old Col1(2.3)/Rs1 mice and characterized the in vivo gene expression specifically occurring in osteoblasts with activated G{sub s} G protein-coupled receptor signaling, at the cellular level rather than in a whole bone. Rs1 calvariae displayed a dramatic increase in bone volume with partial loss of cortical structure. By immunohistochemistry, Osterix was detected in cells throughout the inter-trabecular space while Osteocalcin was expressed predominantly in cells along bone surfaces, suggesting the role of paracrine mediators secreted from OBs driven by 2.3 kb Col I promoter could influence early OB commitment, differentiation, and/or proliferation. Gene expression analysis of calvarial OBs revealed that genes affected by Rs1 signaling include those encoding proteins important for cell differentiation, cytokines and growth factors, angiogenesis, coagulation, and energy metabolism. The set of G{sub s}-GPCRs and other GPCRs that may contribute to the observed skeletal phenotype and candidate paracrine mediators of the effect of G{sub s} signaling in OBs were also determined. Our results identify novel detailed in vivo cellular changes of the anabolic response of the skeleton to G{sub s} signaling in mature OBs. - Highlights: • OB expression of an engineered G{sub s}-coupled receptor dramatically increases bone mass. • We investigated the changes in gene expression in vivo in enhanced OB G{sub s} signaling. • Genes in cell cycle and transcription were increased in

  10. Nanostructural evolution of one-dimensional BaTiO₃ structures by hydrothermal conversion of vertically aligned TiO₂ nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Tabares, J A; Bejtka, K; Lamberti, A; Garino, N; Bianco, S; Quaglio, M; Pirri, C F; Chiodoni, A

    2016-03-28

    The use of TiO2 nanotube (NT) arrays as templates for hydrothermal conversion of one-dimensional barium titanate (BaTiO3) structures is considered a promising synthesis approach, even though the formation mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Herein we report a nanostructural study by means of XRD and (HR)TEM of high aspect ratio TiO2-NTs hydrothermally converted into BaTiO3. The nanostructure shows two different and well-defined regions: at the top the conversion involves complete dissolution of NTs and subsequent precipitation of BaTiO3 crystals by homogeneous nucleation, followed by the growth of dendritic structures by aggregation and oriented attachment mechanisms. Instead, at the bottom, the low liquid/solid ratio, due to the limited amount of Ba solution that infiltrates the NTs, leads to the rapid crystallization of such a solution into BaTiO3, thus allowing the NTs to act as a template for the formation of highly oriented one-dimensional nanostructures. The in-depth analysis of the structural transformations that take place during the formation of the rod-like arrays of BaTiO3 could help elucidate the conversion mechanism, thus paving the way for the optimization of the synthesis process in view of new applications in energy harvesting devices, where easy and low temperature processing, controlled composition, morphology and functional properties are required.

  11. Hybrid lipid-based nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayani, Yasaman

    Biological membranes serve several important roles, such as structural support of cells and organelles, regulation of ionic and molecular transport, barriers to non-mediated transport, contact between cells within tissues, and accommodation of membrane proteins. Membrane proteins and other vital biomolecules incorporated into the membrane need a lipid membrane to function. Due to importance of lipid bilayers and their vital function in governing many processes in the cell, the development of various models as artificial lipid membranes that can mimic cell membranes has become a subject of great interest. Using different models of artificial lipid membranes, such as liposomes, planar lipid bilayers and supported or tethered lipid bilayers, we are able to study many biophysical processes in biological membranes. The ability of different molecules to interact with and change the structure of lipid membranes can be also investigated in artificial lipid membranes. An important application of lipid bilayer-containing interfaces is characterization of novel membrane proteins for high throughput drug screening studies to investigate receptor-drug interactions and develop biosensor systems. Membrane proteins need a lipid bilayer environment to preserve their stability and functionality. Fabrication of materials that can interact with biomolecules like proteins necessitates the use of lipid bilayers as a mimic of cell membranes. The objective of this research is to develop novel hybrid lipid-based nanostructures mimicking biological membranes. Toward this aim, two hybrid biocompatible structures are introduced: lipid bilayer-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and hydrogel-anchored liposomes with double-stranded DNA anchors. These structures have potential applications in biosensing, drug targeting, drug delivery, and biophysical studies of cell membranes. In the first developed nanostructure, lipid molecules are covalently attached to the surfaces of MWCNTs, and

  12. Nanostructures of Boron, Carbon and Magnesium Diboride for High Temperature Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfefferle, Lisa [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Fang, Fang [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Iyyamperumal, Eswarmoorthi [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Keskar, Gayatri [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2013-12-23

    Direct fabrication of MgxBy nanostructures is achieved by employing metal (Ni,Mg) incorporated MCM-41 in the Hybrid Physical-Chemical Vapor Deposition (HPCVD) reaction. Different reaction conditions are tested to optimize the fabrication process. TEM analysis shows the fabrication of MgxBy nanostructures starting at the reaction temperature of 600oC, with the yield of the nanostructures increasing with increasing reaction temperature. The as-synthesized MgxBy nanostructures have the diameters in the range of 3-5nm, which do not increase with the reaction temperature consistent with templated synthesis. EELS analysis of the template removed nanostructures confirms the existence of B and Mg with possible contamination of Si and O. NEXAFS and Raman spectroscopy analysis suggested a concentric layer-by-layer MgxBy nanowire/nanotube growth model for our as-synthesized nanostructures. Ni k-edge XAS indicates that the formation of MgNi alloy particles is important for the Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) growth of MgxBy nanostructures with fine diameters, and the presence of Mg vapor not just Mg in the catalyst is crucial for the formation of Ni-Mg clusters. Physical templating by the MCM-41 pores was shown to confine the diameter of the nanostructures. DC magnetization measurements indicate possible superconductive behaviors in the as-synthesized samples.

  13. Catalytic activity of various pepsin reduced Au nanostructures towards reduction of nitroarenes and resazurin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Bhagwati; Mandani, Sonam; Sarma, Tridib K., E-mail: tridib@iiti.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Discipline of Chemistry, School of Basic Sciences (India)

    2015-01-15

    Pepsin, a digestive protease enzyme, could function as a reducing as well as stabilizing agent for the synthesis of Au nanostructures of various size and shape under different reaction conditions. The simple tuning of the pH of the reaction medium led to the formation of spherical Au nanoparticles, anisotropic Au nanostructures such as triangles, hexagons, etc., as well as ultra small fluorescent Au nanoclusters. The activity of the enzyme was significantly inhibited after its participation in the formation of Au nanoparticles due to conformational changes in the native structure of the enzyme which was studied by fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), and infra red spectroscopy. However, the Au nanoparticle-enzyme composites served as excellent catalyst for the reduction of p-nitrophenol and resazurin, with the catalytic activity varying with size and shape of the nanoparticles. The presence of pepsin as the surface stabilizer played a crucial role in the activity of the Au nanoparticles as reduction catalysts, as the approach of the reacting molecules to the nanoparticle surface was actively controlled by the stabilizing enzyme.

  14. Surface structural, morphological, and catalytic studies of homogeneously dispersed anisotropic Ag nanostructures within mesoporous silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sareen, Shweta; Mutreja, Vishal; Pal, Bonamali; Singh, Satnam

    2016-11-01

    Highly dispersed anisotropic Ag nanostructures were synthesized within the channels of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS)-modified mesoporous SBA-15 for catalyzing the reduction of p-dinitrobenzene, p-nitrophenol, and p-nitroacetophenone, respectively. A green templating process without involving any reducing agent, by varying the amount (1-10 wt.%) of Ag loading followed by calcination at 350 °C under H2 led to change in the morphology of Ag nanoparticles from nanospheres ( 7-8 nm) to nanorods (aspect ratio 12-30 nm) without any deformation in mesoporous sieves. In comparison to white bare SBA-15, gray-colored samples were formed with Ag impregnation exhibiting absorption bands at 484 and 840 nm indicating the formation of anisotropic Ag nanostructures within mesoporous matrix. TEM and FE-SEM micrographs confirmed the presence of evenly dispersed Ag nanostructures within as well as on the surface of mesoporous matrix. AFM studies indicated a small decrease in the average roughness of SBA-15 from 20.59 to 19.21 nm for 4 wt.% Ag/m-SBA-15, illustrating the encapsulation of majority of Ag nanoparticles in the siliceous matrix and presence of small amount of Ag nanoparticles on the mesoporous support. Moreover, due to plugging of mesopores with Ag, a significant decrease in surface area from 680 m2/g of SBA-15 to 385 m2/g was observed. The Ag-impregnated SBA-15 catalyst displayed superior catalytic activity than did bare SBA-15 with 4 wt.% Ag-loaded catalyst exhibiting optimum activity for selective reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol (100 %), p-nitroacetophenone to p-aminoacetophenone (100 %), and p-dinitrobenzene to p-nitroaniline (87 %), with a small amount of p-phenylenediamine formation.

  15. Nanostructured materials, production and application in construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KUDRYAVTSEV Pavel Gennadievich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers characteristics of water-soluble high module silicate systems: based on polysilicates of alkali element called liquid glasses and the chains of their transformations from the lowest oligomers into the highest ones with further formation colloid solutions – silica sol. The authors describe the potentialities of the use of such systems as binders or modifying additives to produce different nanostructured silicate polymer concretes. There are examples of prospective application of liquid glass and water solutions of high module silicates in industrial areas and construction. Quantum-chemical calculations of the structure and properties of tetraphenylarsonium are given and heterogeneity of its functional groups is shown.

  16. Mixed biofilm formation by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium enhanced bacterial resistance to sanitization due to extracellular polymeric substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Kalchayanand, Norasak; Schmidt, John W; Harhay, Dayna M

    2013-09-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium are important foodborne pathogens capable of forming single-species biofilms or coexisting in multispecies biofilm communities. Bacterial biofilm cells are usually more resistant to sanitization than their planktonic counterparts, so these foodborne pathogens in biofilms pose a serious food safety concern. We investigated how the coexistence of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium strains would affect bacterial planktonic growth competition and mixed biofilm composition. Furthermore, we also investigated how mixed biofilm formation would affect bacterial resistance to common sanitizers. Salmonella Typhimurium strains were able to outcompete E. coli strains in the planktonic growth phase; however, mixed biofilm development was highly dependent upon companion strain properties in terms of the expression of bacterial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), including curli fimbriae and exopolysaccharide cellulose. The EPS-producing strains with higher biofilm-forming abilities were able to establish themselves in mixed biofilms more efficiently. In comparison to single-strain biofilms, Salmonella or E. coli strains with negative EPS expression obtained significantly enhanced resistance to sanitization by forming mixed biofilms with an EPS-producing companion strain of the other species. These observations indicate that the bacterial EPS components not only enhance the sanitizer resistance of the EPS-producing strains but also render protections to their companion strains, regardless of species, in mixed biofilms. Our study highlights the potential risk of cross-contamination by multispecies biofilms in food safety and the need for increased attention to proper sanitization practices in food processing facilities.

  17. Semiconductors and semimetals nanostructured systems

    CERN Document Server

    Willardson, Robert K; Beer, Albert C; Reed, Mark A

    1992-01-01

    This is the first available volume to consolidate prominent topics in the emerging field of nanostructured systems. Recent technological advancements have led to a new era of nanostructure physics, allowing for the fabrication of nanostructures whose behavior is dominated by quantum interference effects. This new capability has enthused the experimentalist and theorist alike. Innumerable possibilities have now opened up for physical exploration and device technology on the nanoscale. This book, with contributions from five pioneering researchers, will allow the expert and novice alike to explore a fascinating new field.Provides a state-of-the-art review of quantum-scale artificially nanostructured electronic systemsIncludes contributions by world-known experts in the fieldOpens the field to the non-expert with a concise introductionFeatures discussions of:Low-dimensional condensed matter physicsProperties of nanostructured, ultrasmall electronic systemsMesoscopic physics and quantum transportPhysics of 2D ele...

  18. The exploration of supramolecular systems and nanostructures by photochemical techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Ceroni, Paola

    2011-01-01

    ""The Exploration of Supramolecular Systems and Nanostructures by Photochemical Techniques"" provides a comprehensive view of the most commonly used photochemical and photophysical techniques and their applications to the study of supramolecular systems. Optical inputs are extremely powerful in the study of nanostructures since they can be used both to ""read"" the state of the system and to provide it energy to work. After a brief introduction to the realm of photochemistry, electronically excited state formation and the different pathways of excited state deactivation, the book focuses on th

  19. Peroxidases in nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria eCarmona-Ribeiro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidases are enzymes catalyzing redox reactions that cleave peroxides. Their active redox centers have heme, cysteine thiols, selenium, manganese and other chemical moieties. Peroxidases and their mimetic systems have several technological and biomedical applications such as environment protection, energy production, bioremediation, sensors and immunoassays design and drug delivery devices. The combination of peroxidases or systems with peroxidase-like activity with nanostructures such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, thin films, liposomes, micelles, nanoflowers, nanorods and others is often an efficient strategy to improve catalytic activity, targeting and reusability.

  20. Irradiation Induced Microstructure Evolution in Nanostructured Materials: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenbo; Ji, Yanzhou; Tan, Pengkang; Zang, Hang; He, Chaohui; Yun, Di; Zhang, Chi; Yang, Zhigang

    2016-02-06

    Nanostructured (NS) materials may have different irradiation resistance from their coarse-grained (CG) counterparts. In this review, we focus on the effect of grain boundaries (GBs)/interfaces on irradiation induced microstructure evolution and the irradiation tolerance of NS materials under irradiation. The features of void denuded zones (VDZs) and the unusual behavior of void formation near GBs/interfaces in metals due to the interactions between GBs/interfaces and irradiation-produced point defects are systematically reviewed. Some experimental results and calculation results show that NS materials have enhanced irradiation resistance, due to their extremely small grain sizes and large volume fractions of GBs/interfaces, which could absorb and annihilate the mobile defects produced during irradiation. However, there is also literature reporting reduced irradiation resistance or even amorphization of NS materials at a lower irradiation dose compared with their bulk counterparts, since the GBs are also characterized by excess energy (compared to that of single crystal materials) which could provide a shift in the total free energy that will lead to the amorphization process. The competition of these two effects leads to the different irradiation tolerance of NS materials. The irradiation-induced grain growth is dominated by irradiation temperature, dose, ion flux, character of GBs/interface and nanoprecipitates, although the decrease of grain sizes under irradiation is also observed in some experiments.

  1. Nanostructure shape effects on response of plasmonic aptamer sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, Subramanian; Mayer, Kathryn M; Lee, Seunghyun; Soper, Steven A; Hafner, Jason H; Spivak, David A

    2013-09-01

    A localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensor surface was fabricated by the deposition of gold nanorods on a glass substrate and subsequent immobilization of the DNA aptamer, which specifically bind to thrombin. This LSPR aptamer sensor showed a response of 6-nm λ(max) shift for protein binding with the detection limit of at least 10 pM, indicating one of the highest sensitivities achieved for thrombin detection by optical extinction LSPR. We also tested the LSPR sensor fabricated using gold bipyramid, which showed higher refractive index sensitivity than the gold nanorods, but the overall response of gold bipyramid sensor appears to be 25% less than that of the gold nanorod substrate, despite the approximately twofold higher refractive index sensitivity. XPS analysis showed that this is due to the low surface density of aptamers on the gold bipyramid compared with gold nanorods. The low surface density of the aptamers on the gold bipyramid surface may be due to the effect of shape of the nanostructure on the kinetics of aptamer monolayer formation. The small size of aptamers relative to other bioreceptors is the key to achieving high sensitivity by biosensors on the basis of LSPR, demonstrated here for protein binding. The generality of aptamer sensors for protein detection using gold nanorod and gold nanobipyramid substrates is anticipated to have a large impact in the important development of sensors toward biomarkers, environmental toxins, and warfare agents.

  2. Formation of N-(2-hydroxyethyl)valine due to exposure to ethylene oxide via tobacco smoke: A risk factor for onset of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, R; Vincenti, M; Meineri, V; Pignata, C; Saglia, U; Giachino, O; Scursatone, E

    1999-07-01

    Human exposure to ethylene oxide (EtO) occurs mainly through inhalation of occupational polluted air and tobacco smoke. EtO is able to react with DNA and proteins producing some molecular adducts. One of these, resulting from reaction between EtO and valine in hemoglobin, is N-(2-hydroxyethyl) valine (HOEtVal). This adduct represents a biological effective dose marker, the level of which correlates linearly with the alkylating activity occurring in DNA. The aim of the present study was to measure HOEtVal in 146 urbanized adult and healthy subjects, nonoccupationally exposed to EtO, and to correlate it with smoke habits. HOEtVal showed a direct positive relationship to tobacco smoke exposure quantified by questionnaire, urinary cotinine (r=0.64509), and the number of cigarettes (r=0. 6308) actively or passively smoked. Results relative to HOEtVal and urinary cotinine in adults distinguish well between active and passive smokers but do not allow distinguishment between passive smokers and nonsmokers. Nevertheless, several authors demonstrated a very good capacity of cotinine to discriminate inside groups of adolescents passive smokers. Therefore, the future objective of the present study is a closer inspection of the two biomarkers with respect to passive exposure to tobacco smoke considering a large group of adolescents. Finally, the correlation between urinary cotinine and HOEtVal increases knowledge about early steps of the carcinogenic process due to active exposure to tobacco smoke. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  3. Nano-structure formation of Fe-Pt perpendicular magnetic recording media co-deposited with MgO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safran, G. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Hungarian Academy of Sciences 1121 Budapest, Konkoly-Thege ut 29-33 (Hungary)]. E-mail: safran@mfa.kfki.hu; Suzuki, T. [Akita Research Institute of Advanced Technology (AIT), 4-21 Sanuki, Araya, Akita 010-1623 (Japan); Ouchi, K. [Akita Research Institute of Advanced Technology (AIT), 4-21 Sanuki, Araya, Akita 010-1623 (Japan); Barna, P.B. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Hungarian Academy of Sciences 1121 Budapest, Konkoly-Thege ut 29-33 (Hungary); Radnoczi, G. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Hungarian Academy of Sciences 1121 Budapest, Konkoly-Thege ut 29-33 (Hungary)

    2006-02-21

    Perpendicular magnetic recording media samples were prepared by sputter deposition on sapphire with a layer sequence of MgO seed-layer/Cr under-layer/FeSi soft magnetic under-layer/MgO intermediate layer/FePt-oxide recording layer. The effects of MgO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} additives on the morphology and orientation of the FePt layer were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. The samples exhibited (001) orientation of the L1 FePt phase with the mutual orientations of sapphire substrate//MgO(100)[001]//Cr(100)[11-bar0]//FeSi(100)[11-bar0]//MgO(100) [001]//FePt(001)[100]. The morphology of the FePt films varied due to the co-deposited oxides: The FePt layers were continuous and segmented by stacking faults aligned at 54{sup o} to the surface. Films with SiO{sub 2} addition, beside the oriented columnar FePt grains, exhibited a fraction of misoriented crystallites due to random repeated nucleation. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition resulted in a layered structure, i.e. an initial continuous epitaxial FePt layer covered by a secondary layer of FePt-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite. Both components (FePt and MgO) of the MgO-added samples were grown epitaxially on the MgO intermediate layer, so that a nano-composite of intercalated (001) FePt and (001) MgO was formed. The revealed microstructures and formation mechanisms may facilitate the improvement of the structural and magnetic properties of the FePt-oxide composite perpendicular magnetic recording media.

  4. Nanostructured surfaces of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, Eriberto; Sbricoli, Luca; Guazzo, Riccardo; Tocco, Ilaria; Roman, Marco; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Stellini, Edoardo; Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Sivolella, Stefano; Zavan, Barbara

    2013-01-17

    The structural and functional fusion of the surface of the dental implant with the surrounding bone (osseointegration) is crucial for the short and long term outcome of the device. In recent years, the enhancement of bone formation at the bone-implant interface has been achieved through the modulation of osteoblasts adhesion and spreading, induced by structural modifications of the implant surface, particularly at the nanoscale level. In this context, traditional chemical and physical processes find new applications to achieve the best dental implant technology. This review provides an overview of the most common manufacture techniques and the related cells-surface interactions and modulation. A Medline and a hand search were conducted to identify studies concerning nanostructuration of implant surface and their related biological interaction. In this paper, we stressed the importance of the modifications on dental implant surfaces at the nanometric level. Nowadays, there is still little evidence of the long-term benefits of nanofeatures, as the promising results achieved in vitro and in animals have still to be confirmed in humans. However, the increasing interest in nanotechnology is undoubted and more research is going to be published in the coming years.

  5. Nanostructured Surfaces of Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Sivolella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural and functional fusion of the surface of the dental implant with the surrounding bone (osseointegration is crucial for the short and long term outcome of the device. In recent years, the enhancement of bone formation at the bone-implant interface has been achieved through the modulation of osteoblasts adhesion and spreading, induced by structural modifications of the implant surface, particularly at the nanoscale level. In this context, traditional chemical and physical processes find new applications to achieve the best dental implant technology. This review provides an overview of the most common manufacture techniques and the related cells-surface interactions and modulation. A Medline and a hand search were conducted to identify studies concerning nanostructuration of implant surface and their related biological interaction. In this paper, we stressed the importance of the modifications on dental implant surfaces at the nanometric level. Nowadays, there is still little evidence of the long-term benefits of nanofeatures, as the promising results achieved in vitro and in animals have still to be confirmed in humans. However, the increasing interest in nanotechnology is undoubted and more research is going to be published in the coming years.

  6. Oxidation resistance of Al2O3-nanostructured/CSZ composite compared to conventional CSZ and YSZ thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyvani, A.; Bahamirian, M.

    2016-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are widely used in combustion sections of turbine engines, however, their main disadvantage is the spallation from the bond coat, occurring due to oxidation and formation of thermally grown oxide (TGO). In this paper, the oxidation resistance of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ), ceria stabilized zirconia (CSZ), and Al2O3-nanostructured/CSZ composite coatings have been studied and compared with each other. Samples were heated in air at 1100 °C using an electrical furnace. Three types of the top coats were applied by thermal spray technique on IN738LC base metal. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the microstructure of the coatings before and after the oxidation. The experimental results showed that Al2O3-nanostructured/CSZ composite coating exhibits considerably better oxidation resistance compared to conventional YSZ and CSZ coatings. The microstructural analysis indicated a smaller growth of TGO in the Al2O3-nanostructured/CSZ composite coating, improving the oxidation resistance of the coating.

  7. Hydrothermal synthesis of urchin-like MnO{sub 2} nanostructures and its electrochemical character for supercapacitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Shuoqing, E-mail: 18780107501@163.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Liu, Tianmo, E-mail: tmliu@cqu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Shi, Dongfeng; Zhang, Yu; Zeng, Wen; Li, Tianming; Miao, Bin [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Urchin-like α-MnO{sub 2} nanostructures were synthesized via a hydrothermal process. • The possible formation mechanism of the urchin-like α-MnO{sub 2} was discussed. • The evolution of the urchin-like nanostructures due to the increase of reaction temperature. • The urchin-like α-MnO{sub 2} exhibits high specific capacitance of 151.5 F g{sup −1}. • The urchin-like α-MnO{sub 2} shows 93.4% capacitance retention after 1000 cycles. - Abstract: Urchin-like α-MnO{sub 2} nanostructures were successfully synthesized via a simple hydrothermal process at different synthesis temperatures without using any template or surfactant. The microstructure and morphology of as-synthesized products were systematically investigated by focused ion beam, transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The electrochemical test of the prepared MnO{sub 2} exhibits ideal cyclic voltammetry behavior, high specific capacitance (151.5 F g{sup −1} at a current density of 1 A g{sup −1}) and excellent cycling stability (93.4% capacitance retention after 1000 cycles) which suggests its promising application as supercapacitor.

  8. Bifunctional luminescent and magnetic core/shell type nanostructures Fe3O4@CeF3 :Tb3+/Si

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Runowski; T. Grzyb, S. Lis

    2011-01-01

    A facile co-precipitation and microemulsion methods were applied to obtain core/shell type nanoparticles.Cerium fluoride doped with terbium(Ⅲ) ions supplied intensive green luminescence of the system.Due to the presence of magnetite nanoparticles as cores,the product was highly sensitive to external magnetic field.Both sorts of nanostructures were encapsulated by silica shell.Such external layer of inert oxide can potentially increase the resistance of prepared nanostructures to thermal oxidation,aggressive agents,changing of pH or destructive radiation.Morphology of the product was examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM).Formations of the core/shell type nanostructures were clearly seen in the TEM pictures.Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed the structure of the products,their nanocrystallinity and amorphous nature of silica shell.Optical properties were investigated by measuring excitation and emission spectra.Such multifunctional luminescent and magnetic nanoparticles coated with easily functionalized silica shell could be applied in many field of science.

  9. Influence of the fuel in the nanostructure catalyzer oxides synthesis; Influencia do combustivel na sintese de oxidos catalisadores nanestruturados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zampiva, R.Y.S.; Panta, P.C.; Carlos, R.B.; Alves, A.K.; Bergmann, C.P., E-mail: rubiayoungsun@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (LACER/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Lab. de Ceramicos

    2012-07-01

    Among the techniques used in catalysts production, the solution combustion synthesis (SCS) has been increasingly applied due the possibility of producing, at low cost, highly pure and homogeneous nanostructured powders. The smaller the particle diameter, the greater the activity of the catalyst. In SCS, the size of the particles produced depends on the process variables. In order to formulate the optimal methodology for the preparation of nanostructured oxides for catalysis, it was studied the fuel-oxidant concentration ratio, and the use of glycine and polyethylene glycol with molecular weight 200 (PEG 200) as fuel in the SCS of Iron, Magnesium and Molybdenum based catalysts. The phase identification of the products was performed by x-ray diffraction (XRD). Particle size and surface area analysis were done to characterize the particles size and the samples morphology was obtained by scanning electron microscopy. Results indicated the formation of high purity nanomaterials obtained for low concentrations of fuel, and a wide variation in the nanostructure sizes depending on the concentration and type of fuel used. (author)

  10. Continuous and discrete modeling of the decay of two-dimensional nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castez, Marcos F; Albano, Ezequiel V [Instituto de Investigaciones FisicoquImicas Teoricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), CCT La Plata, Casilla de Correo 16, Sucursal 4, (1900) La Plata, UNLP, CONICET (Argentina)

    2009-07-01

    In this work we review some recent research on the surface diffusion-mediated decay of two-dimensional nanostructures. These results include both a continuous, vectorial model and a discrete kinetic Monte Carlo approach. Predictions from the standard linear continuous theory of surface-diffusion-driven interface decay are contrasted with simulational results both from kinetic and morphological points of view. In particular, we focused our attention on high-aspect-ratio nanostructures, where strong deviations from linear theory take place, including nonexponential amplitude decay and the emergence of several interesting nanostructures such as overhangs developing, nanoislands and nanovoids formation, loss of convexity, nanostructures-pinch off and nanostructures-break off, etc. (topical review)

  11. Novel palladium flower-like nanostructured networks for electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Mingjun; Zou, Liangliang; Yuan, Ting; Huang, Qinghong; Zou, Zhiqing; Li, Xuemei; Yang, Hui

    2014-12-01

    Novel Pd flower-like nanostructured networks are synthesized via a simple CO-assisted reduction. The morphology and size of the Pd nanostructures are found to strongly depend on the temperature and solvent during the synthesis process. Such Pd flower-like nanostructured networks exhibit a much enhanced activity of about 3 times of that on conventional Pd nanoparticles towards the electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid. The specific activity of formic acid oxidation on Pd nanostructures is also greatly improved, indicating that the formation of flower-like nanostructured networks is beneficial for the electrooxidation of formic acid. Thus, it could be served as highly active catalyst for formic acid electrooxidation although the stability needs to be greatly improved.

  12. Achievements of DFT for the investigation of graphene-related nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botello-Méndez, Andrés R; Dubois, Simon M-M; Lherbier, Aurélien; Charlier, Jean-Christophe

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: Graphene-related nanostructures stand out as exceptional materials due to both their wide range of properties and their expanse of interest in both applied and fundamental research. They are good examples of nanoscale materials for which the properties do not necessarily replicate those of the bulk. For the description and the understanding of their properties, it is clear that a general quantum-mechanical approach is mandatory. The remarkable result of density functional theory (DFT) is that the quantum-mechanical description of materials at the ground state is made amenable to simulations at a relatively low computational cost. The knowledge of materials has undergone a revolution after the introduction of DFT as an unrivaled instrument for the investigation of materials properties through computer experiments. Their deeper understanding comes from a variety of tools developed from concepts intrinsically present in DFT, notably the total energy and the charge density. Such tools allow the prediction of a diverse set of physicochemical properties relevant for material scientists. This Account lays out an example-driven tour through the achievements of ground-state DFT applied to the description of graphene-related nanostructures and to the deep understanding of their outstanding properties. After a brief introduction to DFT, the survey starts with the determination of the most basic properties that can be obtained from DFT, that is, band structures, lattice parameters, and spin ground state. Next follows an exploration of how total energies of different systems can give information about relative stability, formation energies, and reaction paths. Exploiting the derivatives of the energy with respect to displacements leads the way toward the extraction of vibrational and mechanical properties. In addition, a close examination of the charge density gives information about charge transfer mechanisms, which can be linked to chemical reactivity. The ground

  13. Spontaneous structural transition in phospholipid-inspired aromatic phosphopeptide nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellach, Michal; Atsmon-Raz, Yoav; Simonovsky, Eyal; Gottlieb, Hugo; Jacoby, Guy; Beck, Roy; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Miller, Yifat; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipid membranes could be considered a prime example of the ability of nature to produce complex yet ordered structures, by spontaneous and efficient self-assembly. Inspired by the unique properties and architecture of phospholipids, we designed simple amphiphilic decapeptides, intended to fold in the center of the peptide sequence, with a phosphorylated serine "head" located within a central turn segment, and two hydrophobic "tails". The molecular design also included the integration of the diphenylalanine motif, previously shown to facilitate self-assembly and increase nanostructure stability. Secondary structure analysis of the peptides indeed indicated the presence of stabilized conformations in solution, with a central turn connecting two hydrophobic "tails", and interactions between the hydrophobic strands. The mechanisms of assembly into supramolecular structures involved structural transitions between different morphologies, which occurred over several hours, leading to the formation of distinctive nanostructures, including half-elliptical nanosheets and curved tapes. The phosphopeptide building blocks appear to self-assemble via a particular combination of aromatic, hydrophobic and ionic interactions, as well as hydrogen bonding, as demonstrated by proposed constructed simulated models of the peptides and self-assembled nanostructures. Molecular dynamics simulations also gave insight into mechanisms of structural transitions of the nanostructures at a molecular level. Because of the biocompatibility of peptides, the phosphopeptide assemblies allow for expansion of the library of biomolecular nanostructures available for future design and application of biomedical devices.

  14. Bottom-Up Synthesis and Sensor Applications of Biomimetic Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of nanotechnology, biology, and bioengineering greatly improved the developments of nanomaterials with unique functions and properties. Biomolecules as the nanoscale building blocks play very important roles for the final formation of functional nanostructures. Many kinds of novel nanostructures have been created by using the bioinspired self-assembly and subsequent binding with various nanoparticles. In this review, we summarized the studies on the fabrications and sensor applications of biomimetic nanostructures. The strategies for creating different bottom-up nanostructures by using biomolecules like DNA, protein, peptide, and virus, as well as microorganisms like bacteria and plant leaf are introduced. In addition, the potential applications of the synthesized biomimetic nanostructures for colorimetry, fluorescence, surface plasmon resonance, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, electrical resistance, electrochemistry, and quartz crystal microbalance sensors are presented. This review will promote the understanding of relationships between biomolecules/microorganisms and functional nanomaterials in one way, and in another way it will guide the design and synthesis of biomimetic nanomaterials with unique properties in the future.

  15. Plasma Spray Forming of Nanostructured Composite Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The nanostructure composite coating is obtained via plasma spraying of Al2O3-13 wt pct TiO2 powder. Brittle and hard lamella results from melted nanostructured powder. Ductile nanostructured matrix forms from unmelted nanostructured particles. Through the adjustment of constituent and nanostructure, hardness/strength and toughness/ductility are balanced and overall properties of the structure composite are achieved.

  16. Lithium insertion in nanostructured TiO(2)(B) architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dylla, Anthony G; Henkelman, Graeme; Stevenson, Keith J

    2013-05-21

    Electric vehicles and grid storage devices have potentialto become feasible alternatives to current technology, but only if scientists can develop energy storage materials that offer high capacity and high rate capabilities. Chemists have studied anatase, rutile, brookite and TiO2(B) (bronze) in both bulk and nanostructured forms as potential Li-ion battery anodes. In most cases, the specific capacity and rate of lithiation and delithiation increases as the materials are nanostructured. Scientists have explained these enhancements in terms of higher surface areas, shorter Li(+) diffusion paths and different surface energies for nanostructured materials allowing for more facile lithiation and delithiation. Of the most studied polymorphs, nanostructured TiO2(B) has the highest capacity with promising high rate capabilities. TiO2(B) is able to accommodate 1 Li(+) per Ti, giving a capacity of 335 mAh/g for nanotubular and nanoparticulate TiO2(B). The TiO2(B) polymorph, discovered in 1980 by Marchand and co-workers, has been the focus of many recent studies regarding high power and high capacity anode materials with potential applications for electric vehicles and grid storage. This is due to the material's stability over multiple cycles, safer lithiation potential relative to graphite, reasonable capacity, high rate capability, nontoxicity, and low cost (Bruce, P. G.; Scrosati, B.; Tarascon, J.-M. Nanomaterials for Rechargeable Lithium Batteries. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed.2008, 47, 2930-2946). One of the most interesting properties of TiO2(B) is that both bulk and nanostructured forms lithiate and delithiate through a surface redox or pseudocapacitive charging mechanism, giving rise to stable high rate charge/discharge capabilities in the case of nanostructured TiO2(B). When other polymorphs of TiO2 are nanostructured, they still mainly intercalate lithium through a bulk diffusion-controlled mechanism. TiO2(B) has a unique open crystal structure and low energy Li

  17. Mechanical design of DNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Carlos E; Su, Hai-Jun; Marras, Alexander E; Zhou, Lifeng; Johnson, Joshua

    2015-04-14

    Structural DNA nanotechnology is a rapidly emerging field that has demonstrated great potential for applications such as single molecule sensing, drug delivery, and templating molecular components. As the applications of DNA nanotechnology expand, a consideration of their mechanical behavior is becoming essential to understand how these structures will respond to physical interactions. This review considers three major avenues of recent progress in this area: (1) measuring and designing mechanical properties of DNA nanostructures, (2) designing complex nanostructures based on imposed mechanical stresses, and (3) designing and controlling structurally dynamic nanostructures. This work has laid the foundation for mechanically active nanomachines that can generate, transmit, and respond to physical cues in molecular systems.

  18. Simulation of metallic nanostructures for emission of THz radiation using the lateral photo-Dember effect

    CERN Document Server

    McBryde, Duncan; Daniell, Geoff J; Chung, Aaron L; Mihoubi, Zakaria; Quarterman, Adrian H; Wilcox, Keith G; Tropper, Anne C; Apostolopoulos, Vasilis; 10.1109/irmmw-THz.2011.6104994

    2012-01-01

    A 2D simulation for the lateral photo-Dember effect is used to calculate the THz emission of metallic nanostructures due to ultrafast diffusion of carriers in order to realize a series of THz emitters.

  19. Carbon nanostructure composite for electromagnetic interference shielding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anupama Joshi; Suwarna Datar

    2015-06-01

    This communication reviews current developments in carbon nanostructure-based composite materials for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding. With more and more electronic gadgets being used at different frequencies, there is a need for shielding them from one another to avoid interference. Conventionally, metal-based shielding materials have been used. But due to the requirement of light weight, corrosion resistive materials, lot of work is being done on composite materials. In this research the forerunner is the nanocarbon-based composite material whose different forms add different characteristics to the composite. The article focusses on composites based on graphene, graphene oxide, carbon nanotubes, and several other novel forms of carbon.

  20. ZnO-ionic liquid nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanes, Jose; Carrion, Francisco-Jose [Grupo de Ciencia de Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Departamento de Ingenieria de Materiales y Fabricacion, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Campus de la Muralla del Mar, C/ Doctor Fleming s/n, 30202 Cartagena (Spain); Bermudez, Maria-Dolores, E-mail: mdolores.bermudez@upct.es [Grupo de Ciencia de Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Departamento de Ingenieria de Materiales y Fabricacion, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Campus de la Muralla del Mar, C/ Doctor Fleming s/n, 30202 Cartagena (Spain)

    2009-02-15

    The mixture of nanostructures derived from the surface interactions and reactivity of ZnO nanoparticles with the room-temperature ionic liquid (IL1) 1-hexyl, 3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate has been studied. Results are discussed on the basis of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) determinations. Size and morphology changes in ZnO nanoparticles by surface modification with IL1 are observed. ZnF{sub 2} crystalline needles due to reaction with the hexafluorophosphate anion are also formed.

  1. Nonlocal optical response in metallic nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Søren; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I; Wubs, Martijn; Asger Mortensen, N

    2015-05-13

    This review provides a broad overview of the studies and effects of nonlocal response in metallic nanostructures. In particular, we thoroughly present the nonlocal hydrodynamic model and the recently introduced generalized nonlocal optical response (GNOR) model. The influence of nonlocal response on plasmonic excitations is studied in key metallic geometries, such as spheres and dimers, and we derive new consequences due to the GNOR model. Finally, we propose several trajectories for future work on nonlocal response, including experimental setups that may unveil further effects of nonlocal response.

  2. Nonlocal optical response in metallic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raza, Søren; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Wubs, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    This review provides a broad overview of the studies and effects of nonlocal response in metallic nanostructures. In particular, we thoroughly present the nonlocal hydrodynamic model and the recently introduced generalized nonlocal optical response (GNOR) model. The influence of nonlocal response...... on plasmonic excitations is studied in key metallic geometries, such as spheres and dimers, and we derive new consequences due to the GNOR model. Finally, we propose several trajectories for future work on nonlocal response, including experimental setups that may unveil further effects of nonlocal response....

  3. Nanostructured bioceramics for maxillofacial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamopoulos, Othon; Papadopoulos, Triantafillos

    2007-08-01

    Biomaterials science and technology have been expanding tremendously the recent years. The results of this evolution are obvious in maxillofacial applications especially with the contemporary development of Nanotechnology. Among biomaterials, bioceramics possess a specific field due to various interactions with the biological tissues. The combination of bioceramics and nanotechnology has resulted in enhanced skeletal interactions in maxillofacial applications. Nanotechnology secures better mechanical properties and more effective biological interactions with jaws. The main production methods for the synthesis of nanostructured materials include plasma arcing, chemical vapour deposition, sol-gel and precipitation. The bioceramics in Dentistry comprise inert, bioactive, resorbable and composite systems. The purpose of the present article is to describe the available nanotechnology methods and how these could be addressed to synthesise maxillofacial bioceramics with advanced properties for better biological applications. Additionally, it describes specific clinical applications in maxillofacial surgery of these biomaterials--either by themselves or in combination with others--that can be promising candidates for bone tissue engineering. Such applications include replacement of lost teeth, filling of jaws defects or reconstruction of mandible and temporomandibular joint.

  4. A combined experimental and theoretical approach towards the understanding of transport in one-dimensional molecular nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Grimm, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    This thesis comprises detailed experimental and theoretical investigations of the transport properties of one-dimensional nanostructures. Most of the work is dedicated to the exploration of the fascinating effects occurring in single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). These particular nanostructures gained an overwhelming interest in the past two decades due to its outstanding electronic and mechanical features. We have investigated the properties of a novel family of carbon nanostructures, named...

  5. Hydrothermal synthesis of alpha- and beta-HgS nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galain, Isabel; María, Pérez Barthaburu; Ivana, Aguiar; Laura, Fornaro

    2017-01-01

    We synthesized HgS nanostructures by the hydrothermal method in order to use them as electron acceptors in hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells. We employed different mercury sources (HgO and Hg(CH3COO)2) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) or hexadecanethiol (HDT) as stabilizing/capping agent for controlling size, crystallinity, morphology and stability of the obtained nanostructures. We also used thiourea as sulfur source, and a temperature of 180 °C during 6 h. Synthesized nanostructures were characterized by powder X-Ray Diffraction, Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform and Transmission Electron Microscopy. When PVP acts as stabilizing agent, the mercury source has influence on the size -but not in morphology- of the beta-HgS obtained nansostructures. HDT has control over nanostructures' size and depending on the relation Hg:HDT, we obtained a mixture of alpha and beta HgS which can be advantageous in the application in solar cells, due their absorption in different spectral regions. The smallest nanostructures obtained have a mean diameter of 20 nm when using HDT as capping agent. Also, we deposited the aforementioned nanostructures onto flat glass substrates by the spin coating technique as a first approach of an active layer of a solar cell. The depositions were characterized by atomic force microscopy. We obtained smaller particle deposition and higher particle density -but a lower area coverage (5%) - in samples with HDT as capping agent. This work presents promising results on nanostructures for future application on hybrid solar cells. Further efforts will be focused on the deposition of organic-inorganic layers.

  6. Structural differences between capped GaSb nanostructures grown by Stranski-Krastanov and droplet epitaxy growth modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJarld, Matt; Yan, Lifan; Luengo-Kovac, Marta; Sih, Vanessa; Millunchick, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Droplet epitaxy (DE) has emerged as an alternative to Stranski-Krastanov (SK) as a method for epitaxial nanostructure formation. We find significant structural differences of similar sized nanostructures embedded in GaAs between the two methods. Atomic force microscopy and atom probe tomography measurements reveal that uncapped and capped SK structures resemble each other. However, the DE nanostructures appear as rings topographically but are quantum dots compositionally. A GaSb wetting layer is present regardless of the growth method and shares a nearly identical Sb concentration profile. DE nanostructures are shown to have a lower Sb concentration, and transmission electron microscopy measurements reveal that they produce less strain on the capping layer. Despite significant structural differences, SK and DE nanostructures exhibit the same photoluminescence response, suggesting that the emission is from a shared feature such as the wetting layer, rather than the nanostructures.

  7. Synthesis of magnetic nanostructures: Shape tuning by the addition of a polymer at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Md. Harunar; Raula, Manoj; Mandal, Tarun K., E-mail: psutkm@iacs.res.in

    2014-06-01

    We report a simple method for shape-controlled synthesis of iron oxide spinels such as magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) and maghemite (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanostructures using a thermoresponsive polymer poly(vinyl methyl ether) (PVME) by the alkaline hydrolysis of iron salt at low temperature (20 °C). Microscopic analysis confirmed the formation of needle- and flower-shaped iron oxide nanostructures depending on reaction conditions. High-resolution transmission electron microscopic analysis of the needle- and flower-shaped nanostructures as well as their corresponding selected area electron diffraction patterns revealed that the formed nanostructures are crystalline in nature. X-ray diffraction study reveals the formation of well-crystalline pure Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures under different reaction conditions. Fourier transform Infra-red spectroscopic analysis confirms the adsorption of PVME on the surface of iron oxide nanostructures. Finally, the magnetic properties of γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanostructures is studied that shows the superparamagnetic behavior of the formed iron oxide nanostructures. - Graphical abstract: A simple method for shape-controlled synthesis of iron oxide spinels such as magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) and maghemite (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanostructures using a thermoresponsive polymer poly(vinyl methyl ether) (PVME) by the alkaline hydrolysis of iron salt at low temperature (20 °C) is described. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Low-temperature method for iron oxide (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanostructures is described. • Shape of iron oxide nanostructures can be tuned by varying the reaction parameter. • Needle- and flower-shaped iron oxide nanostructures are obtained with polymer. • HRTEM analysis shows iron oxide nanostructures are crystalline in nature. • Both γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanostructures shows superparamagnetic behavior.

  8. One-dimensional Nanostructured Materials From Organic Precursor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. F. Cai

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction One-dimensional nanostructured materials, such as nanowires, nanobelts, nanotubes and nanocables have been attracting a great research interest in the last decade due to their superior electrical, optical, mechanical and thermal properties, and many methods have been explored to synthesis of the materials, e.g., arc discharge, laser ablation, chemical vapor deposition, thermal evaporation, sol-gel method, template method and so on. In this work, we present a novel and simple method to one-dimensional nanostructured materials by pyrolysis of organic precursor.

  9. Quantum Simulations of One-Dimensional Nanostructures under Arbitrary Deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Pekka

    2016-09-01

    A powerful technique is introduced for simulating mechanical and electromechanical properties of one-dimensional nanostructures under arbitrary combinations of bending, twisting, and stretching. The technique is based on an unconventional control of periodic symmetry which eliminates artifacts due to deformation constraints and quantum finite-size effects and allows transparent electronic-structure analysis. Via density-functional tight-binding implementation, the technique demonstrates its utility by predicting nonlinear electromechanical properties in carbon nanotubes and abrupt behavior in the structural yielding of Au7 and Mo6 S6 nanowires. The technique drives simulations markedly closer to the realistic modeling of these slender nanostructures under experimental conditions.

  10. Lithographically patterned silicon nanostructures on silicon substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megouda, Nacera [Institut de Recherche Interdisciplinaire (IRI, USR 3078), Universite Lille1, Parc de la Haute Borne, 50 Avenue de Halley-BP 70478, 59658 Villeneuve d' Ascq and Institut d' Electronique, de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN, CNRS-8520), Cite Scientifique, Avenue Poincare-B.P. 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mouloud Mammeri, Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Unite de Developpement de la Technologie du Silicium (UDTS), 2 Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 140 Alger-7 merveilles, Alger (Algeria); Piret, Gaeelle; Galopin, Elisabeth; Coffinier, Yannick [Institut de Recherche Interdisciplinaire (IRI, USR 3078), Universite Lille1, Parc de la Haute Borne, 50 Avenue de Halley-BP 70478, 59658 Villeneuve d' Ascq and Institut d' Electronique, de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN, CNRS-8520), Cite Scientifique, Avenue Poincare-B.P. 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Hadjersi, Toufik, E-mail: hadjersi@yahoo.com [Unite de Developpement de la Technologie du Silicium (UDTS), 2 Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 140 Alger-7 merveilles, Alger (Algeria); Elkechai, Omar [Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mouloud Mammeri, Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); and others

    2012-06-01

    The paper reports on controlled formation of silicon nanostructures patterns by the combination of optical lithography and metal-assisted chemical dissolution of crystalline silicon. First, a 20 nm-thick gold film was deposited onto hydrogen-terminated silicon substrate by thermal evaporation. Gold patterns (50 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 50 {mu}m spaced by 20 {mu}m) were transferred onto the silicon wafer by means of photolithography. The etching process of crystalline silicon in HF/AgNO{sub 3} aqueous solution was studied as a function of the silicon resistivity, etching time and temperature. Controlled formation of silicon nanowire arrays in the unprotected areas was demonstrated for highly resistive silicon substrate, while silicon etching was observed on both gold protected and unprotected areas for moderately doped silicon. The resulting layers were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  11. Alternative nanostructures for thermophones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Nathanael; Aliev, Ali; Baughman, Ray

    2015-03-01

    There is a large promise for thermophones in high power sonar arrays, flexible loudspeakers, and noise cancellation devices. So far, freestanding aerogel-like carbon nanotube sheets demonstrate the best performance as a thermoacoustic heat source. However, the limited accessibility of large size freestanding carbon nanotube sheets and other even more exotic materials published recently, hampers the field. We present here new alternative materials for a thermoacoustic heat source with high energy conversion efficiency, additional functionalities, environmentally friendly and cost effective production technologies. We discuss the thermoacoustic performance of alternative nanoscale materials and compare their spectral and power dependencies of sound pressure in air. The study presented here focuses on engineering thermal gradients in the vicinity of nanostructures and subsequent heat dissipation processes from the interior of encapsulated thermoacoustic projectors. Applications of thermoacoustic projectors for high power SONAR arrays, sound cancellation, and optimal thermal design, regarding enhanced energy conversion efficiency, are discussed.

  12. Defects in semiconductor nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vijay A Singh; Manoj K Harbola; Praveen Pathak

    2008-02-01

    Impurities play a pivotal role in semiconductors. One part in a million of phosphorous in silicon alters the conductivity of the latter by several orders of magnitude. Indeed, the information age is possible only because of the unique role of shallow impurities in semiconductors. Although work in semiconductor nanostructures (SN) has been in progress for the past two decades, the role of impurities in them has been only sketchily studied. We outline theoretical approaches to the electronic structure of shallow impurities in SN and discuss their limitations. We find that shallow levels undergo a SHADES (SHAllow-DEep-Shallow) transition as the SN size is decreased. This occurs because of the combined effect of quantum confinement and reduced dielectric constant in SN. Level splitting is pronounced and this can perhaps be probed by ESR and ENDOR techniques. Finally, we suggest that a perusal of literature on (semiconductor) cluster calculations carried out 30 years ago would be useful.

  13. Magnetism in carbon nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Hagelberg, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Magnetism in carbon nanostructures is a rapidly expanding field of current materials science. Its progress is driven by the wide range of applications for magnetic carbon nanosystems, including transmission elements in spintronics, building blocks of cutting-edge nanobiotechnology, and qubits in quantum computing. These systems also provide novel paradigms for basic phenomena of quantum physics, and are thus of great interest for fundamental research. This comprehensive survey emphasizes both the fundamental nature of the field, and its groundbreaking nanotechnological applications, providing a one-stop reference for both the principles and the practice of this emerging area. With equal relevance to physics, chemistry, engineering and materials science, senior undergraduate and graduate students in any of these subjects, as well as all those interested in novel nanomaterials, will gain an in-depth understanding of the field from this concise and self-contained volume.

  14. Biogenic nanostructured silica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Silicon is by far the most abundant element in the earth crust and also is an essential element for higher plants, yet its biology and mechanisms in plant tolerance of biotic and abiotic stresses are poorly understood. Based on the molecular mechanisms of the biosilicification in marine organisms such as diatoms and sponges, the cell wall template-mediated self-assembly of nanostructured silica in marine organisms and higher plants as well as the related organic molecules are discussed. Understanding of the templating and structure-directed effects of silicon-processing organic molecules not only offers the clue for synthesizing silicon-based materials, but also helps to recognize the anomaly of silicon in plant biology.

  15. Formation and dissolution of microbubbles on highly-ordered plasmonic nanopillar arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiumei; Bao, Lei; Dipalo, Michele; De Angelis, Francesco; Zhang, Xuehua

    2015-01-01

    Bubble formation from plasmonic heating of nanostructures is of great interest in many applications. In this work, we study experimentally the intrinsic effects of the number of three-dimensional plasmonic nanostructures on the dynamics of microbubbles, largely decoupled from the effects of dissolved air. The formation and dissolution of microbubbles is observed on exciting groups of 1, 4, and 9 nanopillars. Our results show that the power threshold for the bubble formation depends on the number density of the nanopillars in highly-ordered arrays. In the degassed water, both the growth rate and the maximal radius of the plasmonic microbubbles increase with an increase of the illuminated pillar number, due to the heat balance between the heat loss across the bubble and the collective heating generated from the nanopillars. Interestingly, our results show that the bubble dissolution is affected by the spatial arrangement of the underlying nanopillars, due to the pinning effect on the bubble boundary. The bubbles on nanopillar arrays dissolve in a jumping mode with step-wise features on the dissolution curves, prior to a smooth dissolution phase for the bubble pinned by a single pillar. The insight from this work may facilitate the design of nanostructures for efficient energy conversion. PMID:26687143

  16. Fabrication and Cathodoluminescence Spectroscopy of Optical Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redinbo, Gregory Finley

    1995-01-01

    This thesis presents the fabrication of buried optical nanostructures in III-V materials by modifying semiconductor quantum wells using an implantation enhanced interdiffusion (IEI) technique. An investigation of the effect of fabrication parameters on the resulting nanostructures is carried out, and the characteristics of the fabricated structures are measured using room temperature and low temperature cathodoluminescence (CL). IEI using protons is reported for the first time in this work and is found to increase the diffusion length of Al in GaAs/AlGaAs single quantum wells. The enhanced diffusion lengths compare favorably to Ga^ {+} IEI studies and the enhanced interdiffusion mechanism is determined to be due to implantation generated point defects. The use of H^{+} IEI for laterally patterning 100-nm optical nanostructures is demonstrated and is found to be limited by the lateral straggle of the light ions during implantation. Optical quantum wires with widths down to 40 nm are fabricated using low energy Ga^{+ } and electron beam lithography generated metal masks on GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells. Single nanostructures are measured with low temperature CL, and an increasing blue shift of wire emission with decreasing mask size is measured. The lateral extent of intermixing is found to be 30 nm, independent of Ga^{+} implantation energy. Based on a model of emission energy shift, a lateral quantization energy of ~3 meV for carriers is achieved in these structures. Optical nanostructures are also fabricated with direct write IEI using a Ga^{+ } focused ion beam (FIB) and are compared to the quantum wires. A larger effective lateral extent of intermixing of 200 nm is found with the FIB. IEI patterning of strained InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells is demonstrated and a model of the resulting lateral bandgap profile leads to a lateral defect diffusion length of ~1 mum. Strain enhanced lateral diffusion of defects during IEI cause this length to be substantially larger than that

  17. Magnetocaloric properties of metallic nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khurram S. Khattak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A compilation of magnetocaloric properties of metallic nanostructures with Curie temperature (TC between 260 and 340 K has been tabulated. The tabulated data show that nanostructure plays an important role in enhancing the magnetocaloric properties of a material, namely by reducing the peak of magnetic entropy, but broadening of the magnetocaloric effect curve with an average of 10 K sliding window for Curie temperature. A second table lists all bulk metallic and intermetallic materials, in which there is no nanostructural data, with an entropy change of at least 20 J/kg K and a Curie temperature between 260 and 340 K. We propose that further experiments should be made on the nanostructured form of these materials.

  18. Nanostructured materials and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Logothetidis, Stergios

    2012-01-01

    This book applies nanostructures and nanomaterials to energy and organic electronics, offering advanced deposition and processing methods and theoretical and experimental aspects for nanoparticles, nanotubes and thin films for organic electronics applications.

  19. Quantum optics with semiconductor nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Jahnke, Frank

    2012-01-01

    A guide to the theory, application and potential of semiconductor nanostructures in the exploration of quantum optics. It offers an overview of resonance fluorescence emission.$bAn understanding of the interaction between light and matter on a quantum level is of fundamental interest and has many applications in optical technologies. The quantum nature of the interaction has recently attracted great attention for applications of semiconductor nanostructures in quantum information processing. Quantum optics with semiconductor nanostructures is a key guide to the theory, experimental realisation, and future potential of semiconductor nanostructures in the exploration of quantum optics. Part one provides a comprehensive overview of single quantum dot systems, beginning with a look at resonance fluorescence emission. Quantum optics with single quantum dots in photonic crystal and micro cavities are explored in detail, before part two goes on to review nanolasers with quantum dot emitters. Light-matter interaction...

  20. Modeling the Electron Transport in Nanostructures by Using the Concept of BIons in M-theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehri, Alireza; Pincak, Richard

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, using the similarity between quantum tunnels in nanostructures and BIon in M-theory, we propose a new model which considers the process of formation of superconductors in nanostructures. We show that by decreasing the size of nanostructures, emitted photons by electrons connect to each other and form a wormhole-like tunnel. This tunnel is a channel for transporting electron inside the nanostructure. If different wormhole-like tunnels join to each other, one big tunnel is constructed that can be an origin for superconductivity in matter. The superconductor order parameter depends on the size of nanostructure and temperature. Increasing temperature, it is shown that the model matches with quantum theory prescriptions. Also, by applying external electromagnetism, external photons interact with exchanging photons between electrons, exchanging photons deviate from original route and the formation of wormhole-like tunnels inside a nanostructure is prevented. Finally, it is shown that the origin of electrodynamics and gravity are the same and thus, the phrase of wormhole can be applied for appeared tunnels in nanostructures.

  1. Nanostructures design and fabrication for magnetic storage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yong

    The advent of nanofabrication technology offers capabilities in patterning materials and modifying the magnetic properties. The focus of this research is to design and fabricate magnetic nanostructures and understand the magnetic behavior modified by nanostructures, to generate new devices for magnetic storage applications. First, novel techniques have been successfully developed to fabricate nanostructures with different shapes and dimensions below the resolution limit of photolithography tool. Anisotropic nanostructures, diamonds and triangles, have been obtained by over-exposure technique; nano-rings, both centered and de-centered, have been obtained by lateral etch technique and ALD spacer mask technique. All these techniques are simple and use conventional photolithography. Large area, high density nanostructures have been obtained at low cost. Second, anisotropic nanostructures have been characterized correlated with simulation to understand the shape anisotropy effect on magnetic behavior. Coercivity change and angular dependent behavior result from pinning the magnet by the nanostructures and these have been explored. Dimensions of nanostructure also play an important role in changing the magnetic properties. Third, nano-rings have been characterized correlated with simulation to study the magnetic state switching process. Various dimensions of rings have been compared and have revealed that the vortex state in rings is affected by the dimensions of inner diameter, width and thickness. The shape anisotropy and magnetostatic energy play an important role in vortex state formation and maintenance. The interaction effect in ring array has also been explored for high density MRAM design application. Fourth, feasible design and fabrication of de-centered rings have been developed for vortex chirality control. The asymmetry in the de-centered rings controls the movement direction of the domain walls, leading to predictable vortex chirality. Finally, future

  2. Low temperature synthesis of SiCN nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Silicon carbon nitride (SiCN) nanowires, nanorods and nanotubes have gained much attention due to their excellent field emission and photoluminescence properties. These nanostructures were usually grown using catalysts at high temperature (800―1000℃). In this paper, synthesis of SiCN nanostruc-tures at a temperature less than 500℃ is reported. Various kinds of SiCN nanostructures were synthe-sized using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition method. Gas mixtures of CH4, H2 and N2 were used as precursors and Si chips were inserted in the sample holder at symmetrical positions around the specimen as additional Si sources. Metallic gallium was used as the liquid medium in a mechanism similar to vapor-liquid-solid. Morphologies of the resultant were characterized by field emission scan-ning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize their compositions and bonding states.

  3. Broadband solar absorption enhancement via periodic nanostructuring of electrodes.

    KAUST Repository

    Adachi, Michael M

    2013-10-14

    Solution processed colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells have great potential for large area low-cost photovoltaics. However, light utilization remains low mainly due to the tradeoff between small carrier transport lengths and longer infrared photon absorption lengths. Here, we demonstrate a bottom-illuminated periodic nanostructured CQD solar cell that enhances broadband absorption without compromising charge extraction efficiency of the device. We use finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations to study the nanostructure for implementation in a realistic device and then build proof-of-concept nanostructured solar cells, which exhibit a broadband absorption enhancement over the wavelength range of λ = 600 to 1,100 nm, leading to a 31% improvement in overall short-circuit current density compared to a planar device containing an approximately equal volume of active material. Remarkably, the improved current density is achieved using a light-absorber volume less than half that typically used in the best planar devices.

  4. Low temperature synthesis of SiCN nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Wen Juan; MA XueMing

    2009-01-01

    Silicon carbon nitride (SiCN) nanowires, nanorods and nanotubes have gained much attention due to their excellent field emission and photoluminescence properties. These nanostructures were usually grown using catalysts at high temperature (800-1000℃). In this paper, synthesis of SiCN nanostruc-tures at a temperature less than 500℃ is reported. Various kinds of SiCN nanostructures were synthe-sized using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition method. Gas mixtures of CH4, H2 and N2 were used as precursors and Si chips were inserted in the sample holder at symmetrical positions around the specimen as additional Si sources. Metallic gallium was used as the liquid medium in a mechanism similar to vapor-liquid-solid. Morphologies of the resultant were characterized by field emission scan-ning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize their compositions and bonding states.

  5. Solution-phase Synthesis of One-dimensional Semiconductor Nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianfeng YE; Limin QI

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis of one-dimensional (1D) semiconductor nanostructures has been studied intensively for a wide range of materials due to their unique structural and physical properties and promising potential for future technological applications. Among various strategies for synthesizing 1D semiconductor nanostructures, solution-phase synthetic routes are advantageous in terms of cost, throughput, modulation of composition, and the potential for large-scale and environmentally benign production. This article gives a concise review on the recent developments in the solution-phase synthesis of 1D semiconductor nanostructures of different compositions, sizes, shapes, and architectures. We first introduce several typical solution-phase synthetic routes based on controlled precipitation from homogeneous solutions, including hydrothermal/solvothermal process, solution-liquid-solid (SLS) process, high-temperature organic-solution process, and low-temperature aqueous-solution process. Subsequently, we discuss two solution-phase synthetic strategies involving solid templates or substrates, such as the chemical transformation of 1D sacrificial templates and the oriented growth of 1D nanostructure arrays on solid substrates. Finally, prospects of the solution-phase approaches to 1D semiconductor nanostructures will be briefly discussed.

  6. Nanostructure Engineered Chemical Sensors for Hazardous Gas and Vapor Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Lu, Yijiang

    2005-01-01

    A nanosensor technology has been developed using nanostructures, such as single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and metal oxides nanowires or nanobelts, on a pair of interdigitated electrodes (IDE) processed with a silicon based microfabrication and micromachining technique. The IDE fingers were fabricated using thin film metallization techniques. Both in-situ growth of nanostructure materials and casting of the nanostructure dispersions were used to make chemical sensing devices. These sensors have been exposed to hazardous gases and vapors, such as acetone, benzene, chlorine, and ammonia in the concentration range of ppm to ppb at room temperature. The electronic molecular sensing in our sensor platform can be understood by electron modulation between the nanostructure engineered device and gas molecules. As a result of the electron modulation, the conductance of nanodevice will change. Due to the large surface area, low surface energy barrier and high thermal and mechanical stability, nanostructured chemical sensors potentially can offer higher sensitivity, lower power consumption and better robustness than the state-of-the-art systems, which make them more attractive for defense and space applications. Combined with MEMS technology, light weight and compact size sensors can be made in wafer scale with low cost.

  7. Versatility of electrospinning in the fabrication of fibrous mat and mesh nanostructures of bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) and their magnetic and photocatalytic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathkumar, S; Sakar, M; K, Rohith Vinod; Balakumar, S

    2015-07-21

    This study demonstrates the fabrication of electrospun bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3/BFO) fiber mat and fibrous mesh nanostructures consisting of aligned and random fibers respectively. The formation of these one dimensional (1D) nanostructures was mediated by the drum and plate collectors in the electrospinning process that yielded aligned and random nanofibers of BFO respectively. The single phase and rhombohedral crystal structure of the fabricated 1D BFO nanostructures are confirmed through X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies indicated that the fabricated fibers are stoichiometric BFO with native oxidation states +3. The surface texture and morphology are analyzed using the field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. The average size of fibers in mat and mesh nanostructures is found to be 200 nm and 150 nm respectively. The band gap energy of BFO mat and mesh deduced from their UV diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-DRS) was found to be 2.44 eV and 2.39 eV, respectively, which evidenced the improved visible light receptivity of BFO mesh compared to that of the mat. Magnetization studies using a super conducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer revealed the weak ferromagnetic properties of BFO mesh and mat nanostructures that could emerge due to the dimension induced suppression of cycloidal spin structures. The photocatalytic degradation properties of the fibrous mesh are found to be enhanced compared to that of the mat. This could be attributed to the reduced band gap energy and an improved semiconductor band-bending phenomenon in the mesh that favoured the transportation of excited charge carriers to the photocatalyst-dye interfaces and the production of more number of reactive species that lead to the effective degradation of the dye molecules.

  8. Nanostructured Diamond-Like Carbon Films Grown by Off-Axis Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Shan Yap

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured diamond-like carbon (DLC films instead of the ultrasmooth film were obtained by pulsed laser ablation of pyrolytic graphite. Deposition was performed at room temperature in vacuum with substrates placed at off-axis position. The configuration utilized high density plasma plume arriving at low effective angle for the formation of nanostructured DLC. Nanostructures with maximum size of 50 nm were deposited as compared to the ultrasmooth DLC films obtained in a conventional deposition. The Raman spectra of the films confirmed that the films were diamond-like/amorphous in nature. Although grown at an angle, ion energy of >35 eV was obtained at the off-axis position. This was proposed to be responsible for subplantation growth of sp3 hybridized carbon. The condensation of energetic clusters and oblique angle deposition correspondingly gave rise to the formation of nanostructured DLC in this study.

  9. Synthesis of vertically aligned metal oxide nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Roqan, Iman S.

    2016-03-03

    Metal oxide nanostructure and methods of making metal oxide nanostructures are provided. The metal oxide nanostructures can be 1 -dimensional nanostructures such as nanowires, nanofibers, or nanotubes. The metal oxide nanostructures can be doped or undoped metal oxides. The metal oxide nanostructures can be deposited onto a variety of substrates. The deposition can be performed without high pressures and without the need for seed catalysts on the substrate. The deposition can be performed by laser ablation of a target including a metal oxide and, optionally, a dopant. In some embodiments zinc oxide nanostructures are deposited onto a substrate by pulsed laser deposition of a zinc oxide target using an excimer laser emitting UV radiation. The zinc oxide nanostructure can be doped with a rare earth metal such as gadolinium. The metal oxide nanostructures can be used in many devices including light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

  10. Self-organised synthesis of Rh nanostructures with tunable chemical reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizzit S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractNonequilibrium periodic nanostructures such as nanoscale ripples, mounds and rhomboidal pyramids formed on Rh(110 are particularly interesting as candidate model systems with enhanced catalytic reactivity, since they are endowed with steep facets running along nonequilibrium low-symmetry directions, exposing a high density of undercoordinated atoms. In this review we report on the formation of these novel nanostructured surfaces, a kinetic process which can be controlled by changing parameters such as temperature, sputtering ion flux and energy. The role of surface morphology with respect to chemical reactivity is investigated by analysing the carbon monoxide dissociation probability on the different nanostructured surfaces.

  11. Spin spatial splitter based on a magnetic nanostructure with zero average magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xu-Hui; Zhang, Gui-Lian, E-mail: glzhang01@126.com; Kong, Yong-Hong; Li, Ai-Hua; Fu, Xi

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • The lateral displacement of spin electron is investigated theoretically in a new magnetic nanostructure with a zero average magnetic field. • The lateral displacement is found to be dependent strongly on the spins. • Such a magnetic nanostructure can serve as a spin spatial splitter for spintronics applications. - Abstract: We report a theoretical study on spin-polarized lateral displacement for the electron across a magnetic nanostructure with a zero average magnetic field, which can be experimentally realized by depositing a ferromagnetic stripe with a plumb magnetization on the top of a semiconductor heterostructure. It is shown that, the lateral displacement depends strongly on the electron spins due to the Zeeman coupling and the intrinsic symmetry, though the average magnetic field is vanishing in the nanostructure. It is also shown that the spin-polarized lateral displacement is related closely to the structural parameters. Therefore, such a novel magnetic nanostructure may be used as a spin spatial splitter for spintronics applications.

  12. EDTA-Decorated Nanostructured ZnO/CdS Thin Films for Oxygen Gas Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunraja, L.; Thirumoorthy, P.; Karthik, A.; Rajendran, V.; Edwinpaul, L.

    2016-08-01

    ZnO/CdS and ZnO/CdS-EDTA nanostructured thin films were prepared on a glass substrate using spin-coating and used for oxygen gas sensor applications. The structural properties of both ZnO/CdS and ZnO/CdS-EDTA nanostructured composites were comparatively characterized. The nanostructure thin film was found in a hexagonal structure with an average crystallite size reduced from 77 nm to 29 nm due to the influence of the EDTA. The optical absorption, photo luminescence, functional groups and surface morphology of the nanostructured thin films were comprehensively investigated. Oxygen was suitably tailored to verify the sensor response over a concentration range of 10-50 ppm at room temperature. Thus, the sensor studies reveal that the performance, response, and recovery time were enhanced in ZnO/CdS-EDTA nanostructured thin film compared with ZnO/CdS.

  13. Synthesis and optical properties of two novel ZnO flower like and spindlelike nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong; WANG Wei-sheng

    2011-01-01

    A new aqueous chemical growth method for generation of ZnO flowerlike and spindlelike nanostructures, transformed from layered basic zinc acetate (LBZA) nanobelts, is developed. The novel as-synthesized ZnO flowerlike and spindlelike nanostructures are mainly due to the pH. They are characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The X-ray diffraction peaks indicate that these ZnO nanostructures prefer to grow along the C-axis.Photoluminescence (PL) measurements show that the ZnO flowerlike nanostructures have strong ultraviolet (UV) emission properties at 380 nm, while no defect-related visible emission can be detected. The good performance for photoluminescence emission makes the ZnO flowerlike nanostructures to be promising candidates for photonic and electronic device applications.

  14. Organic phase synthesis of noble metal-zinc chalcogenide core-shell nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prashant; Diab, Mahmud; Flomin, Kobi; Rukenstein, Pazit; Mokari, Taleb

    2016-10-15

    Multi-component nanostructures have been attracting tremendous attention due to their ability to form novel materials with unique chemical, optical and physical properties. Development of hybrid nanostructures that are composed of metal-semiconductor components using a simple approach is of interest. Herein, we report a robust and general organic phase synthesis of metal (Au or Ag)-Zinc chalcogenide (ZnS or ZnSe) core-shell nanostructures. This synthetic protocol also enabled the growth of more compositionally complex nanostructures of Au-ZnSxSe1-x alloys and Au-ZnS-ZnSe core-shell-shell. The optical and structural properties of these hybrid nanostructures are also presented.

  15. One-dimensional titania nanostructures: Synthesis and applications in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hao [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials and Hubei Collaborative Innovation Centre for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Guo, Zhiguang, E-mail: zguo@licp.cas.cn [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials and Hubei Collaborative Innovation Centre for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, Shimin [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials and Hubei Collaborative Innovation Centre for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Liu, Weimin [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-05-02

    One-dimensional (1D) titania (TiO{sub 2}) in the form of nanorods, nanowires, nanobelts and nanotubes have attracted much attention due to their unique physical, chemical and optical properties enabling extraordinary performance in biomedicine, sensors, energy storage, solar cells and photocatalysis. In this review, we mainly focus on synthetic methods for 1D TiO{sub 2} nanostructures and the applications of 1D TiO{sub 2} nanostructures in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Traditional nanoparticle-based DSCs have numerous grain boundaries and surface defects, which increase the charge recombination from photoanode to electrolyte. 1D TiO{sub 2} nanostructures can provide direct and rapid electron transport to the electron collecting electrode, indicating a promising choice for DSCs. We divide the applications of 1D TiO{sub 2} nanostructures in DSCs into four parts, that is, 1D TiO{sub 2} nanostructures only, 1D TiO{sub 2} nanostructure/nanoparticle composites, branched 1D TiO{sub 2} nanostructures, and 1D TiO{sub 2} nanostructures combined with other materials. This work will provide guidance for preparing 1D TiO{sub 2} nanostructures, and using them as photoanodes in efficient DSCs. - Graphical abstract: 1D TiO{sub 2} nanostructures which can provide direct and rapid pathways for electron transport have promising applications in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). The synthetic methods and applications of 1D TiO{sub 2} nanostructures in DSCs are summarized in this review article.

  16. Nanostructured bioactive glass-ceramic coatings deposited by the liquid precursor plasma spraying process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yanfeng; Song, Lei; Liu, Xiaoguang; Huang, Yi; Huang, Tao; Wu, Yao; Chen, Jiyong; Wu, Fang

    2011-01-01

    Bioactive glass-ceramic coatings have great potential in dental and orthopedic medical implant applications, due to its excellent bioactivity, biocompatibility and osteoinductivity. However, most of the coating preparation techniques either produce only thin thickness coatings or require tedious preparation steps. In this study, a new attempt was made to deposit bioactive glass-ceramic coatings on titanium substrates by the liquid precursor plasma spraying (LPPS) process. Tetraethyl orthosilicate, triethyl phosphate, calcium nitrate and sodium nitrate solutions were mixed together to form a suspension after hydrolysis, and the liquid suspension was used as the feedstock for plasma spraying of P 2O 5-Na 2O-CaO-SiO 2 bioactive glass-ceramic coatings. The in vitro bioactivities of the as-deposited coatings were evaluated by soaking the samples in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 4 h, 1, 2, 4, 7, 14, and 21 days, respectively. The as-deposited coating and its microstructure evolution behavior under SBF soaking were systematically analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The results showed that P 2O 5-Na 2O-CaO-SiO 2 bioactive glass-ceramic coatings with nanostructure had been successfully synthesized by the LPPS technique and the synthesized coatings showed quick formation of a nanostructured HCA layer after being soaked in SBF. Overall, our results indicate that the LPPS process is an effective and simple method to synthesize nanostructured bioactive glass-ceramic coatings with good in vitro bioactivity.

  17. Mechanochemical route to the synthesis of nanostructured Aluminium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounaghi, S. A.; Eshghi, H.; Scudino, S.; Vyalikh, A.; Vanpoucke, D. E. P.; Gruner, W.; Oswald, S.; Kiani Rashid, A. R.; Samadi Khoshkhoo, M.; Scheler, U.; Eckert, J.

    2016-09-01

    Hexagonal Aluminium nitride (h-AlN) is an important wide-bandgap semiconductor material which is conventionally fabricated by high temperature carbothermal reduction of alumina under toxic ammonia atmosphere. Here we report a simple, low cost and potentially scalable mechanochemical procedure for the green synthesis of nanostructured h-AlN from a powder mixture of Aluminium and melamine precursors. A combination of experimental and theoretical techniques has been employed to provide comprehensive mechanistic insights on the reactivity of melamine, solid state metal-organic interactions and the structural transformation of Al to h-AlN under non-equilibrium ball milling conditions. The results reveal that melamine is adsorbed through the amine groups on the Aluminium surface due to the long-range van der Waals forces. The high energy provided by milling leads to the deammoniation of melamine at the initial stages followed by the polymerization and formation of a carbon nitride network, by the decomposition of the amine groups and, finally, by the subsequent diffusion of nitrogen into the Aluminium structure to form h-AlN.

  18. Nanostructured cavity devices for extracellular stimulation of HL-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeschik, Anna; Rinklin, Philipp; Derra, Ulrike; Ullmann, Sabrina; Holik, Peter; Steltenkamp, Siegfried; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Wolfrum, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) are state-of-the-art devices for extracellular recording and stimulation on biological tissue. Furthermore, they are a relevant tool for the development of biomedical applications like retina, cochlear and motor prostheses, cardiac pacemakers and drug screening. Hence, research on functional cell-sensor interfaces, as well as the development of new surface structures and modifications for improved electrode characteristics, is a vivid and well established field. However, combining single-cell resolution with sufficient signal coupling remains challenging due to poor cell-electrode sealing. Furthermore, electrodes with diameters below 20 µm often suffer from a high electrical impedance affecting the noise during voltage recordings. In this study, we report on a nanocavity sensor array for voltage-controlled stimulation and extracellular action potential recordings on cellular networks. Nanocavity devices combine the advantages of low-impedance electrodes with small cell-chip interfaces, preserving a high spatial resolution for recording and stimulation. A reservoir between opening aperture and electrode is provided, allowing the cell to access the structure for a tight cell-sensor sealing. We present the well-controlled fabrication process and the effect of cavity formation and electrode patterning on the sensor's impedance. Further, we demonstrate reliable voltage-controlled stimulation using nanostructured cavity devices by capturing the pacemaker of an HL-1 cell network.

  19. Mechanochemical route to the synthesis of nanostructured Aluminium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounaghi, S A; Eshghi, H; Scudino, S; Vyalikh, A; Vanpoucke, D E P; Gruner, W; Oswald, S; Kiani Rashid, A R; Samadi Khoshkhoo, M; Scheler, U; Eckert, J

    2016-09-21

    Hexagonal Aluminium nitride (h-AlN) is an important wide-bandgap semiconductor material which is conventionally fabricated by high temperature carbothermal reduction of alumina under toxic ammonia atmosphere. Here we report a simple, low cost and potentially scalable mechanochemical procedure for the green synthesis of nanostructured h-AlN from a powder mixture of Aluminium and melamine precursors. A combination of experimental and theoretical techniques has been employed to provide comprehensive mechanistic insights on the reactivity of melamine, solid state metal-organic interactions and the structural transformation of Al to h-AlN under non-equilibrium ball milling conditions. The results reveal that melamine is adsorbed through the amine groups on the Aluminium surface due to the long-range van der Waals forces. The high energy provided by milling leads to the deammoniation of melamine at the initial stages followed by the polymerization and formation of a carbon nitride network, by the decomposition of the amine groups and, finally, by the subsequent diffusion of nitrogen into the Aluminium structure to form h-AlN.

  20. (Plasmonic Metal Core)/(Semiconductor Shell) Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Caihong

    Over the past several years, integration of metal nanocrystals that can support localized surface plasmon has been demonstrated as one of the most promising methods to the improvement of the light-harvesting efficiency of semiconductors. Ag and Au nanocrystals have been extensively hybridized with semiconductors by either deposition or anchoring. However, metal nanocrystals tend to aggregate, reshape, detach, or grow into large nanocrystals, leading to a loss of the unique properties seen in the original nanocrystals. Fortunately, core/shell nanostructures, circumventing the aforementioned problems, have been demonstrated to exhibit superior photoactivities. To further improve the light-harvesting applications of (plasmonic metal core)/(semiconductor shell) nanostructures, it is vital to understand the plasmonic and structural evolutions during the preparation processes, design novel hybrid nanostructures, and improve their light-harvesting performances. In this thesis, I therefore studied the plasmonic and structural evolutions during the formation of (Ag core)/(Ag2S shell) nanostructures. Moreover, I also prepared (noble metal core)/(TiO2 shell) nanostructures and investigated their plasmonic properties and photon-harvesting applications. Clear understanding of the sulfidation process can enable fine control of the plasmonic properties as well as the structural composition of Ag/Ag 2S nanomaterials. Therefore, I investigated the plasmonic and structural variations during the sulfidation process of Ag nanocubes both experimentally and numerically. The sulfidation reactions were carried out at both the ensemble and single-particle levels. Electrodynamic simulations were also employed to study the variations of the plasmonic properties and plasmon modes. Both experiment and simulation results revealed that sulfidation initiates at the vertices of Ag nanocubes. Ag nanocubes are then gradually truncated and each nanocube becomes a nanosphere eventually. The cubic

  1. Effects of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} and BTA on the nanostructure of copper foam prepared by electrodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Do Hwan; Kim, Ryoung Hee; Han, Dong Wook; Kim, Jeong Han [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 335 Gwahangno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hyuk Sang, E-mail: hskwon@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 335 Gwahangno, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-30

    Copper foam with dendritic copper nanostructure was synthesized by an electrodeposition process using hydrogen bubbles as dynamic templates. To modify the morphology of the copper nanostructure in the foam walls, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} and BTA (benzotriazole) were introduced into the electrolytic bath as chemical additives, and their influences on the morphologies and the structural characteristics of copper deposits were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The mechanical strength and stiffness of the copper foam were evaluated by the compression test. The corncob-like deposits of the copper foam were changed to needle-like nanodendrites by the addition of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, which significantly improved the mechanical strength and stiffness due to the self-supporting effects of the tightly interlocked needle-like nanodendrites. In contrast, the copper foam prepared from the solution with (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} and BTA shows high ductility but low mechanical strength due to the formation to grape-like copper deposits. Both the copper foams exhibited higher mechanical properties than the one with corncob-like deposits formed in the additive-free solution. The reaction mechanism of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} and BTA on the nanostructure of the copper foam at high cathodic current density was clarified by analyzing the effects of the additives on the copper deposition reaction and hydrogen gas evolution reaction, respectively.

  2. Syntheses, spectral, electrochemical and thermal studies of mononuclear manganese(III) complexes with ligands derived from 1,2-propanediamine and 2-hydroxy-3 or 5-methoxybenzaldehyde: Self-assembled monolayer formation on nanostructure zinc oxide thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Mohammad Hossein; Askari, Elham; Amirnasr, Mehdi; Amiri, Ahmad; Yamane, Yuki; Suzuki, Takayoshi

    2011-08-01

    Mononuclear Mn(III) complexes have been prepared via the Mn(II) reaction of an equimolar of Schiff-bases derived from reaction of 2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde or 2-hydroxy-5-methoxybenzaldehyde with 1,2-diaminopropane. Axial ligands L include: pyridine (py) and H 2O. The resulting complexes have been characterized by FT-IR and UV-vis spectroscopy. The crystal structures of the complexes were determined and indicate that in the solid state the complex adopts a slightly distorted octahedral environment of the imine N and hydroxo O with the two axial ligands. The electrochemical reduction of these complexes at a glassy carbon electrode in acetonitrile solution indicates that the first reduction process corresponding to Mn III-Mn II is electrochemically quasi-reversible. Thermal stability of these complexes was determined by TG and DTG. Layers of these complexes were formed on nanostructure zinc oxide thin film and a red shift was observed when zinc oxide thin film is modified by complex.

  3. Nanostructure of Cationic Polymer Brush at the Air/Water Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuoka Hideki

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cationic amphiphilic diblock copolymers were synthesized by RAFT polymerization and the nanostructure of their monolayers was investigated by π-A isotherm and X-ray reflectivity. Carpet layer (dense hydrophilic block layer formation under the hydrophobic layer was confirmed and a “brush” layer was found beneath the carpet layer. However, the thickness of brush layer was much thinner than that of the fully-stretched chain length. The critical salt concentration was found to be 0.01 M NaCl, which is much lower than that of the previous strongly anionic brush. These differences were probably caused by the low effective charge on the brush chains due to the hydrophobic nature of the quarternized ammonium cation.

  4. Metal Oxide Nanostructures from Simple Metal-oxygen Reaction in Air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting YU; Zexaing SHEN

    2008-01-01

    Vapor-phase growth of ZnO nanowires based on gold catalyst is usually accompanied with lateral crawling growth on the substrate surface. We present results from our systematic experiments where the growth temperature and catalyst size are controlled. The data corroborate that it is possible to obtain clean vertical nanowire arrays while avoiding the crawling growth. Oh the other hand, crawling growth can be manipulated to obtain root-interconnected nanowire arrays, which could be useful for certain applications. Our results also imply that the previously suggested growth mechanism for the wire-on-wall hybridstructure might be incorrect. Finally, we show the formation of sub-millimeter long, straight ZnO nanowalls by combining a gold-catalyzed epitaxial growth of vertical nanowires and their mergence due to a confined crawling growth. These unconventional nanostructures might have unique electric or optical transport properties.

  5. Ab initio design of nanostructures for solar energy conversion: a case study on silicon nitride nanowire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Design of novel materials for efficient solar energy conversion is critical to the development of green energy technology. In this work, we present a first-principles study on the design of nanostructures for solar energy harvesting on the basis of the density functional theory. We show that the indirect band structure of bulk silicon nitride is transferred to direct bandgap in nanowire. We find that intermediate bands can be created by doping, leading to enhancement of sunlight absorption. We further show that codoping not only reduces the bandgap and introduces intermediate bands but also enhances the solubility of dopants in silicon nitride nanowires due to reduced formation energy of substitution. Importantly, the codoped nanowire is ferromagnetic, leading to the improvement of carrier mobility. The silicon nitride nanowires with direct bandgap, intermediate bands, and ferromagnetism may be applicable to solar energy harvesting.

  6. Plasmonic Properties of Nanostructured Diamond Like Carbon/Silver Nanocomposite Films with Nanohole Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šarūnas MEŠKINIS

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic properties of the diamond like carbon nanocomposite films with embedded silver nanoparticles with patterned nanohole arrays were analyzed in this study. The films were deposited by unbalanced reactive magnetron sputtering of silver target. Nanopatterning of the films was performed by combining electron beam nanolithography and ion beam etching techniques. Modeling of plasmonic properties was done using the classical Maxwell-Garnett theory. Modeling data and experimental results were in good accordance. Formation of the nanohole pattern in diamond like carbon films doped with silver resulted in decreased intensity of the surface plasmon resonance absorbance peak. No new absorbance or transmittance peaks were observed after the nanopattering. It was explained by extraordinary transmission effect in nanostructured DLC : Ag film films due to plasmon polariton resonance inside of the nanoholes.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.4.13193

  7. Heat treatment effects on the surface morphology and optical properties of ZnO nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zainizan Sahdan, M. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Faculty of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein onn Malaysia, 86400 Batu Pahat, Johor (Malaysia); Hafiz Mamat, M.; Salina, M.; Noor, Uzer M.; Rusop, Mohamad [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Khusaimi, Zuraida [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2010-09-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures have received broad attention due to its wide applications especially for thin-film solar cells and transistors. In this paper, we report the effects of heat treatment on the structural and optical properties of ZnO nanostructures. Zinc oxide nanostructures were synthesized using thermal chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method on glass substrate. The surface morphologies which were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) show that ZnO nanostructures change its shape and size when the annealing temperature increases from 400 C to 600 C. Structural measurement using X-ray diffraction (XRD) has shown that ZnO nanostructures have the highest crystallinity and smallest crystallite size (20 nm) when annealed at 550 C. Furthermore, the samples were optically characterized using Photoluminescence (PL) spectrometer. The PL spectra indicate that ZnO nanostructures have the highest peak at UV wavelength when annealed at 550 C. The mechanism of the PL properties of ZnO nanostructures is also discussed. We conclude that ZnO nanostructures deposited using thermal CVD have the optimum structural and PL properties when annealed at 550 C. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Effect of Gd dopant concentration on the defect engineering in ceria nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakar, M.; Rajkumar, Rubini [National Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Madras, Chennai 600025 (India); Tripathy, S. [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A-STAR (Agency for Science, Technology, and Research), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); Balakumar, S., E-mail: balasuga@yahoo.com [National Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Madras, Chennai 600025 (India)

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Investigates the ionic conductivity of defect engineered Gd doped nano scale ceria. ► Reveals that there exists an optimum concentration of dopant to engineer ceria with large O{sub 2} vacancies. ► For the first time the Nanosponge morphology observed in the Gd doped nanoceria. ► It is observed that 5% of Gd in ceria is optimum to induce appropriate amount of defects. ► Thereby an enhanced ionic conductivity is achieved in 5% Gd doped ceria. -- Abstract: In this study, the fabrication and characterization of pure and gadolinium (Gd) doped ceria nanostructures (Ce{sub 1−x}Gd{sub x}O{sub 2−δ} where x = 0.05, 0.1 and 0.2) are investigated. The origin of defect formation has been systematically investigated by XRD and UV-Visible Raman. All the fabricated ceria are found to be “Nanosponge” morphology which is observed by using FESEM technique. The charge transfer of O{sup 2−} ions and Ce{sup 3+}/Ce{sup 4+} in the ceria host due to these defect structures are studied by UV–DRS. Impedance analysis is showed an enhanced ionic conductivity for 5% Gd doped ceria compared to other concentration of Gd, revealing that the dopant concentration is a critical parameter in engineering a large number of vacancy defects in ceria nanostructures.

  9. Optoelectronic and thermoelectric properties in Ga doped {beta}- PbS{sub 2} nanostructured thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geethu, R.; Jacob, Rajani [Thin Film Research Lab, U.C. College, Aluva, Cochin, Kerala (India); Shripathi, T.; Okram, G.S.; Ganesan, V.; Tripathi, Shilpa; Fatima, Anees [UGC-DAE CSR, Khandwa Road, Indore-452 001, Madhya Pradesh (India); Sreenivasan, P.V. [Department of Chemistry, U.C. College, Aluva, Cochin, Kerala (India); Urmila, K.S.; Pradeep, B. [Solid State Physics Laboratory, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin, Kerala (India); Philip, Rachel Reena, E-mail: reenatara@rediffmail.com [Thin Film Research Lab, U.C. College, Aluva, Cochin, Kerala (India)

    2012-06-15

    Lead sulphide nanostructured thin films were grown on soda lime glass substrates by chemical bath deposition. The films were then doped with gallium using vacuum evaporation technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) established the structural type of the host films to be tetragonal {beta}-PbS{sub 2} with average grain size of the order of 15 nm. The nanostructure of films was further confirmed from scanning electron and atomic force micrographs. The shift in the binding energies of the 4f and 4d states of lead, 2p state of sulphur and the 2p states of Ga from their elemental binding energy values, determined from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), indicated intact chemical bonding in the compound. Compositional analysis showed about 0.01% doping of Ga into PbS{sub 2}. Low temperature thermopower measurements indicated p-type conductivity for the films with Fermi level positioned at about 0.017 eV above the maxima of valence band. Optical absorption studies in conjunction with photo sensitivity measurements established its pertinence in junction formation in photovoltaic applications due to the blue shift in the band gap to 2.37 eV and the increased photoconductivity of the films.

  10. Effect of tempering upon the tensile properties of a nanostructured bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, H.S. [University of Technology, Baghdad (Iraq); Peet, M.J., E-mail: mjp54@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Avettand-Fènoël, M-N. [Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET) UMR CNRS 8207, Université, Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve D' ASCQ (France); Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-06

    The tensile properties of a nanostructured carbide-free bainitic steel formed at 200–250 °C are compared against those after tempering sufficiently to remove the retained austenite. Although significant ductility is observed following tempering, a comparison of tempered and untempered samples shows that it is in fact reduced when a comparison is made at identical strength. The shape of the stress–strain curves shows clear evidence that the capacity for work hardening is reduced with the loss of austenite. The nanostructure of the steel transformed at 250 °C is examined by transmission electron microscopy, to compare the as-transformed to the tempered structure. In this case after tempering at 500 °C the energy absorbed during the tensile test is lower, due to the lower strength. Reduction of strength is caused by the slight coarsening of the bainite plates, and lower dislocation density after tempering. Considering the formation of carbide particles in high strength steel, impressive ductility is exhibited even in the tempered condition.

  11. High-efficiency nanostructured silicon solar cells on a large scale realized through the suppression of recombination channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Sihua; Huang, Zengguang; Lin, Xingxing; Zeng, Yang; Ma, Yechi; Shen, Wenzhong

    2015-01-21

    Nanostructured silicon solar cells show great potential for new-generation photovoltaics due to their ability to approach ideal light-trapping. However, the nanofeatured morphology that brings about the optical benefits also introduces new recombination channels, and severe deterioration in the electrical performance even outweighs the gain in optics in most attempts. This Research News article aims to review the recent progress in the suppression of carrier recombination in silicon nanostructures, with the emphasis on the optimization of surface morphology and controllable nanostructure height and emitter doping concentration, as well as application of dielectric passivation coatings, providing design rules to realize high-efficiency nanostructured silicon solar cells on a large scale.

  12. Addressing the instability of DNA nanostructures in tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Jaeseung; Wickham, Shelley F J; Shih, William M; Perrault, Steven D

    2014-09-23

    DNA nanotechnology is an advanced technique that could contribute diagnostic, therapeutic, and biomedical research devices to nanomedicine. Although such devices are often developed and demonstrated using in vitro tissue culture models, these conditions may not be compatible with DNA nanostructure integrity and function. The purpose of this study was to characterize the sensitivity of 3D DNA nanostructures produced via the origami method to the in vitro tissue culture environment and identify solutions to prevent loss of nanostructure integrity. We examined whether the physiological cation concentrations of cell culture medium and the nucleases present in fetal bovine serum (FBS) used as a medium supplement result in denaturation and digestion, respectively. DNA nanostructure denaturation due to cation depletion was design- and time-dependent, with one of four tested designs remaining intact after 24 h at 37 °C. Adjustment of medium by addition of MgSO4 prevented denaturation. Digestion of nanostructures by FBS nucleases in Mg(2+)-adjusted medium did not appear design-dependent and became significant within 24 h and when medium was supplemented with greater than 5% FBS. We estimated that medium supplemented with 10% FBS contains greater than 256 U/L equivalent of DNase I activity in digestion of DNA nanostructures. Heat inactivation at 75 °C and inclusion of actin protein in medium inactivated and inhibited nuclease activity, respectively. We examined the impact of medium adjustments on cell growth, viability, and phenotype. Adjustment of Mg(2+) to 6 mM did not appear to have a detrimental impact on cells. Heat inactivation was found to be incompatible with in vitro tissue culture, whereas inclusion of actin had no observable effect on growth and viability. In two in vitro assays, immune cell activation and nanoparticle endocytosis, we show that using conditions compatible with cell phenotype and nanostructure integrity is critical for obtaining reliable

  13. Addressing the Instability of DNA Nanostructures in Tissue Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    DNA nanotechnology is an advanced technique that could contribute diagnostic, therapeutic, and biomedical research devices to nanomedicine. Although such devices are often developed and demonstrated using in vitro tissue culture models, these conditions may not be compatible with DNA nanostructure integrity and function. The purpose of this study was to characterize the sensitivity of 3D DNA nanostructures produced via the origami method to the in vitro tissue culture environment and identify solutions to prevent loss of nanostructure integrity. We examined whether the physiological cation concentrations of cell culture medium and the nucleases present in fetal bovine serum (FBS) used as a medium supplement result in denaturation and digestion, respectively. DNA nanostructure denaturation due to cation depletion was design- and time-dependent, with one of four tested designs remaining intact after 24 h at 37 °C. Adjustment of medium by addition of MgSO4 prevented denaturation. Digestion of nanostructures by FBS nucleases in Mg2+-adjusted medium did not appear design-dependent and became significant within 24 h and when medium was supplemented with greater than 5% FBS. We estimated that medium supplemented with 10% FBS contains greater than 256 U/L equivalent of DNase I activity in digestion of DNA nanostructures. Heat inactivation at 75 °C and inclusion of actin protein in medium inactivated and inhibited nuclease activity, respectively. We examined the impact of medium adjustments on cell growth, viability, and phenotype. Adjustment of Mg2+ to 6 mM did not appear to have a detrimental impact on cells. Heat inactivation was found to be incompatible with in vitro tissue culture, whereas inclusion of actin had no observable effect on growth and viability. In two in vitro assays, immune cell activation and nanoparticle endocytosis, we show that using conditions compatible with cell phenotype and nanostructure integrity is critical for obtaining reliable experimental

  14. Chemically enabled nanostructure fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Fengwei

    The first part of the dissertation explored ways of chemically synthesizing new nanoparticles and biologically guided assembly of nanoparticle building blocks. Chapter two focuses on synthesizing three-layer composite magnetic nanoparticles with a gold shell which can be easily functionalized with other biomolecules. The three-layer magnetic nanoparticles, when functionalized with oligonucleotides, exhibit the surface chemistry, optical properties, and cooperative DNA binding properties of gold nanoparticle probes, while maintaining the magnetic properties of the Fe3O4 inner shell. Chapter three describes a new method for synthesizing nanoparticles asymmetrically functionalized with oligonucleotides and the use of these novel building blocks to create satellite structures. This synthetic capability allows one to introduce valency into such structures and then use that valency to direct particle assembly events. The second part of the thesis explored approaches of nanostructure fabrication on substrates. Chapter four focuses on the development of a new scanning probe contact printing method, polymer pen lithography (PPL), which combines the advantages of muCp and DPN to achieve high-throughput, flexible molecular printing. PPL uses a soft elastomeric tip array, rather than tips mounted on individual cantilevers, to deliver inks to a surface in a "direct write" manner. Arrays with as many as ˜11 million pyramid-shaped pens can be brought into contact with substrates and readily leveled optically in order to insure uniform pattern development. Chapter five describes gel pen lithography, which uses a gel to fabricate pen array. Gel pen lithography is a low-cost, high-throughput nanolithography method especially useful for biomaterials patterning and aqueous solution patterning which makes it a supplement to DPN and PPL. Chapter 6 shows a novel form of optical nanolithography, Beam Pen Lithography (BPL), which uses an array of NSOM pens to do nanoscale optical

  15. Microstructural, spectroscopic, and antibacterial properties of silver-based hybrid nanostructures biosynthesized using extracts of coriander leaves and seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Carlos; Barriga-Castro, Enrique Díaz; Gómez-Treviño, Alberto; Núñez, Nuria O; Mendoza-Reséndez, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Coriander leaves and seeds have been highly appreciated since ancient times, not only due to their pleasant flavors but also due to their inhibitory activity on food degradation and their beneficial properties for health, both ascribed to their strong antioxidant activity. Recently, it has been shown that coriander leaf extracts can mediate the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles through oxidation/reduction reactions. In the present study, extracts of coriander leaves and seeds have been used as reaction media for the wet chemical synthesis of ultrafine silver nanoparticles and nanoparticle clusters, with urchin- and tree-like shapes, coated by biomolecules (mainly, proteins and polyphenols). In this greener route of nanostructure preparation, the active biocompounds of coriander simultaneously play the roles of reducing and stabilizing agents. The morphological and microstructural studies of the resulting biosynthesized silver nanostructures revealed that the nanostructures prepared with a small concentration of the precursor Ag salt (AgNO3 =5 mM) exhibit an ultrafine size and a narrow size distribution, whereas particles synthesized with high concentrations of the precursor Ag salt (AgNO3 =0.5 M) are polydisperse and formation of supramolecular structures occurs. Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy studies indicated that the bioreduction of the Ag− ions takes place through their interactions with free amines, carboxylate ions, and hydroxyl groups. As a consequence of such interactions, residues of proteins and polyphenols cap the biosynthesized Ag nanoparticles providing them a hybrid core/shell structure. In addition, these biosynthesized Ag nanomaterials exhibited size-dependent plasmon extinction bands and enhanced bactericidal activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, displaying minimal inhibitory Ag concentrations lower than typical values reported in the literature for Ag nanoparticles, probably due to the synergy of

  16. EDITORIAL: Focus on Nanostructured Soft Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reineker, Peter; Schülz, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Nanostructures in general are playing a more and more important role in the physics and chemistry of condensed matter systems including both hard and soft materials. This Focus Issue concentrates particularly on recent developments in Nanostructured Soft Matter Systems. Many interesting questions related to both fundamental and applied research in this field have arisen. Some of them are connected to the chemical reactions that take place during the irreversible formation of soft matter systems. Others refer to the theoretical and experimental investigations of structures and topologies of `nanostructured soft matter', e.g. heterogeneous polymers and polymer networks, or soft matter at low dimensions or in constrained geometries. Additional research has also been devoted to the dynamics of other complex nanostructured systems, such as the structure formation on the basis of polymer systems and polyelectrolytes, and several kinds of phase transitions on nano- and microscales. The contributions collected here present the most up-to-date research results on all of these topics. New Journal of Physics, as an electronic journal, is perfectly suited for the presentation of the complex results that the experimental and theoretical investigations reported here yield. The articles that will follow provide a number of excellent examples of the use of animations, movies and colour features for the added benefit of the reader. Focus on Nanostructured Soft Matter Contents Phase separation kinetics in compressible polymer solutions: computer simulation of the early stages Peter Virnau, Marcus Müller, Luis González MacDowell and Kurt Binder Spectral dynamics in the B800 band of LH2 from Rhodospirillum molischianum: a single-molecule study Clemens Hofmann, Thijs J Aartsma, Hartmut Michel and Jürgen Köhler Adsorption of polyacrylic acid on self-assembled monolayers investigated by single-molecule force spectroscopy Claudia Friedsam, Aránzazu Del Campo Bécares, Ulrich Jonas

  17. Highly efficient uniform ZnO nanostructures for an electron transport layer of inverted organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sarah; Kim, Chul-Hyun; Lee, Sang Kyu; Jeong, Jun-Ho; Lee, Jihye; Jin, Sung-Ho; Shin, Won Suk; Song, Chang Eun; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Jeong, Jong-Ryul

    2013-07-11

    A highly uniform and predesigned ZnO nanostructure fabricated by single step direct nanoimprinting was used as the efficient electron transport layer (ETL) in inverted bulk heterojunction organic solar cells. Improved photovoltaic cell efficiency with long-term stability can be observed due to the large interface between the active layer and nanostructured ZnO ETL.

  18. Highly-Ordered Magnetic Nanostructures on Self-Assembled α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Diblock Copolymer Templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erb, Denise

    2015-08-15

    This thesis shows the preparation of nanostructured systems with a high degree of morphological uniformity and regularity employing exclusively selfassembly processes, and documents the investigation of these systems by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM), grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS), and nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation (NRS). Whenever possible, the X-ray scattering methods are applied in-situ and simultaneously in order to monitor and correlate the evolution of structural and magnetic properties of the nanostructured systems. The following systems are discussed, where highly-ordered magnetic nanostructures are grown on α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates with topographical surface patterning and on diblock copolymer templates with chemical surface patterning: - Nanofaceted surfaces of α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - Magnetic nanostructures on nanofaceted α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates - Thin films of microphase separated diblock copolymers - Magnetic nanostructures on diblock copolymer thin film templates The fact that the underlying self-assembly processes can be steered by external factors is utilized to optimize the degree of structural order in the nanostructured systems. The highly-ordered systems are well-suited for investigations with X-ray scattering methods, since due to their uniformity the inherently averaged scattered signal of a sample yields meaningful information on the properties of the contained nanostructures: By means of an in-situ GISAXS experiment at temperatures above 1000 C, details on the facet formation on α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surfaces are determined. A novel method, merging in-situ GISAXS and NRS, shows the evolution of magnetic states in a system with correlated structural and magnetic inhomogeneity with lateral resolution. The temperature-dependence of the shape of Fe nanodots growing on diblock copolymer templates is revealed by in-situ GISAXS during sputter deposition of Fe. Combining in

  19. Synthesis of One Dimensional Gold Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongchen Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanostructures with shapes of rod, dumbbells, and dog bone have been fabricated by an improved seed-mediated method. It is found that the pH change (the addition of HNO3 or HCl and the presence of Ag+ ions have a great influence on the growth process and aspect ratios of these Au nanocrystals. UV-Vis-NIR absorption spectra for the Au colloidal show that the transverse plasmon absorption band locates at ~520 nm, while the longitudinal plasmon absorption band shifts in a wide spectra region of 750–1100 nm. The obtained Au nanostructures have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffractometer. Based on the characterizations and FDTD simulations, most of the obtained Au nanorods are single crystals, possessing an octagonal cross-section bounded by {110} and {100} faces. One model for the anisotropic growth has been proposed. It is found that slow kinetics favor the formation of single-crystalline Au nanorods.

  20. Synthesis Technique and Characterizations of Silver Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajawat, Shweta; Qureshi, M. S.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we report synthesis of nanostructures of silver nanoparticles using X-ray films. Exposed X-ray films, which consist of silver nanoparticles, are cut into small pieces of size 1 cm × 1 cm. These pieces were heated in distilled water at temperature 70°C. These nanoparticles, separated from heated films, are simultaneously collected through electrolytic deposition using copper and carbon rods. The carbon rod is wrapped over by Low density polyethylene (LDPE) sheet for easy extraction. This process was carried in two different environments (1) in broad daylight and (2) on a cloudy day. Characterization of the two samples was done using X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. XRD of the particles gave peaks well in accordance with JCPDS file 04-. This result confirms formation of highly pure silver nanoparticles. TEM revealed that the interaction of silver nanoparticles with sunlight gave chain like structures whereas in the absence of interaction with sunlight, cloudy day, nanoflowers were formed. Nanostructures were more prominent for bigger particles.

  1. Ultrahard magnetic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahota, P. K.; Liu, Y.; Skomski, R.; Manchanda, P.; Zhang, R.; Franchin, M.; Fangohr, H.; Hadjipanayis, G. C.; Kashyap, A.; Sellmyer, D. J.

    2012-04-01

    The performance of hard-magnetic nanostructures is investigated by analyzing the size and geometry dependence of thin-film hysteresis loops. Compared to bulk magnets, weight and volume are much less important, but we find that the energy product remains the main figure of merit down to very small features sizes. However, hysteresis loops are much easier to control on small length scales, as epitomized by Fe-Co-Pt thin films with magnetizations of up to 1.78 T and coercivities of up to 2.52 T. Our numerical and analytical calculations show that the feature size and geometry have a big effect on the hysteresis loop. Layered soft regions, especially if they have a free surface, are more harmful to coercivity and energy product than spherical inclusions. In hard-soft nanocomposites, an additional complication is provided by the physical properties of the hard phases. For a given soft phase, the performance of a hard-soft composite is determined by the parameter (Ms - Mh)/Kh.

  2. Magnetic anisotropy in nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenbach, M

    2001-01-01

    method for solving the LDA Kohn-Sham equation. This extended code allows us to perform fully relativistic calculations to enable us to investigate the spin orbit coupling effects leading to anisotropies and potentially non collinear ordering of magnetic moments in these systems of magnetic inclusions in copper. With this approach we find that depending on the orientation of the atoms along the 100 or 110 direction in copper the ground state orientation of the magnetic moments in the chain is either perpendicular or parallel to the chain direction, when the magnetic dipolar interaction energy is added to the final ab initio result. In this thesis we investigate the effect of magnetic anisotropies in nanostructured materials. The main emphasis in our work presented here is on systems that have an underlying one dimensional structure, like nanowires or atomic chains. In a simple classical one dimensional model we show the rich ground state structure of magnetic orientations one might expect to find in such syste...

  3. Phonon engineering for nanostructures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubry, Sylvie (Stanford University); Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sullivan, John Patrick; Peebles, Diane Elaine; Hurley, David H. (Idaho National Laboratory); Shinde, Subhash L.; Piekos, Edward Stanley; Emerson, John Allen

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the physics of phonon transport at small length scales is increasingly important for basic research in nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, nanomechanics, and thermoelectrics. We conducted several studies to develop an understanding of phonon behavior in very small structures. This report describes the modeling, experimental, and fabrication activities used to explore phonon transport across and along material interfaces and through nanopatterned structures. Toward the understanding of phonon transport across interfaces, we computed the Kapitza conductance for {Sigma}29(001) and {Sigma}3(111) interfaces in silicon, fabricated the interfaces in single-crystal silicon substrates, and used picosecond laser pulses to image the thermal waves crossing the interfaces. Toward the understanding of phonon transport along interfaces, we designed and fabricated a unique differential test structure that can measure the proportion of specular to diffuse thermal phonon scattering from silicon surfaces. Phonon-scale simulation of the test ligaments, as well as continuum scale modeling of the complete experiment, confirmed its sensitivity to surface scattering. To further our understanding of phonon transport through nanostructures, we fabricated microscale-patterned structures in diamond thin films.

  4. Characterization and Synthesis of Silver Nanostructures in Rare Earth Activated GeO2-PbO Glass Matrix Using Matrix Adjustment Thermal Reduction Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hj. A. A. Sidek

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports matrix adjustment thermal reduction method to synthesize silver nanostructures in Er3+/Yb3+ activated GeO2-PbO glass matrix. The GeO2-PbO glass, the medium of nanoparticle formation, doped with Er2O3, Yb2O3 and AgNO3 was prepared by a melt quenching method. Annealing of the glass for different times was utilized, not only due to thermally reduce Ag+ ions to Ag nanostructures, but also to influence the glassy network. This is because, the glass structural transformation temperature is near to 435 °C and heating at more than this temperature can cause some structural changes in the glass matrix. According to TEM images, samples that tolerate 450 °C annealing temperature for one hour show the formation of basil-like silver nanostructures with a mean length of 54 nm and mean diameter of 13 nm embedded in the glass matrix, whereas with annealing at 450 °C for 5 to 20 h, silver nanoparticles of about 3–4 nm mean diameter size are formed. Annealing for 30 h causes silver nanoparticles to aggregate to form larger particles due to an Oswald ripening process. Observation of the characteristic Ag-NP SPR band at 400–500 nm in the UV-visible absorption spectra confirms the existence of silver nanoparticles. The SPR band widens to longer wavelengths in one hour annealed samples, which relates to the existence of nanostructures with different size or fractal shapes. In addition, an increment in the peak of the SPR band by increasing the duration of annealing indicates the formation of more nanoparticles. Furthermore, the existence of a peak at 470 cm–1 in the FTIR spectra of annealed samples and its absence in the samples not exposed to an annealing process suggests that the glass matrix is polymerized by Pb-O chains during the 450 °C annealing process. This is the main source of different nanostructures because of the dissimilar stabilizing media. The tighter media cap the particles to form small and dense nanoparticles but a

  5. Nanostructured aqueous dispersions of citrem interacting with lipids and PEGylated lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, S.F.; Nilsson, Christa; Laurinmäki, P.;

    2013-01-01

    We report on the formation of nanostructured aqueous dispersions based on the negatively charged food-grade emulsifier citrem (citric acid esters of mono- and diglycerides). To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature on the spontaneous formation of aqueous PEGylated and non-PEGy...

  6. Ultraflexible nanostructures and implications for future nanorobots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Robert W.; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2016-05-01

    Several high aspect ratio nanostructures have been made by capillary force directed self-assembly including polymeric nanofiber air-bridges, trampoline-like membranes, microsphere-beaded nanofibers, and intermetallic nanoneedles. Arrays of polymer air-bridges form in seconds by simply hand brushing a bead of polymeric liquid over an array of micropillars. The domination of capillary force that is thinning unstable capillary bridges leads to uniform arrays of nanofiber air-bridges. Similarly, arrays of vertically oriented Ag2Ga nanoneedles have been formed by dipping silvercoated arrays of pyramidal silicon into melted gallium. Force-displacement measurements of these structures are presented. These nanostructures, especially when compressively or torsionally buckled, have extremely low stiffnesses, motion due to thermal fluctuations that is relatively easily detected, and the ability to move great distances for very small changes in applied force. Nanofibers with bead-on-a-string structure, where the beads are micron diameter and loaded with magnetic iron oxide (maghemite), are shown to be simply viewable under optical microscopes, have micronewton/ m stiffness, and have ultralow torsional stiffnesses enabling the bead to be rotated numerous revolutions without breaking. Combination of these high aspect ratio structures with stretched elastomers offer interesting possibilities for robotic actuation and locomotion. Polydimethylsiloxane loaded with nanomaterials, e.g. nanotubes, graphene or MoS2, can be efficiently heated with directed light. Heating produces considerable force through the thermoelastic effect, and this force can be used for continuous translation or to trigger reversible elastic buckling of the nanostructures. The remote stimulation of motion with light provides a possible mechanism for producing cooperative behavior between swarms of semiautonomous nanorobots.

  7. Two-qubit correlations via a periodic plasmonic nanostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iliopoulos, Nikos; Terzis, Andreas F. [Department of Physics, School of Natural Sciences, University of Patras, Patras 265 04 (Greece); Yannopapas, Vassilios [Department of Physics, National Technical University of Athens, Athens 157 80 (Greece); Paspalakis, Emmanuel, E-mail: paspalak@upatras.gr [Materials Science Department, School of Natural Sciences, University of Patras, Patras 265 04 (Greece)

    2016-02-15

    We theoretically investigate the generation of quantum correlations by using two distant qubits in free space or mediated by a plasmonic nanostructure. We report both entanglement of formation as well as quantum discord and classical correlations. We have found that for proper initial state of the two-qubit system and distance between the two qubits we can produce quantum correlations taking significant value for a relatively large time interval so that it can be useful in quantum information and computation processes.

  8. Compositional ordering and stability in nanostructured, bulk thermoelectric alloys.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hekmaty, Michelle A.; Faleev, S.; Medlin, Douglas L.; Leonard, F.; Lensch-Falk, J.; Sharma, Peter Anand; Sugar, J. D.

    2009-09-01

    Thermoelectric materials have many applications in the conversion of thermal energy to electrical power and in solid-state cooling. One route to improving thermoelectric energy conversion efficiency in bulk material is to embed nanoscale inclusions. This report summarize key results from a recently completed LDRD project exploring the science underpinning the formation and stability of nanostructures in bulk thermoelectric and the quantitative relationships between such structures and thermoelectric properties.

  9. Nanostructure-based Processes at the Carbonizing Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.I. Roslyakova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The studies of nanostructure-based processes carburizing steels showed that oxidizing atmosphere when carburizing steel contains along with carbon dioxide (CO2 + C = 2CO molecular and atmospheric oxygen (O2 + 2C = 2CO; O + C = CO released from the carbonate ВаСОз during its thermal dissociation. Intensive formation of CO provides high carbonizing ability of carbonate-soot coating and steel.

  10. Morphology-Controlled Growth of AIN One-Dimensional Nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting XIE; Min YE; Xiaosheng FANG; Zhi JIANG; Li CHEN; Mingguang KONG; Yucheng WU; Lide ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    Aluminum nitride (AIN) nanowires, serrated nanoribbons, and nanoribbons were selectively obtained through a simple chloride assisted chemical vapor deposition process. The morphologies of the products could be controlled by adjusting the deposition position and the flux of the reactant gas. The morphologies and structures of the AIN products were investigated in detail. The formation mechanism of the as-prepared different morphologies of AIN one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures was discussed on the basis of the experimental results.

  11. Measurement of ion species produced due to bombardment of 450 eV N{sub 2}{sup +} ions with hydrocarbons-covered surface of tungsten: Formation of tungsten nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S. [Atomic Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Bhatt, P. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Kumar, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Singh, B.K.; Singh, B.; Prajapati, S. [Atomic Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Shanker, R., E-mail: shankerorama@gmail.com [Atomic Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2016-08-01

    A laboratory experiment has been performed to study the ions that are produced due to collisions of 450 eV N{sub 2}{sup +} ions with a hydrocarbons-covered surface of polycrystalline tungsten at room temperature. Using a TOF mass spectrometry technique, the product ions formed in these collisions have been detected, identified and analyzed. Different ion–surface reaction processes, namely, neutralization, reflection, surface induced dissociation, surface induced chemical reactions and desorption are observed and discussed. Apart from the presence of desorbed aliphatic hydrocarbon and other ions, the mass spectra obtained from the considered collisions show the formation and sputtering of tungsten nitride (WN). A layer of WN on tungsten surface is known to decrease the sputtering of bulk tungsten in fusion devices more effectively than when the tungsten is bombarded with other seeding gases (He, Ar). It is further noted that there is a negligible diffusion of N in the bulk tungsten at room temperature.

  12. Modeling of space environment impact on nanostructured materials. General principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronina, Ekaterina; Novikov, Lev

    2016-07-01

    In accordance with the resolution of ISO TC20/SC14 WG4/WG6 joint meeting, Technical Specification (TS) 'Modeling of space environment impact on nanostructured materials. General principles' which describes computer simulation methods of space environment impact on nanostructured materials is being prepared. Nanomaterials surpass traditional materials for space applications in many aspects due to their unique properties associated with nanoscale size of their constituents. This superiority in mechanical, thermal, electrical and optical properties will evidently inspire a wide range of applications in the next generation spacecraft intended for the long-term (~15-20 years) operation in near-Earth orbits and the automatic and manned interplanetary missions. Currently, ISO activity on developing standards concerning different issues of nanomaterials manufacturing and applications is high enough. Most such standards are related to production and characterization of nanostructures, however there is no ISO documents concerning nanomaterials behavior in different environmental conditions, including the space environment. The given TS deals with the peculiarities of the space environment impact on nanostructured materials (i.e. materials with structured objects which size in at least one dimension lies within 1-100 nm). The basic purpose of the document is the general description of the methodology of applying computer simulation methods which relate to different space and time scale to modeling processes occurring in nanostructured materials under the space environment impact. This document will emphasize the necessity of applying multiscale simulation approach and present the recommendations for the choice of the most appropriate methods (or a group of methods) for computer modeling of various processes that can occur in nanostructured materials under the influence of different space environment components. In addition, TS includes the description of possible

  13. The role of electrostatics and temperature on morphological transitions of hydrogel nanostructures self-assembled by peptide amphiphiles via molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Iris W; Markegard, Cade B; Chu, Brian K; Nguyen, Hung D

    2013-10-01

    Smart biomaterials that are self-assembled from peptide amphiphiles (PA) are known to undergo morphological transitions in response to specific physiological stimuli. The design of such customizable hydrogels is of significant interest due to their potential applications in tissue engineering, biomedical imaging, and drug delivery. Using a novel coarse-grained peptide/polymer model, which has been validated by comparison of equilibrium conformations from atomistic simulations, large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are performed to examine the spontaneous self-assembly process. Starting from initial random configurations, these simulations result in the formation of nanostructures of various sizes and shapes as a function of the electrostatics and temperature. At optimal conditions, the self-assembly mechanism for the formation of cylindrical nanofibers is deciphered involving a series of steps: (1) PA molecules quickly undergo micellization whose driving force is the hydrophobic interactions between alkyl tails; (2) neighboring peptide residues within a micelle engage in a slow ordering process that leads to the formation of β-sheets exposing the hydrophobic core; (3) spherical micelles merge together through an end-to-end mechanism to form cylindrical nanofibers that exhibit high structural fidelity to the proposed structure based on experimental data. As the temperature and electrostatics vary, PA molecules undergo alternative kinetic mechanisms, resulting in the formation of a wide spectrum of nanostructures. A phase diagram in the electrostatics-temperature plane is constructed delineating regions of morphological transitions in response to external stimuli.

  14. Biogenic nanoparticles: copper, copper oxides, copper sulphides, complex copper nanostructures and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubilar, Olga; Rai, Mahendra; Tortella, Gonzalo; Diez, Maria Cristina; Seabra, Amedea B; Durán, Nelson

    2013-09-01

    Copper nanoparticles have been the focus of intensive study due to their potential applications in diverse fields including biomedicine, electronics, and optics. Copper-based nanostructured materials have been used in conductive films, lubrification, nanofluids, catalysis, and also as potent antimicrobial agent. The biogenic synthesis of metallic nanostructured nanoparticles is considered to be a green and eco-friendly technology since neither harmful chemicals nor high temperatures are involved in the process. The present review discusses the synthesis of copper nanostructured nanoparticles by bacteria, fungi, and plant extracts, showing that biogenic synthesis is an economically feasible, simple and non-polluting process. Applications for biogenic copper nanoparticles are also discussed.

  15. Fabrication and Characterization of Core/shell ZnO/Gold Nanostructures" and study of their Structural and Optical Properties"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Azimi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available ZnO/gold core/shellis a kind of nanostructure which due to having different surface chemistryare formed a new class of gold coated nanoparticles that will be essential for nanoelectronic,biological and catalytic application. The ZnO/gold core/shell nanostructure having novel electrical and optical properties ,and luminescence properties have been exploited for controlling antibacterial system,bio-sensing and bio-detection. In this paper, we report fabrication and characterization of ZnO/gold core/shell nanoparticles by chemical method and Turkevich citrate method.The formation of ZnO/gold nanocomposite can be observed by a change in color from white to gray precipitate.Characterization of the prepared samples was carried out by various techniques such as field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, Elemental analysis (EDS , X-ray diffraction (XRD , photoluminescence measurement (PL ,UV-VIS diffuse reflectance/absorption spectroscopy ,Typical transmission electron microscopy (TEMand Fourier transform infrared (FTIR. The formation of gold layer on the ZnOsurface can be proved using the results obtained from the UV-VIS , EDS and XRD pattern.

  16. Ion beam induced optical and surface modification in plasmonic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Udai B., E-mail: udaibhansingh123@gmail.com; Gautam, Subodh K.; Kumar, Sunil; Hooda, Sonu; Ojha, Sunil; Singh, Fouran

    2016-07-15

    In present work, ion irradiation induced nanostructuring has been exploited as an efficient and effective tool for synthesis of coupled plasmonics nanostructures by using 1.2 MeV Xe ions on Au/ZnO/Au system deposited on glass substrate. The results are correlated on the basis of their optical absorption, surface morphologies and enhanced sensitivity of evolved phonon modes by using UV Visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Raman spectroscopy (RS), respectively. Optical absorbance spectra of plasmonic nanostructures (NSs) show a decrease in band gap, which may be ascribed to the formation of defects with ion irradiation. The surface morphology reveals the formation of percolated NSs upon ion irradiation and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) study clearly shows the formation of multilayer system. Furthermore, RS measurements on samples are studied to understand the enhanced sensitivity of ion irradiation induced phonon mode at 573 cm{sup −1} along with other modes. As compared to pristine sample, a stronger and pronounced evolution of these phonon modes is observed with further ion irradiation, which indicates localized surface plasmon results with enhanced intensity of phonon modes of Zinc oxide (ZnO) material. Thus, such plasmonic NSs can be used as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates.

  17. Analysis on surface nanostructures present in hindwing of dragon fly (Sympetrum vulgatum) using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvakumar, Rajendran; Karuppanan, Karthikeyan K; Pezhinkattil, Radhakrishnan

    2012-12-01

    The present study involves the analysis of surface nanostructures and its variation present in the hind wing of dragon fly (Sympetrum vulgatum) using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The hindwing was dissected into 4 parts (D1-D4) and each dissected section was analyzed using AFM in tapping mode at different locations. The AFM analysis revealed the presence of irregular shaped nanostructures on the surface of the wing membrane with size varying between 83.25±1.79 nm to 195.08±10.25 nm. The size and shape of the nanostructure varied from tip (pterostigma) to the costa part. The membrane surface of the wing showed stacked arrangement leading to increase in size of the nanostructure. Such arrangement of the nanostructures has lead to the formation of nanometer sized valleys of different depth and length on the membrane surface giving them ripple wave morphology. The average roughness of the surface nanostructures varied from 18.58±3.12 nm to 24.25±8.33 nm. Surfaces of the wings had positive skewness in D1, D2 and D4 regions and negative skewness in D3 region. These surface nanostructures may contribute asymmetric resistance under mechanical loading during the flight by increasing the bending and torsional resistance of the wing.

  18. Electrically conducting polymer nanostructures confined in anodized aluminum oxide templates (AAO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Blaszczyk-Lezak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsically or extrinsically conducting polymers are considered good candidates for replacement of metals in specific applications. In order to further expand their applications, it seems necessary to examine the influence of confinement effects on the electric properties of nanostructured conducting polymers in comparison to the bulk. The present study reports a novel way to fabricate and characterize high quality and controllable one-dimensional (1D polymer nanostructures with promising electrical properties, with the aid of two examples polyaniline (PANI and poly(vinylidene fluoride with multiwall carbon nanotubes (PVDF-MWCNT as representative of intrinsically and extrinsically conducting polymers, respectively. In this work, porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO templates have been used both as a nanoreactor to synthesize 1D PANI nanostructures by polymerization of the ANI monomer and as a nanomold to prepare 1D PVDFMWCNT nanorods by melt infiltration of the precursor PVDF-MWCNT film. The obtained polymer nanostructures were morphologically and chemically characterized by SEM and Confocal Raman Spectroscopy, respectively, and the electrical properties determined by Broadband Dielectric Spectroscopy (BDS in a non-destructive way. SEM study allowed to establish the final nanostructure of PANI and PVDF-MWCNT and confirmed, in both cases, the well-aligned and uniform rodlike polymer nanostructures. Confocal Raman Microscopy has been performed to study the formation of the conducting emeraldine salt of PANI through all the length of AAO nanocavities. Finally, the electrical conductivity of both types of polymer nanostructures was easily evaluated by means of Dielectric Spectroscopy.

  19. Preparation of nanostructured tungsten trioxide thin films by high pressure sublimation and condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Samad, B., E-mail: bassel.abdel.samad@umoncton.ca; Thibodeau, J.; Ashrit, P.V.

    2015-09-30

    Highlights: • A new technique combines the high pressure sublimation and condensation with the variation of source–substrate distance to control the thin film nanostructure. • The nanostructure of WO{sub 3} thin films is systematically controlled in terms of the grain size and porosity. • The dependence of nanostructure, roughness, grain size, porosity and index of refraction to the source–substrate distance is studied. • The potential tailoring of the film properties for solar energy applications through the precise control of film nanostructure is suggested. - Abstract: Thin films of tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) have gained increasing importance due to their interesting chromogenic properties and for their high application potential in electrochromic devices. It is very well known that their electrochromic switching properties depend very sensitively on their nanostructure. Hence, a vast majority of the research work carried out in this domain at present is dedicated to the various techniques of controlled inducing of a nanostructure in these WO{sub 3} thin films in order to enhance their electrochromic performance. In the present work we have carried out a systematic study of the nanostructured WO{sub 3} thin films by using a novel technique of varying the source–substrate distance in a high pressure sublimation and condensation method. This technique has been found to be very efficient in controlling the grain size and thus the nanostructure of the deposited films. A correlation is established between the optical and electrochromic properties of the WO{sub 3} films and the induced nanostructure. The electrochromic properties are studied by a dry lithiation process developed in our laboratory. The results indicate a strong dependence of the film nanostructure on the source–substrate distance which influences quite sensitively the electrochromic properties. These results are expected to help design electrochromic devices suitable for different

  20. One-Dimensional Perovskite Manganite Oxide Nanostructures: Recent Developments in Synthesis, Characterization, Transport Properties, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Liang, Lizhi; Wu, Heng; Zhu, Xinhua

    2016-12-01

    One-dimensional nanostructures, including nanowires, nanorods, nanotubes, nanofibers, and nanobelts, have promising applications in mesoscopic physics and nanoscale devices. In contrast to other nanostructures, one-dimensional nanostructures can provide unique advantages in investigating the size and dimensionality dependence of the materials' physical properties, such as electrical, thermal, and mechanical performances, and in constructing nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices. Among the one-dimensional nanostructures, one-dimensional perovskite manganite nanostructures have been received much attention due to their unusual electron transport and magnetic properties, which are indispensable for the applications in microelectronic, magnetic, and spintronic devices. In the past two decades, much effort has been made to synthesize and characterize one-dimensional perovskite manganite nanostructures in the forms of nanorods, nanowires, nanotubes, and nanobelts. Various physical and chemical deposition techniques and growth mechanisms are explored and developed to control the morphology, identical shape, uniform size, crystalline structure, defects, and homogenous stoichiometry of the one-dimensional perovskite manganite nanostructures. This article provides a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art research activities that focus on the rational synthesis, structural characterization, fundamental properties, and unique applications of one-dimensional perovskite manganite nanostructures in nanotechnology. It begins with the rational synthesis of one-dimensional perovskite manganite nanostructures and then summarizes their structural characterizations. Fundamental physical properties of one-dimensional perovskite manganite nanostructures are also highlighted, and a range of unique applications in information storages, field-effect transistors, and spintronic devices are discussed. Finally, we conclude this review with some perspectives/outlook and future