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Sample records for nanostructure formation due

  1. Research of Self-Formation Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romas Petrauskas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Lateral etching processes for the modeling of the geometry of self-formation nanostructures with Silvaco TCAD Athena program are analyzed. Self-formation nanostructures is modeled with different mask selectivity values equal to 2, 10, 40 and 100 with respect to the etching layer, with the etching duration of 0–180 s. The etching rates are constant – 1.33 nm/s. The analysis of the dependence of the etching systematic error on its thickness has been carried out. The computer modeled results are close to the ones produced by means of the application of the analytical calculation models by other authors.Article in Lithuanian

  2. Carbon nanostructure formation driven by energetic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhiyuan; Gong Jinlong; Zhu Dezhang

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanostructures, especially carbon nanotubes (CNTs), have been envisaged to be the building blocks of a variety of nanoscale devices and materials. The inherent nanometer-size and ability of being either metallic or semiconductive of CNTs lead to their application in nanoelectronics. Excellent mechanical characteristics of CNTs suggest their use as structural reinforcements. However, to fully exploit the potential applications, effective means of tailoring CNT properties must be developed. Irradiation of materials with energetic particles beams (ions and electrons) is a standard and important tool for modifying material properties. Irradiation makes it possible to dope the samples, to create local amorphous region or vice versa, recrystallize the lattice and even drive a phase transition. In this paper, we report our results of (1) phase transfromation from carbon nanotubes to nanocrystalline diamond driven by hydrogen plasma, (2) onion-like nanostructure from carbon nanotubes driven by ion beams of several tens keV, and (3) amorphous carbon nanowire network formation by ion beam irradiation. Structural phase transformation from multiwalled carbon nanotubes to nanocrystalline diamond by hydrogen plasma post-treatment was carried out. Ultrahigh equivalent diamond nucleation density of more than 1011 nuclei/cm 2 was obtained. The diamond formation and growth mechanisms were proposed to be the consequence of the formation of sp3 bonded amorphous carbon clusters. The hydrogen chemisorption on curved graphite network and the energy deposited on CNTs by continuous impingement of activated molecular or atomic hydrogen are responsible for the formation of amorphous carbon matrix. Diamond nucleates and grows in the way similar to that of diamond chemical vapor deposition processes on amorphous carbon films. Furthermore, single crystalline diamond nanorods of 4-8 nm in diameter and up to 200 nm in length have been successfully synthesized by hydrogen plasma post

  3. Formation and surface characterization of nanostructured Al2O3 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Page 1. Electronic Supplementary Material. Graphical abstract. Formation and surface characterization of nanostructured Al2O3–TiO2 coatings by Vairamuthu Raj and Mohamed Sirajudeen Mumjitha. (pp 1411–1418).

  4. Formation of different gold nanostructures by silk nanofibrils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Guangqiang; Yang, Yuhong; Yao, Jinrong; Shao, Zhengzhong; Chen, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Metal nanostructures that have unique size- and shape-dependent electronic, optical and chemical properties gain more and more attention in modern science and technology. In this article, we show the possibility that we are able to obtain different gold nanostructures simply with the help of silk nanofibrils. We demonstrate that only by varying the pH of the reaction solution, we get gold nanoparticles, nano-icosahedrons, nanocubes, and even microplates. Particularly, we develop a practical method for the preparation of gold microplates in acid condition in the presence of silk nanofibrils, which is impossible by using other forms of silk protein. We attribute the role of silk nanofibrils in the formation of gold nanostructure to their reduction ability from several specific amino acid residues, and the suitable structural anisotropic features to sustain the crystal growth after the reduction process. Although the main purpose of this article is to demonstrate that silk nanofibrils are able to mediate the formation of different gold nanostructure, we show the potential applications of these resulting gold nanostructures, such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and photothermal transformation effect, as same as those produced by other methods. In conclusion, we present in this communication a facile and green synthesis route to prepare various gold nanostructures with silk nanofibrils by simply varying pH in the reaction system, which has remarkable advantages in future biomedical applications. - Highlights: • Different Au nanostructures can be obtained by a facile and green protein reduction method. • Silk nanofibrils serve as both reductant and template in the formation of Au nanostructures. • Different Au nanostructures can be obtained simply by regulating the pH in the medium. • Large Au microplates can be obtained with a cheap, abundant, sustainable silk protein. • Silk/Au hybrid nanocomposites show potential application in SERS and

  5. Formation of different gold nanostructures by silk nanofibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Guangqiang [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Collaborative Innovation Center of Polymers and Polymer Composite Materials, Department of Macromolecular Science, Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Yang, Yuhong [Research Centre for Analysis and Measurement, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Yao, Jinrong; Shao, Zhengzhong [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Collaborative Innovation Center of Polymers and Polymer Composite Materials, Department of Macromolecular Science, Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Chen, Xin, E-mail: chenx@fudan.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Collaborative Innovation Center of Polymers and Polymer Composite Materials, Department of Macromolecular Science, Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200433 (China)

    2016-07-01

    Metal nanostructures that have unique size- and shape-dependent electronic, optical and chemical properties gain more and more attention in modern science and technology. In this article, we show the possibility that we are able to obtain different gold nanostructures simply with the help of silk nanofibrils. We demonstrate that only by varying the pH of the reaction solution, we get gold nanoparticles, nano-icosahedrons, nanocubes, and even microplates. Particularly, we develop a practical method for the preparation of gold microplates in acid condition in the presence of silk nanofibrils, which is impossible by using other forms of silk protein. We attribute the role of silk nanofibrils in the formation of gold nanostructure to their reduction ability from several specific amino acid residues, and the suitable structural anisotropic features to sustain the crystal growth after the reduction process. Although the main purpose of this article is to demonstrate that silk nanofibrils are able to mediate the formation of different gold nanostructure, we show the potential applications of these resulting gold nanostructures, such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and photothermal transformation effect, as same as those produced by other methods. In conclusion, we present in this communication a facile and green synthesis route to prepare various gold nanostructures with silk nanofibrils by simply varying pH in the reaction system, which has remarkable advantages in future biomedical applications. - Highlights: • Different Au nanostructures can be obtained by a facile and green protein reduction method. • Silk nanofibrils serve as both reductant and template in the formation of Au nanostructures. • Different Au nanostructures can be obtained simply by regulating the pH in the medium. • Large Au microplates can be obtained with a cheap, abundant, sustainable silk protein. • Silk/Au hybrid nanocomposites show potential application in SERS and

  6. Formation of novel assembled silver nanostructures from polyglycol solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jie; Liu Ke; Dai Zhihui; Feng Yuying; Bao Jianchun; Mo Xiangyin

    2006-01-01

    This paper described a simple and mild chemical reduction approach to prepare novel silver nanostructures with different morphologies. Dendritic silver nanostructure was obtained by a fast reduction reaction using hydrazine as a reducing agent in aqueous solution of polyglycol, while both the zigzag and linear Ag nanostructures were slowly assembled using polyglycol as a reducing agent. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) were used to characterize the obtained silver nanostructures. Fourier transform infrared absorption (FT-IR) spectra were recorded to show that there exists a certain coordination of the oxygen atoms in the polyglycol with Ag + ions in aqueous solution of the AgNO 3 /polyglycol. Furthermore, the examination of the morphologies of the products obtained at different stages of the reaction of Ag + ions with polyglycol revealed that such a coordination is of utmost importance for the formation of the silver nanostructures, namely polyglycol provided lots of active sites for the coordination, nucleation, growth and serves as backbones for directing the assembly of the metal particles formed. The formation mechanism of the dendritic silver nanostructure was called a coordination-reduction-nucleation-growth-fractal growth process. The strong surface plasmon absorption bands at 470 nm for the zigzag silver and at 405 nm for the dendritic silver were found

  7. Methanofullerene elongated nanostructure formation for enhanced organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Reyes, M. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi (Mexico)], E-mail: reyesm@cactus.iico.uaslp.mx; Lopez-Sandoval, R. [Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la presa San Jose 2055, CP 78216. San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Arenas-Alatorre, J. [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Garibay-Alonso, R. [Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la presa San Jose 2055, CP 78216. San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Carroll, D.L. [Center for Nanotechnology and Molecular Materials, Department of Physics. Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem NC 27109 (United States); Lastras-Martinez, A. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2007-11-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Z-contrast imaging we have demonstrated elongated nanostructure formation of fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) within an organic host through annealing. The annealing provides an enhanced mobility of the PCBM molecules and, with good initial dispersion, allows for the formation of exaggerated grain growth within the polymer host. We have assembled these nanostructures within the regioregular conjugated polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). This PCBM elongated nanostructure formation maybe responsible for the very high efficiencies observed, at very low loadings of PCBM (1:0.6, polymer to PCBM), in annealed photovoltaics. Moreover, our high resolution TEM and electron energy loss spectroscopy studies clearly show that the PCBM crystals remain crystalline and are unaffected by the 200-keV electron beam.

  8. Methanofullerene elongated nanostructure formation for enhanced organic solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes-Reyes, M.; Lopez-Sandoval, R.; Arenas-Alatorre, J.; Garibay-Alonso, R.; Carroll, D.L.; Lastras-Martinez, A.

    2007-01-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Z-contrast imaging we have demonstrated elongated nanostructure formation of fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) within an organic host through annealing. The annealing provides an enhanced mobility of the PCBM molecules and, with good initial dispersion, allows for the formation of exaggerated grain growth within the polymer host. We have assembled these nanostructures within the regioregular conjugated polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). This PCBM elongated nanostructure formation maybe responsible for the very high efficiencies observed, at very low loadings of PCBM (1:0.6, polymer to PCBM), in annealed photovoltaics. Moreover, our high resolution TEM and electron energy loss spectroscopy studies clearly show that the PCBM crystals remain crystalline and are unaffected by the 200-keV electron beam

  9. Molecular dynamics and density functional simulations of tungsten nanostructure formation by helium plasma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, A.M.; Takayama, A.; Oda, Y.

    2014-10-01

    For the purposes of long-term use of tungsten diverter walls, it is necessary to suppress the surface deterioration due to the helium ash which induces the formations of helium bubbles and tungsten fuzzy nanostructures. In the present paper, the formation mechanisms of helium bubbles and tungsten fuzzy nanostructures were explained by the four-step process which is composed of the penetration process, the diffusion and agglomeration process, the helium bubble growth process and the tungsten fuzzy nanostructure formation process. The first to third step processes of the four-step process were investigated by using binary collision approximation, density functional theory and molecular dynamics, respectively. Furthermore, newly developed molecular dynamics and Monte-Carlo hybrid simulation has successfully reproduced the early formation process of tungsten fuzzy nanostructure. From these simulations, we here suggest the following key mechanisms of the formations of helium bubbles and tungsten fuzzy nanostructures: (1) By comparison between helium, neon, argon and hydrogen, the noble gas atoms can agglomerate limitlessly not only at a vacancy but also at an interstitial site. In particular, at the low incident energy, only helium atoms bring about the nucleation for helium bubble. (2) In the helium bubble growth process, the strain of the tungsten material around a helium atom is released as a dislocation loop, which is regarded as the loop punching phenomenon. (3) In the tungsten nanostructure formation process, the bursting of a helium bubble forms cavity and convexity in the surface. The helium bubbles tend to be grown and to burst at the cavity region, and then the difference of height between the cavity and convexity on the surface are enhanced. Consequently, the tungsten fuzzy nanostructure is formed. (author)

  10. Investigation of the phase formation from nickel coated nanostructured silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilyaeva, Yulia I.; Pyatilova, Olga V.; Berezkina, Alexandra Yu.; Sysa, Artem V.; Dudin, Alexander A.; Smirnov, Dmitry I.; Gavrilov, Sergey A.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, the influence of the conditions of chemical and electrochemical nickel plating of nanostructured silicon and subsequent heat treatment on the phase composition of Si/Ni structures with advanced interface is studied. Nanostructured silicon formed by chemical and electrochemical etching was used for the formation of a developed interphase surface. The resulting Si/Ni samples were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and X-ray phase analysis. The experiments have revealed the differences in phase composition of the Si/Ni structures obtained by different methods, both before and after heat treatment.

  11. Formation of helium induced nanostructure 'fuzz' on various tungsten grades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, M.J.; Doerner, R.P.

    2010-01-01

    The response of a variety of W material grades to nanostructure 'fuzz' formation is explored. W targets are exposed to He or D 2 -0.2He plasmas in PISCES-B at 900-1320 K to below sputter threshold He + ions of energy 25-60 eV for up to 2.2 x 10 4 s. SEM and XPS reveal nanoscopic reorganization of the W surface to a layer of 'fuzz' of porosity ∼90% as determined by a 'fuzz' removal/weight loss method. The variability of 'fuzz' growth is examined at 1120 K for 1 h durations: SR, SC and doped W grades - La 2 O 3 (1% wt.), Re (5% and 10% wt.), and TiC (1.5% wt.) developed 2-3 μm thick 'fuzz' layers, while a VPS grade developed a layer 4 μm thick. An RC grade revealed additional 'fuzz' at deep (>100 μm) grain boundaries. However, heat treatment up to 1900 K produced reintegration of 'fuzz' with the bulk and He release at ∼1000 K and ∼1400-1800 K due to depopulation from vacancy complexes.

  12. Spontaneous formation of gold nanostructures in aqueous microdroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Kyoo; Samanta, Devleena; Nam, Hong Gil; Zare, Richard N

    2018-04-19

    The synthesis of gold nanostructures has received widespread attention owing to many important applications. We report the accelerated synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), as well as the reducing-agent-free and template-free synthesis of gold nanoparticles and nanowires in aerosol microdroplets. At first, the AuNP synthesis are carried out by fusing two aqueous microdroplet streams containing chloroauric acid and sodium borohydride. The AuNPs (~7 nm in diameter) are produced within 60 µs at the rate of 0.24 nm µs -1 . Compared to bulk solution, microdroplets enhance the size and the growth rate of AuNPs by factors of about 2.1 and 1.2 × 10 5 , respectively. Later, we find that gold nanoparticles and nanowires (~7 nm wide and >2000 nm long) are also formed in microdroplets in the absence of any added reducing agent, template, or externally applied charge. Thus, water microdroplets not only accelerate the synthesis of AuNPs by orders of magnitude, but they also cause spontaneous formation of gold nanostructures.

  13. Nanostructure formation on refractory metal surfaces irradiated by helium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamura, Shuichi; Kajita, Shin; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2013-01-01

    Helium defects on plasma-facing refractory metals like tungsten have been studied in fusion sciences from the view point of the effects on metal surface properties, concentrating on the bubble formation. However, the surface morphology over the lower surface temperature range was found recently to be changed drastically, something like cotton down or arborescence, sometimes called as “fuzz”. The formation process, although still open problem, would be discussed in terms of viscoelastic model with the effect of surface tension, taking account of its thermal properties and nano-bubbles inside the thin fibers. Some physical surface characteristics like electron emission, radiation emissivity and sputtering are quite influenced by its forest-like structure. Unipolar arcing has been newly studied by using such a surface structure which makes its initiation controllable. In the present report, other examples of nanostructure formation in a variety of particle incident conditions have been introduced as well as the possibility of its industrial applications to enhance interdisciplinary interests. (author)

  14. Hybrid simulation research on formation mechanism of tungsten nanostructure induced by helium plasma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Atsushi M., E-mail: ito.atsushi@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Takayama, Arimichi; Oda, Yasuhiro [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Tamura, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Ryo; Hattori, Tatsunori; Ogata, Shuji [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Ohno, Noriyasu; Kajita, Shin [Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Yajima, Miyuki [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Noiri, Yasuyuki [Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Yoshimoto, Yoshihide [University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Saito, Seiki [Kushiro National College of Technology, Kushiro, Hokkaido 084-0916 (Japan); Takamura, Shuichi [Aichi Institute of Technology, 1247 Yachigusa, Yakusa-cho, Toyota 470-0392 (Japan); Murashima, Takahiro [Tohoku University, 6-3, Aramaki-Aza-Aoba, Aoba-Ward, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Miyamoto, Mitsutaka [Shimane University, Matsue, Shimane 690-8504 (Japan); Nakamura, Hiroaki [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    The generation of tungsten fuzzy nanostructure by exposure to helium plasma is one of the important problems for the use of tungsten material as divertor plates in nuclear fusion reactors. In the present paper, the formation mechanisms of the helium bubble and the tungsten fuzzy nanostructure were investigated by using several simulation methods. We proposed the four-step process which is composed of penetration step, diffusion and agglomeration step, helium bubble growth step, and fuzzy nanostructure formation step. As the fourth step, the formation of the tungsten fuzzy nanostructure was successfully reproduced by newly developed hybrid simulation combining between molecular dynamics and Monte-Carlo method. The formation mechanism of tungsten fuzzy nanostructure observed by the hybrid simulation is that concavity and convexity of the surface are enhanced by the bursting of helium bubbles in the region around the concavity.

  15. Self-formation of polymer nanostructures in plasma etching: mechanisms and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ke; Jiang, Youhua; Huang, Po-Shun; Ding, Junjun; Gao, Tongchuan; Choi, Chang-Hwan

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, plasma-induced self-formation of polymer nanostructures has emerged as a simple, scalable and rapid nanomanufacturing technique to pattern sub-100 nm nanostructures. High-aspect-ratio nanostructures (>20:1) are fabricated on a variety of polymer surfaces such as poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), polystyrene (PS), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP). Sub-100 nm nanostructures (i.e. diameter  ⩽  50 nm) are fabricated in this one-step process without relying on slow and expensive nanolithography techniques. This review starts with discussion of the self-formation mechanisms including surface modulation, random masks, and materials impurities. Emphasis is put on the applications of polymer nanostructures in the fields of hierarchical nanostructures, liquid repellence, adhesion, lab-on-a-chip, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), organic light emitting diode (OLED), and energy harvesting. The unique advantages of this nanomanufacturing technique are illustrated, followed by prospects.

  16. Formation of Nanostructures on the Nickel Metal Surface in Ionic Liquid under Anodizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, O. K.; Root, N. V.; Kultin, D. Yu.; Kalmykov, K. B.; Kustov, L. M.

    2018-05-01

    The formation of nanostructures in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide on the surface of a nickel electrode during anodizing was studied. Hexagonal ordered surface nanostructures were found to form in a narrow range of current densities. The form of the potential transients of the nickel electrode corresponded to the morphology of the nickel surface obtained which was studied by electron microscopy. No other types of nanostructures were found under the electrosynthesis conditions under study.

  17. Magma ocean formation due to giant impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonks, W. B.; Melosh, H. J.

    1993-01-01

    The thermal effects of giant impacts are studied by estimating the melt volume generated by the initial shock wave and corresponding magma ocean depths. Additionally, the effects of the planet's initial temperature on the generated melt volume are examined. The shock pressure required to completely melt the material is determined using the Hugoniot curve plotted in pressure-entropy space. Once the melting pressure is known, an impact melting model is used to estimate the radial distance melting occurred from the impact site. The melt region's geometry then determines the associated melt volume. The model is also used to estimate the partial melt volume. Magma ocean depths resulting from both excavated and retained melt are calculated, and the melt fraction not excavated during the formation of the crater is estimated. The fraction of a planet melted by the initial shock wave is also estimated using the model.

  18. Formation mechanism of PbTe dendritic nanostructures grown by electrodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sangwoo; Kim, Hyunghoon; Lee, Ho Seong, E-mail: hs.lee@knu.ac.kr

    2017-02-01

    The formation mechanism of PbTe dendritic nanostructures grown at room temperature by electrodeposition in nitric acid electrolytes containing Pb and Te was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analyses indicated that the PbTe dendritic nanostructures were composed of triangular-shaped units surrounded by {111} and {110} planes. Because of the interfacial energy anisotropy of the {111} and {110} planes and the difference in the current density gradient, the growth rate in the vertical direction of the (111) basal plane was slower than that in the direction of the tip of the triangular shape, leading to growth in the tip direction. In contrast to the general growth direction of fcc dendrites, namely <100>, the tip direction of the {111} basal plane for our samples was <112>, and the PbTe dendritic nanostructures grew in the tip direction. The angles formed by the main trunk and first branches were regular and approximately 60°, and those between the first and second branches were also approximately 60°. Finally, the nanostructures grew in single-crystalline dendritic form. - Highlights: • PbTe dendrite nanostructures were grown by electrodeposition. • PbTe dendritic nanostructures were composed of triangular-shaped units. • The formation mechanism of PbTe dendrite nanostructures was characterized.

  19. Formation of strain-induced quantum dots in gated semiconductor nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Thorbeck

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A long-standing mystery in the field of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs is: Why are there so many unintentional dots (also known as disorder dots which are neither expected nor controllable. It is typically assumed that these unintentional dots are due to charged defects, however the frequency and predictability of the location of the unintentional QDs suggests there might be additional mechanisms causing the unintentional QDs besides charged defects. We show that the typical strains in a semiconductor nanostructure from metal gates are large enough to create strain-induced quantum dots. We simulate a commonly used QD device architecture, metal gates on bulk silicon, and show the formation of strain-induced QDs. The strain-induced QD can be eliminated by replacing the metal gates with poly-silicon gates. Thus strain can be as important as electrostatics to QD device operation operation.

  20. Observation of reduction of secondary electron emission from helium ion impact due to plasma-generated nanostructured tungsten fuzz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollmann, E M; Doerner, R P; Nishijima, D; Pigarov, A Yu

    2017-01-01

    Growth of nanostructured fuzz on a tungsten target in a helium plasma is found to cause a significant (∼3×) reduction in ion impact secondary electron emission in a linear plasma device. The ion impact secondary electron emission is separated from the electron impact secondary electron emission by varying the target bias voltage and fitting to expected contributions from electron impact, both thermal and non-thermal; with the non-thermal electron contribution being modeled using Monte-Carlo simulations. The observed (∼3×) reduction is similar in magnitude to the (∼2×) reduction observed in previous work for the effect of tungsten fuzz formation on secondary electron emission due to electron impact. It is hypothesized that the observed reduction results from re-absorption of secondary electrons in the tungsten fuzz. (paper)

  1. Biofilm formation on nanostructured titanium oxide surfaces and a micro/nanofabrication-based preventive strategy using colloidal lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Ajay Vikram; Vyas, Varun; Salve, Tushar S; Dellasega, David; Cortelli, Daniele; Podestà, Alessandro; Milani, Paolo; Gade, W N

    2012-01-01

    The contamination of implant devices as a result of biofilm formation through bacterial infection has instigated major research in this area, particularly to understand the mechanism of bacterial cell/implant surface interactions and their preventions. In this paper, we demonstrate a controlled method of nanostructured titanium oxide surface synthesis using supersonic cluster beam depositions. The nanoscale surface characterization using atomic force microscopy and a profilometer display a regulated evolution in nanomorphology and physical properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses display a stoichiometric nanostructured TiO 2 film. Measurement of the water contact angle shows a nominal increase in the hydrophilic nature of ns-TiO 2 films, whereas the surface energy increases with decreasing contact angle. Bacterial species Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli interaction with nanostructured surfaces shows an increase in adhesion and biofilm formation with increasing nanoscale morphological properties. Conversely, limiting ns-TiO 2 film distribution to micro/nanopatterned designed substrates integrated with bovine serum albumin functionalization leads to a reduction in biofilm formations due to a globally decreased bacterial cell–surface interaction area. The results have potential implications in inhibiting bacterial colonization and promoting mammalian cell–implant interactions. (paper)

  2. Oligodeoxynucleotide nanostructure formation in the presence of polypropyleneimine dendrimers and their uptake in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Alex M; Santhakumaran, Latha M; Nair, Sandhya K; Amenta, Peter S; Thomas, Thresia; He, Huixin; Thomas, T J

    2006-01-01

    We studied the efficacy of five generations of polypropyleneimine (PPI) dendrimer to provoke nanostructure formation from a 21-nucleotide antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN). Nanostructure formation was observed with all generations of dendrimer by light scattering and microscopic techniques. The efficacy of the dendrimers increased with generation number. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the morphology of the structures at different condensation stages. Based on the observed nanostructures, we propose a zipping condensation mechanism, which is very different from the condensation pathways of high molecular weight DNA polymers. Electron microscopy showed the presence of toroidal nanoparticles. Confocal microscopic analysis showed that the nanostructures formed with G-4 and G-5 dendrimers could undergo facile cellular uptake in a breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, whereas nanostructures formed with G-1 to G-3 dendrimers lacked this ability. Nanoparticles formed with G-1 to G-3 dendrimers showed significantly lower zeta potential (5.2-6.5 mV) than those (12-18 mV) of particles formed with G-4 and G-5 dendrimers. These results show that the structure and charge density of the dendrimers are important in ODN nanoparticle formation and cellular transport and that G-4 and G-5 dendrimers are useful in cellular delivery of antisense ODN

  3. Oligodeoxynucleotide nanostructure formation in the presence of polypropyleneimine dendrimers and their uptake in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Alex M [Department of Chemistry, Rutgers University, 73 Warren Street, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Santhakumaran, Latha M [Department of Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 (United States); Nair, Sandhya K [Department of Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 (United States); Amenta, Peter S [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 (United States); Thomas, Thresia [Department of Environmental and Health Sciences Institute, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 (United States); He, Huixin [Department of Chemistry, Rutgers University, 73 Warren Street, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Thomas, T J [Department of Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 (United States)

    2006-11-14

    We studied the efficacy of five generations of polypropyleneimine (PPI) dendrimer to provoke nanostructure formation from a 21-nucleotide antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN). Nanostructure formation was observed with all generations of dendrimer by light scattering and microscopic techniques. The efficacy of the dendrimers increased with generation number. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the morphology of the structures at different condensation stages. Based on the observed nanostructures, we propose a zipping condensation mechanism, which is very different from the condensation pathways of high molecular weight DNA polymers. Electron microscopy showed the presence of toroidal nanoparticles. Confocal microscopic analysis showed that the nanostructures formed with G-4 and G-5 dendrimers could undergo facile cellular uptake in a breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, whereas nanostructures formed with G-1 to G-3 dendrimers lacked this ability. Nanoparticles formed with G-1 to G-3 dendrimers showed significantly lower zeta potential (5.2-6.5 mV) than those (12-18 mV) of particles formed with G-4 and G-5 dendrimers. These results show that the structure and charge density of the dendrimers are important in ODN nanoparticle formation and cellular transport and that G-4 and G-5 dendrimers are useful in cellular delivery of antisense ODN.

  4. Oligodeoxynucleotide nanostructure formation in the presence of polypropyleneimine dendrimers and their uptake in breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alex M.; Santhakumaran, Latha M.; Nair, Sandhya K.; Amenta, Peter S.; Thomas, Thresia; He, Huixin; Thomas, T. J.

    2006-11-01

    We studied the efficacy of five generations of polypropyleneimine (PPI) dendrimer to provoke nanostructure formation from a 21-nucleotide antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN). Nanostructure formation was observed with all generations of dendrimer by light scattering and microscopic techniques. The efficacy of the dendrimers increased with generation number. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the morphology of the structures at different condensation stages. Based on the observed nanostructures, we propose a zipping condensation mechanism, which is very different from the condensation pathways of high molecular weight DNA polymers. Electron microscopy showed the presence of toroidal nanoparticles. Confocal microscopic analysis showed that the nanostructures formed with G-4 and G-5 dendrimers could undergo facile cellular uptake in a breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, whereas nanostructures formed with G-1 to G-3 dendrimers lacked this ability. Nanoparticles formed with G-1 to G-3 dendrimers showed significantly lower zeta potential (5.2-6.5 mV) than those (12-18 mV) of particles formed with G-4 and G-5 dendrimers. These results show that the structure and charge density of the dendrimers are important in ODN nanoparticle formation and cellular transport and that G-4 and G-5 dendrimers are useful in cellular delivery of antisense ODN.

  5. Deepening of floating potential for tungsten target plate on the way to nanostructure formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamura, Shuichi; Miyamoto, Takanori; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2010-01-01

    Deepening of floating potential has been observed on the tungsten target plate immersed in high-density helium plasma with hot electron component on the way to nanostructure formation. The physical mechanism is thought to be a reduction of secondary electron emission from such a complex nano fiber-form structure on the tungsten surface. (author)

  6. Low energy helium ion irradiation induced nanostructure formation on tungsten surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ajlony, A.; Tripathi, J.K.; Hassanein, A.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the low energy helium ion irradiation induced surface morphology changes on tungsten (W) surfaces under extreme conditions. Surface morphology changes on W surfaces were monitored as a function of helium ion energy (140–300 eV), fluence (2.3 × 10 24 –1.6 × 10 25 ions m −2 ), and flux (2.0 × 10 20 –5.5 × 10 20 ion m −2 s −1 ). All the experiments were performed at 900° C. Our study shows significant effect of all the three ion irradiation parameters (ion flux, fluence, and energy) on the surface morphology. However, the effect of ion flux is more pronounced. Variation of helium ion fluence allows to capture the very early stages of fuzz growth. The observed fuzz growth and morphology changes were understood in the realm of various possible phenomena. The study has relevance and important impact in the current and future nuclear fusion applications. - Highlights: •Reporting formation of W nanostructure (fuzz) due to low energy He ion beam irradiation. •Observing the very early stages for the W-Fuzz formation. •Tracking the surface morphological evolution during the He irradiation. •Discussing in depth our observation and drawing a possible scenario that explain this phenomenon. •Studying various ions irradiation parameters such as flux, fluence, and ions energy.

  7. Low energy helium ion irradiation induced nanostructure formation on tungsten surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ajlony, A., E-mail: montaserajlony@yahoo.com; Tripathi, J.K.; Hassanein, A.

    2017-05-15

    We report on the low energy helium ion irradiation induced surface morphology changes on tungsten (W) surfaces under extreme conditions. Surface morphology changes on W surfaces were monitored as a function of helium ion energy (140–300 eV), fluence (2.3 × 10{sup 24}–1.6 × 10{sup 25} ions m{sup −2}), and flux (2.0 × 10{sup 20}–5.5 × 10{sup 20} ion m{sup −2} s{sup −1}). All the experiments were performed at 900° C. Our study shows significant effect of all the three ion irradiation parameters (ion flux, fluence, and energy) on the surface morphology. However, the effect of ion flux is more pronounced. Variation of helium ion fluence allows to capture the very early stages of fuzz growth. The observed fuzz growth and morphology changes were understood in the realm of various possible phenomena. The study has relevance and important impact in the current and future nuclear fusion applications. - Highlights: •Reporting formation of W nanostructure (fuzz) due to low energy He ion beam irradiation. •Observing the very early stages for the W-Fuzz formation. •Tracking the surface morphological evolution during the He irradiation. •Discussing in depth our observation and drawing a possible scenario that explain this phenomenon. •Studying various ions irradiation parameters such as flux, fluence, and ions energy.

  8. Computer simulation of radiation-induced nanostructure formation in amorphous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, K.-D.; Perez-Bergquist, Alejandro; Wang, Lumin

    2009-01-01

    In this study, 3D simulations based on a theoretical model were developed to investigate radiation-induced nanostructure formation in amorphous materials. Model variables include vacancy production and recombination rates, ion sputtering effects, and redeposition of sputtered atoms. In addition, a phase field model was developed to predict vacancy diffusion as a function of free energies of mixing and interfacial energies. The distribution profile of the vacancy production rate along the depth of an irradiated matrix was considered as a near Gaussian approximation according to Monte-Carlo TRIM code calculations. Dynamic processes responsible for nanostructure evolution were simulated by updating the vacancy concentration profile over time. Simulated morphologies include cellular nanoholes, nanowalls, nanovoids, and nanofibers, with the resultant morphology dependant upon the incident ion species and ion fluence. These simulated morphologies are consistent with experimental observations achieved under comparable experimental conditions. Our model provides a distinct numerical approach to accurately predicting morphological results for ion-irradiation-induced nanostructures.

  9. Formation of nitrile species on Ag nanostructures supported on a-Al2O3: a new corrosion route for silver exposed to the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez, R. J.; Espinós, J. P.; Afonso, C. N.

    2017-04-01

    The aging of supported Ag nanostructures upon storage in ambient conditions (air and room temperature) for 20 months has been studied. The samples are produced on glass substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD); first a 15 nm thick buffer layer of amorphous aluminum oxide (a-Al2O3) is deposited, followed by PLD of Ag. The amount of deposited Ag ranges from that leading to a discontinuous layer up to an almost-percolated layer with a thickness of oxidized faster, the smaller the amount of Ag. The corrosion leads to the formation of nitrile species due to the reaction between NO x species from the atmosphere adsorbed at the surface of Ag, and hydrocarbons adsorbed in defects at the surface of the a-Al2O3 layer during the deposition of the Ag nanostructures by PLD that migrate to the surface of the metal with time. The nitrile formation thus results in the main oxidation mechanism and inhibits almost completely the formation of sulphate/sulphide. Finally, the optical changes upon aging offer an easy-to-use tool for following the aging process. They are dominated by an enhanced absorption in the UV side of the spectrum and a blue-shift of the surface plasmon resonance that are, respectively, related to the formation of a dielectric overlayer on the Ag nanostructure and changes in the dimensions/features of the nanostructures, both due to the oxidation process.

  10. Delayed frost formation on hybrid nanostructured surfaces with patterned high wetting contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Youmin; Zhou, Peng; Yao, Shuhuai

    2014-11-01

    Engineering icephobic surfaces that can retard the frost formation and accumulation are important to vehicles, wind turbines, power lines, and HVAC systems. For condensation frosting, superhydrophobic surfaces promote self-removal of condensed droplets before freezing and consequently delay the frost growth. However, a small thermal fluctuation may lead to a Cassie-to-Wenzel transition, and thus dramatically enhance the frost formation and adhesion. In this work, we investigated the heterogeneous ice nucleation on hybrid nanostructured surfaces with patterned high wetting contrast. By judiciously introducing hydrophilic micro-patches into superhydrophobic nanostructured surface, we demonstrated that such a novel hybrid structure can efficiently defer the ice nucleation as compared to a superhydrophobic surface with nanostructures only. We observed efficient droplet jumping and higher coverage of droplets with diameter smaller than 10 μm, both of which suppress frost formation. The hybrid surface avoids the formation of liquid-bridges for Cassie-to-Wenzel transition, therefore eliminating the `bottom-up' droplet freezing from the cold substrate. These findings provide new insights to improve anti-frosting and anti-icing by using heterogeneous wettability in multiscale structures.

  11. Formation of titanate nanostructures under different NaOH concentration and their application in wastewater treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jiquan; Cao Yongge; Deng Zhonghua; Tong Hao

    2011-01-01

    The effects of the concentration of NaOH on the formation and transformation of various titanate nanostructures were studied. With increasing NaOH concentration, three different formation mechanisms were proposed. Nanotubes can only be obtained under moderate NaOH conditions, and should transform into nanowires with prolonged hydrothermal treatment, and their formation rate is accelerated by increasing NaOH concentration. Low concentration of NaOH results in the direct formation of nanowires, while extra high concentration of NaOH leads to the formation of amorphous nanoparticles. Adsorption and photocatalysis studies show that titanate nanowires and nanotubes might be potential adsorbents for the removal of both heavy metal ions and dyes and photocatalysts for the removal of dyes from wastewater. -- Graphical abstract: The morphologies of the titanates depend deeply on the concentration of NaOH. With increasing NaOH concentration, three different formation mechanisms were proposed. The application of these titanate nanostructures in the wastewater treatment was studied. Display Omitted Research highlights: → Effect of NaOH concentration on the structures of various titanates was reported. → Three different formation mechanisms were presented with increasing NaOH concentration. → Various titanates were used as adsorbents/photocatalysts in wastewater treatment.

  12. Directionally independent energy gap formation due to the hyperfine interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miyashita, Seiji; Raedt, Hans De; Michielsen, Kristel

    We study energy gap formation at the level-crossing point due to the hyperfine interaction. In contrast to the energy gap induced by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, the gap induced by the hyperfine interaction is independent of the direction of the magnetic field. We also study the dynamics

  13. Electric field distribution and simulation of avalanche formation due ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electric field distributions and their role in the formation of avalanche due to the passage of heavy ions in parallel grid avalanche type wire chamber detectors are evaluated using a Monte Carlo simulation. The relative merits and demerits of parallel and crossed wire grid configurations are studied. It is found that the crossed ...

  14. Plasma-induced formation of flower-like Ag2O nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zen-Hung; Ho, Chun-Hsien; Lee, Szetsen

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Flower-like Ag 2 O nanostructures. - Highlights: • Flower-like Ag 2 O nanostructures were synthesized from Ag colloids using plasma. • XPS was used to monitor plasma treatment effect on Ag colloids. • SERS of methyl orange was used to monitor the plasma oxidation–reduction processes. • Photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue was performed using Ag 2 O. • Ag 2 O is a more efficient visible light photocatalyst than Ag colloids. - Abstract: Plasma treatment effect on Ag colloids was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) techniques. XPS showed that O 2 plasma was critical in removing organic residues in Ag colloids synthesized using citric acid as a reducing agent. With O 2 plasma treatment, Ag colloids were also oxidized to form flower-like Ag 2 O nanostructures. The formation mechanism is proposed. The SERS spectral intensity of methyl orange (MO) adsorbed on Ag surface became deteriorated with O 2 plasma treatment. Followed by H 2 plasma treatment, the SERS intensity of MO on Ag regained, which indicated that Ag 2 O has been reduced to Ag. Nonetheless, the reduction by H 2 plasma could not bring Ag back to the original as-synthesized nanoparticle morphology. The flower-like nanostructure morphology still remained. The photocatalytic degradation reactions of methylene blue (MB) aqueous solutions were carried out using Ag colloids and Ag 2 O nanostructures. The results show that Ag 2 O is more efficient than Ag colloids and many other metal oxides for the photocatalytic degradation of MB in solution when utilizing visible light

  15. Plasma-induced formation of flower-like Ag{sub 2}O nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zen-Hung; Ho, Chun-Hsien; Lee, Szetsen, E-mail: slee@cycu.edu.tw

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Flower-like Ag{sub 2}O nanostructures. - Highlights: • Flower-like Ag{sub 2}O nanostructures were synthesized from Ag colloids using plasma. • XPS was used to monitor plasma treatment effect on Ag colloids. • SERS of methyl orange was used to monitor the plasma oxidation–reduction processes. • Photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue was performed using Ag{sub 2}O. • Ag{sub 2}O is a more efficient visible light photocatalyst than Ag colloids. - Abstract: Plasma treatment effect on Ag colloids was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) techniques. XPS showed that O{sub 2} plasma was critical in removing organic residues in Ag colloids synthesized using citric acid as a reducing agent. With O{sub 2} plasma treatment, Ag colloids were also oxidized to form flower-like Ag{sub 2}O nanostructures. The formation mechanism is proposed. The SERS spectral intensity of methyl orange (MO) adsorbed on Ag surface became deteriorated with O{sub 2} plasma treatment. Followed by H{sub 2} plasma treatment, the SERS intensity of MO on Ag regained, which indicated that Ag{sub 2}O has been reduced to Ag. Nonetheless, the reduction by H{sub 2} plasma could not bring Ag back to the original as-synthesized nanoparticle morphology. The flower-like nanostructure morphology still remained. The photocatalytic degradation reactions of methylene blue (MB) aqueous solutions were carried out using Ag colloids and Ag{sub 2}O nanostructures. The results show that Ag{sub 2}O is more efficient than Ag colloids and many other metal oxides for the photocatalytic degradation of MB in solution when utilizing visible light.

  16. Formation of various types of nanostructures on germanium surface by nanosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolutskiy, S. I.; Khasaya, R. R.; Khomich, Yu V.; Yamshchikov, V. A.

    2018-03-01

    The paper describes the formation of micro- and nanostructures in different parts of irradiation zone on germanium surface by multiple action of nanosecond pulses of ArF-laser. It proposes a simple method using only one laser beam without any optional devices and masks for surface treatment. Hexa- and pentagonal cells with submicron dimensions along the surface were observed in peripheral zone of irradiation spot by atomic-force microscopy. Nanostructures in the form of bulbs with rounded peaks with lateral sizes of 40-120 nm were obtained in peripheral low-intensity region of the laser spot. Considering experimental data on material processing by nanosecond laser pulses, a classification of five main types of surface reliefs formed by nanosecond laser pulses with energy density near or slightly above ablation threshold was proposed.

  17. Increase in the energy absorption of pulsed plasma by the formation of tungsten nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, D.; Ohno, N.; Domon, F.; Kajita, S.; Kikuchi, Y.; Sakuma, I.

    2017-06-01

    The synergistic effects of steady-state and pulsed plasma irradiation to material have been investigated in the device NAGDIS-PG (NAGoya DIvertor Simulator with Plasma Gun). The duration of the pulsed plasma was ~0.25 ms. To investigate the pulsed plasma heat load on the materials, we developed a temperature measurement system using radiation from the sample in a high time resolution. The heat deposited in response to the transient plasma on a tungsten surface was revealed by using this system. When the nanostructures were formed by helium plasma irradiation, the temperature increase on the bulk sample was enhanced. The result suggested that the amount of absorbed energy on the surface was increased by the formation of nanostructures. The possible mechanisms causing the phenomena are discussed with the calculation of a sample temperature in response to the transient heat load.

  18. Deuterium-induced nanostructure formation on tungsten exposed to high-flux plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, H.Y., E-mail: donaxu@163.com [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, Mianyang, Sichuan 621907 (China); De Temmerman, G. [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Ass. EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Postbus 1207, 3430BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon CS 90046-13067, St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Luo, G.-N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Jia, Y.Z.; Yuan, Y.; Fu, B.Q.; Godfrey, A. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, W., E-mail: liuw@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Surface topography of polycrystalline tungsten (W) have been examined after exposure to a low-energy (38 eV/D), high-flux (∼1.1–1.5 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −2} s{sup −1}) deuterium plasma in the Pilot-PSI linear plasma device. The methods used were scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), positron annihilation Doppler broadening (PADB) and grazing incident X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD). After exposure to high flux D plasma, blisters and nanostructures are formed on the W surface. Generation of defects was evidenced by PADB, while high stress and mixture of phases were detected in depth of 50 nm by GI-XRD. TEM observation revealed fluctuations and disordered microstructure on the outmost surface layer. Based on these results, surface reconstruction is considered as a possible mechanism for the formation of defects and nanostructures.

  19. Role of nanostructured gold surfaces on monocyte activation and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svensson S

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Sara Svensson,1,2 Magnus Forsberg,1,2 Mats Hulander,1,2 Forugh Vazirisani,1,2 Anders Palmquist,1,2 Jukka Lausmaa,2,3 Peter Thomsen,1,2 Margarita Trobos1,21Department of Biomaterials, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; 2BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Gothenburg, Sweden; 3SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Borås, SwedenAbstract: The role of material surface properties in the direct interaction with bacteria and the indirect route via host defense cells is not fully understood. Recently, it was suggested that nanostructured implant surfaces possess antimicrobial properties. In the current study, the adhesion and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus epidermidis and human monocyte adhesion and activation were studied separately and in coculture in different in vitro models using smooth gold and well-defined nanostructured gold surfaces. Two polystyrene surfaces were used as controls in the monocyte experiments. Fluorescent viability staining demonstrated a reduction in the viability of S. epidermidis close to the nanostructured gold surface, whereas the smooth gold correlated with more live biofilm. The results were supported by scanning electron microscopy observations, showing higher biofilm tower formations and more mature biofilms on smooth gold compared with nanostructured gold. Unstimulated monocytes on the different substrates demonstrated low activation, reduced gene expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and low cytokine secretion. In contrast, stimulation with opsonized zymosan or opsonized live S. epidermidis for 1 hour significantly increased the production of reactive oxygen species, the gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10, as well as the secretion of TNF-α, demonstrating the ability of the cells to elicit a response and actively phagocytose prey. In addition, cells cultured on the smooth

  20. Modulation of fluorescence signals from biomolecules along nanowires due to interaction of light with oriented nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Rune Schøneberg; Alarcon-Llado, Esther; Madsen, Morten H.

    2015-01-01

    High aspect ratio nanostructures have gained increasing interest as highly sensitive platforms for biosensing. Here, well-defined biofunctionalized vertical indium arsenide nanowires are used to map the interaction of light with nanowires depending on their orientation and the excitation waveleng...

  1. Influence of DC arc current on the formation of cobalt-based nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orpe, P. B.; Balasubramanian, C.; Mukherjee, S.

    2017-08-01

    The synthesis of cobalt-based magnetic nanostructures using DC arc discharge technique with varying arc current is reported here. The structural, morphological, compositional and magnetic properties of these nanostructures were studied as a function of applied arc current. Various techniques like X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, EDAX and vibrating sample magnetometry were used to carry out this study and the results are reported here. The results clearly indicate that for a given oxygen partial pressure, an arc current of 100 A favours the formation of unreacted cobalt atomic species. Also change in arc current leads to variation in phase, diversity in morphology etc. Other property changes such as thermal changes, mechanical changes etc. are not addressed here. The magnetic characterization further indicates that the anisotropy in shape plays a crucial role in deciding the magnetic properties of the nanostructured materials. We have quantified an interesting result in our experiment, that is, for a given partial pressure, 100 A arc current results in unique variation in structural and magnetic properties as compared to other arc currents.

  2. Laser ablation of a silicon target in chloroform: formation of multilayer graphite nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abderrafi, Kamal; García-Calzada, Raúl; Sanchez-Royo, Juan F.; Chirvony, Vladimir S.; Agouram, Saïd; Abargues, Rafael; Ibáñez, Rafael; Martínez-Pastor, Juan P.

    2013-04-01

    With the use of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy methods of analysis we show that the laser ablation of a Si target in chloroform (CHCl3) by nanosecond UV pulses (40 ns, 355 nm) results in the formation of about 50-80 nm core-shell nanoparticles with a polycrystalline core composed of small (5-10 nm) Si and SiC mono-crystallites, the core being coated by several layers of carbon with the structure of graphite (the shell). In addition, free carbon multilayer nanostructures (carbon nano-onions) are also found in the suspension. On the basis of a comparison with similar laser ablation experiments implemented in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), where only bare (uncoated) Si nanoparticles are produced, we suggest that a chemical (solvent decomposition giving rise to highly reactive CH-containing radicals) rather than a physical (solvent atomization followed by carbon nanostructure formation) mechanism is responsible for the formation of graphitic shells. The silicon carbonization process found for the case of laser ablation in chloroform may be promising for silicon surface protection and functionalization.

  3. Formation of surface nano-structures by plasma expansion induced by highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moslem, W. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said (Egypt); Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt (BUE), El-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt) and International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); El-Said, A. S. [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Nuclear and Radiation Physics Laboratory, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, 35516 Mansoura (Egypt) and Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Bautzner Landstr. 128, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Slow highly charged ions (HCIs) create surface nano-structures (nano-hillocks) on the quartz surface. The formation of hillocks was only possible by surpassing a potential energy threshold. By using the plasma expansion approach with suitable hydrodynamic equations, the creation mechanism of the nano-hillocks induced by HCIs is explained. Numerical analysis reveal that within the nanoscale created plasma region, the increase of the temperature causes an increase of the self-similar solution validity domain, and consequently the surface nano-hillocks become taller. Furthermore, the presence of the negative (positive) nano-dust particles would lead to increase (decrease) the nano-hillocks height.

  4. Modelling the formation of nanostructures on metal surface induced by femtosecond laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djouder, M.; Itina, T.E.; Deghiche, D.; Lamrous, O.

    2012-01-01

    We employ the particle-in-cell method to simulate the mechanisms of femtosecond (fs) laser interactions with a metallic target. The theoretical approach considers the solid as a gas of free electrons in a lattice of immobile ions and the laser fluences close to the ablation threshold. At first moments of the interaction, our simulations mapped out different nanostructures. We carefully characterized the rippling phase and found that its morphology is dependent on the distribution of the electron density and the period of the ripples depends on the laser intensity. The simulation method provides new insights into the mechanisms that are responsible for surface grating formation.

  5. Modelling the formation of nanostructures on metal surface induced by femtosecond laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djouder, M. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Universite Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-ouzou, BP 17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Itina, T.E. [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR CNRS 5516/Universite Jean Monnet, 18 rue de Professeur Benoit Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Deghiche, D. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Universite Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-ouzou, BP 17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Lamrous, O., E-mail: omarlamrous@mail.ummto.dz [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Universite Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-ouzou, BP 17 RP, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria)

    2012-01-15

    We employ the particle-in-cell method to simulate the mechanisms of femtosecond (fs) laser interactions with a metallic target. The theoretical approach considers the solid as a gas of free electrons in a lattice of immobile ions and the laser fluences close to the ablation threshold. At first moments of the interaction, our simulations mapped out different nanostructures. We carefully characterized the rippling phase and found that its morphology is dependent on the distribution of the electron density and the period of the ripples depends on the laser intensity. The simulation method provides new insights into the mechanisms that are responsible for surface grating formation.

  6. Asymmetric Star Formation Efficiency Due to Ram Pressure Stripping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Troncoso Iribarren

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous works have shown that a dense cluster environment affects satellite galaxy properties and accelerates or truncates their evolutionary processes. In this work, we use the EAGLE simulation to study this effect, dissecting the galaxies in two halves: the one that is falling directly to the cluster (leading half and the one behind (trailing half. Considering all galaxies within the virial radius of the most massive groups and clusters of the simulation ( M h a l o > 10 13 . 8 [ M ⊙ ] , we find that on average the leading half presents an enhancement of the star formation rate with respect to the trailing half. We conclude that galaxies falling into the intra-cluster medium experience a boost in star-formation in their leading half due to ram pressure. Sparse observations of jellyfish galaxies have revealed visually the enhancement of the star formation in the leading half. In order to confirm this effect statistically using observations, different cases must be investigated using the simulation as a test dataset.

  7. Electrochemical formation of InP porous nanostructures and its application to amperometric chemical sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Taketomo; Mizohata, Akinori; Fujino, Toshiyuki; Hashizume, Tamotsu

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we report the electrochemical formation of the InP porous nanostructures and their feasibility for the application to the amperometric chemical sensors. Our two step electrochemical process consists of the pore formation on a (001) n-type InP substrate and the subsequent etching of pore walls caused by changing the polarity of the InP electrode in a HCl-based electrolyte. By applying the anodic bias to the InP electrode, the high-density array of uniform nanopores was formed on the surface. Next, the cathodic bias was applied to the porous sample to reduce the wall thickness by cathodic decomposition of InP, where the thickness of InP nanowall decreased uniformly along the entire depth of the porous layer. From the amperometric measurements of the porous electrode, it was found that the electrocatalytic activity was much higher than that of the planar electrode. Furthermore, the current sensitivity for the H 2 O 2 detection was much enhanced after the cathodic decomposition process. The InP porous nanostructure formed by the present process is one of the promising structures for the application to the semiconductor-based bio/chemical sensors. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Earth's core formation due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, S.; Nakagawa, Y.; Nakazawa, K.

    1987-01-01

    A protoearth accretion stage configuration consisting of an undifferentiated solid core, an intermediate metal-melt layer, and an outer silicate-melt layer, is presently taken as the initial state in an investigation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability-induced core formation. The Ida et al. (to be published) quantitative results on the instability in a self-gravitating fluid sphere are used. The instability is found to occur through the translational mode on a time-scale of about 10 hr, in the case where the metal-melt layer is greater than about 1 km; this implies that the earth's core formed due to the undifferentiated solid core's translation upon the outer layer's melting. Differentiation would then have occurred in the late accretion stage. 17 references

  9. Temperature dependence of underdense nanostructure formation in tungsten under helium irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valles, G.; Martin-Bragado, I.; Nordlund, K.; Lasa, A.; Björkas, C.; Safi, E.; Perlado, J.M.; Rivera, A.

    2017-01-01

    Recently, tungsten has been found to form a highly underdense nanostructured morphology (“W fuzz”) when bombarded by an intense flux of He ions, but only in the temperature window 900–2000 K. Using object kinetic Monte Carlo simulations (pseudo-3D simulations) parameterized from first principles, we show that this temperature dependence can be understood based on He and point defect clustering, cluster growth, and detrapping reactions. At low temperatures (<900 K), fuzz does not grow because almost all He is trapped in very small He-vacancy clusters. At high temperatures (>2300 K), all He is detrapped from clusters, preventing the formation of the large clusters that lead to fuzz growth in the intermediate temperature range. - Highlights: •OKMC simulation of temperature window for fuzz formation. •Stable He-V clusters prevent fuzz formation at low temperatures. •Dissociation of He-V clusters prevent fuzz formation at high temperatures. •Fuzz formation rate increases with increasing temperature. •An incubation fluence observed in the simulations, similar to experimental observations.

  10. Temperature dependence of underdense nanostructure formation in tungsten under helium irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valles, G., E-mail: gonzalovallesalberdi@hotmail.com [Instituto de Fusión Nuclear, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, C/ José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, 28006, Madrid (Spain); Martin-Bragado, I. [UCAM, Universidad Católica de Murcia, Campus de los Jerónimos, Guadalupe, 30107, Murcia (Spain); Nordlund, K. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, Helsinki, FI-00014 (Finland); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, 115409, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lasa, A. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, Helsinki, FI-00014 (Finland); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831-6169 (United States); Björkas, C.; Safi, E. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, Helsinki, FI-00014 (Finland); Perlado, J.M.; Rivera, A. [Instituto de Fusión Nuclear, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, C/ José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, 28006, Madrid (Spain)

    2017-07-15

    Recently, tungsten has been found to form a highly underdense nanostructured morphology (“W fuzz”) when bombarded by an intense flux of He ions, but only in the temperature window 900–2000 K. Using object kinetic Monte Carlo simulations (pseudo-3D simulations) parameterized from first principles, we show that this temperature dependence can be understood based on He and point defect clustering, cluster growth, and detrapping reactions. At low temperatures (<900 K), fuzz does not grow because almost all He is trapped in very small He-vacancy clusters. At high temperatures (>2300 K), all He is detrapped from clusters, preventing the formation of the large clusters that lead to fuzz growth in the intermediate temperature range. - Highlights: •OKMC simulation of temperature window for fuzz formation. •Stable He-V clusters prevent fuzz formation at low temperatures. •Dissociation of He-V clusters prevent fuzz formation at high temperatures. •Fuzz formation rate increases with increasing temperature. •An incubation fluence observed in the simulations, similar to experimental observations.

  11. Ionic Liquids As Self-Assembly Guide for the Formation of Nanostructured Block Copolymer Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, Poornima

    2015-04-30

    Nanostructured block copolymer membranes were manufactured by water induced phase inversion, using ionic liquids (ILs) as cosolvents. The effect of ionic liquids on the morphology was investigated, by using polystyrene-b-poly(4-vinyl pyridine) (PS-b-PV4P) diblock as membrane copolymer matrix and imidazolium and pyridinium based ILs. The effect of IL concentration and chemical composition was evident with particular interaction with P4VP blocks. The order of block copolymer/ILs solutions previous to the membrane casting was confirmed by cryo scanning electron microscopy and the morphologies of the manufactured nanostructured membranes were characterized by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Non-protic ionic liquids facilitate the formation of hexagonal nanoporous block copolymer structure, while protic ILs led to a lamella-structured membrane. The rheology of the IL/block copolymer solutions was investigated, evaluating the storage and loss moduli. Most membranes prepared with ionic liquid had higher water flux than pure block copolymer membranes without additives.

  12. Aerosol formation of Sea-Urchin-like nanostructures of carbon nanotubes on bimetallic nanocomposite particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. H.; Wang, C.; Zachariah, M. R.

    2011-01-01

    With the advantage of continuous production of pure carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a new simple aerosol process for the formation of CNTs was developed. A combination of conventional spray pyrolysis and thermal chemical vapor deposition enabled the formation unusual sea-urchin-like carbon nanostructures composed of multi-walled CNTs and metal composite nanoparticles. The CNTs formed were relatively untangled and uniform with a diameter of less than∼10 nm. The key to the formation of CNTs in this way was to create a substrate particle containing both a catalytic and non-catalytic component, which prevented coking. The density of the CNTs grown on the spherical metal nanoparticles could be controlled by perturbing the density of the metal catalysts (Fe) in the host non-catalytic metal particle matrix (Al). Mobility size measurement was identified as a useful technique to real-time characterization of either the catalytic formation of thin carbon layer or CNTs on the surface of the metal aerosol. These materials have shown unique properties in enhancing the thermal conductivity of fluids. Other potential advantages are that the as-produced material can be manipulated easily without the concern of high mobility of conventional nanowires, and then subsequently released at the desired time in an unagglomerated state.

  13. In Situ Monitoring of Nanostructure Formation during the Digestion of Mayonnaise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salentinig, Stefan; Amenitsch, Heinz; Yaghmur, Anan

    2017-01-01

    Triglycerides in food products such as mayonnaise are a vital source of energy and essential for a complete and healthy diet. Their molecular structures consist of a glycerol backbone esterified with fatty acids on the two outer and the middle positions. During the digestion of triglycerides...... by pancreatic lipase in the small intestine, the ester bonds on the outer positions are hydrolyzed, leading to amphiphilic monoglycerides and free fatty acids as products. Depending on their chain length and degree of saturation, these products can self-assemble into a variety of structures in excess water....... In this study, we report the discovery of highly ordered nanostructures inside of the mayonnaise emulsion droplets during in vitro digestion of mayonnaise under simulated in vivo conditions using timeresolved synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering. The formation of these structures is most likely linked...

  14. Controlled hydrodynamic conditions on the formation of iron oxide nanostructures synthesized by electrochemical anodization: Effect of the electrode rotation speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas-Granados, Bianca; Sánchez-Tovar, Rita; Fernández-Domene, Ramón M.; García-Antón, Jose

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel iron anodization process under controlled dynamic conditions was evaluated. • Iron oxide nanostructures composed mainly by hematite were synthesized. • Different morphologies were obtained depending on the electrode rotation speed. • A suitable photocatalyst was obtained by stirring the electrode at 1000 rpm.. - Abstract: Iron oxide nanostructures are of particular interest because they can be used as photocatalysts in water splitting due to their advantageous properties. Electrochemical anodization is one of the best techniques to synthesize nanostructures directly on the metal substrate (direct back contact). In the present study, a novel methodology consisting of the anodization of iron under hydrodynamic conditions is carried out in order to obtain mainly hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) nanostructures to be used as photocatalysts for photoelectrochemical water splitting applications. Different rotation speeds were studied with the aim of evaluating the obtained nanostructures and determining the most attractive operational conditions. The synthesized nanostructures were characterized by means of Raman spectroscopy, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, photoelectrochemical water splitting, stability against photocorrosion tests, Mott-Schottky analysis, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and band gap measurements. The results showed that the highest photocurrent densities for photoelectrochemical water splitting were achieved for the nanostructure synthesized at 1000 rpm which corresponds to a nanotubular structure reaching ∼0.130 mA cm −2 at 0.54 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). This is in agreement with the EIS measurements and Mott-Schottky analysis which showed the lowest resistances and the corresponding donor density values, respectively, for the nanostructure anodized at 1000 rpm.

  15. Controlled hydrodynamic conditions on the formation of iron oxide nanostructures synthesized by electrochemical anodization: Effect of the electrode rotation speed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas-Granados, Bianca; Sánchez-Tovar, Rita; Fernández-Domene, Ramón M.; García-Antón, Jose, E-mail: jgarciaa@iqn.upv.es

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Novel iron anodization process under controlled dynamic conditions was evaluated. • Iron oxide nanostructures composed mainly by hematite were synthesized. • Different morphologies were obtained depending on the electrode rotation speed. • A suitable photocatalyst was obtained by stirring the electrode at 1000 rpm.. - Abstract: Iron oxide nanostructures are of particular interest because they can be used as photocatalysts in water splitting due to their advantageous properties. Electrochemical anodization is one of the best techniques to synthesize nanostructures directly on the metal substrate (direct back contact). In the present study, a novel methodology consisting of the anodization of iron under hydrodynamic conditions is carried out in order to obtain mainly hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanostructures to be used as photocatalysts for photoelectrochemical water splitting applications. Different rotation speeds were studied with the aim of evaluating the obtained nanostructures and determining the most attractive operational conditions. The synthesized nanostructures were characterized by means of Raman spectroscopy, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, photoelectrochemical water splitting, stability against photocorrosion tests, Mott-Schottky analysis, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and band gap measurements. The results showed that the highest photocurrent densities for photoelectrochemical water splitting were achieved for the nanostructure synthesized at 1000 rpm which corresponds to a nanotubular structure reaching ∼0.130 mA cm{sup −2} at 0.54 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). This is in agreement with the EIS measurements and Mott-Schottky analysis which showed the lowest resistances and the corresponding donor density values, respectively, for the nanostructure anodized at 1000 rpm.

  16. Synthesis and shape control of copper tin sulphide nanocrystals and formation of gold-copper tin sulphide hybrid nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruszynska, Marta; Parisi, Juergen; Kolny-Olesiak, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Hexagonal prismatic Cu 3 SnS 4 nanoparticles and nanorods were synthesized by a hot-injection procedure. Changing the reaction conditions leads to the formation of different shapes. When oleylamine is used as a solvent, hexagonal prismatic particles are obtained, while a reaction in octadecene results in the formation of nanorods. The growth process of copper tin sulphide starts with the formation of djurleite copper sulphide seeds. Their reaction with Sn 4+ ions leads to the formation of Cu 3 SnS 4 . These Cu 3 SnS 4 nanocrystals form Au-Cu 3 SnS 4 hybrid nanostructures by reaction with gold seeds.

  17. Cellular events in adhesion formation due to thermal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplun, A; Aronson, M; Halperin, B; Griffel, B

    1984-01-01

    Consequent to thermal traumatization of the intestinal wall of the mouse, histopathological events ensue which lead to peritoneal adhesion formation. In the first 48 h, the main pathological findings are of a necrotic and inflammatory nature, but subsequently fibroplasia is the main feature, as evidenced by the appearance of spindle-shaped cells followed by fibroblasts. Factors essential for and contributing to the formation of adhesions are described.

  18. pH-regulated antimony oxychloride nanoparticle formation on titanium oxide nanostructures: a photocatalytically active heterojunction

    KAUST Repository

    Buchholcz, Balázs

    2017-02-06

    Improving the catalytic activity of heterogeneous photocatalysts has become a hot topic recently. To this end, considerable progress has been made in the efficient separation of photogenerated charge carriers by e.g. the realization of heterojunction photocatalysts. V-VI-VII compound semiconductors, namely, bismuth oxyhalides, are popular photocatalysts. However, results on antimony oxyhalides [SbOX (X = Br, Cl, I)], the very promising alternatives to the well-known BiOX photomodifiers, are scarce. Here, we report the successful decoration of titanium oxide nanostructures with 8-11 nm diameter SbOX nanoparticles for the first time ever. The product size and stoichiometry could be controlled by the pH of the reactant mixture, while subsequent calcination could transform the structure of the titanate nanotube (TiONT) support and the prepared antimony oxychloride particles. In contrast to the ease of composite formation in the SbOX/TiONT case, anatase TiO could not facilitate the formation of antimony oxychloride nanoparticles on its surface. The titanate nanotube-based composites showed activity in a generally accepted quasi-standard photocatalytic test reaction (methyl orange dye decolorization). We found that the SbOCl/TiONT synthesized at pH = 1 is the most active sample in a broad temperature range.

  19. Strain-Mediated Interfacial Dynamics during Au–PbS Core–Shell Nanostructure Formation

    KAUST Repository

    Niu, Kai-Yang; Liu, Miao; Persson, Kristin A.; Han, Yu; Zheng, Haimei

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of the hierarchical nanostructure formation is of significant importance for the design of advanced functional materials. Here, we report the in situ study of lead sulfide (PbS) growth on gold (Au) nanorod seeds using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM). By tracking the formation dynamics of Au-PbS core-shell nanoparticles, we found the preferential heterogeneous nucleation of PbS on the ends of a Au nanorod prior to the development of a complete PdS shell. During PbS shell growth, drastic sulfidation of Au nanorod was observed, leading to large volume shrinkage (up to 50%) of the initial Au nanorod seed. We also captured intriguing wavy interfacial behavior, which can be explained by our DFT calculation results that the local strain gradient at the core-shell interface facilitates the mass transport and mediates reversible phase transitions of Au ↔ Au2S during the PbS shell growth. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  20. Strain-Mediated Interfacial Dynamics during Au–PbS Core–Shell Nanostructure Formation

    KAUST Repository

    Niu, Kai-Yang

    2016-05-23

    An understanding of the hierarchical nanostructure formation is of significant importance for the design of advanced functional materials. Here, we report the in situ study of lead sulfide (PbS) growth on gold (Au) nanorod seeds using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM). By tracking the formation dynamics of Au-PbS core-shell nanoparticles, we found the preferential heterogeneous nucleation of PbS on the ends of a Au nanorod prior to the development of a complete PdS shell. During PbS shell growth, drastic sulfidation of Au nanorod was observed, leading to large volume shrinkage (up to 50%) of the initial Au nanorod seed. We also captured intriguing wavy interfacial behavior, which can be explained by our DFT calculation results that the local strain gradient at the core-shell interface facilitates the mass transport and mediates reversible phase transitions of Au ↔ Au2S during the PbS shell growth. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  1. Study on the effect of ambient gas on nanostructure formation on metal surfaces during femtosecond laser ablation for fabrication of low-reflective surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smausz, Tomi, E-mail: tomi@physx.u-szeged.hu [MTA-SZTE Research Group on Photoacoustic Spectroscopy, University of Szeged, 6720 Szeged, Dóm tér 9 (Hungary); Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dóm tér 9 (Hungary); Csizmadia, Tamás [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dóm tér 9 (Hungary); Attosecond Light Pulse Source, ELI-Hu Nkft, H-6720 Szeged, Dugonics ter 13 (Hungary); Tápai, Csaba; Kopniczky, Judit [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dóm tér 9 (Hungary); Oszkó, Albert [Department of Physical Chemistry and Material Science, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Aradi vértanuk tere 1 (Hungary); Ehrhardt, Martin; Lorenz, Pierre; Zimmer, Klaus; Prager, Andrea [Leibniz-Institut für Oberflächenmodifizierung e.V., Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Hopp, Béla [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dóm tér 9 (Hungary)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Metal surfaces were irradiated with femtosecond laser in different gas environments. • The reflectivity, morphology and chemical composition of the surfaces were studied. • Darkening was influenced by chemical and physical interaction of the plume and gas. • Molecular mass of the applied gas had an impact on the nanostructure formation. • For some of the used metals the oxide formation affected the reflective properties. - Abstract: Nanostructure formation on bulk metals (silver, gold, copper and titanium) by femtosecond Ti-sapphire laser irradiation (775 nm, 150 fs) is studied aiming the production of low-reflectivity surfaces and the better understanding of the development process. The experiments were performed in nitrogen, air, oxygen and helium environments at atmospheric pressure. The samples were irradiated with fluences in the 0.1–2 J/cm{sup 2} range and an average pulse number of 100 falling over a given area. The reflectivity of the treated surfaces was determined by a microspectrometer in the 450–800 nm range and their morphology was studied by scanning electron microscopy. The gas ambience influenced the results via two effects: formation processes and the chemically-induced modifications of the nanostructures. In case of He the nanoparticle aggregates–otherwise generally present–are predominantly missing, which leads to a lower darkening efficiency. The presence of oxygen enhances the darkening effect for copper mostly at lower fluences, while causes a slow increase in reflectivity in the case of titanium (in case of pure oxygen) in the high fluence range. The surface morphology in case of nitrogen and air were quite similar probably due to their close molecular mass values.

  2. Quantitative characterization of the influence of the nanoscale morphology of nanostructured surfaces on bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Vikram Singh

    Full Text Available Bacterial infection of implants and prosthetic devices is one of the most common causes of implant failure. The nanostructured surface of biocompatible materials strongly influences the adhesion and proliferation of mammalian cells on solid substrates. The observation of this phenomenon has led to an increased effort to develop new strategies to prevent bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation, primarily through nanoengineering the topology of the materials used in implantable devices. While several studies have demonstrated the influence of nanoscale surface morphology on prokaryotic cell attachment, none have provided a quantitative understanding of this phenomenon. Using supersonic cluster beam deposition, we produced nanostructured titania thin films with controlled and reproducible nanoscale morphology respectively. We characterized the surface morphology; composition and wettability by means of atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. We studied how protein adsorption is influenced by the physico-chemical surface parameters. Lastly, we characterized Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus adhesion on nanostructured titania surfaces. Our results show that the increase in surface pore aspect ratio and volume, related to the increase of surface roughness, improves protein adsorption, which in turn downplays bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. As roughness increases up to about 20 nm, bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are enhanced; the further increase of roughness causes a significant decrease of bacterial adhesion and inhibits biofilm formation. We interpret the observed trend in bacterial adhesion as the combined effect of passivation and flattening effects induced by morphology-dependent protein adsorption. Our findings demonstrate that bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on nanostructured titanium oxide surfaces are significantly influenced by nanoscale morphological

  3. Nanostructure formation during relatively high temperature growth of Mn-doped GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Río-De Santiago, A.; Méndez-García, V.H. [CIACyT-UASLP, Sierra Leona Av. # 550, Lomas 2a Secc, San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. 78210, México (Mexico); Martínez-Velis, I.; Casallas-Moreno, Y.L. [Physics Department, CINVESTAV-IPN, Apdo. Postal 14470 D. F. México, México (Mexico); López-Luna, E. [CIACyT-UASLP, Sierra Leona Av. # 550, Lomas 2a Secc, San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. 78210, México (Mexico); Yu Gorbatchev, A. [IICO-UASLP, Av. Karakorum 1470, Lomas 4a. Sección, San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. 78210, México (Mexico); López-López, M. [Physics Department, CINVESTAV-IPN, Apdo. Postal 14470 D. F. México, México (Mexico); Cruz-Hernández, E., E-mail: esteban.cruz@uaslp.mx [CIACyT-UASLP, Sierra Leona Av. # 550, Lomas 2a Secc, San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. 78210, México (Mexico)

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • The formation of different kind of nanostructures in GaMnAs layers depending on Mn concentration at relative HT-MBE is reported. In this Mn% range, it is found the formation of nanogrooves, nanoleaves, and nanowires. • It is shown the progressive photoluminescence transitions from purely GaAsMn zinc blende (for Mn% = 0.01) to a mixture of zinc blende and wurtzite GaAsMn (for Mn% = 0.2). • A critical thickness for the Mn catalyst effect was determined by RHEED. - Abstract: In the present work, we report on molecular beam epitaxy growth of Mn-doped GaAs films at the relatively high temperature (HT) of 530 °C. We found that by increasing the Mn atomic percent, Mn%, from 0.01 to 0.2, the surface morphology of the samples is strongly influenced and changes from planar to corrugated for Mn% values from 0.01 to 0.05, corresponding to nanostructures on the surface with dimensions of 200–300 nm and with the shape of leave, to nanowire-like structures for Mn% values above 0.05. From reflection high-energy electron diffraction patterns, we observed the growth mode transition from two- to three-dimensional occurring at a Mn% exceeding 0.05. The optical and electrical properties were obtained from photoluminescence (PL) and Hall effect measurements, respectively. For the higher Mn concentration, besides the Mn related transitions at approximately 1.41 eV, PL spectra sharp peaks are present between 1.43 and 1.49 eV, which we related to the coexistence of zinc blende and wurtzite phases in the nanowire-like structures of this sample. At Mn% of 0.04, an increase of the carrier mobility up to a value of 1.1 × 10{sup 3} cm{sup 2}/Vs at 77 K was found, then decreases as Mn% is further increased due to the strengthening of the ionized impurity scattering.

  4. Chronic Ulceration and Sinus Formation due to Foreign Body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karin Birgitte; Gottrup, Finn

    2015-01-01

    generated from a foreign body reaction. The case report shows that this condition is often overlooked and even using advanced equipment, it is difficult to diagnose. The only solution is to diagnose and remove the triggering cause. Fistulography and ultrasound scanning seem to be the optimal diagnostic tool......Foreign bodies like residues of suture or mesh may lead to a foreign body reaction, cavity formation and continuous secretion and perhaps ulceration. We present a more than 9 years long medical record of a 49 year old man after a simple surgical procedure. The background was a sinus formation...... in these cases. The knowledge of the foreign body reaction in tissue continuously needs to be reestablished in the health care system especially in areas, where implantation of foreign material is used....

  5. Abdominal colic due to ureteric diverticulum with stone formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roodhooft, A.M.; Boven, K.; Acker, K.J. van; Gentens, P.

    1987-01-01

    In a 15-year-old boy right lower abdominal colicky pain was caused by intermittent obstruction of the ureter by stones which had accumulated in a ureteric diverticulum. As was shown by repeated X-rays, each of these stones had moved to the ureter and back to the diverticulum. Ureteric diverticulum mostly remains asymptomatic in children: stone formation and obstruction of the ureter by the stones is one of the instances which may cause symptoms. (orig.)

  6. Influence of the introduction and formation of artificial pinning centers on the transport properties of nanostructured Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva, L B S; Rodrigues, C A; Bormio-Nunes, C; Oliveira, N F Jr; Rodrigues, D Jr, E-mail: lucas_sarno@ppgem.eel.usp.b, E-mail: durval@demar.eel.usp.b [Superconductivity Group, Department of Materials Engineering (DEMAR) Escola de Engenharia de Lorena (EEL), Universidade de Sao Paulo - USP Polo Urbo-Industrial, Gleba AI-6 - PO Box 116 - Lorena, SP (Brazil)

    2009-05-01

    The formation of nanostructures projected to act as pinning centers is presented as a highly promising technique for the transport properties optimization of superconductors. However, due to the necessity of nanometric dimensions of these pinning centers, the heat treatment (HT) profiles must be carefully analyzed. The present work describes a methodology to optimize the HT profiles in respect to diffusion, reaction and formation of the superconducting phases. After the HT, samples were removed for micro structural characterization. Measurements of transport properties were performed to analyze the influence of the introduction of artificial pinning centers (APC) on the superconducting phase and to find the flux pinning mechanism acting in these wires. Fitting the volumetric pinning force vs. applied magnetic field (F{sub p} vs. mu{sub o}H) curves of transport properties, we could determine the type and influence of flux pinning mechanism acting in the global behavior of the samples. It was concluded that the maximum current densities were obtained when normal phases (due to the introduction of the APCs) are the most efficient pinning centers in the global behavior of the samples. The use of HT with profile 220{sup 0}C/100h+575{sup 0}C/50h+650{sup 0}C/100h was found as the best treatment for these nanostructured superconducting wires.

  7. Formation of vertically aligned carbon nanostructures in plasmas: numerical modelling of growth and energy exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denysenko, I; Azarenkov, N A, E-mail: idenysenko@yahoo.com [School of Physics and Technology, V N Karazin Kharkiv National University, 4 Svobody sq., 61077 Kharkiv (Ukraine)

    2011-05-04

    Results on modelling of the plasma-assisted growth of vertically aligned carbon nanostructures and of the energy exchange between the plasma and the growing nanostructures are reviewed. Growth of carbon nanofibres and single-walled carbon nanotubes is considered. Focus is made on studies that use the models based on mass balance equations for species, which are adsorbed on catalyst nanoparticles or walls of the nanostructures. It is shown that the models can be effectively used for the study and optimization of nanostructure growth in plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition. The results from these models are in good agreement with the available experimental data on the growth of nanostructures. It is discussed how input parameters for the models may be obtained.

  8. Ferroelectric mesocrystals of bismuth sodium titanate: formation mechanism, nanostructure, and application to piezoelectric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dengwei; Kong, Xingang; Mori, Kotaro; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Shinagawa, Kazunari; Feng, Qi

    2013-09-16

    Ferroelectric mesocrystals of Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3 (BNT) with [100]-crystal-axis orientation were successfully prepared using a topotactic structural transformation process from a layered titanate H1.07Ti1.73O4·nH2O (HTO). The formation reactions of BNT mesocrystals in HTO-Bi2O3-Na2CO3 and HTO-TiO2-Bi2O3-Na2CO3 reaction systems and their nanostructures were studied by XRD, FE-SEM, TEM, SAED, and EDS, and the reaction mechanisms were given. The BNT mesocrystals are formed by a topotactic structural transformation mechanism in the HTO-Bi2O3-Na2CO3 reaction system and by a combination mechanism of the topotactic structural transformation and epitaxial crystal growth in the HTO-TiO2-Bi2O3-Na2CO3 reaction system, respectively. The BNT mesocrystals prepared by these methods are constructed from [100]-oriented BNT nanocrystals. Furthermore, these reaction systems were successfully applied to the fabrication of [100]-oriented BNT ferroelectric ceramic materials. A BNT ceramic material with a high degree of orientation, high relative density, and small grain size was achieved.

  9. Formation of nanostructures in Eu3+ doped glass-ceramics: an XAS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicer-Porres, J; Segura, A; Martínez-Criado, G; Rodríguez-Mendoza, U R; Lavín, V

    2013-01-16

    We describe the results of x-ray absorption experiments carried out to deduce structural and chemical information in Eu(3+) doped, transparent, oxyfluoride glass and nanostructured glass-ceramic samples. The spectra were measured at the Pb and Eu-L(III) edges. The Eu environment in the glass samples is observed to be similar to that of EuF(3). Complementary x-ray diffraction experiments show that thermal annealing creates β-PbF(2) type nanocrystals. X-ray absorption indicates that Eu ions act as seeds in the nanocrystal formation. There is evidence of interstitial fluorine atoms around Eu ions as well as Eu dimers. X-ray absorption at the Pb-L(III) edge shows that after the thermal treatment most lead atoms form a PbO amorphous phase and that only 10% of the lead atoms remain available to form β-PbF(2) type nanocrystals. Both x-ray diffraction and absorption point to a high Eu content in the nanocrystals. Our study suggests new approaches to the oxyfluoride glass-ceramic synthesis in order to further improve their properties.

  10. Systematic Moiety Variations of Ultrashort Peptides Produce Profound Effects on Self-Assembly, Nanostructure Formation, Hydrogelation, and Phase Transition

    KAUST Repository

    Chan, Kiat Hwa

    2017-10-04

    Self-assembly of small biomolecules is a prevalent phenomenon that is increasingly being recognised to hold the key to building complex structures from simple monomeric units. Small peptides, in particular ultrashort peptides containing up to seven amino acids, for which our laboratory has found many biomedical applications, exhibit immense potential in this regard. For next-generation applications, more intricate control is required over the self-assembly processes. We seek to find out how subtle moiety variation of peptides can affect self-assembly and nanostructure formation. To this end, we have selected a library of 54 tripeptides, derived from systematic moiety variations from seven tripeptides. Our study reveals that subtle structural changes in the tripeptides can exert profound effects on self-assembly, nanostructure formation, hydrogelation, and even phase transition of peptide nanostructures. By comparing the X-ray crystal structures of two tripeptides, acetylated leucine-leucine-glutamic acid (Ac-LLE) and acetylated tyrosine-leucine-aspartic acid (Ac-YLD), we obtained valuable insights into the structural factors that can influence the formation of supramolecular peptide structures. We believe that our results have major implications on the understanding of the factors that affect peptide self-assembly. In addition, our findings can potentially assist current computational efforts to predict and design self-assembling peptide systems for diverse biomedical applications.

  11. Mechanisms of detonation formation due to a temperature gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapila, A. K.; Schwendeman, D. W.; Quirk, J. J.; Hawa, T.

    2002-12-01

    Emergence of a detonation in a homogeneous, exothermically reacting medium can be deemed to occur in two phases. The first phase processes the medium so as to create conditions ripe for the onset of detonation. The actual events leading up to preconditioning may vary from one experiment to the next, but typically, at the end of this stage the medium is hot and in a state of nonuniformity. The second phase consists of the actual formation of the detonation wave via chemico-gasdynamic interactions. This paper considers an idealized medium with simple, rate-sensitive kinetics for which the preconditioned state is modelled as one with an initially prescribed linear gradient of temperature. Accurate and well-resolved numerical computations are carrried out to determine the mode of detonation formation as a function of the size of the initial gradient. For shallow gradients, the result is a decelerating supersonic reaction wave, a weak detonation, whose trajectory is dictated by the initial temperature profile, with only weak intervention from hydrodynamics. If the domain is long enough, or the gradient less shallow, the wave slows down to the Chapman-Jouguet speed and undergoes a swift transition to the ZND structure. For sharp gradients, gasdynamic nonlinearity plays a much stronger role. Now the path to detonation is through an accelerating pulse that runs ahead of the reaction wave and rearranges the induction-time distribution there to one that bears little resemblance to that corresponding to the initial temperature gradient. The pulse amplifies and steepens, transforming itself into a complex consisting of a lead shock, an induction zone, and a following fast deflagration. As the pulse advances, its three constituent entities attain progressively higher levels of mutual coherence, to emerge as a ZND detonation. For initial gradients that are intermediate in size, aspects of both the extreme scenarios appear in the path to detonation. The novel aspect of this study

  12. Size-dependent buckling and vibration behaviors of piezoelectric nanostructures due to flexoelectricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Xu; Hu, Shuling; Shen, Shengping

    2015-01-01

    The symmetry breaking of inversion in solid crystals will induce electric polarization in all solid crystals, which is well known as flexoelectricity. At the nanometer scale, due to the large ratio of surface to volume, piezoelectric structures always exhibit distinct mechanical and electrical behaviors compared with their bulk counterparts. In the current work, the effects of surface and flexoelectricity on the buckling and vibration of piezoelectric nanowires is investigated based on a continuum framework and the Euler–Bernoulli beam hypothesis. Analytical solutions of the electric field in the piezoelectric nanobeam subjected to electrical and mechanical loads are obtained with the surface, flexoelectric and nonlocal electric effects. Numeric simulations demonstrate that the Young’s modulus and bending rigidity of PZT and BaTiO 3 (BT) nanowires are enhanced by flexoelectricity. In addition, the critical buckling voltage is calculated with consideration of the effects of surface and flexoelectricity, and it is found that the effects of surface piezoelectricity, flexoelectricity and residual surface stress play significant roles in determining the critical buckling voltage. Results obtained for the first resonance frequency also indicate that the effects of surface and flexoelectricity are more significant at a narrow range of beam thickness. The first resonance frequency of PZT and BT nanowires is also influenced by the residual surface stress and external applied voltage. The current work is expected to provide a fundamental study on the buckling and vibration behaviors of piezoelectric nanobeams, and it might also be helpful in devising piezoelectric nanowire-based nanoelectronics. (paper)

  13. Pattern formation due to non-linear vortex diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijngaarden, Rinke J.; Surdeanu, R.; Huijbregtse, J. M.; Rector, J. H.; Dam, B.; Einfeld, J.; Wördenweber, R.; Griessen, R.

    Penetration of magnetic flux in YBa 2Cu 3O 7 superconducting thin films in an external magnetic field is visualized using a magneto-optic technique. A variety of flux patterns due to non-linear vortex diffusion is observed: (1) Roughening of the flux front with scaling exponents identical to those observed in burning paper including two distinct regimes where respectively spatial disorder and temporal disorder dominate. In the latter regime Kardar-Parisi-Zhang behavior is found. (2) Fractal penetration of flux with Hausdorff dimension depending on the critical current anisotropy. (3) Penetration as ‘flux-rivers’. (4) The occurrence of commensurate and incommensurate channels in films with anti-dots as predicted in numerical simulations by Reichhardt, Olson and Nori. It is shown that most of the observed behavior is related to the non-linear diffusion of vortices by comparison with simulations of the non-linear diffusion equation appropriate for vortices.

  14. Submarine slope failures due to pipe structure formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elger, Judith; Berndt, Christian; Rüpke, Lars; Krastel, Sebastian; Gross, Felix; Geissler, Wolfram H

    2018-02-19

    There is a strong spatial correlation between submarine slope failures and the occurrence of gas hydrates. This has been attributed to the dynamic nature of gas hydrate systems and the potential reduction of slope stability due to bottom water warming or sea level drop. However, 30 years of research into this process found no solid supporting evidence. Here we present new reflection seismic data from the Arctic Ocean and numerical modelling results supporting a different link between hydrates and slope stability. Hydrates reduce sediment permeability and cause build-up of overpressure at the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. Resulting hydro-fracturing forms pipe structures as pathways for overpressured fluids to migrate upward. Where these pipe structures reach shallow permeable beds, this overpressure transfers laterally and destabilises the slope. This process reconciles the spatial correlation of submarine landslides and gas hydrate, and it is independent of environmental change and water depth.

  15. Understanding the wetting properties of nanostructured selenium coatings: the role of nanostructured surface roughness and air-pocket formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran PA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Phong A Tran,1,2 Thomas J Webster31Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 2The Particulate Fluid Processing Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 3Department of Chemical Engineering and Program in Bioengineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Wetting properties of biomaterials, in particular nanomaterials, play an important role, as these influence interactions with biological elements, such as proteins, bacteria, and cells. In this study, the wetting phenomenon of titanium substrates coated with selenium nanoparticles was studied using experimental and mathematical modeling tools. Importantly, these selenium-coated titanium substrates were previously reported to increase select protein adsorption (such as vitronectin and fibronectin, to decrease bacteria growth, and increase bone cell growth. Increased selenium nanoparticle coating density resulted in higher contact angles but remained within the hydrophilic regime. This trend was found in disagreement with the Wenzel model, which is widely used to understand the wetting properties of rough surfaces. The trend also did not fit well with the Cassie–Baxter model, which was developed to understand the wetting properties of composite surfaces. A modified wetting model was thus proposed in this study, to understand the contributing factors of material properties to the hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of these nanostructured selenium-coated surfaces. The analysis and model created in this study can be useful in designing and/or understanding the wetting behavior of numerous biomedical materials and in turn, biological events (such as protein adsorption as well as bacteria and mammalian cell functions.Keywords: hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity, Wenzel model, Cassie–Baxter model, free energy, implant material, proteins, cells, bacteria

  16. Nanostructure Formation by controlled dewetting on patterned substrates: A combined theoretical, modeling and experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Liang-Xing; Wang, Ying-Min; Srinivasan, Bharathi Madurai; Asbahi, Mohamed; Yang, Joel K W; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2016-09-01

    We perform systematic two-dimensional energetic analysis to study the stability of various nanostructures formed by dewetting solid films deposited on patterned substrates. Our analytical results show that by controlling system parameters such as the substrate surface pattern, film thickness and wetting angle, a variety of equilibrium nanostructures can be obtained. Phase diagrams are presented to show the complex relations between these system parameters and various nanostructure morphologies. We further carry out both phase field simulations and dewetting experiments to validate the analytically derived phase diagrams. Good agreements between the results from our energetic analyses and those from our phase field simulations and experiments verify our analysis. Hence, the phase diagrams presented here provide guidelines for using solid-state dewetting as a tool to achieve various nanostructures.

  17. Ionic Liquids As Self-Assembly Guide for the Formation of Nanostructured Block Copolymer Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, Poornima; Sougrat, Rachid; Behzad, Ali Reza; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor; Nunes, Suzana Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured block copolymer membranes were manufactured by water induced phase inversion, using ionic liquids (ILs) as cosolvents. The effect of ionic liquids on the morphology was investigated, by using polystyrene-b-poly(4-vinyl pyridine) (PS

  18. Influence of Growth Parameters on the Formation of Hydroxyapatite (HAp) Nanostructures and Their Cell Viability Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Manoj, Murugesan; Subbiah, Ramesh; Mangalaraj, Devanesan; Ponpandian, Nagamony; Viswanathan, Chinnuswamy; Park, Kwideok

    2015-01-01

    Morphology controlled hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanostruc‐ tures play a vital role in biomedical engineering, tissue regenerative medicine, biosensors, chemotherapeutic applications, environmental remediation, etc. The present work investigates the influence of temperature, pH and time on the growth of HAp nanostructures using a simple, cost effective and surfactant free chemical approach. The obtained HAp nanostructures were systematically investi‐ gated by analytical techniques such as XRD, FESE...

  19. Periodic fluctuations in deep water formation due to sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, R.

    2012-12-01

    During the last ice age, several abrupt warming events took place, known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) events. Their effects were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest temperature increase. The leading hypothesis to explain their occurrence postulates that the warming was caused by abrupt disruptions of the North Atlantic Current due to meltwater discharge from destabilized ice sheets (Heinrich events). However, the number of warming events outnumber the those of ice-sheet collapse. Thus, the majority of D-O events are not attributed to surface freshwater anomalies, and the underlying mechanism behind their occurrence remain unexplained. Using a simple dynamical model of sea ice and an overturning circulation, I show the existence of self-sustained relaxation oscillations in the overturning circulation. The insulating effect of sea ice is shown to paradoxically lead to a net loss of heat from the top layer of the polar ocean when sea ice retreats. Repeated heat loss results in a denser top layer and a destabilized water column, which triggers convection. The convective state pulls the system out of its preferred mode of circulation, setting up relaxation oscillations. The period of oscillations in this case is linked to the geometry of the ocean basin, if solar forcing is assumed to remain constant. If appropriate glacial freshwater forcing is applied to the model, a pattern of oscillation is produced that bears remarkable similarity to the observed fluctuations in North Atlantic climate between 50,000 and 30,000 years before present.; Comparison of NGRIP δ 18-O (proxy for near surface air temperature) between 50,000 and 30,000 years before present, showing Bond cycles (left) with the model output when forced with appropriate glacial freshwater forcing (right).

  20. Optical chirality in AgCl-Ag thin films through formation of laser-induced planar crossed-chain nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahal, Arashmid; Kashani, Somayeh

    2017-09-01

    Irradiation of AgCl-Ag thin films by a linearly polarized He-Ne laser beam results in the formation of self-organized periodic nanostructures. As a result of secondary irradiation of the initially exposed sample by the same linearly polarized He-Ne laser beam, but with different orientations of polarization, a complex crossed-chain nanostructure forms. We found that such a complex nanostructure has noticeable chirality and increased optical anisotropy, resulting in optical activity of the sample. Double exposure produces two gratings, crossing each other with angle α, which leads to the formation of crossed building blocks with chiroptical effects. It is established that the amount and the sign of the angle between the two laser-induced gratings (±α) determine the amount and the direction of rotation of the linearly polarized probe beam, respectively. We have also observed an induced anisotropy-dependent ellipticity for the probe light, which is passed through the sample. It is shown that the amount of ellipticity depends on the angle α.

  1. Nanostructured thin film formation on femtosecond laser-textured Ti-35Nb-xZr alloy for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yong-Hoon [Department of Dental Materials and Research Center of Nano-Interface Activation for Biomaterials, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Han-Cheol, E-mail: hcchoe@chosun.ac.kr [Department of Dental Materials and Research Center of Nano-Interface Activation for Biomaterials, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Brantley, William A. [Division of Restorative and Prosthetic Dentistry and Primary Care, College of Dentistry, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2011-05-31

    The aim of this study was to investigate the nanostructured thin film formation on femtosecond (FS) laser-textured Ti-35Nb-xZr alloy for biomedical applications. The initial surface roughening treatment involved irradiation with the FS laser in ambient air. After FS laser texturing, nanotubes were formed on the alloy surface using a potentiostat and a 1 M H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} solution containing 0.8 wt.% NaF with an applied cell voltage of 10 V for 2 h. The surface phenomena were investigated by FE-SEM, EDS, XRD, XPS and a cell proliferation test. It was found that nanostructured Ti-35Nb-xZr alloys after FS laser texturing had a hybrid surface topography with micro and nano scale structures, which should provide very effective osseointegration.

  2. Monitoring the formation of inorganic fullerene-like MoS2 nanostructures by laser ablation in liquid environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compagnini, Giuseppe; Sinatra, Marco G.; Messina, Gabriele C.; Patanè, Giacomo; Scalese, Silvia; Puglisi, Orazio

    2012-01-01

    Laser ablation of solid targets in liquid media is emerging as a simple, clean and reproducible way to generate a large number of intriguing nanometric structures with peculiar properties. In this work we present some results on the formation of MoS 2 fullerene-like nanoparticles (10-15 nm diameter) obtained by the ablation of crystalline targets in water. Such a top-down approach can be considered greener than standard sulphidization reactions and represents an intriguing single step procedure. The generation of the MoS 2 nanostructures is in competition with that of oxide clusters and strongly depends on the oxidative environment created by the plasma plume. The size, shape and crystalline phase of the obtained nanoparticles are studied by microscopy while X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy is used to investigate the chemical state of produced nanostructures and to propose mechanisms for their growth.

  3. Nanostructured thin film formation on femtosecond laser-textured Ti-35Nb-xZr alloy for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yong-Hoon; Choe, Han-Cheol; Brantley, William A.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the nanostructured thin film formation on femtosecond (FS) laser-textured Ti-35Nb-xZr alloy for biomedical applications. The initial surface roughening treatment involved irradiation with the FS laser in ambient air. After FS laser texturing, nanotubes were formed on the alloy surface using a potentiostat and a 1 M H 3 PO 4 solution containing 0.8 wt.% NaF with an applied cell voltage of 10 V for 2 h. The surface phenomena were investigated by FE-SEM, EDS, XRD, XPS and a cell proliferation test. It was found that nanostructured Ti-35Nb-xZr alloys after FS laser texturing had a hybrid surface topography with micro and nano scale structures, which should provide very effective osseointegration.

  4. Unexpected formation by pulsed laser deposition of nanostructured Fe/olivine thin films on MgO substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrand, C.; Dupont, L.; Davoisne, C.; Le Marrec, F.; Perriere, J.; Baudrin, E.

    2011-01-01

    Olivine-type LiFePO 4 thin films were grown on MgO (1 0 0) substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The formation of an original nanostructure is evidenced by transmission electron microscopy measurements. Indeed, on focused ion beam prepared cross sections of the thin film, we observe, the amazing formation of metallic iron/olivine nanostructures. The appearance of such a structure is explained owing to a topotactic relation between the two phases as well as a strong Mg diffusion from the substrate to the film surface. Magnesium migration is thus concomitant with the creation of metallic iron domains that grow from the core of the film to the surface leading to large protuberances. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on iron extrusion from the olivine-type LiFePO 4 . -- Graphical Abstract: HRTEM image of olivine/Fe nanostructure obtained by PLD. Display Omitted Research highlights: → This manuscript describes the attempt to prepare textured LiFePO 4 by PLD. This is presently a challenge to better understand the physical properties of the material, used as cathode in lithium ion batteries. → We describe for the first time the iron extrusion from this material. Indeed, there were recent reports on the possible non-stoichiometry, i.e. lithium or oxygen. However, on the iron side, only some defect were observed for hydrothermally prepared material but the extrusion is new in this paper. → We prepared interesting nanostructures which could be used for different fundamental studies: electric and magnetic measurements.

  5. Synthesis and shape control of copper tin sulphide nanocrystals and formation of gold-copper tin sulphide hybrid nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruszynska, Marta; Parisi, Juergen; Kolny-Olesiak, Joanna [Oldenburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Physics, Energy and Semiconductor Research Lab.

    2014-08-15

    Hexagonal prismatic Cu{sub 3}SnS{sub 4} nanoparticles and nanorods were synthesized by a hot-injection procedure. Changing the reaction conditions leads to the formation of different shapes. When oleylamine is used as a solvent, hexagonal prismatic particles are obtained, while a reaction in octadecene results in the formation of nanorods. The growth process of copper tin sulphide starts with the formation of djurleite copper sulphide seeds. Their reaction with Sn{sup 4+} ions leads to the formation of Cu{sub 3}SnS{sub 4}. These Cu{sub 3}SnS{sub 4} nanocrystals form Au-Cu{sub 3}SnS{sub 4} hybrid nanostructures by reaction with gold seeds.

  6. Nanostructure Formations and Improvement in Corrosion Resistance of Steels by Means of Pulsed Electron Beam Surface Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion of steels has long been the topic for materials scientists. It is established that surface treatment is an efficient way to improve the corrosion resistance of steels without changing the bulk properties and with low costs. In the present paper, different kinds of surface treatment techniques for steels are briefly reviewed. In particular, the surface modification involving nanostructure formations of steels by using a low energy high pulsed electron beam (LEHCPEB treatment is lightened in the case of an AISI 316L stainless steel and D2 steel. The overall results demonstrate the high potential of the LEHCPEB technique for improving the corrosion performance of steels.

  7. Formation of tungsten oxide nanostructures by laser pyrolysis: stars, fibres and spheres

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govender, M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This report focuses on the production of multi-phase WO3 and WO3-x (where x could vary between 0.2 and 0.33) nanostructures synthesized by CO2-laser pyrolysis technique at varying laser wavelengths (9.22-10.82 mm) and power densities (17-110 W/cm2...

  8. Formation of rod-like nanostructure by aggregation of TiO2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    rod-like nanoparticle aggregates was evaluated by the degradation of methylene blue ... Rod-like nanostructure; aligned nanoparticle aggregates; photocatalytic activity; antibacterial ... bioactive and electrical properties by effective utilization of light. Further TiO2 ... contact with microorganism as antimicrobial nanomaterials,.

  9. Simulataneous Formation of InGaN Nanostructures with Varying Shapes for White Light Source Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Gasim, Anwar A.; Bhattacharya, Pallab K.; Cha, Dong Kyu; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.

    2012-01-01

    Varying shapes of InGaN nanostructures were simultaneously formed on silicon epitaxially. The nanowires and nanomushrooms emit violet-blue light, and broad yellow-orange-red luminescence, respectively. The combination of which is promising for white light emission.

  10. Formation of three-dimensional ZnSe-based semiconductor nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alyshev, S. V.; Zabezhaylov, A. O.; Mironov, R. A.; Kozlovsky, V. I.; Dianov, E. M.

    2010-01-01

    Nanostructures consisting of a 10-nm-thick sacrificial layer of ZnMgSSe and a 20-nm-thick stressed bilayer of ZnSSe/ZnSe were grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on GaAs substrates. Upon removal of the sacrificial layer by selective etching, multiwall ZnSSe/ZnSe microtubes were formed.

  11. Utilizing Neon Ion Microscope for GaSb nanopatterning studies: Nanostructure formation and comparison with low energy nanopatterning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Atwani, Osman; Huynh, Chuong; Norris, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Carl Zeiss-neon ion microscope was used to irradiated GaSb surfaces with 5 keV neon. • In-situ imaging using helium beam and ex-situ imaging using an electron beam were performed. • Differences in imaging output between the helium and the electron beam were observed. • Transition occurred in the nanostructure type and formation mechanism as the energy is changed from 2 to 5 keV. • Collision cascade simulations suggested a transition toward bulk-driven mechanisms. - Abstract: Low energy irradiation of GaSb surfaces has been shown to lead to nanopillar formation. Being performed ex-situ, controlling the parameters of the ion beam for controlled nanopattern formation is challenging. While mainly utilized for imaging and cutting purposes, the development of multibeam (helium/neon) ion microscopes has opened the path towards the use of these microscopes for in-situ ion irradiation and nanopatterning studies. In this study, in-situ irradiation (neon ions)/imaging (helium ions) of GaSb surfaces is performed using Carl Zeiss-neon ion microscope at low energies (5 and 10 keV). Imaging with helium ions, nanodots were shown to form at particular fluences after which are smoothed. Ex-situ imaging with SEM showed nanopore formation of size controlled by the ion energy and fluence. Compared to lower energy ex-situ neon ion irradiation at similar fluxes, where nanopillars are formed, the results demonstrated a transition in the nanostructure type and formation mechanism as the energy is changed from 2 to 5 keV. Simulations show an increase in the ballistic diffusion and a decrease in the strength of phase separation as a function of ion energy in agreement with the suppression of nanopillar formation at higher energies. Collision cascade simulations suggest a transition toward bulk-driven mechanisms.

  12. Utilizing Neon Ion Microscope for GaSb nanopatterning studies: Nanostructure formation and comparison with low energy nanopatterning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Atwani, Osman, E-mail: oelatwan25@gmail.com [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Huynh, Chuong [Carl Zeiss Microscopy, LLC, One Corporation Way, Peabody, MA 01960 (United States); Norris, Scott [Department of Mathematics, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275 (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Carl Zeiss-neon ion microscope was used to irradiated GaSb surfaces with 5 keV neon. • In-situ imaging using helium beam and ex-situ imaging using an electron beam were performed. • Differences in imaging output between the helium and the electron beam were observed. • Transition occurred in the nanostructure type and formation mechanism as the energy is changed from 2 to 5 keV. • Collision cascade simulations suggested a transition toward bulk-driven mechanisms. - Abstract: Low energy irradiation of GaSb surfaces has been shown to lead to nanopillar formation. Being performed ex-situ, controlling the parameters of the ion beam for controlled nanopattern formation is challenging. While mainly utilized for imaging and cutting purposes, the development of multibeam (helium/neon) ion microscopes has opened the path towards the use of these microscopes for in-situ ion irradiation and nanopatterning studies. In this study, in-situ irradiation (neon ions)/imaging (helium ions) of GaSb surfaces is performed using Carl Zeiss-neon ion microscope at low energies (5 and 10 keV). Imaging with helium ions, nanodots were shown to form at particular fluences after which are smoothed. Ex-situ imaging with SEM showed nanopore formation of size controlled by the ion energy and fluence. Compared to lower energy ex-situ neon ion irradiation at similar fluxes, where nanopillars are formed, the results demonstrated a transition in the nanostructure type and formation mechanism as the energy is changed from 2 to 5 keV. Simulations show an increase in the ballistic diffusion and a decrease in the strength of phase separation as a function of ion energy in agreement with the suppression of nanopillar formation at higher energies. Collision cascade simulations suggest a transition toward bulk-driven mechanisms.

  13. Formation of Self-assembled Nanostructure on Noble Metal Islands Based on Anodized Aluminum Oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Bae; Kim, Young Sic; Kim, Seong Kyu; Lee, Hae Seong

    2004-01-01

    We have developed the methodology to produce nanoscale gold rods using an AAO template. Each gold rod was generated in every AAO pore. This nanoislands array of gold formed over the AAO pores can be used as corner stones for building nanostructures. We demonstrated this by forming a nanostructure on the Au/AAO by binding a self-assembly class of molecules onto the metal islands. Anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) has been considered an attractive template for simple fabrication of highly-ordered nanostructures. It provides a 2-dimensional array of hexagonal cells with pores of uniform diameter and inter-pore distance that are adjustable in the range of a few tens to hundreds of nanometers. It can be easily grown on an aluminum sheet with high purity by a sequence of several electrochemical steps; electro-polishing, the 1st anodization, etching, and the 2nd anodization. The pores are grown vertically with respect to the AAO surface. The regularity of the pore structure is usually limited by the inherent grain domain in the aluminum sheet to a few micrometers, but can be improved to cover many millimeters of monodomain by pre-indenting the aluminum sheet with SiC 7 or Si 3 N 4 molds. Although fabrication of such molds requires elaborate and costly processes with e-beam nanolithography, such potentially superb regularity can be practically applied to fabrication of nanoscale devices in electronics, optics, biosensors, etc

  14. Influence of Growth Parameters on the Formation of Hydroxyapatite (HAp Nanostructures and Their Cell Viability Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murugesan Manoj

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Morphology controlled hydroxyapatite (HAp nanostructures play a vital role in biomedical engineering, tissue regenerative medicine, biosensors, chemotherapeutic applications, environmental remediation, etc. The present work investigates the influence of temperature, pH and time on the growth of HAp nanostructures using a simple, cost effective and surfactant free chemical approach. The obtained HAp nanostructures were systematically investigated by analytical techniques such as XRD, FESEM, EDX, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. The XRD analysis showed that the hexagonal structure of the hydroxyapatite and average crystallite size was estimated from this analysis. The electron microscopic analysis confirmed the different morphologies obtained by varying the synthesis parameters such as temperature, pH and time. The elemental composition was determined through EDS analysis. FTIR and Raman spectroscopic analysis confirmed the presence of functional groups and the purity and crystallinity of the samples. The biocompatibility and adhesion nature of samples was examined with mouse preosteoblast cells. The obtained results demonstrated good biocompatibility and excellent focal adhesion.

  15. High-energy ion tail formation due to ion acoustic turbulence in the TRIAM-1 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Kazuo; Hiraki, Naoji; Nakamura, Yukio; Itoh, Satoshi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1982-02-01

    The two-component ion energy spectra observed in the TRIAM-1 tokamak are explained as a result of the high-energy ion tail formation due to ion acoustic turbulence driven by a toroidal current pulse for turbulent heating.

  16. Effect of Er{sup 3+} ions on the phase formation and properties of In{sub 2}O{sub 3}nanostructures crystallized upon microwave heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemos, Samantha C.S.; Romeiro, Fernanda C.; Paula, Leonardo F. de [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, 38400-902 Uberlândia, MG (Brazil); Gonçalves, Rosana F. [UNIFESP, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, 09972-270 Diadema, SP (Brazil); Moura, Ana P. de [LIEC, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual Paulista, 14800-900 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Ferrer, Mateus M.; Longo, Elson [INCTMN-UFSCar, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Patrocinio, Antonio Otavio T. [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, 38400-902 Uberlândia, MG (Brazil); Lima, Renata C., E-mail: rclima@ufu.br [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, 38400-902 Uberlândia, MG (Brazil)

    2017-05-15

    Regular sized nanostructures of indium oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were homogeneously grown using a facile route, i.e. a microwave-hydrothermal method combined with rapid thermal treatment in a microwave oven. The presence of Er{sup 3+} doping plays an important role in controlling the formation of cubic (bcc) and rhombohedral (rh) In{sub 2}O{sub 3} phases. The samples presented broad photoluminescent emission bands in the green-orange region, which were attributed to the recombination of electrons at oxygen vacancies. The photocatalytic activities of pure bcc-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} and a bcc-rh-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixture towards the UVA degradation of methylene blue (MB) were also evaluated. The results showed that Er{sup +3} doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity with a photonic efficiency three times higher than the pure oxide. The improved performance was attributed to the higher surface area, the greater concentration of electron traps due the presence of the dopant and the possible formation of heterojunctions between the cubic and rhombohedral phases. - Graphical abstract: Photodegradation curves as a function of irradiation time of the samples obtained upon rapid microwave heating. - Highlights: • Efficient and rapid microwave heating to obtain Er{sup 3+} doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures. • Er{sup 3+} ions doping is fundamental to stabilizing the crystalline rhombohedral phase. • Symmetry breaking induced by vacancies in the lattice leads to photoluminescence. • Surface area of doped sample was two times higher than the surface of pure oxide. • The presence of defects in the lattice structure favors photocatalytic activity.

  17. Mechanism of nanostructure formation in ball-milled Cu and Cu–3wt%Zn studied by X-ray diffraction line profile analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoshkhoo, M. Samadi; Scudino, S.; Bednarcik, J.; Kauffmann, A.; Bahmanpour, H.; Freudenberger, J.; Scattergood, R.; Zehetbauer, M.J.; Koch, C.C.; Eckert, J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Nanostructured powders of Cu and Cu–3wt%Zn were produced using ball milling. • During cryomilling, nanostructure was formed by structural decomposition. • Dynamic recrystallization happened in room–temperature milling of Cu–3wt%Zn. • Structural decomposition took place during room–temperature milling of Cu. -- Abstract: The mechanism of nanostructure formation during cryogenic and room-temperature milling of Cu and Cu–3wt%Zn was investigated using X-ray diffraction line profile analysis. For that, the whole powder pattern modeling approach (WPPM) was used to analyze the evolution of microstructural features including coherently scattering domain size, dislocation density, and density of planar faults. It was found that for all sets of experiments, structural decomposition is the dominant mechanism of nanostructure formation during cryomilling. During subsequent RT-milling, grain refinement still occurs by structural decomposition for pure copper. On the other hand, discontinuous dynamic recrystallization is responsible for nanostructure formation during RT-milling of Cu–3wt%Zn. This is attributed to lower stacking-fault energy of Cu–3wt%Zn compared to pure copper. Finally, room temperature milling reveals the occurrence of a detwinning phenomenon

  18. Regularities of Filamentary Channels Formation During Formation of Nanostructured Non-Metallic Inorganic Coatings in Microplasma Galvanostatic Mode in Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamaev, A. I.; Mamaeva, V. A.; Kolenchin, N. F.; Chubenko, A. K.; Kovalskaya, Ya. B.; Konstantinova, T. A.; Dolgova, Yu. N.; Beletskaya, E. Yu.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the theoretical models describing the growth of filamentary channels of nanostructured non-metallic coatings formed by anodizing and microplasma oxidation. The authors identified dependences of the number of pores on the coating thickness. The paper presents graphic dependences of the number of filamentary channels on the process time and the coating thickness. These dependences allow calculating through and surface porosity, and in cases, when the pores are filled with functional material, they allow calculating the concentration distribution of this functional material throughout the coating thickness. The theoretical models enhance our understanding of the nature of anode processes and can be used to describe and forecast the growth and filling of porous coatings, so they can also be used to create functional and bioactive materials.

  19. Dynamics study of green AuNP formation and their basis for Au-Pt core-shell nanostructure synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Seselj, Nedjeljko; Ulstrup, Jens

    The SAMENS method (saccharide - based approach to metallic nanostructure synthesis) is a synthesis platform for metallic nanostructures. The method has been developed since 2008 and can produce nanostructures of various sizes, shapes and compositions. Recently, a new methodology for studying the ...

  20. Comparative study of He bubble formation in nanostructured reduced activation steel and its coarsen-grained counterpart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. B.; Zhang, J. H.; Ji, Y. Z.; Xia, L. D.; Liu, H. P.; Yun, D.; He, C. H.; Zhang, C.; Yang, Z. G.

    2018-03-01

    High temperature (550 °C) He ions irradiation was performed on nanostructured (NS) and coarsen-grained (CG) reduced activation steel to investigate the effects of GBs/interfaces on the formation of bubbles during irradiation. Experimental results showed that He bubbles were preferentially trapped at dislocations and/or grain boundaries (GBs) for both of the samples. Void denuded zones (VDZs) were observed in the CG samples, while VDZs near GBs were unobvious in NS sample. However, both the average bubble size and the bubble density in peak damage region of the CG sample were significantly larger than that observed in the NS sample, which indicated that GBs play an important role during the irradiation, and the NS steel had better irradiation resistance than its CG counterpart.

  1. Facile conversion of bulk metal surface to metal oxide single-crystalline nanostructures by microwave irradiation: Formation of pure or Cr-doped hematite nanostructure arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Seungho; Jeong, Haeyoon; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2010-01-01

    We report a method for converting the surfaces of bulk metal substrates (pure iron or stainless steel) to metal oxide (hematite or Cr-doped hematite) nanostructures using microwave irradiation. When microwave radiation (2.45 GHz, single-mode) was applied to a metal substrate under the flow of a gas mixture containing O 2 and Ar, metal oxide nanostructures formed and entirely covered the substrate. The nanostructures were single crystalline, and the atomic ratios of the substrate metals were preserved in the nanostructures. When a pure iron sheet was used as a substrate, hematite nanowires (1000 W microwave radiation) or nanosheets (1800 W microwave radiation) formed on the surface of the substrate. When a SUS410 sheet was used as a substrate, slightly curved rod-like nanostructures were synthesized. The oxidation states of Fe and Cr in these nanorods were Fe 3+ and Cr 3+ . Quantitative analyses revealed an average Fe/Cr atomic ratio of 9.2, nearly identical to the ratio of the metals in the SUS410 substrate.

  2. New roots to formation of nanostructures on glass surface through anodic oxidation of sputtered aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Inoue, Song-Zhu Chu, Kenji Wada, Di Li and Hajime Haneda

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available New processes for the preparation of nanostructure on glass surfaces have been developed through anodic oxidation of sputtered aluminum. Aluminum thin film sputtered on a tin doped indium oxide (ITO thin film on a glass surface was converted into alumina by anodic oxidation. The anodic alumina gave nanometer size pore array standing vertically on the glass surface. Kinds of acids used in the anodic oxidation changed the pore size drastically. The employment of phosphoric acid solution gave several tens nanometer size pores. Oxalic acid cases produced a few tens nanometer size pores and sulfuric acid solution provided a few nanometer size pores. The number of pores in a unit area could be changed with varying the applied voltage in the anodization and the pore sizes could be increased by phosphoric acid etching. The specimen consisting of a glass substrate with the alumina nanostructures on the surface could transmit UV and visible light. An etched specimen was dipped in a TiO2 sol solution, resulting in the impregnation of TiO2 sol into the pores of alumina layer. The TiO2 sol was heated at ~400 °C for 2 h, converting into anatase phase TiO2. The specimens possessing TiO2 film on the pore wall were transparent to the light in UV–Visible region. The electro deposition technique was applied to the introduction of Ni metal into pores, giving Ni nanorod array on the glass surface. The removal of the barrier layer alumina at the bottom of the pores was necessary to attain smooth electro deposition of Ni. The photo catalytic function of the specimens possessing TiO2 nanotube array was investigated in the decomposition of acetaldehyde gas under the irradiation of UV light, showing that the rate of the decomposition was quite large.

  3. The effect of composition on the formation of light-emitting Si nanostructures in SiOx layers on irradiation with swift heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachurin, G. A.; Cherkova, S. G.; Marin, D. V.; Kesler, V. G.; Skuratov, V. A.; Cherkov, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    The SiO x layers different in composition (0 14 cm −2 to stimulate the formation of light-emitting Si nanostructures. The irradiation gives rise to a photoluminescence band with the parameters dependent on x. As the Si content is increased, the photoluminescence is first enhanced, with the peak remaining arranged near the wavelength λ ≈ 600 nm, and then the peak shifts to λ ≈ 800 nm. It is concluded that the emission sources are quantum-confined nanoprecipitates formed by disproportionation of SiO x in ion tracks due to profound ionization losses. Changes in the photoluminescence spectrum with increasing x are attributed firstly to the increase in the probability of formation of nanoprecipitates and then to the increase in their dimensions; the latter effect is accompanied with a shift of the emission band to longer wavelengths. The subsequent quenching of photoluminescence is interpreted as a result of the removal of quantum confinement in nanoprecipitates and their coagulation.

  4. The effect of composition on the formation of light-emitting Si nanostructures in SiO{sub x} layers on irradiation with swift heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachurin, G. A., E-mail: kachurin@isp.nsc.ru; Cherkova, S. G.; Marin, D. V.; Kesler, V. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Skuratov, V. A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Cherkov, A. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2011-03-15

    The SiO{sub x} layers different in composition (0 < x < 2) are irradiated with Xe ions with the energy 167 MeV and the dose 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} to stimulate the formation of light-emitting Si nanostructures. The irradiation gives rise to a photoluminescence band with the parameters dependent on x. As the Si content is increased, the photoluminescence is first enhanced, with the peak remaining arranged near the wavelength {lambda} Almost-Equal-To 600 nm, and then the peak shifts to {lambda} Almost-Equal-To 800 nm. It is concluded that the emission sources are quantum-confined nanoprecipitates formed by disproportionation of SiO{sub x} in ion tracks due to profound ionization losses. Changes in the photoluminescence spectrum with increasing x are attributed firstly to the increase in the probability of formation of nanoprecipitates and then to the increase in their dimensions; the latter effect is accompanied with a shift of the emission band to longer wavelengths. The subsequent quenching of photoluminescence is interpreted as a result of the removal of quantum confinement in nanoprecipitates and their coagulation.

  5. Formation of superhydrophobic/superhydrophilic patterns by combination of nanostructure-imprinted perfluoropolymer and nanostructured silicon oxide for biological droplet generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Taizo; Shimizu, Kazunori; Kaizuma, Yoshihiro; Konishi, Satoshi

    2011-03-01

    In this letter, we report a technology for fabricating superhydrophobic/superhydrophilic patterns using a combination of a nanostructure-imprinted perfluoropolymer and nanostructured silicon oxide. In our previous study, we used a combination of hydrophobic and superhydrophilic materials. However, it was difficult to split low-surface-tension liquids such as biological liquids into droplets solely using hydrophobic/hydrophilic patterns. In this study, the contact angle of the hydrophobic region was enhanced from 109.3° to 155.6° by performing nanostructure imprinting on a damage-reduced perfluoropolymer. The developed superhydrophobic/superhydrophilic patterns allowed the splitting of even those media that contained fetal bovine serum into droplets of a desired shape.

  6. Dynamics of Green AuNP Formation and Their Application in Core-Shell Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Zhang, Jingdong; Jensen, Palle Skovhus

    The formation of gold nanoparticles in our optimized synthesis is achieved through reduction of tetrachloroauric acid in 2 - (N - morpholino)ethanesulphonic acid (MES) buffered glucose and stabilization by starch at room temperature. The formation has been followed by measuring the electrochemica...

  7. Optical instabilities and chaos due to the virtual formation of biexcitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Trung Dan.

    1994-07-01

    Optical instabilities and chaos due to virtual formation of biexcitons in optically excited semiconductors are investigated. A complete linear stability analysis of steady-state bistable solutions of nonlinear coupled differential equations describing the nonlinear dynamics of semiconductors is carried out. The dynamical solutions are studied numerically using an iterative procedure. (author). 20 refs, 3 figs

  8. Formation of nanostructured weldments in the Al-Si system using electrospark welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milligan, J.; Heard, D.W.; Brochu, M.

    2010-01-01

    Electrospark welding (ESW) electrodes were manufactured from three binary aluminum-silicon alloys consisting of 12 and 17 wt% silicon, produced using chill and sand casting. The electrodes were used to assess the feasibility of producing aluminum-silicon weldments consisting of nano-sized silicon particles embedded in nanostructured aluminum matrix, using the ESW process. Line tests were performed to determine the optimal processing parameters resulting in a high quality deposit. X-ray diffraction (XRD) as well as optical and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed to determine the composition and microstructure of the depositions. It was determined that a capacitance of 110 μF and a voltage of 100 V resulted in the highest quality deposition. Furthermore it was determined that the ESW process was capable of producing a microstructure consisting of an extremely fine-grained silicon phase ranging from ∼6 to 50 nm for the eutectic composition, and 10-200 nm for the hypereutectic compositions. Finally it was determined that the functional thickness limit of the aluminum-silicon deposit produced under these process parameters was 120 μm.

  9. Formation of nanostructures on HOPG surface in presence of surfactant atom during low energy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjan, M., E-mail: ranjanm@ipr.res.in; Joshi, P.; Mukherjee, S.

    2016-07-15

    Low energy ions beam often develop periodic patterns on surfaces under normal or off-normal incidence. Formation of such periodic patterns depends on the substrate material, the ion beam parameters, and the processing conditions. Processing conditions introduce unwanted contaminant atoms, which also play strong role in pattern formation by changing the effective sputtering yield of the material. In this work we have analysed the effect of Cu, Fe and Al impurities introduced during low energy Ar{sup +} ion irradiation on HOPG substrate. It is observed that by changing the species of foreign atoms the surface topography changes drastically. The observed surface topography is co-related with the modified sputtering yield of HOPG. Presence of Cu and Fe amplify the effective sputtering yield of HOPG, so that the required threshold for the pattern formation is achieved with the given fluence, whereas Al does not lead to any significant change in the effective yield and hence no pattern formation occurs.

  10. Formation of carbon nanostructures using acetylene, argon-acetylene and argon-hydrogen-acetylene plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcinauskas, L.; Grigonis, A.; Minialga, V.; Marcinauskas, L.; Valincius, V.

    2013-01-01

    The films prepared in argon-acetylene plasma are attributed to graphite-like carbon films. Addition of the hydrogen decreases growth rate and the surface roughness of the films and lead to the formation of nanocrystalline graphite. The carbon nanotubes were formed at low (≤ 450°C; p = 40 Pa) temperature in pure acetylene plasma. (authors)

  11. Repair for mitral stenosis due to pannus formation after Duran ring annuloplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Seunghwan; Cho, Seong Ho; Yang, Ji-Hyuk; Park, Pyo Won

    2010-12-01

    Mitral stenosis after mitral repair with using an annuloplasty ring is not common and it is almost always due to pannus formation. Mitral valve replacement was required in most of the previous cases of pannus covering the mitral valve leaflet, which could not be stripped off without damaging the valve leaflets. In two cases, we removed the previous annuloplasty ring and pannus without leaflet injury, and we successfully repaired the mitral valve. During the follow-up of 4 months and 39 months respectively, we observed improvement of the patients' symptoms and good valvular function. Redo mitral repair may be a possible method for treating mitral stenosis due to pannus formation after ring annuloplasty. Copyright © 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Synergistic methane formation on pyrolytic graphite due to combined H+ ion and H0 atom impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haasz, A.A.; Davis, J.W.; Auciello, O.; Strangeby, P.C.; Vietzke, E.; Flaskamp, K.; Philipps, V.

    1986-06-01

    Exposure of graphite to multispecies hydrogenic impact, as is the case in tokamaks, could lead to synergistic mechanisms resulting in an enhancement of methane formation, and consequently in increased carbon erosion. We present results obtained in controlled experiments in our laboratories in Toronto and Juelich for the synergistic methane production due to combined sub-eV H 0 atoms and energetic H + ion impact on pyrolytic graphite. Flux densities were 10 14 -2x10 16 H 0 /cm 2 s for the sub-eV H 0 atoms and 6x10 12 -5x10 15 H + /cm 2 for H + ions of 300 eV to 2.5 keV energy. Synergistic factors (defined as the ratio of methane formation rate due to combined H 0 and H + fluxes to the sum of the formation rates due to separate species impact) ranged from about 1.5-15 for the experimental parameters used. In addition, a spectrum of formed hydrocarbons in the synergistic reaction of H + and H 0 on graphite is presented

  13. Self-organized formation of metal-carbon nanostructures by hyperthermal ion deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannstein, I.K.

    2006-04-26

    The quasi-simultaneous deposition of mass-selected hyperthermal carbon and metal ions results in a variety of interesting film morphologies, depending on the metal used and the deposition conditions. The observed features are of the order of a few nanometres and are therefore interesting for future potential applications in the various fields of nanotechnology. The present study focuses on the structural analysis of amorphous carbon films containing either copper, silver, gold, or iron using amongst others Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy. The film morphologies found are as follows: copper-containing films consist of copper nanoclusters with sizes ranging from about 3 to 9 nm uniformly distributed throughout the amorphous carbon matrix. The cluster size hereby rises with the copper content of the films. The silver containing films decompose into a pure amorphous carbon film with silver agglomerates at the surface. Both, the gold- and the iron-containing films show a multilayer structure of metal-rich layers with higher cluster density separated by metal-depleted amorphous carbon layers. The layer distances are of the order of up to 15 nm in the case of gold-carbon films and 7 nm in the case of iron-carbon films. The formation of theses different structures cannot be treated in the context of conventional self-organization mechanisms basing upon thermal diffusion and equilibrium thermodynamics. Instead, an ion-induced atomic transport, sputtering effects, and the stability of small metal clusters were taken into account in order to model the structure formation processes. A similar multilayer morphology was recently also reported in the literature for metal-carbon films grown by magnetron sputtering techniques. In order to investigate, whether the mechanisms are the same as in the case of the ion beam deposited films described above, first experiments were conducted

  14. Microsized structures assisted nanostructure formation on ZnSe wafer by femtosecond laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shutong; Feng, Guoying; Zhou, Shouhuan

    2014-01-01

    Micro/nano patterning of ZnSe wafer is demonstrated by femtosecond laser irradiation through a diffracting pinhole. The irradiation results obtained at fluences above the ablation threshold are characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The microsized structure with low spatial frequency has a good agreement with Fresnel diffraction theory. Laser induced periodic surface structures and laser-induced periodic curvelet surface structures with high spatial frequency have been found on the surfaces of microsized structures, such as spikes and valleys. We interpret its formation in terms of the interference between the reflected laser field on the surface of the valley and the incident laser pulse

  15. Electrochemical formation and characterization of Au nanostructures on a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arroyo Gómez, José J.; Zubieta, Carolina; Ferullo, Ricardo M.; García, Silvana G.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The electrodeposition of Au on HOPG tends to follow the response predicted for a 3D instantaneous nucleation mechanism in the potential range considered. • By choosing suitable nucleation and growth pulses, one-dimensional deposits were possible, preferentially located on step edges of the HOPG substrate. • Quantum-mechanical calculations confirmed the tendency of Au atoms to join selectively on the HOPG step edges, at the early stages of Au electrodeposition. - Abstract: The electrochemical formation of Au nanoparticles on a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) substrate using conventional electrochemical techniques and ex-situ AFM is reported. From the potentiostatic current transients studies, the Au electrodeposition process on HOPG surfaces was described, within the potential range considered, by a model involving instantaneous nucleation and diffusion controlled 3D growth, which was corroborated by the microscopic analysis. Initially, three-dimensional (3D) hemispherical nanoparticles distributed on surface defects (step edges) of the substrate were observed, with increasing particle size at more negative potentials. The double potential pulse technique allowed the formation of rounded deposits at low deposition potentials, which tend to form lines of nuclei aligned in defined directions leading to 3D ordered structures. By choosing suitable nucleation and growth pulses, one-dimensional (1D) deposits were possible, preferentially located on step edges of the HOPG substrate. Quantum-mechanical calculations confirmed the tendency of Au atoms to join selectively on surface defects, such as the HOPG step edges, at the early stages of Au electrodeposition.

  16. Formation and characterization of Ni nanostructures in porous InP - from crystallites to wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerngross, M.-D.; Hrkac, V.; Kienle, L.; Carstensen, J.; Foell, H.

    2013-01-01

    In this work the galvanic formation of Ni crystallites and Ni nanowires with very high aspect ratios (>1000:1) in porous InP is presented. By depositing a dielectric interlayer on the InP pore walls it is possible to produce very high aspect ratio Ni nanowires. The coercivity of these nanowires is about 100 Oe (in-plane) and 240 Oe (out-of-plane), while the coercivity of the crystallites lies in between these values. The in-plane remanence squareness of the Ni nanowires is very low (S ∼ 0.08), out-of-plane it is 0.36. For the Ni crystallites the remanence squareness lies in between the range given for the Ni nanowires. (author)

  17. Formation of light-emitting nanostructures in layers of stoichiometric SiO{sub 2} irradiated with swift heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachurin, G. A., E-mail: kachurin@isp.nsc.ru; Cherkova, S. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Russian Federation); Skuratov, V. A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Marin, D. V.; Kesler, V. G.; Volodin, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Russian Federation)

    2011-10-15

    Thermally grown SiO{sub 2} layers have been irradiated with 700-MeV Bi ions with doses of (3-10) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}. It is found that, even after a dose of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}, a photoluminescence band in the region of 600 nm appears. Its intensity levels off at a dose of {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}. The nature of the emission centers is studied by the methods of infrared transmission, Raman scattering, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ellipsometry, and the reaction to passivating low-temperature anneals. It is established that irradiation brings about a decrease in the number of Si-O bonds with a relevant increase in the Si-Si bonds. It is assumed that the photoluminescence is caused by nanostructures containing an excess Si and/or having a deficit of O. The reaction of reduction of SiO{sub 2} proceeds in ion tracks due to high levels of ionization and heating within these tracks. The dose dependence is used to estimate the diameter of a track at 8-9 nm.

  18. Formation of light-emitting nanostructures in layers of stoichiometric SiO2 irradiated with swift heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachurin, G. A.; Cherkova, S. G.; Skuratov, V. A.; Marin, D. V.; Kesler, V. G.; Volodin, V. A.

    2011-01-01

    Thermally grown SiO 2 layers have been irradiated with 700-MeV Bi ions with doses of (3–10) × 10 12 cm −2 . It is found that, even after a dose of 3 × 10 12 cm −2 , a photoluminescence band in the region of 600 nm appears. Its intensity levels off at a dose of ∼5 × 10 12 cm −2 . The nature of the emission centers is studied by the methods of infrared transmission, Raman scattering, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ellipsometry, and the reaction to passivating low-temperature anneals. It is established that irradiation brings about a decrease in the number of Si-O bonds with a relevant increase in the Si-Si bonds. It is assumed that the photoluminescence is caused by nanostructures containing an excess Si and/or having a deficit of O. The reaction of reduction of SiO 2 proceeds in ion tracks due to high levels of ionization and heating within these tracks. The dose dependence is used to estimate the diameter of a track at 8–9 nm.

  19. Dystrophic Cutaneous Calcification and Metaplastic Bone Formation due to Long Term Bisphosphonate Use in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Murat Tatlı

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bisphosphonates are widely used in the treatment of breast cancer with bone metastases. We report a case of a female with breast cancer presented with a rash around a previous mastectomy site and a discharge lesion on her right chest wall in August 2010. Biopsy of the lesion showed dystrophic calcification and metaplastic bone formation. The patient’s history revealed a long term use of zoledronic acid for the treatment of breast cancer with bone metastasis. We stopped the treatment since we believed that the cutaneous dystrophic calcification could be associated with her long term bisphosphonate therapy. Adverse cutaneous events with bisphosphonates are very rare, and dystrophic calcification has not been reported previously. The dystrophic calcification and metaplastic bone formation in this patient are thought to be due to long term bisphosphonate usage.

  20. Cracks growth behaviors of commercial pure titanium under nanosecond laser irradiation for formation of nanostructure-covered microstructures (with sub-5-μm)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, A. F.; Wang, W. J.; Mei, X. S.; Zheng, B. X.; Yan, Z. X.

    2016-11-01

    This study reported on the formation of sub-5-μm microstructures covered on titanium by cracks growth under 10-ns laser radiation at the wavelength of 532 nm and its induced light modification for production of nanostructures. The electric field intensity and laser power density absorbed by commercial pure titanium were computed to investigate the self-trapping introduced by cracks and the effect of surface morphology on laser propagation characteristics. It is found that nanostructures can form at the surface with the curvature radius below 20 μm. Meanwhile, variable laser fluences were applied to explore the evolution of cracks on commercial pure titanium with or without melt as spot overlap number increased. Experimental study was first performed at the peak laser fluence of 1.063 J/cm2 to investigate the microstructures induced only by cracks growth. The results demonstrated that angular microstructures with size between 1.68 μm and 4.74 μm was obtained and no nanostructure covered. Then, at the peak laser fluence of 2.126 J/cm2, there were some nanostructures covered on the melt-induced curved microstructured surface. However, surface molten material submerged in the most of cracks at the spot overlap number of 744, where the old cracks disappeared. The results indicated that there was too much molten material and melting time at the peak laser fluence of 2.126 J/cm2, which was not suitable for obtainment of perfect micro-nano structures. On this basis, peak laser fluence was reduced down to 1.595 J/cm2 and the sharp sub-5 μm microstructures with nanostructures covered was obtained at spot overlap number of 3720.

  1. Structural investigations of silicon nanostructures grown by self-organized island formation for photovoltaic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roczen, Maurizio; Malguth, Enno; Barthel, Thomas; Gref, Orman; Toefflinger, Jan A.; Schoepke, Andreas; Schmidt, Manfred; Ruske, Florian; Korte, Lars; Rech, Bernd [Institute for Silicon Photovoltaics, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Schade, Martin; Leipner, Hartmut S. [Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Interdisziplinaeres Zentrum fuer Materialwissenschaften, Halle (Germany); Callsen, Gordon; Hoffmann, Axel [Technische Universitaet Berlin, Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Berlin (Germany); Phillips, Matthew R. [University of Technology Sydney, Department of Physics and Advanced Materials, NSW (Australia)

    2012-09-15

    The self-organized growth of crystalline silicon nanodots and their structural characteristics are investigated. For the nanodot synthesis, thin amorphous silicon (a-Si) layers with different thicknesses have been deposited onto the ultrathin (2 nm) oxidized (111) surface of Si wafers by electron beam evaporation under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. The solid phase crystallization of the initial layer is induced by a subsequent in situ annealing step at 700 C, which leads to the dewetting of the initial a-Si layer. This process results in the self-organized formation of highly crystalline Si nanodot islands. Scanning electron microscopy confirms that size, shape, and planar distribution of the nanodots depend on the thickness of the initial a-Si layer. Cross-sectional investigations reveal a single-crystalline structure of the nanodots. This characteristic is observed as long as the thickness of the initial a-Si layer remains under a certain threshold triggering coalescence. The underlying ultra-thin oxide is not structurally affected by the dewetting process. Furthermore, a method for the fabrication of close-packed stacks of nanodots is presented, in which each nanodot is covered by a 2 nm thick SiO{sub 2} shell. The chemical composition of these ensembles exhibits an abrupt Si/SiO{sub 2} interface with a low amount of suboxides. A minority charge carrier lifetime of 18 {mu}s inside of the nanodots is determined. (orig.)

  2. Pyrene synthesis in circumstellar envelopes and its role in the formation of 2D nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Long; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Xu, Bo; Ablikim, Utuq; Ahmed, Musahid; Joshi, Dharati; Veber, Gregory; Fischer, Felix R.; Mebel, Alexander M.

    2018-05-01

    For the past decades, the hydrogen-abstraction/acetylene-addition (HACA) mechanism has been instrumental in attempting to untangle the origin of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as identified in carbonaceous meteorites such as Allende and Murchison. However, the fundamental reaction mechanisms leading to the synthesis of PAHs beyond phenanthrene (C14H10) are still unknown. By exploring the reaction of the 4-phenanthrenyl radical (C14H9•) with acetylene (C2H2) under conditions prevalent in carbon-rich circumstellar environments, we show evidence of a facile, isomer-selective formation of pyrene (C16H10). Along with the hydrogen-abstraction/vinylacetylene-addition (HAVA) mechanism, molecular mass growth processes from pyrene may lead through systematic ring expansions not only to more complex PAHs, but ultimately to 2D graphene-type structures. These fundamental reaction mechanisms are crucial to facilitate an understanding of the origin and evolution of the molecular universe and, in particular, of carbon in our Galaxy.

  3. Dynamics of seed magnetic island formation due to geometrically coupled perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegna, C.C.; Callen, J.D.; LaHaye, R.J.

    1998-06-01

    Seed magnetic island formation due to a dynamically growing external source in toroidal confinement devices is modeled as an initial value forced reconnection problem. For an external source whose amplitude grows on a time scale quickly compared to the Sweet-Parker time of resistive magnetohydrodynamics, the induced reconnection is characterized by a current sheet and a reconnected flux amplitude which lags in time the source amplitude. This suggests that neoclassical tearing modes, whose excitation requires a seed magnetic island, are more difficult to cause in high Lundquist number plasmas

  4. Computer Code for Nanostructure Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filikhin, Igor; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2009-01-01

    Due to their small size, nanostructures can have stress and thermal gradients that are larger than any macroscopic analogue. These gradients can lead to specific regions that are susceptible to failure via processes such as plastic deformation by dislocation emission, chemical debonding, and interfacial alloying. A program has been developed that rigorously simulates and predicts optoelectronic properties of nanostructures of virtually any geometrical complexity and material composition. It can be used in simulations of energy level structure, wave functions, density of states of spatially configured phonon-coupled electrons, excitons in quantum dots, quantum rings, quantum ring complexes, and more. The code can be used to calculate stress distributions and thermal transport properties for a variety of nanostructures and interfaces, transport and scattering at nanoscale interfaces and surfaces under various stress states, and alloy compositional gradients. The code allows users to perform modeling of charge transport processes through quantum-dot (QD) arrays as functions of inter-dot distance, array order versus disorder, QD orientation, shape, size, and chemical composition for applications in photovoltaics and physical properties of QD-based biochemical sensors. The code can be used to study the hot exciton formation/relation dynamics in arrays of QDs of different shapes and sizes at different temperatures. It also can be used to understand the relation among the deposition parameters and inherent stresses, strain deformation, heat flow, and failure of nanostructures.

  5. Deletion of IFT80 Impairs Epiphyseal and Articular Cartilage Formation Due to Disruption of Chondrocyte Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xue; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport proteins (IFT) play important roles in cilia formation and organ development. Partial loss of IFT80 function leads Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (JATD) or short-rib polydactyly (SRP) syndrome type III, displaying narrow thoracic cavity and multiple cartilage anomalies. However, it is unknown how IFT80 regulates cartilage formation. To define the role and mechanism of IFT80 in chondrocyte function and cartilage formation, we generated a Col2α1; IFT80f/f mouse model by crossing IFT80f/f mice with inducible Col2α1-CreER mice, and deleted IFT80 in chondrocyte lineage by injection of tamoxifen into the mice in embryonic or postnatal stage. Loss of IFT80 in the embryonic stage resulted in short limbs at birth. Histological studies showed that IFT80-deficient mice have shortened cartilage with marked changes in cellular morphology and organization in the resting, proliferative, pre-hypertrophic, and hypertrophic zones. Moreover, deletion of IFT80 in the postnatal stage led to mouse stunted growth with shortened growth plate but thickened articular cartilage. Defects of ciliogenesis were found in the cartilage of IFT80-deficient mice and primary IFT80-deficient chondrocytes. Further study showed that chondrogenic differentiation was significantly inhibited in IFT80-deficient mice due to reduced hedgehog (Hh) signaling and increased Wnt signaling activities. These findings demonstrate that loss of IFT80 blocks chondrocyte differentiation by disruption of ciliogenesis and alteration of Hh and Wnt signaling transduction, which in turn alters epiphyseal and articular cartilage formation. PMID:26098911

  6. Cracks growth behaviors of commercial pure titanium under nanosecond laser irradiation for formation of nanostructure-covered microstructures (with sub-5-μm)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, A.F.; Wang, W.J., E-mail: wenjunwang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Mei, X.S.; Zheng, B.X.; Yan, Z.X.

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • The sub-5-μm microstructures on commercial pure titanium are creatively obtained based on cracks growth under 10 ns laser irradiation. • The distribution modification of laser energy induced by cambered microstructures was theoretically analyzed to produce nanostructures. • The sharp micro-nano structures under combined action of crack growth and hot-melt are obtained. - Abstract: This study reported on the formation of sub-5-μm microstructures covered on titanium by cracks growth under 10-ns laser radiation at the wavelength of 532 nm and its induced light modification for production of nanostructures. The electric field intensity and laser power density absorbed by commercial pure titanium were computed to investigate the self-trapping introduced by cracks and the effect of surface morphology on laser propagation characteristics. It is found that nanostructures can form at the surface with the curvature radius below 20 μm. Meanwhile, variable laser fluences were applied to explore the evolution of cracks on commercial pure titanium with or without melt as spot overlap number increased. Experimental study was first performed at the peak laser fluence of 1.063 J/cm{sup 2} to investigate the microstructures induced only by cracks growth. The results demonstrated that angular microstructures with size between 1.68 μm and 4.74 μm was obtained and no nanostructure covered. Then, at the peak laser fluence of 2.126 J/cm{sup 2}, there were some nanostructures covered on the melt-induced curved microstructured surface. However, surface molten material submerged in the most of cracks at the spot overlap number of 744, where the old cracks disappeared. The results indicated that there was too much molten material and melting time at the peak laser fluence of 2.126 J/cm{sup 2}, which was not suitable for obtainment of perfect micro-nano structures. On this basis, peak laser fluence was reduced down to 1.595 J/cm{sup 2} and the sharp sub–5

  7. Irreversible fouling of membrane bioreactors due to formation of a non-biofilm gel layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poorasgari, Eskandar; Larsen, Poul; Zheng, Xing

    2014-01-01

    Extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS), known to contribute to fouling in membrane bio-reactors (MBRs), are generally divided into bound and free EPS. The free EPS are able to form a gel layer on the membrane active surface. The mechanisms involved in formation of such layer and its effects...... on performance of the MBR membranes were studied. The free EPS, extracted by centrifugation and microfiltration, contained a significant amount of humic-like substances. Under static contact to the membrane, adsorption of humic-like substances to the membrane occurred and could be explained by conventional...... adsorption kinetics. Due to static adsorption, surface roughness of the membrane declined significantly, indicating that adsorbed matters to the membranefilled the cavities of the membrane surface. Filtration of the free EPS caused 50% waterflux decline. The fouling resistance linearly increased...

  8. STAR FORMATION SUPPRESSION DUE TO JET FEEDBACK IN RADIO GALAXIES WITH SHOCKED WARM MOLECULAR GAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanz, Lauranne; Ogle, Patrick M.; Appleton, Philip N.; Alatalo, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    We present Herschel observations of 22 radio galaxies, selected for the presence of shocked, warm molecular hydrogen emission. We measured and modeled spectral energy distributions in 33 bands from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared to investigate the impact of jet feedback on star formation activity. These galaxies are massive, early-type galaxies with normal gas-to-dust ratios, covering a range of optical and infrared colors. We find that the star formation rate (SFR) is suppressed by a factor of ∼3–6, depending on how molecular gas mass is estimated. We suggest that this suppression is due to the shocks driven by the radio jets injecting turbulence into the interstellar medium (ISM), which also powers the luminous warm H 2 line emission. Approximately 25% of the sample shows suppression by more than a factor of 10. However, the degree of SFR suppression does not correlate with indicators of jet feedback including jet power, diffuse X-ray emission, or intensity of warm molecular H 2 emission, suggesting that while injected turbulence likely impacts star formation, the process is not purely parameterized by the amount of mechanical energy dissipated into the ISM. Radio galaxies with shocked warm molecular gas cover a wide range in SFR–stellar mass space, indicating that these galaxies are in a variety of evolutionary states, from actively star-forming and gas-rich to quiescent and gas-poor. SFR suppression appears to have the largest impact on the evolution of galaxies that are moderately gas-rich.

  9. Singular deposit formation in PWR due to electrokinetic phenomena - application to SG clogging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillodo, M.; Muller, T.; Barale, M.; Foucault, M. [AREVA NP SAS, Technical Centre (France); Clinard, M.-H.; Brun, C.; Chahma, F. [AREVA NP SAS, Chemistry and Radiochemistry Group (France); Corredera, G.; De Bouvier, O. [Electricite de France, Centre d' Expertise de I' inspection dans les domaines de la Realisation et de l' Exploitation (France)

    2009-07-01

    The deposits which cause clogging of the 'foils' of the tube support plates (TSP) in Steam Generators (SG) of PWR present two characteristics which put forward that the mechanism at the origin of their formation is different from the mechanism that drives the formation of homogeneous deposits leading to the fouling of the free spans of SG tubes. Clogging occurs near the leading edge of the TSP and the deposits appear as diaphragms localized between both TSP and SG tubing materials, while the major part of the tube/TSP interstice presents little or no significant clogging. This type of deposit seems rather comparable to the ones which were reproduced in Lab tests to explain the flow rate instabilities observed on a French unit during hot shutdown in the 90's. The deposits which cause TSP clogging are owed to a discontinuity of the streaming currents in the vicinity of a surface singularity (orifices, scratches ...) which, in very low conductivity environment, produce local potential variations and/or current loop in the metallic pipe material due to electrokinetic effects. Deposits can be built by two mechanisms which may or not coexist: (i) accumulation of particles stabilized by an electrostatic attraction due to the local variation of electrokinetic potential, and (ii) crystalline growth of magnetite produced by the oxidation of ferrous ions on the anodic branch of a current loop. Lab investigations carried out by AREVA NP Technical Centre since the end of the 90's showed that this type of deposit occurs when the redox potential is higher than a critical value, and can be gradually dissolved when the potential becomes lower than this value which depends on the 'Material - Chemistry' couple. Special emphasis will be given in this paper to the TSP clogging of SG in PWR secondary coolant dealing particularly with the potential strong effect of electrokinetic phenomena in low conductive environment and in high temperature conditions

  10. Damage formation and annealing in InP due to swift heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamarou, A.; Wesch, W.; Wendler, E.; Klaumuenzer, S.

    2004-01-01

    Virgin and pre-damaged InP samples were irradiated at room temperature (RT) and at liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) with different fluences of 140 MeV Kr, 390 MeV Xe and 600 MeV Au ions. The pre-damaging was performed with 600 keV Ge ions at LNT to obtain different damage levels. The samples were analysed by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) in random and channelling geometry. A relatively weak damage accumulation in virgin InP and a very significant defect annealing in pre-damaged InP occurs due to 140 MeV Kr irradiation. The damaging of virgin InP with 390 MeV Xe and 600 MeV Au is much more efficient in comparison with that of 140 MeV Kr. Further, annealing of the pre-damaged InP due to 390 MeV Xe irradiation is hardly visible. At LNT InP appears to be much more radiation-resistant to swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation than at RT. Our results show that during SHI irradiation of InP both damage formation and damage annealing occur simultaneously. Whether the first or the second one plays a more important role depends on the SHI mass and energy

  11. Laser generation of nanostructures on the surface and in the bulk of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bityurin, N M

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers nanostructuring of solid surfaces by nano-optical techniques, primarily by laser particle nanolithography. Threshold processes are examined that can be used for laser structuring of solid surfaces, with particular attention to laser swelling of materials. Fundamental spatial resolution issues in three-dimensional (3D) laser nanostructuring are analysed with application to laser nanopolymerisation and 3D optical information recording. The formation of nanostructures in the bulk of solids due to their structural instability under irradiation is exemplified by photoinduced formation of nanocomposites. (photonics and nanotechnology)

  12. Template-directed formation of functional complex metal-oxide nanostructures by combination of sol-gel processing and spin coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Y.C.; Kim, J.; Bu, S.D.

    2006-01-01

    We report the template-based formation of functional complex metal-oxide nanostructures by a combination of sol-gel processing and spin coating. This method employs the spin-coating of a sol-gel solution into an anodic aluminum oxide membrane (SSAM). Various metal-oxide nanowires and nanotubes with a high aspect-ratio were prepared. The aspect-ratios of the PbO 2 nanowires and Pb(Zr 0.52 Ti 0.48 )O 3 nanowires were about 300 and 400, respectively, and their diameters were about 50 nm. The fabricated PbTiO 3 nanotubes have a relatively constant wall thickness of about 20 nm with an outer diameter of about 60 nm. The deposition time for all of the fabricated metal-oxide nanowires and nanotubes is less than 120 s, which is far shorter than those required in both the sol-gel dipping and sol-gel electrophoretic methods. These results indicate that the SSAM method can be a versatile pathway to prepare functional complex metal-oxide nanowires and nanotubes with a high aspect-ratio. The possible formation process for the one-dimensional nanostructures by SSAM is discussed

  13. ANALYSIS OF PERIODIC NANOSTRUCTURES FORMATION ON A GOLD SURFACE UNDER EXPOSURE TO ULTRASHORT LASER PULSES NEAR THE MELTING THRESHOLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Ivanov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Study. The mechanism of surface restructuring by ultrashort laser pulses involves a lot of fast, non-equilibrium, and interrelated processes while the solid is in a transient state. As a result, the analysis of the experimental data cannot cover all the mechanisms of nanostructuring. We present a direct comparison of a simulation and experimental results of surface nanomodification induced by a single laser pulse. Method. The experimental results were obtained by using a mask projection setup with a laser wavelength equal to 248 nm and a pulse length equal to 1.6 ps. This setup is used to produce an intensity grating on a gold surface with a sinusoidal shape and a period of 500 nm. The formed structures were analyzed by a scanning and transmission electron microscope, respectively. Then a hybrid atomistic-continuum model capable of capturing the essential mechanisms responsible for the nanostructuring process was used for modeling the interaction of the laser pulse with a thick gold target. Main Results. A good agreement between simulation and experimental data justifies the proposed approach as a powerful tool revealing the physics behind the nanostructuring process at a gold surface and providing a microscopic insight into the dynamics of the structuring processes of metals in general. The presented model, therefore, is an important step towards a new computational tool in predicting materials response to an ultrashort laser pulse on the atomic scale and properties of the modified surfaces. Practical Relevance. This detailed understanding of the dynamics of the process will pave the way towards pre-designed topologies for functionalized surfaces on the nano- and micro-scales.

  14. Thermal radiation characteristics and direct evidence of tungsten cooling on the way to nanostructure formation on its surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamura, S., E-mail: takamura@aitech.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering, Aichi Institute of Technology, Yakusa-cho, Toyota 470-0392 (Japan); Miyamoto, T. [Faculty of Engineering, Aichi Institute of Technology, Yakusa-cho, Toyota 470-0392 (Japan); Ohno, N. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    The physical properties of tungsten with nanostructure on its surface are investigated focusing on the thermal radiation and cooling characteristics. First, direct evidence of substantial W surface cooling has been clearly shown with use of a very thin thermocouple inserted into W target, which solves an uncertainty associated with a radiation thermometer. Second, the above measurements of W surface temperature make it possible to estimate quantitatively the total emissivity from which we may evaluate the radiative power through the Stefan–Boltzmann equation, which is very important for mitigation evaluation of a serious plasma heat load to the plasma-facing component.

  15. Thermal radiation characteristics and direct evidence of tungsten cooling on the way to nanostructure formation on its surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamura, S.; Miyamoto, T.; Ohno, N.

    2013-01-01

    The physical properties of tungsten with nanostructure on its surface are investigated focusing on the thermal radiation and cooling characteristics. First, direct evidence of substantial W surface cooling has been clearly shown with use of a very thin thermocouple inserted into W target, which solves an uncertainty associated with a radiation thermometer. Second, the above measurements of W surface temperature make it possible to estimate quantitatively the total emissivity from which we may evaluate the radiative power through the Stefan–Boltzmann equation, which is very important for mitigation evaluation of a serious plasma heat load to the plasma-facing component

  16. Acoustic and Electrical Property Changes Due to Microbial Growth and Biofilm Formation in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the effect of microbial growth and biofilm formation on compressional waves, and complex conductivity during stimulated microbial growth. Over the 29 day duration of the experiment, compressional wave amplitudes and arrival times f...

  17. Long term mineralogical changes in salt formations due to water and brine interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbert, H.J.; Brewitz, W.

    1996-01-01

    Four very common long term mineralogical changes in salt formations are discussed in the view of the safety considerations for underground repositories. Two of these processes, the 'Hartsalz' and 'Carnallite' dissolution were studied in two scale in situ experiments. The results are presented and compared with the results of the geochemical modelling with the computer code EQ3/6. Furthermore the reactions leading to the formation of the gypsum cap rock on the top of the Zechstein salt formations and to the polyhalitization of anhydrite are discussed. Geological field observations and mineral assemblages agree well with the results of the geochemical modelling employing the Pitzer formalism along with the Harvie, Moller and Weare database. We conclude that once the mechanisms of the chemical reactions are well understood it becomes possible to evaluate realistically whether such processes, when encountered in the repository, are still active or whether they are finished. It also becomes possible to estimate the volume changes associated with the reactions and thus the impact of these reactions on the integrity and the geomechanical stability of the salt formation. The intimate knowledge of the reaction mechanisms of the short and long term changes in the mineralogical assemblages and the associated brine chemistry is a first prerequisite for the correct evaluation of the origin of brines. Thus, it is essential for the correct assessment of the hazards which brine inflows may pose for the safety of a repository in salt formations. (authors). 8 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs

  18. Nanostructures from nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, Paula M; Chen Yu; Palmer, Richard E; Nikitin, Kirill; Fitzmaurice, Donald; Preece, Jon A

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews recent experimental approaches to the development of surface nanostructures from nanoparticles. The formation of nanowires by electron beam writing in films of gold nanoparticles passivated with a specially designed class of ligand molecules (dialkyl sulfides) is presented, together with illustrations of practical nanostructures. Potential applications of this methodology are discussed. Another alternative to the controlled fabrication of arrays of nanoparticles, based on nanocrystals which contain molecular recognition elements in the ligand shell, is also surveyed. These particles aggregate in the presence of specifically designed molecular dications which act as a molecular binder. Finally, recent work on the formation of nanoscale surface architectures using x-ray patterning of self-assembled monolayers is introduced. Current and potential future applications of these surface nanostructures are discussed

  19. Impact of radial transport on the quasilinear plateau formation due to electron cyclotron wave absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, A.G.; Westerhof, E.

    1996-01-01

    Numerical simulations using a three-dimensional Fokker-Planck code show that for small tokamaks the transport of electrons across the magnetic surfaces at a level consistent with anomalous transport has a large influence on the formation of the quasilinear plateau during electron cyclotron resonant

  20. Formation and investigation of multilayer nanostructured coatings TiN/MoN for different layers thicknesses with c-pvd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogrebnyak, A.D.; Bondar, O.V.; Postol'nyj, B.A.; Andreev, A.A.; Abadias, G.; Beresnev, V.M.; Sobol', O.B.

    2013-01-01

    Multilayer coatings based on TiN/MoN were obtained using the vacuum arc evaporation cathode method (C-PVD). Multilayers thickness was in the range 6,7 ÷ 8,7 μm and monolayers thickness was 2, 10, 20 and 40 nm. Vacuum-arc unit Bulat 6 was used for depositions. For the analysis of multilayer structures and properties of nanostructured coatings XRD analysis method was used (D8 ADVANCE, Bruker). For elemental composition and morphology investigation of the surface layers and multilayered coatings SEM (JEOL-7001F) with EDX attachment was used. Also HRTEM method was used to analyze the phase composition. In addition, this article provides investigation of hardness by Micro-Hardness Tester CSM (Switzerland). AFM was used for additional analysis of the topography and surface roughness of these coatings. This investigation have revealed the relationship between the layers thicknesses, substrate potential, the annealing process, physical and mechanical properties of samples. (authors)

  1. Plasma treatment of ITO films for the formation of nanoparticles toward scalable production of novel nanostructure-based solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Cigang; Bailey, Louise R.; Proudfoot, Gary; Cooke, Mike [Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology, Bristol (United Kingdom); Eisenhawer, Bjoern; Jia, Guobin; Bergmann, Joachim; Falk, Fritz [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Jena (Germany); Ulyashin, Alexander [Department of Industrial Processes, SINTEF, Oslo (Norway)

    2015-01-01

    Plasma treatment of indium tin oxide (ITO) has been studied to form metallic nanoparticles (NPs) for nanostructure-based solar cells. It is demonstrated that NPs can be formed at temperatures as low as 100 C, and the size of NPs increases with temperature. An ITO layer treated at 100 C has higher transmission than that treated at 200 C for the same time. It is suggested that such NPs can be used for the conversion efficiency enhancement of ITO/Si heterojunction solar cells. It is also shown that NPs can be produced on different substrates covered by an ITO layer, such as ITO/Al foil, ITO/glass, ITO/stainless steel, and ITO/Si, where the resulting NPs were used for catalytic growth of Si nanowires (NWs). The morphology and density of Si NWs depend on a substrate. It is established that p-doped Si NWs show larger diameters, and n-doped Si NWs do not show obvious change of diameters compared to undoped Si NWs. New types of solar cell structures with combined radial and axial junctions have been proposed. As an example, p-n junction-based 3D structures using the NPs obtained from treatment of ITO film are presented. Finally, a potentially scalable process flow for fabrication of nanostructure-based solar cells is discussed. Schematic illustration of fabrication steps to produce the proposed novel solar cell with combined radial and axial junctions. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Nanostructures via DNA scaffold metallization

    OpenAIRE

    Ning, C.; Zinchenko, A.; Baigl, D.; Pyshkina, O.; Sergeyev, V.; Endo, Kazunaka; Yoshikawa, K.

    2005-01-01

    The critical role of polymers in process of noble metals nanostructures formation is well known, however, the use of DNA chain template in this process is yet largely unknown. In this study we demonstrate different ways of silver deposition on DNA template and report the influence of silver nanostructures formation on DNA conformational state. Metallization of DNA chain proceeds by two different scenarios depending on DNA conformation. If DNA chain is unfolded (elongated) chain, silver reduct...

  3. Piezoelectric ZnO nanostructure for energy harvesting

    CERN Document Server

    Leprince-Wang, Yamin

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, ZnO as an important II-VI semiconductor has attracted much attention within the scientific community over the world owing to its numerous unique and prosperous properties. This material, considered as a "future material", especially in nanostructural format, has aroused many interesting research works due to its large range of applications in electronics, photonics, acoustics, energy and sensing. The bio-compatibility, piezoelectricity & low cost fabrication make ZnO nanostructure a very promising material for energy harvesting.

  4. Nanostructured Basaltfiberconcrete Exploitational Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraykina, K. A.; Shamanov, V. A.

    2017-11-01

    The article demonstrates that the mass use of basalt fiber concrete (BFC) is constrained by insufficient study of their durability and serviceability in a variety of environments. This research is aimed at the study of the basalt fiber corrosion processes in the cement stone of BFC, the control of the new products structure formation in order to protect the reinforcing fiber from alkaline destruction and thereby improve the exploitational characteristics of the composite. The research result revealed that the modification of basaltfiber concrete by the dispersion of MWNTs contributes to the directional formation of new products in the cement matrix. The HAM additive in basaltfiberconcrete provides for the binding of portlandite to low-basic calcium hydroaluminosilicates, thus reducing the aggressive effect of the cement environment on the reinforcing fibers properties. The complex modification of BFC with nanostructured additives provides for an increase in its durability and exploitational properties (strength, frost resistance and water resistance) due to basalt fiber protection from alkali corrosion on account of the compacting of the contact zone “basalt fiber - cement stone” and designing of the new products structure and morphology of cement matrix over the fiber surface.

  5. Blob Formation and Ejection in Coronal Jets due to the Plasmoid and Kelvin–Helmholtz Instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Lei; Lin, Jun [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 396 Yangfangwang, Guandu District, Kunming, 650216 (China); Zhang, Qing-Min [Key Laboratory for Dark Matter and Space Science, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Murphy, Nicholas A., E-mail: leini@ynao.ac.cn [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-05-20

    We perform 2D resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations of coronal jets driven by flux emergence along the lower boundary. The reconnection layers are susceptible to the formation of blobs that are ejected in the jet. Our simulation with low plasma β (Case I) shows that magnetic islands form easily and propagate upward in the jet. These islands are multithermal and thus are predicted to show up in hot channels (335 Å and 211 Å) and the cool channel (304 Å) in observations by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory . The islands have maximum temperatures of 8 MK, lifetimes of 120 s, diameters of 6 Mm, and velocities of 200 km s{sup −1}. These parameters are similar to the properties of blobs observed in extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) jets by AIA. The Kelvin–Helmholtz instability develops in our simulation with moderately high plasma β (Case II) and leads to the formation of bright vortex-like blobs above the multiple high magnetosonic Mach number regions that appear along the jet. These vortex-like blobs can also be identified in the AIA channels. However, they eventually move downward and disappear after the high magnetosonic Mach number regions disappear. In the lower plasma β case, the lifetime for the jet is shorter, the jet and magnetic islands are formed with higher velocities and temperatures, the current-sheet fragments are more chaotic, and more magnetic islands are generated. Our results show that the plasmoid instability and Kelvin–Helmholtz instability along the jet are both possible causes of the formation of blobs observed at EUV wavelengths.

  6. Radiation effects and damage formation in semiconductors due to high-energy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamarou, A.

    2006-11-07

    The object of this thesis was the study of ion-beam induced damage formation and annealing in crystalline and conventionally predamaged Ge, GaAs, and InP. The samples were irradiated either at {approx}80 K or at room temperature with Kr, Xe, or Au ions with specific energy of about 0.3 MeV/u to 3 MeV/u. Thereafter the samples were studied by means of Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and/or transmission electron microscopy.

  7. Anhelation due to formation of tuberculomas at the medulla oblongata during chemotherapy of tuberculous meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Pengfei; Zhang, Xiaojie; Zhong, Yangping; Bian, Xinchao; Fu, Shuanglin; Luo, Yinan

    2012-01-01

    Formation of tuberculoma is a rare response of neurotuberculosis in patients regularly and adequately treated with anti-tuberculous drugs. We report a 13-year-old girl with two tuberculomas which formed in the dorsal part of the medulla oblongata during chemotherapy for tuberculous meningitis. The tuberculomas were both removed via a suboccipital midline approach and were demonstrated by pathological findings but the girl died of cardiac arrest that was thought to be caused by postoperative medulla oblongata oedema. In combination with a literature review, we discuss the clinical features and treatment options of brainstem tuberculomas.

  8. Radiation effects and damage formation in semiconductors due to high-energy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamarou, A.

    2006-01-01

    The object of this thesis was the study of ion-beam induced damage formation and annealing in crystalline and conventionally predamaged Ge, GaAs, and InP. The samples were irradiated either at ∼80 K or at room temperature with Kr, Xe, or Au ions with specific energy of about 0.3 MeV/u to 3 MeV/u. Thereafter the samples were studied by means of Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and/or transmission electron microscopy

  9. Subsurface methane formation in graphite due to exposure to H+ and D+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, S.; Haasz, A.A.

    1994-01-01

    The extent of H-D mixing in the form of mixed-isotope methane formation during simultaneous H + /D + bombardment of graphite was measured and found to be a sensitive function of H + -D + ion range separation. The result strongly supports the model that methane molecules are formed at the end of ion range in the bulk of graphite. A long steadily decreasing transient was observed in the methane emission when bombarding a virgin graphite sample with 10 keV D + at 800 K. The effect was less pronounced for low density fine grain isographites (EK98) than for high density pyrolytic graphite (HPG99) and monocrystal carbons. We propose a model which attributes this transient to the creation of new internal ''surfaces'', formed during ion irradiation along with ion-created micropaths. The increase in internal surface area effectively ''dilutes'' the inner surface hydrogen concentration in the region where incident hydrogen ions thermalize. We propose that, initially, methane molecules are formed mainly on inherent internal surfaces (pore and grain/crystallite boundary surfaces) in the region where hydrogen ions thermalize; then as damage builds up, newly produced internal ''surfaces'' also contribute to methane formation. (orig.)

  10. Hillock Formation, Metal Lifting and Voiding of an AlCu Metallization due to Temperature Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerster, J.; Schuderer, B.; Haeuser, M.; Kallensee, O.; Gross, Th.

    2004-01-01

    A metalstack with a layer composition of Ti/TiN/AlCu/TiN was evaluated in an AlCu metallization. Reliability results show a higher electromigration lifetime compared to a Ti/AlCu/Ti/TiN stack. During the metallization process flow large elevations were seen by optical inspection. Analysis by SEM cross sections showed different deviations. A metal lifting with void formation as consequence was found in large aluminum areas above tungsten plugs. Also voiding in the passivated Metal 2 and the unpassivated Metal 3 with a cracked anti-reflective coating as a result of the expansion of the aluminum was seen. The influence of processes with high thermal budget on the stress behaviour of the new metalstack was investigated. The final annealing was found as the process with the most critical influence. This study shows the influence of different final annealing temperatures on hillock formation and voiding using a Ti/TiN/AlCu/TiN metalstack. A reduction of the maximum temperature of the final annealing process is necessary for using the new AlCu metallization stack. The use of a surface treatment before deposition showed an optimization of the adhesion

  11. Structural and technological formation of surface nanostructured Ti-Ni-Mo layers by high-speed gas-flame spraying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blednova Zhesfina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article covers a complex method of forming surface-modified layers using materials with shape memory effect (SME based on TiNiMo including pre-grinding and mechanical activation of the coating material, high-speed gas-flame spraying of Ni adhesive layer and subsequent TiNiMo spraying with molybdenum content up to 2%, thermal and thermomechanical processing in a single technological cycle. This allowed forming nanostructured surface layers with a high level of functional mechanical and performance properties. We defined control parameters of surface steel modification using material with shape memory effect based on TiNiMo, which monitor the structural material state, both at the stage of spraying, and during subsequent combined treatment, which allows affecting purposefully on the functional properties of the SME surface layer. Test results of samples before coating and after surface modification with TiNiMo in the seawater indicate that surface modification brings to a slower damage accumulation and to increase of steel J91171 endurance limit in seawater by 45%. Based on complex metallophysical research of surface layers we obtained new data about nano-sized composition “steel - Ni - TiNiMo”.

  12. Defect production and formation of helium-vacancy clusters due to cascades in α-iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, L.; Zu, X.T.; Xiao, H.Y.; Gao, F.; Heinisch, H.L.; Kurtz, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Displacement cascades are simulated by molecular dynamics methods in α-Fe containing different concentrations of substitutional He atoms. Primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies, E p , from 0.5 to 5 keV are considered at the irradiation temperature of 100 K. The concentration of He in Fe varies from 1 to 5 at%, and the results are compared with the simulations performed in pure α-Fe. We find that the total number of point defects increases with increasing He concentration. The present studies reveal the formation and the configurations of He-vacancy clusters in the cascades of α-Fe. Furthermore, the production efficiency of He-vacancy clusters increases with increasing He concentration and PKA energy. The nucleation mechanisms of He-vacancy clusters in displacement cascades are discussed in detail

  13. Simulation of surface profile formation in oxygen laser cutting of mild steel due to combustion cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermolaev, G V; Kovalev, O B [Khristianovich Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Institutskaya Str 4/1, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2009-09-21

    A physicomathematical model of cyclic iron combustion in an oxygen flow during oxygen laser cutting of metal sheets is developed. The combustion front is set into motion by focused laser radiation and a heterogeneous oxidation reaction in oxygen. The burning rate is limited by oxygen supply from the gas phase towards the metal surface, and the interface motion depends on the local temperature. A 3D numerical simulation predicts wavy structures on the metal surface; their linear sizes depend on the scanning speed of the laser beam, the thickness of the produced liquid oxide film and the parameters of the oxygen jet flow. Simulation results help in understanding the mechanism of striation formation during oxygen gas-laser cutting of mild steel and are in qualitative agreement with experimental findings.

  14. On the blister formation in copper alloys due to the helium ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, D.; Eliezer, D.

    1997-01-01

    Structural materials in fusion reactors will be exposed to alpha radiation and helium implantation over a broad range of energies. A new approach to the blister-formation phenomenon is discussed by means of the mathematical solution on a uniformly loaded circular plate with clamped edges (circular diaphragm). In the present investigation, it was found that blister formation depends on the mechanical properties of the alloys and the near-surface concentration of the implanted gas, which itself is contingent on the crystallographic orientation by means of the stopping power of the implanted atoms. The reported model is based on the fact that at certain depths from the surface, the pressure in the cavities approaches the yield stress of the metal and blistering starts. The thickness of this thin film depends on the mechanical properties of the specific metal. Once a blister cavity is formed, the deformation of the thin film to form a blister cap depends on the buildup of pressure in the cavity contingent on the implanted dose. For the present model, it is sufficient to say that the thickness of the blister's cap cannot be correlated with the projected range of the implantation, as assumed by other authors. The implanted helium concentration needed to build up enough gas pressure to create a blister at a depth which is close to the projected range is higher by 50 times than the gas helium concentration in the cavity. Experimental results, such as the fact that the blisters have burst at the edge of the circular skin, where the maximum stresses are developed, and the fact that at high implantation energy (large projected range), the bursting of the blisters occurs by multilayer caps, support the present model

  15. Lifetime of Nano-Structured Black Silicon for Photovoltaic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present recent results of lifetime optimization for nano-structured black silicon and its photovoltaic applications. Black silicon nano-structures provide significant reduction of silicon surface reflection due to highly corrugated nanostructures with excellent light trapping pro......, respectively. This is promising for use of black silicon RIE nano-structuring in a solar cell process flow......In this work, we present recent results of lifetime optimization for nano-structured black silicon and its photovoltaic applications. Black silicon nano-structures provide significant reduction of silicon surface reflection due to highly corrugated nanostructures with excellent light trapping...

  16. Modification of the SERS spectrum of cyanide traces due to complex formation between cyanide and silver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao Dao, Tran; Kieu, Ngoc Minh; Quynh Ngan Luong, Truc; Cao, Tuan Anh; Hai Nguyen, Ngoc; Le, Van Vu

    2018-06-01

    It is well known that cyanide is an extremely toxic lethal poison with human death within minutes after exposure to only 300 ppm cyanide. On the other hand, cyanide is released into the environment (mainly through waste water) every day from various human activities. Therefore, rapid, sensitive and cost-effective cyanide trace detection is an urgent need. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a method that meets these requirements. It should be noted, however, that in this technique SERS substrates, which are usually made of gold or silver, will be leached with aqueous cyanide by the formation of complexes between gold or silver with cyanide. This will cause the SERS spectrum of cyanide to be modified. When determining cyanide concentrations by SERS analysis, this spectral modification should be taken into account. This report presents the SERS spectral modification of aqueous cyanide traces (in ppm and lower concentration range) when the SERS substrates used are flower-like silver micro-structures.

  17. Pattern Formation in Langmuir Monolayers Due to Long-Range Electrostatic Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Thomas M.; Lösche, Mathias

    A distinctive characteristic of Langmuir monolayers that bears important consequences for the physics of structure formation within membranes is the uniaxial orientation of the constituent dipolar molecules, brought about by the symmetry break which is induced by the surface of the aqueous substrate. The association of oriented molecular dipoles with the interface leads to the formation of image dipoles within the polarizeable medium - the subphase - such that the effective dipole orientation of every of the individual molecules is strictly normal to the surface, even within molecularly disordered phases. As a result, dipole-dipole repulsions play an eminently important role for the molecular interactions within the system - independent of the state of phase (while the dipole area density does of course depend on the state of phase) - and control the morphogenesis of the phase boundaries in their interplay with the one-dimensional (1D) line tension between coexisting phases. The physics of these phenomena is only now being explored and is particularly exciting for systems within a three-phase coexistence region where complete or partial wetting, as well as dewetting between the coexisting phases may be experimentally observed by applying fluorescence microscopy to the monolayer films. It is revealed that the wetting behavior depends sensitively on the details of the electrostatic interactions, in that the apparent contact angles observed at three-phase contact points depends on the sizes of the coexisting phases. This is in sharp contrast to the physics of wetting in conventional 3D systems where the contact angle is a materials property, independent of the local details. In 3D systems, this leads to Youngs equation - which has been established more than two centuries ago. We report recent progress in the understanding of this unusual and rather unexpected behavior of a quasi-2D system by reviewing recent experimental results from optical microscopy on equilibrium

  18. Modeling ambipolar potential formation due to ICRF heating effects on electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.W.; Callen, J.D.; Hershkowitz, N.

    1985-08-01

    A mechanism for the potential bump observed near the region of ICRF heating in the endplugs of the Phaedrus tandem mirror experiment is investigated by numerical simulation of electron orbits in a simple mirror geometry. Given initial magnetic and ambipolar potential wells that trap the electrons, the ''near field'' parallel electric field E-tilde/sub z/e/sup -iωt/, which is localized near and due to the ICRF heating, tends to eject electrons from the region where E-tilde/sub z/ is nonzero. This depletion of the local electron population causes a local increase in the ambipolar potential. The rate at which the electrons are ejected, (dn/dt), is calculated from the electron orbit computation for a given potential well depth. The rate at which passing particles ''fill in'' the potential well can also be calculated. An estimate of how large the bump in the ambipolar potential becomes is obtained by finding the well depth at which (dn/dt) approximately equals the ''filling'' rate. For Phaedrus parameters (n 0 approx. = 4.0 x 10 12 cm -3 , T/sub e/ = 20 eV, E-tilde/sub z/ approx. = 1.0 V/cm) the electron pumping rate balances the ''filling'' rate at a potential well depth of approximately 40 V, consistent with experimental results

  19. [Fungal infectivities of implanted catheters due to Candida sp. Biofilms formation and resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddiki, S M L; Boucherit-Otmani, Z; Boucherit, K; Kunkel, D

    2015-06-01

    Candidemia are the most common fungal infections in hospitals. However, the catheters are subject to be altered by Candida biofilms which increase the risk of invasive nosocomial infections due to the high resistance to antifungal agents. Therefore, the minimum inhibitory concentrations of planktonic (MIC) and sessile cells (CIMS) were evaluated. To review the in vivo biofilms structures of Candida sp. formed on the inner and/or external surfaces of collected catheters, we used scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The level of biofilm resistance was assessed against two conventional antifungal agents: amphotericin B (AmB), which belongs to the class of polyenes, and fluconazole (FLZ) which is an azole. The SEM observation of biofilms of Candida sp. reveals complex structures. Compared to MICs, the calculation of CIMS showed an increase of 32 times with AmB and of 128 times with FLZ. Catheters offer an ideal surface to Candida sp. to form biofilms. This complex structure induces the increase of the resistance of sessile cells against two antifungal agents, AmB and FLZ. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Photoresponsive nanostructured membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, Poornima

    2016-07-26

    The perspective of adding stimuli-response to isoporous membranes stimulates the development of separation devices with pores, which would open or close under control of environment chemical composition, temperature or exposure to light. Changes in pH and temperature have been previously investigated. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the preparation of photoresponsive isoporous membranes, applying self-assembly non-solvent induced phase separation to a new light responsive block copolymer. First, we optimized the membrane formation by using poly(styrene-b-anthracene methyl methacrylate-b-methylmethacrylate) (PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA) copolymer, identifying the most suitable solvent, copolymer block length, and other parameters. The obtained final triblock copolymer membrane morphologies were characterized using atomic force and electron microscopy. The microscopic analysis reveals that the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer can form both lamellar and ordered hexagonal nanoporous structures on the membrane top layer in appropriate solvent compositions. The nanostructured membrane emits fluorescence due to the presence of the anthracene mid-block. On irradiation of light the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer membranes has an additional stimuli response. The anthracene group undergoes conformational changes by forming [4 + 4] cycloadducts and this alters the membrane\\'s water flux and solute retention. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. Photoresponsive nanostructured membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, Poornima; Sutisna, Burhannudin; Sougrat, Rachid; Nunes, Suzana Pereira

    2016-01-01

    The perspective of adding stimuli-response to isoporous membranes stimulates the development of separation devices with pores, which would open or close under control of environment chemical composition, temperature or exposure to light. Changes in pH and temperature have been previously investigated. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the preparation of photoresponsive isoporous membranes, applying self-assembly non-solvent induced phase separation to a new light responsive block copolymer. First, we optimized the membrane formation by using poly(styrene-b-anthracene methyl methacrylate-b-methylmethacrylate) (PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA) copolymer, identifying the most suitable solvent, copolymer block length, and other parameters. The obtained final triblock copolymer membrane morphologies were characterized using atomic force and electron microscopy. The microscopic analysis reveals that the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer can form both lamellar and ordered hexagonal nanoporous structures on the membrane top layer in appropriate solvent compositions. The nanostructured membrane emits fluorescence due to the presence of the anthracene mid-block. On irradiation of light the PS-b-PAnMMA-b-PMMA copolymer membranes has an additional stimuli response. The anthracene group undergoes conformational changes by forming [4 + 4] cycloadducts and this alters the membrane's water flux and solute retention. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  2. Bone formation in mono cortical mandibular critical size defects after augmentation with two synthetic nanostructured and one xenogenous hydroxyapatite bone substitute - in vivo animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dau, Michael; Kämmerer, Peer W; Henkel, Kai-Olaf; Gerber, Thomas; Frerich, Bernhard; Gundlach, Karsten K H

    2016-05-01

    Healing characteristics as well as level of tissue integration and degradation of two different nanostructured hydroxyapatite bone substitute materials (BSM) in comparison with a deproteinized hydroxyapatite bovine BSM were evaluated in an in vivo animal experiment. In the posterior mandible of 18 minipigs, bilateral mono cortical critical size bone defects were created. Randomized augmentation procedures with NanoBone(®) (NHA1), Ostim(®) (NHA2) or Bio-Oss(®) (DBBM) were conducted (each material n = 12). Samples were analyzed after five (each material n = 6) and 8 months (each material n = 6). Defect healing, formation of soft tissue and bone as well as the amount of remaining respective BSM were quantified both macro- and microscopically. For NHA2, the residual bone defect after 5 weeks was significantly less compared to NHA1 or DBBM. There was no difference in residual BSM between NHA1 and DBBM, but the amount in NHA2 was significantly lower. NHA2 also showed the least amount of soft tissue and the highest amount of new bone after 5 weeks. Eight months after implantation, no significant differences in the amount of residual bone defects, in soft tissue or in bone formation were detected between the groups. Again, NHA2 showed significant less residual material than NHA1 and DBBM. We observed non-significant differences in the biological hard tissue response of NHA1 and DBBM. The water-soluble NHA2 initially induced an increased amount of new bone but was highly compressed which may have a negative effect in less stable augmentations of the jaw. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Influence of reaction conditions on formation of ionic liquid-based nanostructured Bi2O3 as an efficient visible-light-driven photocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Mozhgan; Heydari, Mojgan; Vaezi, Mohammad Reza

    2018-01-01

    In this study, nanostructured bismuth oxide was synthesized based on the chemical reaction of bismuth nitrate and NaOH in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C4mim]Cl) under ultrasonic irradiation. The effect of sodium hydroxide with a different molar ratio of NaOH to bismuth in the range of 3-10 was investigated. The results of fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) showed that NaOH has a critical role in the formation of pure α-Bi2O3. So, at high concentrations of NaOH (NaOH:Bi ≥ 7.5), the chloride anion from the ionic liquid cannot be entered into the crystalline structure of bismuth oxide, which resulted in the formation of pure bismuth oxide, while at lower concentrations of NaOH (NaOH:Bi ≤ 5), Bi3O4Cl was formed with a layered structure. The XRD results revealed that the synthesized α-Bi2O3 has a monoclinic structure and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that the sample consists of needle like particles with an average thickness of 50 nm. The ionic liquid has an important role in the prevention of an agglomeration of particles in the Bi2O3 sample. The photocatalytic activity of the synthesized Bi2O3 was investigated to study the degradation of malachite green dye as a model pollutant under visible light. The effects of various parameters such as the pH, concentration of the dye, and the catalyst on the degradation of malachite green were also investigated.

  4. Liquid phase formation due to solid/solid chemical interaction and its modelling: applications to zircaloy/stainless steel system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, E.A.; Piotrkowski, R.; Denis, A.; Kovacs, J.

    1992-01-01

    The chemical interaction at high temperatures between Zircaloy (Zry) and stainless steel (SS) and the liquid phase formation due to eutectic reactions were studied. In a previous work the Zry/Inconel system was modelled assuming that the kinetics of phase growth is controlled by diffusion. The same model and the obtained Zr diffusion coefficient in the liquid phase were applied in the present work. In order to obtain an adequate description of the Zry/SS the major component of both alloys and also Cr and Ni had to be considered. (author)

  5. Electroless formation of conductive polymer-metal nanostructured composites at boundary of two immiscible solvents. Morphology and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gniadek, Marianna; Donten, Mikolaj; Stojek, Zbigniew

    2010-01-01

    Formation of polypyrrole (PPy) with metallic inclusions was carried out at the interface between the aqueous phase containing an oxidizer and an organic solution of the monomer. A variety of the polymer-metal composites were obtained in the system. When the oxidizers were silver- and gold salts the obtained material contained from 4 to 9 at.% of metal. In the case of Ag + oxidant the structure of the metallic silver objects varied and included beads and ultra thin wires covered by polymer film, nanocrystals, micrometer cuboid monocrystals and microplates. Metallic gold practically appeared only in one structure-granules. The granules of Au incorporated into PPy were porous and made of very fine flat crystals of thickness in the nanometer range. The use of copper salts never led to the formation of metallic species in the composite. The influence of selected process parameters such as temperature and concentration of the reactants on the polymerization reaction was investigated. The composites with metallic nanoobjects were found to be better catalysts for the electrooxidation of ascorbic acids compared to pure polypyrrole. SEM, X-ray diffractometry, Raman spectroscopy and voltammetry were used in the investigation.

  6. Electroless formation of conductive polymer-metal nanostructured composites at boundary of two immiscible solvents. Morphology and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gniadek, Marianna [Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Donten, Mikolaj, E-mail: donten@chem.uw.edu.p [Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Stojek, Zbigniew, E-mail: stojek@chem.uw.edu.p [Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland)

    2010-11-01

    Formation of polypyrrole (PPy) with metallic inclusions was carried out at the interface between the aqueous phase containing an oxidizer and an organic solution of the monomer. A variety of the polymer-metal composites were obtained in the system. When the oxidizers were silver- and gold salts the obtained material contained from 4 to 9 at.% of metal. In the case of Ag{sup +} oxidant the structure of the metallic silver objects varied and included beads and ultra thin wires covered by polymer film, nanocrystals, micrometer cuboid monocrystals and microplates. Metallic gold practically appeared only in one structure-granules. The granules of Au incorporated into PPy were porous and made of very fine flat crystals of thickness in the nanometer range. The use of copper salts never led to the formation of metallic species in the composite. The influence of selected process parameters such as temperature and concentration of the reactants on the polymerization reaction was investigated. The composites with metallic nanoobjects were found to be better catalysts for the electrooxidation of ascorbic acids compared to pure polypyrrole. SEM, X-ray diffractometry, Raman spectroscopy and voltammetry were used in the investigation.

  7. Nanostructural Features of Silver Nanoparticles Powder Synthesized through Concurrent Formation of the Nanosized Particles of Both Starch and Silver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hebeish

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Green innovative strategy was developed to accomplish silver nanoparticles formation of starch-silver nanoparticles (St-AgNPs in the powder form. Thus, St-AgNPs were synthesized through concurrent formation of the nanosized particles of both starch and silver. The alkali dissolved starch acts as reducing agent for silver ions and as stabilizing agent for the formed AgNPs. The chemical reduction process occurred in water bath under high-speed homogenizer. After completion of the reaction, the colloidal solution of AgNPs coated with alkali dissolved starch was cooled and precipitated using ethanol. The powder precipitate was collected by centrifugation, then washed, and dried; St-AgNPs powder was characterized using state-of-the-art facilities including UV-vis spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, particle size analyzer (PS, Polydispersity index (PdI, Zeta potential (ZP, XRD, FT-IR, EDX, and TGA. TEM and XRD indicate that the average size of pure AgNPs does not exceed 20 nm with spherical shape and high concentration of AgNPs (30000 ppm. The results obtained from TGA indicates that the higher thermal stability of starch coated AgNPS than that of starch nanoparticles alone. In addition to the data obtained from EDX which reveals the presence of AgNPs and the data obtained from particle size analyzer and zeta potential determination indicate that the good uniformity and the highly stability of St-AgNPs.

  8. Nanotechnologies. Properties and applications of nanostructured materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempel, A A

    2007-01-01

    The review summarises the main methods for the preparation of nanostructured metals, alloys, semiconductors and ceramics. The formation mechanisms of nanostructures based on two different principles, viz. the assembly principle (bottom-up) and the disintegration principle (top-down), are analysed. Isolated nanoparticles, nanopowders and compact nanomaterials produced by these methods possess different properties. The scope of application of various classes of nanostructured materials is considered and the topicality of the development of nanoindustry is emphasised.

  9. Fabrication of nanowires and nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Piraux, L.

    2009-01-01

    We report on different approaches that we have adopted and developed for the fabrication of nanowires and nanostructures. Methods based on template synthesis and on self organization seem to be the most promising for the fabrication of nanomaterials and nanostructures due to their easiness and low...... cost. The development of a supported nanoporous alumina template and the possibility of using this template to combine electrochemical synthesis with lithographic methods open new ways for the fabrication of complex nanostructures. The numerous advantages of the supported template and its compatibility...

  10. Structural, optical and photocatalytic properties of flower-like ZnO nanostructures prepared by a facile wet chemical method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sini Kuriakose

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Flower-like ZnO nanostructures were synthesized by a facile wet chemical method. Structural, optical and photocatalytic properties of these nanostructures have been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, photoluminescence (PL and UV–vis absorption spectroscopy. SEM and TEM studies revealed flower-like structures consisting of nanosheets, formed due to oriented attachment of ZnO nanoparticles. Flower-like ZnO structures showed enhanced photocatalytic activity towards sun-light driven photodegradation of methylene blue dye (MB as compared to ZnO nanoparticles. XRD, UV–vis absorption, PL, FTIR and TEM studies revealed the formation of Zn(OH2 surface layer on ZnO nanostructures upon ageing. We demonstrate that the formation of a passivating Zn(OH2 surface layer on the ZnO nanostructures upon ageing deteriorates their efficiency to photocatalytically degrade of MB.

  11. Nanostructured Y2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skandan, G.; Hahn, H.; Parker, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    It has been shown that a variety of nanostructured (n-) metal-oxide ceramics such as n-TiO 2 , n-ZrO 2 , n-Al 2 O 3 , n-ZnO and n-MgO can be produced using the inert gas condensation process. Amongst all the nanostructured oxides, the synthesis, microstructure, sintering, and mechanical properties of n-TiO 2 have been studied the most extensively. The gas condensation preparation of nanostructured metal-oxide ceramics involves evaporation of metal nanoparticles, collection and post- oxidation. The original synthesis studies of n-TiO 2 showed that in order to avoid formation of the many low oxidation state oxides in the Ti-O system, the post-oxidation had to be performed by rapidly exposing the Ti nanoparticles to pure oxygen gas. By doing so, the highest oxidation state and the most stable structure, rutile, was obtained. An undesired feature of this step is that the nanoparticles heat up to high temperatures for a brief period of time due to the exothermic nature of the oxidation. As a consequence, the particles with an average size of 12 nm tend to agglomerate into larger structures up to 50 nm. The agglomerated state of the powder is important since it determines the original density and pore size distribution after compaction, as well as the sintering characteristics and final microstructure of the bulk sample. As a consequence of the preparation procedure of n-TiO 2 and the resulting agglomeration, the pore size distribution of n-TiO 2 compacted at room temperature is very wide, with pore sizes ranging from 1 to 200 nm. Nevertheless, the n-TiO 2 sinters at temperatures several hundred degrees lower than conventional coarse grained ceramics. From the previous results on n- TiO 2 it is anticipated that better microstructures and properties can be achieved by reducing the agglomeration of nanostructured powders through a more controlled post- oxidation process

  12. Analytic device including nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Fratalocchi, Andrea; Totero Gongora, Juan Sebastian; Coluccio, Maria Laura; Candeloro, Patrizio; Cuda, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    A device for detecting an analyte in a sample comprising: an array including a plurality of pixels, each pixel including a nanochain comprising: a first nanostructure, a second nanostructure, and a third nanostructure, wherein size of the first nanostructure is larger than that of the second nanostructure, and size of the second nanostructure is larger than that of the third nanostructure, and wherein the first nanostructure, the second nanostructure, and the third nanostructure are positioned on a substrate such that when the nanochain is excited by an energy, an optical field between the second nanostructure and the third nanostructure is stronger than an optical field between the first nanostructure and the second nanostructure, wherein the array is configured to receive a sample; and a detector arranged to collect spectral data from a plurality of pixels of the array.

  13. Irreversible fouling of membrane bioreactors due to formation of a non-biofilm gel-like layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poorasgari, Eskandar; Larsen, Poul; Zheng, Xing

    2013-01-01

    Extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS), known to contribute to fouling in membrane bio-reactors (MBR)s, are generally divided into bound and free EPS. The free EPS are able to form a gel-like layer on the membrane active surface. The mechanisms involved in formation of such layer and its effects...... on performance of the MBR membranes were studied. The free EPS, extracted by centrifugation and microfiltration, contained a significant amount of humic-like substances. Under static contact to the membrane, adsorption of humic-like substances to the membrane occurred and could be explained by conventional...... adsorption kinetics. Due to static adsorption, surface roughness of the membrane declined significantly indicating that adsorbed matters to the membrane filled the cavities of the membrane surface. Filtration of the free EPS caused 50% water flux decline. The fouling resistance linearly increased...

  14. Improved theory of forced magnetic reconnection due to error field and its application to seed island formation for NTM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizawa, A.; Tokuda, S.; Wakatani, M.

    2001-01-01

    A seed island is required for destabilizing the neo-classical tearing mode (NTM), which degrades confinement in long sustained, high-confinement, high beta plasmas. The seed island formation due to an MHD event, such as a sawtooth crash, is investigated by applying the improved boundary layer theory of forced magnetic reconnection. This improved theory introduces the non-constant-ψ matching and reveals the complicated feature of the reconnection described by two reconnected fluxes. In the initial evolution, these reconnected fluxes grow on the time scale including the ideal time scale, typical time scale of the MHD event and the time scale of resistive kink mode. The surface current is negative, Δ' (t) A S 1/3 . (author)

  15. Suppressing Energy Loss due to Triplet Exciton Formation in Organic Solar Cells: The Role of Chemical Structures and Molecular Packing

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Xiankai; Wang, Tonghui; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    In the most efficient solar cells based on blends of a conjugated polymer (electron donor) and a fullerene derivative (electron acceptor),ultrafast formation of charge-transfer (CT) electronic states at the donor-acceptor interfaces and efficient separation of these CT states into free charges, lead to internal quantum efficiencies near 100%. However, there occur substantial energy losses due to the non-radiative recombinations of the charges, mediated by the loweset-energy (singlet and triplet) CT states; for example, such recombinations can lead to the formation of triplet excited electronic states on the polymer chains, which do not generate free charges. This issue remains a major factor limiting the power conversion efficiencies (PCE) of these devices. The recombination rates are, however, difficult to quantify experimentally. To shed light on these issues, here, an integrated multi-scale theoretical approach that combines molecular dynamics simulations with quantum chemistry calculations is employed in order to establish the relationships among chemical structures, molecular packing, and non-radiative recombination losses mediated by the lowest-energy charge-transfer states.

  16. Suppressing Energy Loss due to Triplet Exciton Formation in Organic Solar Cells: The Role of Chemical Structures and Molecular Packing

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Xiankai

    2017-04-21

    In the most efficient solar cells based on blends of a conjugated polymer (electron donor) and a fullerene derivative (electron acceptor),ultrafast formation of charge-transfer (CT) electronic states at the donor-acceptor interfaces and efficient separation of these CT states into free charges, lead to internal quantum efficiencies near 100%. However, there occur substantial energy losses due to the non-radiative recombinations of the charges, mediated by the loweset-energy (singlet and triplet) CT states; for example, such recombinations can lead to the formation of triplet excited electronic states on the polymer chains, which do not generate free charges. This issue remains a major factor limiting the power conversion efficiencies (PCE) of these devices. The recombination rates are, however, difficult to quantify experimentally. To shed light on these issues, here, an integrated multi-scale theoretical approach that combines molecular dynamics simulations with quantum chemistry calculations is employed in order to establish the relationships among chemical structures, molecular packing, and non-radiative recombination losses mediated by the lowest-energy charge-transfer states.

  17. Silk fibroin nanostructured materials for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitropoulos, Alexander N.

    Nanostructured biopolymers have proven to be promising to develop novel biomedical applications where forming structures at the nanoscale normally occurs by self-assembly. However, synthesizing these structures can also occur by inducing materials to transition into other forms by adding chemical cross-linkers, changing pH, or changing ionic composition. Understanding the generation of nanostructures in fluid environments, such as liquid organic solvents or supercritical fluids, has not been thoroughly examined, particularly those that are based on protein-based block-copolymers. Here, we examine the transformation of reconstituted silk fibroin, which has emerged as a promising biopolymer due to its biocompatibility, biodegradability, and ease of functionalization, into submicron spheres and gel networks which offer applications in tissue engineering and advanced sensors. Two types of gel networks, hydrogels and aerogels, have small pores and large surface areas that are defined by their structure. We design and analyze silk nanoparticle formation using a microfluidic device while offering an application for drug delivery. Additionally, we provide a model and characterize hydrogel formation from micelles to nanoparticles, while investigating cellular response to the hydrogel in an in vitro cell culture model. Lastly, we provide a second model of nanofiber formation during near-critical and supercritical drying and characterize the silk fibroin properties at different drying pressures which, when acting as a stabilizing matrix, shows to improve the activity of entrapped enzymes dried at different pressures. This work has created new nanostructured silk fibroin forms to benefit biomedical applications that could be applied to other fibrous proteins.

  18. Photosynthetic solar cell using nanostructured proton exchange membrane for microbial biofilm prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Hyun; Oh, Hwa Jin; Bai, Seoung Jae; Song, Young Seok

    2014-06-24

    Unwanted biofilm formation has a detrimental effect on bioelectrical energy harvesting in microbial cells. This issue still needs to be solved for higher power and longer durability and could be resolved with the help of nanoengineering in designing and manufacturing. Here, we demonstrate a photosynthetic solar cell (PSC) that contains a nanostructure to prevent the formation of biofilm by micro-organisms. Nanostructures were fabricated using nanoimprint lithography, where a film heater array system was introduced to precisely control the local wall temperature. To understand the heat and mass transfer phenomena behind the manufacturing and energy harvesting processes of PSC, we carried out a numerical simulation and experimental measurements. It revealed that the nanostructures developed on the proton exchange membrane enable PSC to produce enhanced output power due to the retarded microbial attachment on the Nafion membrane. We anticipate that this strategy can provide a pathway where PSC can ensure more renewable, sustainable, and efficient energy harvesting performance.

  19. Positronium formation in nanostructured metals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čížek, J.; Melikhova, O.; Hruška, P.; Vlček, M.; Anwand, W.; Liedke, M.O.; Novotný, Michal; Bulíř, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 132, č. 5 (2017), s. 1579-1584 ISSN 0587-4246 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP108/12/G043 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : positronium * positron annihilation spectroscopy * black gold Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 0.469, year: 2016

  20. Film Thickness Formation in Nanoscale due to Effects of Elastohydrodynamic, Electrostatic and Surface force of Solvation and Van der Waals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.F. Abd Al-Samieh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of oil film with a thickness in the nanoscale is discussed in this paper. A polar lubricant of propylene carbonate is used as the intervening liquid between contiguous bodies in concentrated contacts. A pressure caused by the hydrodynamic viscous action in addition to double layer electrostatic force, Van der Waals inter-molecular forces, and solvation pressure due to inter-surface forces is considered in calculating the ultrathin lubricating films. The numerical solution has been carried out, using the Newton-Raphson iteration technique, applied for the convergence of the hydrodynamic pressure. The results show that, at separations beyond about five molecular diameters of the intervening liquid, the formation of a lubricant film thickness is governed by combined effects of viscous action and surface force of an attractive Van der Waals force and a repulsive double layer force. At smaller separations below about five molecular diameters of the intervening liquid, the effect of solvation force is dominant in determining the oil film thickness

  1. Ab Initio Calculations of 31P NMR Chemical Shielding Anisotropy Tensors in Phosphates: Variations Due to Ring Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd M. Alam

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Ring formation in phosphate systems is expected to influence both the magnitude and orientation of the phosphorus (31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR chemical shielding anisotropy (CSA tensor. Ab initio calculations of the 31P CSA tensor in both cyclic and acyclic phosphate clusters were performed as a function of the number of phosphate tetrahedral in the system. The calculation of the 31P CSA tensors employed the GAUSSIAN 98 implementation of the gauge-including atomic orbital (GIAO method at the Hartree-Fock (HF level. It is shown that both the 31P CSA tensor anisotropy, and the isotropic chemical shielding can be used for the identification of cyclic phosphates. The differences between the 31P CSA tensor in acyclic and cyclic phosphate systems become less pronounced with increasing number of phosphate groups within the ring. The orientation of the principal components for the 31P CSA tensor shows some variation due to cyclization, most notably with the smaller, highly strained ring systems.

  2. Manganese Nanostructures and Magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simov, Kirie Rangelov

    The primary goal of this study is to incorporate adatoms with large magnetic moment, such as Mn, into two technologically significant group IV semiconductor (SC) matrices, e.g. Si and Ge. For the first time in the world, we experimentally demonstrate Mn doping by embedding nanostructured thin layers, i.e. delta-doping. The growth is observed by in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), which combines topographic and electronic information in a single image. We investigate the initial stages of Mn monolayer growth on a Si(100)(2x1) surface reconstruction, develop methods for classification of nanostructure types for a range of surface defect concentrations (1.0 to 18.2%), and subsequently encapsulate the thin Mn layer in a SC matrix. These experiments are instrumental in generating a surface processing diagram for self-assembly of monoatomic Mn-wires. The role of surface vacancies has also been studied by kinetic Monte Carlo modeling and the experimental observations are compared with the simulation results, leading to the conclusion that Si(100)(2x1) vacancies serve as nucleation centers in the Mn-Si system. Oxide formation, which happens readily in air, is detrimental to ferromagnetism and lessens the magnetic properties of the nanostructures. Therefore, the protective SC cap, composed of either Si or Ge, serves a dual purpose: it is both the embedding matrix for the Mn nanostructured thin film and a protective agent for oxidation. STM observations of partially deposited caps ensure that the nanostructures remain intact during growth. Lastly, the relationship between magnetism and nanostructure types is established by an in-depth study using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). This sensitive method detects signals even at coverages less than one atomic layer of Mn. XMCD is capable of discerning which chemical compounds contribute to the magnetic moment of the system, and provides a ratio between the orbital and spin contributions. Depending on the amount

  3. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  4. Thermal failure of nanostructured thermal barrier coatings with cold sprayed nanostructured NiCrAlY bond coat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Q.; Li, Y.; Zhang, S.L.; Wang, X.R.; Yang, G.J.; Li, C.X.; Li, C.J. [Xi' an Jiaotong Univ., Xi' an (China)

    2008-07-01

    Nanostructured YSZ is expected to exhibit a high strain tolerability due to its low Young's modulus and consequently high durability. In this study, a porous YSZ as the thermal barrier coating was deposited by plasma spraying using an agglomerated nanostructured YSZ powder on a Ni-based superalloy Inconel 738 substrate with a cold-sprayed nanostructured NiCrAlY as the bond coat. The heat treatment in Ar atmosphere was applied to the cold-sprayed bond coat before deposition of YSZ. The isothermal oxidation and thermal cycling tests were applied to examine failure modes of plasma-sprayed nanostructured YSZ. The results showed that YSZ coating was deposited by partially melted YSZ particles. The nonmelted fraction of spray particles retains the porous nanostructure of the starting powder into the deposit. YSZ coating exhibits a bimodal microstructure consisting of nanosized particles retained from the powder and micro-columnar grains formed through the solidification of the melted fraction in spray particles. The oxidation of the bond coat occurs during the heat treatment in Ar atmosphere. The uniform oxide at the interface between the bond coat and YSZ can be formed during isothermal test. The cracks were observed at the interface between TGO/BC or TGO/YSZ after thermal cyclic test. However, the failure of TBCs mainly occurred through spalling of YSZ within YSZ coating. The failure characteristics of plasma-sprayed nanostructured YSZ are discussed based on the coating microstructure and formation of TGO on the bond coat surface. (orig.)

  5. An SU-8-based microprobe with a nanostructured surface enhances neuronal cell attachment and growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunhee; Kim, Jin-Young; Choi, Hongsoo

    2017-12-01

    Microprobes are used to repair neuronal injury by recording electrical signals from neuronal cells around the surface of the device. Following implantation into the brain, the immune response results in formation of scar tissue around the microprobe. However, neurons must be in close proximity to the microprobe to enable signal recording. A common reason for failure of microprobes is impaired signal recording due to scar tissue, which is not related to the microprobe itself. Therefore, the device-cell interface must be improved to increase the number of neurons in contact with the surface. In this study, we developed nanostructured SU-8 microprobes to support neuronal growth. Nanostructures of 200 nm diameter and depth were applied to the surface of microprobes, and the attachment and neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells on the microprobes were evaluated. Neuronal attachment and neurite outgrowth on the nanostructured microprobes were significantly greater than those on non-nanostructured microprobes. The enhanced neuronal attachment and neurite outgrowth on the nanostructured microprobes occurred in the absence of an adhesive coating, such as poly- l-lysine, and so may be useful for implantable devices for long-term use. Therefore, nanostructured microprobes can be implanted without adhesive coating, which can cause problems in vivo over the long term.

  6. Structure and property evaluation of a vacuum plasma sprayed nanostructured tungsten-hafnium carbide bulk composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rea, K.E.; Viswanathan, V.; Kruize, A.; Hosson, J.Th.M. de; O'Dell, S.; McKechnie, T.; Rajagopalan, S.; Vaidyanathan, R.; Seal, S.

    2008-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) forming of tungsten-based metal matrix nanocomposites (MMCs) has shown to be a cost effective and time saving method for the formation of bulk monolithic nanostructured thermo-mechanical components. Spray drying of powder feedstock appears to have a significant effect on the improved mechanical properties of the bulk nanocomposite. The reported elastic modulus of the nanocomposite nearly doubles due to the presence of HfC nano particulates in the W matrix. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) revealed the retention of nanostructures at the select process conditions and is correlated with the enhanced mechanical properties of the nanocomposite

  7. Observation of the structural, optical and magnetic properties during the transformation from hexagonal NiS nano-compounds to cubic NiO nanostructures due to thermal oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linganiso, E.C., E-mail: elinganiso@csir.co.za [National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, Molecular Sciences Institute, School of Chemistry, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, Johannesburg, Wits 2050 (South Africa); Mwakikunga, B.W., E-mail: bmwakikunga@csir.co.za [National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Coville, N.J. [DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, Molecular Sciences Institute, School of Chemistry, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, Johannesburg, Wits 2050 (South Africa); Mhlanga, S.D. [Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Johannesburg, PO Box 17011, Doornfontein, 2028 Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2015-04-25

    Graphical abstract: The transition temperature of 350 °C for the formation of c-NiO from h-NiS oxidation was obtained from structural and optical property studies and by calculating the number of spins obtained from the EPR data. Vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) shows that this pure NiS has both ferromagnetic ordering and paramagnetic domains. Further, the transition temperature of −9 °C of the pure α-NiS nano-alloys was confirmed by performing electrical measurements on the as-synthesized material. - Highlights: • Single hexagonal phase NiS obtained by microwave assisted hydrothermal synthesis. • NiS nanoalloys show both ferromagnetic and paramagnetic domains by VSM. • Structural evolution of annealed NiS and temperature dependent NiS oxidation presented. • Phase transition from NiS to NiO studied and correlated to the EPR spin population data and crystallite size. • Ferromagnetic and paramagnetic ordering observed for the raw NiS nanostructures. - Abstract: Single phase α-NiS nano-compounds with uniformly distributed hierarchical networks were synthesized by a microwave-assisted hydrothermal technique. The materials were evaluated for thermal stability under an oxidative environment and at temperatures between 150 °C and 600 °C. NiS materials showed stability at 300 °C and NiO formation was observed from 350 °C to 600 °C. The annealing effect on the crystalline size and IR absorption of the annealed samples is reported by XRD and FTIR studied. The EPR properties of the annealed materials were studied and compared to the oxidized materials. The transition temperature of 350 °C for the formation of NiO from NiS oxidation was confirmed by calculating the number of spins obtained from the EPR data. Vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) shows that this pure NiS has both ferromagnetic ordering and paramagnetic domains. Further, the transition temperature of −9 °C of the pure α-NiS nano-compounds was confirmed by performing electrical

  8. Self-Assembled Hierarchical Formation of Conjugated 3D Cobalt Oxide Nanobead-CNT-Graphene Nanostructure Using Microwaves for High-Performance Supercapacitor Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Singh, Rajesh Kumar; Dubey, Pawan Kumar; Singh, Dinesh Pratap; Yadav, Ram Manohar

    2015-07-15

    Here we report the electrochemical performance of a interesting three-dimensional (3D) structures comprised of zero-dimensional (0D) cobalt oxide nanobeads, one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanotubes and two-dimensional (2D) graphene, stacked hierarchically. We have synthesized 3D self-assembled hierarchical nanostructure comprised of cobalt oxide nanobeads (Co-nb), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and graphene nanosheets (GNSs) for high-performance supercapacitor electrode application. This 3D self-assembled hierarchical nanostructure Co3O4 nanobeads-CNTs-GNSs (3D:Co-nb@CG) is grown at a large scale (gram) through simple, facile, and ultrafast microwave irradiation (MWI). In 3D:Co-nb@CG nanostructure, Co3O4 nanobeads are attached to the CNT surfaces grown on GNSs. Our ultrafast, one-step approach not only renders simultaneous growth of cobalt oxide and CNTs on graphene nanosheets but also institutes the intrinsic dispersion of carbon nanotubes and cobalt oxide within a highly conductive scaffold. The 3D:Co-nb@CG electrode shows better electrochemical performance with a maximum specific capacitance of 600 F/g at the charge/discharge current density of 0.7A/g in KOH electrolyte, which is 1.56 times higher than that of Co3O4-decorated graphene (Co-np@G) nanostructure. This electrode also shows a long cyclic life, excellent rate capability, and high specific capacitance. It also shows high stability after few cycles (550 cycles) and exhibits high capacitance retention behavior. It was observed that the supercapacitor retained 94.5% of its initial capacitance even after 5000 cycles, indicating its excellent cyclic stability. The synergistic effect of the 3D:Co-nb@CG appears to contribute to the enhanced electrochemical performances.

  9. Synthesis of ferroelectric nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roervik, Per Martin

    2008-12-15

    respectively BaTi2O5/BaTi5O11 and Na2Ti6O13 for the two different systems, in contradiction to the previous studies. It was shown that NaCl reacted with BaO(PbO) resulting in loss of volatile BaCl2 (PbCl2 ) and formation and preferential growth of titanium oxide-rich nanorods instead of the target phase BaTiO3 (or PbTiO3 ). The molten salt synthesis route may therefore not necessarily yield nanorods of the target ternary oxide as reported previously. In addition, the importance of NaCl(g) for the growth of nanorods below the melting point of NaCl was demonstrated in a special experimental setup, where NaCl and the precursors were physically separated. In Paper II and III, a hydrothermal synthesis method to grow arrays and hierarchical nanostructures of PbTiO3 nanorods and platelets on substrates is presented. Hydrothermal treatment of an amorphous PbTiO3 precursor in the presence of a surfactant and PbTiO3 or SrTiO3 substrates resulted in the growth of PbTiO3 nanorods and platelets aligned in the crystallographic <100> orientations of the SrTiO3 substrates. PbTiO3 nanorods oriented perpendicular to the substrate surface could also be grown directly on the substrate by a modified synthesis method. The hydrothermal method described in Paper II and III was developed on the basis of the method described in Appendices I and II. In Paper IV, a template-assisted method to make PbTiO3 nanotubes is presented. An equimolar Pb-Ti sol was dropped onto porous alumina membranes and penetrated into the channels of the template. Single-phase PbTiO3 perovskite nanotubes were obtained by annealing at 700 degrees Celsius for 6 h. The nanotubes had diameters of 200 - 400 nm with a wall thickness of approximately 20 nm. Excess PbO or annealing in a Pb-containing atmosphere was not necessary in order to achieve single phase PbTiO3 nanotubes. The influence of the heating procedure and the sol concentration is discussed. In Paper V, a piezoresponse force microscopy study of single PbTiO3 nanorods is

  10. Silver nanostructures with well-controlled shapes: synthesis, characterization and growth mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan Caixia; Zhu Jiejun; Zhu Xiaoguang

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a poly(vinylpyrollidone)-directed polyol synthesis method for the fabrication of silver (Ag) nanostructures with well-controlled shapes (such as nanorods and nanocubes) by adjusting the synthesizing parameters. The structure characterizations suggest that the Ag nanorods grow from the five-fold twinned decahedral crystal nuclei. The nature of the {1 1 1} planes of Ag crystal and the highly selective poly(vinylpyrollidone) adsorption on the {100} planes of Ag crystal nuclei are favourable for the formation of Ag nanorods and Ag nanowires. The single crystalline Ag nanocubes obtained at optimum conditions are perfect in shape and are enclosed by the {1 0 0} facets. The optical properties of the Ag nanostructures show an attractive plasma resonance, displaying a considerable dependence on the shape and size. The formation of the Ag nanostructures with well-defined shapes is probably due to the fact that the nanostructures are controlled thermodynamically and kinetically. The ability to generate shape-controlled Ag nanostructures also provides an opportunity to experimentally and systematically study the relationship between their properties and geometric shapes

  11. Silver nanostructures with well-controlled shapes: synthesis, characterization and growth mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Cai-Xia; Zhu, Jie-Jun; Zhu, Xiao-Guang

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes a poly(vinylpyrollidone)-directed polyol synthesis method for the fabrication of silver (Ag) nanostructures with well-controlled shapes (such as nanorods and nanocubes) by adjusting the synthesizing parameters. The structure characterizations suggest that the Ag nanorods grow from the five-fold twinned decahedral crystal nuclei. The nature of the {1 1 1} planes of Ag crystal and the highly selective poly(vinylpyrollidone) adsorption on the {100} planes of Ag crystal nuclei are favourable for the formation of Ag nanorods and Ag nanowires. The single crystalline Ag nanocubes obtained at optimum conditions are perfect in shape and are enclosed by the {1 0 0} facets. The optical properties of the Ag nanostructures show an attractive plasma resonance, displaying a considerable dependence on the shape and size. The formation of the Ag nanostructures with well-defined shapes is probably due to the fact that the nanostructures are controlled thermodynamically and kinetically. The ability to generate shape-controlled Ag nanostructures also provides an opportunity to experimentally and systematically study the relationship between their properties and geometric shapes.

  12. Silver nanostructures with well-controlled shapes: synthesis, characterization and growth mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan Caixia [College of Science, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 211100 (China); Zhu Jiejun [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhu Xiaoguang [Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)], E-mail: cxkan@nuaa.edu.cn

    2008-08-07

    This paper describes a poly(vinylpyrollidone)-directed polyol synthesis method for the fabrication of silver (Ag) nanostructures with well-controlled shapes (such as nanorods and nanocubes) by adjusting the synthesizing parameters. The structure characterizations suggest that the Ag nanorods grow from the five-fold twinned decahedral crystal nuclei. The nature of the {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace} planes of Ag crystal and the highly selective poly(vinylpyrollidone) adsorption on the {l_brace}100{r_brace} planes of Ag crystal nuclei are favourable for the formation of Ag nanorods and Ag nanowires. The single crystalline Ag nanocubes obtained at optimum conditions are perfect in shape and are enclosed by the {l_brace}1 0 0{r_brace} facets. The optical properties of the Ag nanostructures show an attractive plasma resonance, displaying a considerable dependence on the shape and size. The formation of the Ag nanostructures with well-defined shapes is probably due to the fact that the nanostructures are controlled thermodynamically and kinetically. The ability to generate shape-controlled Ag nanostructures also provides an opportunity to experimentally and systematically study the relationship between their properties and geometric shapes.

  13. Growth, structure and magnetic properties of FePt nanostructures on NaCl(001) and MgO(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liscio, F; Maret, M; Doisneau-Cottignies, B; Makarov, D; Albrecht, M; Roussel, H

    2010-01-01

    A comparison of the structural and magnetic properties of FePt nanostructures grown at different temperatures on NaCl(001) and MgO(001) substrates is presented. A strong influence of the deposition temperature on the epitaxial growth as well as on the size distribution of FePt nanostructures grown on NaCl substrates is observed. In spite of a large lattice mismatch between FePt and NaCl, a 'cube-over-cube' growth of nanostructures with a narrow size distribution was achieved at 520 K. Moreover, the growth of FePt nanostructures on NaCl(001) is not preceded by the formation of a wetting layer as observed on MgO(001). The higher degree of L1 0 chemical ordering in FePt nanostructures grown on MgO(001) accompanied by the absence of L1 0 variants with an in-plane tetragonal c-axis indicates that the tensile epitaxial stress induced by the MgO substrate is a key factor in the formation of the L1 0 phase with an out-of-plane c-axis. Superparamagnetic behavior is revealed for the FePt nanostructures grown on NaCl(001) due to their small size and relatively poor chemical order.

  14. Formation of Anhydrite due to Interaction Between Water Soluble CO2 (aq) and Calcite Mineral During Enhanced Oil Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakravarty, Krishna Hara; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj

    2015-01-01

    In the Low Salinity based EOR method, formation and migration of fines have proved to have profound effect on the displacement efficiency of residual oil. Salinity variations of injected brines have also been shown to affect oil recovery for WAG-CO2 processes. But the effect of fines in EOR during...... simulations were conducted over a temperature range of 50°C to 250°C and a pressure range of 5 bars to 500 bars. The amounts of fines formation taking place for different LSWAG-CO2 processes were correlated to the described oil recovery. It is observed that significant amounts of fines formation can take...... with the available SO42- ions. The salinity and composition of brines present in pore space shows direct correlation with the amount of fines produced during CO2 injection. With increase in temperature and pressure, the amount fines formation increased significantly. The described oil recovery for different LSWAG...

  15. Formation of ghost images due to metal objects on the surface of the patient's face: A pictorial essay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Bárbara Couto; da Silva Izar, Bruna Raquel; Pereira, Jéssica Lourdes Costa; Souza, Priscilla Sena; Valerio, Claudia Scigliano; Tuji, Fabrício Mesquita; Manzi, Flávio Ricardo

    2016-03-01

    Panoramic radiographs are a relatively simple technique that is commonly used in all dental specialties. In panoramic radiographs, in addition to the formation of real images of metal objects, ghost images may also form, and these ghost images can hinder an accurate diagnosis and interfere with the accuracy of radiology reports. Dentists must understand the formation of these images in order to avoid making incorrect radiographic diagnoses. Therefore, the present study sought to present a study of the formation of panoramic radiograph ghost images caused by metal objects in the head and neck region of a dry skull, as well as to report a clinical case n order to warn dentists about ghost images and to raise awareness thereof. An understanding of the principles of the formation of ghost images in panoramic radiographs helps prevent incorrect diagnoses.

  16. Irradiation-Induced Nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birtcher, R.C.; Ewing, R.C.; Matzke, Hj.; Meldrum, A.; Newcomer, P.P.; Wang, L.M.; Wang, S.X.; Weber, W.J.

    1999-08-09

    This paper summarizes the results of the studies of the irradiation-induced formation of nanostructures, where the injected interstitials from the source of irradiation are not major components of the nanophase. This phenomena has been observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in a number of intermetallic compounds and ceramics during high-energy electron or ion irradiations when the ions completely penetrate through the specimen. Beginning with single crystals, electron or ion irradiation in a certain temperature range may result in nanostructures composed of amorphous domains and nanocrystals with either the original composition and crystal structure or new nanophases formed by decomposition of the target material. The phenomenon has also been observed in natural materials which have suffered irradiation from the decay of constituent radioactive elements and in nuclear reactor fuels which have been irradiated by fission neutrons and other fission products. The mechanisms involved in the process of this nanophase formation are discussed in terms of the evolution of displacement cascades, radiation-induced defect accumulation, radiation-induced segregation and phase decomposition, as well as the competition between irradiation-induced amorphization and recrystallization.

  17. Formation of ghost images due to metal objects on the surface of the patient's face: A pictorial essay

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, B?rbara Couto; da Silva Izar, Bruna Raquel; Pereira, J?ssica Lourdes Costa; Souza, Priscilla Sena; Valerio, Claudia Scigliano; Tuji, Fabr?cio Mesquita; Manzi, Fl?vio Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Panoramic radiographs are a relatively simple technique that is commonly used in all dental specialties. In panoramic radiographs, in addition to the formation of real images of metal objects, ghost images may also form, and these ghost images can hinder an accurate diagnosis and interfere with the accuracy of radiology reports. Dentists must understand the formation of these images in order to avoid making incorrect radiographic diagnoses. Therefore, the present study sought to present a stu...

  18. Charge separation sensitized by advanced II-VI semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, David F. [Univ.of California, Merced, CA (United States)

    2017-04-11

    This proposal focuses on how the composition and morphology of pure and alloyed II-VI semiconductor heterostructures control their spectroscopic and dynamical properties. The proposed research will use a combination of synthesis development, electron microscopy, time-resolved electronic spectroscopy and modeling calculations to study these nanostructures. The proposed research will examine the extent to which morphology, compression due to lattice mismatch and alloy effects can be used to tune the electron and hole energies and the spectroscopic properties of II-VI heterojunctions. It will also use synthesis, optical spectroscopy and HRTEM to examine the role of lattice mismatch and hence lattice strain in producing interfacial defects, and the extent to which defect formation can be prevented by controlling the composition profile through the particles and across the interfaces. Finally, we will study the magnitude of the surface roughness in core/shell nanostructures and the role of shell thickness variability on the inhomogeneity of interfacial charge transfer rates.

  19. Micro/nanostructures formation by femtosecond laser surface processing on amorphous and polycrystalline Ni{sub 60}Nb{sub 40}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Edwin, E-mail: edwin.peng@huskers.unl.edu [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Tsubaki, Alfred; Zuhlke, Craig A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Wang, Meiyu [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Bell, Ryan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Lucis, Michael J. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Anderson, Troy P.; Alexander, Dennis R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Gogos, George; Shield, Jeffrey E. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Femtosecond laser processing of glass-forming Ni{sub 60}Nb{sub 40} produce surface structures. • Cross sectioning, imaging, & TEM sample preparation with dual-beam SEM. • Low laser fluence surface structures’ form by ablation. • High laserfluence surface structures form by ablation and fluid flow. - Abstract: Femtosecond laser surface processing is a technology that can be used to functionalize many surfaces, imparting specialized properties such as increased broadband optical absorption or superhydrophilicity/superhydrophobicity. In this study, two unique classes of surface structures, below surface growth (BSG) and above surface growth (ASG) mounds, were formed by femtosecond laser surface processing on amorphous and polycrystalline Ni{sub 60}Nb{sub 40} with two different grain sizes. Cross sectional imaging of these mounds revealed thermal evidence of the unique formation processes for each class of surface structure. BSG mounds formed on all three substrates using the same laser parameters had similar surface morphology. The microstructures in the mounds were unaltered compared with the substrate before laser processing, suggesting their formation was dominated by preferential valley ablation. ASG mounds had similar morphology when formed on the polycrystalline Ni{sub 60}Nb{sub 40} substrates with 100 nm and 2 μm grain size. However, the ASG mounds had significantly wider diameter and higher peak-to-valley heights when the substrate was amorphous Ni{sub 60}Nb{sub 40}. Hydrodynamic melting was primarily responsible for ASG mound formation. On amorphous Ni{sub 60}Nb{sub 40} substrates, the ASG mounds are most likely larger due to lower thermal diffusivity. There was clear difference in growth mechanism of femtosecond laser processed BSG and ASG mounds, and grain size does not appear to be a factor.

  20. Thermoelectric effects in magnetic nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hatami, Moosa; Bauer, Gerrit E.W.; Zhang, Q.F.; Kelly, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    We model and evaluate the Peltier and Seebeck effects in magnetic multilayer nanostructures by a finite-element theory of thermoelectric properties. We present analytical expressions for the thermopower and the current-induced temperature changes due to Peltier cooling/heating. The thermopower of a

  1. Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichhardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reichhardt, Cynthia J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Libal, Andras J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

  2. Self-Reconstructed Formation of a One-Dimensional Hierarchical Porous Nanostructure Assembled by Ultrathin TiO2 Nanobelts for Fast and Stable Lithium Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Yan, Xiaodong; Xu, Bingqing; Lan, Jinle; Yu, Yunhua; Yang, Xiaoping; Lin, Yuanhua; Nan, Cewen

    2018-06-06

    Owing to their unique structural advantages, TiO 2 hierarchical nanostructures assembled by low-dimensional (LD) building blocks have been extensively used in the energy-storage/-conversion field. However, it is still a big challenge to produce such advanced structures by current synthetic techniques because of the harsh conditions needed to generate primary LD subunits. Herein, a novel one-dimensional (1D) TiO 2 hierarchical porous fibrous nanostructure constructed by TiO 2 nanobelts is synthesized by combining a room-temperature aqueous solution growth mechanism with the electrospinning technology. The nanobelt-constructed 1D hierarchical nanoarchitecture is evolves directly from the amorphous TiO 2 /SiO 2 composite fibers in alkaline solutions at ambient conditions without any catalyst and other reactant. Benefiting from the unique structural features such as 1D nanoscale building blocks, large surface area, and numerous interconnected pores, as well as mixed phase anatase-TiO 2 (B), the optimum 1D TiO 2 hierarchical porous nanostructure shows a remarkable high-rate performance when tested as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries (107 mA h g -1 at ∼10 A g -1 ) and can be used in a hybrid lithium-ion supercapacitor with very stable lithium-storage performance (a capacity retention of ∼80% after 3000 cycles at 2 A g -1 ). The current work presents a scalable and cost-effective method for the synthesis of advanced TiO 2 hierarchical materials for high-power and stable energy-storage/-conversion devices.

  3. Tailoring nanostructure and bioactivity of 3D printable hydrogels with self-assemble Peptides Amphiphile (PA) for promoting bile duct formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ming; Lewis, Phillip L; Shah, Ramille N

    2018-05-31

    3D-printing has expanded our ability to produce reproducible and more complex scaffold architectures for tissue engineering applications. In order to enhance the biological response within these 3D printed scaffolds incorporating nanostructural features and/or specific biological signaling may be an effective means to optimize tissue regeneration. Peptides Amphiphiles (PAs) are a versatile supramolecular biomaterial with tailorable nanostructural and biochemical features. PAs are widely used in tissue engineering applications such as angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and bone regeneration. Thus, the addition of PAs is a potential solution that can greatly expand the utility of 3D bio-printing hydrogels in the field of regenerative medicine. In this paper, we firstly developed a 3D printable thiolated-gelatin bioink supplemented with PAs to tailor the bioactivity and nanostructure which allows for the incorporation of cells. The bioink can be printed at 4 °C and stabilized to last a long time (>1 month) in culture at 37 °C by via a dual secondary cross-linking strategy using calcium ions and homobifunctional maleiminde-poly (ethylene glycol). Rheological properties of inks were characterized and were suitable for printing multi-layered structures. We additionally demonstrated enhanced functionality of ink formulations by utilizing a laminin-mimetic IKVAV-based PA system within a 3D-printable ink containing cholangiocytes. Viability and functional staining showed that the IKVAV PA nanofibers stimulated cholangioctyes to form functional tubular structures, which was not observed in other ink formulations. . © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  4. Nanostructures for Organic Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goszczak, Arkadiusz Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    The experimental work in this thesis is focused on the fabrication of nanostructures that can be implemented in organic solar cell (OSC) architecture for enhancement of the device performance. Solar devices made from organic material are gaining increased attention, compared to their inorganic...... counterparts, due to the promising advantages, such as transparency, flexibility, ease of processing etc. But their efficiencies cannot be compared to the inorganic ones. Boosting the efficiency of OSCs by nanopatterning has thus been puzzling many researchers within the past years. Therefore various methods...... have been proposed to be used for developing efficient nanostructures for OSC devices such as, plasmonic structures, nanowires (NWs), gratings, nanorods etc. The nanostructuring methods applied though, do not offer the possibility of a cheap, rapid, reproducible and scalable fabrication. It is the aim...

  5. Nanostructured Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sholklapper, Tal Zvi [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The ability of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) to directly and efficiently convert the chemical energy in hydrocarbon fuels to electricity places the technology in a unique and exciting position to play a significant role in the clean energy revolution. In order to make SOFC technology cost competitive with existing technologies, the operating temperatures have been decreased to the range where costly ceramic components may be substituted with inexpensive metal components within the cell and stack design. However, a number of issues have arisen due to this decrease in temperature: decreased electrolyte ionic conductivity, cathode reaction rate limitations, and a decrease in anode contaminant tolerance. While the decrease in electrolyte ionic conductivities has been countered by decreasing the electrolyte thickness, the electrode limitations have remained a more difficult problem. Nanostructuring SOFC electrodes addresses the major electrode issues. The infiltration method used in this dissertation to produce nanostructure SOFC electrodes creates a connected network of nanoparticles; since the method allows for the incorporation of the nanoparticles after electrode backbone formation, previously incompatible advanced electrocatalysts can be infiltrated providing electronic conductivity and electrocatalysis within well-formed electrolyte backbones. Furthermore, the method is used to significantly enhance the conventional electrode design by adding secondary electrocatalysts. Performance enhancement and improved anode contamination tolerance are demonstrated in each of the electrodes. Additionally, cell processing and the infiltration method developed in conjunction with this dissertation are reviewed.

  6. Characterization of ion beam induced nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghatak, J.; Satpati, B.; Umananda, M.; Kabiraj, D.; Som, T.; Dev, B.N.; Akimoto, K.; Ito, K.; Emoto, T.; Satyam, P.V.

    2006-01-01

    Tailoring of nanostructures with energetic ion beams has become an active area of research leading to the fundamental understanding of ion-solid interactions at nanoscale regime and with possible applications in the near future. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and asymmetric X-ray Bragg-rocking curve experimental methods have been used to characterize ion-induced effects in nanostructures. The possibility of surface and sub-surface/interface alloying at nano-scale regime, ion-beam induced embedding, crater formation, sputtering yield variations for systems with isolated nanoislands, semi-continuous and continuous films of noble metals (Au, Ag) deposited on single crystalline silicon will be reviewed. MeV-ion induced changes in specified Au-nanoislands on silicon substrate are tracked as a function of ion fluence using ex situ TEM. Strain induced in the bulk silicon substrate surface due to 1.5 MeV Au 2+ and C 2+ ion beam irradiation is determined by using HRTEM and asymmetric Bragg X-ray rocking curve methods. Preliminary results on 1.5 MeV Au 2+ ion-induced effects in nanoislands of Co deposited on silicon substrate will be discussed

  7. On the possibility of wormhole formation due to quantum effects in the gravitational collapse of a small dust shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz P, G.; Minzoni, A.; Padilla, P. [Proyecto Universitario en Fenomenos Nolineales y Mecanica Instituto de Investigaciones en Matematicas Aplicadas y en Sistemas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 20-726, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Rosenbaum, M.; Ryan, M.P. Jr. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Proyecto Universitario en Fenomenos Nolineales y Mecanica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-543, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Smyth, N.F. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Edinburgh, The King' s Building, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK, EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Vukasinac, T. [Facultad de Economia, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, A.P. 2-82, 58030 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    In the present note we outline the main steps towards the analysis of wormhole formation during the quantum collapse of a spherical dust shell. We define the quantum observable {theta}, corresponding to the classical trace of the expansion tensor, and calculate its expected value in order to obtain information about the geometry of space-time around the shell. We show that the local quantum geometry represents a wormhole. (Author)

  8. On the possibility of wormhole formation due to quantum effects in the gravitational collapse of a small dust shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz P, G.; Minzoni, A.; Padilla, P.; Rosenbaum, M.; Ryan, M.P. Jr.; Smyth, N.F.; Vukasinac, T.

    2003-01-01

    In the present note we outline the main steps towards the analysis of wormhole formation during the quantum collapse of a spherical dust shell. We define the quantum observable Θ, corresponding to the classical trace of the expansion tensor, and calculate its expected value in order to obtain information about the geometry of space-time around the shell. We show that the local quantum geometry represents a wormhole. (Author)

  9. Biofilm formation in Escherichia coli cra mutants is impaired due to down-regulation of curli biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshamwala, Shamlan M S; Noronha, Santosh B

    2011-10-01

    Cra is a pleiotropic regulatory protein that controls carbon and energy flux in enteric bacteria. Recent studies have shown that Cra also regulates other cell processes and influences biofilm formation. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of Cra in biofilm formation in Escherichia coli. Congo red-binding studies suggested that curli biosynthesis is impaired in cra mutants. Microarray analysis of wild-type and mutant E. coli cultivated in conditions promoting biofilm formation revealed that the curli biosynthesis genes, csgBAC and csgDEFG, are poorly expressed in the mutant, suggesting that transcription of genes required for curli production is regulated by Cra. Four putative Cra-binding sites were identified in the curli intergenic region, which were experimentally validated by performing electromobility shift assays. Site-directed mutagenesis of three Cra-binding sites in the promoter region of the csgDEFG operon suggests that Cra activates transcription of this operon upon binding to operator regions both downstream and upstream of the transcription start site. Based on the Cra-binding sites identified in this and other studies, the Cra consensus sequence is refined.

  10. Shape of Field-Induced Nanostructures Formed by STM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhashis Gangopadhyay

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Creation of controlled and reproducible nanostructures on material surfaces using scanning tunneling microscope is a novel technique, which can be used for a variety of applications. We have examined the shape of the nanostructures so formed on the gold film using tungsten tip and examined the formation parameters, which govern their shape and size. During our investigations it is found that the reproducibility of mound formation can reach up to 90% under optimum operating conditions, whereas the pit formation can be made with almost 100% reproducibility. Formation mechanism of such nanostructures is also discussed.

  11. Templated electrodeposition of functional nanostructures: nanowires, nanotubes and nanocubes

    OpenAIRE

    Maijenburg, A.W.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is entitled “Templated electrodeposition of functional nanostructures: nanowires, nanotubes and nanocubes”. Templated electrodeposition is the synthesis technique that was used throughout this thesis, and it comprises the use of a template with specific shape and dimensions for the formation of different types of nanostructures. Throughout this thesis, three different nanostructures were made: nanowires (Chapters 2 to 6), nanotubes (Chapters 2 and 5) and nanocubes (Chapters 7 and ...

  12. PREFACE: Self-organized nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousset, Sylvie; Ortega, Enrique

    2006-04-01

    the EUROCORES SONS Programme under the auspices of the European Science Foundation and the VI Framework Programme of the European Community. It was also funded by CNRS `formation permanente'. Major topics relevant to self-organization are covered in these papers. The first two papers deal with the physics of self-organized nucleation and growth. Both metal and semiconductor templates are investigated. The paper by Meyer zu Heringdorf focuses on the mesoscopic patterns formed by the Au-induced faceting of vicinal Si (001). Repain et al describe how uniform and long-range ordered nanostructures are built on a surface by using nucleation on a point-defect array. Electronic properties of such self-organized systems are reviewed by Mugarza and Ortega. The next three papers deal with molecules and self-organization. In the paper presented by Kröger, molecules are deposited on vicinal Au surfaces and are studied by STM. A very active field in self-organized nanostructures is the chemical route for nanoparticle synthesis. The paper by Piléni deals with self-organization of inorganic crystals produced by evaporation of a solution, also called colloids. Their physical properties are also treated. Gacoin et al illustrate chemical synthesis, including the template approach, using organized mesoporous silica films for the production of semiconductor or metal arrays of particles. An alternative method is developed in the paper by Allongue and Maroun which is the electrochemical method of building arrays of nanostructures. Ultimately, self-organization is a very interdisciplinary field. There is also an attempt in this issue to present some of the challenges using biology. The paper by Belamie et al deals with the self-assembly of biological macromolecules, such as chitin and collagen. Finally, Molodtsov and co-workers describe how a biological template can be used in order to achieve novel materials made of hybrid metallo-organic nanostructures.

  13. Nanotechnology and health safety--toxicity and risk assessments of nanostructured materials on human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Surya; Nalwa, Hari Singh

    2007-09-01

    The field of nanotechnology has recently emerged as the most commercially viable technology of this century because of its wide-ranging applications in our daily lives. Man-made nanostructured materials such as fullerenes, nanoparticles, nanopowders, nanotubes, nanowires, nanorods, nanofibers, quantum dots, dendrimers, nanoclusters, nanocrystals, and nanocomposites are globally produced in large quantities due to their wide potential applications, e.g., in skincare and consumer products, healthcare, electronics, photonics, biotechnology, engineering products, pharmaceuticals, drug delivery, and agriculture. Human exposure to these nanostructured materials is inevitable, as they can enter the body through the lungs or other organs via food, drink, and medicine and affect different organs and tissues such as the brain, liver, kidney, heart, colon, spleen, bone, blood, etc., and may cause cytotoxic effects, e.g., deformation and inhibition of cell growth leading to various diseases in humans and animals. Since a very wide variety of nanostructured materials exits, their interactions with biological systems and toxicity largely depend upon their properties, such as size, concentration, solubility, chemical and biological properties, and stability. The toxicity of nanostructured materials could be reduced by chemical approaches such by surface treatment, functionalization, and composite formation. This review summarizes the sources of various nanostructured materials and their human exposure, biocompatibility in relation to potential toxicological effects, risk assessment, and safety evaluation on human and animal health as well as on the environment.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of noble metal–titania core–shell nanostructures with tunable shell thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Bartosewicz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Core–shell nanostructures have found applications in many fields, including surface enhanced spectroscopy, catalysis and solar cells. Titania-coated noble metal nanoparticles, which combine the surface plasmon resonance properties of the core and the photoactivity of the shell, have great potential for these applications. However, the controllable synthesis of such nanostructures remains a challenge due to the high reactivity of titania precursors. Hence, a simple titania coating method that would allow better control over the shell formation is desired. A sol–gel based titania coating method, which allows control over the shell thickness, was developed and applied to the synthesis of Ag@TiO2 and Au@TiO2 with various shell thicknesses. The morphology of the synthesized structures was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Their sizes and shell thicknesses were determined using tunable resistive pulse sensing (TRPS technique. The optical properties of the synthesized structures were characterized using UV–vis spectroscopy. Ag@TiO2 and Au@TiO2 structures with shell thickness in the range of ≈40–70 nm and 90 nm, for the Ag and Au nanostructures respectively, were prepared using a method we developed and adapted, consisting of a change in the titania precursor concentration. The synthesized nanostructures exhibited significant absorption in the UV–vis range. The TRPS technique was shown to be a very useful tool for the characterization of metal–metal oxide core–shell nanostructures.

  15. Biological effects like cancer formation due to inhalational exposure to plutonium. What are evident in animal experiments?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oghiso, Yoichi

    2013-01-01

    Literatures on the title subject are reviewed and problems to be solved are given. There are 2 reports of dog experiments of inhaled Pu by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), which have given results incompatible/compatible with risk assessments hitherto: one with the micro-particle of Pu-nitrate, 239 Pu(NO 3 ) 4 , in which the dog lung is compared with human's by histology and autoradiography, presenting findings that differ from the previous ICRP assumption of the homogeneous distribution in the lung; and the other with 239 PuO 2 , indicating that non-tumorous diseases are agreeable with the determinative effect defined by ICRP. Other literatures have shown that effects of Pu inhalation differ dependently on the solubility of its chemical form and on its isotope ( 239 Pu and 238 Pu). Size of the inhaled Pu particle affects its deposition and thereby its influence on the air tract and other tissues. Rats are also used in Pu inhalation experiments. The significant increase of malignant lung tumor incidence is shown with 239 PuO 2 inhalation at >1 Gy lung absorbed dose by PNL and Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) and by National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), at >0.7 Gy and not at 239 PuO 2 inhalation in dogs involves the long-term decrease of peripheral lymphocytes, acute radiation pneumonia and chronic fibroid lung at 10-20 Gy, which can be a cause of death. There are many studies of the lung tumor formation at various carcinogenic steps in rats. Problems to be solved for the inhaled Pu compound are the elucidation of accuracy and validity concerning the metabolic parameters, alpha-ray dose assessment, dose rate effects of particle size; the biological factors modifying the metabolism and effect; and the relationship of cancer formation with non-tumorous diseases. (T.T)

  16. Nitrate-assisted photocatalytic efficiency of defective Eu-doped Pr(OH)3 nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aškrabić, S; Araújo, V D; Passacantando, M; Bernardi, M I B; Tomić, N; Dojčinović, B; Manojlović, D; Čalija, B; Miletić, M; Dohčević-Mitrović, Z D

    2017-12-06

    Pr(OH) 3 one-dimensional nanostructures are a less studied member of lanthanide hydroxide nanostructures, which recently demonstrated an excellent adsorption capacity for organic pollutant removal from wastewater. In this study, Pr 1-x Eu x (OH) 3 (x = 0, 0.01, 0.03, and 0.05) defective nanostructures were synthesized by a facile and scalable microwave-assisted hydrothermal method using KOH as an alkaline metal precursor. The phase and surface composition, morphology, vibrational, electronic and optical properties of the as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), Raman, infrared (IR), photoluminescence (PL), and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). It was deduced that the incorporation of Eu 3+ ions promoted the formation of oxygen vacancies in the already defective Pr(OH) 3 , subsequently changing the Pr(OH) 3 nanorod morphology. The presence of KNO 3 phase was registered in the Eu-doped samples. The oxygen-deficient Eu-doped Pr(OH) 3 nanostructures displayed an improved photocatalytic activity in the removal of reactive orange (RO16) dye under UV-vis light irradiation. An enhanced photocatalytic activity of the Eu-doped Pr(OH) 3 nanostructures was caused by the synergetic effect of oxygen vacancies and Eu 3+ (NO 3 - ) ions present on the Pr(OH) 3 surface, the charge separation efficiency and the formation of the reactive radicals. In addition, the 3% Eu-doped sample exhibited very good adsorptive properties due to different morphology and higher electrostatic attraction with the anionic dye. Pr 1-x Eu x (OH) 3 nanostructures with the possibility of tuning their adsorption/photocatalytic properties present a great potential for wastewater treatment.

  17. Osteogenesis imperfecta due to mutations in non-collagenous genes: lessons in the biology of bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Joan C; Reich, Adi; Smith, Simone M

    2014-08-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta or 'brittle bone disease' has mainly been considered a bone disorder caused by collagen mutations. Within the last decade, however, a surge of genetic discoveries has created a new paradigm for osteogenesis imperfecta as a collagen-related disorder, where most cases are due to autosomal dominant type I collagen defects, while rare, mostly recessive, forms are due to defects in genes whose protein products interact with collagen protein. This review is both timely and relevant in outlining the genesis, development, and future of this paradigm shift in the understanding of osteogenesis imperfecta. Bone-restricted interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM)-like protein (BRIL) and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) defects cause types V and VI osteogenesis imperfecta via defective bone mineralization, while defects in cartilage-associated protein (CRTAP), prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1), and cyclophilin B (CYPB) cause types VII-IX osteogenesis imperfecta via defective collagen post-translational modification. Heat shock protein 47 (HSP47) and FK506-binding protein-65 (FKBP65) defects cause types X and XI osteogenesis imperfecta via aberrant collagen crosslinking, folding, and chaperoning, while defects in SP7 transcription factor, wingless-type MMTV integration site family member 1 (WNT1), trimeric intracellular cation channel type b (TRIC-B), and old astrocyte specifically induced substance (OASIS) disrupt osteoblast development. Finally, absence of the type I collagen C-propeptidase bone morphogenetic protein 1 (BMP1) causes type XII osteogenesis imperfecta due to altered collagen maturation/processing. Identification of these multiple causative defects has provided crucial information for accurate genetic counseling, inspired a recently proposed functional grouping of osteogenesis imperfecta types by shared mechanism to simplify current nosology, and has prodded investigations into common pathways in osteogenesis imperfecta. Such

  18. Clay-Alcohol-Water Dispersions: Anomalous Viscosity Changes Due to Network Formation of Clay Nanosheets Induced by Alcohol Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuji; Haraguchi, Kazutoshi

    2017-05-16

    Clay-alcohol-water ternary dispersions were compared with alcohol-water binary mixtures in terms of viscosity and optical absorbance. Aqueous clay dispersions to which lower alcohols (ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, and tert-butanol) were added exhibited significant viscosity anomalies (maxima) when the alcohol content was 30-55 wt %, as well as optical absorbance anomalies (maxima). The maximum viscosity (η max ) depended strongly on the clay content and varied between 300 and 8000 mPa·s, making it remarkably high compared with the viscosity anomalies (2 mPa·s) observed in alcohol-water binary mixtures. The alcohol content at η max decreased as the hydrophobicity of the alcohol increased. The ternary dispersions with viscosity anomalies exhibited thixotropic behaviors. The effects of other hydrophilic solvents (glycols) and other kinds of clays were also clarified. Based on these findings and the average particle size changes, the viscosity anomalies in the ternary dispersions were explained by alcohol-clustering-induced network formation of the clay nanosheets. It was estimated that 0.9, 1.7, and 2.5 H 2 O molecules per alcohol molecule were required to stabilize the ethanol, 2-propanol, and tert-butanol, respectively, in the clay-alcohol-water dispersions.

  19. Leafy nanostructure PANI for material of supercapacitors

    OpenAIRE

    XI Dong; CHEN Xinman

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructure conducting polyaniline(PANI) has great potential applications in supercapacitor electrode materials.In this paper,we report a template-free approach to synthesize PANI by a galvanostatic current procedure with a three-electrode configuration directly on indium-doped tin-oxide substrates (ITO).The morphology of product was characterized by Hitachi S-4800 field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM).Due to the nanostructure,the specific capacitance of PANI film with the th...

  20. On the mechanical stress of Zr, Zry, and other materials due to the formation of oxide layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, P.

    1977-06-01

    Several mechanisms are indicated which during oxidation of sheets, tubes, and cylinders of pure metals and alloys might lead to plastic deformation of the remaining uncorroded cross section. Some experimental methods are described which allow evaluation of stresses occurring in oxide layers. The main reason for the creep deformation of flat and tubular specimens made of Zr and Zr alloys lies in the stresses that arise from volume increase due to the growth of oxide layers. Plastic deformations of the sheet metal specimens can be up to 100% and are anisotropic. In tubular specimens the changes in geometry (axial, radial) are much smaller in the course of oxidation and attain 2% at the maximum for Zr- or Zry-tubes and go up to 10% for Ta-tubes when no differential pressure is applied simultaneously. (orig.) [de

  1. Osteogenesis Imperfecta due to Mutations in Non-Collagenous Genes-Lessons in the Biology of Bone Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Joan C.; Reich, Adi; Smith, Simone M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), or “brittle bone disease”, has mainly been considered a bone disorder caused by collagen mutations. Within the last decade, however, a surge of genetic discoveries has created a new paradigm for OI as a collagen-related disorder, where autosomal dominant type I collagen defects cause most cases, while rare, mostly recessive forms are due to defects in genes whose protein products interact with collagen protein. This review is both timely and relevant in outlining the genesis, development and future of this paradigm shift in the understanding of OI. Recent Findings BRIL and PEDF defects cause types V and VI OI via defective bone mineralization, while defects in CRTAP, P3H1 and CyPB cause types VII-IX via defective collagen post-translational modification. Hsp47 and FKBP65 defects cause types X and XI OI via aberrant collagen crosslinking, folding and chaperoning, while defects in SP7, WNT1, TRIC-B and OASIS disrupt osteoblast development. Finally, absence of the type I collagen C-propeptidase BMP1 causes type XII OI due to altered collagen maturation/processing. Summary Identification of these multiple causative defects has provided crucial information for accurate genetic counseling, inspired a recently proposed functional grouping of OI types by shared mechanism to simplify current nosology, and should prod investigations into common pathways in OI. Such investigations could yield critical information on cellular and bone tissue mechanisms and translate to new mechanistic insight into clinical therapies for patients. PMID:25007323

  2. Influence of the fuel in the nanostructure catalyzer oxides synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zampiva, R.Y.S.; Panta, P.C.; Carlos, R.B.; Alves, A.K.; Bergmann, C.P.

    2012-01-01

    Among the techniques used in catalysts production, the solution combustion synthesis (SCS) has been increasingly applied due the possibility of producing, at low cost, highly pure and homogeneous nanostructured powders. The smaller the particle diameter, the greater the activity of the catalyst. In SCS, the size of the particles produced depends on the process variables. In order to formulate the optimal methodology for the preparation of nanostructured oxides for catalysis, it was studied the fuel-oxidant concentration ratio, and the use of glycine and polyethylene glycol with molecular weight 200 (PEG 200) as fuel in the SCS of Iron, Magnesium and Molybdenum based catalysts. The phase identification of the products was performed by x-ray diffraction (XRD). Particle size and surface area analysis were done to characterize the particles size and the samples morphology was obtained by scanning electron microscopy. Results indicated the formation of high purity nanomaterials obtained for low concentrations of fuel, and a wide variation in the nanostructure sizes depending on the concentration and type of fuel used. (author)

  3. Shape evolution of nanostructures by thermal and ion beam processing. Modeling and atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roentzsch, L.

    2007-07-01

    Single-crystalline nanostructures often exhibit gradients of surface (and/or interface) curvature that emerge from fabrication and growth processes or from thermal fluctuations. Thus, the system-inherent capillary force can initiate morphological transformations during further processing steps or during operation at elevated temperature. Therefore and because of the ongoing miniaturization of functional structures which causes a general rise in surface-to-volume ratios, solid-state capillary phenomena will become increasingly important: On the one hand diffusion-mediated capillary processes can be of practical use in view of non-conventional nanostructure fabrication methods based on self-organization mechanisms, on the other hand they can destroy the integrity of nanostructures which can go along with the failure of functionality. Additionally, capillarity-induced shape transformations are effected and can thereby be controlled by applied fields and forces (guided or driven evolution). With these prospects and challenges at hand, formation and shape transformation of single-crystalline nanostructures due to the system-inherent capillary force in combination with external fields or forces are investigated in the frame of this dissertation by means of atomistic computer simulations. For the exploration (search, description, and prediction) of reaction pathways of nanostructure shape transformations, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations are the method of choice. Since the employed KMC code is founded on a cellular automaton principle, the spatio-temporal development of lattice-based N-particle systems (N up to several million) can be followed for time spans of several orders of magnitude, while considering local phenomena due to atomic-scale effects like diffusion, nucleation, dissociation, or ballistic displacements. In this work, the main emphasis is put on nanostructures which have a cylindrical geometry, for example, nanowires (NWs), nanorods, nanotubes etc

  4. Shape evolution of nanostructures by thermal and ion beam processing. Modeling and atomistic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roentzsch, L.

    2007-01-01

    Single-crystalline nanostructures often exhibit gradients of surface (and/or interface) curvature that emerge from fabrication and growth processes or from thermal fluctuations. Thus, the system-inherent capillary force can initiate morphological transformations during further processing steps or during operation at elevated temperature. Therefore and because of the ongoing miniaturization of functional structures which causes a general rise in surface-to-volume ratios, solid-state capillary phenomena will become increasingly important: On the one hand diffusion-mediated capillary processes can be of practical use in view of non-conventional nanostructure fabrication methods based on self-organization mechanisms, on the other hand they can destroy the integrity of nanostructures which can go along with the failure of functionality. Additionally, capillarity-induced shape transformations are effected and can thereby be controlled by applied fields and forces (guided or driven evolution). With these prospects and challenges at hand, formation and shape transformation of single-crystalline nanostructures due to the system-inherent capillary force in combination with external fields or forces are investigated in the frame of this dissertation by means of atomistic computer simulations. For the exploration (search, description, and prediction) of reaction pathways of nanostructure shape transformations, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations are the method of choice. Since the employed KMC code is founded on a cellular automaton principle, the spatio-temporal development of lattice-based N-particle systems (N up to several million) can be followed for time spans of several orders of magnitude, while considering local phenomena due to atomic-scale effects like diffusion, nucleation, dissociation, or ballistic displacements. In this work, the main emphasis is put on nanostructures which have a cylindrical geometry, for example, nanowires (NWs), nanorods, nanotubes etc

  5. About possible technologies of creation nanostructures blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blednova, Zh.M.; Chaevskij, M.I.; Rusinov, P.O.

    2008-01-01

    Possible technologies of formation nanostructures blankets are considered: a method of thermal carrying over of weights in the conditions of a high gradient of temperatures; the combined method including cathode-plasma nitriding in the conditions of low pressure and drawing of nitride of the titan in a uniform work cycle; the combined method including high-frequency ionic nitriding and drawing of carbide of chrome by pyrolysis chrome and organic of connections in plasma of the decaying category. Possibility of formation layered nanostructures layers is shown.

  6. Nanostructured diamine-fullerene derivatives: computational density functional theory study and experimental evidence for their formation via gas-phase functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Torres, Flavio F; Basiuk, Elena V; Basiuk, Vladimir A; Meza-Laguna, Víctor; Gromovoy, Taras Yu

    2012-02-16

    Nanostructure derivatives of fullerene C(60) are used in emerging applications of composite matrices, including protective and decorative coating, superadsorbent material, thin films, and lightweight high-strength fiber-reinforced materials, etc. In this study, quantum chemical calculations and experimental studies were performed to analyze the derivatives of diamine-fullerene prepared by the gas-phase solvent-free functionalization technique. In particular, the aliphatic 1,8-diamino-octane and the aromatic 1,5-diaminonaphthalene, which are diamines volatile in vacuum, were studied. We addressed two alternative mechanisms of the amination reaction via polyaddition and cross-linking of C(60) with diamines, using the pure GGA BLYP, PW91, and PBE functionals; further validation calculations were performed using the semiempirical dispersion GGA B97-D functional which contains parameters that have been specially adjusted by a more realistic view on dispersion contributions. In addition, we looked for experimental evidence for the covalent functionalization by using laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, thermogravimetric analysis, and atomic force microscopy.

  7. Study on the nanostructure formation mechanism of hypereutectic Al–17.5Si alloy induced by high current pulsed electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Bo, E-mail: gaob@smm.neu.edu.cn [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Hu, Liang [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Li, Shi-wei [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Hao, Yi [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Zhang, Yu-dong [Laboratoire d’Etude des Textures et Applications aux Matériaux (LETAM, UMR-CNRS 7078), Université Paul Verlaine de Metz, Ile du Saulcy, Metz 57012 (France); Tu, Gan-feng [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Grosdidier, Thierry [Laboratoire d’Etude des Textures et Applications aux Matériaux (LETAM, UMR-CNRS 7078), Université Paul Verlaine de Metz, Ile du Saulcy, Metz 57012 (France)

    2015-08-15

    This work investigates the nanostructure forming mechanism of hypereutectic Al–17.5Si alloy associated with the high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) treatment with increasing number of pulses by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and SEM. The surface layers were melted and resolidified rapidly. The treated surfaces show different structural characteristics in different compositions and distribution zones. The top melted-layer zone can be divided into three zones: Si-rich, Ai-rich, and intermediate zone. The Al-rich zone has a nano-cellular microstructure with a diameter of ∼100 nm. The microstructure in the Si-rich zone consists of fine, dispersive, and spherical nano-sized Si crystals surrounded by α(Al) cells. Some superfine eutectic structures form in the boundary of the two zones. With the increase of number of pulses, the proportion of Si-rich zone to the whole top surface increases, and more cellular substructures are transformed to fine equiaxed grain. In other words, with increasing number of pulses, more Si elements diffuse to the Al-rich zone and provide heterogeneous nucleation sites, and Al grains are refined dramatically. Moreover, the relationship between the substrate Si phase and crystalline phase is determined by EBSD; that is, (1 1 1){sub Al}//(0 0 1){sub Si} with a value of disregistry δ at approximately 5%. The HCPEB technique is a versatile technique for refining the surface microstructure of hypereutectic Al–Si alloys.

  8. Single ion induced surface nanostructures: a comparison between slow highly charged and swift heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumayr, Friedrich; Facsko, Stefan; El-Said, Ayman S; Trautmann, Christina; Schleberger, Marika

    2011-10-05

    This topical review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the formation of surface nanostructures, an intriguing phenomenon in ion-surface interaction due to the impact of individual ions. In many solid targets, swift heavy ions produce narrow cylindrical tracks accompanied by the formation of a surface nanostructure. More recently, a similar nanometric surface effect has been revealed for the impact of individual, very slow but highly charged ions. While swift ions transfer their large kinetic energy to the target via ionization and electronic excitation processes (electronic stopping), slow highly charged ions produce surface structures due to potential energy deposited at the top surface layers. Despite the differences in primary excitation, the similarity between the nanostructures is striking and strongly points to a common mechanism related to the energy transfer from the electronic to the lattice system of the target. A comparison of surface structures induced by swift heavy ions and slow highly charged ions provides a valuable insight to better understand the formation mechanisms. © 2011 IOP Publishing Ltd

  9. Are the different gully morphologies due to different formation processes on the Kaiser dune field on Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquon, K.; Gargani, J.; Nachon, M.; Conway, S. J.; Massé, M.; Jouannic, G.; Balme, M. R.; Costard, F.; Vincendon, M.

    2017-12-01

    Diverse gully morphologies are seen on Mars and differences are often neglected for simplification. Here we describe in detail the morphology and present-day activity of two gully-systems on the Kaiser dune field in the southern hemisphere of Mars. We then compare their activity with that of the morphologically distinct linear dune gullies present on the same dunes. The studied gully-systems have large depositional aprons (named "large apron gullies") and occur on dune faces oriented westward. They are active from mid-autumn to late winter (i.e. from Ls 50° to Ls 180°) coinciding with CO2 ice condensation/sublimation cycles. Sandy material collapses from the alcove flanks onto the alcove floor sporadically throughout this period. This accumulated sand is remobilized by punctuated mass flows which we estimate to be up to 7100 m3 in volume. These flows run out on to the apron and occur between Ls 120° and Ls 160°. These mass flow events occur when the number of "digitate flows" is at its seasonal maximum. Digitate flows are characterized by long-narrow zig-zagging low-albedo tracks and do not seem to transport appreciable sediment, and they can number in the hundreds. Small pits appear at their termini or midway along and sometimes these pits are re-deepened by subsequent flows. These events repeat every year and using volume balance calculations we find that the whole system could be built on a timescale of hundreds of martian ears. These large apron gullies differ in morphology and timing from the linear dune gullies. The linear dune gullies are active in late winter, or beginning of spring when the CO2 frost finally sublimates, which occurs after the activity of the large apron gullies. Due to the difference of orientation between large apron gullies and linear dune as well as timing, we infer that insolation, which may influence (i) the depth to ground ice, (ii) the amount of volatiles deposits, is the main cause their differences. Sediment transport by CO2

  10. Tailoring galvanic replacement reaction for the preparation of Pt/Ag bimetallic hollow nanostructures with controlled number of voids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiqing; Yang, Jizheng; Lu, Xianmao

    2012-08-28

    Here we report the synthesis of Pt/Ag bimetallic nanostructures with controlled number of void spaces via a tailored galvanic replacement reaction (GRR). Ag nanocubes (NCs) were employed as the template to react with Pt ions in the presence of HCl. The use of HCl in the GRR caused rapid precipitation of AgCl, which grew on the surface of Ag NCs and acted as a removable secondary template for the deposition of Pt. The number of nucleation sites for AgCl was tailored by controlling the amount of HCl added to the Ag NCs or by introducing PVP to the reaction. This strategy led to the formation of Pt/Ag hollow nanoboxes, dimers, multimers, or popcorn-shaped nanostructures consisting of one, two, or multiple hollow domains. Due to the presence of large void space and porous walls, these nanostructures exhibited high surface area and improved catalytic activity for methanol oxidation reaction.

  11. In situ nanostructure formation of (micro-hydroxo)bis(micro-carboxylato) diruthenium units in nafion membrane and its utilization for selective reduction of nitrosonium ion in aqueous medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Annamalai Senthil; Tanase, Tomoaki; Iida, Masayasu

    2007-01-16

    Nanostructured molecular film containing the (micro-hydroxo)bis(micro-carboxylato) diruthenium(III) units, [RuIII2(micro-OH)(micro-CH3COO)2(HBpz3)2]+ ({RuIII2(micro-OH)}), was prepared by an in situ conversion of its micro-oxo precursor, [RuIII2(micro-O)(micro-CH3COO)2(HBpz3)2] ({RuIII2(micro-O)}), in a Nafion membrane matrix, where HBpz3 is hydrotris(1-pyrazolyl)borate. The conversion procedure results in fine nanoparticle aggregates of the {RuIII2(micro-OH)} units in the Nafion membrane (Nf-{RuIII2(micro-OH)}), where an average particle size (4.1 +/- 2.3 nm) is close to the Nafion's cluster dimension of approximately 4 nm. Chemically modified electrodes by using the Nafion molecular membrane films (Nf-{RuIII2(micro-OH)}-MMFEs) were further developed on ITO/glass and glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surfaces, and a selective reduction of nitrosonium ion (NO+), presumably through reaction of a {RuIIRuIII(micro-OH)} mixed-valence state with HNO2, was demonstrated without interference by molecular oxygen in an acidic aqueous solution. The Nf-{RuIII2(micro-OH)}-MMFEs are stable even in a physiological condition (pH 7), where the naked {RuIII2(-OH)} complex is readily transformed into its deprotonated {RuIII2(micro-O)} form, demonstrating an unusual stabilizing effects for the {RuIII2(micro-OH)} unit by the Nafion cluster environment.

  12. Metallic Nanostructures Based on DNA Nanoshapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boxuan Shen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Metallic nanostructures have inspired extensive research over several decades, particularly within the field of nanoelectronics and increasingly in plasmonics. Due to the limitations of conventional lithography methods, the development of bottom-up fabricated metallic nanostructures has become more and more in demand. The remarkable development of DNA-based nanostructures has provided many successful methods and realizations for these needs, such as chemical DNA metallization via seeding or ionization, as well as DNA-guided lithography and casting of metallic nanoparticles by DNA molds. These methods offer high resolution, versatility and throughput and could enable the fabrication of arbitrarily-shaped structures with a 10-nm feature size, thus bringing novel applications into view. In this review, we cover the evolution of DNA-based metallic nanostructures, starting from the metallized double-stranded DNA for electronics and progress to sophisticated plasmonic structures based on DNA origami objects.

  13. Advanced Magnetic Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Sellmyer, David

    2006-01-01

    Advanced Magnetic Nanostructures is devoted to the fabrication, characterization, experimental investigation, theoretical understanding, and utilization of advanced magnetic nanostructures. Focus is on various types of 'bottom-up' and 'top-down' artificial nanostructures, as contrasted to naturally occurring magnetic nanostructures, such as iron-oxide inclusions in magnetic rocks, and to structures such as perfect thin films. Chapter 1 is an introduction into some basic concepts, such as the definitions of basic magnetic quantities. Chapters 2-4 are devoted to the theory of magnetic nanostructures, Chapter 5 deals with the characterization of the structures, and Chapters 6-10 are devoted to specific systems. Applications of advanced magnetic nanostructures are discussed in Chapters11-15 and, finally, the appendix lists and briefly discusses magnetic properties of typical starting materials. Industrial and academic researchers in magnetism and related areas such as nanotechnology, materials science, and theore...

  14. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard M [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  15. Semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marstein Erik Stensrud

    2003-07-01

    This thesis presents a study of two material systems containing semiconductor nanocrystals, namely porous silicon (PSi) films and germanium (Ge) nanocrystals embedded in silicon dioxide (SiO2) films. The PSi films were made by anodic etching of silicon (Si) substrates in an electrolyte containing hydrofluoric acid. The PSi films were doped with erbium (Er) using two different doping methods. electrochemical doping and doping by immersing the PSi films in a solution containing Er. The resulting Er concentration profiles were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEN1) combined with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS). The main subject of the work on PSi presented in this thesis was investigating and comparing these two doping methods. Ge nanocrystals were made by implanting Ge ions into Si02 films that were subsequently annealed. However. nanocrystal formation occurred only for certain sets of processing parameters. The dependence of the microstructure of the Ge implanted Si02 films on the processing parameters were therefore investigated. A range of methods were employed for these investigations, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with EDS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The observed structures, ranging from Ge nanocrystals to voids with diameters of several tens of nanometers and Ge rich Si02 films without any nanocrystals is described. A model explaining the void formation is also presented. For certain sets of processing parameters. An accumulation of Ge at the Si-Si02 interface was observed. The effect of this accumulation on the electrical properties of MOS structures made from Ge implanted SiO2 films was investigated using CV-measurements. (Author)

  16. Nanostructured Materials for Magnetoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Mikailzade, Faik

    2013-01-01

    This book provides an up-to-date review of nanometer-scale magnetism and focuses on the investigation of the basic properties of magnetic nanostructures. It describes a wide range of physical aspects together with theoretical and experimental methods. A broad overview of the latest developments in this emerging and fascinating field of nanostructured materials is given with emphasis on the practical understanding and operation of submicron devices based on nanostructured magnetic materials.

  17. Injection moulding antireflective nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Alexander Bruun; Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2014-01-01

    We present a method for injection moulding antireflective nanostructures on large areas, for high volume production. Nanostructured black silicon masters were fabricated by mask-less reactive ion etching, and electroplated with nickel. The nickel shim was antistiction coated and used in an inject......We present a method for injection moulding antireflective nanostructures on large areas, for high volume production. Nanostructured black silicon masters were fabricated by mask-less reactive ion etching, and electroplated with nickel. The nickel shim was antistiction coated and used...

  18. Injection moulding antireflective nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Alexander Bruun; Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik; Mortensen, N. Asger

    We present a method for injection moulding antireflective nanostructures on large areas, for high volume production. Nanostructured black silicon masters were fabricated by mask-less reactive ion etching, and electroplated with nickel. The nickel shim was antistiction coated and used in an inject......We present a method for injection moulding antireflective nanostructures on large areas, for high volume production. Nanostructured black silicon masters were fabricated by mask-less reactive ion etching, and electroplated with nickel. The nickel shim was antistiction coated and used...

  19. Metal Surface Modification for Obtaining Nano- and Sub-Nanostructured Protective Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledovskykh, Volodymyr; Vyshnevska, Yuliya; Brazhnyk, Igor; Levchenko, Sergiy

    2017-03-01

    Regularities of the phase protective layer formation in multicomponent systems involving inhibitors with different mechanism of protective action have been investigated. It was shown that optimization of the composition of the inhibition mixture allows to obtain higher protective efficiency owing to improved microstructure of the phase layer. It was found that mechanism of the film formation in the presence of NaNO2-PHMG is due to deposition of slightly soluble PHMG-Fe complexes on the metal surface. On the basis of the proposed mechanism, the advanced surface engineering methods for obtaining nanoscaled and sub-nanostructured functional coatings may be developed.

  20. Nanostructured layers of thermoelectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Jeffrey J.; Lynch, Jared; Coates, Nelson; Forster, Jason; Sahu, Ayaskanta; Chabinyc, Michael; Russ, Boris

    2018-01-30

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to thermoelectric materials. In one aspect, a method includes providing a plurality of nanostructures. The plurality of nanostructures comprise a thermoelectric material, with each nanostructure of the plurality of nanostructures having first ligands disposed on a surface of the nanostructure. The plurality of nanostructures is mixed with a solution containing second ligands and a ligand exchange process occurs in which the first ligands disposed on the plurality of nanostructures are replaced with the second ligands. The plurality of nanostructures is deposited on a substrate to form a layer. The layer is thermally annealed.

  1. Imaging edges of nanostructured graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Jens; Cagliani, Alberto; Booth, T. J.

    Graphene, as the forefather of 2D-materials, attracts much attention due to its extraordinary properties like transparency, flexibility and outstanding high conductivity, together with a thickness of only one atom. However, graphene also possesses no band gap, which makes it unsuitable for many...... electronic applications like transistors. It has been shown theoretically that by nanostructuring pristine graphene, e.g. with regular holes, the electronic properties can be tuned and a band gap introduced. The size, distance and edge termination of these “defects” influence the adaptability....... Such nanostructuring can be done experimentally, but especially characterization at atomic level is a huge challenge. High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) is used to characterize the atomic structure of graphene. We optimized the imaging conditions used for the FEI Titan ETEM. To reduce the knock-on damage of the carbon atoms...

  2. Exposure of tungsten nano-structure to TEXTOR edge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Y.; Miyata, K.; Ohtsuka, Y.; Lee, H.T.; Fukumoto, M.; Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J.W.; Kreter, A.; Litnovsky, A.; Philipps, V.; Schweer, B.; Sergienko, G.; Hirai, T.; Taguchi, A.; Torikai, Y.; Sugiyama, K.; Tanabe, T.; Kajita, S.; Ohno, N.

    2011-01-01

    W nano-structures (fuzz), produced in the linear high plasma device, NAGDIS, were exposed to TEXTOR edge plasmas (ohmic He/D mixed plasma and pure D plasma) to study formation, erosion and C deposition on W fuzz in tokamak plasmas for the first time. Fuzz layers were either completely eroded or covered by C deposit. There was no clear indication of W fuzz growth under the present conditions. There was no significant difference of C deposition between 'thick' fuzz (500-600 nm in thickness) and 'thin' fuzz (300-400 nm) in the He/D plasma. On the W fuzz surface, C deposition was enhanced probably due to reduction of effective sputtering yield and effective reflection coefficient of carbon ions, similar to roughness effects. Formation and erosion of W fuzz in tokamak devices and role of impurities are discussed.

  3. Broad range tuning of structural and optical properties of Znx Mg1−x O nanostructures grown by vapor transport method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanjaria, Jignesh V; Azhar, Ebraheem Ali; Yu, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) Zn x Mg 1−x O nanomaterials have drawn global attention due to their remarkable chemical and physical properties, and their diverse current and future technological applications. In this work, 1D ZnMgO nanostructures with different magnesium concentrations and different morphologies were grown directly on zinc oxide-coated silicon substrates by thermal evaporation of zinc oxide, magnesium boride and graphite powders. Highly well-defined Mg-rich ZnMgO nanorods with a rock salt structure and Zn-rich ZnMgO nanostructures with a wurtzite structure have been deposited individually by careful optimization of the source mixture and process parameters. Structural and optical properties of the deposited products were studied by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. Cathodoluminescence measurements demonstrate strong dominant peaks at 3.3 eV in Mg poor ZnMgO nanostructures and 4.8 eV in Mg rich nanostructures implying that the ZnMgO nanostructures can be used for the fabrication of deep UV optoelectronic devices. A mechanism for the formation and achieved diverse morphology of the ZnMgO nanostructures was proposed based on the characterization results. (paper)

  4. Silicon-germanium (Sige) nanostructures production, properties and applications in electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Usami, N

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructured silicon-germanium (SiGe) provides the prospect of novel and enhanced electronic device performance. This book reviews the materials science and technology of SiGe nanostructures, including crystal growth, fabrication of nanostructures, material properties and applications in electronics.$bNanostructured silicon-germanium (SiGe) opens up the prospects of novel and enhanced electronic device performance, especially for semiconductor devices. Silicon-germanium (SiGe) nanostructures reviews the materials science of nanostructures and their properties and applications in different electronic devices. The introductory part one covers the structural properties of SiGe nanostructures, with a further chapter discussing electronic band structures of SiGe alloys. Part two concentrates on the formation of SiGe nanostructures, with chapters on different methods of crystal growth such as molecular beam epitaxy and chemical vapour deposition. This part also includes chapters covering strain engineering and mo...

  5. Highly-Ordered Magnetic Nanostructures on Self-Assembled α-Al2O3 and Diblock Copolymer Templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erb, Denise

    2015-08-01

    This thesis shows the preparation of nanostructured systems with a high degree of morphological uniformity and regularity employing exclusively selfassembly processes, and documents the investigation of these systems by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM), grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS), and nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation (NRS). Whenever possible, the X-ray scattering methods are applied in-situ and simultaneously in order to monitor and correlate the evolution of structural and magnetic properties of the nanostructured systems. The following systems are discussed, where highly-ordered magnetic nanostructures are grown on α-Al 2 O 3 substrates with topographical surface patterning and on diblock copolymer templates with chemical surface patterning: - Nanofaceted surfaces of α-Al 2 O 3 - Magnetic nanostructures on nanofaceted α-Al 2 O 3 substrates - Thin films of microphase separated diblock copolymers - Magnetic nanostructures on diblock copolymer thin film templates The fact that the underlying self-assembly processes can be steered by external factors is utilized to optimize the degree of structural order in the nanostructured systems. The highly-ordered systems are well-suited for investigations with X-ray scattering methods, since due to their uniformity the inherently averaged scattered signal of a sample yields meaningful information on the properties of the contained nanostructures: By means of an in-situ GISAXS experiment at temperatures above 1000 C, details on the facet formation on α-Al 2 O 3 surfaces are determined. A novel method, merging in-situ GISAXS and NRS, shows the evolution of magnetic states in a system with correlated structural and magnetic inhomogeneity with lateral resolution. The temperature-dependence of the shape of Fe nanodots growing on diblock copolymer templates is revealed by in-situ GISAXS during sputter deposition of Fe. Combining in-situ GISAXS and NRS, the magnetization

  6. Design and fabrication of Ni nanowires having periodically hollow nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada, Takao; Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2014-10-07

    We propose a concept for the design and fabrication of metal nanowires having periodically hollow nanostructures inside the pores of an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane using a sacrificial metal. In this study, nickel (Ni) and silver (Ag) were used as the base metal and the sacrificial metal, respectively. Alternating an applied potential between -0.4 and -1.0 V provided alternatively deposited Ni and Ag segments in a Ni-Ag 'barcode' nanowire with a diameter of 18 or 35 nm. After etching away the Ag segments, we fabricated Ni nanowires with nanopores of 12 ± 5.3 nm. Such nanostructure formation is explained by the formation of a Ni shell layer over the surface of the Ag segments due to the strong affinity of Ni(2+) for the interior surfaces of AAO. The Ni shell layer allows the Ni segments to remain even after dissolution of the Ag segments. Because the electroplating conditions can be easily controlled, we could carefully adjust the size and pitch of the periodically hollow nanospaces. We also describe a method for the fabrication of Ni nanorods by forming an Ag shell instead of a Ni shell on the Ni-Ag barcode nanowire, in which the interior of the AAO surfaces was modified with a compound bearing a thiol group prior to electroplating.

  7. Boron carbide nanostructures: A prospective material as an additive in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Paviter; Kaur, Gurpreet; Kumar, Rohit; Kumar, Umesh; Singh, Kulwinder; Kumar, Manjeet; Bala, Rajni; Meena, Ramovatar; Kumar, Akshay

    2018-05-01

    In recent decades, manufacture and ingestion of concrete have increased particularly in developing countries. Due to its low cost, safety and strength, concrete have become an economical choice for protection of radiation shielding material in nuclear reactors. As boron carbide has been known as a neutron absorber material makes it a great candidate as an additive in concrete for shielding radiation. This paper presents the synthesis of boron carbide nanostructures by using ball milling method. The X-ray diffraction pattern, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Scanning Electron Microscope analysis confirms the formation of boron carbide nanostructures. The effect of boron carbide nanostructures on the strength of concrete samples was demonstrated. The compressive strength tests of concrete cube B4C powder additives for 0 % and 5 % of total weight of cement was compared for different curing time period such as 7, 14, 21 and 28 days. The high compressive strength was observed when 5 wt % boron carbide nanostructures were used as an additive in concrete samples after 28 days curing time and showed significant improvement in strength.

  8. Knock-on tail formation due to nuclear elastic scattering and its observation method using γ-ray-generating "6Li+d reaction in tokamak deuterium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Hideaki; Sugiyama, Shota; Kajimoto, Shogo; Sawada, Daisuke; Nishimura, Yosuke; Kawamoto, Yasuko

    2016-01-01

    A knock-on tail formation in deuteron velocity distribution function due to nuclear elastic scattering (NES) by energetic protons and its observation method using γ-ray-generating "6Li(d,pγ)"7Li reaction are examined for proton-beam-injected deuterium plasmas. The proton velocity distribution function is obtained by means of the ion trajectory analysis in a Tokamak magnetic configuration. The knock-on tail in two-dimensional (2D) deuteron velocity distribution function due to NES by energetic protons is evaluated via Boltzmann collision integral and 2D Fokker-Planck simulation. From the 2D deuteron velocity distribution function obtained, enhancement of the emission rate of 0.48-MeV γ-rays by "6Li(d,p)"7Li*, "7Li*→"7Li+γ reaction due to NES is evaluated. It is shown that the γ-ray emission rate is significantly influenced by the magnitude of the knock-on tail, and the γ-ray-generating reaction can be a useful tool for the knock-on tail observation. (author)

  9. Differential Geometry Applied to Rings and Möbius Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Benny; Willatzen, Morten; Gravesen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructure shape effects have become a topic of increasing interest due to advancements in fabrication technology. In order to pursue novel physics and better devices by tailoring the shape and size of nanostructures, effective analytical and computational tools are indispensable. In this chap......Nanostructure shape effects have become a topic of increasing interest due to advancements in fabrication technology. In order to pursue novel physics and better devices by tailoring the shape and size of nanostructures, effective analytical and computational tools are indispensable....... In this chapter, we present analytical and computational differential geometry methods to examine particle quantum eigenstates and eigenenergies in curved and strained nanostructures. Example studies are carried out for a set of ring structures with different radii and it is shown that eigenstate and eigenenergy...

  10. Mitigation of environmental impacts due to ghat road formation in Palamalai Hills, South India, by optimizing cut and fill volumes using GPS and GIS techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulmozhi, R; Subramani, T; Sukumar, S

    2015-01-01

    Formation of new roads generally brings about adverse impact on the environment, and in the case of hill roads, the impact is diverse and effective measures are required to mitigate it. The common problems in hill road formation are tree cutting, destruction of canopies, change in land use pattern, soil erosion, slope instability, induced landslides, invasion of foreign species, and so on. Removal of trees and vegetations causes rapid soil erosion, landslides, and invasion of foreign species posing danger to the survival of weak native species. Dumping of surplus earth materials on the valley side poses a significant threat to the environment as it would cause induced landslides. Using the cut earth for filling in road formation and dumping, the surplus cut earth in safe locations will reduce environmental degradation considerably. Conventionally, hill road alignments are finalized using traditional survey methods using ghat tracer, compass, and leveling surveys which require enormous complicated field and office works. Any revision to reduce the quantum of earthwork is difficult in this method due to its complex nature. In the present study at Palamalai Hills, South India, an alignment for a length of 7.95 km was prepared by traditional methods using ghat tracer and total station instruments for survey works. The earthwork quantities were ascertained from the longitudinal profile of the alignment. A GPS survey was also conducted along the alignment to examine its utility in alignment modification. To modify the stretches, where the earthwork cutting and filling are above normal and unbalanced and result in surplus earth, repeated GPS surveys were conducted along different paths to optimize the earthwork. The earthwork quantities of the original alignment were analyzed, and its correlation with environmental effect and the usefulness of the GPS survey in this task are presented in this paper.

  11. Surface nanostructuring by ion-induced localized plasma expansion in zinc oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Said, A. S., E-mail: elsaid@kfupm.edu.sa, E-mail: a.s.el-said@hzdr.de [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), 01328 Dresden (Germany); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, 35516 Mansoura (Egypt); Moslem, W. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt); Centre for Theoretical Physics, British University in Egypt (BUE), El-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt); Djebli, M. [Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Faculty of Physics USTHB, B.P. 32 Bab Ezzour, 16079 Algiers (Algeria)

    2014-06-09

    Creation of hillock-like nanostructures on the surface of zinc oxide single crystals by irradiation with slow highly charged ions is reported. At constant kinetic energy, the nanostructures were only observed after irradiation with ions of potential energies above a threshold between 19.1 keV and 23.3 keV. The size of the nanostructures increases as a function of potential energy. A plasma expansion approach is used to explain the nanostructures creation. The calculations showed that the surface nanostructures became taller with the increase of ionic temperature. The influence of charged cluster formation and the relevance of their polarity are discussed.

  12. Surface nanostructuring by ion-induced localized plasma expansion in zinc oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Said, A. S.; Moslem, W. M.; Djebli, M.

    2014-01-01

    Creation of hillock-like nanostructures on the surface of zinc oxide single crystals by irradiation with slow highly charged ions is reported. At constant kinetic energy, the nanostructures were only observed after irradiation with ions of potential energies above a threshold between 19.1 keV and 23.3 keV. The size of the nanostructures increases as a function of potential energy. A plasma expansion approach is used to explain the nanostructures creation. The calculations showed that the surface nanostructures became taller with the increase of ionic temperature. The influence of charged cluster formation and the relevance of their polarity are discussed.

  13. Study of crater formation and its characteristics due to impact of a cluster projectile on a metal surface by molecular dynamics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naspoori, Srujan Kumar; Kammara, Kishore K.; Kumar, Rakesh, E-mail: rkm@iitk.ac.in

    2017-04-01

    Impingement of energetic particles/ions on material surfaces is of great interest as these impacts give rise to various interesting phenomena, such as sputtering, back-scattering, crater formation, emission of electrons and photons from material surfaces etc. Surface erosion occurring in the plasma-facing material of nuclear fusion reactors reduce their performance and this motivated the course of the current work in understanding the underlying physics of solid–particle interactions. In the present work, we have studied sputtering, crater formation and its characteristics on the surface of a plasma-facing material due to the impact of a low to high energy dust particle (a conglomerate of a few to a thousand atoms) using the molecular dynamics method. Sputtering yield, excavated atoms from the crater, crater depth, height of crater rim, radius and aspect ratio of the crater are calculated for a range of incident energies (10 eV to 10 keV), and the variation of these parameters with varying size (formed of 14, 32, 64 atoms) of dust particle at different temperatures of the target material are computed.

  14. Laser-assisted nanostructuring of Tungsten in liquid environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barmina, E.V., E-mail: barminaev@gmail.com [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Stratakis, E. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas (IESL-FORTH), P.O. Box 1527, Heraklion 711 10 (Greece); Materials Science and Technology Department, University of Crete, Heraklion 710 03 (Greece); Barberoglou, M. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas (IESL-FORTH), P.O. Box 1527, Heraklion 711 10 (Greece); Physics Department, University of Crete, Heraklion 714 09 (Greece); Stolyarov, V.N.; Stolyarov, I.N. [Roentgenprom, 35 Lenin str., Protvino, 1442281 Moscow region (Russian Federation); Fotakis, C. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas (IESL-FORTH), P.O. Box 1527, Heraklion 711 10 (Greece); Physics Department, University of Crete, Heraklion 714 09 (Greece); Shafeev, G.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-05-15

    Formation of surface nanostructures on Tungsten target immersed into liquids is experimentally studied under its exposure to femtosecond laser pulses with different durations. In particular, nanotexturing of Tungsten upon its exposure to delayed femtosecond pulses is investigated. Two different types of morphological features are observed, namely periodic ripples and nanostructures. Field emission scanning electron microscopy shows that the density of nanostructures as well as their morphology depends on the time delay between pulses and reaches its maximum at 1 ps delay. Thermionic emission of nano-structured W cathode is investigated. The work function of nanostructured W surface is measured to be 0.3 eV lower than that of the pristine surface.

  15. RESUS: A code for low volatile radio-nuclide release from liquids due to vapor bubble burst induced liquid jet formation and disintegration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, M.K.; Starflinger, J.; Linnemann, Th.; Brockmeier, U.; Unger, H.; Schuetz, W.

    1995-01-01

    In the field of nuclear safety, the release of volatile and low volatile radio-nuclides from liquid surfaces into a gas atmosphere is important for aerosol source term considerations particularly in late severe accident sequences. In case of a hypothetical nuclear reactor accident involving a failure of the primary system, primary coolant and radio-nuclides may be released into the containment to frequently form a liquid pool which may be contaminated by suspended or solved fuel particles and fission products. Under this scope, the release code package REVOLS/RENONS was developed for radio-nuclide release from liquid surfaces. Assuming the absence of gas or vapor bubbles in the liquid, the evaporative release of volatile components, calculated by the REVOLS code, is governed by diffusive and convective transport processes, whereas the release of low volatiles, calculated by the RENONS code, may be governed by mechanical processes which leads to droplet entrainment in case of wavy liquid pool surface conditions into the containment atmosphere by means of convection. For many accident sequences, in which gas is injected into a pool or liquid area elsewhere, predominantly when saturation temperatures can be reached, the release of low volatile species from liquid surfaces due to bubble burst is identified as a decisive release mechanism also. Together with the liquid, the particles which are located at the pool surface or suspended in the pool, are released into the atmosphere. Consequently, the code RESUS.MOD1 (RESUSpension) is presently extended to include the calculation of the release of droplets and suspended radio-nuclide particles due to bubble burst induced liquid jet formation and disintegration above liquid surfaces. Experimental investigations indicate the influence of bubble volume and shape at the pool surface as well as bubble stabilization or destabilization, and furthermore the system pressure and temperatures as well as fluid properties, on droplet

  16. On the shear strength of tungsten nano-structures with embedded helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, R.D.; Krasheninnikov, S.I.

    2013-01-01

    Modification of plastic properties of tungsten nano-structures under shear stress load due to embedded helium atoms is studied using molecular dynamics modelling. The modelling demonstrates that the yield strength of tungsten nano-structures reduces significantly with increasing embedded helium concentration. At high helium concentrations (>10 at%), the yield strength decreases to values characteristic to the pressure in helium nano-bubbles, which are formed in tungsten under such conditions and thought to be responsible for the formation of nano-fuzz on tungsten surfaces irradiated with helium plasma. It is also shown that tungsten plastic flow strongly facilitates coagulation of helium clusters to larger bubbles. The temperature dependencies of the yield strength are obtained. (letter)

  17. Field Emission from Carbon Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Giubileo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Field emission electron sources in vacuum electronics are largely considered to achieve faster response, higher efficiency and lower energy consumption in comparison with conventional thermionic emitters. Carbon nanotubes had a leading role in renewing attention to field emission technologies in the early 1990s, due to their exceptional electron emitting properties enabled by their large aspect ratio, high electrical conductivity, and thermal and chemical stability. In the last decade, the search for improved emitters has been extended to several carbon nanostructures, comprising carbon nanotubes, either individual or films, diamond structures, graphitic materials, graphene, etc. Here, we review the main results in the development of carbon-based field emitters.

  18. Hydrogen adsorption in carbon nanostructures compared

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schimmel, H.G.; Nijkamp, M.G.; Kearley, G.J.; Rivera, A.; de Jong, K.P.; Mulder, F.M.

    2004-01-01

    Recent reports continue to suggest high hydrogen storage capacities for some carbon nanostructures due to a stronger interaction between hydrogen and carbon. Here the interaction of hydrogen with activated charcoal, carbon nanofibers, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), and electron beam ‘opened’

  19. The effect of Ce ion substituted OMS-2 nanostructure in catalytic activity for benzene oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jingtao; Li, Yuanzhi; Mao, Mingyang; Zhao, Xiujian; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2014-11-01

    The nanostructure of Ce doped OMS-2 plays a very important role in its catalytic property. We demonstrate by density functional theory (DFT) calculations that the unique nanostructure of the Ce ion substituted OMS-2 with Mn vacancy in the framework is beneficial for the improvement of catalytic activity, while the nanostructure of the Ce ion substituted OMS-2 without defects are detrimental to the catalytic activity. We establish a novel and facile strategy of synthesizing these unique Ce ion substituted OMS-2 nanostructure with Mn vacancies in the framework by hydrothermal redox reaction between Ce(NO3)3 and KMnO4 with KMnO4/Ce(NO3)3 at a molar ratio of 3 : 1 at 120 °C. Compared to pure OMS-2, the produced catalyst of Ce ion substituted OMS-2 ultrathin nanorods exhibits an enormous enhancement in the catalytic activity for benzene oxidation, which is evidenced by a significant decrease (ΔT50 = 100 °C, ΔT90 = 129 °C) in the reaction temperature of T50 and T90 (corresponding to the benzene conversion = 50% and 90%), which is considerably more efficient than the expensive supported noble metal catalyst (Pt/Al2O3). We combine both theoretical and experimental evidence to provide a new physical insight into the significant effect due to the defects induced by the Ce ion substitution on the catalytic activity of OMS-2. The formation of unique Ce ion substituted OMS-2 nanostructure with Mn vacancies in the framework leads to a significant enhancement of the lattice oxygen activity, thus tremendously increasing the catalytic activity.The nanostructure of Ce doped OMS-2 plays a very important role in its catalytic property. We demonstrate by density functional theory (DFT) calculations that the unique nanostructure of the Ce ion substituted OMS-2 with Mn vacancy in the framework is beneficial for the improvement of catalytic activity, while the nanostructure of the Ce ion substituted OMS-2 without defects are detrimental to the catalytic activity. We establish a novel

  20. Self-assembled nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jin Z; Liu, Jun; Chen, Shaowei; Liu, Gang-yu

    2003-01-01

    Nanostructures refer to materials that have relevant dimensions on the nanometer length scales and reside in the mesoscopic regime between isolated atoms and molecules in bulk matter. These materials have unique physical properties that are distinctly different from bulk materials. Self-Assembled Nanostructures provides systematic coverage of basic nanomaterials science including materials assembly and synthesis, characterization, and application. Suitable for both beginners and experts, it balances the chemistry aspects of nanomaterials with physical principles. It also highlights nanomaterial-based architectures including assembled or self-assembled systems. Filled with in-depth discussion of important applications of nano-architectures as well as potential applications ranging from physical to chemical and biological systems, Self-Assembled Nanostructures is the essential reference or text for scientists involved with nanostructures.

  1. Nanowires and nanostructures fabrication using template methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Vlad, A.

    2009-01-01

    One of the great challenges of today is to find reliable techniques for the fabrication of nanomaterials and nanostructures. Methods based on template synthesis and on self organization are the most promising due to their easiness and low cost. This paper focuses on the electrochemical synthesis ...... of nanowires and nanostructures using nanoporous host materials such as supported anodic aluminum considering it as a key template for nanowires based devices. New ways are opened for applications by combining such template synthesis methods with nanolithographic techniques....

  2. Formation of D- and I-shaped geochemical profiles in saucer-shaped sills due to post- emplacement magma flow induced by thermal stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarnes, I.; Podladchikov, Y. Y.; Neumann, E.

    2007-12-01

    There are still unresolved problems in the processes of emplacement and crystallization of saucer shaped sill intrusions. We use geochemistry and numerical modelling in order to constrain identify processes in mafic sill intrusions. Profiles sampled through through a saucer-shaped sill complex in the Karoo igneous province, South Africa show a variety of geochemical variations. Some variations are observed repeatedly, i.e. the D- and I-shaped profiles. D-shaped profiles are recognized by having the least evolved composition in the center (high Mg#) with more evolved composition at the upper and lower margins (low Mg#), resulting in a D-shaped Mg# profile. I- shaped profiles are recognized by having no variation in the Mg# through the profile. The formation mechanism of D-shaped profiles is enigmatic, as classical fractional crystallization theory predicts C-shapes to occur. The least evolved composition will be at the margins where crystallization initiates, and with continued cooling and crystallization the center will be progressively more evolved. Hence, we need another formation mechanism. The most common explanation for D-shaped profiles is a movement of early formed phenocrysts towards the center due to flow segregation. However, petrographical evidences from a D-shaped profile in this study show no phenocryst assemblage in the center, and the modal composition is homogeneous through the profile. We propose that differentiation is caused by a melt flow from the central parts of the sill towards the margins driven by underpressure anomalies at the margins. The underpressures develop because of strong cooling gradients at the margins, assuming no volume change due to a rigid crystal network. The less compatible elements associated with the melt phase will be transported into the margins by advection, resulting in a more evolved total system composition from a higher total melt percentage. The central parts will progressively be depleted in the less compatible

  3. Matrix-assisted energy conversion in nanostructured piezoelectric arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirbuly, Donald J.; Wang, Xianying; Wang, Yinmin

    2013-01-01

    A nanoconverter is capable of directly generating electricity through a nanostructure embedded in a polymer layer experiencing differential thermal expansion in a stress transfer zone. High surface-to-volume ratio semiconductor nanowires or nanotubes (such as ZnO, silicon, carbon, etc.) are grown either aligned or substantially vertically aligned on a substrate. The resulting nanoforest is then embedded with the polymer layer, which transfers stress to the nanostructures in the stress transfer zone, thereby creating a nanostructure voltage output due to the piezoelectric effect acting on the nanostructure. Electrodes attached at both ends of the nanostructures generate output power at densities of .about.20 nW/cm.sup.2 with heating temperatures of .about.65.degree. C. Nanoconverters arrayed in a series parallel arrangement may be constructed in planar, stacked, or rolled arrays to supply power to nano- and micro-devices without use of external batteries.

  4. Growth and anisotropic transport properties of self-assembled InAs nanostructures in InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierwagen, O.

    2007-01-01

    Self-assembled InAs nanostructures in InP, comprising quantum wells, quantum wires, and quantum dots, are studied in terms of their formation and properties. In particular, the structural, optical, and anisotropic transport properties of the nanostructures are investigated. The focus is a comprehending exploration of the anisotropic in-plane transport in large ensembles of laterally coupled InAs nanostructures. The self-assembled Stranski-Krastanov growth of InAs nanostructures is studied by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy on both nominally oriented and vicinal InP(001). Optical polarization of the interband transitions arising from the nanostructure type is demonstrated by photoluminescence and transmission spectroscopy. The experimentally convenient four-contact van der Pauw Hall measurement of rectangularly shaped semiconductors, usually applied to isotropic systems, is extended to yield the anisotropic transport properties. Temperature dependent transport measurements are performed in large ensembles of laterally closely spaced nanostructures. The transport of quantum wire-, quantum dash- and quantum dot containing samples is highly anisotropic with the principal axes of conductivity aligned to the directions. The direction of higher mobility is [ anti 110], which is parallel to the direction of the quantum wires. In extreme cases, the anisotropies exceed 30 for electrons, and 100 for holes. The extreme anisotropy for holes is due to diffusive transport through extended states in the [ anti 110], and hopping transport through laterally localized states in the [110] direction, within the same sample. A novel 5-terminal electronic switching device based on gate-controlled transport anisotropy is proposed. The gate-control of the transport anisotropy in modulation-doped, self-organized InAs quantum wires embedded in InP is demonstrated. (orig.)

  5. Growth and anisotropic transport properties of self-assembled InAs nanostructures in InP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bierwagen, O.

    2007-12-20

    Self-assembled InAs nanostructures in InP, comprising quantum wells, quantum wires, and quantum dots, are studied in terms of their formation and properties. In particular, the structural, optical, and anisotropic transport properties of the nanostructures are investigated. The focus is a comprehending exploration of the anisotropic in-plane transport in large ensembles of laterally coupled InAs nanostructures. The self-assembled Stranski-Krastanov growth of InAs nanostructures is studied by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy on both nominally oriented and vicinal InP(001). Optical polarization of the interband transitions arising from the nanostructure type is demonstrated by photoluminescence and transmission spectroscopy. The experimentally convenient four-contact van der Pauw Hall measurement of rectangularly shaped semiconductors, usually applied to isotropic systems, is extended to yield the anisotropic transport properties. Temperature dependent transport measurements are performed in large ensembles of laterally closely spaced nanostructures. The transport of quantum wire-, quantum dash- and quantum dot containing samples is highly anisotropic with the principal axes of conductivity aligned to the <110> directions. The direction of higher mobility is [ anti 110], which is parallel to the direction of the quantum wires. In extreme cases, the anisotropies exceed 30 for electrons, and 100 for holes. The extreme anisotropy for holes is due to diffusive transport through extended states in the [ anti 110], and hopping transport through laterally localized states in the [110] direction, within the same sample. A novel 5-terminal electronic switching device based on gate-controlled transport anisotropy is proposed. The gate-control of the transport anisotropy in modulation-doped, self-organized InAs quantum wires embedded in InP is demonstrated. (orig.)

  6. Ion induced segregation in gold nanostructured thin films on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghatak, J.; Satyam, P.V.

    2008-01-01

    We report a direct observation of segregation of gold atoms to the near surface regime due to 1.5 MeV Au 2+ ion impact on isolated gold nanostructures deposited on silicon. Irradiation at fluences of 6 x 10 13 , 1 x 10 14 and 5 x 10 14 ions cm -2 at a high beam flux of 6.3 x 10 12 ions cm -2 s -1 show a maximum transported distance of gold atoms into the silicon substrate to be 60, 45 and 23 nm, respectively. At a lower fluence (6 x 10 13 ions cm -2 ) transport has been found to be associated with the formation of gold silicide (Au 5 Si 2 ). At a high fluence value of 5 x 10 14 ions cm -2 , disassociation of gold silicide and out-diffusion lead to the segregation of gold to defect - rich surface and interface regions.

  7. Study of quantum confinement effects in ZnO nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movlarooy, Tayebeh

    2018-03-01

    Motivation to fact that zinc oxide nanowires and nanotubes with successful synthesis and the mechanism of formation, stability and electronic properties have been investigated; in this study the structural, electronic properties and quantum confinement effects of zinc oxide nanotubes and nanowires with different diameters are discussed. The calculations within density functional theory and the pseudo potential approximation are done. The electronic structure and energy gap for Armchair and zigzag ZnO nanotubes with a diameter of about 4 to 55 Angstrom and ZnO nanowires with a diameter range of 4 to 23 Å is calculated. The results revealed that due to the quantum confinement effects, by reducing the diameter of nanowires and nanotubes, the energy gap increases. Zinc oxide semiconductor nanostructures since having direct band gap with size-dependent and quantum confinement effect are recommended as an appropriate candidate for making nanoscale optoelectronic devices.

  8. Metal nanostructures: from clusters to nanocatalysis and sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, B. M.

    2017-12-01

    The properties of metal clusters and nanostructures composed of them are reviewed. Various existing methods for the generation of intense beams of metal clusters and their subsequent conversion into nanostructures are compared. Processes of the flow of a buffer gas with active molecules through a nanostructure are analyzed as a basis of using nanostructures for catalytic applications. The propagation of an electric signal through a nanostructure is studied by analogy with a macroscopic metal. An analysis is given of how a nanostructure changes its resistance as active molecules attach to its surface and are converted into negative ions. These negative ions induce the formation of positively charged vacancies inside the metal conductor and attract the vacancies to together change the resistance of the metal nanostructure. The physical basis is considered for using metal clusters and nanostructures composed of them to create new materials in the form of a porous metal film on the surface of an object. The fundamentals of nanocatalysis are reviewed. Semiconductor conductometric sensors consisting of bound nanoscale grains or fibers acting as a conductor are compared with metal sensors conducting via a percolation cluster, a fractal fiber, or a bunch of interwoven nanofibers formed in superfluid helium. It is shown that sensors on the basis of metal nanostructures are characterized by a higher sensitivity than semiconductor ones, but are not selective. Measurements using metal sensors involve two stages, one of which measures to high precision the attachment rate of active molecules to the sensor conductor, and in the other one the surface of metal nanostructures is cleaned from the attached molecules using a gas discharge plasma (in particular, capillary discharge) with a subsequent chromatography analysis for products of cleaning.

  9. Influence of stellar multiplicity on planet formation. I. Evidence of suppressed planet formation due to stellar companions within 20 au and validation of four planets from the Kepler multiple planet candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Xie, Ji-Wei; Barclay, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The planet occurrence rate for multiple stars is important in two aspects. First, almost half of stellar systems in the solar neighborhood are multiple systems. Second, the comparison of the planet occurrence rate for multiple stars to that for single stars sheds light on the influence of stellar multiplicity on planet formation and evolution. We developed a method of distinguishing planet occurrence rates for single and multiple stars. From a sample of 138 bright (K P < 13.5) Kepler multi-planet candidate systems, we compared the stellar multiplicity rate of these planet host stars to that of field stars. Using dynamical stability analyses and archival Doppler measurements, we find that the stellar multiplicity rate of planet host stars is significantly lower than field stars for semimajor axes less than 20 AU, suggesting that planet formation and evolution are suppressed by the presence of a close-in companion star at these separations. The influence of stellar multiplicity at larger separations is uncertain because of search incompleteness due to a limited Doppler observation time baseline and a lack of high-resolution imaging observation. We calculated the planet confidence for the sample of multi-planet candidates and find that the planet confidences for KOI 82.01, KOI 115.01, KOI 282.01, and KOI 1781.02 are higher than 99.7% and thus validate the planetary nature of these four planet candidates. This sample of bright Kepler multi-planet candidates with refined stellar and orbital parameters, planet confidence estimation, and nearby stellar companion identification offers a well-characterized sample for future theoretical and observational study.

  10. Nanostructured silicon for thermoelectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranz, A.; Kähler, J.; Waag, A.; Peiner, E.

    2011-06-01

    Thermoelectric modules convert thermal energy into electrical energy and vice versa. At present bismuth telluride is the most widely commercial used material for thermoelectric energy conversion. There are many applications where bismuth telluride modules are installed, mainly for refrigeration. However, bismuth telluride as material for energy generation in large scale has some disadvantages. Its availability is limited, it is hot stable at higher temperatures (>250°C) and manufacturing cost is relatively high. An alternative material for energy conversion in the future could be silicon. The technological processing of silicon is well advanced due to the rapid development of microelectronics in recent years. Silicon is largely available and environmentally friendly. The operating temperature of silicon thermoelectric generators can be much higher than of bismuth telluride. Today silicon is rarely used as a thermoelectric material because of its high thermal conductivity. In order to use silicon as an efficient thermoelectric material, it is necessary to reduce its thermal conductivity, while maintaining high electrical conductivity and high Seebeck coefficient. This can be done by nanostructuring into arrays of pillars. Fabrication of silicon pillars using ICP-cryogenic dry etching (Inductive Coupled Plasma) will be described. Their uniform height of the pillars allows simultaneous connecting of all pillars of an array. The pillars have diameters down to 180 nm and their height was selected between 1 micron and 10 microns. Measurement of electrical resistance of single silicon pillars will be presented which is done in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with nanomanipulators. Furthermore, measurement of thermal conductivity of single pillars with different diameters using the 3ω method will be shown.

  11. Lifetime of ALD Al2O3 Passivated Black Silicon Nanostructured for Photovoltaic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    Black silicon nano-structures provide significant reduction of silicon surface reflection due to highly corrugated nano-structures with excellent light trapping properties. However, most recent RIE techniques for black silicon nano-structuring have one very important limitation for PV applications...

  12. Incubation and nanostructure formation on n- and p-type Si(1 0 0) and Si(1 1 1) at various doping levels induced by sub-nanojoule femto- and picosecond near-infrared laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schüle, M.; Afshar, M.; Feili, D.; Seidel, H.; König, K.; Straub, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Nanorifts, ripples of period 130 nm and randomly nanoporous surface structures were generated. • Such nanostructures emerged on heavily and lightly n- and p-doped Si(1 0 0) and Si(1 1 1) surfaces. • Strong incubation occurred irrespective of dopant type and concentration or surface orientation. • Incubation is attributed to photoexcitation from laser-induced defect states in the bandgap. • Aggregation of defects results in nanocracks, which turn into nanorift and nanoripple patterns. • Ablation involved predominantly single-photon processes but also multiphoton absorption. - Abstract: N- and p-doped Si(1 0 0) and Si(1 1 1) surfaces with dopant concentrations of 2 × 10 14 –1 × 10 19 cm −3 were irradiated by tightly focused 85-MHz repetition rate Ti:sapphire laser light (central wavelength 800 nm, bandwidth 120 nm) at pulse durations of 12 fs to 1.6 ps. Dependent on pulse peak intensity and exposure time nanorifts, ripples of period 130 nm as well as sponge-like randomly nanoporous surface structures were generated with water immersion and, thereafter, laid bare by etching off aggregated oxide nanoparticles. The same structure types emerged in air or water with transform-limited 100-fs pulses. At a pulse length of 12 fs pronounced incubation occurred with incubation coefficients S = 0.66–0.85, whereas incubation was diminished for picosecond pulses (S > 0.95). The ablation threshold strongly rose with dopant concentration. At similar doping level it was higher for n-type than for p-type samples and for Si(1 0 0) compared to Si(1 1 1) surfaces. These observations are attributed to laser-induced defect states in the bandgap which participate in photoexcitation, deactivation of dopants by complex formation, and different densities of interface states at the boundary with the ultrathin native silicon dioxide surface layer. The threshold increase with pulse length revealed predominant single-photon excitation as well as multiphoton

  13. An overview on cellulose-based material in tailoring bio-hybrid nanostructured photocatalysts for water treatment and renewable energy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mohamad Azuwa; Abd Mutalib, Muhazri; Mohd Hir, Zul Adlan; M Zain, M F; Mohamad, Abu Bakar; Jeffery Minggu, Lorna; Awang, Nor Asikin; W Salleh, W N

    2017-10-01

    A combination between the nanostructured photocatalyst and cellulose-based materials promotes a new functionality of cellulose towards the development of new bio-hybrid materials for various applications especially in water treatment and renewable energy. The excellent compatibility and association between nanostructured photocatalyst and cellulose-based materials was induced by bio-combability and high hydrophilicity of the cellulose components. The electron rich hydroxyl group of celluloses helps to promote superior interaction with photocatalyst. The formation of bio-hybrid nanostructured are attaining huge interest nowadays due to the synergistic properties of individual cellulose-based material and photocatalyst nanoparticles. Therefore, in this review we introduce some cellulose-based material and discusses its compatibility with nanostructured photocatalyst in terms of physical and chemical properties. In addition, we gather information and evidence on the fabrication techniques of cellulose-based hybrid nanostructured photocatalyst and its recent application in the field of water treatment and renewable energy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Andrew J.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2007-12-04

    A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

  15. Nanostructured manganese oxide thin films as electrode material for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hui; Lai, Man On; Lu, Li

    2011-01-01

    Electrochemical capacitors, also called supercapacitors, are alternative energy storage devices, particularly for applications requiring high power densities. Recently, manganese oxides have been extensively evaluated as electrode materials for supercapacitors due to their low cost, environmental benignity, and promising supercapacitive performance. In order to maximize the utilization of manganese oxides as the electrode material for the supercapacitors and improve their supercapacitive performance, the nanostructured manganese oxides have therefore been developed. This paper reviews the synthesis of the nanostructured manganese oxide thin films by different methods and the supercapacitive performance of different nanostructures.

  16. Nanostructures for delivery of natural antimicrobials in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Nathalie Almeida; Brandelli, Adriano

    2017-04-10

    Natural antimicrobial compounds are a topic of utmost interest in food science due to the increased demand for safe and high-quality foods with minimal processing. The use of nanostructures is an interesting alternative to protect and delivery antimicrobials in food, also providing controlled release of natural compounds such as bacteriocins and antimicrobial proteins, and also for delivery of plant derived antimicrobials. A diversity of nanostructures are capable of trapping natural antimicrobials maintaining the stability of substances that are frequently sensitive to food processing and storage conditions. This article provides an overview on natural antimicrobials incorporated in nanostructures, showing an effective antimicrobial activity on a diversity of food spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms.

  17. Multifunctional Carbon Nanostructures for Advanced Energy Storage Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiran Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructures—including graphene, fullerenes, etc.—have found applications in a number of areas synergistically with a number of other materials. These multifunctional carbon nanostructures have recently attracted tremendous interest for energy storage applications due to their large aspect ratios, specific surface areas, and electrical conductivity. This succinct review aims to report on the recent advances in energy storage applications involving these multifunctional carbon nanostructures. The advanced design and testing of multifunctional carbon nanostructures for energy storage applications—specifically, electrochemical capacitors, lithium ion batteries, and fuel cells—are emphasized with comprehensive examples.

  18. Nanostructured piezoelectric energy harvesters

    CERN Document Server

    Briscoe, Joe

    2014-01-01

    This book covers a range of devices that use piezoelectricity to convert mechanical deformation into electrical energy and relates their output capabilities to a range of potential applications. Starting with a description of the fundamental principles and properties of piezo- and ferroelectric materials, where applications of bulk materials are well established, the book shows how nanostructures of these materials are being developed for energy harvesting applications. The authors show how a nanostructured device can be produced, and put in context some of the approaches that are being invest

  19. Space charge in nanostructure resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Peter J.

    1996-10-01

    In quantum ballistic propagation of electrons through a variety of nanostructures, resonance in the energy-dependent transmission and reflection probabilities generically is associated with (1) a quasi-level with a decay lifetime, and (2) a bulge in electron density within the structure. It can be shown that, to a good approximation, a simple formula in all cases connects the density of states for the latter to the energy dependence of the phase angles of the eigen values of the S-matrix governing the propagation. For both the Lorentzian resonances (normal or inverted) and for the Fano-type resonances, as a consequence of this eigen value formula, the space charge due to filled states over the energy range of a resonance is just equal (for each spin state) to one electron charge. The Coulomb interaction within this space charge is known to 'distort' the electrical characteristics of resonant nanostructures. In these systems, however, the exchange effect should effectively cancel the interaction between states with parallel spins, leaving only the anti-parallel spin contribution.

  20. Engineered Metallic Nanostructures: Fabrication, Characterization, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohloul, Arash

    Metallic nanostructures have garnered a great deal of attention due to their fascinating optical properties, which differ from the bulk metal. They have been proven to exceed expectations in wide variety of applications including chemical and biological sensing. Nevertheless, high-throughput and low cost nanofabrication techniques are required to implant metallic nanostructures in widespread applications. With that vision, this thesis presents a versatile and reliable method for scalable fabrication of gold nanostructures. In this approach, a plasma-treated ordered array of polystyrene nanospheres acts as an initial mask. The key step in this process is the vapor-deposition of nickel as a sacrificial mask. Thereby, gold nanostructures are directly formed on the substrate through the nickel mask. This is an easy, powerful, and straightforward method that offers several degrees of freedom to precisely control the shape and size of nanostructures. We made a library of nanostructures including gold nanocrescents, double crescents, nanorings, and nanodisks with the ability to tune the size in the range of 150 to 650 nm. The fabricated nanostructures are highly packed and uniformly cover the centimeter scale substrate. The optical properties of metallic nanostructures were extensively studied by a combination of UV-Vis-NIR and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopies, and correlation between optical response and geometrical parameters were investigated. In the next part of this thesis, highly sensitive surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) analysis was demonstrated on gold nanocrescent arrays. Theoretical modeling was confirmed that these substrates provide highly dense and strong hot-spots over the substrate, which is required for surface enhanced spectroscopic studies. Gold nanocrescent arrays exhibit highly tunable plasmon resonance to cover desired molecular vibrational bands. These substrates experimentally illustrated 3 orders of magnitude

  1. Design and fabrication of Ni nanowires having periodically hollow nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada, Takao; Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2014-09-01

    We propose a concept for the design and fabrication of metal nanowires having periodically hollow nanostructures inside the pores of an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane using a sacrificial metal. In this study, nickel (Ni) and silver (Ag) were used as the base metal and the sacrificial metal, respectively. Alternating an applied potential between -0.4 and -1.0 V provided alternatively deposited Ni and Ag segments in a Ni-Ag `barcode' nanowire with a diameter of 18 or 35 nm. After etching away the Ag segments, we fabricated Ni nanowires with nanopores of 12 +/- 5.3 nm. Such nanostructure formation is explained by the formation of a Ni shell layer over the surface of the Ag segments due to the strong affinity of Ni2+ for the interior surfaces of AAO. The Ni shell layer allows the Ni segments to remain even after dissolution of the Ag segments. Because the electroplating conditions can be easily controlled, we could carefully adjust the size and pitch of the periodically hollow nanospaces. We also describe a method for the fabrication of Ni nanorods by forming an Ag shell instead of a Ni shell on the Ni-Ag barcode nanowire, in which the interior of the AAO surfaces was modified with a compound bearing a thiol group prior to electroplating.We propose a concept for the design and fabrication of metal nanowires having periodically hollow nanostructures inside the pores of an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane using a sacrificial metal. In this study, nickel (Ni) and silver (Ag) were used as the base metal and the sacrificial metal, respectively. Alternating an applied potential between -0.4 and -1.0 V provided alternatively deposited Ni and Ag segments in a Ni-Ag `barcode' nanowire with a diameter of 18 or 35 nm. After etching away the Ag segments, we fabricated Ni nanowires with nanopores of 12 +/- 5.3 nm. Such nanostructure formation is explained by the formation of a Ni shell layer over the surface of the Ag segments due to the strong affinity of Ni2+ for the

  2. Epitaxial growth of hybrid nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chaoliang; Chen, Junze; Wu, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Hua

    2018-02-01

    Hybrid nanostructures are a class of materials that are typically composed of two or more different components, in which each component has at least one dimension on the nanoscale. The rational design and controlled synthesis of hybrid nanostructures are of great importance in enabling the fine tuning of their properties and functions. Epitaxial growth is a promising approach to the controlled synthesis of hybrid nanostructures with desired structures, crystal phases, exposed facets and/or interfaces. This Review provides a critical summary of the state of the art in the field of epitaxial growth of hybrid nanostructures. We discuss the historical development, architectures and compositions, epitaxy methods, characterization techniques and advantages of epitaxial hybrid nanostructures. Finally, we provide insight into future research directions in this area, which include the epitaxial growth of hybrid nanostructures from a wider range of materials, the study of the underlying mechanism and determining the role of epitaxial growth in influencing the properties and application performance of hybrid nanostructures.

  3. Formation of ghost images due to meta objects on the surface of the patient's face: A pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramons, BarbaraCouto; Da Silva Izar, Bruna Raquel; Pereira, Jessica Lourdes Costa; Souza Priscilla Serna; Valerio, Cludia Scigliano; Manzi, Flavio Ricardo; Tuji, Fabricio Mesquita

    2016-01-01

    Panoramic radiographs are a relatively simple technique that is commonly used in all dental specialties. In panoramic radiographs, in addition to the formation of real images of metal objects, ghost images may also form, and these ghost images can hinder an accurate diagnosis and interfere with the accuracy of radiology reports. Dentists must understand the formation of these images in order to avoid making incorrect radiographic diagnoses. Therefore, the present study sought to present a study of the formation of panoramic radiograph ghost images caused by metal objects in the head and neck region of a dry skull, as well as to report a clinical case n order to warn dentists about ghost images and to raise awareness thereof. An understanding of the principles of the formation of ghost images in panoramic radiographs helps prevent incorrect diagnoses

  4. Formation of ghost images due to meta objects on the surface of the patient's face: A pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramons, BarbaraCouto; Da Silva Izar, Bruna Raquel; Pereira, Jessica Lourdes Costa; Souza Priscilla Serna; Valerio, Cludia Scigliano; Manzi, Flavio Ricardo [Dept. of Oral Radiology, School of Dentistry, Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Tuji, Fabricio Mesquita [Federal University of Pará, Belém do Pará (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Panoramic radiographs are a relatively simple technique that is commonly used in all dental specialties. In panoramic radiographs, in addition to the formation of real images of metal objects, ghost images may also form, and these ghost images can hinder an accurate diagnosis and interfere with the accuracy of radiology reports. Dentists must understand the formation of these images in order to avoid making incorrect radiographic diagnoses. Therefore, the present study sought to present a study of the formation of panoramic radiograph ghost images caused by metal objects in the head and neck region of a dry skull, as well as to report a clinical case n order to warn dentists about ghost images and to raise awareness thereof. An understanding of the principles of the formation of ghost images in panoramic radiographs helps prevent incorrect diagnoses.

  5. Nanostructures-History

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Nanostructures-History. Inspiration to Nanotechnology-. The Japanese scientist Norio Taniguchi of the Tokyo University of Science was used the term "nano-technology" in a 1974 conference, to describe semiconductor processes such as thin film His definition was, ...

  6. Functionality of novel black silicon based nanostructured surfaces studied by TOF SIMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talian, Ivan; Aranyosiova, M.; Orinak, A.

    2010-01-01

    A functionality of the novel black silicon based nanostructured surfaces (BS 2) with different metal surface modifications was tested by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF SIMS). Mainly two surface functions were studied: analytical signal enhancement and analyte pre-ionization e......A functionality of the novel black silicon based nanostructured surfaces (BS 2) with different metal surface modifications was tested by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF SIMS). Mainly two surface functions were studied: analytical signal enhancement and analyte pre......-ionization effect in SIMS due to nanostructure type and the assistance of the noble metal surface coating (Ag or Au) for secondary ion formation. As a testing analyte a Rhodamine 6G was applied. Bi+ has been used as SIMS primary ions. It was found out that SIMS signal enhancement of the analyte significantly...... depends on Ag layer thickness and measured ion mode (negative, positive). The best SIMS signal enhancement was obtained at BS2 surface coated with 400 nm of Ag layer. SIMS fragmentation schemes were developed for a model analyte deposited onto a silver and gold surface. Significant differences in pre...

  7. Synthesis and characterization of CuO flower-nanostructure processing by a domestic hydrothermal microwave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volanti, D.P.; Keyson, D.; Cavalcante, L.S.; Simoes, A.Z.; Joya, M.R.; Longo, E.; Varela, J.A.; Pizani, P.S.; Souza, A.G.

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of CuO flower-nanostructure processed in domestic hydrothermal microwave oven was presented. Phase analysis was carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and micro-Raman scattering (MRS) and the results confirmed the CuO flower-nanostructure as a single-phase. The field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) was used to estimate the average spheres diameter while transmission electron microscope (TEM) to observe the thorn of the flower-nanostructures. The mechanism of CuO flower-nanostructures formation is proposed and explained

  8. Synthesis and characterization of CuO flower-nanostructure processing by a domestic hydrothermal microwave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volanti, D.P. [Laboratorio Interdisciplinar em Ceramica, Departamento de Fisico-Quimica, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, P.O. Box 355, 14801-907 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Keyson, D. [Laboratorio de Ensino de Ciencias e Laboratorio de Combustiveis e Materiais, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, 58051-900 Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Cavalcante, L.S. [Laboratorio Interdisciplinar de Eletroquimica e Ceramica, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, P.O. Box 676, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: laeciosc@bol.com.br; Simoes, A.Z. [Laboratorio Interdisciplinar em Ceramica, Departamento de Fisico-Quimica, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, P.O. Box 355, 14801-907 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Joya, M.R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, P.O. Box 676, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Longo, E.; Varela, J.A. [Laboratorio Interdisciplinar em Ceramica, Departamento de Fisico-Quimica, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, P.O. Box 355, 14801-907 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Pizani, P.S. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, P.O. Box 676, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Souza, A.G. [Laboratorio de Ensino de Ciencias e Laboratorio de Combustiveis e Materiais, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, 58051-900 Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2008-07-14

    The synthesis and characterization of CuO flower-nanostructure processed in domestic hydrothermal microwave oven was presented. Phase analysis was carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and micro-Raman scattering (MRS) and the results confirmed the CuO flower-nanostructure as a single-phase. The field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) was used to estimate the average spheres diameter while transmission electron microscope (TEM) to observe the thorn of the flower-nanostructures. The mechanism of CuO flower-nanostructures formation is proposed and explained.

  9. Emerging advances in nanomedicine with engineered gold nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Joseph A; Bardhan, Rizia

    2014-03-07

    Gold nanostructures possess unique characteristics that enable their use as contrast agents, as therapeutic entities, and as scaffolds to adhere functional molecules, therapeutic cargo, and targeting ligands. Due to their ease of synthesis, straightforward surface functionalization, and non-toxicity, gold nanostructures have emerged as powerful nanoagents for cancer detection and treatment. This comprehensive review summarizes the progress made in nanomedicine with gold nanostructures (1) as probes for various bioimaging techniques including dark-field, one-photon and two-photon fluorescence, photothermal optical coherence tomography, photoacoustic tomography, positron emission tomography, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering based imaging, (2) as therapeutic components for photothermal therapy, gene and drug delivery, and radiofrequency ablation, and (3) as a theranostic platform to simultaneously achieve both cancer detection and treatment. Distinct from other published reviews, this article also discusses the recent advances of gold nanostructures as contrast agents and therapeutic actuators for inflammatory diseases including atherosclerotic plaque and arthritis. For each of the topics discussed above, the fundamental principles and progress made in the past five years are discussed. The review concludes with a detailed future outlook discussing the challenges in using gold nanostructures, cellular trafficking, and translational considerations that are imperative for rapid clinical viability of plasmonic nanostructures, as well as the significance of emerging technologies such as Fano resonant gold nanostructures in nanomedicine.

  10. Plasmonic nanostructures for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ruiqian

    In the last three decades, a large number of different plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention due to their unique optical properties. Those plasmonic nanostructures include nanoparticles, nanoholes and metal nanovoids. They have been widely utilized in optical devices and sensors. When the plasmonic nanostructures interact with the electromagnetic wave and their surface plasmon frequency match with the light frequency, the electrons in plasmonic nanostructures will resonate with the same oscillation as incident light. In this case, the plasmonic nanostructures can absorb light and enhance the light scattering. Therefore, the plasmonic nanostructures can be used as substrate for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to enhance the Raman signal. Using plasmonic nanostructures can significantly enhance Raman scattering of molecules with very low concentrations. In this thesis, two different plasmonic nanostructures Ag dendrites and Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles are investigated. Simple methods were used to produce these two plasmonic nanostructures. Then, their applications in surface enhanced Raman scattering have been explored. Ag dendrites were produced by galvanic replacement reaction, which was conducted using Ag nitrate aqueous solution and copper metal. Metal copper layer was deposited at the bottom side of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane. Silver wires formed inside AAO channels connected Ag nitrate on the top of AAO membrane and copper layer at the bottom side of AAO. Silver dendrites were formed on the top side of AAO. The second plasmonic nanostructure is Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles. They were fabricated by electroless plating (galvanic replacement) reaction in a silver plating solution. First, electrochemically evolved hydrogen bubbles were used as template through electroless deposition to produce hollow Au nanoparticles. Then, the Au nanoparticles were coated with Cu shells in a Cu plating solution. In the following step, a Ag

  11. In situ controlled synthesis of various TiO2 nanostructured materials via a facile hydrothermal route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hai; Liu Yong; Zhong Minyi; Xu Hongmei; Huang Hong; Shen Hui

    2011-01-01

    Various TiO 2 nanomaterials, such as nanosheets, nanoflowers, and nanowires were directly self assembled on titanium substrate on a large scale under hydrothermal conditions. The morphology of the formed TiO 2 nanomaterials could be easily tuned by varying the experimental parameters of temperature, reaction time, and the NaOH concentration. A possible formation mechanism was suggested on the basis of the shape evolution of TiO 2 nanostructures by SEM images in combination with XRD patterns of as-grown samples. The optical properties of TiO 2 nanosheets, nanoflowers, and nanowires were characterized by reflectance spectroscopy. The studies revealed that the absorption capability of visible light is obviously different for TiO 2 with different morphologies. Moreover, TiO 2 nanosheets exhibited better light trapping than TiO 2 nanoflowers and TiO 2 nanowires due to their unique nanostructure.

  12. Study of Growth Kinetics in One Dimensional and Two Dimensional ZnO Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xin

    Because of the merits arising from the unique geometry, nanostructure materials have been an essential class of materials, which have shown great potentials in the fields of electronics, photonics, and biology. With various nanostructures being intensively investigated and successfully complemented into device applications, there has been one increasing demand to the investigation of the growth mechanism devoted to the controlled nanostructure synthesis. Motivated by this situation, this thesis is focused on the fundamental understanding of the nanostructure growth. Specifically, by taking zinc oxide as an example material, through controlling the basic driving force, that is, the supersaturation, I have rationally designed and synthesized various of nanostructures, and further applied the classical layer-by-layer growth mechanism to the understanding on the formation of these nanostructures, they are, the convex-plate-capped nanowires, the concave-plate-capped nanowires, the facet evolution at the tip of the nanowires, and the ultrathin 2D nanosheets.

  13. TEM of nanostructured metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnthaler, H.P.; Waitz, T.; Rentenberger, C.; Mingler, B.

    2004-01-01

    Nanostructuring has been used to improve the mechanical properties of bulk metals and alloys. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) including atomic resolution is therefore appropriate to study these nanostructures; four examples are given as follows. (1) The early stages of precipitation at RT were investigated in an Al-Mg-Si alloy. By high resolution TEM it is shown that the precipitates lie on (0 0 1) planes having an ordered structure. (2) In Co alloys the fronts of martensitic phase transformations were analysed showing that the transformation strains are very small thus causing no surface relief. (3) Re-ordering and recrystallization were studied by in situ TEM of an Ni 3 Al alloy being nanocrystalline after severe plastic deformation. (4) In NiTi severe plastic deformation is leading to the formation of amorphous shear bands. From the TEM analysis it is concluded that the amorphization is caused by plastic shear instability starting in the shear bands

  14. Hydrothermal synthesis of nanostructured titania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshito, Walter Kenji; Ferreira, Nildemar A.M.; Rumbao, Ana Carolina S. Coutinho; Lazar, Dolores R.R.; Ussui, Valter

    2009-01-01

    Titania ceramics have many applications due to its surface properties and, recently, its nanostructured compounds, prepared by hydrothermal treatments, have been described to improve these properties. In this work, commercial titanium dioxide was treated with 10% sodium hydroxide solution in a pressurized reactor at 150°C for 24 hours under vigorous stirring and then washed following two different procedures. The first one consisted of washing with water and ethanol and the second with water and hydrochloric acid solution (1%). Resulting powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, N 2 gas adsorption and field emission gun scanning and transmission electronic microscopy. Results showed that from an original starting material with mainly rutile phase, both anatase and H 2 Ti 3 O 7 phase could be identified after the hydrothermal treatment. Surface area of powders presented a notable increase of one order of magnitude and micrographs showed a rearrangement on the microstructure of powders. (author)

  15. Optical Characterization of Nanostructured Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feidenhans'l, Nikolaj Agentoft

    Micro- and nanostructured surfaces are interesting due to the unique properties they add to the bulk material. One example is structural colors, where the interaction between surface structures and visible light produce bright color effects without the use of paints or dyes. Several research groups...... modeling to evaluate the dimensions of subwavelength gratings, by correlating the reflected light measured from the structures with a database of simulations. A new method is developed and termed color scatterometry, since compared to typical spectroscopic scatterometry, which evaluates the full reflection...... spectrum; the new method only evaluates the color of the reflected light using a standard RGB color camera. Color scatterometry provides the combined advantages of spectroscopic scatterometry, which provides fast evaluations, and imaging scatterometry that provides an overview image from which small...

  16. Hydrothermal synthesis of nanostructured titania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshito, W.K.; Ferreira, N.A.M.; Lazar, D.R.R.; Ussui, V.; Rumbao, A.C.S.

    2011-01-01

    Titania ceramics have many applications due to its surface properties and, recently, its nanostructured compounds, prepared by hydrothermal treatments, have been described to improve these properties. In this work, commercial titanium dioxide was treated with 10% sodium hydroxide solution in a pressurized reactor at 150 deg C for 24 hours under vigorous stirring and then washed following two different procedures. The first one consisted of washing with water and ethanol and the second with water and hydrochloric acid solution (1%). Resulting powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, N 2 gas adsorption and field emission gun scanning and transmission electronic microscopy. Results showed that from an original starting material with mainly rutile phase, both anatase and H 2 Ti 3 O 7 phase could be identified after the hydrothermal treatment. Surface area of powders presented a notable increase of one order of magnitude and micrographs showed a rearrangement on the microstructure of powders. (author)

  17. Nanostructured energy devices equilibrium concepts and kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Bisquert, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Due to the pressing needs of society, low cost materials for energy devices have experienced an outstanding development in recent times. In this highly multidisciplinary area, chemistry, material science, physics, and electrochemistry meet to develop new materials and devices that perform required energy conversion and storage processes with high efficiency, adequate capabilities for required applications, and low production cost. Nanostructured Energy Devices: Equilibrium Concepts and Kinetics introduces the main physicochemical principles that govern the operation of energy devices. It inclu

  18. Blister/hole formation on tungsten surface due to low-energy and high-flux deuterium/helium plasma exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, D.; Iwakiri, H.; Yoshida, N.; Ye, M.Y.; Ohno, N.; Takamura, S.

    2005-01-01

    Deuterium/helium plasma exposures on tungsten surface bring serious damages such as blister and hole. Blistering occurs by cleaving along layered structure intrinsic to the press-roll manufacturing process. Mechanical polishing and helium pre-exposure on mirror-finished powder metallurgy tungsten drastically suppress blister formation. Small cracks made by a polishing would become paths to the surface for diffusing deuterium atoms in the substrate, resulting in no gas accumulation and no blister formation on the surface. Helium pre-exposure would make a helium-enriched layer near the surface, which becomes a kind of diffusion barrier for incident deuterium atoms. Blister formation and deuterium retention are suppressed on the surface with helium-enriched layer. (author)

  19. Expression of a cytoplasmic transhydrogenase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in formation of 2-oxoglutarate due to depletion of the NADPH pool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, T.L.; Anderlund, M.; Nielsen, Jens

    2001-01-01

    The intracellular redox state of a cell is to a large extent defined by the concentration ratios of the two pyridine nucleotide systems NADH/NAD(+) and NADPH/ADP(+) and has a significant influence on product formation in microorganisms. The enzyme pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenase, which can...... cultivations in high-performance bioreactors were carried out in order to allow quantitative analysis of the effect of transhydrogenase expression on product formation and on the intracellular concentrations of NADH, NAD(+), NADPH and NADP(+). A specific transhydrogenase activity of 4.53 U/mg protein...

  20. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-01-01

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was flat and rough reference surfaces. Our micro/nanofabrication process is a scalable approach based on cost-efficient self-organization and provides potential for further developing functional surfaces to study the behavior of microbes on nanoscale topographies.We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all

  1. GRB 980425 host: [C II], [O I], and CO lines reveal recent enhancement of star formation due to atomic gas inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michałowski, M. J.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Wardlow, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Accretion of gas from the intergalactic medium is required to fuel star formation in galaxies. We have recently suggested that this process can be studied using host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Aims. Our aim is to test this possibility by studying in detail the properties of gas...

  2. Shape-specific nanostructured protein mimics from de novo designed chimeric peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Linhai; Yang, Su; Lund, Reidar; Dong, He

    2018-01-30

    Natural proteins self-assemble into highly-ordered nanoscaled architectures to perform specific functions. The intricate functions of proteins have provided great impetus for researchers to develop strategies for designing and engineering synthetic nanostructures as protein mimics. Compared to the success in engineering fibrous protein mimetics, the design of discrete globular protein-like nanostructures has been challenging mainly due to the lack of precise control over geometric packing and intermolecular interactions among synthetic building blocks. In this contribution, we report an effective strategy to construct shape-specific nanostructures based on the self-assembly of chimeric peptides consisting of a coiled coil dimer and a collagen triple helix folding motif. Under salt-free conditions, we showed spontaneous self-assembly of the chimeric peptides into monodisperse, trigonal bipyramidal-like nanoparticles with precise control over the stoichiometry of two folding motifs and the geometrical arrangements relative to one another. Three coiled coil dimers are interdigitated on the equatorial plane while the two collagen triple helices are located in the axial position, perpendicular to the coiled coil plane. A detailed molecular model was proposed and further validated by small angle X-ray scattering experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The results from this study indicated that the molecular folding of each motif within the chimeric peptides and their geometric packing played important roles in the formation of discrete protein-like nanoparticles. The peptide design and self-assembly mechanism may open up new routes for the construction of highly organized, discrete self-assembling protein-like nanostructures with greater levels of control over assembly accuracy.

  3. Fabrication of nano-structured UO2 fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jae Ho; Kang, Ki Won; Rhee, Young Woo; Kim, Dong Joo; Kim, Jong Heon; Kim, Keon Sik; Song, Kun Woo

    2007-01-01

    Nano-structured materials have received much attention for their possibility for various functional materials. Ceramics with a nano-structured grain have some special properties such as super plasticity and a low sintering temperature. To reduce the fuel cycle costs and the total mass of spent LWR fuels, it is necessary to extend the fuel discharged burn-up. In order to increase the fuel burn-up, it is important to understand the fuel property of a highly irradiated fuel pellet. Especially, research has focused on the formation of a porous and small grained microstructure in the rim area of the fuel, called High Burn-up Structure (HBS). The average grain size of HBS is about 300nm. This paper deals with the feasibility study on the fabrication of nano-structured UO 2 pellets. The nano sized UO 2 particles are prepared by a combined process of a oxidation-reducing and a mechanical milling of UO 2 powder. Nano-structured UO 2 pellets (∼300nm) with a density of ∼93%TD can be obtained by sintering nano-sized UO 2 compacts. The SEM study reveals that the microstructure of the fabricated nano-structure UO 2 pellet is similar to that of HBS. Therefore, this bulk nano-structured UO 2 pellet can be used as a reference pellet for a measurement of the physical properties of HBS

  4. Ductility of Nanostructured Bainite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Morales-Rivas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured bainite is a novel ultra-high-strength steel-concept under intensive current research, in which the optimization of its mechanical properties can only come from a clear understanding of the parameters that control its ductility. This work reviews first the nature of this composite-like material as a product of heat treatment conditions. Subsequently, the premises of ductility behavior are presented, taking as a reference related microstructures: conventional bainitic steels, and TRIP-aided steels. The ductility of nanostructured bainite is then discussed in terms of work-hardening and fracture mechanisms, leading to an analysis of the three-fold correlation between ductility, mechanically-induced martensitic transformation, and mechanical partitioning between the phases. Results suggest that a highly stable/hard retained austenite, with mechanical properties close to the matrix of bainitic ferrite, is advantageous in order to enhance ductility.

  5. Vortices and nanostructured superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book provides expert coverage of modern and novel aspects of the study of vortex matter, dynamics, and pinning in nanostructured and multi-component superconductors. Vortex matter in superconducting materials is a field of enormous beauty and intellectual challenge, which began with the theoretical prediction of vortices by A. Abrikosov (Nobel Laureate). Vortices, vortex dynamics, and pinning are key features in many of today’s human endeavors: from the huge superconducting accelerating magnets and detectors at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, which opened new windows of knowledge on the universe, to the tiny superconducting transceivers using Rapid Single Flux Quanta, which have opened a revolutionary means of communication. In recent years, two new features have added to the intrinsic beauty and complexity of the subject: nanostructured/nanoengineered superconductors, and the discovery of a range of new materials showing multi-component (multi-gap) superconductivity. In this book, leading researche...

  6. Hybrid phonons in nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Ridley, Brian K

    2017-01-01

    Crystalline semiconductor nanostructures have special properties associated with electrons and lattice vibrations and their interaction, and this is the topic of the book. The result of spatial confinement of electrons is indicated in the nomenclature of nonostructures: quantum wells, quantum wires, and quantum dots. Confinement also has a profound effect on lattice vibrations and an account of this is the prime focus. The documentation of the confinement of acoustic modes goes back to Lord Rayleigh’s work in the late nineteenth century, but no such documentation exists for optical modes. Indeed, it is only comparatively recently that any theory of the elastic properties of optical modes exists, and the account given in the book is comprehensive. A model of the lattice dynamics of the diamond lattice is given that reveals the quantitative distinction between acoustic and optical modes and the difference of connection rules that must apply at an interface. The presence of interfaces in nanostructures forces ...

  7. CuO urchin-nanostructures synthesized from a domestic hydrothermal microwave method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyson, D.; Volanti, D.P.; Cavalcante, L.S.; Simoes, A.Z.; Varela, J.A.; Longo, E.

    2008-01-01

    This letter reports the synthesis of CuO urchin-nanostructures by a simple and novel hydrothermal microwave method. The formation and growth of urchin-nanostructures is mainly affected by the addition of polyethylene glycol (PEG). The hierarchical malachite particles are uniform spheres with a diameter of 0.7-1.9 μm. CuO urchin-nanostructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) and nitrogen adsorption (BET). The specific surface area of the CuO nanostructured microspheres was about 170.5 m 2 /g. A possible mechanism for the formation of such CuO urchin-nanostructures is proposed

  8. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-02-07

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was flat and rough reference surfaces. Our micro/nanofabrication process is a scalable approach based on cost-efficient self-organization and provides potential for further developing functional surfaces to study the behavior of microbes on nanoscale topographies.

  9. Studies of Heterogeneous and Diffusion-Influenced Nucleation for Improved Processing of Nanostructural Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kellon, Kenneth F; Buhro, William E

    2005-01-01

    .... The purpose of this grant was to identify a suitable glass for studies of the nucleation processes leading to nanostructure formation and to investigate the possibility of using TiB2 for enhanced...

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exhibits Deficient Biofilm Formation in the Absence of Class II and III Ribonucleotide Reductases Due to Hindered Anaerobic Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Anna; Pedraz, Lucas; Astola, Josep; Torrents, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lung infections by the ubiquitous and extremely adaptable opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa correlate with the formation of a biofilm, where bacteria grow in association with an extracellular matrix and display a wide range of changes in gene expression and metabolism. This leads to increased resistance to physical stress and antibiotic therapies, while enhancing cell-to-cell communication. Oxygen diffusion through the complex biofilm structure generates an oxygen concentration gradient, leading to the appearance of anaerobic microenvironments. Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) are a family of highly sophisticated enzymes responsible for the synthesis of the deoxyribonucleotides, and they constitute the only de novo pathway for the formation of the building blocks needed for DNA synthesis and repair. P. aeruginosa is one of the few bacteria encoding all three known RNR classes (Ia, II, and III). Class Ia RNRs are oxygen dependent, class II are oxygen independent, and class III are oxygen sensitive. A tight control of RNR activity is essential for anaerobic growth and therefore for biofilm development. In this work we explored the role of the different RNR classes in biofilm formation under aerobic and anaerobic initial conditions and using static and continuous-flow biofilm models. We demonstrated the importance of class II and III RNR for proper cell division in biofilm development and maturation. We also determined that these classes are transcriptionally induced during biofilm formation and under anaerobic conditions. The molecular mechanism of their anaerobic regulation was also studied, finding that the Anr/Dnr system is responsible for class II RNR induction. These data can be integrated with previous knowledge about biofilms in a model where these structures are understood as a set of layers determined by oxygen concentration and contain cells with different RNR expression profiles, bringing us a step closer to the understanding of this

  11. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Acetylene (C2H2: seed effect on SOA yields due to organic photochemistry in the aerosol aqueous phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Ziemann

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The lightest Non Methane HydroCarbon (NMHC, i.e., acetylene (C2H2 is found to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA. Contrary to current belief, the number of carbon atoms, n, for a NMHC to act as SOA precursor is lowered to n=2 here. The OH-radical initiated oxidation of C2H2 forms glyoxal (CHOCHO as the highest yield product, and >99% of the SOA from C2H2 is attributed to CHOCHO. SOA formation from C2H2 and CHOCHO was studied in a photochemical and a dark simulation chamber. Further, the experimental conditions were varied with respect to the chemical composition of the seed aerosols, mild acidification with sulphuric acid (SA, 3formation, and identify a potential bias in the currently available YSOA data for other SOA precursor NMHCs. We demonstrate that SOA formation via the aqueous phase is not limited to cloud droplets, but proceeds also in the absence of clouds, i.e., does not stop once a cloud droplet evaporates. Atmospheric models need to be expanded to include SOA formation from WSOC photochemistry of CHOCHO, and possibly other α-dicarbonyls, in aqueous aerosols.

  12. Synthesis of dumbbell-like Au nanostructure and its light-absorbance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Jianlei; Xu Yan; Li Kun; Song Shiping; Fan Chunhai

    2013-01-01

    Background: By changing the size or the morphology of Au nanostructure, they can absorb different wavelength light due to the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). Because Au nanorods show good ability to transform light into heat (photothermal effect), they have been wildly used to deliver the drugs and release them controllably. However, when applying such nanostructure for in vivo treatments, Au nanorods must have long aspect ratio which often make it hard to prepare heterogeneous nanostructure. Purpose: A new method to synthesize Au nanostructure with uniform size and to achieve long wavelength light absorbance is needed. This work attempts to synthesize such Au nanostructure by using bio-nano techniques. Methods: New nanostructures are prepared by growing Au nanoparticles on the surface of Au nanorods modified with DNA molecules. Results: Dumbbell-Ikea Au nanostructures were prepared firstly. Its maximum absorbance locates at near ultraviolet region, which means that it can be used as a potential tool for the deep-skin photothermal treatment. Moreover, other two kinds of nanostructures, i.e. Au nanorods with Au splinter at two ends and sea urchin-like nanostructures, are also studied. Conclusions: We successfully fabricated novel Au nanostructures which can be used for drug delivery, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and catalysis. (authors)

  13. PREFACE: Nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Richard E.

    2003-10-01

    We can define nanostructured surfaces as well-defined surfaces which contain lateral features of size 1-100 nm. This length range lies well below the micron regime but equally above the Ångstrom regime, which corresponds to the interatomic distances on single-crystal surfaces. This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter presents a collection of twelve papers which together address the fabrication, characterization, properties and applications of such nanostructured surfaces. Taken together they represent, in effect, a status report on the rapid progress taking place in this burgeoning area. The first four papers in this special issue have been contributed by members of the European Research Training Network ‘NanoCluster’, which is concerned with the deposition, growth and characterization of nanometre-scale clusters on solid surfaces—prototypical examples of nanoscale surface features. The paper by Vandamme is concerned with the fundamentals of the cluster-surface interaction; the papers by Gonzalo and Moisala address, respectively, the optical and catalytic properties of deposited clusters; and the paper by van Tendeloo reports the application of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to elucidate the surface structure of spherical particles in a catalyst support. The fifth paper, by Mendes, is also the fruit of a European Research Training Network (‘Micro-Nano’) and is jointly contributed by three research groups; it reviews the creation of nanostructured surface architectures from chemically-synthesized nanoparticles. The next five papers in this special issue are all concerned with the characterization of nanostructured surfaces with scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The papers by Bolotov, Hamilton and Dunstan demonstrate that the STM can be employed for local electrical measurements as well as imaging, as illustrated by the examples of deposited clusters, model semiconductor structures and real

  14. Construction of N-doped carbon@MoSe2 core/branch nanostructure via simultaneous formation of core and branch for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jiayu; Peng, Changqing; Zhang, Lili; Fu, Yongsheng; Li, Hang; Zhao, Xianmin; Zhu, Junwu; Wang, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •N-doped carbon@MoSe 2 core/branch was prepared via a facile calcining method. •N-doped carbon core and MoSe 2 branch can be simultaneously constructed. •PANI played vital roles in the reduction of MoO 3 and elemental Se. •The core/branch structure remarkably improved the lithium storage performance. -- Abstract: Here, we report a one-step simultaneous-construction approach to synthesize N-doped carbon@MoSe 2 core/branch nanostructures by heating a mixture of MoO 3 /PANI hybrids and Se powders in argon atmosphere, without requiring a cumbersome multi-step process or highly toxic reducing agents. It is found that in the construction process, PANI played a crucial role in the reduction of MoO 3 and Se to form MoSe 2 nanosheet branches, while PANI itself was decomposed and carbonized into N-doped carbon nanorod cores. Interestingly, the coexistence of 1D and 2D nanostructures in the N-doped carbon@MoSe 2 core/branch system leads to excellent lithium storage performance, including a large discharging capacity of 1275 mA h g −1 , a high reversible lithium extraction capacity of 928 mA h g −1 and a coulombic efficiency of 72.8%. After 100 cycles, the NDC@MS electrode still delivers a reversible capacity of 906 mA h g −1 with a capacity retention ratio of 97.6%. The superior electrochemical properties can be attributed to the unique core/branch nanostructure of NDC@MS and the synergistic effect between the N-doped carbon nanorod cores and MoSe 2 nanosheet branches.

  15. Periodic nanostructures formed on a poly-methyl methacrylate surface with a femtosecond laser for biocompatibility improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Keisuke; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Sato, Yuji; Ooga, Takahiro; Asai, Satoru; Murai, Kensuke

    2018-06-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) is widely used as a biomaterial. The formation of periodic nanostructures on the surface is necessary to improve the biocompatibility. A method was proposed and developed to form periodic nanostructures on a PMMA surface. A PMMA plate was placed on titanium (Ti) plate, and then the Ti plate was irradiated with a laser through the PMMA plate. We try to effectively produce periodic nanostructures on PMMA with a femtosecond laser at a fundamental wavelength by increasing the contact pressure and using titanium (Ti) plate. The contact pressure between PMMA and Ti required to form a periodic nanostructure is 300 kPa, and for a contact pressure of 2400 kPa, periodic nanostructures are formed in 62% of the laser-irradiated area on the PMMA surface. These results suggest that the formation efficiency of the periodic nanostructure depends on the laser conditions and the contact pressure.

  16. semiconducting nanostructures: morphology and thermoelectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culebras, Mario; Torán, Raquel; Gómez, Clara M.; Cantarero, Andrés

    2014-08-01

    Semiconducting metallic oxides, especially perosvkite materials, are great candidates for thermoelectric applications due to several advantages over traditionally metallic alloys such as low production costs and high chemical stability at high temperatures. Nanostructuration can be the key to develop highly efficient thermoelectric materials. In this work, La 1- x Ca x MnO 3 perosvkite nanostructures with Ca as a dopant have been synthesized by the hydrothermal method to be used in thermoelectric applications at room temperature. Several heat treatments have been made in all samples, leading to a change in their morphology and thermoelectric properties. The best thermoelectric efficiency has been obtained for a Ca content of x=0.5. The electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient are strongly related to the calcium content.

  17. Engineering Metal Nanostructure for SERS Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanqin Cao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS has attracted great attention due to its remarkable enhancement and excellent selectivity in the detection of various molecules. Noble metal nanomaterials have usually been employed for producing substrates that can be used in SERS because of their unique local plasma resonance. As the SERS enhancement of signals depends on parameters such as size, shape, morphology, arrangement, and dielectric environment of the nanostructure, there have been a number of studies on tunable nanofabrication and synthesis of noble metals. In this work, we will illustrate progress in engineering metallic nanostructures with various morphologies using versatile methods. We also discuss their SERS applications in different fields and the challenges.

  18. Leafy nanostructure PANI for material of supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XI Dong

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructure conducting polyaniline(PANI has great potential applications in supercapacitor electrode materials.In this paper,we report a template-free approach to synthesize PANI by a galvanostatic current procedure with a three-electrode configuration directly on indium-doped tin-oxide substrates (ITO.The morphology of product was characterized by Hitachi S-4800 field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM.Due to the nanostructure,the specific capacitance of PANI film with the thickness of 100nm were measured as high as 829 F/g and 667 F/g at a charge-discharge current density of 1 A/g and 10 A/g respectively.After 500 cycle charge-discharge test employed at the current density of 20 A/g the PANI film still had a 95.1% capacitance retention.

  19. Multilocular Hepatic Abscess Formation and Sepsis due to Yersinia enterocolitica in a Patient with Hereditary Hemochromatosis and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Sauter

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Yersinia enterocolitica (YE typically presents with mild gastroenteritis without systemic infection. However, systemic YE infection has been described in states of iron overload. We present the case of a patient with sepsis with hepatic abscesses due to YE infection. Workup revealed a past diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and hemochromatosis which had been untreated for the previous 5 years due to patient refusal. This case highlights risk factors for systemic infection with YE. A high degree of suspicion for YE infection is warranted in patients with iron overload, diabetes mellitus, or immunosuppression.

  20. Synthesis of gold nanostructures using fruit extract of Garcinia Indica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaprabha, M.; Pattabi, Manjunatha

    2016-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles having different shapes are synthesized using extract of fresh fruit rinds of Garcinia Indica. The onset of growth and formation of gold nanostructures is confirmed from UV-Vis spectroscopy. Morphological studies are done using FESEM. Size dependent catalytic activity is evaluated with the model reduction reaction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol.

  1. Synthesis engineering of iron oxide raspberry-shaped nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, O; Pichon, B P; Ihiawakrim, D; Florea, I; Moldovan, S; Ersen, O; Begin, D; Grenèche, J-M; Lemonnier, S; Barraud, E; Begin-Colin, S

    2017-01-07

    Magnetic porous nanostructures consisting of oriented aggregates of iron oxide nanocrystals display very interesting properties such as a lower oxidation state of magnetite, and enhanced saturation magnetization in comparison with individual nanoparticles of similar sizes and porosity. However, the formation mechanism of these promising nanostructures is not well understood, which hampers the fine tuning of their magnetic properties, for instance by doping them with other elements. Therefore the formation mechanism of porous raspberry shaped nanostructures (RSNs) synthesized by a one-pot polyol solvothermal method has been investigated in detail from the early stages by using a wide panel of characterization techniques, and especially by performing original in situ HR-TEM studies in temperature. A time-resolved study showed the intermediate formation of an amorphous iron alkoxide phase with a plate-like lamellar structure (PLS). Then, the fine investigation of PLS transformation upon heating up to 500 °C confirmed that the synthesis of RSNs involves two iron precursors: the starting one (hydrated iron chlorides) and the in situ formed iron alkoxide precursor which decomposes with time and heating and contributes to the growth step of nanostructures. Such an understanding of the formation mechanism of RSNs is necessary to envision efficient and rational enhancement of their magnetic properties.

  2. A novel technique for synthesizing dense alumina nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pancholi, A [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Stoleru, V G [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Kell, C D [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2007-05-30

    The formation of highly ordered nanoporous alumina membranes by anodizing high-purity aluminium under optimum conditions (i.e., anodization time, electrolyte temperature, and cell voltage) in various electrolyte solutions is a well established process. In this paper we report on the formation of a wide range of alumina nanostructures, including nanotubes/nanochannels, nanoplates, and nanofibres, by using a technique that involves anodization and etching processing steps similar to the ones that yield nanopores, under slightly modified experimental conditions. The effects of the anodization voltage, time, and temperature, as well as the effects of the etching time, on the formation and the properties of the alumina nanostructures are analysed. We propose a simple analytical model to describe the formation of different types of alumina nanostructures, as a result of irreversible breakage of the pore walls for long etching times. The geometry of the nanostructures and their dimensions, ranging between 10 and 100 nm, were found to be dependent on the pore dimensions and on the location of the cleavage/breakage of the pore walls.

  3. SF{sub 6} decomposition and layer formation due to excimer laser photoablation of SiO{sub 2} surface at gas-solid system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajad, Batool [Physics Department, Amirkabir University, PO Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parvin, Parviz [Physics Department, Amirkabir University, PO Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bassam, Mohamad Amin [Excimer Laser Lab, Emam Hussain University, PO Box 16575-4347, Tehrann (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2004-12-21

    In this work, the effect of an excimer laser has been studied for presenting a method for SF{sub 6} decomposition and simultaneous formation of a SiF{sub 2} layer on amorphous SiO{sub 2}. Though the excimer laser did not establish a gas phase photodissociation, we have shown that UV photoablation leads strongly to molecular decomposition in the SF{sub 6}-SiO{sub 2} system. Moreover, the dependence of the decomposition process on the exposure parameters such as the wavelength and intensity as well as the gas pressure and the focal point distance from the gas-solid interface has been investigated.

  4. Prospects of target nanostructuring for laser proton acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübcke, Andrea; Andreev, Alexander A.; Höhm, Sandra; Grunwald, Ruediger; Ehrentraut, Lutz; Schnürer, Matthias

    2017-03-01

    In laser-based proton acceleration, nanostructured targets hold the promise to allow for significantly boosted proton energies due to strong increase of laser absorption. We used laser-induced periodic surface structures generated in-situ as a very fast and economic way to produce nanostructured targets capable of high-repetition rate applications. Both in experiment and theory, we investigate the impact of nanostructuring on the proton spectrum for different laser-plasma conditions. Our experimental data show that the nanostructures lead to a significant enhancement of absorption over the entire range of laser plasma conditions investigated. At conditions that do not allow for efficient laser absorption by plane targets, i.e. too steep plasma gradients, nanostructuring is found to significantly enhance the proton cutoff energy and conversion efficiency. In contrast, if the plasma gradient is optimized for laser absorption of the plane target, the nanostructure-induced absorption increase is not reflected in higher cutoff energies. Both, simulation and experiment point towards the energy transfer from the laser to the hot electrons as bottleneck.

  5. Effect of poly(ethylene oxide) homopolymer and two different poly(ethylene oxide-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) triblock copolymers on morphological, optical, and mechanical properties of nanostructured unsaturated polyester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Builes, Daniel H; Hernández-Ortiz, Juan P; Corcuera, Ma Angeles; Mondragon, Iñaki; Tercjak, Agnieszka

    2014-01-22

    Novel nanostructured unsaturated polyester resin-based thermosets, modified with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), poly(propylene oxide) (PPO), and two poly(ethylene oxide-b-propylene oxide-b-ethylene oxide) block copolymers (BCP), were developed and analyzed. The effects of molecular weights, blocks ratio, and curing temperatures on the final morphological, optical, and mechanical properties were reported. The block influence on the BCP miscibility was studied through uncured and cured mixtures of unsaturated polyester (UP) resins with PEO and PPO homopolymers having molecular weights similar to molecular weights of the blocks of BCP. The final morphology of the nanostructured thermosetting systems, containing BCP or homopolymers, was investigated, and multiple mechanisms of nanostructuration were listed and explained. By considering the miscibility of each block before and after curing, it was determined that the formation of the nanostructured matrices followed a self-assembly mechanism or a polymerization-induced phase separation mechanism. The miscibility between PEO or PPO blocks with one of two phases of UP matrix was highlighted due to its importance in the final thermoset properties. Relationships between the final morphology and thermoset optical and mechanical properties were examined. The mechanisms and physics behind the morphologies lead toward the design of highly transparent, nanostructured, and toughened thermosetting UP systems.

  6. Nanostructures of Boron, Carbon and Magnesium Diboride for High Temperature Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfefferle, Lisa [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Fang, Fang [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Iyyamperumal, Eswarmoorthi [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Keskar, Gayatri [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2013-12-23

    Direct fabrication of MgxBy nanostructures is achieved by employing metal (Ni,Mg) incorporated MCM-41 in the Hybrid Physical-Chemical Vapor Deposition (HPCVD) reaction. Different reaction conditions are tested to optimize the fabrication process. TEM analysis shows the fabrication of MgxBy nanostructures starting at the reaction temperature of 600oC, with the yield of the nanostructures increasing with increasing reaction temperature. The as-synthesized MgxBy nanostructures have the diameters in the range of 3-5nm, which do not increase with the reaction temperature consistent with templated synthesis. EELS analysis of the template removed nanostructures confirms the existence of B and Mg with possible contamination of Si and O. NEXAFS and Raman spectroscopy analysis suggested a concentric layer-by-layer MgxBy nanowire/nanotube growth model for our as-synthesized nanostructures. Ni k-edge XAS indicates that the formation of MgNi alloy particles is important for the Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) growth of MgxBy nanostructures with fine diameters, and the presence of Mg vapor not just Mg in the catalyst is crucial for the formation of Ni-Mg clusters. Physical templating by the MCM-41 pores was shown to confine the diameter of the nanostructures. DC magnetization measurements indicate possible superconductive behaviors in the as-synthesized samples.

  7. Nanostructured materials, production and application in construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KUDRYAVTSEV Pavel Gennadievich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers characteristics of water-soluble high module silicate systems: based on polysilicates of alkali element called liquid glasses and the chains of their transformations from the lowest oligomers into the highest ones with further formation colloid solutions – silica sol. The authors describe the potentialities of the use of such systems as binders or modifying additives to produce different nanostructured silicate polymer concretes. There are examples of prospective application of liquid glass and water solutions of high module silicates in industrial areas and construction. Quantum-chemical calculations of the structure and properties of tetraphenylarsonium are given and heterogeneity of its functional groups is shown.

  8. Optical switching systems using nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stubkjær, Kristian

    2004-01-01

    High capacity multiservice optical networks require compact and efficient switches. The potential benefits of optical switch elements based on nanostructured material are reviewed considering various material systems.......High capacity multiservice optical networks require compact and efficient switches. The potential benefits of optical switch elements based on nanostructured material are reviewed considering various material systems....

  9. Study of liquid phase formation kinetics due to solid/solid chemical interaction and its model. Application to the Zircaloy/Inconel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, E.A.; Denis, A.

    1990-01-01

    A description is made of the chemical interaction between Inconel spacing grids and the Zircaloy of the sheaths. Experiments performed at 1000, 1100 and 1200 deg C with base Zircaloy and with a previously formed layer of ZrO 2 , show that the kinetics is parabolic. The difference between both types of experiments is that the oxide layer delays the initiation of the Inconel-Zry interaction. A model is presented, for the description of the solid/solid interaction, which leads to the formation of eutectic that is liquid at the experiment temperature. Also a model, which represents the oxide layer dissolution and predicts the instant in which it disappears completely, is presented. (Author) [es

  10. Observation of ion confining potential enhancement due to thermal barrier potential formation and its scaling law in the tandem mirror GAMMA 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Teruji; Nakashima, Yousuke; Foote, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    In the tandem mirror GAMMA 10, (i) the enhancement of the ion confining potential, φ c , only during the period of the thermal barrier potential φ b -formation, has been observed first by using not only end-loss-analysers (ELA's) of GAMMA 10 but an end-loss-ion-spectrometer (ELIS) installed from TMX-U. This results in strong end-loss-ion plugging with increased central cell density. (ii) The first experimental observation of the φ c vs φ b -scaling law is obtained, where φ c increases with φ b . This scaling law is consistently interpreted by Cohen's theories of the weak-ECH and the strong-ECH in the plug region. (iii) Good agreement of the plug potential measured with the ELA's and the ELIS is achieved. (author)

  11. Surface structural, morphological, and catalytic studies of homogeneously dispersed anisotropic Ag nanostructures within mesoporous silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sareen, Shweta [Thapar University, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry (India); Mutreja, Vishal [Maharishi Markandeshwar University, Department of Chemistry (India); Pal, Bonamali; Singh, Satnam, E-mail: ssingh@thapar.edu [Thapar University, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry (India)

    2016-11-15

    Highly dispersed anisotropic Ag nanostructures were synthesized within the channels of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS)-modified mesoporous SBA-15 for catalyzing the reduction of p-dinitrobenzene, p-nitrophenol, and p-nitroacetophenone, respectively. A green templating process without involving any reducing agent, by varying the amount (1–10 wt.%) of Ag loading followed by calcination at 350 °C under H{sub 2} led to change in the morphology of Ag nanoparticles from nanospheres (~7–8 nm) to nanorods (aspect ratio ~12–30 nm) without any deformation in mesoporous sieves. In comparison to white bare SBA-15, gray-colored samples were formed with Ag impregnation exhibiting absorption bands at 484 and 840 nm indicating the formation of anisotropic Ag nanostructures within mesoporous matrix. TEM and FE-SEM micrographs confirmed the presence of evenly dispersed Ag nanostructures within as well as on the surface of mesoporous matrix. AFM studies indicated a small decrease in the average roughness of SBA-15 from 20.59 to 19.21 nm for 4 wt.% Ag/m-SBA-15, illustrating the encapsulation of majority of Ag nanoparticles in the siliceous matrix and presence of small amount of Ag nanoparticles on the mesoporous support. Moreover, due to plugging of mesopores with Ag, a significant decrease in surface area from 680 m{sup 2}/g of SBA-15 to 385 m{sup 2}/g was observed. The Ag-impregnated SBA-15 catalyst displayed superior catalytic activity than did bare SBA-15 with 4 wt.% Ag-loaded catalyst exhibiting optimum activity for selective reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol (100 %), p-nitroacetophenone to p-aminoacetophenone (100 %), and p-dinitrobenzene to p-nitroaniline (87 %), with a small amount of p-phenylenediamine formation.

  12. The green hydrothermal synthesis of nanostructured Cu2ZnSnSe4 as solar cell material and study of their structural, optical and morphological properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanalakar, S. A.; Agawane, G. L.; Kamble, A. S.; Patil, P. S.; Kim, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) has attracted intensive attention as an absorber material for the thin-film solar cells due to its high absorption coefficient, direct band gap, low toxicity, and abundance of its constituent elements. In this study nanostructured CZTSe nanoparticles are prepared via green hydrothermal synthesis without using toxic solvents, organic amines, catalysts or noxious chemicals. The structural, optical, and morphological properties of CZTSe nanostructured powder were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscope (TEM) techniques. Raman peaks at 170, 195, and 232 cm-1 confirm the formation of pure phase CZTSe nanostructured particles. In addition, the EDS and XPS results confirm the appropriate chemical purity of the annealed CZTSe nanoparticles. Meanwhile, the TEM analysis showed the presence of phase pure oval like CZTSe particle with size of about 80-140 nm. The UV-Vis-NIR absorption spectra analysis showed that the optical band gap of CZTSe nanostructured particles is about 1.14 eV. This band gap energy is close to the optimum value of a photovoltaic solar cell absorber material.

  13. Nanostructured thin film coatings with different strengthening effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panfilov Yury

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of articles on strengthening thin film coatings were analyzed and a lot of unusual strengthening effects, such as super high hardness and plasticity simultaneously, ultra low friction coefficient, high wear-resistance, curve rigidity increasing of drills with small diameter, associated with process formation of nanostructured coatings by the different thin film deposition methods were detected. Vacuum coater with RF magnetron sputtering system and ion-beam source and arc evaporator for nanostructured thin film coating manufacture are represented. Diamond Like Carbon and MoS2 thin film coatings, Ti, Al, Nb, Cr, nitride, carbide, and carbo-nitride thin film materials are described as strengthening coatings.

  14. Semiconductors and semimetals nanostructured systems

    CERN Document Server

    Willardson, Robert K; Beer, Albert C; Reed, Mark A

    1992-01-01

    This is the first available volume to consolidate prominent topics in the emerging field of nanostructured systems. Recent technological advancements have led to a new era of nanostructure physics, allowing for the fabrication of nanostructures whose behavior is dominated by quantum interference effects. This new capability has enthused the experimentalist and theorist alike. Innumerable possibilities have now opened up for physical exploration and device technology on the nanoscale. This book, with contributions from five pioneering researchers, will allow the expert and novice alike to explore a fascinating new field.Provides a state-of-the-art review of quantum-scale artificially nanostructured electronic systemsIncludes contributions by world-known experts in the fieldOpens the field to the non-expert with a concise introductionFeatures discussions of:Low-dimensional condensed matter physicsProperties of nanostructured, ultrasmall electronic systemsMesoscopic physics and quantum transportPhysics of 2D ele...

  15. Peroxidases in nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria eCarmona-Ribeiro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidases are enzymes catalyzing redox reactions that cleave peroxides. Their active redox centers have heme, cysteine thiols, selenium, manganese and other chemical moieties. Peroxidases and their mimetic systems have several technological and biomedical applications such as environment protection, energy production, bioremediation, sensors and immunoassays design and drug delivery devices. The combination of peroxidases or systems with peroxidase-like activity with nanostructures such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, thin films, liposomes, micelles, nanoflowers, nanorods and others is often an efficient strategy to improve catalytic activity, targeting and reusability.

  16. Chiral silicon nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, E.; Fahlteich, J.; Hoeche, Th.; Wagner, G.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2006-01-01

    Glancing angle ion beam assisted deposition is used for the growth of amorphous silicon nanospirals onto [0 0 1] silicon substrates in a temperature range from room temperature to 475 deg. C. The nanostructures are post-growth annealed in an argon atmosphere at various temperatures ranging from 400 deg. C to 800 deg. C. Recrystallization of silicon within the persisting nanospiral configuration is demonstrated for annealing temperatures above 800 deg. C. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the silicon samples prior and after temperature treatment

  17. Nano-structure formation of Fe-Pt perpendicular magnetic recording media co-deposited with MgO, Al2O3 and SiO2 additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safran, G.; Suzuki, T.; Ouchi, K.; Barna, P.B.; Radnoczi, G.

    2006-01-01

    Perpendicular magnetic recording media samples were prepared by sputter deposition on sapphire with a layer sequence of MgO seed-layer/Cr under-layer/FeSi soft magnetic under-layer/MgO intermediate layer/FePt-oxide recording layer. The effects of MgO, Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 additives on the morphology and orientation of the FePt layer were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. The samples exhibited (001) orientation of the L1 FePt phase with the mutual orientations of sapphire substrate//MgO(100)[001]//Cr(100)[11-bar0]//FeSi(100)[11-bar0]//MgO(100) [001]//FePt(001)[100]. The morphology of the FePt films varied due to the co-deposited oxides: The FePt layers were continuous and segmented by stacking faults aligned at 54 o to the surface. Films with SiO 2 addition, beside the oriented columnar FePt grains, exhibited a fraction of misoriented crystallites due to random repeated nucleation. Al 2 O 3 addition resulted in a layered structure, i.e. an initial continuous epitaxial FePt layer covered by a secondary layer of FePt-Al 2 O 3 composite. Both components (FePt and MgO) of the MgO-added samples were grown epitaxially on the MgO intermediate layer, so that a nano-composite of intercalated (001) FePt and (001) MgO was formed. The revealed microstructures and formation mechanisms may facilitate the improvement of the structural and magnetic properties of the FePt-oxide composite perpendicular magnetic recording media

  18. Oriented growth due to topotactic replacement of antigorite by olivine as a mechanism for the formation of B-type olivine CPO in convergent margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaya, T.; Wallis, S.; Kobayashi, H.; Michibayashi, K.; Mizukami, T.

    2012-12-01

    B-type olivine (Ol) CPO patterns are characterized by an a-axis concentration parallel to the intermediate principle axis of strain and have been proposed by many workers as the cause of seismic anisotropy in the mantle wedge of subduction zones that shows the fast direction perpendicular to the plate movement direction. Experimental work has shown that B-type Ol CPO can form by dislocation creep at relatively high stresses and in the presence of water. Natural examples of B-type Ol CPO have also been reported, but there are several discrepancies with the experimental results. 1) Some natural B-type CPO formed at relatively high temperatures and low stress outside the ranges predicted by experiments. 2) Natural examples lack evidence for the c-slip expected for the formation of B-type Ol CPO by dislocation creep. 3) The high shear stresses expected along subduction boundaries promote the formation of B-type Ol CPO, but these regions are also expected to be associated with the formation of serpentine minerals and even relatively small amounts prevent strong CPO patterns from forming because of grain-boundary sliding occurring between Ol and serpentine. We show B-type Ol CPO can form as a result of static topotactic growth of olivine after high-temperature breakdown of antigorite (Atg) schist. In the Happo-One region of the Hida Marginal belt, Japan, dehydration of foliated Atg produces non-deformed secondary Ol formed in veins or patches and peridotite-hornfels where the conversion is complete.The CPO of non-deformed Ol in veins and in the hornfels shows a strong B-type fabric. The veins show consistent Ol CPO irrespective of the vein orientation, implying the CPO is not related to the vein opening direction. The CPO of Atg bordering the vein Ol shows a strong concentration of c-axes at a high angle to the foliation and a strong alignment of b-axes parallel to the lineation. Numerous recent studies have shown this type of Atg CPO is the most widespread in the

  19. Assessing the osteoblast transcriptome in a model of enhanced bone formation due to constitutive G{sub s}–G protein signaling in osteoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattanachanya, Lalita, E-mail: lalita_md@yahoo.com [Endocrine Research Unit, Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University and King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok (Thailand); Wang, Liping, E-mail: lipingwang05@yahoo.com [Endocrine Research Unit, Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Millard, Susan M., E-mail: susan.millard@mater.uq.edu.au [Endocrine Research Unit, Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Lu, Wei-Dar, E-mail: weidar_lu@yahoo.com [Endocrine Research Unit, Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); O’Carroll, Dylan, E-mail: dylancocarroll@gmail.com [Endocrine Research Unit, Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hsiao, Edward C., E-mail: Edward.Hsiao@ucsf.edu [Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Conklin, Bruce R., E-mail: bconklin@gladstone.ucsf.edu [Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, San Francisco, CA (United States); Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nissenson, Robert A., E-mail: Robert.Nissenson@ucsf.edu [Endocrine Research Unit, Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in osteoblasts (OBs) is an important regulator of bone formation. We previously described a mouse model expressing Rs1, an engineered constitutively active G{sub s}-coupled GPCR, under the control of the 2.3 kb Col I promoter. These mice showed a dramatic age-dependent increase in trabecular bone of femurs. Here, we further evaluated the effects of enhanced G{sub s} signaling in OBs on intramembranous bone formation by examining calvariae of 1- and 9-week-old Col1(2.3)/Rs1 mice and characterized the in vivo gene expression specifically occurring in osteoblasts with activated G{sub s} G protein-coupled receptor signaling, at the cellular level rather than in a whole bone. Rs1 calvariae displayed a dramatic increase in bone volume with partial loss of cortical structure. By immunohistochemistry, Osterix was detected in cells throughout the inter-trabecular space while Osteocalcin was expressed predominantly in cells along bone surfaces, suggesting the role of paracrine mediators secreted from OBs driven by 2.3 kb Col I promoter could influence early OB commitment, differentiation, and/or proliferation. Gene expression analysis of calvarial OBs revealed that genes affected by Rs1 signaling include those encoding proteins important for cell differentiation, cytokines and growth factors, angiogenesis, coagulation, and energy metabolism. The set of G{sub s}-GPCRs and other GPCRs that may contribute to the observed skeletal phenotype and candidate paracrine mediators of the effect of G{sub s} signaling in OBs were also determined. Our results identify novel detailed in vivo cellular changes of the anabolic response of the skeleton to G{sub s} signaling in mature OBs. - Highlights: • OB expression of an engineered G{sub s}-coupled receptor dramatically increases bone mass. • We investigated the changes in gene expression in vivo in enhanced OB G{sub s} signaling. • Genes in cell cycle and transcription were increased in

  20. Theory of Rapid Formation of Pedestal and Pedestal width due to Anomalous Particle Pinch in the Edge of H-mode Discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaw, P.K., E-mail: kaw@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat (India); Singh, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat (India); ITER Organization, Saint Paul-lez-Durance [France; Nordman, H. [Chamlers Institute of Technology, Goteborg (Sweden); Garbet, X.; Bourdelle, C. [CEA, Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Campbell, D.; Loarte, A.; Bora, D. [ITER Organization, Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: A theory based on a turbulent particle pinch is proposed to explain the rapid formation of sharp density gradients in tokamak edge plasmas, in particular the pedestal region. The inward radial particle flux in the pedestal results from the interaction between small scale electron temperature gradient driven (ETG) turbulence and self-consistently formed 'electron geodesic acoustic modes' (el-GAMs). To address this phenomenon, the el-GAM modulational instability driven by the ETG turbulence background is studied. The ETG level of fluctuations and particle pinch are estimated through the back reaction of eGAMs on ETG turbulence. It is found that the particle pinch is quite sensitive to magnetic shear, safety factor, ratio of electron to ion temperatures and atomic mass number. In the absence of particle source in the pedestal, the density gradient length scale, of the order of the pedestal width, is estimated. It is shown that it is proportional to the major radius, up to some dependence on the poloidal beta. Moreover it does not depend on the normalized gyro-radius. This scaling agrees with DIII-D and JET similarity experiments. This dependence is favorable when extrapolated to the pedestal width in ITER in spite of its low normalized gyro radius. It is also shown that the density scale length becomes sharper by increasing the magnetic shear. A new H-mode pedestal pressure scaling is derived assuming that the pressure gradient is limited by the ballooning instability. (author)

  1. Nanostructures by ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, B.

    Ion beam techniques, including conventional broad beam ion implantation, ion beam synthesis and ion irradiation of thin layers, as well as local ion implantation with fine-focused ion beams have been applied in different fields of micro- and nanotechnology. The ion beam synthesis of nanoparticles in high-dose ion-implanted solids is explained as phase separation of nanostructures from a super-saturated solid state through precipitation and Ostwald ripening during subsequent thermal treatment of the ion-implanted samples. A special topic will be addressed to self-organization processes of nanoparticles during ion irradiation of flat and curved solid-state interfaces. As an example of silicon nanocrystal application, the fabrication of silicon nanocrystal non-volatile memories will be described. Finally, the fabrication possibilities of nanostructures, such as nanowires and chains of nanoparticles (e.g. CoSi2), by ion beam synthesis using a focused Co+ ion beam will be demonstrated and possible applications will be mentioned.

  2. Mesoporous magnetic secondary nanostructures as versatile adsorbent for efficient scavenging of heavy metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Kakoli; Parasar, Devaborniny; Mondal, Bholanath; Deb, Pritam

    2015-01-01

    Porous magnetic secondary nanostructures exhibit high surface area because of the presence of plentiful interparticle spaces or pores. Mesoporous Fe3O4 secondary nanostructures (MFSNs) have been studied here as versatile adsorbent for heavy metal scavenging. The porosity combined with magnetic functionality of the secondary nanostructures has facilitated efficient heavy metal (As, Cu and Cd) remediation from water solution within a short period of contact time. It is because of the larger surface area of MFSNs due to the porous network in addition to primary nanostructures which provides abundant adsorption sites facilitating high adsorption of the heavy metal ions. The brilliance of adsorption property of MFSNs has been realized through comprehensive adsorption studies and detailed kinetics. Due to their larger dimension, MFSNs help in overcoming the Brownian motion which facilitates easy separation of the metal ion sorbed secondary nanostructures and also do not get drained out during filtration, thus providing pure water. PMID:26602613

  3. Precipitation synthesis and magnetic properties of self-assembled magnetite-chitosan nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezdorozhev, Oleksii; Kolodiazhnyi, Taras; Vasylkiv, Oleg, E-mail: oleg.vasylkiv@nims.go.jp

    2017-04-15

    This paper reports the synthesis and magnetic properties of unique magnetite-chitosan nanostructures synthesized by the chemical precipitation of magnetite nanoparticles in the presence of chitosan. The influence of varying synthesis parameters on the morphology of the magnetic composites is determined. Depending on the synthesis parameters, magnetite-chitosan nanostructures of spherical (9–18 nm), rice-seed-like (75–290 nm) and lumpy (75–150 nm) shapes were obtained via self-assembly. Spherical nanostructures encapsulated by a 9–15 nm chitosan layer were assembled as well. The prospective morphology of the nanostructures is combined with their excellent magnetic characteristics. It was found that magnetite-chitosan nanostructures are ferromagnetic and pseudo-single domain. Rice-seed-like nanostructures exhibited a coercivity of 140 Oe and saturation magnetization of 56.7 emu/g at 300 K. However, a drop in the magnetic properties was observed for chitosan-coated spherical nanostructures due to the higher volume fraction of chitosan. - Highlights: • Magnetite-chitosan nanostructures are synthesized via self-assembly. • Different morphology can be obtained by adjusting the synthesis parameters. • An attractive combination of magnetic properties and morphology is obtained. • Magnetite-chitosan nanostructures are ferrimagnetic and pseudo-single domain.

  4. Precipitation synthesis and magnetic properties of self-assembled magnetite-chitosan nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezdorozhev, Oleksii; Kolodiazhnyi, Taras; Vasylkiv, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the synthesis and magnetic properties of unique magnetite-chitosan nanostructures synthesized by the chemical precipitation of magnetite nanoparticles in the presence of chitosan. The influence of varying synthesis parameters on the morphology of the magnetic composites is determined. Depending on the synthesis parameters, magnetite-chitosan nanostructures of spherical (9–18 nm), rice-seed-like (75–290 nm) and lumpy (75–150 nm) shapes were obtained via self-assembly. Spherical nanostructures encapsulated by a 9–15 nm chitosan layer were assembled as well. The prospective morphology of the nanostructures is combined with their excellent magnetic characteristics. It was found that magnetite-chitosan nanostructures are ferromagnetic and pseudo-single domain. Rice-seed-like nanostructures exhibited a coercivity of 140 Oe and saturation magnetization of 56.7 emu/g at 300 K. However, a drop in the magnetic properties was observed for chitosan-coated spherical nanostructures due to the higher volume fraction of chitosan. - Highlights: • Magnetite-chitosan nanostructures are synthesized via self-assembly. • Different morphology can be obtained by adjusting the synthesis parameters. • An attractive combination of magnetic properties and morphology is obtained. • Magnetite-chitosan nanostructures are ferrimagnetic and pseudo-single domain.

  5. Morphology and thermodynamic characteristics of selenium-containing nanostructures based on polymethacrylic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valueva, S. V.; Borovikova, L. N.; Vylegzhanina, M. E.; Sukhanova, T. E.

    2010-09-01

    The morphology and thermodynamic characteristics of nanostructures formed as a result of the reduction of the selenium ion in a selenite-ascorbate redox system in water solutions of polymethacrylic acid were studied by molecular optics and atomic-force microscopy. The dependence of the morphology of the selenium-containing nanostructures on the mass selenium-to-polymer ratio (ν) in solution was determined. It was established that a large number of macromolecules (up to 4300) is adsorbed on the selenium nanoparticles, leading to the formation of nanostructures with super-high molecular mass and an almost spherical form. It was shown that the density of the nanostructures, as calculated on the basis of the experimental data on the size and molecular mass of the nanocomposite, depends substantially on the selenium concentrations in the solution. The thermodynamic state of the solutions of nanostructures is described.

  6. Bottom-Up Synthesis and Sensor Applications of Biomimetic Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of nanotechnology, biology, and bioengineering greatly improved the developments of nanomaterials with unique functions and properties. Biomolecules as the nanoscale building blocks play very important roles for the final formation of functional nanostructures. Many kinds of novel nanostructures have been created by using the bioinspired self-assembly and subsequent binding with various nanoparticles. In this review, we summarized the studies on the fabrications and sensor applications of biomimetic nanostructures. The strategies for creating different bottom-up nanostructures by using biomolecules like DNA, protein, peptide, and virus, as well as microorganisms like bacteria and plant leaf are introduced. In addition, the potential applications of the synthesized biomimetic nanostructures for colorimetry, fluorescence, surface plasmon resonance, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, electrical resistance, electrochemistry, and quartz crystal microbalance sensors are presented. This review will promote the understanding of relationships between biomolecules/microorganisms and functional nanomaterials in one way, and in another way it will guide the design and synthesis of biomimetic nanomaterials with unique properties in the future.

  7. A study on photoelectrochemical properties of ZnO@ZnS nanostructures synthesized via facile ion-exchange approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Akash; Sahoo, Pooja; Thangavel, R.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, ZnO nanorods (NRs) were fabricated, on cleaned ITO substrates by using sol-gel spin coating followed by hydrothermal technique. In order to coat zinc sulphide (ZnS) layers on the earlier prepared NRs a facile ion-exchange approach was adopted. The ZnO@ZnS nanostructures so prepared were characterised by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), UV-visible spectroscopy and photoelectrochemical study. XRD spectra confirmed the hexagonal wurtzite structure of all the samples along with preferential c-axis orientation. Further it was also observed from the FESEM images that sulfidation process doesn't affect the structure of ZnO NRs arrays. From the absorption spectra it can be clearly observed that the light absorbing property has increased in within the visible range due to the formation of ZnS layer on the ZnO nanostructures, which is not possible for either of the material individually. The cyclic voltammetry results indicates the enhancement in photocurrent density after illumination for the synthesized nanostructures. The electrocatalytic behaviour of ZnO@ZnS electrodes have been studied using a 3-electrode system in presence of 0.1M NaOH electrolyte solution with respect to an Ag/AgCl reference electrode.

  8. SWAXS investigations on diffuse boundary nanostructures of metallic nanoparticles synthesized by electrical discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xiaoai, E-mail: xiaoai.guo@kit.edu; Gutsche, Alexander; Nirschl, Hermann [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Mechanical Process Engineering and Mechanics (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    Metallic nanoparticles have attracted a particular interest in scientific research and industrial applications due to their unique size-dependent physical and chemical properties. An eco-friendly and cost-effective synthesis method called electrical discharge enables large scale production of metallic nanoparticles. Systematic investigations of such synthesized metallic nanoparticles help to optimize the synthesis process and improve the product quality. In this work, for the first time we have investigated the diffuse interfacial boundary nanostructures of the metallic nanoparticles, which were synthesized under different conditions by electrical glow and arc discharges in the carrier gas, by means of a small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SWAXS) technique using a laboratory X-ray source. Meanwhile, this unique SWAXS technique allows simultaneous study of the primary particle size, morphology, and crystallinity. The metallic nanoparticles (copper and nickel) under investigation cover a size range of 10–80 nm, and the determined thickness of the diffuse boundary nanostructured layer of metallic nanoparticles is in the range of 1–3 nm. The experimental results obtained by SWAXS were compared to the TEM/EDX observation and the XRD reference patterns from RRUFF database, and a good agreement was found. Our SWAXS investigations indicated that the existence of a diffuse nanostructured solid layer on the synthesized metallic nanoparticle surface causes a negative deviation of the scattering intensity (Ι∝q{sup -α}, α>4) from Porod’s law which corresponds to the case of ideal two-phase particle systems with sharp boundaries (Ι∝q{sup -α}, α=4) . This implies that the electron density profile is not sharp but changes gradually between two phases, and hence the exponent α is greater than four. Two electron density profile models, sigmoidal electron-density gradient model and linear electron-density gradient model, have been taken into account in

  9. Characterization of the porous anodic alumina nanostructures with a metal interlayer on Si substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Chia-Hui; Chen, Hung-Ing; Hsiao, Jui-Ju; Wang, Jen-Cheng; Nee, Tzer-En, E-mail: neete@mail.cgu.edu.tw

    2014-04-15

    Porous anodic alumina (PAA) films produced by the anodization technique have made possible the mass production of porous nano-scale structures where the pore height and diameter are controllable. A metal interlayer is observed to have a significant influence on the characteristics of these PAA nanostructures. In this study, we investigate in-depth the effect of the current density on the properties of porous anodic alumina nanostructures with a metal interlayer. A thin film layer of tungsten (W) and titanium (Ti) was sandwiched between a porous anodic alumina film and a silicon (Si) substrate to form PAA/W/Si and PAA/Ti/Si structures. The material and optical characteristics of the porous anodic alumina nanostructures, with and without a metal interlayer, on silicon substrates were studied using the scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) measurements. The current densities of the porous anodic alumina nanostructures with the metal interlayer are higher than for the PAA/Si, resulting in an increase of the growth rate of the oxide layer. It can be observed from the X-ray diffraction curves that there is more aluminum oxide inside the structure with the metal interlayer. Furthermore, it has been found that there is a reduction in the photoluminescence intensity of the oxygen vacancy with only one electron due to the formation of oxygen vacancies inside the aluminum oxide during the re-crystallization process. This leads to competition between the two kinds of different oxygen-deficient defect centers (F+ and F centers) in the carrier recombination mechanism from the PL spectra of the porous anodic alumina nanostructures, with and without a metal interlayer, on silicon substrates. -- Highlights: • Study of porous anodic alumina (PAA) films with metal interlayers on silicon. • The highly ordered PAA film with a fairly regular nano-porous structure. • The luminescence properties of PAA films were

  10. Growth of ZnO nanostructures on Au-coated Si: Influence of growth temperature on growth mechanism and morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajendra; McGlynn, E.; Biswas, M.

    2008-01-01

    ZnO nanostructures were grown on Au-catalyzed Si silicon substrates using vapor phase transport at growth temperatures from 800 to 1150 degrees C. The sample location ensured a low Zn vapor supersaturation during growth. Nanostructures grown at 800 and 850 degrees C showed a faceted rodlike...... growth tended to dominate resulting in the formation of a porous, nanostructured morphology. In all cases growth was seen only on the Au-coated region. Our results show that the majority of the nanostructures grow via a vapor-solid mechanism at low growth temperatures with no evidence of Au nanoparticles...

  11. Due diligence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanghera, G.S.

    1999-01-01

    The Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Act requires that every employer shall ensure the health and safety of workers in the workplace. Issues regarding the practices at workplaces and how they should reflect the standards of due diligence were discussed. Due diligence was described as being the need for employers to identify hazards in the workplace and to take active steps to prevent workers from potentially dangerous incidents. The paper discussed various aspects of due diligence including policy, training, procedures, measurement and enforcement. The consequences of contravening the OHS Act were also described

  12. A general strategy toward the rational synthesis of metal tungstate nanostructures using plasma electrolytic oxidation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Yanan; Liu, Baodan; Zhai, Zhaofeng; Liu, Xiaoyuan; Yang, Bing; Liu, Lusheng; Jiang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A general strategy for the rational synthesis of tungstate nanostructure has been developed based on plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technology (up). Using this method, ZnWO 4 and NiWO 4 nanostructures with controllable morphologies and superior crystallinity can be easily obtained (down), showing obvious advantage in comparison with conventional hydrothermal and sol–gel methods. - Highlights: • Plasma electrolyte oxidation (PEO) method has been used for the rational synthesis of tungstate nanostructures. • ZnWO 4 nanoplates have strong mechanical adhesion with porous TiO 2 film substrate. • The morphology and dimensional size of ZnWO 4 nanostructures can be selectively tailored by controlling the annealing temperature and growth time. • The PEO method can be widely applied to the growth of various metal oxides. - Abstract: A new method based on conventional plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technology has been developed for the rational synthesis of metal tungstate nanostructures. Using this method, ZnWO 4 and NiWO 4 nanostructures with controllable morphologies (nanorods, nanosheets and microsheets) and superior crystallinity have been synthesized. It has been found that the morphology diversity of ZnWO 4 nanostructures can be selectively tailored through tuning the electrolyte concentration and annealing temperatures, showing obvious advantages in comparison to traditional hydrothermal and sol–gel methods. Precise microscopy analyses on the cross section of the PEO coating and ZnWO 4 nanostructures confirmed that the precursors initially precipitated in the PEO coating and its surface during plasma discharge process are responsible for the nucleation and subsequent growth of metal tungstate nanostructures by thermal annealing. The method developed in this work represents a general strategy toward the rational synthesis of metal oxide nanostructures and the formation mechanism of metal tungstate nanostructures fabricated by

  13. A general strategy toward the rational synthesis of metal tungstate nanostructures using plasma electrolytic oxidation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yanan; Liu, Baodan, E-mail: baodanliu@imr.ac.cn; Zhai, Zhaofeng; Liu, Xiaoyuan; Yang, Bing; Liu, Lusheng; Jiang, Xin, E-mail: xjiang@imr.ac.cn

    2015-11-30

    Graphical abstract: A general strategy for the rational synthesis of tungstate nanostructure has been developed based on plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technology (up). Using this method, ZnWO{sub 4} and NiWO{sub 4} nanostructures with controllable morphologies and superior crystallinity can be easily obtained (down), showing obvious advantage in comparison with conventional hydrothermal and sol–gel methods. - Highlights: • Plasma electrolyte oxidation (PEO) method has been used for the rational synthesis of tungstate nanostructures. • ZnWO{sub 4} nanoplates have strong mechanical adhesion with porous TiO{sub 2} film substrate. • The morphology and dimensional size of ZnWO{sub 4} nanostructures can be selectively tailored by controlling the annealing temperature and growth time. • The PEO method can be widely applied to the growth of various metal oxides. - Abstract: A new method based on conventional plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technology has been developed for the rational synthesis of metal tungstate nanostructures. Using this method, ZnWO{sub 4} and NiWO{sub 4} nanostructures with controllable morphologies (nanorods, nanosheets and microsheets) and superior crystallinity have been synthesized. It has been found that the morphology diversity of ZnWO{sub 4} nanostructures can be selectively tailored through tuning the electrolyte concentration and annealing temperatures, showing obvious advantages in comparison to traditional hydrothermal and sol–gel methods. Precise microscopy analyses on the cross section of the PEO coating and ZnWO{sub 4} nanostructures confirmed that the precursors initially precipitated in the PEO coating and its surface during plasma discharge process are responsible for the nucleation and subsequent growth of metal tungstate nanostructures by thermal annealing. The method developed in this work represents a general strategy toward the rational synthesis of metal oxide nanostructures and the formation mechanism of

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of carbon nanostructures: The C60 buckminsterfullerene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laszlo, Istvan; Zsoldos, Ibolya

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics calculations can reveal the physical and chemical properties of various carbon nanostructures or can help to devise the possible formation pathways. In our days the most well-known carbon nanostructures are the fullerenes, the nanotubes, and the graphene. The fullerenes and nanotubes can be thought of as being formed from graphene sheets, i.e., single layers of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice. Usually the nature does not follow the mathematical constructions. Although the first time the C 60 and the C 70 were produced by laser irradiated graphite, the fullerene formation theories are based on various fragments of carbon chains and networks of pentagonal and hexagonal rings. In the present article various formation pathways for the buckminsterfullerene C 60 molecule will be presented. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Biological Properties of Ti-Nb-Zr-O Nanostructures Grown on Ti35Nb5Zr Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaohui Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification of low modulus implant alloys with oxide nanostructures is one of the important ways to achieve favorable biological behaviors. In the present work, amorphous Ti-Nb-Zr-O nanostructures were grown on a peak-aged Ti35Nb5Zr alloy through anodization. Biological properties of the Ti-Nb-Zr-O nanostructures were investigated through in vitro bioactivity testings, stem cell interactions, and drug release experiments. The Ti-Nb-Zr-O nanostructures demonstrated a good capability of inducing apatite formation after immersion in simulated body fluids (SBFs. Drug delivery experiment based on gentamicin and the Ti-Nb-Zr-O nanostructures indicated that a high drug loading content could result in a prolonged release process and a higher quantity of drug residues in the oxide nanostructures after drug release. Quick stem cell adhesion and spreading, as well as fast formation of extracellular matrix materials on the surfaces of the Ti-Nb-Zr-O nanostructures, were found. These findings make it possible to further explore the biomedical applications of the Ti-Nb-Zr-O nanostructure modified alloys especially clinical operation of orthopaedics by utilizing the nanostructures-based drug-release system.

  16. Chemical scissors cut phosphorene nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Xihong; Wei, Qun

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorene, a recently fabricated two-dimensional puckered honeycomb structure of phosphorus, showed promising properties for applications in nano-electronics. In this work, we report a chemical scissors effect on phosphorene, using first-principles method. It was found that chemical species, such as H, OH, F, and Cl, can act as scissors to cut phosphorene. Phosphorus nanochains and nanoribbons can be obtained. The scissors effect results from the strong bonding between the chemical species and phosphorus atoms. Other species such as O, S and Se fail to cut phosphorene nanostructures due to their weak bonding with phosphorus. The electronic structures of the produced P-chains reveal that the hydrogenated chain is an insulator while the pristine chain is a one-dimensional Dirac material, in which the charge carriers are massless fermions travelling at an effective speed of light ∼8 × 10 5 m s −1 . The obtained zigzag phosphorene nanoribbons show either metallic or semiconducting behaviors, depending on the treatment of the edge phosphorus atoms. (paper)

  17. Electrons in Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flindt, Christian

    2007-01-01

    in the possibilities o®ered by the quantum mechanical behavior of electrons when it comes to informa- tion processing. This branch of research is also concerned with fundamental questions in physics. Besides an introduction to the above-mentioned subjects, the thesis con- tains a number of contributions to the ¯elds...... of coherent electron manip- ulation and the statistical description of electron transport through nano- devices. The physics of the electrons are described with a combination of numerical methods, developed and applied in the thesis, and more analytical approaches, which are also discussed. The thesis......-based communication. The statistical description of electron transport through nanostructures is based on rate equations, and the primary contribution of the thesis in that respect is the development of a method that allows for the calculation of the distribution of electrons passing through a device. The method...

  18. Magnetism in carbon nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Hagelberg, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Magnetism in carbon nanostructures is a rapidly expanding field of current materials science. Its progress is driven by the wide range of applications for magnetic carbon nanosystems, including transmission elements in spintronics, building blocks of cutting-edge nanobiotechnology, and qubits in quantum computing. These systems also provide novel paradigms for basic phenomena of quantum physics, and are thus of great interest for fundamental research. This comprehensive survey emphasizes both the fundamental nature of the field, and its groundbreaking nanotechnological applications, providing a one-stop reference for both the principles and the practice of this emerging area. With equal relevance to physics, chemistry, engineering and materials science, senior undergraduate and graduate students in any of these subjects, as well as all those interested in novel nanomaterials, will gain an in-depth understanding of the field from this concise and self-contained volume.

  19. Quantum theory of plasmons in nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Kirsten Trøstrup

    ripples in a pond where the water represents a sea of free electrons. Plasmons on metal surfaces and in nanostructured materials, such as metal nanoparticles and atomically thin two-dimensional materials, have several technological applications due to their ability to confine light on nanoscale......, also van der Waals heterostructures (vdWh), which are stacks of different twodimensional materials, are considered. A new multi-scale approach for calculating the dielectric-function of vdWh, which extends ab initio accuracy to the description of hundreds of atomic layers, is presented. Also, one...

  20. First-principle study of nanostructures of functionalized graphene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present first-principle calculations of 2D nanostructures of graphene functionalized with hydrogen and fluorine, respectively, in chair conformation. The partial density of states, band structure, binding energy and transverse displacement of C atoms due to functionalization (buckling) have been calculated within the ...

  1. Facile hydrothermal synthesis and characterization of cesium-doped PbI2 nanostructures for optoelectronic, radiation detection and photocatalytic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkir, Mohd; AlFaify, S.; Yahia, I. S.; Hamdy, Mohamed S.; Ganesh, V.; Algarni, H.

    2017-10-01

    Low-temperature hydrothermal-assisted synthesis of pure and cesium (Cs) (1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 wt%) doped lead iodide (PbI2) nanorods and nanosheets have been achieved successfully for the first time. The structural and vibrational studies confirm the formation of a 2H-polytypic PbI2 predominantly. Scanning electron microscope analysis confirms the formation of well-aligned nanorods of average size 100 nm at low concentration and nanosheets of average thicknesses in the range of 20-40 nm at higher concentrations of Cs doping. The presence of Cs doping was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray study. Ultra-violet-visible absorbance spectra were recorded, and energy gap was calculated in the range of 3.33 to 3.45 eV for pure and Cs-doped PbI2 nanostructures which is higher than the bulk value (i.e., 2.27 eV) due to quantum confinement effect. Dielectric constant, loss, and AC conductivity studies have been done. Enhancement in Gamma linear absorption coefficient due to Cs doping confirms the suitability of prepared nanostructures for radiation detection applications. Furthermore, the photocatalytic performance of the synthesized nanostructures was evaluated in the decolorization of methyl green (MG) and methyl orange (MO) under the illumination of visible light (λ > 420 nm). The observed photocatalytic activity for 5 and 7 wt% Cs-doped PbI2 was observed to be more than pure PbI2 and also > 10 times higher than the commercially available photocatalysts. The results suggest that the prepared nanostructures are highly applicable in optoelectronic, radiation detection and many other applications. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Nanostructured Photovoltaics for Space Power

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA NSTRF proposal entitled Nanostructured Photovoltaics for Space Power is targeted towards research to improve the current state of the art photovoltaic...

  3. Quantum optics with semiconductor nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Jahnke, Frank

    2012-01-01

    A guide to the theory, application and potential of semiconductor nanostructures in the exploration of quantum optics. It offers an overview of resonance fluorescence emission.$bAn understanding of the interaction between light and matter on a quantum level is of fundamental interest and has many applications in optical technologies. The quantum nature of the interaction has recently attracted great attention for applications of semiconductor nanostructures in quantum information processing. Quantum optics with semiconductor nanostructures is a key guide to the theory, experimental realisation, and future potential of semiconductor nanostructures in the exploration of quantum optics. Part one provides a comprehensive overview of single quantum dot systems, beginning with a look at resonance fluorescence emission. Quantum optics with single quantum dots in photonic crystal and micro cavities are explored in detail, before part two goes on to review nanolasers with quantum dot emitters. Light-matter interaction...

  4. Nanostructured Materials for Renewable Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-11-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose overall objective is to advance the fundamental understanding of novel photoelectronic organic device structures integrated with inorganic nanostructures, while also expanding the general field of nanomaterials for renewable energy devices and systems.

  5. Growth, characterization and electrochemical properties of hierarchical CuO nanostructures for supercapacitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamoorthy, Karthikeyan [Nanomaterials and System Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Jeju National University, Jeju 690 756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang-Jae, E-mail: kimsangj@jejunu.ac.kr [Nanomaterials and System Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Jeju National University, Jeju 690 756 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Mechatronics Engineering, Jeju National University, Jeju 690 756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Hierarchical CuO nanostructures were grown on Cu foil. • Monoclinic phase of CuO was grown. • XPS analysis revealed the presence of Cu(2p{sub 3/2}) and Cu(2p{sub 1/2}) on the surfaces. • Specific capacitance of 94 F/g was achieved for the CuO using cyclic voltammetry. • Impedance spectra show their pseudo capacitor applications. - Abstract: In this paper, we have investigated the electrochemical properties of hierarchical CuO nanostructures for pseudo-supercapacitor device applications. Moreover, the CuO nanostructures were formed on Cu substrate by in situ crystallization process. The as-grown CuO nanostructures were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform-infra red spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and field emission-scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) analysis. The XRD and FT-IR analysis confirm the formation of monoclinic CuO nanostructures. FE-SEM analysis shows the formation of leave like hierarchical structures of CuO with high uniformity and controlled density. The electrochemical analysis such as cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies confirms the pseudo-capacitive behavior of the CuO nanostructures. Our experimental results suggest that CuO nanostructures will create promising applications of CuO toward pseudo-supercapacitors.

  6. Growth, characterization and electrochemical properties of hierarchical CuO nanostructures for supercapacitor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamoorthy, Karthikeyan; Kim, Sang-Jae

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Hierarchical CuO nanostructures were grown on Cu foil. • Monoclinic phase of CuO was grown. • XPS analysis revealed the presence of Cu(2p 3/2 ) and Cu(2p 1/2 ) on the surfaces. • Specific capacitance of 94 F/g was achieved for the CuO using cyclic voltammetry. • Impedance spectra show their pseudo capacitor applications. - Abstract: In this paper, we have investigated the electrochemical properties of hierarchical CuO nanostructures for pseudo-supercapacitor device applications. Moreover, the CuO nanostructures were formed on Cu substrate by in situ crystallization process. The as-grown CuO nanostructures were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform-infra red spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and field emission-scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) analysis. The XRD and FT-IR analysis confirm the formation of monoclinic CuO nanostructures. FE-SEM analysis shows the formation of leave like hierarchical structures of CuO with high uniformity and controlled density. The electrochemical analysis such as cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies confirms the pseudo-capacitive behavior of the CuO nanostructures. Our experimental results suggest that CuO nanostructures will create promising applications of CuO toward pseudo-supercapacitors

  7. Quantum Nanostructures by Droplet Epitaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Somsak Panyakeow

    2009-01-01

    Droplet epitaxy is an alternative growth technique for several quantum nanostructures. Indium droplets are distributed randomly on GaAs substrates at low temperatures (120-350'C). Under background pressure of group V elements, Arsenic and Phosphorous, InAs and InP nanostructures are created. Quantum rings with isotropic shape are obtained at low temperature range. When the growth thickness is increased, quantum rings are transformed to quantum dot rings. At high temperature range, anisotropic...

  8. Nanostructured Diamond-Like Carbon Films Grown by Off-Axis Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Shan Yap

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured diamond-like carbon (DLC films instead of the ultrasmooth film were obtained by pulsed laser ablation of pyrolytic graphite. Deposition was performed at room temperature in vacuum with substrates placed at off-axis position. The configuration utilized high density plasma plume arriving at low effective angle for the formation of nanostructured DLC. Nanostructures with maximum size of 50 nm were deposited as compared to the ultrasmooth DLC films obtained in a conventional deposition. The Raman spectra of the films confirmed that the films were diamond-like/amorphous in nature. Although grown at an angle, ion energy of >35 eV was obtained at the off-axis position. This was proposed to be responsible for subplantation growth of sp3 hybridized carbon. The condensation of energetic clusters and oblique angle deposition correspondingly gave rise to the formation of nanostructured DLC in this study.

  9. Synthesis of vertically aligned metal oxide nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Roqan, Iman S.

    2016-03-03

    Metal oxide nanostructure and methods of making metal oxide nanostructures are provided. The metal oxide nanostructures can be 1 -dimensional nanostructures such as nanowires, nanofibers, or nanotubes. The metal oxide nanostructures can be doped or undoped metal oxides. The metal oxide nanostructures can be deposited onto a variety of substrates. The deposition can be performed without high pressures and without the need for seed catalysts on the substrate. The deposition can be performed by laser ablation of a target including a metal oxide and, optionally, a dopant. In some embodiments zinc oxide nanostructures are deposited onto a substrate by pulsed laser deposition of a zinc oxide target using an excimer laser emitting UV radiation. The zinc oxide nanostructure can be doped with a rare earth metal such as gadolinium. The metal oxide nanostructures can be used in many devices including light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

  10. A Versatile Route for the Synthesis of Nickel Oxide Nanostructures Without Organics at Low Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah MA

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractNickel oxide nanoparticles and nanoflowers have been synthesized by a soft reaction of nickel powder and water without organics at 100 °C. The mechanism for the formation of nanostructures is briefly described in accordance with decomposition of metal with water giving out hydrogen. The structure, morphology, and the crystalline phase of resulting nanostructures have been characterized by various techniques. Compared with other methods, the present method is simple, fast, economical, template-free, and without organics. In addition, the approach is nontoxic without producing hazardous waste and could be expanded to provide a general and convenient strategy for the synthesis of nanostructures to other functional nanomaterials.

  11. Self-organized synthesis of silver dendritic nanostructures via an electroless metal deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, T.; Wu, X. L.; Mei, Y. F.; Chu, P. K.; Siu, G. G.

    2005-09-01

    Unique silver dendritic nanostructures, with stems, branches, and leaves, were synthesized with self-organization via a simple electroless metal deposition method in a conventional autoclave containing aqueous HF and AgNO3 solution. Their growth mechanisms are discussed in detail on the basis of a self-assembled localized microscopic electrochemical cell model. A process of diffusion-limited aggregation is suggested for the formation of the silver dendritic nanostructures. This nanostructured material is of great potential to be building blocks for assembling mini-functional devices of the next generation.

  12. Si nanostructures grown by picosecond high repetition rate pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pervolaraki, M.; Komninou, Ph.; Kioseoglou, J.; Athanasopoulos, G.I.; Giapintzakis, J.

    2013-01-01

    One-step growth of n-doped Si nanostructures by picosecond ultra fast pulsed laser deposition at 1064 nm is reported for the first time. The structure and morphology of the Si nanostructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that the shape of the Si nanostructures depends on the ambient argon pressure. Fibrous networks, cauliflower formations and Si rectangular crystals grew when argon pressure of 300 Pa, 30 Pa and vacuum (10 −3 Pa) conditions were used, respectively. In addition, the electrical resistance of the vacuum made material was investigated

  13. Self-organised synthesis of Rh nanostructures with tunable chemical reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizzit S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractNonequilibrium periodic nanostructures such as nanoscale ripples, mounds and rhomboidal pyramids formed on Rh(110 are particularly interesting as candidate model systems with enhanced catalytic reactivity, since they are endowed with steep facets running along nonequilibrium low-symmetry directions, exposing a high density of undercoordinated atoms. In this review we report on the formation of these novel nanostructured surfaces, a kinetic process which can be controlled by changing parameters such as temperature, sputtering ion flux and energy. The role of surface morphology with respect to chemical reactivity is investigated by analysing the carbon monoxide dissociation probability on the different nanostructured surfaces.

  14. Si nanostructures grown by picosecond high repetition rate pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pervolaraki, M., E-mail: pervolaraki@ucy.ac.cy [Nanotechnology Research Center and Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus, 75 Kallipoleos Av., PO Box 20537, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Komninou, Ph.; Kioseoglou, J. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Athanasopoulos, G.I. [Nanotechnology Research Center and Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus, 75 Kallipoleos Av., PO Box 20537, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Giapintzakis, J., E-mail: giapintz@ucy.ac.cy [Nanotechnology Research Center and Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus, 75 Kallipoleos Av., PO Box 20537, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus)

    2013-08-01

    One-step growth of n-doped Si nanostructures by picosecond ultra fast pulsed laser deposition at 1064 nm is reported for the first time. The structure and morphology of the Si nanostructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that the shape of the Si nanostructures depends on the ambient argon pressure. Fibrous networks, cauliflower formations and Si rectangular crystals grew when argon pressure of 300 Pa, 30 Pa and vacuum (10{sup −3} Pa) conditions were used, respectively. In addition, the electrical resistance of the vacuum made material was investigated.

  15. Mechanical design of DNA nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Carlos E.; Su, Hai-Jun; Marras, Alexander E.; Zhou, Lifeng; Johnson, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    Structural DNA nanotechnology is a rapidly emerging field that has demonstrated great potential for applications such as single molecule sensing, drug delivery, and templating molecular components. As the applications of DNA nanotechnology expand, a consideration of their mechanical behavior is becoming essential to understand how these structures will respond to physical interactions. This review considers three major avenues of recent progress in this area: (1) measuring and designing mechanical properties of DNA nanostructures, (2) designing complex nanostructures based on imposed mechanical stresses, and (3) designing and controlling structurally dynamic nanostructures. This work has laid the foundation for mechanically active nanomachines that can generate, transmit, and respond to physical cues in molecular systems.Structural DNA nanotechnology is a rapidly emerging field that has demonstrated great potential for applications such as single molecule sensing, drug delivery, and templating molecular components. As the applications of DNA nanotechnology expand, a consideration of their mechanical behavior is becoming essential to understand how these structures will respond to physical interactions. This review considers three major avenues of recent progress in this area: (1) measuring and designing mechanical properties of DNA nanostructures, (2) designing complex nanostructures based on imposed mechanical stresses, and (3) designing and controlling structurally dynamic nanostructures. This work has laid the foundation for mechanically active nanomachines that can generate, transmit, and respond to physical cues in molecular systems. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07153k

  16. Nanostructure Engineered Chemical Sensors for Hazardous Gas and Vapor Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Lu, Yijiang

    2005-01-01

    A nanosensor technology has been developed using nanostructures, such as single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and metal oxides nanowires or nanobelts, on a pair of interdigitated electrodes (IDE) processed with a silicon based microfabrication and micromachining technique. The IDE fingers were fabricated using thin film metallization techniques. Both in-situ growth of nanostructure materials and casting of the nanostructure dispersions were used to make chemical sensing devices. These sensors have been exposed to hazardous gases and vapors, such as acetone, benzene, chlorine, and ammonia in the concentration range of ppm to ppb at room temperature. The electronic molecular sensing in our sensor platform can be understood by electron modulation between the nanostructure engineered device and gas molecules. As a result of the electron modulation, the conductance of nanodevice will change. Due to the large surface area, low surface energy barrier and high thermal and mechanical stability, nanostructured chemical sensors potentially can offer higher sensitivity, lower power consumption and better robustness than the state-of-the-art systems, which make them more attractive for defense and space applications. Combined with MEMS technology, light weight and compact size sensors can be made in wafer scale with low cost.

  17. DNA origami compliant nanostructures with tunable mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lifeng; Marras, Alexander E; Su, Hai-Jun; Castro, Carlos E

    2014-01-28

    DNA origami enables fabrication of precise nanostructures by programming the self-assembly of DNA. While this approach has been used to make a variety of complex 2D and 3D objects, the mechanical functionality of these structures is limited due to their rigid nature. We explore the fabrication of deformable, or compliant, objects to establish a framework for mechanically functional nanostructures. This compliant design approach is used in macroscopic engineering to make devices including sensors, actuators, and robots. We build compliant nanostructures by utilizing the entropic elasticity of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to locally bend bundles of double-stranded DNA into bent geometries whose curvature and mechanical properties can be tuned by controlling the length of ssDNA strands. We demonstrate an ability to achieve a wide range of geometries by adjusting a few strands in the nanostructure design. We further developed a mechanical model to predict both geometry and mechanical properties of our compliant nanostructures that agrees well with experiments. Our results provide a basis for the design of mechanically functional DNA origami devices and materials.

  18. Cellular processing and destinies of artificial DNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Di Sheng; Qian, Hang; Tay, Chor Yong; Leong, David Tai

    2016-08-07

    Since many bionanotechnologies are targeted at cells, understanding how and where their interactions occur and the subsequent results of these interactions is important. Changing the intrinsic properties of DNA nanostructures and linking them with interactions presents a holistic and powerful strategy for understanding dual nanostructure-biological systems. With the recent advances in DNA nanotechnology, DNA nanostructures present a great opportunity to understand the often convoluted mass of information pertaining to nanoparticle-biological interactions due to the more precise control over their chemistry, sizes, and shapes. Coupling just some of these designs with an understanding of biological processes is both a challenge and a source of opportunities. Despite continuous advances in the field of DNA nanotechnology, the intracellular fate of DNA nanostructures has remained unclear and controversial. Because understanding its cellular processing and destiny is a necessary prelude to any rational design of exciting and innovative bionanotechnology, in this review, we will discuss and provide a comprehensive picture relevant to the intracellular processing and the fate of various DNA nanostructures which have been remained elusive for some time. We will also link the unique capabilities of DNA to some novel ideas for developing next-generation bionanotechnologies.

  19. Broadband solar absorption enhancement via periodic nanostructuring of electrodes.

    KAUST Repository

    Adachi, Michael M; Labelle, André J; Thon, Susanna M; Lan, Xinzheng; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sargent, Edward H

    2013-01-01

    Solution processed colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells have great potential for large area low-cost photovoltaics. However, light utilization remains low mainly due to the tradeoff between small carrier transport lengths and longer infrared photon absorption lengths. Here, we demonstrate a bottom-illuminated periodic nanostructured CQD solar cell that enhances broadband absorption without compromising charge extraction efficiency of the device. We use finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations to study the nanostructure for implementation in a realistic device and then build proof-of-concept nanostructured solar cells, which exhibit a broadband absorption enhancement over the wavelength range of λ = 600 to 1,100 nm, leading to a 31% improvement in overall short-circuit current density compared to a planar device containing an approximately equal volume of active material. Remarkably, the improved current density is achieved using a light-absorber volume less than half that typically used in the best planar devices.

  20. Broadband solar absorption enhancement via periodic nanostructuring of electrodes.

    KAUST Repository

    Adachi, Michael M

    2013-10-14

    Solution processed colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells have great potential for large area low-cost photovoltaics. However, light utilization remains low mainly due to the tradeoff between small carrier transport lengths and longer infrared photon absorption lengths. Here, we demonstrate a bottom-illuminated periodic nanostructured CQD solar cell that enhances broadband absorption without compromising charge extraction efficiency of the device. We use finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations to study the nanostructure for implementation in a realistic device and then build proof-of-concept nanostructured solar cells, which exhibit a broadband absorption enhancement over the wavelength range of λ = 600 to 1,100 nm, leading to a 31% improvement in overall short-circuit current density compared to a planar device containing an approximately equal volume of active material. Remarkably, the improved current density is achieved using a light-absorber volume less than half that typically used in the best planar devices.

  1. One-dimensional titania nanostructures: Synthesis and applications in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hao [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials and Hubei Collaborative Innovation Centre for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Guo, Zhiguang, E-mail: zguo@licp.cas.cn [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials and Hubei Collaborative Innovation Centre for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, Shimin [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials and Hubei Collaborative Innovation Centre for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Liu, Weimin [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2014-05-02

    One-dimensional (1D) titania (TiO{sub 2}) in the form of nanorods, nanowires, nanobelts and nanotubes have attracted much attention due to their unique physical, chemical and optical properties enabling extraordinary performance in biomedicine, sensors, energy storage, solar cells and photocatalysis. In this review, we mainly focus on synthetic methods for 1D TiO{sub 2} nanostructures and the applications of 1D TiO{sub 2} nanostructures in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Traditional nanoparticle-based DSCs have numerous grain boundaries and surface defects, which increase the charge recombination from photoanode to electrolyte. 1D TiO{sub 2} nanostructures can provide direct and rapid electron transport to the electron collecting electrode, indicating a promising choice for DSCs. We divide the applications of 1D TiO{sub 2} nanostructures in DSCs into four parts, that is, 1D TiO{sub 2} nanostructures only, 1D TiO{sub 2} nanostructure/nanoparticle composites, branched 1D TiO{sub 2} nanostructures, and 1D TiO{sub 2} nanostructures combined with other materials. This work will provide guidance for preparing 1D TiO{sub 2} nanostructures, and using them as photoanodes in efficient DSCs. - Graphical abstract: 1D TiO{sub 2} nanostructures which can provide direct and rapid pathways for electron transport have promising applications in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). The synthetic methods and applications of 1D TiO{sub 2} nanostructures in DSCs are summarized in this review article.

  2. Surface morphology effects on the light-controlled wettability of ZnO nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khranovskyy, V., E-mail: volkh@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linkoping University (Sweden); Ekblad, T.; Yakimova, R.; Hultman, L. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linkoping University (Sweden)

    2012-08-01

    ZnO nanostructures of diverse morphology with shapes of corrals and cabbages as well as open and filled hexagons and sheaves prepared by APMOCVD technique, are investigated with water contact angle (CA) analysis. The as-grown ZnO nanostructures exhibit pure hydrophobic behavior, which is enhanced with the increase of the nanostructure's surface area. The most hydrophobic structures (CA = 124 Degree-Sign ) were found to be the complex nanosheaf, containing both the macro-and nanoscale features. It is concluded that the nanoscale roughness contributes significantly to the hydrophobicity increase. The character of wettability was possible to switch from hydrophobic-to-superhydrophilic state upon ultra violet irradiation. Both the rate and amplitude of the contact angle depend on the characteristic size of nanostructure. The observed effect is explained due to the semiconductor properties of zinc oxide enhanced by increased surface chemistry effect in nanostructures.

  3. Composition of silicon fibrous nanostructures synthesized using ultrafast laser pulses under ambient conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the composition of nanostructures generated owing to ablation of crystalline silicon using high repletion rate femtosecond laser under ambient condition is investigated. The web-like silicon fibrous nanostructures are formed in and around the laser irradiated area. Electron Microscopy investigation revealed that the nanostructures are made of nanoparticles of size about 40 nm. In addition Micro-Raman analysis shows that the nanofibrous structures comprises a mixture of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis reveals the oxidized and un-oxidized elemental states of silicon in the nanostructures. Moreover web-like fibrous nanostructures are generated due to condensation of super saturated vapour and subsequent nucleus growth in the laser induced plasma plume.

  4. Synthesis of Pt–Pd Bimetallic Porous Nanostructures as Electrocatalysts for the Methanol Oxidation Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Yang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Pt-based bimetallic nanostructures have attracted a great deal of attention due to their unique nanostructures and excellent catalytic properties. In this study, we prepared porous Pt–Pd nanoparticles using an efficient, one-pot co-reduction process without using any templates or toxic reactants. In this process, Pt–Pd nanoparticles with different nanostructures were obtained by adjusting the temperature and ratio of the two precursors; and their catalytic properties for the oxidation of methanol were studied. The porous Pt–Pd nanostructures showed better electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of methanol with a higher current density (0.67 mA/cm2, compared with the commercial Pt/C catalyst (0.31 mA/cm2. This method provides one easy pathway to economically prepare different alloy nanostructures for various applications.

  5. Triblock copolymer-mediated synthesis of catalytically active gold nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Douglas C.; de Souza, Viviane C.; Vasconcelos, Diego A.; Andrade, George R. S.; Gimenez, Iara F.; Teixeira, Zaine

    2018-04-01

    The design of nanostructures based on poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) and metal nanoparticles is becoming an important research topic due to their multiple functionalities in different fields, including nanomedicine and catalysis. In this work, water-soluble gold nanoparticles have been prepared through a green aqueous synthesis method using Pluronic F127 as both reducing and stabilizing agents. The size dependence (varying from 2 to 70 nm) and stability of gold nanoparticles were systematically studied by varying some parameters of synthesis, which were the polymer concentration, temperature, and exposure to UV-A light, being monitored by UV-Vis spectroscopy and TEM. Also, an elaborated study regarding to the kinetic of formation (nucleation and growth) was presented. Finally, the as-prepared Pluronic-capped gold nanoparticles have shown excellent catalytic activity towards the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol with sodium borohydride, in which a higher catalytic performance was exhibited when compared with gold nanoparticles prepared by classical reduction method using sodium citrate. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Addressing the instability of DNA nanostructures in tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Jaeseung; Wickham, Shelley F J; Shih, William M; Perrault, Steven D

    2014-09-23

    DNA nanotechnology is an advanced technique that could contribute diagnostic, therapeutic, and biomedical research devices to nanomedicine. Although such devices are often developed and demonstrated using in vitro tissue culture models, these conditions may not be compatible with DNA nanostructure integrity and function. The purpose of this study was to characterize the sensitivity of 3D DNA nanostructures produced via the origami method to the in vitro tissue culture environment and identify solutions to prevent loss of nanostructure integrity. We examined whether the physiological cation concentrations of cell culture medium and the nucleases present in fetal bovine serum (FBS) used as a medium supplement result in denaturation and digestion, respectively. DNA nanostructure denaturation due to cation depletion was design- and time-dependent, with one of four tested designs remaining intact after 24 h at 37 °C. Adjustment of medium by addition of MgSO4 prevented denaturation. Digestion of nanostructures by FBS nucleases in Mg(2+)-adjusted medium did not appear design-dependent and became significant within 24 h and when medium was supplemented with greater than 5% FBS. We estimated that medium supplemented with 10% FBS contains greater than 256 U/L equivalent of DNase I activity in digestion of DNA nanostructures. Heat inactivation at 75 °C and inclusion of actin protein in medium inactivated and inhibited nuclease activity, respectively. We examined the impact of medium adjustments on cell growth, viability, and phenotype. Adjustment of Mg(2+) to 6 mM did not appear to have a detrimental impact on cells. Heat inactivation was found to be incompatible with in vitro tissue culture, whereas inclusion of actin had no observable effect on growth and viability. In two in vitro assays, immune cell activation and nanoparticle endocytosis, we show that using conditions compatible with cell phenotype and nanostructure integrity is critical for obtaining reliable

  7. Effect of tempering upon the tensile properties of a nanostructured bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, H.S. [University of Technology, Baghdad (Iraq); Peet, M.J., E-mail: mjp54@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Avettand-Fènoël, M-N. [Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET) UMR CNRS 8207, Université, Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve D' ASCQ (France); Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-06

    The tensile properties of a nanostructured carbide-free bainitic steel formed at 200–250 °C are compared against those after tempering sufficiently to remove the retained austenite. Although significant ductility is observed following tempering, a comparison of tempered and untempered samples shows that it is in fact reduced when a comparison is made at identical strength. The shape of the stress–strain curves shows clear evidence that the capacity for work hardening is reduced with the loss of austenite. The nanostructure of the steel transformed at 250 °C is examined by transmission electron microscopy, to compare the as-transformed to the tempered structure. In this case after tempering at 500 °C the energy absorbed during the tensile test is lower, due to the lower strength. Reduction of strength is caused by the slight coarsening of the bainite plates, and lower dislocation density after tempering. Considering the formation of carbide particles in high strength steel, impressive ductility is exhibited even in the tempered condition.

  8. Temperature dependence of Ni3S2 nanostructures with high electrochemical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. L.; Wei, X. Q.; Li, M. B.; Hou, P. Y.; Xu, X. J.

    2018-04-01

    Different Ni3S2 nanostructures have been successfully synthesized at different temperatures by a facile and efficient solvothermal method. The Ni3S2 nanostructures with three-dimensional (3D) nanosheets array and silkworm eggs-like morphologies were obtained by adjusting the reaction temperature. A large number of 3D nanosheets are interconnected to form an open network structure with porous of Ni3S2 at 180 °C, and electrochemical tests showed that the special structure exhibited the outstanding specific capacitance (1357 F g -1 at 1 A g-1) and excellent cycling stability (maintained 91% after 3000 cycles). In comparison, the performance of Ni3S2 silkworm eggs-like structure is not very perfect. This may be due to the fact that the 3D nanosheets with porous structure can improve the electrochemical performance by shortening effectively the diffusion path of electrolyte ions and increasing the active sites during charging and discharging. Among them, the reaction temperature is the main factor to control the formation of the 3D nanosheets array. These results indicated the Ni3S2 nanosheets promising applications as high-performance supercapacitor electrode materials.

  9. Effect of tempering upon the tensile properties of a nanostructured bainitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, H.S.; Peet, M.J.; Avettand-Fènoël, M-N.; Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H.

    2014-01-01

    The tensile properties of a nanostructured carbide-free bainitic steel formed at 200–250 °C are compared against those after tempering sufficiently to remove the retained austenite. Although significant ductility is observed following tempering, a comparison of tempered and untempered samples shows that it is in fact reduced when a comparison is made at identical strength. The shape of the stress–strain curves shows clear evidence that the capacity for work hardening is reduced with the loss of austenite. The nanostructure of the steel transformed at 250 °C is examined by transmission electron microscopy, to compare the as-transformed to the tempered structure. In this case after tempering at 500 °C the energy absorbed during the tensile test is lower, due to the lower strength. Reduction of strength is caused by the slight coarsening of the bainite plates, and lower dislocation density after tempering. Considering the formation of carbide particles in high strength steel, impressive ductility is exhibited even in the tempered condition

  10. Optoelectronic and thermoelectric properties in Ga doped {beta}- PbS{sub 2} nanostructured thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geethu, R.; Jacob, Rajani [Thin Film Research Lab, U.C. College, Aluva, Cochin, Kerala (India); Shripathi, T.; Okram, G.S.; Ganesan, V.; Tripathi, Shilpa; Fatima, Anees [UGC-DAE CSR, Khandwa Road, Indore-452 001, Madhya Pradesh (India); Sreenivasan, P.V. [Department of Chemistry, U.C. College, Aluva, Cochin, Kerala (India); Urmila, K.S.; Pradeep, B. [Solid State Physics Laboratory, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin, Kerala (India); Philip, Rachel Reena, E-mail: reenatara@rediffmail.com [Thin Film Research Lab, U.C. College, Aluva, Cochin, Kerala (India)

    2012-06-15

    Lead sulphide nanostructured thin films were grown on soda lime glass substrates by chemical bath deposition. The films were then doped with gallium using vacuum evaporation technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) established the structural type of the host films to be tetragonal {beta}-PbS{sub 2} with average grain size of the order of 15 nm. The nanostructure of films was further confirmed from scanning electron and atomic force micrographs. The shift in the binding energies of the 4f and 4d states of lead, 2p state of sulphur and the 2p states of Ga from their elemental binding energy values, determined from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), indicated intact chemical bonding in the compound. Compositional analysis showed about 0.01% doping of Ga into PbS{sub 2}. Low temperature thermopower measurements indicated p-type conductivity for the films with Fermi level positioned at about 0.017 eV above the maxima of valence band. Optical absorption studies in conjunction with photo sensitivity measurements established its pertinence in junction formation in photovoltaic applications due to the blue shift in the band gap to 2.37 eV and the increased photoconductivity of the films.

  11. In situ transmission electron microscope observation of the formation of fuzzy structures on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, M; Watanabe, T; Nagashima, H; Nishijima, D; Doerner, R P; Krasheninnikov, S I; Sagara, A; Yoshida, N

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the formation processes of tungsten nano-structures, so called fuzz, in situ transmission electron microscope observations during helium ion irradiation and high temperature annealing have been performed. The irradiation with 3 keV He + from room temperature to 1273 K is found to cause high-density helium bubbles in tungsten with no significant change in the surface structure. At higher temperatures, surface morphology changes were observed even without helium irradiation due probably to surface diffusion of tungsten atoms driven by surface tension. It is clearly shown that this morphology change is enhanced with helium irradiation, i.e. the formation of helium bubbles. (paper)

  12. Ab initio design of nanostructures for solar energy conversion: a case study on silicon nitride nanowire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Design of novel materials for efficient solar energy conversion is critical to the development of green energy technology. In this work, we present a first-principles study on the design of nanostructures for solar energy harvesting on the basis of the density functional theory. We show that the indirect band structure of bulk silicon nitride is transferred to direct bandgap in nanowire. We find that intermediate bands can be created by doping, leading to enhancement of sunlight absorption. We further show that codoping not only reduces the bandgap and introduces intermediate bands but also enhances the solubility of dopants in silicon nitride nanowires due to reduced formation energy of substitution. Importantly, the codoped nanowire is ferromagnetic, leading to the improvement of carrier mobility. The silicon nitride nanowires with direct bandgap, intermediate bands, and ferromagnetism may be applicable to solar energy harvesting.

  13. Nanostructure of Cationic Polymer Brush at the Air/Water Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuoka Hideki

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cationic amphiphilic diblock copolymers were synthesized by RAFT polymerization and the nanostructure of their monolayers was investigated by π-A isotherm and X-ray reflectivity. Carpet layer (dense hydrophilic block layer formation under the hydrophobic layer was confirmed and a “brush” layer was found beneath the carpet layer. However, the thickness of brush layer was much thinner than that of the fully-stretched chain length. The critical salt concentration was found to be 0.01 M NaCl, which is much lower than that of the previous strongly anionic brush. These differences were probably caused by the low effective charge on the brush chains due to the hydrophobic nature of the quarternized ammonium cation.

  14. HFCVD growth of various carbon nanostructures on SWCNT paper controlled by surface treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, M.; Izak, T.; Kromka, A.; Kotlar, M.; Vretenar, V.; Ledinsky, M.; Michalka, M.; Skakalova, V.; Vesely, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the nanocomposite material formation, particularly the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond and carbon nanowalls (CNWs) on single-wall carbon nanotubes buckypaper (BP). One part of the buckypaper substrate was nucleated by nanodiamond powder. The growth was carried out in a hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) system. Contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy were used for the surface morphology analysis and characterization of carbon phases. Due to a different surface pretreatment, different carbon nanostructures were formed: diamond film was grown on the nucleated BP area; non-treated area of the BP was covered with a dense field of CNWs. Covering a part of the BP surface prevented an access of the HF-plasma and so the growth of any carbon structures. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Laser ablation of microparticles for nanostructure generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waraich, Palneet Singh; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2011-01-01

    The process of laser ablation of microparticles has been shown to generate nanoparticles from microparticles; but the generation of nanoparticle networks from microparticles has never been reported before. We report a unique approach for the generation of nanoparticle networks through ablation of microparticles. Using this approach, two samples containing microparticles of lead oxide (Pb 3 O 4 ) and nickel oxide (NiO), respectively, were ablated under ambient conditions using a femtosecond laser operating in the MHz repetition rate regime. Nanoparticle networks with particle diameter ranging from 60 to 90 nm were obtained by ablation of microparticles without use of any specialized equipment, catalysts or external stimulants. The formation of finer nanoparticle networks has been explained by considering the low pressure region created by the shockwave, causing rapid condensation of microparticles into finer nanoparticles. A comparison between the nanostructures generated by ablating microparticle and those by ablating bulk substrate was carried out; and a considerable reduction in size and narrowed size distribution was observed. Our nanostructure fabrication technique will be a unique process for nanoparticle network generation from a vast array of materials.

  16. The nanostructure problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billinge, S.

    2010-01-01

    Diffraction techniques are making progress in tackling the difficult problem of solving the structures of nanoparticles and nanoscale materials. The great gift of x-ray crystallography has made us almost complacent in our ability to locate the three-dimensional coordinates of atoms in a crystal with a precision of around 10 -4 nm. However, the powerful methods of crystallography break down for structures in which order only extends over a few nanometers. In fact, as we near the one hundred year mark since the birth of crystallography, we face a resilient frontier in condensed matter physics: our inability to routinely and robustly determine the structure of complex nanostructured and amorphous materials. Knowing the structure and arrangement of atoms in a solid is so fundamental to understanding its properties that the topic routinely occupies the early chapters of every solid-state physics textbook. Yet what has become clear with the emergence of nanotechnology is that diffraction data alone may not be enough to uniquely solve the structure of nanomaterials. As part of a growing effort to incorporate the results of other techniques to constrain x-ray refinements - a method called 'complex modeling' which is a simple but elegant approach for combining information from spectroscopy with diffraction data to solve the structure of several amorphous and nanostructured materials. Crystallography just works, so we rarely question how and why this is so, yet understanding the physics of diffraction can be very helpful as we consider the nanostructure problem. The relationship between the electron density distribution in three dimensions (i.e., the crystal structure) and an x-ray diffraction pattern is well established: the measured intensity distribution in reciprocal space is the square of the Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function of the electron density distribution ρ(r). The fact that we get the autocorrelation function (rather than just the density

  17. Multiscale modelling of nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vvedensky, Dimitri D

    2004-01-01

    Most materials phenomena are manifestations of processes that are operative over a vast range of length and time scales. A complete understanding of the behaviour of materials thereby requires theoretical and computational tools that span the atomic-scale detail of first-principles methods and the more coarse-grained description provided by continuum equations. Recent efforts have focused on combining traditional methodologies-density functional theory, molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo methods and continuum descriptions-within a unified multiscale framework. This review covers the techniques that have been developed to model various aspects of materials behaviour with the ultimate aim of systematically coupling the atomistic to the continuum descriptions. The approaches described typically have been motivated by particular applications but can often be applied in wider contexts. The self-assembly of quantum dot ensembles will be used as a case study for the issues that arise and the methods used for all nanostructures. Although quantum dots can be obtained with all the standard growth methods and for a variety of material systems, their appearance is a quite selective process, involving the competition between equilibrium and kinetic effects, and the interplay between atomistic and long-range interactions. Most theoretical models have addressed particular aspects of the ordering kinetics of quantum dot ensembles, with far fewer attempts at a comprehensive synthesis of this inherently multiscale phenomenon. We conclude with an assessment of the current status of multiscale modelling strategies and highlight the main outstanding issues. (topical review)

  18. Nuclear spins in nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coish, W.A.; Baugh, J.

    2009-01-01

    We review recent theoretical and experimental advances toward understanding the effects of nuclear spins in confined nanostructures. These systems, which include quantum dots, defect centers, and molecular magnets, are particularly interesting for their importance in quantum information processing devices, which aim to coherently manipulate single electron spins with high precision. On one hand, interactions between confined electron spins and a nuclear-spin environment provide a decoherence source for the electron, and on the other, a strong effective magnetic field that can be used to execute local coherent rotations. A great deal of effort has been directed toward understanding the details of the relevant decoherence processes and to find new methods to manipulate the coupled electron-nuclear system. A sequence of spectacular new results have provided understanding of spin-bath decoherence, nuclear spin diffusion, and preparation of the nuclear state through dynamic polarization and more general manipulation of the nuclear-spin density matrix through ''state narrowing.'' These results demonstrate the richness of this physical system and promise many new mysteries for the future. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. Phonon engineering for nanostructures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubry, Sylvie (Stanford University); Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sullivan, John Patrick; Peebles, Diane Elaine; Hurley, David H. (Idaho National Laboratory); Shinde, Subhash L.; Piekos, Edward Stanley; Emerson, John Allen

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the physics of phonon transport at small length scales is increasingly important for basic research in nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, nanomechanics, and thermoelectrics. We conducted several studies to develop an understanding of phonon behavior in very small structures. This report describes the modeling, experimental, and fabrication activities used to explore phonon transport across and along material interfaces and through nanopatterned structures. Toward the understanding of phonon transport across interfaces, we computed the Kapitza conductance for {Sigma}29(001) and {Sigma}3(111) interfaces in silicon, fabricated the interfaces in single-crystal silicon substrates, and used picosecond laser pulses to image the thermal waves crossing the interfaces. Toward the understanding of phonon transport along interfaces, we designed and fabricated a unique differential test structure that can measure the proportion of specular to diffuse thermal phonon scattering from silicon surfaces. Phonon-scale simulation of the test ligaments, as well as continuum scale modeling of the complete experiment, confirmed its sensitivity to surface scattering. To further our understanding of phonon transport through nanostructures, we fabricated microscale-patterned structures in diamond thin films.

  20. Structural and optical properties of CdO nanostructures prepared by atmospheric-pressure CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terasako, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Nakata, Y.; Yagi, M.; Shirakata, S.

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium oxide (CdO) nanostructures of various shapes were successfully grown on gold (Au) nanocolloid coated c-plane sapphire substrates by atmospheric-pressure CVD using Cd powder and H 2 O as source materials. CdO nanorods (NRs) exhibited tapered shapes and the degree of the tapering became larger with increasing substrate temperature. One of the possible reasons for the tapering behavior is the competition between the axial growth due to the vapor–liquid–solid (VLS) mechanism and the radial growth due to the vapor–solid (VS) mechanism. The influence of the competition between the two different growth mechanisms was also confirmed on the appearance of “seaweed-like” NRs. Moreover, we cannot neglect the influence of the shrinkage of catalyst particles during the growth process on the tapering behavior. In addition, there is a possibility that the temporal evolution of catalyst particles, such as diffusion, splitting, migration and coalescence, contributes not only to the disappearance of catalyst particles on the tips of the NRs, resulting in the enhancement of the radial growth relative to the axial growth, but also to the formation of nanobelts (NBs) and nanotrees (NTs). Photoacoustic measurements revealed that the absorption edge shifts towards lower energies and the absorption band below the absorption edge becomes larger with increasing T S . This tendency may be due to the increase of intrinsic defects and/or the decrease in residual impurities. - Highlights: ► Various shapes of CdO nanostructures were grown by AP-CVD using Cd and H 2 O. ► This diversity is due to the competition between VLS and VS mechanisms. ► The temporal evolution of Au catalyst particles also contributes to the diversity. ► Photoacoustic spectra were changed, depending on the substrate temperature. ► This is probably related to the intrinsic defects and/or residual impurities

  1. Ultraflexible nanostructures and implications for future nanorobots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Robert W.; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2016-05-01

    Several high aspect ratio nanostructures have been made by capillary force directed self-assembly including polymeric nanofiber air-bridges, trampoline-like membranes, microsphere-beaded nanofibers, and intermetallic nanoneedles. Arrays of polymer air-bridges form in seconds by simply hand brushing a bead of polymeric liquid over an array of micropillars. The domination of capillary force that is thinning unstable capillary bridges leads to uniform arrays of nanofiber air-bridges. Similarly, arrays of vertically oriented Ag2Ga nanoneedles have been formed by dipping silvercoated arrays of pyramidal silicon into melted gallium. Force-displacement measurements of these structures are presented. These nanostructures, especially when compressively or torsionally buckled, have extremely low stiffnesses, motion due to thermal fluctuations that is relatively easily detected, and the ability to move great distances for very small changes in applied force. Nanofibers with bead-on-a-string structure, where the beads are micron diameter and loaded with magnetic iron oxide (maghemite), are shown to be simply viewable under optical microscopes, have micronewton/ m stiffness, and have ultralow torsional stiffnesses enabling the bead to be rotated numerous revolutions without breaking. Combination of these high aspect ratio structures with stretched elastomers offer interesting possibilities for robotic actuation and locomotion. Polydimethylsiloxane loaded with nanomaterials, e.g. nanotubes, graphene or MoS2, can be efficiently heated with directed light. Heating produces considerable force through the thermoelastic effect, and this force can be used for continuous translation or to trigger reversible elastic buckling of the nanostructures. The remote stimulation of motion with light provides a possible mechanism for producing cooperative behavior between swarms of semiautonomous nanorobots.

  2. Mechanical alloying and sintering of nanostructured tungsten carbide-reinforced copper composite and its characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusoff, Mahani; Othman, Radzali; Hussain, Zuhailawati

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → W 2 C phase was formed at short milling time while WC only appears after longer milling time. → Cu crystallite size decreased but internal strain increased with increasing milling time. → Increasing milling time induced more WC formation, thus improving the hardness of the composite. → Electrical conductivity is reduced due to powder refinement and the presence of carbide phases. -- Abstract: Elemental powders of copper (Cu), tungsten (W) and graphite (C) were mechanically alloyed in a planetary ball mill with different milling durations (0-60 h), compacted and sintered in order to precipitate hard tungsten carbide particles into a copper matrix. Both powder and sintered composite were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and assessed for hardness and electrical conductivity to investigate the effects of milling time on formation of nanostructured Cu-WC composite and its properties. No carbide peak was detected in the powder mixtures after milling. Carbide WC and W 2 C phases were precipitated only in the sintered composite. The formation of WC began with longer milling times, after W 2 C formation. Prolonged milling time decreased the crystallite size as well as the internal strain of Cu. Hardness of the composite was enhanced but electrical conductivity reduced with increasing milling time.

  3. Ion beam induced optical and surface modification in plasmonic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Udai B., E-mail: udaibhansingh123@gmail.com; Gautam, Subodh K.; Kumar, Sunil; Hooda, Sonu; Ojha, Sunil; Singh, Fouran

    2016-07-15

    In present work, ion irradiation induced nanostructuring has been exploited as an efficient and effective tool for synthesis of coupled plasmonics nanostructures by using 1.2 MeV Xe ions on Au/ZnO/Au system deposited on glass substrate. The results are correlated on the basis of their optical absorption, surface morphologies and enhanced sensitivity of evolved phonon modes by using UV Visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Raman spectroscopy (RS), respectively. Optical absorbance spectra of plasmonic nanostructures (NSs) show a decrease in band gap, which may be ascribed to the formation of defects with ion irradiation. The surface morphology reveals the formation of percolated NSs upon ion irradiation and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) study clearly shows the formation of multilayer system. Furthermore, RS measurements on samples are studied to understand the enhanced sensitivity of ion irradiation induced phonon mode at 573 cm{sup −1} along with other modes. As compared to pristine sample, a stronger and pronounced evolution of these phonon modes is observed with further ion irradiation, which indicates localized surface plasmon results with enhanced intensity of phonon modes of Zinc oxide (ZnO) material. Thus, such plasmonic NSs can be used as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates.

  4. Modeling of space environment impact on nanostructured materials. General principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronina, Ekaterina; Novikov, Lev

    2016-07-01

    In accordance with the resolution of ISO TC20/SC14 WG4/WG6 joint meeting, Technical Specification (TS) 'Modeling of space environment impact on nanostructured materials. General principles' which describes computer simulation methods of space environment impact on nanostructured materials is being prepared. Nanomaterials surpass traditional materials for space applications in many aspects due to their unique properties associated with nanoscale size of their constituents. This superiority in mechanical, thermal, electrical and optical properties will evidently inspire a wide range of applications in the next generation spacecraft intended for the long-term (~15-20 years) operation in near-Earth orbits and the automatic and manned interplanetary missions. Currently, ISO activity on developing standards concerning different issues of nanomaterials manufacturing and applications is high enough. Most such standards are related to production and characterization of nanostructures, however there is no ISO documents concerning nanomaterials behavior in different environmental conditions, including the space environment. The given TS deals with the peculiarities of the space environment impact on nanostructured materials (i.e. materials with structured objects which size in at least one dimension lies within 1-100 nm). The basic purpose of the document is the general description of the methodology of applying computer simulation methods which relate to different space and time scale to modeling processes occurring in nanostructured materials under the space environment impact. This document will emphasize the necessity of applying multiscale simulation approach and present the recommendations for the choice of the most appropriate methods (or a group of methods) for computer modeling of various processes that can occur in nanostructured materials under the influence of different space environment components. In addition, TS includes the description of possible

  5. Laser nanostructuring of ZnO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedyalkov, N., E-mail: nned@ie.bas.bg [Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi Kohoku-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa-ken 223-8522 (Japan); Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tzarigradsko shousse 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Koleva, M.; Nikov, R.; Atanasov, P. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tzarigradsko shousse 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Nakajima, Y.; Takami, A.; Shibata, A.; Terakawa, M. [Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi Kohoku-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa-ken 223-8522 (Japan)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Nanosecond laser pulse nanostructuring of ZnO thin films on metal substrate is demonstrated. • Two regimes of the thin film modification are observed depending on the applied laser fluence. • At high fluence regime the ZnO film is homogeneously decomposed into nanosized particles. • The characteristic size of the formed nanostructures corresponds to the domain size of the thin film. - Abstract: In this work, results on laser processing of thin zinc oxide films deposited on metal substrate are presented. ZnO films are obtained by classical nanosecond pulsed laser deposition method in oxygen atmosphere on tantalum substrate. The produced films are then processed by nanosecond laser pulses at wavelength of 355 nm. The laser processing parameters and the film thickness are varied and their influence on the fabricated structures is estimated. The film morphology after the laser treatment is found to depend strongly on the laser fluence as two regimes are defined. It is shown that at certain conditions (high fluence regime) the laser treatment of the film leads to formation of a discrete nanostructure, composed of spherical like nanoparticles with narrow size distribution. The dynamics of the melt film on the substrate and fast cooling are found to be the main mechanisms for fabrication of the observed structures. The demonstrated method is an alternative way for direct fabrication of ZnO nanostructures on metal which can be easy implemented in applications as resistive sensor devices, electroluminescent elements, solar cell technology.

  6. ZnO Nanostructures for Tissue Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Laurenti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the most recent applications of zinc oxide (ZnO nanostructures for tissue engineering. ZnO is one of the most investigated metal oxides, thanks to its multifunctional properties coupled with the ease of preparing various morphologies, such as nanowires, nanorods, and nanoparticles. Most ZnO applications are based on its semiconducting, catalytic and piezoelectric properties. However, several works have highlighted that ZnO nanostructures may successfully promote the growth, proliferation and differentiation of several cell lines, in combination with the rise of promising antibacterial activities. In particular, osteogenesis and angiogenesis have been effectively demonstrated in numerous cases. Such peculiarities have been observed both for pure nanostructured ZnO scaffolds as well as for three-dimensional ZnO-based hybrid composite scaffolds, fabricated by additive manufacturing technologies. Therefore, all these findings suggest that ZnO nanostructures represent a powerful tool in promoting the acceleration of diverse biological processes, finally leading to the formation of new living tissue useful for organ repair.

  7. Field emission from patterned SnO2 nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongsheng; Yu Ke; Li Guodong; Peng Deyan; Zhang Qiuxiang; Hu Hongmei; Xu Feng; Bai Wei; Ouyang Shixi; Zhu Ziqiang

    2006-01-01

    A simple and reliable method has been developed for synthesizing finely patterned tin dioxide (SnO 2 ) nanostructure arrays on silicon substrates. A patterned Au catalyst film was prepared on the silicon wafer by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering and photolithographic patterning processes. The patterned SnO 2 nanostructures arrays, a unit area is of ∼500 μm x 200 μm, were synthesized via vapor phase transport method. The surface morphology and composition of the as-synthesized SnO 2 nanostructures were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The mechanism of formation of SnO 2 nanostructures was also discussed. The measurement of field emission (FE) revealed that the as-synthesized SnO 2 nanorods, nanowires and nanoparticles arrays have a lower turn-on field of 2.6, 3.2 and 3.9 V/μm, respectively, at the current density of 0.1 μA/cm 2 . This approach must have a wide variety of applications such as fabrications of micro-optical components and micropatterned oxide thin films used in FE-based flat panel displays, sensor arrays and so on

  8. Nanostructuring of Solar Cell Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    Solar energy is by far the most abundant renewable energy source available, but the levelized cost of solar energy is still not competitive with that of fossil fuels. Therefore there is a need to improve the power conversion effciency of solar cells without adding to the production cost. The main...... objective of this PhD thesis is to develop nanostructured silicon (Si) solar cells with higher power conversion efficiency using only scalable and cost-efficient production methods. The nanostructures, known as 'black silicon', are fabricated by single-step, maskless reactive ion etching and used as front...... texturing of different Si solar cells. Theoretically the nanostructure topology may be described as a graded refractive index in a mean-field approximation between air and Si. The optical properties of the developed black Si were simulated and experimentally measured. Total AM1.5G-weighted average...

  9. Quantum Nanostructures by Droplet Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsak Panyakeow

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Droplet epitaxy is an alternative growth technique for several quantum nanostructures. Indium droplets are distributed randomly on GaAs substrates at low temperatures (120-350'C. Under background pressure of group V elements, Arsenic and Phosphorous, InAs and InP nanostructures are created. Quantum rings with isotropic shape are obtained at low temperature range. When the growth thickness is increased, quantum rings are transformed to quantum dot rings. At high temperature range, anisotropic strain gives rise to quantum rings with square holes and non-uniform ring stripe. Regrowth of quantum dots on these anisotropic quantum rings, Quadra-Quantum Dots (QQDs could be realized. Potential applications of these quantum nanostructures are also discussed.

  10. Interfacing nanostructures to biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2012-09-04

    Disclosed herein are methods and materials by which nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes, nanorods, etc. are bound to lectins and/or polysaccharides and prepared for administration to cells. Also disclosed are complexes comprising glycosylated nanostructures, which bind selectively to cells expressing glycosylated surface molecules recognized by the lectin. Exemplified is a complex comprising a carbon nanotube functionalized with a lipid-like alkane, linked to a polymer bearing repeated .alpha.-N-acetylgalactosamine sugar groups. This complex is shown to selectively adhere to the surface of living cells, without toxicity. In the exemplified embodiment, adherence is mediated by a multivalent lectin, which binds both to the cells and the .alpha.-N-acetylgalactosamine groups on the nanostructure.

  11. Zinc stannate nanostructures: hydrothermal synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baruah, Sunandan; Dutta, Joydeep

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructured binary semiconducting metal oxides have received much attention in the last decade owing to their unique properties rendering them suitable for a wide range of applications. In the quest to further improve the physical and chemical properties, an interest in ternary complex oxides has become noticeable in recent times. Zinc stannate or zinc tin oxide (ZTO) is a class of ternary oxides that are known for their stable properties under extreme conditions, higher electron mobility compared to its binary counterparts and other interesting optical properties. The material is thus ideal for applications from solar cells and sensors to photocatalysts. Among the different methods of synthesizing ZTO nanostructures, the hydrothermal method is an attractive green process that is carried out at low temperatures. In this review, we summarize the conditions leading to the growth of different ZTO nanostructures using the hydrothermal method and delve into a few of its applications reported in the literature. (topical review)

  12. Nanostructures for protein drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachioni-Vasconcelos, Juliana de Almeida; Lopes, André Moreni; Apolinário, Alexsandra Conceição; Valenzuela-Oses, Johanna Karina; Costa, Juliana Souza Ribeiro; Nascimento, Laura de Oliveira; Pessoa, Adalberto; Barbosa, Leandro Ramos Souza; Rangel-Yagui, Carlota de Oliveira

    2016-02-01

    Use of nanoscale devices as carriers for drugs and imaging agents has been extensively investigated and successful examples can already be found in therapy. In parallel, recombinant DNA technology together with molecular biology has opened up numerous possibilities for the large-scale production of many proteins of pharmaceutical interest, reflecting in the exponentially growing number of drugs of biotechnological origin. When we consider protein drugs, however, there are specific criteria to take into account to select adequate nanostructured systems as drug carriers. In this review, we highlight the main features, advantages, drawbacks and recent developments of nanostructures for protein encapsulation, such as nanoemulsions, liposomes, polymersomes, single-protein nanocapsules and hydrogel nanoparticles. We also discuss the importance of nanoparticle stabilization, as well as future opportunities and challenges in nanostructures for protein drug delivery.

  13. On the Response of Nascent Soot Nanostructure and Oxidative Reactivity to Photoflash Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Soot particles are a kind of major pollutant from fuel combustion. To enrich the understanding of soot, this work focuses on investigating detailed influences of instantaneous external irradiation (conventional photoflash exposure on nanostructure as well as oxidation reactivity of nascent soot particles. By detailed soot characterizations flash can reduce the mass of soot and soot nanostructure can be reconstructed substantially without burning. After flash, the degree of soot crystallization increases while the soot reactive rate decreases and the activation energy increases. In addition, nanostructure and oxidative reactivity of soot in air and Ar after flash are different due to their different thermal conductivities.

  14. Fullerene nanostructures, monolayers and thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotier, B.N.

    2000-10-01

    The interaction of submonolayer, monolayer and multilayer coverages of C 60 with the Ag/Si(111)-(√3x√3)R30 deg. (√3Ag/Si) and Si(111)-7x7 surfaces has been investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM), photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and ultra high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (UHV-STM). It is shown that it is possible to preserve the √3Ag/Si surface, normally corrupted by exposure to air, in ambient conditions when immersed beneath a few layers of C 60 molecules. Upon removal of the fullerene layers in the UHV-STM some corruption is observed which is linked to the morphology of the fullerene film (defined by the nature of the interaction of C 60 with √3Ag/Si). This technique opens up the possibility of performing experiments on the clean √3Ag/Si surface outside of UHV conditions. With the discovery of techniques whereby structures may be formed that are composed of only a few atoms/molecules, there is a need to perform electrical measurements in order to probe the fascinating properties of these 'nano-scale' devices. Using AFM, PES and STM evaporated metals and ion implantation have been investigated as materials for use in forming sub-micron scale contacts to nanostructures. It is found that ion implantation is a more promising approach after studying the response to annealing of treated surfaces. Electrical measurements between open/short circuited contacts and through Ag films clearly demonstrate the validity of the method, further confirmed by a PES study which probes the chemical nature of the near surface region of ion-implanted samples. Attempts have been made to form nanostructure templates between sub-micron scale contacts as a possible precursor to forming nanostructures. The bonding state of C 60 molecules on the Si(111)-7x7 surface has been in dispute for many years. To properly understand the system a comprehensive AFM, PES and STM study has been performed. PES results indicate covalent bond formation, with the number of bonds

  15. Mycobacteria inactivation using Engineered Water Nanostructures (EWNS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; McDevitt, James; Gao, Ya; Branco, Alan; Eleftheriadou, Mary; Lemos, Bernardo; Nardell, Edward; Demokritou, Philip

    2014-08-01

    Airborne transmitted pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) cause serious, often fatal infectious disease with enormous global health implications. Due to their unique cell wall and slow growth, mycobacteria are among the most resilient microbial forms. Herein we evaluate the ability of an emerging, chemical-free, nanotechnology-based method to inactivate M. parafortuitum (Mtb surrogate). This method is based on the transformation of atmospheric water vapor into engineered water nano-structures (EWNS) via electrospray. We demonstrate that the EWNS can interact with and inactivate airborne mycobacteria, reducing their concentration levels significantly. Additionally, EWNS can inactivate M. parafortuitum on surfaces eight times faster than the control. The mechanism of mycobacteria inactivation was also investigated in this study. It was demonstrated that the EWNS effectively deliver the reactive oxygen species, encapsulated during the electrospray process, to the bacteria oxidizing their cell membrane resulting into inactivation. Overall, this is a method with the potential to become an effective intervention technology in the battle against airborne infections. This study demonstrates the feasibility of mycobacterium inactivation in airborne form or on contact surfaces using electrospray activated water nano-structures. Given that the method is free of toxic chemicals, this might become an important tool in the prevention of mycobacterial infections, which are notoriously hard to treat. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Measurement of ion species produced due to bombardment of 450 eV N{sub 2}{sup +} ions with hydrocarbons-covered surface of tungsten: Formation of tungsten nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S. [Atomic Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Bhatt, P. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Kumar, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Singh, B.K.; Singh, B.; Prajapati, S. [Atomic Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Shanker, R., E-mail: shankerorama@gmail.com [Atomic Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2016-08-01

    A laboratory experiment has been performed to study the ions that are produced due to collisions of 450 eV N{sub 2}{sup +} ions with a hydrocarbons-covered surface of polycrystalline tungsten at room temperature. Using a TOF mass spectrometry technique, the product ions formed in these collisions have been detected, identified and analyzed. Different ion–surface reaction processes, namely, neutralization, reflection, surface induced dissociation, surface induced chemical reactions and desorption are observed and discussed. Apart from the presence of desorbed aliphatic hydrocarbon and other ions, the mass spectra obtained from the considered collisions show the formation and sputtering of tungsten nitride (WN). A layer of WN on tungsten surface is known to decrease the sputtering of bulk tungsten in fusion devices more effectively than when the tungsten is bombarded with other seeding gases (He, Ar). It is further noted that there is a negligible diffusion of N in the bulk tungsten at room temperature.

  17. LPG ammonia and nitrogen dioxide gas sensing properties of nanostructured polypyrrole thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagul, Sagar B.; Upadhye, Deepak S.; Sharma, Ramphal

    2016-05-01

    Nanostructured Polypyrrole thin film was synthesized by easy and economic chemical oxidative polymerization technique on glass at room temperature. The prepared thin film of Polypyrrole was characterized by optical absorbance study by UV-visible spectroscopy and electrical study by I-V measurement system. The optical absorbance spectrum of Polypyrrole shows two fundamental peaks in region of 420 and 890 nm, which confirms the formation of Polypyrrole on glass substrate. The I-V graph of nanostructured Polypyrrole represents the Ohmic nature. Furthermore, the thin film of Polypyrrole was investigated by Scanning electron microscopy for surface morphology study. The SEM micrograph represents spherical nanostructured morphology of Polypyrrole on glass substrate. In order to investigate gas sensing properties, 100 ppm of LPG, Ammonia and Nitrogen Dioxide were injected in the gas chamber and magnitude of resistance has been recorded as a function of time in second. It was observed that nanostructured Polypyrrole thin film shows good sensing behavior at room temperature.

  18. Controlled synthesis of 2D Au nanostructure assembly with the assistance of sulfonated polyaniline nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Junhua; Wang Zhijuan; Zhang Qixian; Han, Dongxue; Zhang Yuanjian; Shen Yanfei; Niu Li

    2006-01-01

    A wet chemical approach is used successfully to produce nanostructured Au material by the reduction of sulfonated polyaniline (SPANI) nanotubes. The Au nanostructures obtained are composed of single crystal Au nanoplates, which are aggregated layer-by-layer into stacks or edge-on-face into clusters at various conditions. The Au nanoplate diameter and thickness can be conveniently controlled in the range of 100 nm to 2 μm and 10 to 30 nm, respectively, with no accompanying single Au nanoparticles being observed. The formation of the Au nanostructures was controlled by the degradation of SPANI. The gradually and slowly released segments of SPANI served as the reductant during the growth of the 2D Au nanostructures

  19. Synthesis and applications of one-dimensional nano-structured polyaniline: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Donghua; Wang Yangyong

    2006-01-01

    This paper summarizes and reviews the various synthesizing approaches of one-dimensional nano-structured polyaniline (PANI) and several potential applications of the nanomaterial. The synthesizing approaches can be generally categorized into template synthesis and non-template synthesis according to whether template(s), hard (physical template) or soft (chemical template), is (are) used or not. However, though the various approaches established, preparation of one-dimensional nano-structured PANI with controllable morphologies and sizes, especially well oriented arrays on a large scale is still a major challenge. Furthermore, the formation mechanisms of the nanostructures are still unclear. On the other hand, one-dimensional nano-structured PANI exhibits high surface area, high conductivity, as well as controllable chemical/physical properties and good environmental stability, rendering the nanomaterial promising candidate for application ranging from sensors, energy storage and flash welding to digital nonvolatile memory

  20. Studies on the controlled growth of InAs nanostructures on scission surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, J.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was the controlled alignment of self-assembled InAs nano-structures on a {110}-oriented surface. The surface is prestructured with the atomic precision offered by molecular beam epitaxy, using the cleaved edge overgrowth-technique. On all samples grown within this work, the epitaxial template in the first growth step was deposited on a (001)GaAs substrate, while the InAs-layer forming the nanostructures during the second growth step was grown on cleaved {110}-GaAs surfaces. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) investigations demonstrate the formation of quantum dot (QD)-like nanostructures on top of the AlAs-stripes. X-ray diffraction measurements on large arrays of aligned quantum dots demonstrate that the quantum dots are formed of pure InAs. First investigations on the optical properties of these nanostructures were done using microphotoluminescence-spectroscopy with both high spatial and spectral resolution. (orig.)

  1. Low Thermal Budget Fabrication of III-V Quantum Nanostructures on Si Substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bietti, S; Somaschini, C; Sanguinetti, S; Koguchi, N; Isella, G; Chrastina, D; Fedorov, A

    2010-01-01

    We show the possibility to integrate high quality III-V quantum nanostructures tunable in shape and emission energy on Si-Ge Virtual Substrate. Strong photoemission is observed, also at room temperature, from two different kind of GaAs quantum nanostructures fabricated on Silicon substrate. Due to the low thermal budget of the procedure used for the fabrication of the active layer, Droplet Epitaxy is to be considered an excellent candidate for implementation of optoelectronic devices on CMOS circuits.

  2. Stabilization of Ag nanostructures by tuning their Fermi levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Tadaaki; Kan, Ryota; Yamano, Yuka; Uchida, Takayuki

    2018-05-01

    The oxidation of Ag nanostructures has been studied as a key step for their degradation under the guiding principle in the previous paper that they are stable when their Fermi level is lower than those of their surroundings. The drop of the Fermi level of a thin Ag layer was caused by the formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of certain organic compounds including those of photographic interest and a monolayer of AgI, and attributed to the formation of dielectric layers, whose positive charges were closer to the Ag layer than negative charges. A consideration is given on further examinations needed to realize the above guiding principle in individual devices.

  3. Noncollinear magnetism in manganese nanostructures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zelený, Martin; Šob, Mojmír; Hafner, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 14 (2009), 144414/1-144414/19 ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100920; GA MŠk OC09011 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : magnetism of nanostructures * nanowires * noncollinear magnetism * manganese Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.475, year: 2009

  4. Chemical solution route to self-assembled epitaxial oxide nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obradors, X; Puig, T; Gibert, M; Queraltó, A; Zabaleta, J; Mestres, N

    2014-04-07

    Self-assembly of oxides as a bottom-up approach to functional nanostructures goes beyond the conventional nanostructure formation based on lithographic techniques. Particularly, chemical solution deposition (CSD) is an ex situ growth approach very promising for high throughput nanofabrication at low cost. Whereas strain engineering as a strategy to define nanostructures with tight control of size, shape and orientation has been widely used in metals and semiconductors, it has been rarely explored in the emergent field of functional complex oxides. Here we will show that thermodynamic modeling can be very useful to understand the principles controlling the growth of oxide nanostructures by CSD, and some attractive kinetic features will also be presented. The methodology of strain engineering is applied in a high degree of detail to form different sorts of nanostructures (nanodots, nanowires) of the oxide CeO2 with fluorite structure which then is used as a model system to identify the principles controlling self-assembly and self-organization in CSD grown oxides. We also present, more briefly, the application of these ideas to other oxides such as manganites or BaZrO3. We will show that the nucleation and growth steps are essentially understood and manipulated while the kinetic phenomena underlying the evolution of the self-organized networks are still less widely explored, even if very appealing effects have been already observed. Overall, our investigation based on a CSD approach has opened a new strategy towards a general use of self-assembly and self-organization which can now be widely spread to many functional oxide materials.

  5. Synthesis and magnetic properties of superparamagnetic CoAs nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, P.; Ashokaan, N.; Masud, J.; Pariti, A.; Nath, M.

    2015-03-01

    This article provides a comprehensive guide on the synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic CoAs nanoparticles and elongated nanostructures with high blocking temperature, (TB), via hot-injection precipitation and solvothermal methods. Cobalt arsenides constitute an important family of magnetically active solids that find a variety of applications ranging from magnetic semiconductors to biomedical imaging. While the higher temperature hot-injection precipitation technique (300 °C) yields pure CoAs nanostructures, the lower temperature solvothermal method (200 °C) yields a mixture of CoAs nanoparticles along with other Co-based impurity phases. The synthesis in all these cases involved usage of triphenylarsine ((C6H5)3As) as the As precursor which reacts with solid Co2(CO)8 by ligand displacement to yield a single source precursor. The surfactant, hexadecylamine (HDA) further assists in controlling the morphology of the nanostructures. HDA also provides a basic medium and molten flux-like conditions for the redox chemistry to occur between Co and As at elevated temperatures. The influence of the length of reaction time was investigated by studying the evolution of product morphology over time. It was observed that while spontaneous nucleation at higher temperature followed by controlled growth led to the predominant formation of short nanorods, with longer reaction time, the nanorods were further converted to nanoparticles. The size of the nanoparticles obtained, was mostly in the range of 10-15 nm. The key finding of this work is exceptionally high coercivity in CoAs nanostructures for the first time. Coercivity observed was as high as 0.1 T (1000 Oe) at 2 K. These kinds of magnetic nanostructures find multiple applications in spintronics, whereas the superparamagnetic nanoparticles are viable for use in magnetic storage, ferrofluids and as contrast enhancing agents in MRI.

  6. Canted antiferromagnetic and optical properties of nanostructures of Mn2O3 prepared by hydrothermal synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javed, Qurat-ul-ain; Feng-Ping Wang; Rafique, M. Yasir; Toufiq, Arbab Mohammad; Iqbal, M. Zubair

    2012-01-01

    We have reported new magnetic and optical properties of Mn 2 O 3 nanostructures. The nanostructures have been synthesized by the hydrothermal method combined with the adjustment of pH values in the reaction system. The particular characteristics of the nanostructures have been analyzed by employing X-Ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectroscopy (RS), UV—visible spectroscopy, and the vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Structural investigation manifests that the synthesized Mn 2 O 3 nanostructures are orthorhombic crystal. Magnetic investigation indicates that the Mn 2 O 3 nanostructures are antiferromagnetic and the antiferromagnetic transition temperature is at T N = 83 K. Furthermore, the Mn 2 O 3 nanostructures possess canted antiferromagnetic order below the Neel temperature due to spin frustration, resulting in hysteresis with large coercivity (1580 Oe) and remnant magnetization (1.52 emu/g). The UV—visible spectrophotometry was used to determine the transmittance behaviour of Mn 2 O 3 nanostructures. A direct optical band gap of 1.2 eV was acquired by using the Davis—Mott model. The UV—visible spectrum indicates that the absorption is prominent in the visible region, and transparency is more than 80% in the UV region

  7. Nanostructured Mineral Coatings Stabilize Proteins for Therapeutic Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaohua; Biedrzycki, Adam H; Khalil, Andrew S; Hess, Dalton; Umhoefer, Jennifer M; Markel, Mark D; Murphy, William L

    2017-09-01

    Proteins tend to lose their biological activity due to their fragile structural conformation during formulation, storage, and delivery. Thus, the inability to stabilize proteins in controlled-release systems represents a major obstacle in drug delivery. Here, a bone mineral inspired protein stabilization strategy is presented, which uses nanostructured mineral coatings on medical devices. Proteins bound within the nanostructured coatings demonstrate enhanced stability against extreme external stressors, including organic solvents, proteases, and ethylene oxide gas sterilization. The protein stabilization effect is attributed to the maintenance of protein conformational structure, which is closely related to the nanoscale feature sizes of the mineral coatings. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) released from a nanostructured mineral coating maintains its biological activity for weeks during release, while it maintains activity for less than 7 d during release from commonly used polymeric microspheres. Delivery of the growth factors bFGF and vascular endothelial growth factor using a mineral coated surgical suture significantly improves functional Achilles tendon healing in a rabbit model, resulting in increased vascularization, more mature collagen fiber organization, and a two fold improvement in mechanical properties. The findings of this study demonstrate that biomimetic interactions between proteins and nanostructured minerals provide a new, broadly applicable mechanism to stabilize proteins in the context of drug delivery and regenerative medicine. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Plasmonic Nanostructures for Biosensor Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadde, Akshitha

    Improving the sensitivity of existing biosensors is an active research topic that cuts across several disciplines, including engineering and biology. Optical biosensors are the one of the most diverse class of biosensors which can be broadly categorized into two types based on the detection scheme: label-based and label-free detection. In label-based detection, the target bio-molecules are labeled with dyes or tags that fluoresce upon excitation, indicating the presence of target molecules. Label-based detection is highly-sensitive, capable of single molecule detection depending on the detector type used. One method of improving the sensitivity of label-based fluorescence detection is by enhancement of the emission of the labels by coupling them with metal nanostructures. This approach is referred as plasmon-enhanced fluorescence (PEF). PEF is achieved by increasing the electric field around the nano metal structures through plasmonics. This increased electric field improves the enhancement from the fluorophores which in turn improves the photon emission from the fluorophores which, in turn, improves the limit of detection. Biosensors taking advantage of the plasmonic properties of metal films and nanostructures have emerged an alternative, low-cost, high sensitivity method for detecting labeled DNA. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensors employing noble metal nanostructures have recently attracted considerable attention as a new class of plasmonic nanosensors. In this work, the design, fabrication and characterization of plasmonic nanostructures is carried out. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations were performed using software from Lumerical Inc. to design a novel LSPR structure that exhibit resonance overlapping with the absorption and emission wavelengths of quantum dots (QD). Simulations of a composite Au/SiO2 nanopillars on silicon substrate were performed using FDTD software to show peak plasmonic enhancement at QD emission wavelength

  9. Functional nanostructured titanium nitride films obtained by sputtering magnetron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, O.; Hernandez-Velez, M.; Navas, D.; Auger, M.A.; Baldonedo, J.L.; Sanz, R.; Pirota, K.R.; Vazquez, M.

    2006-01-01

    Development of new methods in the formation of hollow structures, in particular, nanotubes and nanocages are currently generating a great interest as a consequence of the growing relevance of these nanostructures on many technological fields, ranging from optoelectronics to biotechnology. In this work, we report the formation of titanium nitride (TiN) nanotubes and nanohills via reactive sputtering magnetron processes. Anodic Alumina Membranes (AAM) were used as template substrates to grow the TiN nanostructures. The AAM were obtained through electrochemical anodization processes by using oxalic acid solutions as electrolytes. The nanotubes were produced at temperatures below 100 deg. C, and using a pure titanium (99.995%) sputtering target and nitrogen as reactive gas. The obtained TiN thin films showed surface morphologies adjusted to pore diameter and interpore distance of the substrates, as well as ordered arrays of nanotubes or nanohills depending on the sputtering and template conditions. High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy (HRSEM) was used to elucidate both the surface order and morphology of the different grown nanostructures. The crystalline structure of the samples was examined using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) patterns and their qualitative chemical composition by using X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (XEDS) in a scanning electron microscopy

  10. Formation of tungsten oxide nanowires by ion irradiation and vacuum annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xu-Dong; Ren, Feng; Wu, Heng-Yi; Qin, Wen-Jing; Jiang, Chang-Zhong

    2018-04-01

    Here we reported the fabrication of tungsten oxide (WO3-x ) nanowires by Ar+ ion irradiation of WO3 thin films followed by annealing in vacuum. The nanowire length increases with increasing irradiation fluence and with decreasing ion energy. We propose that the stress-driven diffusion of the irradiation-induced W interstitial atoms is responsible for the formation of the nanowires. Comparing to the pristine film, the fabricated nanowire film shows a 106-fold enhancement in electrical conductivity, resulting from the high-density irradiation-induced vacancies on the oxygen sublattice. The nanostructure exhibits largely enhanced surface-enhanced Raman scattering effect due to the oxygen vacancy. Thus, ion irradiation provides a powerful approach for fabricating and tailoring the surface nanostructures of semiconductors.

  11. Ion beam assisted deposition of nano-structured C:Ni films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrasonis, G.; Muecklich, A.; Heller, R.; Heinig, K.H.; Gemming, S.; Moeller, W. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Krause, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Institute of Physics, TU Dresden (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Nanostructures influence material properties dramatically due to size, shape and interface effects. Thus the control of the structure at the nanoscale is a key issue in nanomaterials science. The interaction of hyperthermal ions with solids is confined to the nanometer scale. Thus, it can be used to control the morphology evolution during multiphase film deposition. Ion-induced displacements occur in a thin surface layer of the growing film where they increase the atomic mobility for the phase separation. Here the growth-structure relationship of C:Ni (15 at.%) nanocomposite films grown by oblique incidence (45 ) ion beam assisted deposition is reported. The influences of the flux of an assisting Ar+ ion beam (0-140 eV) as well as of an elevated substrate temperature have been studied. The formation of elongated nickel nanoparticles is strongly promoted by the ion beam assistance. Moreover, the metal nanocolumns no longer align with the advancing surface, but with the incoming ions. A window of conditions is established within which the ion assistance leads to the formation of regular composition modulations with a well defined periodicity and tilt. As the dominating driving force for the pattern formation is of physical origin, this approach might be applicable to other immiscible systems.

  12. Fabrication of zein nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecha, Jarupat

    resins. The soft lithography technique was mainly used to fabricate micro and nanostructures on zein films. Zein material well-replicated small structures with the smallest size at sub micrometer scale that resulted in interesting photonic properties. The bonding method was also developed for assembling portable zein microfluidic devices with small shape distortion. Zein-zein and zein-glass microfluidic devices demonstrated sufficient strength to facilitate fluid flow in a complex microfluidic design with no leakage. Aside from the fabrication technique development, several potential applications of this environmentally friendly microfluidic device were investigated. The concentration gradient manipulation of Rhodamine B solution in zein-glass microfluidic devices was demonstrated. The diffusion of small molecules such as fluorescent dye into the wall of the zein microfluidic channels was observed. However, with this formulation, zein microfluidic devices were not suitable for cell culture applications. This pioneer study covered a wide spectrum of the implementation of the two nanotechnology approaches to advance zein biomaterial which provided proof of fundamental concepts as well as presenting some limitations. The findings in this study can lead to several innovative research opportunities of advanced zein biomaterials with broad applications. The information from the study of zein nanocomposite structure allows the packaging industry to develop the low cost biodegradable materials with physical property improvement. The information from the study of the zein microfluidic devices allows agro-industry to develop the nanotechnology-enabled microfluidic sensors fabricated entirely from biodegradable polymer for on-site disease or contaminant detection in the fields of food and agriculture.

  13. Carbon/Clay nanostructured composite obtained by hydrothermal method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barin, G.B.; Bispo, T.S.; Gimenez, I.F.; Barreto, L.S.; Souza Filho, A.G.

    2010-01-01

    The development of strategies for converting biomass into useful materials, more efficient energy carrier and / or hydrogen storage is shown a key issue for the present and future. Carbon nanostructure can be obtained by severe processing techniques such as arc discharge, chemical deposition and catalyzed pyrolysis of organic compounds. In this study we used hydrothermal methods for obtaining nanostructured composites of carbon / clay. To this end, we used coir dust and special clays. The samples were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman. The presence of the D band at 1350 cm -1 in the Raman spectrum shows the formation of amorphous carbon with particle size of about 8.85 nm. (author)

  14. Hierarchical nanostructures assembled from ultrathin Bi2WO6 nanoflakes and their visible-light induced photocatalytic property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiong; Tian, Peng; Lin, Ying; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Hierarchical Bi 2 WO 6 nanostructures assembled from nanoflakes were successfully synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method. The excellent photocatalytic activity and recycling performance might be mainly ascribed to the unique hierarchical nanostructures and are expected to offer the nanostructures promising applications in the field of wastewater treatment. - Highlights: • Hierarchical Bi 2 WO 6 nanostructures assembled from nanoflakes were successfully synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method. • Visible-light-induced photocatalytic efficiency of the obtained nanoarchitectures was enhanced about 6 times. • A possible mechanism was proposed. - Abstract: With the aid of ethylene glycol and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate, the hierarchical Bi 2 WO 6 nanoarchitectures assembled from nanoflakes could be attained by a facile solvothermal method. The synthetic strategy is versatile and environmentally friendly and a plausible growth-assembly process was proposed for the formation of the hierarchical nanostructures. The visible-light-irradiated photocatalytic activity was estimated by the degradation of rhodamine B. Compared with the sample prepared by a solid-state reaction, the visible-light-induced photocatalytic efficiency of the nanostructures was enhanced about 6 times. The photocatalysis tests show that the nanostructures exhibit excellent photocatalytic activity and recycling performance, which were mainly ascribed to the unique hierarchical nanostructures and are expected to offer promising applications in the field of wastewater treatment

  15. Carbon Nanotube Embedded Nanostructure for Biometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Juhyuk; Youn, Jae Ryoun; Song, Young Seok

    2017-12-27

    Low electric energy loss is a very important problem to minimize the decay of transferred energy intensity due to impedance mismatch. This issue has been dealt with by adding an impedance matching layer at the interface between two media. A strategy was proposed to improve the charge transfer from the human body to a biometric device by using an impedance matching nanostructure. Nanocomposite pattern arrays were fabricated with shape memory polymer and carbon nanotubes. The shape recovery ability of the nanopatterns enhanced durability and sustainability of the structure. It was found that the composite nanopatterns improved the current transfer by two times compared with the nonpatterned composite sample. The underlying mechanism of the enhanced charge transport was understood by carrying out a numerical simulation. We anticipate that this study can provide a new pathway for developing advanced biometric devices with high sensitivity to biological information.

  16. Spatially resolved spectroscopy on semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roessler, Johanna

    2009-02-20

    Cleared edge overgrowth (CEO) nanostructures are identified and studied by 1D und 2D {mu}PL mapping scans and by time-resolved and power-dependent measurements. Distinct excitonic ground states of 2fold CEO QDs with large localization energies are achieved. The deeper localization reached as compared to the only other report on 2fold CEO QDs in literature is attributed to a new strain-free fabrication process and changed QW thickness in [001] growth. In order to achieve controlled manipulation of 2fold CEO QDs the concept of a CEO structure with three top gates and one back gate is presented. Due to the complexity of this device, a simpler test structure is realized. Measurements on this test structure confirm the necessity to either grow significantly thicker overgrowth layers or to provide separate top gates in all three spatial direction to controllably manipulate 2fold CEO QDs with an external electric field. (orig.)

  17. Surface and Bulk Nanostructuring of Insulators by Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-05

    non perturbative effects leading to HHG. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Nanostructuring of bulk insulators, sub-picosecond electronic and structural events , photo...time, the charge density oscillations follow the time periodicity of the incident radiation. These transient charge oscillations are exclusively due...As in section II photoexcitation and the dielectric response of laser-irradiated diamond are treated in independent particle approximation based on the

  18. Space confinement and rotation stress induced self-organization of double-helix nanostructure: a nanotube twist with a moving catalyst head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Qiang; Tian, Gui-Li; Huang, Jia-Qi; Wei, Fei

    2012-05-22

    Inorganic materials with double-helix structure have attracted intensive attention due to not only their elegant morphology but also their amazing morphology-related potential applications. The investigation on the formation mechanism of the inorganic double-helix nanostructure is the first step for the fundamental studies of their materials or physical properties. Herein, we demonstrated the space confinement and rotation stress induced self-organization mechanism of the carbon nanotube (CNT)-array double helices under scanning electron microscopy by directly observing their formation process from individual layered double hydroxide flakes, which is a kind of hydrotalcite-like material composed of positively charged layers and charge-balancing interlayer anions. Space confinement is considered to be the most important extrinsic factor for the formation of CNT-array double helices. Synchronous growth of the CNT arrays oppositely from LDH flakes with space confinement on both sides at the same time is essential for the growth of CNT-array double helices. Coiling of the as-grown CNT arrays into double helices will proceed by self-organization, tending to the most stable morphology in order to release their internal rotation stress. Based on the demonstrated mechanism, effective routes were carried out to improve the selectivity for CNT-array double helices. The work provides a promising method for the fabrication of double-helix nanostructures with their two helices connected at the end by self-assembly.

  19. Recent advances in ZnO nanostructures and thin films for biosensor applications: Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arya, Sunil K.; Saha, Shibu; Ramirez-Vick, Jaime E.; Gupta, Vinay; Bhansali, Shekhar; Singh, Surinder P.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: ZnO nanostructures have shown binding of biomolecules in desired orientation with improved conformation and high biological activity, resulting in enhanced sensing characteristics. Furthermore, their compatibility with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology for constructing integrated circuits makes them suitable candidate for future small integrated biosensor devices. This review highlights various approaches to synthesize ZnO nanostructures and thin films, and their applications in biosensor technology. Highlights: ► This review highlights various approaches to synthesize ZnO nanostructures and thin films. ► Article highlights the importance of ZnO nanostructures as biosensor matrix. ► Article highlights the advances in various biosensors based on ZnO nanostructures. ► Article describes the potential of ZnO based biosensor for new generation healthcare devices. - Abstract: Biosensors have shown great potential for health care and environmental monitoring. The performance of biosensors depends on their components, among which the matrix material, i.e., the layer between the recognition layer of biomolecule and transducer, plays a crucial role in defining the stability, sensitivity and shelf-life of a biosensor. Recently, zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures and thin films have attracted much interest as materials for biosensors due to their biocompatibility, chemical stability, high isoelectric point, electrochemical activity, high electron mobility, ease of synthesis by diverse methods and high surface-to-volume ratio. ZnO nanostructures have shown the binding of biomolecules in desired orientations with improved conformation and high biological activity, resulting in enhanced sensing characteristics. Furthermore, compatibility with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology for constructing integrated circuits makes ZnO nanostructures suitable candidate for future small integrated biosensor devices. This review

  20. Recent advances in ZnO nanostructures and thin films for biosensor applications: Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arya, Sunil K., E-mail: sunilarya333@gmail.com [Bioelectronics Program, Institute of Microelectronics, A-Star 11 Science Park Road, Singapore Science Park II, Singapore 117685 (Singapore); Saha, Shibu [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Ramirez-Vick, Jaime E. [Engineering Science and Materials Department, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, PR 00681 (United States); Gupta, Vinay [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Bhansali, Shekhar [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); Singh, Surinder P., E-mail: singh.uprm@gmail.com [National Physical Laboratory, Dr K.S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2012-08-06

    Graphical abstract: ZnO nanostructures have shown binding of biomolecules in desired orientation with improved conformation and high biological activity, resulting in enhanced sensing characteristics. Furthermore, their compatibility with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology for constructing integrated circuits makes them suitable candidate for future small integrated biosensor devices. This review highlights various approaches to synthesize ZnO nanostructures and thin films, and their applications in biosensor technology. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This review highlights various approaches to synthesize ZnO nanostructures and thin films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Article highlights the importance of ZnO nanostructures as biosensor matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Article highlights the advances in various biosensors based on ZnO nanostructures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Article describes the potential of ZnO based biosensor for new generation healthcare devices. - Abstract: Biosensors have shown great potential for health care and environmental monitoring. The performance of biosensors depends on their components, among which the matrix material, i.e., the layer between the recognition layer of biomolecule and transducer, plays a crucial role in defining the stability, sensitivity and shelf-life of a biosensor. Recently, zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures and thin films have attracted much interest as materials for biosensors due to their biocompatibility, chemical stability, high isoelectric point, electrochemical activity, high electron mobility, ease of synthesis by diverse methods and high surface-to-volume ratio. ZnO nanostructures have shown the binding of biomolecules in desired orientations with improved conformation and high biological activity, resulting in enhanced sensing characteristics. Furthermore, compatibility with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology for constructing integrated circuits makes Zn

  1. A Self-Templating Scheme for the Synthesis of Nanostructured Transition Metal Chalcogenide Electrodes for Capacitive Energy Storage

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Chuan; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2015-01-01

    Due to their unique structural features including well-defined interior voids, low density, low coefficients of thermal expansion, large surface area and surface permeability, hollow micro/nanostructured transition metal sulfides with high

  2. Enhancement of Electrical Properties of Nanostructured Polysilicon Layers Through Hydrogen Passivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, D; Xu, T; Lambert, Y; Cristini-Robbe; Stiévenard, D

    2015-12-01

    The light absorption of polysilicon planar junctions can be improved using nanostructured top surfaces due to their enhanced light harvesting properties. Nevertheless, associated with the higher surface, the roughness caused by plasma etching and defects located at the grain boundary in polysilicon, the concentration of the recombination centers increases, leading to electrical performance deterioration. In this work, we demonstrate that wet oxidation combined with hydrogen passivation using SiN(x):H are the key technological processes to significantly decrease the surface recombination and improve the electrical properties of nanostructured n(+)-i-p junctions. Nanostructured surface is fabricated by nanosphere lithography in a low-cost and controllable approach. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that the successive annealing of silicon nitride films has significant effect on the passivation quality, resulting in some improvements on the efficiency of the Si nanostructure-based solar cell device.

  3. Anodized ZnO nanostructures for photoelectrochemical water splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Mao-Chia [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan 32001, Taiwan (China); Wang, TsingHai [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environment Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Wu, Bin-Jui [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan 32001, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jing-Chie, E-mail: jclin4046@gmail.com [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan 32001, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ching-Chen [Green Energy and Environment Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 310, Taiwan (China)

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • ZnO nanostructures were synthesized by electrochemical anodic process. • The parameter of ZnO nanostructure was anodic potential. • The model of growth of ZnO nanostructure was investigated. - Abstract: Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures were fabricated on the polished zinc foil by anodic deposition in an alkaline solution containing 1.0 M NaOH and 0.25 M Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}. Potentiostatic anodization was conducted at two potentials (−0.7 V in the passive region and −1.0 V in the active region vs. SCE) which are higher than the open circuit potential (−1.03 V vs. SCE) and as-obtained ZnO nanostrcutures were investigated focusing on their structural, optical, electrical and photoelectrochemical (PEC) characteristics. All samples were confirmed ZnO by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectra. Observations in the SEM images clearly showed that ZnO nanostructures prepared at −0.7 V vs. SCE were composed of nanowires at while those obtained at −1.0 V vs. SCE possessed nanosheets morphology. Result from transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction patterns suggested that the ZnO nanowires belonged to single crystalline with a preferred orientation of (0 0 2) whereas the ZnO nanosheets were polycrystalline. Following PEC experiments indicated that ZnO nanowires had higher photocurrent density of 0.32 mA/cm{sup 2} at 0.5 V vs. SCE under 100 mW/cm{sup 2} illumination. This value was about 1.9 times higher than that of ZnO nanosheets. Observed higher photocurrent was likely due to the single crystalline, preferred (0 0 2) orientation, higher carrier concentration and lower charge transfer resistance.

  4. Free-volume characterization of nanostructurized substances by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Ingram, A.; Shpotyuk, Ya.

    2018-02-01

    Methodological possibilities of positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) spectroscopy are examined to parameterize free-volume structural evolution processes in some nanostructurized substances obeying conversion from positronium (Ps) decaying to positron trapping. Unlike conventional x3-term fitting analysis based on admixed positron trapping and Ps decaying, the effect of nanostructurization is considered as occurring due to conversion from preferential Ps decaying in initial host matrix to positron trapping in modified (nanostructurized) host-guest matrix. The developed approach referred to as x3-x2-CDA (coupling decomposition algorithm) allows estimation defect-free bulk and defect-specific positron lifetimes of free-volume elements responsible for nanostructurization. The applicability of this approach is proved for some nanostructurized materials allowing free-volume changes through Ps-to-positron trapping conversion, such as (i) metallic Ag nanoparticles embedded in polymer matrix, (ii) structure-modification processes caused by swift heavy ions irradiation in polystyrene, and (iii) host-guest chemistry problems like water immersion in alumomagnesium spinel ceramics. This approach is considered to be used as test-indicator, separating processes of host-matrix nanostructurization due to embedded nanoparticles from uncorrelated changes in positron-trapping and Ps-decaying channels.

  5. Surface engineering of one-dimensional tin oxide nanostructures for chemical sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Yuanyuan; Qu, Yongquan; Zhou, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured materials are promising candidates for chemical sensors due to their fascinating physicochemical properties. Among various candidates, tin oxide (SnO 2 ) has been widely explored in gas sensing elements due to its excellent chemical stability, low cost, ease of fabrication and remarkable reproducibility. We are presenting an overview on recent investigations on 1-dimensional (1D) SnO 2 nanostructures for chemical sensing. In particular, we focus on the performance of devices based on surface engineered SnO 2 nanostructures, and on aspects of morphology, size, and functionality. The synthesis and sensing mechanism of highly selective, sensitive and stable 1D nanostructures for use in chemical sensing are discussed first. This is followed by a discussion of the relationship between the surface properties of the SnO 2 layer and the sensor performance from a thermodynamic point of view. Then, the opportunities and recent progress of chemical sensors fabricated from 1D SnO 2 heterogeneous nanostructures are discussed. Finally, we summarize current challenges in terms of improving the performance of chemical (gas) sensors using such nanostructures and suggest potential applications. (author)

  6. Template-free sonochemical synthesis of flower-like ZnO nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Huawa [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); School of Science, Xi' an Polytechnic University, Xi' an 710048 (China); Fan, Huiqing, E-mail: hqfan3@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Wang, Xin [Shaanxi Province Thin Film Technology and Optical Test Open Key Laboratory, School of Photoelectrical Engineering, Xi' an Technological University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Wang, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Cheng, Pengfei; Zhang, Xiaojun [School of Science, Xi' an Polytechnic University, Xi' an 710048 (China)

    2014-10-03

    Flower-like ZnO nanostructures have been successfully synthesized via a facile and template-free sonochemical method, using zinc acetate and potassium hydroxide as reactants only. The as-synthesized flower-like ZnO nanostructures were composed of nanorods with the width of ∼300–400 nm and the length of ∼2–3 μm. The structures, morphologies and optical properties of the as-prepared products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscopy, UV-Vis spectrophotometry and Raman-scattering spectroscopy. A plausible formation mechanism of flower-like ZnO nanostructures was studied by SEM which monitors an intermediate morphology transformation of the product at the different ultrasonic time (t=80,90,95,105, and 120 min). - Highlights: • A facile and template-free sonochemical method to fabricate flower-like ZnO nanostructures was proposed. • The flower-like ZnO nanostructures follow the ingrowth of ZnO from the matrix of Zn(OH){sub 2} crystals. • The flower-like ZnO nanostructures are also expected to explore their application in the field of nano-electronic devices.

  7. Template-free sonochemical synthesis of flower-like ZnO nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Huawa; Fan, Huiqing; Wang, Xin; Wang, Jing; Cheng, Pengfei; Zhang, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    Flower-like ZnO nanostructures have been successfully synthesized via a facile and template-free sonochemical method, using zinc acetate and potassium hydroxide as reactants only. The as-synthesized flower-like ZnO nanostructures were composed of nanorods with the width of ∼300–400 nm and the length of ∼2–3 μm. The structures, morphologies and optical properties of the as-prepared products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscopy, UV-Vis spectrophotometry and Raman-scattering spectroscopy. A plausible formation mechanism of flower-like ZnO nanostructures was studied by SEM which monitors an intermediate morphology transformation of the product at the different ultrasonic time (t=80,90,95,105, and 120 min). - Highlights: • A facile and template-free sonochemical method to fabricate flower-like ZnO nanostructures was proposed. • The flower-like ZnO nanostructures follow the ingrowth of ZnO from the matrix of Zn(OH) 2 crystals. • The flower-like ZnO nanostructures are also expected to explore their application in the field of nano-electronic devices

  8. Femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface nanostructuring of sputtered platinum thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez, Ainara, E-mail: airodriguez@ceit.es [CIC microGUNE, Goiru Kalea 9 Polo Innovación Garaia, 20500 Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain); CEIT-IK4 & Tecnun (University of Navarra), Paseo Manuel Lardizábal 15, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Morant-Miñana, Maria Carmen; Dias-Ponte, Antonio; Martínez-Calderón, Miguel; Gómez-Aranzadi, Mikel; Olaizola, Santiago M. [CIC microGUNE, Goiru Kalea 9 Polo Innovación Garaia, 20500 Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain); CEIT-IK4 & Tecnun (University of Navarra), Paseo Manuel Lardizábal 15, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Femtosecond laser-induced surface nanostructures on sputtered platinum thin films. • Three types of structures obtained: random nanostructures, LSFL and HSFL. • Two different modification regimes have been established based on laser fluence. - Abstract: In this work, submicro and nanostructures self-formed on the surface of Platinum thin films under femtosecond laser-pulse irradiation are investigated. A Ti:Sapphire laser system was used to linearly scan 15 mm lines with 100 fs pulses at a central wavelength of 800 nm with a 1 kHz repetition rate. The resulting structures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and 2D-Fast Fourier Transform (2D-FFT) analysis. This analysis of images revealed different types of structures depending on the laser irradiation parameters: random nanostructures, low spatial frequency LIPSS (LSFL) with a periodicity from about 450 to 600 nm, and high spatial frequency LIPSS (HSFL) with a periodicity from about 80 to 200 nm. Two different modifications regimes have been established for the formation of nanostructures: (a) a high-fluence regime in which random nanostructures and LSFL are obtained and (b) a low-fluence regime in which HSFL and LSFL are obtained.

  9. Nanostructured Mesoporous Silicas for Bone Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Izquierdo-Barba

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The research on the development of new biomaterials that promote bone tissue regeneration is receiving great interest by the biomedical scientific community. Recent advances in nanotechnology have allowed the design of materials with nanostructure similar to that of natural bone. These materials can promote new bone formation by inducing the formation of nanocrystalline apatites analogous to the mineral phase of natural bone onto their surfaces, i.e. they are bioactive. They also stimulate osteoblast proliferation and differentiation and, therefore, accelerate the healing processes. Silica-based ordered mesoporous materials are excellent candidates to be used as third generation bioceramics that enable the adsorption and local control release of biological active agents that promote bone regeneration. This local delivery capability together with the bioactive behavior of mesoporous silicas opens up promising expectations in the bioclinical field. In this review, the last advances in nanochemistry aimed at designing and tailoring the chemical and textural properties of mesoporous silicas for biomedical applications are described. The recent developed strategies to synthesize bioactive glasses with ordered mesopore arrangements are also summarized. Finally, a deep discussion about the influence of the textural parameters and organic modification of mesoporous silicas on molecules adsorption and controlled release is performed.

  10. Low temperature surface chemistry and nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, G. B.; Shabatina, T. I.

    2002-03-01

    The new scientific field of low temperature surface chemistry, which combines the low temperature chemistry (cryochemistry) and surface chemistry approaches, is reviewed in this paper. One of the most exciting achievements in this field of science is the development of methods to create highly ordered hybrid nanosized structures on different organic and inorganic surfaces and to encapsulate nanosized metal particles in organic and polymer matrices. We consider physical and chemical behaviour for the systems obtained by co-condensation of the components vapours on the surfaces cooled down to 4-10 and 70-100 K. In particular the size effect of both types, the number of atoms in the reactive species structure and the thickness of growing co-condensate film, on the chemical activity of the system is analysed in detail. The effect of the internal mechanical stresses on the growing interfacial co-condensate film formation and on the generation of fast (explosive) spontaneous reactions at low temperatures is discussed. The examples of unusual chemical interactions of metal atoms, clusters and nanosized particles, obtained in co-condensate films on the cooled surfaces under different conditions, are presented. The examples of highly ordered surface and volume hybrid nanostructures formation are analysed.

  11. Nanostructured aqueous dispersions of citrem interacting with lipids and PEGylated lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, S.F.; Nilsson, Christa; Laurinmäki, P.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the formation of nanostructured aqueous dispersions based on the negatively charged food-grade emulsifier citrem (citric acid esters of mono- and diglycerides). To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature on the spontaneous formation of aqueous PEGylated and non-PEGy...... ) phase. Based on the SAXS results, the partial replacement of citrem by high amount of MO or PHYT induced the formation of hexosomes. The investigated dispersions of citrem could be attractive as nanocarriers of poorly water-soluble drugs and functional foods.......We report on the formation of nanostructured aqueous dispersions based on the negatively charged food-grade emulsifier citrem (citric acid esters of mono- and diglycerides). To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature on the spontaneous formation of aqueous PEGylated and non...

  12. Chemical Sensors Based on Metal Oxide Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.; Evans, Laura J.; VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.; Kulis, Mike J.; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2006-01-01

    This paper is an overview of sensor development based on metal oxide nanostructures. While nanostructures such as nanorods show significan t potential as enabling materials for chemical sensors, a number of s ignificant technical challenges remain. The major issues addressed in this work revolve around the ability to make workable sensors. This paper discusses efforts to address three technical barriers related t o the application of nanostructures into sensor systems: 1) Improving contact of the nanostructured materials with electrodes in a microse nsor structure; 2) Controling nanostructure crystallinity to allow co ntrol of the detection mechanism; and 3) Widening the range of gases that can be detected by using different nanostructured materials. It is concluded that while this work demonstrates useful tools for furt her development, these are just the beginning steps towards realizati on of repeatable, controlled sensor systems using oxide based nanostr uctures.

  13. Complex Nanostructures by Pulsed Droplet Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noboyuki Koguchi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available What makes three dimensional semiconductor quantum nanostructures so attractive is the possibility to tune their electronic properties by careful design of their size and composition. These parameters set the confinement potential of electrons and holes, thus determining the electronic and optical properties of the nanostructure. An often overlooked parameter, which has an even more relevant effect on the electronic properties of the nanostructure, is shape. Gaining a strong control over the electronic properties via shape tuning is the key to access subtle electronic design possibilities. The Pulsed Dropled Epitaxy is an innovative growth method for the fabrication of quantum nanostructures with highly designable shapes and complex morphologies. With Pulsed Dropled Epitaxy it is possible to combine different nanostructures, namely quantum dots, quantum rings and quantum disks, with tunable sizes and densities, into a single multi-function nanostructure, thus allowing an unprecedented control over electronic properties.

  14. Composite materials formed with anchored nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-03-10

    A method of forming nano-structure composite materials that have a binder material and a nanostructure fiber material is described. A precursor material may be formed using a mixture of at least one metal powder and anchored nanostructure materials. The metal powder mixture may be (a) Ni powder and (b) NiAl powder. The anchored nanostructure materials may comprise (i) NiAl powder as a support material and (ii) carbon nanotubes attached to nanoparticles adjacent to a surface of the support material. The process of forming nano-structure composite materials typically involves sintering the mixture under vacuum in a die. When Ni and NiAl are used in the metal powder mixture Ni.sub.3Al may form as the binder material after sintering. The mixture is sintered until it consolidates to form the nano-structure composite material.

  15. Genesis of nanostructured, magnetically tunable ceramics from the pyrolysis of cross-linked polyferrocenylsilane networks and formation of shaped macroscopic objects and micron scale patterns by micromolding inside silicon wafers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, Madlen; MacLachlan, Mark J; Yang, San Ming; Coombs, Neil; Coyle, Thomas W; Raju, Nandyala P; Greedan, John E; Herber, Rolfe H; Ozin, Geoffrey A; Manners, Ian

    2002-03-20

    The ability to form molded or patterned metal-containing ceramics with tunable properties is desirable for many applications. In this paper we describe the evolution of a ceramic from a metal-containing polymer in which the variation of pyrolysis conditions facilitates control of ceramic structure and composition, influencing magnetic and mechanical properties. We have found that pyrolysis under nitrogen of a well-characterized cross-linked polyferrocenylsilane network derived from the ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of a spirocyclic [1]ferrocenophane precursor gives shaped macroscopic magnetic ceramics consisting of alpha-Fe nanoparticles embedded in a SiC/C/Si(3)N(4) matrix in greater than 90% yield up to 1000 degrees C. Variation of the pyrolysis temperature and time permitted control over the nucleation and growth of alpha-Fe particles, which ranged in size from around 15 to 700 A, and the crystallization of the surrounding matrix. The ceramics contained smaller alpha-Fe particles when prepared at temperatures lower than 900 degrees C and displayed superparamagnetic behavior, whereas the materials prepared at 1000 degrees C contained larger alpha-Fe particles and were ferromagnetic. This flexibility may be useful for particular materials applications. In addition, the composition of the ceramic was altered by changing the pyrolysis atmosphere to argon, which yielded ceramics that contain Fe(3)Si(5). The ceramics have been characterized by a combination of physical techniques, including powder X-ray diffraction, TEM, reflectance UV-vis/near-IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, XPS, SQUID magnetometry, Mössbauer spectroscopy, nanoindentation, and SEM. Micromolding of the spirocyclic [1]ferrocenophane precursor within soft lithographically patterned channels housed inside silicon wafers followed by thermal ROP and pyrolysis enabled the formation of predetermined micron scale designs of the magnetic ceramic.

  16. Pressure effects on nanostructured manganites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acha, C.; Garbarino, G.; Leyva, A.G.

    2007-01-01

    We have measured the pressure sensitivity of magnetic properties on La 5/8-y Pr y Ca 3/8 MnO 3 (y=0.3) nanostructured powders. Samples were synthesized following a microwave assisted denitration process and a final heat treatment at different temperatures to control the grain size of the samples. A span in grain diameters from 40 nm to ∼1000 nm was obtained. Magnetization curves as a function of temperature were measured following different thermomagnetic histories. AC susceptibility as a function of temperature was also measured at different hydrostatic pressures (up to 10 kbar) and for different frequencies. Our results indicate that the nanostructuration plays a role of an internal pressure, producing a structural deformation with similar effects to those obtained under an external hydrostatic pressure

  17. Nanostructured materials for water desalination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humplik, T; Lee, J; O' Hern, S C; Fellman, B A; Karnik, R; Wang, E N [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States); Baig, M A; Hassan, S F; Atieh, M A; Rahman, F; Laoui, T, E-mail: tlaoui@kfupm.edu.sa, E-mail: karnik@mit.edu, E-mail: enwang@mit.edu [Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Chemical Engineering and Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-07-22

    Desalination of seawater and brackish water is becoming an increasingly important means to address the scarcity of fresh water resources in the world. Decreasing the energy requirements and infrastructure costs of existing desalination technologies remains a challenge. By enabling the manipulation of matter and control of transport at nanometer length scales, the emergence of nanotechnology offers new opportunities to advance water desalination technologies. This review focuses on nanostructured materials that are directly involved in the separation of water from salt as opposed to mitigating issues such as fouling. We discuss separation mechanisms and novel transport phenomena in materials including zeolites, carbon nanotubes, and graphene with potential applications to reverse osmosis, capacitive deionization, and multi-stage flash, among others. Such nanostructured materials can potentially enable the development of next-generation desalination systems with increased efficiency and capacity. (topical review)

  18. Nanostructured materials for water desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humplik, T; Lee, J; O'Hern, S C; Fellman, B A; Karnik, R; Wang, E N; Baig, M A; Hassan, S F; Atieh, M A; Rahman, F; Laoui, T

    2011-01-01

    Desalination of seawater and brackish water is becoming an increasingly important means to address the scarcity of fresh water resources in the world. Decreasing the energy requirements and infrastructure costs of existing desalination technologies remains a challenge. By enabling the manipulation of matter and control of transport at nanometer length scales, the emergence of nanotechnology offers new opportunities to advance water desalination technologies. This review focuses on nanostructured materials that are directly involved in the separation of water from salt as opposed to mitigating issues such as fouling. We discuss separation mechanisms and novel transport phenomena in materials including zeolites, carbon nanotubes, and graphene with potential applications to reverse osmosis, capacitive deionization, and multi-stage flash, among others. Such nanostructured materials can potentially enable the development of next-generation desalination systems with increased efficiency and capacity. (topical review)

  19. Nanostructured materials for water desalination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humplik, T.; Lee, J.; O'Hern, S. C.; Fellman, B. A.; Baig, M. A.; Hassan, S. F.; Atieh, M. A.; Rahman, F.; Laoui, T.; Karnik, R.; Wang, E. N.

    2011-07-01

    Desalination of seawater and brackish water is becoming an increasingly important means to address the scarcity of fresh water resources in the world. Decreasing the energy requirements and infrastructure costs of existing desalination technologies remains a challenge. By enabling the manipulation of matter and control of transport at nanometer length scales, the emergence of nanotechnology offers new opportunities to advance water desalination technologies. This review focuses on nanostructured materials that are directly involved in the separation of water from salt as opposed to mitigating issues such as fouling. We discuss separation mechanisms and novel transport phenomena in materials including zeolites, carbon nanotubes, and graphene with potential applications to reverse osmosis, capacitive deionization, and multi-stage flash, among others. Such nanostructured materials can potentially enable the development of next-generation desalination systems with increased efficiency and capacity.

  20. Reactor casts light on nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garvey, C.

    2002-01-01

    Chris Garvey explains how the replacement research reactor will help scientists to design better materials by understanding how macromolecules behave. Australia is making a substantial financial commitment to providing scientists with facilities to scatter neutrons. Neutron scattering is one of the core areas of science in which the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) invests its resources. His particular interest is to find out the way nature uses macromolecules, and how the shape and interaction of macromolecules with other molecules change their function. Biologists call aggregates of macromolecules, 'nanostructures'. Neutron probes are used at ANSTO for studying nanostructures, and in particular the organisation of the protein that is used to transport oxygen in the blood. Small angle neutron scattering was also allowed to understand at microscopic level, how humidity changes the mechanical properties of fibres

  1. White emission from nano-structured top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes based on a blue emitting layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, Woo Jin; Park, Jung Jin; Park, O Ok; Im, Sang Hyuk; Chin, Byung Doo

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrated that white emission can be obtained from nano-structured top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (TEOLEDs) based on a blue emitting layer (EML). The nano-structured TEOLEDs were fabricated on nano-patterned substrates, in which both optical micro-cavity and scattering effects occur simultaneously. Due to the combination of these two effects, the electroluminescence spectra of the nano-structured device with a blue EML exhibited not only blue but also yellow colours, which corresponded to the intrinsic emission of the EML and the resonant emission of the micro-cavity effect. Consequently, it was possible to produce white emission from nano-structured TEOLEDs without employing a multimode micro-cavity. The intrinsic emission wavelength can be varied by altering the dopant used for the EML. Furthermore, the emissive characteristics turned out to be strongly dependent on the nano-pattern sizes of the nano-structured devices. (paper)

  2. Synthesis of nanostructured polyaniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surwade, Sumedh P.

    The organization of my thesis is as follows: (a) Chapter III describes the synthesis of bulk quantities of polyaniline nanofibers in one step using a simple and versatile high ionic strength aqueous system (HCl/NaCl) that permits the use of pure H2O2 as a mild oxidant without any added metal or enzyme catalyst. Polyaniline nanofibers obtained are highly conducting, sigma˜1--5 S/cm, and spectroscopically similar to conventional polyaniline synthesized using stronger oxidants. The synthesis method is further extended to the synthesis of oligoanilines of controlled molecular weight, e.g., aniline tetramer, octamer, and hexadecamer. Microns long tetramer nanofibers are synthesized using this method. (b) Chapter IV describes the mechanism of nanofiber formation in polyaniline. It is proposed that the surfaces such as the walls of the reaction vessel and/or intentionally added surfaces play a dramatic role in the evolution of nanofibrillar morphology. Nucleation sites on surfaces promote the accumulation of aniline dimer that reacts further to yield aniline tetramer, which (surprisingly) is entirely in form of nanofibers and whose morphology is transcribed to the bulk by a double heterogeneous nucleation mechanism. This unexpected phenomenon could form the basis of nanofiber formation in all classes of precipitation polymerization systems. (c) Chapter V is the mechanistic study on the formation of oligoanilines during the chemical oxidation of aniline in weakly acidic, neutral or basic media using peroxydisulfate oxidant. It is proposed that the reaction proceeds via the intermediacy of benzoquinone monoimine that is formed as a result of a Boyland-Sims rearrangement of aniline. The initial role of peroxydisulfate is to provide a pathway for the formation of benzoquinone monoimine intermediate that is followed by a conjugate Michael-type addition reaction with aniline or sulfated anilines. The products isolated in pH 2.5--10.0 buffers are intermediate species at various

  3. Fibrin nanostructures for biomedical applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Riedelová-Reicheltová, Zuzana; Brynda, Eduard; Riedel, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, Suppl. 2 (2016), S263-S272 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : fibrinogen * fibrin-bound thrombin * nanostructures Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016 http://www.biomed.cas.cz/physiolres/pdf/65%20Suppl%202/65_S263.pdf

  4. Alkali-etching growth of nest-like Ag@mTiO2 hierarchical nanostructures and their potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zongnan; Zhang, Haijiao

    2017-06-01

    Porous nanomaterials have attracted extensive interests in adsorption, catalysis, biosensors, and biomedicine due to their high surface area, well-defined pore structure and tunable pore size. However, how to obtain porous nanomaterials of desirable component and unique structure with multifunctionalities and synergetic properties is still a great challenge. In this work, a novel nest-like Ag@mTiO 2 hierarchical nanostructure with Ag nanoparticle as the core and a mesoporous crystalline TiO 2 as the protective shell was successfully prepared by layer-by-layer assembly technique and alkali-etching hydrothermal route. By simply changing the conditions of alkali etching, different nanostructures could be obtained, such as core-shell or rattle type. In the process, the thickness of coating silica layer and TiO 2 shell both played important roles for the formation of desired nanostructures. The as-prepared products had a large specific surface area of 301m 2 /g and a tailored TiO 2 outer shell. Raman spectra results showed perfect SERS signal of the tags enhanced and remained good stability even after one month. Doxycycline (Doxy) was chosen to evaluate their drug loading and controlled release properties. The results indicated that the obtained Ag@mTiO 2 nanoparticles exhibited good biocompatibility and excellent drug-loading capacity. Consequently, they are also expected to serve as ideal candidates for more potential applications including photocatalysis, drug controlled release, biosensor and cell imaging, etc. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Metal chalcogenide nanostructures for renewable energy applications

    CERN Document Server

    Qurashi, Ahsanulhaq

    2014-01-01

    This first ever reference book that focuses on metal chalcogenide semiconductor nanostructures for renewable energy applications encapsulates the state-of-the-art in multidisciplinary research on the metal chalcogenide semiconductor nanostructures (nanocrystals, nanoparticles, nanorods, nanowires,  nanobelts, nanoflowers, nanoribbons and more).  The properties and synthesis of a class of nanomaterials is essential to renewable energy manufacturing and this book focuses on the synthesis of metal chalcogendie nanostructures, their growth mechanism, optical, electrical, and other important prop

  6. Optical anisotropy of quasi-1D rare-earth silicide nanostructures on Si(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandola, S., E-mail: sandhya.chandola@isas.de [Leibniz-Institut für Analytische Wissenschaften – ISAS – e.V., Schwarzschildstraße 8, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Speiser, E.; Esser, N. [Leibniz-Institut für Analytische Wissenschaften – ISAS – e.V., Schwarzschildstraße 8, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Appelfeller, S.; Franz, M.; Dähne, M. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstraße 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • Reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) is capable of distinguishing optically between the semiconducting wetting layer and the metallic nanowires of rare earth (Tb and Dy) silicide nanostructures grown on vicinal Si(001). • The spectra of the wetting layer show a distinctive line shape with a large peak appearing at 3.8 eV, which is assigned to the formation of 2 × 3 and 2 × 4-like subunits of the 2 × 7 reconstruction. The spectra of the metallic nanowires show peaks at the E{sub 1} and E{sub 2} transitions of bulk Si which is assigned to strong substrate strain induced by the nanowires. • The optical anisotropy of the Tb nanowires is larger than for the Dy nanowires, which is related to the preferential formation of more strained bundles as well as larger areas of clean Si surfaces in the case of Tb. • RAS is shown to be a powerful addition to surface science techniques for studying the formation of rare-earth silicide nanostructures. Its surface sensitivity and rapidity of response make it an ideal complement to the slower but higher resolution of scanning probes of STM and AFM. - Abstract: Rare earth metals are known to interact strongly with Si(001) surfaces to form different types of silicide nanostructures. Using STM to structurally characterize Dy and Tb silicide nanostructures on vicinal Si(001), it will be shown that reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) can be used as an optical fingerprint technique to clearly distinguish between the formation of a semiconducting two-dimensional wetting layer and the metallic one-dimensional nanowires. Moreover, the distinctive spectral features can be related to structural units of the nanostructures. RAS spectra of Tb and Dy nanostructures are found to show similar features.

  7. Reactor and method for production of nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Kim, Jeong H.; Kumar, Vivekanand

    2017-04-25

    A reactor and method for production of nanostructures, including metal oxide nanowires or nanoparticles, are provided. The reactor includes a regulated metal powder delivery system in communication with a dielectric tube; a plasma-forming gas inlet, whereby a plasma-forming gas is delivered substantially longitudinally into the dielectric tube; a sheath gas inlet, whereby a sheath gas is delivered into the dielectric tube; and a microwave energy generator coupled to the dielectric tube, whereby microwave energy is delivered into a plasma-forming gas. The method for producing nanostructures includes providing a reactor to form nanostructures and collecting the formed nanostructures, optionally from a filter located downstream of the dielectric tube.

  8. Is there a shift to 'active nanostructures'?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, Vrishali; Youtie, Jan; Porter, Alan L.; Shapira, Philip

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that an important transition in the long-run trajectory of nanotechnology development is a shift from passive to active nanostructures. Such a shift could present different or increased societal impacts and require new approaches for risk assessment. An active nanostructure 'changes or evolves its state during its operation,' according to the National Science Foundation's (2006) Active Nanostructures and Nanosystems grant solicitation. Active nanostructure examples include nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), nanomachines, self-healing materials, targeted drugs and chemicals, energy storage devices, and sensors. This article considers two questions: (a) Is there a 'shift' to active nanostructures? (b) How can we characterize the prototypical areas into which active nanostructures may emerge? We build upon the NSF definition of active nanostructures to develop a research publication search strategy, with a particular intent to distinguish between passive and active nanotechnologies. We perform bibliometric analyses and describe the main publication trends from 1995 to 2008. We then describe the prototypes of research that emerge based on reading the abstracts and review papers encountered in our search. Preliminary results suggest that there is a sharp rise in active nanostructures publications in 2006, and this rise is maintained in 2007 and through to early 2008. We present a typology that can be used to describe the kind of active nanostructures that may be commercialized and regulated in the future.

  9. Is there a shift to "active nanostructures"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Vrishali; Youtie, Jan; Porter, Alan L.; Shapira, Philip

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that an important transition in the long-run trajectory of nanotechnology development is a shift from passive to active nanostructures. Such a shift could present different or increased societal impacts and require new approaches for risk assessment. An active nanostructure "changes or evolves its state during its operation," according to the National Science Foundation's (2006) Active Nanostructures and Nanosystems grant solicitation. Active nanostructure examples include nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), nanomachines, self-healing materials, targeted drugs and chemicals, energy storage devices, and sensors. This article considers two questions: (a) Is there a "shift" to active nanostructures? (b) How can we characterize the prototypical areas into which active nanostructures may emerge? We build upon the NSF definition of active nanostructures to develop a research publication search strategy, with a particular intent to distinguish between passive and active nanotechnologies. We perform bibliometric analyses and describe the main publication trends from 1995 to 2008. We then describe the prototypes of research that emerge based on reading the abstracts and review papers encountered in our search. Preliminary results suggest that there is a sharp rise in active nanostructures publications in 2006, and this rise is maintained in 2007 and through to early 2008. We present a typology that can be used to describe the kind of active nanostructures that may be commercialized and regulated in the future.

  10. Facile synthesis of Zn doped CuO hierarchical nanostructures: Structural, optical and antibacterial properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed Iqbal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ZnxCu1−xO (where x= 0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05, 0.07 and 0.1 mol% hierarchical nanostructures have been prepared via soft chemical route. X-ray diffraction (XRD results of the synthesized samples reveal the monoclinic structure of CuO without any impurity related phases. The micro-structural parameters such as crystallite size and microstrain have been strongly influenced by Zn doping. Scanning electron microscope (SEM analyses depict the formation of hierarchical nanostructures having average particle size in the range of 26-43 nm. The surface area of CuO nanostructures has been reduced systematically with the increase in Zn content which is linked with the variations in particle size. An obvious decrease in the optical band gap energy of the synthesized CuO hierarchical nanostructures has been observed with Zn doping which is assigned to the formation of shallow levels in the band gap of CuO and combined transition from oxygen 2p states to d sates of Cu and Zn ions. The bactericidal potency of the CuO hierarchical nanostructures have been found to be enhanced remarkably with Zn doping.

  11. Particle size and shape modification of hydroxyapatite nanostructures synthesized via a complexing agent-assisted route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohandes, Fatemeh; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    In this work, hydroxyapatite (HAP), Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 , nanostructures including nanorods, nanobundles and nanoparticles have been prepared via a simple precipitation method. In the present method, Ca(NO 3 ) 2 ·4H 2 O and (NH 4 ) 2 HPO 4 were used as calcium and phosphorus precursors, respectively. Besides, the Schiff bases derived from 2-hydroxyacetophenone and different diamines were used as complexing agents for the in situ formation of Ca 2+ complexes. The formation mechanism of 0-D and 1-D nanostructures of HAP was also considered. When the complexing agents could coordinate to the Ca 2+ ions through N and O atoms to form the [CaN 2 O 2 ] 2+ complexes, HAP nanoparticles were generated. On the other hand, nanorods and nanobundles of HAP were obtained by forming the [CaN 2 ] 2+ as well as [CaO 2 ] 2+ complexes in the reaction solution. This work is the first successful synthesis of pure HAP nanostructures in the presence of Schiff bases instead of using the common surfactants. - Highlights: • HAP nanostructures have been prepared by a simple precipitation method. • To control shape and particle size of HAP, different Schiff bases were employed. • 0-D and 1-D HAP nanostructures have been formed by this method

  12. Facile synthesis of Zn doped CuO hierarchical nanostructures: Structural, optical and antibacterial properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Javed, E-mail: tariqjan84@gmail.com, E-mail: javed.suggau@iiu.edu.pk; Jan, Tariq, E-mail: tariqjan84@gmail.com, E-mail: javed.suggau@iiu.edu.pk; Ul-Hassan, Sibt; Umair Ali, M.; Abbas, Fazal [Laboratory of Nanoscience and Technology, Department of Physics, International Islamic University, H-10, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ahmed, Ishaq [Experimental Physics Labs, National Center for Physics, Islamabad (Pakistan); Mansoor, Qaisar; Ismail, Muhammad [Institute of Biomedical and Genetic Engineering (IBGE), Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2015-12-15

    Zn{sub x}Cu{sub 1−x}O (where x= 0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05, 0.07 and 0.1 mol%) hierarchical nanostructures have been prepared via soft chemical route. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results of the synthesized samples reveal the monoclinic structure of CuO without any impurity related phases. The micro-structural parameters such as crystallite size and microstrain have been strongly influenced by Zn doping. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses depict the formation of hierarchical nanostructures having average particle size in the range of 26-43 nm. The surface area of CuO nanostructures has been reduced systematically with the increase in Zn content which is linked with the variations in particle size. An obvious decrease in the optical band gap energy of the synthesized CuO hierarchical nanostructures has been observed with Zn doping which is assigned to the formation of shallow levels in the band gap of CuO and combined transition from oxygen 2p states to d sates of Cu and Zn ions. The bactericidal potency of the CuO hierarchical nanostructures have been found to be enhanced remarkably with Zn doping.

  13. Study of the phase composition of nanostructures produced by the local anodic oxidation of titanium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avilov, V. I.; Ageev, O. A.; Konoplev, B. G.; Smirnov, V. A.; Solodovnik, M. S.; Tsukanova, O. G.

    2016-01-01

    The results of experimental studies of the phase composition of oxide nanostructures formed by the local anodic oxidation of a titanium thin film are reported. The data of the phase analysis of titanium-oxide nanostructures are obtained by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in the ion profiling mode of measurements. It is established that the surface of titanium-oxide nanostructures 4.5 ± 0.2 nm in height possesses a binding energy of core levels characteristic of TiO_2 (458.4 eV). By analyzing the titanium-oxide nanostructures in depth by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the formation of phases with binding energies of core levels characteristic of Ti_2O_3 (456.6 eV) and TiO (454.8 eV) is established. The results can be used in developing the technological processes of the formation of a future electronic-component base for nanoelectronics on the basis of titanium-oxide nanostructures and probe nanotechnologies.

  14. Hydrogen adsorption in carbon nanostructures compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmel, H.G.; Nijkamp, G.; Kearley, G.J.; Rivera, A.; Jong, K.P. de; Mulder, F.M.

    2004-01-01

    Recent reports continue to suggest high hydrogen storage capacities for some carbon nanostructures due to a stronger interaction between hydrogen and carbon. Here the interaction of hydrogen with activated charcoal, carbon nanofibers, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), and electron beam 'opened' SWNT are compared and shown to be similar. The storage capacity below 77 K of these materials correlates with the surface area of the material with the activated charcoal having the largest. SWNT and 'opened' SWNT have a relatively low accessible surface area due to bundling of the tubes. Pressure-temperature curves give the interaction potential, which was found to be ∼580 K or 50 meV in all samples, leading to significant adsorption below ∼50 K. Using the inelastic neutron scattering signal associated with rotation of the hydrogen molecule as a sensitive probe for the surroundings of the molecule, no difference was found between the hydrogen molecules adsorbed in the investigated materials. These combined spectroscopic and macroscopic results show that SWNT, nanofibers and activated carbons store molecular hydrogen due to their graphitic nature and not because they possess special morphologies. Results from a density functional theory computer calculation suggest molecular hydrogen bonding to an aromatic C-C bond of graphite, irrespective of the surface morphology farther away

  15. Atomically flat single-crystalline gold nanostructures for plasmonic nanocircuitry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, J S; Geisler, P; Bruening, C; Kern, J; Prangsma, J C; Wu, X; Feichtner, Thorsten; Ziegler, J; Weinmann, P; Kamp, M; Forchel, A; Hecht, B [Wilhelm-Conrad-Roentgen-Center for Complex Material Systems, University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Biagioni, P [CNISM, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano (Italy)

    2011-07-01

    Deep subwavelength integration of high-definition plasmonic nano-structures is of key importance for the development of future optical nanocircuitry. So far the experimental realization of proposed extended plasmonic networks remains challenging, mainly due to the multi-crystallinity of commonly used thermally evaporated gold layers. Resulting structural imperfections in individual circuit elements drastically reduce the yield of functional integrated nanocircuits. Here we demonstrate the use of very large but thin chemically grown single-crystalline gold flakes. After immobilization on any arbitrary surface, they serve as an ideal basis for focused-ion beam milling. We present high-definition ultra-smooth gold nanostructures with reproducible nanosized features over micrometer lengthscales. By comparing multi- and single-crystalline optical antennas we prove that the latter have superior optical properties which are in good agreement with numerical simulations.

  16. Patterned titania nanostructures produced by electrochemical anodization of titanium sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Junzhe; Ariyanti, Dessy; Gao, Wei; Niu, Zhenjiang; Weil, Emeline

    2017-07-01

    A two-step anodization method has been used to produce patterned arrays of TiO2 on the surface of Ti sheet. Hexagonal ripples were created on Ti substrate after removing the TiO2 layer produced by first-step anodization. The shallow concaves were served as an ideal position for the subsequent step anodization due to their low electrical resistance, resulting in novel hierarchical nanostructures with small pits inside the original ripples. The mechanism of morphology evolution during patterned anodization was studied through changing the anodizing voltages and duration time. This work provides a new idea for controlling nanostructures and thus tailoring the photocatalytic property and wettability of anodic TiO2.

  17. Synchrotron diffraction characterization of nanostructured KY3F10:Tb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Rodrigo U.; Teixeira, Maria I.; Ranieri, Izilda M.; Martinez, Luis G.; Linhares, Horacio M.S.M.D.; Turrillas, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured rare-earth fluorides materials are being intensively studied recently due to their potential applications in high-dose dosimetry. Particularly, nanostructured Tb-doped KY 3 F 10 has shown satisfactory results to be used in this area. In the present work, the structure and microstructure of KY 3 F 10 :Tb was investigated by means of X-ray synchrotron diffraction. One of the samples was analyzed as synthesized and another after a heat treatment. Rietveld refinement of synchrotron diffraction data was applied to obtain cell parameters, atomic positions and atomic displacement factors and the results were compared to values found in literature. X-ray line profile analysis methods were applied to determine mean crystallite sizes and their distribution. (author)

  18. Wetting characteristics of 3-dimensional nanostructured fractal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ethan; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Lijia; Lu, Yongfeng; Ndao, Sidy

    2017-01-01

    This article reports the fabrication and wetting characteristics of 3-dimensional nanostructured fractal surfaces (3DNFS). Three distinct 3DNFS surfaces, namely cubic, Romanesco broccoli, and sphereflake were fabricated using two-photon direct laser writing. Contact angle measurements were performed on the multiscale fractal surfaces to characterize their wetting properties. Average contact angles ranged from 66.8° for the smooth control surface to 0° for one of the fractal surfaces. The change in wetting behavior was attributed to modification of the interfacial surface properties due to the inclusion of 3-dimensional hierarchical fractal nanostructures. However, this behavior does not exactly obey existing surface wetting models in the literature. Potential applications for these types of surfaces in physical and biological sciences are also discussed.

  19. Current status of nanostructured tungsten-based materials development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurishita, H; Matsuo, S; Arakawa, H; Hatakeyama, M; Shikama, T; Sakamoto, T; Kobayashi, S; Nakai, K; Okano, H; Watanabe, H; Yoshida, N; Torikai, Y; Hatano, Y; Takida, T; Kato, M; Ikegaya, A; Ueda, Y

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured tungsten (W)-based materials offer many advantages for use as plasma facing materials and components exposed to heavy thermal loads combined with irradiation with high-energy neutron and low-energy ion. This paper first presents the recent progress in nanostructured toughened, fine grained, recrystallized W materials. Thermal desorption spectrometry apparatus equipped with an ion gun has been installed in the radiation controlled area in our Center at Tohoku University to systematically investigate the effects of displacement damage due to high-energy neutron irradiation on hydrogen isotope retention in connection with the nano- or micro-structures in W-based materials. In this paper, the effects of high-energy heavy ion irradiation on deuterium retention in W with different microstructures are described as a preliminary work with the prospective view of neutron irradiation effects. (paper)

  20. Structure and property evaluation of a vacuum plasma sprayed nanostructured tungsten-hafnium carbide bulk composite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rea, K. E.; Viswanathan, V.; Kruize, A.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; O'Dell, S.; McKechnie, T.; Rajagopalan, S.; Vaidyanathan, R.; Seal, S.; O’Dell, S.

    2008-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) forming of tungsten-based metal matrix nanocomposites (MMCs) has shown to be a cost effective and time saving method for the formation of bulk monolithic nanostructured then no-mechanical components. Spray drying of powder feedstock appears to have a significant effect on

  1. Nanostructured magnesium has fewer detrimental effects on osteoblast function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weng L

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Lucy Weng, Thomas J Webster School of Engineering and Department of Orthopedics, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA Abstract: Efforts have been made recently to implement nanoscale surface features on magnesium, a biodegradable metal, to increase bone formation. Compared with normal magnesium, nanostructured magnesium has unique characteristics, including increased grain boundary properties, surface to volume ratio, surface roughness, and surface energy, which may influence the initial adsorption of proteins known to promote the function of osteoblasts (bone-forming cells. Previous studies have shown that one way to increase nanosurface roughness on magnesium is to soak the metal in NaOH. However, it has not been determined if degradation of magnesium is altered by creating nanoscale features on its surface to influence osteoblast density. The aim of the present in vitro study was to determine the influence of degradation of nanostructured magnesium, created by soaking in NaOH, on osteoblast density. Our results showed a less detrimental effect of magnesium degradation on osteoblast density when magnesium was treated with NaOH to create nanoscale surface features. The detrimental degradation products of magnesium are of significant concern when considering use of magnesium as an orthopedic implant material, and this study identified a surface treatment, ie, soaking in NaOH to create nanoscale features for magnesium that can improve its use in numerous orthopedic applications. Keywords: nanostructured magnesium, degradation, detrimental effects, osteoblasts

  2. Near-field scanning optical microscopy based nanostructuring of glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chimmalgi, A; Hwang, D J; Grigoropoulos, C P

    2007-01-01

    Nanofabrication, at lateral resolutions beyond the capability of conventional optical lithography techniques, is demonstrated here. Femtosecond laser was used in conjunction with Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopes (NSOMs) to nanostructure thin metal films. Also, the possibility of using these nanostructured metal films as masks to effectively transfer the pattern to the underlying substrate by wet etching process is shown. Two different optical nearfiled processing schemes were studied for near-field nanostructuring. In the first scheme, local field enhancement in the near-field of a scanning probe microscope (SPM) probe tip irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses was utilized (apertureless NSOM mode) and as a second approach, femtosecond laser beam was spatially confined by cantilevered NSOM fiber tip (apertured NOSM mode). The minimized heat- and shock-affected areas introduced during ultrafast laser based machining process, allows processing of even high conductivity thin metal films with minimized formation of any interfacial compounds between the metal films and the underlying substrate. Potential applications of this method may be in the fields of nanolithography, nanofluidics, nanoscale chemical and gas sensors, high-density data storage, nano-opto-electronics, as well as biotechnology related applications

  3. Hierarchically nanostructured hydroxyapatite: hydrothermal synthesis, morphology control, growth mechanism, and biological activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming-Guo

    2012-01-01

    Hierarchically nanosized hydroxyapatite (HA) with flower-like structure assembled from nanosheets consisting of nanorod building blocks was successfully synthesized by using CaCl2, NaH2PO4, and potassium sodium tartrate via a hydrothermal method at 200°C for 24 hours. The effects of heating time and heating temperature on the products were investigated. As a chelating ligand and template molecule, the potassium sodium tartrate plays a key role in the formation of hierarchically nanostructured HA. On the basis of experimental results, a possible mechanism based on soft-template and self-assembly was proposed for the formation and growth of the hierarchically nanostructured HA. Cytotoxicity experiments indicated that the hierarchically nanostructured HA had good biocompatibility. It was shown by in-vitro experiments that mesenchymal stem cells could attach to the hierarchically nanostructured HA after being cultured for 48 hours. Objective The purpose of this study was to develop facile and effective methods for the synthesis of novel hydroxyapatite (HA) with hierarchical nanostructures assembled from independent and discrete nanobuilding blocks. Methods A simple hydrothermal approach was applied to synthesize HA by using CaCl2, NaH2PO4, and potassium sodium tartrate at 200°C for 24 hours. The cell cytotoxicity of the hierarchically nanostructured HA was tested by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. Results HA displayed the flower-like structure assembled from nanosheets consisting of nanorod building blocks. The potassium sodium tartrate was used as a chelating ligand, inducing the formation and self-assembly of HA nanorods. The heating time and heating temperature influenced the aggregation and morphology of HA. The cell viability did not decrease with the increasing concentration of hierarchically nanostructured HA added. Conclusion A novel, simple and reliable hydrothermal route had been developed for the synthesis of

  4. Hierarchically nanostructured hydroxyapatite: hydrothermal synthesis, morphology control, growth mechanism, and biological activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma MG

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ming-Guo MaInstitute of Biomass Chemistry and Technology, College of Materials Science and Technology, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Hierarchically nanosized hydroxyapatite (HA with flower-like structure assembled from nanosheets consisting of nanorod building blocks was successfully synthesized by using CaCl2, NaH2PO4, and potassium sodium tartrate via a hydrothermal method at 200°C for 24 hours. The effects of heating time and heating temperature on the products were investigated. As a chelating ligand and template molecule, the potassium sodium tartrate plays a key role in the formation of hierarchically nanostructured HA. On the basis of experimental results, a possible mechanism based on soft-template and self-assembly was proposed for the formation and growth of the hierarchically nanostructured HA. Cytotoxicity experiments indicated that the hierarchically nanostructured HA had good biocompatibility. It was shown by in-vitro experiments that mesenchymal stem cells could attach to the hierarchically nanostructured HA after being cultured for 48 hours.Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop facile and effective methods for the synthesis of novel hydroxyapatite (HA with hierarchical nanostructures assembled from independent and discrete nanobuilding blocks.Methods: A simple hydrothermal approach was applied to synthesize HA by using CaCl2, NaH2PO4, and potassium sodium tartrate at 200°C for 24 hours. The cell cytotoxicity of the hierarchically nanostructured HA was tested by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay.Results: HA displayed the flower-like structure assembled from nanosheets consisting of nanorod building blocks. The potassium sodium tartrate was used as a chelating ligand, inducing the formation and self-assembly of HA nanorods. The heating time and heating temperature influenced the aggregation and morphology of HA. The cell viability did

  5. Synthesis, characterization and biological studies of copper oxide nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jillani, Saquf; Jelani, Mohsan; Hassan, Najam Ul; Ahmad, Shahbaz; Hafeez, Muhammad

    2018-04-01

    The development of synthetic methods has been broadly accepted as an area of fundamental importance to the understanding and application of nanoscale materials. It allows the individual to modulate basic parameters such as morphology, particle size, size distributions, and composition. Several methods have been developed to synthesize CuO nanostructures with diverse morphologies, sizes, and dimensions using different chemical and physical based approaches. In this work, CuO nanostructures have been synthesized by aqueous precipitation method and simple chemical deposition method. The characterization of these products has been carried out by the x-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and UV–vis spectroscopy. Biological activity such as antibacterial nature of synthesized CuO is also explored. XRD peaks analysis revealed the monoclinic crystalline phase of copper oxide nanostructures. While the rod-like and particle-like morphologies have been observed in SEM results. FTIR spectra have confirmed the formation of CuO nanoparticles by exhibiting its characteristic peaks corresponding to 494 cm‑1 and 604 cm‑1. The energy band gap of the as-prepared CuO nanostructures determined from UV–vis spectra is found to be 2.18 eV and 2.0 eV for precipitation and chemically deposited samples respectively. The antibacterial activity results described that the synthesized CuO nanoparticles showed better activity against Staphylococcus aureus. The investigated results suggested the synthesis of highly stable CuO nanoparticles with significant antibacterial activities.

  6. Synthesis, morphology, optical and photocatalytic performance of nanostructured β-Ga2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girija, K.; Thirumalairajan, S.; Avadhani, G.S.; Mangalaraj, D.; Ponpandian, N.; Viswanathan, C.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Nanostructures of β-Ga 2 O 3 were prepared using facile reflux condensation process. ► The pH of the reaction mixture shows evident influence on the size and shape of the nanostructures formed. ► The nanostructures exhibited good photocatalytic activity toward Rhodamine B and was found to be superior for higher pH value. - Abstract: Fine powders of β-Ga 2 O 3 nanostructures were prepared via low temperature reflux condensation method by varying the pH value without using any surfactant. The pH value of reaction mixture had great influence on the morphology of final products. High crystalline single phase β-Ga 2 O 3 nanostructures were obtained by thermal treatment at 900 °C which was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The morphological analysis revealed rod like nanostructures at lower and higher pH values of 6 and 10, while spindle like structures were obtained at pH = 8. The phase purity and presence of vibrational bands were identified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The optical absorbance spectrum showed intense absorption features in the UV spectral region. A broad blue emission peak centered at 441 nm due to donor–acceptor gallium–oxygen vacancy pair recombination appeared. The photocatalytic activity toward Rhodamine B under visible light irradiation was higher for nanorods at pH 10

  7. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of C@ZnO core-shell nanostructures and its photoluminescence property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Tao; Yu, Shanwen; Fang, Xiaoxin; Huang, Honghong; Li, Lun [School of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan (China); Wang, Xiuyuan [College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan (China); Wang, Huihu, E-mail: wanghuihu@mail.hbut.edu.cn [School of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan (China); Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory of Green Materials for Light Industry, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • C@ZnO nanostructures were synthesized by a facile hydrothermal carbonization method. • Glucose content has a great influence on the microstructure of C@ZnO nanostructures. • An ultrathin amorphous carbon layer enhances the adsorption capacity of C@ZnO. • C@ZnO nanostructures exhibit the improved photocatalytic activity and stability. - Abstract: An ultrathin layer of amorphous carbon coated C@ZnO core-shell nanostructures were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal carbonization process using glucose as precursor in this work. X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and diffuse reflectance UV–vis spectroscopy (DRS) were used for the characterization of as-prepared samples. Photoluminescence (PL) properties of C@ZnO samples were investigated using PL spectroscopy. The microstructure analysis results show that the glucose content has a great influence on the size, morphology, crystallinity and surface chemical states of C@ZnO nanostructures. Moreover, the as-prepared C@ZnO core-shell nanostructures exhibit the enhanced photocatalytic activity and good photostability for methyl orange dye degradation due to its high adsorption ability and its improved optical characteristics.

  8. Growth of hybrid carbon nanostructures on iron-decorated ZnO nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbuyisa, Puleng N.; Rigoni, Federica; Sangaletti, Luigi; Ponzoni, Stefano; Pagliara, Stefania; Goldoni, Andrea; Ndwandwe, Muzi; Cepek, Cinzia

    2016-04-01

    A novel carbon-based nanostructured material, which includes carbon nanotubes (CNTs), porous carbon, nanostructured ZnO and Fe nanoparticles, has been synthetized using catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of acetylene on vertically aligned ZnO nanorods (NRs). The deposition of Fe before the CVD process induces the presence of dense CNTs in addition to the variety of nanostructures already observed on the process done on the bare NRs, which range from amorphous graphitic carbon up to nanostructured dendritic carbon films, where the NRs are partially or completely etched. The combination of scanning electron microscopy and in situ photoemission spectroscopy indicate that Fe enhances the ZnO etching, and that the CNT synthesis is favoured by the reduced Fe mobility due to the strong interaction between Fe and the NRs, and to the presence of many defects, formed during the CVD process. Our results demonstrate that the resulting new hybrid shows a higher sensitivity to ammonia gas at ambient conditions (∼60 ppb) than the carbon nanostructures obtained without the aid of Fe, the bare ZnO NRs, or other one-dimensional carbon nanostructures, making this system of potential interest for environmental ammonia monitoring. Finally, in view of the possible application in nanoscale optoelectronics, the photoexcited carrier behaviour in these hybrid systems has been characterized by time-resolved reflectivity measurements.

  9. Fabrication, Characterization, Properties, and Applications of Low-Dimensional BiFeO3 Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-dimensional BiFeO3 nanostructures (e.g., nanocrystals, nanowires, nanotubes, and nanoislands have received considerable attention due to their novel size-dependent properties and outstanding multiferroic properties at room temperature. In recent years, much progress has been made both in fabrications and (microstructural, electrical, and magnetic in characterizations of BiFeO3 low-dimensional nanostructures. An overview of the state of art in BiFeO3 low-dimensional nanostructures is presented. First, we review the fabrications of high-quality BiFeO3 low-dimensional nanostructures via a variety of techniques, and then the structural characterizations and physical properties of the BiFeO3 low-dimensional nanostructures are summarized. Their potential applications in the next-generation magnetoelectric random access memories and photovoltaic devices are also discussed. Finally, we conclude this review by providing our perspectives to the future researches of BiFeO3 low-dimensional nanostructures and some key problems are also outlined.

  10. Printable nanostructured silicon solar cells for high-performance, large-area flexible photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Min; Biswas, Roshni; Li, Weigu; Kang, Dongseok; Chan, Lesley; Yoon, Jongseung

    2014-10-28

    Nanostructured forms of crystalline silicon represent an attractive materials building block for photovoltaics due to their potential benefits to significantly reduce the consumption of active materials, relax the requirement of materials purity for high performance, and hence achieve greatly improved levelized cost of energy. Despite successful demonstrations for their concepts over the past decade, however, the practical application of nanostructured silicon solar cells for large-scale implementation has been hampered by many existing challenges associated with the consumption of the entire wafer or expensive source materials, difficulties to precisely control materials properties and doping characteristics, or restrictions on substrate materials and scalability. Here we present a highly integrable materials platform of nanostructured silicon solar cells that can overcome these limitations. Ultrathin silicon solar microcells integrated with engineered photonic nanostructures are fabricated directly from wafer-based source materials in configurations that can lower the materials cost and can be compatible with deterministic assembly procedures to allow programmable, large-scale distribution, unlimited choices of module substrates, as well as lightweight, mechanically compliant constructions. Systematic studies on optical and electrical properties, photovoltaic performance in experiments, as well as numerical modeling elucidate important design rules for nanoscale photon management with ultrathin, nanostructured silicon solar cells and their interconnected, mechanically flexible modules, where we demonstrate 12.4% solar-to-electric energy conversion efficiency for printed ultrathin (∼ 8 μm) nanostructured silicon solar cells when configured with near-optimal designs of rear-surface nanoposts, antireflection coating, and back-surface reflector.

  11. Multi-periodic nanostructures for photon control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kluge, Christian; Adam, Jost; Barié, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    We propose multi-periodic nanostructures yielded by superposition of multiple binary gratings for wide control over photon emission in thin-film devices. We present wavelength- and angle-resolved photoluminescence measurements of multi-periodically nanostructured organic light-emitting layers...

  12. Geometry and magnetism of L10 nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorge, K.D.; Skomski, R.; Daniil, M.; Michalski, S.; Gao, L.; Zhou, J.; Yan, M.; Sui, Y.; Kirby, R.D.; Liou, S.H.; Sellmyer, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    The fabrication and magnetism of L1 0 nanostructures with different shapes (such as nanoparticles and nanotubes) is investigated. These nanostructures are produced by hydrogen processing and focused ion beam milling. The structures exhibit interesting reversal modes and are of present or potential interest for sensors and imaging, as well as magnetic recording

  13. Spin tunneling and manipulation in nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, E Ya; Ban, Yue; Gulyaev, L V; Khomitsky, D V

    2012-09-01

    The results for joint effects of tunneling and spin-orbit coupling on spin dynamics in nanostructures are presented for systems with discrete and continuous spectra. We demonstrate that tunneling plays the crucial role in the spin dynamics and the abilities of spin manipulation by external electric field. This result can be important for design of nanostructures-based spintronics devices.

  14. Catalyst-free growth and tailoring morphology of zinc oxide nanostructures by plasma-enhanced deposition at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W. Z. [Quanzhou Normal University, Key Laboratory of Information Functional Material for Fujian Higher Education, College of Physics & Information Engineering (China); Wang, B. B. [Chongqing University of Technology, College of Chemical Engineering (China); Qu, Y. Z.; Huang, X. [Xiamen University, College of Energy, Xiang’an Campus (China); Ostrikov, K. [Queensland University of Technology, School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering (Australia); Levchenko, I.; Xu, S. [Nanyang Technological University, Plasma Sources and Applications Centre, National Institute of Education (Singapore); Cheng, Q. J., E-mail: qijin.cheng@xmu.edu.cn [Xiamen University, College of Energy, Xiang’an Campus (China)

    2017-03-15

    ZnO nanostructures were grown under different deposition conditions from Zn films pre-deposited onto Si substrates in O{sub 2}-Ar plasma, ignited in an advanced custom-designed plasma-enhanced horizontal tube furnace deposition system. The morphology and structure of the synthesized ZnO nanostructures were systematically and extensively investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. It is shown that the morphology of ZnO nanostructures changes from the hybrid ZnO/nanoparticle and nanorod system to the mixture of ZnO nanosheets and nanorods when the growth temperature increases, and the density of ZnO nanorods increases with the increase of oxygen flow rate. The formation of ZnO nanostructures was explained in terms of motion of Zn atoms on the Zn nanoparticle surfaces, and to the local melting of Zn nanoparticles or nanosheets. Moreover, the photoluminescence properties of ZnO nanostructures were studied, and it was revealed that the photoluminescence spectrum features two strong ultraviolet bands at about 378 and 399 nm and a series of weak blue bands within a range of 440–484 nm, related to the emissions of free excitons, near-band edge, and defects of ZnO nanostructures. The obtained results enrich our knowledge on the synthesis of ZnO-based nanostructures and contribute to the development of ZnO-based optoelectronic devices.

  15. Catalyst-free growth and tailoring morphology of zinc oxide nanostructures by plasma-enhanced deposition at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W. Z.; Wang, B. B.; Qu, Y. Z.; Huang, X.; Ostrikov, K.; Levchenko, I.; Xu, S.; Cheng, Q. J.

    2017-01-01

    ZnO nanostructures were grown under different deposition conditions from Zn films pre-deposited onto Si substrates in O 2 -Ar plasma, ignited in an advanced custom-designed plasma-enhanced horizontal tube furnace deposition system. The morphology and structure of the synthesized ZnO nanostructures were systematically and extensively investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. It is shown that the morphology of ZnO nanostructures changes from the hybrid ZnO/nanoparticle and nanorod system to the mixture of ZnO nanosheets and nanorods when the growth temperature increases, and the density of ZnO nanorods increases with the increase of oxygen flow rate. The formation of ZnO nanostructures was explained in terms of motion of Zn atoms on the Zn nanoparticle surfaces, and to the local melting of Zn nanoparticles or nanosheets. Moreover, the photoluminescence properties of ZnO nanostructures were studied, and it was revealed that the photoluminescence spectrum features two strong ultraviolet bands at about 378 and 399 nm and a series of weak blue bands within a range of 440–484 nm, related to the emissions of free excitons, near-band edge, and defects of ZnO nanostructures. The obtained results enrich our knowledge on the synthesis of ZnO-based nanostructures and contribute to the development of ZnO-based optoelectronic devices.

  16. Synthesis of carbon nanostructures from high density polyethylene (HDPE) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) waste by chemical vapour deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, M. N. M.; Hashim, M. S.; Hussin, R.; Aida, S.; Kamdi, Z.; Ainuddin, AR; Yunos, MZ

    2017-10-01

    In this study, carbon nanostructures were synthesized from High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) and Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) waste by single-stage chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method. In CVD, iron was used as catalyst and pyrolitic of carbon source was conducted at temperature 700, 800 and 900°C for 30 minutes. Argon gas was used as carrier gas with flow at 90 sccm. The synthesized carbon nanostructures were characterized by FESEM, EDS and calculation of carbon yield (%). FESEM micrograph shows that the carbon nanostructures were only grown as nanofilament when synthesized from PET waste. The synthesization of carbon nanostructure at 700°C was produced smooth and the smallest diameter nanofilament compared to others. The carbon yield of synthesized carbon nanostructures from PET was lower from HDPE. Furthermore, the carbon yield is recorded to increase with increasing of reaction temperature for all samples. Elemental study by EDS analysis were carried out and the formation of carbon nanostructures was confirmed after CVD process. Utilization of polymer waste to produce carbon nanostructures is beneficial to ensure that the carbon nanotechnology will be sustained in future.

  17. The influence of projectile ion induced chemistry on surface pattern formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karmakar, Prasanta, E-mail: prasantak@vecc.gov.in [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Satpati, Biswarup [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2016-07-14

    We report the critical role of projectile induced chemical inhomogeneity on surface nanostructure formation. Experimental inconsistency is common for low energy ion beam induced nanostructure formation in the presence of uncontrolled and complex contamination. To explore the precise role of contamination on such structure formation during low energy ion bombardment, a simple and clean experimental study is performed by selecting mono-element semiconductors as the target and chemically inert or reactive ion beams as the projectile as well as the source of controlled contamination. It is shown by Atomic Force Microscopy, Cross-sectional Transmission Electron Microscopy, and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy measurements that bombardment of nitrogen-like reactive ions on Silicon and Germanium surfaces forms a chemical compound at impact zones. Continuous bombardment of the same ions generates surface instability due to unequal sputtering and non-uniform re-arrangement of the elemental atom and compound. This instability leads to ripple formation during ion bombardment. For Argon-like chemically inert ion bombardment, the chemical inhomogeneity induced boost is absent; as a result, no ripples are observed in the same ion energy and fluence.

  18. Vicinal surfaces for functional nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegenkamp, Christoph

    2009-01-07

    Vicinal surfaces are currently the focus of research. The regular arrangements of atomic steps on a mesoscopic scale reveal the possibility to functionalize these surfaces for technical applications, e.g. nanowires, catalysts, etc. The steps of the vicinal surface are well-defined defect structures of atomic size for nucleation of low-dimensional nanostructures. The concentration and therefore the coupling between the nanostructures can be tuned over a wide range by simply changing the inclination angle of the substrate. However, the coupling of these nano-objects to the substrate is just as important in controlling their electronic or chemical properties and making a functionality useable. On the basis of stepped insulating films, these aspects are fulfilled and will be considered in the first part of this review. Recent results for the epitaxial growth of wide bandgap insulating films (CaF(2), MgO, NaCl, BaSrO) on metallic and semiconducting vicinal substrates (Si(100), Ge(100), Ag(100)) will be presented. The change of the electronic structure, the adsorption behavior as well as the kinetics and energetics of color centers in the presence of steps is discussed. The successful bridging of the gap between the atomic and mesoscopic world, i.e. the functionalization of vicinal surfaces by nanostructures, is demonstrated in the second part by metal adsorption on semiconducting surfaces. For (sub)monolayer coverage these systems have in common that the surface states do not hybridize with the support, i.e. the semiconducting surfaces are insulating. Here I will focus on the latest results of macroscopic transport measurements on Pb quantum wires grown on vicinal Si(111) showing indeed a one-dimensional transport behavior.

  19. Vicinal surfaces for functional nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegenkamp, Christoph [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Appelstrasse 2, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)], E-mail: tegenkamp@fkp.uni-hannover.de

    2009-01-07

    Vicinal surfaces are currently the focus of research. The regular arrangements of atomic steps on a mesoscopic scale reveal the possibility to functionalize these surfaces for technical applications, e.g. nanowires, catalysts, etc. The steps of the vicinal surface are well-defined defect structures of atomic size for nucleation of low-dimensional nanostructures. The concentration and therefore the coupling between the nanostructures can be tuned over a wide range by simply changing the inclination angle of the substrate. However, the coupling of these nano-objects to the substrate is just as important in controlling their electronic or chemical properties and making a functionality useable. On the basis of stepped insulating films, these aspects are fulfilled and will be considered in the first part of this review. Recent results for the epitaxial growth of wide bandgap insulating films (CaF{sub 2}, MgO, NaCl, BaSrO) on metallic and semiconducting vicinal substrates (Si(100), Ge(100), Ag(100)) will be presented. The change of the electronic structure, the adsorption behavior as well as the kinetics and energetics of color centers in the presence of steps is discussed. The successful bridging of the gap between the atomic and mesoscopic world, i.e. the functionalization of vicinal surfaces by nanostructures,