WorldWideScience

Sample records for nanosecond molecular relaxations

  1. Picosecond absorption relaxation measured with nanosecond laser photoacoustics

    OpenAIRE

    Danielli, Amos; Favazza, Christopher P.; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-01-01

    Picosecond absorption relaxation—central to many disciplines—is typically measured by ultrafast (femtosecond or picosecond) pump-probe techniques, which however are restricted to optically thin and weakly scattering materials or require artificial sample preparation. Here, we developed a reflection-mode relaxation photoacoustic microscope based on a nanosecond laser and measured picosecond absorption relaxation times. The relaxation times of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin molecules, b...

  2. Picosecond absorption relaxation measured with nanosecond laser photoacoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielli, Amos; Favazza, Christopher P; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V

    2010-10-18

    Picosecond absorption relaxation-central to many disciplines-is typically measured by ultrafast (femtosecond or picosecond) pump-probe techniques, which however are restricted to optically thin and weakly scattering materials or require artificial sample preparation. Here, we developed a reflection-mode relaxation photoacoustic microscope based on a nanosecond laser and measured picosecond absorption relaxation times. The relaxation times of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin molecules, both possessing extremely low fluorescence quantum yields, were measured at 576 nm. The added advantages in dispersion susceptibility, laser-wavelength availability, reflection sensing, and expense foster the study of natural-including strongly scattering and nonfluorescent-materials.

  3. Balanced cross-rate model for saturated molecular fluorescence in flames using a nanosecond pulse length laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucht, R.P.; Sweeney, D.W.; Laurendeau, N.M.

    1980-01-01

    The balanced cross-rate model is proposed to analyze laser-induced molecular fluorescence signals when the laser pulse length is of the order of nanoseconds. Nanosecond pulse length lasers. specifically Q-switched Nd:YAG-pumped dye lasers, are attractive for saturated molecular fluorescence spectroscopy because of their high peak power and because of their short pulse length minimizes the risk of laser-induced chemistry. In the balanced cross-rate model, single upper and lower rotational levels are assumed to be directly coupled by the laser radiation. Because the laser-induced processes which couple these levels are so fast at saturation intensities, a steady state is established between the two levels within picoseconds. Provided that the total population of the two laser-coupled rotational levels is constant during the laser pulse, the total molecular population can be calculated from the observed upper rotational level population using a two-level saturation model and Boltzmann statistics. Numerical simulation of the laser excitation dynamics of OH in an atmospheric pressure H 2 /O 2 /N 2 flame indicates that the balanced cross-rate model will give accurate results provided that the rotational relaxation rates in the upper and lower sets of rotational levels are approximately equal

  4. Molecular potentials and relaxation dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karo, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The use of empirical pseudopotentials, in evaluating interatomic potentials, provides an inexpensive and convenient method for obtaining highly accurate potential curves and permits the modeling of core-valence correlation, and the inclusion of relativistic effects when these are significant. Recent calculations of the X 1 Σ + and a 3 Σ + states of LiH, NaH, KH, RbH, and CsH and the X 2 Σ + states of their anions are discussed. Pseudopotentials, including core polarization terms, have been used to replace the core electrons, and this has been coupled with the development of compact, higly-optimized basis sets for the corresponding one- and two-electron atoms. Comparisons of the neutral potential curves with experiment and other ab initio calculations show good agreement (within 1000 cm -1 over most of the potential curves) with the difference curves being considerably more accurate. In the method of computer molecular dynamics, the force acting on each particle is the resultant of all interactions with other atoms in the neighborhood and is obtained as the derivative of an effective many-body potential. Exploiting the pseudopotential approach, in obtaining the appropriate potentials may be very fruitful in the future. In the molecular dynamics example considered here, the conventional sum-of-pairwise-interatomic-potentials (SPP) approximation is used with the potentials derived either from experimental spectroscopic data or from Hartree-Fock calculations. The problem is the collisional de-excitation of vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen at an Fe surface. The calculations have been carried out for an initial vibrotational state v = 8, J = 1 and a translational temperature corresponding to a gas temperature of 500 0 K. Different angles of approach and different initial random impact points on the surface have been selected. For any given collision with the wall, the molecule may pick up or lose vibrotatonal and translational energy

  5. Transmembrane molecular transport during versus after extremely large, nanosecond electric pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kyle C; Weaver, James C

    2011-08-19

    Recently there has been intense and growing interest in the non-thermal biological effects of nanosecond electric pulses, particularly apoptosis induction. These effects have been hypothesized to result from the widespread creation of small, lipidic pores in the plasma and organelle membranes of cells (supra-electroporation) and, more specifically, ionic and molecular transport through these pores. Here we show that transport occurs overwhelmingly after pulsing. First, we show that the electrical drift distance for typical charged solutes during nanosecond pulses (up to 100 ns), even those with very large magnitudes (up to 10 MV/m), ranges from only a fraction of the membrane thickness (5 nm) to several membrane thicknesses. This is much smaller than the diameter of a typical cell (∼16 μm), which implies that molecular drift transport during nanosecond pulses is necessarily minimal. This implication is not dependent on assumptions about pore density or the molecular flux through pores. Second, we show that molecular transport resulting from post-pulse diffusion through minimum-size pores is orders of magnitude larger than electrical drift-driven transport during nanosecond pulses. While field-assisted charge entry and the magnitude of flux favor transport during nanosecond pulses, these effects are too small to overcome the orders of magnitude more time available for post-pulse transport. Therefore, the basic conclusion that essentially all transmembrane molecular transport occurs post-pulse holds across the plausible range of relevant parameters. Our analysis shows that a primary direct consequence of nanosecond electric pulses is the creation (or maintenance) of large populations of small pores in cell membranes that govern post-pulse transmembrane transport of small ions and molecules. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Capturing molecular multimode relaxation processes in excitable gases based on decomposition of acoustic relaxation spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming; Liu, Tingting; Wang, Shu; Zhang, Kesheng

    2017-08-01

    Existing two-frequency reconstructive methods can only capture primary (single) molecular relaxation processes in excitable gases. In this paper, we present a reconstructive method based on the novel decomposition of frequency-dependent acoustic relaxation spectra to capture the entire molecular multimode relaxation process. This decomposition of acoustic relaxation spectra is developed from the frequency-dependent effective specific heat, indicating that a multi-relaxation process is the sum of the interior single-relaxation processes. Based on this decomposition, we can reconstruct the entire multi-relaxation process by capturing the relaxation times and relaxation strengths of N interior single-relaxation processes, using the measurements of acoustic absorption and sound speed at 2N frequencies. Experimental data for the gas mixtures CO2-N2 and CO2-O2 validate our decomposition and reconstruction approach.

  7. Accelerating convergence of molecular dynamics-based structural relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Asbjørn

    2005-01-01

    We describe strategies to accelerate the terminal stage of molecular dynamics (MD)based relaxation algorithms, where a large fraction of the computational resources are used. First, we analyze the qualitative and quantitative behavior of the QuickMin family of MD relaxation algorithms and explore...

  8. Nanosecond and femtosecond mass spectroscopic analysis of a molecular beam produced by the spray-jet technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Toshiki; Shinohara, Hidenori; Kamikado, Toshiya; Okuno, Yoshishige; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Mashiko, Shinro; Yokoyama, Shiyoshi

    2008-01-01

    The spray-jet molecular beam apparatus enabled us to produce a molecular beam of non-volatile molecules under high vacuum from a sprayed mist of sample solutions. The apparatus has been used in spectroscopic studies and as a means of molecular beam deposition. We analyzed the molecular beam, consisting of non-volatile, solvent, and carrier-gas molecules, by using femtosecond- and nanosecond- laser mass spectroscopy. The information thus obtained provided insight into the molecular beam produced by the spray-jet technique

  9. Molecular signatures in femtosecond laser-induced organic plasmas: comparison with nanosecond laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Jorge; Moros, Javier; Laserna, J Javier

    2016-01-28

    During the last few years, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has evolved significantly in the molecular sensing area through the optical monitoring of emissions from organic plasmas. Large efforts have been made to study the formation pathways of diatomic radicals as well as their connections with the bonding framework of molecular solids. Together with the structural and chemical-physical properties of molecules, laser ablation parameters seem to be closely tied to the observed spectral signatures. This research focuses on evaluating the impact of laser pulse duration on the production of diatomic species that populate plasmas of organic materials. Differences in relative intensities of spectral signatures from the plasmas of several organic molecules induced in femtosecond (fs) and nanosecond (ns) ablation regimes have been studied. Beyond the abundance and origin of diatomic radicals that seed the plasma, findings reveal the crucial role of the ablation regime in the breakage pattern of the molecule. The laser pulse duration dictates the fragments and atoms resulting from the vaporized molecules, promoting some formation routes at the expense of other paths. The larger amount of fragments formed by fs pulses advocates a direct release of native bonds and a subsequent seeding of the plasma with diatomic species. In contrast, in the ns ablation regime, the atomic recombinations and single displacement processes dominate the contribution to diatomic radicals, as long as atomization of molecules prevails over their progressive decomposition. Consequently, fs-LIBS better reflects correlations between strengths of emissions from diatomic species and molecular structure as compared to ns-LIBS. These new results entail a further step towards the specificity in the analysis of molecular solids by fs-LIBS.

  10. Water interactions with varying molecular states of bovine casein: 2H NMR relaxation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumosinski, T.F.; Pessen, H.; Prestrelski, S.J.; Farrell, H.M. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The caseins occur in milk as spherical colloidal complexes of protein and salts with an average diameter of 1200 A, the casein micelles. Removal of Ca2+ is thought to result in their dissociation into smaller protein complexes stabilized by hydrophobic interactions and called submicelles. Whether these submicelles actually occur within the micelles as discrete particles interconnected by calcium phosphate salt bridges has been the subject of much controversy. A variety of physical measurements have shown that casein micelles contain an inordinately high amount of trapped water (2 to 7 g H 2 O/g protein). With this in mind it was of interest to determine if NMR relaxation measurements could detect the presence of this trapped water within the micelles, and to evaluate whether it is a continuum with picosecond correlation times or is associated in part with discrete submicellar structures with nanosecond motions. For this purpose the variations in 2 H NMR longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates of water with protein concentration were determined for bovine casein at various temperatures, under both submicellar and micellar conditions. D 2 O was used instead of H 2 O to eliminate cross-relaxation effects. From the protein concentration dependence of the relaxation rates, the second virial coefficient of the protein was obtained by nonlinear regression analysis. Using either an isotropic tumbling or an intermediate asymmetry model, degrees of hydration, v, and correlation times, tau c, were calculated for the caseins; from the latter parameter the Stokes radius, r, was obtained. Next, estimates of molecular weights were obtained from r and the partial specific volume. Values were in the range of those published from other methodologies for the submicelles

  11. Molecular dynamics study on the relaxation properties of bilayered ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-08-31

    Aug 31, 2017 ... Abstract. The influence of defects on the relaxation properties of bilayered graphene (BLG) has been studied by molecular dynamics simulation in nanometre sizes. Type and position of defects were taken into account in the calculated model. The results show that great changes begin to occur in the ...

  12. Thermal relaxation of molecular oxygen in collisions with nitrogen atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrienko, Daniil A., E-mail: daniila@umich.edu; Boyd, Iain D. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, 1320 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48108 (United States)

    2016-07-07

    Investigation of O{sub 2}–N collisions is performed by means of the quasi-classical trajectory method on the two lowest ab initio potential energy surfaces at temperatures relevant to hypersonic flows. A complete set of bound–bound and bound–free transition rates is obtained for each precollisional rovibrational state. Special attention is paid to the vibrational and rotational relaxations of oxygen as a result of chemically non-reactive interaction with nitrogen atoms. The vibrational relaxation of oxygen partially occurs via the formation of an intermediate NO{sub 2} complex. The efficient energy randomization results in rapid vibrational relaxation at low temperatures, compared to other molecular systems with a purely repulsive potential. The vibrational relaxation time, computed by means of master equation studies, is nearly an order of magnitude lower than the relaxation time in N{sub 2}–O collisions. The rotational nonequilibrium starts to play a significant effect at translational temperatures above 8000 K. The present work provides convenient relations for the vibrational and rotational relaxation times as well as for the quasi-steady dissociation rate coefficient and thus fills a gap in data due to a lack of experimental measurements for this system.

  13. Stretched exponential relaxation in molecular and electronic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J. C.

    1996-09-01

    Stretched exponential relaxation, 0034-4885/59/9/003/img1, fits many relaxation processes in disordered and quenched electronic and molecular systems, but it is widely believed that this function has no microscopic basis, especially in the case of molecular relaxation. For electronic relaxation the appearance of the stretched exponential is often described in the context of dispersive transport, where 0034-4885/59/9/003/img2 is treated as an adjustable parameter, but in almost all cases it is generally assumed that no microscopic meaning can be assigned to 0034-4885/59/9/003/img3 even at 0034-4885/59/9/003/img4, a glass transition temperature. We show that for molecular relaxation 0034-4885/59/9/003/img5 can be understood, providing that one separates extrinsic and intrinsic effects, and that the intrinsic effects are dominated by two magic numbers, 0034-4885/59/9/003/img6 for short-range forces, and 0034-4885/59/9/003/img7 for long-range Coulomb forces, as originally observed by Kohlrausch for the decay of residual charge on a Leyden jar. Our mathematical model treats relaxation kinetics using the Lifshitz - Kac - Luttinger diffusion to traps depletion model in a configuration space of effective dimensionality, the latter being determined using axiomatic set theory and Phillips - Thorpe constraint theory. The experiments discussed include ns neutron scattering experiments, particularly those based on neutron spin echoes which measure S( Q,t) directly, and the traditional linear response measurements which span the range from 0034-4885/59/9/003/img8 to s, as collected and analysed phenomenologically by Angell, Ngai, Böhmer and others. The electronic materials discussed include a-Si:H, granular 0034-4885/59/9/003/img9, semiconductor nanocrystallites, charge density waves in 0034-4885/59/9/003/img10, spin glasses, and vortex glasses in high-temperature semiconductors. The molecular materials discussed include polymers, network glasses, electrolytes and alcohols, Van

  14. Stretched exponential relaxation in molecular and electronic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    Stretched exponential relaxation, exp[-(t/τ) β ], fits many relaxation processes in disordered and quenched electronic and molecular systems, but it is widely believed that this function has no microscopic basis, especially in the case of molecular relaxation. For electronic relaxation the appearance of the stretched exponential is often described in the context of dispersive transport, where β is treated as an adjustable parameter, but in almost all cases it is generally assumed that no microscopic meaning can be assigned to 0 g , a glass transition temperature. We show that for molecular relaxation β(T g ) can be understood, providing that one separates extrinsic and intrinsic effects, and that the intrinsic effects are dominated by two magic numbers, β SR =3/5 for short-range forces, and β K =3/7 for long-range Coulomb forces, as originally observed by Kohlrausch for the decay of residual charge on a Leyden jar. Our mathematical model treats relaxation kinetics using the Lifshitz-Kac-Luttinger diffusion to traps depletion model in a configuration space of effective dimensionality, the latter being determined using axiomatic set theory and Phillips-Thorpe constraint theory. The experiments discussed include ns neutron scattering experiments, particularly those based on neutron spin echoes which measure S(Q, t) directly, and the traditional linear response measurements which span the range from μs to s, as collected and analysed phenomenologically by Angell, Ngai, Boehmer and others. The electronic materials discussed include a-Si:H, granular C 60 , semiconductor nanocrystallites, charge density waves in TaS 3 , spin glasses, and vortex glasses in high-temperature semiconductors. The molecular materials discussed include polymers, network glasses, electrolytes and alcohols, Van der Waals supercooled liquids and glasses, orientational glasses, water, fused salts, and heme proteins. In the intrinsic cases the theory of β(T g ) is often accurate to 2%, which

  15. Stability and suppression of turbulence in relaxing molecular gas flows

    CERN Document Server

    Grigoryev, Yurii N

    2017-01-01

    This book presents an in-depth systematic investigation of a dissipative effect which manifests itself as the growth of hydrodynamic stability and suppression of turbulence in relaxing molecular gas flows. The work describes the theoretical foundations of a new way to control stability and laminar turbulent transitions in aerodynamic flows. It develops hydrodynamic models for describing thermal nonequilibrium gas flows which allow the consideration of suppression of inviscid acoustic waves in 2D shear flows. Then, nonlinear evolution of large-scale vortices and Kelvin-Helmholtz waves in relaxing shear flows are studied. Critical Reynolds numbers in supersonic Couette flows are calculated analytically and numerically within the framework of both linear and nonlinear classical energy hydrodynamic stability theories. The calculations clearly show that the relaxation process can appreciably delay the laminar-turbulent transition. The aim of the book is to show the new dissipative effect, which can be used for flo...

  16. Stability investigations of relaxing molecular gas flows. Results and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'ev, Yurii N.; Ershov, Igor V.

    2017-10-01

    This article presents results of systematic investigations of a dissipative effect which manifests itself as the growth of hydrodynamic stability and suppression of turbulence in relaxing molecular gas flows. The effect can be a new way for control stability and laminar turbulent transition in aerodynamic flows. The consideration of suppression of inviscid acoustic waves in 2D shear flows is presented. Nonlinear evolution of large-scale vortices and Kelvin — Helmholtz waves in relaxing shear flows are studied. Critical Reynolds numbers in supersonic Couette flows are calculated analytically and numerically within the framework of both classical linear and nonlinear energy hydrodynamic stability theories. The calculations clearly show that the relaxation process can appreciably delay the laminar-turbulent transition. The aim of this article is to show the new dissipative effect, which can be used for flow control and laminarization.

  17. TURBULENCE DECAY AND CLOUD CORE RELAXATION IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Yang; Law, Chung K.; Xu, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    The turbulent motion within molecular clouds is a key factor controlling star formation. Turbulence supports molecular cloud cores from evolving to gravitational collapse and hence sets a lower bound on the size of molecular cloud cores in which star formation can occur. On the other hand, without a continuous external energy source maintaining the turbulence, such as in molecular clouds, the turbulence decays with an energy dissipation time comparable to the dynamic timescale of clouds, which could change the size limits obtained from Jean's criterion by assuming constant turbulence intensities. Here we adopt scaling relations of physical variables in decaying turbulence to analyze its specific effects on the formation of stars. We find that the decay of turbulence provides an additional approach for Jeans' criterion to be achieved, after which gravitational infall governs the motion of the cloud core. This epoch of turbulence decay is defined as cloud core relaxation. The existence of cloud core relaxation provides a more complete understanding of the effect of the competition between turbulence and gravity on the dynamics of molecular cloud cores and star formation

  18. AC relaxation in the iron(8) molecular magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Geordie

    2000-11-01

    We investigate the low energy magnetic relaxation characteristics of the ``iron eight'' (Fe8) molecular magnet. Each molecule in this material contains a cluster of eight Fe 3+ ions surrounded by organic ligands. The molecules arrange themselves into a regular lattice with triclinic symmetry. At sufficiently low energies, the electronic spins of the Fe3+ ions lock together into a ``quantum rotator'' with spin S = 10. We derive a low energy effective Hamiltonian for this system, valid for temperatures less than Tc ~ 360 mK , where Tc is the temperature at which the Fe8 system crosses over into a ``quantum regime'' where relaxation characteristics become temperature independent. We show that in this regime the dominant environmental coupling is to the environmental spin bath in the molecule. We show how to explicitly calculate these couplings, given crystallographic information about the molecule, and do this for Fe8. We use this information to calculate the linewidth, topological decoherence and orthogonality blocking parameters. All of these quantities are shown to exhibit an isotope effect. We demonstrate that orthogonality blocking in Fe8 is significant and suppresses coherent tunneling. We then use our low energy effective Hamiltonian to calculate the single-molecule relaxation rate in the presence of an external magnetic field with both AC and DC components by solving the Landau-Zener problem in the presence of a nuclear spin bath. Both sawtooth and sinusoidal AC fields are analyzed. This single-molecule relaxation rate is then used as input into a master equation in order to take into account the many-molecule nature of the full system. Our results are then compared to quantum regime relaxation experiments performed on the Fe8 system.

  19. Reliable Approximation of Long Relaxation Timescales in Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Many interesting rare events in molecular systems, like ligand association, protein folding or conformational changes, occur on timescales that often are not accessible by direct numerical simulation. Therefore, rare event approximation approaches like interface sampling, Markov state model building, or advanced reaction coordinate-based free energy estimation have attracted huge attention recently. In this article we analyze the reliability of such approaches. How precise is an estimate of long relaxation timescales of molecular systems resulting from various forms of rare event approximation methods? Our results give a theoretical answer to this question by relating it with the transfer operator approach to molecular dynamics. By doing so we also allow for understanding deep connections between the different approaches.

  20. Excitation dynamics and relaxation in a molecular heterodimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balevičius, V.; Gelzinis, A.; Abramavicius, D.; Mančal, T.; Valkunas, L.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Dynamics of excitation within a heterogenous molecular dimer. ► Excited states can be swapped due to different reorganization energies of monomers. ► Conventional excitonic basis becomes renormalized due to interaction with the bath. ► Relaxation is independent of mutual positioning of monomeric excited states. -- Abstract: The exciton dynamics in a molecular heterodimer is studied as a function of differences in excitation and reorganization energies, asymmetry in transition dipole moments and excited state lifetimes. The heterodimer is composed of two molecules modeled as two-level systems coupled by the resonance interaction. The system-bath coupling is taken into account as a modulating factor of the molecular excitation energy gap, while the relaxation to the ground state is treated phenomenologically. Comparison of the description of the excitation dynamics modeled using either the Redfield equations (secular and full forms) or the Hierarchical quantum master equation (HQME) is demonstrated and discussed. Possible role of the dimer as an excitation quenching center in photosynthesis self-regulation is discussed. It is concluded that the system-bath interaction rather than the excitonic effect determines the excitation quenching ability of such a dimer.

  1. Simulations of vibrational relaxation in dense molecular fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holian, B.L.

    1985-07-01

    In the understanding of high-temperatre and -pressure chemistry in explosives, first step is the study of the transfer of energy from translational degrees of freedom into internal vibrations of the molecules. We present new methods using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) for measuring vibrational relaxation in a diatomic fluid, where we expect a classical treatment of many-body collisions to be relevant because of the high densities (2 to 3 times compressed compared to the normal fluid) and high temperatures (2000 to 4000 K) involved behind detonation waves. NEMD techniques are discussed, including their limitations, and qualitative results presented

  2. Molecular order and T1-relaxation, cross-relaxation in nitroxide spin labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Derek

    2018-05-01

    Interpretation of saturation-recovery EPR experiments on nitroxide spin labels whose angular rotation is restricted by the orienting potential of the environment (e.g., membranes) currently concentrates on the influence of rotational rates and not of molecular order. Here, I consider the dependence on molecular ordering of contributions to the rates of electron spin-lattice relaxation and cross relaxation from modulation of N-hyperfine and Zeeman anisotropies. These are determined by the averages and , where θ is the angle between the nitroxide z-axis and the static magnetic field, which in turn depends on the angles that these two directions make with the director of uniaxial ordering. For saturation-recovery EPR at 9 GHz, the recovery rate constant is predicted to decrease with increasing order for the magnetic field oriented parallel to the director, and to increase slightly for the perpendicular field orientation. The latter situation corresponds to the usual experimental protocol and is consistent with the dependence on chain-labelling position in lipid bilayer membranes. An altered dependence on order parameter is predicted for saturation-recovery EPR at high field (94 GHz) that is not entirely consistent with observation. Comparisons with experiment are complicated by contributions from slow-motional components, and an unexplained background recovery rate that most probably is independent of order parameter. In general, this analysis supports the interpretation that recovery rates are determined principally by rotational diffusion rates, but experiments at other spectral positions/field orientations could increase the sensitivity to order parameter.

  3. Generalized extended Navier-Stokes theory: Multiscale spin relaxation in molecular fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Schmidt

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the relaxation of the molecular spin angular velocity in the framework of generalized extended Navier-Stokes theory. Using molecular dynamics simulations, it is shown that for uncharged diatomic molecules the relaxation time decreases with increasing molecular moment of inertia...

  4. Selective excitation, relaxation, and energy channeling in molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, W.C.

    1993-08-01

    Research involves theoretical studies of response, relaxation, and correlated motion in time-dependent behavior of large molecular systems ranging from polyatomic molecules to protein molecules in their natural environment. Underlying theme is subsystem modulation dynamics. Main idea is that quantum mechanical correlations between components of a system develop with time, playing a major role in determining the balance between coherent and dissipative forces. Central theme is interplay of coherence and dissipation in determining the nature of dynamic structuring and energy flow in molecular transformation mechanisms. Subsystem equations of motion are being developed to show how nonlinear, dissipative dynamics of a particular subsystem arise from correlated interactions with the rest of the system (substituent groups, solvent, lattice modes, etc.); one consequence is resonance structures and networks. Quantum dynamics and thermodynamics are being applied to understand control and energy transfer mechanisms in biological functions of protein molecules; these mechanisms are both global and local. Besides the above theory, the research deals with phenomenological aspects of molecular systems

  5. Nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, B.

    1985-03-01

    This article is a summary of a short course lecture given in conjunction with the 1984 Nuclear Science Symposium. Measuring systems for nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy using single-photon counting techniques are presented. These involve systems based on relaxation-type spark gap light pulser and synchronously pumped mode-locked dye lasers. Furthermore, typical characteristics and optimization of operating conditions of the critical components responsible for the system time resolution are discussed. A short comparison of the most important deconvolution methods for numerical analysis of experimental data is given particularly with respect to the signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescence signal. 22 refs., 8 figs

  6. A simple measurement method of molecular relaxation in a gas by reconstructing acoustic velocity dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming; Liu, Tingting; Zhang, Xiangqun; Li, Caiyun

    2018-01-01

    Recently, a decomposition method of acoustic relaxation absorption spectra was used to capture the entire molecular multimode relaxation process of gas. In this method, the acoustic attenuation and phase velocity were measured jointly based on the relaxation absorption spectra. However, fast and accurate measurements of the acoustic attenuation remain challenging. In this paper, we present a method of capturing the molecular relaxation process by only measuring acoustic velocity, without the necessity of obtaining acoustic absorption. The method is based on the fact that the frequency-dependent velocity dispersion of a multi-relaxation process in a gas is the serial connection of the dispersions of interior single-relaxation processes. Thus, one can capture the relaxation times and relaxation strengths of N decomposed single-relaxation dispersions to reconstruct the entire multi-relaxation dispersion using the measurements of acoustic velocity at 2N  +  1 frequencies. The reconstructed dispersion spectra are in good agreement with experimental data for various gases and mixtures. The simulations also demonstrate the robustness of our reconstructive method.

  7. How sensitive are nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations of proteins to changes in the force field?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villa, Alessandra; Fan, Hao; Wassenaar, Tsjerk; Mark, Alan E.

    2007-01-01

    The sensitivity of molecular dynamics simulations to variations in the force field has been examined in relation to a set of 36 structures corresponding to 31 proteins simulated by using different versions of the GROMOS force field. The three parameter sets used (43a1, 53a5, and 53a6) differ

  8. Generalized extended Navier-Stokes theory: multiscale spin relaxation in molecular fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J S

    2013-09-01

    This paper studies the relaxation of the molecular spin angular velocity in the framework of generalized extended Navier-Stokes theory. Using molecular dynamics simulations, it is shown that for uncharged diatomic molecules the relaxation time decreases with increasing molecular moment of inertia per unit mass. In the regime of large moment of inertia the fast relaxation is wave-vector independent and dominated by the coupling between spin and the fluid streaming velocity, whereas for small inertia the relaxation is slow and spin diffusion plays a significant role. The fast wave-vector-independent relaxation is also observed for highly packed systems. The transverse and longitudinal spin modes have, to a good approximation, identical relaxation, indicating that the longitudinal and transverse spin viscosities have same value. The relaxation is also shown to be isomorphic invariant. Finally, the effect of the coupling in the zero frequency and wave-vector limit is quantified by a characteristic length scale; if the system dimension is comparable to this length the coupling must be included into the fluid dynamical description. It is found that the length scale is independent of moment of inertia but dependent on the state point.

  9. Nanosecond laser therapy reverses pathologic and molecular changes in age-related macular degeneration without retinal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobling, A I; Guymer, R H; Vessey, K A; Greferath, U; Mills, S A; Brassington, K H; Luu, C D; Aung, K Z; Trogrlic, L; Plunkett, M; Fletcher, E L

    2015-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss, characterized by drusen deposits and thickened Bruch's membrane (BM). This study details the capacity of nanosecond laser treatment to reduce drusen and thin BM while maintaining retinal structure. Fifty patients with AMD had a single nanosecond laser treatment session and after 2 yr, change in drusen area was compared with an untreated cohort of patients. The retinal effect of the laser was determined in human and mouse eyes using immunohistochemistry and compared with untreated eyes. In a mouse with thickened BM (ApoEnull), the effect of laser treatment was quantified using electron microscopy and quantitative PCR. In patients with AMD, nanosecond laser treatment reduced drusen load at 2 yr. Retinal structure was not compromised in human and mouse retina after laser treatment, with only a discrete retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) injury, and limited mononuclear cell response observed. BM was thinned in the ApoEnull mouse 3 mo after treatment (ApoEnull treated 683 ± 38 nm, ApoEnull untreated 890 ± 60 nm, C57Bl6J 606 ± 43 nm), with the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -3 increased (>260%). Nanosecond laser resolved drusen independent of retinal damage and improved BM structure, suggesting this treatment has the potential to reduce AMD progression. © FASEB.

  10. Rotational and translational dynamics and their relation to hydrogen bond lifetimes in an ionic liquid by means of NMR relaxation time experiments and molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strate, Anne; Neumann, Jan; Overbeck, Viviane; Bonsa, Anne-Marie; Michalik, Dirk; Paschek, Dietmar; Ludwig, Ralf

    2018-05-01

    We report a concerted theoretical and experimental effort to determine the reorientational dynamics as well as hydrogen bond lifetimes for the doubly ionic hydrogen bond +OH⋯O- in the ionic liquid (2-hydroxyethyl)trimethylammonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [Ch][NTf2] by using a combination of NMR relaxation time experiments, density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Due to fast proton exchange, the determination of rotational correlation times is challenging. For molecular liquids, 17O-enhanced proton relaxation time experiments have been used to determine the rotational correlation times for the OH vectors in water or alcohols. As an alternative to those expensive isotopic substitution experiments, we employed a recently introduced approach which is providing access to the rotational dynamics from a single NMR deuteron quadrupolar relaxation time experiment. Here, the deuteron quadrupole coupling constants (DQCCs) are obtained from a relation between the DQCC and the δ1H proton chemical shifts determined from a set of DFT calculated clusters in combination with experimentally determined proton chemical shifts. The NMR-obtained rotational correlation times were compared to those obtained from MD simulations and then related to viscosities for testing the applicability of popular hydrodynamic models. In addition, hydrogen bond lifetimes were derived, using hydrogen bond population correlation functions computed from MD simulations. Here, two different time domains were observed: The short-time contributions to the hydrogen lifetimes and the reorientational correlation times have roughly the same size and are located in the picosecond range, whereas the long-time contributions decay with relaxation times in the nanosecond regime and are related to rather slow diffusion processes. The computed average hydrogen bond lifetime is dominated by the long-time process, highlighting the importance and longevity of

  11. Conformational Entropy of FK506 Binding to FKBP12 Determined by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Relaxation and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomentsev, Gleb; Diehl, Carl; Akke, Mikael

    2018-03-06

    FKBP12 (FK506 binding protein 12 kDa) is an important drug target. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) order parameters, describing amplitudes of motion on the pico- to nanosecond time scale, can provide estimates of changes in conformational entropy upon ligand binding. Here we report backbone and methyl-axis order parameters of the apo and FK506-bound forms of FKBP12, based on 15 N and 2 H NMR relaxation. Binding of FK506 to FKBP12 results in localized changes in order parameters, notably for the backbone of residues E54 and I56 and the side chains of I56, I90, and I91, all positioned in the binding site. The order parameters increase slightly upon FK506 binding, indicating an unfavorable entropic contribution to binding of TΔ S = -18 ± 2 kJ/mol at 293 K. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate a change in conformational entropy, associated with all dihedral angles, of TΔ S = -26 ± 9 kJ/mol. Both these values are significant compared to the total entropy of binding determined by isothermal titration calorimetry and referenced to a reactant concentration of 1 mM ( TΔ S = -29 ± 1 kJ/mol). Our results reveal subtle differences in the response to ligand binding compared to that of the previously studied rapamycin-FKBP12 complex, despite the high degree of structural homology between the two complexes and their nearly identical ligand-FKBP12 interactions. These results highlight the delicate dependence of protein dynamics on drug interactions, which goes beyond the view provided by static structures, and reinforce the notion that protein conformational entropy can make important contributions to the free energy of ligand binding.

  12. Molecular quenching and relaxation in a plasmonic tunable system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baffou, Guillaume; Girard, Christian; Dujardin, Erik; Colas Des Francs, Gérard; Martin, Olivier J. F.

    2008-03-01

    Molecular fluorescence decay is significantly modified when the emitting molecule is located near a plasmonic structure. When the lateral sizes of such structures are reduced to nanometer-scale cross sections, they can be used to accurately control and amplify the emission rate. In this Rapid Communication, we extend Green’s dyadic method to quantitatively investigate both radiative and nonradiative decay channels experienced by a single fluorescent molecule confined in an adjustable dielectric-metal nanogap. The technique produces data in excellent agreement with current experimental work.

  13. Relaxation Estimation of RMSD in Molecular Dynamics Immunosimulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Schreiner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations have to be sufficiently long to draw reliable conclusions. However, no method exists to prove that a simulation has converged. We suggest the method of “lagged RMSD-analysis” as a tool to judge if an MD simulation has not yet run long enough. The analysis is based on RMSD values between pairs of configurations separated by variable time intervals Δt. Unless RMSD(Δt has reached a stationary shape, the simulation has not yet converged.

  14. Molecular excitation dynamics and relaxation quantum theory and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Valkunas, Leonas; Mancal, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Meeting the need for a work that brings together quantum theory and spectroscopy to convey excitation processes to advanced students and specialists wishing to conduct research and understand the entire field rather than just single aspects.Written by an experienced author and recognized authority in the field, this text covers numerous applications and offers examples taken from different disciplines. As a result, spectroscopists, molecular physicists, physical chemists, and biophysicists will all find this a must-have for their research. Also suitable as supplementary reading in graduate

  15. A study of internal energy relaxation in shocks using molecular dynamics based models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zheng; Parsons, Neal; Levin, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent potential energy surfaces (PESs) for the N 2 + N and N 2 + N 2 systems are used in molecular dynamics (MD) to simulate rates of vibrational and rotational relaxations for conditions that occur in hypersonic flows. For both chemical systems, it is found that the rotational relaxation number increases with the translational temperature and decreases as the rotational temperature approaches the translational temperature. The vibrational relaxation number is observed to decrease with translational temperature and approaches the rotational relaxation number in the high temperature region. The rotational and vibrational relaxation numbers are generally larger in the N 2 + N 2 system. MD-quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) with the PESs is also used to calculate the V-T transition cross sections, the collision cross section, and the dissociation cross section for each collision pair. Direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) results for hypersonic flow over a blunt body with the total collision cross section from MD/QCT simulations, Larsen-Borgnakke with new relaxation numbers, and the N 2 dissociation rate from MD/QCT show a profile with a decreased translational temperature and a rotational temperature close to vibrational temperature. The results demonstrate that many of the physical models employed in DSMC should be revised as fundamental potential energy surfaces suitable for high temperature conditions become available

  16. Inhomogeneous Relaxation of a Molecular Layer on an Insulator due to Compressive Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocquet, F.; Nony, L.; Mannsfeld, S. C. B.; Oison, V.; Pawlak, R.; Porte, L.; Loppacher, Ch.

    2012-05-01

    We discuss the inhomogeneous stress relaxation of a monolayer of hexahydroxytriphenylene (HHTP) which adopts the rare line-on-line (LOL) coincidence on KCl(001) and forms moiré patterns. The fact that the hexagonal HHTP layer is uniaxially compressed along the LOL makes this system an ideal candidate to discuss the influence of inhomogeneous stress relaxation. Our work is a combination of noncontact atomic force microscopy experiments, density functional theory and potential energy calculations, and a thorough interpretation by means of the Frenkel-Kontorova model. We show that the assumption of a homogeneous molecular layer is not valid for this organic-inorganic heteroepitaxial system since the best calculated energy configuration correlates with the experimental data only if inhomogeneous relaxations of the layer are taken into account.

  17. Effect of holographic grating period on its relaxation in a molecular glassy film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozols, A; Augustovs, P; Kokars, V; Traskovskis, K; Saharov, D

    2013-01-01

    Holographic grating (HG) relaxation has been experimentally studied in 5,5,5-triphenylpentyl 4-((4-(bis(5,5,5-triphenylpentyl)amino) phenyl) diazenyl) benzoate molecular glassy film for HG periods (Λ) of 0.50, 2.0 and 8.6 μm. A strong effect of HG period on its relaxation is found manifesting itself differently in the volume and on the surface. The volume part of HG is fairly stable during 40 days if Λ > 0.50μm whereas the surface part of HG (most probably, surface relief grating) exhibits relaxational self-enhancement which is maximal at Λ = 8.6μm. It is proposed that thermostimulated directional mass transfer in the process of relaxation can be responsible for this relaxational self-enhancement. Weak HG recording and relatively fast HG decay takes place at Λ=0.50 μm. Therefore, effective chromophore photoorientation domain of about 0.2 μm is supposed

  18. Dynamics of relaxation to a stationary state for interacting molecular motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Luiza V. F.; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2018-01-01

    Motor proteins are active enzymatic molecules that drive a variety of biological processes, including transfer of genetic information, cellular transport, cell motility and muscle contraction. It is known that these biological molecular motors usually perform their cellular tasks by acting collectively, and there are interactions between individual motors that specify the overall collective behavior. One of the fundamental issues related to the collective dynamics of motor proteins is the question if they function at stationary-state conditions. To investigate this problem, we analyze a relaxation to the stationary state for the system of interacting molecular motors. Our approach utilizes a recently developed theoretical framework, which views the collective dynamics of motor proteins as a totally asymmetric simple exclusion process of interacting particles, where interactions are taken into account via a thermodynamically consistent approach. The dynamics of relaxation to the stationary state is analyzed using a domain-wall method that relies on a mean-field description, which takes into account some correlations. It is found that the system quickly relaxes for repulsive interactions, while attractive interactions always slow down reaching the stationary state. It is also predicted that for some range of parameters the fastest relaxation might be achieved for a weak repulsive interaction. Our theoretical predictions are tested with Monte Carlo computer simulations. The implications of our findings for biological systems are briefly discussed.

  19. Vibrational relaxation of a triatomic molecular impurity: D2O in vitreous As2S3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rella, C.W.; Schwettman, H.A.; Engholm, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    Measurements of the relaxation of the D 2 O stretch mode in vitreous As 2 S 3 are presented. Because the bending mode of the molecule offers an intra-molecular decay channel for the stretch mode, the decay scheme of the D 2 O molecule is more complex than that of diatomic molecules. The asymmetric stretch mode of D 2 O has a frequency of 2680 cm -1 . To study the relaxation of this mode we applied a pump-probe technique, using intense psec; pulses of the Stanford Free Electron Laser. Due to the small cross-section of the vibrational mode, successful efforts were made to improve the signal to noise ratio by using a laser stabilization system and a tightly focused beam to increase the intensity, by averaging the signal with a kHz repetition rate and by using samples with an optimized D 2 O concentration. A rapid relaxation rate on the order of 5 x 10 9 sec -1 at low temperature is found that increases with temperature. Recalling that the bending mode of the D 2 O molecule has a frequency of 1170 cm -1 , one would expect a decay in a third order process, involving two quanta of the bending mode plus a vibrational host quanta with a frequency of 340 cm -1 , which coincides with a fundamental frequency of the pyramidal building blocks of the glassy As 2 S 3 host. Instead, we find from the temperature dependence of the relaxation rate that the D 2 O stretching mode relaxes in a higher order process. This indicates that the relaxation dynamics of small molecules is more complex than generally assumed

  20. Collective dynamic dipole moment and orientation fluctuations, cooperative hydrogen bond relaxations, and their connections to dielectric relaxation in ionic acetamide deep eutectics: Microscopic insight from simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Suman [Chemical, Biological and Macromolecular Sciences, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block-JD, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India); Biswas, Ranjit, E-mail: ranjit@bose.res.in, E-mail: biswaroop.mukherjee@gmail.com [Chemical, Biological and Macromolecular Sciences, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block-JD, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India); Thematic Unit for Excellence – Computational Materials Science, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block-JD, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India); Mukherjee, Biswaroop, E-mail: ranjit@bose.res.in, E-mail: biswaroop.mukherjee@gmail.com [Thematic Unit for Excellence – Computational Materials Science, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block-JD, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India)

    2016-08-28

    The paper reports a detailed simulation study on collective reorientational relaxation, cooperative hydrogen bond (H-bond) fluctuations, and their connections to dielectric relaxation (DR) in deep eutectic solvents made of acetamide and three uni-univalent electrolytes, lithium nitrate (LiNO{sub 3}), lithium bromide (LiBr), and lithium perchlorate (LiClO{sub 4}). Because cooperative H-bond fluctuations and ion migration complicate the straightforward interpretation of measured DR timescales in terms of molecular dipolar rotations for these conducting media which support extensive intra- and inter-species H-bonding, one needs to separate out the individual components from the overall relaxation for examining the microscopic origin of various timescales. The present study does so and finds that reorientation of ion-complexed acetamide molecules generates relaxation timescales that are in sub-nanosecond to nanosecond range. This explains in molecular terms the nanosecond timescales reported by recent giga-Hertz DR measurements. Interestingly, the simulated survival timescale for the acetamide-Li{sup +} complex has been found to be a few tens of nanosecond, suggesting such a cation-complexed species may be responsible for a similar timescale reported by mega-Hertz DR measurements of acetamide/potassium thiocyanate deep eutectics near room temperature. The issue of collective versus single particle relaxation is discussed, and jump waiting time distributions are determined. Dependence on anion-identity in each of the cases has been examined. In short, the present study demonstrates that assumption of nano-sized domain formation is not required for explaining the DR detected nanosecond and longer timescales in these media.

  1. Anisotropic Rotational Diffusion Studied by Nuclear Spin Relaxation and Molecular Dynamics Simulation: An Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuson, Michael M.

    2017-01-01

    Laboratories studying the anisotropic rotational diffusion of bromobenzene using nuclear spin relaxation and molecular dynamics simulations are described. For many undergraduates, visualizing molecular motion is challenging. Undergraduates rarely encounter laboratories that directly assess molecular motion, and so the concept remains an…

  2. Molecular motion of micellar solutes: a 13C NMR relaxation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, R.E.; Kasakevich, M.L.; Granger, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    A series of simple NMR relaxation experiments have been performed on nitrobenzene and aniline dissolved in the ionic detergents sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Using 13 C relaxation rates at various molecular sites, and comparing data obtained in organic media with those for micellar solutions, the viscosity at the solubilization site was estimated and a detailed picture of motional restrictions imposed by the micellar enviroment was derived. Viscosities of 8 to 17 cp indicate a rather fluid environment for solubilized nitrobenzene; both additives exhibit altered motional preferences in CTAB solutions only. As an aid in interpretation of the NMR data, quasi-elastic light scattering and other physical techniques have been used to evaluate the influence of organic solutes on micellar size and shape. The NMR methods are examined critically in terms of their general usefulness for studies of solubilization in detergent micelles. 48 references

  3. Simple molecular mechanism of heat transfer: Debye relaxation versus power-law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gall, M.; Kutner, R.

    2005-01-01

    We study a simple molecular model (at coarse-grain level) as a basis of irreversible heat transfer through a diathermic partition. The partition separates into two adjacent parts a box containing ideal point particles that communicate only though this partition. We provide the basic mechanism of energy transfer between the left- and right-hand side gas samples by assuming equipartition of kinetic energy of all outgoing particles colliding with the partition at a given time. We analyse and compare two essentially different cases (A) the reference one, where we assume that the border walls of the box and the diathermic partitions can randomize the direction of motion of rebounding particles, and (B) the case where we assume the mirror collisions of particles with the border walls and the partition. In both cases the rebounding of the particles from border walls is elastic. The above introduced assumptions allow us to numerically simulate and analytically consider, for example, the relaxation of temperatures of both gas samples and the entropy of the system. However, in both cases the long-time relaxation is essentially different since in case (A) it is an exponential one, while in case (B) it seems to be a power-law relaxation. The obtained results well agree in case (A) with the predictions of the phenomenological, linear theory of irreversible theory had to be developed which assumes time-dependence of heat conductivity; it describes the relaxation of the system far from equilibrium. The explanation of the results obtained in this case is, nevertheless, an intriguing problem. (author)

  4. Atomistic insights into the nanosecond long amorphization and crystallization cycle of nanoscale G e2S b2T e5 : An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branicio, Paulo S.; Bai, Kewu; Ramanarayan, H.; Wu, David T.; Sullivan, Michael B.; Srolovitz, David J.

    2018-04-01

    The complete process of amorphization and crystallization of the phase-change material G e2S b2T e5 is investigated using nanosecond ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Varying the quench rate during the amorphization phase of the cycle results in the generation of a variety of structures from entirely crystallized (-0.45 K/ps) to entirely amorphized (-16 K/ps). The 1.5-ns annealing simulations indicate that the crystallization process depends strongly on both the annealing temperature and the initial amorphous structure. The presence of crystal precursors (square rings) in the amorphous matrix enhances nucleation/crystallization kinetics. The simulation data are used to construct a combined continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) and temperature-time-transformation (TTT) diagram. The nose of the CCT-TTT diagram corresponds to the minimum time for the onset of homogenous crystallization and is located at 600 K and 70 ps. That corresponds to a critical cooling rate for amorphization of -4.5 K/ps. The results, in excellent agreement with experimental observations, suggest that a strategy that utilizes multiple quench rates and annealing temperatures may be used to effectively optimize the reversible switching speed and enable fast and energy-efficient phase-change memories.

  5. Communication: High pressure specific heat spectroscopy reveals simple relaxation behavior of glass forming molecular liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, Lisa Anita; Niss, Kristine; Jakobsen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The frequency dependent specific heat has been measured under pressure for the molecular glass forming liquid 5-polyphenyl-4-ether in the viscous regime close to the glass transition. The temperature and pressure dependences of the characteristic time scale associated with the specific heat...... is compared to the equivalent time scale from dielectric spectroscopy performed under identical conditions. It is shown that the ratio between the two time scales is independent of both temperature and pressure. This observation is non-trivial and demonstrates the existence of specially simple molecular...... liquids in which different physical relaxation processes are both as function of temperature and pressure/density governed by the same underlying “inner clock.” Furthermore, the results are discussed in terms of the recent conjecture that van der Waals liquids, like the measuredliquid, comply...

  6. Nanosecond pulsed electric field incorporation technique to predict molecular mechanisms of teratogenicity and developmental toxicity of estradiol-17β on medaka embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Akemi; Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Kono, Susumu; Iida, Midori; Uchida, Masaya; Arizono, Koji; Tominaga, Nobuaki

    2018-05-01

    Herein, we propose using a nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) technique to assess teratogenicity and embryonic developmental toxicity of estradiol-17β (E 2 ) and predict the molecular mechanisms of teratogenicity and embryonic developmental defects caused by E 2 on medaka (Oryzias latipes). The 5 hour post-fertilization embryos were exposed to co-treatment with 10 μm E 2 and nsPEF for 2 hours and then continuously cultured under non-E 2 and nsPEF conditions until hatching. Results documented that the time to hatching of embryos was significantly delayed in comparison to the control group and that typical abnormal embryo development, such as the delay of blood vessel formation, was observed. For DNA microarray analysis, 6 day post-fertilization embryos that had been continuously cultured under the non-E 2 and nsPEF condition after 2 hour co-treatments were used. DNA microarray analysis identified 542 upregulated genes and one downregulated gene in the 6 day post-fertilization embryos. Furthermore, bioinformatic analyses using differentially expressed genes revealed that E 2 exposure affected various gene ontology terms, such as response to hormone stimulus. The network analysis also documented that the estrogen receptor α in the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway may be involved in regulating several transcription factors, such as FOX, AKT1 and epidermal growth factor receptor. These results suggest that our nsPEF technique is a powerful tool for assessing teratogenicity and embryonic developmental toxicity of E 2 and predict their molecular mechanisms in medaka embryos. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Local spin dynamics at low temperature in the slowly relaxing molecular chain [Dy(hfac)3{NIT(C6H4OPh)}]: A μ+ spin relaxation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arosio, Paolo; Corti, Maurizio; Mariani, Manuel; Orsini, Francesco; Bogani, Lapo; Caneschi, Andrea; Lago, Jorge; Lascialfari, Alessandro

    2015-05-01

    The spin dynamics of the molecular magnetic chain [Dy(hfac)3{NIT(C6H4OPh)}] were investigated by means of the Muon Spin Relaxation (μ+SR) technique. This system consists of a magnetic lattice of alternating Dy(III) ions and radical spins, and exhibits single-chain-magnet behavior. The magnetic properties of [Dy(hfac)3{NIT(C6H4OPh)}] have been studied by measuring the magnetization vs. temperature at different applied magnetic fields (H = 5, 3500, and 16500 Oe) and by performing μ+SR experiments vs. temperature in zero field and in a longitudinal applied magnetic field H = 3500 Oe. The muon asymmetry P(t) was fitted by the sum of three components, two stretched-exponential decays with fast and intermediate relaxation times, and a third slow exponential decay. The temperature dependence of the spin dynamics has been determined by analyzing the muon longitudinal relaxation rate λinterm(T), associated with the intermediate relaxing component. The experimental λinterm(T) data were fitted with a corrected phenomenological Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound law by using a distribution of thermally activated correlation times, which average to τ = τ0 exp(Δ/kBT), corresponding to a distribution of energy barriers Δ. The correlation times can be associated with the spin freezing that occurs when the system condenses in the ground state.

  8. Local spin dynamics at low temperature in the slowly relaxing molecular chain [Dy(hfac)3(NIT(C6H4OPh))]: A μ+ spin relaxation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arosio, Paolo; Orsini, Francesco; Corti, Maurizio; Mariani, Manuel; Bogani, Lapo; Caneschi, Andrea; Lago, Jorge; Lascialfari, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The spin dynamics of the molecular magnetic chain [Dy(hfac) 3 (NIT(C 6 H 4 OPh))] were investigated by means of the Muon Spin Relaxation (μ + SR) technique. This system consists of a magnetic lattice of alternating Dy(III) ions and radical spins, and exhibits single-chain-magnet behavior. The magnetic properties of [Dy(hfac) 3 (NIT(C 6 H 4 OPh))] have been studied by measuring the magnetization vs. temperature at different applied magnetic fields (H = 5, 3500, and 16500 Oe) and by performing μ + SR experiments vs. temperature in zero field and in a longitudinal applied magnetic field H = 3500 Oe. The muon asymmetry P(t) was fitted by the sum of three components, two stretched-exponential decays with fast and intermediate relaxation times, and a third slow exponential decay. The temperature dependence of the spin dynamics has been determined by analyzing the muon longitudinal relaxation rate λ interm (T), associated with the intermediate relaxing component. The experimental λ interm (T) data were fitted with a corrected phenomenological Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound law by using a distribution of thermally activated correlation times, which average to τ = τ 0 exp(Δ/k B T), corresponding to a distribution of energy barriers Δ. The correlation times can be associated with the spin freezing that occurs when the system condenses in the ground state

  9. Molecular dissipation phenomena of nanoscopic friction in the heterogeneous relaxation regime of a glass former.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, Scott; Gray, Tomoko; Overney, René M

    2005-10-01

    Nanoscale sliding friction involving a polystyrene melt near its glass transition temperature Tg (373 K) exhibited dissipation phenomena that provide insight into the underlying molecular relaxation processes. A dissipative length scale that shows significant parallelism with the size of cooperatively rearranging regions (CRRs) could be experimentally deduced from friction-velocity isotherms, combined with dielectric loss analysis. Upon cooling to approximately 10 K above Tg, the dissipation length Xd grew from a segmental scale of approximately 3 A to 2.1 nm, following a power-law relationship with the reduced temperature Xd approximately TR-phi. The resulting phi=1.89+/-0.08 is consistent with growth predictions for the length scale of CRRs in the heterogeneous regime of fragile glass formers. Deviations from the power-law behavior closer to Tg suggest that long-range processes, e.g., the normal mode or ultraslow Fischer modes, may couple with the alpha relaxation, leading to energy dissipation in domains of tens of nanometers.

  10. Resonances in field-cycling NMR on molecular crystals. (reversible) Spin dynamics or (irreversible) relaxation?; Resonanzen in Field-Cycling-NMR an Molekuelkristallen. (reversible) Spindynamik oder (irreversible) Relaxation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacke, Christian

    2015-07-01

    Multi spin systems with spin 1/2 nuclei and dipolar coupled quadrupolar nuclei can show so called ''quadrupolar dips''. There are two main reasons for this behavior: polarization transfer and relaxation. They look quite alike and without additional research cannot be differentiated easily in most cases. These two phenomena have quite different physical and theoretical backgrounds. For no or very slow dynamics, polarization transfer will take place, which is energy conserving inside the spin system. This effect can entirely be described using quantum mechanics on the spin system. Detailed knowledge about the crystallography is needed, because this affects the relevant hamiltonians directly. For systems with fast enough dynamics, relaxation takes over, and the energy flows from the spin system to the lattice; thus a more complex theoretical description is needed. This description has to include a dynamic model, usually in the form of a spectral density function. Both models should include detailed modelling of the complete spin system. A software library was developed to be able to model complex spin systems. It allows to simulate polarization transfer or relaxation effects. NMR measurements were performed on the protonic conductor K{sub 3}H(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}. A single crystal shows sharp quadrupolar dips at room temperature. Dynamics could be excluded using relaxation measurements and literature values. Thus, a polarization transfer analysis was used to describe those dips with good agreement. As a second system, imidazolium based molecular crystals were analyzed. The quadrupolar dips were expected to be caused by polarization transfer; this was carefully analyzed and found not to be true. A relaxation based analysis shows good agreement with the measured data in the high temperature area. It leverages a two step spectral density function, which indicates two distinct dynamic processes happening in this system.

  11. Rational extended thermodynamics of a rarefied polyatomic gas with molecular relaxation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, Takashi; Ruggeri, Tommaso; Sugiyama, Masaru

    2017-10-01

    We present a more refined version of rational extended thermodynamics of rarefied polyatomic gases in which molecular rotational and vibrational relaxation processes are treated individually. In this case, we need a triple hierarchy of the moment system and the system of balance equations is closed via the maximum entropy principle. Three different types of the production terms in the system, which are suggested by a generalized BGK-type collision term in the Boltzmann equation, are adopted. In particular, the rational extended thermodynamic theory with seven independent fields (ET7) is analyzed in detail. Finally, the dispersion relation of ultrasonic wave derived from the ET7 theory is confirmed by the experimental data for CO2, Cl2, and Br2 gases.

  12. Dielectric relaxation spectra of liquid crystals in relation to molecular structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrobel, S.

    1986-07-01

    The dielectric spectra obtained for some members of two homologous series, i.e. for di-alkoxyazoxybenzenes and penthyl-alkoxythiobenzoates, are discussed qualitatively on the basis of the Nordio-Rigatti-Segre diffusion model. It is additionally assumed that the molecular reorientations take place about the principal axes of the inertia tensor. The distribution of correlation times, which is strongly temperature dependent in the vicinity of the clearing point, is interpreted as being caused by fluctuations of the principal axes frame which are due to conformation changes inside the end chains. The Bauer equation is used to describe both principal molecular reorientations, i.e. the reorientations about the long and short axis, observed in liquid crystalline structure by means of dielectric relaxation methods. The energies and entropies of activation have been computed for both principal reorientations. The differences between the high frequency limit of the dielectric permittivity and the refractive index squared of liquid crystals are explained in terms of two librational motions of the molecules observed by other experimental techniques, viz. far infra-red, Raman and inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopies, and found in this work on the basis of dielectrically measured energy barriers. It has been shown qualitatively that intramolecular libratory motions greatly effect the high frequency dielectric spectrum. Finally, molecular motions in liquid crystals are divided into two types: coherent and incoherent. 127 refs., 56 figs., 17 tabs. (author)

  13. [Mechanism of ablation with nanosecond pulsed electric field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Chao; Chen, Xin-hua; Zheng, Shu-sen

    2015-11-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric field ablation has been widely applied in clinical cancer treatment, while its molecular mechanism is still unclear. Researchers have revealed that nanosecond pulsed electric field generates nanopores in plasma membrane, leading to a rapid influx of Ca²⁺; it has specific effect on intracellular organelle membranes, resulting in endoplasmic reticulum injuries and mitochondrial membrane potential changes. In addition, it may also change cellular morphology through damage of cytoskeleton. This article reviews the recent research advances on the molecular mechanism of cell membrane and organelle changes induced by nanosecond pulsed electric field ablation.

  14. Nanosecond neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobov, S.I.; Pavlovskaya, N.G.; Pukhov, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    High-voltage nanosecond neutron generator for obtaining neutrons in D-T reaction is described. Yield of 6x10 6 neutron/pulse was generated in a sealed gas-filled diode with a target on the cathode by accelerating pulse voltage of approximately 0.5 MV and length at half-height of 0.5 ns and deuterium pressure of 6x10 -2 Torr. Ways of increasing neutron yield and possibilities of creating generators of nanosecond neutron pulses with great service life are considered

  15. Dual reorientation relaxation routes of water molecules in oxyanion’s hydration shell: A molecular geometry perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Wen Jun; Yang, Yi Isaac; Gao, Yi Qin, E-mail: gaoyq@pku.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering and Biodynamic Optical Imaging Center, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-12-14

    In this study, we examine how complex ions such as oxyanions influence the dynamic properties of water and whether differences exist between simple halide anions and oxyanions. Nitrate anion is taken as an example to investigate the hydration properties of oxyanions. Reorientation relaxation of its hydration water can occur through two different routes: water can either break its hydrogen bond with the nitrate to form one with another water or switch between two oxygen atoms of the same nitrate. The latter molecular mechanism increases the residence time of oxyanion’s hydration water and thus nitrate anion slows down the translational motion of neighbouring water. But it is also a “structure breaker” in that it accelerates the reorientation relaxation of hydration water. Such a result illustrates that differences do exist between the hydration of oxyanions and simple halide anions as a result of different molecular geometries. Furthermore, the rotation of the nitrate solute is coupled with the hydrogen bond rearrangement of its hydration water. The nitrate anion can either tilt along the axis perpendicularly to the plane or rotate in the plane. We find that the two reorientation relaxation routes of the hydration water lead to different relaxation dynamics in each of the two above movements of the nitrate solute. The current study suggests that molecular geometry could play an important role in solute hydration and dynamics.

  16. Dual reorientation relaxation routes of water molecules in oxyanion’s hydration shell: A molecular geometry perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Wen Jun; Yang, Yi Isaac; Gao, Yi Qin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examine how complex ions such as oxyanions influence the dynamic properties of water and whether differences exist between simple halide anions and oxyanions. Nitrate anion is taken as an example to investigate the hydration properties of oxyanions. Reorientation relaxation of its hydration water can occur through two different routes: water can either break its hydrogen bond with the nitrate to form one with another water or switch between two oxygen atoms of the same nitrate. The latter molecular mechanism increases the residence time of oxyanion’s hydration water and thus nitrate anion slows down the translational motion of neighbouring water. But it is also a “structure breaker” in that it accelerates the reorientation relaxation of hydration water. Such a result illustrates that differences do exist between the hydration of oxyanions and simple halide anions as a result of different molecular geometries. Furthermore, the rotation of the nitrate solute is coupled with the hydrogen bond rearrangement of its hydration water. The nitrate anion can either tilt along the axis perpendicularly to the plane or rotate in the plane. We find that the two reorientation relaxation routes of the hydration water lead to different relaxation dynamics in each of the two above movements of the nitrate solute. The current study suggests that molecular geometry could play an important role in solute hydration and dynamics

  17. Rotational dynamics in supercooled water from nuclear spin relaxation and molecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qvist, Johan; Mattea, Carlos; Sunde, Erik P; Halle, Bertil

    2012-05-28

    Structural dynamics in liquid water slow down dramatically in the supercooled regime. To shed further light on the origin of this super-Arrhenius temperature dependence, we report high-precision (17)O and (2)H NMR relaxation data for H(2)O and D(2)O, respectively, down to 37 K below the equilibrium freezing point. With the aid of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we provide a detailed analysis of the rotational motions probed by the NMR experiments. The NMR-derived rotational correlation time τ(R) is the integral of a time correlation function (TCF) that, after a subpicosecond librational decay, can be described as a sum of two exponentials. Using a coarse-graining algorithm to map the MD trajectory on a continuous-time random walk (CTRW) in angular space, we show that the slowest TCF component can be attributed to large-angle molecular jumps. The mean jump angle is ∼48° at all temperatures and the waiting time distribution is non-exponential, implying dynamical heterogeneity. We have previously used an analogous CTRW model to analyze quasielastic neutron scattering data from supercooled water. Although the translational and rotational waiting times are of similar magnitude, most translational jumps are not synchronized with a rotational jump of the same molecule. The rotational waiting time has a stronger temperature dependence than the translation one, consistent with the strong increase of the experimentally derived product τ(R) D(T) at low temperatures. The present CTRW jump model is related to, but differs in essential ways from the extended jump model proposed by Laage and co-workers. Our analysis traces the super-Arrhenius temperature dependence of τ(R) to the rotational waiting time. We present arguments against interpreting this temperature dependence in terms of mode-coupling theory or in terms of mixture models of water structure.

  18. Critical thickness and strain relaxation in molecular beam epitaxy-grown SrTiO3 films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Tianqi; Ganguly, Koustav; Marshall, Patrick; Xu, Peng; Jalan, Bharat

    2013-01-01

    We report on the study of the critical thickness and the strain relaxation in epitaxial SrTiO 3 film grown on (La 0.3 Sr 0.7 )(Al 0.65 Ta 0.35 )O 3 (001) (LSAT) substrate using the hybrid molecular beam epitaxy approach. No change in the film's lattice parameter (both the in-plane and the out-of-plane) was observed up to a film thickness of 180 nm, which is in sharp contrast to the theoretical critical thickness of ∼12 nm calculated using the equilibrium theory of strain relaxation. For film thicknesses greater than 180 nm, the out-of-plane lattice parameter was found to decrease hyperbolically in an excellent agreement with the relaxation via forming misfit dislocations. Possible mechanisms are discussed by which the elastic strain energy can be accommodated prior to forming misfit dislocations leading to such anomalously large critical thickness

  19. Study of local conformation and molecular movements of homo-polypeptides in aqueous solutions by using magnetic resonance and relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perly, Bruno

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this research thesis is to study local conformations and mobilities of some typical homo-polypeptides by using techniques of magnetic resonance. By using these techniques, it is possible to make highly local observations of molecular elements which allows very efficient analysis of structural and dynamic properties of several biologically important compounds to be performed, and the study of their interactions. After a presentation of the general properties of the studied polypeptides, of magnetic resonance and of magnetic relaxation, the author presents some elements of macromolecular dynamics and movement models. Then, he reports the study of local conformations and structural transitions, applications of spin marking to the dynamic study of polypeptides, a dynamic study of the polypeptide skeleton under the form of statistic balls, the study of local movements of side chains by using nuclear relaxation, the study of the coupling of movements of main and side chains, and of the nuclear relaxation induced by a radical spin marker

  20. Vibronic relaxation in molecular mixed crystals : Pentacene in naphthalene and p-terphenyl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, Wim H.; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1981-01-01

    Picosecond photon echo techniques are used to measure directly vibronic relaxation times in the first excited singlet state of pentacene in naphthalene and p-terphenyl. In regions of low (< 300 cm–1) and high (> 1000 cm–1) vibrational energy, relaxation is fast (τ <2 ps) due to direct phonon

  1. Molecular relaxation behavior and isothermal crystallization above glass transition temperature of amorphous hesperetin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shete, Ganesh; Khomane, Kailas S; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the relaxation behavior of amorphous hesperetin (HRN), using dielectric spectroscopy, and assessment of its crystallization kinetics above glass transition temperature (Tg ). Amorphous HRN exhibited both local (β-) and global (α-) relaxations. β-Relaxation was observed below Tg , whereas α-relaxation prominently emerged above Tg . β-Relaxation was found to be of Johari-Goldstein type and was correlated with α-process by coupling model. Secondly, isothermal crystallization experiments were performed at 363 K (Tg + 16.5 K), 373 K (Tg + 26.5 K), and 383 K (Tg + 36.5 K). The kinetics of crystallization, obtained from the normalized dielectric strength, was modeled using the Avrami model. Havriliak-Negami (HN) shape parameters, αHN and αHN .βHN , were analyzed during the course of crystallization to understand the dynamics of amorphous phase during the emergence of crystallites. HN shape parameters indicated that long range (α-like) were motions affected to a greater extent than short range (β-like) motions during isothermal crystallization studies at all temperature conditions. The variable behavior of α-like motions at different isothermal crystallization temperatures was attributed to evolving crystallites with time and increase in electrical conductivity with temperature. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  2. Lattice Distortion Mediated Paramagnetic Relaxation in High-Spin High-Symmetry Molecular Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Anupam

    1998-08-01

    Field-dependent maxima in the relaxation rate of the magnetic molecules Mn12-Ac and Fe8-tacn have commonly been ascribed to some resonant tunneling phenomena. We argue instead that the relaxation is purely due to phonons. The rate maxima arise because of a Jahn-Teller-like distortion caused by the coupling of phonons to degenerate Zeeman levels of the molecule at the top of the barrier. The binding energy of the distorted intermediate states lowers the barrier height and increases the relaxation rate. A nonperturbative calculation of this effect is carried out for a model system. An approximate result for the field variation near a maximum is found to agree reasonably with experiment.

  3. Molecular theory for nuclear magnetic relaxation in protein solutions and tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimmich, R.; Nusser, W.; Gneiting, T.

    1990-01-01

    A model theory is presented explaining a series of striking phenomena observed with nuclear magnetic relaxation in protein systems such as solutions or tissue. The frequency, concentration and temperature dependences of proton or deuteron relaxation times of protein solutions and tissue are explained. It is concluded that the translational diffusion of water molecules along the rugged surfaces of proteins and, to a minor degree, protein backbone fluctuations are crucial processes. The rate limiting factor of macromolecular tumbling is assumed to be given by the free water content in a certain analogy to the free-volume model of Cohen ad Turnbull. There are two characteristic water mass fractions indicating the saturation of the hydration shells and the onset of protein tumbling. A closed and relatively simple set of relaxation formulas is presented. The potentially fractal nature of the diffusion of water molecules on the protein surface is discussed. (author). 43 refs.; 4 figs

  4. Second-order Monte Carlo wave-function approach to the relaxation effects on ringing revivals in a molecular system interacting with a strongly squeezed coherent field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Masayoshi; Kishi, Ryohei; Nitta, Tomoshige; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the relaxation effects on the quantum dynamics in a two-state molecular system interacting with a single-mode strongly amplitude-squeezed coherent field using the second-order Monte Carlo wave-function method. The molecular population inversion (collapse-revival behavior of Rabi oscillations) is known to show the echoes after each revival, which are referred to as ringing revivals, in the case of strongly squeezed coherent fields with oscillatory photon-number distributions due to the phase-space interference effect. Two types of relaxation effects, i.e., cavity relaxation (the dissipation of an internal single mode to outer mode) and molecular coherent (phase) relaxation caused by nuclear vibrations on ringing revivals are investigated from the viewpoint of the quantum-phase dynamics using the quasiprobability (Q function) distribution of a single-mode field and the off-diagonal molecular density matrix ρ elec1,2 (t). It turns out that the molecular phase relaxation attenuates both the entire revival-collapse behavior and the increase in ρ elec1,2 (t) during the quiescent region, whereas a very slight cavity relaxation particularly suppresses the echoes in ringing revivals more significantly than the first revival but hardly changes a primary variation in envelope of ρ elec1,2 (t) in the nonrelaxation case

  5. Investigation of effective impact parameters in electron-ion temperature relaxation via Particle-Particle Coulombic molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yinjian

    2017-09-01

    Aiming at a high simulation accuracy, a Particle-Particle (PP) Coulombic molecular dynamics model is implemented to study the electron-ion temperature relaxation. In this model, the Coulomb's law is directly applied in a bounded system with two cutoffs at both short and long length scales. By increasing the range between the two cutoffs, it is found that the relaxation rate deviates from the BPS theory and approaches the LS theory and the GMS theory. Also, the effective minimum and maximum impact parameters (bmin* and bmax*) are obtained. For the simulated plasma condition, bmin* is about 6.352 times smaller than the Landau length (bC), and bmax* is about 2 times larger than the Debye length (λD), where bC and λD are used in the LS theory. Surprisingly, the effective relaxation time obtained from the PP model is very close to the LS theory and the GMS theory, even though the effective Coulomb logarithm is two times greater than the one used in the LS theory. Besides, this work shows that the PP model (commonly known as computationally expensive) is becoming practicable via GPU parallel computing techniques.

  6. Slow molecular dynamics in the β relaxation of semicrystalline polymers studied by pure exchange 13C solid state NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, Eduardo R. de; Becker-Guedes, Fabio; Bonagamba, Tito J.; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Iowa State University, Ames, IA

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics in the amorphous regions of semicrystalline polymers exert important influences on mechanical properties, but have been notoriously difficult to characterize. Two new solid-state NMR techniques, PUREX (pure exchange) and CODEX (center band-only detection of exchange) NMR, make it possible to analyze the molecular motions near the glass transition in the amorphous regions of semicrystalline polymers. This is achieved by selectively suppressing the otherwise dominant signals of the static segments in the crystallites. We have applied both NMR techniques to study the slow motions near the glass transition in semicrystalline polymers (β relaxation) and in fully amorphous samples for reference. The studied polymers were isotactic poly(1-butene) (iPB1) (form I), syndiotactic and atactic polypropylenes (sPP, and aPP, respectively), as well as polyisobutylene (PIB). We have analyzed the geometry and time scale of the slow molecular motion for all samples and determined the apparent activation energies. (author)

  7. Extended Thermodynamics of Rarefied Polyatomic Gases: 15-Field Theory Incorporating Relaxation Processes of Molecular Rotation and Vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Arima

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available After summarizing the present status of Rational Extended Thermodynamics (RET of gases, which is an endeavor to generalize the Navier–Stokes and Fourier (NSF theory of viscous heat-conducting fluids, we develop the molecular RET theory of rarefied polyatomic gases with 15 independent fields. The theory is justified, at mesoscopic level, by a generalized Boltzmann equation in which the distribution function depends on two internal variables that take into account the energy exchange among the different molecular modes of a gas, that is, translational, rotational, and vibrational modes. By adopting the generalized Bhatnagar, Gross and Krook (BGK-type collision term, we derive explicitly the closed system of field equations with the use of the Maximum Entropy Principle (MEP. The NSF theory is derived from the RET theory as a limiting case of small relaxation times via the Maxwellian iteration. The relaxation times introduced in the theory are shown to be related to the shear and bulk viscosities and heat conductivity.

  8. Quad nanosecond delay module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, R.J.; Hunter, J.B.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1986-04-01

    Four nanosecond (ns) delay units have been designed to fit in a single-width NIM module. This module is particularly suited for use in conjunction with quad constant fraction timing discriminators (CFTDs) since it has four delay units that can be placed adjacent to the four units of the CFTD. A series of different length cables connected via DIP toggle switches provide delays of 0.60 ns in 4 ns increments. Thus, the CFTD delay can be optimized for pulses of different rise times from approx.10-100 ns. Design work for the PC board and silkscreening of the front panel were done with the MacDraw program on the Apple Mackintosh computer and printed with the Lasewriter printer. 6 refs

  9. On the field-induced switching of molecular organization in a biaxial nematic cell and its relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Matteo; Berardi, Roberto; Zannoni, Claudio

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the switching of a biaxial nematic filling a flat cell with planar homogeneous anchoring using a coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation. We have found that an aligning field applied across the film, and acting on specific molecular axes, can drive the reorientation of the secondary biaxial director up to one order of magnitude faster than that for the principal director. While the π/2 switching of the secondary director does not affect the alignment of the long molecular axes, the field-driven reorientation of the principal director proceeds via a concerted rotation of the long and transversal molecular axes. More importantly, while upon switching off a (relatively) weak or intermediate field, the biaxial nematic liquid crystal is always able to relax to the initial surface aligned director state; this is not the case when using fields above a certain threshold. In that case, while the secondary director always recovers the initial state, the principal one remains, occasionally, trapped in a nonuniform director state due to the formation of domain walls.

  10. Structural Relaxations and Thermodynamic Properties of Molecular Amorphous Solids by Mechanical Milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukushi, I.; Yamamuro, O.; Matsuo, T.

    The organic crystals of tri-O-methyl-β-cyclodextrin (TMCD) and its three clathrate compounds containing benzoic acid (BA), p-nitrobenzoic acid (NBA) and p-hydroxybenzoic acid (HBA), sucrose (SUC), salicin (SAL), phenolphthalein (PP), 1,3,5-tri-α-naphthylbenzene (TNB) were amorphized by milling with a vibrating mill for 2 ˜ 16 hours at room temperature. The amorphization was checked by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray powder diffraction. The heat capacities of crystals, liquid quenched glasses (LQG), and mechanically-milled amorphous solid (MMAS) of TMCD and TNB were measured with an adiabatic calorimeter in the temperature range between 12 and 375 K. For both compounds, the enthalpy relaxation of MMAS appeared in the wide temperature range below Tg and the released configurational enthalpy was much larger than that of LQG, indicating that MMAS is more disordered and strained than LQG.

  11. Anisotropic molecular reorientations of quinuclidine in its plastic solid phase: 1H and 14N NMR relaxation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brot, C.; Virlet, J.

    1979-01-01

    14 N and 1 H NMR relaxation times have been measured in quinuclidine in its plastic phase. These measurements rule out isotropic motion. Correlation times for several anisotropic reorientational models are calculated from these NMR data. The best agreement with the values calculated from neutron scattering experiments (preceding paper) is obtained for a model where the molecules reorient by +-90 0 jumps about the crystallographic C 4 axes with a residence time of (22.2+-2).10 -12 s, and by +-120 0 jumps about the molecular C 3 axes with a residence of (5.25+-2.8).10 -12 s, at room temperature. The activation enthalpy is 15.3 kJ.mol. -1 for the +-90 0 jumps, and higher for the +-120 0 jumps. Translational correlation times have also been measured at high temperature, below the melting point

  12. Low-relaxation spin waves in laser-molecular-beam epitaxy grown nanosized yttrium iron garnet films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutsev, L. V., E-mail: l-lutsev@mail.ru; Korovin, A. M.; Bursian, V. E.; Gastev, S. V.; Fedorov, V. V.; Suturin, S. M.; Sokolov, N. S. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-02

    Synthesis of nanosized yttrium iron garnet (Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}, YIG) films followed by the study of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin wave propagation in these films is reported. The YIG films were grown on gadolinium gallium garnet substrates by laser molecular beam epitaxy. It has been shown that spin waves propagating in YIG deposited at 700 °C have low damping. At the frequency of 3.29 GHz, the spin-wave damping parameter is less than 3.6 × 10{sup −5}. Magnetic inhomogeneities of the YIG films give the main contribution to the FMR linewidth. The contribution of the relaxation processes to the FMR linewidth is as low as 1.2%.

  13. Influence of Tertiary paleoenvironmental changes on the diversification of South American mammals: a relaxed molecular clock study within xenarthrans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vizcaíno Sergio F

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genomic data among organisms allow the reconstruction of their phylogenies and evolutionary time scales. Molecular timings have been recently used to suggest that environmental global change have shaped the evolutionary history of diverse terrestrial organisms. Living xenarthrans (armadillos, anteaters and sloths constitute an ideal model for studying the influence of past environmental changes on species diversification. Indeed, extant xenarthran species are relicts from an evolutionary radiation enhanced by their isolation in South America during the Tertiary era, a period for which major climate variations and tectonic events are relatively well documented. Results We applied a Bayesian approach to three nuclear genes in order to relax the molecular clock assumption while accounting for differences in evolutionary dynamics among genes and incorporating paleontological uncertainties. We obtained a molecular time scale for the evolution of extant xenarthrans and other placental mammals. Divergence time estimates provide substantial evidence for contemporaneous diversification events among independent xenarthran lineages. This correlated pattern of diversification might possibly relate to major environmental changes that occurred in South America during the Cenozoic. Conclusions The observed synchronicity between planetary and biological events suggests that global change played a crucial role in shaping the evolutionary history of extant xenarthrans. Our findings open ways to test this hypothesis further in other South American mammalian endemics like hystricognath rodents, platyrrhine primates, and didelphid marsupials.

  14. Nuclear magnetic relaxation induced by exchange-mediated orientational randomization: longitudinal relaxation dispersion for a dipole-coupled spin-1/2 pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2013-10-14

    In complex biological or colloidal samples, magnetic relaxation dispersion (MRD) experiments using the field-cycling technique can characterize molecular motions on time scales ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds, provided that a rigorous theory of nuclear spin relaxation is available. In gels, cross-linked proteins, and biological tissues, where an immobilized macromolecular component coexists with a mobile solvent phase, nuclear spins residing in solvent (or cosolvent) species relax predominantly via exchange-mediated orientational randomization (EMOR) of anisotropic nuclear (electric quadrupole or magnetic dipole) couplings. The physical or chemical exchange processes that dominate the MRD typically occur on a time scale of microseconds or longer, where the conventional perturbation theory of spin relaxation breaks down. There is thus a need for a more general relaxation theory. Such a theory, based on the stochastic Liouville equation (SLE) for the EMOR mechanism, is available for a single quadrupolar spin I = 1. Here, we present the corresponding theory for a dipole-coupled spin-1/2 pair. To our knowledge, this is the first treatment of dipolar MRD outside the motional-narrowing regime. Based on an analytical solution of the spatial part of the SLE, we show how the integral longitudinal relaxation rate can be computed efficiently. Both like and unlike spins, with selective or non-selective excitation, are treated. For the experimentally important dilute regime, where only a small fraction of the spin pairs are immobilized, we obtain simple analytical expressions for the auto-relaxation and cross-relaxation rates which generalize the well-known Solomon equations. These generalized results will be useful in biophysical studies, e.g., of intermittent protein dynamics. In addition, they represent a first step towards a rigorous theory of water (1)H relaxation in biological tissues, which is a prerequisite for unravelling the molecular basis of soft

  15. State-specific Multi-reference Perturbation Theories with Relaxed Coefficients: Molecular Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashis Mukherjee

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We present in this paper two new versions of Rayleigh-Schr¨odinger (RS and the Brillouin-Wigner (BW state-specific multi-reference perturbative theories (SSMRPT which stem from our state-specific multi-reference coupled-cluster formalism (SS-MRCC, developed with a complete active space (CAS. They are manifestly sizeextensive and are designed to avoid intruders. The combining coefficients cμ for the model functions φμ are completely relaxed and are obtained by diagonalizing an effective operator in the model space, one root of which is the target eigenvalue of interest. By invoking suitable partitioning of the hamiltonian, very convenient perturbative versions of the formalism in both the RS and the BW forms are developed for the second order energy. The unperturbed hamiltonians for these theories can be chosen to be of both Mφller-Plesset (MP and Epstein-Nesbet (EN type. However, we choose the corresponding Fock operator fμ for each model function φμ, whose diagonal elements are used to define the unperturbed hamiltonian in the MP partition. In the EN partition, we additionally include all the diagonal direct and exchange ladders. Our SS-MRPT thus utilizes a multi-partitioning strategy. Illustrative numerical applications are presented for potential energy surfaces (PES of the ground (1Σ+ and the first delta (1Δ states of CH+ which possess pronounced multi-reference character. Comparison of the results with the corresponding full CI values indicates the efficacy of our formalisms.

  16. Novel spin dynamics in ferrimagnetic molecular chains from 1H NMR and μSR spin-lattice relaxation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micotti, E.; Lascialfari, A.; Rigamonti, A.; Aldrovandi, S.; Caneschi, A.; Gatteschi, D.; Bogani, L.

    2004-01-01

    The spin dynamics in the helical chain Co(hfac) 2 NITPhOMe has been investigated by 1 H NMR and μSR relaxation. In the temperature range 15< T<60 K, the results are consistent with the relaxation of the homogeneous magnetization. For T≤15 K, NMR and μSR evidence a second spin relaxation mechanism, undetected by the magnetization measurements. From the analysis of these data, insights on this novel relaxation process are derived

  17. Novel spin dynamics in ferrimagnetic molecular chains from 1H NMR and μSR spin-lattice relaxation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micotti, E.; Lascialfari, A.; Rigamonti, A.; Aldrovandi, S.; Caneschi, A.; Gatteschi, D.; Bogani, L.

    2004-05-01

    The spin dynamics in the helical chain Co(hfac) 2NITPhOMe has been investigated by 1H NMR and μSR relaxation. In the temperature range 15relaxation of the homogeneous magnetization. For T⩽15 K, NMR and μSR evidence a second spin relaxation mechanism, undetected by the magnetization measurements. From the analysis of these data, insights on this novel relaxation process are derived.

  18. Adiabatic fast passage application in solid state NMR study of cross relaxation and molecular dynamics in heteronuclear systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, M; Woźniak-Braszak, A; Jurga, K

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the benefits of using fast adiabatic passage for the study of molecular dynamics in the solid state heteronuclear systems in the laboratory frame. A homemade pulse spectrometer operating at the frequency of 30.2MHz and 28.411MHz for protons and fluorines, respectively, has been enhanced with microcontroller direct digital synthesizer DDS controller [1-4]. This work briefly describes how to construct a low-cost and easy-to-assemble adiabatic extension set for homemade and commercial spectrometers based on recently very popular Arduino shields. The described set was designed for fast adiabatic generation. Timing and synchronization problems are discussed. The cross-relaxation experiments with different initial states of the two spin systems have been performed. Contrary to our previous work [5] where the steady-state NOE experiments were conducted now proton spins (1)H are polarized in the magnetic field B0 while fluorine spins (19)F are perturbed by selective saturation for a short time and then the system is allowed to evolve for a period in the absence of a saturating field. The adiabatic passage application leads to a reversal of magnetization of fluorine spins and increases the amplitude of the signal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Thermal Fluctuations in the Magnetic Ground State of the Molecular Cluster Mn12O12 Acetate from μSR and Proton NMR Relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lascialfari, A.; Borsa, F.; Carretta, P.; Jang, Z.H.; Borsa, F.; Gatteschi, D.

    1998-01-01

    Measurements of the spin-lattice relaxation rate are reported for muons and protons as a function of temperature for different values of the applied magnetic field in the Mn 12 O 12 molecular cluster. Strongly field dependent maxima in the relaxation rate versus temperature are observed below 50thinspthinspK. The results are explained in terms of thermal fluctuations of the total magnetization of the cluster among the different orientations with respect to the anisotropy axis. The lifetimes of the different m components of the total spin, S T =10 , of the molecule are obtained from the experiment and shown to be consistent with the ones expected from a spin-phonon coupling mechanism. No clear evidence for macroscopic quantum tunneling was observed in the field dependence of the proton relaxation rate at low T . copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  20. The investigation of molecular mechanisms in photodynamic action and radiobiology with nanosecond flash photolysis and pulse radiolysis: Final report for period April 1, 1972-June 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossweiner, L.I.

    1987-07-01

    Laser flash was employed to investigate initial photolysis mechanisms in enzymes and constituent aromatic amino acids. The key role of photoionization and solvated electron generation was demonstrated. The photochemistry of furocoumarins employed for phototherapy of skin diseases was investigated, emphasizing the production and subsequent reactions of singlet molecular oxygen. The photochemistry of porphyrins employed for photodynamic therapy of malignant tumors was studied, emphasizing photosensitization of model membranes, liposomes and resealed red blood cell membranes. Photosensitization in light-scattering media was investigated in a tissue model, consisting of polystyrene microspheres in an aqueous dye solution and analyzed with the diffusion approximation to radiative transfer. The diffusion approximation was employed to develop a dosimetry model for photodynamic therapy

  1. Molecular motions in sucrose-PVP and sucrose-sorbitol dispersions-II. Implications of annealing on secondary relaxations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sisir; Bhardwaj, Sunny P; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2014-10-01

    To determine the effect of annealing on the two secondary relaxations in amorphous sucrose and in sucrose solid dispersions. Sucrose was co-lyophilized with either PVP or sorbitol, annealed for different time periods and analyzed by dielectric spectroscopy. In an earlier investigation, we had documented the effect of PVP and sorbitol on the primary and the two secondary relaxations in amorphous sucrose solid dispersions (1). Here we investigated the effect of annealing on local motions, both in amorphous sucrose and in the dispersions. The average relaxation time of the local motion (irrespective of origin) in sucrose, decreased upon annealing. However, the heterogeneity in relaxation time distribution as well as the dielectric strength decreased only for β1- (the slower relaxation) but not for β2-relaxations. The effect of annealing on β2-relaxation times was neutralized by sorbitol while PVP negated the effect of annealing on both β1- and β2-relaxations. An increase in local mobility of sucrose brought about by annealing could be negated with an additive.

  2. Local spin dynamics at low temperature in the slowly relaxing molecular chain [Dy(hfac)3(NIT(C6H4OPh))]: A μ{sup +} spin relaxation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arosio, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.arosio@guest.unimi.it; Orsini, Francesco [Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Milano, and INSTM, Milano (Italy); Corti, Maurizio [Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Pavia and INSTM, Pavia (Italy); Mariani, Manuel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Università degli Studi di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Bogani, Lapo [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany); Caneschi, Andrea [INSTM and Department of Chemistry, University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); Lago, Jorge [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Bilbao (Spain); Lascialfari, Alessandro [Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Milano, and INSTM, Milano (Italy); Centro S3, Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Modena (Italy)

    2015-05-07

    The spin dynamics of the molecular magnetic chain [Dy(hfac){sub 3}(NIT(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}OPh))] were investigated by means of the Muon Spin Relaxation (μ{sup +}SR) technique. This system consists of a magnetic lattice of alternating Dy(III) ions and radical spins, and exhibits single-chain-magnet behavior. The magnetic properties of [Dy(hfac){sub 3}(NIT(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}OPh))] have been studied by measuring the magnetization vs. temperature at different applied magnetic fields (H = 5, 3500, and 16500 Oe) and by performing μ{sup +}SR experiments vs. temperature in zero field and in a longitudinal applied magnetic field H = 3500 Oe. The muon asymmetry P(t) was fitted by the sum of three components, two stretched-exponential decays with fast and intermediate relaxation times, and a third slow exponential decay. The temperature dependence of the spin dynamics has been determined by analyzing the muon longitudinal relaxation rate λ{sub interm}(T), associated with the intermediate relaxing component. The experimental λ{sub interm}(T) data were fitted with a corrected phenomenological Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound law by using a distribution of thermally activated correlation times, which average to τ = τ{sub 0} exp(Δ/k{sub B}T), corresponding to a distribution of energy barriers Δ. The correlation times can be associated with the spin freezing that occurs when the system condenses in the ground state.

  3. Molecular packing, hydrogen bonding, and fast dynamics in lysozyme/trehalose/glycerol and trehalose/glycerol glasses at low hydration

    OpenAIRE

    Lerbret, Adrien; Affouard, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Water and glycerol are well-known to facilitate the structural relaxation of amorphous protein matrices. However, several studies evidenced that they may also limit fast ($\\sim$ pico-nanosecond, ps-ns) and small-amplitude ($\\sim$ \\AA ) motions of proteins, which govern their stability in freeze-dried sugar mixtures. To determine how they interact with proteins and sugars in glassy matrices and, thereby, modulate their fast dynamics, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of lysozyme...

  4. Impact of growth and annealing conditions on the parameters of Ge/Si(001) relaxed layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yurasov, D. V., E-mail: Inquisitor@ipm.sci-nnov.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation); Bobrov, A. I. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Daniltsev, V. M.; Novikov, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation); Pavlov, D. A. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Skorokhodov, E. V.; Shaleev, M. V.; Yunin, P. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    Influence of the Ge layer thickness and annealing conditions on the parameters of relaxed Ge/Si(001) layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy via two-stage growth is investigated. The dependences of the threading dislocation density and surface roughness on the Ge layer thickness, annealing temperature and time, and the presence of a hydrogen atmosphere are obtained. As a result of optimization of the growth and annealing conditions, relaxed Ge/Si(001) layers which are thinner than 1 μm with a low threading dislocation density on the order of 10{sup 7} cm{sup –2} and a root mean square roughness of less than 1 nm are obtained.

  5. Molecular theory for nuclear magnetic relaxation in protein solutions and tissue; Surface diffusion and free-volume analogy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimmich, R; Nusser, W; Gneiting, T [Ulm Universitaet (Federal Republic of Germany). Sektion Kernresonanzspektroskopie

    1990-04-01

    A model theory is presented explaining a series of striking phenomena observed with nuclear magnetic relaxation in protein systems such as solutions or tissue. The frequency, concentration and temperature dependences of proton or deuteron relaxation times of protein solutions and tissue are explained. It is concluded that the translational diffusion of water molecules along the rugged surfaces of proteins and, to a minor degree, protein backbone fluctuations are crucial processes. The rate limiting factor of macromolecular tumbling is assumed to be given by the free water content in a certain analogy to the free-volume model of Cohen ad Turnbull. There are two characteristic water mass fractions indicating the saturation of the hydration shells and the onset of protein tumbling. A closed and relatively simple set of relaxation formulas is presented. The potentially fractal nature of the diffusion of water molecules on the protein surface is discussed. (author). 43 refs.; 4 figs.

  6. Ozone and dinitrogen monoxide production in atmospheric pressure air dielectric barrier discharge plasma effluent generated by nanosecond pulse superimposed alternating current voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Keisuke; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2017-06-01

    The effects of nanosecond pulse superposition to alternating current voltage (NS + AC) on the generation of an air dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma and reactive species are experimentally studied, along with measurements of ozone (O3) and dinitrogen monoxide (N2O) in the exhausted gas through the air DBD plasma (air plasma effluent). The charge-voltage cycle measurement indicates that the role of nanosecond pulse superposition is to induce electrical charge transport and excess charge accumulation on the dielectric surface following the nanosecond pulses. The densities of O3 and N2O in NS + AC DBD are found to be significantly increased in the plasma effluent, compared to the sum of those densities generated in NS DBD and AC DBD operated individually. The production of O3 and N2O is modulated significantly by the phase in which the nanosecond pulse is superimposed. The density increase and modulation effects by the nanosecond pulse are found to correspond with the electrical charge transport and the excess electrical charge accumulation induced by the nanosecond pulse. It is suggested that the electrical charge transport by the nanosecond pulse might result in the enhancement of the nanosecond pulse current, which may lead to more efficient molecular dissociation, and the excess electrical charge accumulation induced by the nanosecond pulse increases the discharge coupling power which would enhance molecular dissociation.

  7. The Effect of Crystal Packing and Re(IV) Ions on the Magnetisation Relaxation of [Mn6 ]-Based Molecular Magnets

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Lillo, José; Cano, Joan; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Brechin, Euan K

    2015-01-01

    The energy barrier to magnetisation relaxation in single-molecule magnets (SMMs) proffers potential technological applications in high-density information storage and quantum computation. Leading candidates amongst complexes of 3d metals ions are the hexametallic family of complexes of formula [Mn6 O2 (R-sao)6 (X)2 (solvent)y ] (saoH2 =salicylaldoxime; X=mono-anion; y=4-6; R=H, Me, Et, and Ph). The recent synthesis of cationic [Mn6 ][ClO4 ]2 family members, in which the coordinating X ions we...

  8. Computer Code for Interpreting 13C NMR Relaxation Measurements with Specific Models of Molecular Motion: The Rigid Isotropic and Symmetric Top Rotor Models and the Flexible Symmetric Top Rotor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    top rotor superimposes an effective correlation time, τe, onto a symmetric top rotor to account for internal motion. 2. THEORY The purpose...specifically describe how simple 13C relaxation theory is used to describe quantitatively simple molecular 3 motions. More-detailed accounts ...of nuclear magnetic relaxation can be found in a number of basic textbooks (i.e., Farrar and Becker, 1971; Fukushima and Roeder, 1981; Harris, 1986

  9. Effect of molecular weight and glass transition on relaxation and release behaviour of poly(DL-lactic acid) tablets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steendam, R.; Van Steenbergen, M.J.; Hennink, W.E.; Frijlink, H.W.; Lerk, C.F.

    2001-01-01

    Different molecular weight grades of poly(DL-lactic acid) were applied as release controlling excipients in tablets for oral drug administration. The role of molecular weight and glass transition in the mechanism of water-induced volume expansion and drug release of PDLA tablets was investigated.

  10. Nanosecond pulsed discharges in N2 and N2/H2O mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, R.M.; Verreycken, T.; Veldhuizen, van E.M.; Bruggeman, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Nanosecond pulsed discharges in N2 and N2/H2O at atmospheric pressure between two pin-shaped electrodes are studied. The evolution of the discharge is investigated with time-resolved imaging and optical emission spectroscopy. The discharge consists of three phases, the ignition (mainly molecular

  11. From beta-relaxation to alpha-decay: Atomistic picture from molecular dynamics simulations for glass-forming Ni0.5Zr0.5 melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teichler, Helmar [Inst. Materialphysik, Univ Goettingen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    In glass-forming melts the decay of structural fluctuation shows the well known transition from beta-relaxation (von-Schweidler law with exponent b) to alpha-decay (KWW law with exponent beta). Here we present results from molecular dynamics simulations for a metallic glass forming Ni0.5Zr0.5 model aimed at giving an understanding of this transition on the atomistic scale. At the considered temperature below mode coupling Tc, the dynamics of the system can be interpreted by residence of the particles in their neighbour cages and escape from the cages as rare processes. Our analysis yields that the fraction of residing particles is characterized by a hierarchical law in time, with von-Schweidler b explicitly related to the exponent of this law. In the alpha-decay regime the stretching exponent reflects, in addition, floating of the cages due to strain effects of escaped particles. Accordingly, the change from beta-relaxation to alpha-decay indicates the transition from low to large fraction of escaped particles.

  12. Self-motion and the α-relaxation in glass-forming polymers. Molecular dynamic simulation and quasielastic neutron scattering results in polyisoprene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colmenero, Juan; Arbe, Arantxa; Alvarez, Fernando; Monkenbusch, Michael; Richter, Dieter; Farago, Bela; Frick, Bernhard

    2003-01-01

    The momentum transfer dependence of the self-motion of main chain hydrogens in the α-relaxation regime of a glass forming polymer, polyisoprene, has been thoroughly investigated by a combined effort involving fully atomistic molecular dynamic simulations and quasielastic neutron scattering measurements. In this way, we have established the existence of a crossover from a Gaussian regime of sublinear diffusion to a strongly non-Gaussian regime at short distances. We show that an anomalous jump diffusion model with a distribution of jump lengths gives rise to such a crossover. This model leads to a time-dependent non-Gaussian parameter exhibiting all features revealed so far from various simulations of different glass forming systems

  13. Two-dimensional 1H and 31P NMR spectra and restrained molecular dynamics structure of an oligodeoxyribonucleotide duplex refined via a hybrid relaxation matrix procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, R.; Jones, C.R.; Gorenstein, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    Assignment of the 1H and 31P resonances of a decamer DNA duplex, d(CGCTTAAGCG)2 was determined by two-dimensional COSY, NOESY and 1H-31P Pure Absorption phase Constant time (PAC) heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy. The solution structure of the decamer was calculated by an iterative hybrid relaxation matrix method combined with NOESY-distance restrained molecular dynamics. The distances from the 2D NOESY spectra were calculated from the relaxation rate matrix which were evaluated from a hybrid NOESY volume matrix comprising elements from the experiment and those calculated from an initial structure. The hybrid matrix-derived distances were then used in a restrained molecular dynamics procedure to obtain a new structure that better approximates the NOESY spectra. The resulting partially refined structure was then used to calculate an improved theoretical NOESY volume matrix which is once again merged with the experimental matrix until refinement is complete. JH3'-P coupling constants for each of the phosphates of the decamer were obtained from 1H-31P J-resolved selective proton flip 2D spectra. By using a modified Karplus relationship the C4'-C3'-O3'-P torsional angles were obtained. Comparison of the 31P chemical shifts and JH3'-P coupling constants of this sequence has allowed a greater insight into the various factors responsible for 31P chemical shift variations in oligonucleotides. It also provides an important probe of the sequence-dependent structural variation of the deoxyribose phosphate backbone of DNA in solution. These correlations are consistent with the hypothesis that changes in local helical structure perturb the deoxyribose phosphate backbone. The variation of the 31P chemical shift, and the degree of this variation from one base step to the next is proposed as a potential probe of local helical conformation within the DNA double helix

  14. A perspective on slow-relaxing molecular magnets built from rare-earths and nitronyl-nitroxide building blocks (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, Lapo

    2011-04-01

    We offer a perspective, accessible to both chemists and physicists, of recent developments in the synthesis and characterization of molecular magnetic materials based on rare-earths and nitronyl-nitroxide radicals. We show both the rationale of the synthetic strategies and the observed behaviors. We highlight the relevance of these findings for synthetic chemists, material scientists, and physicists.

  15. Relaxation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Environ Corporation's relaxation system is built around a body lounge, a kind of super easy chair that incorporates sensory devices. Computer controlled enclosure provides filtered ionized air to create a feeling of invigoration, enhanced by mood changing aromas. Occupant is also surrounded by multidimensional audio and the lighting is programmed to change colors, patterns, and intensity periodically. These and other sensory stimulators are designed to provide an environment in which the learning process is stimulated, because research has proven that while an individual is in a deep state of relaxation, the mind is more receptive to new information.

  16. Novel spin dynamics in ferrimagnetic molecular chains from {sup 1}H NMR and {mu}SR spin-lattice relaxation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micotti, E. E-mail: micotti@fisicavolta.unipv.it; Lascialfari, A.; Rigamonti, A.; Aldrovandi, S.; Caneschi, A.; Gatteschi, D.; Bogani, L

    2004-05-01

    The spin dynamics in the helical chain Co(hfac){sub 2}NITPhOMe has been investigated by {sup 1}H NMR and {mu}SR relaxation. In the temperature range 15relaxation of the homogeneous magnetization. For T{<=}15 K, NMR and {mu}SR evidence a second spin relaxation mechanism, undetected by the magnetization measurements. From the analysis of these data, insights on this novel relaxation process are derived.

  17. Development of the relaxation-assisted 2DIR method for accessing structures of molecules and its application for studying the energy transport on a molecular level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasyanenko, Valeriy Mitrofanovich

    Measuring the three-dimensional structure of molecules, dynamics of structural changes, and energy transport on a molecular scale is important for many areas of natural science. Supplementing the widely used methods of x-ray diffraction, NMR, and optical spectroscopies, a two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2DIR) method was introduced about a decade ago. The 2DIR method measures pair-wise interactions between vibrational modes in molecules, thus acquiring molecular structural constraints such as distances between vibrating groups and the angles between their transition dipoles. The 2DIR method has been applied to a variety of molecular systems but in studying larger molecules such as proteins and peptides the method is facing challenges associated with the congestion of their vibrational spectra and delocalized character of their vibrational modes. To help extract structural information from such spectra and make efficient use of vibrational modes separated by large distances, a novel relaxation-assisted 2DIR method (RA 2DIR) has recently been proposed, which exploits the transport of excess vibrational energy from the initially excited mode. With the goal of further development of RA 2DIR, we applied it to a variety of molecular systems, including model compounds, transition-metal complexes, and isomers. The experiments revealed several novel effects which both enhance the power of RA 2DIR and bring a deeper understanding to the fundamental process of energy transport on a molecular level. We demonstrated that RA 2DIR can enhance greatly (27-fold) the cross-peak amplitude among spatially remote modes, which leads to an increase of the range of distances accessible for structural measurements by several fold. We demonstrated that the energy transport time correlates with the intermode distance. This correlation offers a new way for identifying connectivity patterns in molecules. We developed two models of energy transport in molecules. In one, a spatial overlap

  18. Nanosecond dynamics of influenza A/M2TM and an amantadine resistant mutant probed by time-dependent red shifts of a native tryptophan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanda, Vikas [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School – UMDNJ, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School – UMDNJ, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Cristian, Lidia [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6059 (United States); Toptygin, Dmitri; Brand, Ludwig [Department of Biology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); DeGrado, William F., E-mail: William.Degrado@ucsf.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94158 (United States)

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: ► Examined nanosecond dynamics of essential tryptophan residue of M2 proton channel. ► Channel blocking drugs restrict the ability of M2 to stabilize charge. ► Dielectric relaxation of M2 consistent with molecular dynamics simulation studies. - Abstract: Proteins involved in functions such as electron transfer or ion transport must be capable of stabilizing transient charged species on time scales ranging from picoseconds to microseconds. We study the influenza A M2 proton channel, containing a tryptophan residue that serves as an essential part of the proton conduction pathway. We induce a transition dipole in tryptophan by photoexcitation, and then probe the dielectric stabilization of its excited state. The magnitude of the stabilization over this time regime was larger than that generally found for tryptophan in membrane or protein environments. M2 achieves a water-like stabilization over a 25 ns time scale, slower than that of bulk water, but sufficiently rapid to contribute to stabilization of charge as protons diffuse through the channel. These measurements should stimulate future MD studies to clarify the role of sidechain versus non-bulk water in defining the process of relaxation.

  19. Formation of molecular hydrogen on carbonaceous grains from the interstellar medium. Role of the surface, her relaxation, her morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachellerie, D.

    2008-12-01

    The formation of H 2 in the interstellar medium, from two hydrogen atoms, is a fundamental question in astrophysics. This very exothermic reaction is indeed the first step of a series of essential reactions for the interstellar physical-chemistry that takes place on the surface of interstellar dust grains. In the warm regions of the ISM, diffuse clouds and Photodissociation regions, the invoked formation mechanism is the Eley-Rideal heterogeneous catalysis reaction, in which one H atom is initially chemisorbed. The grains have mainly carbonaceous graphitic-like composition. Previous theoretical works carried out using constrained geometries were unable to explain the formation of H 2 in the observed rovibrationnal states (v≤5). In order to take into account the degrees of freedom of all relevant atoms, we have built, from the Brenner potential, a new potential that models the graphene H-H system.With this potential, we have completed a classical molecular dynamics study of the formation of H 2 . This work has been performed for collision energies of the impinging H atoms from 0.015 eV to 0.2 eV and for surface temperature of 0, 10 and 30 K. One of the salient results is that the reaction cross section is directly related with the shape of the potential seen by the impinging H atom. Furthermore, the rovibrationnal distribution obtained by allowing the surface atoms to move is in better agreement with the one observed by astrophysicists (v≤6), the surface absorbs a large part (∼25%) of the available energy. Some works about the influence of: an additional H atom upon the surface or a possible porous structure of the grains, on the formation of H 2 are presented in appendices. (author)

  20. Theoretical and experimental study of the relaxation of excited states of the DCM laser dye. Intra-molecular electron transfer and photo-isomerization. Solvent effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marguet, Sylvie

    1992-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of a styrenic laser dye, the 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-[p-(dimethylamino) styryl]-4H-pyrane or DCM for the characterization of the first electronic states and of the influence of the solvent on efficiencies of different relaxation processes of the first excited state S1 of the DCM. Due to the presence of a combination of a donor group and acceptor group, this compound has interesting properties of intra-molecular charge transfer and of photo-isomerization which highly depend on solvent polarity. Two approaches have been adopted to study these complementary processes: an experimental approach (determination of rate constants of the different deactivation ways of the S1 state by measuring fluorescence quantum efficiencies, photo-isomerization quantum efficiencies, and fluorescence lifetimes of DCM in about twenty solvent of increasing polarity), and a computational approach (a CS-INDO-MRI type quantum chemistry calculation to obtain potential energy curves, charge distributions, and dipolar moments of DCM first electronic states) [fr

  1. Investigation of the spectroscopy and relaxation dynamics of benzaldehyde using molecular orbital calculations and laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Maria Cristina Rodrigues

    1998-11-01

    Molecular orbital methods and laser ionization mass spectrometry measurements are used to investigate the spectroscopy and relaxation dynamics of benzaldehyde following excitation to its S2(/pi/pi/sp/*) state. Energies, equilibrium geometries and vibrational frequencies of ground and low-lying excited states of benzaldehyde neutral and cation determined by ab initio calculations provide a theoretical description of the electronic spectroscopy of benzaldehyde and of the changes occurring on excitation and ionization. The S2(/pi/pi/sp/*)[/gets]S0 excitation spectrum of jet-cooled benzaldehyde acquired using two-color laser ionization mass spectrometry techniques is interpreted with the aid of these calculations. The spectrum is dominated by the origin band and by transitions involving some of the ring modes consistent with the results of the molecular orbital calculations that indicate that the major geometric changes on excitation to S2 are located in the aromatic ring. Ten fundamental vibrations of the S2(/pi/pi/sp/*) state are assigned. The dissociation dynamics of benzaldehyde into benzene and carbon monoxide following excitation to its S2(/pi/pi/sp/*) state are investigated under jet- cooled conditions by two-color laser ionization mass spectrometry using a pump-probe technique. This experimental arrangement allows monitoring the benzaldehyde reactant and the benzene product ion signals as a function of the time delay between the excitation and ionization steps. A kinetic model is proposed to explain the observed biexponential decay of the benzaldehyde signal and the single exponential growth of the benzene product signal in terms of a sequential decay of two excited states of benzaldehyde, one of which leads to formation of benzene molecules in its lowest triplet state. Reactant disappearance and product appearance rates are determined for a number of vibronic transitions of the S2 state. They are found to increase with excitation energy without any indication

  2. One nanosecond pulsed electron gun systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, R.F.

    1979-02-01

    At SLAC there has been a continuous need for the injection of very short bunches of electrons into the accelerator. Several time-of-flight experiments have used bursts of short pulses during a normal 1.6 micro-second rf acceleration period. Single bunch beam loading experiments made use of a short pulse injection system which included high power transverse beam chopping equipment. Until the equipment described in this paper came on line, the basic grid-controlled gun pulse was limited to a rise time of 7 nanoseconds and a pulse width of 10 nanoseconds. The system described here has a grid-controlled rise time of less than 500 pico-seconds, and a minimum pulse width of less than 1 nanosecond. Pulse burst repetition rate has been demonstrated above 20 MHz during a 1.6 microsecond rf accelerating period. The order-of-magnitude increase in gun grid switching speed comes from a new gun design which minimizes lead inductance and stray capacitance, and also increases gun grid transconductance. These gun improvements coupled with a newly designed fast pulser mounted directly within the gun envelope make possible subnanosecond pulsing of the gun

  3. Relaxation processes and glass transition of confined polymer melts: A molecular dynamics simulation of 1,4-polybutadiene between graphite walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solar, M; Binder, K; Paul, W

    2017-05-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a chemically realistic model for 1,4-polybutadiene in a thin film geometry confined by two graphite walls are presented. Previous work on melts in the bulk has shown that the model faithfully reproduces static and dynamic properties of the real material over a wide temperature range. The present work studies how these properties change due to nano-confinement. The focus is on orientational correlations observable in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and on the local intermediate incoherent neutron scattering function, F s (q z , z, t), for distances z from the graphite walls in the range of a few nanometers. Temperatures from about 2T g down to about 1.15T g , where T g is the glass transition temperature in the bulk, are studied. It is shown that weakly attractive forces between the wall atoms and the monomers suffice to effectively bind a polymer coil that is near the wall. For a wide regime of temperatures, the Arrhenius-like adsorption/desorption kinetics of the monomers is the slowest process, while very close to T g the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-like α-relaxation takes over. The α-process is modified only for z≤1.2 nm due to the density changes near the walls, less than expected from studies of coarse-grained (bead-spring-type) models. The weakness of the surface effects on the glass transition in this case is attributed to the interplay of density changes near the wall with the torsional potential. A brief discussion of pertinent experiments is given.

  4. Molecular potentials and relaxation dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karo, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The use of empirical pseudopotentials, in evaluating interatomic potentials, provides an inexpensive and convenient method for obtaining highly accurate potential curves and permits the modeling of core-valence correlation, and the inclusion of relativistic effects when these are significant. As an example, recent calculations of the chi 1 Σ + and a 3 Σ + states of LiH, NaH, KH, RbH, and CsH and the chi 2 Σ + states of their anions are discussed. Pseudopotentials, including core polarization terms, have been used to replace the core electrons, and this has been coupled with the development of compact, highly-optimized basis sets for the corresponding one- and two-electron atoms. Comparisons of the neutral potential curves with experiment and other ab initio calculations show good agreement (within 1000 cm -1 over most of the potential curves) with the difference curves being considerably more accurate

  5. Gas Discharge Produced by Strong Microwaves of Nanosecond Duration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikharev, A.L.

    2000-01-01

    The results of the investigation of nanosecond microwave discharge are reviewed. Nanosecond microwave discharge is a new branch of gas discharge physics. The paper lists base types of microwave generators used to produce nanosecond discharge and classifies the discharges relative to their base parameters: the way the discharge gets localized in a limited space, amplitude and frequency of microwave field, gas pressure, duration of microwave pulses. The laboratory experiments performed and the new effects which appear in nanosecond microwave discharge are briefly summarized. Different applications of such a discharge are analyzed on the basis of the experimental modelling. (author)

  6. Electric field measurements in a dielectric barrier nanosecond pulse discharge with sub-nanosecond time resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, Benjamin M; Shkurenkov, Ivan; Adamovich, Igor V; Lempert, Walter R; O’Byrne, Sean

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of time-resolved electric field measurements in a nanosecond discharge between two plane electrodes covered by dielectric plates, using picosecond four-wave mixing diagnostics. For absolute calibration, the IR signal was measured in hydrogen at a pressure of 440 Torr, for electrostatic electric field ranging from 0 to 8 kV cm −1 . The calibration curve (i.e. the square root of IR signal intensity versus electric field) was shown to be linear. By measuring the intensities of the pump, Stokes, and IR signal beam for each laser shot during the time sweep across the high-voltage pulse, temporal evolution of the electric field in the nanosecond pulse discharge was determined with sub-nanosecond time resolution. The results are compared to kinetic modeling predictions, showing good agreement, including non-zero electric field offset before the main high voltage pulse, breakdown moment, and reduction of electric field in the plasma after breakdown. The difference between the experimental results and model predictions is likely due to non-1D structure of the discharge. Comparison with the kinetic modeling predictions shows that electric field in the nanosecond pulse discharge is controlled primarily by electron impact excitation and charge accumulation on the dielectric surfaces. (paper)

  7. Nanosecond bipolar pulse generators for bioelectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shu; Zhou, Chunrong; Yang, Enbo; Rajulapati, Sambasiva R

    2018-04-26

    Biological effects caused by a nanosecond pulse, such as cell membrane permeabilization, peripheral nerve excitation and cell blebbing, can be reduced or cancelled by applying another pulse of reversed polarity. Depending on the degree of cancellation, the pulse interval of these two pulses can be as long as dozens of microseconds. The cancellation effect diminishes as the pulse duration increases. To study the cancellation effect and potentially utilize it in electrotherapy, nanosecond bipolar pulse generators must be made available. An overview of the generators is given in this paper. A pulse forming line (PFL) that is matched at one end and shorted at the other end allows a bipolar pulse to be produced, but no delay can be inserted between the phases. Another generator employs a combination of a resistor, an inductor and a capacitor to form an RLC resonant circuit so that a bipolar pulse with a decaying magnitude can be generated. A third generator is a converter, which converts an existing unipolar pulse to a bipolar pulse. This is done by inserting an inductor in a transmission line. The first phase of the bipolar pulse is provided by the unipolar pulse's rising phase. The second phase is formed during the fall time of the unipolar pulse, when the inductor, which was previously charged during the flat part of the unipolar pulse, discharges its current to the load. The fourth type of generator uses multiple MOSFET switches stacked to turn on a pre-charged, bipolar RC network. This approach is the most flexible in that it can generate multiphasic pulses that have different amplitudes, delays, and durations. However, it may not be suitable for producing short nanosecond pulses (<100 ns), whereas the PFL approach and the RLC approach with gas switches are used for this range. Thus, each generator has its own advantages and applicable range. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. PNG-300 a nanosecond pulsed neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sztaricskai, T.; Vasvary, L.; Petoe, G.C.; Devkin, B.V.

    1985-01-01

    The design and operation of a nanosecond-pulse neutron generator is reported. It was constructed for the measurement of prompt neutron and gamma radiation in experimental studies of fast neutron reactions by time of flight techniques. The acceleration voltage is 300 kV and the total resolution of the generator-neutron spectrometer system is 2 ns. The ion-optical system, the vacuum system and the control of the neutron generator is described in detail. The equipment was used for prompt neutron and gamma radiation induced in construction materials. (R.P.)

  9. Analysis of copper contamination in transformer insulating material with nanosecond- and femtosecond-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparna, N.; Vasa, N. J.; Sarathi, R.

    2018-06-01

    This work examines the oil-impregnated pressboard insulation of high-voltage power transformers, for the determination of copper contamination. Nanosecond- and femtosecond-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy revealed atomic copper lines and molecular copper monoxide bands due to copper sulphide diffusion. X-ray diffraction studies also indicated the presence of CuO emission. Elemental and molecular mapping compared transformer insulating material ageing in different media—air, N2, He and vacuum.

  10. Comparative study of the dissociative ionization of 1,1,1-trichloroethane using nanosecond and femtosecond laser pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available , but different fragmentation patterns. A general trend is that when using femtosecond laser pulses for ionization, the parent molecular ion is observed but not for nanosecond laser ionization. There is also a fundamental interest in laser...-molecule interactions at the high intensities available from femtosecond lasers [12,13]. These papers describe the multiphoton ionization mechanisms termed ladder climbing and ladder switching, which explain the presence of parent molecular ion in ultrashort pulse...

  11. Approach to equilibrium of a quantum system and generalization of the Montroll-Shuler equation for vibrational relaxation of a molecular oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenkre, V. M.; Chase, M.

    2017-08-01

    The approach to equilibrium of a quantum mechanical system in interaction with a bath is studied from a practical as well as a conceptual point of view. Explicit memory functions are derived for given models of bath couplings. If the system is a harmonic oscillator representing a molecule in interaction with a reservoir, the generalized master equation derived becomes an extension into the coherent domain of the well-known Montroll-Shuler equation for vibrational relaxation and unimolecular dissociation. A generalization of the Bethe-Teller result regarding energy relaxation is found for short times. The theory has obvious applications to relaxation dynamics at ultra-short times as in observations on the femtosecond time scale and to the investigation of quantum coherence at those short times. While vibrational relaxation in chemical physics is a primary target of the study, another system of interest in condensed matter physics, an electron or hole in a lattice subjected to a strong DC electric field that gives rise to well-known Wannier-Stark ladders, is naturally addressed with the theory. Specific system-bath interactions are explored to obtain explicit details of the dynamics. General phenomenological descriptions of the reservoir are considered rather than specific microscopic realizations.

  12. On the Use of Molecular Weight Cutoff Cassettes to Measure Dynamic Relaxivity of Novel Gadolinium Contrast Agents: Example Using Hyaluronic Acid Polymer Complexes in Phosphate-Buffered Saline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Kasraie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to determine whether standard extracellular contrast agents of Gd(III ions in combination with a polymeric entity susceptible to hydrolytic degradation over a finite period of time, such as Hyaluronic Acid (HA, have sufficient vascular residence time to obtain comparable vascular imaging to current conventional compounds and to obtain sufficient data to show proof of concept that HA with Gd-DTPA ligands could be useful as vascular imaging agents. We assessed the dynamic relaxivity of the HA bound DTPA compounds using a custom-made phantom, as well as relaxation rates at 10.72 MHz with concentrations ranging between 0.09 and 7.96 mM in phosphate-buffered saline. Linear dependences of static longitudinal relaxation rate (R1 on concentration were found for most measured samples, and the HA samples continued to produce high signal strength after 24 hours after injection into a dialysis cassette at 3T, showing superior dynamic relaxivity values compared to conventional contrast media such as Gd-DTPA-BMA.

  13. The role of nanosecond electric pulse-induced mechanical stress in cellular nanoporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Caleb C.

    Background: Exposures of cells to very short (less than 1 microsecond) electric pulses in the megavolt/meter range have been shown to cause a multitude of effects, both physical and molecular in nature. Physically, nanosecond electrical pulse exposure can disrupt the plasma membrane, leading to a phenomenon known as nanoporation. Nanoporation is the production of nanometer sized holes (less than 2 nanometers in diameter) that can persist for up to fifteen minutes, allowing the flow of ions into and out of the cell. Nanoporation can lead to secondary physical effects, such as cellular swelling, shrinking and blebbing. Molecularly, nanosecond electrical pulses have been shown to activate signaling pathways, produce oxidative stress, stimulate hormone secretion and induce both apoptotic and necrotic death. The mechanism by which nanosecond electrical pulses cause molecular changes is unknown; however, it is thought the flow of ions, such as calcium, into the cell via nanopores, could be a major cause. The ability of nanosecond electrical pulses to cause membranes to become permeable and to induce apoptosis makes the technology a desirable modality for cancer research; however, the lack of understanding regarding the mechanisms by which nanosecond electrical pulses cause nanoporation impedes further development of this technology. This dissertation documents the genomic and proteomic responses of cells exposed to nanosecond electrical pulses and describes in detail the biophysical effects of these electrical pulses, including the demonstration for the first time of the generation of acoustic pressure transients capable of disrupting plasma membranes and possibly contributing to nanoporation. Methods: Jurkat, clone E6-1 (human lymphocytic cell line), U937 (human lymphocytic cell line), Chinese hamster ovarian cells and adult primary human dermal fibroblasts exposed to nanosecond electrical pulses were subjected to a variety of molecular assays, including flow cytometry

  14. Megavolt nanosecond generator with semiconductor current breaker

    CERN Document Server

    Bushlyakov, A I; Rukin, S N; Slovikovskij, B G; Timoshenkov, S P

    2002-01-01

    The heavy-current nanosecond generator with the pulse capacity up to 1.6 GW and output voltage of 0.5-1 MW is described. The generator contains four capacity storages, one induction storage and six solid body commutators: one thyristor, four magnetic commutators and a semiconductor current breaker on the SOS-diodes. The results of studies on the energy change-over efficiency through a semiconductor breaker by various external resistance loads as well as the results of the thermal and frequency tests are presented. It is established that selection of the optimal cooling system provides for the generator continuous mode of operation with the pulse sequence frequency from 300 Hz up to 850 Hz

  15. High-voltage nanosecond pulse shaper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapishnikov, N.K.; Muratov, V.M.; Shatanov, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    A high-voltage pulse shaper with an output of up to 250 kV, a base duration of ∼ 10 nsec, and a repetition frequency of 50 pulses/sec is described. The described high-voltage nanosecond pulse shaper is designed for one-orbit extraction of an electron beam from a betatron. A diagram of the pulse shaper, which employs a single-stage generator is shown. The shaping element is a low-inductance capacitor bank of series-parallel KVI-3 (2200 pF at 10 kV) or K15-10 (4700 pF at 31.5 kV) disk ceramic capacitors. Four capacitors are connected in parallel and up to 25 are connected in series

  16. Nanosecond Surface Microdischarges in Multilayer Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinov, A. E.; Lyubimtseva, V. A.

    2018-05-01

    Multilayer structures in which nanosecond surface microdischarges are generated have been developed, fabricated, and investigated. In these structures, layers are made in the form of thin transparent films, and a plasma discharge channel is formed in thin spacings between the layers. Passage of the discharge channel from one layer into the neighboring layer is implemented via pre-fabricated microholes. Images of microdischarges were obtained which confirmed that their plasma channels are formed according to the route assigned by the holes. The route may follow a fairly complex scheme and have self-intersection points and portions in which the electrons are bound to move in opposition to the electric field. In studying the shape of channels in multilayer strictures, the authors have found a new physical effect which lies in the azimuthal self-orientation of the discharge channel as it passes from one microhole to another.

  17. Texturing of polypropylene (PP) with nanosecond lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveiro, A.; Soto, R.; del Val, J.; Comesaña, R.; Boutinguiza, M.; Quintero, F.; Lusquiños, F.; Pou, J.

    2016-06-01

    Polypropylene (PP) is a biocompatible and biostable polymer, showing good mechanical properties that has been recently introduced in the biomedical field for bone repairing applications; however, its poor surface properties due to its low surface energy limit their use in biomedical applications. In this work, we have studied the topographical modification of polypropylene (PP) laser textured with Nd:YVO4 nanosecond lasers emitting at λ = 1064 nm, 532 nm, and 355 nm. First, optical response of this material under these laser wavelengths was determined. The application of an absorbing coating was also studied. The influence of the laser processing parameters on the surface modification of PP was investigated by means of statistically designed experiments. Processing maps to tailor the roughness, and wettability, the main parameters affecting cell adhesion characteristics of implants, were also determined. Microhardness measurements were performed to discern the impact of laser treatment on the final mechanical properties of PP.

  18. Plastic relaxation of GeSi/Si(001) films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy in the presence of the Sb surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolkhovityanov, Yu. B.; Deryabin, A. S.; Gutakovskii, A. K.; Kolesnikov, A. V.; Sokolov, L. V.

    2007-01-01

    Plastically relaxed GeSi films with the Ge fraction equal to 0.29-0.42 and thickness as large as 0.5 μm were grown on Si (001) substrates using the low-temperature (350 deg. C) buffer Si layer and Sb as a surfactant. It is shown that introduction of Sb that smoothens the film surface at the stage of pseudomorphic growth lowers the density of threading dislocations in the plastically relaxed heterostructure by 1-1.5 orders of magnitude and also reduces the final roughness of the surface. The root-mean-square value of roughness smaller than 1 nm was obtained for a film with the Ge content of 0.29 and the density of threading dislocations of about 10 6 cm -2 . It is assumed that the effect of surfactant is based on the fact that the activity of surface sources of dislocations is reduced in the presence of Sb

  19. Nanosecond high-power dense microplasma switch for visible light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bataller, A., E-mail: bataller@physics.ucla.edu; Koulakis, J.; Pree, S.; Putterman, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Spark discharges in high-pressure gas are known to emit a broadband spectrum during the first 10 s of nanoseconds. We present calibrated spectra of high-pressure discharges in xenon and show that the resulting plasma is optically thick. Laser transmission data show that such a body is opaque to visible light, as expected from Kirchoff's law of thermal radiation. Nanosecond framing images of the spark absorbing high-power laser light are presented. The sparks are ideal candidates for nanosecond, high-power laser switches.

  20. Breathing and Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find a Doctor Relaxation is the absence of tension in muscle groups and a minimum or absence ... Drill Meditation Progressive Muscle Relaxation Minimizing Shortness of Breath Visualization This information has been approved by Shelby ...

  1. Nanosecond-timescale spin transfer using individual electrons in a quadruple-quantum-dot device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baart, T. A.; Jovanovic, N.; Vandersypen, L. M. K. [QuTech and Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W. [Solid State Physics Laboratory, ETH Zürich, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2016-07-25

    The ability to coherently transport electron-spin states between different sites of gate-defined semiconductor quantum dots is an essential ingredient for a quantum-dot-based quantum computer. Previous shuttles using electrostatic gating were too slow to move an electron within the spin dephasing time across an array. Here, we report a nanosecond-timescale spin transfer of individual electrons across a quadruple-quantum-dot device. Utilizing enhanced relaxation rates at a so-called hot spot, we can upper bound the shuttle time to at most 150 ns. While actual shuttle times are likely shorter, 150 ns is already fast enough to preserve spin coherence in, e.g., silicon based quantum dots. This work therefore realizes an important prerequisite for coherent spin transfer in quantum dot arrays.

  2. Relationship between Structural and Stress Relaxation in a Block-Copolymer Melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Amish J.; Narayanan, Suresh; Sandy, Alec; Mochrie, Simon G. J.; Garetz, Bruce A.; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Balsara, Nitash P.

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between structural relaxation on molecular length scales and macroscopic stress relaxation was explored in a disordered block-copolymer melt. Experiments show that the structural relaxation time, measured by x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy is larger than the terminal stress relaxation time, measured by rheology, by factors as large as 100. We demonstrate that the structural relaxation data are dominated by the diffusion of intact micelles while the stress relaxation data are dominated by contributions due to disordered concentration fluctuations

  3. Relaxation dynamics following transition of solvated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, R.B.; Landman, U.; Nitzan, A.

    1989-01-01

    Relaxation dynamics following an electronic transition of an excess solvated electron in clusters and in bulk water is studied using an adiabatic simulation method. In this method the solvent evolves classically and the electron is constrained to a specified state. The coupling between the solvent and the excess electron is evaluated via the quantum expectation value of the electron--water molecule interaction potential. The relaxation following excitation (or deexcitation) is characterized by two time scales: (i) a very fast (/similar to/20--30 fs) one associated with molecular rotations in the first solvation shell about the electron, and (ii) a slower stage (/similar to/200 fs), which is of the order of the longitudinal dielectric relaxation time. The fast relaxation stage exhibits an isotope effect. The spectroscopical consequences of the relaxation dynamics are discussed

  4. Vibrational and Rotational Energy Relaxation in Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jakob

    Vibrational and rotational energy relaxation in liquids are studied by means of computer simulations. As a precursor for studying vibrational energy relaxation of a solute molecule subsequent to the formation of a chemical bond, the validity of the classical Bersohn-Zewail model for describing......, the vibrational energy relaxation of I2 subsequent to photodissociation and recombination in CCl4 is studied using classical Molecular Dynamics simulations. The vibrational relaxation times and the time-dependent I-I pair distribution function are compared to new experimental results, and a qualitative agreement...... is found in both cases. Furthermore, the rotational energy relaxation of H2O in liquid water is studied via simulations and a power-and-work analysis. The mechanism of the energy transfer from the rotationally excited H2O molecule to its water neighbors is elucidated, i.e. the energy-accepting degrees...

  5. Corroborative evidences of TV γ -scaling of the α-relaxation originating from the primitive relaxation/JG β relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngai, K. L.; Paluch, M.

    2017-12-01

    Successful thermodynamic scaling of the structural alpha-relaxation time or transport coefficients of glass-forming liquids determined at various temperatures T and pressures P means the data conform to a single function of the product variable TVgamma, where V is the specific volume and gamma is a material specific constant. In the past two decades we have witnessed successful TVgamma-scaling in many molecular, polymeric, and even metallic glass-formers, and gamma is related to the slope of the repulsive part of the intermolecular potential. The advances made indicate TVgamma-scaling is an important aspect of the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of glass-formers. In this paper we show the origin of TVgamma-scaling is not from the structural alpha-relaxation time. Instead it comes from its precursor, the Johari-Goldstein beta-relaxation or the primitive relaxation of the Coupling Model and their relaxation times or tau_0 respectively. It is remarkable that all relaxation times are functions of TVgamma with the same gama, as well as the fractional exponent of the Kohlrausch correlation function of the structural alpha-relaxation. We arrive at this conclusion convincingly based on corroborative evidences from a number of experiments and molecular dynamics simulations performed on a wide variety of glass-formers and in conjunction with consistency with the predictions of the Coupling Model.

  6. Physics of high intensity nanosecond electron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera-Gomez, A.; Spicer, W.E.

    1993-08-01

    A new high-intensity, short-time electron source is now being used at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Using a GaAs negative affinity semiconductor in the construction of the cathode, it is possible to fulfill operation requirements such as peak currents of tens of amperes, peak widths of the order of nanoseconds, hundreds of hours of operation stability, and electron spin polarization. The cathode is illuminated with high intensity laser pulses, and photoemitted electrons constitute the yield. Because of the high currents, some nonlinear effects are present. Very noticeable is the so-called Charge Limit (CL) effect, which consists of a limit on the total charge in each pulse-that is, the total bunch charge stops increasing as the light pulse total energy increases. In this paper, we explain the mechanism of the CL and how it is caused by the photovoltaic effect. Our treatment is based on the Three-Step model of photoemission. We relate the CL to the characteristics of the surface and bulk of the semiconductor, such as doping, band bending, surface vacuum level, and density of surface states. We also discuss possible ways to prevent the Char's Level effect

  7. Redox reaction studies by nanosecond pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moorthy, P.N.

    1979-01-01

    Free radicals are formed as intermediates in many chemical and biochemical reactions. An important type of reaction which they can undergo is a one electron or redox process. The direction and rate of such electron transfer reactions is governed by the relative redox potentials of the participating species. Because of the generally short lived nature of free radicals, evaluation of their redox potentials poses a number of problems. Two techniques are described for the experimental determination of the redox potentials of short lived species generated by either a nanosecond electron pulse or laser flash. In the first method, redox titration of the short lived species with stable molecules of known redox potential is carried out, employing the technique of fast kinetic spectrophotometry. Conversely, by the same method it is also possible to evaluate the one electron redox potentials of stable molecules by redox titration with free radicals of known redox potential produced as above. In the second method, electrochemical reduction or oxidation of the short lived species at an appropriate electrode (generally a mercury drop) is carried out at different fixed potentials, and the redox potential evaluated from the current-potential curves (polarograms). Full description of the experimental set up and theoretical considerations for interpretation of the raw data are given. The relative merits of the two methods and their practical applicability are discussed. (auth.)

  8. Regularities of intermediate adsorption complex relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manukova, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    The experimental data, characterizing the regularities of intermediate adsorption complex relaxation in the polycrystalline Mo-N 2 system at 77 K are given. The method of molecular beam has been used in the investigation. The analytical expressions of change regularity in the relaxation process of full and specific rates - of transition from intermediate state into ''non-reversible'', of desorption into the gas phase and accumUlation of the particles in the intermediate state are obtained

  9. Universal Mechanism of Spin Relaxation in Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, Eugene

    2006-03-01

    Conventional elastic theory ignores internal local twists and torques. Meantime, spin-lattice relaxation is inherently coupled with local elastic twists through conservation of the total angular momentum (spin + lattice). This coupling gives universal lower bound (free of fitting parameters) on the relaxation of the atomic or molecular spin in a solid [1] and on the relaxation of the electron spin in a quantum dot [2]. [1] E. M. Chudnovsky, D. A. Garanin, and R. Schilling, Phys. Rev. B 72, 094426 (2005). [2] C. Calero, E. M. Chudnovsky, and D. A. Garanin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 166603 (2005).

  10. Stress relaxation of bi-disperse polystyrene melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hengeller, Ludovica; Huang, Qian; Dorokhin, Andriy

    2016-01-01

    We present start-up of uniaxial extension followed by stress relaxation experiments of a bi-disperse 50 % by weight blend of 95k and 545k molecular weight polystyrene. We also show, for comparison, stress relaxation measurements of the polystyrene melts with molecular weight 95k and 545k, which...... are the components of the bi-disperse melt. The measurements show three separated relaxation regimes: a fast regime, a transition regime, and a slow regime. In the fast regime, the orientation of the long chains is frozen and the stress relaxation is due to stretch relaxation of the short chains primarily....... Conversely in the slow regime, the long chains have retracted and undergo relaxation of orientation in fully relaxed short chains....

  11. Fast evaluation of protein dynamics from deficient 15N relaxation data

    KAUST Repository

    Jaremko, Łukasz

    2018-03-28

    Simple and convenient method of protein dynamics evaluation from the insufficient experimental N relaxation data is presented basing on the ratios, products, and differences of longitudinal and transverse N relaxation rates obtained at a single magnetic field. Firstly, the proposed approach allows evaluating overall tumbling correlation time (nanosecond time scale). Next, local parameters of the model-free approach characterizing local mobility of backbone amide N–H vectors on two different time scales, S and R, can be elucidated. The generalized order parameter, S, describes motions on the time scale faster than the overall tumbling correlation time (pico- to nanoseconds), while the chemical exchange term, R, identifies processes slower than the overall tumbling correlation time (micro- to milliseconds). Advantages and disadvantages of different methods of data handling are thoroughly discussed.

  12. Fast evaluation of protein dynamics from deficient 15N relaxation data

    KAUST Repository

    Jaremko, Łukasz; Jaremko, Mariusz; Ejchart, Andrzej; Nowakowski, Michał

    2018-01-01

    Simple and convenient method of protein dynamics evaluation from the insufficient experimental N relaxation data is presented basing on the ratios, products, and differences of longitudinal and transverse N relaxation rates obtained at a single magnetic field. Firstly, the proposed approach allows evaluating overall tumbling correlation time (nanosecond time scale). Next, local parameters of the model-free approach characterizing local mobility of backbone amide N–H vectors on two different time scales, S and R, can be elucidated. The generalized order parameter, S, describes motions on the time scale faster than the overall tumbling correlation time (pico- to nanoseconds), while the chemical exchange term, R, identifies processes slower than the overall tumbling correlation time (micro- to milliseconds). Advantages and disadvantages of different methods of data handling are thoroughly discussed.

  13. Energy coupling to the plasma in repetitive nanosecond pulse discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamovich, Igor V.; Nishihara, Munetake; Choi, Inchul; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Lempert, Walter R.

    2009-01-01

    A new analytic quasi-one-dimensional model of energy coupling to nanosecond pulse discharge plasmas in plane-to-plane geometry has been developed. The use of a one-dimensional approach is based on images of repetitively pulsed nanosecond discharge plasmas in dry air demonstrating that the plasma remains diffuse and uniform on a nanosecond time scale over a wide range of pressures. The model provides analytic expressions for the time-dependent electric field and electron density in the plasma, electric field in the sheath, sheath boundary location, and coupled pulse energy. The analytic model predictions are in very good agreement with numerical calculations. The model demonstrates that (i) the energy coupled to the plasma during an individual nanosecond discharge pulse is controlled primarily by the capacitance of the dielectric layers and by the breakdown voltage and (ii) the pulse energy coupled to the plasma during a burst of nanosecond pulses decreases as a function of the pulse number in the burst. This occurs primarily because of plasma temperature rise and resultant reduction in breakdown voltage, such that the coupled pulse energy varies approximately proportionally to the number density. Analytic expression for coupled pulse energy scaling has been incorporated into the air plasma chemistry model, validated previously by comparing with atomic oxygen number density measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges. The results of kinetic modeling using the modified air plasma chemistry model are compared with time-resolved temperature measurements in a repetitively pulsed nanosecond discharge in air, by emission spectroscopy, and purely rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy showing good agreement.

  14. Critical thickness for strain relaxation of Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} (x ≤ 0.17) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Ge(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei; Zhou, Qian; Dong, Yuan; Yeo, Yee-Chia, E-mail: yeo@ieee.org [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Tok, Eng Soon [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117551 (Singapore)

    2015-06-08

    We investigated the critical thickness (h{sub c}) for plastic relaxation of Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} films with various Sn mole fraction x (x ≤ 0.17) and different thicknesses were grown on Ge(001). The strain relaxation of Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} films and the h{sub c} were investigated by high-resolution x-ray diffraction and reciprocal space mapping. It demonstrates that the measured h{sub c} values of Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} layers are as much as an order of magnitude larger than that predicted by the Matthews and Blakeslee (M-B) model. The People and Bean (P-B) model was also used to predict the h{sub c} values in Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x}/Ge system. The measured h{sub c} values for various Sn content follow the trend, but slightly larger than that predicted by the P-B model.

  15. Mechanical relaxation in glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiki, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The basic properties of glasses and the characteristics of mechanical relaxation in glasses were briefly reviewed, and then our studies concerned were presented. Experimental methods adopted were viscosity, internal friction, ultrasonic attenuation, and Brillouin scattering measurements. The specimens used were several kinds of inorganic, organic, and metallic glasses. The measurements were mainly carried out from the room temperature up to the glass transition temperature, and the relaxation time was determined as a function of temperature. The 'double relaxation' composed of two Arrhenius-type relaxations was observed in many materials. In both relaxations, the 'compensation effect' showing a correlation of the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy was observed. These results were explained by considering the 'complex relaxation' due to cooperative motions of atoms or group of atoms. Values of activation energy near the glass transition determined by the various experimental methods were compared with each other

  16. High-Voltage, Multiphasic, Nanosecond Pulses to Modulate Cellular Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Hollie A; Hirakawa, Shinji; Yang, Enbo; Zhou, Chunrong; Xiao, Shu

    2018-04-01

    Nanosecond electric pulses are an effective power source in plasma medicine and biological stimulation, in which biophysical responses are governed by peak power and not energy. While uniphasic nanosecond pulse generators are widely available, the recent discovery that biological effects can be uniquely modulated by reversing the polarity of nanosecond duration pulses calls for the development of a multimodal pulse generator. This paper describes a method to generate nanosecond multiphasic pulses for biomedical use, and specifically demonstrates its ability to cancel or enhance cell swelling and blebbing. The generator consists of a series of the fundamental module, which includes a capacitor and a MOSFET switch. A positive or a negative phase pulse module can be produced based on how the switch is connected. Stacking the modules in series can increase the voltage up to 5 kV. Multiple stacks in parallel can create multiphase outputs. As each stack is independently controlled and charged, multiphasic pulses can be created to produce flexible and versatile pulse waveforms. The circuit topology can be used for high-frequency uniphasic or biphasic nanosecond burst pulse production, creating numerous opportunities for the generator in electroporation applications, tissue ablation, wound healing, and nonthermal plasma generation.

  17. Development of an electron momentum spectrometer for time-resolved experiments employing nanosecond pulsed electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yaguo; Shan, Xu; Liu, Zhaohui; Niu, Shanshan; Wang, Enliang; Chen, Xiangjun

    2018-03-01

    The low count rate of (e, 2e) electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS) has long been a major limitation of its application to the investigation of molecular dynamics. Here we report a new EMS apparatus developed for time-resolved experiments in the nanosecond time scale, in which a double toroidal energy analyzer is utilized to improve the sensitivity of the spectrometer and a nanosecond pulsed electron gun with a repetition rate of 10 kHz is used to obtain an average beam current up to nA. Meanwhile, a picosecond ultraviolet laser with a repetition rate of 5 kHz is introduced to pump the sample target. The time zero is determined by photoionizing the target using a pump laser and monitoring the change of the electron beam current with time delay between the laser pulse and electron pulse, which is influenced by the plasma induced by the photoionization. The performance of the spectrometer is demonstrated by the EMS measurement on argon using a pulsed electron beam, illustrating the potential abilities of the apparatus for investigating the molecular dynamics in excited states when employing the pump-probe scheme.

  18. Free volume from positron lifetime and pressure-volume-temperature experiments in relation to structural relaxation of van der Waals molecular glass-forming liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlubek, G; Shaikh, M Q; Rätzke, K; Paluch, M; Faupel, F

    2010-06-16

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is employed to characterize the temperature dependence of the free volume in two van der Waals liquids: 1, 1'-bis(p-methoxyphenyl)cyclohexane (BMPC) and 1, 1'-di(4-methoxy-5-methylphenyl)cyclohexane (BMMPC). From the PALS spectra analysed with the routine LifeTime9.0, the size (volume) distribution of local free volumes (subnanometer size holes), its mean, [v(h)], and mean dispersion, σ(h), were calculated. A comparison with the macroscopic volume from pressure-volume-temperature (PV T) experiments delivered the hole density and the specific hole free volume and a complete characterization of the free volume microstructure in that sense. These data are used in correlation with structural (α) relaxation data from broad-band dielectric spectroscopy (BDS) in terms of the Cohen-Grest and Cohen-Turnbull free volume models. An extension of the latter model allows us to quantify deviations between experiments and theory and an attempt to systematize these in terms of T(g) or of the fragility. The experimental data for several fragile and less fragile glass formers are involved in the final discussion. It was concluded that, for large differences in the fragility of different glass formers, the positron lifetime mirrors clearly the different character of these materials. For small differences in the fragility, additional properties like the character of bonds and chemical structure of the material may affect size, distribution and thermal behaviour of the free volume.

  19. Free volume from positron lifetime and pressure-volume-temperature experiments in relation to structural relaxation of van der Waals molecular glass-forming liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dlubek, G [ITA Institute for Innovative Technologies, Koethen/Halle, Wiesenring 4, D-06120 Lieskau (Germany); Shaikh, M Q; Raetzke, K; Faupel, F [Faculty of Engineering, Institute for Materials Science, Christian-Albrechts University of Kiel, Kaiserstrasse 2, D-24143 Kiel (Germany); Paluch, M, E-mail: guenter.dlubek@gmx.d [Institute of Physics, Silesian University, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland)

    2010-06-16

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is employed to characterize the temperature dependence of the free volume in two van der Waals liquids: 1, 1'-bis(p-methoxyphenyl)cyclohexane (BMPC) and 1, 1'-di(4-methoxy-5-methylphenyl)cyclohexane (BMMPC). From the PALS spectra analysed with the routine LifeTime9.0, the size (volume) distribution of local free volumes (subnanometer size holes), its mean, (v{sub h}), and mean dispersion, {sigma}{sub h}, were calculated. A comparison with the macroscopic volume from pressure-volume-temperature (PV T) experiments delivered the hole density and the specific hole free volume and a complete characterization of the free volume microstructure in that sense. These data are used in correlation with structural ({alpha}) relaxation data from broad-band dielectric spectroscopy (BDS) in terms of the Cohen-Grest and Cohen-Turnbull free volume models. An extension of the latter model allows us to quantify deviations between experiments and theory and an attempt to systematize these in terms of T{sub g} or of the fragility. The experimental data for several fragile and less fragile glass formers are involved in the final discussion. It was concluded that, for large differences in the fragility of different glass formers, the positron lifetime mirrors clearly the different character of these materials. For small differences in the fragility, additional properties like the character of bonds and chemical structure of the material may affect size, distribution and thermal behaviour of the free volume.

  20. Energy efficiency in nanoscale synthesis using nanosecond plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, David Z; Ken Ostrikov, Kostya; Kumar, Shailesh; Lacoste, Deanna A; Levchenko, Igor; Laux, Christophe O

    2013-01-01

    We report a nanoscale synthesis technique using nanosecond-duration plasma discharges. Voltage pulses 12.5 kV in amplitude and 40 ns in duration were applied repetitively at 30 kHz across molybdenum electrodes in open ambient air, generating a nanosecond spark discharge that synthesized well-defined MoO₃ nanoscale architectures (i.e. flakes, dots, walls, porous networks) upon polyamide and copper substrates. No nitrides were formed. The energy cost was as low as 75 eV per atom incorporated into a nanostructure, suggesting a dramatic reduction compared to other techniques using atmospheric pressure plasmas. These findings show that highly efficient synthesis at atmospheric pressure without catalysts or external substrate heating can be achieved in a simple fashion using nanosecond discharges.

  1. Relaxation characteristics of hastelloy X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiko

    1980-02-01

    Relaxation diagrams of Hastelloy X (relaxation curves, relaxation design diagrams, etc.) were generated from the creep constitutive equation of Hastelloy X, using inelastic stress analysis code TEPICC-J. These data are in good agreement with experimental relaxation data of ORNL-5479. Three typical inelastic stress analyses were performed for various relaxation behaviors of the high-temperature structures. An attempt was also made to predict these relaxation behaviors by the relaxation curves. (author)

  2. Amorphous Terfenol-D films using nanosecond pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, James; O'Brien, Daniel T.; Kovar, Desiderio

    2009-01-01

    Thin films of Terfenol-D were produced by nanosecond pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at two fluences. Electron dispersive spectroscopy conducted using scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes showed that the film compositions were similar to that of the PLD target. Contrary to previous assertions that suggested that nanosecond PLD results in crystalline films, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that the films produced at both fluences were amorphous. Splatters present on the film had similar compositions to the overall film and were also amorphous. Magnetic measurements showed that the films had high saturation magnetization and magnetostriction, similar to high quality films produced using other physical vapor deposition methods.

  3. TEACHING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NORRIS, JEANNE E.; STEINHAUS, ARTHUR H.

    THIS STUDY ATTEMPTED TO FIND OUT WHETHER (1) THE METHODS FOR ATTAINING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION THAT HAVE PROVED FRUITFUL IN THE ONE-TO-ONE RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLINIC CAN BE SUCCESSFULLY ADAPTED TO THE TEACHER-CLASS RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLASSROOM AND GYMNASIUM, AND (2) NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION CAN BE TAUGHT SUCCESSFULLY BY AN APPROPRIATELY TRAINED…

  4. Relaxation of Anisotropic Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deubener, Joachim; Martin, Birgit; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2004-01-01

    . When the load was removed at room temperature a permanent optical anisotropy (birefringence) was observed only perpendicular to cylinder axis and the pressure direction indicating complete elimination of thermal stresses. Relaxation of structural anisotropy was studied from reheating experiments using...... the energy release, thermo-mechanical and optical relaxation behaviour are drawn....

  5. Relaxation techniques for stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... raise your heart rate. This is called the stress response. Relaxation techniques can help your body relax and lower your blood pressure ... also many other types of breathing techniques you can learn. In many cases, you do not need much ... including those that cause stress. Meditation has been practiced for thousands of years, ...

  6. Effect of nanosecond UV laser irradiation on luminescence and absorption in silver- and copper-containing phosphate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashov, A. A.; Sidorov, A. I.; Stoliarchuk, M. V.

    2018-03-01

    Experimental evidence is presented that nanosecond UV laser irradiation of silver- and copper-containing barium phosphate glasses leads to luminescence quenching in the visible range. Subsequent heat treatment induces an absorption in the range 350–500 nm. These effects are due to the ionisation and fragmentation of subnanometre molecular clusters by laser radiation and subsequent (heat treatment-induced) formation of nanoparticles possessing plasmon resonance. Our numerical modelling results demonstrate the feasibility of producing stable AgnCum hybrid molecular clusters in glass. Local modification of the optical properties of glass by laser light can be used for optical information recording.

  7. Performance of the Fitch generator in a nanosecond electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernyj, V.V.

    1976-01-01

    The operation of the Fitch generator in the nanosecond electron accelerator is discussed. The operating principle of the generator is based on the inversion of the voltage at the storage capacitances. Only one discharger is employed in the discharge circuit of the generator which provides for decreasing the generator impedance to 24 Ohms. The maximum accelerating voltage equals 0.6 MV

  8. High power semiconductor switching in the nanosecond regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, O.S.; Long, J.R.; Smith, V.L.; Page, D.J.; Roberts, J.S.

    1975-12-01

    Light activated multilayered silicon semiconductor devices have been used to switch at megawatt power levels with nanosecond turnon time. Current rate of rise of 700 kA/μs at 10 kA, with 1 kV across the load have been achieved. Recovery time of 1 millisec has been obtained. Applicability to fusion research needs is discussed

  9. Low charge state heavy ion production with sub-nanosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanesue, T; Kumaki, M; Ikeda, S; Okamura, M

    2016-02-01

    We have investigated laser ablation plasma of various species using nanosecond and sub-nanosecond lasers for both high and low charge state ion productions. We found that with sub-nanosecond laser, the generated plasma has a long tail which has low charge state ions determined by an electrostatic ion analyzer even under the laser irradiation condition for highly charged ion production. This can be caused by insufficient laser absorption in plasma plume. This property might be suitable for low charge state ion production. We used a nanosecond laser and a sub-nanosecond laser for low charge state ion production to investigate the difference of generated plasma using the Zirconium target.

  10. Low charge state heavy ion production with sub-nanosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanesue, T., E-mail: tkanesue@bnl.gov; Okamura, M. [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Kumaki, M. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ikeda, S. [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    We have investigated laser ablation plasma of various species using nanosecond and sub-nanosecond lasers for both high and low charge state ion productions. We found that with sub-nanosecond laser, the generated plasma has a long tail which has low charge state ions determined by an electrostatic ion analyzer even under the laser irradiation condition for highly charged ion production. This can be caused by insufficient laser absorption in plasma plume. This property might be suitable for low charge state ion production. We used a nanosecond laser and a sub-nanosecond laser for low charge state ion production to investigate the difference of generated plasma using the Zirconium target.

  11. The relaxation time approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gairola, R.P.; Indu, B.D.

    1991-01-01

    A plausible approximation has been made to estimate the relaxation time from a knowledge of the transition probability of phonons from one state (r vector, q vector) to other state (r' vector, q' vector), as a result of collision. The relaxation time, thus obtained, shows a strong dependence on temperature and weak dependence on the wave vector. In view of this dependence, relaxation time has been expressed in terms of a temperature Taylor's series in the first Brillouin zone. Consequently, a simple model for estimating the thermal conductivity is suggested. the calculations become much easier than the Callaway model. (author). 14 refs

  12. Dielectric Relaxation Studies of Alkyl Methacrylate–Phenol Mixtures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Kirkwood correlation factor and the excess inverse relaxation time were determined and they yield information on the molecular interactions occurring in the systems. The values of the static permittivity and the relaxation time increase with an increase in the percentage of phenol in the mixtures. KEYWORDS: Dielectric ...

  13. Stress relaxation in viscous soft spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschan, Julia; Vasudevan, Siddarth A; Boukany, Pouyan E; Somfai, Ellák; Tighe, Brian P

    2017-10-04

    We report the results of molecular dynamics simulations of stress relaxation tests in athermal viscous soft sphere packings close to their unjamming transition. By systematically and simultaneously varying both the amplitude of the applied strain step and the pressure of the initial condition, we access both linear and nonlinear response regimes and control the distance to jamming. Stress relaxation in viscoelastic solids is characterized by a relaxation time τ* that separates short time scales, where viscous loss is substantial, from long time scales, where elastic storage dominates and the response is essentially quasistatic. We identify two distinct plateaus in the strain dependence of the relaxation time, one each in the linear and nonlinear regimes. The height of both plateaus scales as an inverse power law with the distance to jamming. By probing the time evolution of particle velocities during relaxation, we further identify a correlation between mechanical relaxation in the bulk and the degree of non-affinity in the particle velocities on the micro scale.

  14. Green--Kubo formula for collisional relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visscher, P.B.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper we generalize the Green--Kubo method (usually used for obtaining formulas for transport coefficients involving conserved densities) to relaxation processes occurring during collisions, such as the transfer of energy from vibrational to translational modes in a molecular fluid. We show that the relaxation rate can be calculated without evaluating time correlation functions over long times, and can in fact be written as a sum over collisions which makes the relation between the Green--Kubo method and approximate independent-collision models much clearer

  15. New approach to the dosimetry of ionizing radiations by fluorescence measurement, according to the single photon counting technique, correlated in time at the nanosecond scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohier, Till

    2011-01-01

    This research thesis reports the first fundamental study of the dosimetry of charged and gamma radiations by measurement of fluorescence resolved in time at a nanosecond scale, in organic matter. This method allows an in-depth and real-time analysis of the deposited dose, while taking ionisation as well as excitation processes into account. The author describes mechanisms of interaction and deposition of energy on dense matter, reports the detailed study of the ion-matter interaction, and the interaction of secondary electrons produced within traces. He addresses mechanisms of energy relaxation, and more particularly the study or organic scintillators. Then, he presents the adopted experimental approach: experimental observation with a statistic reconstitution of the curve representing the intensity of the emitted fluorescence in time and with a nanosecond resolution by using a scintillating sensor for time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC). The next part reports the development of an experimental multi-modal platform for dosimetry by TCSPC aimed at the measurement of fluorescence decays under pulsed excitation (nanosecond pulsed ion beams) and continuous flow excitation (non pulsed beams and radioactive sources). Experimental results are then presented for fluorescence measurements, and compared with measurements obtained by using an ionization chamber under the same irradiation conditions: dose deposited by hellions and carbon ions within polyvinyl toluene and polyethylene terephthalate, use of scintillating optic fibers under gamma irradiation of Caesium 137 and Cobalt 60. A new experimental approach is finally presented to perform dosimetry measurements while experimentally ignoring luminescence produced by Cerenkov effect [fr

  16. Dynamical propagation of nanosecond pulses in Naphthalocyanines and Phthalocyanines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Quan, E-mail: qmiao2013@yahoo.com [College of Electronics, Communication and Physics, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590, Shandong (China); Liang, Min; Liu, Qixin [College of Electronics, Communication and Physics, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590, Shandong (China); College of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590, Shandong (China); Wang, Jing-Jing [College of Electronics, Communication and Physics, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590, Shandong (China); Sun, Erping; Xu, Yan [College of Electronics, Communication and Physics, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590, Shandong (China); College of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590, Shandong (China)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • We study the dynamical processes of nanoseconds lasers in Naphthalocyanines and Phthalocyanines. • We provide theoretical evidences of the main mechanism of optical power limiting. • The central metals play more important roles in the dynamical processes. • The main reason is the central metals enhance the spin–orbit coupling. - Abstract: Dynamical propagation and optical limiting of nanosecond pulses in peripherally substituted Naphthalocyanines (Npcs) and Phthalocyanines (Pcs) with central metals gallium and indium were theoretically studied using paraxial field and rate equations. The results demonstrated that both Npcs and Pcs have good optical limiting performances, and Npc with heavier central mental indium shows better optical limiting properities due to the stronger reverse saturable absorption, which is mainly strengthened by the larger one-photo absorption cross section of excited state and the faster intersystem crossing rate.

  17. Nanosecond electric pulses trigger actin responses in plant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berghoefer, Thomas; Eing, Christian; Flickinger, Bianca; Hohenberger, Petra; Wegner, Lars H.; Frey, Wolfgang; Nick, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We have analyzed the cellular effects of nanosecond pulsed electrical fields on plant cells using fluorescently tagged marker lines in the tobacco cell line BY-2 and confocal laser scanning microscopy. We observe a disintegration of the cytoskeleton in the cell cortex, followed by contraction of actin filaments towards the nucleus, and disintegration of the nuclear envelope. These responses are accompanied by irreversible permeabilization of the plasma membrane manifest as uptake of Trypan Blue. By pretreatment with the actin-stabilizing drug phalloidin, the detachment of transvacuolar actin from the cell periphery can be suppressed, and this treatment can also suppress the irreversible perforation of the plasma membrane. We discuss these findings in terms of a model, where nanosecond pulsed electric fields trigger actin responses that are key events in the plant-specific form of programmed cell death.

  18. Synthesis of pure ozone by nanosecond discharge at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amirov, R.H.; Asinovsky, E.I.; Samoilov, I.S.

    1996-01-01

    Synthesis of pure ozone by nanosecond discharge at cryogenic temperatures was experimentally examined. The average ozone concentration in the volume of the discharge tube was less at cryogenic temperatures than at room temperatures. The production of condensed ozone have been determined by measuring the ozone concentration when the walls was heated and ozone evaporated. The energy yield of ozone generation at cryogenic temperatures has been calculated. The maximum value was 200 g/kWh

  19. Relaxation of the magnetization in magnetic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretta, S.; Bianchi, A.; Liviotti, E.; Santini, P.; Amoretti, G.

    2006-04-01

    Several mechanisms characterize the relaxation dynamics in magnetic molecules. We investigate two of them, spin-lattice coupling and incoherent quantum tunneling. The effect of the phonon heat bath is studied by analyzing the exponential time decay of the autocorrelation of the magnetization. We show that in ferromagnetic (Cu6) and antiferromagnetic (Fe6) molecular rings this decay is characterized by a single characteristic time. At very low temperature, relaxation through incoherent quantum tunneling may occur in nanomagnets such as Fe8 or Ni4. The mixing between levels with different values of the total spin (S mixing) greatly influences this mechanism. In particular, we demonstrate that a fourth-order anisotropy term O44, required to interpret experimental electron paramagnetic resonance and relaxation data in Ni4, naturally arises when S mixing is considered in calculations.

  20. Excited-state relaxation of some aminoquinolines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The absorption and fluorescence spectra, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetimes, and fluorescence rate constants ( k f of 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzoxazolylquinoline (I, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzothiazolylquinoline (II, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -methoxybenzothiazolyl-quinoline (III, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzothiazolylbenzoquinoline (IV at different temperatures have been measured. The shortwavelength shift of fluorescence spectra of compounds studied (23–49 nm in ethanol as the temperature decreases (the solvent viscosity increases points out that the excited-state relaxation process takes place. The rate of this process depends essentially on the solvent viscosity, but not the solvent polarity. The essential increasing of fluorescence rate constant k f (up to about 7 times as the solvent viscosity increases proves the existence of excited-state structural relaxation consisting in the mutual internal rotation of molecular fragments of aminoquinolines studied, followed by the solvent orientational relaxation.

  1. Characteristics of 2-heptanone decomposition using nanosecond pulsed discharge plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakase, Yuki; Fukuchi, Yuichi; Wang, Douyan; Namihira, Takao; Akiyama, Hidenori; Kumamoto University Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) evaporate at room temperature. VOCs typically consist of toluene, benzene and ethyl acetate, which are used in cosmetics, dry cleaning products and paints. Exposure to elevated levels of VOCs may cause headaches, dizziness and irritation to the eyes, nose, and throat; they may also cause environmental problems such as air pollution, acid rain and photochemical smog. As such, they require prompt removal. Nanosecond pulsed discharge is a kind of non-thermal plasma consisting of a streamer discharge. Several advantages of nanosecond pulsed discharge plasma have been demonstrated by studies of our research group, including low heat loss, highly energetic electron generation, and the production of highly active radicals. These advantages have shown ns pulsed discharge plasma capable of higher energy efficiency for processes, such as air purification, wastewater treatment and ozone generation. In this research, nanosecond pulsed discharge plasma was employed to treat 2-heptanone, which is a volatile organic compound type and presents several harmful effects. Characteristics of treatment dependent on applied voltage, gas flow rate and input energy density were investigated. Furthermore, byproducts generated by treatment were also investigated.

  2. Nanosecond time-resolved characterization of a pentacene-based room-temperature MASER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadori, Enrico; Breeze, Jonathan D.; Tan, Ke-Jie; Sathian, Juna; Richards, Benjamin; Fung, Mei Wai; Wolfowicz, Gary; Oxborrow, Mark; Alford, Neil McN.; Kay, Christopher W. M.

    2017-01-01

    The performance of a room temperature, zero-field MASER operating at 1.45 GHz has been examined. Nanosecond laser pulses, which are essentially instantaneous on the timescale of the spin dynamics, allow the visible-to-microwave conversion efficiency and temporal response of the MASER to be measured as a function of excitation energy. It is observed that the timing and amplitude of the MASER output pulse are correlated with the laser excitation energy: at higher laser energy, the microwave pulses have larger amplitude and appear after shorter delay than those recorded at lower laser energy. Seeding experiments demonstrate that the output variation may be stabilized by an external source and establish the minimum seeding power required. The dynamics of the MASER emission may be modeled by a pair of first order, non-linear differential equations, derived from the Lotka-Volterra model (Predator-Prey), where by the microwave mode of the resonator is the predator and the spin polarization in the triplet state of pentacene is the prey. Simulations allowed the Einstein coefficient of stimulated emission, the spin-lattice relaxation and the number of triplets contributing to the MASER emission to be estimated. These are essential parameters for the rational improvement of a MASER based on a spin-polarized triplet molecule. PMID:28169331

  3. Relaxed Binaural LCMV Beamforming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutrouvelis, A.; Hendriks, R.C.; Heusdens, R.; Jensen, Jesper Rindom

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new binaural beamforming technique, which can be seen as a relaxation of the linearly constrained minimum variance (LCMV) framework. The proposed method can achieve simultaneous noise reduction and exact binaural cue preservation of the target source, similar to the

  4. Charge Relaxation Dynamics of an Electrolytic Nanocapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Understanding ion relaxation dynamics in overlapping electric double layers (EDLs) is critical for the development of efficient nanotechnology-based electrochemical energy storage, electrochemomechanical energy conversion, and bioelectrochemical sensing devices as well as the controlled synthesis of nanostructured materials. Here, a lattice Boltzmann (LB) method is employed to simulate an electrolytic nanocapacitor subjected to a step potential at t = 0 for various degrees of EDL overlap, solvent viscosities, ratios of cation-to-anion diffusivity, and electrode separations. The use of a novel continuously varying and Galilean-invariant molecular-speed-dependent relaxation time (MSDRT) with the LB equation recovers a correct microscopic description of the molecular-collision phenomena and enhances the stability of the LB algorithm. Results for large EDL overlaps indicated oscillatory behavior for the ionic current density, in contrast to monotonic relaxation to equilibrium for low EDL overlaps. Further, at low solvent viscosities and large EDL overlaps, anomalous plasmalike spatial oscillations of the electric field were observed that appeared to be purely an effect of nanoscale confinement. Employing MSDRT in our simulations enabled modeling of the fundamental physics of the transient charge relaxation dynamics in electrochemical systems operating away from equilibrium wherein Nernst–Einstein relation is known to be violated. PMID:25678941

  5. Vogel-Fulcher dependence of relaxation rates in a nematic monomer and elastomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, D.; Filippov, S.; Aliev, F.; Keller, P.; Thomsen, D.; Ratna, B.

    2000-12-01

    Dielectric relaxation spectroscopy is used to study the relaxation processes in a nematic monomer and the corresponding cross-linked polymer nematic liquid crystal (elastomer). In the frequency window 10 mHz to 2 GHz the monomer liquid crystal shows a single relaxation whereas the polymer exhibits three relaxation processes, two of which are quantitatively analyzed. The temperature dependence of relaxation times in both the monomer and polymer follows a Vogel-Fulcher behavior. The relaxation processes are identified with specific molecular motions and activation energies are calculated in a linear approximation for comparison with literature data.

  6. On real statistics of relaxation in gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzovlev, Yu. E.

    2016-02-01

    By example of a particle interacting with ideal gas, it is shown that the statistics of collisions in statistical mechanics at any value of the gas rarefaction parameter qualitatively differ from that conjugated with Boltzmann's hypothetical molecular chaos and kinetic equation. In reality, the probability of collisions of the particle in itself is random. Because of that, the relaxation of particle velocity acquires a power-law asymptotic behavior. An estimate of its exponent is suggested on the basis of simple kinematic reasons.

  7. Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... products. If you have a bad reaction to hair dyes and relaxers, you should: Stop using the ...

  8. Experiments in paramagnetic relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lijphart, E.E.

    1976-01-01

    This thesis presents two attempts to improve the resolving power of the relaxation measurement technique. The first attempt reconsiders the old technique of steady state saturation. When used in conjunction with the pulse technique, it offers the possibility of obtaining additional information about the system in which all-time derivatives are zero; in addition, non-linear effects may be distinguished from each other. The second attempt involved a systematic study of only one system: Cu in the Tutton salts (K and Rb). The systematic approach, the high accuracy of the measurement and the sheer amount of experimental data for varying temperature, magnetic field and concentration made it possible in this case to separate the prevailing relaxation mechanisms reliably

  9. Relaxation from particle production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hook, Anson; Marques-Tavares, Gustavo [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    We consider using particle production as a friction force by which to implement a “Relaxion” solution to the electroweak hierarchy problem. Using this approach, we are able to avoid superplanckian field excursions and avoid any conflict with the strong CP problem. The relaxation mechanism can work before, during or after inflation allowing for inflationary dynamics to play an important role or to be completely decoupled.

  10. Magnetic relaxation in anisotropic magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1971-01-01

    The line shape and the kinematic and thermodynamic slowing down of the critical and paramagnetic relaxation in axially anisotropic materials are discussed. Kinematic slowing down occurs only in the longitudinal relaxation function. The thermodynamic slowing down occurs in either the transverse...... or longitudinal relaxation function depending on the sign of the axial anisotropy....

  11. Momentum constraint relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marronetti, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    Full relativistic simulations in three dimensions invariably develop runaway modes that grow exponentially and are accompanied by violations of the Hamiltonian and momentum constraints. Recently, we introduced a numerical method (Hamiltonian relaxation) that greatly reduces the Hamiltonian constraint violation and helps improve the quality of the numerical model. We present here a method that controls the violation of the momentum constraint. The method is based on the addition of a longitudinal component to the traceless extrinsic curvature A ij -tilde, generated by a vector potential w i , as outlined by York. The components of w i are relaxed to solve approximately the momentum constraint equations, slowly pushing the evolution towards the space of solutions of the constraint equations. We test this method with simulations of binary neutron stars in circular orbits and show that it effectively controls the growth of the aforementioned violations. We also show that a full numerical enforcement of the constraints, as opposed to the gentle correction of the momentum relaxation scheme, results in the development of instabilities that stop the runs shortly

  12. Dynamic of ozone formation in nanosecond microwave discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmedzhanov, R.A.; Vikharev, A.L.; Gorbachev, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    Nanosecond gas discharges are efficient sources of chemically active plasma. Studies of the nanosecond microwave discharge are interesting for remote modification of the chemical composition of the atmosphere in term of its purification, for diagnostics of impurities and ozone replenishment in the regions of local open-quotes ozone holesclose quotes. In this connection a study of plasma chemical processes in such a discharge seems appropriate, as well as modeling of ecological consequences of the effect of powerful microwave radiation on the atmosphere. The present paper contains generalized results of studying the process of ozone formation in a pulse-periodic freely localized nanosecond microwave discharge. The experiments were performed in a wide range of parameters: microwave radiation wavelength λ = 0.8 and 3cm, pulse duration τ = 6 and 500ns, pulse power P = 50kW and 20MW, pulse repetition rate F = 1-10 3 Hz. The working gases were air and oxygen under pressure P = 10-100Torr. As a source of the microwave radiation a pulse magnetron was used with a device for pulse compression based on the waveguide resonator, and a relativistic microwave generator. The discharge was produced in the focus of the parabolic mirror and had the form of homogeneous cylinder. The plasma chemical processes were studied in two cases. The discharge was created either in the quartz tube placed along the focal line of the mirror or in the free air. Dynamics of formation of ozone and nitrogen oxides in the discharge was studied by means of absorption spectroscopy in the regime of accumulation of the products of chemical reactions (in a closed volume) and their diffusion spreading

  13. Sub-nanosecond lasers for cosmetics and dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Aleksandr A.; Chu, Hong

    2018-02-01

    We report about the development of two new subnanosecond solid-state laser models for application in dermatology and cosmetics. One model uses subnanosecond Nd: YAG microchip laser as a master oscillator and includes Nd: YAG double- and single-pass amplifiers. At 10 Hz this laser produces more than 600 mJ pulse energy with duration 500 +/- 5 ps. Another model (under development) is gain-switched Ti: Sapphire laser with short cavity. This laser produces 200 mJ, 560 ps pulses at 790 nm and uses standard Q-Switched Nd: YAG laser with nanosecond pulse duration as a pumping sourse.

  14. Laser ablation comparison by picosecond pulses train and nanosecond pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednev, V. N.; Filippov, M. N.; Bunkin, A. F.; Pershin, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    A comparison of laser ablation by a train of picosecond pulses and nanosecond pulses revealed a difference in laser craters, ablation thresholds, plasma sizes and spectral line intensities. Laser ablation with a train of picosecond pulses resulted in improved crater quality while ablated mass decreased up to 30%. A reduction in laser plasma dimensions for picosecond train ablation was observed while the intensity of atomic/ionic lines in the plasma spectra was greater by a factor of 2-4 indicating an improved excitation and atomization in the plasma.

  15. Multiple pulse nanosecond laser induced damage threshold on hybrid mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanda, Jan; Muresan, Mihai-George; Bilek, Vojtech; Sebek, Matej; Hanus, Martin; Lucianetti, Antonio; Rostohar, Danijela; Mocek, Tomas; Škoda, Václav

    2017-11-01

    So-called hybrid mirrors, consisting of broadband metallic surface coated with dielectric reflector designed for specific wavelength, becoming more important with progressing development of broadband mid-IR sources realized using parametric down conversion system. Multiple pulse nanosecond laser induced damage on such mirrors was tested by method s-on-1, where s stands for various numbers of pulses. We show difference in damage threshold between common protected silver mirrors and hybrid silver mirrors prepared by PVD technique and their variants prepared by IAD. Keywords: LIDT,

  16. Generation of nanosecond S band microwave pulses based on superradiance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, N.S.; Zotova, I.V.; Rozental, R.M.

    2002-01-01

    Modeling carried out demonstrates possibility of generation of gigawatt power level S band microwave pulse with duration of several nanoseconds using superradiation of short electron beam moving along slow-wave periodical structure. A 10 ns / 500 keV / 5 kA accelerator of Kanazawa University can be used in such experiments. It is shown that significant increasing peak power can be obtained by optimization of voltage and current pulses waveforms. Required increasing of electron energy and current by the end of electron pulse can be achieved by using self-acceleration of a short beam passing through a system of passive cavities. (author)

  17. Generation of nanosecond S band microwave pulses based on superradiance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginzburg, N.S.; Zotova, I.V.; Rozental, R.M. [Russian Academy of Science, Institute of Applied Physics, Nizhny Novgorod (RU)] [and others

    2002-06-01

    Modeling carried out demonstrates possibility of generation of gigawatt power level S band microwave pulse with duration of several nanoseconds using superradiation of short electron beam moving along slow-wave periodical structure. A 10 ns / 500 keV / 5 kA accelerator of Kanazawa University can be used in such experiments. It is shown that significant increasing peak power can be obtained by optimization of voltage and current pulses waveforms. Required increasing of electron energy and current by the end of electron pulse can be achieved by using self-acceleration of a short beam passing through a system of passive cavities. (author)

  18. Anomalous behavior of secondary dielectric relaxation in polypropylene glycols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grzybowska, K; Grzybowski, A; Ziolo, J; Rzoska, S J; Paluch, M [Institute of Physics, Silesian University, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland)

    2007-09-19

    A surprising slow down in the dielectric secondary {gamma}-relaxation with temperature increasing near the glass transition is confirmed for several polypropylene glycols. The peculiar behavior diminishes as the molecular weight grows. The minimal model (Dyre and Olsen 2003 Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 155703) is applied successfully to describe the temperature dependences of the {gamma}-relaxation times. The minimal model parameters are analyzed for different molecular weights. A molecular explanation of the {gamma}-process anomaly for polypropylene glycols is proposed on the basis of the minimal model prediction.

  19. Magnetic relaxation in analytical, coordination and bioinorganic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhajlov, O.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic relaxation is a special type of nuclear magnetic resonance in which the rate is measured of energy transfer between the excited nuclei and their molecular medium (spin-lattice relaxation) or the whole nuclear spin system (spin-spin relaxation). Nuclear magnetic relaxation relates to nuclei with a spin of 1/2, primarily H 1 1 , and is mainly measured in water solutions. It is suitable for (1) analytical chemistry because the relaxation time rapidly reduces in the presence of paramagnetic ions, (2) the study of complex compounds, (3) the study of biochemical reactions in the presence of different metal ions. It is also suitable for testing the composition of a flowing liquid. Its disadvantage is that it requires complex and expensive equipment. (Ha)

  20. Relaxation of coupled nuclear spin systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenigsberger, E.

    1985-05-01

    The subject of the present work is the relaxation behaviour of scalarly coupled spin-1/2 systems. In the theoretical part the semiclassical Redfield equations are used. Dipolar (D), Chemical Shift Anisotropy (CSA) and Random Field (RF) interactions are considered as relaxation mechanisms. Cross correlations of dipolar interactions of different nuclei pairs and those between the D and the CSA mechanisms are important. The model of anisotropic molecular rotational relaxation and the extreme narrowing approximation are used to obtain the spectral density functions. The longitudinal relaxation data are analyzed into normal modes following Werbelow and Grant. The time evolution of normal modes is derived for the AX system with D-CSA cross terms. In the experimental part the hypothesis of dimerization in the cinnamic acid and the methyl cinnamate - AMX systems with DD cross terms - is corroborated by T 1 -time measurements and a calculation of the diffusion constants. In pentachlorobenzene - an AX system - taking into account of D-CSA cross terms enables the complete determination of movements anosotropy and the determination of the sign of the indirect coupling constant 1 Jsub(CH). (G.Q.)

  1. Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in carbon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panich, A.M., E-mail: pan@bgu.ac.i [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Sergeev, N.A. [Institute of Physics, University of Szczecin, 70-451 Szczecin (Poland)

    2010-04-15

    Interpretation of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation data in the carbon nanostructures is usually based on the analysis of fluctuations of dipole-dipole interactions of nuclear spins and anisotropic electron-nuclear interactions responsible for chemical shielding, which are caused by molecular dynamics. However, many nanocarbon systems such as fullerene and nanotube derivatives, nanodiamonds and carbon onions reveal noticeable amount of paramagnetic defects with unpaired electrons originating from dangling bonds. The interaction between nuclear and electron spins strongly influences the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation, but usually is not taken into account, thus the relaxation data are not correctly interpreted. Here we report on the temperature dependent NMR spectra and spin-lattice relaxation measurements of intercalated fullerenes C{sub 60}(MF{sub 6}){sub 2} (M=As and Sb), where nuclear relaxation is caused by both molecular rotation and interaction between nuclei and unpaired electron spins. We present a detailed theoretical analysis of the spin-lattice relaxation data taking into account both these contributions. Good agreement between the experimental data and calculations is obtained. The developed approach would be useful in interpreting the NMR relaxation data in different nanostructures and their intercalation compounds.

  2. Hybrid micromachining using a nanosecond pulsed laser and micro EDM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sanha; Chung, Do Kwan; Shin, Hong Shik; Chu, Chong Nam; Kim, Bo Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Micro electrical discharge machining (micro EDM) is a well-known precise machining process that achieves micro structures of excellent quality for any conductive material. However, the slow machining speed and high tool wear are main drawbacks of this process. Though the use of deionized water instead of kerosene as a dielectric fluid can reduce the tool wear and increase the machine speed, the material removal rate (MRR) is still low. In contrast, laser ablation using a nanosecond pulsed laser is a fast and non-wear machining process but achieves micro figures of rather low quality. Therefore, the integration of these two processes can overcome the respective disadvantages. This paper reports a hybrid process of a nanosecond pulsed laser and micro EDM for micromachining. A novel hybrid micromachining system that combines the two discrete machining processes is introduced. Then, the feasibility and characteristics of the hybrid machining process are investigated compared to conventional EDM and laser ablation. It is verified experimentally that the machining time can be effectively reduced in both EDM drilling and milling by rapid laser pre-machining prior to micro EDM. Finally, some examples of complicated 3D micro structures fabricated by the hybrid process are shown

  3. A thermal model for nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to simulate the nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of aluminum, a novel model was presented for the target ablation and plume expansion. The simulation of the target ablation was based on one-dimensional heat conduction, taking into account temperature dependent material properties, phase transition, dielectric transition and phase explosion. While the simulation of the plume expansion was based on one-dimensional gas-dynamical equation, taking into account ionization, plume absorption and shielding. By coupling the calculations of the target ablation and plume expansion, the characteristics of the target and plume were obtained. And the calculated results were in good agreement with the experimental data, in terms of ablation threshold and depth within the fluence range of the tested laser. Subsequently, investigations were carried out to analyze the mechanisms of nanosecond pulsed laser ablation. The calculated results showed that the maximum surface temperature remained at about 90% of the critical temperature (0.9Tc due to phase explosion. Moreover, the plume shielding has significant effects on the laser ablation, and the plume shielding proportion increase as the laser fluence increasing. The ambient pressure belows 100 Pa is more suitable for laser ablation, which can obtained larger ablation depth.

  4. Interaction of gold nanoparticles with nanosecond laser pulses: Nanoparticle heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedyalkov, N.N.; Imamova, S.E.; Atanasov, P.A.; Toshkova, R.A.; Gardeva, E.G.; Yossifova, L.S.; Alexandrov, M.T.; Obara, M.

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental results on the heating process of gold nanoparticles irradiated by nanosecond laser pulses are presented. The efficiency of particle heating is demonstrated by in-vitro photothermal therapy of human tumor cells. Gold nanoparticles with diameters of 40 and 100 nm are added as colloid in the cell culture and the samples are irradiated by nanosecond pulses at wavelength of 532 nm delivered by Nd:YAG laser system. The results indicate clear cytotoxic effect of application of nanoparticle as more efficient is the case of using particles with diameter of 100 nm. The theoretical analysis of the heating process of nanoparticle interacting with laser radiation is based on the Mie scattering theory, which is used for calculation of the particle absorption coefficient, and two-dimensional heat diffusion model, which describes the particle and the surrounding medium temperature evolution. Using this model the dependence of the achieved maximal temperature in the particles on the applied laser fluence and time evolution of the particle temperature is obtained.

  5. Interaction of gold nanoparticles with nanosecond laser pulses: Nanoparticle heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedyalkov, N. N.; Imamova, S. E.; Atanasov, P. A.; Toshkova, R. A.; Gardeva, E. G.; Yossifova, L. S.; Alexandrov, M. T.; Obara, M.

    2011-04-01

    Theoretical and experimental results on the heating process of gold nanoparticles irradiated by nanosecond laser pulses are presented. The efficiency of particle heating is demonstrated by in-vitro photothermal therapy of human tumor cells. Gold nanoparticles with diameters of 40 and 100 nm are added as colloid in the cell culture and the samples are irradiated by nanosecond pulses at wavelength of 532 nm delivered by Nd:YAG laser system. The results indicate clear cytotoxic effect of application of nanoparticle as more efficient is the case of using particles with diameter of 100 nm. The theoretical analysis of the heating process of nanoparticle interacting with laser radiation is based on the Mie scattering theory, which is used for calculation of the particle absorption coefficient, and two-dimensional heat diffusion model, which describes the particle and the surrounding medium temperature evolution. Using this model the dependence of the achieved maximal temperature in the particles on the applied laser fluence and time evolution of the particle temperature is obtained.

  6. Nanosecond radar system based on repetitive pulsed relativistic BWO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunkin, B.V.; Gaponov-Grekhov, A.V.; Eltchaninov, A.S.; Zagulov, F.Ya.; Korovin, S.D.; Mesyats, G.A.; Osipov, M.L.; Otlivantchik, E.A.; Petelin, M.I.; Prokhorov, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents the results of studies of a nanosecond radar system based on repetitive pulsed relativistic BWO. A pulsed power repetitive accelerator producing electron beams of electron energy 500-700 keV and current 5 kA in pulses of duraction 10 ns with a repetition rate of 100 pps is described. The results of experiments with a high-voltage gas-filled spark gap and a cold-cathode vacuum diode under the conditions of high repetition rates are given. Also presented are the results of studies of a relativistic BWO operating with a wavelength of 3 cm. It is shown that for a high-current beam electron energy of 500-700 keV, the BWO efficiency can reach 35%, the microwave power being 10 9 W. A superconducting solenoid creating a magnetic field of 30 kOe was used for the formation and transportation of the high-current electron beam. In conclusion, the outcome of tests of a nanosecond radar station based on a pulsed power repetitive accelerator and a relativistic BWO is reported

  7. A note on supersonic flow control with nanosecond plasma actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J. G.; Cui, Y. D.; Li, J.; Khoo, B. C.

    2018-04-01

    A concept study on supersonic flow control using nanosecond pulsed plasma actuator is conducted by means of numerical simulation. The nanosecond plasma discharge is characterized by the generation of a micro-shock wave in ambient air and a residual heat in the discharge volume arising from the rapid heating of near-surface gas by the quick discharge. The residual heat has been found to be essential for the flow separation control over aerodynamic bodies like airfoil and backward-facing step. In this study, novel experiment is designed to utilize the other flow feature from discharge, i.e., instant shock wave, to control supersonic flow through shock-shock interaction. Both bow shock in front of a blunt body and attached shock anchored at the tip of supersonic projectile are manipulated via the discharged-induced shock wave in an appropriate manner. It is observed that drag on the blunt body is reduced appreciably. Meanwhile, a lateral force on sharp-edged projectile is produced, which can steer the body and give it an effective angle of attack. This opens a promising possibility for extending the applicability of this flow control technique in supersonic flow regime.

  8. Evaluation of material dispersion using a nanosecond optical pulse radiator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, M; Ohmori, Y; Miya, T

    1979-07-01

    To study the material dispersion effects on graded-index fibers, a method for measuring the material dispersion in optical glass fibers has been developed. Nanosecond pulses in the 0.5-1.7-microm region are generated by a nanosecond optical pulse radiator and grating monochromator. These pulses are injected into a GeO(2)-P(2)0(5)-doped silica graded-index fiber. Relative time delay changes between different wavelengths are used to determine material dispersion, core glass refractive index, material group index, and optimum profile parameter of the graded-index fiber. From the measured data, the optimum profile parameter on the GeO(2)-P(2)O(5)-doped silica graded-index fiber could be estimated to be 1.88 at 1.27 microm of the material dispersion free wavelength region and 1.82 at 1.55 microm of the lowest-loss wavelength region in silica-based optical fiber waveguides.

  9. Current-Voltage Characteristic of Nanosecond - Duration Relativistic Electron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Andrey

    2005-10-01

    The pulsed electron-beam accelerator SINUS-6 was used to measure current-voltage characteristic of nanosecond-duration thin annular relativistic electron beam accelerated in vacuum along axis of a smooth uniform metal tube immersed into strong axial magnetic field. Results of these measurements as well as results of computer simulations performed using 3D MAGIC code show that the electron-beam current dependence on the accelerating voltage at the front of the nanosecond-duration pulse is different from the analogical dependence at the flat part of the pulse. In the steady-state (flat) part of the pulse), the measured electron-beam current is close to Fedosov current [1], which is governed by the conservation law of an electron moment flow for any constant voltage. In the non steady-state part (front) of the pulse, the electron-beam current is higher that the appropriate, for a giving voltage, steady-state (Fedosov) current. [1] A. I. Fedosov, E. A. Litvinov, S. Ya. Belomytsev, and S. P. Bugaev, ``Characteristics of electron beam formed in diodes with magnetic insulation,'' Soviet Physics Journal (A translation of Izvestiya VUZ. Fizika), vol. 20, no. 10, October 1977 (April 20, 1978), pp.1367-1368.

  10. Communication: Relaxation-limited electronic currents in extended reservoir simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruss, Daniel; Smolyanitsky, Alex; Zwolak, Michael

    2017-10-01

    Open-system approaches are gaining traction in the simulation of charge transport in nanoscale and molecular electronic devices. In particular, "extended reservoir" simulations, where explicit reservoir degrees of freedom are present, allow for the computation of both real-time and steady-state properties but require relaxation of the extended reservoirs. The strength of this relaxation, γ, influences the conductance, giving rise to a "turnover" behavior analogous to Kramers turnover in chemical reaction rates. We derive explicit, general expressions for the weak and strong relaxation limits. For weak relaxation, the conductance increases linearly with γ and every electronic state of the total explicit system contributes to the electronic current according to its "reduced" weight in the two extended reservoir regions. Essentially, this represents two conductors in series—one at each interface with the implicit reservoirs that provide the relaxation. For strong relaxation, a "dual" expression-one with the same functional form-results, except now proportional to 1/γ and dependent on the system of interest's electronic states, reflecting that the strong relaxation is localizing electrons in the extended reservoirs. Higher order behavior (e.g., γ2 or 1/γ2) can occur when there is a gap in the frequency spectrum. Moreover, inhomogeneity in the frequency spacing can give rise to a pseudo-plateau regime. These findings yield a physically motivated approach to diagnosing numerical simulations and understanding the influence of relaxation, and we examine their occurrence in both simple models and a realistic, fluctuating graphene nanoribbon.

  11. Variational formulation of relaxed and multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, R. L.; Yoshida, Z.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Hudson, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    > Ideal magnetohydrodynamics (IMHD) is strongly constrained by an infinite number of microscopic constraints expressing mass, entropy and magnetic flux conservation in each infinitesimal fluid element, the latter preventing magnetic reconnection. By contrast, in the Taylor relaxation model for formation of macroscopically self-organized plasma equilibrium states, all these constraints are relaxed save for the global magnetic fluxes and helicity. A Lagrangian variational principle is presented that leads to a new, fully dynamical, relaxed magnetohydrodynamics (RxMHD), such that all static solutions are Taylor states but also allows state with flow. By postulating that some long-lived macroscopic current sheets can act as barriers to relaxation, separating the plasma into multiple relaxation regions, a further generalization, multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics (MRxMHD) is developed.

  12. Dynamics of relaxed inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangarife, Walter; Tobioka, Kohsaku; Ubaldi, Lorenzo; Volansky, Tomer

    2018-02-01

    The cosmological relaxation of the electroweak scale has been proposed as a mechanism to address the hierarchy problem of the Standard Model. A field, the relaxion, rolls down its potential and, in doing so, scans the squared mass parameter of the Higgs, relaxing it to a parametrically small value. In this work, we promote the relaxion to an inflaton. We couple it to Abelian gauge bosons, thereby introducing the necessary dissipation mechanism which slows down the field in the last stages. We describe a novel reheating mechanism, which relies on the gauge-boson production leading to strong electro-magnetic fields, and proceeds via the vacuum production of electron-positron pairs through the Schwinger effect. We refer to this mechanism as Schwinger reheating. We discuss the cosmological dynamics of the model and the phenomenological constraints from CMB and other experiments. We find that a cutoff close to the Planck scale may be achieved. In its minimal form, the model does not generate sufficient curvature perturbations and additional ingredients, such as a curvaton field, are needed.

  13. Modern problems of relaxation gas dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losev, S.A.; Osipov, A.I.

    1985-01-01

    Some of the dynamical characteristics of relaxation processes are studied. Unfortunately, many dynamical characteristics of relaxation processes, necessary for the solution of important scientific and applied problems, are not known. These problems require further development of experimental methods of the study of nonequilibrium gas. It is known, that gas systems are shifted from the equilibrium by different methods: by acoustic and shock wav es, by means of gas expansion in nozzles and jets, by powerful radiations (laser, first of all), by electric discharges, in burning and combustion devices, etc. Non-equilibrium gas is produced in installations of continuum, impulse and periodic regime. Molecular beams, shock tubes (especially with nozzles), flow and jet installations, aerodynamical tubes, plasmatrons, vessels with a gas, influenced by the strong radiation, burners and combustion devices, where the study of non-euilibrium gas is helpful to solve the problems of the determination of kinetic equations and constants of physico-chemical kinetics

  14. Numerical simulation of nanosecond-pulse electrical discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggie, J.; Adamovich, I.; Bisek, N.; Nishihara, M.

    2013-02-01

    Recent experiments with a nanosecond-pulse, dielectric barrier discharge at the stagnation point of a Mach 5 cylinder flow have demonstrated the formation of weak shock waves near the electrode edge, which propagate upstream and perturb the bow shock. This is a promising means of flow control, and understanding the detailed physics of the conversion of electrical energy into gas motion will aid in the design of efficient actuators based on the concept. In this work, a simplified configuration with planar symmetry was chosen as a vehicle to develop a physics-based model of nanosecond-pulse discharges, including realistic air kinetics, electron energy transport, and compressible bulk gas flow. A reduced plasma kinetic model (23 species and 50 processes) was developed to capture the dominant species and reactions for energy storage and thermalization in the discharge. The kinetic model included electronically and vibrationally excited species, and several species of ions and ground state neutrals. The governing equations included the Poisson equation for the electric potential, diffusion equations for each neutral species, conservation equations for each charged species, and mass-averaged conservation equations for the bulk gas flow. The results of calculations with this model highlighted the path of energy transfer in the discharge. At breakdown, the input electrical energy was transformed over a time scale on the order of 1 ns into chemical energy of ions, dissociation products, and vibrationally and electronically excited particles. About 30% of this energy was subsequently thermalized over a time scale of 10 µs. Since the thermalization time scale was faster than the acoustic time scale, the heat release led to the formation of weak shock waves originating near the sheath edge, consistent with experimental observations. The computed translational temperature rise (40 K) and nitrogen vibrational temperature rise (370 K) were of the same order of magnitude as

  15. Universal pulse generator with a nanosecond fast responce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basiladze, S.G.; Nguen Kuang Min'.

    1977-01-01

    A pulse generator with nanosecond action is described; it is mainly designed for testing and tuning fast electronic devices operating with pulses in the N/1/M standard. The generator is principally based on integral circuits and has wide functional potentialities: it includes a main-pulse channel, a delayed-pulse channel, and an overall output, which sums up these pulses; in addition to the logic pulse outputs it includes a linear pulse output with an amplitude smoothly regulated in the range from 0.3 to 6.0 V; it can operate in the self-oscillation mode, in the pulse series formation mode, in the starting mode, and in the single-start mode. Two generators are placed in a double-width CAMAC cell. The generation frequency is from 3 Hz to 75 MHz, pulse duration from 8 to 320 ns, and pulse front duration 2 ns

  16. Thermally assisted nanosecond laser generation of ferric nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurselis, K.; Kozheshkurt, V.; Kiyan, R.; Chichkov, B.; Sajti, L.

    2018-03-01

    A technique to increase nanosecond laser based production of ferric nanoparticles by elevating temperature of the iron target and controlling its surface exposure to oxygen is reported. High power near-infrared laser ablation of the iron target heated up to 600 °C enhances the particle generation efficiency by more than tenfold exceeding 6 μg/J. Temporal and thermal dependencies of the particle generation process indicate correlation of this enhancement with the oxidative processes that take place on the iron surface during the per spot interpulse delay. Nanoparticles, produced using the heat-assisted ablation technique, are examined using scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy confirming the presence of 1-100 nm nanoparticles with an exponential size distribution that contain multiple randomly oriented magnetite nanocrystallites. The described process enables the application of high power lasers and facilitates precise, uniform, and controllable direct deposition of ferric nanoparticle coatings at the industry-relevant rates.

  17. Double nanosecond pulses generation in ytterbium fiber laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiko, V. P.; Samokhvalov, A. A., E-mail: samokhvalov.itmo@gmail.com; Yakovlev, E. B.; Zhitenev, I. Yu.; Kliushin, A. N. [Saint-Petersburg State University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, Kronverksky Pr. 49, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Lednev, V. N. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov Str., 38, Moscow (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology MISiS, Leninskyave., 4, Moscow (Russian Federation); Pershin, S. M. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov Str., 38, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    Double pulse generation mode for nanosecond ytterbium fiber laser was developed. Two sequential 60-200 ns laser pulses with variable delay between them were generated by acousto-optic modulator opening with continuous diode pumping. A custom radio frequency generator was developed to produce two sequential “opening” radio pulses with a delay of 0.2–1 μs. It was demonstrated that double pulse generation did not decrease the average laser power while providing the control over the laser pulse power profile. Surprisingly, a greater peak power in the double pulse mode was observed for the second laser pulse. Laser crater studies and plasma emission measurements revealed an improved efficiency of laser ablation in the double pulse mode.

  18. Nanosecond-resolved temperature measurements using magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wenbiao; Zhang, Pu [School of Automation, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Liu, Wenzhong, E-mail: lwz7410@hust.edu.cn [School of Automation, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Key Laboratory of Image Processing and Intelligent Control, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Instantaneous and noninvasive temperature measurements are important when laser thermotherapy or welding is performed. A noninvasive nanosecond-resolved magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) temperature measurement system is described in which a transient change in temperature causes an instantaneous change in the magnetic susceptibilities of the MNPs. These transient changes in the magnetic susceptibilities are rapidly recorded using a wideband magnetic measurement system with an upper frequency limit of 0.5 GHz. The Langevin function (the thermodynamic model characterizing the MNP magnetization process) is used to obtain the temperature information. Experiments showed that the MNP DC magnetization temperature-measurement system can detect a 14.4 ns laser pulse at least. This method of measuring temperature is likely to be useful for acquiring the internal temperatures of materials irradiated with lasers, as well as in other areas of research.

  19. Removal of Tattoos by Q-Switched Nanosecond Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsai, Syrus

    2017-01-01

    Tattoo removal by Q-switched nanosecond laser devices is generally a safe and effective method, albeit a time-consuming one. Despite the newest developments in laser treatment, it is still not possible to remove every tattoo completely and without complications. Incomplete removal remains one of the most common challenges. As a consequence, particular restraint should be exercised when treating multicoloured tattoos, and patients need to be thoroughly informed about remaining pigment. Other frequent adverse effects include hyper- and hypopigmentation as well as ink darkening; the latter is particularly frequent in permanent make-up. Scarring is also possible, although it is rare when treatment is performed correctly. It is becoming more widespread for laser operators to encounter allergic reactions and even malignant tumours in tattoos, and treating these conditions requires a nuanced approach. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Method for integrating a train of fast, nanosecond wide pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a method used to integrate a train of fast, nanosecond wide pulses. The pulses come from current transformers in a RF LINAC beamline. Because they are ac signals and have no dc component, true mathematical integration would yield zero over the pulse train period or an equally erroneous value because of a dc baseline shift. The circuit used to integrate the pulse train first stretches the pulses to 35 ns FWHM. The signals are then fed into a high-speed, precision rectifier which restores a true dc baseline for the following stage - a fast, gated integrator. The rectifier is linear over 55dB in excess of 25 MHz, and the gated integrator is linear over a 60 dB range with input pulse widths as short as 16 ns. The assembled system is linear over 30 dB with a 6 MHz input signal

  1. Long Spin-Relaxation Times in a Transition-Metal Atom in Direct Contact to a Metal Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermenau, Jan; Ternes, Markus; Steinbrecher, Manuel; Wiesendanger, Roland; Wiebe, Jens

    2018-03-14

    Long spin-relaxation times are a prerequisite for the use of spins in data storage or nanospintronics technologies. An atomic-scale solid-state realization of such a system is the spin of a transition-metal atom adsorbed on a suitable substrate. For the case of a metallic substrate, which enables the direct addressing of the spin by conduction electrons, the experimentally measured lifetimes reported to date are on the order of only hundreds of femtoseconds. Here, we show that the spin states of iron atoms adsorbed directly on a conductive platinum substrate have a surprisingly long spin-relaxation time in the nanosecond regime, which is comparable to that of a transition metal atom decoupled from the substrate electrons by a thin decoupling layer. The combination of long spin-relaxation times and strong coupling to conduction electrons implies the possibility to use flexible coupling schemes to process the spin information.

  2. Plasma plume expansion dynamics in nanosecond Nd:YAG laserosteotome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Hamed; Rauter, Georg; Guzman, Raphael; Cattin, Philippe C.; Zam, Azhar

    2018-02-01

    In minimal invasive laser osteotomy precise information about the ablation process can be obtained with LIBS in order to avoid carbonization, or cutting of wrong types of tissue. Therefore, the collecting fiber for LIBS needs to be optimally placed in narrow cavities in the endoscope. To determine this optimal placement, the plasma plume expansion dynamics in ablation of bone tissue by the second harmonic of a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm has been studied. The laserinduced plasma plume was monitored in different time delays, from one nanosecond up to one hundred microseconds. Measurements were performed using high-speed gated illumination imaging. The expansion features were studied using illumination of the overall visible emission by using a gated intensified charged coupled device (ICCD). The camera was capable of having a minimum gate width (Optical FWHM) of 3 ns and the timing resolution (minimum temporal shift of the gate) of 10 ps. The imaging data were used to generate position-time data of the luminous plasma-front. Moreover, the velocity of the plasma plume expansion was studied based on the time-resolved intensity data. By knowing the plasma plume profile over time, the optimum position (axial distance from the laser spot) of the collecting fiber and optimal time delay (to have the best signal to noise ratio) in spatial-resolved and time-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) can be determined. Additionally, the function of plasma plume expansion could be used to study the shock wave of the plasma plume.

  3. Femtosecond and nanosecond pulsed laser deposition of silicon and germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reenaas, Turid Worren [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Lee, Yen Sian [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Chowdhury, Fatema Rezwana; Gupta, Manisha; Tsui, Ying Yin [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta (Canada); Tou, Teck Yong [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Yap, Seong Ling [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Kok, Soon Yie [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Yap, Seong Shan, E-mail: seongshan@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-11-01

    Highlights: • Ge and Si were deposited by fs and ns laser at room temperature and at vacuum. • Ion of 10{sup 4} ms{sup −1} and 30–200 eV was obtained for ns ablation for Ge and Si. • Highly energetic ions of 10{sup 5} ms{sup −1} with 2–7 KeV were produced in fs laser ablation. • Nanocrystalline Si and Ge were deposited by using fs laser. • Nanoparticles < 10 nm haven been obtained by fs laser. - Abstract: 150 fs Ti:Sapphire laser pulsed laser deposition of Si and Ge were compared to a nanosecond KrF laser (25 ns). The ablation thresholds for ns lasers were about 2.5 J cm{sup −2} for Si and 2.1 J cm{sup −2} for Ge. The values were about 5–10 times lower when fs laser were used. The power densities were 10{sup 8}–10{sup 9} W cm{sup −2} for ns but 10{sup 12} W cm{sup −2} for fs. By using an ion probe, the ions emission at different fluence were measured where the emitting ions achieving the velocity in the range of 7–40 km s{sup −1} and kinetic energy in the range of 30–200 eV for ns laser. The ion produced by fs laser was measured to be highly energetic, 90–200 km s{sup −1}, 2–10 KeV. Two ion peaks were detected above specific laser fluence for both ns and fs laser ablation. Under fs laser ablation, the films were dominated by nano-sized crystalline particles, drastically different from nanosecond pulsed laser deposition where amorphous films were obtained. The ions characteristics and effects of pulse length on the properties of the deposited films were discussed.

  4. Studies on laser material processing with nanosecond and sub-nanosecond and picosecond and sub-picosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Tao, Sha; Wang, Brian; Zhao, Jay

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, laser ablation of widely used metal (Al, Cu. stainless-steel), semiconductor (Si), transparent material (glass, sapphire), ceramic (Al2O3, AlN) and polymer (PI, PMMA) in industry were systematically studied with pulse width from nanosecond (5-100ns), picosecond (6-10ps) to sub-picosecond (0.8-0.95ps). A critical damage zone (CDZ) of up to 100um with ns laser, efficiency were also investigated. This is to explore how to provide industry users the best laser solution for device micro-fabrication with best price. Our studies of cutting and drilling with ns, ps, and sub-ps lasers indicate that it is feasible to achieve user accepted quality and speed with cost-effective and reliable laser by optimizing processing conditions.

  5. Characteristics of a novel nanosecond DBD microplasma reactor for flow applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkholy, A.; Nijdam, S.; van Veldhuizen, E.; Dam, N.; van Oijen, J.; Ebert, U.; de Goey, L. Philip H.

    2018-05-01

    We present a novel microplasma flow reactor using a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) driven by repetitive nanosecond high-voltage pulses. Our DBD-based geometry can generate a non-thermal plasma discharge at atmospheric pressure and below in a regular pattern of micro-channels. This reactor can work continuously up to about 100 min in air, depending on the pulse repetition rate and operating pressure. We here present the geometry and main characteristics of the reactor. Pulse energies of 1.46 and 1.3 μJ per channel at atmospheric pressure and 50 mbar, respectively, have been determined by time-resolved measurements of current and voltage. Time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy measurements have been performed to calculate the relative species concentrations and temperatures (vibrational and rotational) of the discharge. The effects of the operating pressure and flow velocity on the discharge intensity have been investigated. In addition, the effective reduced electric field strength {(E/N)}eff} has been obtained from the intensity ratio of vibronic emission bands of molecular nitrogen at different operating pressures and different locations. The derived {(E/N)}eff} increases gradually from about 550 to 4600 Td when decreasing the pressure from 1 bar to 100 mbar. Below 100 mbar, further pressure reduction results in a significant increase in {(E/N)}eff} up to about 10000 Td at 50 mbar.

  6. Dielectric relaxation studies of dilute solutions of amides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malathi, M.; Sabesan, R.; Krishnan, S

    2003-11-15

    The dielectric constants and dielectric losses of formamide, acetamide, N-methyl acetamide, acetanilide and N,N-dimethyl acetamide in dilute solutions of 1,4-dioxan/benzene have been measured at 308 K using 9.37 GHz, dielectric relaxation set up. The relaxation time for the over all rotation {tau}{sub (1)} and that for the group rotation {tau}{sub (2)} of (the molecules were determined using Higasi's method. The activation energies for the processes of dielectric relaxation and viscous flow were determined by using Eyring's rate theory. From relaxation time behaviour of amides in non-polar solvent, solute-solvent and solute-solute type of molecular association is proposed.

  7. Electron spin relaxation in cryptochrome-based magnetoreception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kattnig, Daniel R; Solov'yov, Ilia A; Hore, P J

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic compass sense of migratory birds is thought to rely on magnetically sensitive radical pairs formed photochemically in cryptochrome proteins in the retina. An important requirement of this hypothesis is that electron spin relaxation is slow enough for the Earth's magnetic field to have...... this question for a structurally characterized model cryptochrome expected to share many properties with the putative avian receptor protein. To this end we combine all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, Bloch-Redfield relaxation theory and spin dynamics calculations to assess the effects of spin relaxation...... on the performance of the protein as a compass sensor. Both flavin-tryptophan and flavin-Z˙ radical pairs are studied (Z˙ is a radical with no hyperfine interactions). Relaxation is considered to arise from modulation of hyperfine interactions by librational motions of the radicals and fluctuations in certain...

  8. Spectroscopic studies of model photo-receptors: validation of a nanosecond time-resolved micro-spectrophotometer design using photoactive yellow protein and α-phycoerythrocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwar, Namrta; Tenboer, Jason; Tripathi, Shailesh; Schmidt, Marius

    2013-09-13

    Time-resolved spectroscopic experiments have been performed with protein in solution and in crystalline form using a newly designed microspectrophotometer. The time-resolution of these experiments can be as good as two nanoseconds (ns), which is the minimal response time of the image intensifier used. With the current setup, the effective time-resolution is about seven ns, determined mainly by the pulse duration of the nanosecond laser. The amount of protein required is small, on the order of 100 nanograms. Bleaching, which is an undesirable effect common to photoreceptor proteins, is minimized by using a millisecond shutter to avoid extensive exposure to the probing light. We investigate two model photoreceptors, photoactive yellow protein (PYP), and α-phycoerythrocyanin (α-PEC), on different time scales and at different temperatures. Relaxation times obtained from kinetic time-series of difference absorption spectra collected from PYP are consistent with previous results. The comparison with these results validates the capability of this spectrophotometer to deliver high quality time-resolved absorption spectra.

  9. Measurements of Electric Field in a Nanosecond Pulse Discharge by 4-WAVE Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratte, Edmond; Adamovich, Igor V.; Simeni Simeni, Marien; Frederickson, Kraig

    2017-06-01

    Picosecond four-wave mixing is used to measure temporally and Picosecond four-wave mixing is used to measure temporally and spatially resolved electric field in a nanosecond pulse dielectric discharge sustained in room air and in an atmospheric pressure hydrogen diffusion flame. Measurements of the electric field, and more precisely the reduced electric field (E/N) in the plasma is critical for determination rate coefficients of electron impact processes in the plasma, as well as for quantifying energy partition in the electric discharge among different molecular energy modes. The four-wave mixing measurements are performed using a collinear phase matching geometry, with nitrogen used as the probe species, at temporal resolution of about 2 ns . Absolute calibration is performed by measurement of a known electrostatic electric field. In the present experiments, the discharge is sustained between two stainless steel plate electrodes, each placed in a quartz sleeve, which greatly improves plasma uniformity. Our previous measurements of electric field in a nanosecond pulse dielectric barrier discharge by picosecond 4-wave mixing have been done in air at room temperature, in a discharge sustained between a razor edge high-voltage electrode and a plane grounded electrode (a quartz plate or a layer of distilled water). Electric field measurements in a flame, which is a high-temperature environment, are more challenging because the four-wave mixing signal is proportional to the to square root of the difference betwen the populations of N2 ground vibrational level (v=0) and first excited vibrational level (v=1). At high temperatures, the total number density is reduced, thus reducing absolute vibrational level populations of N2. Also, the signal is reduced further due to a wider distribution of N2 molecules over multiple rotational levels at higher temperatures, while the present four-wave mixing diagnostics is using spectrally narrow output of a ps laser and a high

  10. THE INFLUENCE OF NANOSECOND ELECTROMAGNETIC PULSES TO OBTAIN TIN AND THE PROPERTIES OF ITS ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Komkov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimentally found that the effect of nanosecond electromagnetic pulses to melt the charge, while the carbon thermal recovery of the tin ore, accelerates the formation of the metallic phase.

  11. Fiber Coupled Pulse Shaper for Sub-Nanosecond Pulse Lidar, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase II effort will develop an all-diode laser and fiber optic based, single frequency, sub-nanosecond pulsed laser source...

  12. Restricted lithium ion dynamics in PEO-based block copolymer electrolytes measured by high-field nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Tan Vu; Messinger, Robert J.; Sarou-Kanian, Vincent; Fayon, Franck; Bouchet, Renaud; Deschamps, Michaël

    2017-10-01

    The intrinsic ionic conductivity of polyethylene oxide (PEO)-based block copolymer electrolytes is often assumed to be identical to the conductivity of the PEO homopolymer. Here, we use high-field 7Li nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation and pulsed-field-gradient (PFG) NMR diffusion measurements to probe lithium ion dynamics over nanosecond and millisecond time scales in PEO and polystyrene (PS)-b-PEO-b-PS electrolytes containing the lithium salt LiTFSI. Variable-temperature longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) 7Li NMR relaxation rates were acquired at three magnetic field strengths and quantitatively analyzed for the first time at such fields, enabling us to distinguish two characteristic time scales that describe fluctuations of the 7Li nuclear electric quadrupolar interaction. Fast lithium motions [up to O (ns)] are essentially identical between the two polymer electrolytes, including sub-nanosecond vibrations and local fluctuations of the coordination polyhedra between lithium and nearby oxygen atoms. However, lithium dynamics over longer time scales [O (10 ns) and greater] are slower in the block copolymer compared to the homopolymer, as manifested experimentally by their different transverse 7Li NMR relaxation rates. Restricted dynamics and altered thermodynamic behavior of PEO chains anchored near PS domains likely explain these results.

  13. Relaxation and transport properties of liquid n-triacontane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondratyuk, N D; Lankin, A V; Norman, G E; Stegailov, V V

    2015-01-01

    Molecular modelling is used to calculate transport properties and to study relaxation of liquid n-triacontane (C 30 H 62 ). The problem is important in connection with the behavior of liquid isolators in a pre-breakdown state. Two all-atom models and a united-atom model are used. Shear viscosity is calculated using the Green-Kubo formula. The force fields are compared with each other using the following criteria: the required time for one molecular dynamics step, the compliance of the main physical and transport properties with experimental values. The problem of the system equilibration is considered. The united-atom potential is used to model the n-triacontane liquid with an initial directional orientation. The time of relaxation to the disordered state, when all molecules orientations are randomized, are obtained. The influence of the molecules orientations on the shear viscosity value and the shear viscosity relaxation are treated. (paper)

  14. Nanosecond laser-induced synthesis of nanoparticles with tailorable magneticanisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna, H.; Gangopadhyay, A.K.; Strader, J.; Kalyanaraman, R.

    2011-01-01

    Controlling the magnetic orientation of nanoparticles is important for many applications. Recently, it has been shown that single domain ferromagnetic hemispherical Co nanoparticles prepared by nanosecond laser-induced self-organization, show magnetic orientation that was related to the negative sign of the magnetostrictive coefficient λ S [J. Appl. Phys. v103, p073902, 2008]. Here we have extended this work to the Fe 50 Co 50 alloy, which has a positive λ S and Ni, which has a negative λ S . Patterned arrays of ferromagnetic nanoparticles of Fe 50 Co 50 , Ni, (and Co) were synthesized from their ultrathin metal films on SiO 2 substrate by nanosecond laser-induced self-organization. The morphology, nanostructure, and magnetic behavior of the nanoparticle arrays were investigated by a combination of electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and magnetic force microscopy techniques. Transmission electron microscopy investigations revealed a granular polycrystalline nanostructure, with the number of grains inside the nanoparticle increasing with their diameter. Magnetic force measurements showed that the magnetization direction of the hemispherical Co and Ni nanoparticles was predominantly out-of-plane while those for the Fe 50 Co 50 alloy was in the plane of the substrate. Finite element analysis was used to estimate the average residual strain in the nanoparticles, following laser processing. The difference in behavior is due to the dominating influence of magnetostrictive energy on the magnetization as a result of residual thermal strain following fast laser processing. Since λ S is negative for polycrystalline Co and Ni, and positive for Fe 50 Co 50 , the tensile residual strain forces the magnetization direction to out-of-plane and in-plane, respectively. This work demonstrates a cost-effective non-epitaxial technique for the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles with tailored magnetization orientations. - Research Highlights: → Pulsed laser self

  15. Relaxed states with plasma flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avinash, K.; Taylor, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    In the theory of relaxation, a turbulent plasma reaches a state of minimum energy subject to constant magnetic helicity. In this state the plasma velocity is zero. Attempts have been made by introducing a number of different constraints, to obtain relaxed states with plasma flow. It is shown that these alternative constraints depend on two self-helicities, one for ions, and one for electrons. However, whereas there are strong arguments for the effective invariance of the original magnetic-helicity, these arguments do not apply to the self-helicities. Consequently the existence of relaxed states with flow remains in doubt. (author)

  16. A model for the generic alpha relaxation in viscous liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2005-01-01

    Dielectric measurements on molecular liquids just above the glass transition indicate that alpha relaxation is characterized by a generic high-frequency loss varying as one over square root of frequency, whereas deviations from this come from one or more low-lying beta processes [Olsen et al., Phys...

  17. Creation of excitations and defects in insulating materials by high-current-density electron beams of nanosecond pulse duration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaisburd, D.I.; Evdokimov, K.E.

    2005-01-01

    The paper is concerned with fast and ultra-fast processes in insulating materials under the irradiation by a high-current-density electron beam of a nanosecond pulse duration. The inflation process induced by the interaction of a high-intensity electron beam with a dielectric is examined. The ''instantaneous'' distribution of non-ionizing electrons and holes is one of the most important stages of the process. Ionization-passive electrons and holes make the main contribution to many fast processes with a characteristic time in the range 10 -14 /10 -12 s: high-energy conductivity, intraband luminescence, etc. A technique was developed for calculation of the ''instantaneous'' distribution of non-ionizing electrons and holes in a dielectric prior to electron-phonon relaxation. The following experimental effects are considered: intraband luminescence, coexistence of intraband electron luminescence and band-to-band hole luminescence in CsI, high energy conductivity; generation of mechanical fields and their interaction with cracks and dislocations. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Nanosecond electric pulses modulate skeletal muscle calcium dynamics and contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Chris; Jirjis, Michael B.; Roth, Caleb C.; Barnes, Ronald A.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2017-02-01

    Irreversible electroporation therapy is utilized to remove cancerous tissues thru the delivery of rapid (250Hz) and high voltage (V) (1,500V/cm) electric pulses across microsecond durations. Clinical research demonstrated that bipolar (BP) high voltage microsecond pulses opposed to monophasic waveforms relieve muscle contraction during electroporation treatment. Our group along with others discovered that nanosecond electric pulses (nsEP) can activate second messenger cascades, induce cytoskeletal rearrangement, and depending on the nsEP duration and frequency, initiate apoptotic pathways. Of high interest across in vivo and in vitro applications, is how nsEP affects muscle physiology, and if nuances exist in comparison to longer duration electroporation applications. To this end, we exposed mature skeletal muscle cells to monopolar (MP) and BP nsEP stimulation across a wide range of electric field amplitudes (1-20 kV/cm). From live confocal microscopy, we simultaneously monitored intracellular calcium dynamics along with nsEP-induced muscle movement on a single cell level. In addition, we also evaluated membrane permeability with Yo-PRO-1 and Propidium Iodide (PI) across various nsEP parameters. The results from our findings suggest that skeletal muscle calcium dynamics, and nsEP-induced contraction exhibit exclusive responses to both MP and BP nsEP exposure. Overall the results suggest in vivo nsEP application may elicit unique physiology and field applications compared to longer pulse duration electroporation.

  19. Trends in nanosecond melanosome microcavitation up to 1540 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Morgan S.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Noojin, Gary D.; Vincelette, Rebecca L.; Thomas, Robert J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2015-09-01

    Thresholds for microcavitation of bovine and porcine melanosomes were previously reported, using single nanosecond (ns) laser pulses in the visible (532 nm) and the near-infrared (NIR) from 1000 to 1319 nm. Here, we report average radiant exposure thresholds for bovine melanosome microcavitation at additional NIR wavelengths up to 1540 nm, which range from ˜0.159 J/cm2 at 800 nm to 4.5 J/cm2 at 1540 nm. Melanosome absorption coefficients were also estimated, and decreased with increasing wavelength. These values were compared to retinal pigment epithelium coefficients, and to water absorption, over the same wavelength range. Corneal total intraocular energy retinal damage threshold values were estimated and compared to the previous (2007) and recently changed (2014) maximum permissible exposure (MPE) safe levels. Results provide additional data that support the recent changes to the MPE levels, as well as the first microcavitation data at 1540 nm, a wavelength for which melanosome microcavitation may be an ns-pulse skin damage mechanism.

  20. Ignition modes of nanosecond discharge with bubbles in distilled water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdan, Ahmad; Cha, Min Suk

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the microscopic physical characteristics of nanosecond discharges with an array of bubbles in distilled water. In particular, applying a single high-voltage pulse, four delayed intensified charge-coupled device cameras successfully visualized four successive images during a single discharge event. We identified three distinctive modes of ignition inside a bubble, depending on the relative location of the bubble with respect to pin-to-hollow needle electrodes when a single bubble was located in an inter-electrode gap of 1 mm: anode-driven ignition, cathode-driven ignition, and co-ignition near both electrodes. Anode- and cathode-driven ignitions evolved into either a complete propagation of the streamer or an incomplete propagation, which were limited in location by proximity to an ignition location, while co-ignitions consistently showed complete propagation. When we increased the gap to 2 mm to accommodate multiple bubbles in the gap, an ignited bubble near the cathode was able to cause the ignition of an upper adjacent bubble. Bubble–bubble interface zones can also be spots of ignition, such that we observed simultaneous co-ignitions in the zones of bubble–bubble interfaces and near electrodes with triple bubbles. We compared the experimental results of discharge propagation with different ignition modes between Ar, He, and N 2 bubbles. In addition, numerical simulations for static electric fields reasonably supported observed ignition behavior such that field intensity was locally enhanced. (paper)

  1. Direct modification of silicon surface by nanosecond laser interference lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dapeng [JR3CN and CNM (Changchun University of Science and Technology), Changchun 130022 (China); JR3CN and IRAC (University of Bedfordshire), Luton LU1 3JU (United Kingdom); Wang, Zuobin, E-mail: wangz@cust.edu.cn [JR3CN and CNM (Changchun University of Science and Technology), Changchun 130022 (China); JR3CN and IRAC (University of Bedfordshire), Luton LU1 3JU (United Kingdom); Zhang, Ziang [JR3CN and CNM (Changchun University of Science and Technology), Changchun 130022 (China); Yue, Yong [JR3CN and CNM (Changchun University of Science and Technology), Changchun 130022 (China); JR3CN and IRAC (University of Bedfordshire), Luton LU1 3JU (United Kingdom); Li, Dayou [JR3CN and IRAC (University of Bedfordshire), Luton LU1 3JU (United Kingdom); Maple, Carsten [JR3CN and CNM (Changchun University of Science and Technology), Changchun 130022 (China); JR3CN and IRAC (University of Bedfordshire), Luton LU1 3JU (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-01

    Periodic and quasi-periodic structures on silicon surface have numerous significant applications in photoelectronics and surface engineering. A number of technologies have been developed to fabricate the structures in various research fields. In this work, we take the strategy of direct nanosecond laser interference lithography technology, and focus on the silicon material to create different well-defined surface structures based on theoretical analysis of the formation of laser interference patterns. Two, three and four-beam laser interference systems were set up to fabricate the grating, regular triangle and square structures on silicon surfaces, respectively. From the AFM micrographs, the critical features of structures have a dependence on laser fluences. For a relative low laser fluence, grating and dot structures formed with bumps due to the Marangoni Effect. With the increase of laser fluences, melt and evaporation behaviors can be responsible for the laser modification. By properly selecting the process parameters, well-defined grating and dot structures can been achieved. It can be demonstrated that direct laser interference lithography is a facile and efficient technology with the advantage of a single process procedure over macroscale areas for the fabrication of micro and nano structures.

  2. Nanosecond pulsed electric field ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Stephen J; Chen, Xinhua; Liu, Jie A; Schoenbach, Karl H

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma often evades effective therapy and recurrences are frequent. Recently, nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) ablation using pulse power technology has emerged as a local-regional, non-thermal, and non-drug therapy for skin cancers. In the studies reported here we use nsPEFs to ablate murine, rat and human HCCs in vitro and an ectopic murine Hepa 1-6 HCC in vivo. Using pulses with 60 or 300 ns and electric fields as high as 60 kV/cm, murine Hepa 1-6, rat N1S1 and human HepG2 HCC are readily eliminated with changes in caspase-3 activity. Interestingly caspase activities increase in the mouse and human model and decrease in the rat model as electric field strengths are increased. In vivo, while sham treated control mice survived an average of 15 days after injection and before humane euthanasia, Hepa 1-6 tumors were eliminated for longer than 50 days with 3 treatments using one hundred pulses with 100 ns at 55 kV/cm. Survival was 40% in mice treated with 30 ns pulses at 55 kV/cm. This study demonstrates that nsPEF ablation is not limited to effectively treating skin cancers and provides a rationale for treating orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma in pre-clinical applications and ultimately in clinical trials.

  3. Absorption and luminescence of crystalline quartz under electron nanosecond irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritsenko, B P; Lisitsyn, V M; Stepanchuk, V N [Tomskij Politekhnicheskij Inst. (USSR)

    1981-02-01

    The purpose of the study is continuation of investigations of principal regularities of production and destruction of short-lived defects in quartz and accompanying luminescence under electron pulse irradiation. For investigation purposes samples of crystalline synthetic quartz have been used. The irradiation has been performed at 80-400 K temperatures by means of an electron pulse accelerator with parameters: electron flow pulse duration 10 ns, pulse current density up to 1000 A/cm/sup 2/, electron mean energy 200 keV. Temperature-time characteristics of absorption and luminescence spectrum are studied. It has been found that quartz irradiation by electron pulses of nanosecond duration leads to appearance of short-lived bands of optical absorption at 4.1 and 5.15 eV to which by kinetic parameters correspond luminescence bands at 2.6 and 3.1 eV, respectively. The enumerated absorption bands are induced by quartz irradiation independently of the prehistory and phase state of the sample and are caused obviously by intrinsic radiation defects. Possible models of such defects are suggested.

  4. Solid state {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation and isolated-molecule and cluster electronic structure calculations in organic molecular solids: The relationship between structure and methyl group and t-butyl group rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xianlong, E-mail: WangXianlong@uestc.edu.cn, E-mail: pbeckman@brynmawr.edu [Key Laboratory for NeuroInformation of Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, 4 North Jianshe Rd., 2nd Section, Chengdu 610054 (China); Mallory, Frank B. [Department of Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 101 North Merion Ave., Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 19010-2899 (United States); Mallory, Clelia W. [Department of Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 101 North Merion Ave., Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 19010-2899 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6323 (United States); Odhner, Hosanna R.; Beckmann, Peter A., E-mail: WangXianlong@uestc.edu.cn, E-mail: pbeckman@brynmawr.edu [Department of Physics, Bryn Mawr College, 101 North Merion Ave., Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 19010-2899 (United States)

    2014-05-21

    We report ab initio density functional theory electronic structure calculations of rotational barriers for t-butyl groups and their constituent methyl groups both in the isolated molecules and in central molecules in clusters built from the X-ray structure in four t-butyl aromatic compounds. The X-ray structures have been reported previously. We also report and interpret the temperature dependence of the solid state {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spin-lattice relaxation rate at 8.50, 22.5, and 53.0 MHz in one of the four compounds. Such experiments for the other three have been reported previously. We compare the computed barriers for methyl group and t-butyl group rotation in a central target molecule in the cluster with the activation energies determined from fitting the {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation data. We formulate a dynamical model for the superposition of t-butyl group rotation and the rotation of the t-butyl group's constituent methyl groups. The four compounds are 2,7-di-t-butylpyrene, 1,4-di-t-butylbenzene, 2,6-di-t-butylnaphthalene, and 3-t-butylchrysene. We comment on the unusual ground state orientation of the t-butyl groups in the crystal of the pyrene and we comment on the unusually high rotational barrier of these t-butyl groups.

  5. Relaxed states of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucinski, M.Y.; Okano, V.

    1993-01-01

    The relaxed states of tokamak plasmas are studied. It is assumed that the plasma relaxes to a quasi-steady state which is characterized by a minimum entropy production rate, compatible with a number of prescribed conditions and pressure balance. A poloidal current arises naturally due to the anisotropic resistivity. The minimum entropy production theory is applied, assuming the pressure equilibrium as fundamental constraint on the final state. (L.C.J.A.)

  6. Negative magnetic relaxation in superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnoperov E.P.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It was observed that the trapped magnetic moment of HTS tablets or annuli increases in time (negative relaxation if they are not completely magnetized by a pulsed magnetic field. It is shown, in the framework of the Bean critical-state model, that the radial temperature gradient appearing in tablets or annuli during a pulsed field magnetization can explain the negative magnetic relaxation in the superconductor.

  7. Relaxation effects in ferrous complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolini, C.; Mathieu, J.P.; Chappert, J.

    1976-01-01

    The slow relaxation mechanism of the Fe 2+ ion in the tri-fluorinated TF(acac) and hexafluorinated HF(acac) complexes of Fe(II) acetylacetonate was investigated. The 300K and 77K Moessbauer spectra for TF(acac) consist in a slightly asymmetric quadrupole doublet. On the contrary, at 4.2K the higher energy line is strongly widened; that is typical of a slowing down in the electron relaxation frequency [fr

  8. Holographic grating relaxation technique for soft matter science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesnichii, Vasilii, E-mail: vasilii.lesnichii@physchem.uni-freiburg.de [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Albertstraße 21, Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Stefan-Meier-Str. 31, Albert-Ludwigs Universität, Freiburg im Breisgau 79104 (Germany); ITMO University, Kronverksky prospekt 49, Saint-Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation); Kiessling, Andy [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Albertstraße 21, Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Stefan-Meier-Str. 31, Albert-Ludwigs Universität, Freiburg im Breisgau 79104 (Germany); Current address: Illinois Institute of Technology, 10 West 33rd Street, Chicago,IL60616 (United States); Bartsch, Eckhard [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Albertstraße 21, Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Stefan-Meier-Str. 31, Albert-Ludwigs Universität, Freiburg im Breisgau 79104 (Germany); Veniaminov, Andrey, E-mail: veniaminov@phoi.ifmo.ru [ITMO University, Kronverksky prospekt 49, Saint-Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-17

    The holographic grating relaxation technique also known as forced Rayleigh scattering consists basically in writing a holographic grating in the specimen of interest and monitoring its diffraction efficiency as a function of time, from which valuable information on mass or heat transfer and photoinduced transformations can be extracted. In a more detailed view, the shape of the relaxation curve and the relaxation rate as a function of the grating period were found to be affected by the architecture of diffusing species (molecular probes) that constitute the grating, as well as that of the environment they diffuse in, thus making it possible to access and study spatial heterogeneity of materials and different modes of e.g., polymer motion. Minimum displacements and spatial domains approachable by the technique are in nanometer range, well below spatial periods of holographic gratings. In the present paper, several cases of holographic relaxation in heterogeneous media and complex motions are exemplified. Nano- to micro-structures or inhomogeneities comparable in spatial scale with holographic gratings manifest themselves in relaxation experiments via non-exponential decay (stepwise or stretched), spatial-period-dependent apparent diffusion coefficient, or unusual dependence of diffusion coefficient on molecular volume of diffusing probes.

  9. Relaxation Dynamics of Nanoparticle-Tethered Polymer Chains

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Sung A

    2015-09-08

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Relaxation dynamics of nanoparticle-tethered cis-1,4-polyisoprene (PI) are investigated using dielectric spectroscopy and rheometry. A model system composed of polymer chains densely grafted to spherical SiO2 nanoparticles to form self-suspended suspensions facilitates detailed studies of slow global chain and fast segmental mode dynamics under surface and geometrical confinement-from experiments performed in bulk materials. We report that unentangled polymer molecules tethered to nanoparticles relax far more slowly than their tethered entangled counterparts. Specifically, at fixed grafting density we find, counterintuitively, that increasing the tethered polymer molecular weight up to values close to the entanglement molecular weight speeds up chain relaxation dynamics. Decreasing the polymer grafting density for a fixed molecular weight has the opposite effect: it dramatically slows down chain relaxation, increases interchain coupling, and leads to a transition in rheological response from simple fluid behavior to viscoelastic fluid behavior for tethered PI chains that are unentangled by conventional measures. Increasing the measurement temperature produces an even stronger elastic response and speeds up molecular relaxation at a rate that decreases with grafting density and molecular weight. These observations are discussed in terms of chain confinement driven by crowding between particles and by the existence of an entropic attractive force produced by the space-filling constraint on individual chains in a self-suspended material. Our results indicate that the entropic force between densely grafted polymer molecules couples motions of individual chains in an analogous manner to reversible cross-links in associating polymers.

  10. Topology of Collisionless Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakter, Renato; Levin, Yan

    2013-04-01

    Using extensive molecular dynamics simulations we explore the fine-grained phase space structure of systems with long-range interactions. We find that if the initial phase space particle distribution has no holes, the final stationary distribution will also contain a compact simply connected region. The microscopic holes created by the filamentation of the initial distribution function are always restricted to the outer regions of the phase space. In general, for complex multilevel distributions it is very difficult to a priori predict the final stationary state without solving the full dynamical evolution. However, we show that, for multilevel initial distributions satisfying a generalized virial condition, it is possible to predict the particle distribution in the final stationary state using Casimir invariants of the Vlasov dynamics.

  11. Nuclear quadrupole relaxation and viscosity in liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schirmacher, W.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that the nuclear quadrupole relaxation rate due to the molecular motions in liquid metals is related to the shear and bulk viscosity and hence to the absorption coefficient of ultrasound. Application of the 'extended liquid phonon' model of Ortoleva and Nelkin - which is the third of a series of continued-fraction-approximations for the van Hove neutron scattering function - gives a relation to the self diffusion constant. The predictions of the theory concerning the temperature dependence are compared with quadrupole relaxation measurements of Riegel et al. and Kerlin et al. in liquid gallium. Agreement is found only with the data of Riegel et al. (orig.) [de

  12. Non-exponential dynamic relaxation in strongly nonequilibrium nonideal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, I V; Norman, G E

    2003-01-01

    Relaxation of kinetic energy to the equilibrium state is simulated by the molecular dynamics method for nonideal two-component non-degenerate plasmas. Three limiting examples of initial states of strongly nonequilibrium plasma are considered: zero electron velocities, zero ion velocities and zero velocities of both electrons and ions. The initial non-exponential stage, its duration τ nB and subsequent exponential stages of the relaxation process are studied for a wide range of the nonideality parameter and the ion mass

  13. Methyl group rotation and nuclear relaxation at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweers, A.E.

    1976-01-01

    This thesis deals with the proton spin-lattice relaxation of some methyl group compounds at liquid helium temperatures. In these molecular crystals, an energy difference between the ground and first rotational state of the methyl group occurs, the so-called tunnelling splitting, which is of the order of a few degrees Kelvin. This means that the high temperature approximation is inappropriate for the description of the occupation densities of the two lowest rotational levels. A description of the properties of the methyl group in connection with relaxation

  14. AN INDUCTION SENSOR FOR MEASURING CURRENTS OF NANOSECOND RANGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Shalamov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. A current meter based on the principle of electromagnetic induction is designed to register the current flowing in the rod lightning. The aim of the article is to describe the way of increasing the sensitivity of the converter by means of their serial communication. Methodology. The recorded current is in the nanosecond range. If compared with other methods, meters based on the principle of electromagnetic induction have several advantages, such as simplicity of construction, reliability, low cost, no need in a power source, relatively high sensitivity. Creation of such a meter is necessary, because in some cases there is no possibility to use a shunt. Transient properties of a meter are determined by the number of turns and the constant of integration. Sensitivity is determined by measuring the number of turns, the coil sectional area, the core material and the integration constant. For measuring the magnetic field pulses with a rise time of 5 ns to 50 ns a meter has turns from 5 to 15. The sensitivity of such a meter is low. When the number of turns is increased, the output signal and the front increase. Earlier described dependencies were used to select the main parameters of the converter. It was based on generally accepted and widely known equivalent circuit. The experience of created earlier pulse magnetic field meters was considered both for measuring the magnetic fields, and large pulse current. Originality. Series connection of converters has the property of a long line. The level of the transient response of the meter is calculated. The influence of parasitic parameters on the type of meter transient response is examined. The shown construction was not previously described. Practical value. The results of meter implementation are given. The design peculiarities of the given measuring instruments are shown.

  15. A trial of ignition innovation of gasoline engine by nanosecond pulsed low temperature plasma ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, Taisuke; Urushihara, Tomonori; Gundersen, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Application of nanosecond pulsed low temperature plasma as an ignition technique for automotive gasoline engines, which require a discharge under conditions of high back pressure, has been studied experimentally using a single-cylinder engine. The nanosecond pulsed plasma refers to the transient (non-equilibrated) phase of a plasma before the formation of an arc discharge; it was obtained by applying a high voltage with a nanosecond pulse (FWHM of approximately 80 or 25 ns) between coaxial cylindrical electrodes. It was confirmed that nanosecond pulsed plasma can form a volumetric multi-channel streamer discharge at an energy consumption of 60 mJ cycle -1 under a high back pressure of 1400 kPa. It was found that the initial combustion period was shortened compared with the conventional spark ignition. The initial flame visualization suggested that the nanosecond pulsed plasma ignition results in the formation of a spatially dispersed initial flame kernel at a position of high electric field strength around the central electrode. It was observed that the electric field strength in the air gap between the coaxial cylindrical electrodes was increased further by applying a shorter pulse. It was also clarified that the shorter pulse improved ignitability even further.

  16. A distributed parameter model of transmission line transformer for high voltage nanosecond pulse generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiangtao; Zhao, Zheng; Li, Longjie; He, Jiaxin; Li, Chenjie; Wang, Yifeng; Su, Can

    2017-09-01

    A transmission line transformer has potential advantages for nanosecond pulse generation including excellent frequency response and no leakage inductance. The wave propagation process in a secondary mode line is indispensable due to an obvious inside transient electromagnetic transition in this scenario. The equivalent model of the transmission line transformer is crucial for predicting the output waveform and evaluating the effects of magnetic cores on output performance. However, traditional lumped parameter models are not sufficient for nanosecond pulse generation due to the natural neglect of wave propagations in secondary mode lines based on a lumped parameter assumption. In this paper, a distributed parameter model of transmission line transformer was established to investigate wave propagation in the secondary mode line and its influential factors through theoretical analysis and experimental verification. The wave propagation discontinuity in the secondary mode line induced by magnetic cores is emphasized. Characteristics of the magnetic core under a nanosecond pulse were obtained by experiments. Distribution and formation of the secondary mode current were determined for revealing essential wave propagation processes in secondary mode lines. The output waveform and efficiency were found to be affected dramatically by wave propagation discontinuity in secondary mode lines induced by magnetic cores. The proposed distributed parameter model was proved more suitable for nanosecond pulse generation in aspects of secondary mode current, output efficiency, and output waveform. In depth, comprehension of underlying mechanisms and a broader view of the working principle of the transmission line transformer for nanosecond pulse generation can be obtained through this research.

  17. A trial of ignition innovation of gasoline engine by nanosecond pulsed low temperature plasma ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Taisuke; Urushihara, Tomonori; Gundersen, Martin

    2009-07-01

    Application of nanosecond pulsed low temperature plasma as an ignition technique for automotive gasoline engines, which require a discharge under conditions of high back pressure, has been studied experimentally using a single-cylinder engine. The nanosecond pulsed plasma refers to the transient (non-equilibrated) phase of a plasma before the formation of an arc discharge; it was obtained by applying a high voltage with a nanosecond pulse (FWHM of approximately 80 or 25 ns) between coaxial cylindrical electrodes. It was confirmed that nanosecond pulsed plasma can form a volumetric multi-channel streamer discharge at an energy consumption of 60 mJ cycle-1 under a high back pressure of 1400 kPa. It was found that the initial combustion period was shortened compared with the conventional spark ignition. The initial flame visualization suggested that the nanosecond pulsed plasma ignition results in the formation of a spatially dispersed initial flame kernel at a position of high electric field strength around the central electrode. It was observed that the electric field strength in the air gap between the coaxial cylindrical electrodes was increased further by applying a shorter pulse. It was also clarified that the shorter pulse improved ignitability even further.

  18. Nuclear spin relaxation due to chemical shift anisotropy of gas-phase 129Xe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Vaara, Juha

    2011-08-14

    Nuclear spin relaxation provides detailed dynamical information on molecular systems and materials. Here, first-principles modeling of the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) relaxation time for the prototypic monoatomic (129)Xe gas is carried out, both complementing and predicting the results of NMR measurements. Our approach is based on molecular dynamics simulations combined with pre-parametrized ab initio binary nuclear shielding tensors, an "NMR force field". By using the Redfield relaxation formalism, the simulated CSA time correlation functions lead to spectral density functions that, for the first time, quantitatively determine the experimental spin-lattice relaxation times T(1). The quality requirements on both the Xe-Xe interaction potential and binary shielding tensor are investigated in the context of CSA T(1). Persistent dimers Xe(2) are found to be responsible for the CSA relaxation mechanism in the low-density limit of the gas, completely in line with the earlier experimental findings.

  19. Peeling mode relaxation ELM model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimblett, C. G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses an approach to modelling Edge Localised Modes (ELMs) in which toroidal peeling modes are envisaged to initiate a constrained relaxation of the tokamak outer region plasma. Relaxation produces both a flattened edge current profile (which tends to further destabilise a peeling mode), and a plasma-vacuum negative current sheet which has a counteracting stabilising influence; the balance that is struck between these two effects determines the radial extent (rE) of the ELM relaxed region. The model is sensitive to the precise position of the mode rational surfaces to the plasma surface and hence there is a 'deterministic scatter' in the results that has an accord with experimental data. The toroidal peeling stability criterion involves the edge pressure, and using this in conjunction with predictions of rE allows us to evaluate the ELM energy losses and compare with experiment. Predictions of trends with the edge safety factor and collisionality are also made

  20. Formation of various types of nanostructures on germanium surface by nanosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolutskiy, S. I.; Khasaya, R. R.; Khomich, Yu V.; Yamshchikov, V. A.

    2018-03-01

    The paper describes the formation of micro- and nanostructures in different parts of irradiation zone on germanium surface by multiple action of nanosecond pulses of ArF-laser. It proposes a simple method using only one laser beam without any optional devices and masks for surface treatment. Hexa- and pentagonal cells with submicron dimensions along the surface were observed in peripheral zone of irradiation spot by atomic-force microscopy. Nanostructures in the form of bulbs with rounded peaks with lateral sizes of 40-120 nm were obtained in peripheral low-intensity region of the laser spot. Considering experimental data on material processing by nanosecond laser pulses, a classification of five main types of surface reliefs formed by nanosecond laser pulses with energy density near or slightly above ablation threshold was proposed.

  1. gamma. -relaxation process in crystallizable polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mindiyarov, Kh G; Zelenev, Yu V; Bartenev, G M [Birskij Gosudarstvennyj Pedagogicheskij Inst. (USSR)

    1975-07-01

    In the present paper, with the aid of radiothermoluminescence technique ..gamma..-relaxation processes are investigated, which are conditioned by molecular mobility and are associated with defects in the crystalline structure of polymers PEh, PP, and elastomers PIB, NK, SKD, SKI exposed to ..gamma..-rays of Co/sup 60/ at a dose rate of 1 Mrad. The shape of the thermoluminescence curve, i.e. the luminescence intensity in the ..cap alpha.. - ..gamma..-maxima, their relationship, position with respect to temperature are strongly dependent on the degree of crystallinity, on the thermal and mechanical prehistory. In highly crystalline samples of PEh and PP ..cap alpha..-maximum may be absent. Dependence has been studied of the luminescence intensity in the ..cap alpha..- and ..gamma..-maxima (Isub(..cap alpha..)/Isub(..gamma..)) on the crystallization temperature; the curve passes through the minimum when the crystallization rate is maximum. The relationship Isub(..gamma..)re of crystallinity degree.

  2. Method of the nanosecond microstructure creation of the negative ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov-Borodin, A.V.

    2001-01-01

    The method of the nanosecond microstructure creation of the negative ion beam with nanosecond edge times is presented. The method of creation does not destroy the beam compensation by the residual gas,so it available for low-energy beams. Such effects as a beam divergence and,therefore,a bad beam transport are overcome. The two plate travelling wave chopper is used.The special shape of the plate deflecting voltage is needed. The estimations and a comparison with the existing methods of a beam deflection are presented

  3. Microstructured silicon created with a nanosecond neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandeville, W.J. [MITRE Corporation, Colorado Springs, CO (United States); Shaffer, M.K.; Lu, Yalin; O' Keefe, D.; Knize, R.J. [United States Air Force Academy, USAFA, CO (United States)

    2011-08-15

    We produce microstructured silicon using frequency doubled, nanosecond Nd:YAG pulses in SF{sub 6} gas. The micro-penitentes formed are up to 20 {mu}m tall with a sulfur concentration of 0.5% near the surface. The infrared absorption is increased to near unity and extends well below the original bandgap far into the infrared. These data are similar to results reported by others using more complicated and less economical femtosecond titanium sapphire and picosecond and nanosecond excimer lasers. (orig.)

  4. Photoemission in nanosecond and picosecond regimes obtained from macro and micro cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussoukaya, M.; Bergeret, H.; Chehab, R.; Leblond, B.; Franco, M.

    1987-03-01

    For Lasertron studies at LAL, results obtained from tests on different photocathodes are given below. Using respectively two Nd: YAG lasers (a nanosecond one and a picosecond one) we have determined the level and the intensity of pulsed photoemission and the photoelectric yield in UV, green and infrared lights. We obtained a total current of more than 1 A with nanosecond width from a single W needle, and photoconversion yield of more than 1 was reached in green and UV lights. In classical pulsed photoemission, obtained photoconversion yield from LaB 6 photocathode was of about 10 -3 in higher fields

  5. F19 relaxation in non-magnetic hexafluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigny, P.

    1969-01-01

    The interesting properties of the fluorine magnetic resonance in the hexafluorides of molybdenum, tungsten and uranium, are very much due to large anisotropies of the chemical shift tensors. In the solid phases these anisotropies, the values of which are deduced from line shape studies, allow one to show that the molecules undergo hindered rotations about the metal atom. The temperature and frequency dependence of the fluorine longitudinal relaxation times shows that the relaxation is due to the molecular motion. The dynamical parameters of this motion are then deduced from the complete study of the fluorine relaxation in the rotating frame. In the liquid phases, the existence of anisotropies allows an estimation of the different contributions to the relaxation. In particular, the frequency and temperature dependence of the relaxation shows it to be dominated by the spin-rotation interaction. We have shown that the strength of this interaction can be deduced from the chemical shifts, and the angle through which the molecule rotates quasi-freely can be determined. In the hexafluorides, this angle is roughly one radian at 70 C, and with the help of this value, the friction coefficients which describe the intermolecular interactions are discussed. (author) [fr

  6. Mixed quantum-classical simulations of the vibrational relaxation of photolyzed carbon monoxide in a hemoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, Alexander, E-mail: schubert@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr; Meier, Christoph [Laboratoire Collisions Agrégats et Réactivité, IRSAMC, UMR CNRS 5589, Université Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse (France); Falvo, Cyril [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay (ISMO), CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2016-08-07

    We present mixed quantum-classical simulations on relaxation and dephasing of vibrationally excited carbon monoxide within a protein environment. The methodology is based on a vibrational surface hopping approach treating the vibrational states of CO quantum mechanically, while all remaining degrees of freedom are described by means of classical molecular dynamics. The CO vibrational states form the “surfaces” for the classical trajectories of protein and solvent atoms. In return, environmentally induced non-adiabatic couplings between these states cause transitions describing the vibrational relaxation from first principles. The molecular dynamics simulation yields a detailed atomistic picture of the energy relaxation pathways, taking the molecular structure and dynamics of the protein and its solvent fully into account. Using the ultrafast photolysis of CO in the hemoprotein FixL as an example, we study the relaxation of vibrationally excited CO and evaluate the role of each of the FixL residues forming the heme pocket.

  7. Relaxation properties in classical diamagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carati, A.; Benfenati, F.; Galgani, L.

    2011-06-01

    It is an old result of Bohr that, according to classical statistical mechanics, at equilibrium a system of electrons in a static magnetic field presents no magnetization. Thus a magnetization can occur only in an out of equilibrium state, such as that produced through the Foucault currents when a magnetic field is switched on. It was suggested by Bohr that, after the establishment of such a nonequilibrium state, the system of electrons would quickly relax back to equilibrium. In the present paper, we study numerically the relaxation to equilibrium in a modified Bohr model, which is mathematically equivalent to a billiard with obstacles, immersed in a magnetic field that is adiabatically switched on. We show that it is not guaranteed that equilibrium is attained within the typical time scales of microscopic dynamics. Depending on the values of the parameters, one has a relaxation either to equilibrium or to a diamagnetic (presumably metastable) state. The analogy with the relaxation properties in the Fermi Pasta Ulam problem is also pointed out.

  8. Onsager relaxation of toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samain, A.; Nguyen, F.

    1997-01-01

    The slow relaxation of isolated toroidal plasmas towards their thermodynamical equilibrium is studied in an Onsager framework based on the entropy metric. The basic tool is a variational principle, equivalent to the kinetic equation, involving the profiles of density, temperature, electric potential, electric current. New minimization procedures are proposed to obtain entropy and entropy production rate functionals. (author)

  9. Anisotropic spin relaxation in graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tombros, N.; Tanabe, S.; Veligura, A.; Jozsa, C.; Popinciuc, M.; Jonkman, H. T.; van Wees, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    Spin relaxation in graphene is investigated in electrical graphene spin valve devices in the nonlocal geometry. Ferromagnetic electrodes with in-plane magnetizations inject spins parallel to the graphene layer. They are subject to Hanle spin precession under a magnetic field B applied perpendicular

  10. Stochastic and Chaotic Relaxation Oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grasman, J.; Roerdink, J.B.T.M.

    1988-01-01

    For relaxation oscillators stochastic and chaotic dynamics are investigated. The effect of random perturbations upon the period is computed. For an extended system with additional state variables chaotic behavior can be expected. As an example, the Van der Pol oscillator is changed into a

  11. Tensions relaxation in Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuniberti, A.M.; Picasso, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    Traction and stress relaxation studies were performed on polycrystalline Zry-4 at room temperature. The effect of loading velocity on the plastic behaviour of the material is discussed, analysing log σ vs. log dε/dt at different deformation levels. The contribution introduced by the testing machine was taken into account in data evaluation. (Author). 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Relaxation model of radiation-induced conductivity in polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhutayeva, Yu. R.; Khatipov, S. A.

    1999-05-01

    The paper suggests a relaxation model of radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) in polymers. According to the model, the transfer of charges generated in the polymer volume by ionizing radiation takes place with the participation of molecular relaxation processes. The mechanism of electron transport consists in the transfer of the charge directly between traps when they draw close to one another due to the rotation of macromolecule segments. The numerical solutions of the corresponding kinetic equations for different distribution functions Q( τ) of the times of molecular relaxation and for different functions of the probability P( τ, τ') of charge transfer in the `overlapping' regions of the diffusion spheres of the segments are analyzed. The relaxation model provides an explanation of the non-Arrhenius behavior of the RIC temperature dependence, the power dependence of RIC on the dose rate with a power index in the interval 0.5-1.0, the appearance of maxima in the curves of the RIC temporal dependence and their irreversible character in the region of large dose rates (more than 1 Gy/s). The model can be used for interpreting polymer RIC in conditions of kinetic mobility of macromolecules.

  13. Sleep, Stress & Relaxation: Rejuvenate Body & Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep, Stress & Relaxation: Rejuvenate Body & Mind; Relieve Stress; best ways to relieve stress; best way to relieve stress; different ways to relieve stress; does smoking relieve stress; does tobacco relieve stress; how can I relieve stress; how can you relieve stress; how do I relieve stress; reduce stress; does smoking reduce stress; how can I reduce stress; how to reduce stress; reduce stress; reduce stress levels; reducing stress; smoking reduce stress; smoking reduces stress; stress reducing techniques; techniques to reduce stress; stress relief; best stress relief; natural stress relief; need stress relief; relief for stress; relief from stress; relief of stress; smoking and stress relief; smoking for stress relief; smoking stress relief; deal with stress; dealing with stress; dealing with anger; dealing with stress; different ways of dealing with stress; help dealing with stress; how to deal with anger; how to deal with stress; how to deal with stress when quitting smoking; stress management; free stress management; how can you manage stress; how do you manage stress; how to manage stress; manage stress; management of stress; management stress; managing stress; strategies for managing stress; coping with stress; cope with stress; copeing with stress; coping and stress; coping skills for stress; coping strategies for stress; coping strategies with stress; coping strategy for stress; coping with stress; coping with stress and anxiety; emotional health; emotional health; emotional health article; emotional health articles; deep relaxation; deep breathing relaxation techniques; deep muscle relaxation; deep relaxation; deep relaxation meditation; deep relaxation technique; deep relaxation techniques; meditation exercises; mindful exercises; mindful meditation exercises; online relaxation exercises; relaxation breathing exercises; relaxation exercise; relaxation exercises; stress relaxation; methods of relaxation for stress; relax stress; relax techniques stress

  14. The relaxational behaviour of poly-(vinylidene fluoride) before and after gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callens, A.

    The main purpose of this work was to investigate how molecular chain reorganization may affect the physical property of polymers. This may be done by the analysis of the as received and post-irradiation relaxation spectra of the semi-crystalline linear chain polymer polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), which has been gamma-irradiated up to doses of 1 grad. The effects of the irradiation on the material are primarly main chain cross-linking production of unsaturated bonds and crystallite degradation. To reach a complete interpretation of the relaxation spectra, it is necessary to incorporate a third phase into the analysis besides the amorphous viscoelastic region (AVR) and the crystalline viscoelastic region (CVR), the intermediate phase. The amorphous phase (AVR) is at the origin of the relaxation effects occurring in the temperature region below room temperature. The saturation like behaviour of the cross-linking in the amorphous phase is at the origin of the intensity decrease, temperature shift and peak broadening of the beta relaxation. There is a large amount of evidence that in the neighbourhood of the beta relaxation, relaxation effects are created through irradiation, as mainly revealed by TSD-spectra (thermalloy stimulated depolarisation). The intensity of the gamma relaxation, gradually increases with dose, which has been attributed to the production of disordered chain from the debris of radiation enhanced crystallite destruction. The relaxation effect, occuring at the temperatures between AVR and CVR, is assigned to the long amorphous chain segments attached partly to the crystallites, mainly from the consideration of the similarity of the dose enhanced decrease in intensity of both beta and βsub(μ)-effects. The increase with dose of the intensity of the α1 relaxation, which has been classified within CVR, confirms the grainboundary hypothesis. The second component of CVR (α2 relaxation) is due to relaxation effects of molecular chains belonging to the

  15. The effect of the Magnus force on skyrmion relaxation dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Barton L.; Täuber, Uwe C.; Pleimling, Michel

    2018-01-01

    We perform systematic Langevin molecular dynamics simulations of interacting skyrmions in thin films. The interplay between Magnus force, repulsive skyrmion-skyrmion interaction and thermal noise yields different regimes during non-equilibrium relaxation. In the noise-dominated regime the Magnus force enhances the disordering effects of the thermal noise. In the Magnus-force-dominated regime, the Magnus force cooperates with the skyrmion-skyrmion interaction to yield a dynamic regime with slo...

  16. Vibrational energy relaxation: proposed pathway of fast local chromatin denaturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harder, D.; Greinert, R.

    2002-01-01

    The molecular mechanism responsible for the a component of exchange-type chromosome aberrations, of chromosome fragmentation and of reproductive cell death is one of the unsolved issues of radiation biology. Under review is whether vibrational energy relaxation in the constitutive biopolymers of chromatin, induced by inelastic energy deposition events and mediated via highly excited vibrational states, may provide a pathway of fast local chromatin denaturation, thereby producing the severe DNA lesion able to interact chemically with other, non-damaged chromatin. (author)

  17. Identification of structural relaxation in the dielectric response of water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Schmidt; Kisliuk, Alexander; Solokov, Alexei P.

    2016-01-01

    One century ago pioneering dielectric results obtained for water and n-alcohols triggered the advent of molecular rotation diffusion theory considered by Debye to describe the primary dielectric absorption in these liquids. Comparing dielectric, viscoelastic, and light scattering results, we...... unambiguously demonstrate that the structural relaxation appears only as a high-frequency shoulder in the dielectric spectra of water. In contrast, the main dielectric peak is related to a supramolecular structure, analogous to the Debye-like peak observed in monoalcohols....

  18. Relaxation Techniques to Manage IBS Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for 15–20 seconds and then begin again. Progressive Muscle Relaxation This method of relaxation focuses on ... helpful, please consider supporting IFFGD with a small tax- deductible donation. Make Donation Adapted from IFFGD Publication # ...

  19. Relaxation and Distraction in Experimental Desensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, R. O.; Marshall, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    Compared experimental desensitization with a procedure that replaced relaxation with a distraction task and with an approach that combined both relaxation and distraction. Desensitization generally was more effective than the other two procedures. (Author)

  20. Relaxation as a Factor in Semantic Desensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtel, James E.; McNamara, J. Regis

    1975-01-01

    Relaxation and semantic desensitization were used to alleviate the fear of phobic females. Results showed that semantic desensitization, alone or in combination with relaxation, failed to modify the evaluative meanings evoked by the feared object. (SE)

  1. Sodium current inhibition by nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF)--fact or artifact?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerk, Arie O.; van Ginneken, Antoni C. G.; Wilders, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    In two recent publications in Bioelectromagnetics it has been demonstrated that the voltage-gated sodium current (I(Na)) is inhibited in response to a nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF). At the same time, there was an increase in a non-inactivating "leak" current (I(leak)), which was

  2. Low-dielectric layer increases nanosecond electric discharges in distilled water

    KAUST Repository

    Hamdan, Ahmad; Cha, Min

    2016-01-01

    decreasing of the energy consumption are the main goals of today’s research. Here we present an experimental study of nanosecond discharge in distilled water covered by a layer of dielectric material. We demonstrate through this paper that the discharge

  3. Temporal shaping of nanosecond CO2 laser pulses in multiphoton saturable absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haglund, R.F. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    It was shown that substantial temporal distortion of nanosecond 10.6 μm laser pulses occurs in traversing multiphoton saturable absorbers. The risetime and pulse delay effects appear to depend both on fluence and wavelength, and to be qualitatively consistent with predictions of a simple two-level absorption model

  4. Efficient temporal compression of coherent nanosecond pulses in compact SBS generator-amplifier setup

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiemann, S.; Ubachs, W.M.G.; Hogervorst, W.

    1997-01-01

    A pulse compressor based on stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in liquids is experimentally and theoretically investigated. It allows for the compression of Fourier-transform limited nanosecond pulses of several hundreds of millijoules of energy with both high conversion efficiency and a high

  5. Spin-on nanostructured silicon-silica film displaying room-temperature nanosecond lifetime photoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Y.; Hatton, B.; Miguez, H.; Coombs, N.; Fournier-Bidoz, S.; Ozin, G.A. [Materials Chemistry Research Group, Department of Chemistry, Lash Miller Chemical Laboratories, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3H6 (Canada); Grey, J.K.; Beaulac, R.; Reber, C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2003-04-17

    A yellow transparent mesoporous silica film has been achieved by the incorporation of silicon nanoclusters into its channels. The resulting nanocomposite - fabricated using a combination of evaporation induced self- assembly and chemical vapor deposition - emits light brightly at visible wavelengths and has nanosecond radiative lifetimes at room temperature when excited by ultraviolet light (see Figure). (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. Nano-Second Isomers in Neutron-Rich Ni Region Produced by Deep-Inelastic Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, T.; Asai, M.; Matsuda, M.; Ichikawa, S.; Makishima, A.; Hossain, I.; Kleinheinz, P.; Ogawa, M.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear structure of the doubly magic 68 Ni and its neighbors has been studied by spectroscopic techniques. Developing a new instrument isomer-scope, we have measured γ rays from nano-second isomers produced in heavy-ion deep-inelastic collisions with great sensitivity. (author)

  7. Integrated circuits with emitter coupling and their application in nanosecond nuclear electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basiladze, S.G.

    1976-01-01

    Principal static and dynamic characteristics are considered of integrated circuits with emitter coupling, as well as problems of signal transmission. Diagrams are given of amplifiers, discriminators, time interval drivers, generators, etc. Systems and units of nanosecond electronics employing integrated circuits with emitter coupling are briefly described

  8. Generation of fast-rise time, repetitive, (sub) nanosecond, high-voltage pulses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huiskamp, T.; Pemen, A.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    In this contribution we present our fast-rise time nanosecond pulse generator, capable of generating up to 50 kV (positive and negative) rectangular pulses at a repetition rate of up to 1 kHz and with a rise time of less than 200 picoseconds. We focus on the general concepts involved in the design

  9. Sub-nanosecond time-of-flight for segmented silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, R.T. de; Alexander, A.; Brown, K.; Floyd, B.; Gosser, Z.Q.; Hudan, S.; Poehlman, J.; Rudolph, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Development of a multichannel time-of-flight system for readout of a segmented, ion-passivated, ion-implanted silicon detector is described. This system provides sub-nanosecond resolution (δt∼370ps) even for low energy α particles which deposit E≤7.687MeV in the detector.

  10. Plasma-Enhanced Combustion of Hydrocarbon Fuels and Fuel Blends Using Nanosecond Pulsed Discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappelli, Mark; Mungal, M Godfrey

    2014-10-28

    This project had as its goals the study of fundamental physical and chemical processes relevant to the sustained premixed and non-premixed jet ignition/combustion of low grade fuels or fuels under adverse flow conditions using non-equilibrium pulsed nanosecond discharges.

  11. A nanosecond high voltage pulse device for accelerator time analytical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou Binqiao; Ding Furong; Xue Zhihua; Wang Xuemei; Shen Dingyu

    2002-01-01

    A nanosecond high voltage pulse device has been designed. The pulse rise time is 10 ns. The pulse voltage reached 16000 V. This device has been used to accelerator time analytical system, its resolution time is less than 0.8%

  12. Towards a laser fluence dependent nanostructuring of thin Au films on Si by nanosecond laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruffino, F.; Pugliara, A.; Carria, E.; Romano, L.; Bongiorno, C.; Fisicaro, G.; La Magna, A.; Spinella, C.; Grimaldi, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Au nanoclusters are produced by nanosecond laser irradiations of thin Au film on Si. ► The shape, size, and surface density of the Au nanoclusters are tunable by laser fluence. ► The formation dynamic of the Au nanoclusters under nanosecond laser irradiation is analyzed. - Abstract: In this work, we study the nanostructuring effects of nanosecond laser irradiations on 5 nm thick Au film sputter-deposited on Si. After deposition of Au on Si substrate, nanosecond laser irradiations were performed increasing the laser fluence from 750 to 1500 mJ/cm 2 . Several analyses techniques, such as Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were crossed to study the morphological evolution of the Au film as a function of laser fluence. In particular, the formation of Au nanoparticles was observed. The analyses allowed a quantitative evaluation of the evolution of the nanoparticles size, surface density, and shape as a function of the laser fluence. Therefore, a control the structural properties of the Au nanoparticles is reached, for example, for applications in Si nanowires growth or plasmonics.

  13. Enhancing cell proliferation by non-contact nanosecond PEF treatment of cell culture vials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bree, van J.W.M.; Geysen, J.J.G.; Pemen, A.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The applicability of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) has been focused on killing of cells by means of direct contact between the nsPEF electrodes and tissue or liquid, such as in melanoma destruction [1] and sterilization of fluids. Here we present a novel, tabletop device that induces

  14. Nanosecond optical limiting response of sandwich-type neodymium dyphthalocyanine in a co-polymer host

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aneeshkumar, B.N.; Gopinath, P.; Thomas, J.; Vallabhan, C.P.G.; Nampoori, V.P.N.; Radhakrishnan, P.

    2004-01-01

    The nanosecond optical limiting characteristics of sandwich-type neodymium diphthalocyanine in a co-polymer matrix of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and methyl-2-cyanoacrylate have been studied for the first time. The measurements were performed using 9 ns laser pulses generated from a

  15. Plasmon-mediated energy relaxation in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferry, D. K. [School of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-5706 (United States); Somphonsane, R. [Department of Physics, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology, Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand); Ramamoorthy, H.; Bird, J. P. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University at Buffalo, the State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14260-1500 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    Energy relaxation of hot carriers in graphene is studied at low temperatures, where the loss rate may differ significantly from that predicted for electron-phonon interactions. We show here that plasmons, important in the relaxation of energetic carriers in bulk semiconductors, can also provide a pathway for energy relaxation in transport experiments in graphene. We obtain a total loss rate to plasmons that results in energy relaxation times whose dependence on temperature and density closely matches that found experimentally.

  16. Nonlinear Relaxation in Population Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirone, Markus A.; de Pasquale, Ferdinando; Spagnolo, Bernardo

    We analyze the nonlinear relaxation of a complex ecosystem composed of many interacting species. The ecological system is described by generalized Lotka-Volterra equations with a multiplicative noise. The transient dynamics is studied in the framework of the mean field theory and with random interaction between the species. We focus on the statistical properties of the asymptotic behaviour of the time integral of the ith population and on the distribution of the population and of the local field.

  17. Structural relaxation: low temperature properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, F. de la

    1984-01-01

    We discuss the changes in transport and superconducting properties of amorphous Zr 70 Cu 30 , induced by thermal relaxation. The experimental results are used to investigate the relation between the microscopic parameters and the observed physical properties. It is shown that the density of eletronic states determines the shift Tc as well as the variation of the electrical resistivity. It is necessary to assume strong hybridization between s and d bands to understand the eletrodynamic response of the superconductor. (Author) [pt

  18. The Effects of Suggestibility on Relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Henry C.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Selected undergraduates (N=32) on the basis of Creative Imagination Scale scores and randomly assigned high and low suggestibility subjects to progressive relaxation (PR) and suggestions of relaxation (SR) training modes. Results revealed a significant pre-post relaxation effect, and main efffects for both suggestibility and training mode. (NRB)

  19. Relaxed Poisson cure rate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Josemar; Cordeiro, Gauss M; Cancho, Vicente G; Balakrishnan, N

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to make the standard promotion cure rate model (Yakovlev and Tsodikov, ) more flexible by assuming that the number of lesions or altered cells after a treatment follows a fractional Poisson distribution (Laskin, ). It is proved that the well-known Mittag-Leffler relaxation function (Berberan-Santos, ) is a simple way to obtain a new cure rate model that is a compromise between the promotion and geometric cure rate models allowing for superdispersion. So, the relaxed cure rate model developed here can be considered as a natural and less restrictive extension of the popular Poisson cure rate model at the cost of an additional parameter, but a competitor to negative-binomial cure rate models (Rodrigues et al., ). Some mathematical properties of a proper relaxed Poisson density are explored. A simulation study and an illustration of the proposed cure rate model from the Bayesian point of view are finally presented. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Arresting relaxation in Pickering Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Tim; Burke, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Pickering emulsions consist of droplets of one fluid dispersed in a host fluid and stabilized by colloidal particles absorbed at the fluid-fluid interface. Everyday materials such as crude oil and food products like salad dressing are examples of these materials. Particles can stabilize non spherical droplet shapes in these emulsions through the following sequence: first, an isolated droplet is deformed, e.g. by an electric field, increasing the surface area above the equilibrium value; additional particles are then adsorbed to the interface reducing the surface tension. The droplet is then allowed to relax toward a sphere. If more particles were adsorbed than can be accommodated by the surface area of the spherical ground state, relaxation of the droplet is arrested at some non-spherical shape. Because the energetic cost of removing adsorbed colloids exceeds the interfacial driving force, these configurations can remain stable over long timescales. In this presentation, we present a computational study of the ordering present in anisotropic droplets produced through the mechanism of arrested relaxation and discuss the interplay between the geometry of the droplet, the dynamical process that produced it, and the structure of the defects observed.

  1. Vibrational relaxation in OCS mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, C.J.S.M.; Gait, P.D.; Simmie, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental measurements are reported of vibrational relaxation times which may be used to show whether there is near resonant vibration-rotation energy transfer between OCS and H 2 , D 2 or HD. Vibrational relaxation times have been measured in OCS and OCS mixtures over the temperature range 360 to 1000 K using a shock tube and a laser schlieren system. The effectiveness of the additives in reducing the relaxation time of OCS is in the order 4 He 3 He 2 2 and HD. Along this series the effect of an increase in temperature changes from the case of speeding up the rate with 4 He to retarding it with D 2 , HD and H 2 . There is no measurable difference in the effectiveness of n-D 2 and o-D 2 and little, or no, difference between n-H 2 and p-H 2 . Thus the experimental results do not give clear evidence for rotational-vibration energy transfer between hydrogen and OCS. This contrasts with the situation for CO 2 + H 2 mixtures. (author)

  2. Relaxed plasma-vacuum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spies, G.O.; Lortz, D.; Kaiser, R.

    2001-01-01

    Taylor's theory of relaxed toroidal plasmas (states of lowest energy with fixed total magnetic helicity) is extended to include a vacuum between the plasma and the wall. In the extended variational problem, one prescribes, in addition to the helicity and the magnetic fluxes whose conservation follows from the perfect conductivity of the wall, the fluxes whose conservation follows from the assumption that the plasma-vacuum interface is also perfectly conducting (if the wall is a magnetic surface, then one has the toroidal and the poloidal flux in the vacuum). Vanishing of the first energy variation implies a pressureless free-boundary magnetohydrostatic equilibrium with a Beltrami magnetic field in the plasma, and in general with a surface current in the interface. Positivity of the second variation implies that the equilibrium is stable according to ideal magnetohydrodynamics, that it is a relaxed state according to Taylor's theory if the interface is replaced by a wall, and that the surface current is nonzero (at least if there are no closed magnetic field lines in the interface). The plane slab, with suitable boundary conditions to simulate a genuine torus, is investigated in detail. The relaxed state has the same double symmetry as the vessel if, and only if, the prescribed helicity is in an interval that depends on the prescribed fluxes. This interval is determined in the limit of a thin slab

  3. Regularized Label Relaxation Linear Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaozhao; Xu, Yong; Li, Xuelong; Lai, Zhihui; Wong, Wai Keung; Fang, Bingwu

    2018-04-01

    Linear regression (LR) and some of its variants have been widely used for classification problems. Most of these methods assume that during the learning phase, the training samples can be exactly transformed into a strict binary label matrix, which has too little freedom to fit the labels adequately. To address this problem, in this paper, we propose a novel regularized label relaxation LR method, which has the following notable characteristics. First, the proposed method relaxes the strict binary label matrix into a slack variable matrix by introducing a nonnegative label relaxation matrix into LR, which provides more freedom to fit the labels and simultaneously enlarges the margins between different classes as much as possible. Second, the proposed method constructs the class compactness graph based on manifold learning and uses it as the regularization item to avoid the problem of overfitting. The class compactness graph is used to ensure that the samples sharing the same labels can be kept close after they are transformed. Two different algorithms, which are, respectively, based on -norm and -norm loss functions are devised. These two algorithms have compact closed-form solutions in each iteration so that they are easily implemented. Extensive experiments show that these two algorithms outperform the state-of-the-art algorithms in terms of the classification accuracy and running time.

  4. Ultrafast Librational Relaxation of H2O in Liquid Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jakob; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Rey, Rossend

    2013-01-01

    The ultrafast librational (hindered rotational) relaxation of a rotationally excited H2O molecule in pure liquid water is investigated by means of classical nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and a power and work analysis. This analysis allows the mechanism of the energy transfer from...... the excited H2O to its water neighbors, which occurs on a sub-100 fs time scale, to be followed in molecular detail, i.e., to determine which water molecules receive the energy and in which degrees of freedom. It is found that the dominant energy flow is to the four hydrogen-bonded water partners in the first...

  5. Spin-lattice relaxation in phosphorescent triplet state molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbeek, P.J.F.

    1979-01-01

    The present thesis contains the results of a study of spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) in the photo-excited triplet state of aromatic molecules, dissolved in a molecular host crystal. It appears that SLR in phosphorescent triplet state molecules often is related to the presence of so-called (pseudo) localized phonons in the molecular mixed crystals. These local phonons can be thought to correspond with vibrations (librations) of the guest molecule in the force field of the surrounding host molecules. Since the intermolecular forces are relatively weak, the frequencies corresponding with these vibrations are relatively low and usually are of the order of 10-30 cm -1 . (Auth.)

  6. A comparison of methods for calculating NMR cross-relaxation rates (NOESY and ROESY intensities) in small peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feenstra, K Anton; Peter, Christine; Scheek, Ruud M; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Mark, Alan E

    Three methods for calculating nuclear magnetic resonance cross-relaxation rates from molecular dynamics simulations of small flexible molecules have been compared in terms of their ability to reproduce relaxation data obtained experimentally and to produce consistent descriptions of the system. The

  7. Thermodynamic scaling of α-relaxation time and viscosity stems from the Johari-Goldstein β-relaxation or the primitive relaxation of the coupling model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngai, K L; Habasaki, J; Prevosto, D; Capaccioli, S; Paluch, Marian

    2012-07-21

    By now it is well established that the structural α-relaxation time, τ(α), of non-associated small molecular and polymeric glass-formers obey thermodynamic scaling. In other words, τ(α) is a function Φ of the product variable, ρ(γ)/T, where ρ is the density and T the temperature. The constant γ as well as the function, τ(α) = Φ(ρ(γ)/T), is material dependent. Actually this dependence of τ(α) on ρ(γ)/T originates from the dependence on the same product variable of the Johari-Goldstein β-relaxation time, τ(β), or the primitive relaxation time, τ(0), of the coupling model. To support this assertion, we give evidences from various sources itemized as follows. (1) The invariance of the relation between τ(α) and τ(β) or τ(0) to widely different combinations of pressure and temperature. (2) Experimental dielectric and viscosity data of glass-forming van der Waals liquids and polymer. (3) Molecular dynamics simulations of binary Lennard-Jones (LJ) models, the Lewis-Wahnström model of ortho-terphenyl, 1,4 polybutadiene, a room temperature ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate, and a molten salt 2Ca(NO(3))(2)·3KNO(3) (CKN). (4) Both diffusivity and structural relaxation time, as well as the breakdown of Stokes-Einstein relation in CKN obey thermodynamic scaling by ρ(γ)/T with the same γ. (5) In polymers, the chain normal mode relaxation time, τ(N), is another function of ρ(γ)/T with the same γ as segmental relaxation time τ(α). (6) While the data of τ(α) from simulations for the full LJ binary mixture obey very well the thermodynamic scaling, it is strongly violated when the LJ interaction potential is truncated beyond typical inter-particle distance, although in both cases the repulsive pair potentials coincide for some distances.

  8. Sandpile model for relaxation in complex systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, A.; Sotolongo-Costa, O.; Brouers, F.

    1997-10-01

    The relaxation in complex systems is, in general, nonexponential. After an initial rapid decay the system relaxes slowly following a long time tail. In the present paper a sandpile moderation of the relaxation in complex systems is analysed. Complexity is introduced by a process of avalanches in the Bethe lattice and a feedback mechanism which leads to slower decay with increasing time. In this way, some features of relaxation in complex systems: long time tails relaxation, aging, and fractal distribution of characteristic times, are obtained by simple computer simulations. (author)

  9. The relationships between suggestibility, influenceability, and relaxability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polczyk, Romuald; Frey, Olga; Szpitalak, Malwina

    2013-01-01

    This research explores the relationships between relaxability and various aspects of suggestibility and influenceability. The Jacobson Progressive Muscle Relaxation procedure was used to induce relaxation. Tests of direct suggestibility, relating to the susceptibility of overt suggestions, and indirect suggestibility, referring to indirect hidden influence, as well as self-description questionnaires on suggestibility and the tendency to comply were used. Thayer's Activation-Deactivation Adjective Check List, measuring various kinds of activation and used as a pre- and posttest, determined the efficacy of the relaxation procedure. Indirect, direct, and self-measured suggestibility proved to be positively related to the ability to relax, measured by Thayer's subscales relating to emotions. Compliance was not related to relaxability. The results are discussed in terms of the aspects of relaxation training connected with suggestibility.

  10. Nuclear relaxation and critical fluctuations in membranes containing cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Harden

    2009-04-01

    Nuclear resonance frequencies in bilayer membranes depend on lipid composition. Our calculations describe the combined effects of composition fluctuations and diffusion on nuclear relaxation near a miscibility critical point. Both tracer and gradient diffusion are included. The calculations involve correlation functions and a correlation length ξ =ξ0T/(T -Tc), where T -Tc is temperature above the critical temperature and ξ0 is a parameter of molecular length. Several correlation functions are examined, each of which is related in some degree to the Ising model correlation function. These correlation functions are used in the calculation of transverse deuterium relaxation rates in magic angle spinning and quadrupole echo experiments. The calculations are compared with experiments that report maxima in deuterium and proton nuclear relaxation rates at the critical temperature [Veatch et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104, 17650 (2007)]. One Ising-model-related correlation function yields a maximum 1/T2 relaxation rate at the critical temperature for both magic angle spinning and quadrupole echo experiments. The calculated rates at the critical temperature are close to the experimental rates. The rate maxima involve relatively rapid tracer diffusion in a static composition gradient over distances of up to 10-100 nm.

  11. Rouse mode analysis of chain relaxation in polymer nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalathi, Jagannathan T; Kumar, Sanat K; Rubinstein, Michael; Grest, Gary S

    2015-05-28

    Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the internal relaxations of chains in nanoparticle (NP)/polymer composites. We examine the Rouse modes of the chains, a quantity that is closest in spirit to the self-intermediate scattering function, typically determined in an (incoherent) inelastic neutron scattering experiment. Our simulations show that for weakly interacting mixtures of NPs and polymers, the effective monomeric relaxation rates are faster than in a neat melt when the NPs are smaller than the entanglement mesh size. In this case, the NPs serve to reduce both the monomeric friction and the entanglements in the polymer melt, as in the case of a polymer-solvent system. However, for NPs larger than half the entanglement mesh size, the effective monomer relaxation is essentially unaffected for low NP concentrations. Even in this case, we observe a strong reduction in chain entanglements for larger NP loadings. Thus, the role of NPs is to always reduce the number of entanglements, with this effect only becoming pronounced for small NPs or for high concentrations of large NPs. Our studies of the relaxation of single chains resonate with recent neutron spin echo (NSE) experiments, which deduce a similar entanglement dilution effect.

  12. Dielectric and mechanical relaxation in isooctylcyanobiphenyl (8*OCB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawlus, S; Mierzwa, M; Paluch, M; Rzoska, S J [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Roland, C M, E-mail: michal.mierzwa@us.edu.p [Chemistry Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Code 6120, Washington, DC 20375-5342 (United States)

    2010-06-16

    The dynamics of isooctylcyanobiphenyl (8*OCB) was characterized using dielectric and mechanical spectroscopies. This isomer of the liquid crystalline octylcyanobiphenyl (8OCB) vitrifies during cooling or on application of pressure, exhibiting the typical features of glass-forming liquids: non-Debye relaxation function, non-Arrhenius temperature dependence of the relaxation times, {tau}{sub {alpha}}, a dynamic crossover at T {approx} 1.6T{sub g}. This crossover is evidenced by changes in the behavior of both the peak shape and the temperature dependence of {tau}{sub {alpha}}. The primary relaxation time at the crossover, 2 ns at ambient pressure, is the smallest value reported to date for any molecular liquid or polymer. Interestingly, at all temperatures below this crossover, {tau}{sub {alpha}}and the dc conductivity remain coupled (i.e., conform to the Debye-Stokes-Einstein relation). Two secondary relaxations are observed in the glassy state, one of which is identified as the Johari-Goldstein process. Unlike the case for 8OCB, no liquid crystalline phase could be attained for 8*OCB, demonstrating that relatively small differences in chemical structure can effect substantial changes in the intermolecular potential.

  13. Numerical investigation of heating of a gold nanoparticle and the surrounding microenvironment by nanosecond laser pulses for nanomedicine applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sassaroli, E; Li, K C P; O' Neill, B E [Department of Radiology, Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, TX, 77030 (United States)], E-mail: beoneill@tmhs.org

    2009-09-21

    We have modeled, by finite element analysis, the process of heating of a spherical gold nanoparticle by nanosecond laser pulses and of heat transfer between the particle and the surrounding medium, with no mass transfer. In our analysis, we have included thermal conductivity changes, vapor formation, and changes of the dielectric properties as a function of temperature. We have shown that such changes significantly affect the temperature reached by the particle and surrounding microenvironment and therefore the thermal and dielectric properties of the medium need to be known for a correct determination of the temperature elevation. We have shown that for sufficiently low intensity and long pulses, it is possible to establish a quasi-steady temperature profile in the medium with no vapor formation. As the intensity is increased, a phase-change with vapor formation takes place around the gold nanoparticle. As phase-transition starts, an additional increase in the intensity does not significantly increase the temperature of the gold nanoparticle and surrounding environment. The temperature starts to rise again above a given intensity threshold which is particle and environment dependent. The aim of this study is to provide useful insights for the development of molecular targeting of gold nanoparticles for applications such as remote drug release of therapeutics and photothermal cancer therapy.

  14. Numerical investigation of heating of a gold nanoparticle and the surrounding microenvironment by nanosecond laser pulses for nanomedicine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sassaroli, E; Li, K C P; O'Neill, B E

    2009-01-01

    We have modeled, by finite element analysis, the process of heating of a spherical gold nanoparticle by nanosecond laser pulses and of heat transfer between the particle and the surrounding medium, with no mass transfer. In our analysis, we have included thermal conductivity changes, vapor formation, and changes of the dielectric properties as a function of temperature. We have shown that such changes significantly affect the temperature reached by the particle and surrounding microenvironment and therefore the thermal and dielectric properties of the medium need to be known for a correct determination of the temperature elevation. We have shown that for sufficiently low intensity and long pulses, it is possible to establish a quasi-steady temperature profile in the medium with no vapor formation. As the intensity is increased, a phase-change with vapor formation takes place around the gold nanoparticle. As phase-transition starts, an additional increase in the intensity does not significantly increase the temperature of the gold nanoparticle and surrounding environment. The temperature starts to rise again above a given intensity threshold which is particle and environment dependent. The aim of this study is to provide useful insights for the development of molecular targeting of gold nanoparticles for applications such as remote drug release of therapeutics and photothermal cancer therapy.

  15. Compaction and relaxation of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, R.

    2015-06-18

    Operation of membrane systems for water treatment can be seriously hampered by biofouling. A better characterization of biofilms in membrane systems and their impact on membrane performance may help to develop effective biofouling control strategies. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence, extent and timescale of biofilm compaction and relaxation (decompaction), caused by permeate flux variations. The impact of permeate flux changes on biofilm thickness, structure and stiffness was investigated in situ and non-destructively with optical coherence tomography using membrane fouling monitors operated at a constant crossflow velocity of 0.1 m s−1 with permeate production. The permeate flux was varied sequentially from 20 to 60 and back to 20 L m−2 h−1. The study showed that the average biofilm thickness on the membrane decreased after elevating the permeate flux from 20 to 60 L m−2 h−1 while the biofilm thickness increased again after restoring the original flux of 20 L m−2 h−1, indicating the occurrence of biofilm compaction and relaxation. Within a few seconds after the flux change, the biofilm thickness was changed and stabilized, biofilm compaction occurred faster than the relaxation after restoring the original permeate flux. The initial biofilm parameters were not fully reinstated: the biofilm thickness was reduced by 21%, biofilm stiffness had increased and the hydraulic biofilm resistance was elevated by 16%. Biofilm thickness was related to the hydraulic biofilm resistance. Membrane performance losses are related to the biofilm thickness, density and morphology, which are influenced by (variations in) hydraulic conditions. A (temporarily) permeate flux increase caused biofilm compaction, together with membrane performance losses. The impact of biofilms on membrane performance can be influenced (increased and reduced) by operational parameters. The article shows that a (temporary) pressure increase leads to more

  16. Multiplied effect of heat and radiation in chemical stress relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masayuki

    1981-01-01

    About the deterioration of rubber due to radiation, useful knowledge can be obtained by the measurement of chemical stress relaxation. As an example, the rubber coating of cables in a reactor containment vessel is estimated to be irradiated by weak radiation at the temperature between 60 and 90 deg C for about 40 years. In such case, it is desirable to establish the method of accelerated test of the deterioration. The author showed previously that the law of time-dose rate conversion holds in the case of radiation. In this study, the chemical stress relaxation to rubber was measured by the simultaneous application of heat and radiation, and it was found that there was the multiplied effect of heat and radiation in the stress relaxation speed. Therefore the factor of multiplication of heat and radiation was proposed to describe quantitatively the degree of the multiplied effect. The chloroprene rubber used was offered by Hitachi Cable Co., Ltd. The experimental method and the results are reported. The multiplication of heat and radiation is not caused by the direct cut of molecular chains by radiation, instead, it is based on the temperature dependence of various reaction rates at which the activated species reached the cut of molecular chains through complex reaction mechanism and the temperature dependence of the diffusion rate of oxygen in rubber. (Kako, I.)

  17. Electroporation of Mammalian Cells by Nanosecond Electric Field Oscillations and its Inhibition by the Electric Field Reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-08

    Report 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) March 2013 to July 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Electroporation of mammalian cells by nanosecond electric field...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 1Scientific RepoRts | 5:13818 | DOi: 10.1038/srep13818 www.nature.com/scientificreports Electroporation of mammalian cells...first to demonstrate that mammalian cells can be electroporated by damped sine wave electric stimuli of nanosecond duration. By comparing the

  18. Ultrasonic relaxations in borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Angelo, G.; Tripodo, G.; Carini, G.; Cosio, E.; Bartolotta, A.; Di Marco, G.

    2004-01-01

    The attenuation and velocity of ultrasonic waves of frequencies in the range from 10 to 70 MHz have been measured in M 2 O-B 2 O 3 borate glasses (M: Li or Ag) as a function of temperature between 15 and 350 K. The velocity of sound waves decreases with increasing temperature in all the glasses, the decrease as the temperature is increased is larger in glasses containing silver than in those with lithium. A broad relaxation peak characterises the attenuation behaviour of the lithium and silver borate glasses at temperatures below 100 K and is paralleled by a corresponding dispersive behaviour of the sound velocity. Above 100 K, the ultrasonic velocity shows a nearly linear behaviour regulated by the vibrational anharmonicity, which decreases with increasing content of modifier oxide and is smaller in lithium than in silver borates. These results suggest that the relaxation of structural defects and the anharmonicity of borate glasses are strongly affected by two parameters: the number of bridging bonds per network forming ion and the polarising power of network modifier ions which occupy sites in the existing interstices

  19. Statistical mechanics of violent relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, F.H.

    1978-01-01

    We reexamine the foundations of Lynden-Bell's statistical mechanical discussion of violent relaxation in collisionless stellar systems. We argue that Lynden-Bell's formulation in terms of a continuum description introduces unnecessary complications, and we consider a more conventional formulation in terms of particles. We then find the exclusion principle discovered by Lynden-Bell to be quantitatively important only at phase densities where two-body encounters are no longer negligible. Since the edynamical basis for the exclusion principle vanishes in such cases anyway, Lynden-Bell statistics always reduces in practice to Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics when applied to stellar systems. Lynden-Bell also found the equilibrium distribution function generally to be a sum of Maxwellians with velocity dispersions dependent on the phase density at star formation. We show that this difficulty vanishes in the particulate description for an encounterless stellar system as long as stars of different masses are initially well mixed in phase space. Our methods also demonstrate the equivalence between Gibbs's formalism which uses the microcanonical ensemble and Boltzmann's formalism which uses a coarse-grained continuum description. In addition, we clarify the concept of irreversible behavior on a macroscopic scale for an encounterless stellar system. Finally, we comment on the use of unusual macroscopic constraints to simulate the effects of incomplete relaxation

  20. Glass transition and relaxation dynamics of propylene glycol-water solutions confined in clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elamin, Khalid; Björklund, Jimmy; Nyhlén, Fredrik; Yttergren, Madeleine; Mârtensson, Lena; Swenson, Jan

    2014-07-01

    The molecular dynamics of aqueous solutions of propylene glycol (PG) and propylene glycol methylether (PGME) confined in a two-dimensional layer-structured Na-vermiculite clay has been studied by broadband dielectric spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. As typical for liquids in confined geometries the intensity of the cooperative α-relaxation becomes considerably more suppressed than the more local β-like relaxation processes. In fact, at high water contents the calorimetric glass transition and related structural α-relaxation cannot even be observed, due to the confinement. Thus, the intensity of the viscosity related α-relaxation is dramatically reduced, but its time scale as well as the related glass transition temperature Tg are for both systems only weakly influenced by the confinement. In the case of the PGME-water solutions it is an important finding since in the corresponding bulk system a pronounced non-monotonic concentration dependence of the glass transition related dynamics has been observed due to the growth of hydrogen bonded relaxing entities of water bridging between PGME molecules [J. Sjöström, J. Mattsson, R. Bergman, and J. Swenson, Phys. Chem. B 115, 10013 (2011)]. The present results suggest that the same type of structural entities are formed in the quasi-two-dimensional space between the clay platelets. It is also observed that the main water relaxation cannot be distinguished from the β-relaxation of PG or PGME in the concentration range up to intermediate water contents. This suggests that these two processes are coupled and that the water molecules affect the time scale of the β-relaxation. However, this is most likely true also for the corresponding bulk solutions, which exhibit similar time scales of this combined relaxation process below Tg. Finally, it is found that at higher water contents the water relaxation does not merge with, or follow, the α-relaxation above Tg, but instead crosses the α-relaxation

  1. A simple sub-nanosecond ultraviolet light pulse generator with high repetition rate and peak power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binh, P H; Trong, V D; Renucci, P; Marie, X

    2013-08-01

    We present a simple ultraviolet sub-nanosecond pulse generator using commercial ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with peak emission wavelengths of 290 nm, 318 nm, 338 nm, and 405 nm. The generator is based on step recovery diode, short-circuited transmission line, and current-shaping circuit. The narrowest pulses achieved have 630 ps full width at half maximum at repetition rate of 80 MHz. Optical pulse power in the range of several hundreds of microwatts depends on the applied bias voltage. The bias voltage dependences of the output optical pulse width and peak power are analysed and discussed. Compared to commercial UV sub-nanosecond generators, the proposed generator can produce much higher pulse repetition rate and peak power.

  2. Nanosecond-level time synchronization of AERA using a beacon reference transmitter and commercial airplanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huege Tim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Radio detection of cosmic-ray air showers requires time synchronization of detectors on a nanosecond level, especially for advanced reconstruction algorithms based on the wavefront curvature and for interferometric analysis approaches. At the Auger Engineering Radio Array, the distributed, autonomous detector stations are time-synchronized via the Global Positioning System which, however, does not provide sufficient timing accuracy. We thus employ a dedicated beacon reference transmitter to correct for eventby-event clock drifts in our offline data analysis. In an independent cross-check of this “beacon correction” using radio pulses emitted by commercial airplanes, we have shown that the combined timing accuracy of the two methods is better than 2 nanoseconds.

  3. The effect of polymer type on electric breakdown strength on a nanosecond time scale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Liang; Su Jian-Cang; Pan Ya-Feng; Zhang Xi-Bo

    2012-01-01

    Based on the concepts of fast polarization,effective electric field and electron impact ionization criterion,the effect of polymer type on electric breakdown strength (EBD) on a nanosecond time scale is investigated,and a formula that qualitatively characterizes the relation between the electric breakdown strength and the polymer type is derived.According to this formula,it is found that the electric breakdown strength decreases with an increase in the effective relative dielectric constants of the polymers.By calculating the effective relative dielectric constants for different types of polymers,the theoretical relation for the electric breakdown strengths of common polymers is predicted.To verify the prediction,the polymers of PE (polyethylene),PTFE (polytetrafluoroethelene),PMMA (organic glass) and Nylon are tested with a nanosecond-pulse generator.The experimental result shows EBD (PTFE) > EBD (PMMA) > EBD (Nylon) > EBD (PE).This result is consistent with the theoretical prediction.

  4. Supershort avalanche electron beams and x-ray in high-pressure nanosecond discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasenko, V F; Baksht, E H; Kostyrya, I D; Lomaev, M I; Rybka, D V

    2008-01-01

    The properties of a supershort avalanche electron beam (S AEB) and X-ray radiation produced using a nanosecond volume discharge are examined. An electron beam of the runaway electrons with amplitude of ∼ 50 A has been obtained in air atmospheric pressure. It is reported that S AEB is formed in the angle above 2π sr. Three groups of the runaway electrons are formed in a gas diode under atmospheric air pressure, when nanosecond voltage pulses with amplitude of hundreds of kilovolts are applied. The electron beam has been generated behind a 45 μm thick AlBe foil in SF 6 and Xe under the pressure of 2 arm, and in He under the pressure of about 12 atm. The paper gives the analysis of a generation mechanism of SAEB.

  5. Nanosecond laser pulse stimulation of spiral ganglion neurons and model cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettenmaier, Alexander; Lenarz, Thomas; Reuter, Günter

    2014-04-01

    Optical stimulation of the inner ear has recently attracted attention, suggesting a higher frequency resolution compared to electrical cochlear implants due to its high spatial stimulation selectivity. Although the feasibility of the effect is shown in multiple in vivo experiments, the stimulation mechanism remains open to discussion. Here we investigate in single-cell measurements the reaction of spiral ganglion neurons and model cells to irradiation with a nanosecond-pulsed laser beam over a broad wavelength range from 420 nm up to 1950 nm using the patch clamp technique. Cell reactions were wavelength- and pulse-energy-dependent but too small to elicit action potentials in the investigated spiral ganglion neurons. As the applied radiant exposure was much higher than the reported threshold for in vivo experiments in the same laser regime, we conclude that in a stimulation paradigm with nanosecond-pulses, direct neuronal stimulation is not the main cause of optical cochlea stimulation.

  6. Radial Distribution of the Nanosecond Dielectric Barrier Discharge Current in Atmospheric-Pressure Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malashin, M. V.; Moshkunov, S. I.; Khomich, V. Yu.; Shershunova, E. A.

    2018-01-01

    Experimental results on the radial distribution of the nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) current in flat millimeter air gaps under atmospheric pressure and natural humidity of 40-60% at a voltage rise rate at the electrodes of 250 V/ns are presented. The time delay of the appearance of discharge currents was observed to increase from the center to the periphery of the air gap at discharge gap heights above 3 mm, which correlated with the appearance of constricted channels against the background of the volume DBD plasma. Based on the criterion of the avalanche-streamer transition, it is found out that the development of a nanosecond DBD in air gaps of 1-3 mm occurs by the streamer mechanism.

  7. Nanosecond-level time synchronization of AERA using a beacon reference transmitter and commercial airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huege, Tim

    2017-03-01

    Radio detection of cosmic-ray air showers requires time synchronization of detectors on a nanosecond level, especially for advanced reconstruction algorithms based on the wavefront curvature and for interferometric analysis approaches. At the Auger Engineering Radio Array, the distributed, autonomous detector stations are time-synchronized via the Global Positioning System which, however, does not provide sufficient timing accuracy. We thus employ a dedicated beacon reference transmitter to correct for eventby-event clock drifts in our offline data analysis. In an independent cross-check of this "beacon correction" using radio pulses emitted by commercial airplanes, we have shown that the combined timing accuracy of the two methods is better than 2 nanoseconds.

  8. Paramagnetic relaxation effects in perturbed angular correlations for arbitrary electronic relaxation time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopin, C.; Spanjaard, D.; Hartmann-Boutron, F.

    1975-01-01

    Previous perturbation treatments of paramagnetic relaxation effects in γγ PAC were limited to the case of very short electronic relaxation times. This limitation is circumvented by invoking a new perturbation theory recently elaborated by Hirst and others for handling relaxation effects in Moessbauer spectra. Under the assumption of spherical electronic relaxation the perturbation factors are computed as functions of certain relaxation parameters which are directly related to the microscopic relaxation Hamiltonian. The results are compared to those of the stochastic theory of Scherer and Blume [fr

  9. Memory effects in the relaxation of a confined granular gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brey, J. Javier; de Soria, M. I. García; Maynar, P.; Buzón, V.

    2014-09-01

    The accuracy of a model to describe the horizontal dynamics of a confined quasi-two-dimensional system of inelastic hard spheres is discussed by comparing its predictions for the relaxation of the temperature in a homogenous system with molecular dynamics simulation results for the original system. A reasonably good agreement is found. Next the model is used to investigate the peculiarities of the nonlinear evolution of the temperature when the parameter controlling the energy injection is instantaneously changed while the system was relaxing. This can be considered as a nonequilibrium generalization of the Kovacs effect. It is shown that, in the low-density limit, the effect can be accurately described by using a simple kinetic theory based on the first Sonine approximation for the one-particle distribution function. Some possible experimental implications are indicated.

  10. Electrosensitization Increases Antitumor Effectiveness of Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Muratori, Claudia; Pakhomov, Andrei G.; Heller, Loree; Casciola, Maura; Gianulis, Elena; Grigoryev, Sergey; Xiao, Shu; Pakhomova, O. N.

    2017-01-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric fields are emerging as a new modality for tissue and tumor ablation. We previously reported that cells exposed to pulsed electric fields develop hypersensitivity to subsequent pulsed electric field applications. This phenomenon, named electrosensitization, is evoked by splitting the pulsed electric field treatment in fractions (split-dose treatments) and causes in vitro a 2- to 3-fold increase in cytotoxicity. The aim of this study was to show the benefit of split-d...

  11. High-voltage nanosecond Marx generator with quasi-rectangular pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulan, V.V.; Grabovskij, E.V.; Gribov, A.N.; Luzhnov, V.G.

    1999-01-01

    The automated high-voltage nanosecond generator, forming single pulses of any polarity on the load of 17 Ohm with polarity voltage from 100 up to 300 kV at the semiheight of 80 ns and the front of 7 ns is described. The generator is assembled on the basis of low-inductive capacitors, which by discharge form the pulse, close by form to rectangular one [ru

  12. Comparative study of femtosecond and nanosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmert, Luke A.; Chinni, Rosemarie C.; Cremers, David A.; Jones, C. Randy; Rudolph, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    We present spectra of depleted uranium metal from laser plasmas generated by nanosecond Nd:YAG (1064 nm) and femtosecond Ti:sapphire (800 nm) laser pulses. The latter pulses produce short-lived and relatively cool plasmas in comparison to the longer pulses, and the spectra of neutral uranium atoms appear immediately after excitation. Evidence for nonequilibrium excitation with femtosecond pulses is found in the dependence of spectral line intensities on the pulse chirp.

  13. Efficient temporal compression of coherent nanosecond pulses in compact SBS generator-amplifier setup

    OpenAIRE

    Schiemann, S.; Ubachs, W.M.G.; Hogervorst, W.

    1997-01-01

    A pulse compressor based on stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in liquids is experimentally and theoretically investigated. It allows for the compression of Fourier-transform limited nanosecond pulses of several hundreds of millijoules of energy with both high conversion efficiency and a high temporal compression factor. The two-cell generator-amplifier arrangement is of a compact design not requiring external attenuation of the generator cell input energy. Pulses from an injection-seeded,...

  14. Low-Cost Facile Fabrication of Flexible Transparent Copper Electrodes by Nanosecond Laser Ablation

    KAUST Repository

    Paeng, Dongwoo

    2015-03-27

    © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Low-cost Cu flexible transparent conducting electrodes (FTCEs) are fabricated by facile nanosecond laser ablation. The fabricated Cu FTCEs show excellent opto-electrical properties (transmittance: 83%, sheet resistance: 17.48 Ω sq-1) with outstanding mechanical durability. Successful demonstration of a touch-screen panel confirms the potential applicability of Cu FTCEs to the flexible optoelectronic devices.

  15. Luminous phase of nanosecond discharge in deionized water: morphology, propagation velocity and optical emission.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimek, Milan; Pongrác, Branislav; Babický, Václav; Člupek, Martin; Lukeš, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 7 (2017), č. článku 07LT01. ISSN 0963-0252 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-12987S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : water * nanosecond discharge * emission spectra * breakdown Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 3.302, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1361-6595/aa758d

  16. Activation of Anti-tumor Immune Response by Ablation of HCC with Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaobo; Chen, Yiling; Zhang, Ruiqing; Miao, Xudong; Chen, Xinhua

    2018-03-28

    Locoregional therapy is playing an increasingly important role in the non-surgical management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The novel technique of non-thermal electric ablation by nanosecond pulsed electric field has been recognized as a potential locoregional methodology for indicated HCC. This manuscript explores the most recent studies to indicate its unique anti-tumor immune response. The possible immune mechanism, termed as nano-pulse stimulation, was also analyzed.

  17. Characterization of Pressure Transients Generated by Nanosecond Electrical Pulse (nsEP) Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Caleb C. Roth; Ronald A. Barnes Jr.; Bennett L. Ibey; Hope T. Beier; L. Christopher Mimun; Saher M. Maswadi; Mehdi Shadaram; Randolph D. Glickman

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism(s) responsible for the breakdown (nanoporation) of cell plasma membranes after nanosecond pulse (nsEP) exposure remains poorly understood. Current theories focus exclusively on the electrical field, citing electrostriction, water dipole alignment and/or electrodeformation as the primary mechanisms for pore formation. However, the delivery of a high-voltage nsEP to cells by tungsten electrodes creates a multitude of biophysical phenomena, including electrohydraulic cavitation, el...

  18. Interaction Of CO2 Laser Nanosecond Pulse Train With The Metallic Targets In Optical Breakdown Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apollonov, V. V.; Firsov, K. N.; Konov, V. I.; Nikitin, P. I.; Prokhorov, A. M.; Silenok, A. S.; Sorochenko, V. R.

    1986-11-01

    In the present paper the electric field and currents in the air-breakdown plasma, produced by the train of nanosecond pulses of TEA-002 - regenerative amplifier near the un-charged targets are studied. The breakdown thresholds and the efficiency of plasma-target heat transmission are also measured. The results of numerical calculations made for increasing of the pulse train contrast with respect to the background in a regenerative amplifier are advanced.

  19. Explosive Processes on Cathode while Forming Nanosecond Pulsed Discharge of High Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Hashimov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to research of cathode surfaces with different curvature radius (r = 1–8 mm while forming nanosecond pulsed discharge in dense air. Influence of field and air pressure heterogeneity rate in gas gap on size of micro-craters being formed on working cathode surface after pulsed effect has been shown in the paper. The paper reveals a maximum expansion of separate micro-crater size on cathode surface with small curvature radius.

  20. Femtosecond versus nanosecond laser machining: comparison of induced stresses and structural changes in silicon wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amer, M.S.; El-Ashry, M.A.; Dosser, L.R.; Hix, K.E.; Maguire, J.F.; Irwin, Bryan

    2005-01-01

    Laser micromachining has proven to be a very successful tool for precision machining and microfabrication with applications in microelectronics, MEMS, medical device, aerospace, biomedical, and defense applications. Femtosecond (FS) laser micromachining is usually thought to be of minimal heat-affected zone (HAZ) local to the micromachined feature. The assumption of reduced HAZ is attributed to the absence of direct coupling of the laser energy into the thermal modes of the material during irradiation. However, a substantial HAZ is thought to exist when machining with lasers having pulse durations in the nanosecond (NS) regime. In this paper, we compare the results of micromachining a single crystal silicon wafer using a 150-femtosecond and a 30-nanosecond lasers. Induced stress and amorphization of the silicon single crystal were monitored using micro-Raman spectroscopy as a function of the fluence and pulse duration of the incident laser. The onset of average induced stress occurs at lower fluence when machining with the femtosecond pulse laser. Induced stresses were found to maximize at fluence of 44 J cm -2 and 8 J cm -2 for nanosecond and femtosecond pulsed lasers, respectively. In both laser pulse regimes, a maximum induced stress is observed at which point the induced stress begins to decrease as the fluence is increased. The maximum induced stress was comparable at 2.0 GPa and 1.5 GPa for the two lasers. For the nanosecond pulse laser, the induced amorphization reached a plateau of approximately 20% for fluence exceeding 22 J cm -2 . For the femtosecond pulse laser, however, induced amorphization was approximately 17% independent of the laser fluence within the experimental range. These two values can be considered nominally the same within experimental error. For femtosecond laser machining, some effect of the laser polarization on the amount of induced stress and amorphization was also observed

  1. Cross relaxation in nitroxide spin labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Cross relaxation, and mI-dependence of the intrinsic electron spin-lattice relaxation rate We, are incorporated explicitly into the rate equations for the electron-spin population differences that govern the saturation behaviour of 14N- and 15N-nitroxide spin labels. Both prove important in spin......-label EPR and ELDOR, particularly for saturation recovery studies. Neither for saturation recovery, nor for CW-saturation EPR and CW-ELDOR, can cross relaxation be described simply by increasing the value of We, the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate. Independence of the saturation recovery rates from...... the hyperfine line pumped or observed follows directly from solution of the rate equations including cross relaxation, even when the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate We is mI-dependent....

  2. Numerical Simulation of a Nanosecond-Pulse Discharge for High-Speed Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggie, Jonathan; Adamovich, Igor

    2012-10-01

    Numerical calculations were carried out to examine the physics of the operation of a nanosecond-pulse, single dielectric barrier discharge in a configuration with planar symmetry. This simplified configuration was chosen as a vehicle to develop a physics based nanosecond discharge model, including realistic air plasma chemistry and compressible bulk gas flow. First, a reduced plasma kinetic model was developed by carrying out a sensitivity analysis of zero-dimensional plasma computations with an extended chemical kinetic model. Transient, one- dimensional discharge computations were then carried out using the reduced kinetic model, incorporating a drift-diffusion formulation for each species, a self-consistent computation of the electric potential using the Poisson equation, and a mass-averaged gas dynamic formulation for the bulk gas motion. Discharge parameters (temperature, pressure, and input waveform) were selected to be representative of recent experiments on bow shock control with a nanosecond discharge in a Mach 5 cylinder flow. The computational results qualitatively reproduce many of the features observed in the experiments, including the rapid thermalization of the input electrical energy and the consequent formation of a weak shock wave. At breakdown, input electrical energy is rapidly transformed (over roughly 1 ns) into ionization products, dissociation products, and electronically excited particles, with subsequent thermalization over a relatively longer time-scale (roughly 10 μs).

  3. A novel method of calculating the energy deposition curve of nanosecond pulsed surface dielectric barrier discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Kun; Wang, Xinying; Lu, Jiayu; Cui, Quansheng; Pang, Lei; Di, Dongxu; Zhang, Qiaogen

    2015-01-01

    To obtain the energy deposition curve is very important in the fields to which nanosecond pulse dielectric barrier discharges (NPDBDs) are applied. It helps the understanding of the discharge physics and fast gas heating. In this paper, an equivalent circuit model, composed of three capacitances, is introduced and a method of calculating the energy deposition curve is proposed for a nanosecond pulse surface dielectric barrier discharge (NPSDBD) plasma actuator. The capacitance C d and the energy deposition curve E R are determined by mathematically proving that the mapping from C d to E R is bijective and numerically searching one C d that satisfies the requirement for E R to be a monotonically non-decreasing function. It is found that the value of capacitance C d varies with the amplitude of applied pulse voltage due to the change of discharge area and is dependent on the polarity of applied voltage. The bijectiveness of the mapping from C d to E R in nanosecond pulse volumetric dielectric barrier discharge (NPVDBD) is demonstrated and the feasibility of the application of the new method to NPVDBD is validated. This preliminarily shows a high possibility of developing a unified approach to calculate the energy deposition curve in NPDBD. (paper)

  4. Monopole patch antenna for in vivo exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merla, C; Apollonio, F; Paffi, A; Marino, C; Vernier, P T; Liberti, M

    2017-07-01

    To explore the promising therapeutic applications of short nanosecond electric pulses, in vitro and in vivo experiments are highly required. In this paper, an exposure system based on monopole patch antenna is reported to perform in vivo experiments on newborn mice with both monopolar and bipolar nanosecond signals. Analytical design and numerical simulations of the antenna in air were carried out as well as experimental characterizations in term of scattering parameter (S 11 ) and spatial electric field distribution. Numerical dosimetry of the setup with four newborn mice properly placed in proximity of the antenna patch was carried out, exploiting a matching technique to decrease the reflections due to dielectric discontinuities (i.e., from air to mouse tissues). Such technique consists in the use of a matching dielectric box with dielectric permittivity similar to those of the mice. The average computed electric field inside single mice was homogeneous (better than 68 %) with an efficiency higher than 20 V m -1  V -1 for the four exposed mice. These results demonstrate the possibility of a multiple (four) exposure of small animals to short nanosecond pulses (both monopolar and bipolar) in a controlled and efficient way.

  5. Review of supershort avalanche electron beam during nanosecond-pulse discharges in some gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor F. Tarasenko

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB plays an important role in nanosecond-pulse discharges. This paper aims at reviewing experiments results on characteritics of SAEB and its spectra in different gases in nanosecond-pulse discharges. All the joint experiments were carried in the Institute of High Current Electronics of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Electrical Engineering of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. In these experiments, the generation of a SAEB in SF6 in an inhomogeneous electric field was studied on three generators with pulse rise times of 0.3, 0.5 and ∼2 ns. Firstly, the comparison of SAEB parameters in SF6 with those obtained in other gases (air, nitrogen, argon, and krypton is introduced. Secondly, the SAEB spectra in SF6 and air at pressures of 10 kPa (75 torr, and 0.1 MPa (750 torr are reviewed and discussed. Finally, 1.5-D theoretical simulation of the supershort pulse of the fast electron beam in a coaxial diode filled with SF6 at atmospheric pressure is described. The simulation was carried out in the framework of hybrid model for discharge and runaway electron kinetics. The above research progress can provide better understanding of the investigation into the mechanism of nanosecond-pulse discharges.

  6. Nanosecond UV lasers stimulate transient Ca2+ elevations in human hNT astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raos, B J; Graham, E S; Unsworth, C P

    2017-06-01

    Astrocytes respond to various stimuli resulting in intracellular Ca 2+ signals that can propagate through organized functional networks. Recent literature calls for the development of techniques that can stimulate astrocytes in a fast and highly localized manner to emulate more closely the characteristics of astrocytic Ca 2+ signals in vivo. In this article we demonstrate, for the first time, how nanosecond UV lasers are capable of reproducibly stimulating Ca 2+ transients in human hNT astrocytes. We report that laser pulses with a beam energy of 4-29 µJ generate transient increases in cytosolic Ca 2+ . These Ca 2+ transients then propagate to adjacent astrocytes as intercellular Ca 2+ waves. We propose that nanosecond laser stimulation provides a valuable tool for enabling the study of Ca 2+ dynamics in human astrocytes at both a single cell and network level. Compared to previously developed techniques nanosecond laser stimulation has the advantage of not requiring loading of photo-caged or -sensitising agents, is non-contact, enables stimulation with a high spatiotemporal resolution and is comparatively cost effective.

  7. Structural relaxation in annealed hyperquenched basaltic glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoju; Mauro, John C.; Potuzak, M.

    2012-01-01

    The enthalpy relaxation behavior of hyperquenched (HQ) and annealed hyperquenched (AHQ) basaltic glass is investigated through calorimetric measurements. The results reveal a common onset temperature of the glass transition for all the HQ and AHQ glasses under study, indicating that the primary...... relaxation is activated at the same temperature regardless of the initial departure from equilibrium. The analysis of secondary relaxation at different annealing temperatures provides insights into the enthalpy recovery of HQ glasses....

  8. Mechanisms of relaxation and spin decoherence in nanomagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tol, Johan

    Relaxation in spin systems is of great interest with respect to various possible applications like quantum information processing and storage, spintronics, and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). The implementation of high frequencies and fields is crucial in the study of systems with large zero-field splitting or large interactions, as for example molecular magnets and low dimensional magnetic materials. Here we will focus on the implementation of pulsed Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (ERP) at multiple frequencies of 10, 95, 120, 240, and 336 GHz, and the relaxation and decoherence processes as a function of magnetic field and temperature. Firstly, at higher frequencies the direct single-phonon spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) is considerably enhanced, and will more often than not be the dominant relaxation mechanism at low temperatures, and can be much faster than at lower fields and frequencies. In principle the measurement of the SLR rates as a function of the frequency provides a means to map the phonon density of states. Secondly, the high electron spin polarization at high fields has a strong influence on the spin fluctuations in relatively concentrated spin systems, and the contribution of the electron-electron dipolar interactions to the coherence rate can be partially quenched at low temperatures. This not only allows the study of relatively concentrated spin systems by pulsed EPR (as for example magnetic nanoparticles and molecular magnets), it enables the separation of the contribution of the fluctuations of the electron spin system from other decoherence mechanisms. Besides choice of temperature and field, several strategies in sample design, pulse sequences, or clock transitions can be employed to extend the coherence time in nanomagnets. A review will be given of the decoherence mechanisms with an attempt at a quantitative comparison of experimental rates with theory.

  9. Influence of E-beam irradiation on dielectric relaxation of recycled polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazilova, Z.; Gafurov, U.; Tolstov, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The dielectric relaxation connected with molecular groups and polymer chain mobility for un-irradiated and e-beam irradiated recycled polypropylene was investigated. It was studied films of samples produced from virgin (initial) and e- beam irradiated of the polymer granules (E-beam source with 5 MeV energy). The dielectric losses were measured with temperature increasing and decreasing regime. The losses were measured with E8-4 bridge help (the frequency is 1kH). Heating velocity was 2 grad/min. The dielectric losses did not appeared in minus temperature region for the initial polypropylene samples. The measurement in temperature increasing and decreasing shows that the relaxation peak at ∼ 35 o C for un-irradiated and ∼70 o C for irradiated polymer samples connected with macromolecular segments mobility with water molecular groups participation. The main relaxation peak (higher 100 o C) shifts after e-beam irradiation is result of the cross-links formation. ) The peak connected with macromolecular segments mobility in polymer amorphous regions (β-relaxation process). In irradiated polypropylene on IR spectroscopy data oxygen molecular groups is increased. The molecular groupings form inter-molecular hydrogen bonds. The intermolecular bonds also hindered molecular groups and macromolecular mobility. The e-beam stimulated cross-links formation was confirmed by method of sol-gel analyses. The work was supported by STCU Fund (Project No 3009)

  10. Dielectric Relaxation of Water: Theory and Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, Narayan Prasad; Paudyal, Harihar; Johri, Manoj

    2010-06-01

    We have studied the hydrogen bond dynamics and methods for evaluation of probability and relaxation time for hydrogen bond network. Further, dielectric relaxation time has been calculated by using a diagonalization procedure by obtaining eigen values (inverse of relaxation time) of a master equation framed on the basis of Fokker-Planck equations. Microwave cavity spectrometer has been described to make measurements of relaxation time. Slater's perturbation equations are given for the analysis of the data. A comparison of theoretical and experimental data shows that there is a need for improvements in the theoretical model and experimental techniques to provide exact information about structural properties of water. (author)

  11. Pair plasma relaxation time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, A G; Ruffini, R; Vereshchagin, G V

    2010-04-01

    By numerically solving the relativistic Boltzmann equations, we compute the time scale for relaxation to thermal equilibrium for an optically thick electron-positron plasma with baryon loading. We focus on the time scales of electromagnetic interactions. The collisional integrals are obtained directly from the corresponding QED matrix elements. Thermalization time scales are computed for a wide range of values of both the total-energy density (over 10 orders of magnitude) and of the baryonic loading parameter (over 6 orders of magnitude). This also allows us to study such interesting limiting cases as the almost purely electron-positron plasma or electron-proton plasma as well as intermediate cases. These results appear to be important both for laboratory experiments aimed at generating optically thick pair plasmas as well as for astrophysical models in which electron-positron pair plasmas play a relevant role.

  12. Relaxing Chosen-Ciphertext Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canetti, Ran; Krawczyk, Hugo; Nielsen, Jesper Buus

    2003-01-01

    Security against adaptive chosen ciphertext attacks (or, CCA security) has been accepted as the standard requirement from encryption schemes that need to withstand active attacks. In particular, it is regarded as the appropriate security notion for encryption schemes used as components within...... general protocols and applications. Indeed, CCA security was shown to suffice in a large variety of contexts. However, CCA security often appears to be somewhat too strong: there exist encryption schemes (some of which come up naturally in practice) that are not CCA secure, but seem sufficiently secure...... “for most practical purposes.” We propose a relaxed variant of CCA security, called Replayable CCA (RCCA) security. RCCA security accepts as secure the non-CCA (yet arguably secure) schemes mentioned above; furthermore, it suffices for most existing applications of CCA security. We provide three...

  13. Nuclear magnetic relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism: Multi-spin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2017-08-01

    In aqueous systems with immobilized macromolecules, including biological tissues, the longitudinal spin relaxation of water protons is primarily induced by exchange-mediated orientational randomization (EMOR) of intra- and intermolecular magnetic dipole-dipole couplings. Starting from the stochastic Liouville equation, we have previously developed a rigorous EMOR relaxation theory for dipole-coupled two-spin and three-spin systems. Here, we extend the stochastic Liouville theory to four-spin systems and use these exact results as a guide for constructing an approximate multi-spin theory, valid for spin systems of arbitrary size. This so-called generalized stochastic Redfield equation (GSRE) theory includes the effects of longitudinal-transverse cross-mode relaxation, which gives rise to an inverted step in the relaxation dispersion profile, and coherent spin mode transfer among solid-like spins, which may be regarded as generalized spin diffusion. The GSRE theory is compared to an existing theory, based on the extended Solomon equations, which does not incorporate these phenomena. Relaxation dispersion profiles are computed from the GSRE theory for systems of up to 16 protons, taken from protein crystal structures. These profiles span the range from the motional narrowing limit, where the coherent mode transfer plays a major role, to the ultra-slow motion limit, where the zero-field rate is closely related to the strong-collision limit of the dipolar relaxation rate. Although a quantitative analysis of experimental data is beyond the scope of this work, it is clear from the magnitude of the predicted relaxation rate and the shape of the relaxation dispersion profile that the dipolar EMOR mechanism is the principal cause of water-1H low-field longitudinal relaxation in aqueous systems of immobilized macromolecules, including soft biological tissues. The relaxation theory developed here therefore provides a basis for molecular-level interpretation of endogenous soft

  14. Curie-type paramagnetic NMR relaxation in the aqueous solution of Ni(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareš, Jiří; Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Lounila, Juhani; Vaara, Juha

    2014-04-21

    Ni(2+)(aq) has been used for many decades as a model system for paramagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance (pNMR) relaxation studies. More recently, its magnetic properties and also nuclear magnetic relaxation rates have been studied computationally. We have calculated electron paramagnetic resonance and NMR parameters using quantum-mechanical (QM) computation of molecular dynamics snapshots, obtained using a polarizable empirical force field. Statistical averages of hyperfine coupling, g- and zero-field splitting tensors, as well as the pNMR shielding terms, are compared to the available experimental and computational data. In accordance with our previous work, the isotropic hyperfine coupling as well as nuclear shielding values agree well with experimental measurements for the (17)O nuclei of water molecules in the first solvation shell of the nickel ion, whereas larger deviations are found for (1)H centers. We report, for the first time, the Curie-type contribution to the pNMR relaxation rate using QM calculations together with Redfield relaxation theory. The Curie relaxation mechanism is analogous to chemical shift anisotropy relaxation, well-known in diamagnetic NMR. Due to the predominance of other types of paramagnetic relaxation mechanisms for this system, it is possible to extract the Curie term only computationally. The Curie mechanism alone would result in around 16 and 20 s(-1) of relaxation rates (R1 and R2 respectively) for the (1)H nuclei of water molecules bonded to the Ni(2+) center, in a magnetic field of 11.7 T. The corresponding (17)O relaxation rates are around 33 and 38 s(-1). We also report the Curie contribution to the relaxation rate for molecules beyond the first solvation shell in a 1 M solution of Ni(2+) in water.

  15. Markov state modeling and dynamical coarse-graining via discrete relaxation path sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fačkovec, B; Vanden-Eijnden, E; Wales, D J

    2015-07-28

    A method is derived to coarse-grain the dynamics of complex molecular systems to a Markov jump process (MJP) describing how the system jumps between cells that fully partition its state space. The main inputs are relaxation times for each pair of cells, which are shown to be robust with respect to positioning of the cell boundaries. These relaxation times can be calculated via molecular dynamics simulations performed in each cell separately and are used in an efficient estimator for the rate matrix of the MJP. The method is illustrated through applications to Sinai billiards and a cluster of Lennard-Jones discs.

  16. Guiding of Long-Distance Electric Discharges by Combined Femtosecond and Nanosecond Pulses Emitted by Hybrid KrF Laser System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-30

    laser pulse initiated HV discharge with a time delay of tens nanoseconds – evidently it is developing due to an avalanche -like growth of electron...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2014-0040 Guiding of long-distance electric discharges by combined femtosecond and nanosecond pulses emitted by...and guiding electric discharge , KrF laser, femtosecond pulse , nanosecond pulse , filamentation, plasma channel, lightning control, laser control of

  17. The Effects of Progressive Relaxation and Music on Attention, Relaxation, and Stress Responses: An Investigation of the Cognitive-Behavioral Model of Relaxation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scheufele, Peter

    1999-01-01

    ...) suggested that stress management techniques have specific effects A compromise position suggests that the specific effects of relaxation techniques are superimposed upon a general relaxation response...

  18. Vibrational relaxation in liquids: Comparisons between gas phase and liquid phase theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, D.J.

    1990-12-01

    The vibrational relaxation of iodine in liquid xenon was studied to understand what processes are important in determining the density dependence of the vibrational relaxation. This examination will be accomplished by taking simple models and comparing the results to both experimental outcomes and the predictions of molecular dynamics simulations. The vibration relaxation of iodine is extremely sensitive to the iodine potential. The anharmonicity of iodine causes vibrational relaxation to be much faster at the top of the iodine well compared to the vibrational relaxation at the bottom. A number of models are used in order to test the ability of the Isolated Binary Collision theory's ability to predict the density dependence of the vibrational relaxation of iodine in liquid xenon. The models tested vary from the simplest incorporating only the fact that the solvent occupies volume to models that incorporate the short range structure of the liquid in the radial distribution function. None of the models tested do a good job of predicting the actual relaxation rate for a given density. This may be due to a possible error in the choice of potentials to model the system

  19. Relaxation property of the fractional Brownian particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Litan; Lung, C.W.

    1988-08-01

    Dynamic susceptibility of a diffusion system associated with the fractional Brownian motion (fBm) was examined for the fractal property of the Non-Debye relaxation process. The comparisons between fBm and other approaches were made. Anomalous diffusion and the Non-Debye relaxation processes were discussed with this approach. (author). 8 refs, 1 fig

  20. Lifshitz quasinormal modes and relaxation from holography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sybesma, Watse|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/369283074; Vandoren, Stefan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304830739

    2015-01-01

    We obtain relaxation times for field theories with Lifshitz scaling and with holographic duals Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton gravity theories. This is done by computing quasinormal modes of a bulk scalar field in the presence of Lifshitz black branes. We determine the relation between relaxation time and

  1. Superparamagnetic relaxation of weakly interacting particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Tronc, Elisabeth

    1994-01-01

    The influence of particle interactions on the superparamagnetic relaxation time has been studied by Mossbauer spectroscopy in samples of maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) particles with different particle sizes and particle separations. It is found that the relaxation time decreases with decreasing particl...

  2. Models of Flux Tubes from Constrained Relaxation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    J. Astrophys. Astr. (2000) 21, 299 302. Models of Flux Tubes from Constrained Relaxation. Α. Mangalam* & V. Krishan†, Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala,. Bangalore 560 034, India. *e mail: mangalam @ iiap. ernet. in. † e mail: vinod@iiap.ernet.in. Abstract. We study the relaxation of a compressible plasma to ...

  3. Superparamagnetic relaxation in alpha-Fe particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Franz; Mørup, Steen; Pedersen, Michael Stanley

    1998-01-01

    The superparamagnetic relaxation time of carbon-supported alpha-Fe particles with an average size of 3.0 Mm has been studied over a large temperature range by the use of Mossbauer spectroscopy combined with AC and DC magnetization measurements. It is found that the relaxation time varies...

  4. Baryogenesis via Elementary Goldstone Higgs Relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gertov, Helene; Pearce, Lauren; Sannino, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We extend the relaxation mechanism to the Elementary Goldstone Higgs framework. Besides studying the allowed parameter space of the theory we add the minimal ingredients needed for the framework to be phenomenologically viable. The very nature of the extended Higgs sector allows to consider very ...... but radiatively generated, it is possible to generate the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry via the relaxation mechanism....

  5. Stress relaxation under cyclic electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystrov, L.N.; Reznitskij, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    The kinetics of deformation process in a relaxating sample under 2 MeV electron cyclic irradiation was studied experimentally. The Al-Mg alloys with controllable and different (in dislocation density precipitate presence and their character) structure were used in experiments. It was established that after the beam was switched on the deformation rate increased sharply and then, during prolonged irradiation, in a gradual manner. After the switching-off the relaxation rate decreases by jumps up to values close to extrapolated rates of pre-radiation relaxation. The exhibition of these effects with radiation switching-off and switchin-on is dependent on the initial rate of thermal relaxation, the test temperature, the preliminary cold deformation and the dominating deformation dislocation mechanism. The preliminary cold deformation and test temperature elevation slightly decrease the effect of instantaneous relaxation acceleration with the irradiation switch-on. 17 refs., 5 figs

  6. Anomalous enthalpy relaxation in vitreous silica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-01-01

    scans. It is known that the liquid fragility (i.e., the speed of the viscous slow-down of a supercooled liquid at its Tg during cooling) has impact on enthalpy relaxation in glass. Here, we find that vitreous silica (as a strong system) exhibits striking anomalies in both glass transition and enthalpy...... relaxation compared to fragile oxide systems. The anomalous enthalpy relaxation of vitreous silica is discovered by performing the hyperquenching-annealing-calorimetry experiments. We argue that the strong systems like vitreous silica and vitreous Germania relax in a structurally cooperative manner, whereas...... the fragile ones do in a structurally independent fashion. We discuss the origin of the anomalous enthalpy relaxation in the HQ vitreous silica....

  7. Cross-relaxation solid state lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antipenko, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    Cross-relaxation functional diagrams provide a high quantum efficiency for pumping bands of solid state laser media and a low waste heat. A large number of the cross-relaxation mechanisms for decay rare earth excited states in crystals have been investigated. These investigations have been a starting-point for development of the cross-relaxation solid state lasers. For example, the cross-relaxation interactions, have been used for the laser action development of LiYF 4 :Gd-Tb. These interactions are important elements of the functional diagrams of the 2 μm Ho-doped media sensitized with Er and Tm and the 3 μm Er-doped media. Recently, new efficient 2 μm laser media with cross-relaxation pumping diagrams have been developed. Physical aspects of these media are the subject of this paper. A new concept of the Er-doped medium, sensitized with Yb, is illustrated

  8. Effect of the Magnus force on skyrmion relaxation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Barton L.; Täuber, Uwe C.; Pleimling, Michel

    2018-01-01

    We perform systematic Langevin molecular dynamics simulations of interacting skyrmions in thin films. The interplay between the Magnus force, the repulsive skyrmion-skyrmion interaction, and the thermal noise yields different regimes during nonequilibrium relaxation. In the noise-dominated regime, the Magnus force enhances the disordering effects of the thermal noise. In the Magnus-force-dominated regime, the Magnus force cooperates with the skyrmion-skyrmion interaction to yield a dynamic regime with slow decaying correlations. These two regimes are characterized by different values of the aging exponent. In general, the Magnus force accelerates the approach to the steady state.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting with short relaxation intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amthor, Thomas; Doneva, Mariya; Koken, Peter; Sommer, Karsten; Meineke, Jakob; Börnert, Peter

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate a technique for improving the performance of Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (MRF) in repetitive sampling schemes, in particular for 3D MRF acquisition, by shortening relaxation intervals between MRF pulse train repetitions. A calculation method for MRF dictionaries adapted to short relaxation intervals and non-relaxed initial spin states is presented, based on the concept of stationary fingerprints. The method is applicable to many different k-space sampling schemes in 2D and 3D. For accuracy analysis, T 1 and T 2 values of a phantom are determined by single-slice Cartesian MRF for different relaxation intervals and are compared with quantitative reference measurements. The relevance of slice profile effects is also investigated in this case. To further illustrate the capabilities of the method, an application to in-vivo spiral 3D MRF measurements is demonstrated. The proposed computation method enables accurate parameter estimation even for the shortest relaxation intervals, as investigated for different sampling patterns in 2D and 3D. In 2D Cartesian measurements, we achieved a scan acceleration of more than a factor of two, while maintaining acceptable accuracy: The largest T 1 values of a sample set deviated from their reference values by 0.3% (longest relaxation interval) and 2.4% (shortest relaxation interval). The largest T 2 values showed systematic deviations of up to 10% for all relaxation intervals, which is discussed. The influence of slice profile effects for multislice acquisition is shown to become increasingly relevant for short relaxation intervals. In 3D spiral measurements, a scan time reduction of 36% was achieved, maintaining the quality of in-vivo T1 and T2 maps. Reducing the relaxation interval between MRF sequence repetitions using stationary fingerprint dictionaries is a feasible method to improve the scan efficiency of MRF sequences. The method enables fast implementations of 3D spatially

  10. Vibrational relaxation and energy transfer of matrix isolated HCl and DCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesenfeld, J.M.

    1977-12-01

    Vibrational kinetic and spectroscopic studies have been performed on matrix-isolated HCl and DCl between 9 and 20 K. Vibrational relaxation rates for v = 2 and v = 1 were measured by a tunable infrared laser-induced, time-resolved fluorescence technique. In an Ar matrix, vibrational decay times are faster than radiative and it is found that HCl relaxes about 35 times more rapidly than CCl, in spite of the fact that HCl must transfer more energy to the lattice than DCl. This result is explained by postulating that the rate-determining step for vibrational relaxation produces a highly rotationally excited guest in a V yield R step; rotational relaxation into lattice phonons follows rapidly. HCl v = 1, but not v = 2, excitation rapidly diffuses through the sample by a resonant dipole-dipole vibrational energy transfer process. Molecular complexes, and in particular the HCl dimer, relax too rapidly for direct observation, less than or approximately 1 ..mu..s, and act as energy sinks in the energy diffusion process. The temperature dependence for all these processes is weak--less than a factor of two between 9 and 20 K. Vibrational relaxation of HCl in N/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/ matrices is unobservable, presumably due to rapid V yield V transfer to the host. A V yield R binary collision model for relaxation in solids is successful in explaining the HCl(DCl)/Ar results as well as results of other experimenters. The model considers relaxation to be the result of ''collisions'' due to molecular motion in quantized lattice normal modes--gas phase potential parameters can fit the matrix kinetic data.

  11. Vibrational relaxation and energy transfer of matrix isolated HCl and DCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesenfeld, J.M.

    1977-12-01

    Vibrational kinetic and spectroscopic studies have been performed on matrix-isolated HCl and DCl between 9 and 20 K. Vibrational relaxation rates for v = 2 and v = 1 were measured by a tunable infrared laser-induced, time-resolved fluorescence technique. In an Ar matrix, vibrational decay times are faster than radiative and it is found that HCl relaxes about 35 times more rapidly than CCl, in spite of the fact that HCl must transfer more energy to the lattice than DCl. This result is explained by postulating that the rate-determining step for vibrational relaxation produces a highly rotationally excited guest in a V yield R step; rotational relaxation into lattice phonons follows rapidly. HCl v = 1, but not v = 2, excitation rapidly diffuses through the sample by a resonant dipole-dipole vibrational energy transfer process. Molecular complexes, and in particular the HCl dimer, relax too rapidly for direct observation, less than or approximately 1 μs, and act as energy sinks in the energy diffusion process. The temperature dependence for all these processes is weak--less than a factor of two between 9 and 20 K. Vibrational relaxation of HCl in N 2 and O 2 matrices is unobservable, presumably due to rapid V yield V transfer to the host. A V yield R binary collision model for relaxation in solids is successful in explaining the HCl(DCl)/Ar results as well as results of other experimenters. The model considers relaxation to be the result of ''collisions'' due to molecular motion in quantized lattice normal modes--gas phase potential parameters can fit the matrix kinetic data

  12. Brownian relaxation of an inelastic sphere in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, G. A., E-mail: gab@gab.com.au [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    The procedures that are used to calculate the forces and moments on an aerodynamic body in the rarefied gas of the upper atmosphere are applied to a small sphere of the size of an aerosol particle at sea level. While the gas-surface interaction model that provides accurate results for macroscopic bodies may not be appropriate for bodies that are comprised of only about a thousand atoms, it provides a limiting case that is more realistic than the elastic model. The paper concentrates on the transfer of energy from the air to an initially stationary sphere as it acquires Brownian motion. Individual particle trajectories vary wildly, but a clear relaxation process emerges from an ensemble average over tens of thousands of trajectories. The translational and rotational energies in equilibrium Brownian motion are determined. Empirical relationships are obtained for the mean translational and rotational relaxation times, the mean initial power input to the particle, the mean rates of energy transfer between the particle and air, and the diffusivity. These relationships are functions of the ratio of the particle mass to an average air molecule mass and the Knudsen number, which is the ratio of the mean free path in the air to the particle diameter. The ratio of the molecular radius to the particle radius also enters as a correction factor. The implications of Brownian relaxation for the second law of thermodynamics are discussed.

  13. Automated NMR relaxation dispersion data analysis using NESSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gooley Paul R

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins are dynamic molecules with motions ranging from picoseconds to longer than seconds. Many protein functions, however, appear to occur on the micro to millisecond timescale and therefore there has been intense research of the importance of these motions in catalysis and molecular interactions. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR relaxation dispersion experiments are used to measure motion of discrete nuclei within the micro to millisecond timescale. Information about conformational/chemical exchange, populations of exchanging states and chemical shift differences are extracted from these experiments. To ensure these parameters are correctly extracted, accurate and careful analysis of these experiments is necessary. Results The software introduced in this article is designed for the automatic analysis of relaxation dispersion data and the extraction of the parameters mentioned above. It is written in Python for multi platform use and highest performance. Experimental data can be fitted to different models using the Levenberg-Marquardt minimization algorithm and different statistical tests can be used to select the best model. To demonstrate the functionality of this program, synthetic data as well as NMR data were analyzed. Analysis of these data including the generation of plots and color coded structures can be performed with minimal user intervention and using standard procedures that are included in the program. Conclusions NESSY is easy to use open source software to analyze NMR relaxation data. The robustness and standard procedures are demonstrated in this article.

  14. Sedative and muscle relaxant activities of diterpenoids from Phlomidoschema parviflorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdur Rauf

    Full Text Available Abstract Phlomidoschema parviflorum (Benth. Vved. (Basionym: Stachys parviflora Benth. Lamiaceae, have significance medicinal importance as it is used in number of health disorders including diarrhea, fever, sore mouth and throat, internal bleeding, weaknesses of the liver and heart genital tumors, sclerosis of the spleen, inflammatory tumors and cancerous ulcers. The present contribution deals with the sedative and muscle relaxant like effects of diterpenoids trivially named stachysrosane and stachysrosane, isolated from the ethyl acetate soluble fraction of P. parviflorum. Both compounds (at 5, 10 and 15 mg/kg, i.p were assessed for their in vivo sedative and muscle relaxant activity in open field and inclined plane test, respectively. The geometries of both compounds were optimized with density functional theory. The molecular docking of both compounds were performed with receptor gamma aminobutyric acid. Both compounds showed marked activity in a dose dependent manner. The docking studies showed that both compounds interact strongly with important residues in receptor gamma aminobutyric acid. The reported data demonstrate that both compounds exhibited significant sedative and muscle relaxant-like effects in animal models, which opens a door for novel therapeutic applications.

  15. Relaxation and physical aging in network glasses: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micoulaut, Matthieu

    2016-06-01

    Recent progress in the description of glassy relaxation and aging are reviewed for the wide class of network-forming materials such as GeO2, Ge x Se1-x , silicates (SiO2-Na2O) or borates (B2O3-Li2O), all of which have an important usefulness in domestic, geological or optoelectronic applications. A brief introduction of the glass transition phenomenology is given, together with the salient features that are revealed both from theory and experiments. Standard experimental methods used for the characterization of the slowing down of the dynamics are reviewed. We then discuss the important role played by aspects of network topology and rigidity for the understanding of the relaxation of the glass transition, while also permitting analytical predictions of glass properties from simple and insightful models based on the network structure. We also emphasize the great utility of computer simulations which probe the dynamics at the molecular level, and permit the calculation of various structure-related functions in connection with glassy relaxation and the physics of aging which reveal the non-equilibrium nature of glasses. We discuss the notion of spatial variations of structure which leads to the concept of 'dynamic heterogeneities', and recent results in relation to this important topic for network glasses are also reviewed.

  16. Excitation relaxation and structure of TPPS4 J-aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelbauskas, L.; Bagdonas, S.; Dietel, W.; Rotomskis, R.

    2003-01-01

    The energy relaxation kinetics and the structure of the J-aggregates of water-soluble porphyrin 5,10,15,20-tetrasulphonatophenyl porphine (TPPS 4 ) were investigated in aqueous medium by means of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and confocal laser-scanning fluorescence microscopy. The excitation of the J-aggregates, at excitation intensities higher than ∼10 15 photons/cm 2 per pulse, results in a remarkable decrease of the fluorescence quantum yield and in the appearance of an additional, non-exponential energy relaxation channel with a decay constant that depends on the excitation intensity. This relaxation mechanism was attributed to the exciton single-singlet annihilation. The exciton lifetime in the absence of the annihilation was calculated to be ∼150 ps. Using exciton annihilation theory, the exciton migration within the J-aggregates could be characterized by determining the exciton diffusion constant (1.8±0.9) 10 -3 cm 2 /s and the hopping time (1.2±0.6) ps. Using the experimental data, the size of the J-aggregate could be evaluated and was seen to yield at least 20 TPPS 4 molecules per aggregate. It was shown by means of confocal fluorescence laser scanning microscopy that TPPS 4 does self-associate in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) at acidic pH forming molecular macro-assemblies on a scale of ∼1 μm in PVA matrices

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of the formation, structure, and dynamics of small phospholipid vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marrink, SJ; Mark, AE

    2003-01-01

    Here, we use coarse grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the spontaneous aggregation of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipids into small unilamellar vesicles. We show that the aggregation process occurs on a nanosecond time scale, with bicelles and cuplike vesicles formed at

  18. Relaxing a large cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Florian; Sola, Joan; Stefancic, Hrvoje

    2009-01-01

    The cosmological constant (CC) problem is the biggest enigma of theoretical physics ever. In recent times, it has been rephrased as the dark energy (DE) problem in order to encompass a wider spectrum of possibilities. It is, in any case, a polyhedric puzzle with many faces, including the cosmic coincidence problem, i.e. why the density of matter ρ m is presently so close to the CC density ρ Λ . However, the oldest, toughest and most intriguing face of this polyhedron is the big CC problem, namely why the measured value of ρ Λ at present is so small as compared to any typical density scale existing in high energy physics, especially taking into account the many phase transitions that our Universe has undergone since the early times, including inflation. In this Letter, we propose to extend the field equations of General Relativity by including a class of invariant terms that automatically relax the value of the CC irrespective of the initial size of the vacuum energy in the early epochs. We show that, at late times, the Universe enters an eternal de Sitter stage mimicking a tiny positive cosmological constant. Thus, these models could be able to solve the big CC problem without fine-tuning and have also a bearing on the cosmic coincidence problem. Remarkably, they mimic the ΛCDM model to a large extent, but they still leave some characteristic imprints that should be testable in the next generation of experiments.

  19. The effects of progressive muscle relaxation and autogenic relaxation on young soccer players' mood states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Hairul Anuar; Hanafi Ahmad Yusof, Hazwani

    2011-06-01

    This study was designed to compare the effects of two different relaxation techniques, namely progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and autogenic relaxation (AGR) on moods of young soccer players. sixteen adolescent athletes (mean age: 14.1 ± 1.3) received either PMR or AGR training. Using Profile of Mood States- Adolescents, their mood states were measured one week before relaxation training, before the first relaxation session, and after the twelfth relaxation session. Mixed ANOVA revealed no significant interaction effects and no significant main effects in any of the subscales. However, significant main effects for testing sessions were found for confusion, depression, fatigue, and tension subscales. Post hoc tests revealed post-intervention reductions in the confusion, depression, fatigue, and tension subscale scores. These two relaxation techniques induce equivalent mood responses and may be used to regulate young soccer players' mood states.

  20. The Effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Autogenic Relaxation on Young Soccer Players’ Mood States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Hairul Anuar; Hanafi@Ahmad Yusof, Hazwani

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to compare the effects of two different relaxation techniques, namely progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and autogenic relaxation (AGR) on moods of young soccer players. Methods Sixteen adolescent athletes (mean age: 14.1 ± 1.3) received either PMR or AGR training. Using Profile of Mood States- Adolescents, their mood states were measured one week before relaxation training, before the first relaxation session, and after the twelfth relaxation session. Results Mixed ANOVA revealed no significant interaction effects and no significant main effects in any of the subscales. However, significant main effects for testing sessions were found for confusion, depression, fatigue, and tension subscales. Post hoc tests revealed post-intervention reductions in the confusion, depression, fatigue, and tension subscale scores. Conclusion These two relaxation techniques induce equivalent mood responses and may be used to regulate young soccer players’ mood states. PMID:22375225

  1. Electron spin relaxation can enhance the performance of a cryptochrome-based magnetic compass sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kattnig, Daniel R; Sowa, Jakub K; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2016-01-01

    thaliana cryptochrome 1 were obtained from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and used to calculate the spin relaxation caused by modulation of the exchange and dipolar interactions. We find that intermediate spin relaxation rates afford substantial enhancements in the sensitivity of the reaction yields....... Here we argue that certain spin relaxation mechanisms can enhance its performance. We focus on the flavin-tryptophan radical pair in cryptochrome, currently the only candidate magnetoreceptor molecule. Correlation functions for fluctuations in the distance between the two radicals in Arabidopsis...... to an Earth-strength magnetic field. Supported by calculations using toy radical pair models, we argue that these enhancements could be consistent with the molecular dynamics and magnetic interactions in avian cryptochromes....

  2. NMR relaxation induced by iron oxide particles: testing theoretical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossuin, Y; Orlando, T; Basini, M; Henrard, D; Lascialfari, A; Mattea, C; Stapf, S; Vuong, Q L

    2016-04-15

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide particles find their main application as contrast agents for cellular and molecular magnetic resonance imaging. The contrast they bring is due to the shortening of the transverse relaxation time T 2 of water protons. In order to understand their influence on proton relaxation, different theoretical relaxation models have been developed, each of them presenting a certain validity domain, which depends on the particle characteristics and proton dynamics. The validation of these models is crucial since they allow for predicting the ideal particle characteristics for obtaining the best contrast but also because the fitting of T 1 experimental data by the theory constitutes an interesting tool for the characterization of the nanoparticles. In this work, T 2 of suspensions of iron oxide particles in different solvents and at different temperatures, corresponding to different proton diffusion properties, were measured and were compared to the three main theoretical models (the motional averaging regime, the static dephasing regime, and the partial refocusing model) with good qualitative agreement. However, a real quantitative agreement was not observed, probably because of the complexity of these nanoparticulate systems. The Roch theory, developed in the motional averaging regime (MAR), was also successfully used to fit T 1 nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles, even outside the MAR validity range, and provided a good estimate of the particle size. On the other hand, the simultaneous fitting of T 1 and T 2 NMRD profiles by the theory was impossible, and this occurrence constitutes a clear limitation of the Roch model. Finally, the theory was shown to satisfactorily fit the deuterium T 1 NMRD profile of superparamagnetic particle suspensions in heavy water.

  3. Electrosensitization Increases Antitumor Effectiveness of Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Claudia; Pakhomov, Andrei G; Heller, Loree; Casciola, Maura; Gianulis, Elena; Grigoryev, Sergey; Xiao, Shu; Pakhomova, O N

    2017-01-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric fields are emerging as a new modality for tissue and tumor ablation. We previously reported that cells exposed to pulsed electric fields develop hypersensitivity to subsequent pulsed electric field applications. This phenomenon, named electrosensitization, is evoked by splitting the pulsed electric field treatment in fractions (split-dose treatments) and causes in vitro a 2- to 3-fold increase in cytotoxicity. The aim of this study was to show the benefit of split-dose treatments for in vivo tumor ablation by nanosecond pulsed electric field. KLN 205 squamous carcinoma cells were embedded in an agarose gel or grown subcutaneously as tumors in mice. Nanosecond pulsed electric field ablations were produced using a 2-needle probe with a 6.5-mm interelectrode distance. In agarose gel, splitting a pulsed electric field dose of 300, 300-ns pulses (20 Hz, 4.4-6.4 kV) in 2 equal fractions increased cell death up to 3-fold compared to single-train treatments. We then compared the antitumor effectiveness of these treatments in vivo. At 24 hours after treatment, sensitizing tumors by a split-dose pulsed electric field exposure (150 + 150, 300-ns pulses, 20 Hz, 6.4 kV) caused a 4- and 2-fold tumor volume reduction as compared to sham and single-train treatments, respectively. Tumor volume reduction that exceeds 75% was 43% for split-dose-treated animals compared to only 12% for single-dose treatments. The difference between the 2 experimental groups remained statistically significant for at least 1 week after the treatment. The results show that electrosensitization occurs in vivo and can be exploited to assist in vivo cancer ablation.

  4. Electrical and optical characteristics of dielectric-barrier discharge driven by high voltage nanosecond generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadeev, V.V.; Kost'yuchenko, S.V.; Kudryavtsev, N.N.; Kurkin, G.A.; Vasilyak, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    Electrical and optical characteristics of the dielectric-barrier discharge in the pressure range of 10-400 Torr were investigated experimentally, particular attention being paid to the discharge homogeneity and to the energy dissipation in the discharge volume. The discharge was driven by a high-voltage pulse generator producing nanosecond high-voltage pulses with an amplitude of 20-30 kV. Air, nitrogen, and helium were used as working gases. The discharge was found to be homogeneous within a wide range of gas pressure. A power density of up to 250 mW/cm 3 has been achieved. (J.U.)

  5. A 350 KV nanosecond pulse voltage generator with adjustable pulsed-width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.; Wang, M.; Chen, Y.Q.; Zeng, L.G.; Han, M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a 350 kV nanosecond pulse voltage generator (NPVG). The voltage pulsed-width can be adjusted from 30 to 160 ns. The generator consists of: Marx generator, pulsed forming line (PFL), main switch and matched impedance. The output voltage of Marx generator is over than nU c (n- the stage number of Marx generator, U c -the charging voltage of capacitor). When the pulse forming line is terminated with an impedance that is over than the characteristic impedance of PFL, the higher voltage pulse was provided for the load

  6. Shield gas induced cracks during nanosecond-pulsed laser irradiation of Zr-based metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Hu; Noguchi, Jun; Yan, Jiwang [Keio University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Yokohama (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    Laser processing techniques have been given increasing attentions in the field of metallic glasses (MGs). In this work, effects of two kinds of shield gases, nitrogen and argon, on nanosecond-pulsed laser irradiation of Zr-based MG were comparatively investigated. Results showed that compared to argon gas, nitrogen gas remarkably promoted the formation of cracks during laser irradiation. Furthermore, crack formation in nitrogen gas was enhanced by increasing the peak laser power intensity or decreasing the laser scanning speed. X-ray diffraction and micro-Raman spectroscopy indicated that the reason for enhanced cracks in nitrogen gas was the formation of ZrN. (orig.)

  7. Investigation of the fundamentals of low-energy nanosecond pulse ignition: Final CRADA Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallner, Thomas [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Scarcelli, Riccardo [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Zhang, Anqi [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sevik, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Biruduganti, Munidhar [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bihari, Bipin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Matusik, Katarzyna E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Duke, Daniel J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Powell, Christopher F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kastengren, Alan L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A detailed investigation of the fundamentals of low-energy nanosecond pulse ignition was performed with the objective to overcome the barrier presented by limited knowledge and characterization of nonequilibrium plasma ignition for realistic internal combustion engine applications (be it in the automotive or power generation field) and shed light on the mechanisms which improve the performance of the advanced TPS ignition system compared to conventional state-of-the-art hardware. Three main tasks of the research included experimental evaluation on a single-cylinder automotive gasoline engine, experimental evaluation on a single-cylinder stationary natural gas engine and energy quantification using x-ray diagnostics.

  8. Spatial and temporal evolutions of ozone in a nanosecond pulse corona discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duten, X; Redolfi, M; Aggadi, N; Vega, A; Hassouni, K, E-mail: duten@lspm.cnrs.fr [LSPM-CNRS UPR 3407, Universite Paris Nord, 90 Avenue J.B. Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2011-10-19

    This paper deals with the experimental determination of the spatial and temporal evolutions of the ozone concentration in an atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma, working in the nanosecond regime. We observed that ozone was produced in the localized region of the streamer. The ozone transport requires a characteristic time well above the millisecond. The numerical modelling of the streamer expansion confirms that the hydrodynamic expansion of the filamentary discharge region during the streamer propagation does not lead to a significant transport of atomic oxygen and ozone. It appears therefore that only diffusional transport can take place, which requires a characteristic time of the order of 50 ms.

  9. High voltage nanosecond generator with pulse repetition rate of 1,000 p.p.s.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubanov, V P; Korovin, S D; Stepchenko, A S [High Current Electronics Institute, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    A compact high voltage nanosecond generator is described with a pulse repetition rate up to 1000 p.p.s. The generator includes a 30-Ohm coaxial forming line charged by a built-in Tesla transformer with a high coupling coefficient, and a high voltage (N{sub 2}) gas gap switch with gas blowing between the electrodes. The maximum forming line charge voltage is 450 kV, the pulse duration is about 4 ns, and its amplitude for a matched load is up to 200 kV. (author). 3 figs., 9 refs.

  10. Time-domain calculation of sub-nanosecond pulse launched by a proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Kwok-Chi Dominic; Cooper, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    Using the finite-difference time-domain code TBCI, we have numerically calculated the radiation from a sub-nanosecond 800-MeV proton bunch as it is launched into space. The calculation is compared to measurements of the time history of the radiated fields and good agreement is found. A movie showing the development of the radiation pattern will be shown during the presentation at this conference, namely, the First Los Alamos Symposium on Ultra-Wideband Radar. 6 refs., 7 figs

  11. Spatial and temporal evolutions of ozone in a nanosecond pulse corona discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duten, X.; Redolfi, M.; Aggadi, N.; Vega, A.; Hassouni, K.

    2011-10-01

    This paper deals with the experimental determination of the spatial and temporal evolutions of the ozone concentration in an atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma, working in the nanosecond regime. We observed that ozone was produced in the localized region of the streamer. The ozone transport requires a characteristic time well above the millisecond. The numerical modelling of the streamer expansion confirms that the hydrodynamic expansion of the filamentary discharge region during the streamer propagation does not lead to a significant transport of atomic oxygen and ozone. It appears therefore that only diffusional transport can take place, which requires a characteristic time of the order of 50 ms.

  12. Spatial and temporal evolutions of ozone in a nanosecond pulse corona discharge at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duten, X; Redolfi, M; Aggadi, N; Vega, A; Hassouni, K

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the experimental determination of the spatial and temporal evolutions of the ozone concentration in an atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma, working in the nanosecond regime. We observed that ozone was produced in the localized region of the streamer. The ozone transport requires a characteristic time well above the millisecond. The numerical modelling of the streamer expansion confirms that the hydrodynamic expansion of the filamentary discharge region during the streamer propagation does not lead to a significant transport of atomic oxygen and ozone. It appears therefore that only diffusional transport can take place, which requires a characteristic time of the order of 50 ms.

  13. Fundamental Physics and Engineering of Nanosecond-Pulsed Nonequilibrium Microplasma in Liquid Phase without Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    the electrode, the value   coth0  a corresponds to an equipotential surface which coincides with the electrode;  is the ratio of the semiaxes...liquid when filled – see Figure 1. The liquid surface was left open to the air, subject to atmospheric pressure. Nanosecond pulse generators from...temperature T , k is the Boltzmann constant,  is the surface tension coefficient, J is the nucleation rate equal to the density of vapor bubbles of a

  14. Mono-energetic ions emission by nanosecond laser solid target irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muoio, A., E-mail: Annamaria.Muoio@lns.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Tudisco, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Altana, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Lanzalone, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Enna “Kore”, Via delle Olimpiadi, 94100 Enna (Italy); Mascali, D.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Schillaci, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Trifirò, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Sezione INFN, Catania (Italy)

    2016-09-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate the acceleration mechanisms through laser–matter interaction in nanosecond domain has been carried out at the LENS (Laser Energy for Nuclear Science) laboratory of INFN-LNS, Catania. Pure Al targets were irradiated by 6 ns laser pulses at different pumping energies, up to 2 J. Advanced diagnostics tools were used to characterize the plasma plume and ion production. We show the preliminary results of this experimental campaign, and especially the ones showing the production of multicharged ions having very narrow energy spreads.

  15. Nanosecond high-voltage generators for supplying the kickers of charged particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korchuganov, V.N.; Matveev, Yu.G.; Shvedov, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    The high-voltage nanosecond generators (VNG) of rectangular pulses, developed for supplying the injection and extraction kickers of the accelerator-storage complexes are considered in this work. The pulse hydrogen thyratrons and gas-filled discharges are used as commutators in those generators. If necessary, the VNG pulses fronts may be shortened up to 2-3 ns in the coaxial lines, filled with ferrite rings. The mechanism of the pulse fronts shortening was considered earlier. The basis parameters of the VNG various types are presented [ru

  16. Shield gas induced cracks during nanosecond-pulsed laser irradiation of Zr-based metallic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hu; Noguchi, Jun; Yan, Jiwang

    2016-10-01

    Laser processing techniques have been given increasing attentions in the field of metallic glasses (MGs). In this work, effects of two kinds of shield gases, nitrogen and argon, on nanosecond-pulsed laser irradiation of Zr-based MG were comparatively investigated. Results showed that compared to argon gas, nitrogen gas remarkably promoted the formation of cracks during laser irradiation. Furthermore, crack formation in nitrogen gas was enhanced by increasing the peak laser power intensity or decreasing the laser scanning speed. X-ray diffraction and micro-Raman spectroscopy indicated that the reason for enhanced cracks in nitrogen gas was the formation of ZrN.

  17. Superradiance from crystals of molecular nanomagnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, E M; Garanin, D A

    2002-10-07

    We show that crystals of molecular nanomagnets can exhibit giant magnetic relaxation due to the Dicke superradiance of electromagnetic waves. Rigorous theory is presented that combines superradiance with the Landau-Zener effect.

  18. Relaxation of polarized nuclei in superconducting rhodium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knuuttila, T.A.; Tuoriniemi, J.T.; Lefmann, K.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates were measured in normal and superconducting (sc) rhodium with nuclear polarizations up to p = 0.55. This was sufficient to influence the sc state of Rh, whose T, and B-c, are exceptionally low. Because B-c ... is unchanged, the nuclear spin entropy was fully sustained across the sc transition. The relaxation in the sc state was slower at all temperatures without the coherence enhancement close to T-c. Nonzero nuclear polarization strongly reduced the difference between the relaxation rates in the sc and normal...

  19. Spin relaxation in nanowires by hyperfine coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echeverria-Arrondo, C.; Sherman, E.Ya.

    2012-01-01

    Hyperfine interactions establish limits on spin dynamics and relaxation rates in ensembles of semiconductor quantum dots. It is the confinement of electrons which determines nonzero hyperfine coupling and leads to the spin relaxation. As a result, in nanowires one would expect the vanishing of this effect due to extended electron states. However, even for relatively clean wires, disorder plays a crucial role and makes electron localization sufficient to cause spin relaxation on the time scale of the order of 10 ns. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Le Chatelier's principle with multiple relaxation channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, R.; Levine, R. D.

    1986-05-01

    Le Chatelier's principle is discussed within the constrained variational approach to thermodynamics. The formulation is general enough to encompass systems not in thermal (or chemical) equilibrium. Particular attention is given to systems with multiple constraints which can be relaxed. The moderation of the initial perturbation increases as additional constraints are removed. This result is studied in particular when the (coupled) relaxation channels have widely different time scales. A series of inequalities is derived which describes the successive moderation as each successive relaxation channel opens up. These inequalities are interpreted within the metric-geometry representation of thermodynamics.

  1. Collisional relaxation of electron tail distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagiwa, Mitsuru; Okamoto, Masao.

    1985-05-01

    Relaxation due to the Coulomb collisions of the electron velocity distribution function with a high energy tail is investigated in detail. In the course of the relaxation, a 'saddle' point can be created in velocity space owing to upsilon -3 dependence of the deflection rate and a positive slope or a 'dip' appears in the tail direction. The time evolution of the electron tail is studied analytically. A comparison is made with numerical results by using a Fokker-Planck code. Also discussed is the kinetic instability concerned with the positive slope during the relaxation. (author)

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Barker, G J; MacKay, A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The theory of relaxation processes and their measurements are described. An overview is presented of the literature on relaxation time measurements in the normal and the developing brain, in experimental diseases in animals, and in patients with multiple sclerosis. RESULTS...... AND CONCLUSION: Relaxation time measurements provide insight into development of multiple sclerosis plaques, especially the occurrence of oedema, demyelination, and gliosis. There is also evidence that normal appearing white matter in patients with multiple sclerosis is affected. What is now needed are fast...

  3. Stress Relaxation in Entangled Polymer Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Ji-Xuan; Svaneborg, Carsten; Everaers, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    We present an extensive set of simulation results for the stress relaxation in equilibrium and step-strained bead-spring polymer melts. The data allow us to explore the chain dynamics and the shear relaxation modulus, G(t), into the plateau regime for chains with Z=40 entanglements...... and into the terminal relaxation regime for Z=10. Using the known (Rouse) mobility of unentangled chains and the melt entanglement length determined via the primitive path analysis of the microscopic topological state of our systems, we have performed parameter-free tests of several different tube models. We find...

  4. Slow relaxation in weakly open rational polygons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokshenev, Valery B; Vicentini, Eduardo

    2003-07-01

    The interplay between the regular (piecewise-linear) and irregular (vertex-angle) boundary effects in nonintegrable rational polygonal billiards (of m equal sides) is discussed. Decay dynamics in polygons (of perimeter P(m) and small opening Delta) is analyzed through the late-time survival probability S(m) approximately equal t(-delta). Two distinct slow relaxation channels are established. The primary universal channel exhibits relaxation of regular sliding orbits, with delta=1. The secondary channel is given by delta>1 and becomes open when m>P(m)/Delta. It originates from vertex order-disorder dual effects and is due to relaxation of chaoticlike excitations.

  5. [A study on Korean concepts of relaxation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J S

    1992-01-01

    Relaxation technique is an independent nursing intervention used in various stressful situations. The concept of relaxation must be explored for the meaning given by the people in their traditional thought and philosophy. Korean relaxation technique, wanting to become culturally acceptable and effective, is learning to recognize and develop Korean concepts, experiences, and musics of relaxation. This study was aimed at discovering Korean concepts, experiences and musics of relaxation and contributing the development of the relaxation technique for Korean people. The subjects were 59 nursing students, 39 hospitalized patients, 61 housewives, 21 rural residents and 16 researchers. Data were collected from September 4th to October 24th, 1991 by interviews or questionnaires. The data analysis was done by qualitative research method, and validity assured by conformation of the concept and category by 2 nursing scientists who had written a Master's thesis on the relaxation technique. The results of the study were summarized as follows; 1. The meaning of the relaxation concept; From 298 statements, 107 concepts were extracted and then 5 categories "Physical domain", "Psychological domain", "Complex domain", "Situation", and "environment" were organized. 'Don't have discomforts, 'don't have muscle tension', 'don't have energy (him in Korean)', 'don't have activities' subcategories were included in "Physical domain". 'Don't have anxiety', 'feel good', 'emotional stability', 'don't have wordly thoughts', 'feel one's brain muddled', 'loss of desire' subcategories were included in "physical domain" 'Comfort body and mind', 'don't have tension of body and mind', 'be sagged' 'liveliness of thoughts' subcategories were included in "Complex domain". 'Rest', 'sleep', 'others' subcategories were included in "Situation domain". And 'quite environment' & 'comfortable environment' subcategories were included in "Environmental domain". 2. The experiences of the relaxation; From 151

  6. Modeling of plasma chemical processes in the artificial ionized layer in the upper atmosphere by the nanosecond corona discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikharev, A. L.; Gorbachev, A. M.; Ivanov, O. A.; Kolisko, A. L.; Litvak, A. G.

    1993-08-01

    The plasma chemical processes in the corona discharge formed in air by a series of high voltage pulses of nanosecond duration are investigated experimentally. The experimental conditions (reduced electric field, duration and repetition frequency of the pulses, gas pressure in the chamber) modeled the regime of creation of the artificial ionized layer (AIL) in the upper atmosphere by a nanosecond microwave discharge. It was found that in a nanosecond microwave discharge predominantly generation of ozone occurs, and that the production of nitrogen dioxide is not large. The energy expenditures for the generation of one O 3 molecule were about 15 eV. On the basis of the experimental results the prognosis of the efficiency of ozone generation in AIL was made.

  7. Nanosecond-Timescale Intra-Bunch-Train Feedback for the Linear Collider: Results of the FONT2 Run

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlow, R.; Dufau, M.; Kalinin, A.; Daresbury; Myatt, G.; Perry, C.; Oxford U.; Burrows, P.N.; Hartin, T.; Hussain, S.M.; Molloy, S.; White, G.R.; Queen Mary, U. of London; Adolphsen, C.; Frisch, J.C.; Hendrickson, L.; Jobe, R.K.; Markiewicz, T.; McCormick, D.J.; Nelson, J.; Ross, M.C.; Smith, S.; Smith, T.J.; SLAC

    2005-01-01

    We report on experimental results from the December 2003/January 2004 data run of the Feedback On Nanosecond Timescales (FONT) experiment at the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator at SLAC. We built a second-generation prototype intra-train beam-based feedback system incorporating beam position monitors, fast analogue signal processors, a feedback circuit, fast-risetime amplifiers and stripline kickers. We applied a novel real-time charge-normalization scheme to account for beam current variations along the train. We used the system to correct the position of the 170-nanosecond-long bunchtrain at NLCTA. We achieved a latency of 53 nanoseconds, representing a significant improvement on FONT1 (2002), and providing a demonstration of intra-train feedback for the Linear Collider

  8. Relaxation processes during amorphous metal alloys heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinochka, E.Ya.; Durachenko, A.M.; Borisov, V.T.

    1982-01-01

    Behaviour of Te+15 at.%Ge and Fe+13 at.%P+7 at.%C amorphous metal alloys during heating has been studied using the method of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as the most convenient one for determination of the value of heat effects, activation energies, temperature ranges of relaxation processes. Thermal effects corresponding to high-temperature relaxation processes taking place during amorphous metal alloys (AMA) heating are detected. The change of ratio of relaxation peaks values on DSC curves as a result of AMA heat treatment can be explained by the presence of a number of levels of inner energy in amorphous system, separated with potential barriers, the heights of which correspond to certain activation energies of relaxation processes

  9. The relaxation of plasmas with dust particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chutov, Yu.I.; Kravchenko, A.Yu.; Schram, P.P.J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Various parameters of relaxing plasmas with dust particles including the electron and ion energy distributions function are numerically simulated at various parameters of the dust particles using the PIC method and taking into account the dynamics of the dust particle charge without the assumption about the equilibrium of electrons and ions. Coulomb collisions are taken into account in the framework of the method of stochastic differential equations. The relaxation of bounded plasma clouds expanding into a vacuum as well as the relaxation of a uniform plasma, in which dust particles appear at some initial time, are investigated. The obtained results show that the relaxation of plasmas can be accompanied by a deviation of the ion distribution function from equilibrium as well as a change of the mean energy of electrons and ions because of the dependence of the collection of electrons and ions by dust particles on their energy. (author)

  10. Multiscale dipole relaxation in dielectric materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Schmidt

    2016-01-01

    Dipole relaxation from thermally induced perturbations is investigated on different length scales for dielectric materials. From the continuum dynamical equations for the polarisation, expressions for the transverse and longitudinal dipole autocorrelation functions are derived in the limit where ...

  11. Generalized approach to non-exponential relaxation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Non-exponential relaxation is a universal feature of systems as diverse as glasses, spin ... which changes from a simple exponential to a stretched exponential and a power law by increasing the constraints in the system. ... Current Issue

  12. Oxygen-17 relaxation in aqueous agarose gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ablett, S.; Lillford, P.J.

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic relaxation of oxygen-17 in H 2 17 O enriched agarose gels shows that existing explanations of water behaviour are oversimplified. Satisfactory models must include at least three proton phases, two of which involve water molecules. (Auth.)

  13. Proton NMR relaxivity of blood samples in the presence of some gadolinium and dysprosium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coroiu, I.; Darabont, Al.; Bogdan, M.

    1999-01-01

    The use of some new compounds in MRI tissue and blood characterisation based on nuclear spin relaxation time measurements cannot be sustained until the molecular sources of these variations are understood. Tissues and blood are complex molecular systems with complex NMR properties. A better comprehension of the molecular basis of relaxation offers the possibility to predict the changes expected for a given pathology. The purpose of this contribution is to evidence the different relaxation characteristics of some gadolinium and dysprosium compounds in the presence and absence of the blood and to give a possible explanation about the molecular processes that cause occurrence of changes. Some gadolinium and dysprosium compounds such as: Gd-CIT (gadolinium citrate), Dy-DTPA (DTPA-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid), iron oxide - gadolinium oxide (or dysprosium oxide)- dextran complexes were prepared. The longitudinal T 1 -1 and transverse T 2 -1 'relaxation rates' measurements have been carried out as a function of molar concentrations. All measurements have been made at room temperature (about 25 deg.C) and the proton Larmor frequency ν o = 90 MHz. The pulsed NMR spectrometer utilised was a commercial Bruker SXP4/100 spectrometer. Transverse relaxation rate measurements have been made using the Carr-Purcell method, while longitudinal relaxation rate measurements using the inversion recovery pulse sequence, 180 angle-τ-90 angle. The accuracy was about 2-3% for the longitudinal relaxation rates and about 5-7% for the transverse relaxation rates. R 1 and R 2 relaxivities, in mM -1 s -1 were determined from the least square determination of the slopes of plots 1/T 1,2 versus compound molar concentration, using at least five independent measurements at several concentrations between 0 and 2 mM. Increased R 2 relaxivity observed for dysprosium compounds in the blood presence can be explained by PRE effect. The largest gain in R 2 relaxivity seems to imply a noncovalent

  14. A scheme for recording a fast process at nanosecond scale by using digital holographic interferometry with continuous wave laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Zhao, Jianlin; Di, Jianglei; Jiang, Biqiang

    2015-04-01

    A scheme for recording fast process at nanosecond scale by using digital holographic interferometry with continuous wave (CW) laser is described and demonstrated experimentally, which employs delayed-time fibers and angular multiplexing technique and can realize the variable temporal resolution at nanosecond scale and different measured depths of object field at certain temporal resolution. The actual delay-time is controlled by two delayed-time fibers with different lengths. The object field information in two different states can be simultaneously recorded in a composite hologram. This scheme is also suitable for recording fast process at picosecond scale, by using an electro-optic modulator.

  15. Relaxation and hypnosis in pediatric dental patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, B

    1996-01-01

    Relaxation and hypnosis are methods which, may solve the problem of extreme dental anxiety, when all other methods, behavioral or pharmacological may not be used. A simple definition of hypnosis is suggestion and repetition. Suggestion is the process whereby an individual accepts a proposition put to him by another, without having the slightest logical reason for doing so. Relaxation is one method of inducing hypnosis. A case of using hypnosis on an 11-year-old boy is described.

  16. Ghost lines in Moessbauer relaxation spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    The appearance in Moessbauer relaxation spectra of 'ghost' lines, which are narrow lines that do not correspond to transitions between real hyperfine energy levels of the resonant system, is examined. It is shown that in many cases of interest, the appearance of these 'ghost' lines can be interpreted in terms of the relaxational averaging of one or more of the static interactions of the ion. (orig.)

  17. Dynamics of helicity transport and Taylor relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, P.H.; Malkov, M.

    2003-01-01

    A simple model of the dynamics of Taylor relaxation is derived using symmetry principles alone. No statistical closure approximations are invoked or detailed plasma model properties assumed. Notably, the model predicts several classes of nondiffusive helicity transport phenomena, including traveling nonlinear waves and superdiffusive turbulent pulses. A universal expression for the scaling of the effective magnetic Reynolds number of a system undergoing Taylor relaxation is derived. Some basic properties of intermittency in helicity transport are examined

  18. F{sup 19} relaxation in non-magnetic hexafluorides; Contribution a l'etude de la relaxation des fluors dans les hexafluorures non magnetiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigny, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-12-01

    The interesting properties of the fluorine magnetic resonance in the hexafluorides of molybdenum, tungsten and uranium, are very much due to large anisotropies of the chemical shift tensors. In the solid phases these anisotropies, the values of which are deduced from line shape studies, allow one to show that the molecules undergo hindered rotations about the metal atom. The temperature and frequency dependence of the fluorine longitudinal relaxation times shows that the relaxation is due to the molecular motion. The dynamical parameters of this motion are then deduced from the complete study of the fluorine relaxation in the rotating frame. In the liquid phases, the existence of anisotropies allows an estimation of the different contributions to the relaxation. In particular, the frequency and temperature dependence of the relaxation shows it to be dominated by the spin-rotation interaction. We have shown that the strength of this interaction can be deduced from the chemical shifts, and the angle through which the molecule rotates quasi-freely can be determined. In the hexafluorides, this angle is roughly one radian at 70 C, and with the help of this value, the friction coefficients which describe the intermolecular interactions are discussed. (author) [French] Les proprietes de la resonance magnetique des fluors dans les hexafluorures de molybdene, tungstene et uranium sont influencees par l'existence de deplacements chimiques tres anisotropes. Dans les phases solides, la valeur de cette anisotropie peut etre determinee par l'analyse des formes de raies et son existence permet de montrer que les molecules sont en rotation empechee autour de leur atome central. L'etude du temps de relaxation longitudinal en fonction de la temperature et de la frequence montre que la relaxation est due aux mouvements moleculaires, aux plus hautes temperatures. Les proprietes dynamiques du mouvement sont obtenues par l'etude complete de la relaxation spin-reseau dans le referentiel

  19. Strain relaxation and ambipolar electrical transport in GaAs/InSb core-shell nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Torsten; Zellekens, Patrick; Demarina, Natalia; Hassan, Ali Al; Hackemüller, Franz Josef; Lüth, Hans; Pietsch, Ullrich; Schäpers, Thomas; Grützmacher, Detlev; Lepsa, Mihail Ion

    2017-11-30

    The growth, crystal structure, strain relaxation and room temperature transport characteristics of GaAs/InSb core-shell nanowires grown using molecular beam epitaxy are investigated. Due to the large lattice mismatch between GaAs and InSb of 14%, a transition from island-based to layer-like growth occurs during the formation of the shell. High resolution transmission electron microscopy in combination with geometric phase analyses as well as X-ray diffraction with synchrotron radiation are used to investigate the strain relaxation and prove the existence of different dislocations relaxing the strain on zinc blende and wurtzite core-shell nanowire segments. While on the wurtzite phase only Frank partial dislocations are found, the strain on the zinc blende phase is relaxed by dislocations with perfect, Shockley partial and Frank partial dislocations. Even for ultrathin shells of about 2 nm thickness, the strain caused by the high lattice mismatch between GaAs and InSb is relaxed almost completely. Transfer characteristics of the core-shell nanowires show an ambipolar conductance behavior whose strength strongly depends on the dimensions of the nanowires. The interpretation is given based on an electronic band profile which is calculated for completely relaxed core/shell structures. The peculiarities of the band alignment in this situation implies simultaneously occupied electron and hole channels in the InSb shell. The ambipolar behavior is then explained by the change of carrier concentration in both channels by the gate voltage.

  20. Viscoelastic characterization of compacted pharmaceutical excipient materials by analysis of frequency-dependent mechanical relaxation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, K.; Mousavi, S.; Lundberg, B.; Strømme, M.

    2005-09-01

    A newly developed method for determining the frequency-dependent complex Young's modulus was employed to analyze the mechanical response of compacted microcrystalline cellulose, sorbitol, ethyl cellulose and starch for frequencies up to 20 kHz. A Debye-like relaxation was observed in all the studied pharmaceutical excipient materials and a comparison with corresponding dielectric spectroscopy data was made. The location in frequency of the relaxation peak was shown to correlate to the measured tensile strength of the tablets, and the relaxation was interpreted as the vibrational response of the interparticle hydrogen and van der Waals bindings in the tablets. Further, the measured relaxation strength, holding information about the energy loss involved in the relaxation processes, showed that the weakest material in terms of tensile strength, starch, is the material among the four tested ones that is able to absorb the most energy within its structure when exposed to external perturbations inducing vibrations in the studied frequency range. The results indicate that mechanical relaxation analysis performed over relatively broad frequency ranges should be useful for predicting material properties of importance for the functionality of a material in applications such as, e.g., drug delivery, drug storage and handling, and also for clarifying the origin of hitherto unexplained molecular processes.

  1. relaxGUI: a new software for fast and simple NMR relaxation data analysis and calculation of ps-ns and μs motion of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieri, Michael; D’Auvergne, Edward J.; Gooley, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Investigation of protein dynamics on the ps-ns and μs-ms timeframes provides detailed insight into the mechanisms of enzymes and the binding properties of proteins. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is an excellent tool for studying protein dynamics at atomic resolution. Analysis of relaxation data using model-free analysis can be a tedious and time consuming process, which requires good knowledge of scripting procedures. The software relaxGUI was developed for fast and simple model-free analysis and is fully integrated into the software package relax. It is written in Python and uses wxPython to build the graphical user interface (GUI) for maximum performance and multi-platform use. This software allows the analysis of NMR relaxation data with ease and the generation of publication quality graphs as well as color coded images of molecular structures. The interface is designed for simple data analysis and management. The software was tested and validated against the command line version of relax.

  2. relaxGUI: a new software for fast and simple NMR relaxation data analysis and calculation of ps-ns and μs motion of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieri, Michael; d'Auvergne, Edward J; Gooley, Paul R

    2011-06-01

    Investigation of protein dynamics on the ps-ns and μs-ms timeframes provides detailed insight into the mechanisms of enzymes and the binding properties of proteins. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is an excellent tool for studying protein dynamics at atomic resolution. Analysis of relaxation data using model-free analysis can be a tedious and time consuming process, which requires good knowledge of scripting procedures. The software relaxGUI was developed for fast and simple model-free analysis and is fully integrated into the software package relax. It is written in Python and uses wxPython to build the graphical user interface (GUI) for maximum performance and multi-platform use. This software allows the analysis of NMR relaxation data with ease and the generation of publication quality graphs as well as color coded images of molecular structures. The interface is designed for simple data analysis and management. The software was tested and validated against the command line version of relax.

  3. Relaxation of synchronization on complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Seung-Woo; Jeong, Hawoong; Hong, Hyunsuk

    2008-07-01

    We study collective synchronization in a large number of coupled oscillators on various complex networks. In particular, we focus on the relaxation dynamics of the synchronization, which is important from the viewpoint of information transfer or the dynamics of system recovery from a perturbation. We measure the relaxation time tau that is required to establish global synchronization by varying the structural properties of the networks. It is found that the relaxation time in a strong-coupling regime (K>Kc) logarithmically increases with network size N , which is attributed to the initial random phase fluctuation given by O(N-1/2) . After elimination of the initial-phase fluctuation, the relaxation time is found to be independent of the system size; this implies that the local interaction that depends on the structural connectivity is irrelevant in the relaxation dynamics of the synchronization in the strong-coupling regime. The relaxation dynamics is analytically derived in a form independent of the system size, and it exhibits good consistency with numerical simulations. As an application, we also explore the recovery dynamics of the oscillators when perturbations enter the system.

  4. Relaxation strain measurements in cellular dislocation structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, C.Y.; Quesnel, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    The conventional picture of what happens during a stress relaxation usually involves imagining the response of a single dislocation to a steadily decreasing stress. The velocity of this dislocation decreases with decreasing stress in such a way that we can measure the stress dependence of the dislocation velocity. Analysis of the data from a different viewpoint enables us to calculate the apparent activation volume for the motion of the dislocation under the assumption of thermally activated glie. Conventional thinking about stress relaxation, however, does not consider the eventual fate of this dislocation. If the stress relaxes to a low enough level, it is clear that the dislocation must stop. This is consistent with the idea that we can determine the stress dependence of the dislocation velocity from relaxation data only for those cases where the dislocation's velocity is allowed to approach zero asymptotically, in short, for those cases where the dislocation never stops. This conflict poses a dilemma for the experimentalist. In real crystals, however, obstacles impede the dislocation's progress so that those dislocations which are stopped at a given stress will probably never resume motion under the influence of the steadily declining stress present during relaxation. Thus one could envision stress relaxation as a process of exhaustion of mobile dislocations, rather than a process of decreasing dislocation velocity. Clearly both points of view have merit and in reality both mechanisms contribute to the phenomena

  5. A Novel Nanosecond Pulsed Power Unit for the Formation of ·OH in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengli; Hu, Sheng; Zhang, Han

    2012-04-01

    A novel nanosecond pulsed power unit was developed for plasma treatment of wastewater, based on the theory of magnetic pulse compression and semiconductor opening switch (SOS). The peak value, rise time and pulse duration of the output voltage were observed to be -51 kV, 60 ns and 120 ns, respectively. The concentrations of ·OH generated by the novel nanosecond pulsed plasma power were determined using the method of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results showed that the concentrations of ·OH increased with the increase in peak voltage, and the generation rates of ·OH were 4.1 × 10-10 mol/s, 5.7 × 10-10 mol/s, and 7.7 × 10-10 mol/s at 30 kV, 35 kV, and 40 kV, respectively. The efficiency of OH generation was found to be independent of the input parameters for applied power, with an average value of 3.23×10-12 mol/J obtained.

  6. A CMOS delay locked loop and sub-nanosecond time-to-digital converter chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, D.M.; Dow, S.F.; Flasck, J.M.; Levi, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    Phase-locked loops have been employed in the past to obtain sub-nanosecond time resolution in high energy physics and nuclear science applications. An alternative solution based on a delay-locked loop (DLL) is described. This solution allows for a very high level of integration yet still offers resolution in the sub-nanosecond regime. Two variations on this solution are outlined. A novel phase detector, based on the Mueller C-element, is used to implement a charge pump where the injected charge approaches zero as the loop approaches lock on the leading edge of an input clock reference. This greatly reduces timing jitter. In the second variation the loop locks to both the leading and trailing clock edges. In this second implementation, software coded layout generators are used to automatically layout a highly integrated, multichannel, time-to-digital converter (TDC) targeted for one specific frequency. The two circuits, DLL and TDC, are implemented in CMOS 1.2 microm and 0.8 microm technologies, respectively. Test results show a timing jitter of less than 30 ps for the DLL circuit and less than 190 ps integral and differential nonlinearity for the TDC circuit

  7. Nanosecond laser ablation processes in aluminum-doped zinc-oxide for photovoltaic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canteli, D.; Fernandez, S.; Molpeceres, C.; Torres, I.; Gandía, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A study of the ablation of AZO thin films deposited at different temperature conditions with nanosecond UV laser light for photovoltaic devices has been performed. ► The ablation threshold of AZO thin films was measured and related with the absorption coefficient of the films at the laser wavelength, showing a direct correspondence. ► A change in the material structure in the areas closest to the edges of laser grooves made in samples deposited at temperatures below 100 °C was observed and studied. - Abstract: Aiming to a future use in thin film solar modules, the processing of aluminum doped zinc oxide thin films with good optoelectronic properties with a nanosecond-pulsed ultraviolet laser has been studied. The ablation threshold fluence of the films has been determined and associated with the material properties. The ablation process has been optimized and grooves with good properties for photovoltaic devices have been obtained. The morphology of the ablated surfaces has been observed by confocal microscopy and its structure has been characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The influence of ablation parameters like focus distance, pulse energy and repetition frequency in the groove morphology has been studied with special attention to the thermal effects on the material structure.

  8. Nanosecond laser textured superhydrophobic metallic surfaces and their chemical sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ta, Duong V.; Dunn, Andrew; Wasley, Thomas J.; Kay, Robert W.; Stringer, Jonathan; Smith, Patrick J.; Connaughton, Colm; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2015-12-01

    This work demonstrates superhydrophobic behavior on nanosecond laser patterned copper and brass surfaces. Compared with ultrafast laser systems previously used for such texturing, infrared nanosecond fiber lasers offer a lower cost and more robust system combined with potentially much higher processing rates. The wettability of the textured surfaces develops from hydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity over time when exposed to ambient conditions. The change in the wetting property is attributed to the partial deoxidation of oxides on the surface induced during laser texturing. Textures exhibiting steady state contact angles of up to ∼152° with contact angle hysteresis of around 3-4° have been achieved. Interestingly, the superhydrobobic surfaces have the self-cleaning ability and have potential for chemical sensing applications. The principle of these novel chemical sensors is based on the change in contact angle with the concentration of methanol in a solution. To demonstrate the principle of operation of such a sensor, it is found that the contact angle of methanol solution on the superhydrophobic surfaces exponentially decays with increasing concentration. A significant reduction, of 128°, in contact angle on superhydrophobic brass is observed, which is one order of magnitude greater than that for the untreated surface (12°), when percent composition of methanol reaches to 28%.

  9. A CMOS delay locked loop and sub-nanosecond time-to-digital converter chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, D.M.; Dow, S.F.; Levi, M.E.

    1995-12-01

    Many high energy physics and nuclear science applications require sub-nanosecond time resolution measurements over many thousands of detector channels. Phase-locked loops have been employed in the past to obtain accurate time references for these measurements. An alternative solution, based on a delay-locked loop (DLL) is described. This solution allows for a very high level of integration yet still offers resolution in the sub-nanosecond regime. Two variations on this solution are outlined. A novel phase detector, based on the Muller C element, is used to implement a charge pump where the injected charge approaches zero as the loop approaches lock on the leading edge of an input clock reference. This greatly reduces timing jitter. In the second variation the loop locks to both the leading and trailing clock edges. In this second implementation, software coded layout generators are used to automatically layout a highly integrated, multi-channel, time to digital converter (TDC). Complex clock generation can be, achieved by taking symmetric taps off the delay elements. The two circuits, DLL and TDC, were implemented in a CMOS 1.2μm and 0.8μm technology, respectively. Test results show a timing jitter of less than 35 ps for the DLL circuit and better solution for the TDC circuit

  10. Mechanical response of agar gel irradiated with Nd:YAG nanosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Gutiérrez, Francisco G.; Evans, Rodger; Camacho-López, Santiago; Aguilar, Guillermo

    2010-02-01

    Nanosecond long laser pulses are used in medical applications where precise tissue ablation with minimal thermal and mechanical collateral damage is required. When a laser pulse is incident on a material, optical energy will be absorbed by a combination of linear and nonlinear absorption according to both: laser light intensity and material properties. In the case of water or gels, the first results in heat generation and thermoelastic expansion; while the second results in an expanding plasma formation that launches a shock wave and a cavitation/boiling bubble. Plasma formation due to nonlinear absorption of nanosecond laser pulses is originated by a combination of multiphoton ionization and thermionic emission of free electrons, which is enhanced when the material has high linear absorption coefficient. In this work, we present measurements of pressure transients originated when 6 ns laser pulses are incident on agar gels with varying linear absorption coefficient, mechanical properties and irradiation geometry using laser radiant exposures above threshold for bubble formation. The underlying hypothesis is that pressure transients are composed of the superposition of both: shock wave originated by hot expanding plasma resulting from nonlinear absorption of optical energy and, thermoelastic expansion originated by heat generation due to linear absorption of optical energy. The objective of this work is to evaluate the relative contribution of each absorption mechanism to mechanical effects in agar gel. Real time pressure transients are recorded with PVDF piezoelectric sensors and time-resilved imaging from 50 μm to 10 mm away from focal point.

  11. Sub-nanosecond clock synchronization and trigger management in the nuclear physics experiment AGATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellato, M; Isocrate, R; Rampazzo, G; Bazzacco, D; Bortolato, D; Triossi, A; Chavas, J; Mengoni, D; Recchia, F

    2013-01-01

    The new-generation spectrometer AGATA, the Advanced GAmma Tracking Array, requires sub-nanosecond clock synchronization among readout and front-end electronics modules that may lie hundred meters apart. We call GTS (Global Trigger and Synchronization System) the infrastructure responsible for precise clock synchronization and for the trigger management of AGATA. It is made of a central trigger processor and nodes, connected in a tree structure by means of optical fibers operated at 2Gb/s. The GTS tree handles the synchronization and the trigger data flow, whereas the trigger processor analyses and eventually validates the trigger primitives centrally. Sub-nanosecond synchronization is achieved by measuring two different types of round-trip times and by automatically correcting for phase-shift differences. For a tree of depth two, the peak-to-peak clock jitter at each leaf is 70 ps; the mean phase difference is 180 ps, while the standard deviation over such phase difference, namely the phase equalization repeatability, is 20 ps. The GTS system has run flawlessly for the two-year long AGATA campaign, held at the INFN Legnaro National Laboratories, Italy, where five triple clusters of the AGATA sub-array were coupled with a variety of ancillary detectors

  12. Sub-nanosecond clock synchronization and trigger management in the nuclear physics experiment AGATA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellato, M.; Bortolato, D.; Chavas, J.; Isocrate, R.; Rampazzo, G.; Triossi, A.; Bazzacco, D.; Mengoni, D.; Recchia, F.

    2013-07-01

    The new-generation spectrometer AGATA, the Advanced GAmma Tracking Array, requires sub-nanosecond clock synchronization among readout and front-end electronics modules that may lie hundred meters apart. We call GTS (Global Trigger and Synchronization System) the infrastructure responsible for precise clock synchronization and for the trigger management of AGATA. It is made of a central trigger processor and nodes, connected in a tree structure by means of optical fibers operated at 2Gb/s. The GTS tree handles the synchronization and the trigger data flow, whereas the trigger processor analyses and eventually validates the trigger primitives centrally. Sub-nanosecond synchronization is achieved by measuring two different types of round-trip times and by automatically correcting for phase-shift differences. For a tree of depth two, the peak-to-peak clock jitter at each leaf is 70 ps; the mean phase difference is 180 ps, while the standard deviation over such phase difference, namely the phase equalization repeatability, is 20 ps. The GTS system has run flawlessly for the two-year long AGATA campaign, held at the INFN Legnaro National Laboratories, Italy, where five triple clusters of the AGATA sub-array were coupled with a variety of ancillary detectors.

  13. Damage caused by a nanosecond UV laser on a heated copper surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henč-Bartolić, V., E-mail: visnja.henc@fer.hr [University of Zagreb, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, Unska 3, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Bončina, T. [University of Maribor, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Smetanova 17, 2000 Maribor (Slovenia); Jakovljević, S., E-mail: suzana.jakovljevic@fsb.hr [University of Zagreb, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture, Ivana Lučića 5, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Panjan, P. [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Zupanič, F. [University of Maribor, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Smetanova 17, 2000 Maribor (Slovenia)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • A Cu-plate was exposed to nanosecond UV laser with max. energy 1.1 J/cm{sup 2}. • Surface topography was studied on the cold and heated copper plate. • At room temperature, a crater formed, the melt was ejected from it. • Capillary waves formed in the vicinity of the crater at 360 °C. - Abstract: This work studied the effect of thin copper plate temperature on its surface morphology after irradiation using a pulsed nanosecond UV laser. The surface characteristics were investigated using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, focused ion beam and stylus profilometry. When a target was at room temperature, a crater and the radial flow of molten Cu from the crater was observed. When the thin target was warm (about 360 °C ± 20 °C), a crater was smaller, and quasi-semicircular waves with the periodicity of around 3 μm appeared in its vicinity. The origin of the waves is Marangoni effect, causing thermocapillary waves, which in same occasions had a structure of final states of chaos in Rayleigh–Bénard convection.

  14. Nanosecond laser pulses for mimicking thermal effects on nanostructured tungsten-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besozzi, E.; Maffini, A.; Dellasega, D.; Russo, V.; Facibeni, A.; Pazzaglia, A.; Beghi, M. G.; Passoni, M.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we exploit nanosecond laser irradiation as a compact solution for investigating the thermomechanical behavior of tungsten materials under extreme thermal loads at the laboratory scale. Heat flux factor thresholds for various thermal effects, such as melting, cracking and recrystallization, are determined under both single and multishot experiments. The use of nanosecond lasers for mimicking thermal effects induced on W by fusion-relevant thermal loads is thus validated by direct comparison of the thresholds obtained in this work and the ones reported in the literature for electron beams and millisecond laser irradiation. Numerical simulations of temperature and thermal stress performed on a 2D thermomechanical code are used to predict the heat flux factor thresholds of the different thermal effects. We also investigate the thermal effect thresholds of various nanostructured W coatings. These coatings are produced by pulsed laser deposition, mimicking W coatings in tokamaks and W redeposited layers. All the coatings show lower damage thresholds with respect to bulk W. In general, thresholds decrease as the porosity degree of the materials increases. We thus propose a model to predict these thresholds for coatings with various morphologies, simply based on their porosity degree, which can be directly estimated by measuring the variation of the coating mass density with respect to that of the bulk.

  15. Nanosecond pulsed laser induced self-organized nano-dots patterns on GaSb surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Yutaka, E-mail: yyoshida@cris.hokudai.ac.jp [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N8, W13, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628, Hokkaido (Japan); Creative Research Institution Sousei, Hokkaido University, N21, W10, Kita-ku, Sapporo 001-0021, Hokkaido (Japan); Oosawa, Kazuya; Wajima, Jyunya; Watanabe, Seiichi [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N8, W13, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628, Hokkaido (Japan); Matsuo, Yasutaka [Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0020, Hokkaido (Japan); Kato, Takahiko [Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., 7-1-1 Omika, Hitachi-shi 319-1292, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N8, W13, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    We report a technique for formation of two-dimensional (2D) nanodot (ND) patterns on gaillium antimoide (GaSb) using a nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation with 532 nm wavelength. The patterns have formed because of the interference and the self-organization under energy deposition of the laser irradiation, which induced the growth of NDs on the local area. The NDs are grown and shrunken in the pattern by energy depositions. In the laser irradiation with average laser energy density of 35 mJ cm⁻², large and small NDs are formed on GaSb surface. The large NDs have grown average diameter from 160 to 200 nm with increase of laser pulses, and the small NDs have shrunken average diameter from 75 to 30 nm. The critical dot size is required about 107 nm for growth of the NDs in the patterns. Nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation can control the self-organized ND size on GaSb in air as a function of the laser pulses.

  16. Insight into electronic mechanisms of nanosecond-laser ablation of silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marine, Wladimir; Patrone, Lionel; Ozerov, Igor; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.

    2008-01-01

    We present experimental and theoretical studies of nanosecond ArF excimer laser desorption and ablation of silicon with insight into material removal mechanisms. The experimental studies involve a comprehensive analysis of the laser-induced plume dynamics and measurements of the charge gained by the target during irradiation time. At low laser fluences, well below the melting threshold, high-energy ions with a narrow energy distribution are observed. When the fluence is increased, a thermal component of the plume is formed superimposing on the nonthermal ions, which are still abundant. The origin of these ions is discussed on the basis of two modeling approaches, thermal and electronic, and we analyze the dynamics of silicon target excitation, heating, melting, and ablation. An electronic model is developed that provides insight into the charge-carrier transport in the target. We demonstrate that, contrary to a commonly accepted opinion, a complete thermalization between the electron and lattice subsystems is not reached during the nanosecond-laser pulse action. Moreover, the charging effects can retard the melting process and have an effect on the overall target behavior and laser-induced plume dynamics

  17. Nanosecond laser ablation processes in aluminum-doped zinc-oxide for photovoltaic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canteli, D., E-mail: david.canteli@ciemat.es [Division de Energias Renovables, Energia Solar Fotovoltaica, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, S. [Division de Energias Renovables, Energia Solar Fotovoltaica, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Molpeceres, C. [Centro Laser, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ctra. de Valencia Km 7.3, 28031 Madrid (Spain); Torres, I.; Gandia, J.J. [Division de Energias Renovables, Energia Solar Fotovoltaica, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A study of the ablation of AZO thin films deposited at different temperature conditions with nanosecond UV laser light for photovoltaic devices has been performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ablation threshold of AZO thin films was measured and related with the absorption coefficient of the films at the laser wavelength, showing a direct correspondence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A change in the material structure in the areas closest to the edges of laser grooves made in samples deposited at temperatures below 100 Degree-Sign C was observed and studied. - Abstract: Aiming to a future use in thin film solar modules, the processing of aluminum doped zinc oxide thin films with good optoelectronic properties with a nanosecond-pulsed ultraviolet laser has been studied. The ablation threshold fluence of the films has been determined and associated with the material properties. The ablation process has been optimized and grooves with good properties for photovoltaic devices have been obtained. The morphology of the ablated surfaces has been observed by confocal microscopy and its structure has been characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The influence of ablation parameters like focus distance, pulse energy and repetition frequency in the groove morphology has been studied with special attention to the thermal effects on the material structure.

  18. Research on the impacts of air temperature on the evolution of nanosecond pulse discharge products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Jin-lu; He, Li-ming; Ding, Wei; Zhao, Zi-chen; Zhang, Hua-lei

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Most of the O_2 particles become O_2(V1) in high temperature. • The O_3 molecules are produced mainly by decayed O atoms. • NO molecules are obtained by decayed N_2(A3), N(2D) and N(2P) at the first stage, NO molecules are obtained by decayed N atoms at last. - Abstract: Based on nonequilibrium plasma dynamics of air discharge, the kinetic model simulating plasma discharge products induced by nanosecond pulse discharge in air is presented in this work. Then the paper compares the calculation of model with experimental results of references, and verifies the accuracy of the model. The evolution characteristics of nanosecond pulse discharge plasma under different air temperatures are obtained. Because the O, O_3 and NO have close relationship with the combustion, their formation mechanisms are discussed especially. With increasing temperature, there is no significant addition in O atoms and O_3 molecules. It is found that most of the O_2 molecules become O_2(V1) in higher temperature. The decreasing time of the O atoms is in accordance with the increasing time of O_3 molecules. Thus, the O_3 molecules are produced mainly by decayed O atoms. Increased air temperature will not produce more active particles which could assist the combustion. With the increasing temperature, the particle number density of NO increases fast. At last, they have reached an equilibrium value of the same.

  19. Nanosecond pulse-width electron diode based on dielectric wall accelerator technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Quantang, E-mail: zhaoquantang@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Z.M.; Yuan, P.; Cao, S.C.; Shen, X.K.; Jing, Y. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yu, C.S. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Z.P.; Liu, M.; Xiao, R.Q. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zong, Y.; Wang, Y.R. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhao, H.W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2013-11-21

    An electron diode using a short section of dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) has been under development at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences. Tests have been carried out with spark gap switches triggered by lasers. The stack voltage efficiency of a four-layer of Blumleins reached about 60–70% with gas filled spark gap switching. The generated pulse voltage of peak amplitude of 23 kV and pulse width of 5 ns is used to extract and accelerate an electron beam of 320 mA, measured by a fast current transformer. A nanosecond pulse width electron diode was achieved successfully. Furthermore, the principle of a DWA is well proven and the development details and discussions are presented in this article. -- Highlights: •The key technology of DWA, including switches and pulse forming lines were studied. •The SiC PCSS obtained from Shanghai Institute were tested. •Two layers ZIP lines (new structure) and four layers Blumlein lines were studied with laser triggered spark gap switches. •A nanosecond pulse-width electron diode based on DWA technologies is achieved and studied experimentally. •The principle of DWA is also proved by the diode.

  20. A Novel Nanosecond Pulsed Power Unit for the Formation of ·OH in Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shengli; Hu Sheng; Zhang Han

    2012-01-01

    A novel nanosecond pulsed power unit was developed for plasma treatment of wastewater, based on the theory of magnetic pulse compression and semiconductor opening switch (SOS). The peak value, rise time and pulse duration of the output voltage were observed to be -51 kV, 60 ns and 120 ns, respectively. The concentrations of ·OH generated by the novel nanosecond pulsed plasma power were determined using the method of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results showed that the concentrations of ·OH increased with the increase in peak voltage, and the generation rates of ·OH were 4.1 × 10 -10 mol/s, 5.7 × 10 -10 mol/s, and 7.7 × 10 -10 mol/s at 30 kV, 35 kV, and 40 kV, respectively. The efficiency of OH generation was found to be independent of the input parameters for applied power, with an average value of 3.23×10 -12 mol/J obtained. (plasma technology)

  1. Nanosecond laser ablation of target Al in a gaseous medium: explosive boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazhukin, V. I.; Mazhukin, A. V.; Demin, M. M.; Shapranov, A. V.

    2018-03-01

    An approximate mathematical description of the processes of homogeneous nucleation and homogeneous evaporation (explosive boiling) of a metal target (Al) under the influence of ns laser radiation is proposed in the framework of the hydrodynamic model. Within the continuum approach, a multi-phase, multi-front hydrodynamic model and a computational algorithm are designed to simulate nanosecond laser ablation of the metal targets immersed in gaseous media. The proposed approach is intended for modeling and detailed analysis of the mechanisms of heterogeneous and homogeneous evaporation and their interaction with each other. It is shown that the proposed model and computational algorithm allow modeling of interrelated mechanisms of heterogeneous and homogeneous evaporation of metals, manifested in the form of pulsating explosive boiling. Modeling has shown that explosive evaporation in metals is due to the presence of a near-surface temperature maximum. It has been established that in nanosecond pulsed laser ablation, such exposure regimes can be implemented in which phase explosion is the main mechanism of material removal.

  2. Acrolein relaxes mouse isolated tracheal smooth muscle via a TRPA1-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Esther Y; Burcham, Philip C; Mann, Tracy S; Henry, Peter J

    2014-05-01

    Airway sensory C-fibres express TRPA1 channels which have recently been identified as a key chemosensory receptor for acrolein, a toxic and highly prevalent component of smoke. TRPA1 likely plays an intermediary role in eliciting a range of effects induced by acrolein including cough and neurogenic inflammation. Currently, it is not known whether acrolein-induced activation of TRPA1 produces other airway effects including relaxation of mouse airway smooth muscle. The aims of this study were to examine the effects of acrolein on airway smooth muscle tone in mouse isolated trachea, and to characterise the cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning the effects of acrolein. Isometric tension recording studies were conducted on mouse isolated tracheal segments to characterise acrolein-induced relaxation responses. Release of the relaxant PGE₂ was measured by EIA to examine its role in the response. Use of selective antagonists/inhibitors permitted pharmacological characterisation of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying this relaxation response. Acrolein induced dose-dependent relaxation responses in mouse isolated tracheal segments. Importantly, these relaxation responses were significantly inhibited by the TRPA1 antagonists AP-18 and HC-030031, an NK₁ receptor antagonist RP-67580, and the EP₂ receptor antagonist PF-04418948, whilst completely abolished by the non-selective COX inhibitor indomethacin. Acrolein also caused rapid PGE₂ release which was suppressed by HC-030031. In summary, acrolein induced a novel bronchodilator response in mouse airways. Pharmacologic studies indicate that acrolein-induced relaxation likely involves interplay between TRPA1-expressing airway sensory C-fibres, NK₁ receptor-expressing epithelial cells, and EP₂-receptor expressing airway smooth muscle cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields induce poly(ADP-ribose) formation and non-apoptotic cell death in HeLa S3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Akiyama, Hidenori; Yano, Ken-ichi

    2013-08-30

    Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) have recently gained attention as effective cancer therapy owing to their potency for cell death induction. Previous studies have shown that apoptosis is a predominant mode of nsPEF-induced cell death in several cell lines, such as Jurkat cells. In this study, we analyzed molecular mechanisms for cell death induced by nsPEFs. When nsPEFs were applied to Jurkat cells, apoptosis was readily induced. Next, we used HeLa S3 cells and analyzed apoptotic events. Contrary to our expectation, nsPEF-exposed HeLa S3 cells exhibited no molecular signs of apoptosis execution. Instead, nsPEFs induced the formation of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), a hallmark of necrosis. PAR formation occurred concurrently with a decrease in cell viability, supporting implications of nsPEF-induced PAR formation for cell death. Necrotic PAR formation is known to be catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), and PARP-1 in apoptotic cells is inactivated by caspase-mediated proteolysis. Consistently, we observed intact and cleaved forms of PARP-1 in nsPEF-exposed and UV-irradiated cells, respectively. Taken together, nsPEFs induce two distinct modes of cell death in a cell type-specific manner, and HeLa S3 cells show PAR-associated non-apoptotic cell death in response to nsPEFs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. String-like collective motion in the α- and β-relaxation of a coarse-grained polymer melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazmiño Betancourt, Beatriz A.; Starr, Francis W.; Douglas, Jack F.

    2018-03-01

    Relaxation in glass-forming liquids occurs as a multi-stage hierarchical process involving cooperative molecular motion. First, there is a "fast" relaxation process dominated by the inertial motion of the molecules whose amplitude grows upon heating, followed by a longer time α-relaxation process involving both large-scale diffusive molecular motion and momentum diffusion. Our molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained glass-forming polymer melt indicate that the fast, collective motion becomes progressively suppressed upon cooling, necessitating large-scale collective motion by molecular diffusion for the material to relax approaching the glass-transition. In each relaxation regime, the decay of the collective intermediate scattering function occurs through collective particle exchange motions having a similar geometrical form, and quantitative relationships are derived relating the fast "stringlet" collective motion to the larger scale string-like collective motion at longer times, which governs the temperature-dependent activation energies associated with both thermally activated molecular diffusion and momentum diffusion.

  5. Time, stress, and temperature-dependent deformation in nanostructured copper: Stress relaxation tests and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xu-Sheng; Wang, Yun-Jiang; Wang, Guo-Yong; Zhai, Hui-Ru; Dai, L.H.; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, stress relaxation tests, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were conducted on coarse-grained (cg), nanograined (ng), and nanotwinned (nt) copper at temperatures of 22 °C (RT), 30 °C, 40 °C, 50 °C, and 75 °C. The comprehensive investigations provide sufficient information for the building-up of a formula to describe the time, stress, and temperature-dependent deformation and clarify the relationship among the strain rate sensitivity parameter, stress exponent, and activation volume. The typically experimental curves of logarithmic plastic strain rate versus stress exhibited a three staged relaxation process from a linear high stress relaxation region to a subsequent nonlinear stress relaxation region and finally to a linear low stress relaxation region, which only showed-up at the test temperatures higher than 22 °C, 22 °C, and 30 °C, respectively, in the tested cg-, ng-, and nt-Cu specimens. The values of stress exponent, stress-independent activation energy, and activation volume were determined from the experimental data in the two linear regions. The determined activation parameters, HRTEM images, and MD simulations consistently suggest that dislocation-mediated plastic deformation is predominant in all tested cg-, ng-, and nt-Cu specimens in the initial linear high stress relaxation region at the five relaxation temperatures, whereas in the linear low stress relaxation region, the grain boundary (GB) diffusion-associated deformation is dominant in the ng- and cg-Cu specimens, while twin boundary (TB) migration, i.e., twinning and detwinning with parallel partial dislocations, governs the time, stress, and temperature-dependent deformation in the nt-Cu specimens.

  6. Effect of alkali ion on relaxation properties of binary alkali-borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomovskoj, V.A.; Bartenev, G.M.

    1992-01-01

    Method of relaxation spectrometry were used to analyze the data on internal friction spectra of lithium, sodium, potassium and rubidium alkali-borate glasses in wide range of temperatures and frequencies. The nature of two relaxation processes was clarified: β m -process, related with mobility of alkaline metal cations, and α-process (vitrification), conditioned by system transformation from viscous-flow to vitreous state. It is shown that atomic-molecular mechanism of vitrification process changes when passing from vitreous B 2 O 3 to alkali-borate glasses

  7. Dielectric relaxation and hydrogen bonding interaction in xylitol-water mixtures using time domain reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rander, D. N.; Joshi, Y. S.; Kanse, K. S.; Kumbharkhane, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    The measurements of complex dielectric permittivity of xylitol-water mixtures have been carried out in the frequency range of 10 MHz-30 GHz using a time domain reflectometry technique. Measurements have been done at six temperatures from 0 to 25 °C and at different weight fractions of xylitol (0 xylitol-water can be well described by Cole-Davidson model having an asymmetric distribution of relaxation times. The dielectric parameters such as static dielectric constant and relaxation time for the mixtures have been evaluated. The molecular interaction between xylitol and water molecules is discussed using the Kirkwood correlation factor ( g eff ) and thermodynamic parameter.

  8. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields induce poly(ADP-ribose) formation and non-apoptotic cell death in HeLa S3 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Akiyama, Hidenori [Institute of Pulsed Power Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Yano, Ken-ichi, E-mail: yanoken@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Priority Organization for Innovation and Excellence, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •Nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) is a new and unique means for life sciences. •Apoptosis was induced by nsPEF exposure in Jurkat cells. •No signs of apoptosis were detected in HeLa S3 cells exposed to nsPEFs. •Formation of poly(ADP-ribose) was induced in nsPEF-exposed HeLa S3 cells. •Two distinct modes of cell death were activated by nsPEF in a cell-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) have recently gained attention as effective cancer therapy owing to their potency for cell death induction. Previous studies have shown that apoptosis is a predominant mode of nsPEF-induced cell death in several cell lines, such as Jurkat cells. In this study, we analyzed molecular mechanisms for cell death induced by nsPEFs. When nsPEFs were applied to Jurkat cells, apoptosis was readily induced. Next, we used HeLa S3 cells and analyzed apoptotic events. Contrary to our expectation, nsPEF-exposed HeLa S3 cells exhibited no molecular signs of apoptosis execution. Instead, nsPEFs induced the formation of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), a hallmark of necrosis. PAR formation occurred concurrently with a decrease in cell viability, supporting implications of nsPEF-induced PAR formation for cell death. Necrotic PAR formation is known to be catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), and PARP-1 in apoptotic cells is inactivated by caspase-mediated proteolysis. Consistently, we observed intact and cleaved forms of PARP-1 in nsPEF-exposed and UV-irradiated cells, respectively. Taken together, nsPEFs induce two distinct modes of cell death in a cell type-specific manner, and HeLa S3 cells show PAR-associated non-apoptotic cell death in response to nsPEFs.

  9. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields induce poly(ADP-ribose) formation and non-apoptotic cell death in HeLa S3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Akiyama, Hidenori; Yano, Ken-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) is a new and unique means for life sciences. •Apoptosis was induced by nsPEF exposure in Jurkat cells. •No signs of apoptosis were detected in HeLa S3 cells exposed to nsPEFs. •Formation of poly(ADP-ribose) was induced in nsPEF-exposed HeLa S3 cells. •Two distinct modes of cell death were activated by nsPEF in a cell-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) have recently gained attention as effective cancer therapy owing to their potency for cell death induction. Previous studies have shown that apoptosis is a predominant mode of nsPEF-induced cell death in several cell lines, such as Jurkat cells. In this study, we analyzed molecular mechanisms for cell death induced by nsPEFs. When nsPEFs were applied to Jurkat cells, apoptosis was readily induced. Next, we used HeLa S3 cells and analyzed apoptotic events. Contrary to our expectation, nsPEF-exposed HeLa S3 cells exhibited no molecular signs of apoptosis execution. Instead, nsPEFs induced the formation of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), a hallmark of necrosis. PAR formation occurred concurrently with a decrease in cell viability, supporting implications of nsPEF-induced PAR formation for cell death. Necrotic PAR formation is known to be catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), and PARP-1 in apoptotic cells is inactivated by caspase-mediated proteolysis. Consistently, we observed intact and cleaved forms of PARP-1 in nsPEF-exposed and UV-irradiated cells, respectively. Taken together, nsPEFs induce two distinct modes of cell death in a cell type-specific manner, and HeLa S3 cells show PAR-associated non-apoptotic cell death in response to nsPEFs

  10. Measurement and Characterization of Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Chemistry Using Relaxation Dispersion NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khirich, Gennady; Holliday, Michael J; Lin, Jasper C; Nandy, Aditya

    2018-03-01

    One-dimensional heteronuclear relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy at 13 C natural abundance successfully characterized the dynamics of the hydrogen-deuterium exchange reaction occurring at the N ε position in l-arginine by monitoring C δ in varying amounts of D 2 O. A small equilibrium isotope effect was observed and quantified, corresponding to ΔG = -0.14 kcal mol -1 . A bimolecular rate constant of k D = 5.1 × 10 9 s -1 M -1 was determined from the pH*-dependence of k ex (where pH* is the direct electrode reading of pH in 10% D 2 O and k ex is the nuclear spin exchange rate constant), consistent with diffusion-controlled kinetics. The measurement of ΔG serves to bridge the millisecond time scale lifetimes of the detectable positively charged arginine species with the nanosecond time scale lifetime of the nonobservable low-populated neutral arginine intermediate species, thus allowing for characterization of the equilibrium lifetimes of the various arginine species in solution as a function of fractional solvent deuterium content. Despite the system being in fast exchange on the chemical shift time scale, the magnitude of the secondary isotope shift due to the exchange reaction at N ε was accurately measured to be 0.12 ppm directly from curve-fitting D 2 O-dependent dispersion data collected at a single static field strength. These results indicate that relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy is a robust and general method for studying base-catalyzed hydrogen-deuterium exchange chemistry at equilibrium.

  11. Orientation and conformation of a lipase at an interface studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Østergaard; Jensen, T.R.; Kjær, Kristian

    2002-01-01

    Electron density profiles calculated from molecular dynamics trajectories are used to deduce the orientation and conformation of Thermomyces lanuginosa lipase and a mutant adsorbed at an air-water interface. It is demonstrated that the profiles display distinct fine structures, which uniquely...... characterize enzyme orientation and conformation. The density profiles are, on the nanosecond timescale, determined by the average enzyme conformation. We outline a Computational scheme that from a single molecular dynamics trajectory allows for extraction of electron density profiles referring to different...

  12. Use of relaxation skills in differentially skilled athletes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kudlackova, K.; Eccles, D. W.; Dieffenbach, K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the use of relaxation skills by differentially skilled athletes in relation to the deliberate practice framework. Design: Differentially skilled athletes completed a survey about their use of relaxation skills. Method: 150 athletes representing three skill levels (recreational, college, and professional) completed the deliberate relaxation for sport survey, which assessed relaxation on three deliberate practice dimensions (relevancy, concentration, and ...

  13. The use of (double) relaxation oscillation SQUIDs as a sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duuren, M.J.; Brons, G.C.S.; Kattouw, H.; Flokstra, Jakob; Rogalla, Horst

    1997-01-01

    Relaxation Oscillation SQUIDs (ROSs) and Double Relaxation Oscillation SQUIDs (DROSs) are based on relaxation oscillations that are induced in hysteretic dc SQUIDs by an external L-R shunt. The relaxation frequency of a ROS varies with the applied flux Φ, whereas the output of a DROS is a dc

  14. Origin of stretched-exponential photoluminescence relaxation in size-separated silicon nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel L. Brown

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A detailed understanding of the photoluminescence (PL from silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs is convoluted by the complexity of the decay mechanism, including a stretched-exponential relaxation and the presence of both nanosecond and microsecond time scales. In this publication, we analyze the microsecond PL decay of size-resolved SiNC fractions in both full-spectrum (FS and spectrally resolved (SR configurations, where the stretching exponent and lifetime are used to deduce a probability distribution function (PDF of decay rates. For the PL decay measured at peak emission, we find a systematic shift and narrowing of the PDF in comparison to the FS measurements. In a similar fashion, we resolve the PL lifetime of the ‘blue’, ‘peak’, and ‘red’ regions of the spectrum and map PL decays of different photon energy onto their corresponding location in the PDF. A general trend is observed where higher and lower photon energies are correlated with shorter and longer lifetimes, respectively, which we relate to the PL line width and electron-phonon coupling.

  15. High optical label switching add-drop multiplexer nodes with nanoseconds latency for 5G metro/access networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calabretta, N.; Miao, W.; De Waardt, H.

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel optical add-drop multiplexer for next-generation metro/access networks by exploiting optical label switching technology. Experimental results of a ring network show nanoseconds add/drop operation including multicasting and power equalization of 50Gb/s data.

  16. System-Level Demonstration of a Dynamically Reconfigured Burst-Mode Link Using a Nanosecond Si-Photonic Switch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forencich, Alex; Kamchevska, Valerija; Dupuis, Nicolas

    2018-01-01

    Using a novel FPGA-based network emulator, microsecond-scale packets with 12.5-20-Gb/s data are generated, routed through a nanosecond Si-photonic switch, and received in a fast-locking burst-mode receiver. Error-free links with <382-ns system-level switching are shown....

  17. Simultaneous high crystallinity and sub-bandgap optical absorptance in hyperdoped black silicon using nanosecond laser annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franta, Benjamin, E-mail: bafranta@gmail.com; Pastor, David; Gandhi, Hemi H.; Aziz, Michael J.; Mazur, Eric [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Rekemeyer, Paul H.; Gradečak, Silvija [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Hyperdoped black silicon fabricated with femtosecond laser irradiation has attracted interest for applications in infrared photodetectors and intermediate band photovoltaics due to its sub-bandgap optical absorptance and light-trapping surface. However, hyperdoped black silicon typically has an amorphous and polyphasic polycrystalline surface that can interfere with carrier transport, electrical rectification, and intermediate band formation. Past studies have used thermal annealing to obtain high crystallinity in hyperdoped black silicon, but thermal annealing causes a deactivation of the sub-bandgap optical absorptance. In this study, nanosecond laser annealing is used to obtain high crystallinity and remove pressure-induced phases in hyperdoped black silicon while maintaining high sub-bandgap optical absorptance and a light-trapping surface morphology. Furthermore, it is shown that nanosecond laser annealing reactivates the sub-bandgap optical absorptance of hyperdoped black silicon after deactivation by thermal annealing. Thermal annealing and nanosecond laser annealing can be combined in sequence to fabricate hyperdoped black silicon that simultaneously shows high crystallinity, high above-bandgap and sub-bandgap absorptance, and a rectifying electrical homojunction. Such nanosecond laser annealing could potentially be applied to non-equilibrium material systems beyond hyperdoped black silicon.

  18. A comparison between characteristics of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets sustained by nanosecond- and microsecond-pulse generators in helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Shao, Tao; Wang, Ruixue; Yan, Ping; Zhou, Zhongsheng; Zhou, Yixiao

    2014-01-01

    Power source is an important parameter that can affect the characteristics of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets (APPJs), because it can play a key role on the discharge characteristics and ionization process of APPJs. In this paper, the characteristics of helium APPJs sustained by both nanosecond-pulse and microsecond-pulse generators are compared from the aspects of plume length, discharge current, consumption power, energy, and optical emission spectrum. Experimental results showed that the pulsed APPJ was initiated near the high-voltage electrode with a small curvature radius, and then the stable helium APPJ could be observed when the applied voltage increased. Moreover, the discharge current of the nanosecond-pulse APPJ was larger than that of the microsecond-pulse APPJ. Furthermore, although the nanosecond-pulse generator consumed less energy than the microsecond-pulse generator, longer plume length, larger instantaneous power per pulse and stronger spectral line intensity could be obtained in the nanosecond-pulse excitation case. In addition, some discussion indicated that the rise time of the applied voltage could play a prominent role on the generation of APPJs

  19. X-ray emission from a nanosecond-pulse discharge in an inhomogeneous electric field at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Cheng; Shao Tao; Ren Chengyan; Zhang Dongdong; Tarasenko, Victor; Kostyrya, Igor D.; Ma Hao; Yan Ping

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes experimental studies of the dependence of the X-ray intensity on the anode material in nanosecond high-voltage discharges. The discharges were generated by two nanosecond-pulse generators in atmospheric air with a highly inhomogeneous electric field by a tube-plate gap. The output pulse of the first generator (repetitive pulse generator) has a rise time of about 15 ns and a full width at half maximum of 30–40 ns. The output of the second generator (single pulse generator) has a rise time of about 0.3 ns and a full width at half maximum of 1 ns. The electrical characteristics and the X-ray emission of nanosecond-pulse discharge in atmospheric air are studied by the measurement of voltage-current waveforms, discharge images, X-ray count and dose. Our experimental results showed that the anode material rarely affects electrical characteristics, but it can significantly affect the X-ray density. Comparing the density of X-rays, it was shown that the highest x-rays density occurred in the diffuse discharge in repetitive pulse mode, then the spark discharge with a small air gap, and then the corona discharge with a large air gap, in which the X-ray density was the lowest. Therefore, it could be confirmed that the bremsstrahlung at the anode contributes to the X-ray emission from nanosecond-pulse discharges.

  20. Nuclear magnetic relaxation induced by exchange-mediated orientational randomization: longitudinal relaxation dispersion for spin I = 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Tomas; Halle, Bertil

    2012-08-07

    The frequency dependence of the longitudinal relaxation rate, known as the magnetic relaxation dispersion (MRD), can provide a frequency-resolved characterization of molecular motions in complex biological and colloidal systems on time scales ranging from 1 ns to 100 μs. The conformational dynamics of immobilized proteins and other biopolymers can thus be probed in vitro or in vivo by exploiting internal water molecules or labile hydrogens that exchange with a dominant bulk water pool. Numerous water (1)H and (2)H MRD studies of such systems have been reported, but the widely different theoretical models currently used to analyze the MRD data have resulted in divergent views of the underlying molecular motions. We have argued that the essential mechanism responsible for the main dispersion is the exchange-mediated orientational randomization (EMOR) of anisotropic nuclear (electric quadrupole or magnetic dipole) couplings when internal water molecules or labile hydrogens escape from orientationally confining macromolecular sites. In the EMOR model, the exchange process is thus not just a means of mixing spin populations but it is also the direct cause of spin relaxation. Although the EMOR theory has been used in several studies to analyze water (2)H MRD data from immobilized biopolymers, the fully developed theory has not been described. Here, we present a comprehensive account of a generalized version of the EMOR theory for spin I = 1 nuclides like (2)H. As compared to a previously described version of the EMOR theory, the present version incorporates three generalizations that are all essential in applications to experimental data: (i) a biaxial (residual) electric field gradient tensor, (ii) direct and indirect effects of internal motions, and (iii) multiple sites with different exchange rates. In addition, we describe and assess different approximations to the exact EMOR theory that are useful in various regimes. In particular, we consider the experimentally

  1. Comparison of two picosecond lasers to a nanosecond laser for treating tattoos: a prospective randomized study on 49 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorgeou, A; Perrillat, Y; Gral, N; Lagrange, S; Lacour, J-P; Passeron, T

    2018-02-01

    Q-switched nanosecond lasers demonstrated their efficacy in treating most types of tattoos, but complete disappearance is not always achieved even after performing numerous laser sessions. Picosecond lasers are supposed to be more efficient in clearing tattoos than nanosecond lasers, but prospective comparative data remain limited. To compare on different types of tattoos the efficacy of a nanosecond laser with two types of picosecond lasers. We conducted a prospective randomized study performed from December 2014 to June 2016 on adult patients with all types of tattoos. The tattoos were divided into two halves of equal size. After randomization, half of the tattoo was treated with a picosecond laser and the other half with a nanosecond laser. The evaluation was performed on standardized pictures performed before treatment and 2 months after the last session, by two physicians, not involved in the treatment, blinded on the type of treatments received. The main end point was a clearance above 75% of the tattoos. A total of 49 patients were included. Professional tattoos represented 85.7%, permanent make-up 8.2% and non-professional tattoo 6.1%. The majority were black or blue and 10.2% were polychromatic. No patient was lost during follow-up. A reduction of 75% or more of the colour intensity was obtained for 33% of the tattoos treated with the picosecond lasers compared to 14% with the nanosecond laser (P = 0.008). An improvement superior to 75% was obtained in 34% monochromic black or blue tattoos with the picosecond lasers compared to 9% for the nanosecond laser. Only one of the five polychromic tattoos achieved more than 75% of improvement with the two types of laser. Our results show a statistically significant superiority of the picosecond lasers compared to the nanosecond laser for tattoo clearance. However, they do not show better efficacy for polychromic tattoos and the difference in terms of side-effects was also minimal with a tendency of picosecond

  2. Hydrophobic treatment on polymethylmethacrylate surface by nanosecond-pulse DBDs in CF4 at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Zhou, Yang; Shao, Tao; Xie, Qing; Xu, Jiayu; Yang, Wenjin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Increase in hydrophobicity on PMMA is achieved after the DBD treatment in CF 4 , and the water contact angle can increase from 68° to 100° after treatment. • Nanosecond-pulse DBD is used for the surface treatment and the power density is about 114.8 mW/cm 2 . • The effects of applied voltage, CF 4 flow, and time on plasma treatment are investigated. • Plasma treatment causes morphological change, significantly increases the roughness of the surface, and introduces fluorine-containing groups into the polymethylmethacrylate surface. • Hydrophobic behavior of the treated PMMA surface is slightly affected by the aging effect. - Abstract: Nanosecond-pulse dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) can provide non-thermal plasmas with extremely high energy and high density, which can result in a series of complicated physical and chemical reactions in the surface treatment of polymers. Therefore, in this paper, hydrophobic treatment of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) surface is conducted by nanosecond-pulse DBD in carbon tetrafluoride (CF 4 ) at atmospheric pressure. Investigations on surface morphology and chemical composition before and after the DBD treatment in CF 4 are conducted with the contact angle measurement, atomic force microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectrometer. The effects of the applied voltage, CF 4 flow rate, and treatment time on the hydrophobic modification are studied. Results show that the contact angles of the treated PMMA surface increases with the applied voltage, and it could be greatly affected by the CF 4 flow rate and the treatment time. The water contact angle can increase from 68° to 100° after the treatment. Furthermore, both surface morphology and chemical composition of the PMMA samples are changed. Both the increase of the surface roughness and the occurrence of fluorine-containing functional groups on the PMMA surface treated by DBD in CF 4 lead to the hydrophobicity

  3. Studies of multi-wavelength laser-induced damage on KDP crystals in the nanosecond regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyne, Stephane

    2011-01-01

    This thesis interests in the laser-induced damage mechanisms of KDP and DKDP crystals in the nanosecond regime. KDP is a non-linear material particularly used in the frequency converters of the Laser MegaJoule, which is under construction at the CEA-Cesta in France. For this facility, the KDP laser damage resistance is one of the keystones and is still under investigations to fix this problem. This is why this manuscript presents different studies which highlight the two main aspects of the nanosecond laser-induced damage of KDP frequency converters: the precursor defects and the mechanisms to initiate damage. First, we propose a study based on the analysis of several photos obtained by DIC microscopy of damage initiated by different wavelengths. A comparison with a code coupling the energy deposition and hydrodynamic is also done. Then, we interest in the influence of the defects geometry through a study based on the laser polarization effect on the laser damage resistance. By the comparison with a CEA home-made code, this study particularly underlines the possibility to define a new geometry for the precursor defects. This geometry proposed has the shape of an ellipsoid and is supposed to keep the crystal structure properties. Finally, we enlarge on the physical mechanisms initiating laser damage with pump-pump experiments. These tests consist in combining two radiations of different wavelengths which impacting the crystal simultaneously or are delayed one by the other. We then observe the influence of this wavelengths mixing on the KDP laser damage resistance. In particular, a coupling effect between the wavelengths of the mixture may occur as a function of the fluences combination. Finally, the goal of these specific studies is to accumulate new data in order to improve the understanding in the initiation of the laser damage in KDP and DKDP crystals in the nanosecond regime. In the end, these data will allow us to develop predictive models to simulate the laser

  4. Wind tunnel experiments on flow separation control of an Unmanned Air Vehicle by nanosecond discharge plasma aerodynamic actuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Kang; Liang Hua

    2016-01-01

    Plasma flow control (PFC) is a new kind of active flow control technology, which can improve the aerodynamic performances of aircrafts remarkably. The flow separation control of an unmanned air vehicle (UAV) by nanosecond discharge plasma aerodynamic actuation (NDPAA) is investigated experimentally in this paper. Experimental results show that the applied voltages for both the nanosecond discharge and the millisecond discharge are nearly the same, but the current for nanosecond discharge (30 A) is much bigger than that for millisecond discharge (0.1 A). The flow field induced by the NDPAA is similar to a shock wave upward, and has a maximal velocity of less than 0.5 m/s. Fast heating effect for nanosecond discharge induces shock waves in the quiescent air. The lasting time of the shock waves is about 80 μs and its spread velocity is nearly 380 m/s. By using the NDPAA, the flow separation on the suction side of the UAV can be totally suppressed and the critical stall angle of attack increases from 20° to 27° with a maximal lift coefficient increment of 11.24%. The flow separation can be suppressed when the discharge voltage is larger than the threshold value, and the optimum operation frequency for the NDPAA is the one which makes the Strouhal number equal one. The NDPAA is more effective than the millisecond discharge plasma aerodynamic actuation (MDPAA) in boundary layer flow control. The main mechanism for nanosecond discharge is shock effect. Shock effect is more effective in flow control than momentum effect in high speed flow control. (paper)

  5. Mozart versus new age music: relaxation states, stress, and ABC relaxation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jonathan C; Joyce, Carol A

    2004-01-01

    Smith's (2001) Attentional Behavioral Cognitive (ABC) relaxation theory proposes that all approaches to relaxation (including music) have the potential for evoking one or more of 15 factor-analytically derived relaxation states, or "R-States" (Sleepiness, Disengagement, Rested / Refreshed, Energized, Physical Relaxation, At Ease/Peace, Joy, Mental Quiet, Childlike Innocence, Thankfulness and Love, Mystery, Awe and Wonder, Prayerfulness, Timeless/Boundless/Infinite, and Aware). The present study investigated R-States and stress symptom-patterns associated with listening to Mozart versus New Age music. Students (N = 63) were divided into three relaxation groups based on previously determined preferences. Fourteen listened to a 28-minute tape recording of Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik and 14 listened to a 28-minute tape of Steven Halpern's New Age Serenity Suite. Others (n = 35) did not want music and instead chose a set of popular recreational magazines. Participants engaged in their relaxation activity at home for three consecutive days for 28 minutes a session. Before and after each session, each person completed the Smith Relaxation States Inventory (Smith, 2001), a comprehensive questionnaire tapping 15 R-States as well as the stress states of somatic stress, worry, and negative emotion. Results revealed no differences at Session 1. At Session 2, those who listened to Mozart reported higher levels of At Ease/Peace and lower levels of Negative Emotion. Pronounced differences emerged at Session 3. Mozart listeners uniquely reported substantially higher levels of Mental Quiet, Awe and Wonder, and Mystery. Mozart listeners reported higher levels, and New Age listeners slightly elevated levels, of At Ease/Peace and Rested/Refreshed. Both Mozart and New Age listeners reported higher levels of Thankfulness and Love. In summary, those who listened to Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik reported more psychological relaxation and less stress than either those who listened to

  6. Asymptotic representation of relaxation oscillations in lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Grigorieva, Elena V

    2017-01-01

    In this book we analyze relaxation oscillations in models of lasers with nonlinear elements controlling light dynamics. The models are based on rate equations taking into account periodic modulation of parameters, optoelectronic delayed feedback, mutual coupling between lasers, intermodal interaction and other factors. With the aim to study relaxation oscillations we present the special asymptotic method of integration for ordinary differential equations and differential-difference equations. As a result, they are reduced to discrete maps. Analyzing the maps we describe analytically such nonlinear phenomena in lasers as multistability of large-amplitude relaxation cycles, bifurcations of cycles, controlled switching of regimes, phase synchronization in an ensemble of coupled systems and others. The book can be fruitful for students and technicians in nonlinear laser dynamics and in differential equations.

  7. Relaxation oscillation logic in Josephson junction circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulton, T.A.

    1981-01-01

    A dc powered, self-resetting Josephson junction logic circuit relying on relaxation oscillations is described. A pair of Josephson junction gates are connected in series, a first shunt is connected in parallel with one of the gates, and a second shunt is connected in parallel with the series combination of gates. The resistance of the shunts and the dc bias current bias the gates so that they are capable of undergoing relaxation oscillations. The first shunt forms an output line whereas the second shunt forms a control loop. The bias current is applied to the gates so that, in the quiescent state, the gate in parallel with the second shunt is at V O, and the other gate is undergoing relaxation oscillations. By controlling the state of the first gate with the current in the output loop of another identical circuit, the invert function is performed

  8. Muon spin relaxation in ferromagnets. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovesey, S.W.; Karlsson, E.B.

    1991-04-01

    Expressions for the dipolar and hyperfine contributions to the relaxation rate of muons implanted in a ferromagnet are presented and analysed using the Heisenberg model of spin-waves including dipolar and Zeeman energies. Calculations for EuO indicate that relaxation is likely to be dominated by the hyperfine mechanism, even if the ratio of the hyperfine and dipolar coupling constants is small. The hyperfine mechanism is sensitive to the dipolar energy of the atomic spins, whereas the dipolar mechanisms depend essentially on the exchange energy. For both mechanisms there is an almost quadratic dependence on temperature, throughout much of the ordered magnetic phase, which reflects two-spin-wave difference events from the Raman-type relaxation processes. (author)

  9. Improved memristor-based relaxation oscillator

    KAUST Repository

    Mosad, Ahmed G.

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents an improved memristor-based relaxation oscillator which offers higher frequency and wider tunning range than the existing reactance-less oscillators. It also has the capability of operating on two positive supplies or alternatively a positive and negative supply. Furthermore, it has the advantage that it can be fully integrated on-chip providing an area-efficient solution. On the other hand, The oscillation concept is discussed then a complete mathematical analysis of the proposed oscillator is introduced. Furthermore, the power consumption of the new relaxation circuit is discussed and validated by the PSPICE circuit simulations showing an excellent agreement. MATLAB results are also introduced to demonstrate the resistance range and the corresponding frequency range which can be obtained from the proposed relaxation oscillator. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Relaxation and Diffusion in Complex Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ngai, K L

    2011-01-01

    Relaxation and Diffusion in Complex Systems comprehensively presents a variety of experimental evidences of universal relaxation and diffusion properties in complex materials and systems. The materials discussed include liquids, glasses, colloids, polymers, rubbers, plastic crystals and aqueous mixtures, as well as carbohydrates, biomolecules, bioprotectants and pharmaceuticals. Due to the abundance of experimental data, emphasis is placed on glass-formers and the glass transition problem, a still unsolved problem in condensed matter physics and chemistry. The evidence for universal properties of relaxation and diffusion dynamics suggests that a fundamental physical law is at work. The origin of the universal properties is traced to the many-body effects of the interaction, rigorous theory of which does not exist at the present time. However, using solutions of simplified models as guides, key quantities have been identified and predictions of the universal properties generated. These predictions from Ngai’...

  11. Electron relaxation properties of Ar magnetron plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinjing, CAI; Xinxin, WANG; Xiaobing, ZOU

    2018-03-01

    An understanding of electron relaxation properties in plasmas is of importance in the application of magnetrons. An improved multi-term approximation of the Boltzmann equation is employed to study electron transport and relaxation properties in plasmas. Elastic, inelastic and nonconservative collisions between electrons and neutral particles are considered. The expressions for the transport coefficients are obtained using the expansion coefficients and the collision operator term. Numerical solutions of the matrix equations for the expansion coefficients are also investigated. Benchmark calculations of the Reid model are presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the improved multi-term approximation. It is shown that the two-term approximation is generally not accurate enough and the magnetic fields can reduce the anisotropy of the velocity distribution function. The electron relaxation properties of Ar plasmas in magnetrons for various magnetic fields are studied. It is demonstrated that the energy parameters change more slowly than the momentum parameters.

  12. Kinetic details of crystallization in supercooled liquid Pb during the isothermal relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Lili; Liu Rangsu; Tian Zean; Liu Hairong; Hou Zhaoyang; Peng Ping; Zhu Xuanmin; Liu Quanhui

    2012-01-01

    The kinetic details of crystallization in supercooled liquid Pb during the isothermal relaxation process have been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations, and the microstructure evolution analyzed by the cluster-type index method (CTIM) and the tracing method. It has been found that, the dynamic features are consistently correlated with the microstructure evolution and the crystallization characteristics in the mean square displacement (MSD) and the non-Gaussian parameter (NGP): the β relaxation regime corresponds to the minor structural rearrangement because of the “cage effect”, and the atoms attempt to escape from the “cages”; the α relaxation regime is related to a more diffusive movement of atoms, and the appearance of the second plateau in MSD and the non-zero plateau in NGP corresponds to the completion of crystallization. In addition, three distinct stages of nucleation, growth of nuclei and coarsening of crystallites in the crystallization process have been clearly revealed.

  13. Atomistic simulation of processes in Ni-base alloys with account for local relaxations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursik, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    Ordering in Ni-base superalloys is the crucial process controlling the development of the characteristic two-phase microstructure and subsequently the mechanical properties. Systems containing up to six alloying elements typical of advanced Ni-based superalloys are modelled in this work using a Monte Carlo approach with phenomenological Lennard-Jones pair potentials and interactions up to the third coordination sphere. Three-dimensional crystal block is used with over 10 5 atoms. Molecular dynamics approach is used to relax local atomic positions in course of ordering processes under applied stress. The importance of taking into account both relaxation of modelled block dimensions and relaxation of local atomic positions is discussed

  14. Nanosecond field emitted and photo-field emitted current pulses from ZrC tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganter, R.; Bakker, R.J.; Gough, C.; Paraliev, M.; Pedrozzi, M.; Le Pimpec, F.; Rivkin, L.; Wrulich, A.

    2006-01-01

    In order to find electron sources with low thermal emittance, cathodes based on single tip field emitter are investigated. Maximum peak current, measured from single tip in ZrC with a typical apex radius around 1 μm, are presented. Voltage pulses of 2 ns duration and up to 50 kV amplitude lead to field emission current up to 470 mA from one ZrC tip. Combination of high applied electric field with laser illumination gives the possibility to modulate the emission with laser pulses. Nanoseconds current pulses have been emitted with laser pulses at 1064 nm illuminating a ZrC tip under high-DC electric field. The dependence of photo-field emitted current with the applied voltage can be explained by the Schottky effect

  15. Modeling of nanosecond pulsed laser processing of polymers in air and water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marla, Deepak; Zhang, Yang; Hattel, Jesper H.

    2018-01-01

    radiation (λ = 1064 nm) of nanosecond pulse duration. The laser–polymer interaction at such wavelengths is purely photo-thermal in nature and the laser–plasma interaction is assumed to occur mainly by inverse-bremsstrahlung photon absorption. The computational model is based on the finite volume method......Laser ablation of polymers in water is known to generate distinct surface characteristics as compared to that in air. In order to understand the role of ambient media during laser ablation of polymers, this paper aims to develop a physics-based model of the process considering the effect of ambient...... media. Therefore, in the present work, models are developed for laser ablation of polymers in air and water considering all the relevant physical phenomena such as laser–polymer interaction, plasma generation, plasma expansion and plasma shielding. The current work focuses on near-infrared laser...

  16. Comparative study of ornamental granite cleaning using femtosecond and nanosecond pulsed lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivas, T., E-mail: trivas@uvigo.es [Dpto. Ingeniería de los Recursos Naturales y Medioambiente. E.T.S. Ingeniería de Minas, Universidad de Vigo, 36200 Vigo Spain (Spain); Lopez, A.J.; Ramil, A. [Centro de Investigaciones Tecnológicas. Campus de Esteiro. Universidad de A Coruña 15403 Ferrol Spain (Spain); Pozo, S. [Dpto. Ingeniería de los Recursos Naturales y Medioambiente. E.T.S. Ingeniería de Minas, Universidad de Vigo, 36200 Vigo Spain (Spain); Fiorucci, M.P. [Centro de Investigaciones Tecnológicas. Campus de Esteiro. Universidad de A Coruña 15403 Ferrol Spain (Spain); Silanes, M.E. López de [Dpto. Ingeniería de los Recursos Naturales y Medioambiente. E.I. Forestales. Universidad de Vigo, Campus Pontevedra. 36005 Pontevedra Spain (Spain); García, A.; Aldana, J. R. Vazquez de; Romero, C.; Moreno, P. [Grupo de Investigación en Microprocesado de Materiales con Laser. Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Salamanca, 37008 Salamanca Spain (Spain)

    2013-08-01

    Granite has been widely used as a structural and ornamental element in public works and buildings. In damp climates it is almost permanently humid and its exterior surfaces are consequently biologically colonized and blackened We describe a comparative analysis of the performance of two different laser sources in removing biological crusts from granite surfaces: nanosecond Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser (355 nm) and femtosecond Ti:Sapphire laser at its fundamental wavelength (790 nm) and second harmonic (395 nm). The granite surface was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, attenuated total reflection – Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and profilometry, in order to assess the degree of cleaning and to characterize possible morphological and chemical changes caused by the laser sources.

  17. Nanosecond field emitted and photo-field emitted current pulses from ZrC tips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganter, R. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH 5232 (Switzerland)]. E-mail: romain.ganter@psi.ch; Bakker, R.J. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH 5232 (Switzerland); Gough, C. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH 5232 (Switzerland); Paraliev, M. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH 5232 (Switzerland); Pedrozzi, M. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH 5232 (Switzerland); Le Pimpec, F. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH 5232 (Switzerland); Rivkin, L. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH 5232 (Switzerland); Wrulich, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH 5232 (Switzerland)

    2006-09-15

    In order to find electron sources with low thermal emittance, cathodes based on single tip field emitter are investigated. Maximum peak current, measured from single tip in ZrC with a typical apex radius around 1 {mu}m, are presented. Voltage pulses of 2 ns duration and up to 50 kV amplitude lead to field emission current up to 470 mA from one ZrC tip. Combination of high applied electric field with laser illumination gives the possibility to modulate the emission with laser pulses. Nanoseconds current pulses have been emitted with laser pulses at 1064 nm illuminating a ZrC tip under high-DC electric field. The dependence of photo-field emitted current with the applied voltage can be explained by the Schottky effect.

  18. Visualization of nanosecond laser-induced dewetting, ablation and crystallization processes in thin silicon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Dongfeng; Zhang, Zifeng; Yu, Xiaohan; Zhang, Yawen

    2018-06-01

    In the present work, nanosecond pulsed laser crystallization, dewetting and ablation of thin amorphous silicon films are investigated by time-resolved imaging. Laser pulses of 532 nm wavelength and 7 ns temporal width are irradiated on silicon film. Below the dewetting threshold, crystallization process happens after 400 ns laser irradiation in the spot central region. With the increasing of laser fluence, it is observed that the dewetting process does not conclude until 300 ns after the laser irradiation, forming droplet-like particles in the spot central region. At higher laser intensities, ablative material removal occurs in the spot center. Cylindrical rims are formed in the peripheral dewetting zone due to solidification of transported matter at about 500 ns following the laser pulse exposure.

  19. Image-rotating cavity designs for improved beam quality in nanosecond optical parametric oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Arlee V.; Bowers, Mark S.

    2001-01-01

    We show by computer simulation that high beam quality can be achieved in high-energy, nanosecond optical parametric oscillators by use of image-rotating resonators. Lateral walk-off between the signal and the idler beams in a nonlinear crystal creates correlations across the beams in the walk off direction, or equivalently, creates a restricted acceptance angle. These correlations can improve the beam quality in the walk-off plane. We show that image rotation or reflection can be used to improve beam quality in both planes. The lateral walk-off can be due to birefringent walk-off in type II mixing or to noncollinear mixing in type I or type II mixing

  20. Nanosecond formation of diamond and lonsdaleite by shock compression of graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, D; Ravasio, A; Gauthier, M; Gericke, D O; Vorberger, J; Frydrych, S; Helfrich, J; Fletcher, L B; Schaumann, G; Nagler, B; Barbrel, B; Bachmann, B; Gamboa, E J; Göde, S; Granados, E; Gregori, G; Lee, H J; Neumayer, P; Schumaker, W; Döppner, T; Falcone, R W; Glenzer, S H; Roth, M

    2016-03-14

    The shock-induced transition from graphite to diamond has been of great scientific and technological interest since the discovery of microscopic diamonds in remnants of explosively driven graphite. Furthermore, shock synthesis of diamond and lonsdaleite, a speculative hexagonal carbon polymorph with unique hardness, is expected to happen during violent meteor impacts. Here, we show unprecedented in situ X-ray diffraction measurements of diamond formation on nanosecond timescales by shock compression of pyrolytic as well as polycrystalline graphite to pressures from 19 GPa up to 228 GPa. While we observe the transition to diamond starting at 50 GPa for both pyrolytic and polycrystalline graphite, we also record the direct formation of lonsdaleite above 170 GPa for pyrolytic samples only. Our experiment provides new insights into the processes of the shock-induced transition from graphite to diamond and uniquely resolves the dynamics that explain the main natural occurrence of the lonsdaleite crystal structure being close to meteor impact sites.

  1. Nanosecond laser scribing of CIGS thin film solar cell based on ITO bottom contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuk, Seungkuk; Wang, Zhen; Fu, Shi; Zhang, Tao; Yu, Yi Yin; Choi, JaeMyung; Jeong, Jeung-hyun; Hwang, David J.

    2018-03-01

    Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin films, a promising photovoltaic architecture, have mainly relied on Molybdenum for the bottom contact. However, the opaque nature of Molybdenum (Mo) poses limitations in module level fabrication by laser scribing as a preferred method for interconnect. We examined the P1, P2, and P3 laser scribing processes on CIGS photovoltaic architecture on the indium tin oxide (ITO) bottom contact with a cost-effective nanosecond pulsed laser of 532 nm wavelength. Laser illuminated from the substrate side, enabled by the transparent bottom contact, facilitated selective laser energy deposition onto relevant interfaces towards high-quality scribing. Parametric tuning procedures are described in conjunction with experimental and numerical investigation of relevant mechanisms, and preliminary mini-module fabrication results are also presented.

  2. Comparative study of ornamental granite cleaning using femtosecond and nanosecond pulsed lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivas, T.; Lopez, A.J.; Ramil, A.; Pozo, S.; Fiorucci, M.P.; Silanes, M.E. López de; García, A.; Aldana, J. R. Vazquez de; Romero, C.; Moreno, P.

    2013-01-01

    Granite has been widely used as a structural and ornamental element in public works and buildings. In damp climates it is almost permanently humid and its exterior surfaces are consequently biologically colonized and blackened We describe a comparative analysis of the performance of two different laser sources in removing biological crusts from granite surfaces: nanosecond Nd:YVO 4 laser (355 nm) and femtosecond Ti:Sapphire laser at its fundamental wavelength (790 nm) and second harmonic (395 nm). The granite surface was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, attenuated total reflection – Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and profilometry, in order to assess the degree of cleaning and to characterize possible morphological and chemical changes caused by the laser sources.

  3. High pulse energy sub-nanosecond Tm-doped fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cserteg, Andras; Guillemet, Sebastien; Hernandez, Yves; Giannone, Domenico

    2012-02-01

    We report a core pumped thulium-doped fiber amplifier that generates 1.4 μJ pulses at 1980 nm with a repetition rate of 3.6 MHz preserving the original spectral bandwidth of the oscillator. The amplifier chain is seeded by a passively modelocked fiber laser with 5 mW output power and the pulses are stretched to 800 picoseconds. The amplifier is core pumped by a single mode erbium fiber laser. The slope efficiency is 35%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of sub nanosecond pulses with energies higher than 1 μJ coming out of a thulium-doped fiber amplifier.

  4. Plasma-assisted ignition and combustion: nanosecond discharges and development of kinetic mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starikovskaia, S. M.

    2014-09-01

    This review covers the results obtained in the period 2006-2014 in the field of plasma-assisted combustion, and in particular the results on ignition and combustion triggered or sustained by pulsed nanosecond discharges in different geometries. Some benefits of pulsed high voltage discharges for kinetic study and for applications are demonstrated. The necessity of and the possibility of building a particular kinetic mechanism of plasma-assisted ignition and combustion are discussed. The most sensitive regions of parameters for plasma-combustion kinetic mechanisms are selected. A map of the pressure and temperature parameters (P-T diagram) is suggested, to unify the available data on ignition delay times, ignition lengths and densities of intermediate species reported by different authors.

  5. Particle-in-cell modeling of the nanosecond field emission driven discharge in pressurized hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levko, Dmitry; Yatom, Shurik; Krasik, Yakov E.

    2018-02-01

    The high-voltage field-emission driven nanosecond discharge in pressurized hydrogen is studied using the one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo collision model. It is obtained that the main part of the field-emitted electrons becomes runaway in the thin cathode sheath. These runaway electrons propagate the entire cathode-anode gap, creating rather dense (˜1012 cm-3) seeding plasma electrons. In addition, these electrons initiate a streamer propagating through this background plasma with a speed ˜30% of the speed of light. Such a high streamer speed allows the self-acceleration mechanism of runaway electrons present between the streamer head and the anode to be realized. As a consequence, the energy of runaway electrons exceeds the cathode-anode gap voltage. In addition, the influence of the field emission switching-off time is analyzed. It is obtained that this time significantly influences the discharge dynamics.

  6. Abnormal polarity effect in nanosecond-pulse breakdown of SF6 and nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, Tao; Tarasenko, Victor F.; Zhang, Cheng; Beloplotov, Dmitry S.; Yang, Wenjin; Lomaev, Mikhail I.; Zhou, Zhongsheng; Sorokin, Dmitry A.; Yan, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The breakdown of gas gaps in an inhomogeneous electric field at subnanosecond and nanosecond voltage pulse rise times are studied, and the famous polarity effect in point-to-plane gaps is investigated. It is shown that at a voltage pulse rise time of ∼0.5 ns, the inversion of polarity effect takes place not only in electronegative gases such as SF 6 , but also occurs in electropositive nitrogen. The inversion of polarity effect is related to a delay of electron emission from the plane cathode on arrival of the ionization wave front anode to the cathode. It is found that with a voltage pulse rise time of ∼0.5 ns, the inversion of polarity effect occurs at SF 6 and SF 6 –N 2 pressures of 0.25 MPa and lower, and with a voltage pulse rise time of 15 ns, at a SF 6 pressure lower than 0.12 MPa.

  7. Temporally resolved imaging on quenching and re-ignition of nanosecond underwater discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Yang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the temporally resolved images of plasma discharge in de-ionized water. The discharge was produced by high voltage pulses with 0.3 ns rise time and 10 ns duration. The temporal resolution of the imaging system was one nanosecond. A unique three-stage process, including a fast ignition at the leading edge of the pulse, quenching at the plateau of the pulse, and self re-ignition at the trailing edge of the pulse, was observed in a single pulse cycle. The maximum measured propagation velocity of the plasma discharge was about 1000 km/s. The possibility of direct ionization in water under high reduced electric field conditions was discussed.

  8. Ionization processes in combined high-voltage nanosecond - laser discharges in inert gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Shneider, Mikhail; PU Team

    2016-09-01

    Remote control of plasmas induced by laser radiation in the atmosphere is one of the challenging issues of free space communication, long-distance energy transmission, remote sensing of the atmosphere, and standoff detection of trace gases and bio-threat species. Sequences of laser pulses, as demonstrated by an extensive earlier work, offer an advantageous tool providing access to the control of air-plasma dynamics and optical interactions. The avalanche ionization induced in a pre-ionized region by infrared laser pulses where investigated. Pre-ionization was created by an ionization wave, initiated by high-voltage nanosecond pulse. Then, behind the front of ionization wave extra avalanche ionization was initiated by the focused infrared laser pulse. The experiment was carried out in argon. It is shown that the gas pre-ionization inhibits the laser spark generation under low pressure conditions.

  9. Experimental investigation on the repetitively nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge with the parallel magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yidi; Yan, Huijie; Guo, Hongfei; Fan, Zhihui; Wang, Yuying; Ren, Chunsheng

    2018-02-01

    The effects of a parallel magnetic field on the unipolar positive nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge are experimentally investigated through electrical and spectral measurements. The discharge is produced between two parallel-plate electrodes in the ambient air with a parallel magnetic field of 1.4 T. Experimental results show that both the discharge intensity and uniformity are improved in the discharge with the parallel magnetic field. The intensity ratio of the spectrum at 371.1 nm and 380.5 nm, which describes the average electron density, is increased by the parallel magnetic field. Meanwhile, the intensity ratio of the spectrum at 391.4 nm and 337.1 nm, which describes the electron temperature, is also increased. It is speculated that both the average electron density and the electron temperature are increased by the parallel magnetic field. The aforementioned phenomena have been explained by the confinement effect of the parallel magnetic field on the electrons.

  10. Histopathology of normal skin and melanomas after nanosecond pulsed electric field treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinhua; Swanson, R. James; Kolb, Juergen F.; Nuccitelli, Richard; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2011-01-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) can affect the intracellular structures of cells in vitro. This study shows the direct effects of nsPEFs on tumor growth, tumor volume, and histological characteristics of normal skin and B16-F10 melanoma in SKH-1 mice. A melanoma model was set up by injecting B16-F10 into female SKH-1 mice. After a 100-pulse treatment with an nsPEF (40-kV/cm field strength; 300-ns duration; 30-ns rise time; 2-Hz repetition rate), tumor growth and histology were studied using transillumination, light microscopy with hematoxylin and eosin stain and transmission electron microscopy. Melanin and iron within the melanoma tumor were also detected with specific stains. After nsPEF treatment, tumor development was inhibited with decreased volumes post-nsPEF treatment compared with control tumors (Pelectric fields surrounding the needle electrodes. PMID:19730404

  11. Environmental temperature affects physiology and survival of nanosecond pulsed electric field-treated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shengyong; Miao, Xudong; Zhang, Xueming; Chen, Xinhua; Wen, Hao

    2018-02-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) is a novel non-thermal tumor ablation technique. However, how nsPEF affect cell physiology at different environmental temperature is still kept unknown. But this issue is of critical clinical practice relevance. This work aim to investigate how nsPEF treated cancer cells react to different environmental temperatures (0, 4, 25, and 37°C). Their cell viability, apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were examined. Lower temperature resulted in higher apoptosis rate, decreased mitochondria membrane potential, and increased ROS levels. Sucrose and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) pre-incubation inhibit ROS generation and increase cell survival, protecting nsPEF-treated cells from low temperature-caused cell death. This work provides an experimental basis for hypothermia and fluid transfusion during nsPEF ablation with anesthesia. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Electric field measurements in a nanosecond pulse discharge by picosecond CARS/4-wave mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Ben; Shkurenkov, Ivan; Adamovich, Igor; Lempert, Walter

    2014-10-01

    Time-resolved electric field measurements in hydrogen by picosecond CARS/4-wave mixing are presented. Measurements are carried out in a high voltage nanosecond pulse discharge in hydrogen in plane-to-plane geometry, at pressures of up to several hundred Torr, and with a time resolution of 0.2 ns. Absolute calibration of the diagnostics is done using a sub-breakdown high voltage pulse of 12 kV/cm. A diffuse discharge is obtained by applying a peak high voltage pulse of 40 kV/cm between the electrodes. It is found that breakdown occurs at a lower field, 15--20 kV/cm, after which the field in the plasma is reduced rapidly due to plasma self shielding The experimental results are compared with kinetic modeling calculations, showing good agreement between the measured and the predicted electric field.

  13. Nanosecond laser ablation and deposition of silver, copper, zinc and tin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzaniga, Andrea Carlo; Ettlinger, Rebecca Bolt; Canulescu, Stela

    2014-01-01

    Nanosecond pulsed laser deposition of different metals (Ag, Cu, Sn, Zn) has been studied in high vacuum at a laser wavelength of 355 nm and pulse length of 6 ns. The deposition rate is roughly similar for Sn, Cu and Ag, which have comparable cohesive energies, and much higher for the deposition...... of Zn which has a low cohesive energy. The deposition rate for all metals is strongly correlated with the total ablation yield, i.e., the total mass ablated per pulse, reported in the literature except for Sn, for which the deposition rate is low, but the total ablation yield is high. This may...... be explained by the continuous erosion by nanoparticles during deposition of the Sn films which appear to have a much rougher surface than those of the other metals studied in the present work....

  14. One - step nanosecond laser microstructuring, sulfur hyperdoping, and annealing of silicon surfaces in liquid carbondisulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Luong, Nguyen; Danilov, P. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Khmel'nitskii, P. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Mel'nik, N. N.; Saraeva, I. N.; Смirnov, H. A.; Rudenko, A. A.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2017-09-01

    We perform a single-shot IR nanosecond laser processing of commercial silicon wafers in ambient air and under a 2 mm thick carbon disulfide liquid layer. We characterize the surface spots modified in the liquid ambient and the spots ablated under the same conditions in air in terms of its surface topography, chemical composition, band-structure modification, and crystalline structure by means of SEM and EDX microscopy, as well as of FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy. These studies indicate that single-step microstructuring and deep (up to 2-3% on the surface) hyperdoping of the crystalline silicon in its submicron surface layer, preserving via pulsed laser annealing its crystallinity and providing high (103 - 104 cm-1) spectrally at near- and mid-IR absorption coefficients, can be obtained in this novel approach, which is very promising for thin - film silicon photovoltaic devices

  15. Micromachining of glass by the third harmonic of nanosecond Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramil, A. [Centro de Investigacions Tecnoloxicas, Universidade da Coruna, E-15403 Ferrol (A Coruna) (Spain)], E-mail: aramil@cdf.udc.es; Lamas, J.; Alvarez, J.C.; Lopez, A.J.; Saavedra, E.; Yanez, A. [Centro de Investigacions Tecnoloxicas, Universidade da Coruna, E-15403 Ferrol (A Coruna) (Spain)

    2009-03-01

    The ablation processing of glass was performed by using the third harmonic of nanosecond Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser. The objective of this work was the formation of deep holes with a high aspect ratio in soda lime glass; with this purpose different ways to raster the glass surface with the focused laser beam, i.e., single line, parallel lines and orthogonally crossing lines, have been tried and the effect of different parameters as the number of lines and number of scans in the depth and inclination of the sidewalls of the hole has been analyzed. Moreover, to reduce the time consumption in the laser processing of glass plates the relationship between penetration depths and overlapping factor has been studied and an optimum value of scan speed has been obtained for a particular case.

  16. Surface modification of PET films using dielectric barrier discharge driven by repetitive nanosecond-pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Tao; Zhang Cheng; Long Kaihua; Wang Jue; Zhang Dongdong; Yan Ping; Zhou Yuanxiang

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, surface treatment of PET films for improving the hydrophilicity using DBD excited by unipolar nanosecond-pulses is presented. Homogeneous and filamentary discharge are obtained under certain experimental conditions and then used to modify the surface of PET films. The properties of PET films before and after treatment are characterized with water contact angle measurement, atomic force microscope and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope. The experimental results show that static water contact angles decrease after DBD plasma treatment and the observed contact angle is changed from 80 degree for the untreated samples to 20 degree after treatment. However, the decrease of contact angles is not continuous and it will reach a saturation state after certain treatment time. The improvement of surface hydrophilicity can be attributed to the enhancement of the surface roughness and introduction of oxygen-containing polar functional groups. In contrast with the filamentary DBD treatment, the homogenous DBD is more effective in PET surface treatment. (authors)

  17. Dynamics of the plume produced by nanosecond ultraviolet laser ablation of metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, J.G.

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of the ablation plume of a partially ionized plasma produced by a nanosecond UV laser with different irradiation spot geometries has been explored. We have used an ensemble of quartz crystal microbalances to make the first systematic and quantitative study of how the shape of the plume...... varies as the aspect ratio (b/a) of the elliptical laser spot is varied by about a factor of ten. The flip-over effect can be described by the adiabatic expansion model of Anisimov using a value of the adiabatic constant of about gamma = 1.4. We have also studied the forward peaking of the ablation plume...... for a large number of metals at the same laser fluence. Contrary to earlier reports, we find that the more refractory metals have the broader angular distributions....

  18. Laser ablation of lysozyme with UV, visible and infrared femto- and nanosecond pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Canulescu, Stela; Matei, Andreea

    Lysozyme is an interesting molecule for laser ablation of organic materials, because the ablation has been comprehensively studied, it is a medium heavy molecule with a mass of 14305 Da, which can be detected by standard techniques, and because it is used as a bactericidal protein in the food...... industry. Lysozyme molecules do not absorb energy for wavelengths above 310 nm, but nevertheless there is a strong mass loss by ablation for laser irradiation in the visible regime. The total ablation yield of lysozyme at 355 nm and at 2 J/cm2 is about 155 µg/pulse, possibly one of the highest ablation...... the ablation process for different wavelengths and time duration. Measurements for 6-7-ns laser ablation were carried out at DTU on Risø Campus, while measurements with pulses of 300 fs were carried out at the University of Naples in a similar setup. For all wavelengths except at nanosecond laser pulses at 355...

  19. High resolution selective multilayer laser processing by nanosecond laser ablation of metal nanoparticle films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Seung H.; Pan Heng; Hwang, David J.; Chung, Jaewon; Ryu, Sangil; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2007-01-01

    Ablation of gold nanoparticle films on polymer was explored using a nanosecond pulsed laser, with the goal to achieve feature size reduction and functionality not amenable with inkjet printing. The ablation threshold fluence for the unsintered nanoparticle deposit was at least ten times lower than the reported threshold for the bulk film. This could be explained by the combined effects of melting temperature depression, lower conductive heat transfer loss, strong absorption of the incident laser beam, and the relatively weak bonding between nanoparticles. The ablation physics were verified by the nanoparticle sintering characterization, ablation threshold measurement, time resolved ablation plume shadowgraphs, analysis of ablation ejecta, and the measurement and calculation of optical properties. High resolution and clean feature fabrication with small energy and selective multilayer processing are demonstrated

  20. Nanosecond radio bursts from strong plasma turbulence in the Crab pulsar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankins, T H; Kern, J S; Weatherall, J C; Eilek, J A

    2003-03-13

    The Crab pulsar was discovered by the occasional exceptionally bright radio pulses it emits, subsequently dubbed 'giant' pulses. Only two other pulsars are known to emit giant pulses. There is no satisfactory explanation for the occurrence of giant pulses, nor is there a complete theory of the pulsar emission mechanism in general. Competing models for the radio emission mechanism can be distinguished by the temporal structure of their coherent emission. Here we report the discovery of isolated, highly polarized, two-nanosecond subpulses within the giant radio pulses from the Crab pulsar. The plasma structures responsible for these emissions must be smaller than one metre in size, making them by far the smallest objects ever detected and resolved outside the Solar System, and the brightest transient radio sources in the sky. Only one of the current models--the collapse of plasma-turbulent wave packets in the pulsar magnetosphere--can account for the nanopulses we observe.

  1. Nanoparticle mediated ablation of breast cancer cells using a nanosecond pulsed electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burford, Christopher

    In the past, both nanomaterials and various heating modalities have been researched as means for treating cancers. However, many of the current methodologies have the flaws of inconsistent tumor ablation and significant destruction of healthy cells. Based on research performed using constant radiofrequency electric fields and metallic nanoparticles (where cell necrosis is induced by the heating of these nanoparticles) we have developed a modality that simlarly uses functionalized metallic nanoparticles, specific for the T47D breast cancer cell line, and nanosecond pulsed electric fields as the hyperthermic inducer. Using both iron oxide and gold nanoparticles the results of our pilot studies indicated that up to 90% of the cancer cells were ablated given the optimal treatment parameters. These quantities of ablated cells were achieved using a cumulative exposure time 6 orders of magnitude less than most in vitro radiofrequency electric field studies.

  2. Thermodynamics of nanosecond nanobubble formation at laser-excited metal nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siems, A; Weber, S A L; Boneberg, J; Plech, A

    2011-01-01

    The nonlinear thermal behavior of laser-heated gold nanoparticles in aqueous suspension is determined by time-resolved optical spectroscopy and x-ray scattering. The nanoparticles can be excited transiently to high lattice temperatures owing to their large absorption cross-section and slow heat dissipation to the surrounding. A consequence is the observation of lattice expansion, changed optical transmission, vapor bubble formation or particle melting. The heat transfer equations are solved for two limiting cases of heat pulses shorter and longer than the characteristic cooling time. The results of pulsed excitation with femtosecond and nanosecond lasers are explained by the theoretical prediction, and the bubble formation is interpreted by a spinodal decomposition at the particle-liquid interface. It is shown that both the laser spectroscopy and x-ray scattering results agree qualitatively and quantitatively, underlining the validity of the comprehensive model.

  3. Applications of nanosecond, kilojoule lasers to the basic physics of waves in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Plasmas can sustain many normal modes of oscillation (waves), including both electromagnetic and electrostatic modes. These waves can interact by a wide variety of linear and nonlinear mechanisms, including mode coupling, mixing, and instabilities. Furthermore, such mechanisms compete, so that a given wave might be absorbed, might mode convert, or might decay by one of several instabilities, depending upon the specific circumstances in which it is produced. Moreover, such waves are important in many applications, including for example laser fusion, x-ray lasers, plasma accelerators, and ionospheric heating. Laser-produced plasmas can provide an effective medium for the studies of such waves and the related mechanisms. New opportunities will be made possible by the advent of comparatively inexpensive nanosecond, kilojoule lasers. One can now contemplate affordable experiments, not limited by programmatic constraints, that could study such the basic physics of the waves in such plasmas with unprecedented precision and in unprecedented detail

  4. Abrupt relaxation in high-spin molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.-R.; Cheng, T.C.

    2000-01-01

    Mean-field model suggests that the rate of resonant quantum tunneling in high-spin molecules is not only field-dependent but also time-dependent. The relaxation-assisted resonant tunneling in high-spin molecules produces an abrupt magnetization change during relaxation. When the applied field is very close to the resonant field, a time-dependent interaction field gradually shifts the energies of different collective spin states, and magnetization tunneling is observed as two energies of the spin states coincide

  5. Relaxed plasmas in external magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spies, G.O.; Li, J.

    1991-08-01

    The well-known theory of relaxed plasmas (Taylor states) is extended to external magnetic fields whose field lines intersect the conducting toroidal boundary. Application to an axially symmetric, large-aspect-ratio torus with circular cross section shows that the maximum pinch ratio, and hence the phenomenon of current saturation, is independent of the external field. The relaxed state is explicitly given for an external octupole field. In this case, field reversal is inhibited near parts of the boundary if the octupole generates magnetic x-points within the plasma. (orig.)

  6. Spin transport and relaxation in graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Wei; McCreary, K.M.; Pi, K.; Wang, W.H.; Li Yan; Wen, H.; Chen, J.R.; Kawakami, R.K.

    2012-01-01

    We review our recent work on spin injection, transport and relaxation in graphene. The spin injection and transport in single layer graphene (SLG) were investigated using nonlocal magnetoresistance (MR) measurements. Spin injection was performed using either transparent contacts (Co/SLG) or tunneling contacts (Co/MgO/SLG). With tunneling contacts, the nonlocal MR was increased by a factor of ∼1000 and the spin injection/detection efficiency was greatly enhanced from ∼1% (transparent contacts) to ∼30%. Spin relaxation was investigated on graphene spin valves using nonlocal Hanle measurements. For transparent contacts, the spin lifetime was in the range of 50-100 ps. The effects of surface chemical doping showed that for spin lifetimes in the order of 100 ps, charged impurity scattering (Au) was not the dominant mechanism for spin relaxation. While using tunneling contacts to suppress the contact-induced spin relaxation, we observed the spin lifetimes as long as 771 ps at room temperature, 1.2 ns at 4 K in SLG, and 6.2 ns at 20 K in bilayer graphene (BLG). Furthermore, contrasting spin relaxation behaviors were observed in SLG and BLG. We found that Elliot-Yafet spin relaxation dominated in SLG at low temperatures whereas Dyakonov-Perel spin relaxation dominated in BLG at low temperatures. Gate tunable spin transport was studied using the SLG property of gate tunable conductivity and incorporating different types of contacts (transparent and tunneling contacts). Consistent with theoretical predictions, the nonlocal MR was proportional to the SLG conductivity for transparent contacts and varied inversely with the SLG conductivity for tunneling contacts. Finally, bipolar spin transport in SLG was studied and an electron-hole asymmetry was observed for SLG spin valves with transparent contacts, in which nonlocal MR was roughly independent of DC bias current for electrons, but varied significantly with DC bias current for holes. These results are very important for

  7. Nonlocal and collective relaxation in stellar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Martin D.

    1993-01-01

    The modal response of stellar systems to fluctuations at large scales is presently investigated by means of analytic theory and n-body simulation; the stochastic excitation of these modes is shown to increase the relaxation rate even for a system which is moderately far from instability. The n-body simulations, when designed to suppress relaxation at small scales, clearly show the effects of large-scale fluctuations. It is predicted that large-scale fluctuations will be largest for such marginally bound systems as forming star clusters and associations.

  8. NMR relaxation times of natural rubber latex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harun, S.; Aziz, H.; Basir, Z.

    1994-01-01

    NMR relaxation times T sub 1 and T sub 2 of natural rubber latex have been measured at 25 degree C on a pulsed NMR spectrometer. The work focuses on the variation of the relaxation times with the amount of water content from 0% to 50%. The water content was adjusted by centrifuging and removing a certain amount of water from the sample. The data were analysed using a biexponential fitting procedure which yields simultaneously either T sub 1a and T sub 1b or T sub 2a and T sub 2b. The amount of solid was compared with the known amount of dry rubber content

  9. Exciton-relaxation dynamics in lead halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwanaga, Masanobu; Hayashi, Tetsusuke

    2003-01-01

    We survey recent comprehensive studies of exciton relaxation in the crystals of lead halides. The luminescence and electron-spin-resonance studies have revealed that excitons in lead bromide spontaneously dissociate and both electrons and holes get self-trapped individually. Similar relaxation has been also clarified in lead chloride. The electron-hole separation is ascribed to repulsive correlation via acoustic phonons. Besides, on the basis of the temperature profiles of self-trapped states, we discuss the origin of luminescence components which are mainly induced under one-photon excitation into the exciton band in lead fluoride, lead chloride, and lead bromide

  10. Point defect relaxation volumes for copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, K.M.

    1979-11-01

    The methods used for the determination of point defect relaxation volumes are discussed and it is shown that a previous interatomic potential derived for copper is inaccurate and results obtained using it are invalid. A new interatomic potential has been produced for copper and a computer simulation of point and planar defects carried out. A vacancy relaxation volume of -0.33 atomic volumes has been found with interstitial values in the range 1.7 to 2.0 atomic volumes. It is shown that these values in current theories of irradiation induced swelling lead to an anomalously high value for dislocation bias compared with that determined experimentally. (author)

  11. The second phase of bipolar, nanosecond-range electric pulses determines the electroporation efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomov, Andrei G; Grigoryev, Sergey; Semenov, Iurii; Casciola, Maura; Jiang, Chunqi; Xiao, Shu

    2018-03-29

    Bipolar cancellation refers to a phenomenon when applying a second electric pulse reduces ("cancels") cell membrane damage by a preceding electric pulse of the opposite polarity. Bipolar cancellation is a reason why bipolar nanosecond electric pulses (nsEP) cause weaker electroporation than just a single unipolar phase of the same pulse. This study was undertaken to explore the dependence of bipolar cancellation on nsEP parameters, with emphasis on the amplitude ratio of two opposite polarity phases of a bipolar pulse. Individual cells (CHO, U937, or adult mouse ventricular cardiomyocytes (VCM)) were exposed to either uni- or bipolar trapezoidal nsEP, or to nanosecond electric field oscillations (NEFO). The membrane injury was evaluated by time-lapse confocal imaging of the uptake of propidium (Pr) or YO-PRO-1 (YP) dyes and by phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization. Within studied limits, bipolar cancellation showed little or no dependence on the electric field intensity, pulse repetition rate, chosen endpoint, or cell type. However, cancellation could increase for larger pulse numbers and/or for longer pulses. The sole most critical parameter which determines bipolar cancellation was the phase ratio: maximum cancellation was observed with the 2nd phase of about 50% of the first one, whereas a larger 2nd phase could add a damaging effect of its own. "Swapping" the two phases, i.e., delivering the smaller phase before the larger one, reduced or eliminated cancellation. These findings are discussed in the context of hypothetical mechanisms of bipolar cancellation and electroporation by nsEP. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Two modes of cell death caused by exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga N Pakhomova

    Full Text Available High-amplitude electric pulses of nanosecond duration, also known as nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF, are a novel modality with promising applications for cell stimulation and tissue ablation. However, key mechanisms responsible for the cytotoxicity of nsPEF have not been established. We show that the principal cause of cell death induced by 60- or 300-ns pulses in U937 cells is the loss of the plasma membrane integrity ("nanoelectroporation", leading to water uptake, cell swelling, and eventual membrane rupture. Most of this early necrotic death occurs within 1-2 hr after nsPEF exposure. The uptake of water is driven by the presence of pore-impermeable solutes inside the cell, and can be counterbalanced by the presence of a pore-impermeable solute such as sucrose in the medium. Sucrose blocks swelling and prevents the early necrotic death; however the long-term cell survival (24 and 48 hr does not significantly change. Cells protected with sucrose demonstrate higher incidence of the delayed death (6-24 hr post nsPEF. These cells are more often positive for the uptake of an early apoptotic marker dye YO-PRO-1 while remaining impermeable to propidium iodide. Instead of swelling, these cells often develop apoptotic fragmentation of the cytoplasm. Caspase 3/7 activity increases already in 1 hr after nsPEF and poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP cleavage is detected in 2 hr. Staurosporin-treated positive control cells develop these apoptotic signs only in 3 and 4 hr, respectively. We conclude that nsPEF exposure triggers both necrotic and apoptotic pathways. The early necrotic death prevails under standard cell culture conditions, but cells rescued from the necrosis nonetheless die later on by apoptosis. The balance between the two modes of cell death can be controlled by enabling or blocking cell swelling.

  13. Cutting and drilling of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) by 70W short pulse nanosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeschke, Peter; Stolberg, Klaus; Bastick, Stefan; Ziolkowski, Ewa; Roehner, Markus; Suttmann, Oliver; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2014-02-01

    Continuous carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) are recognized as having a significant lightweight construction potential for a wide variety of industrial applications. However, a today`s barrier for a comprehensive dissemination of CFRP structures is the lack of economic, quick and reliable manufacture processes, e.g. the cutting and drilling steps. In this paper, the capability of using pulsed disk lasers in CFRP machining is discussed. In CFRP processing with NIR lasers, carbon fibers show excellent optical absorption and heat dissipation, contrary to the plastics matrix. Therefore heat dissipation away from the laser focus into the material is driven by heat conduction of the fibres. The matrix is heated indirectly by heat transfer from the fibres. To cut CFRP, it is required to reach the melting temperature for thermoplastic matrix materials or the disintegration temperature for thermoset systems as well as the sublimation temperature of the reinforcing fibers simultaneously. One solution for this problem is to use short pulse nanosecond lasers. We have investigated CFRP cutting and drilling with such a laser (max. 7 mJ @ 10 kHz, 30 ns). This laser offers the opportunity of wide range parameter tuning for systematic process optimization. By applying drilling and cutting operations based on galvanometer scanning techniques in multi-cycle mode, excellent surface and edge characteristics in terms of delamination-free and intact fiber-matrix interface were achieved. The results indicate that nanosecond disk laser machining could consequently be a suitable tool for the automotive and aircraft industry for cutting and drilling steps.

  14. Influence of grid resolution in fluid-model simulation of nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Weizhuo; Fukagata, Koji

    2018-04-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulation of a surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma actuator, driven by a nanosecond voltage pulse, is conducted. A special focus is laid upon the influence of grid resolution on the computational result. It is found that the computational result is not very sensitive to the streamwise grid spacing, whereas the wall-normal grid spacing has a critical influence. In particular, the computed propagation velocity changes discontinuously around the wall-normal grid spacing about 2 μm due to a qualitative change of discharge structure. The present result suggests that a computational grid finer than that was used in most of previous studies is required to correctly capture the structure and dynamics of streamer: when a positive nanosecond voltage pulse is applied to the upper electrode, a streamer forms in the vicinity of upper electrode and propagates along the dielectric surface with a maximum propagation velocity of 2 × 108 cm/s, and a gap with low electron and ion density (i.e., plasma sheath) exists between the streamer and dielectric surface. Difference between the results obtained using the finer and the coarser grid is discussed in detail in terms of the electron transport at a position near the surface. When the finer grid is used, the low electron density near the surface is caused by the absence of ionization avalanche: in that region, the electrons generated by ionization is compensated by drift-diffusion flux. In contrast, when the coarser grid is used, underestimated drift-diffusion flux cannot compensate the electrons generated by ionization, and it leads to an incorrect increase of electron density.

  15. Plasma surface treatment of Cu by nanosecond-pulse diffuse discharges in atmospheric air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, ZHANG; Jintao, QIU; Fei, KONG; Xingmin, HOU; Zhi, FANG; Yu, YIN; Tao, SHAO

    2018-01-01

    Nanosecond-pulse diffuse discharges could provide high-density plasma and high-energy electrons at atmospheric pressure. In this paper, the surface treatment of Cu by nanosecond-pulse diffuse discharges is conducted in atmospheric air. Factors influencing the water contact angle (WCA), chemical composition and microhardness, such as the gap spacing and treatment time, are investigated. The results show that after the plasma surface treatment, the WCA considerably decreases from 87° to 42.3°, and the surface energy increases from 20.46 mJ m-2 to 66.28 mJ m-2. Results of energy dispersive x-ray analysis show that the concentration of carbon decreases, but the concentrations of oxygen and nitrogen increase significantly. Moreover, the microhardness increases by approximately 30% after the plasma treatment. The aforementioned changes on the Cu surface indicate the plasma surface treatment enhances the hydrophilicity and microhardness, and it cleans the carbon and achieves oxidization on the Cu surface. Furthermore, by increasing the gap spacing and treatment time, better treatment effects can be obtained. The microhardness in the case of a 2.5 cm gap is higher than that in the case of a 3 cm gap. More oxygen and nitrogen species appear on the Cu surface for the 2.5 cm gap treatment than for the 3 cm gap treatment. The WCA significantly decreases with the treatment time when it is no longer than 90 s, and then it reaches saturation. In addition, more oxygen-containing and nitrogen-containing groups appear after extended plasma treatment time. They contribute to the improvement of the hydrophilicity and oxidation on the Cu surface.

  16. Extended Smoluchowski models for interpreting relaxation phenomena in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polimeno, A.; Frezzato, D.; Saielli, G.; Moro, G.J.; Nordio, P.L.

    1998-01-01

    Interpretation of the dynamical behaviour of single molecules or collective modes in liquids has been increasingly centered, in the last decade, on complex liquid systems, including ionic solutions, polymeric liquids, supercooled fluids and liquid crystals. This has been made necessary by the need of interpreting dynamical data obtained by advanced experiments, like optical Kerr effect, time dependent fluorescence shift experiments, two-dimensional Fourier-transform and high field electron spin resonance and scattering experiments like quasi-elastic neutron scattering. This communication is centered on the definition, treatment and application of several extended stochastic models, which have proved to be very effective tools for interpreting and rationalizing complex relaxation phenomena in liquids structures. First, applications of standard Fokker-Planck equations for the orientational relaxation of molecules in isotropic and ordered liquid phase are reviewed. In particular attention will be focused on the interpretation of neutron scattering in nematics. Next, an extended stochastic model is used to interpret time-domain resolved fluorescence emission experiments. A two-body stochastic model allows the theoretical interpretation of dynamical Stokes shift effects in fluorescence emission spectra, performed on probes in isotropic and ordered polar phases. Finally, for the case of isotropic fluids made of small rigid molecules, a very detailed model is considered, which includes as basic ingredients a Fokker-Planck description of the molecular vibrational motion and the slow diffusive motion of a persistent cage structure together with the decay processes related to the changing structure of the cage. (author)

  17. Nuclear magnetic relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism: General theory with applications to two-spin systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2016-02-28

    In aqueous systems with immobilized macromolecules, including biological tissue, the longitudinal spin relaxation of water protons is primarily induced by exchange-mediated orientational randomization (EMOR) of intra- and intermolecular magnetic dipole-dipole couplings. We have embarked on a systematic program to develop, from the stochastic Liouville equation, a general and rigorous theory that can describe relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism over the full range of exchange rates, dipole coupling strengths, and Larmor frequencies. Here, we present a general theoretical framework applicable to spin systems of arbitrary size with symmetric or asymmetric exchange. So far, the dipolar EMOR theory is only available for a two-spin system with symmetric exchange. Asymmetric exchange, when the spin system is fragmented by the exchange, introduces new and unexpected phenomena. Notably, the anisotropic dipole couplings of non-exchanging spins break the axial symmetry in spin Liouville space, thereby opening up new relaxation channels in the locally anisotropic sites, including longitudinal-transverse cross relaxation. Such cross-mode relaxation operates only at low fields; at higher fields it becomes nonsecular, leading to an unusual inverted relaxation dispersion that splits the extreme-narrowing regime into two sub-regimes. The general dipolar EMOR theory is illustrated here by a detailed analysis of the asymmetric two-spin case, for which we present relaxation dispersion profiles over a wide range of conditions as well as analytical results for integral relaxation rates and time-dependent spin modes in the zero-field and motional-narrowing regimes. The general theoretical framework presented here will enable a quantitative analysis of frequency-dependent water-proton longitudinal relaxation in model systems with immobilized macromolecules and, ultimately, will provide a rigorous link between relaxation-based magnetic resonance image contrast and molecular parameters.

  18. Permeabilisation de membranes cellulaires a l'aide d'un laser nanoseconde amplifie par nanoparticules plasmoniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Louis Lalonde, Bastien

    The plasmic membrane of eukaryot cells provides a selective permeability between the cytoplasm and the external environment. It regulates the passage of ions (O2, N 2, K, etc...) and molecules (H2 O, C2H6 O, etc...) by mechanisms like passive diffusion and active transport. In various fields like molecular biology or drug development, it is sometimes needed to bypass this selective permeability to introduce external molecules that are normally impermeable to cell membrane. Examples of external molecules may be DNA plasmid, RNA segment or drugs. We propose a method based on laser amplification by plasmonic nanoparticles to overcome this biological barrier. This non invasive method increases the membrane permeability of a large number of cells in a short time. Optoporation by laser amplified with plasmonic nanoparticles consists of pulsed laser irradiation on cells that have been previously incubated with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The laser-AuNPs interactions will create a cavitation bubble which in turn will decrease the membrane permeability by disrupting the bilipid layer arrangement. Molecules in the external medium may then penetrate inside the cells and under the right experimental conditions, the cells will rapidly reseal their membrane and continue living without nefast effects. The feasibility of high throughput optical perforation amplified by plasmonic nanoparticles have been tested with a nanosecond pulsed laser working at 532 nm and 1064 nm. The plasma membrane of cancerous human fibroblast (melanoma wm278) have been successfully perforated while keeping an excellent viability rate. Up to 30% of cells are perforated in which the Lucifer Yellow fluorophore have been incorporated. The viability 2 h after the treatment was evaluated by PI exclusion and the long term vitality was tested by MTT essay. Under optimal conditions at 532 nm, the 2 h viability is 84% and the vitality start at 64% for 2h and reaches 88% after 72 h. With 1064 nm pusles, the 2 h

  19. On γ-relaxation process in crystallizable polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mindiyarov, Kh.G.; Zelenev, Yu.V.; Bartenev, G.M.

    1975-01-01

    In the present paper, with the aid of radiothermoluminescence technique γ-relaxation processes are investigated, which are conditioned by molecular mobility and are associated with defects in the crystalline structure of polymers PEh, PP, and elastomers PIB, NK, SKD, SKI exposed to γ-rays of Co 60 at a dose rate of 1 Mrad. The shape of the thermoluminescence curve, i.e. the luminescence intensity in the α - γ-maxima, their relationship, position with respect to temperature are strongly dependent on the degree of crystallinity, on the thermal and mechanical prehistory. In highly crystalline samples of PEh and PP α-maximum may be absent. Dependence has been studied of the luminescence intensity in the α- and γ-maxima (Isub(α)/Isub(γ)) on the crystallization temperature; the curve passes through the minimum when the crystallization rate is maximum. The relationship Isub(γ)re of crystallinity degree

  20. Multimodal targeted high relaxivity thermosensitive liposome for in vivo imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijten, Maayke M. P.; Hannah Degeling, M.; Chen, John W.; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory; Waterman, Peter; Weissleder, Ralph; Azzi, Jamil; Nicolay, Klaas; Tannous, Bakhos A.

    2015-11-01

    Liposomes are spherical, self-closed structures formed by lipid bilayers that can encapsulate drugs and/or imaging agents in their hydrophilic core or within their membrane moiety, making them suitable delivery vehicles. We have synthesized a new liposome containing gadolinium-DOTA lipid bilayer, as a targeting multimodal molecular imaging agent for magnetic resonance and optical imaging. We showed that this liposome has a much higher molar relaxivities r1 and r2 compared to a more conventional liposome containing gadolinium-DTPA-BSA lipid. By incorporating both gadolinium and rhodamine in the lipid bilayer as well as biotin on its surface, we used this agent for multimodal imaging and targeting of tumors through the strong biotin-streptavidin interaction. Since this new liposome is thermosensitive, it can be used for ultrasound-mediated drug delivery at specific sites, such as tumors, and can be guided by magnetic resonance imaging.