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Sample records for nanoscale ulsi device

  1. Terrestrial radiation effects in ULSI devices and electronic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ibe, Eishi H

    2014-01-01

    A practical guide on how mathematical approaches can be used to analyze and control radiation effects in semiconductor devices within various environments Covers faults in ULSI devices to failures in electronic systems caused by a wide variety of radiation fields, including electrons, alpha -rays, muons, gamma rays, neutrons and heavy ions. Readers will learn the environmental radiation features at the ground or avionics altitude. Readers will also learn how to make numerical models from physical insight and what kind of mathematical approaches should be implemented to analyze the radiation effects. A wide variety of mitigation techniques against soft-errors are reviewed and discussed. The author shows how to model sophisticated radiation effects in condensed matter in order to quantify and control them. The book provides the reader with the knowledge on a wide variety of radiation fields and their effects on the electronic devices and systems. It explains how electronic systems including servers and rout...

  2. Spintronics in nanoscale devices

    CERN Document Server

    Hedin, Eric R

    2013-01-01

    By exploiting the novel properties of quantum dots and nanoscale Aharonov-Bohm rings together with the electronic and magnetic properties of various semiconductor materials and graphene, researchers have conducted numerous theoretical and computational modeling studies and experimental tests that show promising behavior for spintronics applications. Spin polarization and spin-filtering capabilities and the ability to manipulate the electron spin state through external magnetic or electric fields have demonstrated the promise of workable nanoscale devices for computing and memory applications.

  3. Nanoscale wicking methods and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jijie (Inventor); Bronikowski, Michael (Inventor); Noca, Flavio (Inventor); Sansom, Elijah B. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A fluid transport method and fluid transport device are disclosed. Nanoscale fibers disposed in a patterned configuration allow transport of a fluid in absence of an external power source. The device may include two or more fluid transport components having different fluid transport efficiencies. The components may be separated by additional fluid transport components, to control fluid flow.

  4. Nanoscale Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xiaoye

    Continuous downscaling in microelectronics has pushed conventional CMOS technology to its physical limits, while Moore's Law has correctly predicted the trend for decades, each step forward is accompanied with unprecedented technological difficulties and near-exponential increase in cost. At the same time, however, demands for low-power, low-cost and high-speed devices have never diminished, instead, even more stringent requirements have been imposed on device performances. It is therefore crucial to explore alternative materials and device architectures in order to alleviate the pressure caused by downscaling. To this end, we investigated two different approaches: (1) InSb nanowire based field effect transistors (NWFETs) and (2) single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) -- peptide nucleic acid (PNA) --SWCNT conjugate. Two types of InSb nanowires were synthesized by template-assisted electrochemistry and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) respectively. In both cases, NWFETs were fabricated by electron beam lithography (EBL) and crystallinity was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns. For electrochemistry nanowire, ambipolar conduction was observed with strong p-type conduction, the effect of thermal annealing on the conductivity was analyzed, a NWFET model that took into consideration the underlapped region in top-gated NWFET was proposed. Hole mobility in the channel was calculated to be 292.84 cm2V-1s -1 with a density of 1.5x1017/cm3. For CVD nanowire, the diameter was below 40nm with an average of 20nm. Vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process was speculated to be the mechanism responsible for nanowire growth. The efficient gate control was manifested by high ION/I OFF ratio which was on the order of 106 and a small inverse subthreshold slope (<200 mV/decade). Scale analysis was used to successfully account for disparities observed among a number of sample devices. N-type conduction was found in all NWFETs with

  5. SSI/MSI/LSI/VLSI/ULSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, George

    1984-01-01

    Discusses small-scale integrated (SSI), medium-scale integrated (MSI), large-scale integrated (LSI), very large-scale integrated (VLSI), and ultra large-scale integrated (ULSI) chips. The development and properties of these chips, uses of gallium arsenide, Josephson devices (two superconducting strips sandwiching a thin insulator), and future…

  6. Pure carbon nanoscale devices: Nanotube heterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chico, L.; Crespi, V.H.; Benedict, L.X.; Louie, S.G.; Cohen, M.L. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)]|[Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Introduction of pentagon-heptagon pair defects into the hexagonal network of a single carbon nanotube can change the helicity of the tube and alter its electronic structure. Using a tight-binding method to calculate the electronic structure of such systems we show that they behave as nanoscale metal/semiconductor or semiconductor/semiconductor junctions. These junctions could be the building blocks of nanoscale electronic devices made entirely of carbon. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. Status and perspectives of nanoscale device modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macucci, M.; Lannaccone, G.; Greer, J.;

    2001-01-01

    and the future perspectives of nanoscale device modelling. The outcome of such a discussion is summarized in the present paper, outlining the major challenges for the future, such as the integration of nonequilibrium phenomena and of molecular scale properties. We believe that modelling has a growing importance...

  8. Self-forming nanoscale devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Samuelson

    2003-10-01

    The top-down approach limits the dimensions of devices to what is technically achievable using lithography. This is the means by which patterns can be drawn, either in stone as the Vikings did when they carved messages into granite, or into Si as the electronics industry does today to build integrated circuits. Lithographic techniques can create device features as narrow as 130 nm and the industry sees the road ahead pretty well drawn up for line-widths down to ∼50 nm. This continued progress does not come without a price; the cost of new fabs is growing extremely fast, at a pace that may limit continued progress, simply because devices and circuits become too expensive to be economically viable.

  9. Direct temperature mapping of nanoscale plasmonic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desiatov, Boris; Goykhman, Ilya; Levy, Uriel

    2014-02-12

    Side by side with the great advantages of plasmonics in nanoscale light confinement, the inevitable ohmic loss results in significant joule heating in plasmonic devices. Therefore, understanding optical-induced heat generation and heat transport in integrated on-chip plasmonic devices is of major importance. Specifically, there is a need for in situ visualization of electromagnetic induced thermal energy distribution with high spatial resolution. This paper studies the heat distribution in silicon plasmonic nanotips. Light is coupled to the plasmonic nanotips from a silicon nanowaveguide that is integrated with the tip on chip. Heat is generated by light absorption in the metal surrounding the silicon nanotip. The steady-state thermal distribution is studied numerically and measured experimentally using the approach of scanning thermal microscopy. It is shown that following the nanoscale heat generation by a 10 mW light source within a silicon photonic waveguide the temperature in the region of the nanotip is increased by ∼ 15 °C compared with the ambient temperature. Furthermore, we also perform a numerical study of the dynamics of the heat transport. Given the nanoscale dimensions of the structure, significant heating is expected to occur within the time frame of picoseconds. The capability of measuring temperature distribution of plasmonic structures at the nanoscale is shown to be a powerful tool and may be used in future applications related to thermal plasmonic applications such as control heating of liquids, thermal photovoltaic, nanochemistry, medicine, heat-assisted magnetic memories, and nanolithography.

  10. Nanoscale device physics science and engineering fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Sandip

    2017-01-01

    Nanoscale devices are distinguishable from the larger microscale devices in their specific dependence on physical phenomena and effects that are central to their operation. The size change manifests itself through changes in importance of the phenomena and effects that become dominant and the changes in scale of underlying energetics and response. Examples of these include classical effects such as single electron effects, quantum effects such as the states accessible as well as their properties; ensemble effects ranging from consequences of the laws of numbers to changes in properties arising from different magnitudes of the inter-actions, and others. These interactions, with the limits placed on size, make not just electronic, but also magnetic, optical and mechanical behavior interesting, important and useful. Connecting these properties to the behavior of devices is the focus of this textbook. Description of the book series: This collection of four textbooks in the Electroscience series span the undergrad...

  11. Exploring Carbon Nanotubes for Nanoscale Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Dai; Anantram; Jaffe; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are shown to promise great opportunities in nanoelectronic devices and nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) because of their inherent nanoscale sizes, intrinsic electric conductivities, and seamless hexagonal network architectures. I present our collaborative work with Stanford on exploring CNTs for nanodevices in this talk. The electrical property measurements suggest that metallic tubes are quantum wires. Furthermore, two and three terminal CNT junctions have been observed experimentally. We have proposed and studied CNT-based molecular switches and logic devices for future digital electronics. We also have studied CNTs based NEMS inclusing gears, cantilevers, and scanning probe microscopy tips. We investigate both chemistry and physics based aspects of the CNT NEMS. Our results suggest that CNT have ideal stiffness, vibrational frequencies, Q-factors, geometry-dependent electric conductivities, and the highest chemical and mechanical stabilities for the NEMS. The use of CNT SPM tips for nanolithography is presented for demonstration of the advantages of the CNT NEMS.

  12. The growth and applications of silicides for nanoscale devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yung-Chen; Chen, Yu; Huang, Yu

    2012-03-01

    Metal silicides have been used in silicon technology as contacts to achieve high device performance and desired device functions. The growth and applications of silicide materials have recently attracted increasing interest for nanoscale device applications. Nanoscale silicide materials have been demonstrated with various synthetic approaches. Solid state reaction wherein high quality silicides form through diffusion of metal atoms into silicon nano-templates and the subsequent phase transformation caught significant attention for the fabrication of nanoscale Si devices. Very interestingly, studies on the diffusion and phase transformation processes at the nanoscale have indicated possible deviations from the bulk and the thin film system. Here we present a review of fabrication, growth kinetics, electronic properties and device applications of nanoscale silicides formed through solid state reaction.

  13. Crystal growth and evaluation of silicon for VLSI and ULSI

    CERN Document Server

    Eranna, Golla

    2014-01-01

    PrefaceAbout the AuthorIntroductionSilicon: The SemiconductorWhy Single CrystalsRevolution in Integrated Circuit Fabrication Technology and the Art of Device MiniaturizationUse of Silicon as a SemiconductorSilicon Devices for Boolean ApplicationsIntegration of Silicon Devices and the Art of Circuit MiniaturizationMOS and CMOS Devices for Digital ApplicationsLSI, VLSI, and ULSI Circuits and ApplicationsSilicon for MEMS ApplicationsSummaryReferencesSilicon: The Key Material for Integrated Circuit Fabrication TechnologyIntroductionPreparation of Raw Silicon MaterialMetallurgical-Grade SiliconPuri

  14. Device Physics of Nanoscale Interdigitated Solar Cells (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzger, W.; Levi, D.

    2008-05-01

    Nanoscale interdigitated solar cell device architectures are being investigated for organic and inorganic solar cell devices. Due to the inherent complexity of these device designs quantitative modeling is needed to understand the device physics. Theoretical concepts have been proposed that nanodomains of different phases may form in polycrystalline CIGS solar cells. These theories propose that the nanodomains may form complex 3D intertwined p-n networks that enhance device performance.Recent experimental evidence offers some support for the existence of nanodomains in CIGS thin films. This study utilizes CIGS solar cells to examine general and CIGS-specific concepts in nanoscale interdigitated solar cells.

  15. Investigation of nanoscale magnetic materials and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rench, David William

    A host of fundamentally and technologically intriguing phenomena can be observed in ferromagnetic systems, ranging from Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR) to spin structures that approximate the non-zero entropy state of water ice. In this dissertation, we consider systems of self-assembled MnAs nanoclusters in a doped GaAs matrix, a magnetically-doped topological insulator material, and magnetotransport devices constructed as artificial spin ices. We performed magnetic, structural, and electronic measurements in each of the projects herein to discover unique materials properties that range from new phase diagrams to electronic structure breaking and intriguing electrical characteristics that seem to defy the symmetry of the system that manifests them. We first explore the impact of co-doping a GaAs semiconductor matrix with magnetic and non-magnetic dopant ions (Mn and Be, respectively) and forcing phase separation to occur during the sample growth stage. The result of this phase-separated co-doped growth was the identification of two distinct materials classes: Type I materials, in which the phase separation produces ferromagnetic zinc blende (Mn,Ga)As nanoclusters with a narrow distribution of small diameters within a weakly Be-doped GaAs matrix, and Type II materials, in which an abrupt mixing of large NiAs-type MnAs nanoclusters and the small (Mn,Ga)As nanoclusters occurs. These two states are shown to also have accessible intermediate states in the case of a doped substrate and buffer layer. Magnetic measurements are performed to determine the dynamics of the unmixed Type I and the mixed Type II materials. Structural characteristization is done at the nanoscale in a variety of instruments to precisely determine the likely growth dynamics during sample synthesis and the resultant structures. The materials are found to be superparamagnetic with 10 K (Type I) and approximately 313 K (Type II) blocking temperatures with a strong dependence on Mn content during growth

  16. Thermoelectric efficiency of nanoscale devices in the linear regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, G.; Grosso, G.; Menichetti, G.; Pastori Parravicini, G.

    2016-12-01

    We study quantum transport through two-terminal nanoscale devices in contact with two particle reservoirs at different temperatures and chemical potentials. We discuss the general expressions controlling the electric charge current, heat currents, and the efficiency of energy transmutation in steady conditions in the linear regime. With focus in the parameter domain where the electron system acts as a power generator, we elaborate workable expressions for optimal efficiency and thermoelectric parameters of nanoscale devices. The general concepts are set at work in the paradigmatic cases of Lorentzian resonances and antiresonances, and the encompassing Fano transmission function: the treatments are fully analytic, in terms of the trigamma functions and Bernoulli numbers. From the general curves here reported describing transport through the above model transmission functions, useful guidelines for optimal efficiency and thermopower can be inferred for engineering nanoscale devices in energy regions where they show similar transmission functions.

  17. Optical Biosensors: A Revolution Towards Quantum Nanoscale Electronics Device Fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Dey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The dimension of biomolecules is of few nanometers, so the biomolecular devices ought to be of that range so a better understanding about the performance of the electronic biomolecular devices can be obtained at nanoscale. Development of optical biomolecular device is a new move towards revolution of nano-bioelectronics. Optical biosensor is one of such nano-biomolecular devices that has a potential to pave a new dimension of research and device fabrication in the field of optical and biomedical fields. This paper is a very small report about optical biosensor and its development and importance in various fields.

  18. Semiempirical model for nanoscale device simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, Kurt; Petersen, Dan Erik; Smidstrup, Søren;

    2010-01-01

    We present a semiempirical model for calculating electron transport in atomic-scale devices. The model is an extension of the extended Hückel method with a self-consistent Hartree potential that models the effect of an external bias and corresponding charge rearrangements in the device. It is als...

  19. Computational aspects of electronic transport in nanoscale devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hans Henrik Brandenborg

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the modeling of electronic properties of nano-scale devices. In particular the computational aspects of calculating the transmission and current-voltage characteristics of Landauer-Büttiker two-probe systems are in focus. To begin with, the main existing methods...

  20. Gate stack technology for nanoscale devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoung Hun Lee

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Scaling of the gate stack has been a key to enhancing the performance of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS field-effect transistors (FETs of past technology generations. Because the rate of gate stack scaling has diminished in recent years, the motivation for alternative gate stacks or novel device structures has increased considerably. Intense research during the last decade has led to the development of high dielectric constant (k gate stacks that match the performance of conventional SiO2-based gate dielectrics. However, many challenges remain before alternative gate stacks can be introduced into mainstream technology. We review the current status of and challenges in gate stack research for planar CMOS devices and alternative device technologies to provide insights for future research.

  1. Temperature mapping of operating nanoscale devices by scanning probe thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menges, Fabian; Mensch, Philipp; Schmid, Heinz; Riel, Heike; Stemmer, Andreas; Gotsmann, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Imaging temperature fields at the nanoscale is a central challenge in various areas of science and technology. Nanoscopic hotspots, such as those observed in integrated circuits or plasmonic nanostructures, can be used to modify the local properties of matter, govern physical processes, activate chemical reactions and trigger biological mechanisms in living organisms. The development of high-resolution thermometry techniques is essential for understanding local thermal non-equilibrium processes during the operation of numerous nanoscale devices. Here we present a technique to map temperature fields using a scanning thermal microscope. Our method permits the elimination of tip-sample contact-related artefacts, a major hurdle that so far has limited the use of scanning probe microscopy for nanoscale thermometry. We map local Peltier effects at the metal-semiconductor contacts to an indium arsenide nanowire and self-heating of a metal interconnect with 7 mK and sub-10 nm spatial temperature resolution.

  2. Manufacturing and Reliability of Nanoscale Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Owen Yin

    The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) identifies emerging technologies with the potential to sustain Moore's Law. A necessary progression from conventional CMOS, to non-planer/dual gate CMOS, and ultimately to novel device architectures such as nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) is envisioned. The ITRS also identifies critical roadblocks which currently preclude advances beyond CMOS as a means to guide research and development efforts. Roadblocks specific to NEMS include widespread manufacturing challenges associated with manipulating one-dimensional nanostructures, and poor reliability arising from a number of prevalent failure modes. The weight of these roadblocks is evident well beyond the goals of the ITRS, where nanoelectromechanical sensors and other devices face similar obstacles. This thesis focuses on two critical challenges facing the development of robust carbon nanotube-based NEMS: scalable manufacturing methods, and understanding and eliminating prevalent failure modes. Toward the first challenge, probe-based nanomanufacturing schemes are developed to construct well-ordered arrays of individual carbon nanotubes from which NEMS can be fabricated. This work extends beyond the goals of the semiconductor industry, and demonstrates the ability to create functional sub-100-nanometer protein and drug arrays, as well as novel in vitro injection methods for single cell studies. The second part of this thesis indentifies prevalent failure modes and their point of onset within the device design space. Again, these are addressed by the ITRS but have implications reaching well beyond the semiconductor industry. It then seeks to find the underlying mechanisms for the observed failure modes, and introduces easily-implemented solutions which exhibit the ability to eliminate or greatly-suppress the prevalent failure modes, enabling numerous device actuation cycles without failure and demonstrations of functionality not possible with failure

  3. Photonic Crystals Towards Nanoscale Photonic Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Lourtioz, Jean-Michel; Berger, Vincent; Gérard, Jean-Michel; Maystre, Daniel; Tchelnokov, Alexis

    2005-01-01

    Just like the periodical crystalline potential in solid-state crystals determines their properties for the conduction of electrons, the periodical structuring of photonic crystals leads to envisioning the possibility of achieving a control of the photon flux in dielectric and metallic materials. The use of photonic crystals as a cage for storing, filtering or guiding light at the wavelength scale thus paves the way to the realisation of optical and optoelectronic devices with ultimate properties and dimensions. This should contribute toward meeting the demands for a greater miniaturisation that the processing of an ever increasing number of data requires. Photonic Crystals intends at providing students and researchers from different fields with the theoretical background needed for modelling photonic crystals and their optical properties, while at the same time presenting the large variety of devices, from optics to microwaves, where photonic crystals have found applications. As such, it aims at building brid...

  4. Time-Dependent Transport in Nanoscale Devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhi-Dong; ZHANG Jin-Yu; YU Zhi-Ping

    2009-01-01

    A method for simulating ballistic time-dependent device transport,which solves the time-dependent SchrSdinger equation using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method together with Poisson's equation,is described in detail The effective mass SchrSdinger equation is solved. The continuous energy spectrum of the system is discretized using adaptive mesh,resulting in energy levels that sample the density-of-states.By calculating time evolution of wavefunctions at sampled energies,time-dependent transport characteristics such as current and charge density distributions are obtained.Simulation results in a uanowire and a coaxially gated carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET) are presented.Transient effects,e.g.,finite rising time,are investigated in these devices.

  5. Photonic Crystals Towards Nanoscale Photonic Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Lourtioz, Jean-Michel; Berger, Vincent; Gérard, Jean-Michel; Maystre, Daniel; Tchelnokov, Alexei; Pagnoux, Dominique

    2008-01-01

    Just like the periodical crystalline potential in solid state crystals determines their properties for the conduction of electrons, the periodical structuring of photonic crystals leads to envisioning the possibility of achieving a control of the photon flux in dielectric and metallic materials. The use of photonic crystals as cages for storing, filtering or guiding light at the wavelength scale paves the way to the realization of optical and optoelectronic devices with ultimate properties and dimensions. This will contribute towards meeting the demands for greater miniaturization imposed by the processing of an ever increasing number of data. Photonic Crystals will provide students and researchers from different fields with the theoretical background required for modelling photonic crystals and their optical properties, while at the same time presenting the large variety of devices, ranging from optics to microwaves, where photonic crystals have found application. As such, it aims at building bridges between...

  6. Nanoscale selective area epitaxy for optoelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elarde, V. C.; Coleman, J. J.

    Self-assembled quantum dots have been heavily researched in recent years because of the potential applications to quantum electronic and optoelectronic devices they present. The non-uniformity and random ordering resulting from the self-assembly processes, however, are detrimental to potential applications, prohibiting the type of engineering control necessary for complex systems. The work presented in this document has sought to overcome the limitations of self-assembly by combining selective area epitaxy via MOCVD with high-resolution electron beam lithography to achieve lateral control over semiconductor structures at the nanometer scale. Two different structures are presented. The first is patterned quantum dots which improve on the uniformity and order of similar self-assembled quantum dots. The second is an entirely novel structure, the nanopore active layer, which demonstrates the potential for this process to extend beyond the constraints of self-assembly. Experimental and theoretical results for both structures are presented.

  7. Magnetization switching schemes for nanoscale three-terminal spintronics devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukami, Shunsuke; Ohno, Hideo

    2017-08-01

    Utilizing spintronics-based nonvolatile memories in integrated circuits offers a promising approach to realize ultralow-power and high-performance electronics. While two-terminal devices with spin-transfer torque switching have been extensively developed nowadays, there has been a growing interest in devices with a three-terminal structure. Of primary importance for applications is the efficient manipulation of magnetization, corresponding to information writing, in nanoscale devices. Here we review the studies of current-induced domain wall motion and spin-orbit torque-induced switching, which can be applied to the write operation of nanoscale three-terminal spintronics devices. For domain wall motion, the size dependence of device properties down to less than 20 nm will be shown and the underlying mechanism behind the results will be discussed. For spin-orbit torque-induced switching, factors governing the threshold current density and strategies to reduce it will be discussed. A proof-of-concept demonstration of artificial intelligence using an analog spin-orbit torque device will also be reviewed.

  8. Development of Nanoscale Graphitic Devices and The Transport Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunasekaran, Venugopal

    2011-02-15

    This dissertation describes the development of graphitic based nanoscale devices with its fabrication and transport characterization results. It covers graphite nano-scale stacked-junctions fabricated using focused ion beam (FIB) 3-D etching technique, a single layer graphite layer (graphene) preparation and its electrical transport characterization results and the synthesis and investigation of electrical transport behavior of graphene oxide based thin film devices. The first chapter describes the basic information about the carbon family in detail in which the electronic properties and structure of graphite, graphene and graphene oxide are discussed. In addition, the necessity of developing nanoscale graphitic devices is given. The second chapter explains the experimental techniques used in this research for fabricating nanoscale devices which includes focused ion beam 3-D fabrication procedures, mechanical exfoliation technique and photolithographic methods. In third chapter, we have reported the results on temperature dependence of graphite planar-type structures fabricated along ab-plane. In the fourth and fifth chapters, the fabrication and electrical transport characteristics of large in-plane area graphite planar-type structures (fabricated along ab-plane and c-axis) were discussed and their transport anisotropy properties were investigated briefly. In the sixth chapter, we focused the fabrication of the submicron sized graphite stacked junctions and their electrical transport characterization studies. In which, FIB was used to fabricated the submicron junctions with various in-plane area (with same stack height) are and their transport characteristics were compared. The seventh chapter reports investigation of electrical transport results of nanoscale graphite stacked-junctions in which the temperature dependent transport (R-T) studies, current-voltage measurements for the various in-plane areas and for various stack height samples were analyzed. The

  9. Integration of molecular functions into Si device for nanoscale molecular devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakayama, Yutaka, E-mail: WAKAYAMA.Yutaka@nims.go.jp; Hayakawa, Ryoma

    2014-03-03

    Recent progress on nanoscale molecular devices is reviewed. The advantages of organic molecules are highlighted in terms of their unique features such as quantum effects based on their nanometer size, optical properties originating from photochromism and chemical syntheses for various structural designs. This review covers three topics: a scanning probe microscope-based evaluation of individual molecules, nano-gap electrodes for electrical current through single-molecules and the incorporation of molecular functions into Si-based devices. In particular, the importance of the incorporation of organic molecules into Si-device architecture is emphasized with a view to realizing the large-scale integration of nanoscale molecular devices. - Highlights: • Scanning probe microscope-based evaluation of individual molecules; • Nano-gap electrodes for electrical current through single-molecules; • Incorporation of molecular functions into Si-based devices.

  10. A hyperlens-based device for nanoscale focusing of light

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiangnan Zhao; Guoxing Zheng; Song Li; Hui Zhou; Yue Ma; Ruiying Zhang; Yah Shi; Ping'an He

    2012-01-01

    To resolve the problem of missed evanescent waves in a beam focusing system,a hyperlens-based beam focusing device is proposed in this letter.This device can convert the evanescent waves into propagating waves,and then a super-resolution spot is formed at the center of the hyperlens.The working principle of the device is presented,and the way in which the material and structural parameters of the hyperlens affect the resolution and transmission is analyzed in detail. A multibeam focusing device is optimally designed,and the simulated results verify that a nanoscale spot with a diameter of 15.6 nm (corresponding to λ0/24,where λ0 is the working wavelength in vacuum) is achieved,which is far less than the diffraction limited resolution with a value of 625 nm (l.7λ0).The device is expected to find numerous applications in optical data storage and nano-photolithography,among others.

  11. Micro- and nano-scale optoelectronic devices using vanadium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joushaghani, Arash

    Miniaturization has the potential to reduce the size, cost, and power requirements of active optical devices. However, implementing (sub)wavelength-scale electro-optic switches with high efficiency, low insertion loss, and high extinction ratios remains challenging due to their small active volumes. Here, we use the insulator-metal phase transition of vanadium dioxide (VO2), which exhibits a large and reversible change in the refractive index across the phase transition to demonstrate compact, broadband, and efficient switches and photodetectors with record-setting characteristics. We begin by analyzing the electrical and optical properties of VO2 thin films across the phase transition and discuss the fabrication processes that yield micron- and nano-scale VO2 devices. We then demonstrate a surface plasmon thermo-optic switch, which achieves an extinction ratio of 10 dB in a 5 um long device, a record for plasmonic devices. The switch operates over a 100 nm optical bandwidth, and exhibits a thermally limited switching time of 40 mus. We investigate the current and voltage induced switching of VO2 in nano-gap junctions and show optical switching times as short as 20 ns. The two terminal VO2 junctions are incorporated in a silicon photonics platform to yield silicon-VO2 hybrid waveguide devices with a record extinction ratio of 12 dB in a 1 mum long device. In photodetector mode, the devices exhibit a nonlinear responsivity greater than 12 A/W for optical powers less than 1 muW. This device is the smallest electrically controlled and integrated switch and photodetector capable of achieving extinction ratios > 10 dB/mum. We finally investigate the ultra-fast thermal heating in gold nano-apertures and demonstrate that electron heating can change the gold lattice temperature by 300 K in tens of picoseconds. These nano-apertures can be hybridized with VO2 to demonstrate high extinction and ultrafast optical switches.

  12. Nanoscale strain engineering of graphene and graphene-based devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, N.-C.; Hsu, C.-C.; Teague, M. L.; Wang, J.-Q.; Boyd, D. A.; Chen, C.-C.

    2016-06-01

    Structural distortions in nano-materials can induce dramatic changes in their electronic properties. This situation is well manifested in graphene, a two-dimensional honeycomb structure of carbon atoms with only one atomic layer thickness. In particular, strained graphene can result in both charging effects and pseudo-magnetic fields, so that controlled strain on a perfect graphene lattice can be tailored to yield desirable electronic properties. Here, we describe the theoretical foundation for strain-engineering of the electronic properties of graphene, and then provide experimental evidence for strain-induced pseudo-magnetic fields and charging effects in monolayer graphene. We further demonstrate the feasibility of nano-scale strain engineering for graphene-based devices by means of theoretical simulations and nano-fabrication technology.

  13. Methods and devices for fabricating three-dimensional nanoscale structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, John A.; Jeon, Seokwoo; Park, Jangung

    2010-04-27

    The present invention provides methods and devices for fabricating 3D structures and patterns of 3D structures on substrate surfaces, including symmetrical and asymmetrical patterns of 3D structures. Methods of the present invention provide a means of fabricating 3D structures having accurately selected physical dimensions, including lateral and vertical dimensions ranging from 10s of nanometers to 1000s of nanometers. In one aspect, methods are provided using a mask element comprising a conformable, elastomeric phase mask capable of establishing conformal contact with a radiation sensitive material undergoing photoprocessing. In another aspect, the temporal and/or spatial coherence of electromagnetic radiation using for photoprocessing is selected to fabricate complex structures having nanoscale features that do not extend entirely through the thickness of the structure fabricated.

  14. Nanoscale strain engineering of graphene and graphene-based devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N-C Yeh; C-C Hsu; M L Teague; J-Q Wang; D A Boyd; C-C Chen

    2016-01-01

    Structural distortions in nano-materials can induce dramatic changes in their electronic properties. This situation is well manifested in graphene, a two-dimensional honeycomb structure of carbon atoms with only one atomic layer thickness. In particular, strained graphene can result in both charging effects and pseudo-magnetic fields, so that controlled strain on a perfect graphene lattice can be tailored to yield desirable electronic properties. Here, we describe the theoretical foundation for strain-engineering of the electronic properties of graphene, and then provide experimental evidence for strain-induced pseudo-magnetic fields and charging effects in monolayer graphene. We further demonstrate the feasibility of nano-scale strain engineering for graphene-based devices by means of theoretical simula-tions and nano-fabrication technology.

  15. Advances in neuromorphic hardware exploiting emerging nanoscale devices

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book covers all major aspects of cutting-edge research in the field of neuromorphic hardware engineering involving emerging nanoscale devices. Special emphasis is given to leading works in hybrid low-power CMOS-Nanodevice design. The book offers readers a bidirectional (top-down and bottom-up) perspective on designing efficient bio-inspired hardware. At the nanodevice level, it focuses on various flavors of emerging resistive memory (RRAM) technology. At the algorithm level, it addresses optimized implementations of supervised and stochastic learning paradigms such as: spike-time-dependent plasticity (STDP), long-term potentiation (LTP), long-term depression (LTD), extreme learning machines (ELM) and early adoptions of restricted Boltzmann machines (RBM) to name a few. The contributions discuss system-level power/energy/parasitic trade-offs, and complex real-world applications. The book is suited for both advanced researchers and students interested in the field.

  16. Thermal measurement. Nanoscale temperature mapping in operating microelectronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecklenburg, Matthew; Hubbard, William A; White, E R; Dhall, Rohan; Cronin, Stephen B; Aloni, Shaul; Regan, B C

    2015-02-06

    Modern microelectronic devices have nanoscale features that dissipate power nonuniformly, but fundamental physical limits frustrate efforts to detect the resulting temperature gradients. Contact thermometers disturb the temperature of a small system, while radiation thermometers struggle to beat the diffraction limit. Exploiting the same physics as Fahrenheit's glass-bulb thermometer, we mapped the thermal expansion of Joule-heated, 80-nanometer-thick aluminum wires by precisely measuring changes in density. With a scanning transmission electron microscope and electron energy loss spectroscopy, we quantified the local density via the energy of aluminum's bulk plasmon. Rescaling density to temperature yields maps with a statistical precision of 3 kelvin/hertz(-1/2), an accuracy of 10%, and nanometer-scale resolution. Many common metals and semiconductors have sufficiently sharp plasmon resonances to serve as their own thermometers. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Nanoscale Copper and Copper Compounds for Advanced Device Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lih-Juann

    2016-12-01

    Copper has been in use for at least 10,000 years. Copper alloys, such as bronze and brass, have played important roles in advancing civilization in human history. Bronze artifacts date at least 6500 years. On the other hand, discovery of intriguing properties and new applications in contemporary technology for copper and its compounds, particularly on nanoscale, have continued. In this paper, examples for the applications of Cu and Cu alloys for advanced device applications will be given on Cu metallization in microelectronics devices, Cu nanobats as field emitters, Cu2S nanowire array as high-rate capability and high-capacity cathodes for lithium-ion batteries, Cu-Te nanostructures for field-effect transistor, Cu3Si nanowires as high-performance field emitters and efficient anti-reflective layers, single-crystal Cu(In,Ga)Se2 nanotip arrays for high-efficiency solar cell, multilevel Cu2S resistive memory, superlattice Cu2S-Ag2S heterojunction diodes, and facet-dependent Cu2O diode.

  18. Nanoscale transfer printing for heterogeneous device integration (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Antonio; Guilhabert, Benoit J. E.; Strain, Michael J.; Laurand, Nicolas; Jagadish, Chennupati; Dawson, Martin D.

    2017-02-01

    We present a novel nanoscale transfer printing (TP) technology which combines a customized nanolithography system with bespoke elastomeric μ-stamps to controllably pick and place diverse semiconductor structures, e.g. nanowires (NWs), Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) and thin films, onto targeted locations on heterogeneous material surfaces (e.g. polymers, metals, silica, diamond). Notably, our technique allows the parallel printing of semiconductor structures of different materials onto a large area (of 10cm x 10cm) whilst simultaneously yielding sub-micrometric positioning control (down to below 100nm) and low printing time ( 20s per print step). In the talk, we will present a variety of hybrid integrated devices fabricated with our TP technique. Emphasis will be given to our recent work using Gallium Nitride (GaN) LEDs and Indium Phosphide (InP) NW lasers as building blocks. Using TP protocols, GaN LEDs fabricated from GaN-on-Si have been integrated onto polymer and thin glass surfaces and onto diamond substrates for mechanically flexible optoelectronic devices and effective device heat management respectively. Additionally, ultra-small InP NW lasers ( 5μm long and 500nm diameter) have been integrated onto multiple heterogeneous substrates, including mechanically flexible (polymers), transparent (silica) and metallic (gold) surfaces. Furthermore, complex spatial patterns with micrometric dimensions have been defined with these nanolasers acting as localised emitters. Finally, we will also introduce our very recent results demonstrating the coupling of InP NW lasers with planar waveguide technology as a back-end hybrid integration technique.

  19. Nanoscale Materials and Devices - New Solutions for Information Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrman, Robert

    2003-03-01

    The continual scaling down of Si C-MOS circuits, the current annual doubling of magnetic storage density, and the regularly increasing capacity of fiber optic communications have resulted in enormous technological change, including a revolutionary transformation of all areas of science and engineering. Indeed the current capabilities of these information technologies both provide the quintessential demonstration that microtechnology, which is now transitioning to nanotechnology, can have tremendous societal impact, and provide essential means and methods by which other aspects of nanotechnology R can now be pursued. If the pace of advance in these information technologies is to be continued well into the future, new approaches and new solutions will be required to overcome the challenges this objective will entail. Nanoscaled material systems and new types of nanoscale devices have substantial promise for providing the basis for effective solutions to a number of these challenges. In this presentation I will briefly discuss research in the areas of nanoelectronics, nanophotonics and nanomagnetics that seeks to establish and develop some of these solutions. These include a radical new approach to Si electronics at the 10 nm scale, the use of nanoscaled materials to enable new photonic capabilities, and a new approach to manipulate nanomagnets for potential information storage and communication applications.

  20. Charge transport in nanoscale vertical organic semiconductor pillar devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbers, Janine G. E.; Xu, Bojian; Bobbert, Peter A.; de Jong, Michel P.; van der Wiel, Wilfred G.

    2017-01-01

    We report charge transport measurements in nanoscale vertical pillar structures incorporating ultrathin layers of the organic semiconductor poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). P3HT layers with thickness down to 5 nm are gently top-contacted using wedging transfer, yielding highly reproducible, robust nanoscale junctions carrying high current densities (up to 106 A/m2). Current-voltage data modeling demonstrates excellent hole injection. This work opens up the pathway towards nanoscale, ultrashort-channel organic transistors for high-frequency and high-current-density operation.

  1. A Review of Atomic Layer Deposition for Nanoscale Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edy Riyanto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Atomic layer deposition (ALD is a thin film growth technique that utilizes alternating, self-saturation chemical reactions between gaseous precursors to achieve a deposited nanoscale layers. It has recently become a subject of great interest for ultrathin film deposition in many various applications such as microelectronics, photovoltaic, dynamic random access memory (DRAM, and microelectromechanic system (MEMS. By using ALD, the conformability and extreme uniformity of layers can be achieved in low temperature process. It facilitates to be deposited onto the surface in many variety substrates that have low melting temperature. Eventually it has advantages on the contribution to the wider nanodevices.

  2. Plant virus directed fabrication of nanoscale materials and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    TMV1cys assembled on gold-coated silicon wafers (Gerasopoulos et al., 2010). This method utilizes photoresist masks to define sacrificial layers that...microscale SU-8 polymer columns were created and assembled with TMV1cys PVNs as a mimic of the microscale bumps and nanoscale hairs found on lotus leaves...functionalized SiO2 wafers (Mueller et al., 2011) (Fig. 3E). Patterned RNAs containing the OAS were capable of guiding the bottom-up assembly of TMV-like rods

  3. Imaging ultrafast carrier transport in nanoscale devices using femtosecond photocurrent microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Son, B H; Hong, J T; Park, Ji-Yong; Lee, Soonil; Ahn, Y H

    2014-01-01

    One-dimensional nanoscale devices, such as semiconductor nanowires (NWs) and single- walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), have been intensively investigated because of their potential application of future high-speed electronic, optoelectronic, and sensing devices. To overcome current limitations on the speed of contemporary devices, investigation of charge carrier dynamics with an ultrashort time scale is one of the primary steps necessary for developing high-speed devices. In the present study, we visualize ultrafast carrier dynamics in nanoscale devices using a combination of scanning photocurrent microscopy and time- resolved pump-probe techniques. We investigate transit times of carriers that are generated near one metallic electrode and subsequently transported toward the opposite electrode based on drift and diffusion motions. Carrier dynamics have been measured for various working conditions. In particular, the carrier velocities extracted from transit times increase for a larger negative gate bias, becau...

  4. Simultaneous topographical, electrical and optical microscopy of optoelectronic devices at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naresh; Zoladek-Lemanczyk, Alina; Guilbert, Anne A Y; Su, Weitao; Tuladhar, Sachetan M; Kirchartz, Thomas; Schroeder, Bob C; McCulloch, Iain; Nelson, Jenny; Roy, Debdulal; Castro, Fernando A

    2017-02-23

    Novel optoelectronic devices rely on complex nanomaterial systems where the nanoscale morphology and local chemical composition are critical to performance. However, the lack of analytical techniques that can directly probe these structure-property relationships at the nanoscale presents a major obstacle to device development. In this work, we present a novel method for non-destructive, simultaneous mapping of the morphology, chemical composition and photoelectrical properties with performance. For instance, the direct measurement of fullerene phase purity can distinguish between high purity aggregates that lead to poor performance and lower purity aggregates (fullerene intercalated with polymer) that result in strong photocurrent generation and collection. We show that the reliable determination of the structure-property relationship at the nanoscale can remove ambiguity from macroscopic device data and support the identification of the best routes for device optimisation. The multi-parameter measurement approach demonstrated herein is expected to play a significant role in guiding the rational design of nanomaterial-based optoelectronic devices, by opening a new realm of possibilities for advanced investigation via the combination of nanoscale optical spectroscopy with a whole range of scanning probe microscopy modes.

  5. Plant virus directed fabrication of nanoscale materials and devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, James N; Brown, Adam D; Zang, Faheng; Gnerlich, Markus; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Ghodssi, Reza

    2015-05-01

    Bottom-up self-assembly methods in which individual molecular components self-organize to form functional nanoscale patterns are of long-standing interest in the field of materials sciences. Such self-assembly processes are the hallmark of biology where complex macromolecules with defined functions assemble from smaller molecular components. In particular, plant virus-derived nanoparticles (PVNs) have drawn considerable attention for their unique self-assembly architectures and functionalities that can be harnessed to produce new materials for industrial and biomedical applications. In particular, PVNs provide simple systems to model and assemble nanoscale particles of uniform size and shape that can be modified through molecularly defined chemical and genetic alterations. Furthermore, PVNs bring the added potential to "farm" such bio-nanomaterials on an industrial scale, providing a renewable and environmentally sustainable means for the production of nano-materials. This review outlines the fabrication and application of several PVNs for a range of uses that include energy storage, catalysis, and threat detection.

  6. Simultaneous topographical, electrical and optical microscopy of optoelectronic devices at the nanoscale

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Naresh

    2017-01-12

    Novel optoelectronic devices rely on complex nanomaterial systems where the nanoscale morphology and local chemical composition are critical to performance. However, the lack of analytical techniques that can directly probe these structure-property relationships at the nanoscale presents a major obstacle to device development. In this work, we present a novel method for non-destructive, simultaneous mapping of the morphology, chemical composition and photoelectrical properties with <20 nm spatial resolution by combining plasmonic optical signal enhancement with electrical-mode scanning probe microscopy. We demonstrate that this combined approach offers subsurface sensitivity that can be exploited to provide molecular information with a nanoscale resolution in all three spatial dimensions. By applying the technique to an organic solar cell device, we show that the inferred surface and subsurface composition distribution correlates strongly with the local photocurrent generation and explains macroscopic device performance. For instance, the direct measurement of fullerene phase purity can distinguish between high purity aggregates that lead to poor performance and lower purity aggregates (fullerene intercalated with polymer) that result in strong photocurrent generation and collection. We show that the reliable determination of the structure-property relationship at the nanoscale can remove ambiguity from macroscopic device data and support the identification of the best routes for device optimisation. The multi-parameter measurement approach demonstrated herein is expected to play a significant role in guiding the rational design of nanomaterial-based optoelectronic devices, by opening a new realm of possibilities for advanced investigation via the combination of nanoscale optical spectroscopy with a whole range of scanning probe microscopy modes.

  7. Extraction of ULSI Interconnect Resistance at High Frequencies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Xia; JIAN Duanduan; YAO Suying; ZHANG Shengcai; RUAN Gang

    2005-01-01

    Correct extraction of the ultra-large-scale integrated (ULSI) interconnect components at hight frequencies is very important for evaluating electrical performances of high-speed ULSI circuits.In this paper, the extraction of the interconnect resistance at high frequencies is derived from the Ohm′s law and verified by the software FastHenry.The results are also compared with those of another resistance formula originated from the effective area of the current flowing. The applicability of these two formulae is discussed.The influence of the interconnect geometry on the resistance at high frequencies is studied.The computation indicates that the effect of frequency on the resistance is weak when the skin depth is larger than half of the short side of the rectangular interconnect cross section.With further increase of frequency, the resistance increases obviously. Results imply that conductor with a square cross section exhibits the largest resistance for rectangular conductors of constant cross section area.

  8. Metal-dielectric-metal plasmonic waveguide devices for manipulating light at the nanoscale Invited Paper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Georgios Veronis; Zongfu Yu; Sukru Ekin Kocabas; David A. B. Miller; Mark L. Brongersma; Shanhui Fan

    2009-01-01

    We review some of the recent advances in the development of subwavelength plasmonic devices for ma- nipulating light at the nanoscale, drawing examples from our own work in metal-dielectric-metal (MDM) plasmonic waveguide devices. We introduce bends, splitters, and mode converters for MDM waveguides with no additional loss. We also demonstrate that optical gain provides a mechanism for on/off switch- ing in MDM plasmonie waveguides. Highly efficient compact couplers between dielectric waveguides and MDM waveguides are also introduced.

  9. Tantalum oxide nanoscale resistive switching devices: TEM/EELS study (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Kate J.; Zhang, Jiaming; Merced-Grafals, Emmanuelle; Musunuru, Srinitya; Zhang, Max; Samuels, Katy; Yang, Jianhua J.; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.

    2015-08-01

    The field of non-volatile memory devices has been boosted by resistive switching, a reversible change in electrical resistance of a dielectric layer through the application of a voltage potential. Tantalum oxide being one of the leading candidates for the dielectric component of resistance switching devices was investigated in this study. 55nm TaOx devices in all states were compared through cross sectional TEM techniques including HRTEM, EELS, and EFTEM and will be discussed in this presentation. Based on the chemical and physical features found in the cross sectioned nanodevices we will discuss the switching mechanism of these nanoscale devices.

  10. Physics and performance of nanoscale semiconductor devices at cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestra, F.; Ghibaudo, G.

    2017-02-01

    The physics and performance of various advanced semiconductor devices, which are the most promising for the end of the ITRS roadmap, are investigated in a wide temperature range down to 20 K. The transport parameters in front and/or back channels in fully depleted ultrathin film SOI devices, Trigate, FinFET, Omega-gate nanowire FET and 3D-stacked SiGe nanowire FETs, fabricated with high-k dielectrics/metal gate, elevated source/drain, different channel orientations, shapes and strains, are addressed. The impacts of the gate length, Si film and wire diameter down to 10 nm, are also shown. The variations of the phonon, Coulomb, neutral defects and surface roughness scattering as a function of temperature and device architecture are highlighted. An overview of the influence of temperature on other main electrical parameters of MOSFETs, nanowires FETs and tunnel FETs, such as threshold voltage, subthreshold swing, leakage and driving currents is also given.

  11. Quantum Boltzmann equation solved by Monte Carlo method for nano-scale semiconductor devices simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Du Gang; Liu Xiao-Yan; Han Ru-Qi

    2006-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) full band self-consistent ensemble Monte Carlo (MC) method for solving the quantum Boltzmann equation, including collision broadening and quantum potential corrections, is developed to extend the MC method to the study of nano-scale semiconductor devices with obvious quantum mechanical (QM) effects. The quantum effects both in real space and momentum space in nano-scale semiconductor devices can be simulated. The effective mobility in the inversion layer of n and p channel MOSFET is simulated and compared with experimental data to verify this method. With this method 50nm ultra thin body silicon on insulator MOSFET are simulated. Results indicate that this method can be used to simulate the 2D QM effects in semiconductor devices including tunnelling effect.

  12. An open-source platform to study uniaxial stress effects on nanoscale devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorello, G.; Schraff, M.; Zellekens, P.; Drechsler, U.; Bürge, M.; Steinauer, H. R.; Heller, R.; Tschudy, M.; Riel, H.

    2017-05-01

    We present an automatic measurement platform that enables the characterization of nanodevices by electrical transport and optical spectroscopy as a function of the uniaxial stress. We provide insights into and detailed descriptions of the mechanical device, the substrate design and fabrication, and the instrument control software, which is provided under open-source license. The capability of the platform is demonstrated by characterizing the piezo-resistance of an InAs nanowire device using a combination of electrical transport and Raman spectroscopy. The advantages of this measurement platform are highlighted by comparison with state-of-the-art piezo-resistance measurements in InAs nanowires. We envision that the systematic application of this methodology will provide new insights into the physics of nanoscale devices and novel materials for electronics, and thus contribute to the assessment of the potential of strain as a technology booster for nanoscale electronics.

  13. Brain-like associative learning using a nanoscale non-volatile phase change synaptic device array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukru Burc Eryilmaz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in neuroscience together with nanoscale electronic device technology have resulted in huge interests in realizing brain-like computing hardwares using emerging nanoscale memory devices as synaptic elements. Although there has been experimental work that demonstrated the operation of nanoscale synaptic element at the single device level, network level studies have been limited to simulations. In this work, we demonstrate, using experiments, array level associative learning using phase change synaptic devices connected in a grid like configuration similar to the organization of the biological brain. Implementing Hebbian learning with phase change memory cells, the synaptic grid was able to store presented patterns and recall missing patterns in an associative brain-like fashion. We found that the system is robust to device variations, and large variations in cell resistance states can be accommodated by increasing the number of training epochs. We illustrated the tradeoff between variation tolerance of the network and the overall energy consumption, and found that energy consumption is decreased significantly for lower variation tolerance.

  14. Charge transport in nanoscale lateral and vertical organic semiconductor devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Bojian

    2017-01-01

    Organic semiconductors have been drawing more and more attention due to their huge potential for low-cost, flexible, printable electronics and spintronics. In this thesis research, we have investigated charge transport in two organic semiconductors, DXP and P3HT, in different device configurations.

  15. New strategy of modeling inversion layer characteristics in MOS structure for ULSI applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马玉涛; 李志坚; 刘理天

    2001-01-01

    With the development of ULSI silicon technology, metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) devices are scaling down to nanometer regime. Energy of carriers in inversion layer in MOS structure is quantized and consequently, the physics and then the transport characteristics of inversion layer carriers are different from those in semi-classical theory. One essential matter is that the widely used concept of conduction band (valence band as well) effective density-of-states is no longer valid in quantized inversion layer. In this paper, an alternative concept, called surface layer effective density-of-states, is used to model the characteristics of MOS structure including threshold voltage, carrier sheet density, surface potential as well as capacitance.

  16. Transparent electrode of nanoscale metal film for optoelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Illhwan; Lee, Jong-Lam

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the principles, impediments, and recent progress in the development of ultrathin flexible Ag electrodes for use in flexible optoelectronic devices. Thin Ag-based electrodes are promising candidates for next-generation flexible transparent electrodes. Thin Ag-based electrodes that have a microcavity structure show the best device performance, but have relatively low optical transmittance (OT) due to reflection and absorption of photons by the thin Ag; this trait causes problems such as spectral narrowing and change of emission color with viewing angle in white organic light-emitting diodes. Thinning the Ag electrode to overcome these problems. This ultrathin Ag electrode has a high OT, while providing comparable sheet resistance similar to indium tin oxide. As the OT of the electrode increases, the cavity is weakened, so the spectral width of the emission and the angular color stability are increased.

  17. Nano-Scale Devices for Frequency-Based Magnetic Biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-31

    electrically contact a spin torque oscillator on a small rectangular silicon wafer which is mounted above one of the (silver) poles of a projected field...versus those induced by large particles which sit on top of the nanopatterened structure (Sec. IIIC in [3]). 1b. Using magnonic crystals for particle...or perhaps a slightly angled device wafer. DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited. Fig. 4. (a) Top -down SEM

  18. Detecting Nano-Scale Vibrations in Rotating Devices by Using Advanced Computational Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl M. del Toro

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a computational method for detecting vibrations related to eccentricity in ultra precision rotation devices used for nano-scale manufacturing. The vibration is indirectly measured via a frequency domain analysis of the signal from a piezoelectric sensor attached to the stationary component of the rotating device. The algorithm searches for particular harmonic sequences associated with the eccentricity of the device rotation axis. The detected sequence is quantified and serves as input to a regression model that estimates the eccentricity. A case study presents the application of the computational algorithm during precision manufacturing processes.

  19. Crystal structure engineering for improved performance of emerging nanoscale devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimalgi, Vinay Uday

    Recent advances in growth techniques and increasing number of experimental studies have made nanostructures grown along different crystallographic directions a reality. These new structures could not only benefit the electronic devices used in mainstream information technology but also show great promise for applications in lasers, solid-state lighting, near-field photolithography, free-space quantum cryptography, consumer displays, quantum computation, as well as diagnostic medicine and imaging. However, only few theoretical investigations have been performed on these structures due to the complex nature of the interplay of atomicity, structural fields, polarization, and quantum size-quantization, all strong function of the crystallographic direction. The objective of this work is mainly four-fold: (1) Integrate a computational framework employing a combination of fully atomistic valence force-field molecular mechanics and 20-band sp3s*d5-SO tight-binding based electronic band­structure models, and numerically investigate the effects of internal fields on the electronic and optical properties of zincblende InAs/GaAs quantum dots grown on (100), (110), and (111) orientated substrates. (2) Augment/extend the open source NEMO 3-D bandstructure simulator by incorporating a recently proposed first principles based model to gauge the importance of nonlinear piezoelectricity on the single-particle electronic states and interband optical transitions in emerging In(Ga)N/GaN disk-in-wire LED structures having c-plane and m-plane wurtzite crystal symmetry. (3) Coupling the NEMO 3-D software toolkit with a commercial TCAD simulator to determine the terminal electrical and optical characteristics of InGaN/GaN disk-in-wire LEDs; and (4) Finding an optimum crystallographic device for InGaN/GaN disk-in-wire LEDs to achieve improved internal quantum efficiency (IQE).

  20. High-energy ion implantation for ULSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukamoto, K.; Komori, S.; Kuroi, T.; Akasaka, Y. (LSI R and D Lab., Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Itami (Japan))

    1991-07-01

    The ''well engineering'' of a retrograde twin well formed by high-energy ion implantation for 0.5 {mu}m CMOS is demonstrated to be quite useful in improving many device characteristics, such as leakage current reduction, soft-error immunity, low latchup susceptibility, smaller device isolation dimensions, etc. In forming a heavily doped buried layer by high-energy ion implantation, a drastic reduction in leakage current has been found. This would be caused by gettering of impurities or microdefects by secondary defects which are induced either by implantation of dopant itself (''self-gettering'') or by an additional implantation of oxygen, carbon or fluorine (''proximity gettering''). (orig.).

  1. Electrode-stress-induced nanoscale disorder in Si quantum electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Ahn, Y.; Tilka, J. A.; Sampson, K. C.; Savage, D. E.; Prance, J. R.; Simmons, C. B.; Lagally, M. G.; Coppersmith, S. N.; Eriksson, M. A.; Holt, M. V.; Evans, P. G.

    2016-06-01

    Disorder in the potential-energy landscape presents a major obstacle to the more rapid development of semiconductor quantum device technologies. We report a large-magnitude source of disorder, beyond commonly considered unintentional background doping or fixed charge in oxide layers: nanoscale strain fields induced by residual stresses in nanopatterned metal gates. Quantitative analysis of synchrotron coherent hard x-ray nanobeam diffraction patterns reveals gate-induced curvature and strains up to 0.03% in a buried Si quantum well within a Si/SiGe heterostructure. Electrode stress presents both challenges to the design of devices and opportunities associated with the lateral manipulation of electronic energy levels.

  2. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES Nanoscale strained-Si MOSFET physics and modeling approaches: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Amit; Roy, J. N.; Joshi, Garima

    2010-10-01

    An attempt has been made to give a detailed review of strained silicon technology. Various device models have been studied that consider the effect of strain on the devices, and comparisons have been drawn. A review of some modeling issues in strained silicon technology has also been outlined. The review indicates that this technology is very much required in nanoscale MOSFETs due to its several potential benefits, and there is a strong need for an analytical model which describes the complete physics of the strain technology.

  3. Bio-Organic Nanotechnology: Using Proteins and Synthetic Polymers for Nanoscale Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Linda K.; Xu, Ting; Trent, Jonathan D.; Russell, Thomas P.

    2003-01-01

    While the ability of proteins to self-assemble makes them powerful tools in nanotechnology, in biological systems protein-based structures ultimately depend on the context in which they form. We combine the self-assembling properties of synthetic diblock copolymers and proteins to construct intricately ordered, three-dimensional polymer protein structures with the ultimate goal of forming nano-scale devices. This hybrid approach takes advantage of the capabilities of organic polymer chemistry to build ordered structures and the capabilities of genetic engineering to create proteins that are selective for inorganic or organic substrates. Here, microphase-separated block copolymers coupled with genetically engineered heat shock proteins are used to produce nano-scale patterning that maximizes the potential for both increased structural complexity and integrity.

  4. Atomistic simulations of electrochemical metallization cells: mechanisms of ultra-fast resistance switching in nanoscale devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofrio, Nicolas; Guzman, David; Strachan, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    We describe a new method that enables reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of electrochemical processes and apply it to study electrochemical metallization cells (ECMs). The model, called EChemDID, extends the charge equilibration method to capture the effect of external electrochemical potential on partial atomic charges and describes its equilibration over connected metallic structures, on-the-fly, during the MD simulation. We use EChemDID to simulate resistance switching in nanoscale ECMs; these devices consist of an electroactive metal separated from an inactive electrode by an insulator and can be reversibly switched to a low-resistance state by the electrochemical formation of a conducting filament between electrodes. Our structures use Cu as the active electrode and SiO2 as the dielectric and have dimensions at the foreseen limit of scalability of the technology, with a dielectric thickness of approximately 1 nm. We explore the effect of device geometry on switching timescales and find that nanowires with an electroactive shell, where ions migrate towards a smaller inactive electrode core, result in faster switching than planar devices. We observe significant device-to-device variability in switching timescales and intermittent switching for these nanoscale devices. To characterize the evolution in the electronic structure of the dielectric as dissolved metallic ions switch the device, we perform density functional theory calculations on structures obtained from an EChemDID MD simulation. These results confirm the appearance of states around the Fermi energy as the metallic filament bridges the electrodes and show that the metallic ions and not defects in the dielectric contribute to the majority of those states.

  5. Recent Advances in Organic Photovoltaics: Device Structure and Optical Engineering Optimization on the Nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Guoping; Ren, Xingang; Zhang, Su; Wu, Hongbin; Choy, Wallace C H; He, Zhicai; Cao, Yong

    2016-03-23

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices, which can directly convert absorbed sunlight to electricity, are stacked thin films of tens to hundreds of nanometers. They have emerged as a promising candidate for affordable, clean, and renewable energy. In the past few years, a rapid increase has been seen in the power conversion efficiency of OPV devices toward 10% and above, through comprehensive optimizations via novel photoactive donor and acceptor materials, control of thin-film morphology on the nanoscale, device structure developments, and interfacial and optical engineering. The intrinsic problems of short exciton diffusion length and low carrier mobility in organic semiconductors creates a challenge for OPV designs for achieving optically thick and electrically thin device structures to achieve sufficient light absorption and efficient electron/hole extraction. Recent advances in the field of OPV devices are reviewed, with a focus on the progress in device architecture and optical engineering approaches that lead to improved electrical and optical characteristics in OPV devices. Successful strategies are highlighted for light wave distribution, modulation, and absorption promotion inside the active layer of OPV devices by incorporating periodic nanopatterns/nanostructures or incorporating metallic nanomaterials and nanostructures.

  6. Low-temperature sintering of nanoscale silver paste for semiconductor device interconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Guofeng

    This research has developed a lead-free semiconductor device interconnect technology by studying the processing-microstructure-property relationships of low-temperature sintering of nanoscale silver pastes. The nanoscale silver pastes have been formulated by adding organic components (dispersant, binder and thinner) into nano-silver particles. The selected organic components have the nano-particle polymeric stabilization, paste processing quality adjustment, and non-densifying diffusion retarding functions and thus help the pastes sinter to ˜80% bulk density at temperatures no more than 300°C. It has been found that the low-temperature sintered silver has better electrical, thermal and overall thermomechanical properties compared with the existing semiconductor device interconnecting materials such as solder alloys and conductive epoxies. After solving the organic burnout problems associated with the covered sintering, a lead-free semiconductor device interconnect technology has been designed to be compatible with the existing surface-mounting techniques with potentially low-cost. It has been found that the low-temperature sintered silver joints have high electrical, thermal, and mechanical performance. The reliability of the silver joints has also been studied by the 50-250°C thermal cycling experiment. Finally, the bonging strength drop of the silver joints has been suggested to be ductile fracture in the silver joints as micro-voids nucleated at microscale grain boundaries during the temperature cycling. The low-temperature silver sintering technology has enabled some benchmark packaging concepts and substantial advantages in future applications.

  7. Nanoscale Plasmonic Devices Based on Metal-Dielectric-Metal Stub Resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We review some of the recent research activities on plasmonic devices based on metal-dielectric-metal (MDM stub resonators for manipulating light at the nanoscale. We first introduce slow-light subwavelength plasmonic waveguides based on plasmonic analogues of periodically loaded transmission lines and electromagnetically induced transparency. In both cases, the structures consist of a MDM waveguide side-coupled to periodic arrays of MDM stub resonators. We then introduce absorption switches consisting of a MDM plasmonic waveguide side-coupled to a MDM stub resonator filled with an active material.

  8. Electrode-stress-induced nanoscale disorder in Si quantum electronic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Park

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Disorder in the potential-energy landscape presents a major obstacle to the more rapid development of semiconductor quantum device technologies. We report a large-magnitude source of disorder, beyond commonly considered unintentional background doping or fixed charge in oxide layers: nanoscale strain fields induced by residual stresses in nanopatterned metal gates. Quantitative analysis of synchrotron coherent hard x-ray nanobeam diffraction patterns reveals gate-induced curvature and strains up to 0.03% in a buried Si quantum well within a Si/SiGe heterostructure. Electrode stress presents both challenges to the design of devices and opportunities associated with the lateral manipulation of electronic energy levels.

  9. Maximum efficiency of state-space models of nanoscale energy conversion devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einax, Mario; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-07-07

    The performance of nano-scale energy conversion devices is studied in the framework of state-space models where a device is described by a graph comprising states and transitions between them represented by nodes and links, respectively. Particular segments of this network represent input (driving) and output processes whose properly chosen flux ratio provides the energy conversion efficiency. Simple cyclical graphs yield Carnot efficiency for the maximum conversion yield. We give general proof that opening a link that separate between the two driving segments always leads to reduced efficiency. We illustrate these general result with simple models of a thermoelectric nanodevice and an organic photovoltaic cell. In the latter an intersecting link of the above type corresponds to non-radiative carriers recombination and the reduced maximum efficiency is manifested as a smaller open-circuit voltage.

  10. The non-equilibrium Green's function method for nanoscale device simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pourfath, Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    For modeling the transport of carriers in nanoscale devices, a Green-function formalism is the most accurate approach. Due to the complexity of the formalism, one should have a deep understanding of the underlying principles and use smart approximations and numerical methods for solving the kinetic equations at a reasonable computational time. In this book the required concepts from quantum and statistical mechanics and numerical methods for calculating Green functions are presented. The Green function is studied in detail for systems both under equilibrium and under nonequilibrium conditions. Because the formalism enables rigorous modeling of different scattering mechanisms in terms of self-energies, but an exact evaluation of self-energies for realistic systems is not possible, their approximation and inclusion in the quantum kinetic equations of the Green functions are elaborated. All the elements of the kinetic equations, which are the device Hamiltonian, contact self-energies, and scattering self-energie...

  11. Maximum efficiency of state-space models of nanoscale energy conversion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einax, Mario; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-07-01

    The performance of nano-scale energy conversion devices is studied in the framework of state-space models where a device is described by a graph comprising states and transitions between them represented by nodes and links, respectively. Particular segments of this network represent input (driving) and output processes whose properly chosen flux ratio provides the energy conversion efficiency. Simple cyclical graphs yield Carnot efficiency for the maximum conversion yield. We give general proof that opening a link that separate between the two driving segments always leads to reduced efficiency. We illustrate these general result with simple models of a thermoelectric nanodevice and an organic photovoltaic cell. In the latter an intersecting link of the above type corresponds to non-radiative carriers recombination and the reduced maximum efficiency is manifested as a smaller open-circuit voltage.

  12. Micro- and nanoscale devices for the investigation of epigenetics and chromatin dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Carlos A.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2013-10-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the blueprint on which life is based and transmitted, but the way in which chromatin -- a dynamic complex of nucleic acids and proteins -- is packaged and behaves in the cellular nucleus has only begun to be investigated. Epigenetic modifications sit 'on top of' the genome and affect how DNA is compacted into chromatin and transcribed into ribonucleic acid (RNA). The packaging and modifications around the genome have been shown to exert significant influence on cellular behaviour and, in turn, human development and disease. However, conventional techniques for studying epigenetic or conformational modifications of chromosomes have inherent limitations and, therefore, new methods based on micro- and nanoscale devices have been sought. Here, we review the development of these devices and explore their use in the study of DNA modifications, chromatin modifications and higher-order chromatin structures.

  13. Invited Review Nanoscale devices fabricated by dynamic ploughing with an atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    A review is given on the dynamic ploughing technique and its application on the fabrication of nanoscale semiconductor structures. The vibrating tip of an atomic force microscope is used to dynamically plough furrows into a polymer layer of a few nm thickness on top of the semiconductor surface. Wet-chemical etching transfers the desired line pattern. The resulting grooves of 50-100 nm width form an arrangement of barriers in the electron layer of a conventional modulation-doped GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. A new type of heterostructure with a compensating p-type doped cap layer shows an electron enhancement if the cap layer is selectively removed. Etching a groove in these structures enables one to induce a one-dimensional electron system. Both types of structures are used to fabricate various ballistic quantum devices and Coulomb-blockade structures.

  14. Novel plasmonic probes and smart superhydrophobic devices, New tools for forthcoming spectroscopies at the nanoscale

    KAUST Repository

    Giugni, Andrea

    2014-08-11

    In this work we review novel strategies and new physical effects to achieve compositional and structural recognition at single molecule level. This chapter is divided in two main parts. The first one introduces the strategies currently adopted to investigate matter at few molecules level. Exploiting the capability of surface plasmon polaritons to deliver optical excitation at nanoscale, we introduce a technique relying on a new transport phenomenon with chemical sensitivity and nanometer spatial resolution. The second part describes how micro and nanostructured superhydrofobic textures can concentrate and localize a small number of molecules into a well-defined region, even when only an extremely diluted solution is available. Several applications of these devices as micro- and nano-systems for high-resolution imaging techniques, cell cultures and tissue engineering applications are also discussed.

  15. Enhancement of high-TC superconducting thin film devices by nanoscale polishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalowski, P.; Shapoval, T.; Meier, D.; Katzer, C.; Schmidl, F.; Schultz, L.; Seidel, P.

    2012-11-01

    The effects of mechanical nanoscale polishing on the superconducting parameters of YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) thin films and bi-crystal grain boundary Josephson junctions have been investigated. We prepared samples with additional gold nanocrystallites in the YBCO film. As they are distributed throughout the whole YBCO film, they provide a low-resistance ohmic contact even if parts of the film are removed. Polishing was performed either before or after the patterning and did not change the properties of the grain boundary. However, nanopolishing reduces the film roughness in a significant way, which makes it an indispensable tool for the preparation of integrated superconducting circuits. We also succeeded in tuning the IC and RN of the Josephson junctions of direct current superconducting quantum interference devices (dc-SQUIDs) by systematically reducing the film thickness, which opens up new possibilities in the application of magnetic field sensors.

  16. Predictive atomistic simulations of electronic properties of realistic nanoscale devices: A multiscale modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedula, Ravi Pramod Kumar

    Scaling of CMOS towards its ultimate limits, where quantum effects and atomistic variability due to fabrication, along with recent emphasis on heterogeneous integration of non-digital devices for increasing the functional diversification presents us with fundamentally new challenges. A comprehensive understanding of design and operation of these nanoscale transistors, and other electronic devices like RF-MEMS, requires an insight into their electronic and mechanical properties that are strongly influenced by underlying atomic structure. Hence, continuum descriptions of materials and use of empirical models at these scales become questionable. This increase in complexity of electronic devices necessitates an understanding at a more fundamental level to accurately predict the performance and reliability of these devices. The objective of this thesis is to outline the application of multiscale predictive modeling methods, ranging from atoms to devices, for addressing these challenges. This capability is demonstrated using two examples: characterization of (i) dielectric charging in RF-MEMS, and (ii) transport properties of Ge-nanofins. For characterizing the dielectric charging phenomenon, a continuum dielectric charging model, augmented by first principles informed trap distributions, is used to predict current transient measurements across a broad range of voltages and temperatures. These simulations demonstrate using ab initio informed model not only reduces the empiricism (number of adjustable parameters) in the model but also leads to a more accurate model over a broad range of operating conditions, and enable the precise determination of additional material parameters. These atomistic calculations also provide detailed information about the nature of charge traps and their trapping mechanisms that are not accessible experimentally; such information could prove invaluable in defect engineering. The second problem addresses the effect of the in-homogeneous strain

  17. Nano Superconducting Quantum Interference device: A powerful tool for nanoscale investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granata, Carmine, E-mail: carmine.granata@cnr.it; Vettoliere, Antonio

    2016-02-19

    The magnetic sensing at nanoscale level is a promising and interesting research topic of nanoscience. Indeed, magnetic imaging is a powerful tool for probing biological, chemical and physical systems. The study of small spin cluster, like magnetic molecules and nanoparticles, single electron, cold atom clouds, is one of the most stimulating challenges of applied and basic research of the next years. In particular, the magnetic nanoparticle investigation plays a fundamental role for the modern material science and its relative technological applications like ferrofluids, magnetic refrigeration and biomedical applications, including drug delivery, hyper-thermia cancer treatment and magnetic resonance imaging contrast-agent. Actually, one of the most ambitious goals of the high sensitivity magnetometry is the detection of elementary magnetic moment or spin. In this framework, several efforts have been devoted to the development of a high sensitivity magnetic nanosensor pushing sensing capability to the individual spin level. Among the different magnetic sensors, Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) exhibit an ultra high sensitivity and are widely employed in numerous applications. Basically, a SQUID consists of a superconducting ring (sensitive area) interrupted by two Josephson junctions. In the recent years, it has been proved that the magnetic response of nano-objects can be effectively measured by using a SQUID with a very small sensitive area (nanoSQUID). In fact, the sensor noise, expressed in terms of the elementary magnetic moment (spin or Bohr magneton), is linearly dependent on the SQUID loop side length. For this reason, SQUIDs have been progressively miniaturized in order to improve the sensitivity up to few spin per unit of bandwidth. With respect to other techniques, nanoSQUIDs offer the advantage of direct measurement of magnetization changes in small spin systems. In this review, we focus on nanoSQUIDs and its applications. In

  18. Nano Superconducting Quantum Interference device: A powerful tool for nanoscale investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, Carmine; Vettoliere, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    The magnetic sensing at nanoscale level is a promising and interesting research topic of nanoscience. Indeed, magnetic imaging is a powerful tool for probing biological, chemical and physical systems. The study of small spin cluster, like magnetic molecules and nanoparticles, single electron, cold atom clouds, is one of the most stimulating challenges of applied and basic research of the next years. In particular, the magnetic nanoparticle investigation plays a fundamental role for the modern material science and its relative technological applications like ferrofluids, magnetic refrigeration and biomedical applications, including drug delivery, hyper-thermia cancer treatment and magnetic resonance imaging contrast-agent. Actually, one of the most ambitious goals of the high sensitivity magnetometry is the detection of elementary magnetic moment or spin. In this framework, several efforts have been devoted to the development of a high sensitivity magnetic nanosensor pushing sensing capability to the individual spin level. Among the different magnetic sensors, Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) exhibit an ultra high sensitivity and are widely employed in numerous applications. Basically, a SQUID consists of a superconducting ring (sensitive area) interrupted by two Josephson junctions. In the recent years, it has been proved that the magnetic response of nano-objects can be effectively measured by using a SQUID with a very small sensitive area (nanoSQUID). In fact, the sensor noise, expressed in terms of the elementary magnetic moment (spin or Bohr magneton), is linearly dependent on the SQUID loop side length. For this reason, SQUIDs have been progressively miniaturized in order to improve the sensitivity up to few spin per unit of bandwidth. With respect to other techniques, nanoSQUIDs offer the advantage of direct measurement of magnetization changes in small spin systems. In this review, we focus on nanoSQUIDs and its applications. In

  19. Nanoscience and technology: An interdisciplinary initiative, self-assembling nanoscale quantum devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doolen, G.; Smith, D.; Mineev, M. [and others

    1996-10-01

    This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Our objective is to develop the devices, interconnection technologies, and self-assembling systems required for quantum-based information processing that permit ultra-dense integrated circuits and that allow continuation of the on-going silicon VLSI miniaturization process. That process is facing increasing difficulties related to switch performance, heat dissipation, interconnect failure, quantum effect complications, and rapidly escalating manufacturing costs. Our approach is intended to address these concerns and consists of the development of highly parallel stochastic computers utilizing quantum components and self-assembly methods; the development of self-assembling monolayers for use as resists and memory devices; and research on approaches to molecular self-assembly of the precursors to molecular transistors. The work will provide confirmation of principles, is intended to provide near-term results of potential relevance to the commercial sector, and has a range of applications that include high performance computing, biotechnology, and nanoscale chemistry.

  20. Development of a Cryostat to Characterize Nano-scale Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Mathew; Matheny, Matthew; Knudsen, Jasmine

    2016-03-01

    We have designed and constructed a low-noise vacuum cryostat to be used for the characterization of nano-scale superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). Such devices are very sensitive to magnetic fields and can measure changes in flux on the order of a single electron magnetic moment. As a part of the design process, we calculated the separation required between the cryogenic preamplifier and superconducting magnet, including a high-permeability magnetic shield, using a finite-element model of the apparatus. The cryostat comprises a vacuum cross at room temperature for filtered DC and shielded RF electrical connections, a thin-wall stainless steel support tube, a taper-sealed cryogenic vacuum can, and internal mechanical support and wiring for the nanoSQUID. The Dewar is modified with a room-temperature flange with a sliding seal for the cryostat. The flange supports the superconducting 3 Tesla magnet and thermometry wiring. Upon completion of the cryostat fabrication and Dewar modifications, operation of the nanoSQUIDs as transported from our collaborator's laboratory in Israel will be confirmed, as the lead forming the SQUID is sensitive to oxidation and the SQUIDs must be shipped in a vacuum container. After operation of the nanoSQUIDs is confirmed, the primary work of characterizing their high-speed properties will begin. This will include looking at the measurement of relaxation oscillations at high bandwidth in comparison to the theoretical predictions of the current model.

  1. Nanoscale Potentiometry and Spectroscopy of Organic Electronic and Photonic Materials and Devices using Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersam, M. C.; Fabbroni, E. F.; Such, M. W.; Shull, K. R.; Veinot, J. G. C.; Marks, T. J.

    2002-03-01

    As organic devices approach the nanometer scale, spatial variations in the electronic and photonic properties of organic materials become increasingly significant. To this end, we have developed conductive atomic force microscopy techniques for measuring temporally and spatially dependent electronic and photonic signals. To test this general nanocharacterization technique, two model organic systems have been studied: (1) a polyethylene-co-maleic anhydride matrix filled with aggregates of carbon black particles and (2) organic light emitting diode (OLED) structures. In the first case, surface potentiometry measurements illustrate individual nanoscale agglomerates of highly conductive carbon black particles within the insulating matirx. In the OLED experiments, electron transport and photon emission are concurrently mapped with 10 nm spatial resolution. Ultimately, we correlate these nanoscale measurements with macroscopic device behavior.

  2. Simulation of novel complementary bipolar inverters for low-voltage high-speed ULSI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bubennikov, AN; Zykov, AV

    2000-01-01

    Complementary bipolar (CBi) inverters on scaled down self-aligned transistors with highly-doped bases for advanced high-speed low-voltage low-power deep-submicron ULSI are considered and studied using a simulator PSPICE. A novel symmetrical transistor structure (STS) with undoped (lightly-doped) act

  3. Pseudo-One-Dimensional Magnonic Crystals for High-Frequency Nanoscale Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Chandrima; Choudhury, Samiran; Sinha, Jaivardhan; Barman, Anjan

    2017-07-01

    The synthetic magnonic crystals (i.e., periodic composites consisting of different magnetic materials) form one fascinating class of emerging research field, which aims to command the process and flow of information by means of spin waves, such as in magnonic waveguides. One of the intriguing features of magnonic crystals is the presence and tunability of band gaps in the spin-wave spectrum, where the high attenuation of the frequency bands can be utilized for frequency-dependent control on the spin waves. However, to find a feasible way of band tuning in terms of a realistic integrated device is still a challenge. Here, we introduce an array of asymmetric saw-tooth-shaped width-modulated nanoscale ferromagnetic waveguides forming a pseudo-one-dimensional magnonic crystal. The frequency dispersion of collective modes measured by the Brillouin light-scattering technique is compared with the band diagram obtained by numerically solving the eigenvalue problem derived from the linearized Landau-Lifshitz magnetic torque equation. We find that the magnonic band-gap width, position, and the slope of dispersion curves are controllable by changing the angle between the spin-wave propagation channel and the magnetic field. The calculated profiles of the dynamic magnetization reveal that the corrugation at the lateral boundary of the waveguide effectively engineers the edge modes, which forms the basis of the interactive control in magnonic circuits. The results represent a prospective direction towards managing the internal field distribution as well as the dispersion properties, which find potential applications in dynamic spin-wave filters and magnonic waveguides in the gigahertz frequency range.

  4. Characterization of structural and electronic properties of nanoscale semiconductor device structures using cross-sectional scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Paul Arthur

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) offers numerous advantages over metrology tools traditionally used for semiconductor materials and device characterization including high lateral spatial resolution, and relative ease of use. Cross-sectional SPM allows material and device measurements including layer thickness metrology and p-n junction delineation on actual nanoscale device structures. Site-specific SPM allows measurements to be performed on modern devices with real, non-arbitrary geometries including deep-submicron Si device structures. In Chapter II we present theoretical analysis and experimental results of capacitive force microscopy studies of AlxGa1-xAs/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistor structures. The contrast obtained yields clear delineation of individual device layers based on doping, and enables a precise determination of the difference in basewidth between the two HBT samples examined. We experimentally determine a charged surface state density on the GaAs {110} surface that is consistent with published values. In Chapter III we present cross-sectional scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) of nanoscale group IV Si device structures. Sample preparation techniques are discussed in context with recent experimental results from the literature. We then presented a theoretical calculation of the flat-band and threshold voltage of Si-MOSFETs as a function of doping including error analysis due to oxide thickness variations. Application to nanoscale FIB implanted Si is presented. The SCM contrast evolves as a function of applied bias as expected based on theoretical modeling of the tip-sample system as an MOS-capacitor. In Chapter IV we apply cross-sectional SCM to directly measure the electronic properties of a 120 nm gate length p-MOSFET including super-halo implants. Bias-dependent SCM images allow us to delineate the individual device regions and image the n+ super-halo implants. We have demonstrated the specific SCM bias conditions necessary for

  5. Nanoscale device architectures derived from biological assemblies: The case of tobacco mosaic virus and (apo)ferritin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calò, Annalisa; Eiben, Sabine; Okuda, Mitsuhiro; Bittner, Alexander M.

    2016-03-01

    Virus particles and proteins are excellent examples of naturally occurring structures with well-defined nanoscale architectures, for example, cages and tubes. These structures can be employed in a bottom-up assembly strategy to fabricate repetitive patterns of hybrid organic-inorganic materials. In this paper, we review methods of assembly that make use of protein and virus scaffolds to fabricate patterned nanostructures with very high spatial control. We chose (apo)ferritin and tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) as model examples that have already been applied successfully in nanobiotechnology. Their interior space and their exterior surfaces can be mineralized with inorganic layers or nanoparticles. Furthermore, their native assembly abilities can be exploited to generate periodic architectures for integration in electrical and magnetic devices. We introduce the state of the art and describe recent advances in biomineralization techniques, patterning and device production with (apo)ferritin and TMV.

  6. Electrochromic Metallo-Organic Nanoscale Films: Fabrication, Color Range, and Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elool Dov, Neta; Shankar, Sreejith; Cohen, Dana; Bendikov, Tatyana; Rechav, Katya; Shimon, Linda J W; Lahav, Michal; van der Boom, Milko E

    2017-08-23

    In this study, we demonstrate a versatile approach for the formation of electrochromic nanoscale assemblies on transparent conductive oxides on both rigid and flexible substrates. Our method is based on the application of alternating spin-coated layers of well-defined metal polypyridyl complexes and a palladium(II) salt to form electrochemically addressable films with a high chromophore density. By varying the central metal ion of the polypyridyl complexes (Os, Ru, and Fe) and their ligands and by mixing these complexes, coatings with a wide range of colors can be achieved. These coatings cover a large area of RGB color space. The coloration intensities of these nanoscale films can be tuned by the number of deposition steps. The materials have very attractive ON/OFF ratios, electrochemical stabilities, and coloration efficiencies. Reversible color-to-colorless and color-to-color transitions were demonstrated, and the films were further integrated into sandwich cells.

  7. Enhanced Device and Circuit-Level Performance Benchmarking of Graphene Nanoribbon Field-Effect Transistor against a Nano-MOSFET with Interconnects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei Chaeng Chin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparative benchmarking of a graphene nanoribbon field-effect transistor (GNRFET and a nanoscale metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (nano-MOSFET for applications in ultralarge-scale integration (ULSI is reported. GNRFET is found to be distinctly superior in the circuit-level architecture. The remarkable transport properties of GNR propel it into an alternative technology to circumvent the limitations imposed by the silicon-based electronics. Budding GNRFET, using the circuit-level modeling software SPICE, exhibits enriched performance for digital logic gates in 16 nm process technology. The assessment of these performance metrics includes energy-delay product (EDP and power-delay product (PDP of inverter and NOR and NAND gates, forming the building blocks for ULSI. The evaluation of EDP and PDP is carried out for an interconnect length that ranges up to 100 μm. An analysis, based on the drain and gate current-voltage (Id-Vd and Id-Vg, for subthreshold swing (SS, drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL, and current on/off ratio for circuit implementation is given. GNRFET can overcome the short-channel effects that are prevalent in sub-100 nm Si MOSFET. GNRFET provides reduced EDP and PDP one order of magnitude that is lower than that of a MOSFET. Even though the GNRFET is energy efficient, the circuit performance of the device is limited by the interconnect capacitances.

  8. Introduction in space technologies, processing and applications of ULSI/WSI/3D-WSI on functional 3D nano- and optoelectronic elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bubennikov, AN

    2002-01-01

    Dynamics and reforms by which the semiconductor industry could be transformed into next-generation manufacturing of Si and nanoelectronic ULSI and WSI are discussed. For competitive Si ULSI and WSI the functional integration becomes a core design principle and cardinal simplification of manufacturin

  9. NASA GSFC Strategic Nanotechnology Interests: Symposium on High-Rate Nanoscale Printing for Devices and Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, Aprille J.

    2014-01-01

    The seminars invitees include representatives from industry, nonprofit research facility and universities. The presentation provides an overview of the NASAGSFC locations, technical capabilities and applied nanotechnology interests. Initially presented are advances by the broader technological communities on current miniaturized multiscale advanced manufacturing and 3D printing products on the micro and macro scale. Briefly assessed is the potential of moving toward the nanoscale for possible space flight applications and challenges. Lastly, highlighted are GSFCs current successes in nano-technology developments and targeted future applications.

  10. Ultrahigh-speed rotating nanoelectromechanical system devices assembled from nanoscale building blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwanoh; Xu, Xiaobin; Guo, Jianhe; Fan, D. L.

    2014-04-01

    The development of rotary nanomotors is crucial for advancing nanoelectromechanical system technology. In this work, we report design, assembly and rotation of ordered arrays of nanomotors. The nanomotors are bottom-up assembled from nanoscale building blocks with nanowires as rotors, patterned nanomagnets as bearings and quadrupole microelectrodes as stators. Arrays of nanomotors rotate with controlled angle, speed (over 18,000 r.p.m.), and chirality by electric fields. Using analytical modelling, we reveal the fundamental nanoscale electrical, mechanical and magnetic interactions in the nanomotor system, which excellently agrees with experimental results and provides critical understanding for designing metallic nanoelectromechanical systems. The nanomotors can be continuously rotated for 15 h over 240,000 cycles. They are applied for controlled biochemical release and demonstrate releasing rate of biochemicals on nanoparticles that can be precisely tuned by mechanical rotations. The innovations reported in this research, from concept, design and actuation to application, are relevant to nanoelectromechanical system, nanomedicine, microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip architectures.

  11. All-polymer bistable resistive memory device based on nanoscale phase-separated PCBM-ferroelectric blends

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Mohammad A.

    2012-11-21

    All polymer nonvolatile bistable memory devices are fabricated from blends of ferroelectric poly(vinylidenefluoride-trifluoroethylene (P(VDF-TrFE)) and n-type semiconducting [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). The nanoscale phase separated films consist of PCBM domains that extend from bottom to top electrode, surrounded by a ferroelectric P(VDF-TrFE) matrix. Highly conducting poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) polymer electrodes are used to engineer band offsets at the interfaces. The devices display resistive switching behavior due to modulation of this injection barrier. With careful optimization of the solvent and processing conditions, it is possible to spin cast very smooth blend films (Rrms ≈ 7.94 nm) and with good reproducibility. The devices exhibit high Ion/I off ratios (≈3 × 103), low read voltages (≈5 V), excellent dielectric response at high frequencies (Ïμr ≈ 8.3 at 1 MHz), and excellent retention characteristics up to 10 000 s. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. JPRS Report, Science and Technology: Japan. ULSI Process Technology Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    accomplished through such techniques as a highly selective separation of nitride films and high-speed separation of resists. 35 4. Conclusion The above... Cleanliness (4) Stress control (5) Low damage (6) Larger diameters (8 inch <f>) 3. Present State of Various CVD Methods Various CVD methods are...in device miniaturization, we can focus only on the thin film property, film thickness control, cleanliness and software, in addition to the

  13. Nanoscale surface modifications to control capillary flow characteristics in PMMA microfluidic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhopadhyay Subhadeep

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA microfluidic devices have been fabricated using a hot embossing technique to incorporate micro-pillar features on the bottom wall of the device which when combined with either a plasma treatment or the coating of a diamond-like carbon (DLC film presents a range of surface modification profiles. Experimental results presented in detail the surface modifications in the form of distinct changes in the static water contact angle across a range from 44.3 to 81.2 when compared to pristine PMMA surfaces. Additionally, capillary flow of water (dyed to aid visualization through the microfluidic devices was recorded and analyzed to provide comparison data between filling time of a microfluidic chamber and surface modification characteristics, including the effects of surface energy and surface roughness on the microfluidic flow. We have experimentally demonstrated that fluid flow and thus filling time for the microfluidic device was significantly faster for the device with surface modifications that resulted in a lower static contact angle, and also that the incorporation of micro-pillars into a fluidic device increases the filling time when compared to comparative devices.

  14. Laser direct writing of micro- and nano-scale medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittard, Shaun D; Narayan, Roger J

    2010-05-01

    Laser-based direct writing of materials has undergone significant development in recent years. The ability to modify a variety of materials at small length scales and using short production times provides laser direct writing with unique capabilities for fabrication of medical devices. In many laser-based rapid prototyping methods, microscale and submicroscale structuring of materials is controlled by computer-generated models. Various laser-based direct write methods, including selective laser sintering/melting, laser machining, matrix-assisted pulsed-laser evaporation direct write, stereolithography and two-photon polymerization, are described. Their use in fabrication of microstructured and nanostructured medical devices is discussed. Laser direct writing may be used for processing a wide variety of advanced medical devices, including patient-specific prostheses, drug delivery devices, biosensors, stents and tissue-engineering scaffolds.

  15. Cellular nanoscale sensory wave computing

    CERN Document Server

    Baatar, Chagaan; Roska, Tamas

    2010-01-01

    This fresh perspective of sensory computing successfully bridges the gap between nanoscale devices and CMOS integrated circuits. Practical and complex algorithms are also discussed, in addition to new developments like the nanoscale antenna.

  16. Numerical analysis of an optical nanoscale particles trapping device based on a slotted nanobeam cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Senlin; Yong, Zhengdong; Shi, Yaocheng; He, Sailing

    2016-01-01

    A slotted nanobeam cavity (SNC) is utilized to trap a polystyrene (PS) particle with a radius of only 2 nm. The carefully designed SNC shows an ultrahigh Q factor of 4.5 × 107 while maintaining a small mode volume of 0.067(λ/nwater)3. Strongly enhanced optical trapping force is numerically demonstrated when the 2 nm PS particle is introduced into the central, slotted part of the SNC. In the vertical direction, the numerical calculation results show that a trapping stiffness of 0.4 pN/(nm · mW) around the equilibrium position and a trapping potential barrier of ~2000 kBT/mW can be reached. To our best knowledge, the trapping capability (trapping stiffness and trapping potential barrier) of the proposed structure significantly outperforms the theoretical results of those in previously reported work. In addition, the SNC system does not suffer from the metal induced heat issue that restricts the performance of state-of-the-art optical trapping systems involving plasmonic enhancement. Based on the proposed cavity, applications such as lab-on-a-chip platforms for nanoscale particle trapping and analysis can be expected in future. PMID:27786248

  17. Numerical analysis of an optical nanoscale particles trapping device based on a slotted nanobeam cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Senlin; Yong, Zhengdong; Shi, Yaocheng; He, Sailing

    2016-10-01

    A slotted nanobeam cavity (SNC) is utilized to trap a polystyrene (PS) particle with a radius of only 2 nm. The carefully designed SNC shows an ultrahigh Q factor of 4.5 × 107 while maintaining a small mode volume of 0.067(λ/nwater)3. Strongly enhanced optical trapping force is numerically demonstrated when the 2 nm PS particle is introduced into the central, slotted part of the SNC. In the vertical direction, the numerical calculation results show that a trapping stiffness of 0.4 pN/(nm · mW) around the equilibrium position and a trapping potential barrier of ~2000 kBT/mW can be reached. To our best knowledge, the trapping capability (trapping stiffness and trapping potential barrier) of the proposed structure significantly outperforms the theoretical results of those in previously reported work. In addition, the SNC system does not suffer from the metal induced heat issue that restricts the performance of state-of-the-art optical trapping systems involving plasmonic enhancement. Based on the proposed cavity, applications such as lab-on-a-chip platforms for nanoscale particle trapping and analysis can be expected in future.

  18. Performance assessment of nanoscale Schottky MOSFET as resonant tunnelling device: Non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zahra Ahangari; Morteza Fathipour

    2013-09-01

    A comprehensive study is performed on the electrical characteristics of Schottky barrier MOSFET (SBMOSFET) in nanoscale regime, by employing the non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF) approach. Quantum confinement results in the enhancement of effective Schottky barrier height (SBH). High enough Schottky barriers at the source/drain and the channel form a double barrier profile along the channel that results in the formation of resonance states. We have, for the first time, proposed a resonant tunnelling device based on SBMOSFET in which multiple resonance states are modulated by the gate voltage. Role of essential factors such as temperature, SBH, bias voltage and structural parameters on the feasibility of this device for silicon-based resonant tunnelling applications are extensively studied. Resonant tunnelling appears at low temperatures and low drain voltages and as a result negative differential resistance (NDR) is apparent in the transfer characteristic. Scaling down the gate length to 6 nm increases the peak-to-valley ratio (PVR) of the drain current. As the effective SBH reduces, the curvature of the double barrier profile is gradually diminished. Therefore, multiple resonant states are contributed to the current and consequently resonant tunnelling is smoothed out.

  19. High-field electron transport in nanoscale group-III nitride devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komirenko, S.M.; Kim, K.W. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Kochelap, V.A. [Inst. of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev-28 (Ukraine); Stroscio, M.A. [Army Research Office, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Mathematical Sciences Div.

    2001-11-08

    Focusing on the short-size group-III nitride heterostructures, we have developed a model which takes into account main features of transport of electrons injected into a polar semiconductor under high electric fields. The model is based on an exact analytical solution of Boltzmann transport equation. The electron velocity distribution over the device is analyzed at different fields and the basic characteristics of the high-field electron transport are obtained. The critical field for the runaway regime, when electron energies and velocities increase with distance which results in the average velocities higher than the peak velocity in bulk-like samples, is determined. We have found that the runaway electrons are characterized by a distribution function with population inversion. Different nitride-based small-size devices where this effect can have an impact on the device performance are considered. (orig.)

  20. Multiscale examination and modeling of electron transport in nanoscale materials and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyai, Douglas R.

    For half a century the integrated circuits (ICs) that make up the heart of electronic devices have been steadily improving by shrinking at an exponential rate. However, as the current crop of ICs get smaller and the insulating layers involved become thinner, electrons leak through due to quantum mechanical tunneling. This is one of several issues which will bring an end to this incredible streak of exponential improvement of this type of transistor device, after which future improvements will have to come from employing fundamentally different transistor architecture rather than fine tuning and miniaturizing the metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) in use today. Several new transistor designs, some designed and built here at Michigan Tech, involve electrons tunneling their way through arrays of nanoparticles. We use a multi-scale approach to model these devices and study their behavior. For investigating the tunneling characteristics of the individual junctions, we use a first-principles approach to model conduction between sub-nanometer gold particles. To estimate the change in energy due to the movement of individual electrons, we use the finite element method to calculate electrostatic capacitances. The kinetic Monte Carlo method allows us to use our knowledge of these details to simulate the dynamics of an entire device---sometimes consisting of hundreds of individual particles---and watch as a device 'turns on' and starts conducting an electric current. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and the closely related scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) are a family of powerful experimental techniques that allow for the probing and imaging of surfaces and molecules at atomic resolution. However, interpretation of the results often requires comparison with theoretical and computational models. We have developed a new method for calculating STM topographs and STS spectra. This method combines an established method for approximating the

  1. Design and Fabrication of Nanoscale IDTs Using Electron Beam Technology for High-Frequency SAW Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Che Shih

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency Rayleigh-mode surface acoustic wave (SAW devices were fabricated for 4G mobile telecommunications. The RF magnetron sputtering method was adopted to grow piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN thin films on the Si3N4/Si substrates. The influence of sputtering parameters on the crystalline characteristics of AlN thin films was investigated. The interdigital transducer electrodes (IDTs of aluminum (Al were then fabricated onto the AlN surfaces by using the electron beam (e-beam direct write lithography method to form the Al/AlN/Si3N4/Si structured SAW devices. The Al electrodes were adopted owing to its low resistivity, low cost, and low density of the material. For 4G applications in mobile telecommunications, the line widths of 937 nm, 750 nm, 562 nm, and 375 nm of IDTs were designed. Preferred orientation and crystalline properties of AlN thin films were determined by X-ray diffraction using a Siemens XRD-8 with CuKα radiation. Additionally, the cross-sectional images of AlN thin films were obtained by scanning electron microscope. Finally, the frequency responses of high-frequency SAW devices were measured using the E5071C network analyzer. The center frequencies of the high-frequency Rayleigh-mode SAW devices of 1.36 GHz, 1.81 GHz, 2.37 GHz, and 3.74 GHz are obtained. This study demonstrates that the proposed processing method significantly contributes to high-frequency SAW devices for wireless communications.

  2. Laser direct writing of micro- and nano-scale medical devices

    OpenAIRE

    Gittard, Shaun D; Narayan, Roger J.

    2010-01-01

    Laser-based direct writing of materials has undergone significant development in recent years. The ability to modify a variety of materials at small length scales and using short production times provides laser direct writing with unique capabilities for fabrication of medical devices. In many laser-based rapid prototyping methods, microscale and submicroscale structuring of materials is controlled by computer-generated models. Various laser-based direct write methods, including selective las...

  3. Micro-/nanoscale multi-field coupling in nonlinear photonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qing; Wang, Yubo; Tang, Mingwei; Xu, Pengfei; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2017-08-01

    The coupling of mechanics/electronics/photonics may improve the performance of nanophotonic devices not only in the linear region but also in the nonlinear region. This review letter mainly presents the recent advances on multi-field coupling in nonlinear photonic devices. The nonlinear piezoelectric effect and piezo-phototronic effects in quantum wells and fibers show that large second-order nonlinear susceptibilities can be achieved, and second harmonic generation and electro-optic modulation can be enhanced and modulated. Strain engineering can tune the lattice structures and induce second order susceptibilities in central symmetry semiconductors. By combining the absorption-based photoacoustic effect and intensity-dependent photobleaching effect, subdiffraction imaging can be achieved. This review will also discuss possible future applications of these novel effects and the perspective of their research. The review can help us develop a deeper knowledge of the substance of photon-electron-phonon interaction in a micro-/nano- system. Moreover, it can benefit the design of nonlinear optical sensors and imaging devices with a faster response rate, higher efficiency, more sensitivity and higher spatial resolution which could be applied in environmental detection, bio-sensors, medical imaging and so on.

  4. Nanoscale Imaging of Band Gap and Defects in Polycrystalline CdTe Photovoltaic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitenev, Nikolai; Yoon, Yohan; Chae, Jungseok; Katzenmeyer, Aaron; Yoon, Heayoung; An, Sangmin; Shumacher, Joshua; Centrone, Andrea

    To further increase the power efficiency of polycrystalline thin film photovoltaic (PV) technology, a detailed understanding of microstructural properties of the devices is required. In this work, we investigate the microstructure of CdTe PV devices using two optical spectroscopies. Sub-micron thickness lamella samples were cut out from a PV device, either in cross-section or in-plane, by focused ion beam. The first technique is the photothermal induced resonance (PTIR) used to obtain absorption spectra over a broad range of wavelengths. In PTIR, a wavelength tunable pulsed laser is combined with an atomic force microscope to detect the local thermal expansion of lamella CdTe sample induced by light absorption. The second technique based on a near-field scanning optical microscope maps the local absorption at fixed near-IR wavelengths with energies at or below CdTe band-gap energy. The variation of the band gap throughout the CdTe absorber determined from PTIR spectra is ~ 20 meV. Both techniques detect strong spatial variation of shallow defects over different grains. The spatial distribution of mid-gap defects appears to be more uniform. The resolution, the sensitivity and the applicability of these two approaches are compared.

  5. Inelastic transport theory from first principles: Methodology and application to nanoscale devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Thomas; Paulsson, Magnus; Brandbyge, Mads

    2007-01-01

    We describe a first-principles method for calculating electronic structure, vibrational modes and frequencies, electron-phonon couplings, and inelastic electron transport properties of an atomic-scale device bridging two metallic contacts under nonequilibrium conditions. The method extends...... approximation. While these calculations often are computationally demanding, we show how they can be approximated by a simple and efficient lowest order expansion. Our method also addresses effects of energy dissipation and local heating of the junction via detailed calculations of the power flow. We...

  6. Wearout Reliability and Intermetallic Compound Diffusion Kinetics of Au and PdCu Wires Used in Nanoscale Device Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Gan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wearout reliability and diffusion kinetics of Au and Pd-coated Cu (PdCu ball bonds are useful technical information for Cu wire deployment in nanoscale semiconductor device packaging. This paper discusses the HAST (with bias and UHAST (unbiased HAST wearout reliability performance of Au and PdCu wires used in fine pitch BGA packages. In-depth failure analysis has been carried out to identify the failure mechanism under various wearout conditions. Intermetallic compound (IMC diffusion constants and apparent activation energies (Eaa of both wire types were investigated after high temperature storage life test (HTSL. Au bonds were identified to have faster IMC formation, compared to slower IMC growth of PdCu. PdCu wire was found to exhibit equivalent or better wearout reliability margin compared to conventional Au wire bonds. Failure mechanisms of Au, Cu ball bonds post-HAST and UHAST tests are been proposed, and both Au and PdCu IMC diffusion kinetics and their characteristics are discussed in this paper.

  7. Nanoscale structure, dynamics and power conversion efficiency correlations in small molecule and oligomer-based photovoltaic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin X. Chen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic functions in organic materials are intimately connected to interfacial morphologies of molecular packing in films on the nanometer scale and molecular levels. This review will focus on current studies on correlations of nanoscale morphologies in organic photovoltaic (OPV materials with fundamental processes relevant to photovoltaic functions, such as light harvesting, exciton splitting, exciton diffusion, and charge separation (CS and diffusion. Small molecule photovoltaic materials will be discussed here. The donor and acceptor materials in small molecule OPV devices can be fabricated in vacuum-deposited, multilayer, crystalline thin films, or spin-coated together to form blended bulk heterojunction (BHJ films. These two methods result in very different morphologies of the solar cell active layers. There is still a formidable debate regarding which morphology is favored for OPV optimization. The morphology of the conducting films has been systematically altered; using variations of the techniques above, the whole spectrum of film qualities can be fabricated. It is possible to form a highly crystalline material, one which is completely amorphous, or an intermediate morphology. In this review, we will summarize the past key findings that have driven organic solar cell research and the current state-of-the-art of small molecule and conducting oligomer materials. We will also discuss the merits and drawbacks of these devices. Finally, we will highlight some works that directly compare the spectra and morphology of systematically elongated oligothiophene derivatives and compare these oligomers to their polymer counterparts. We hope this review will shed some new light on the morphology differences of these two systems.

  8. Nanoscale structure, dynamics and power conversion efficiency correlations in small molecule and oligomer-based photovoltaic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szarko, Jodi M; Guo, Jianchang; Rolczynski, Brian S; Chen, Lin X

    2011-01-01

    Photovoltaic functions in organic materials are intimately connected to interfacial morphologies of molecular packing in films on the nanometer scale and molecular levels. This review will focus on current studies on correlations of nanoscale morphologies in organic photovoltaic (OPV) materials with fundamental processes relevant to photovoltaic functions, such as light harvesting, exciton splitting, exciton diffusion, and charge separation (CS) and diffusion. Small molecule photovoltaic materials will be discussed here. The donor and acceptor materials in small molecule OPV devices can be fabricated in vacuum-deposited, multilayer, crystalline thin films, or spin-coated together to form blended bulk heterojunction (BHJ) films. These two methods result in very different morphologies of the solar cell active layers. There is still a formidable debate regarding which morphology is favored for OPV optimization. The morphology of the conducting films has been systematically altered; using variations of the techniques above, the whole spectrum of film qualities can be fabricated. It is possible to form a highly crystalline material, one which is completely amorphous, or an intermediate morphology. In this review, we will summarize the past key findings that have driven organic solar cell research and the current state-of-the-art of small molecule and conducting oligomer materials. We will also discuss the merits and drawbacks of these devices. Finally, we will highlight some works that directly compare the spectra and morphology of systematically elongated oligothiophene derivatives and compare these oligomers to their polymer counterparts. We hope this review will shed some new light on the morphology differences of these two systems.

  9. Synthesis Methods, Microscopy Characterization and Device Integration of Nanoscale Metal Oxide Semiconductors for Gas Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy L. Vander Wal

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A comparison is made between SnO2, ZnO, and TiO2 single-crystal nanowires and SnO2 polycrystalline nanofibers for gas sensing. Both nanostructures possess a one-dimensional morphology. Different synthesis methods are used to produce these materials: thermal evaporation-condensation (TEC, controlled oxidation, and electrospinning. Advantages and limitations of each technique are listed. Practical issues associated with harvesting, purification, and integration of these materials into sensing devices are detailed. For comparison to the nascent form, these sensing materials are surface coated with Pd and Pt nanoparticles. Gas sensing tests, with respect to H2, are conducted at ambient and elevated temperatures. Comparative normalized responses and time constants for the catalyst and noncatalyst systems provide a basis for identification of the superior metal-oxide nanostructure and catalyst combination. With temperature-dependent data, Arrhenius analyses are made to determine activation energies for the catalyst-assisted systems.

  10. Analysis and calibration of transient enhanced diffusion for an indium impurity in a nanoscale semiconductor device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jun-Ha; Lee, Hoong-Joo [Sangmyung University, Chonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-02-15

    We developed a new systematic calibration procedure which was applied to the prediction of the diffusivity, the segregation, and transient enhanced diffusion (TED) of an indium impurity. The TED of the indium impurity was studied using four different experimental conditions. Although indium is susceptible to TED, rapid thermal annealing (RTA) is effective in suppressing the TED effect and maintaining a steep retrograde profile. Like boron impurities, the indium shows significant oxidation-enhanced diffusion in silicon and has segregation coefficients much less than 1 at the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. In contrast to boron, the segregation coefficient of indium decreases as the temperature increases. The accuracy of the proposed procedure was validated by using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) data and by using the 0.13-{mu}m device characteristics, such as V{sub th} and I{sub dsat}, for which the differences between simulation and experiment less than 5 %.

  11. Surface Potential Analysis of Nanoscale Biomaterials and Devices Using Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyungbeen Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM has emerged as a versatile toolkit for exploring electrical properties on a broad range of nanobiomaterials and molecules. An analysis using KPFM can provide valuable sample information including surface potential and work function of a certain material. Accordingly, KPFM has been widely used in the areas of material science, electronics, and biomedical science. In this review, we will briefly explain the setup of KPFM and its measuring principle and then survey representative results of various KPFM applications ranging from material analysis to device analysis. Finally, we will discuss some possibilities of KPFM on whether it is applicable to various sensor systems. Our perspective shed unique light on how KPFM can be used as a biosensor as well as equipment to measure electrical properties of materials and to recognize various molecular interactions.

  12. Nanoscale discharge electrode for minimizing ozone emission from indoor corona devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Zheng; Yu, Kehan; Lu, Ganhua; Mao, Shun; Chen, Junhong; Fan, Fa-Gung

    2010-08-15

    Ground-level ozone emitted from indoor corona devices poses serious health risks to the human respiratory system and the lung function. Federal regulations call for effective techniques to minimize the indoor ozone production. In this work, stable atmospheric corona discharges from nanomaterials are demonstrated using horizontally suspended carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as the discharge electrode. Compared with the conventional discharges employing micro- or macroscale electrodes, the corona discharge from CNTs could initiate and operate at a much lower voltage due to the small electrode diameter, and is thus energy-efficient. Most importantly, the reported discharge is environmentally friendly since no ozone (below the detection limit of 0.5 ppb) was detected for area current densities up to 0.744 A/m(2) due to the significantly reduced number of electrons and plasma volume generated by CNT discharges. The resulting discharge current density depends on the CNT loading. Contrary to the conventional wisdom, negative CNT discharges should be used to enhance the current density owing to the efficient field emission of electrons from the CNT surface.

  13. Nanoscale design of multifunctional organic layers for low-power high-density memory devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nougaret, Laurianne; Kassa, Hailu G; Cai, Ronggang; Patois, Tilia; Nysten, Bernard; van Breemen, Albert J J M; Gelinck, Gerwin H; de Leeuw, Dago M; Marrani, Alessio; Hu, Zhijun; Jonas, Alain M

    2014-04-22

    We demonstrate the design of a multifunctional organic layer by the rational combination of nanosized regions of two functional polymers. Instead of relying on a spontaneous and random phase separation process or on the tedious synthesis of block copolymers, the method involves the nanomolding of a first component, followed by the filling of the resulting open spaces by a second component. We apply this methodology to fabricate organic nonvolatile memory diodes of high density. These are built by first creating a regular array of ferroelectric nanodots by nanoimprint lithography, followed by the filling of the trenches separating the ferroelectric nanodots with a semiconducting polymer. The modulation of the current in the semiconductor by the polarization state of the ferroelectric material is demonstrated both at the scale of a single semiconductor channel and in a microscopic device measuring about 80,000 channels in parallel, for voltages below ca. 2 V. The fabrication process, which combines synergetically orthogonal functional properties with a fine control over their spatial distribution, is thus demonstrated to be efficient over large areas.

  14. The bulk photovoltaic effect as a platform for ultrafast, nanoscale photosensitive devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Steve

    2017-05-01

    The bulk photovoltaic effect refers to the generation of photocurrents and photovoltages in bulk single-phase materials. It requires only that the material possess broken inversion symmetry, and occurs due a unique mechanism known as "shift current." Discovered over a half-century ago, it received little attention decades due to extremely poor observed efficiency. However, in recent years, it has been both theoretically and experimentally investigated in a variety of new systems and materials, and significant improvements in performance have been achieved. In this talk, I will provide a brief overview of the physics of the bulk photovoltaic effect and survey the experimental and theoretical advances that have been made in its understanding and optimization. I will cover in detail the unique properties of the bulk photovoltaic effect that distinguish it from conventional photovoltaic effects, including photovoltages substantially exceeding the material's band gap, response amplitudes and directions that can depend on both photon energy and polarization, and response that occurs on ultrafast timescales. Finally, I will explore the potential for these features to enable novel and improved photosensitive devices, especially in combination with other functional materials.

  15. Nanoscale thermal probing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Yue

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale novel devices have raised the demand for nanoscale thermal characterization that is critical for evaluating the device performance and durability. Achieving nanoscale spatial resolution and high accuracy in temperature measurement is very challenging due to the limitation of measurement pathways. In this review, we discuss four methodologies currently developed in nanoscale surface imaging and temperature measurement. To overcome the restriction of the conventional methods, the scanning thermal microscopy technique is widely used. From the perspective of measuring target, the optical feature size method can be applied by using either Raman or fluorescence thermometry. The near-field optical method that measures nanoscale temperature by focusing the optical field to a nano-sized region provides a non-contact and non-destructive way for nanoscale thermal probing. Although the resistance thermometry based on nano-sized thermal sensors is possible for nanoscale thermal probing, significant effort is still needed to reduce the size of the current sensors by using advanced fabrication techniques. At the same time, the development of nanoscale imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging, provides a great potential solution to resolve the nanoscale thermal probing problem.

  16. Simulation of self-organized waveguides for self-aligned coupling between micro- and nano-scale devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Tetsuzo

    2015-05-01

    We propose an optical coupling technique based on the reflective self-organized lightwave network (R-SOLNET), where optical devices with different core sizes are connected, for nano-scale-waveguide-based optical interconnects. Growth of R-SOLNET between a 3-μm-wide waveguide and a 600-nm-wide waveguide, on the core edge of which a luminescent target has been deposited, is simulated by the finite-difference time-domain method. The two waveguides are placed with gap distances ranging from 16 to 64 μm in a photopolymer with a refractive index that increases upon exposure to a write beam and luminescence. When a 400 nm wavelength write beam is introduced from the micro-scale waveguide, 470 nm luminescence is generated from the target. In the area where the write beam and the luminescence overlap, the refractive index increases rapidly. The write beam and the luminescence thus attract each other to merge into one through the self-focusing, forming a self-aligned coupling waveguide of R-SOLNET with a coupling loss of 1.5-1.8 dB, even when a lateral misalignment of 600 nm exists between them. This indicates that the R-SOLNET can be used as an optical solder to connect a micro-scale waveguide to a nano-scale waveguide. The optimum writing time required to attain the minimum coupling loss increases with increasing lateral misalignment. The dependence of the optimum writing time on the misalignment is reduced with increasing gap distance, and it almost vanishes when the distance is 64 μm, enabling unmonitored optical solder formation. R-SOLNET utilizing the two-photon photochemistry is briefly described as the next-generation SOLNET.

  17. Fabrication and properties of nanoscale multiferroic heterostructures for application in magneto-electric random access memory (MERAM) devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gunwoo

    Magnetoelectric random access memory (MERAM) has emerged as a promising new class of non-volatile solid-state memory device. It offers nondestructive reading along with low power consumption during the write operation. A common implementation of MERAM involves use of multiferroic tunneling junctions (MFTJs), which besides offering non-volatility are both electrically and magnetically tunable. Fundamentally, a MFTJ consists of a heterostructure of an ultrathin multiferroic or ferroelectric material as the active tunneling barrier sandwiched between ferromagnetic electrodes. Thereby, the MFTJ exhibits both tunnel electroresistance (TER) and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effects with application of an electric and magnetic field, respectively. In this thesis work, we have developed two-dimensional (2D) thin-film multiferroic heterostructure METJ prototypes consisting of ultrathin ferroelectric BaTiO3 (BTO) layer and a conducting ferromagnetic La0.67Sr 0.33MnO3 (LSMO) electrode. The heteroepitaxial films are grown using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. This oxide heterostructure offers the opportunity to study the nano-scale details of the tunnel electroresistance (TER) effect using scanning probe microscopy techniques. We performed the measurements using the MFP-3D (Asylum Research) scanning probe microscope. The ultrathin BTO films (1.2-2.0 nm) grown on LSMO electrodes display both ferro- and piezo-electric properties and exhibit large tunnel resistance effect. We have explored the growth and properties of one-dimensional (1D) heterostructures, referred to as multiferoric nanowire (NW) heterostructures. The ferromagnetic/ferroelectric composite heterostructures are grown as sheath layers using PLD on lattice-matched template NWs, e.g. MgO, that are deposited by chemical vapor deposition utilizing the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. The one-dimensional geometry can substantially overcome the clamping effect of the substrate present in two

  18. Using mathematical models to understand the effect of nanoscale roughness on protein adsorption for improving medical devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ercan B

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Batur Ercan,1 Dongwoo Khang,2 Joseph Carpenter,3 Thomas J Webster1 1Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 2School of Materials Science and Engineering and Center for PRC and RIGET, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, South Korea; 3School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: Surface roughness and energy significantly influence protein adsorption on to biomaterials, which, in turn, controls select cellular adhesion to determine the success and longevity of an implant. To understand these relationships at a fundamental level, a model was originally proposed by Khang et al to correlate nanoscale surface properties (specifically, nanoscale roughness and energy to protein adsorption, which explained the greater cellular responses on nanostructured surfaces commonly reported in the literature today. To test this model for different surfaces from what was previously used to develop that model, in this study we synthesized highly ordered poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid surfaces of identical chemistry but altered nanoscale surface roughness and energy using poly(dimethylsiloxane molds of polystyrene beads. Fibronectin and collagen type IV adsorption studies showed a linear adsorption behavior as the surface nanoroughness increased. This supported the general trends observed by Khang et al. However, when fitting such data to the mathematical model established by Khang et al, a strong correlation did not result. Thus, this study demonstrated that the equation proposed by Khang et al to predict protein adsorption should be modified to accommodate for additional nanoscale surface property contributions (ie, surface charge to make the model more accurate. In summary, results from this study provided an important step in developing future mathematical models that can correlate surface properties (such as nanoscale roughness and surface energy to initial protein adsorption events important to

  19. A microfluidic device for real-time monitoring of Bacillus subtilis bacterial spores during germination based on non-specific physicochemical interactions on the nanoscale level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabrocka, L; Langer, K; Michalski, A; Kocik, J; Langer, J J

    2015-01-07

    A microfluidic device for studies on the germination of bacterial spores (e.g. Bacillus subtilis) based on non-specific interactions on the nanoscale is presented. A decrease in the population of spores during germination followed by the appearance of transition forms and an increase in the number of vegetative cells can be registered directly and simultaneously by using the microfluidic device, which is equipped with a conductive polymer layer (polyaniline) in the form of a nano-network. The lab-on-a-chip-type device, operating in a continuous flow regime, allows monitoring of germination of bacterial spores and analysis of the process in detail. The procedure is fast and accurate enough for quantitative real-time monitoring of the main steps of germination, including final transformation of the spores into vegetative cells. All of this is done without the use of biomarkers or any bio-specific materials, such as enzymes, antibodies and aptamers, and is simply based on an analysis of physicochemical interactions on the nanoscale level.

  20. Complex Phenomena in Nanoscale Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Casati, Giulio

    2009-01-01

    Nanoscale physics has become one of the rapidly developing areas of contemporary physics because of its direct relevance to newly emerging area, nanotechnologies. Nanoscale devices and quantum functional materials are usually constructed based on the results of fundamental studies on nanoscale physics. Therefore studying physical phenomena in nanosized systems is of importance for progressive development of nanotechnologies. In this context study of complex phenomena in such systems and using them for controlling purposes is of great practical importance. Namely, such studies are brought together in this book, which contains 27 papers on various aspects of nanoscale physics and nonlinear dynamics.

  1. Improved Understanding of Space Radiation Effects on Exploration Electronics by Advanced Modeling of Nanoscale Devices and Novel Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future NASA space exploration missions will use nanometer-scale electronic technologies which call for a shift in how radiation effects in such devices and materials...

  2. Cation exchange on the nanoscale: an emerging technique for new material synthesis, device fabrication, and chemical sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivest, Jessy B; Jain, Prashant K

    2013-01-01

    Cation exchange is an age-old technique for the chemical conversion of liquids or extended solids by place-exchanging the cations in an ionic material with a different set of cations. The technique is undergoing a major revival with the advent of high-quality nanocrystals: researchers are now able to overcome the limitations in bulk systems and fully exploit cation exchange for materials synthesis and discovery via rapid, low-temperature transformations in the solid state. In this tutorial review, we discuss cation exchange as a promising materials synthesis and discovery tool. Exchange on the nanoscale exhibits some unique attributes: rapid kinetics at room temperature (orders of magnitude faster than in the bulk) and the tuning of reactivity via control of nanocrystal size, shape, and surface faceting. These features make cation exchange a convenient tool for accessing nanocrystal compositions and morphologies for which conventional synthesis may not be established. A simple exchange reaction allows extension of nanochemistry to a larger part of the periodic table, beyond the typical gamut of II-VI, IV-VI, and III-V materials. Cation exchange transformations in nanocrystals can be topotactic and size- and shape-conserving, allowing nanocrystals synthesized by conventional methods to be used as templates for production of compositionally novel, multicomponent, or doped nanocrystals. Since phases and compositions resulting from an exchange reaction can be kinetically controlled, rather than governed by the phase diagram, nanocrystals of metastable and hitherto inaccessible compositions are attainable. Outside of materials synthesis, applications for cation exchange exist in water purification, chemical staining, and sensing. Since nanoscale cation exchange occurs rapidly at room temperature, it can be integrated with sensitive environments such as those in biological systems. Cation exchange is already allowing access to a variety of new materials and processes

  3. Investigation of Device Performance and Negative Bias Temperature Instability of Plasma Nitrided Oxide in Nanoscale p-Channel Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, In-Shik; Ji, Hee-Hwan; Goo, Tae-Gyu; Yoo, Ook-Sang; Choi, Won-Ho; Na, Min-Ki; Kim, Yong-Goo; Park, Sung-Hyung; Lee, Heui-Seung; Kang, Young-Seok; Kim, Dae-Byung; Lee, Hi-Deok

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, we investigated the device performance and negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) degradation for thermally nitrided oxide (TNO) and plasma nitrided oxide (PNO) in nanoscale p-channel metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (PMOSFET). PNOs show the improvement of dielectric performance compared to TNO with no change of the device performance. PNOs also show the improvement of NBTI immunity than TNO at low temperature stress, whereas NBTI immunity of PNO with high N concentration can be worse than TNO at high temperature stress. Recovery effect of NBTI degradation of PNO is lower than that of TNO and it is increased as the N concentration is increased in PNO because the dissociated Si dangling bonds and generated positive oxide charges are repassivated and neutralized, respectively. Moreover, complete recovery of ΔVth is dominated by neutralization of positive oxide charges. Therefore, N contents at polycrystalline Si/SiO2 interface as well as N contents at Si/SiO2 interface can affect significantly on NBTI degradation and recovery effect.

  4. Cell-directed assembly on an integrated nanoelectronic/nanophotonic device for probing cellular responses on the nanoscale.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Dunphy, Darren Robert; Ashley, Carlee E. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Fan, Hongyou; Lopez, DeAnna (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Simpson, Regina Lynn; Tallant, David Robert; Burckel, David Bruce; Baca, Helen Kennicott (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Carnes, Eric C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Singh, Seema

    2006-01-01

    Our discovery that the introduction of living cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) alters dramatically the evaporation driven self-assembly of lipid-silica nanostructures suggested the formation of novel bio/nano interfaces useful for cellular interrogation at the nanoscale. This one year ''out of the box'' LDRD focused on the localization of metallic and semi-conducting nanocrystals at the fluid, lipid-rich interface between S. cerevisiae and the surrounding phospholipid-templated silica nanostructure with the primary goal of creating Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)-active nanostructures and platforms for cellular integration into electrode arrays. Such structures are of interest for probing cellular responses to the onset of disease, understanding of cell-cell communication, and the development of cell-based bio-sensors. As SERS is known to be sensitive to the size and shape of metallic (principally gold and silver) nanocrystals, various sizes and shapes of nanocrystals were synthesized, functionalized and localized at the cellular surface by our ''cell-directed assembly'' approach. Laser scanning confocal microscopy, SEM, and in situ grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) experiments were performed to study metallic nanocrystal localization. Preliminary Raman spectroscopy studies were conducted to test for SERS activity. Interferometric lithography was used to construct high aspect ratio cylindrical holes on patterned gold substrates and electro-deposition experiments were performed in a preliminary attempt to create electrode arrays. A new printing procedure was also developed for cellular integration into nanostructured platforms that avoids solvent exposure and may mitigate osmotic stress. Using a different approach, substrates comprised of self-assembled nanoparticles in a phospholipid templated silica film were also developed. When printed on top of these substrates, the cells integrate

  5. Enhanced Device and Circuit-Level Performance Benchmarking of Graphene Nanoribbon Field-Effect Transistor against a Nano-MOSFET with Interconnects

    OpenAIRE

    Huei Chaeng Chin; Cheng Siong Lim; Weng Soon Wong; Danapalasingam, Kumeresan A.; Arora, Vijay K.; Michael Loong Peng Tan

    2014-01-01

    Comparative benchmarking of a graphene nanoribbon field-effect transistor (GNRFET) and a nanoscale metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (nano-MOSFET) for applications in ultralarge-scale integration (ULSI) is reported. GNRFET is found to be distinctly superior in the circuit-level architecture. The remarkable transport properties of GNR propel it into an alternative technology to circumvent the limitations imposed by the silicon-based electronics. Budding GNRFET, using the circui...

  6. Capability of tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy about nanoscale analysis of strained silicon for semiconductor devices production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, Arianna; Cacioppo, Onofrio Antonino; Iulianella, Enrico; Latessa, Luca; Moccia, Giuseppe; Passeri, Daniele; Rossi, Marco

    2017-03-01

    Localized strained silicon was observed with a suitable resolution in a real semiconductor device by tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). The device was made via a standard industrial process and its silicon trench isolation structures were used for the silicon strain analysis obtaining results according to finite element method-based simulation data. We have achieved a reliable and repeatable enhancement factor obtaining a trace of strained silicon along the structure with suitable nanometer spatial resolution compatible with IC industry requirements. We demonstrate that the complexity to analyze a real 3D structure, directly from the production lines and not ad hoc realized, entails the challenges to individuate the optimal tip shape, tip contact angle, tip composition, tip positioning system, laser power, and wavelength to achieve an appropriate plasmon resonance inducing a relevant signal to noise ratio. This work gives the base to address the development in TERS optimization for real industrial applications.

  7. Nanoscale 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenders, Ludger; Ducourtieux, Sebastien

    2014-04-01

    The accurate determination of the properties of micro- and nano-structures is essential in research and development. It is also a prerequisite in process control and quality assurance in industry. In most cases, especially at the nanometer range, knowledge of the dimensional properties of structures is the fundamental base, to which further physical properties are linked. Quantitative measurements presuppose reliable and stable instruments, suitable measurement procedures as well as calibration artifacts and methods. This special issue of Measurement Science and Technology presents selected contributions from the NanoScale 2013 seminar held in Paris, France, on 25 and 26 April. It was the 6th Seminar on NanoScale Calibration Standards and Methods and the 10th Seminar on Quantitative Microscopy (the first being held in 1995). The seminar was jointly organized with the Nanometrology Group of the Technical Committee-Length of EURAMET, the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt and the Laboratoire National de Métrologie et d'Essais. Three satellite meetings related to nanometrology were coupled to the seminar. The first one was an open Symposium on Scanning Probe Microscopy Standardization organized by the ISO/TC 201/SC9 technical committee. The two others were specific meetings focused on two European Metrology Research Projects funded by the European Association of National Metrology Institutes (EURAMET) (see www.euramet.org), the first one focused on the improvement of the traceability for high accuracy devices dealing with sub-nm length measurement and implementing optical interferometers or capacitive sensors (JRP SIB08 subnano), the second one aiming to develop a new metrological traceability for the measurement of the mechanical properties of nano-objects (JRP NEW05 MechProNo). More than 100 experts from industry, calibration laboratories and metrology institutes from around the world joined the NanoScale 2013 Seminar to attend 23 oral and 64 poster

  8. Nanoscale Devices for Rectification of High Frequency Radiation from the Infrared through the Visible: A New Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Miskovsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new and viable method for optical rectification. This approach has been demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally and is the basis fot the development of devices to rectify radiation through the visible. This technique for rectification is based not on conventional material or temperature asymmetry as used in MIM (metal/insulator/metal or Schottky diodes, but on a purely sharp geometric property of the antenna. This sharp “tip” or edge with a collector anode constitutes a tunnel junction. In these devices the rectenna (consisting of the antenna and the tunnel junction acts as the absorber of the incident radiation and the rectifier. Using current nanofabrication techniques and the selective atomic layer deposition (ALD process, junctions of 1 nm can be fabricated, which allow for rectification of frequencies up to the blue portion of the spectrum. To assess the viability of our approach, we review the development of nanoantenna structures and tunnel junctions capable of operating in the visible region. In addition, we review the detailed process of rectification and present methodologies for analysis of diode data. Finally, we present operational designs for an optical rectenna and its fabrication and discuss outstanding problems and future work.

  9. Performance optimization of nanoscale junctionless transistors through varying device design parameters for ultra-low power logic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Debapriya; Biswas, Abhijit

    2016-09-01

    Ultra-low power logic applications at advanced CMOS technology nodes have been extensively investigated nowadays to increase packing density in Integrated Circuits at a lower cost. Junctionless (JL) transistors have emerged as promising alternatives to conventional MOSFETs because of their relatively easy fabrication steps and extreme scalability. We perform a detailed numerical study to evaluate the effects of channel doping concentration, dielectric constant of underlap spacers, source/drain resistance on logic performance of 20 nm gate length JL MOSFETs in terms of ON-current at a given OFF-current, subthreshold swing, gate capacitance and intrinsic delay for supply voltages ranging 0.4-0.75 V. In comparison with the reported experimental data for inversion-mode device, our optimized JL device exhibits enhancement of ION by 15.6%, reduction of drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL) by 22.5% while preserving equally low SS of 61.5 mV/decade at channel length of 34 nm and supply voltage of 0.75 V.

  10. Synthesis Methods, Microscopy Characterization and Device Integration of Nanoscale Metal Oxide Semiconductors for Gas Sensing in Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.; Kulis, Michael J.; Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.; Evans, Laura J.

    2009-01-01

    A comparison is made between SnO2, ZnO, and TiO2 single-crystal nanowires and SnO2 polycrystalline nanofibers for gas sensing. Both nanostructures possess a one-dimensional morphology. Different synthesis methods are used to produce these materials: thermal evaporation-condensation (TEC), controlled oxidation, and electrospinning. Advantages and limitations of each technique are listed. Practical issues associated with harvesting, purification, and integration of these materials into sensing devices are detailed. For comparison to the nascent form, these sensing materials are surface coated with Pd and Pt nanoparticles. Gas sensing tests, with respect to H2, are conducted at ambient and elevated temperatures. Comparative normalized responses and time constants for the catalyst and noncatalyst systems provide a basis for identification of the superior metal-oxide nanostructure and catalyst combination. With temperature-dependent data, Arrhenius analyses are made to determine an activation energy for the catalyst-assisted systems.

  11. Surface nanoscale axial photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Sumetsky, M

    2011-01-01

    Dense photonic integration promises to revolutionize optical computing and communications. However, efforts towards this goal face unacceptable attenuation of light caused by surface roughness in microscopic devices. Here we address this problem by introducing Surface Nanoscale Axial Photonics (SNAP). The SNAP platform is based on whispering gallery modes circulating around the optical fiber surface and undergoing slow axial propagation readily described by the one-dimensional Schr\\"odinger equation. These modes can be steered with dramatically small nanoscale variation of the fiber radius, which is quite simple to introduce in practice. The extremely low loss of SNAP devices is achieved due to the fantastically low surface roughness inherent in a drawn fiber surface. In excellent agreement with the developed theory, we experimentally demonstrate localization of light in quantum wells, halting light by a point source, tunneling through potential barriers, dark states, etc. This demonstration, prototyping basi...

  12. Nanoscale technology in biological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Greco, Ralph S; Smith, R Lane

    2004-01-01

    Reviewing recent accomplishments in the field of nanobiology Nanoscale Technology in Biological Systems introduces the application of nanoscale matrices to human biology. It focuses on the applications of nanotechnology fabrication to biomedical devices and discusses new physical methods for cell isolation and manipulation and intracellular communication at the molecular level. It also explores the application of nanobiology to cardiovascular diseases, oncology, transplantation, and a range of related disciplines. This book build a strong background in nanotechnology and nanobiology ideal for

  13. Electroanalysis at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Karen; O'Riordan, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the state of the art of silicon chip-based nanoelectrochemical devices for sensing applications. We first describe analyte mass transport to nanoscale electrodes and emphasize understanding the importance of mass transport for the design of nanoelectrode arrays. We then describe bottom-up and top-down approaches to nanoelectrode fabrication and integration at silicon substrates. Finally, we explore recent examples of on-chip nanoelectrodes employed as sensors and diagnostics, finishing with a brief look at future applications.

  14. Elaboration of Prussian Blue Analogue/Silica Nanocomposites: Towards Tailor-Made Nano-Scale Electronic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Bleuzen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The research of new molecular materials able to replace classical solid materials in electronics has attracted growing attention over the past decade. Among these compounds photoswitchable Prussian blue analogues (PBA are particularly interesting for the elaboration of new optical memories. However these coordination polymers are generally synthesised as insoluble powders that cannot be integrated into a real device. Hence their successful integration into real applications depends on an additional processing step. Nanostructured oxides elaborated by sol-gel chemistry combined with surfactant micelle templating can be used as nanoreactors to confine PBA precipitation and organize the functional nano-objects in the three dimensions of space. In this work we present the elaboration of different CoFe PBA/silica nanocomposites. Our synthetic procedure fully controls the synthesis of PBA in the porosity of the silica matrix from the insertion of the precursors up to the formation of the photomagnetic compound. We present results on systems from the simplest to the most elaborate: from disordered xerogels to ordered nanostructured films passing through mesoporous monoliths.

  15. Nanoscale relaxation oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Regan, Brian C.; Aloni, Shaul

    2009-04-07

    A nanoscale oscillation device is disclosed, wherein two nanoscale droplets are altered in size by mass transport, then contact each other and merge through surface tension. The device may also comprise a channel having an actuator responsive to mechanical oscillation caused by expansion and contraction of the droplets. It further has a structure for delivering atoms between droplets, wherein the droplets are nanoparticles. Provided are a first particle and a second particle on the channel member, both being made of a chargeable material, the second particle contacting the actuator portion; and electrodes connected to the channel member for delivering a potential gradient across the channel and traversing the first and second particles. The particles are spaced apart a specified distance so that atoms from one particle are delivered to the other particle by mass transport in response to the potential (e.g. voltage potential) and the first and second particles are liquid and touch at a predetermined point of growth, thereby causing merging of the second particle into the first particle by surface tension forces and reverse movement of the actuator. In a preferred embodiment, the channel comprises a carbon nanotube and the droplets comprise metal nanoparticles, e.g. indium, which is readily made liquid.

  16. Nanoscale phase change memory materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Marissa A; Jeyasingh, Rakesh Gnana David; Wong, H-S Philip; Milliron, Delia J

    2012-08-01

    Phase change memory materials store information through their reversible transitions between crystalline and amorphous states. For typical metal chalcogenide compounds, their phase transition properties directly impact critical memory characteristics and the manipulation of these is a major focus in the field. Here, we discuss recent work that explores the tuning of such properties by scaling the materials to nanoscale dimensions, including fabrication and synthetic strategies used to produce nanoscale phase change memory materials. The trends that emerge are relevant to understanding how such memory technologies will function as they scale to ever smaller dimensions and also suggest new approaches to designing materials for phase change applications. Finally, the challenges and opportunities raised by integrating nanoscale phase change materials into switching devices are discussed.

  17. Sol-Gel Deposited Porogen Based Porous Low-k Thin Films for Interlayer Dielectric Application in ULSI Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh S. Mhaisagar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Porous SiO2 low-k thin films with low dielectric constant were successfully deposited by sol-gel spin-coating technique. The films were deposited by using Tertaethylorthosilicate (TEOS as a precursor solution and HF was used as an acid catalyst solution. The Tween80 with different volumetric concentrations i.e. 0.0 ml, 0.5 ml and 0.7 ml was used as a pore generator to lower the dielectric constant of the films by introducing the porosity in the films matrix. The thickness and refractive index (RI of low-k thin films have been measured by Ellipsometer. The refractive index and thickness of the films observed to be decreasing with increase in Tween80 concentration. The chemical bonding structures of films were analyzed by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR spectroscopy and the stretching, bending and rocking peaks appear at 1077 cm – 1, 967  cm – 1, 447  cm – 1 respectively confirm the formation of Si-O-Si network. The RIs of the films deposited at 0 ml, 0.5 ml and at 0.7 ml of Tween80 concentration are found to be 1.34, 1.26, and 1.20 respectively. Based on RI values of the films, the porosity percentage, density and dielectric constant have been calculated by standard formulation method. The increase in porosity percentage of films from 3 % to 55 % with increase in Tween80 concentration reveals that, the most of the hydroxyl group and porogen get evaporated and form more voids in the films. This increase in porosity percentage causes to lower the dielectric constant of films and was found to be 2.26 at the 0.7 ml of Tween80 concentration. Such porogen based low dialectic constant thin films can be suitable for interlayer dielectric (ILD applications in ULSI circuits.

  18. Atom Probe Tomography of Nanoscale Electronic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, David J.; Prosa, Ty J.; Perea, Daniel E.; Inoue, Hidekazu; Mangelinck, D.

    2016-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is a mass spectrometry based on time-of-flight measurements which also concurrently produces 3D spatial information. The reader is referred to any of the other papers in this volume or to the following references for further information 4–8. The current capabilities of APT, such as detecting a low number of dopant atoms in nanoscale devices or segregation at a nanoparticle interface, make this technique an important component in the nanoscale metrology toolbox. In this manuscript, we review some of the applications of APT to nanoscale electronic materials, including transistors and finFETs, silicide contact microstructures, nanowires, and nanoparticles.

  19. One-Dimensional (1-D) Nanoscale Heterostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guozhen SHEN; Di CHEN; Yoshio BANDO; Dmitri GOLBERG

    2008-01-01

    One-dimensional (1-D) nanostructures have been attracted much attention as a result of their exceptional properties, which are different from bulk materials. Among 1-D nanostructures, 1-D heterostructures with modulated compositions and interfaces have recently become of particular interest with respect to potential applications in nanoscale building blocks of future optoelectronic devices and systems. Many kinds of methods have been developed for the synthesis of 1-D nanoscale heterostructures. This article reviews the most recent development, with an emphasize on our own recent efforts, on 1-D nanoscale heterostructures, especially those synthesized from the vapor deposition methods, in which all the reactive precursors are mixed together in the reaction chamber. Three types of 1-D nanoscale heterostructures, defined from their morphologies characteristics, are discussed in detail, which include 1-D co-axial core-shell heterostructures, 1-D segmented heterostructures and hierarchical heterostructures. This article begins with a brief survey of various methods that have been developed for synthesizing 1-D nanoscale heterostructures and then mainly focuses on the synthesis, structures and properties of the above three types of nanoscale heterostructures. Finally, this review concludes with personal views towards the topic of 1-D nanoscale heterostructures.

  20. Two-dimensional linear elasticity theory of magneto-electro-elastic plates considering surface and nonlocal effects for nanoscale device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjun; Li, Peng; Jin, Feng

    2016-09-01

    A novel two-dimensional linear elastic theory of magneto-electro-elastic (MEE) plates, considering both surface and nonlocal effects, is established for the first time based on Hamilton’s principle and the Lee plate theory. The equations derived are more general, suitable for static and dynamic analyses, and can also be reduced to the piezoelectric, piezomagnetic, and elastic cases. As a specific application example, the influences of the surface and nonlocal effects, poling directions, piezoelectric phase materials, volume fraction, damping, and applied magnetic field (i.e., constant applied magnetic field and time-harmonic applied magnetic field) on the magnetoelectric (ME) coupling effects are first investigated based on the established two-dimensional plate theory. The results show that the ME coupling coefficient has an obvious size-dependent characteristic owing to the surface effects, and the surface effects increase the ME coupling effects significantly when the plate thickness decreases to its critical thickness. Below this critical thickness, the size-dependent effect is obvious and must be considered. In addition, the output power density of a magnetic energy nanoharvester is also evaluated using the two-dimensional plate theory obtained, with the results showing that a relatively larger output power density can be achieved at the nanoscale. This study provides a mathematical tool which can be used to analyze the mechanical properties of nanostructures theoretically and numerically, as well as evaluating the size effect qualitatively and quantitatively.

  1. Method to determine thermal profiles of nanoscale circuitry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K; Begtrup, Gavi E

    2013-04-30

    A platform that can measure the thermal profiles of devices with nanoscale resolution has been developed. The system measures the local temperature by using an array of nanoscale thermometers. This process can be observed in real time using a high resolution imagining technique such as electron microscopy. The platform can operate at extremely high temperatures.

  2. In-situ spectroscopy and nanoscale electronics in superconductor-topological insulator hybrid devices: a combined thin film growth and quantum transport study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngabonziza, Prosper

    2016-01-01

    In this dissertation, we presented a combined thin film growth and quantum transport study on superconductor topological insulator hybrid devices. Understanding of the electronic properties of topological insulators (TIs), their preparation in high quality thin film form and their interaction with o

  3. Nanoscale temperature sensing using the Seebeck effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, F. L.; Flipse, J.; van Wees, B. J.

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally study the effect of Joule heating on the electron temperature in metallic nanoscale devices and compare the results with a diffusive 3D finite element model. The temperature is probed using four thermocouples located at different distances from the heater. A good quantitative agree

  4. Selective nanoscale growth of lattice mismatched materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung-Chang; Brueck, Steven R. J.

    2017-06-20

    Exemplary embodiments provide materials and methods of forming high-quality semiconductor devices using lattice-mismatched materials. In one embodiment, a composite film including one or more substantially-single-particle-thick nanoparticle layers can be deposited over a substrate as a nanoscale selective growth mask for epitaxially growing lattice-mismatched materials over the substrate.

  5. Nanoscale temperature sensing using the Seebeck effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, F. L.; Flipse, J.; van Wees, B. J.

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally study the effect of Joule heating on the electron temperature in metallic nanoscale devices and compare the results with a diffusive 3D finite element model. The temperature is probed using four thermocouples located at different distances from the heater. A good quantitative

  6. Correlation between nanoscale surface potential and power conversion efficiency of P3HT/TiO2 nanorod bulk heterojunction photovoltaic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Chung; Wu, Yi-Jen; Yen, Wei-Che; Lo, Hsi-Hsing; Lin, Ching-Fuh; Su, Wei-Fang

    2010-08-01

    This is an in depth study on the surface potential changes of P3HT/TiO(2) nanorod bulk heterojunction thin films. They are affected by interlayer structures, the molecular weight of P3HT, the processing solvents and the surface ligands on the TiO(2). The addition of an electron blocking layer and/or the hole blocking layer to the P3HT/TiO(2) thin film can facilitate charge carrier transport and result in a high surface potential shift. The changes in surface potential of multilayered bulk heterojunction films are closely correlated to their power conversion efficiency of photovoltaic devices. Changing ligand leads to the largest change in surface potential yielding the greatest effect on the power conversion efficiency. Merely changing the P3HT molecular weight is less effective and varying the processing solvents is least effective in increasing power conversion efficiency. The steric effect of the ligand has a large influence on the reduction of charge carrier recombination resulting in a great effect on the power conversion efficiency. By monitoring the changes in the surface potential of bulk heterojunction film of multilayer structures, we have obtained a useful guide for the fabrication of high performance photovoltaic devices.

  7. Spin manipulation in nanoscale superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, D

    2016-04-27

    The interplay of superconductivity and magnetism in nanoscale structures has attracted considerable attention in recent years due to the exciting new physics created by the competition of these antagonistic ordering phenomena, and the prospect of exploiting this competition for superconducting spintronics devices. While much of the attention is focused on spin-polarized supercurrents created by the triplet proximity effect, the recent discovery of long range quasiparticle spin transport in high-field superconductors has rekindled interest in spin-dependent nonequilibrium properties of superconductors. In this review, the experimental situation on nonequilibrium spin injection into superconductors is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions of the field are outlined.

  8. Confined Chemical Etching for Electrochemical Machining with Nanoscale Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Dongping; Han, Lianhuan; Zhang, Jie; Shi, Kang; Zhou, Jian-Zhang; Tian, Zhao-Wu; Tian, Zhong-Qun

    2016-11-15

    In the past several decades, electrochemical machining (ECM) has enjoyed the reputation of a powerful technique in the manufacturing industry. Conventional ECM methods can be classified as electrolytic machining and electroforming: the former is based on anodic dissolution and the latter is based on cathodic deposition of metallic materials. Strikingly, ECM possesses several advantages over mechanical machining, such as high removal rate, the capability of making complex three-dimensional structures, and the practicability for difficult-to-cut materials. Additionally, ECM avoids tool wear and thermal or mechanical stress on machining surfaces. Thus, ECM is widely used for various industrial applications in the fields of aerospace, automobiles, electronics, etc. Nowadays, miniaturization and integration of functional components are becoming significant in ultralarge scale integration (ULSI) circuits, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and miniaturized total analysis systems (μ-TAS). As predicted by Moore's law, the feature size of interconnectors in ULSI circuits are down to several nanometers. In this Account, we present our perseverant research in the last two decades on how to "confine" the ECM processes to occur at micrometer or even nanometer scale, that is, to ensure ECM with nanoscale accuracy. We have been developing the confined etchant layer technique (CELT) to fabricate three-dimensional micro- and nanostructures (3D-MNS) on different metals and semiconductor materials since 1992. In general, there are three procedures in CELT: (1) generating the etchant on the surface of the tool electrode by electrochemical or photoelectrochemical reactions; (2) confining the etchant in a depleted layer with a thickness of micro- or nanometer scale; (3) feeding the tool electrode to etch the workpiece. Scavengers, which can react with the etchant, are usually adopted to form a confined etchant layer. Through the subsequent homogeneous reaction between the scavenger

  9. Nanoscale Measurements of Magnetism & Spin Coherence in Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    2015 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Nanoscale Measurements of Magnetism & Spin Coherence in Semiconductors The...floor Princeton, NJ 08544 -2020 31-Jul-2015 ABSTRACT Final Report: Nanoscale Measurements of Magnetism & Spin Coherence in Semiconductors Report Title...Si-on-insultor devices. These SOI devices will provide the samples required for study of spin coherence at a single spin level in a semiconductor

  10. Nanoscale photonics using coupled hybrid plasmonic architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Charles; Su, Yiwen; Helmy, Amr S.

    2016-04-01

    Plasmonic waveguides, which support surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) propagating along metal-dielectric interfaces, offer strong field confinement and are ideal for the design of integrated nano-scale photonic devices. However, due to free-carrier absorption in the metal, the enhanced mode confinement inevitably entails an increase in the waveguide loss. This lowers the device figure-of-merit achievable with passive plasmonic components and in turn hinders the performance of active plasmonic components such as optical modulators.

  11. Molecular Photovoltaics in Nanoscale Dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei V. Pakoulev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the intrinsic charge transport in organic photovoltaic (PVC devices and field-effect transistors (SAM-OFETs fabricated by vapor phase molecular self-assembly (VP-SAM method. The dynamics of charge transport are determined and used to clarify a transport mechanism. The 1,4,5,8-naphthalene-tetracarboxylic diphenylimide (NTCDI SAM devices provide a useful tool to study the fundamentals of polaronic transport at organic surfaces and to discuss the performance of organic photovoltaic devices in nanoscale. Time-resolved photovoltaic studies allow us to separate the charge annihilation kinetics in the conductive NTCDI channel from the overall charge kinetic in a SAM-OFET device. It has been demonstrated that tuning of the type of conductivity in NTCDI SAM-OFET devices is possible by changing Si substrate doping. Our study of the polaron charge transfer in organic materials proposes that a cation-radical exchange (redox mechanism is the major transport mechanism in the studied SAM-PVC devices. The role and contribution of the transport through delocalized states of redox active surface molecular aggregates of NTCDI are exposed and investigated. This example of technological development is used to highlight the significance of future technological development of nanotechnologies and to appreciate a structure-property paradigm in organic nanostructures.

  12. Nanoscale thermometry using point contact thermocouples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat, Seid; Tan, Aaron; Chua, Yi Jie; Reddy, Pramod

    2010-07-14

    Probing temperature fields with nanometer resolution is critical to understanding nanoscale thermal transport as well as dissipation in nanoscale devices. Here, we demonstrate an atomic force microscope (AFM)-based technique capable of mapping temperature fields in metallic films with approximately 10 mK temperature resolution and thermocouples on a grid. The local temperature at each point contact is obtained by measuring the thermoelectric voltage of the platinum-gold point contact and relating it to the local temperature. These results demonstrate a direct measurement of the temperature field of a metallic surface without using specially fabricated scanning temperature-probes.

  13. CMOS compatible nanoscale nonvolatile resistance switching memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Sung Hyun; Lu, Wei

    2008-02-01

    We report studies on a nanoscale resistance switching memory structure based on planar silicon that is fully compatible with CMOS technology in terms of both materials and processing techniques employed. These two-terminal resistance switching devices show excellent scaling potential well beyond 10 Gb/cm2 and exhibit high yield (99%), fast programming speed (5 ns), high on/off ratio (10(3)), long endurance (10(6)), retention time (5 months), and multibit capability. These key performance metrics compare favorably with other emerging nonvolatile memory techniques. Furthermore, both diode-like (rectifying) and resistor-like (nonrectifying) behaviors can be obtained in the device switching characteristics in a controlled fashion. These results suggest that the CMOS compatible, nanoscale Si-based resistance switching devices may be well suited for ultrahigh-density memory applications.

  14. Nanopatterning and nanoscale devices for biological applications

    CERN Document Server

    Šelimović, Seila

    2014-01-01

    ""This book is a good reference for researchers interested in realizing bio-applications based on micro- and nanostructures, where their interface with liquids and biomolecules is the key point. The most important 'players' of micro- and nano-bioengineering are considered, from DNA to proteins and cells. The work is a good merger of basic concepts and real examples of applications.""-Danilo Demarchi, Politecnico di Torino, Italy

  15. Towards Nanoscale Biomedical Devices in Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parracino, A.; Gajula, G.P.; di Gennaro, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    the immobilization of a PhEst, a S-formylglutathione hydrolase from the psychrophilic P. haloplanktis TAC125 onto the gold coated surface of modified superparamagnetic core-shell nanoparticles (FeO@Au). The synthesis of the nanoparticles is also reported. S-formylglutathione hydrolases constitute a family...

  16. Infochemistry Information Processing at the Nanoscale

    CERN Document Server

    Szacilowski, Konrad

    2012-01-01

    Infochemistry: Information Processing at the Nanoscale, defines a new field of science, and describes the processes, systems and devices at the interface between chemistry and information sciences. The book is devoted to the application of molecular species and nanostructures to advanced information processing. It includes the design and synthesis of suitable materials and nanostructures, their characterization, and finally applications of molecular species and nanostructures for information storage and processing purposes. Divided into twelve chapters; the first three chapters serve as an int

  17. Sensing at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna; Hierold, Christofer

    2013-11-01

    The merits of nanostructures in sensing may seem obvious, yet playing these attributes to their maximum advantage can be a work of genius. As fast as sensing technology is improving, expectations are growing, with demands for cheaper devices with higher sensitivities and an ever increasing range of functionalities and compatibilities. At the same time tough scientific challenges like low power operation, noise and low selectivity are keeping researchers busy. This special issue on sensing at the nanoscale with guest editor Christofer Hierold from ETH Zurich features some of the latest developments in sensing research pushing at the limits of current capabilities. Cheap and easy fabrication is a top priority. Among the most popular nanomaterials in sensing are ZnO nanowires and in this issue Dario Zappa and colleagues at Brescia University in Italy simplify an already cheap and efficient synthesis method, demonstrating ZnO nanowire fabrication directly onto silicon substrates [1]. Meanwhile Nicolae Barson and colleagues in Germany point out the advantages of flame spray pyrolysis fabrication in a topical review [2] and, maximizing on existing resources, researchers in Denmark and Taiwan report cantilever sensing using a US20 commercial DVD-ROM optical pickup unit as the readout source [3]. The sensor is designed to detect physiological concentrations of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor, a protein associated with inflammation due to HIV, cancer and other infectious diseases. With their extreme properties carbon nanostructures feature prominently in the issue, including the demonstration of a versatile and flexible carbon nanotube strain sensor [4] and a graphene charge sensor with sensitivities of the order of 1.3 × 10-3 e Hz-1/2 [5]. The issue of patterning for sensing devices is also tackled by researchers in the US who demonstrate a novel approach for multicomponent pattering metal/metal oxide nanoparticles on graphene [6]. Changes in electrical

  18. Optical Spectroscopy at the Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xiaoping

    Recent advances in material science and fabrication techniques enabled development of nanoscale applications and devices with superior performances and high degree of integration. Exotic physics also emerges at nanoscale where confinement of electrons and phonons leads to drastically different behavior from those in the bulk materials. It is therefore rewarding and interesting to investigate and understand material properties at the nanoscale. Optical spectroscopy, one of the most versatile techniques for studying material properties and light-matter interactions, can provide new insights into the nanomaterials. In this thesis, I explore advanced laser spectroscopic techniques to probe a variety of different nanoscale phenomena. A powerful tool in nanoscience and engineering is scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Its capability in atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy unveiled the mystical quantum world of atoms and molecules. However identification of molecular species under investigation is one of the limiting functionalities of the STM. To address this need, we take advantage of the molecular `fingerprints' - vibrational spectroscopy, by combining an infrared light sources with scanning tunneling microscopy. In order to map out sharp molecular resonances, an infrared continuous wave broadly tunable optical parametric oscillator was developed with mode-hop free fine tuning capabilities. We then combine this laser with STM by shooting the beam onto the STM substrate with sub-monolayer diamondoids deposition. Thermal expansion of the substrate is detected by the ultrasensitive tunneling current when infrared frequency is tuned across the molecular vibrational range. Molecular vibrational spectroscopy could be obtained by recording the thermal expansion as a function of the excitation wavelength. Another interesting field of the nanoscience is carbon nanotube, an ideal model of one dimensional physics and applications. Due to the small light absorption with

  19. Interfaces in nanoscale photovoltaics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Öner, S.Z.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis deals with material interfaces in nanoscale photovoltaics. Interface properties between the absorbing semiconductor and other employed materials are crucial for an efficient solar cell. While the optical properties are largely unaffected by a few nanometer thin layer, the electronic prop

  20. Interfaces in nanoscale photovoltaics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Öner, S.Z.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis deals with material interfaces in nanoscale photovoltaics. Interface properties between the absorbing semiconductor and other employed materials are crucial for an efficient solar cell. While the optical properties are largely unaffected by a few nanometer thin layer, the electronic prop

  1. NANOSCALE PROCESS ENGINEERING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qixiang Wang; Fei Wei

    2003-01-01

    The research of nanoscale process engineering (NPE) is based on the interdisciplinary nature of nanoscale science and technology. It mainly deals with transformation of materials and energy into nanostructured materials and nanodevices, and synergizes the multidisciplinary convergence between materials science and technology, biotechnology, and information technology. The core technologies of NPE concern all aspects of nanodevice construction and operation, such as manufacture of nanomaterials "by design", concepts and design of nanoarchitectures, and manufacture and control of customizable nanodevices. Two main targets of NPE at present are focused on nanoscale manufacture and concept design of nanodevices. The research progress of nanoscale manufacturing processes focused on creating nanostructures and assembling them into nanosystems and larger scale architectures has built the interdiscipline of NPE. The concepts and design of smart, multi-functional, environmentally compatible and customizable nanodevice prototypes built from the nanostructured systems of nanocrystalline, nanoporous and microemulsion systems are most challenging tasks of NPE. The development of NPE may also impel us to consider the curriculum and educational reform of chemical engineering in universities.

  2. Critical properties and reliability of low-k dielectrics for ULSI interconnect applications: Thickness and temperature dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyungkun

    A fundamental understanding and detailed elucidation of the thickness dependent behavior of the key properties of low-k dielectrics IS not only necessary but also essential, and the search for the interfacial behaviors between low-k dielectrics and other layers will be an important task to achieve a thinner layers of low-k dielectrics in current and future devices. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) has been considered as one of advanced low-k ILD materials for microelectronic interconnect and packaging applications. This study presents the thickness and temperature dependence of main key properties such as structural, mechanical, electrical, dielectric, optical, and thermal properties of on-wafer PTFE low-k polymer thin and ultrathin films, which has the lowest dielectric constant among nonporous low relative permittivity materials. PTFE polycrystalline polymer thin films ranging in thickness of 90 to 1200 nm are investigated by using ellipsometer, optical spectroscopy, nanoindentation, current-voltage (I-V) characteristic method. Both Nanospec/AFT and ellipsometer are used to measure the thickness of films at 16 selected points per sample, and then these values were averaged. In addition, the characterizations of microstructure and morphology has been studied by using small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXRD-Siemens D5000 Diffractometer), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (MIDAC-PRS 102), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Our results show that thermal, dielectric, optical, and mechanical properties such as the solid-liquid transition temperature, coefficient of thermal expansion, dielectric strength, refractive index, Young's modulus, hardness of low-k polycrystalline polymer thin films strongly depend on the film thickness, and this thickness dependence can be related to the microstructure and morphology of the film. These thickness and temperature dependent behaviors can be also well described by the proposed model and a good agreement with experimental and

  3. Transmission of torque at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ian; Oğuz, Erdal C.; Speck, Thomas; Bartlett, Paul; Löwen, Hartmut; Royall, C. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In macroscopic mechanical devices, torque is transmitted through gearwheels and clutches. In the construction of devices at the nanoscale, torque and its transmission through soft materials will be a key component. However, this regime is dominated by thermal fluctuations leading to dissipation. Here we demonstrate the principle of torque transmission for a disc-like colloidal assembly exhibiting clutch-like behaviour, driven by 27 particles in optical traps. These are translated on a circular path to form a rotating boundary that transmits torque to additional particles confined to the interior. We investigate this transmission and find that it is determined by solid-like or fluid-like behaviour of the device and a stick-slip mechanism reminiscent of macroscopic gearwheels slipping. The transmission behaviour is predominantly governed by the rotation rate of the boundary and the density of the confined system. We determine the efficiency of our device and thus optimize conditions to maximize power output.

  4. Controlling carrier dynamics at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cánovas, Enrique; Bonn, Mischa

    2016-10-01

    This Special issue is motivated by the occasion of the International Conference on Charge Carrier Dynamics at the Nanoscale (CCDNano), held in Santiago de Compostela (Spain) in September 2015. As chairs for the CCDNano meeting, we aimed at bringing together experts from different scientific fields in order to trigger interdisciplinary discussions and collaborations; the ultimate goal of the conference was to serve as a platform to advance and help unifying methodologies and theories from different research sub-fields. We also aimed at a deeper understanding of charge dynamics to contribute to the development of improved or novel nanostructured devices. This special issue keeps that spirit, and intends to provide an overview of ongoing research efforts regarding charge carrier dynamics at the nanoscale.

  5. Ellipsometry at the nanoscale

    CERN Document Server

    Hingerl, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    This book presents and introduces ellipsometry in nanoscience and nanotechnology making a bridge between the classical and nanoscale optical behaviour of materials. It delineates the role of the non-destructive and non-invasive optical diagnostics of ellipsometry in improving science and technology of nanomaterials and related processes by illustrating its exploitation, ranging from fundamental studies of the physics and chemistry of nanostructures to the ultimate goal of turnkey manufacturing control. This book is written for a broad readership: materials scientists, researchers, engineers, as well as students and nanotechnology operators who want to deepen their knowledge about both basics and applications of ellipsometry to nanoscale phenomena. It starts as a general introduction for people curious to enter the fields of ellipsometry and polarimetry applied to nanomaterials and progresses to articles by experts on specific fields that span from plasmonics, optics, to semiconductors and flexible electronics...

  6. Nanoscale Organic Hybrid Electrolytes

    KAUST Repository

    Nugent, Jennifer L.

    2010-08-20

    Nanoscale organic hybrid electrolytes are composed of organic-inorganic hybrid nanostructures, each with a metal oxide or metallic nanoparticle core densely grafted with an ion-conducting polyethylene glycol corona - doped with lithium salt. These materials form novel solvent-free hybrid electrolytes that are particle-rich, soft glasses at room temperature; yet manifest high ionic conductivity and good electrochemical stability above 5V. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Plasmonic nanoantennas: enhancing light-matter interactions at the nanoscale

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Shobhit K

    2015-01-01

    The research area of plasmonics promises devices with ultrasmall footprint operating at ultrafast speeds and with lower energy consumption compared to conventional electronics. These devices will operate with light and bridge the gap between microscale dielectric photonic systems and nanoscale electronics. Recent research advancements in nanotechnology and optics have led to the creation of a plethora of new plasmonic designs. Among the most promising are nanoscale antennas operating at optical frequencies, called nanoantennas. Plasmonic nanoantennas can provide enhanced and controllable light-matter interactions and strong coupling between far-field radiation and localized sources at the nanoscale. After a brief introduction of several plasmonic nanoantenna designs and their well-established radio-frequency antenna counterparts, we review several linear and nonlinear applications of different nanoantenna configurations. In particular, the possibility to tune the scattering response of linear nanoantennas and...

  8. Engineering Nanoscale Biological Molecular Motors

    OpenAIRE

    Korosec, Chapin; Forde, Nancy R.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the operation of biological molecular motors, nanoscale machines that transduce electrochemical energy into mechanical work, is enhanced by bottom-up strategies to synthesize novel motors.

  9. System reduction for nanoscale IC design

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the computational challenges posed by the progression toward nanoscale electronic devices and increasingly short design cycles in the microelectronics industry, and proposes methods of model reduction which facilitate circuit and device simulation for specific tasks in the design cycle. The goal is to develop and compare methods for system reduction in the design of high dimensional nanoelectronic ICs, and to test these methods in the practice of semiconductor development. Six chapters describe the challenges for numerical simulation of nanoelectronic circuits and suggest model reduction methods for constituting equations. These include linear and nonlinear differential equations tailored to circuit equations and drift diffusion equations for semiconductor devices. The performance of these methods is illustrated with numerical experiments using real-world data. Readers will benefit from an up-to-date overview of the latest model reduction methods in computational nanoelectronics.

  10. Charge transport in nanoscale junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2008-09-03

    Understanding the fundamentals of nanoscale charge transfer is pivotal for designing future nano-electronic devices. Such devices could be based on individual or groups of molecular bridges, nanotubes, nanoparticles, biomolecules and other 'active' components, mimicking wire, diode and transistor functions. These have operated in various environments including vacuum, air and condensed matter, in two- or three-electrode configurations, at ultra-low and room temperatures. Interest in charge transport in ultra-small device components has a long history and can be dated back to Aviram and Ratner's letter in 1974 (Chem. Phys. Lett. 29 277-83). So why is there a necessity for a special issue on this subject? The area has reached some degree of maturity, and even subtle geometric effects in the nanojunction and noise features can now be resolved and rationalized based on existing theoretical concepts. One purpose of this special issue is thus to showcase various aspects of nanoscale and single-molecule charge transport from experimental and theoretical perspectives. The main principles have 'crystallized' in our minds, but there is still a long way to go before true single-molecule electronics can be implemented. Major obstacles include the stability of electronic nanojunctions, reliable operation at room temperature, speed of operation and, last but not least, integration into large networks. A gradual transition from traditional silicon-based electronics to devices involving a single (or a few) molecule(s) therefore appears to be more viable from technologic and economic perspectives than a 'quantum leap'. As research in this area progresses, new applications emerge, e.g. with a view to characterizing interfacial charge transfer at the single-molecule level in general. For example, electrochemical experiments with individual enzyme molecules demonstrate that catalytic processes can be studied with nanometre resolution, offering a route towards optimizing biosensors at

  11. Ferroelectric crystals for photonic applications including nanoscale fabrication and characterization techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, Pietro; De Natale, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    This book details the latest achievements in ferroelectric domain engineering and characterization at micro- and nano-scale dimensions and periods. It combines basic research of magnetic materials with device and production orientation.

  12. Nanoscale piezoelectric vibration energy harvester design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Foruzande

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Development of new nanoscale devices has increased the demand for new types of small-scale energy resources such as ambient vibrations energy harvesters. Among the vibration energy harvesters, piezoelectric energy harvesters (PEHs can be easily miniaturized and fabricated in micro and nano scales. This change in the dimensions of a PEH leads to a change in its governing equations of motion, and consequently, the predicted harvested energy comparing to a macroscale PEH. In this research, effects of small scale dimensions on the nonlinear vibration and harvested voltage of a nanoscale PEH is studied. The PEH is modeled as a cantilever piezoelectric bimorph nanobeam with a tip mass, using the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory in conjunction with Hamilton’s principle. A harmonic base excitation is applied as a model of the ambient vibrations. The nonlocal elasticity theory is used to consider the size effects in the developed model. The derived equations of motion are discretized using the assumed-modes method and solved using the method of multiple scales. Sensitivity analysis for the effect of different parameters of the system in addition to size effects is conducted. The results show the significance of nonlocal elasticity theory in the prediction of system dynamic nonlinear behavior. It is also observed that neglecting the size effects results in lower estimates of the PEH vibration amplitudes. The results pave the way for designing new nanoscale sensors in addition to PEHs.

  13. Challenges of Biomolecular Detection at the Nanoscale: Nanopores and Microelectrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathwig, Klaus; Albrecht, Tim; Goluch, Edgar D.; Rassaei, Liza

    2015-01-01

    The interest in analytical devices, which typically rely on the reactivity of a biological component for specificity, is growing rapidly. In this Perspective, we highlight current challenges in all-electrical biosensing as these systems shrink toward the nanoscale and enable the detection of analyte

  14. Dynamic Behaviour of Nanoscale Electrostatic Actuators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林文惠; 赵亚溥

    2003-01-01

    The dynamic behaviour for nanoscale electrostatic actuators is studied.A two parameter mass-spring model is shown to exhibit a bifurcation from the case excluding an equilibrium point to the case including two equilibrium points as the geometrical dimensions of the device are altered.Stability analysis shows that one is a stable Hopf bifurcation point and the other is an unstable saddle point.In addition,we plot the diagram phases,which have periodic orbits around the Hopf point and a homoclinic orbit passing though the unstable saddle point.

  15. Coherent Light Sources at the Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ankun; Wang, Danqing; Wang, Weijia; Odom, Teri W.

    2017-05-01

    This review focuses on coherent light sources at the nanoscale, and specifically on lasers exploiting plasmonic cavities that can beat the diffraction limit of light. Conventional lasers exhibit coherent, intense, and directional emission with cavity sizes much larger than their operating wavelength. Plasmon lasers show ultrasmall mode confinement, support strong light-matter interactions, and represent a class of devices with extremely small sizes. We discuss the differences between plasmon lasers and traditional ones, and we highlight advances in directionality and tunability through innovative cavity designs and new materials. Challenges and future prospects are also discussed.

  16. Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003–2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahill, David G., E-mail: d-cahill@illinois.edu; Braun, Paul V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Chen, Gang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Clarke, David R. [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Fan, Shanhui [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Goodson, Kenneth E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Keblinski, Pawel [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); King, William P. [Department of Mechanical Sciences and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Mahan, Gerald D. [Department of Physics, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Majumdar, Arun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Maris, Humphrey J. [Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States); Phillpot, Simon R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainseville, Florida 32611 (United States); Pop, Eric [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Shi, Li [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas, Autin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale electronics, and nanoparticles for thermal medical therapies are motivating studies of the applied physics of thermal transport at the nanoscale. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces become increasingly important on small length scales. Research during the past decade has extended studies of interfaces between simple metals and inorganic crystals to interfaces with molecular materials and liquids with systematic control of interface chemistry and physics. At separations on the order of ∼1 nm, the science of radiative transport through nanoscale gaps overlaps with thermal conduction by the coupling of electronic and vibrational excitations across weakly bonded or rough interfaces between materials. Major advances in the physics of phonons include first principles calculation of the phonon lifetimes of simple crystals and application of the predicted scattering rates in parameter-free calculations of the thermal conductivity. Progress in the control of thermal transport at the nanoscale is critical to continued advances in the density of information that can be stored in phase change memory devices and new generations of magnetic storage that will use highly localized heat sources to reduce the coercivity of magnetic media. Ultralow thermal conductivity—thermal conductivity below the conventionally predicted minimum thermal conductivity—has been observed in nanolaminates and disordered crystals with strong anisotropy. Advances in metrology by time-domain thermoreflectance have made measurements of the thermal conductivity of a thin layer with micron-scale spatial resolution relatively routine. Scanning thermal microscopy and

  17. Controlling Solid-Gas Reactions at Nanoscale for Enhanced Thin Film Morphologies and Device Performances in Solution-Processed Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chengyang; Hsieh, Yao-Tsung; Zhao, Hongxiang; Zhou, Huanping; Yang, Yang

    2015-09-02

    Using Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe) as a model system, we demonstrate the kinetic control of solid-gas reactions at nanoscale by manipulating the surface chemistry of both sol-gel nanoparticles (NPs) and colloidal nanocrystals (NCs). Specifically, we first identify that thiourea (commonly used as sulfur source in sol-gel processes for metal sulfides) can transform into melamine upon film formation, which serves as surface ligands for as-formed Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) NPs. We further reveal that the presence of these surface ligands can significantly affect the outcome of the solid-gas reactions, which enables us to effectively control the selenization process during the fabrication of CZTSSe solar cells and achieve optimal film morphologies (continuous large grains) by fine-tuning the amount of surface ligands used. Such enhancement leads to better light absorption and allows us to achieve 6.5% efficiency from CZTSSe solar cells processed via a sol-gel process using nontoxic, low boiling point mixed solvents. We believe our discovery that the ligand of particulate precursors can significantly affect solid-gas reactions is universal to solid-state chemistry and will boost further research in both understanding the fundamentals of solid-state reactions at nanoscale and taking advantage of these reactions to fabricate crystalline thin film semiconductors with better morphologies and performances.

  18. Characterizing Nanoscale Transient Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yifan; Anwar, Putri Santi; Huang, Limin; Asvial, Muhamad

    2016-04-01

    We consider the novel paradigm of nanoscale transient communication (NTC), where certain components of the small-scale communication link are physically transient. As such, the transmitter and the receiver may change their properties over a prescribed lifespan due to their time-varying structures. The NTC systems may find important applications in the biomedical, environmental, and military fields, where system degradability allows for benign integration into life and environment. In this paper, we analyze the NTC systems from the channel-modeling and capacity-analysis perspectives and focus on the stochastically meaningful slow transience scenario, where the coherence time of degeneration Td is much longer than the coding delay Tc. We first develop novel and parsimonious models to characterize the NTC channels, where three types of physical layers are considered: electromagnetism-based terahertz (THz) communication, diffusion-based molecular communication (DMC), and nanobots-assisted touchable communication (TouchCom). We then revisit the classical performance measure of ϵ-outage channel capacity and take a fresh look at its formulations in the NTC context. Next, we present the notion of capacity degeneration profile (CDP), which describes the reduction of channel capacity with respect to the degeneration time. Finally, we provide numerical examples to demonstrate the features of CDP. To the best of our knowledge, the current work represents a first attempt to systematically evaluate the quality of nanoscale communication systems deteriorating with time.

  19. Rocket Science at the Nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Wang, Joseph

    2016-06-28

    Autonomous propulsion at the nanoscale represents one of the most challenging and demanding goals in nanotechnology. Over the past decade, numerous important advances in nanotechnology and material science have contributed to the creation of powerful self-propelled micro/nanomotors. In particular, micro- and nanoscale rockets (MNRs) offer impressive capabilities, including remarkable speeds, large cargo-towing forces, precise motion controls, and dynamic self-assembly, which have paved the way for designing multifunctional and intelligent nanoscale machines. These multipurpose nanoscale shuttles can propel and function in complex real-life media, actively transporting and releasing therapeutic payloads and remediation agents for diverse biomedical and environmental applications. This review discusses the challenges of designing efficient MNRs and presents an overview of their propulsion behavior, fabrication methods, potential rocket fuels, navigation strategies, practical applications, and the future prospects of rocket science and technology at the nanoscale.

  20. Atomic origin of ultrafast resistance switching in nanoscale electrometallization cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofrio, Nicolas; Guzman, David; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-04-01

    Nanoscale resistance-switching cells that operate via the electrochemical formation and disruption of metallic filaments that bridge two electrodes are among the most promising devices for post-CMOS electronics. Despite their importance, the mechanisms that govern their remarkable properties are not fully understood, especially for nanoscale devices operating at ultrafast rates, limiting our ability to assess the ultimate performance and scalability of this technology. We present the first atomistic simulations of the operation of conductive bridging cells using reactive molecular dynamics with a charge equilibration method extended to describe electrochemical reactions. The simulations predict the ultrafast switching observed in these devices, with timescales ranging from hundreds of picoseconds to a few nanoseconds for devices consisting of Cu active electrodes and amorphous silica dielectrics and with dimensions corresponding to their scaling limit (cross-sections below 10 nm). We find that single-atom-chain bridges often form during device operation but that they are metastable, with lifetimes below a nanosecond. The formation of stable filaments involves the aggregation of ions into small metallic clusters, followed by a progressive chemical reduction as they become connected to the cathode. Contrary to observations in larger cells, the nanoscale conductive bridges often lack crystalline order. An atomic-level mechanistic understanding of the switching process provides guidelines for materials optimization for such applications and the quantitative predictions over an ensemble of devices provide insight into their ultimate scaling and performance.

  1. Light-matter interaction physics and engineering at the nanoscale

    CERN Document Server

    Weiner, John

    2013-01-01

    This book draws together the essential elements of classical electrodynamics, surface wave physics, plasmonic materials, and circuit theory of electrical engineering to provide insight into the essential physics of nanoscale light-matter interaction and to provide design methodology for practical nanoscale plasmonic devices. A chapter on classical and quantal radiation also highlights the similarities (and differences) between the classical fields of Maxwell's equations and the wave functions of Schrodinger's equation. The aim of this chapter is to provide a semiclassical picture of atomic absorption and emission of radiation, lending credence and physical plausibility to the "rules" of standard wave-mechanical calculations.

  2. Synthesis, dynamics and photophysics of nanoscale systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkovic, Tihana

    The emerging field of nanotechnology, which spans diverse areas such as nanoelectronics, medicine, chemical and pharmaceutical industries, biotechnology and computation, focuses on the development of devices whose improved performance is based on the utilization of self-assembled nanoscale components exhibiting unique properties owing to their miniaturized dimensions. The first phase in the conception of such multifunctional devices based on integrated technologies requires the study of basic principles behind the functional mechanism of nanoscale components, which could originate from individual nanoobjects or result as a collective behaviour of miniaturized unit structures. The comprehensive studies presented in this thesis encompass the mechanical, dynamical and photophysical aspects of three nanoscale systems. A newly developed europium sulfide nanocrystalline material is introduced. Advances in synthetic methods allowed for shape control of surface-functionalized EuS nanocrystals and the fabrication of multifunctional EuS-CdSe hybrid particles, whose unique structural and optical properties hold promise as useful attributes of integrated materials in developing technologies. A comprehensive study based on a new class of multifunctional nanomaterials, derived from the basic unit of barcoded metal nanorods is presented. Their chemical composition affords them the ability to undergo autonomous motion in the presence of a suitable fuel. The nature of their chemically powered self-propulsion locomotion was investigated, and plausible mechanisms for various motility modes were presented. Furthermore functionalization of striped metallic nanorods has been realized through the incorporation of chemically controlled flexible hinges displaying bendable properties. The structural aspect of the light harvesting machinery of a photosynthetic cryptophyte alga, Rhodomonas CS24, and the mobility of the antenna protein, PE545, in vivo were investigated. Information obtained

  3. Nanoscale waveguiding methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Jean; Lin, Lih Y

    2007-05-01

    While 32 nm lithography technology is on the horizon for integrated circuit (IC) fabrication, matching the pace for miniaturization with optics has been hampered by the diffraction limit. However, development of nanoscale components and guiding methods is burgeoning through advances in fabrication techniques and materials processing. As waveguiding presents the fundamental issue and cornerstone for ultra-high density photonic ICs, we examine the current state of methods in the field. Namely, plasmonic, metal slot and negative dielectric based waveguides as well as a few sub-micrometer techniques such as nanoribbons, high-index contrast and photonic crystals waveguides are investigated in terms of construction, transmission, and limitations. Furthermore, we discuss in detail quantum dot (QD) arrays as a gain-enabled and flexible means to transmit energy through straight paths and sharp bends. Modeling, fabrication and test results are provided and show that the QD waveguide may be effective as an alternate means to transfer light on sub-diffraction dimensions.

  4. Anatomy of Nanoscale Propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vinita; Duan, Wentao; Butler, Peter J; Sen, Ayusman

    2015-01-01

    Nature supports multifaceted forms of life. Despite the variety and complexity of these forms, motility remains the epicenter of life. The applicable laws of physics change upon going from macroscales to microscales and nanoscales, which are characterized by low Reynolds number (Re). We discuss motion at low Re in natural and synthetic systems, along with various propulsion mechanisms, including electrophoresis, electrolyte diffusiophoresis, and nonelectrolyte diffusiophoresis. We also describe the newly uncovered phenomena of motility in non-ATP-driven self-powered enzymes and the directional movement of these enzymes in response to substrate gradients. These enzymes can also be immobilized to function as fluid pumps in response to the presence of their substrates. Finally, we review emergent collective behavior arising from interacting motile species, and we discuss the possible biomedical applications of the synthetic nanobots and microbots.

  5. Surface Properties from Transconductance in Nanoscale Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynall, David; Byrne, Kristopher; Shik, Alexander; Nair, Selvakumar V; Ruda, Harry E

    2016-10-12

    Because of the continued scaling of transistor dimensions and incorporation of nanostructured materials into modern electronic and optoelectronic devices, surfaces and interfaces have become a dominant factor dictating material properties and device performance. In this study, we investigate the temperature-dependent electronic transport properties of InAs nanowire field-effect transistors. A point where the nanowire conductance becomes independent of temperature is observed, known as the zero-temperature-coefficient. The distribution of surface states is determined by a spectral analysis of the conductance activation energy and used to develop a carrier transport model that explains the existence and gate voltage dependence of this point. We determine that the position of this point in gate voltage is directly related to the fixed oxide charge on the nanowire surface and demonstrate the utility of this method for studying surface passivations in nanoscale systems by characterizing (NH4)2Sx and H2 plasma surface treatments on InAs nanowires.

  6. Asymmetric propagation of electromagnetic waves through nanoscale spirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jingpei; Lin, Yu; Zhu, Aijiao; Zhao, Xiaonan; Wang, Chinhua

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we report that normal incidence transmission of different circularly polarized waves through the 2D Archimedes' nanoscale spirals is asymmetric. The structures consist of raised spiral ridge and two layers metal film covered on the substrate and the ridge. The finite difference time domain method was used to design the structure and perform the simulation. The device can distinguish the different circularly polarized wave across the transmission intensity compare with the common Archimedes' nanoscale spirals which just exhibit the bright or dark modes in the light field. We confirmed that the device provide about 10% circular dichroism in 3.85um-6.0um broadband region. The circular dichroism in the wavelength 3.95 um can reach 13%. This ultracompact device could prove useful for remote sensing and advanced telecommunication applications.

  7. Mixed electrochemical-ferroelectric states in nanoscale ferroelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sang Mo; Morozovska, Anna N.; Kumar, Rajeev; Eliseev, Eugene A.; Cao, Ye; Mazet, Lucie; Balke, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; Vasudevan, Rama K.; Dubourdieu, Catherine; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2017-08-01

    Ferroelectricity on the nanoscale has been the subject of much fascination in condensed-matter physics for over half a century. In recent years, multiple reports claiming ferroelectricity in ultrathin ferroelectric films based on the formation of remnant polarization states, local electromechanical hysteresis loops, and pressure-induced switching were made. However, similar phenomena were reported for traditionally non-ferroelectric materials, creating a significant level of uncertainty in the field. Here we show that in nanoscale systems the ferroelectric state is fundamentally inseparable from the electrochemical state of the surface, leading to the emergence of a mixed electrochemical-ferroelectric state. We explore the nature, thermodynamics, and thickness evolution of such states, and demonstrate the experimental pathway to establish its presence. This analysis reconciles multiple prior studies, provides guidelines for studies of ferroelectric materials on the nanoscale, and establishes the design paradigm for new generations of ferroelectric-based devices.

  8. Effect of nanoscale patterned interfacial roughness on interfacial toughness.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mook, William M. (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN); Kennedy, Marian S. (Clemson University, Clemson, SC); Bahr, David F. (Washington State University, Pullman, WA); Zhou, Xiao Wang; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.

    2007-09-01

    The performance and the reliability of many devices are controlled by interfaces between thin films. In this study we investigated the use of patterned, nanoscale interfacial roughness as a way to increase the apparent interfacial toughness of brittle, thin-film material systems. The experimental portion of the study measured the interfacial toughness of a number of interfaces with nanoscale roughness. This included a silicon interface with a rectangular-toothed pattern of 60-nm wide by 90-nm deep channels fabricated using nanoimprint lithography techniques. Detailed finite element simulations were used to investigate the nature of interfacial crack growth when the interface is patterned. These simulations examined how geometric and material parameter choices affect the apparent toughness. Atomistic simulations were also performed with the aim of identifying possible modifications to the interfacial separation models currently used in nanoscale, finite element fracture analyses. The fundamental nature of atomistic traction separation for mixed mode loadings was investigated.

  9. Modeling of defect generation during plasma etching and its impact on electronic device performance—plasma-induced damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriguchi, Koji

    2017-08-01

    The increasing demand for the higher performance of ultra-large-scale integration (ULSI) circuits requires the aggressive shrinkage of device feature sizes in accordance with the scaling law. Plasma processing plays an important role in achieving fine patterns with anisotropic features in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). This article comprehensively addresses the negative aspects of plasma processing, i.e. plasma process-induced damage, in particular, the defect creation induced by ion bombardment in Si substrates during plasma etching. The ion bombardment damage forms a surface modified region and creates localized defect structures. Modeling and characterization techniques of the ion bombardment damage in Si substrates are overviewed. The thickness of the modified region, i.e. the damaged layer, is modeled by a modified range theory and the density of defects is characterized by photoreflectance spectroscopy (PRS) and the capacitance-voltage technique. The effects of plasma-induced damage (PID) on MOSFET performance are presented. In addition, some of the emerging topics—the enhanced parameter variability in ULSI circuits and recovery of the damage—are discussed as future perspectives.

  10. Fabrication and characterisation of carbon-based devices

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Thin film material properties and measurement characterisation techniques are crucial for the development of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) devices. Furthermore, as the technology scales down from microtechnology towards nanotechnology, nanoscale materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are required in electronic devices to overcome the limitations encountered by conventional materials at the nanoscale. The integration of CNTs into micro-electronics and material app...

  11. Quantum machines at the nanoscale

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic machines have been studied for two centuries. The rapid advancement in fabrication techniques of the last decades has lead to size reduction from the macroscale to nanoscale. At the nanoscale, quantum properties become important and have thus to be fully taken into account. Quantum heat engines have been the subject of extensive theoretical studies in the last fifty years. However, while classical micro heat engines have been fabricated, to date no quantum heat engine has bee...

  12. Energy Use in Nanoscale Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Teresa; Boyd, Sarah; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of key nanoscale manufacturing technologies, and qualitatively examines their fundamental process requirements with respect to energy demand. The processes requirements are related to semiconductor manufacturing, where applicable, and gaps in our understanding of these processes on the production scale are identified as goals for the research community. Finally, the paper proposes a framework for the systematic analysis of energy use in nanoscale manufacturing ...

  13. Nanoscale waveguiding methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chia-Jean

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWhile 32 nm lithography technology is on the horizon for integrated circuit (IC fabrication, matching the pace for miniaturization with optics has been hampered by the diffraction limit. However, development of nanoscale components and guiding methods is burgeoning through advances in fabrication techniques and materials processing. As waveguiding presents the fundamental issue and cornerstone for ultra-high density photonic ICs, we examine the current state of methods in the field. Namely, plasmonic, metal slot and negative dielectric based waveguides as well as a few sub-micrometer techniques such as nanoribbons, high-index contrast and photonic crystals waveguides are investigated in terms of construction, transmission, and limitations. Furthermore, we discuss in detail quantum dot (QD arrays as a gain-enabled and flexible means to transmit energy through straight paths and sharp bends. Modeling, fabrication and test results are provided and show that the QD waveguide may be effective as an alternate means to transfer light on sub-diffraction dimensions.

  14. Capillarity at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Honschoten, Joost W; Brunets, Nataliya; Tas, Niels R

    2010-03-01

    In this critical review we treat the phenomenon of capillarity in nanoscopic confinement, based on application of the Young-Laplace equation. In classical capillarity the curvature of the meniscus is determined by the confining geometry and the macroscopic contact angle. We show that in narrow confinement the influence of the disjoining pressure and the related wetting films have to be considered as they may significantly change the meniscus curvature. Nanochannel based static and dynamic capillarity experiments are reviewed. A typical effect of nanoscale confinement is the appearance of capillarity induced negative pressure. Special attention is paid to elasto-capillarity and electro-capillarity. The presence of electric fields leads to an extra stress term to be added in the Young-Laplace equation. A typical example is the formation of the Taylor cone, essential in the theory of electrospray. Measurements of the filling kinetics of nanochannels with water and aqueous salt solutions are discussed. These experiments can be used to characterize viscosity and apparent viscosity effects of water in nanoscopic confinement. In the final section we show four examples of appearances of capillarity in engineering and in nature (112 references).

  15. Nanoscale mass conveyors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Brian C.; Aloni, Shaul; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2008-03-11

    A mass transport method and device for individually delivering chargeable atoms or molecules from source particles is disclosed. It comprises a channel; at least one source particle of chargeable material fixed to the surface of the channel at a position along its length; a means of heating the channel; and a means for applying an controllable electric field along the channel, whereby the device transports the atoms or molecules along the channel in response to applied electric field. In a preferred embodiment, the mass transport device will comprise a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT), although other one dimensional structures may also be used. The MWNT or other structure acts as a channel for individual or small collections of atoms due to the atomic smoothness of the material. Also preferred is a source particle of a metal such as indium. The particles move by dissociation into small units, in some cases, individual atoms. The particles are preferably less than 100 nm in size.

  16. Ultrafast and nanoscale diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Lau, Y. Y.

    2016-10-01

    Charge carrier transport across interfaces of dissimilar materials (including vacuum) is the essence of all electronic devices. Ultrafast charge transport across a nanometre length scale is of fundamental importance in the miniaturization of vacuum and plasma electronics. With the combination of recent advances in electronics, photonics and nanotechnology, these miniature devices may integrate with solid-state platforms, achieving superior performance. This paper reviews recent modelling efforts on quantum tunnelling, ultrafast electron emission and transport, and electrical contact resistance. Unsolved problems and challenges in these areas are addressed.

  17. Nanoscale Semiconductor Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-25

    create a brand -new process technology for the nano- fabrication of III-V devices. The radiation effects on these devices has been tested in AFRL...34Hydrolization oxidation of AlxGa1-xAs/GaAs quantum well heterostructures and superlattices," Appl . Phys. Lett. 57, 2844, 1990. [7] H. Wada and T. Kamijoh...942, Jun 1997. [8] H. Wada and T. Kamijoh, “Effects of Heat Treatment on Bonding Properties in InP-to- Si Direct Wafer Bonding,” Jpn. J. Appl

  18. Integrated nanoscale tools for interrogating living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgolli, Marsela

    The development of next-generation, nanoscale technologies that interface biological systems will pave the way towards new understanding of such complex systems. Nanowires -- one-dimensional nanoscale structures -- have shown unique potential as an ideal physical interface to biological systems. Herein, we focus on the development of nanowire-based devices that can enable a wide variety of biological studies. First, we built upon standard nanofabrication techniques to optimize nanowire devices, resulting in perfectly ordered arrays of both opaque (Silicon) and transparent (Silicon dioxide) nanowires with user defined structural profile, densities, and overall patterns, as well as high sample consistency and large scale production. The high-precision and well-controlled fabrication method in conjunction with additional technologies laid the foundation for the generation of highly specialized platforms for imaging, electrochemical interrogation, and molecular biology. Next, we utilized nanowires as the fundamental structure in the development of integrated nanoelectronic platforms to directly interrogate the electrical activity of biological systems. Initially, we generated a scalable intracellular electrode platform based on vertical nanowires that allows for parallel electrical interfacing to multiple mammalian neurons. Our prototype device consisted of 16 individually addressable stimulation/recording sites, each containing an array of 9 electrically active silicon nanowires. We showed that these vertical nanowire electrode arrays could intracellularly record and stimulate neuronal activity in dissociated cultures of rat cortical neurons similar to patch clamp electrodes. In addition, we used our intracellular electrode platform to measure multiple individual synaptic connections, which enables the reconstruction of the functional connectivity maps of neuronal circuits. In order to expand and improve the capability of this functional prototype device we designed

  19. Current nanoscience and nanoengineering at the Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A M Hermann; R S Singh; V P Singh

    2006-07-01

    The Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CeNSE) at the University of Kentucky is a multidisciplinary group of faculty, students, and staff, with a shared vision and cutting-edge research facilities to study and develop materials and devices at the nanoscale. Current research projects at CeNSE span a number of diverse nanoscience thrusts in bio-engineering and medicine (nanosensors and nanoelectrodes, nanoparticle-based drug delivery), electronics (nanolithography, molecular electronics, nanotube FETs), nanotem-plates for electronics and gas sensors (functionalization of carbon nanotubes, aligned carbon nanotube structures for gate-keeping, e-beam lithography with nanoscale precision), and nano–optoelectronics (nanoscale photonics for laser communications, quantum confinement in photovoltaic devices, and nanostructured displays). This paper provides glimpses of this research and future directions.

  20. Nano-scale CMOS analog circuits models and CAD techniques for high-level design

    CERN Document Server

    Pandit, Soumya; Patra, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Reliability concerns and the limitations of process technology can sometimes restrict the innovation process involved in designing nano-scale analog circuits. The success of nano-scale analog circuit design requires repeat experimentation, correct analysis of the device physics, process technology, and adequate use of the knowledge database.Starting with the basics, Nano-Scale CMOS Analog Circuits: Models and CAD Techniques for High-Level Design introduces the essential fundamental concepts for designing analog circuits with optimal performances. This book explains the links between the physic

  1. Nanoscale Properties of Neural Cell Prosthetic and Astrocyte Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, D. A.; Ayres, V. M.; Delgado-Rivera, R.; Ahmed, I.; Meiners, S. A.

    2009-03-01

    Preliminary data from in-vivo investigations (rat model) suggest that a nanofiber prosthetic device of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)-modified nanofibers can correctly guide regenerating axons across an injury gap with aligned functional recovery. Scanning Probe Recognition Microscopy (SPRM) with auto-tracking of individual nanofibers is used for investigation of the key nanoscale properties of the nanofiber prosthetic device for central nervous system tissue engineering and repair. The key properties under SPRM investigation include nanofiber stiffness and surface roughness, nanofiber curvature, nanofiber mesh density and porosity, and growth factor presentation and distribution. Each of these factors has been demonstrated to have global effects on cell morphology, function, proliferation, morphogenesis, migration, and differentiation. The effect of FGF-2 modification on the key nanoscale properties is investigated. Results from the nanofiber prosthetic properties investigations are correlated with astrocyte response to unmodified and FGF-2 modified scaffolds, using 2D planar substrates as a control.

  2. Nanoscale Structuring of Surfaces by Using Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Nicolas; Hess, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Controlled structuring of surfaces is interesting for a wide variety of areas, including microelectronic device fabrication, optical devices, bio(sensing), (electro-, photo)catalysis, batteries, solar cells, fuel cells, and sorption. A unique feature of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is the possibility to form conformal uniform coatings on arbitrarily shaped materials with controlled atomic-scale thickness. In this Minireview, we discuss the potential of ALD for the nanoscale structuring of surfaces, highlighting its versatile application to structuring both planar substrates and powder materials. Recent progress in the application of ALD to porous substrates has even made the nanoscale structuring of high-surface-area materials now feasible, thereby enabling novel applications, such as those in the fields of catalysis and alternative energy.

  3. On the Physical Design of Molecular Communication Receiver Based on Nanoscale Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    1 On the Physical Design of Molecular Communication Receiver Based on Nanoscale Biosensors Murat Kuscu, Student Member, IEEE and Ozgur B. Akan, Fellow, IEEE Abstract—Molecular communications (MC), where molecules are used to encode, transmit, and receive information, is a promising means of enabling the coordination of nanoscale devices. The paradigm has been extensively studied from var-ious aspects, including channel modeling and noise analysis. Comparatively l...

  4. High-rate nanoscale offset printing process using directed assembly and transfer of nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hanchul; Somu, Sivasubramanian; Lee, Jin Young; Jeong, Hobin; Busnaina, Ahmed

    2015-03-11

    High-rate nanoscale offset printing using a newly developed reusable template enables the assembly of nanomaterials into nanostructures followed by their transfer onto a flexible substrate in a few minutes. The developed template can potentially be reused more than 100 times in the offset printing process without any additional functionalization. This approach provides a new way for the printing of flexible devices with nanoscale patterns.

  5. Interplay of Peltier and Seebeck Effects in Nanoscale Nonlocal Spin Valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, F. L.; Slachter, A.; Adam, J-P; van Wees, B. J.

    2010-01-01

    We have experimentally studied the role of thermoelectric effects in nanoscale nonlocal spin valve devices. A finite element thermoelectric model is developed to calculate the generated Seebeck voltages due to Peltier and Joule heating in the devices. By measuring the first, second, and third harmon

  6. High Speed Friction Microscopy and Nanoscale Friction Coefficient Mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Bosse, James L.; Lee, Sungjun; Huey, Bryan D; Andersen, Andreas Sø; Sutherland, Duncan S

    2014-01-01

    As mechanical devices in the nano/micro length scale are increasingly employed, it is crucial to understand nanoscale friction and wear especially at technically relevant sliding velocities. Accordingly, a novel technique has been developed for Friction Coefficient Mapping (FCM), leveraging recent advances in high speed AFM. The technique efficiently acquires friction versus force curves based on a sequence of images at a single location, each with incrementally lower loads. As a result, true...

  7. High yield, single droplet electrode arrays for nanoscale printed electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caironi, Mario; Gili, Enrico; Sakanoue, Tomo; Cheng, Xiaoyang; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2010-03-23

    In this work we demonstrate two building blocks of a scalable manufacturing technology for nanoscale electronic devices based on direct-write printing: an architecture for high-yield printing of electrode gaps with 100 nm dimension and a low-temperature silver complex ink for integration of organic materials with high conductivity metal interconnects. We use single printed droplets that are made to dewet slowly from each other to allow reliable, high yield patterning even in the presence of certain surface defects.

  8. Nanoelectronic device applications handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, James E

    2013-01-01

    Nanoelectronic Device Applications Handbook gives a comprehensive snapshot of the state of the art in nanodevices for nanoelectronics applications. Combining breadth and depth, the book includes 68 chapters on topics that range from nano-scaled complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices through recent developments in nano capacitors and AlGaAs/GaAs devices. The contributors are world-renowned experts from academia and industry from around the globe. The handbook explores current research into potentially disruptive technologies for a post-CMOS world.These include: Nanoscale advance

  9. Nanoscale decomposition of Nb-Ru-O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Music, Denis; Geyer, Richard W.; Chen, Yen-Ting

    2016-11-01

    A correlative theoretical and experimental methodology has been employed to explore the decomposition of amorphous Nb-Ru-O at elevated temperatures. Density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations reveal that amorphous Nb-Ru-O is structurally modified within 10 ps at 800 K giving rise to an increase in the planar metal - oxygen and metal - metal population and hence formation of large clusters, which signifies atomic segregation. The driving force for this atomic segregation process is 0.5 eV/atom. This is validated by diffraction experiments and transmission electron microscopy of sputter-synthesized Nb-Ru-O thin films. Room temperature samples are amorphous, while at 800 K nanoscale rutile RuO2 grains, self-organized in an amorphous Nb-O matrix, are observed, which is consistent with our theoretical predictions. This amorphous/crystalline interplay may be of importance for next generation of thermoelectric devices.

  10. Plasmonic nanoantennas: enhancing light-matter interactions at the nanoscale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Shobhit K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The research area of plasmonics promises devices with ultrasmall footprint operating at ultrafast speeds and with lower energy consumption compared to conventional electronics. These devices will operate with light and bridge the gap between microscale dielectric photonic systems and nanoscale electronics. Recent research advancements in nanotechnology and optics have led to the creation of a plethora of new plasmonic designs. Among the most promising are nanoscale antennas operating at optical frequencies, called nanoantennas. Plasmonic nanoantennas can provide enhanced and controllable light-matter interactions and strong coupling between far-field radiation and localized sources at the nanoscale. After a brief introduction of several plasmonic nanoantenna designs and their well-established radio-frequency antenna counterparts, we review several linear and nonlinear applications of different nanoantenna configurations. In particular, the possibility to tune the scattering response of linear nanoantennas and create robust optical wireless links is presented. In addition, the nonlinear and photodynamic responses of different linear and nonlinear nanoantenna systems are reported. Several future optical devices are envisioned based on these plasmonic nanoantenna configurations, such as low-power nanoswitches, compact ultrafast light sources, nanosensors and efficient energy harvesting systems.

  11. Nanoscale wear as a stress-assisted chemical reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Tevis D B; Carpick, Robert W

    2013-02-01

    Wear of sliding contacts leads to energy dissipation and device failure, resulting in massive economic and environmental costs. Typically, wear phenomena are described empirically, because physical and chemical interactions at sliding interfaces are not fully understood at any length scale. Fundamental insights from individual nanoscale contacts are crucial for understanding wear at larger length scales, and to enable reliable nanoscale devices, manufacturing and microscopy. Observable nanoscale wear mechanisms include fracture and plastic deformation, but recent experiments and models propose another mechanism: wear via atom-by-atom removal ('atomic attrition'), which can be modelled using stress-assisted chemical reaction kinetics. Experimental evidence for this has so far been inferential. Here, we quantitatively measure the wear of silicon--a material relevant to small-scale devices--using in situ transmission electron microscopy. We resolve worn volumes as small as 25 ± 5 nm(3), a factor of 10(3) lower than is achievable using alternative techniques. Wear of silicon against diamond is consistent with atomic attrition, and inconsistent with fracture or plastic deformation, as shown using direct imaging. The rate of atom removal depends exponentially on stress in the contact, as predicted by chemical rate kinetics. Measured activation parameters are consistent with an atom-by-atom process. These results, by direct observation, establish atomic attrition as the primary wear mechanism of silicon in vacuum at low loads.

  12. Nanoscale biomemory composed of recombinant azurin on a nanogap electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yong-Ho; Lee, Taek; Park, Hyung Ju; Yun, Wan Soo; Min, Junhong; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2013-09-13

    We fabricate a nanoscale biomemory device composed of recombinant azurin on nanogap electrodes. For this, size-controllable nanogap electrodes are fabricated by photolithography, electron beam lithography, and surface catalyzed chemical deposition. Moreover, we investigate the effect of gap distance to optimize the size of electrodes for a biomemory device and explore the mechanism of electron transfer from immobilized protein to a nanogap counter-electrode. As the distance of the nanogap electrode is decreased in the nanoscale, the absolute current intensity decreases according to the distance decrement between the electrodes due to direct electron transfer, in contrast with the diffusion phenomenon of a micro-electrode. The biomemory function is achieved on the optimized nanogap electrode. These results demonstrate that the fabricated nanodevice composed of a nanogap electrode and biomaterials provides various advantages such as quantitative control of signals and exclusion of environmental effects such as noise. The proposed bioelectronics device, which could be mass-produced easily, could be applied to construct a nanoscale bioelectronics system composed of a single biomolecule.

  13. Fabrication of nanoscale electrostatic lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinno, I.; Sanz-Velasco, A.; Kang, S.; Jansen, H.; Olsson, E.; Enoksson, P.; Svensson, K.

    2010-09-01

    The fabrication of cylindrical multi-element electrostatic lenses at the nanoscale presents a challenge; they are high-aspect-ratio structures that should be rotationally symmetric, well aligned and freestanding, with smooth edges and flat, clean surfaces. In this paper, we present the fabrication results of a non-conventional process, which uses a combination of focused gallium ion-beam milling and hydrofluoric acid vapor etching. This process makes it possible to fabricate nanoscale electrostatic lenses down to 140 nm in aperture diameter and 4.2 µm in column length, with a superior control of the geometry as compared to conventional lithography-based techniques.

  14. NANOSCALE BIOSENSORS IN ECOSYSTEM EXPOSURE RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    This powerpoint presentation presented information on nanoscale biosensors in ecosystem exposure research. The outline of the presentation is as follows: nanomaterials environmental exposure research; US agencies involved in nanosensor research; nanoscale LEDs in biosensors; nano...

  15. Polarization Engineering in Nano-Scale Waveguides Using Lossless Media

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, PoHan; Helmy, Amr S

    2016-01-01

    A device that achieves controllable rotation of the state of polarization by rotating the orientation of the eigenmodes of a waveguide by 45$^{\\circ}$ is introduced and analyzed. The device can be implemented using lossless materials on a nanoscale and helps circumvent the inherent polarization dependence of photonic devices realized within the silicon on insulator platform. We propose and evaluate two novel polarization rotator-based schemes to achieve polarization engineering functions: (1) A multi-purpose device, with dimensions on the order of a few wavelengths which can function as a polarization splitter or an arbitrary linear polarization state generator. (2) An energy efficient optical modulator that utilizes eigenmode rotation and epsilon near zero (ENZ) effects to achieve high extinction ratio, polarization insensitive amplitude modulation without the need to sweep the device geometry to match the TE and TM mode attributes. By using indium tin oxide (ITO) as an example for a tunable material, the pr...

  16. Bio and nano packaging techniques for electron devices advances in electronic device packaging

    CERN Document Server

    Gerlach, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    This book offers an overview of nanoscale components and systems comprising electronic, mechanical and optical structures, describes trends and developments in electron device packaging, and discusses application of nano and bio techniques in future solutions.

  17. Analytical modeling of drain current and RF performance for double-gate fully depleted nanoscale SOI MOSFETs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajiv Sharma; Sujata Pandey; Shail Bala Jain

    2012-01-01

    A new 2D analytical drain current model is presented for symmetric double-gate fully depleted nanoscale SOI MOSFETs.Investigation of device parameters like transconductance for double-gate fully depleted nanoscale SOI MOSFETs is also carried out.Finally this work is concluded by modeling the cut-off frequency,which is one of the main figures of merit for analog/RF performance for double-gate fully depleted nanoscale SOI MOSFETs.The results of the modeling are compared with those obtained by a 2D ATLAS device simulator to verify the accuracy of the proposed model.

  18. Nanoscale solid-state cooling: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziabari, Amirkoushyar; Zebarjadi, Mona; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Shakouri, Ali

    2016-09-01

    The recent developments in nanoscale solid-state cooling are reviewed. This includes both theoretical and experimental studies of different physical concepts, as well as nanostructured material design and device configurations. We primarily focus on thermoelectric, thermionic and thermo-magnetic coolers. Particular emphasis is given to the concepts based on metal-semiconductor superlattices, graded materials, non-equilibrium thermoelectric devices, Thomson coolers, and photon assisted Peltier coolers as promising methods for efficient solid-state cooling. Thermomagnetic effects such as magneto-Peltier and Nernst-Ettingshausen cooling are briefly described and recent advances and future trends in these areas are reviewed. The ongoing progress in solid-state cooling concepts such as spin-calorimetrics, electrocalorics, non-equilibrium/nonlinear Peltier devices, superconducting junctions and two-dimensional materials are also elucidated and practical achievements are reviewed. We explain the thermoreflectance thermal imaging microscopy and the transient Harman method as two unique techniques developed for characterization of thermoelectric microrefrigerators. The future prospects for solid-state cooling are briefly summarized.

  19. Nanoscale solid-state cooling: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziabari, Amirkoushyar; Zebarjadi, Mona; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Shakouri, Ali

    2016-09-01

    The recent developments in nanoscale solid-state cooling are reviewed. This includes both theoretical and experimental studies of different physical concepts, as well as nanostructured material design and device configurations. We primarily focus on thermoelectric, thermionic and thermo-magnetic coolers. Particular emphasis is given to the concepts based on metal-semiconductor superlattices, graded materials, non-equilibrium thermoelectric devices, Thomson coolers, and photon assisted Peltier coolers as promising methods for efficient solid-state cooling. Thermomagnetic effects such as magneto-Peltier and Nernst-Ettingshausen cooling are briefly described and recent advances and future trends in these areas are reviewed. The ongoing progress in solid-state cooling concepts such as spin-calorimetrics, electrocalorics, non-equilibrium/nonlinear Peltier devices, superconducting junctions and two-dimensional materials are also elucidated and practical achievements are reviewed. We explain the thermoreflectance thermal imaging microscopy and the transient Harman method as two unique techniques developed for characterization of thermoelectric microrefrigerators. The future prospects for solid-state cooling are briefly summarized.

  20. Quantum Transport Simulations of Nanoscale Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Obodo, Tobechukwu Joshua

    2016-01-07

    Nanoscale materials have many potential advantages because of their quantum confinement, cost and producibility by low-temperature chemical methods. Advancement of theoretical methods as well as the availability of modern high-performance supercomputers allow us to control and exploit their microscopic properties at the atomic scale, hence making it possible to design novel nanoscale molecular devices with interesting features (e.g switches, rectifiers, negative differential conductance, and high magnetoresistance). In this thesis, state-of-the-art theoretical calculations have been performed for the quantum transport properties of nano-structured materials within the framework of Density Functional Theory (DFT) and the Nonequilibrium Green\\'s Function (NEGF) formalism. The switching behavior of a dithiolated phenylene-vinylene oligomer sandwiched between Au(111) electrodes is investigated. The molecule presents a configurational bistability, which can be exploited in constructing molecular memories, switches, and sensors. We find that protonation of the terminating thiol groups is at the origin of the change in conductance. H bonding at the thiol group weakens the S-Au bond, and thus lowers the conductance. Our results allow us to re-interpret the experimental data originally attributing the conductance reduction to H dissociation. Also examined is current-induced migration of atoms in nanoscale devices that plays an important role for device operation and breakdown. We studied the migration of adatoms and defects in graphene and carbon nanotubes under finite bias. We demonstrate that current-induced forces within DFT are non-conservative, which so far has only been shown for model systems, and can lower migration barrier heights. Further, we investigated the quantum transport behavior of an experimentally observed diblock molecule by varying the amounts of phenyl (donor) and pyrimidinyl (acceptor) rings under finite bias. We show that a tandem configuration of

  1. PREFACE: Superconductivity in ultrathin films and nanoscale systems Superconductivity in ultrathin films and nanoscale systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianconi, Antonio; Bose, Sangita; Garcia-Garcia, Antonio Miguel

    2012-12-01

    appears to enhance the critical temperature [4]. This is a hot topic as in the past year many works have clarified the nanoscale phase separation in electron-doped chalcogenides, showing the key role of a complex texture of nanograins and opening new avenues for the fundamental understanding of quantum phenomena in networks of superconducting nanograins. The advances in nanotechnology allow the exploration of the possible existence of superconductivity in single carbon nanotubes [5]. The technological applications presented by Gomez [6] and Lehtinen [7] show the fundamental physics of superconductivity at the nanoscale to promote new advances in quantum devices. We hope that this combination will make these focus papers in Superconductor Science and Technology interesting and promote cross-fertilization among the different sub-branches of the field which all share the same goal of addressing the key questions on nanoscale superconductors. References [1]Croitoru M D, Vagov A, Shanenko A A and Axt V M 2012 The Cooper problem in nanoscale: enhancement of the coupling due to confinement Supercond. Sci. Technol. 25 124001 [2]Perali A, Innocenti A, Valletta A and Bianconi A 2012 Anomalous isotope effect near a 2.5 Lifshitz transition in a multi-band multi-condensate superconductor made of a superlattice of stripes Supercond. Sci. Technol. 25 124002 [3]Zeng S W, Huang Z, Wang X, Lü W M, Liu Z Q, Zhang B M, Dhar S, Venkatesan T and Ariando 2012 The influence of La substitution and oxygen reduction in ambipolar La-doped YBa2Cu3Oy thin films Supercond. Sci. Technol. 25 124003 [4]Poccia N, Bianconi A, Campi G, Fratini M and Ricci A 2012 Size evolution of the oxygen interstitial nanowires in La2CuO4+y by thermal treatments and x-ray continuous illumination Supercond. Sci. Technol. 25 124004 [5]Yang Y, Fedorov G, Zhang J, Tselev A, Shafranjuk S and Barbara P 2012 The search for superconductivity at van Hove singularities in carbon nanotubes Supercond. Sci. Technol. 25 124005 [6]Gomez

  2. Fabrication of nanoscale electrostatic lenses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinno, I.; Sanz-Velasco, A.; Kang, S.; Jansen, H.; Olsson, E.; Enoksson, P.; Svensson, K.

    2010-01-01

    The fabrication of cylindrical multi-element electrostatic lenses at the nanoscale presents a challenge; they are high-aspect-ratio structures that should be rotationally symmetric, well aligned and freestanding, with smooth edges and flat, clean surfaces. In this paper, we present the fabrication r

  3. IR nanoscale spectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Eamonn; Yarrow, Fiona; Rice, James H.

    2011-10-01

    Sub diffraction limited infrared absorption imaging was applied to hemoglobin by coupling IR optics with an atomic force microscope. Comparisons between the AFM topography and IR absorption images of micron sized hemoglobin features are presented, along with nanoscale IR spectroscopic analysis of the metalloprotein.

  4. Nanoscale electromechanical parametric amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleman, Benjamin Jose; Zettl, Alexander

    2016-09-20

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to a parametric amplifier. In one aspect, a device includes an electron source electrode, a counter electrode, and a pumping electrode. The electron source electrode may include a conductive base and a flexible conductor. The flexible conductor may have a first end and a second end, with the second end of the flexible conductor being coupled to the conductive base. A cross-sectional dimension of the flexible conductor may be less than about 100 nanometers. The counter electrode may be disposed proximate the first end of the flexible conductor and spaced a first distance from the first end of the flexible conductor. The pumping electrode may be disposed proximate a length of the flexible conductor and spaced a second distance from the flexible conductor.

  5. Nanoscale electromechanical parametric amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Benjamin Jose; Zettl, Alexander

    2016-09-20

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to a parametric amplifier. In one aspect, a device includes an electron source electrode, a counter electrode, and a pumping electrode. The electron source electrode may include a conductive base and a flexible conductor. The flexible conductor may have a first end and a second end, with the second end of the flexible conductor being coupled to the conductive base. A cross-sectional dimension of the flexible conductor may be less than about 100 nanometers. The counter electrode may be disposed proximate the first end of the flexible conductor and spaced a first distance from the first end of the flexible conductor. The pumping electrode may be disposed proximate a length of the flexible conductor and spaced a second distance from the flexible conductor.

  6. An automatic synthesis method of compact models of integrated circuit devices based on equivalent circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, I. I.

    2006-05-01

    An automatic synthesis method of equivalent circuits of integrated circuit devices is described in the paper. This method is based on a physical approach to construction of finite-difference approximation to basic equations of semiconductor device physics. It allows to synthesize compact equivalent circuits of different devices automatically as alternative to, for example, sufficiently formal BSIM2 and BSIM3 models used in circuit simulation programs of SPICE type. The method is one of possible variants of general methodology for automatic synthesis of compact equivalent circuits of almost arbitrary devices and circuit-type structures of micro- and nanoelecronics [1]. The method is easily extended in the case of necessity to account thermal effects in integrated circuits. It was shown that its application would be especially perspective for analysis of integrated circuit fragments as a whole and for identification of significant collective physical effects, including parasitic effects in VLSI and ULSI. In the paper the examples illustrating possibilities of the method for automatic synthesis of compact equivalent circuits of some of semiconductor devices and integrated circuit devices are considered. Special attention is given to examples of integrated circuit devices for coarse grids of spatial discretization (less than 10 nodes).

  7. Heat transfer across the interface between nanoscale solids and gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chun; Fan, Wen; Cao, Jinbo; Ryu, Sang-Gil; Ji, Jie; Grigoropoulos, Costas P; Wu, Junqiao

    2011-12-27

    When solid materials and devices scale down in size, heat transfer from the active region to the gas environment becomes increasingly significant. We show that the heat transfer coefficient across the solid-gas interface behaves very differently when the size of the solid is reduced to the nanoscale, such as that of a single nanowire. Unlike for macroscopic solids, the coefficient is strongly pressure dependent above ∼10 Torr, and at lower pressures it is much higher than predictions of the kinetic gas theory. The heat transfer coefficient was measured between a single, free-standing VO(2) nanowire and surrounding air using laser thermography, where the temperature distribution along the VO(2) nanowire was determined by imaging its domain structure of metal-insulator phase transition. The one-dimensional domain structure along the nanowire results from the balance between heat generation by the focused laser and heat dissipation to the substrate as well as to the surrounding gas, and thus serves as a nanoscale power-meter and thermometer. We quantified the heat loss rate across the nanowire-air interface, and found that it dominates over all other heat dissipation channels for small-diameter nanowires near ambient pressure. As the heat transfer across the solid-gas interface is nearly independent of the chemical identity of the solid, the results reveal a general scaling relationship for gaseous heat dissipation from nanostructures of all solid materials, which is applicable to nanoscale electronic and thermal devices exposed to gaseous environments.

  8. Nanoscale capacitance: A quantum tight-binding model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Feng; Wu, Jian; Li, Yang; Lu, Jun-Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Landauer-Buttiker formalism with the assumption of semi-infinite electrodes as reservoirs has been the standard approach in modeling steady electron transport through nanoscale devices. However, modeling dynamic electron transport properties, especially nanoscale capacitance, is a challenging problem because of dynamic contributions from electrodes, which is neglectable in modeling macroscopic capacitance and mesoscopic conductance. We implement a self-consistent quantum tight-binding model to calculate capacitance of a nano-gap system consisting of an electrode capacitance C‧ and an effective capacitance Cd of the middle device. From the calculations on a nano-gap made of carbon nanotube with a buckyball therein, we show that when the electrode length increases, the electrode capacitance C‧ moves up while the effective capacitance Cd converges to a value which is much smaller than the electrode capacitance C‧. Our results reveal the importance of electrodes in modeling nanoscale ac circuits, and indicate that the concepts of semi-infinite electrodes and reservoirs well-accepted in the steady electron transport theory may be not applicable in modeling dynamic transport properties.

  9. Fluidic nanotubes and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong; He, Rongrui; Goldberger, Joshua; Fan, Rong; Wu, Yiying; Li, Deyu; Majumdar, Arun

    2008-04-08

    Fluidic nanotube devices are described in which a hydrophilic, non-carbon nanotube, has its ends fluidly coupled to reservoirs. Source and drain contacts are connected to opposing ends of the nanotube, or within each reservoir near the opening of the nanotube. The passage of molecular species can be sensed by measuring current flow (source-drain, ionic, or combination). The tube interior can be functionalized by joining binding molecules so that different molecular species can be sensed by detecting current changes. The nanotube may be a semiconductor, wherein a tubular transistor is formed. A gate electrode can be attached between source and drain to control current flow and ionic flow. By way of example an electrophoretic array embodiment is described, integrating MEMs switches. A variety of applications are described, such as: nanopores, nanocapillary devices, nanoelectrophoretic, DNA sequence detectors, immunosensors, thermoelectric devices, photonic devices, nanoscale fluidic bioseparators, imaging devices, and so forth.

  10. Micro/nanoscale continuous printing: direct-writing of wavy micro/nano structures via electrospinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Feiyu; Du, Zefeng; Zeng, Jun; Zhu, Ziming; Chen, Xin; Chen, Xindu; Lv, Yuanjun; Wang, Han

    2015-07-01

    Micro/nanofibers that are created by direct-writing using an electrospinning (ES) technique have aroused much recent attention, owing to their intriguing physical properties and great potential as building blocks for micro/nanoscale devices. In this work, a wavy direct-writing (WDW) process was developed to directly write wavy micro/nanostructures suitable for the fabrication of micro/nanoscale devices. The low voltage WDW technique is anticipated to be useful for a broad range of applications including flexible/stretchable electronics, micro optoelectronics, nano-antennas, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and biomedical engineering.

  11. A transition in mechanisms of size dependent electrical transport at nanoscale metal-oxide interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Jiechang; Nonnenmann, Stephen S.; Qin, Wei; Bonnell, Dawn A., E-mail: bonnell@lrsm.seas.upenn.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2013-12-16

    As device miniaturization approaches nanoscale dimensions, interfaces begin to dominate electrical properties. Here the system archetype Au/SrTiO{sub 3} is used to examine the origin of size dependent transport properties along metal-oxide interfaces. We demonstrate that a transition between two classes of size dependent electronic transport mechanisms exists, defined by a critical size ε. At sizes larger than ε an edge-related tunneling effect proportional to 1/D (the height of the supported Au nanoparticle) is observed; interfaces with sizes smaller than ε exhibit random fluctuations in current. The ability to distinguish between these mechanisms is important to future developments in nanoscale device design.

  12. Thermal stability of nanoscale metallic multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, A.S., E-mail: sofia.ramos@dem.uc.pt [CEMUC, Departamento de Engenharia Mecânica, Universidade de Coimbra, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Cavaleiro, A.J.; Vieira, M.T. [CEMUC, Departamento de Engenharia Mecânica, Universidade de Coimbra, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Morgiel, J. [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, Reymonta 25, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Safran, G. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary)

    2014-11-28

    Metallic nanolayered thin films/foils, in particular Ni/Al multilayers, have been used to promote joining. The objective of this work is to evaluate the thermal stability of nanoscale metallic multilayers with potential for joining applications. Multilayers thin films with low (Ti/Al and Ni/Ti), medium (Ni/Al) and high (Pd/Al) enthalpies of exothermic reaction were prepared by dual cathode magnetron sputtering. Their thermal stability was studied by: i) differential scanning calorimetry combined with X-ray diffraction (XRD), ii) in-situ XRD using cobalt radiation, and iii) in-situ transmission electron microscopy. It was possible to detect traces of intermetallic or amorphous phases in the as-deposited short period (bilayer thickness) multilayers, except for the Ti/Al films where no reaction products that might be formed during deposition were identified. For short periods (below 20 nm) the equilibrium phases are directly achieved upon annealing, whereas for higher periods intermediate trialuminide phases are present for Ti/Al and Ni/Al multilayers. The formation of B2-NiTi from Ni/Ti multilayers occurs without the formation of intermediate phases. On the contrary, for the Pd–Al system the formation of intermediate phases was never avoided. The viability of nanoscale multilayers as “filler” materials for joining macro or microparts/devices was demonstrated. - Highlights: • Me1 and Me2 (Me—metal) alternated nanolayers deposited by magnetron sputtering • Reactive Me1/Me2 multilayer thin films with nanometric modulation period • By heat treatment the films always evolve to the equilibrium intermetallic phase. • For some Me1–Me2 systems and periods, the formation of intermediate phases occurs. • Me1/Me2 multilayer thin films can be used as filler materials to enhance joining.

  13. Optical vortex beam generator at nanoscale level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoli, Denis; Zilio, Pierfrancesco; Gorodetski, Yuri; Tantussi, Francesco; De Angelis, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Optical beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) can find tremendous applications in several fields. In order to apply these particular beams in photonic integrated devices innovative optical elements have been proposed. Here we are interested in the generation of OAM-carrying beams at the nanoscale level. We design and experimentally demonstrate a plasmonic optical vortex emitter, based on a metal-insulator-metal holey plasmonic vortex lens. Our plasmonic element is shown to convert impinging circularly polarized light to an orbital angular momentum state capable of propagating to the far-field. Moreover, the emerging OAM can be externally adjusted by switching the handedness of the incident light polarization. The device has a radius of few micrometers and the OAM beam is generated from subwavelength aperture. The fabrication of integrated arrays of PVLs and the possible simultaneous emission of multiple optical vortices provide an easy way to the large-scale integration of optical vortex emitters for wide-ranging applications. PMID:27404659

  14. Magnetic domain wall engineering in a nanoscale permalloy junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junlin; Zhang, Xichao; Lu, Xianyang; Zhang, Jason; Yan, Yu; Ling, Hua; Wu, Jing; Zhou, Yan; Xu, Yongbing

    2017-08-01

    Nanoscale magnetic junctions provide a useful approach to act as building blocks for magnetoresistive random access memories (MRAM), where one of the key issues is to control the magnetic domain configuration. Here, we study the domain structure and the magnetic switching in the Permalloy (Fe20Ni80) nanoscale magnetic junctions with different thicknesses by using micromagnetic simulations. It is found that both the 90-° and 45-° domain walls can be formed between the junctions and the wire arms depending on the thickness of the device. The magnetic switching fields show distinct thickness dependencies with a broad peak varying from 7 nm to 22 nm depending on the junction sizes, and the large magnetic switching fields favor the stability of the MRAM operation.

  15. Negative pressure characteristics of an evaporating meniscus at nanoscale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maroo Shalabh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aims at understanding the characteristics of negative liquid pressures at the nanoscale using molecular dynamics simulation. A nano-meniscus is formed by placing liquid argon on a platinum wall between two nano-channels filled with the same liquid. Evaporation is simulated in the meniscus by increasing the temperature of the platinum wall for two different cases. Non-evaporating films are obtained at the center of the meniscus. The liquid film in the non-evaporating and adjacent regions is found to be under high absolute negative pressures. Cavitation cannot occur in these regions as the capillary height is smaller than the critical cavitation radius. Factors which determine the critical film thickness for rupture are discussed. Thus, high negative liquid pressures can be stable at the nanoscale, and utilized to create passive pumping devices as well as significantly enhance heat transfer rates.

  16. Strategies for Controlled Placement of Nanoscale Building Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh SeongJin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe capability of placing individual nanoscale building blocks on exact substrate locations in a controlled manner is one of the key requirements to realize future electronic, optical, and magnetic devices and sensors that are composed of such blocks. This article reviews some important advances in the strategies for controlled placement of nanoscale building blocks. In particular, we will overview template assisted placement that utilizes physical, molecular, or electrostatic templates, DNA-programmed assembly, placement using dielectrophoresis, approaches for non-close-packed assembly of spherical particles, and recent development of focused placement schemes including electrostatic funneling, focused placement via molecular gradient patterns, electrodynamic focusing of charged aerosols, and others.

  17. Fabrication of self-aligned, nanoscale, complex oxide varactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Richard X.; Toonen, Ryan C.; Hirsch, Samuel G.; Ivill, Mathew P.; Cole, Melanie W.; Strawhecker, Kenneth E.

    2015-01-01

    Applications in ferroelectric random access memory and superparaelectric devices require the fabrication of ferroelectric capacitors at the nanoscale that exhibit extremely small leakage currents. To systematically study the material-size dependence of ferroelectric varactor performance, arrays of parallel-plate structures have been fabricated with nanoscale dielectric diameters. Electron beam lithography and inductively coupled plasma dry etching have been used to fabricate arrays of ferroelectric varactors using top electrodes as a self-aligned etch mask. Parallel-plate test structures using RF-sputtered Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3 thin-films were used to optimize the fabrication process. Varactors with diameters down to 20 nm were successfully fabricated. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics were measured to evaluate the significance of etch-damage and fabrication quality by ensuring low leakage currents through the structures.

  18. Negative pressure characteristics of an evaporating meniscus at nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroo, Shalabh C; Chung, Jn

    2011-01-12

    This study aims at understanding the characteristics of negative liquid pressures at the nanoscale using molecular dynamics simulation. A nano-meniscus is formed by placing liquid argon on a platinum wall between two nano-channels filled with the same liquid. Evaporation is simulated in the meniscus by increasing the temperature of the platinum wall for two different cases. Non-evaporating films are obtained at the center of the meniscus. The liquid film in the non-evaporating and adjacent regions is found to be under high absolute negative pressures. Cavitation cannot occur in these regions as the capillary height is smaller than the critical cavitation radius. Factors which determine the critical film thickness for rupture are discussed. Thus, high negative liquid pressures can be stable at the nanoscale, and utilized to create passive pumping devices as well as significantly enhance heat transfer rates.

  19. Micromagnetic modeling of the shielding properties of nanoscale ferromagnetic layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskandarova, I. M.; Knizhnik, A. A.; Popkov, A. F.; Potapkin, B. V.; Stainer, Q.; Lombard, L.; Mackay, K.

    2016-09-01

    Ferromagnetic shields are widely used to concentrate magnetic fields in a target region of space. Such shields are also used in spintronic nanodevices such as magnetic random access memory and magnetic logic devices. However, the shielding properties of nanostructured shields can differ considerably from those of macroscopic samples. In this work, we investigate the shielding properties of nanostructured NiFe layers around a current line using a finite element micromagnetic model. We find that thin ferromagnetic layers demonstrate saturation of magnetization under an external magnetic field, which reduces the shielding efficiency. Moreover, we show that the shielding properties of nanoscale ferromagnetic layers strongly depend on the uniformity of the layer thickness. Magnetic anisotropy in ultrathin ferromagnetic layers can also influence their shielding efficiency. In addition, we show that domain walls in nanoscale ferromagnetic shields can induce large increases and decreases in the generated magnetic field. Therefore, ferromagnetic shields for spintronic nanodevices require careful design and precise fabrication.

  20. Nanoscale manipulation of Ge nanowires by ion hammering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picraux, Samuel T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Romano, Lucia [UNIV OF FLORIDA; Rudawski, Nicholas G [UNIV OF FLORIDA; Holzworth, Monta R [UNIV OF FLORIDA; Jones, Kevin S [UNIV OF FLORIDA; Choi, S G [NREL

    2009-01-01

    Nanowires generated considerable interest as nanoscale interconnects and as active components of both electronic and electromechanical devices. However, in many cases, manipulation and modification of nanowires are required to realize their full potential. It is essential, for instance, to control the orientation and positioning of nanowires in some specific applications. This work demonstrates a simple method to reversibly control the shape and the orientation of Ge nanowires by using ion beams. Initially, crystalline nanowires were partially amorphized by 30 keY Ga+-implantation. After amorphization, viscous flow and plastic deformation occurred due to the ion hammering effect, causing the nanowires to bend toward the beam direction. The bending was reversed multiple times by ion-implanting the opposite side of the nanowires, resulting in straightening of the nanowires and subsequent bending in the opposite direction. This ion hammering effect demonstrates the detailed manipulation of nanoscale structures is possible through the use of ion irradiation.

  1. Nanoscale manipulation of Ge nanowires by ion hammering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picraux, Samuel T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Romano, Lucia [UNIV OF FLORIDA; Rudawski, Nicholas G [UNIV OF FLORIDA; Holzworth, Monta R [UNIV OF FLORIDA; Jones, Kevin S [UNIV OF FLORIDA; Choi, S G [NREL

    2009-01-01

    Nanowires generated considerable interest as nanoscale interconnects and as active components of both electronic and electromechanical devices. However, in many cases, manipulation and modification of nanowires are required to realize their full potential. It is essential, for instance, to control the orientation and positioning of nanowires in some specific applications. This work demonstrates a simple method to reversibly control the shape and the orientation of Ge nanowires by using ion beams. Initially, crystalline nanowires were partially amorphized by 30 keY Ga+-implantation. After amorphization, viscous flow and plastic deformation occurred due to the ion hammering effect, causing the nanowires to bend toward the beam direction. The bending was reversed multiple times by ion-implanting the opposite side of the nanowires, resulting in straightening of the nanowires and subsequent bending in the opposite direction. This ion hammering effect demonstrates the detailed manipulation of nanoscale structures is possible through the use of ion irradiation.

  2. Optical antennas as nanoscale resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Agio, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Recent progress in nanotechnology has enabled us to fabricate subwavelength architectures that function as antennas for improving the exchange of optical energy with nanoscale matter. We describe the main features of optical antennas for enhancing quantum emitters and review designs that increase the spontaneous emission rate by orders of magnitude from the ultraviolet up to the near-infrared spectral range. To further explore how optical antennas may lead to unprecedented regimes of light-matter interaction, we draw a relationship between metal nanoparticles, radio-wave antennas and optical resonators. Our analysis points out how optical antennas may function as nanoscale resonators and how these may offer unique opportunities with respect to state-of-the-art microcavities.

  3. Optical antennas as nanoscale resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agio, Mario

    2012-02-07

    Recent progress in nanotechnology has enabled us to fabricate sub-wavelength architectures that function as antennas for improving the exchange of optical energy with nanoscale matter. We describe the main features of optical antennas for enhancing quantum emitters and review the designs that increase the spontaneous emission rate by orders of magnitude from the ultraviolet up to the near-infrared spectral range. To further explore how optical antennas may lead to unprecedented regimes of light-matter interactions, we draw a relationship between metal nanoparticles, radio-wave antennas and optical resonators. Our analysis points out how optical antennas may function as nanoscale resonators and how these may offer unique opportunities with respect to state-of-the-art microcavities.

  4. Nanoscale deformation mechanisms in bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Himadri S; Wagermaier, Wolfgang; Zickler, Gerald A; Raz-Ben Aroush, D; Funari, Sérgio S; Roschger, Paul; Wagner, H Daniel; Fratzl, Peter

    2005-10-01

    Deformation mechanisms in bone matrix at the nanoscale control its exceptional mechanical properties, but the detailed nature of these processes is as yet unknown. In situ tensile testing with synchrotron X-ray scattering allowed us to study directly and quantitatively the deformation mechanisms at the nanometer level. We find that bone deformation is not homogeneous but distributed between a tensile deformation of the fibrils and a shearing in the interfibrillar matrix between them.

  5. Nanoscale Deformable Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Karl F.; Sheldon, Douglas J.

    2011-01-01

    Several missions and instruments in the conceptual design phase rely on the technique of interferometry to create detectable fringe patterns. The intimate emplacement of reflective material upon electron device cells based upon chalcogenide material technology permits high-speed, predictable deformation of the reflective surface to a subnanometer or finer resolution with a very high degree of accuracy. In this innovation, a layer of reflective material is deposited upon a wafer containing (perhaps in the millions) chalcogenic memory cells with the reflective material becoming the front surface of a mirror and the chalcogenic material becoming a means of selectively deforming the mirror by the application of heat to the chalcogenic material. By doing so, the mirror surface can deform anywhere from nil to nanometers in spots the size of a modern day memory cell, thereby permitting realtime tuning of mirror focus and reflectivity to mitigate aberrations caused elsewhere in the optical system. Modern foundry methods permit the design and manufacture of individual memory cells having an area of or equal to the Feature (F) size of the design (assume 65 nm). Fabrication rules and restraints generally require the instantiation of one memory cell to another no closer than 1.5 F, or, for this innovation, 90 nm from its neighbor in any direction. Chalcogenide is a semiconducting glass compound consisting of a combination of chalcogen ions, the ratios of which vary according to properties desired. It has been shown that the application of heat to cells of chalcogenic material cause a large alteration in resistance to the range of 4 orders of magnitude. It is this effect upon which chalcogenidebased commercial memories rely. Upon removal of the heat source, the chalcogenide rapidly cools and remains frozen in the excited state. It has also been shown that the chalcogenide expands in volume because of the applied heat, meaning that the coefficient of expansion of chalcogenic

  6. Material design of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition SiCH films for low-k cap layers in the further scaling of ultra-large-scale integrated devices-Cu interconnects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideharu Shimizu, Shuji Nagano, Akira Uedono, Nobuo Tajima, Takeshi Momose and Yukihiro Shimogaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cap layers for Cu interconnects in ultra-large-scale integrated devices (ULSIs, with a low dielectric constant (k-value and strong barrier properties against Cu and moisture diffusion, are required for the future further scaling of ULSIs. There is a trade-off, however, between reducing the k-value and maintaining strong barrier properties. Using quantum mechanical simulations and other theoretical computations, we have designed ideal dielectrics: SiCH films with Si–C2H4–Si networks. Such films were estimated to have low porosity and low k; thus they are the key to realizing a cap layer with a low k and strong barrier properties against diffusion. For fabricating these ideal SiCH films, we designed four novel precursors: isobutyl trimethylsilane, diisobutyl dimethylsilane, 1, 1-divinylsilacyclopentane and 5-silaspiro [4,4] noname, based on quantum chemical calculations, because such fabrication is difficult by controlling only the process conditions in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD using conventional precursors. We demonstrated that SiCH films prepared using these newly designed precursors had large amounts of Si–C2H4–Si networks and strong barrier properties. The pore structure of these films was then analyzed by positron annihilation spectroscopy, revealing that these SiCH films actually had low porosity, as we designed. These results validate our material and precursor design concepts for developing a PECVD process capable of fabricating a low-k cap layer.

  7. 2D Quantum Mechanical Study of Nanoscale MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, B.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    With the onset of quantum confinement in the inversion layer in nanoscale MOSFETs, behavior of the resonant level inevitably determines all device characteristics. While most classical device simulators take quantization into account in some simplified manner, the important details of electrostatics are missing. Our work addresses this shortcoming and provides: (a) a framework to quantitatively explore device physics issues such as the source-drain and gate leakage currents, DIBL, and threshold voltage shift due to quantization, and b) a means of benchmarking quantum corrections to semiclassical models (such as density-gradient and quantum-corrected MEDICI). We have developed physical approximations and computer code capable of realistically simulating 2-D nanoscale transistors, using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. This is the most accurate full quantum model yet applied to 2-D device simulation. Open boundary conditions and oxide tunneling are treated on an equal footing. Electrons in the ellipsoids of the conduction band are treated within the anisotropic effective mass approximation. We present the results of our simulations of MIT 25, 50 and 90 nm "well-tempered" MOSFETs and compare them to those of classical and quantum corrected models. The important feature of quantum model is smaller slope of Id-Vg curve and consequently higher threshold voltage. Surprisingly, the self-consistent potential profile shows lower injection barrier in the channel in quantum case. These results are qualitatively consistent with ID Schroedinger-Poisson calculations. The effect of gate length on gate-oxide leakage and subthreshold current has been studied. The shorter gate length device has an order of magnitude smaller current at zero gate bias than the longer gate length device without a significant trade-off in on-current. This should be a device design consideration.

  8. 2D Quantum Transport Modeling in Nanoscale MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, Bryan

    2001-01-01

    With the onset of quantum confinement in the inversion layer in nanoscale MOSFETs, behavior of the resonant level inevitably determines all device characteristics. While most classical device simulators take quantization into account in some simplified manner, the important details of electrostatics are missing. Our work addresses this shortcoming and provides: (a) a framework to quantitatively explore device physics issues such as the source-drain and gate leakage currents, DIBL, and threshold voltage shift due to quantization, and b) a means of benchmarking quantum corrections to semiclassical models (such as density- gradient and quantum-corrected MEDICI). We have developed physical approximations and computer code capable of realistically simulating 2-D nanoscale transistors, using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. This is the most accurate full quantum model yet applied to 2-D device simulation. Open boundary conditions, oxide tunneling and phase-breaking scattering are treated on equal footing. Electrons in the ellipsoids of the conduction band are treated within the anisotropic effective mass approximation. Quantum simulations are focused on MIT 25, 50 and 90 nm "well- tempered" MOSFETs and compared to classical and quantum corrected models. The important feature of quantum model is smaller slope of Id-Vg curve and consequently higher threshold voltage. These results are quantitatively consistent with I D Schroedinger-Poisson calculations. The effect of gate length on gate-oxide leakage and sub-threshold current has been studied. The shorter gate length device has an order of magnitude smaller current at zero gate bias than the longer gate length device without a significant trade-off in on-current. This should be a device design consideration.

  9. Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    NIST Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (Program website, free access)   Currently there is no database matching your keyword search, but the NIST Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology website may be of interest. The Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology enables science and industry by providing essential measurement methods, instrumentation, and standards to support all phases of nanotechnology development, from discovery to production.

  10. Quantifying dissipative contributions in nanoscale interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sergio; Gadelrab, Karim R; Souier, Tewfik; Stefancich, Marco; Chiesa, Matteo

    2012-02-01

    Imaging with nanoscale resolution has become routine practice with the use of scanning probe techniques. Nevertheless, quantification of material properties and processes has been hampered by the complexity of the tip-surface interaction and the dependency of the dynamics on operational parameters. Here, we propose a framework for the quantification of the coefficients of viscoelasticity, surface energy, surface energy hysteresis and elastic modulus. Quantification of these parameters at the nanoscale will provide a firm ground to the understanding and modelling of tribology and nanoscale sciences with true nanoscale resolution.

  11. Fine grain tungsten produced with nanoscale powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Lin; Fang Zhao; Liying Zhang; Chengyi Wu; Zhimeng Guo

    2005-01-01

    Nanoscale tungsten powder was prepared by reducing nanoscale tungsten trioxide in hydrogen to WO2.90 and further to W powder. After compacted with a rubber die, the nanoscale tungsten powder was sintered in a high-temperature dilatometer to investigate its shrinkage process. The results show that the compact of the nanoscale tungsten powder starts to shrink at 1050℃ and ends at 1500℃. The shrinkage rate reaches the maximum value at 1210℃. The relative density of sintered samples is 96.4%, and its grain size is about 5.8 μm.

  12. Transparent subdiffraction optics: nanoscale light confinement without metal

    CERN Document Server

    Jahani, Saman

    2014-01-01

    The integration of nanoscale electronics with conventional optical devices is restricted by the diffraction limit of light. Metals can confine light at the subwavelength scales needed, but they are lossy, while dielectric materials do not confine evanescent waves outside a waveguide or resonator, leading to cross talk between components. We show that light can be confined below the diffraction limit using completely transparent artificial media. Our approach relies on controlling the optical momentum of evanescent waves, an important electromagnetic property overlooked in photonic devices. For practical applications, we propose a class of waveguides using this approach that outperforms the cross talk performance by 1 order of magnitude as compared to any existing photonic structure. Our work overcomes a critical stumbling block for nanophotonics by completely averting the use of metals and can impact electromagnetic devices from the visible to microwave frequency ranges.

  13. Preface: Charge transport in nanoscale junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2008-09-01

    Understanding the fundamentals of nanoscale charge transfer is pivotal for designing future nano-electronic devices. Such devices could be based on individual or groups of molecular bridges, nanotubes, nanoparticles, biomolecules and other 'active' components, mimicking wire, diode and transistor functions. These have operated in various environments including vacuum, air and condensed matter, in two- or three-electrode configurations, at ultra-low and room temperatures. Interest in charge transport in ultra-small device components has a long history and can be dated back to Aviram and Ratner's letter in 1974 (Chem. Phys. Lett. 29 277-83). So why is there a necessity for a special issue on this subject? The area has reached some degree of maturity, and even subtle geometric effects in the nanojunction and noise features can now be resolved and rationalized based on existing theoretical concepts. One purpose of this special issue is thus to showcase various aspects of nanoscale and single-molecule charge transport from experimental and theoretical perspectives. The main principles have 'crystallized' in our minds, but there is still a long way to go before true single-molecule electronics can be implemented. Major obstacles include the stability of electronic nanojunctions, reliable operation at room temperature, speed of operation and, last but not least, integration into large networks. A gradual transition from traditional silicon-based electronics to devices involving a single (or a few) molecule(s) therefore appears to be more viable from technologic and economic perspectives than a 'quantum leap'. As research in this area progresses, new applications emerge, e.g. with a view to characterizing interfacial charge transfer at the single-molecule level in general. For example, electrochemical experiments with individual enzyme molecules demonstrate that catalytic processes can be studied with nanometre resolution, offering a route towards optimizing biosensors at

  14. Investigating the Mobility of Trilayer Graphene Nanoribbon in Nanoscale FETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Meisam; Ghafoori Fard, Hassan; Ahmadi, Mohammad Taghi; Rahbarpour, Saeideh; Habibiyan, Hamidreza; Varmazyari, Vali; Rahmani, Komeil

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the present paper is to investigate the scaling behaviors of charge carrier mobility as one of the most remarkable characteristics for modeling of nanoscale field-effect transistors (FETs). Many research groups in academia and industry are contributing to the model development and experimental identification of multi-layer graphene FET-based devices. The approach in the present work is to provide an analytical model for carrier mobility of tri-layer graphene nanoribbon (TGN) FET. In order to do so, one starts by identifying the analytical modeling of TGN carrier velocity and ballistic conductance. At the end, a model of charge carrier mobility with numerical solution is analytically derived for TGN FET, in which the carrier concentration, temperature and channel length characteristics dependence are highlighted. Moreover, variation of band gap and gate voltage during the proposed device operation and its effect on carrier mobility is investigated. To evaluate the nanoscale FET performance, the carrier mobility model is also adopted to obtain the I-V characteristics of the device. In order to verify the accuracy of the proposed analytical model for TGN mobility, it is compared to the existing experimental data, and a satisfactory agreement is reported for analogous ambient conditions. Moreover, the proposed model is compared with the published data of single-layer graphene and bi-layer graphene, in which the obtained results demonstrate significant insights into the importance of charge carrier mobility impact in high-performance TGN FET. The work presented here is one step towards an applicable model for real-world nanoscale FETs.

  15. Characteristics for electrochemical machining with nanoscale voltage pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E S; Back, S Y; Lee, J T

    2009-06-01

    Electrochemical machining has traditionally been used in highly specialized fields, such as those of the aerospace and defense industries. It is now increasingly being applied in other industries, where parts with difficult-to-cut material, complex geometry and tribology, and devices of nanoscale and microscale are required. Electric characteristic plays a principal function role in and chemical characteristic plays an assistant function role in electrochemical machining. Therefore, essential parameters in electrochemical machining can be described current density, machining time, inter-electrode gap size, electrolyte, electrode shape etc. Electrochemical machining provides an economical and effective method for machining high strength, high tension and heat-resistant materials into complex shapes such as turbine blades of titanium and aluminum alloys. The application of nanoscale voltage pulses between a tool electrode and a workpiece in an electrochemical environment allows the three-dimensional machining of conducting materials with sub-micrometer precision. In this study, micro probe are developed by electrochemical etching and micro holes are manufactured using these micro probe as tool electrodes. Micro holes and microgroove can be accurately achieved by using nanoscale voltages pulses.

  16. Nanoscale Engineering of Multiferroic Hybrid Composites for Micro- and Nano-scale Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-14

    electric signal stimulation of living cells", Leszek Malkinski and Armin Kargol (Loyola University) (2010). Presentations: 2009-2012 1) Shiva Adireddy...MRS Spring Meeting, April 5-9, 2010, San Francisco, CA. 6) Gabriel Caruntu, Amin Yourdkhani, Armando K. Perez, Shiva Adireddy "Soft Solution...2010. 12) Gabriel Caruntu, Amin Yourdkhani, Armando K. Perez, Shiva Adireddy "Soft Solution Processing of Ferroelectric Nanostructures and Their

  17. Dose Dependence of Formation of Nanoscale Cavities in Helium-implanted 4H-SiC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Due to its superior mechanical and electrical properries,silicon carbide(SiC)is a technologically important material in the development of high-temperature,high-power,high-frequency electronic devices and in nuclear energy and waste technologies.In the former cases,helium implantation can be used to introduce nanoscale

  18. Nanoscale Properties of Boric Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Nanoscale properties of boric acid were studied by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nanome-chanical testing system. XPS was used to research on the transform behaviors of H3BO3 at different temperatures.The crystal structure, surface morphology, and mechanical properties of H3BO3 were described. The results showthat H3BO3 has layered structure, and can be transformed to boron oxide at high temperature. In addition there area lot of defects in H3BO3 crystal.

  19. Synthesis of nanoscale antimony particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balan, L.; Dailly, A. [Universite Henri Poincare Nancy I, Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide Mineral, UMR 7555 CNRS (France); Schneider, R. [Universite Henri Poincare Nancy I, Laboratoire de Synthese organometallique et Reactivite, UMR 7565 CNRS (France); Billaud, D., E-mail: Denis.Billaud@lcsm.uhp-nancy.fr [Universite Henri Poincare Nancy I, Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide Mineral, UMR 7555 CNRS (France); Willmann, P. [Centre National d' Etudes Spatiales, (France); Olivier-Fourcade, J.; Jumas, J.-C. [Universite Montpellier, Laboratoire des Agregats Moleculaires et Materiaux Inorganiques, UMR 5072 CNRS (France)

    2005-09-15

    For the search of new negative electrodes of Li-ion batteries, a low-temperature method has been developed for the preparation of nanoscale antimony particles which uses an alkoxide-activated sodium hydride as reducing agent of antimony pentachloride. X-ray diffraction and TEM studies confirm the obtaining of amorphous Sb nanoparticles dispersed in an organic matrix. {sup 121}Sb Moessbauer spectroscopy gives evidence for the occurrence of interactions between antimony and the matrix. These interactions are modified by the washing treatments.

  20. Surface Chemistry in Nanoscale Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex V. Hamza

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Although surfaces or, more precisely, the surface atomic and electronic structure, determine the way materials interact with their environment, the influence of surface chemistry on the bulk of the material is generally considered to be small. However, in the case of high surface area materials such as nanoporous solids, surface properties can start to dominate the overall material behavior. This allows one to create new materials with physical and chemical properties that are no longer determined by the bulk material, but by their nanoscale architectures. Here, we discuss several examples, ranging from nanoporous gold to surface engineered carbon aerogels that demonstrate the tuneability of nanoporous solids for sustainable energy applications.

  1. Electron turbulence at nanoscale junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushong, Neil; Gamble, John; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2007-06-01

    Electron transport through a nanostructure can be characterized in part using concepts from classical fluid dynamics. It is thus natural to ask how far the analogy can be taken and whether the electron liquid can exhibit nonlinear dynamical effects such as turbulence. Here we present an ab initio study of the electron dynamics in nanojunctions which reveals that the latter indeed exhibits behavior quite similar to that of a classical fluid. In particular, we find that a transition from laminar to turbulent flow occurs with increasing current, corresponding to increasing Reynolds numbers. These results reveal unexpected features of electron dynamics and shed new light on our understanding of transport properties of nanoscale systems.

  2. Nanoscale tomography in materials science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günter Möbus

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In materials science, various techniques for three-dimensional reconstruction of microstructures have been applied successfully for decades, such as X-ray tomography and mechanical sectioning. However, in the last decade the family tree of methods has grown significantly. This is partly through advances in instrumentation. The introduction of the focused ion beam microscope and the transformation of transmission electron microscopy into a multipurpose analytical and structural tool have made major impacts. The main driving force for progress is perhaps the advent of nanotechnology with the need to achieve nanometer-scale resolution and the desire to get a real three-dimensional view of the nanoscale world.

  3. NEURAL NETWORK FOR THE QUANTUM CORRECTION OF NANOSCALE SOI MOSFETS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zunchao; Jiang Yaolin; Zhang Lili

    2006-01-01

    The quantum effect of carrier distribution in nanoscale SOI MOSFETs is evident and must be taken into consideration in device modeling and simulation. In this paper, a backpropagation neural network was applied to predict the quantum density of carriers from the classical density, and the influence of the network structure on training speed and accuracy was studied. It was concluded that a carefully trained neural network with two hidden layers using the Levenberg-Marquardt learning algorithm could predict the carrier quantum density of SOI MOSFETs in very good agreement with Schrdinger Poisson equations.

  4. Shrink-induced sorting using integrated nanoscale magnetic traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawarathna, Dharmakeerthi; Norouzi, Nazila; McLane, Jolie; Sharma, Himanshu; Sharac, Nicholas; Grant, Ted; Chen, Aaron; Strayer, Scott; Ragan, Regina; Khine, Michelle

    2013-02-11

    We present a plastic microfluidic device with integrated nanoscale magnetic traps (NSMTs) that separates magnetic from non-magnetic beads with high purity and throughput, and unprecedented enrichments. Numerical simulations indicate significantly higher localized magnetic field gradients than previously reported. We demonstrated >20 000-fold enrichment for 0.001% magnetic bead mixtures. Since we achieve high purity at all flow-rates tested, this is a robust, rapid, portable, and simple solution to sort target species from small volumes amenable for point-of-care applications. We used the NSMT in a 96 well format to extract DNA from small sample volumes for quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR).

  5. Quantum mechanical modeling the emission pattern and polarization of nanoscale light emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rulin; Zhang, Yu; Bi, Fuzhen; Frauenheim, Thomas; Chen, GuanHua; Yam, ChiYung

    2016-07-21

    Understanding of the electroluminescence (EL) mechanism in optoelectronic devices is imperative for further optimization of their efficiency and effectiveness. Here, a quantum mechanical approach is formulated for modeling the EL processes in nanoscale light emitting diodes (LED). Based on non-equilibrium Green's function quantum transport equations, interactions with the electromagnetic vacuum environment are included to describe electrically driven light emission in the devices. The presented framework is illustrated by numerical simulations of a silicon nanowire LED device. EL spectra of the nanowire device under different bias voltages are obtained and, more importantly, the radiation pattern and polarization of optical emission can be determined using the current approach. This work is an important step forward towards atomistic quantum mechanical modeling of the electrically induced optical response in nanoscale systems.

  6. Nanoscale photonics of structural transformations in gallium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheludev, Nikolay I.; Fedotov, V. A.; MacDonald, K. F.; Stevens, G. C.; Pochon, Sebastien C.; Woodford, M.

    2002-11-01

    We have found recently that Gallium, confined at an interface with silica, responds dramatically to low power optical excitation when held at temperatures close to its melting point (29.8oC). Intensities of just a few kW/cm2 can reversibly modulate the intensity (by up to 40%) and phase (by as much as several degrees) of reflected light as the result of a light-induced structural transition occurring in a layer of gallium of only a few nm thick. Here, we report that this concept - of achieving a nonlinearity via a light-induced transformation in a confined solid at a temperature close to a phase transition temperature - can also be applied to gallium nanoparticles. We present the transient all-optical switching characteristics of gallium nanoparticle films comprising particles, typically 80 nm in diameter, which were formed directly on the ends of optical fibers using a new light-assisted self-assembly technique. We also report, for the first time, that this light-induced structural transition in gallium confined at an interface with silica underlies a new mechanism for photoconductivity. In our opinion, the exploitation of the light-induced phase transition in gallium may be a means of enabling the development of nanoscale photonic devices.

  7. Differential Electrochemical Conductance Imaging at the Nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Martínez, Montserrat; Artés, Juan Manuel; Sarasso, Veronica; Carminati, Marco; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Sanz, Fausto; Gorostiza, Pau

    2017-09-01

    Electron transfer in proteins is essential in crucial biological processes. Although the fundamental aspects of biological electron transfer are well characterized, currently there are no experimental tools to determine the atomic-scale electronic pathways in redox proteins, and thus to fully understand their outstanding efficiency and environmental adaptability. This knowledge is also required to design and optimize biomolecular electronic devices. In order to measure the local conductance of an electrode surface immersed in an electrolyte, this study builds upon the current-potential spectroscopic capacity of electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy, by adding an alternating current modulation technique. With this setup, spatially resolved, differential electrochemical conductance images under bipotentiostatic control are recorded. Differential electrochemical conductance imaging allows visualizing the reversible oxidation of an iron electrode in borate buffer and individual azurin proteins immobilized on atomically flat gold surfaces. In particular, this method reveals submolecular regions with high conductance within the protein. The direct observation of nanoscale conduction pathways in redox proteins and complexes enables important advances in biochemistry and bionanotechnology. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Non-resonant Nanoscale Extreme Light Confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramania, Ganapathi Subramanian [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Huber, Dale L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    A wide spectrum of photonics activities Sandia is engaged in such as solid state lighting, photovoltaics, infrared imaging and sensing, quantum sources, rely on nanoscale or ultrasubwavelength light-matter interactions (LMI). The fundamental understanding in confining electromagnetic power and enhancing electric fields into ever smaller volumes is key to creating next generation devices for these programs. The prevailing view is that a resonant interaction (e.g. in microcavities or surface-plasmon polaritions) is necessary to achieve the necessary light confinement for absorption or emission enhancement. Here we propose new paradigm that is non-resonant and therefore broadband and can achieve light confinement and field enhancement in extremely small areas [~(λ/500)^2 ]. The proposal is based on a theoretical work[1] performed at Sandia. The paradigm structure consists of a periodic arrangement of connected small and large rectangular slits etched into a metal film named double-groove (DG) structure. The degree of electric field enhancement and power confinement can be controlled by the geometry of the structure. The key operational principle is attributed to quasistatic response of the metal electrons to the incoming electromagnetic field that enables non-resonant broadband behavior. For this exploratory LDRD we have fabricated some test double groove structures to enable verification of quasistatic electronic response in the mid IR through IR optical spectroscopy. We have addressed some processing challenges in DG structure fabrication to enable future design of complex sensor and detector geometries that can utilize its non-resonant field enhancement capabilities.].

  9. PREFACE: Nanoscale science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Stefano

    2008-11-01

    Over the last decade, rapid progress in the field of nanoscience has been increasingly driving the attention of the scientific community as well as society at large on the corresponding technological applications, which are the object of so-called nanotechnology. A strong interest in assessing the current state of the art of this fast growing field, as well as stimulating research networking, prompted the organization of the International School and Workshop 'Nanoscience & Nanotechnology (n&n2007)', under the patronage of the Italian Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN), the University of Rome Tor Vergata, the Tor Vergata Polyclinic, and the Catholic University of Rome, with generous sponsorship from 3M, 2M Strumenti, MTS, Ape Research, Crisel Instruments, Veeco and Amira. The aims of this event were as follows: to foster the concrete planning of future devices based on innovative (nano)materials, involving both industrial entities and public research institutes; to allow sponsoring firms to present their instrumentation and success stories, based on current use by significant customers; to lend an opportunity for preparing and presenting joint projects, involving both industry and public research, see e.g. the EU 7th Framework Programs; to explore the possibility of integrating nanodevices from their concept into system projects. The conference http://www.lnf.infn.it/conference/nn2007/ gathered at Villa Mondragone in Monte Porzio Catone, Italy, with leading experts in research and innovative technologies in biology, medicine, aerospace, optoelectronics, materials and instrumentation, coming both from academic research and industrial areas, as well as national security and military defense experts in attendence. Several successful meetings in this field have taken place in the past, such as the Nanotubes & Nanostructures (N&N) School and Workshop Series [1, 2, 3, 4] including: N&N2000, S Margherita di Pula (Cagliari), Italy, 24 September-4 October 2000, http

  10. Spin transport in metal and oxide devices at the nanoscale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parui, Subir; Rana, Kumari Gaurav; Banerjee, Tamalika

    2012-01-01

    Here we discuss a non-destructive technique that characterizes spin and charge transport at the nanometer scale, across buried layers and interfaces, in magnetic memory elements as used in spin transfer torque based Magnetic Random Access Memory (STT-MRAM). While probing in the

  11. Robust computing with nano-scale devices progresses and challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Chao

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this book is on various issues of robust nano-computing, defect-tolerance design for nano-technology at different design abstraction levels. It addresses both redundancy- and configuration-based methods as well as fault detecting techniques.

  12. Smart Core-Shell Nanowire Architectures for Multifunctional Nanoscale Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-16

    Nabet, Jonathan E. Spanier. Picosecond response times in GaAs/ AlGaAs core/shell nanowire-based photodetectors, Applied Physics Letters, (06 2011...which two normally contradictory properties coexist, and its publication. In one example, switchable polar character (ferroelectricity) arising from non... properties of a completely new family of non-perovskite complex oxide that exhibits ferroelectric and antiferromagnetic order. We report on publication of a

  13. Properties of nanoscale metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, Maximilian

    2009-05-20

    Nanoscale hydride particles may exhibit chemical stabilities which differ from those of a macroscopic system. The stabilities are mainly influenced by a surface energy term which contains size-dependent values of the surface tension, the molar volume and an additional term which takes into account a potential reduction of the excess surface energy. Thus, the equilibrium of a nanoparticular hydride system may be shifted to the hydrogenated or to the dehydrogenated side, depending on the size and on the prefix of the surface energy term of the hydrogenated and dehydrogenated material. Additional complexity appears when solid-state reactions of complex hydrides are considered and phase segregation has to be taken into account. In such a case the reversibility of complex hydrides may be reduced if the nanoparticles are free standing on a surface. However, it may be enhanced if the system is enclosed by a nanoscale void which prevents the reaction partners on the dehydrogenated side from diffusing away from each other. Moreover, the generally enhanced diffusivity in nanocrystalline systems may lower the kinetic barriers for the material's transformation and, thus, facilitate hydrogen absorption and desorption.

  14. Maximal Heat Generation in Nanoscale Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li-Ling; LI Shu-Shen; ZENG Zhao-Yang

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the heat generation in a nanoscale system coupled to normal leads and find that it is maximal when the average occupation of the electrons in the nanoscale system is 0.5,no matter what mechanism induces the heat generation.

  15. Nanoscale Surface Plasmonics Sensor With Nanofluidic Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jianjun; Singhal, Sameer; Waldeck, David H.; Kofke, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Conventional quantitative protein assays of bodily fluids typically involve multiple steps to obtain desired measurements. Such methods are not well suited for fast and accurate assay measurements in austere environments such as spaceflight and in the aftermath of disasters. Consequently, there is a need for a protein assay technology capable of routinely monitoring proteins in austere environments. For example, there is an immediate need for a urine protein assay to assess astronaut renal health during spaceflight. The disclosed nanoscale surface plasmonics sensor provides a core detection method that can be integrated to a lab-on-chip device that satisfies the unmet need for such a protein assay technology. Assays based upon combinations of nanoholes, nanorings, and nanoslits with transmission surface plasmon resonance (SPR) are used for assays requiring extreme sensitivity, and are capable of detecting specific analytes at concentrations as low as picomole to femtomole level in well-controlled environments. The device operates in a transmission mode configuration in which light is directed at one planar surface of the array, which functions as an optical aperture. The incident light induces surface plasmon light transmission from the opposite surface of the array. The presence of a target analyte is detected by changes in the spectrum of light transmitted by the array when a target analyte induces a change in the refractive index of the fluid within the nanochannels. This occurs, for example, when a target analyte binds to a receptor fixed to the walls of the nanochannels in the array. Independent fluid handling capability for individual nanoarrays on a nanofluidic chip containing a plurality of nanochannel arrays allows each array to be used to sense a different target analyte and/or for paired arrays to analyze control and test samples simultaneously in parallel. The present invention incorporates transmission mode nanoplasmonics and nanofluidics into a single

  16. Nanoscale integration is the next frontier for nanotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picraux, Samuel T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    ways, from exploiting field-effect transistor devices and low power complementary logic to enable the electronic watch and hand calculator in the 1970's, to today's microprocessors and memories with billions of devices and a computational power not imagined a few decades ago. The manipulation of charges on a chip, the new concepts in combining devices for logic functions, and the new approaches to computation, information processing, and imaging have all emerged from Kilby and Noyce's simple concept of integrating devices on a single chip. Moving from hard to soft materials, a second more recent example of integration is the DNA microarray. These microarrays, with up to millions of elements in a planar array that can be optically read out, can simultaneously measure the expression of 10's of thousands of genes to study the effects of disease and treatment, or screen for single nucleotide polymorphisms for uses ranging from forensics to predisposition to disease. While still at an early stage, microarrays have revolutionized biosciences by providing the means to interrogate the complex genetic control of biological functions. Just as integrated circuits and microarrays have led to completely new functionalities and performance, the integration of nanoscale materials and structures is anticipated to lead to new performance and enable the design of new functionalities not previously envisioned. The fundamental questions underlying integration go beyond just complex fabrication or the engineering of known solutions; they lead to new discoveries and new science. The scientific challenges around nanoscale integration necessitate the development of new knowledge that is central to the advance of nanotechnology. To move forward one must address key science questions that arise in nanoscience integration and go beyond a single system or materials area. New science and discoveries especially await around three questions. How does one: (1) Control energy

  17. CONTROLLING THE 3D NANOSCALE ORGANIZATION OF BULK HETEROJUNCTION POLYMER SOLAR CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Svetlana S. Van Bavel; Erwan Sourty; Gijsbertus de With; Joachim Loos

    2009-01-01

    In this study,the three dimensional nanoscale organization in the photoactive layers of poly(3-hexylthiophene)(P3HT) and a methanofullerene derivative (PCBM) is revealed by transmission electron tomography.After annealing treatment,either at elevated temperature or during slow solvent evaporation,nanoscale interpenetrating networks are formed with high crystalline order and favorable concentration gradients of both components through the thickness of the photoactive layer.Such a tailored morphology accounts for the considerable increase of the power conversion efficiency in corresponding solar cell devices.

  18. The Properties of Confined Water and Fluid Flow at the Nanoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwegler, E; Reed, J; Lau, E; Prendergast, D; Galli, G; Grossman, J C; Cicero, G

    2009-03-09

    This project has been focused on the development of accurate computational tools to study fluids in confined, nanoscale geometries, and the application of these techniques to probe the structural and electronic properties of water confined between hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates, including the presence of simple ions at the interfaces. In particular, we have used a series of ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations and quantum Monte Carlo calculations to build an understanding of how hydrogen bonding and solvation are modified at the nanoscale. The properties of confined water affect a wide range of scientific and technological problems - including protein folding, cell-membrane flow, materials properties in confined media and nanofluidic devices.

  19. Non-linear optical functions of crystalline-Si resulting from nanoscale layered systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznicki, Z.T. [Laboratoire PHASE, CNRS UPR 292, 23 rue du Loess, F-67037 Strasbourg cedex 2 (France)]. E-mail: kuznicki@phase.c-strasbourg.fr; Ley, M. [Laboratoire PHASE, CNRS UPR 292, 23 rue du Loess, F-67037 Strasbourg cedex 2 (France); Lezec, H.J. [ISIS, ULP, 8 allee Gaspard Monge, F-67083 Strasbourg cedex (France); Sarrabayrouse, G. [LAAS-CNRS, 7 av. du colonel Roche, 31077 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Rousset, B. [LAAS-CNRS, 7 av. du colonel Roche, 31077 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Rossel, F. [LAAS-CNRS, 7 av. du colonel Roche, 31077 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Migeon, H. [LAM, Centre de Recherche Public - Gabriel Lippmann, 162a, av. de la Faiaencerie, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Wirtz, T. [LAM, Centre de Recherche Public - Gabriel Lippmann, 162a, av. de la Faiaencerie, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg)

    2006-07-15

    New non-linear optoelectronic and photovoltaic behavior of crystalline silicon (c-Si) has been obtained with a strained nanoscale Si-layered system. We have found c-Si absorptances that even exceed values of amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films. The present investigation exploits charge carrier and photon flux transformations at the so-called carrier collection limit. A correlation between free carrier density and the absorption coefficient could be established by combining reflectivity and transmissivity measurements on samples having different surface free carrier reservoirs. In summary, Si modifications implemented on the nanoscale lead to new effects that can widen applications of conventional Si devices.

  20. Nanoscale thermal imaging of dissipation in quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbertal, D; Cuppens, J; Shalom, M Ben; Embon, L; Shadmi, N; Anahory, Y; Naren, H R; Sarkar, J; Uri, A; Ronen, Y; Myasoedov, Y; Levitov, L S; Joselevich, E; Geim, A K; Zeldov, E

    2016-11-17

    Energy dissipation is a fundamental process governing the dynamics of physical, chemical and biological systems. It is also one of the main characteristics that distinguish quantum from classical phenomena. In particular, in condensed matter physics, scattering mechanisms, loss of quantum information or breakdown of topological protection are deeply rooted in the intricate details of how and where the dissipation occurs. Yet the microscopic behaviour of a system is usually not formulated in terms of dissipation because energy dissipation is not a readily measurable quantity on the micrometre scale. Although nanoscale thermometry has gained much recent interest, existing thermal imaging methods are not sensitive enough for the study of quantum systems and are also unsuitable for the low-temperature operation that is required. Here we report a nano-thermometer based on a superconducting quantum interference device with a diameter of less than 50 nanometres that resides at the apex of a sharp pipette: it provides scanning cryogenic thermal sensing that is four orders of magnitude more sensitive than previous devices-below 1 μK Hz(-1/2). This non-contact, non-invasive thermometry allows thermal imaging of very low intensity, nanoscale energy dissipation down to the fundamental Landauer limit of 40 femtowatts for continuous readout of a single qubit at one gigahertz at 4.2 kelvin. These advances enable the observation of changes in dissipation due to single-electron charging of individual quantum dots in carbon nanotubes. They also reveal a dissipation mechanism attributable to resonant localized states in graphene encapsulated within hexagonal boron nitride, opening the door to direct thermal imaging of nanoscale dissipation processes in quantum matter.

  1. The impact of defect scattering on the quasi-ballistic transport of nanoscale conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esqueda, I. S., E-mail: isanchez@isi.edu; Fritze, M. [Information Sciences Institute, University of Southern California, Marina del Rey, California 90292 (United States); Cress, C. D. [Electronics Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Cao, Y.; Che, Y.; Zhou, C. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States)

    2015-02-28

    Using the Landauer approach for carrier transport, we analyze the impact of defects induced by ion irradiation on the transport properties of nanoscale conductors that operate in the quasi-ballistic regime. Degradation of conductance results from a reduction of carrier mean free path due to the introduction of defects in the conducting channel. We incorporate scattering mechanisms from radiation-induced defects into calculations of the transmission coefficient and present a technique for extracting modeling parameters from near-equilibrium transport measurements. These parameters are used to describe degradation in the transport properties of nanoscale devices using a formalism that is valid under quasi-ballistic operation. The analysis includes the effects of bandstructure and dimensionality on the impact of defect scattering and discusses transport properties of nanoscale devices from the diffusive to the ballistic limit. We compare calculations with recently published measurements of irradiated nanoscale devices such as single-walled carbon nanotubes, graphene, and deep-submicron Si metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors.

  2. Attosecond physics at the nanoscale

    CERN Document Server

    Ciappina, M F; Landsman, A S; Okell, W; Zherebtsov, S; Förg, B; Schötz, J; Seiffert, J L; Fennel, T; Shaaran, T; Zimmermann, T; Chacón, A; Guichard, R; Zaïr, A; Tisch, J W G; Marangos, J P; Witting, T; Braun, A; Maier, S A; Roso, L; Krüger, M; Hommelhoff, P; Kling, M F; Krausz, F; Lewenstein, M

    2016-01-01

    Recently two emerging areas of research, attosecond and nanoscale physics, have started to come together. Attosecond physics deals with phenomena occurring when ultrashort laser pulses, with duration on the femto- and sub-femtosecond time scales, interact with atoms, molecules or solids. The laser-induced electron dynamics occurs natively on a timescale down to a few hundred or even tens of attoseconds, which is comparable with the optical field. On the other hand, the second branch involves the manipulation and engineering of mesoscopic systems, such as solids, metals and dielectrics, with nanometric precision. Although nano-engineering is a vast and well-established research field on its own, the merger with intense laser physics is relatively recent. In this article we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical overview of physics that takes place when short and intense laser pulses interact with nanosystems, such as metallic and dielectric nanostructures. In particular we elucidate how the spati...

  3. Nanoscale materials for hyperthermal theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bennett E; Roder, Paden B; Zhou, Xuezhe; Pauzauskie, Peter J

    2015-04-28

    Recently, the use of nanoscale materials has attracted considerable attention with the aim of designing personalized therapeutic approaches that can enhance both spatial and temporal control over drug release, permeability, and uptake. Potential benefits to patients include the reduction of overall drug dosages, enabling the parallel delivery of different pharmaceuticals, and the possibility of enabling additional functionalities such as hyperthermia or deep-tissue imaging (LIF, PET, etc.) that complement and extend the efficacy of traditional chemotherapy and surgery. This mini-review is focused on an emerging class of nanometer-scale materials that can be used both to heat malignant tissue to reduce angiogenesis and DNA-repair while simultaneously offering complementary imaging capabilities based on radioemission, optical fluorescence, magnetic resonance, and photoacoustic methods.

  4. Nanoscale metal-organic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carné, Arnau; Carbonell, Carlos; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Metal-organic materials are found to be a fascinating novel class of functional nanomaterials. The limitless combinations between inorganic and organic building blocks enable researchers to synthesize 0- and 1-D metal-organic discrete nanostructures with varied compositions, morphologies and sizes, fabricate 2-D metal-organic thin films and membranes, and even structure them on surfaces at the nanometre length scale. In this tutorial review, the synthetic methodologies for preparing these miniaturized materials as well as their potential properties and future applications are discussed. This review wants to offer a panoramic view of this embryonic class of nanoscale materials that will be of interest to a cross-section of researchers working in chemistry, physics, medicine, nanotechnology, materials chemistry, etc., in the next years.

  5. Symposium GC: Nanoscale Charge Transport in Excitonic Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bommisetty, Venkat [Univ. of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD (United States)

    2011-06-23

    This paper provides a summary only and table of contents of the sessions. Excitonic solar cells, including all-organic, hybrid organic-inorganic and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), offer strong potential for inexpensive and large-area solar energy conversion. Unlike traditional inorganic semiconductor solar cells, where all the charge generation and collection processes are well understood, these excitonic solar cells contain extremely disordered structures with complex interfaces which results in large variations in nanoscale electronic properties and has a strong influence on carrier generation, transport, dissociation and collection. Detailed understanding of these processes is important for fabrication of highly efficient solar cells. Efforts to improve efficiency are underway at a large number of research groups throughout the world focused on inorganic and organic semiconductors, photonics, photophysics, charge transport, nanoscience, ultrafast spectroscopy, photonics, semiconductor processing, device physics, device structures, interface structure etc. Rapid progress in this multidisciplinary area requires strong synergetic efforts among researchers from diverse backgrounds. Such effort can lead to novel methods for development of new materials with improved photon harvesting and interfacial treatments for improved carrier transport, process optimization to yield ordered nanoscale morphologies with well defined electronic structures.

  6. Anomalous electromagnetic coupling via entanglement at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepyan, Gregory; Boag, Amir; Mordachev, Vladimir; Sinkevich, Eugene; Maksimenko, Sergey; Kuzhir, Polina; Miano, Giovanni; Portnoi, Mikhail E.; Maffucci, Antonio

    2017-02-01

    Understanding unwanted mutual interactions between devices at the nanoscale is crucial for the study of the electromagnetic compatibility in nanoelectronic and nanophotonic systems. Anomalous electromagnetic coupling (crosstalk) between nanodevices may arise from the combination of electromagnetic interaction and quantum entanglement. In this paper we study in detail the crosstalk between two identical nanodevices, each consisting of a quantum emitter (atom, quantum dot, etc), capacitively coupled to a pair of nanoelectrodes. Using the generalized susceptibility concept, the overall system is modeled as a two-port within the framework of the electrical circuit theory and it is characterized by the admittance matrix. We show that the entanglement changes dramatically the physical picture of the electromagnetic crosstalk. In particular, the excitation produced in one of the ports may be redistributed in equal parts between both the ports, in spite of the rather small electromagnetic interactions. Such an anomalous crosstalk is expected to appear at optical frequencies in lateral GaAs double quantum dots. A possible experimental set up is also discussed. The classical concepts of interference in the operation of electronic devices, which have been known since the early days of radio-communications and are associated with electromagnetic compatibility, should then be reconsidered at the nanoscale.

  7. Nanoscale domain patterns and a concept for an energy harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renuka Balakrishna, Ananya; Huber, John E.

    2016-10-01

    The current work employs a phase-field model to test the stability of nanoscale periodic domain patterns, and to explore the application of one pattern in an energy harvester device. At first, the stability of several periodic domain patterns with in-plane polarizations is tested under stress-free and electric field-free conditions. It is found that simple domain patterns with stripe-like features are stable, while patterns with more complex domain configurations are typically unstable at the nanoscale. Upon identifying a stable domain pattern with suitable properties, a conceptual design of a thin film energy harvester device is explored. The harvester is modeled as a thin ferroelectric film bound to a substrate. In the initial state a periodic stripe domain pattern with zero net charge on the top electrode is modeled. On bending the substrate, a mechanical strain is induced in the film, causing polarized domains to undergo ferroelectric switching and thus generate electrical energy. The results demonstrate the working cycle of a conceptual energy harvester which, on operating at kHz frequencies, such as from vibrations in the environment, could produce an area power density of about 40 W m-2.

  8. Interconnections in ULSI: Correlation and Crosstalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-31

    cide interconnects. Finally. in Section V. we present the 2L conclusions. -_-. - ax, II. THEORY + A"- a- ) A. Coupling Between Optical Interconnects - To... TesIs . Note that the circulating urrent pattems hardly carry any net current in the x.direction. Therefore, the conductance of the stmctue will be very

  9. Simulation of ion implantation for ULSI technology

    CERN Document Server

    Hoessinger, A

    2000-01-01

    approximately constant an almost linear performance gain could be achieved by the parallelization method, even if a fairly slow network connects the workstations. Finally, the developed Monte-Carlo ion implantation simulator is applied to a set of examples making use of some of the special features of the simulator. Additionally a small operating manual for the simulator is included in the appendix. been developed and implemented. These methods enable to treat the implantation of molecular ions and atom clusters and thus the implantation of BF, which is a widely used for the doping with boron atoms. By providing two methods for the simulation of molecular ions the functionality of the simulator can be adapted to the problem requirements. While the simplified molecular method needs less computation time, the full molecular method provides more precise results. Another part of this work was the design and the implementation of a point response interface method. It allows to interface Monte-Carlo simulation resu...

  10. Enhanced performance thermal diode via thermal boundary resistance at nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar-Padilla, M.; Licea-Jimenez, L.; Pérez-Garcia, S. A.; Alvarez-Quintana, J.

    2015-08-01

    Hypothetically, a thermal rectifier is a device which leads a greater heat flux in one direction than another one, similarly as the electrical diode works for the electrical flux. Here, a drastic increment in the rectification factor has been obtained in nanoscale layered thermal diodes due to the effect of thermal boundary resistance present on an asymmetrical stack of nanofilms. Measurements show a thermal rectification factor as large as 3.3 under a temperature bias well below 1 K, which is the biggest thermal rectification factor reported at room temperature compared to previously reported thermal diodes so far. According to the direction of the applied heat flux, the observed impact of the thermal boundary resistance on the device is manifested through the presence of an asymmetric temperature rise along the heat transfer axis. Such effect provides an alternative route for the development of high performance thermal diodes.

  11. Nanoscale imaging of freestanding nitrogen doped single layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Ganjigunte R S; Wang, Jian; Wells, Garth; Bradley, Michael P; Borondics, Ferenc

    2015-02-14

    Graphene can be p-type or n-type doped by introduction of specific species. Doping can modulate the electronic properties of graphene, but opening a sizable-well-tuned bandgap is essential for graphene-based tunable electronic devices. N-doped graphene is widely used for device applications and is mostly achieved by introducing ammonia into the synthesis gas during the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Post synthesis treatment studies to fine-tune the electron hole doping in graphene are limited. In this work realization of N-doping in large area freestanding single layer graphene (LFG) is achieved by post treatment in nitrogen plasma. The changes in the chemical and electronic properties of graphene are followed with Raman microscopy and mapped via synchrotron based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the nanoscale.

  12. Nanoscale electron transport at the surface of a topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Sebastian; Bobisch, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional topological insulators for disruptive technologies critically depends on the dissipationless transport of electrons at the surface, because of the suppression of backscattering at defects. However, in real devices, defects are unavoidable and scattering at angles other than 180° is allowed for such materials. Until now, this has been studied indirectly by bulk measurements and by the analysis of the local density of states in close vicinity to defect sites. Here, we directly measure the nanoscale voltage drop caused by the scattering at step edges, which occurs if a lateral current flows along a three-dimensional topological insulator. The experiments were performed using scanning tunnelling potentiometry for thin Bi2Se3 films. So far, the observed voltage drops are small because of large contributions of the bulk to the electronic transport. However, for the use of ideal topological insulating thin films in devices, these contributions would play a significant role. PMID:27098939

  13. Nanoscale electron transport at the surface of a topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Sebastian; Bobisch, Christian A.

    2016-04-01

    The use of three-dimensional topological insulators for disruptive technologies critically depends on the dissipationless transport of electrons at the surface, because of the suppression of backscattering at defects. However, in real devices, defects are unavoidable and scattering at angles other than 180° is allowed for such materials. Until now, this has been studied indirectly by bulk measurements and by the analysis of the local density of states in close vicinity to defect sites. Here, we directly measure the nanoscale voltage drop caused by the scattering at step edges, which occurs if a lateral current flows along a three-dimensional topological insulator. The experiments were performed using scanning tunnelling potentiometry for thin Bi2Se3 films. So far, the observed voltage drops are small because of large contributions of the bulk to the electronic transport. However, for the use of ideal topological insulating thin films in devices, these contributions would play a significant role.

  14. Direction-dependent Optical Modes in Nanoscale Silicon Waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Jacob T

    2010-01-01

    On-chip photonic networks have the potential to transmit and route information more efficiently than electronic circuits. Recently, a number of silicon-based optical devices including modulators, buffers, and wavelength converts have been reported. However, a number of technical challenges need to be overcome before these devices can be combined into network-level architectures. In particular, due to the high refractive index contrast between the core and cladding of semiconductor waveguides, nanoscale defects along the waveguide often scatter light into the backward-propagating mode. These reflections could result in unwanted feedback to optical sources or crosstalk in bidirectional interconnects such as those employed in fiber-optic networks. It is often assumed that these reflected waves spatially overlap the forward-propagating waves making it difficult to implement optical circulators or isolators which separate or attenuate light based on its propagation direction. Here, we individually identify and map...

  15. Nanoscale doping of compound semiconductors by solid phase dopant diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Jaehyun, E-mail: jaehyun.ahn@utexas.edu; Koh, Donghyi; Roy, Anupam; Banerjee, Sanjay K., E-mail: banerjee@ece.utexas.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Chou, Harry [Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Kim, Taegon [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Semiconductor R& D Center, Samsung Electronics Corporation, 1 Samsungjeonja-ro, Hwasung, Kyounggi 445-330 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jonghan [Advanced Analysis Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Cheongryang, P.O. Box 131, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-21

    Achieving damage-free, uniform, abrupt, ultra-shallow junctions while simultaneously controlling the doping concentration on the nanoscale is an ongoing challenge to the scaling down of electronic device dimensions. Here, we demonstrate a simple method of effectively doping ΙΙΙ-V compound semiconductors, specifically InGaAs, by a solid phase doping source. This method is based on the in-diffusion of oxygen and/or silicon from a deposited non-stoichiometric silicon dioxide (SiO{sub x}) film on InGaAs, which then acts as donors upon activation by annealing. The dopant profile and concentration can be controlled by the deposited film thickness and thermal annealing parameters, giving active carrier concentration of 1.4 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}. Our results also indicate that conventional silicon based processes must be carefully reviewed for compound semiconductor device fabrication to prevent unintended doping.

  16. Long Channel Carbon Nanotube as an Alternative to Nanoscale Silicon Channels in Scaled MOSFETs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Loong Peng Tan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Long channel carbon nanotube transistor (CNT can be used to overcome the high electric field effects in nanoscale length silicon channel. When maximum electric field is reduced, the gate of a field-effect transistor (FET is able to gain control of the channel at varying drain bias. The device performance of a zigzag CNTFET with the same unit area as a nanoscale silicon metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET channel is assessed qualitatively. The drain characteristic of CNTFET and MOSFET device models as well as fabricated CNTFET device are explored over a wide range of drain and gate biases. The results obtained show that long channel nanotubes can significantly reduce the drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL effects in silicon MOSFET while sustaining the same unit area at higher current density.

  17. Formation and Characterization of Stacked Nanoscale Layers of Polymers and Silanes on Silicon Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Rosie; Davis, Brian; Conley, Hiram; Hurd, Katie; Linford, Matthew R.; Davis, Robert C.

    2008-10-01

    Chemical surface patterning at the nanoscale is a critical component of chemically directed assembly of nanoscale devices or sensitive biological molecules onto surfaces. Complete and consistent formation of nanoscale layers of silanes and polymers is a necessary first step for chemical patterning. We explored methods of silanizing silicon substrates for the purpose of functionalizing the surfaces. The chemical functionalization, stability, flatness, and repeatability of the process was characterized by use of ellipsometry, water contact angle, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). We found that forming the highest quality functionalized surfaces was accomplished through use of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Specifically, surfaces were plasma cleaned and hydrolyzed before the silane was applied. A polymer layer less then 2 nm in thickness was electrostatically bound to the silane layer. The chemical functionalization, stability, flatness, and repeatability of the process was also characterized for the polymer layer using ellipsometry, water contact angle, and AFM.

  18. Investigation of the Static and Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Nano-scale Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambaugh, Corey; Kwon, Soyoung; Jhe, Wonho

    2011-03-01

    The behavior of liquids on the nano-scale has become an area of interest as new fabrication techniques have allowed for increasingly smaller structures to be made. While much work has been done on the interactions forces at liquid and solid interfaces, questions still remain regarding the behavior of nano-scale liquids. By incorporating a micro-electromechanical force sensor (MEMS) into the quartz tuning fork based atomic force microscope (QTF-AFM) probe setup we are able to both manipulate and measure nano-scale water, which in turn provides information beyond the standard AFM approach. Here we look at both the static and dynamic mechanical properties of water formed between the tip of a (QTF-AFM) probe and the polysilicon surface of a MEMS device. Work supported by NSF grant OISE #0853104.

  19. Nanoscale control of low-dimensional spin structures in manganites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Wang; Iftikhar, Ahmed Malik; Renrong, Liang; Wen, Huang; Renkui, Zheng; Jinxing, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Due to the upcoming demands of next-generation electronic/magnetoelectronic devices with low-energy consumption, emerging correlated materials (such as superconductors, topological insulators and manganites) are one of the highly promising candidates for the applications. For the past decades, manganites have attracted great interest due to the colossal magnetoresistance effect, charge-spin-orbital ordering, and electronic phase separation. However, the incapable of deterministic control of those emerging low-dimensional spin structures at ambient condition restrict their possible applications. Therefore, the understanding and control of the dynamic behaviors of spin order parameters at nanoscale in manganites under external stimuli with low energy consumption, especially at room temperature is highly desired. In this review, we collected recent major progresses of nanoscale control of spin structures in manganites at low dimension, especially focusing on the control of their phase boundaries, domain walls as well as the topological spin structures (e.g., skyrmions). In addition, capacitor-based prototype spintronic devices are proposed by taking advantage of the above control methods in manganites. This capacitor-based structure may provide a new platform for the design of future spintronic devices with low-energy consumption. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2014CB920902), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61306105 and 51572278), the Information Science and Technology (TNList) Cross-discipline Foundation from Tsinghua National Laboratory, China and the Fund from the State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, China.

  20. Nanoscale imaging of freestanding nitrogen doped single layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Ganjigunte R. S.; Wang, Jian; Wells, Garth; Bradley, Michael P.; Borondics, Ferenc

    2015-01-01

    Graphene can be p-type or n-type doped by introduction of specific species. Doping can modulate the electronic properties of graphene, but opening a sizable-well-tuned bandgap is essential for graphene-based tunable electronic devices. N-doped graphene is widely used for device applications and is mostly achieved by introducing ammonia into the synthesis gas during the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Post synthesis treatment studies to fine-tune the electron hole doping in graphene are limited. In this work realization of N-doping in large area freestanding single layer graphene (LFG) is achieved by post treatment in nitrogen plasma. The changes in the chemical and electronic properties of graphene are followed with Raman microscopy and mapped via synchrotron based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the nanoscale.Graphene can be p-type or n-type doped by introduction of specific species. Doping can modulate the electronic properties of graphene, but opening a sizable-well-tuned bandgap is essential for graphene-based tunable electronic devices. N-doped graphene is widely used for device applications and is mostly achieved by introducing ammonia into the synthesis gas during the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Post synthesis treatment studies to fine-tune the electron hole doping in graphene are limited. In this work realization of N-doping in large area freestanding single layer graphene (LFG) is achieved by post treatment in nitrogen plasma. The changes in the chemical and electronic properties of graphene are followed with Raman microscopy and mapped via synchrotron based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the nanoscale. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05385k

  1. Design exploration of emerging nano-scale non-volatile memory

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    This book presents the latest techniques for characterization, modeling and design for nano-scale non-volatile memory (NVM) devices.  Coverage focuses on fundamental NVM device fabrication and characterization, internal state identification of memristic dynamics with physics modeling, NVM circuit design, and hybrid NVM memory system design-space optimization. The authors discuss design methodologies for nano-scale NVM devices from a circuits/systems perspective, including the general foundations for the fundamental memristic dynamics in NVM devices.  Coverage includes physical modeling, as well as the development of a platform to explore novel hybrid CMOS and NVM circuit and system design.   • Offers readers a systematic and comprehensive treatment of emerging nano-scale non-volatile memory (NVM) devices; • Focuses on the internal state of NVM memristic dynamics, novel NVM readout and memory cell circuit design, and hybrid NVM memory system optimization; • Provides both theoretical analysis and pr...

  2. Nanoscale nonlinear PANDA ring resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Yupapin, Preecha

    2012-01-01

    Microring/nanoring resonator is an interesting device that has been widely studied and investigated by researchers from a variety of specializations. This book begins with the basic background of linear and nonlinear ring resonators. A novel design of nano device known as a PANDA ring resonator is proposed. The use of the device in the form of a PANDA in applications such as nanoelectronics, measurement, communication, sensors, optical and quantum computing, drug delivery, hybrid transistor and a new concept of electron-hole pair is discussed in detail.

  3. Nanoscale Plasma Coating Inhibits Formation of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuanxi; Jones, John E; Yu, Haiqing; Yu, Qingsong; Christensen, Gordon D; Chen, Meng; Sun, Hongmin

    2015-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus commonly infects medical implants or devices, with devastating consequences for the patient. The infection begins with bacterial attachment to the device, followed by bacterial multiplication over the surface of the device, generating an adherent sheet of bacteria known as a biofilm. Biofilms resist antimicrobial therapy and promote persistent infection, making management difficult to futile. Infections might be prevented by engineering the surface of the device to discourage bacterial attachment and multiplication; however, progress in this area has been limited. We have developed a novel nanoscale plasma coating technology to inhibit the formation of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. We used monomeric trimethylsilane (TMS) and oxygen to coat the surfaces of silicone rubber, a material often used in the fabrication of implantable medical devices. By quantitative and qualitative analysis, the TMS/O2 coating significantly decreased the in vitro formation of S. aureus biofilms; it also significantly decreased in vivo biofilm formation in a mouse model of foreign-body infection. Further analysis demonstrated TMS/O2 coating significantly changed the protein adsorption, which could lead to reduced bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. These results suggest that TMS/O2 coating can be used to effectively prevent medical implant-related infections.

  4. Integration scheme of nanoscale resistive switching memory using bottom-up processes at room temperature for high-density memory applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Un-Bin; Lee, Jang-Sik

    2016-07-01

    A facile and versatile scheme is demonstrated to fabricate nanoscale resistive switching memory devices that exhibit reliable bipolar switching behavior. A solution process is used to synthesize the copper oxide layer into 250-nm via-holes that had been patterned in Si wafers. Direct bottom-up filling of copper oxide can facilitate fabrication of nanoscale memory devices without using vacuum deposition and etching processes. In addition, all materials and processes are CMOS compatible, and especially, the devices can be fabricated at room temperature. Nanoscale memory devices synthesized on wafers having 250-nm via-holes showed reproducible resistive switching programmable memory characteristics with reasonable endurance and data retention properties. This integration strategy provides a solution to overcome the scaling limit of current memory device fabrication methods.

  5. Integration scheme of nanoscale resistive switching memory using bottom-up processes at room temperature for high-density memory applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Un-Bin; Lee, Jang-Sik

    2016-01-01

    A facile and versatile scheme is demonstrated to fabricate nanoscale resistive switching memory devices that exhibit reliable bipolar switching behavior. A solution process is used to synthesize the copper oxide layer into 250-nm via-holes that had been patterned in Si wafers. Direct bottom-up filling of copper oxide can facilitate fabrication of nanoscale memory devices without using vacuum deposition and etching processes. In addition, all materials and processes are CMOS compatible, and especially, the devices can be fabricated at room temperature. Nanoscale memory devices synthesized on wafers having 250-nm via-holes showed reproducible resistive switching programmable memory characteristics with reasonable endurance and data retention properties. This integration strategy provides a solution to overcome the scaling limit of current memory device fabrication methods. PMID:27364856

  6. Integration scheme of nanoscale resistive switching memory using bottom-up processes at room temperature for high-density memory applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Un-Bin; Lee, Jang-Sik

    2016-07-01

    A facile and versatile scheme is demonstrated to fabricate nanoscale resistive switching memory devices that exhibit reliable bipolar switching behavior. A solution process is used to synthesize the copper oxide layer into 250-nm via-holes that had been patterned in Si wafers. Direct bottom-up filling of copper oxide can facilitate fabrication of nanoscale memory devices without using vacuum deposition and etching processes. In addition, all materials and processes are CMOS compatible, and especially, the devices can be fabricated at room temperature. Nanoscale memory devices synthesized on wafers having 250-nm via-holes showed reproducible resistive switching programmable memory characteristics with reasonable endurance and data retention properties. This integration strategy provides a solution to overcome the scaling limit of current memory device fabrication methods.

  7. Nanofabrication of Hybrid Optoelectronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibos, Alan Michael

    The material requirements for optoelectronic devices can vary dramatically depending on the application. Often disparate material systems need to be combined to allow for full device functionality. At the nanometer scale, this can often be challenging because of the inherent chemical and structural incompatibilities of nanofabrication. This dissertation concerns the integration of seemingly dissimilar materials into hybrid optoelectronic devices for photovoltaic, plasmonic, and photonic applications. First, we show that combining a single strip of conjugated polymer and inorganic nanowire can yield a nanoscale solar cell, and modeling of optical absorption and exciton diffusion in this device can provide insight into the efficiency of charge separation. Second, we use an on-chip nanowire light emitting diode to pump a colloidal quantum dot coupled to a silver waveguide. The resulting device is an electro-optic single plasmon source. Finally, we transfer diamond waveguides onto near-field avalanche photodiodes fabricated from GaAs. Embedded in the diamond waveguides are nitrogen vacancy color centers, and the mapping of emission from these single-photon sources is demonstrated using our on-chip detectors, eliminating the need for external photodetectors on an optical table. These studies show the promise of hybrid optoelectronic devices at the nanoscale with applications in alternative energy, optical communication, and quantum optics.

  8. Nanoscale phenomena in ferroelectric thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganpule, Chandan S.

    Ferroelectric materials are a subject of intense research as potential candidates for applications in non-volatile ferroelectric random access memories (FeRAM), piezoelectric actuators, infrared detectors, optical switches and as high dielectric constant materials for dynamic random access memories (DRAMs). With current trends in miniaturization, it becomes important that the fundamental aspects of scaling of ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties in these devices be studied thoroughly and their impact on the device reliability assessed. In keeping with this spirit of miniaturization, the dissertation has two broad themes: (a) Scaling of ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties and (b) The key reliability issue of retention loss. The thesis begins with a look at results on scaling studies of focused-ion-beam milled submicron ferroelectric capacitors using a variety of scanning probe characterization tools. The technique of piezoresponse microscopy, which is rapidly becoming an accepted form of domain imaging in ferroelectrics, has been used in this work for another very important application: providing reliable, repeatable and quantitative numbers for the electromechanical properties of submicron structures milled in ferroelectric films. This marriage of FIB and SPM based characterization of electromechanical and electrical properties has proven unbeatable in the last few years to characterize nanostructures qualitatively and quantitatively. The second half of this dissertation focuses on polarization relaxation in FeRAMs. In an attempt to understand the nanoscale origins of back-switching of ferroelectric domains, the time dependent relaxation of remnant polarization in epitaxial lead zirconate titanate (PbZr0.2Ti0.8O 3, PZT) ferroelectric thin films (used as a model system), containing a uniform 2-dimensional grid of 90° domains (c-axis in the plane of the film) has been examined using voltage modulated scanning force microscopy. A novel approach of

  9. Nanoscale Mixing of Soft Solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soo-Hyung; Lee, Sangwoo; Soto, Haidy E.; Lodge, Timothy P.; Bates, Frank S. (UMM); (Texas)

    2013-03-07

    Assessing the state of mixing on the molecular scale in soft solids is challenging. Concentrated solutions of micelles formed by self-assembly of polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-alt-propylene) (PS-PEP) diblock copolymers in squalane (C{sub 30}H{sub 62}) adopt a body-centered cubic (bcc) lattice, with glassy PS cores. Utilizing small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and isotopic labeling ({sup 1}H and {sup 2}H (D) polystyrene blocks) in a contrast-matching solvent (a mixture of squalane and perdeuterated squalane), we demonstrate quantitatively the remarkable fact that a commercial mixer can create completely random mixtures of micelles with either normal, PS(H), or deuterium-labeled, PS(D), cores on a well-defined bcc lattice. The resulting SANS intensity is quantitatively modeled by the form factor of a single spherical core. These results demonstrate both the possibility of achieving complete nanoscale mixing in a soft solid and the use of SANS to quantify the randomness.

  10. Dielectrophoretic Forces on the Nanoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaldach, C M; Bourcier, W L; Wilson, W D; Paul, P H

    2004-03-30

    We have developed a method of calculation of the dielectrophoretic force on a nanoparticle in a fluid environment where variations in the electric field and electric field gradients are on the same nanoscale as the particle. The Boundary Element Dielectrophoretic Force (BEDF) method involves constructing a solvent-accessible or molecular surface surrounding the particle, calculating the normal component of the electric field at the surface boundary elements and then solving a system of linear equations for the induced surface polarization charge on each element. Different surface elements of the molecule may experience quite different polarizing electric fields, unlike the situation in the point dipole approximation. A single 100 Angstrom radius ring test configuration is employed to facilitate comparison with the well-known point dipole approximation (PDA). We find remarkable agreement between the forces calculated by the BEDF and PDA methods for a 1 Angstrom polarizable sphere. However, for larger particles, the differences between the methods become qualitative as well as quantitative; the character of the force changes from attractive at the origin of the ring for a 50 Angstrom sphere, to repulsive for a 75 Angstrom sphere. Equally dramatic differences are found in a more complex electrical environment involving two sets of 10 rings.

  11. MEMS-enabled Dip Pen Nanolithography for directed nanoscale deposition and high-throughput nanofabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaheim, J. R.; Nafday, O. A.; Levesque, T.; Fragala, J.; Shile, R.

    2009-02-01

    Precision nanoscale deposition is a fundamental requirement for nanoscience research, development, and commercial implementation. Dip Pen Nanolithography(R) (DPN) is an inherently additive SPM-based technique which operates under ambient conditions, making it suitable to deposit a wide range of biological and inorganic materials. This technique is fundamentally enabled by a portfolio of MEMS devices tailored for microfluidic ink delivery, directed placement of nanoscale materials via actuated cantilevers, and cm2 tip arrays for high-throughput nanofabrication. Multiplexed deposition of nanoscale materials is a challenging problem, but we have implemented InkWells(TM) to enable selective delivery of ink materials to different tips in multiple probe arrays, while preventing cross-contamination. Active Pens(TM) can take advantage of this, directly place a variety of materials in nanoscale proximity, and do so in a "clean" fashion since the cantilevers can be manipulated in Z. Further, massively parallel two-dimensional nanopatterning with DPN is now commercially available via NanoInk's 2D nano PrintArray(TM), making DPN a highthroughput, flexible and versatile method for precision nanoscale pattern formation. By fabricating 55,000 tip-cantilevers across a 1 cm2 chip, we leverage the inherent versatility of DPN and demonstrate large area surface coverage, routinely achieving throughputs of 3×107 μm2 per hour. Further, we have engineered the device to be easy to use, wire-free, and fully integrated with the NSCRIPTOR's scanner, stage, and sophisticated lithography routines. In this talk we discuss the methods of operating this commercially available device, and subsequent results showing sub-100 nm feature sizes and excellent uniformity (standard deviation portfolio including: 1) rapidly and flexibly generating nanostructures; 2) chemically directed assembly and 3) directly writing biological materials.

  12. Emerging ferroelectric transistors with nanoscale channel materials: the possibilities, the limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xia

    2016-03-01

    Combining the nonvolatile, locally switchable polarization field of a ferroelectric thin film with a nanoscale electronic material in a field effect transistor structure offers the opportunity to examine and control a rich variety of mesoscopic phenomena and interface coupling. It is also possible to introduce new phases and functionalities into these hybrid systems through rational design. This paper reviews two rapidly progressing branches in the field of ferroelectric transistors, which employ two distinct classes of nanoscale electronic materials as the conducting channel, the two-dimensional (2D) electron gas graphene and the strongly correlated transition metal oxide thin films. The topics covered include the basic device physics, novel phenomena emerging in the hybrid systems, critical mechanisms that control the magnitude and stability of the field effect modulation and the mobility of the channel material, potential device applications, and the performance limitations of these devices due to the complex interface interactions and challenges in achieving controlled materials properties. Possible future directions for this field are also outlined, including local ferroelectric gate control via nanoscale domain patterning and incorporating other emergent materials in this device concept, such as the simple binary ferroelectrics, layered 2D transition metal dichalcogenides, and the 4d and 5d heavy metal compounds with strong spin-orbit coupling.

  13. Nanoscale thermal imaging of dissipation in quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbertal, D.; Cuppens, J.; Shalom, M. Ben; Embon, L.; Shadmi, N.; Anahory, Y.; Naren, H. R.; Sarkar, J.; Uri, A.; Ronen, Y.; Myasoedov, Y.; Levitov, L. S.; Joselevich, E.; Geim, A. K.; Zeldov, E.

    2016-11-01

    Energy dissipation is a fundamental process governing the dynamics of physical, chemical and biological systems. It is also one of the main characteristics that distinguish quantum from classical phenomena. In particular, in condensed matter physics, scattering mechanisms, loss of quantum information or breakdown of topological protection are deeply rooted in the intricate details of how and where the dissipation occurs. Yet the microscopic behaviour of a system is usually not formulated in terms of dissipation because energy dissipation is not a readily measurable quantity on the micrometre scale. Although nanoscale thermometry has gained much recent interest, existing thermal imaging methods are not sensitive enough for the study of quantum systems and are also unsuitable for the low-temperature operation that is required. Here we report a nano-thermometer based on a superconducting quantum interference device with a diameter of less than 50 nanometres that resides at the apex of a sharp pipette: it provides scanning cryogenic thermal sensing that is four orders of magnitude more sensitive than previous devices—below 1 μK Hz-1/2. This non-contact, non-invasive thermometry allows thermal imaging of very low intensity, nanoscale energy dissipation down to the fundamental Landauer limit of 40 femtowatts for continuous readout of a single qubit at one gigahertz at 4.2 kelvin. These advances enable the observation of changes in dissipation due to single-electron charging of individual quantum dots in carbon nanotubes. They also reveal a dissipation mechanism attributable to resonant localized states in graphene encapsulated within hexagonal boron nitride, opening the door to direct thermal imaging of nanoscale dissipation processes in quantum matter.

  14. Nanoscale content-addressable memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Bryan (Inventor); Principe, Jose C. (Inventor); Fortes, Jose (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A combined content addressable memory device and memory interface is provided. The combined device and interface includes one or more one molecular wire crossbar memories having spaced-apart key nanowires, spaced-apart value nanowires adjacent to the key nanowires, and configurable switches between the key nanowires and the value nanowires. The combination further includes a key microwire-nanowire grid (key MNG) electrically connected to the spaced-apart key nanowires, and a value microwire-nanowire grid (value MNG) electrically connected to the spaced-apart value nanowires. A key or value MNGs selects multiple nanowires for a given key or value.

  15. Nanoscale optofluidic sensor arrays for Dengue virus detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Sudeep; Akhmechet, Roman; Chen, Likun; Nugen, Sam; Baeumner, Antje; Erickson, David

    2007-09-01

    Here we present our work towards the development of Nanoscale Optofluidic Sensor Arrays (NOSA), which is an optofluidic architecture for performing label free, highly parallel, detections of biomolecular interactions. The approach is based on the use of optically resonant devices whose resonant wavelength is shifted due to a local change in refractive index caused by a positive binding event between a surface bound molecule and it solution phase target. A special two stage micro-/nanofluidics architecture is used to first functionalize the devices and then to deliver the targets. Two variants of the NOSA will be presented here. The first approach utilizes a 1D resonant cavity in a 1D silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguide with a unique differential size functionalization approach. This approach allows binding events at one or at a combination of the many sensing sites which causes a unique shift in the output resonator spectrum. The latter approach consists of a SOI waveguide evanescently coupled to multiple 1-D photonic crystal resonators of different sizes along the length, each of which is functionalized with a different oligonucleotide probe. These devices have an extremely low limit of detection and are compatible with aqueous environments. The primary advantage of these devices over existing technology is that it combines the sensitivity (limit of detection) of nanosensor technology with the parallelism of the microarray type format. Our initial application is in the detection of viral RNA of Dengue virus.

  16. Nanoscale ferroelectrics and multiferroics key processes and characterization issues, and nanoscale effects

    CERN Document Server

    Alguero, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    This book reviews the key issues in processing and characterization of nanoscale ferroelectrics and multiferroics, and provides a comprehensive description of their properties, with an emphasis in differentiating size effects of extrinsic ones like boundary or interface effects. Recently described nanoscale novel phenomena are also addressed. Organized into three parts it addresses key issues in processing (nanostructuring), characterization (of the nanostructured materials) and nanoscale effects. Taking full advantage of the synergies between nanoscale ferroelectrics and multiferroics, it covers materials nanostructured at all levels, from ceramic technologies like ferroelectric nanopowders, bulk nanostructured ceramics and thick films, and magnetoelectric nanocomposites, to thin films, either polycrystalline layer heterostructures or epitaxial systems, and to nanoscale free standing objects with specific geometries, such as nanowires and tubes at different levels of development. The book is developed from t...

  17. Field Effect Transistor in Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-26

    prominent rectification and NDC properties, due to various factors , such as, internal charge transfer , intrinsic molecular asymmetries, interference...characteristics. The magnetic field induced tuning of current may appear from several factors , such as, tuning of interfering electronic degenerate...play a major role [20,21]. Consequently, these devices remain in Coulomb blockade (CB) regime where integral charge transfer dominates the electron

  18. Attosecond Physics at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciappina, Marcelo F; Perez-Hernandez, J; Landsman, Alexandra; Okell, William; Zherebtsov, Sergey; Förg, Benjamin; Schötz, Johannes; Seiffert, Lennart; Fennel, Thomas; Shaaran, Tahir; Zimmermann, Tomas; Chacón, Alexis; Guichard, Roland; Zair, Amelle; Tisch, John; Marangos, J; Witting, Tobias; Braun, Avi; Maier, Stefan; Roso, Luis; Krüger, Michael; Hommelhoff, Peter; Kling, Matthias; Krausz, Ferenc; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2017-01-06

    Recently two emerging areas of research, attosecond and nanoscale physics, have started to come together. Attosecond physics deals with phenomena occurring when ultrashort laser pulses, with duration on the femto- and sub-femtosecond time scales, interact with atoms, molecules or solids. The laser-induced electron dynamics occurs natively on a timescale down to a few hundred or even tens of attoseconds, which is comparable with the optical field. For comparison, the revolution of an electron on a 1s orbital of a hydrogen atom is 152 as. On the other hand, the second branch involves the manipulation and engineering of mesoscopic systems, such as solids, metals and dielectrics, with nanometric precision. Although nano-engineering is a vast and well-established research field on its own, the merger with intense laser physics is relatively recent. In this report on progress we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical overview of physics that takes place when short and intense laser pulses interact with nanosystems, such as metal- lic and dielectric nanostructures. In particular we elucidate how the spatially inhomogeneous laser induced fields at a nanometer scale modify the laser-driven electron dynamics. Consequently, this has important impact on pivotal processes such as above-threshold ionization and high-order harmonic generation. The deep understanding of the coupled dynamics between these spatially inhomogeneous fields and matter configures a promising way to new avenues of research and applications. Thanks to the maturity that attosecond physics has reached, together with the tremendous advance in material engineering and manipulation techniques, the age of atto-nano physics has begun, but it is in the initial stage. We present thus some of the open questions, challenges and prospects for experimental confirmation of theoretical predictions, as well as experiments aimed at characterizing the induced fields and the unique electron dynamics initiated

  19. Scanning Nanospin Ensemble Microscope for Nanoscale Magnetic and Thermal Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetienne, Jean-Philippe; Lombard, Alain; Simpson, David A; Ritchie, Cameron; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L

    2016-01-13

    Quantum sensors based on solid-state spins provide tremendous opportunities in a wide range of fields from basic physics and chemistry to biomedical imaging. However, integrating them into a scanning probe microscope to enable practical, nanoscale quantum imaging is a highly challenging task. Recently, the use of single spins in diamond in conjunction with atomic force microscopy techniques has allowed significant progress toward this goal, but generalization of this approach has so far been impeded by long acquisition times or by the absence of simultaneous topographic information. Here, we report on a scanning quantum probe microscope which solves both issues by employing a nanospin ensemble hosted in a nanodiamond. This approach provides up to an order of magnitude gain in acquisition time while preserving sub-100 nm spatial resolution both for the quantum sensor and topographic images. We demonstrate two applications of this microscope. We first image nanoscale clusters of maghemite particles through both spin resonance spectroscopy and spin relaxometry, under ambient conditions. Our images reveal fast magnetic field fluctuations in addition to a static component, indicating the presence of both superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic particles. We next demonstrate a new imaging modality where the nanospin ensemble is used as a thermometer. We use this technique to map the photoinduced heating generated by laser irradiation of a single gold nanoparticle in a fluid environment. This work paves the way toward new applications of quantum probe microscopy such as thermal/magnetic imaging of operating microelectronic devices and magnetic detection of ion channels in cell membranes.

  20. Biological responses to immobilized microscale and nanoscale surface topographies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Shelby A; Kumar, Girish; Narayan, Roger J; Goering, Peter L

    2017-07-16

    Cellular responses are highly influenced by biochemical and biomechanical interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM). Due to the impact of ECM architecture on cellular responses, significant research has been dedicated towards developing biomaterials that mimic the physiological environment for design of improved medical devices and tissue engineering scaffolds. Surface topographies with microscale and nanoscale features have demonstrated an effect on numerous cellular responses, including cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, gene expression, protein production, and differentiation; however, relationships between biological responses and surface topographies are difficult to establish due to differences in cell types and biomaterial surface properties. Therefore, it is important to optimize implant surface feature characteristics to elicit desirable biological responses for specific applications. The goal of this work was to review studies investigating the effects of microstructured and nanostructured biomaterials on in vitro biological responses through fabrication of microscale and nanoscale surface topographies, physico-chemical characterization of material surface properties, investigation of protein adsorption dynamics, and evaluation of cellular responses in specific biomedical applications. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Nanoscale mechanical energy harvesting using piezoelectricity and flexoelectricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xu; Hu, Shuling; Shen, Shengping

    2017-03-01

    Due to the electromechanical coupling effect, mechanical energy can be converted into electrical energy in certain materials. A theoretical framework is established to investigate the circuit voltage, electric power of nanoscale mechanical energy harvesting, in which the mechanical vibration energy was converted into electrical energy by piezoelectric and flexoelectric effects. Analytical solutions for the maximum electric potential, circuit voltage and electric power generated in bent BaTiO3 (BT), ZnO nanowires (NWs) and Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 (PMN) nanofilms (NFs) were derived. Static and dynamic analyses are conducted to obtain the fundamental information of these mechanical energy harvestings. Different from the previous studies, the flexoelectric-mechanism are included in the fundamental mechanical frameworks. The maximum electric potential generated in the BT, ZnO NWs and PMN NF is found to be enhanced by flexoelectricity in the static case, meanwhile the circuit voltage and electric power are dramatic enhanced by flexoelectricity when the geometric dimensions shrinks to dozens of nanometers. The mechanical limitation condition is employed to calculate the practical maximum electric potential, circuit voltage and electric power. This work tries to provide a comprehensive understanding of the mechanical energy harvesting capability of these nanoscale structures and provide valuable information for designing flexoelectricity-based nanogenerator devices.

  2. Electronic and optoelectronic nano-devices based on carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarselli, M; Castrucci, P; De Crescenzi, M

    2012-08-08

    The discovery and understanding of nanoscale phenomena and the assembly of nanostructures into different devices are among the most promising fields of material science research. In this scenario, carbon nanostructures have a special role since, in having only one chemical element, they allow physical properties to be calculated with high precision for comparison with experiment. Carbon nanostructures, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in particular, have such remarkable electronic and structural properties that they are used as active building blocks for a large variety of nanoscale devices. We review here the latest advances in research involving carbon nanotubes as active components in electronic and optoelectronic nano-devices. Opportunities for future research are also identified.

  3. 纳米制备与表征%Nanoscale Fabrication and Characterisation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭全民

    2003-01-01

    @@ Are there great things to be discovered at the nanoscale? The answer is almost certainly"yes".From the microscale to the nanoscale,it is far from just scaling down,it is a "great leap forward"into a complete new regime where the physical and chemical properties of materials exhibit size dependent behaviour.A thorough understanding of the new physics and chemistry at the nanometer scale will lead to the design and fabrication of smart new functional materials and devices, for instance,electronic devices that operate on the basic principles of quantum mechanics.Nanofabrication will not go far without reliable measurement and characterisation methods.Indeed,the boom in nanotechnology all started when the scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) was invented in 1982, which enabled surface imagning with atomic resolution.

  4. Anomalous DIBL Effect in Fully Depleted SOI MOSFETs Using Nanoscale Gate-Recessed Channel Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avi Karsenty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale Gate-Recessed Channel (GRC Fully Depleted- (FD- SOI MOSFET device with a silicon channel thickness (tSi as low as 2.2 nm was first tested at room temperature for functionality check and then tested at low temperature (77 K for I-V characterizations. In spite of its FD-SOI nanoscale thickness and long channel feature, the device has surprisingly exhibited a Drain-Induced Barrier Lowering (DIBL effect at RT. However, this effect was suppressed at 77 K. If the apparition of such anomalous effect can be explained by a parasitic short channel transistor located at the edges of the channel, its suppression is explained by the decrease of the potential barrier between the drain and the channel when lowering the temperature.

  5. The memory effect of nanoscale memristors investigated by conducting scanning probe microscopy methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Moreno

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on the use of scanning force microscopy as a versatile tool for the electrical characterization of nanoscale memristors fabricated on ultrathin La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO films. Combining conventional conductive imaging and nanoscale lithography, reversible switching between low-resistive (ON and high-resistive (OFF states was locally achieved by applying voltages within the range of a few volts. Retention times of several months were tested for both ON and OFF states. Spectroscopy modes were used to investigate the I–V characteristics of the different resistive states. This permitted the correlation of device rectification (reset with the voltage employed to induce each particular state. Analytical simulations by using a nonlinear dopant drift within a memristor device explain the experimental I–V bipolar cycles.

  6. Micro/nanoscale patterning of nanostructured metal substrates for plasmonic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, S Shiv; Rizzello, Loris; Cingolani, Roberto; Rinaldi, Ross; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2009-04-28

    The ability to precisely control the pattern of different metals at the micro- and nanoscale, along with their topology, has been demonstrated to be essential for many applications, ranging from material science to biomedical devices, electronics, and photonics. In this work, we show a novel approach, based on a combination of lithographic techniques and galvanic displacement reactions, to fabricate micro- and nanoscale patterns of different metals, with highly controlled surface roughness, onto a number of suitable substrates. We demonstrate the possibility to exploit such metal films to achieve significant fluorescence enhancement of nearby fluorophores, while maintaining accurate spatial control of the process, from submicron resolution to centimeter-sized features. These patterns may be also exploited for a wide range of applications, including SERS, solar cells, DNA microarray technology, hydrophobic/hydrophilic substrates, and magnetic devices.

  7. Investigation of MEMS force sensors for nano-scale water measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Soyoung; Jhe, Wonho; Stambaugh, Corey

    2011-03-01

    Nanoscale water formed by capillary condensation has typically been studied by means of an atomic force microscope (AFM). While this approach can provide details about the dynamic visco-elastic properties, it is limited in the type of information that can be measured. Here we propose replacing the fixed sample surface generally used in AFM systems with movable micro-mechanical force sensors (MEMS) fabricated specifically for tapping mode or shear mode. By incorporating a MEMS device we can directly measure the adhesion force, pull-in distance and capillary force of nano confined water while the AFM collects information pertaining to the dynamic visco-elastic properties. In this talk, we will characterize the force measurement in the system and discuss the behavior of the device in the presence of nano-scale water. Work supported NRF of Korea and NSF grant OISE #0853104.

  8. Micro-and/or nano-scale patterned porous membranes, methods of making membranes, and methods of using membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xianbin

    2015-01-22

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for materials that include a pre-designed patterned, porous membrane (e.g., micro- and/or nano-scale patterned), structures or devices that include a pre-designed patterned, porous membrane, methods of making pre-designed patterned, porous membranes, methods of separation, and the like.

  9. New Circuit Techniques Enabling Millimeter-Wave and Terahertz Transceivers in Nanoscale Silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    The vastly under-utilized spectrum in the sub-THz frequency range enables disruptive applications including 10Gb/s chip-to-chip wireless communications and imaging/spectroscopy. Owing to aggressive scaling in feature size and device fT/fmax, nanoscale CMOS technology potentially enables integration of sophisticated systems at this frequency range. This dissertation mainly focuses on the design of a 210GHz fundamental transceiver and also covers the design of a W-band fully integrated imaging ...

  10. Nanoscale thermal imaging of dissipation in quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Halbertal, Dorri; Shalom, Moshe Ben; Embon, Lior; Shadmi, Nitzan; Anahory, Yonathan; Naren, HR; Sarkar, Jayanta; Uri, Aviram; Ronen, Yuval; Myasoedov, Yury; Levitov, Leonid; Joselevich, Ernesto; Geim, Andre Konstantin; Zeldov, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Energy dissipation is a fundamental process governing the dynamics of physical, chemical, and biological systems. It is also one of the main characteristics distinguishing quantum and classical phenomena. In condensed matter physics, in particular, scattering mechanisms, loss of quantum information, or breakdown of topological protection are deeply rooted in the intricate details of how and where the dissipation occurs. Despite its vital importance the microscopic behavior of a system is usually not formulated in terms of dissipation because the latter is not a readily measureable quantity on the microscale. Although nanoscale thermometry is gaining much recent interest, the existing thermal imaging methods lack the necessary sensitivity and are unsuitable for low temperature operation required for study of quantum systems. Here we report a superconducting quantum interference nano-thermometer device with sub 50 nm diameter that resides at the apex of a sharp pipette and provides scanning cryogenic thermal se...

  11. Physical IC debug ─ backside approach and nanoscale challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Kerst

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Physical analysis for IC functionality in submicron technologies requires access through chip backside. Based upon typical global backside preparation with 50–100 µm moderate silicon thickness remaining, a state of the art of the analysis techniques available for this purpose is presented and evaluated for functional analysis and layout pattern resolution potential. A circuit edit technique valid for nano technology ICs, is also presented that is based upon the formation of local trenches using the bottom of Shallow Trench Isolation (STI as endpoint for Focused Ion Beam (FIB milling. As a derivative from this process, a locally ultra thin silicon device can be processed, creating a back surface as work bench for breakthrough applications of nanoscale analysis techniques to a fully functional circuit through chip backside. Several applications demonstrate the power and potential of this new approach.

  12. An organic donor/acceptor lateral superlattice at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Roberto; Ecija, David; Fernandez, Gustavo; Gallego, José María; Sanchez, Luis; Martín, Nazario; Miranda, Rodolfo

    2007-09-01

    A precise control of the nanometer-scale morphology in systems containing mixtures of donor/acceptor molecules is a key factor to improve the efficiency of organic photovoltaic devices. Here we report on a scanning tunneling microscopy study of the first stages of growth of 2-[9-(1,3-dithiol-2-ylidene)anthracen-10(9H)-ylidene]-1,3-dithiole, as electron donor, and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester, as electron acceptor, on a Au(111) substrate under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Due to differences in bonding strength with the substrate and different interactions with the Au(111) herringbone surface reconstruction, mixed thin films spontaneously segregate into a lateral superlattice of interdigitated nanoscale stripes with a characteristic width of about 10-20 nm, a morphology that has been predicted to optimize the efficiency of organic solar cells.

  13. Nanoscale resolution immersion scanning thermal microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Tovee, Peter D

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale thermal properties are becoming of extreme importance for modern electronic circuits that dissipate increasing power on the length scale of few tens of nanometers, and for chemical and physical properties sensors and biosensors using nanoscale sized features. While Scanning Thermal Microscopy (SThM) is known for its ability to probe thermal properties and heat generation with nanoscale resolution, until today it was perceived impossible to use it in the liquid environment due to dominating direct heat exchange between microfabricated thermal probe and surrounding liquid that would deteriorate spatial resolution. Nonetheless, our theoretical analysis of SThM in liquids showed that for certain design of SThM probe with resistive heater located near the probe tip, their thermal signal is only moderately affected, by less than half on immersion in a dodecane environment. More significantly, its spatial resolution, surprisingly, would remain practically unaffected, and the thermal contact between the tip...

  14. Nanoscale Tunable Strong Carrier Density Modulation of 2D Materials for Metamaterials and Other Tunable Optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng; Efetov, Dmitri; Shiue, Ren-Jye; Nanot, Sebastien; Hempel, Marek; Kong, Jing; Koppens, Frank; Englund, Dirk

    Strong spatial tunability of the charge carrier density at nanoscale is essential to many 2D-material-based electronic and optoelectronic applications. As an example, plasmonic metamaterials with nanoscale dimensions would make graphene plasmonics at visible and near-infrared wavelengths possible. However, existing gating techniques based on conventional dielectric gating geometries limit the spatial resolution and achievable carrier concentration, strongly restricting the available wavelength, geometry, and quality of the devices. Here, we present a novel spatially selective electrolyte gating approach that allows for in-plane spatial Fermi energy modulation of 2D materials of more than 1 eV (carrier density of n = 1014 cm-2) across a length of 2 nm. We present electrostatic simulations as well as electronic transport, photocurrent, cyclic voltammetry and optical spectroscopy measurements to characterize the performance of the gating technique applied to graphene devices. The high spatial resolution, high doping capacity, full tunability and self-aligned device geometry of the presented technique opens a new venue for nanoscale metamaterial engineering of 2D materials for complete optical absorption, nonlinear optics and sensing, among other applications.

  15. Nanoscale Lasers Based on Carbon Peapods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Shao-Long; SHEN Jian-Qi

    2006-01-01

    A scheme of nanoscale lasers based on the so-called carbon peapods is examined in detail.Since there is considerable cylindrical empty space in the middle of a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT),it can serve as a laser resonant cavity that consists of two highly reflecting alignment "mirrors" separated by a distance.These mirrors refer to ordered arrays of C60 inside SWCNTs,which have photonic bandgap structures.Meanwhile,ideally single-mode lasers are supposed to be produced in the nanoscale resonant cavity.

  16. Atomic nanoscale technology in the nuclear industry

    CERN Document Server

    Woo, Taeho

    2011-01-01

    Developments at the nanoscale are leading to new possibilities and challenges for nuclear applications in areas ranging from medicine to international commerce to atomic power production/waste treatment. Progress in nanotech is helping the nuclear industry slash the cost of energy production. It also continues to improve application reliability and safety measures, which remain a critical concern, especially since the reactor disasters in Japan. Exploring the new wide-ranging landscape of nuclear function, Atomic Nanoscale Technology in the Nuclear Industry details the breakthroughs in nanosca

  17. Nanoscale chirality in metal and semiconductor nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jatish; Thomas, K George; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2016-10-18

    The field of chirality has recently seen a rejuvenation due to the observation of chirality in inorganic nanomaterials. The advancements in understanding the origin of nanoscale chirality and the potential applications of chiroptical nanomaterials in the areas of optics, catalysis and biosensing, among others, have opened up new avenues toward new concepts and design of novel materials. In this article, we review the concept of nanoscale chirality in metal nanoclusters and semiconductor quantum dots, then focus on recent experimental and theoretical advances in chiral metal nanoparticles and plasmonic chirality. Selected examples of potential applications and an outlook on the research on chiral nanomaterials are additionally provided.

  18. Chromosome congression explained by nanoscale electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, L John; Shain, Daniel H

    2014-02-24

    Nanoscale electrostatic microtubule disassembly forces between positively charged molecules in kinetochores and negative charges on plus ends of microtubules have been implicated in poleward chromosome motions and may also contribute to antipoleward chromosome movements. We propose that chromosome congression can be understood in terms of antipoleward nanoscale electrostatic microtubule assembly forces between negatively charged microtubule plus ends and like-charged chromosome arms, acting in conjunction with poleward microtubule disassembly forces. Several other aspects of post-attachment prometaphase chromosome motions, as well as metaphase oscillations, are consistently explained within this framework.

  19. Functionalising surfaces at the nanoscale using plasma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R

    2009-01-01

    Plasma technology offers a highly effective toolbox for nanoscale surface engineering of materials. The potential variety of nanoscale features and new properties that can be achieved are reviewed here.

  20. Nanoscale heat transfer and thermoelectrics for alternative energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Richard

    2011-03-01

    In the area of alternative energy, thermoelectrics have experienced an unprecedented growth in popularity because of their ability to convert waste heat into electricity. Wired in reverse, thermoelectrics can act as refrigeration devices, where they are promising because they are small in size and lightweight, have no moving parts, and have rapid on/off cycles. However, due to their low efficiencies bulk thermoelectrics have historically been a niche market. Only in the last decade has thermoelectric efficiency exceeded ~ 20 % due to fabrication of nanostructured materials. Nanoscale materials have this advantage because electronic and acoustic confinement effects can greatly increase thermoelectric efficiency beyond bulk values. In this talk, I will introduce our work in the area of nanoscale heat transfer with the goal of more efficient thermoelectrics. I will discuss our experiments and methods to study acoustic confinement in nanostructures and present some of our new nanostructured thermoelectric materials. To study acoustic confinement we are building a nanoscale phonon spectrometer. The instrument can excite phonon modes in nanostructures in the ~ 100 s of GHz. Ballistic phonons from the generator are used to probe acoustic confinement and surface scattering effects. Transmission studies using this device will help optimize materials and morphologies for more efficient nanomaterial-based thermoelectrics. For materials, our group has synthesized nano-layer superlattices of Na x Co O2 . Sodium cobaltate was recently discovered to have a high Seebeck coeficent and is being studied as an oxide thermoelectric material. The thickness of our nano-layers ranges from 5 nm to 300 nm while the lengths can be varied between 10 μ m and 4 mm. Typical aspect ratios are 40 nm: 4 mm, or 1:100,000. Thermoelectric characterization of samples with tilted multiple-grains along the measurement axis indicate a thermoelectric efficiency on par with current polycrystalline samples

  1. Nanoscale chemical sensor based on organic thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Fine, Daniel; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2004-12-01

    Nanoscale organic thin-film transistors were fabricated to investigate their chemical sensing properties. The use of a four-terminal geometry ensures that the sensor active area is truly nanoscale, and eliminates undesirable spreading currents. The sensor response was markedly different in nanoscale sensors compared to large-area sensors for the same analyte-semiconductor combination. The chemical sensing mechanisms in both microscale and nanoscale transistors are briefly discussed.

  2. Nanoscale Magnetic Materials for Energy-Efficient Spin Based Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incorvia, Jean Anne Currivan

    In this dissertation, I study the physical behavior of nanoscale magnetic materials and build spin-based transistors that encode information in magnetic domain walls. It can be argued that energy dissipation is the most serious problem in modern electronics, and one that has been resistant to a breakthrough. Wasted heat during computing both wastes energy and hinders further technology scaling. This is an opportunity for physicists and engineers to come up with creative solutions for more energy-efficient computing. I present the device we have designed, called domain wall logic (DW-Logic). Information is stored in the position of a magnetic domain wall in a ferromagnetic wire and read out using a magnetic tunnel junction. This hybrid design uses electrical current as the input and output, keeping the device compatible with charge- based transistors. I build an iterative model to predict both the micromagnetic and circuit behavior of DW- Logic, showing a single device can operate as a universal gate. The model shows we can build complex circuits including an 18-gate Full Adder, and allows us to predict the device switching energy compared to complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) transistors. Comparing ?15 nm feature nodes, I find DW-Logic made with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy materials, and utilizing both spin torque transfer and the Spin Hall effect, could operate with 1000x reduced switching energy compared to CMOS. I fabricate DW-Logic device prototypes and show in experiment they can act as AND and NAND gates. I demonstrate that one device can drive two subsequent devices, showing gain, which is a necessary requirement for fanout. I also build a clocked ring oscillator circuit to demonstrate successful bit propagation in a DW-Logic circuit and show that properly scaled devices can have improved operation. Through building the devices, I develop a novel fabrication method for patterning sub-25 nm magnetic wires with very low (˜ 2 nm) average edge

  3. Mapping nanoscale thermal transfer in-liquid environment-immersion scanning thermal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovee, Peter D; Kolosov, Oleg V

    2013-11-22

    Nanoscale heat transport is of increasing importance as it often defines performance of modern processors and thermoelectric nanomaterials, and affects functioning of chemical sensors and biosensors. Scanning thermal microscopy (SThM) is the leading tool for nanoscale mapping of thermal properties, but it is often negatively affected by unstable tip-surface thermal contacts. While operating SThM in-liquid environment may allow unimpeded thermal contact and open new application areas, it has so far been regarded as impossible due to increased heat dissipation into the liquid, and the perceived reduced spatial thermal resolution. Nevertheless, in this paper we show that such liquid immersion SThM (iSThM) is fully feasible and, while its thermal sensitivity and spatial resolution is somewhat below that of in-air SThM, it has sufficient thermal contrast to detect thermal conductivity variations in few tens of nm thick graphite nanoflake and metal-polymer nanostructured interconnects. Our results confirm that thermal sensing in iSThM can provide nanoscale resolution on the order of 30 nm, that, coupled with the absence of tip snap-in due to the elimination of capillary forces, opens the possibility for nanoscale thermal mapping in liquids, including thermal phenomena in energy storage devices, catalysts and biosystems.

  4. The potential and device physics of interdigitated thin-film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Wyatt K.

    2008-05-01

    The device physics of thin-film solar cells with interdigitated p-n junctions is examined for a range of spatial sizes, band offsets, and material parameters. The results are illustrated by focusing on recent nanoscale concepts for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells. Ideally, nanoscale interdigitated junctions can improve solar cell performance relative to planar-junction devices, and make reasonably high solar cell efficiencies (>15%) attainable even with mediocre electro-optical materials.

  5. Lessons learned from nanoscale specimens tested by MEMS-based apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhebeary, Mohamed; Saif, M. Taher A.

    2017-06-01

    The last two decades were marked by the innovative synthesis of nanomaterials and devices. The success of these devices hinges on the mechanical properties of nanomaterials and an understanding of their deformation and failure mechanisms. Many novel testing techniques have been developed to test materials at small scale. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) apparatus developed to characterize materials at nanoscale, and the key insights gained on structure-property relations of materials through these characterizations. Finally, new applications of MEMS in testing living materials, such as tissues and cells, for disease diagnosis and prognosis are discussed.

  6. Interplay of Peltier and Seebeck Effects in Nanoscale Nonlocal Spin Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, F. L.; Slachter, A.; Adam, J.-P.; van Wees, B. J.

    2010-09-01

    We have experimentally studied the role of thermoelectric effects in nanoscale nonlocal spin valve devices. A finite element thermoelectric model is developed to calculate the generated Seebeck voltages due to Peltier and Joule heating in the devices. By measuring the first, second, and third harmonic voltage response nonlocally, the model is experimentally examined. The results indicate that the combination of Peltier and Seebeck effects contributes significantly to the nonlocal baseline resistance. Moreover, we found that the second and third harmonic response signals can be attributed to Joule heating and temperature dependencies of both the Seebeck coefficient and resistivity.

  7. Spin transport in nanoscale spin valves and magnetic tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patibandla, Sridhar

    Spintronics or electronics that utilizes the spin degree of freedom of a single charge carrier (or an ensemble of charge carriers) to store, process, sense or communicate data and information is a rapidly burgeoning field in electronics. In spintronic devices, information is encoded in the spin polarization of a single carrier (or multiple carriers) and the spin(s) of these carrier(s) are manipulated for device operation. This strategy could lead to devices with low power consumption. This dissertation investigates spin transport in one dimensional and two dimensional semiconductors, with a view to applications in spintronic devices. This dissertation is arranged as follows: Chapter 1 gives a detailed introduction and necessary background to understand aspects of spin injection into a semiconductor from a spin polarized source such as a ferromagnet, and spin polarized electron transport in the semiconductor. Chapter 2 discusses the nanoporous alumina technique that is employed to fabricate nanowires and nanowire spin valves for the investigation of spin transport in 1D semiconductors. Chapter 3 investigates the spin transport in quasi one-dimensional spin valves with germanium spacer layer. These spin valves with 50nm in diameter and 1 mum length were fabricated using the porous alumina technique. Spin transport in nanoscale germanium spin valves was demonstrated and the spin relaxation lengths and the spin relaxation times were calculated. Chapter 4 discusses spin transport studies conducted in bulk high purity germanium with a view to comparing spin relaxation mechanisms in low mobility nanowires and high mobility bulk structures. Lateral spin valve with tunnel injectors were employed in this study and the spin transport measurements were conducted at various temperatures. The spin relaxation rates were measured as a function of temperature which allowed us to distinguish between two different mechanisms---D'yakonov-Perel' and Elliott-Yafet---that dominate spin

  8. Benchtop Nanoscale Patterning Using Soft Lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meenakshi, Viswanathan; Babayan, Yelizaveta; Odom, Teri W.

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines several benchtop nanoscale patterning experiments that can be incorporated into undergraduate laboratories or advanced high school chemistry curricula. The experiments, supplemented by an online video lab manual, are based on soft lithographic techniques such as replica molding, micro-molding in capillaries, and micro-contact…

  9. Anomalous freezing behavior of nanoscale liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spangler, E. J.; Kumar, P. B. S.; Laradji, M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of the finite size of one-component liposomes on their phase behavior is investigated via simulations of an implicit-solvent model of self-assembled lipid bilayers. We found that the high curvature of nanoscale liposomes has a significant effect on their freezing behavior. While...

  10. Bio-Conjugates for Nanoscale Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Klaus

    Bio-conjugates for Nanoscale Applications is the title of this thesis, which covers three different projects in chemical bio-conjugation research, namely synthesis and applications of: Lipidated fluorescent peptides, carbohydrate oxime-azide linkers and N-aryl O-R2 oxyamine derivatives. Lipidated...

  11. Adsorption Kinetics in Nanoscale Porous Coordination Polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nune, Satish K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; McGrail, Benard Peter; Annapureddy, Harsha V. R.; Dang, Liem X.; Mei, Donghai; Karri, Naveen; Alvine, Kyle J.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Arey, Bruce W.; Dohnalkova, Alice

    2015-10-07

    Nanoscale porous coordination polymers were synthesized using simple wet chemical method. The effect of various polymer surfactants on colloidal stability and shape selectivity was investigated. Our results suggest that the nanoparticles exhibited significantly improved adsorption kinetics compared to bulk crystals due to decreased diffusion path lengths and preferred crystal plane interaction.

  12. Fats, Oils, & Colors of a Nanoscale Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisensky, George C.; Horoszewski, Dana; Gentry, Kenneth L.; Zenner, Greta M.; Crone, Wendy C .

    2006-01-01

    Phase changes and intermolecular forces are important physical science concepts but are not always easy to present in an active learning format. This article presents several interactive activities in which students plot the melting points of some fatty acids and explore the effect that the nanoscale size and shape of molecules have on the…

  13. Traceable nanoscale measurement at NML-SIRIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlan, Ahmad M.; Abdul Hapip, A. I. [National Metrology Laboratory SIRIM Berhad (NML-SIRIM), Lot PT 4803, Bandar Baru Salak Tinggi, 43900 Sepang (Malaysia)

    2012-06-29

    The role of national metrology institute (NMI) has always been very crucial in national technology development. One of the key activities of the NMI is to provide traceable measurement in all parameters under the International System of Units (SI). Dimensional measurement where size and shape are two important features investigated, is one of the important area covered by NMIs. To support the national technology development, particularly in manufacturing sectors and emerging technology such nanotechnology, the National Metrology Laboratory, SIRIM Berhad (NML-SIRIM), has embarked on a project to equip Malaysia with state-of-the-art nanoscale measurement facility with the aims of providing traceability of measurement at nanoscale. This paper will look into some of the results from current activities at NML-SIRIM related to measurement at nanoscale particularly on application of atomic force microscope (AFM) and laser based sensor in dimensional measurement. Step height standards of different sizes were measured using AFM and laser-based sensors. These probes are integrated into a long-range nanoscale measuring machine traceable to the international definition of the meter thus ensuring their traceability. Consistency of results obtained by these two methods will be discussed and presented. Factors affecting their measurements as well as their related uncertainty of measurements will also be presented.

  14. Bio-Conjugates for Nanoscale Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Klaus

    Bio-conjugates for Nanoscale Applications is the title of this thesis, which covers three different projects in chemical bio-conjugation research, namely synthesis and applications of: Lipidated fluorescent peptides, carbohydrate oxime-azide linkers and N-aryl O-R2 oxyamine derivatives. Lipidated...

  15. Powdered Hexagonal Boron Nitride Reducing Nanoscale Wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chkhartishvili, L.; Matcharashvili, T.; Esiava, R.; Tsagareishvili, O.; Gabunia, D.; Margiev, B.; Gachechiladze, A.

    2013-05-01

    A morphology model is suggested for nano-powdered hexagonal boron nitride that can serve as an effective solid additive to liquid lubricants. It allows to estimate the specific surface, that is a hard-to-measure parameter, based on average size of powder particles. The model can be used also to control nanoscale wear processes.

  16. A compact charge-based model to study the nanoscale undoped double gate MOSFETs for nanoelectronic circuit design using genetic algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendib, T.; Djeffal, F.; Arar, D.

    2013-04-01

    The analytical modeling of nanoscale devices is an important area of computer-aided design for fast and accurate nanoelectronic design and optimization. In the present paper, a new approach for modeling semiconductor devices, nanoscale double gate DG MOSFETs, by use of the gradual channel approximation (GC) approach and genetic algorithm optimization technique (GA) is presented. The proposed approach combines the universal optimization and fitting capability of GA and the cost-effective optimization concept of quantum correction, to achieve reliable, accurate and simple compact models for nanoelectronic circuit simulations. Our compact models give good predictions of the quantum capacitance, threshold voltage shift, quantum inversion charge density and drain current. These models have been verified with 2D self-consistent results from numerical calculations of the coupled Poisson-Schrödinger equations. The developed models can also be incorporated into nanoelectronic circuit simulators to study the nanoscale CMOS-based devices without impact on the computational time and data storage.

  17. Optically Reconfigurable Photonic Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Qian; Gholipour, Behrad; Wang, Chih-Ming; Yuan, Guanghui; Teng, Jinghua; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2015-01-01

    Optoelectronic components with adjustable parameters, from variable-focal-length lenses to spectral filters that can change functionality upon stimulation, have enormous technological importance. Tuning of such components is conventionally achieved by either micro- or nano-mechanical actuation of their consitutive parts, stretching or application of thermal stimuli. Here we report a new dielectric metasurface platform for reconfigurable optical components that are created with light in a non-volatile and reversible fashion. Such components are written, erased and re-written as two-dimensional binary or grey-scale patterns into a nanoscale film of phase change material by inducing a refractive-index-changing phase-transition with tailored trains of femtosecond pulses. We combine germanium-antimony-tellurium-based films optimized for high-optical-contrast ovonic switching with a sub-wavelength-resolution optical writing process to demonstrate technologically relevant devices: visible-range reconfigurable bi-chr...

  18. Writing to and reading from a nano-scale crossbar memory based on memristors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vontobel, Pascal O.; Robinett, Warren; Kuekes, Philip J.; Stewart, Duncan R.; Straznicky, Joseph; Williams, R. Stanley

    2009-10-01

    We present a design study for a nano-scale crossbar memory system that uses memristors with symmetrical but highly nonlinear current-voltage characteristics as memory elements. The memory is non-volatile since the memristors retain their state when un-powered. In order to address the nano-wires that make up this nano-scale crossbar, we use two coded demultiplexers implemented using mixed-scale crossbars (in which CMOS-wires cross nano-wires and in which the crosspoint junctions have one-time configurable memristors). This memory system does not utilize the kind of devices (diodes or transistors) that are normally used to isolate the memory cell being written to and read from in conventional memories. Instead, special techniques are introduced to perform the writing and the reading operation reliably by taking advantage of the nonlinearity of the type of memristors used. After discussing both writing and reading strategies for our memory system in general, we focus on a 64 × 64 memory array and present simulation results that show the feasibility of these writing and reading procedures. Besides simulating the case where all device parameters assume exactly their nominal value, we also simulate the much more realistic case where the device parameters stray around their nominal value: we observe a degradation in margins, but writing and reading is still feasible. These simulation results are based on a device model for memristors derived from measurements of fabricated devices in nano-scale crossbars using Pt and Ti nano-wires and using oxygen-depleted TiO2 as the switching material.

  19. ANFIS-based approach to studying subthreshold behavior including the traps effect for nanoscale thin-film DG MOSFETs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.Bentrcia; F.Djeffal; E.Chebaaki

    2013-01-01

    A fuzzy framework based on an adaptive network fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) is proposed to evaluate the relative degradation of the basic subthreshold parameters due to hot-carrier effects for nanoscale thin-film double-gate (DG) MOSFETs.The effect of the channel length and thickness on the resulting degradation is addressed,and 2-D numerical simulations are used for the elaboration of the training database.Several membership function shapes are developed,and the best one in terms of accuracy is selected.The predicted results agree well with the 2-D numerical simulations and can be efficiently used to investigate the impact of the interface fixed charges and quantum confinement on nanoscale DG MOSFET subthreshold behavior.Therefore,the proposed ANFIS-based approach offers a simple and accurate technique to study nanoscale devices,including the hot-carrier and quantum effects.

  20. Actively phase-controlled coupling between plasmonic waveguides via in-between gain-assisted nanoresonator: nanoscale optical logic gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kum-Song; Han, Yong-Ha; Ri, Chol-Song; Im, Song-Jin

    2016-08-15

    The development of nanoscale optical logic gates has attracted immense attention due to increasing demand for ultrahigh-speed and energy-efficient optical computing and data processing, however, suffers from the difficulty in precise control of phase difference of the two optical signals. We propose a novel conception of nanoscale optical logic gates based on actively phase-controlled coupling between two plasmonic waveguides via an in-between gain-assisted nanoresonator. Precise control of phase difference between the two plasmonic signals can be performed by manipulating pumping rate at an appropriate frequency detuning, enabling a high contrast between the output logic states "1" and "0." Without modification of the structural parameters, different logic functions can be provided. This active nanoscale optical logic device is expected to be quite energy-efficient with ideally low energy consumption on the order of 0.1 fJ/bit. Analytical calculations and numerical experiments demonstrate the validity of the proposed concept.

  1. Real-Time Nanoscale Open-Circuit Voltage Dynamics of Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Joseph L; Tennyson, Elizabeth M; Hu, Miao; Huang, Jinsong; Munday, Jeremy N; Leite, Marina S

    2017-04-12

    Hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites based on methylammonium lead (MAPbI3) are an emerging material with great potential for high-performance and low-cost photovoltaics. However, for perovskites to become a competitive and reliable solar cell technology their instability and spatial variation must be understood and controlled. While the macroscopic characterization of the devices as a function of time is very informative, a nanoscale identification of their real-time local optoelectronic response is still missing. Here, we implement a four-dimensional imaging method through illuminated heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy to spatially (perovskite solar cells in a low relative humidity environment. Local open-circuit voltage (Voc) images show nanoscale sites with voltage variation >300 mV under 1-sun illumination. Surprisingly, regions of voltage that relax in seconds and after several minutes consistently coexist. Time-dependent changes of the local Voc are likely due to intragrain ion migration and are reversible at low injection level. These results show for the first time the real-time transient behavior of the Voc in perovskite solar cells at the nanoscale. Understanding and controlling the light-induced electrical changes that affect device performance are critical to the further development of stable perovskite-based solar technologies.

  2. Chemiresistive properties regulated by nanoscale curvature in molecularly-linked nanoparticle composite assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Han-Wen; Yan, Shan; Han, Li; Chen, Yong; Kang, Ning; Skeete, Zakiya; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2017-03-17

    Interparticle spatial properties influence the electrical and functional properties of nanoparticle-structured assemblies. This report describes the nanoscale curvature-induced change in chemiresistive properties of molecularly-linked assemblies of gold nanoparticles on multiwalled carbon nanotubes, which are exploited for sensitive detection of volatile organic compounds. In addition to using linking/capping molecules to define interparticle spatial distances, the nanoscale curvature radius of the carbon nanotubes provides intriguing tunability of the interparticle spatial properties to influence electrical properties, which contrast with those observed for nanoparticle thin films assembled directly on chemiresistor devices. The electrical characteristics of the nanoparticle-nanotube composite give positive response profiles for the vapor molecules that are distinctively different to those observed for conventional nanoparticle thin-film assemblies. The dominant effect of electron coupling on overall chemiresistive properties is shown in relation to that of nanoscale curvature radius on the nanoparticle thin-film sensing properties. Sensing data are also further assessed in correlation with the solubility parameters of the vapor molecule. These findings have significant implications for the design of sensitive interfaces with nanocomposite-structured sensing materials and microfabricated chemiresistor devices.

  3. Designing a Double-Pole Nanoscale Relay Based on a Carbon Nanotube: A Theoretical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Weihua; Ou-Yang, Zhong-can; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    2017-08-01

    We theoretically investigate a novel and powerful double-pole nanoscale relay based on a carbon nanotube, which is one of the nanoelectromechanical switches being able to work under the strong nuclear radiation, and analyze the physical mechanism of the operating stages in the operation, including "pull in," "connection," and "pull back," as well as the key factors influencing the efficiency of the devices. We explicitly provide the analytical expression of the two important operation voltages, Vpull in and Vpull back , therefore clearly showing the dependence of the material properties and geometry of the present devices by the analytical method from basic physics, avoiding complex numerical calculations. Our method is easy to use in preparing the design guide for fabricating the present device and other nanoelectromechanical devices.

  4. Proposal for a GHz count rate near-IR single-photon detector based on a nanoscale superconducting transition edge sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Santavicca, Daniel F; Prober, Daniel E; 10.1117/12.883979

    2012-01-01

    We describe a superconducting transition edge sensor based on a nanoscale niobium detector element. This device is predicted to be capable of energy-resolved near-IR single-photon detection with a GHz count rate. The increased speed and sensitivity of this device compared to traditional transition edge sensors result from the very small electronic heat capacity of the nanoscale detector element. In the present work, we calculate the predicted thermal response time and energy resolution. We also discuss approaches for achieving efficient optical coupling to the sub-wavelength detector element using a resonant near-IR antenna.

  5. Incidence of in situ annealing on the nanoscale topographical/electrical properties of the tunnel barrier in sputtered epitaxial Fe/MgO/Fe multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D J; Arabski, J; Da Costa, V Da; Schmerber, G; Bowen, M; Boukari, S; Beaurepaire, E, E-mail: dong-jik.kim@ipcms.u-strasbg.f, E-mail: eric.beaurepaire@ipcms.u-strasbg.f [IPCMS UMR 7504 CNRS, Universite de Strasbourg, 23 Rue du Loess, BP 43, 67034 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    2010-06-02

    Technological improvements in the magnetotransport performance of Fe/MgO/Fe stacks require nanoscale control over the topographical and electrical properties of the ultrathin MgO barrier. We have statistically investigated the incidence of in situ annealing of the lower Fe layer on the nanoscale topographical/electrical properties of Fe/MgO bilayers and the structural and magnetic properties of Fe/MgO/Fe/Co multilayers prepared by sputtering. This annealing step improves the crystal quality of both the lower Fe and the upper Fe/Co layers, leading to an enhanced saturated magnetic moment. Finally, this annealing step substantially mitigates the presence of nanohills on the lower Fe layer and improves the uniformity of the height and/or the thickness of the MgO tunnel barrier. Our results pave the way for studies of nanoscale transport on micrometre-sized devices through a better understanding of, and control over, nanoscale hotspots in the tunnel barrier.

  6. Functionalized, biocompatible, and impermeable nanoscale coatings for PEEK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awaja, Firas; Cools, Pieter; Lohberger, Birgit; Nikiforov, Anton Yu; Speranza, Giorgio; Morent, Rino

    2017-07-01

    Biologically compatible coatings that provide hermetic seal could resolve a major technological hurdle in the attempt to replace metals with polymers for biochips and active medical implants. The use of amorphous carbon/diamond like carbon (a-C:H) coatings to hermetically seal and biologically enhance polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) for biomedical device integration in the human body was investigated. The PEEK coating functionality (sp3/sp2 ratio), hardness and thickness (70-200nm) were controlled, by varying H2 and N2 concentration during the plasma operation with CH4. a-C:H coatings having the highest indentation modulus of 13.5GPa, originate out of a CH4 (90%) rich composition. Even in a mixture of 70/30 H2/CH4 the hardness is 4.76GPa, corresponding to hard and dense coatings. In all tested conditions of deposition coatings hardens was sufficient for the purpose of PEEK implants modification. The synthesized (a-C:H) nanoscale coatings were not water permeable as measured by the hydrolysis test, resolving the traditional challenge of swelling in wet environment. The hardness of the coatings showed strong correlations with the thickness, surprisingly however, with no correlations with the sp3/sp2 ratio. Selected non water permeable nanoscale coating on PEEK showed strong bioactivity by being viable for human osteoblast (hFOB) and human fibroblast (hGF) cells without toxicity issues. No correlation was observed between the coatings sp3/sp2 ratio and biological performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Integration of nanoscale memristor synapses in neuromorphic computing architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Legenstein, Robert; Deligeorgis, George; Prodromakis, Themistoklis

    2013-09-01

    Conventional neuro-computing architectures and artificial neural networks have often been developed with no or loose connections to neuroscience. As a consequence, they have largely ignored key features of biological neural processing systems, such as their extremely low-power consumption features or their ability to carry out robust and efficient computation using massively parallel arrays of limited precision, highly variable, and unreliable components. Recent developments in nano-technologies are making available extremely compact and low power, but also variable and unreliable solid-state devices that can potentially extend the offerings of availing CMOS technologies. In particular, memristors are regarded as a promising solution for modeling key features of biological synapses due to their nanoscale dimensions, their capacity to store multiple bits of information per element and the low energy required to write distinct states. In this paper, we first review the neuro- and neuromorphic computing approaches that can best exploit the properties of memristor and scale devices, and then propose a novel hybrid memristor-CMOS neuromorphic circuit which represents a radical departure from conventional neuro-computing approaches, as it uses memristors to directly emulate the biophysics and temporal dynamics of real synapses. We point out the differences between the use of memristors in conventional neuro-computing architectures and the hybrid memristor-CMOS circuit proposed, and argue how this circuit represents an ideal building block for implementing brain-inspired probabilistic computing paradigms that are robust to variability and fault tolerant by design.

  8. Nanoscale deformation measurements for reliability assessment of material interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Jürgen; Gollhardt, Astrid; Vogel, Dietmar; Michel, Bernd

    2006-03-01

    With the development and application of micro/nano electronic mechanical systems (MEMS, NEMS) for a variety of market segments new reliability issues will arise. The understanding of material interfaces is the key for a successful design for reliability of MEMS/NEMS and sensor systems. Furthermore in the field of BIOMEMS newly developed advanced materials and well known engineering materials are combined despite of fully developed reliability concepts for such devices and components. In addition the increasing interface-to volume ratio in highly integrated systems and nanoparticle filled materials are challenges for experimental reliability evaluation. New strategies for reliability assessment on the submicron scale are essential to fulfil the needs of future devices. In this paper a nanoscale resolution experimental method for the measurement of thermo-mechanical deformation at material interfaces is introduced. The determination of displacement fields is based on scanning probe microscopy (SPM) data. In-situ SPM scans of the analyzed object (i.e. material interface) are carried out at different thermo-mechanical load states. The obtained images are compared by grayscale cross correlation algorithms. This allows the tracking of local image patterns of the analyzed surface structure. The measurement results are full-field displacement fields with nanometer resolution. With the obtained data the mixed mode type of loading at material interfaces can be analyzed with highest resolution for future needs in micro system and nanotechnology.

  9. Optoelectronic Devices Advanced Simulation and Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Piprek, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    Optoelectronic devices transform electrical signals into optical signals and vice versa by utilizing the sophisticated interaction of electrons and light within micro- and nano-scale semiconductor structures. Advanced software tools for design and analysis of such devices have been developed in recent years. However, the large variety of materials, devices, physical mechanisms, and modeling approaches often makes it difficult to select appropriate theoretical models or software packages. This book presents a review of devices and advanced simulation approaches written by leading researchers and software developers. It is intended for scientists and device engineers in optoelectronics, who are interested in using advanced software tools. Each chapter includes the theoretical background as well as practical simulation results that help to better understand internal device physics. The software packages used in the book are available to the public, on a commercial or noncommercial basis, so that the interested r...

  10. Controllable nanoscale rotating actuator system based on carbon nanotube and graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianzhang; Han, Qiang

    2016-04-01

    A controllable nanoscale rotating actuator system consisting of a double carbon nanotube and graphene driven by a temperature gradient is proposed, and its rotating dynamics performance and driving mechanism are investigated through molecular dynamics simulations. The outer tube exhibits stable pure rotation with certain orientation under temperature gradient and the steady rotational speed rises as the temperature gradient increases. It reveals that the driving torque is caused by the difference of atomic van der Waals potentials due to the temperature gradient and geometrical features of carbon nanotube. A theoretical model for driving torque is established based on lattice dynamics theory and its predicted results agree well with molecular dynamics simulations. Further discussion is taken according to the theoretical model. The work in this study would be a guide for design and application of controllable nanoscale rotating devices based on carbon nanotubes and graphene.

  11. Nanoscale Internal Fields in a Biased Graphene-Insulator-Semiconductor Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangan, Sylvie; Kalyanikar, Malathi; Duan, Junxi; Liu, Gang; Bartynski, Robert Allen; Andrei, Eva Y; Feldman, Leonard; Garfunkel, Eric

    2016-09-01

    Measuring and understanding electric fields in multilayered materials at the nanoscale remains a challenging problem impeding the development of novel devices. At this scale, it is far from obvious that materials can be accurately described by their intrinsic bulk properties, and considerations of the interfaces between layered materials become unavoidable for a complete description of the system's electronic properties. Here, a general approach to the direct measurement of nanoscale internal fields is proposed. Small spot X-ray photoemission was performed on a biased graphene/SiO2/Si structure in order to experimentally determine the potential profile across the system, including discontinuities at the interfaces. Core levels provide a measure of the local potential and are used to reconstruct the potential profile as a function of the depth through the stack. It is found that each interface plays a critical role in establishing the potential across the dielectric, and the origin of the potential discontinuities at each interface is discussed.

  12. Nanoscale investigation of AlGaN/GaN-on-Si high electron mobility transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontserè, A; Pérez-Tomás, A; Placidi, M; Llobet, J; Baron, N; Chenot, S; Cordier, Y; Moreno, J C; Jennings, M R; Gammon, P M; Fisher, C A; Iglesias, V; Porti, M; Bayerl, A; Lanza, M; Nafría, M

    2012-10-05

    AlGaN/GaN HEMTs are devices which are strongly influenced by surface properties such as donor states, roughness or any kind of inhomogeneity. The electron gas is only a few nanometers away from the surface and the transistor forward and reverse currents are considerably affected by any variation of surface property within the atomic scale. Consequently, we have used the technique known as conductive AFM (CAFM) to perform electrical characterization at the nanoscale. The AlGaN/GaN HEMT ohmic (drain and source) and Schottky (gate) contacts were investigated by the CAFM technique. The estimated area of these highly conductive pillars (each of them of approximately 20-50 nm radius) represents around 5% of the total contact area. Analogously, the reverse leakage of the gate Schottky contact at the nanoscale seems to correlate somehow with the topography of the narrow AlGaN barrier regions producing larger currents.

  13. Alignment of Nanoscale Single-Walled Carb on Nanotub es Strands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Danna Yang; Lin Wang; Xiaoxian Zhang; Dongwei Wang; Zhiqiang Shen; Sai Li

    2011-01-01

    Depositing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with controllable density, pattern and ori-entation on electrodes presents a challenge in today’s research. Here, we report a novel solvent evaporation method to align SWNTs in patterns having nanoscale width and micronscale length. SWNTs suspension has been introduced dropwise onto photoresist resin microchannels; and the capillary force can stretch and align SWNTs into strands with nanoscale width in the microchannels. Then these narrow and long aligned SWNTs patterns were successfully transferred to a pair of gold electrodes with different gaps to fabricate carbon nan-otube field-effect transistor (CNTFET). Moreover, the electrical performance of the CNTFET show that the SWNTs strands can bridge different gaps and fabricate good electrical performance CNTFET with ON/OFF ratio around 106. This result suggests a promising and simple strategy for assembling well-aligned SWNTs into CNTFET device with good electrical performance.

  14. Optimization of molecular organization and nanoscale morphology for high performance low bandgap polymer solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ming; Wang, Mengye; Lin, Changjian; Lin, Zhiqun

    2014-04-21

    Rational design and synthesis of low bandgap (LBG) polymers with judiciously tailored HOMO and LUMO levels have emerged as a viable route to high performance polymer solar cells with power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) exceeding 10%. In addition to engineering the energy-level of LBG polymers, the photovoltaic performance of LBG polymer-based solar cells also relies on the device architecture, in particular the fine morphology of the photoactive layer. The nanoscale interpenetrating networks composed of nanostructured donor and acceptor phases are the key to providing a large donor-acceptor interfacial area for maximizing the exciton dissociation and offering a continuous pathway for charge transport. In this Review Article, we summarize recent strategies for tuning the molecular organization and nanoscale morphology toward an enhanced photovoltaic performance of LBG polymer-based solar cells.

  15. Microfluidic Control Using Colloidal Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terray, Alex; Oakey, John; Marr, David W. M.

    2002-06-01

    By manipulating colloidal microspheres within customized channels, we have created micrometer-scale fluid pumps and particulate valves. We describe two positive-displacement designs, a gear and a peristaltic pump, both of which are about the size of a human red blood cell. Two colloidal valve designs are also demonstrated, one actuated and one passive, for the direction of cells or small particles. The use of colloids as both valves and pumps will allow device integration at a density far beyond what is currently achievable by other approaches and may provide a link between fluid manipulation at the macro- and nanoscale.

  16. Carbon Nanotubes Based Quantum Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jian-Ping

    1999-01-01

    This document represents the final report for the NASA cooperative agreement which studied the application of carbon nanotubes. The accomplishments are reviewed: (1) Wrote a review article on carbon nanotubes and its potentials for applications in nanoscale quantum devices. (2) Extensive studies on the effects of structure deformation on nanotube electronic structure and energy band gaps. (3) Calculated the vibrational spectrum of nanotube rope and the effect of pressure. and (4) Investigate the properties of Li intercalated nanotube ropes and explore their potential for energy storage materials and battery applications. These studies have lead to four publications and seven abstracts in international conferences.

  17. Insertion devices

    CERN Document Server

    Bahrdt, J

    2006-01-01

    The interaction of an insertion device with the electron beam in a storage ring is discussed. The radiation property including brightness, ux and polarization of an ideal and real planar and helical / elliptical device is described. The magnet design of planar, helical, quasiperiodic devices and of devices with a reduced on axis power density are resumed.

  18. Micro and nanoscale electrochemical systems for reagent generation, coupled electrokinetic transport and enhanced detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contento, Nicholas M.

    Chemical analysis is being performed in devices operated at ever decreasing length scales in order to harness the fundamental benefits of micro and nanoscale phenomena while minimizing operating footprint and sample size. The advantages of moving traditional sample or chemical processing steps (e.g. separation, detection, and reaction) into micro- and nanofluidic devices have been demonstrated, and they arise from the relatively rapid rates of heat and mass transport at small length scales. The use of electrochemical methods in micro/nanoscale systems to control and improve these processes holds great promise. Unfortunately, much is still not understood about the coupling of multiple electrode driven processes in a confined environment nor about the fundamental changes in device performance that occur as geometries approach the nanoscale regime. At the nanoscale a significant fraction of the sample volume is in close contact with the device surface, i.e. most of the sample is contained within electronic or diffusion layers associated with surface charge or surface reactions, respectively. The work presented in this thesis aims to understand some fundamental different behaviors observed in micro/nanofluidic structures, particularly those containing one or more embedded, metallic electrode structures. First, a quantitative method is devised to describe the impact of electric fields on electrochemistry in multi-electrode micro/nanofluidic systems. Next the chemical manipulation of small volumes (≤ 10-13 L) in micro/nanofluidic structures is explored by creating regions of high pH and high dissolved gas (H 2) concentration through the electrolysis of H2O. Massively parallel arrays of nanochannel electrodes, or embedded annular nanoband electrodes (EANEs), are then studied with a focus on achieving enhanced signals due to coupled electrokinetic and electrochemical effects. In EANE devices, electroosmotic flow results from the electric field generated between the

  19. Programmed assembly of nanoscale structures using peptoids.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Jianhua (University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA); Russell, Scott (California State University, Stanislaus, Turlock, CA); Morishetti, Kiran (University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA); Robinson, David B.; Zuckermann, Ronald N. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Buffleben, George M.; Hjelm, Rex P. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Kent, Michael Stuart (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-02-01

    Sequence-specific polymers are the basis of the most promising approaches to bottom-up programmed assembly of nanoscale materials. Examples include artificial peptides and nucleic acids. Another class is oligo(N-functional glycine)s, also known as peptoids, which permit greater sidegroup diversity and conformational control, and can be easier to synthesize and purify. We have developed a set of peptoids that can be used to make inorganic nanoparticles more compatible with biological sequence-specific polymers so that they can be incorporated into nucleic acid or other biologically based nanostructures. Peptoids offer degrees of modularity, versatility, and predictability that equal or exceed other sequence-specific polymers, allowing for rational design of oligomers for a specific purpose. This degree of control will be essential to the development of arbitrarily designed nanoscale structures.

  20. Scanning nanoscale multiprobes for conductivity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Peter; Hansen, Torben Mikael; Kuhn, Oliver;

    2000-01-01

    We report fabrication and measurements with two- and four-point probes with nanoscale dimensions, for high spatial resolution conductivity measurements on surfaces and thin films. By combination of conventional microfabrication and additive three-dimensional nanolithography, we have obtained...... electrode spacings down to 200 nm. At the tips of four silicon oxide microcantilevers, narrow carbon tips are grown in converging directions and subsequently coated with a conducting layer. The probe is placed in contact with a conducting surface, whereby the electrode resistance can be determined....... The nanoelectrodes withstand considerable contact force before breaking. The probe offers a unique possibility to position the voltage sensors, as well as the source and drain electrodes in areas of nanoscale dimensions. ©2000 American Institute of Physics....

  1. MEMS & microsystems design, manufacture, and nanoscale engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, Tai-Ran

    2008-01-01

    A bestselling MEMS text...now better than ever. An engineering design approach to Microelectromechanical Systems, MEMS and Microsystems remains the only available text to cover both the electrical and the mechanical aspects of the technology. In the five years since the publication of the first edition, there have been significant changes in the science and technology of miniaturization, including microsystems technology and nanotechnology. In response to the increasing needs of engineers to acquire basic knowledge and experience in these areas, this popular text has been carefully updated, including an entirely new section on the introduction of nanoscale engineering. Following a brief introduction to the history and evolution of nanotechnology, the author covers the fundamentals in the engineering design of nanostructures, including fabrication techniques for producing nanoproducts, engineering design principles in molecular dynamics, and fluid flows and heat transmission in nanoscale substances.

  2. Nanoscale plasmonic stamp lithography on silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fenglin; Luber, Erik J; Huck, Lawrence A; Olsen, Brian C; Buriak, Jillian M

    2015-02-24

    Nanoscale lithography on silicon is of interest for applications ranging from computer chip design to tissue interfacing. Block copolymer-based self-assembly, also called directed self-assembly (DSA) within the semiconductor industry, can produce a variety of complex nanopatterns on silicon, but these polymeric films typically require transformation into functional materials. Here we demonstrate how gold nanopatterns, produced via block copolymer self-assembly, can be incorporated into an optically transparent flexible PDMS stamp, termed a plasmonic stamp, and used to directly functionalize silicon surfaces on a sub-100 nm scale. We propose that the high intensity electric fields that result from the localized surface plasmons of the gold nanoparticles in the plasmonic stamps upon illumination with low intensity green light, lead to generation of electron-hole pairs in the silicon that drive spatially localized hydrosilylation. This approach demonstrates how localized surface plasmons can be used to enable functionalization of technologically relevant surfaces with nanoscale control.

  3. Nanoscale Surface Modification of Layered Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Aaron

    2011-11-01

    A scanning electron microscope can magnify a sample many times greater than a standard microscope, down to nanoscale dimensions. It can also be used to form patterns on the surfaces of certain materials, a technique used to create microchips. We have developed a technique that simplifies and expedites this process using an unmodified scanning electron microscope. Using this technique, we are able to alter the surface chemistry in a controlled pattern on a special class of materials called transition metal dichalcogenides. These materials have many useful applications: industrial lubricants; high strength nanocomposites; advanced solar cells; and next generation electronics. Altering the surface chemistry of these materials at the nanoscale results in unusual quantum behavior, which is useful in nanotechnology.

  4. Hybrid, Nanoscale Phospholipid/Block Copolymer Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liedberg

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid phospholipid/block copolymer vesicles, in which the polymeric membrane is blended with phospholipids, display interesting self-assembly behavior, incorporating the robustness and chemical versatility of polymersomes with the softness and biocompatibility of liposomes. Such structures can be conveniently characterized by preparing giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs via electroformation. Here, we are interested in exploring the self-assembly and properties of the analogous nanoscale hybrid vesicles (ca. 100 nm in diameter of the same composition prepared by film-hydration and extrusion. We show that the self-assembly and content-release behavior of nanoscale polybutadiene-b-poly(ethylene oxide (PB-PEO/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC hybrid phospholipid/block copolymer vesicles can be tuned by the mixing ratio of the amphiphiles. In brief, these hybrids may provide alternative tools for drug delivery purposes and molecular imaging/sensing applications and clearly open up new avenues for further investigation.

  5. Porous silver nanosheets: a novel sensing material for nanoscale and microscale airflow sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzbanrad, Ehsan; Zhao, Boxin; Zhou, Norman Y

    2015-11-01

    Fabrication of nanoscale and microscale machines and devices is one of the goals of nanotechnology. For this purpose, different materials, methods, and devices should be developed. Among them, various types of miniaturized sensors are required to build the nanoscale and microscale systems. In this research, we introduce a new nanoscale sensing material, silver nanosheets, for applications such as nanoscale and microscale gas flow sensors. The silver nanosheets were synthesized through the reduction of silver ions by ascorbic acid in the presence of poly(methacrylic acid) as a capping agent, followed by the growth of silver in the shape of hexagonal and triangular nanoplates, and self-assembly and nanojoining of these structural blocks. At the end of this process, the synthesized nanosheets were floated on the solution. Then, their electrical and thermal stability was demonstrated at 120 °C, and their atmospheric corrosion resistance was clarified at the same temperature range by thermogravimetric analysis. We employed the silver nanosheets in fabricating airflow sensors by scooping out the nanosheets by means of a sensor substrate, drying them at room temperature, and then annealing them at 300 °C for one hour. The fabricated sensors were tested for their ability to measure airflow in the range of 1 to 5 ml min(-1), which resulted in a linear response to the airflow with a response and recovery time around 2 s. Moreover, continuous dynamic testing demonstrated that the response of the sensors was stable and hence the sensors can be used for a long time without detectable drift in their response.

  6. Atomic layer deposition: an enabling technology for the growth of functional nanoscale semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biyikli, Necmi; Haider, Ali

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we present the progress in the growth of nanoscale semiconductors grown via atomic layer deposition (ALD). After the adoption by semiconductor chip industry, ALD became a widespread tool to grow functional films and conformal ultra-thin coatings for various applications. Based on self-limiting and ligand-exchange-based surface reactions, ALD enabled the low-temperature growth of nanoscale dielectric, metal, and semiconductor materials. Being able to deposit wafer-scale uniform semiconductor films at relatively low-temperatures, with sub-monolayer thickness control and ultimate conformality, makes ALD attractive for semiconductor device applications. Towards this end, precursors and low-temperature growth recipes are developed to deposit crystalline thin films for compound and elemental semiconductors. Conventional thermal ALD as well as plasma-assisted and radical-enhanced techniques have been exploited to achieve device-compatible film quality. Metal-oxides, III-nitrides, sulfides, and selenides are among the most popular semiconductor material families studied via ALD technology. Besides thin films, ALD can grow nanostructured semiconductors as well using either template-assisted growth methods or bottom-up controlled nucleation mechanisms. Among the demonstrated semiconductor nanostructures are nanoparticles, nano/quantum-dots, nanowires, nanotubes, nanofibers, nanopillars, hollow and core-shell versions of the afore-mentioned nanostructures, and 2D materials including transition metal dichalcogenides and graphene. ALD-grown nanoscale semiconductor materials find applications in a vast amount of applications including functional coatings, catalysis and photocatalysis, renewable energy conversion and storage, chemical sensing, opto-electronics, and flexible electronics. In this review, we give an overview of the current state-of-the-art in ALD-based nanoscale semiconductor research including the already demonstrated and future applications.

  7. DOE - BES Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beecher, Cathy Jo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-14

    These are slides from a powerpoint shown to guests during tours of Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It shows the five DOE-BES nanoscale science research centers (NSRCs), which are located at different national laboratories throughout the country. Then it goes into detail specifically about the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies at LANL, including statistics on its user community and CINT's New Mexico industrial users.

  8. Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Bradley R.; Talley, Chad E.

    2008-06-10

    Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) having polymer features wherein the size, shape and position are predetermined can be fabricated using an xy piezo stage mounted on an inverted microscope and a laser. Using an AMF controller, a solution containing polymer precursors and a photo initiator are positioned on the xy piezo and hit with a laser beam. The thickness of the polymeric features can be varied from a few nanometers to over a micron.

  9. Current-Induced Effects in Nanoscale Conductors

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    We present an overview of current-induced effects in nanoscale conductors with emphasis on their description at the atomic level. In particular, we discuss steady-state current fluctuations, current-induced forces, inelastic scattering and local heating. All of these properties are calculated in terms of single-particle wavefunctions computed using a scattering approach within the static density-functional theory of many-electron systems. Examples of current-induced effects in atomic and mole...

  10. Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Research Directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowndes, D. H.; Alivisatos, A. P.; Alper, M.; Averback, R. S.; Jacob Barhen, J.; Eastman, J. A.; Imre, D.; Lowndes, D. H.; McNulty, I.; Michalske, T. A.; Ho, K-M; Nozik, A. J.; Russell, T. P.; Valentin, R. A.; Welch, D. O.; Barhen, J.; Agnew, S. R.; Bellon, P.; Blair, J.; Boatner, L. A.; Braiman, Y.; Budai, J. D.; Crabtree, G. W.; Feldman, L. C.; Flynn, C. P.; Geohegan, D. B.; George, E. P.; Greenbaum, E.; Grigoropoulos, C.; Haynes, T. E.; Heberlein, J.; Hichman, J.; Holland, O. W.; Honda, S.; Horton, J. A.; Hu, M. Z.-C.; Jesson, D. E.; Joy, D. C.; Krauss, A.; Kwok, W.-K.; Larson, B. C.; Larson, D. J.; Likharev, K.; Liu, C. T.; Majumdar, A.; Maziasz, P. J.; Meldrum, A.; Miller, J. C.; Modine, F. A.; Pennycook, S. J.; Pharr, G. M.; Phillpot, S.; Price, D. L.; Protopopescu, V.; Poker, D. B.; Pui, D.; Ramsey, J. M.; Rao, N.; Reichl, L.; Roberto, J.; Saboungi, M-L; Simpson, M.; Strieffer, S.; Thundat, T.; Wambsganss, M.; Wendleken, J.; White, C. W.; Wilemski, G.; Withrow, S. P.; Wolf, D.; Zhu, J. H.; Zuhr, R. A.; Zunger, A.; Lowe, S.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes important future research directions in nanoscale science, engineering and technology. It was prepared in connection with an anticipated national research initiative on nanotechnology for the twenty-first century. The research directions described are not expected to be inclusive but illustrate the wide range of research opportunities and challenges that could be undertaken through the national laboratories and their major national scientific user facilities with the support of universities and industry.

  11. Attosecond physics at a nanoscale metal tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemell Christoph

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available With few-cycle laser oscillator pulses at 800 nm we observe strong-field and attosecond physics phenomena in electron spectra recorded at a nanoscale tungsten tip. We observe the rescattering plateau as well as a strong carrier-envelope phase dependence of the spectra. We model the results with the semiclassical three-step model as well as with time-dependent density functional theory.

  12. Fourth International Conference on Nanoscale Magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, Bekir; Advances in Nanoscale Magnetism

    2009-01-01

    The book aims to provide an overview of recent progress in the understanding of magnetic properties in nanoscale through recent results of various theoretical and experimental investigations. The papers describe a wide range of physical aspects, together with theoretical and experimental methods. It is of central interest to researchers and specialists in magnetism and magnetic materials science, both in academic and industrial research, as well as advanced students.

  13. Nanoscale superconducting memory based on the kinetic inductance of asymmetric nanowire loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Andrew; Averin, Dmitri V.; Bezryadin, Alexey

    2017-06-01

    The demand for low-dissipation nanoscale memory devices is as strong as ever. As Moore’s law is staggering, and the demand for a low-power-consuming supercomputer is high, the goal of making information processing circuits out of superconductors is one of the central goals of modern technology and physics. So far, digital superconducting circuits could not demonstrate their immense potential. One important reason for this is that a dense superconducting memory technology is not yet available. Miniaturization of traditional superconducting quantum interference devices is difficult below a few micrometers because their operation relies on the geometric inductance of the superconducting loop. Magnetic memories do allow nanometer-scale miniaturization, but they are not purely superconducting (Baek et al 2014 Nat. Commun. 5 3888). Our approach is to make nanometer scale memory cells based on the kinetic inductance (and not geometric inductance) of superconducting nanowire loops, which have already shown many fascinating properties (Aprili 2006 Nat. Nanotechnol. 1 15; Hopkins et al 2005 Science 308 1762). This allows much smaller devices and naturally eliminates magnetic-field cross-talk. We demonstrate that the vorticity, i.e., the winding number of the order parameter, of a closed superconducting loop can be used for realizing a nanoscale nonvolatile memory device. We demonstrate how to alter the vorticity in a controlled fashion by applying calibrated current pulses. A reliable read-out of the memory is also demonstrated. We present arguments that such memory can be developed to operate without energy dissipation.

  14. Investiagtion of Nanoscale Carbon Nitride Thin Films Grown Using DC HCD Hollow Cathode Discharge%用直流中空阴极放电方法(DC HCD)生长的纳米级碳的氮化物薄膜研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Y.H.; SHI Y.C.; YANG P.; TANG X.L.; FENG P.X.

    2005-01-01

    There is growing interest in the underlying physical processes in optoelectronic devices based on thin-film multilayer structures. Recently, many investigators have made great efforts on synthesizing the ultra - hard nanoscale carbon nitride thin films. Considering low cost and simple configuration, we used DC hollow cathode discharge (HCD) for deposition of nanoscale carbon nitride thin films.

  15. Resonant Effects in Nanoscale Bowtie Apertures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Li; Qin, Jin; Guo, Songpo; Liu, Tao; Kinzel, Edward; Wang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale bowtie aperture antennas can be used to focus light well below the diffraction limit with extremely high transmission efficiencies. This paper studies the spectral dependence of the transmission through nanoscale bowtie apertures defined in a silver film. A realistic bowtie aperture is numerically modeled using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. Results show that the transmission spectrum is dominated by Fabry-Pérot (F-P) waveguide modes and plasmonic modes. The F-P resonance is sensitive to the thickness of the film and the plasmonic resonant mode is closely related to the gap distance of the bowtie aperture. Both characteristics significantly affect the transmission spectrum. To verify these numerical results, bowtie apertures are FIB milled in a silver film. Experimental transmission measurements agree with simulation data. Based on this result, nanoscale bowtie apertures can be optimized to realize deep sub-wavelength confinement with high transmission efficiency with applications to nanolithography, data storage, and bio-chemical sensing. PMID:27250995

  16. Static electric field enhancement in nanoscale structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepetit, Bruno; Lemoine, Didier; Márquez-Mijares, Maykel

    2016-08-01

    We study the effect of local atomic- and nano-scale protrusions on field emission and, in particular, on the local field enhancement which plays a key role as known from the Fowler-Nordheim model of electronic emission. We study atomic size defects which consist of right angle steps forming an infinite length staircase on a tungsten surface. This structure is embedded in a 1 GV/m ambient electrostatic field. We perform calculations based upon density functional theory in order to characterize the total and induced electronic densities as well as the local electrostatic fields taking into account the detailed atomic structure of the metal. We show how the results must be processed to become comparable with those of a simple homogeneous tungsten sheet electrostatic model. We also describe an innovative procedure to extrapolate our results to nanoscale defects of larger sizes, which relies on the microscopic findings to guide, tune, and improve the homogeneous metal model, thus gaining predictive power. Furthermore, we evidence analytical power laws for the field enhancement characterization. The main physics-wise outcome of this analysis is that limited field enhancement is to be expected from atomic- and nano-scale defects.

  17. Static electric field enhancement in nanoscale structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepetit, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.lepetit@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr; Lemoine, Didier, E-mail: didier.lemoine@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr [Université de Toulouse, UPS, Laboratoire Collisions Agrégats Réactivité, IRSAMC, F-31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5589, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Márquez-Mijares, Maykel, E-mail: mmarquez@instec.cu [Université de Toulouse, UPS, Laboratoire Collisions Agrégats Réactivité, IRSAMC, F-31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5589, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Instituto Superior de Tecnologías y Ciencias Aplicadas, Avenida Salvador Allende 1110, Quinta de los Molinos, La Habana (Cuba)

    2016-08-28

    We study the effect of local atomic- and nano-scale protrusions on field emission and, in particular, on the local field enhancement which plays a key role as known from the Fowler-Nordheim model of electronic emission. We study atomic size defects which consist of right angle steps forming an infinite length staircase on a tungsten surface. This structure is embedded in a 1 GV/m ambient electrostatic field. We perform calculations based upon density functional theory in order to characterize the total and induced electronic densities as well as the local electrostatic fields taking into account the detailed atomic structure of the metal. We show how the results must be processed to become comparable with those of a simple homogeneous tungsten sheet electrostatic model. We also describe an innovative procedure to extrapolate our results to nanoscale defects of larger sizes, which relies on the microscopic findings to guide, tune, and improve the homogeneous metal model, thus gaining predictive power. Furthermore, we evidence analytical power laws for the field enhancement characterization. The main physics-wise outcome of this analysis is that limited field enhancement is to be expected from atomic- and nano-scale defects.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Studies of Nanofluidic Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano Rodriguez, Harvey Alexander

    in opposite direction to the imposed thermal gradient also we measure higher velocities as higher thermal gradients are imposed. Secondly, we present an atomistic analysis of a molecular linear motor fabricated of coaxial carbon nanotubes and powered by thermal gradients. The MD simulation results indicate...... in transport caused by the walls become more dominant and the fluid consists of fewer molecules. Carbon nanotubes are tubular graphite molecules which can be imagined to function as nanoscale pipes or conduits. Another important material for nanofluidics applications is silica. Nowadays, silica nanochannels...... of such devices. Computational nanofluidics complements experimental studies by providing detailed spatial and temporal information of the nanosystem. In this thesis, we conduct molecular dynamics simulations to study basic nanoscale devices. We focus our studies on the understanding of transport mechanism...

  19. Spin Coherence at the Nanoscale: Polymer Surfaces and Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, Arthur J. [Professor

    2013-09-10

    Breakthrough results were achieved during the reporting period in the areas of organic spintronics. (A) For the first time the giant magnetic resistance (GMR) was observed in spin valve with an organic spacer. Thus we demonstrated the ability of organic semiconductors to transport spin in GMR devices using rubrene as a prototype for organic semiconductors. (B) We discovered the electrical bistability and spin valve effect in a ferromagnet /organic semiconductor/ ferromagnet heterojunction. The mechanism of switching between conducting phases and its potential applications were suggested. (C) The ability of V(TCNE)x to inject spin into organic semiconductors such as rubrene was demonstrated for the first time. The mechanisms of spin injection and transport from and into organic magnets as well through organic semiconductors were elucidated. (D) In collaboration with the group of OSU Prof. Johnston-Halperin we reported the successful extraction of spin polarized current from a thin film of the organic-based room temperature ferrimagnetic semiconductor V[TCNE]x and its subsequent injection into a GaAs/AlGaAs light-emitting diode (LED). Thus all basic steps for fabrication of room temperature, light weight, flexible all organic spintronic devices were successfully performed. (E) A new synthesis/processing route for preparation of V(TCNE)x enabling control of interface and film thicknesses at the nanoscale was developed at OSU. Preliminary results show these films are higher quality and what is extremely important they are substantially more air stable than earlier prepared V(TCNE)x. In sum the breakthrough results we achieved in the past two years form the basis of a promising new technology, Multifunctional Flexible Organic-based Spintronics (MFOBS). MFOBS technology enables us fabrication of full function flexible spintronic devices that operate at room temperature.

  20. Microelectronics to nanoelectronics materials, devices & manufacturability

    CERN Document Server

    Kaul, Anupama B

    2012-01-01

    Composed of contributions from top experts, Microelectronics to Nanoelectronics: Materials, Devices and Manufacturability offers a detailed overview of important recent scientific and technological developments in the rapidly evolving nanoelectronics arena.Under the editorial guidance and technical expertise of noted materials scientist Anupama B. Kaul of California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Lab, this book captures the ascent of microelectronics into the nanoscale realm. It addresses a wide variety of important scientific and technological issues in nanoelectronics research and

  1. Bottom-up synthesis of ordered metal/oxide/metal nanodots on substrates for nanoscale resistive switching memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Un-Bin; Lee, Jang-Sik

    2016-01-01

    The bottom-up approach using self-assembled materials/processes is thought to be a promising solution for next-generation device fabrication, but it is often found to be not feasible for use in real device fabrication. Here, we report a feasible and versatile way to fabricate high-density, nanoscale memory devices by direct bottom-up filling of memory elements. An ordered array of metal/oxide/metal (copper/copper oxide/copper) nanodots was synthesized with a uniform size and thickness defined by self-organized nanotemplate mask by sequential electrochemical deposition (ECD) of each layer. The fabricated memory devices showed bipolar resistive switching behaviors confirmed by conductive atomic force microscopy. This study demonstrates that ECD with bottom-up growth has great potential to fabricate high-density nanoelectronic devices beyond the scaling limit of top-down device fabrication processes. PMID:27157385

  2. Projected phase-change memory devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelmans, Wabe W.; Sebastian, Abu; Jonnalagadda, Vara Prasad; Krebs, Daniel; Dellmann, Laurent; Eleftheriou, Evangelos

    2015-09-01

    Nanoscale memory devices, whose resistance depends on the history of the electric signals applied, could become critical building blocks in new computing paradigms, such as brain-inspired computing and memcomputing. However, there are key challenges to overcome, such as the high programming power required, noise and resistance drift. Here, to address these, we present the concept of a projected memory device, whose distinguishing feature is that the physical mechanism of resistance storage is decoupled from the information-retrieval process. We designed and fabricated projected memory devices based on the phase-change storage mechanism and convincingly demonstrate the concept through detailed experimentation, supported by extensive modelling and finite-element simulations. The projected memory devices exhibit remarkably low drift and excellent noise performance. We also demonstrate active control and customization of the programming characteristics of the device that reliably realize a multitude of resistance states.

  3. Towards rapid nanoscale measurement of strain in III-nitride heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Eric; Gradečak, Silvija [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Cooper, David [CEA, LETI, Minatec Campus, 17 rue des martyrs, F38054 Grenoble (France); Rouviere, Jean-Luc [CEA, INAC, Minatec Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, F38054 Grenoble (France); Béché, Armand [CEA, LETI, Minatec Campus, 17 rue des martyrs, F38054 Grenoble (France); FEI France, 17 rue des Martyrs, F38054 Grenoble (France); Azize, Mohamed; Palacios, Tomás [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2013-12-02

    We report the structural and compositional nanoscale characterization of InAlN/GaN nanoribbon-structured high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) through the use of geometric phase analysis (GPA) and nanobeam electron diffraction (NBED). The strain distribution in the HEMT layer is quantified and compared to the expected strain profile for the nominal structure predicted by finite element analysis (FEA). Using the experimental strain results, the actual structure is determined and used to modify the FEA model. The improved fit of the model demonstrates that GPA and NBED provide a powerful platform for routine and rapid characterization of strain in III-V semiconducting device systems leading to insights into device evolution during processing and future device optimization.

  4. Recent Approaches to Controlling the Nanoscale Morphology of Polymer-Based Bulk-Heterojunction Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulra'uf Lukman Bola

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The need for clean, inexpensive and renewable energy has increasingly turned research attention towards polymer photovoltaic cells. However, the performance efficiency of these devices is still low in comparison with silicon-based devices. The recent introduction of new materials and processing techniques has resulted in a remarkable increase in power-conversion efficiency, with a value above 10%. Controlling the interpenetrating network morphology is a key factor in obtaining devices with improved performance. This review focuses on the influence of controlled nanoscale morphology on the overall performance of bulk-heterojunction (BHJ photovoltaic cells. Strategies such as the use of solvents, solvent annealing, polymer nanowires (NWs, and donor–acceptor (D–A blend ratios employed to control the active-layer morphologies are all discussed.

  5. Self-assembled nanostructured resistive switching memory devices fabricated by templated bottom-up growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ji-Min; Lee, Jang-Sik

    2016-01-07

    Metal-oxide-based resistive switching memory device has been studied intensively due to its potential to satisfy the requirements of next-generation memory devices. Active research has been done on the materials and device structures of resistive switching memory devices that meet the requirements of high density, fast switching speed, and reliable data storage. In this study, resistive switching memory devices were fabricated with nano-template-assisted bottom up growth. The electrochemical deposition was adopted to achieve the bottom-up growth of nickel nanodot electrodes. Nickel oxide layer was formed by oxygen plasma treatment of nickel nanodots at low temperature. The structures of fabricated nanoscale memory devices were analyzed with scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope (AFM). The electrical characteristics of the devices were directly measured using conductive AFM. This work demonstrates the fabrication of resistive switching memory devices using self-assembled nanoscale masks and nanomateirals growth from bottom-up electrochemical deposition.

  6. Measurement of quasi-ballistic heat transport across nanoscale interfaces using ultrafast coherent soft x-ray beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siemens, M.; Li, Q.; Yang, R.; Nelson, K.; Anderson, E.; Murnane, M.; Kapteyn, H.

    2009-03-02

    Understanding heat transport on nanoscale dimensions is important for fundamental advances in nanoscience, as well as for practical applications such as thermal management in nano-electronics, thermoelectric devices, photovoltaics, nanomanufacturing, as well as nanoparticle thermal therapy. Here we report the first time-resolved measurements of heat transport across nanostructured interfaces. We observe the transition from a diffusive to a ballistic thermal transport regime, with a corresponding increase in the interface resistivity for line widths smaller than the phonon mean free path in the substrate. Resistivities more than three times higher than the bulk value are measured for the smallest line widths of 65 nm. Our findings are relevant to the modeling and design of heat transport in nanoscale engineered systems, including nanoelectronics, photovoltaics and thermoelectric devices.

  7. Photovoltaic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reese, Jason A; Keenihan, James R; Gaston, Ryan S; Kauffmann, Keith L; Langmaid, Joseph A; Lopez, Leonardo; Maak, Kevin D; Mills, Michael E; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R

    2017-03-21

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  8. Photovoltaic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-06-02

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  9. Concentration device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    A concentration device (2) for filter filtration concentration of particles (4) from a volume of a fluid (6). The concentration device (2) comprises a filter (8) configured to filter particles (4) of a predefined size in the volume of the fluid (6). The concentration device (2) comprises...

  10. Photovoltaic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-09-01

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device (10) with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly (100) and a body portion (200) joined at an interface region (410) and including an intermediate layer (500), at least one interconnecting structural member (1500), relieving feature (2500), unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  11. Nanocoax Arrays for Sensing Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizal, Binod

    We have adapted a nanocoax array architecture for high sensitivity, all-electronic, chemical and biological sensing. Arrays of nanocoaxes with various dielectric annuli were developed using polymer replicas of Si nanopillars made via soft lithography. These arrays were implemented in the development of two different kinds of chemical detectors. First, arrays of nanocoaxes constructed with different porosity dielectric annuli were employed to make capacitive detectors for gaseous molecules and to investigate the role of dielectric porosity in the sensitivity of the device. Second, arrays of nanocoaxes with partially hollowed annuli were used to fabricate three-dimensional electrochemical biosensors within which we studied the role of nanoscale gap between electrodes on device sensitivity. In addition, we have employed a molecular imprint technique to develop a non-conducting molecularly imprinted polymer thin film of thickness comparable to size of biomolecules as an "artificial antibody" architecture for the detection of biomolecules.

  12. Nanofluidics in lab-on-a-chip devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovarik, Michelle L; Jacobson, Stephen C

    2009-09-01

    As the field of nanofluidics matures, fundamental discoveries are being applied to lab-on-a-chip analyses. The unique behavior of matter at the nanoscale is adding new functionality to devices that integrate nanopores or nanochannels. (To listen to a podcast about this feature, please go to the Analytical Chemistry website at pubs.acs.org/journal/ancham.).

  13. Study of the Photo- and Thermoactivation Mechanisms in Nanoscale SOI Modulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaakov Mandelbaum

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new nanoscale silicon-based modulator has been investigated at different temperatures. In addition to these two advantages, nanoscale dimensions (versus MEMS temperature sensors and integrated silicon-based material (versus polymers, the third novelty of such optoelectronic device is that it can be activated as a Silicon-On-Insulator Photoactivated Modulator (SOIPAM or as a Silicon-On-Insulator Thermoactivated Modulator (SOITAM. In this work, static and time dependent temperature effects on the current have been investigated. The aim of the time dependent temperature simulation was to set a temporal pulse and to check, for given dimensions, how much time would it take for the temperature profile and for the change in the electrons’ concentration to come back to the steady state. Assuring that the thermal response is fast enough, the device can be operated as a modulator via thermal stimulation or, on the other hand, can be used as thermal sensor/imager. We present here the design, simulation, and model of the second generation which seems capable of speeding up the processing capabilities. This novel device can serve as a building block towards the development of optical/thermal data processing while breaking through the way to all optic processors based on silicon chips that are fabricated via typical microelectronics fabrication process.

  14. Thermal analysis of continuous and patterned multilayer films in the presence of a nanoscale hot spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Jia-Yang; Zheng, Jinglin

    2016-10-01

    Thermal responses of multilayer films play essential roles in state-of-the-art electronic systems, such as photo/micro-electronic devices, data storage systems, and silicon-on-insulator transistors. In this paper, we focus on the thermal aspects of multilayer films in the presence of a nanoscale hot spot induced by near field laser heating. The problem is set up in the scenario of heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR), the next-generation technology to overcome the data storage density limit imposed by superparamagnetism. We characterized thermal responses of both continuous and patterned multilayer media films using transient thermal modeling. We observed that material configurations, in particular, the thermal barriers at the material layer interfaces crucially impact the temperature field hence play a key role in determining the hot spot geometry, transient response and power consumption. With a representative generic media model, we further explored the possibility of optimizing thermal performances by designing layers of heat sink and thermal barrier. The modeling approach demonstrates an effective way to characterize thermal behaviors of micro and nano-scale electronic devices with multilayer thin film structures. The insights into the thermal transport scheme will be critical for design and operations of such electronic devices.

  15. Thermal analysis of continuous and patterned multilayer films in the presence of a nanoscale hot spot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Yang Juang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Thermal responses of multilayer films play essential roles in state-of-the-art electronic systems, such as photo/micro-electronic devices, data storage systems, and silicon-on-insulator transistors. In this paper, we focus on the thermal aspects of multilayer films in the presence of a nanoscale hot spot induced by near field laser heating. The problem is set up in the scenario of heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR, the next-generation technology to overcome the data storage density limit imposed by superparamagnetism. We characterized thermal responses of both continuous and patterned multilayer media films using transient thermal modeling. We observed that material configurations, in particular, the thermal barriers at the material layer interfaces crucially impact the temperature field hence play a key role in determining the hot spot geometry, transient response and power consumption. With a representative generic media model, we further explored the possibility of optimizing thermal performances by designing layers of heat sink and thermal barrier. The modeling approach demonstrates an effective way to characterize thermal behaviors of micro and nano-scale electronic devices with multilayer thin film structures. The insights into the thermal transport scheme will be critical for design and operations of such electronic devices.

  16. Nanoscale programmable sequence-specific patterning of DNA scaffolds using RecA protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R.; Davies, A. G.; Wälti, C.

    2012-09-01

    Molecular self-assembly inherent to many biological molecules, in conjunction with suitable molecular scaffolds to facilitate programmable positioning of nanoscale objects, offers a promising approach for the integration of functional nanoscale complexes into macroscopic host devices. Here, we report the use of the protein RecA as a means of highly efficient programmable patterning of double-stranded (ds)DNA molecules with molecular-scale precision at specific locations along the DNA strand. RecA proteins form nucleoprotein filaments with single-stranded (ss)DNA molecules, which are chosen to be of sequence homologous to the desired binding region on the dsDNA scaffold. We show that the patterning yield can be in excess of 85% and we demonstrate that concurrent patterning of multiple locations on the same dsDNA scaffold can be achieved with separation between the assembled nucleoprotein filaments of less than 4 nm. This is an important prerequisite for this programmable and flexible DNA scaffold patterning technique to be employed in molecular- and nanoscale assembly applications.

  17. Grain engineering: How nanoscale inhomogeneities can control charge collection in solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, Bradley M.; Stuckelberger, Michael; Guthrey, Harvey; Chen, Lei; Lai, Barry; Maser, Jörg; Rose, Volker; Shafarman, William; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Bertoni, Mariana I.

    2017-02-01

    Statistical and correlative analysis are increasingly important in the design and study of new materials, from semiconductors to metals. Non-destructive measurement techniques, with high spatial resolution, capable of correlating composition and/or structure with device properties, are few and far between. For the case of polycrystalline and inhomogeneous materials, the added challenge is that nanoscale resolution is in general not compatible with the large sampling areas necessary to have a statistical representation of the specimen under study. For the study of grain cores and grain boundaries in polycrystalline solar absorbers this is of particular importance since their dissimilar behavior and variability throughout the samples makes it difficult to draw conclusions and ultimately optimize the material. In this study, we present a nanoscale in-operando approach based on the multimodal utilization of synchrotron nano x-ray fluorescence and x-ray beam induced current collected for grain core and grain boundary areas and correlated pixel-by-pixel in fully operational Cu(In(1-x)Gax)Se2Cu(In(1-x)Gax)Se2 solar cells. We observe that low gallium cells have grain boundaries that over perform compared to the grain cores and high gallium cells have boundaries that under perform. These results demonstrate how nanoscale correlative X-ray microscopy can guide research pathways towards grain engineering low cost, high efficiency solar cells.

  18. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2014-07-22

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  19. 75 FR 49487 - Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... AGENCY Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray AGENCY: Environmental Protection... period for the draft document ``Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray'' (EPA.... ] ADDRESSES: The draft ``Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray'' is available...

  20. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Tiziana C; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James; Liu, Gang Logan

    2015-11-03

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  1. Nanoscale characterization of surfaces and interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    DiNardo, N John

    2008-01-01

    Derived from the highly acclaimed series Materials Science and Technology, this book provides in-depth coverage of STM, AFM, and related non-contact nanoscale probes along with detailed applications, such as the manipulation of atoms and clusters on a nanometer scale. The methods are described in terms of the physics and the technology of the methods and many high-quality images demonstrate the power of these techniques in the investigation of surfaces and the processes which occur on them.Topics include:Semiconductor Surfaces and Interfaces * Insulators * Layered Compounds * Charg

  2. Nonlinear Quantum Optics in Optomechanical Nanoscale Waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Zoubi, Hashem

    2016-01-01

    We explore the possibility of achieving a significant nonlinear phase shift among photons propagating in nanoscale waveguides exploiting interactions among photons that are mediated by vibrational modes and induced through Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS). We introduce a configuration that allows slowing down the photons by several orders of magnitude via SBS involving sound waves and two pump fields. We extract the conditions for maintaining vanishing amplitude gain or loss for slowly propagating photons while keeping the influence of thermal phonons to the minimum. The nonlinear phase among two counter-propagating photons can be used to realize a deterministic phase gate.

  3. Nanoscale atomic waveguides with suspended carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Peano, V; Kasper, A; Egger, R

    2005-01-01

    We propose an experimentally viable setup for the realization of one-dimensional ultracold atom gases in a nanoscale magnetic waveguide formed by single doubly-clamped suspended carbon nanotubes. We show that all common decoherence and atom loss mechanisms are small guaranteeing a stable operation of the trap. Since the extremely large current densities in carbon nanotubes are spatially homogeneous, our proposed architecture allows to overcome the problem of fragmentation of the atom cloud. Adding a second nanowire allows to create a double-well potential with a moderate tunneling barrier which is desired for tunneling and interference experiments with the advantage of tunneling distances being in the nanometer regime.

  4. Attosecond nanoscale near-field sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Förg, Benjamin; Suessmann, Frederik; Foerster, Michael; Krueger, Michael; Ahn, Byung-Nam; Wintersperger, Karen; Zherebtsov, Sergey; Guggenmos, Alexander; Pervak, Vladimir; Kessel, Alexander; Trushin, Sergei; Azzeer, Abdallah; Stockman, Mark; Kim, Dong-Eon; Krausz, Ferenc; Hommelhoff, Peter; Kling, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The promise of ultrafast light field driven electronic nanocircuits has stimulated the development of the new research field of attosecond nanophysics. An essential prerequisite for advancing this new area is the ability to characterize optical nearfields from light interaction with nanostructures with sub cycle resolution. Here, we experimentally demonstrate attosecond nearfield retrieval with a gold nanotip using streaking spectroscopy. By comparison of the results from gold nanotips to those obtained for a noble gas, the spectral response of the nanotip near field arising from laser excitation can be extracted. Monte Carlo MC trajectory simulations in near fields obtained with the macroscopic Maxwells equations elucidate the streaking mechanism on the nanoscale.

  5. Nanoscale Morphology Control in Functional Polymer Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joachim; Loos; Svetlana; Chevtchenko

    2007-01-01

    1 Results In high-performance organic solar cells,the photoactive layer consists of a blend of an electron donor and an electron acceptor constituent,a so-called bulk heterojunction.The requirements to morphology of the efficient photoactive layer are nanoscale phase separation,which provides large interface area for exciton dissociation,and at the same time continuous pathways for transport of free charge carriers to the appropriate electrodes.In this context,the research is now focused on a better und...

  6. Nanoscale microwave microscopy using shielded cantilever probes

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Keji

    2011-04-21

    Quantitative dielectric and conductivity mapping in the nanoscale is highly desirable for many research disciplines, but difficult to achieve through conventional transport or established microscopy techniques. Taking advantage of the micro-fabrication technology, we have developed cantilever-based near-field microwave probes with shielded structures. Sensitive microwave electronics and finite-element analysis modeling are also utilized for quantitative electrical imaging. The system is fully compatible with atomic force microscope platforms for convenient operation and easy integration of other modes and functions. The microscope is ideal for interdisciplinary research, with demonstrated examples in nano electronics, physics, material science, and biology.

  7. Interferometer -based Technology for Optical Nanoscale Inspection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryabko M.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the interferometer-based approach for nanoscale grating Critical Dimension (CD measurements and prove the possibility to achieve no worse than 10 nm accuracy of measurements for 100 nm pitch gratings. The approach is based on phase shift measurement of light fields specularly reflected from periodical pattern and adjacent substrate with subsequent comparison between experimental and simulation results. RCWA algorithm is used to fit the measured results and extract the CD value. It is shown that accuracy of CD value measurement depends rather on the grating’s CD/pitch ratio than its CD value

  8. Parallel optical nanolithography using nanoscale bowtie apertures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppuluri, Sreemanth M. V.

    Over the past two decades various branches of science and engineering have developed techniques for producing nanoscopic light sources for different applications such as imaging, detection and fabrication. These areas include near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM), surface-enhanced Raman scattering and detection (SERS), plasmonics and so on. In particular nanolithography techniques have been developed to produce feature sizes in the sub-100 nm length scales. These processes include variations of standard photolithography process to achieve high resolution, optical fiber-based near-field lithography, surface plasmon assisted nanolithography, interference optical lithography and so on. This work presents a study of the viability of using nanoscale bowtie apertures for nanolithography. Bowtie apertures exhibit a unique property of supporting a propagating TE10 mode at wavelengths of light in the visible and near-UV regimes. The energy of this mode is concentrated in the gap region of the aperture and thus these apertures have the potential to produce high intensity nanoscale light spots that can be used for nano-patterning applications. We demonstrate this capability of nanoscale bowtie apertures by patterning photoresist to obtain resolution less than 100 nm. Initially we present the results from static lithography experiments and show that the ridge apertures of different shapes -- C, H and bowtie produce holes in the photoresist of dimensions around 50-60 nm. Subsequently we address the issues involved in using these apertures for nano directwriting. We show that chromium thin-films offer a viable solution to produce high quality metal films of surface roughness less than 1 nm over an area of 25 mum2. This is indeed important to achieve intimate contact between the apertures and the photoresist surface. We also explain ways to decrease friction between the mask and photoresist surfaces during nano direct-writing. In addition, to decrease the contact force

  9. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-07-01

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion.Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice

  10. Nanoscale investigation of organic - inorganic halide perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacovich, S.; Divitini, G.; Vrućinić, M.; Sadhanala, A.; Friend, R. H.; Sirringhaus, H.; Deschler, F.; Ducati, C.

    2015-10-01

    Over the last few years organic - inorganic halide perovskite-based solar cells have exhibited a rapid evolution, reaching certified power conversion efficiencies now surpassing 20%. Nevertheless the understanding of the optical and electronic properties of such systems on the nanoscale is still an open problem. In this work we investigate two model perovskite systems (based on iodine - CH3NH3PbI3 and bromine - CH3NH3PbBr3), analysing the local elemental composition and crystallinity and identifying chemical inhomogeneities.

  11. Micro- and nanoscale phenomena in tribology

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Yip-Wah

    2011-01-01

    Drawn from presentations at a recent National Science Foundation Summer Institute on Nanomechanics, Nanomaterials, and Micro/Nanomanufacturing, Micro- and Nanoscale Phenomena in Tribology explores the convergence of the multiple science and engineering disciplines involved in tribology and the connection from the macro to nano world. Written by specialists from computation, materials science, mechanical engineering, surface physics, and chemistry, each chapter provides up-to-date coverage of both basic and advanced topics and includes extensive references for further study.After discussing the

  12. Nanoscale growth twins in sputtered metal films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, Amit [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderoglu, Osman [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hoagland, Richard G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, X [TEXAS A& M

    2008-01-01

    We review recent studies on the mechanical properties of sputtered Cu and 330 stainless steel films with {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace} nanoscale growth twins preferentially oriented perpendicular to growth direction. The mechanisms of formation of growth twins during sputtering and the deformation mechanisms that enable usually high strengths in nanotwinned structures are highlighted. Growth twins in sputtered films possess good thermal stability at elevated temperature, providing an approach to extend the application of high strength nanostructured metals to higher temperatures.

  13. From Lab to Fab: Developing a Nanoscale Delivery Tool for Scalable Nanomanufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safi, Asmahan A.

    The emergence of nanomaterials with unique properties at the nanoscale over the past two decades carries a capacity to impact society and transform or create new industries ranging from nanoelectronics to nanomedicine. However, a gap in nanomanufacturing technologies has prevented the translation of nanomaterial into real-world commercialized products. Bridging this gap requires a paradigm shift in methods for fabricating structured devices with a nanoscale resolution in a repeatable fashion. This thesis explores the new paradigms for fabricating nanoscale structures devices and systems for high throughput high registration applications. We present a robust and scalable nanoscale delivery platform, the Nanofountain Probe (NFP), for parallel direct-write of functional materials. The design and microfabrication of NFP is presented. The new generation addresses the challenges of throughput, resolution and ink replenishment characterizing tip-based nanomanufacturing. To achieve these goals, optimized probe geometry is integrated to the process along with channel sealing and cantilever bending. The capabilities of the newly fabricated probes are demonstrated through two type of delivery: protein nanopatterning and single cell nanoinjection. The broad applications of the NFP for single cell delivery are investigated. An external microfluidic packaging is developed to enable delivery in liquid environment. The system is integrated to a combined atomic force microscope and inverted fluorescence microscope. Intracellular delivery is demonstrated by injecting a fluorescent dextran into Hela cells in vitro while monitoring the injection forces. Such developments enable in vitro cellular delivery for single cell studies and high throughput gene expression. The nanomanufacturing capabilities of NFPs are explored. Nanofabrication of carbon nanotube-based electronics presents all the manufacturing challenges characterizing of assembling nanomaterials precisely onto devices. The

  14. Preparation and Characteristics of Nanoscale Diamond-Like Carbon Films for Resistive Memory Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Di; XIE Dan; ZHANG Chen-Hui; ZHANG Di; NIU Jie-Bin; QIAN He; LIU Li-Tian

    2010-01-01

    @@ We propose diamond-like carbon(DLC)as the resistance change material for nonvolatile memory applications.Nanoscale DLC films are prepared by filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique and integrated to W/DLC/W structure devices.The deposited DLC film has a thickness of about 2O nm and high sp3 fraction content.Reversible bistable resistive switching from a high resistance state to a low resistance state,and vice versa,is observed under appropriate unipolar stimulation pulses.

  15. Nanoscale investigations on interchain organization in thin films of polymer-liquid crystal blend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve-Faure, C.; Le Borgne, D.; Ventalon, V.; Seguy, I.; Moineau-Chane Ching, K. I.; Bedel-Pereira, E.

    2017-07-01

    Optimized nanomorphology in organic thin active layers is crucial for good performance in organic solar cells. However, the relation between morphology and electronic properties at nanoscale remains not completely understood. Here, we study the effect of film thickness and temperature annealing on the ordering of poly(3-hexylthiophene) chains when the polymer is blended with a columnar liquid crystalline molecule. Electronic absorption, atomic force microscopy measurements, and Raman spectroscopy show that morphology and chain ordering of the blend depend on the film thickness. We highlight the benefit of using a liquid crystal in organic blends, opening the way to use simple processing methods for the fabrication of organic electronic devices.

  16. Dopamine-assisted rapid fabrication of nanoscale protein arrays by colloidal lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogaki, Ryosuke; Bennetsen, Dines T; Bald, Ilko; Foss, Morten

    2012-06-12

    The development of cost-effective methodologies for the precise nanometer-scale positioning of biomolecules permits the low-cost production of various biofunctional devices for a range of biomedical and nanotechnological applications. By combining colloidal lithography and the mussel-inspired multifunctional polydopamine coating, we present a novel parallel benchtop method that allows rapid nanoscale patterning of proteins without the need for electrically powered equipment in the fabrication process. The PDA-immobilized binary nanopattern consisting of BSA surrounded by PLL-g-PEG is fabricated over a large area, and the integrity of the pattern is confirmed using AFM and FM.

  17. In Situ TEM Creation of Nanowire Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Sardar Bilal

    Integration of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) as active components in devices requires that desired mechanical, thermal and electrical interfaces can be established between the nanoscale geometry of the SiNW and the microscale architecture of the device. In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM...... of SiNW were also investigated in situ. SiNWs were grown on silicon microcantilever heaters using the VLS mechanism. When grown across a gap between adjacent cantilevers, contact was formed when the SiNW impinged on the sidewall of an adjacent cantilever. Using in situ TEM, SiNW contact formation...

  18. Viable chemical approach for patterning nanoscale magnetoresistive random access memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taeseung; Kim, Younghee; Chen, Jack Kun-Chieh; Chang, Jane P., E-mail: jpchang@seas.ucla.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    A reactive ion etching process with alternating Cl{sub 2} and H{sub 2} exposures has been shown to chemically etch CoFe film that is an integral component in magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM). Starting with systematic thermodynamic calculations assessing various chemistries and reaction pathways leading to the highest possible vapor pressure of the etch products reactions, the potential chemical combinations were verified by etch rate investigation and surface chemistry analysis in plasma treated CoFe films. An ∼20% enhancement in etch rate was observed with the alternating use of Cl{sub 2} and H{sub 2} plasmas, in comparison with the use of only Cl{sub 2} plasma. This chemical combination was effective in removing metal chloride layers, thus maintaining the desired magnetic properties of the CoFe films. Scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy showed visually and spectroscopically that the metal chloride layers generated by Cl{sub 2} plasma were eliminated with H{sub 2} plasma to yield a clean etch profile. This work suggests that the selected chemistries can be used to etch magnetic metal alloys with a smooth etch profile and this general strategy can be applied to design chemically based etch processes to enable the fabrication of highly integrated nanoscale MRAM devices.

  19. Molecular and Nanoscale Engineering of High Efficiency Excitonic Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenekhe, Samson A. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Ginger, David S. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Cao, Guozhong [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We combined the synthesis of new polymers and organic-inorganic hybrid materials with new experimental characterization tools to investigate bulk heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells and hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells during the 2007-2010 period (phase I) of this project. We showed that the bulk morphology of polymer/fullerene blend solar cells could be controlled by using either self-assembled polymer semiconductor nanowires or diblock poly(3-alkylthiophenes) as the light-absorbing and hole transport component. We developed new characterization tools in-house, including photoinduced absorption (PIA) spectroscopy, time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy (TR-EFM) and conductive and photoconductive atomic force microscopy (c-AFM and pc-AFM), and used them to investigate charge transfer and recombination dynamics in polymer/fullerene BHJ solar cells, hybrid polymer-nanocrystal (PbSe) devices, and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs); we thus showed in detail how the bulk photovoltaic properties are connected to the nanoscale structure of the BHJ polymer solar cells. We created various oxide semiconductor (ZnO, TiO2) nanostructures by solution processing routes, including hierarchical aggregates and nanorods/nanotubes, and showed that the nanostructured photoanodes resulted in substantially enhanced light-harvesting and charge transport, leading to enhanced power conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells.

  20. Three dimensional self-assembly at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracias, D. H.

    2013-05-01

    At the nanoscale, three dimensional manipulation and assembly becomes extremely challenging and also cost prohibitive. Self-assembly provides an attractive and possibly the only highly parallel methodology to structure truly three dimensional patterned materials and devices at this size scale for applications in electronics, optics, robotics and medicine. This is a concise review along with a perspective of an important and exciting field in nanotechnology and is related to a Nanoengineering Pioneer Award that I received at this SPIE symposium for my contributions to the 3D selfassembly of nanostructures. I detail a historical account of 3D self-assembly and outline important developments in this area which is put into context with the larger research areas of 3D nanofabrication, assembly and nanomanufacturing. A focus in this review is on our work as it relates to the self-assembly with lithographically patterned units; this approach provides a means for heterogeneous integration of periodic, curved and angled nanostructures with precisely defined three dimensional patterns.

  1. Subsurface imaging of two-dimensional materials at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinelli, Franco; Pingue, Pasqualantonio; Kay, Nicholas D.; Kolosov, Oleg V.

    2017-02-01

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) represents a powerful tool that, in the past 30 years, has allowed for the investigation of material surfaces in unprecedented ways at the nanoscale level. However, SPM has shown very little capability for depth penetration, which several nanotechnology applications require. Subsurface imaging has been achieved only in a few cases, when subsurface features influence the physical properties of the surface, such as the electronic states or the heat transfer. Ultrasonic force microscopy (UFM), an adaption of the contact mode atomic force microscopy, can dynamically measure the stiffness of the elastic contact between the probing tip and the sample surface. In particular, UFM has proven highly sensitive to the near-surface elastic field in non-homogeneous samples. In this paper, we present an investigation of two-dimensional (2D) materials, namely flakes of graphite and molybdenum disulphide placed on structured polymeric substrates. We show that UFM can non-destructively distinguish suspended and supported areas and localise defects, such as buckling or delamination of adjacent monolayers, generated by residual stress. Specifically, UFM can probe small variations in the local indentation induced by the mechanical interaction between the tip and the sample. Therefore, any change in the elastic modulus within the volume perturbed by the applied load or the flexural bending of the suspended areas can be detected and imaged. These investigation capabilities are very promising in order to study the buried interfaces of nanostructured 2D materials such as in graphene-based devices.

  2. Thermal electron-tunneling devices as coolers and amplifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Shanhe Su; Yanchao Zhang; Jincan Chen; Tien-Mo Shih

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale thermal systems that are associated with a pair of electron reservoirs have been previously studied. In particular, devices that adjust electron tunnels relatively to reservoirs’ chemical potentials enjoy the novelty and the potential. Since only two reservoirs and one tunnel exist, however, designers need external aids to complete a cycle, rendering their models non-spontaneous. Here we design thermal conversion devices that are operated among three electron reservoirs connected by...

  3. Nanoscale optical imaging of semiconductor nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehmler, Miriam; Hartschuh, Achim [Department Chemie, CeNS, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Myalitsin, Anton; Mews, Alf [Department Chemie, Universitaet Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Inorganic semiconducting nanowires (NWs) feature size-related optical properties which make them interesting for a wide range of applications, e.g. nanoscale optoelectronics, sensors, and photovoltaics. Their relevant length scales that are determined by nanowire diameter and exciton Bohr radius, however, can not be resolved by conventional diffraction limited methods. We illustrate the prospects of tip-enhanced near-field optical microscopy (TENOM) as a method to investigate single nanowires. In TENOM a sharp metallic tip acts as optical antenna thereby enhancing the detected signal and increasing the optical resolution to about 15 nm. We present our investigations of CdSe NWs which have been grown by the wet chemical solution liquid solid technique. Here, TENOM provides the possibility to simultaneously image photoluminescence (PL) as well as Raman scattering of individual NWs with nanoscale resolution. We observe spatial variations of the PL intensity and energy on a length scale of about 15 nm indicating crystal phase transitions and diameter fluctuations.

  4. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-08-14

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion.

  5. Svnthesis and Characterization of Nanoscale Mullite Powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Huizhong; HU Shoutian; WANG Houzhi; ZHANG Wenjie

    2003-01-01

    Nanoscale mullite powder were synthesized via Solgel-SCFD and middle temperature treatment by using AIP( aluminum-isopropoxde ) and TEOS ( tetraethyl orthosdicate) as starting materials. Both of the binary aerogel of alumina-silica and calcined nanoscale materials were investigated by using TG-DSC (thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimeter), TEM (transmission electron microscope), XRD ( X-Ray diffractometer ) and specific surface area and porosimetry. TG-DSC indicated the removal of most of the volatiles , i. e. 15.98% up to about 700℃ ,and in the DSC curve, existence of two exothermic peak at about 445℃ and 1015℃ may be due to the crystallization of Si-O-Al-O in diphasic gels and mullitization and a small endothermic peak at about 805℃ indicated the decomposition of structural water molecules. On the colligation of the results of TG- DSC, XRD and TEM , the beginning temperature of mullitization in Al2 O3-SiO2 aerogel system can be confirmed at about 1015℃. XRD results also showed the formation of mullite at the range 1100 ~1200℃. TEM and surface area and porosimetry results showed that the nanosized mullite were calcinated at 1100and 1200℃ exhibited size 30nm and 50nm, specific surface area 138.91m2/g and 95.81m2/g.

  6. Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide in ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide in Water Treatment and in Topical Sunscreen. This report is a starting point to determine what is known and what needs to be known about selected nanomaterials as part of a process to identify and prioritize research to inform future assessments of the potential ecological and health implications of these materials. Two specific applications of nanoscale titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) are considered: (1) as an agent for removing arsenic from drinking water; and (2) as an active ingredient in topical sunscreen. These case studies are organized around a comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) framework that combines a product life cycle perspective with the risk assessment paradigm. They are intended to help identify what may need to be known in order to conduct a comprehensive environmental assessment of the potential risks related to nano-TiO2. These “case studies” do not represent completed or even preliminary assessments, nor are they intended to serve as a basis for risk management decisions in the near term on these specific uses of nano TiO2. Rather, the intent is to use this document in developing the scientific and technical information needed for future assessment efforts.

  7. Transport and structure in nanoscale channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Gregory William

    Driven by the rapidly advancing fields of nano- and biotechnology, there has been an explosion of interest in molecular transport and structure formation on small length scales. A canonical model for the transport of particles along one dimensional pathways in nanoscale channels is the Totally Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process (TASEP). After introducing the standard TASEP, modifications of the TASEP designed to increase its utility in modeling biological transport processes are described. One variant of the TASEP is particularly suitable for modeling protein translation, and the results of using this variant to investigate the effects of slow-codons on the translation process are discussed. A related topic is the voltage-driven translocation of DNA hairpins through membrane-embedded nanopores. Motivated by recent experiments, a stochastic model is developed that couples the translocation and dehybridization of the DNA hairpin. This model is used to explore the behaviour of the mean translocation time of hairpins as a function of driving voltage, and two translocation mechanisms are identified and discussed. Finally, the adsorption and equilibrium structures of water in the interior of ion-bearing nanoscale pores are considered. The behaviour of water and ions under confinement is critical to the functioning of biological ion channels and nanoporous filters. Here, the adsorption isotherms of water are examined, and the layered structures formed by the confined water are described.

  8. Nanoscale Morphology of Sulfonated Polystyrene Ionomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nancy C.; Winey, Karen I.

    2007-03-01

    We have applied our scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) methods to investigate the size, shape and spatial distribution of the ionic, nanoscale aggregates in poly(styrene-ran-styrene sulfonate) (P(S-SSx)) ionomers. This analytical electron microscopy method minimizes phase contrast that can obscure nano-scale features and accentuates differences in atomic number. We recently reported quantitative agreement between STEM and X-ray scattering results in a Cu-neutralized poly(styrene-ran-methacrylic acid) (SMAA) ionomer with respect to the size of the ionic aggregates and their number density. For this study, P(S-SSx) ionomers were prepared by solution neutralizing with metal acetates, solution casting, and annealing. Initial STEM results from P(S-SS0.019) fully neutralized with Zn indicate a uniform distribution of monodisperse spherical aggregates. Combining direct imaging and X-ray scattering of P(S-SSx) ionomers, we will investigate the effect of cation type and level of neutralization.

  9. Structure of nanoscale gas bubbles in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro, A., E-mail: caro@lanl.gov; Schwen, D.; Martinez, E. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2013-11-18

    A usual way to estimate the amount of gas in a bubble inside a metal is to assume thermodynamic equilibrium, i.e., the gas pressure P equals the capillarity force 2γ/R, with γ the surface energy of the host material and R the bubble radius; under this condition there is no driving force for vacancies to be emitted or absorbed by the bubble. In contrast to the common assumption that pressure inside a gas or fluid bubble is constant, we show that at the nanoscale this picture is no longer valid. P and density can no longer be defined as global quantities determined by an equation of state (EOS), but they become functions of position because the bubble develops a core-shell structure. We focus on He in Fe and solve the problem using both continuum mechanics and empirical potentials to find a quantitative measure of this effect. We point to the need of redefining an EOS for nanoscale gas bubbles in metals, which can be obtained via an average pressure inside the bubble. The resulting EOS, which is now size dependent, gives pressures that differ by a factor of two or more from the original EOS for bubble diameters of 1 nm and below.

  10. Quantifying Nanoscale Order in Amorphous Materials via Fluctuation Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogle, Stephanie Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM) has been used to study the nanoscale order in various amorphous materials. The method is explicitly sensitive to 3- and 4-body atomic correlation functions in amorphous materials; this is sufficient to establish the existence of structural order on the nanoscale, even when the radial distribution function…

  11. Bumpy, Sticky, and Shaky: Nanoscale Science and the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Amy; Jones, Gail; Pearl, Thomas P.

    2008-01-01

    Nanoscience, or the study of the world at the size of a billionth of a meter, has the potential to help students see how all of the sciences are related. Behavior of materials at the nanoscale differs from materials at the macroscale. This article introduces three nanoscale properties and how they relate to various science domains. Three…

  12. Frontier in nanoscale flows fractional calculus and analytical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Roland; Liu, Hong-yan

    2014-01-01

    This ebook covers the basic properties of nanoscale flows, and various analytical and numerical methods for nanoscale flows and environmental flows. This ebook is a good reference not only for audience of the journal, but also for various communities in mathematics, nanotechnology and environmental science.

  13. Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the release of the final report, Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray. This report represents a case study of engineered nanoscale silver (nano-Ag), focusing on the specific example of nano-Ag as possibly used in disinfectant spr...

  14. Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the release of the final report, Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray. This report represents a case study of engineered nanoscale silver (nano-Ag), focusing on the specific example of nano-Ag as possibly used in disinfectant spr...

  15. Quantifying Nanoscale Order in Amorphous Materials via Fluctuation Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogle, Stephanie Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM) has been used to study the nanoscale order in various amorphous materials. The method is explicitly sensitive to 3- and 4-body atomic correlation functions in amorphous materials; this is sufficient to establish the existence of structural order on the nanoscale, even when the radial distribution function…

  16. Probing light emission at the nanoscale with cathodoluminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.J.M. Brenny

    2016-01-01

    Nanophotonics, the study of light at the nanoscale, is a vibrant field of research with a wide variety of applications. To mold and control light at the nanoscale, it is essential to measure and characterize nanostructures and their interaction with light at this subwavelength scale. This thesis des

  17. A micro-scale hot-surface device based on non-radiative carrier recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Holleman, J.; Iordache, G.

    2004-01-01

    This work employs the idea of making micro-scale hot-surface devices (e.g. sensors, flow meters, micro reactors, etc) based on generation of heat due to nonradiative recombination of carriers in a thin (13 nm) poly silicon surface layer. An important part of the device is a nano-scale (10-100 nm)

  18. Analysis of Voltage Transfer Characteristics of Nano-scale SOI CMOS Inverter with Variable Channel Length and Doping Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Daniyel Raj

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available During many decades, continuous device performance improvement has been made possible only through device scaling. But presently, due to aggressive scaling at the sub-micron or nanometer region, the conventional planner silicon technology is suffering from the fundamental physical limits. Such imposed limits on further downscaling of silicon planner technology have lead to alternative device technology like Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI technology. Due-to some of its inherent advantages, the Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI technology has reduced the Short-channel-effects (SCEs and thus increased transistor scalability. Till now, intense research interests have been paid in practical fabrication and theoretical modeling of SOI MOSFETs but a little attention has been paid to understand the circuit level performance improvement with nano-scale SOI MOSFETs. The circuit level performance analysis of SOI MOSFET is highly essential to understand the impact of SOI technology on next level VLSI circuit and chip design and for doing so device compact models are high on demand. In such scenario, under present research, a physics based compact device model of SOI MOSFET has been developed. At the first phase of the compact model development, a physics based threshold voltage model has been developed by solving 2-D Poisson’s equation at the channel region and at the second phase, a current-voltage model has been developed with drift-diffusion analysis. Different SCEs, valid at nano-scale, are effectively incorporated in threshold voltage and Current-Voltage model. At the third phase, using the compact model, the Voltage Transfer Characteristics (VTC for a nano-scale SOI CMOS inverter has been derived with graphical analysis. The impacts of different device parameters e.g.; channel length and channel doping concentration on VTC has been investigated through simulation and the results have been analyzed.

  19. Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  20. The Soft Mode Driven Dynamics in Ferroelectric Perovskites at the Nanoscale: An Atomistic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCash, Kevin

    The discovery of ferroelectricity at the nanoscale has incited a lot of interest in perovskite ferroelectrics not only for their potential in device application but also for their potential to expand fundamental understanding of complex phenomena at very small size scales. Unfortunately, not much is known about the dynamics of ferroelectrics at this scale. Many of the widely held theories for ferroelectric materials are based on bulk dynamics which break down when applied to smaller scales. In an effort to increase understanding of nanoscale ferroelectric materials we use atomistic resolution computational simulations to investigate the dynamics of polar perovskites. Within the framework of a well validated effective Hamiltonian model we are able to accurately predict many of the properties of ferroelectric materials at the nanoscale including the response of the soft mode to mechanical boundary conditions and the polarization reversal dynamics of ferroelectric nanowires. Given that the focus of our study is the dynamics of ferroelectric perovskites we begin by developing an effective Hamiltonian based model that could simultaneously describe both static and dynamic properties of such materials. Our study reveals that for ferroelectric perovskites that undergo a sequence of phase transitions, such as BaTiO3. for example, the minimal parameter effective Hamiltonian model is unable to reproduce both static and dynamical properties simultaneously. Nevertheless we developed two sets of parameters that accurately describes the static properties and dynamic properties of BaTiO3 independently. By creating a tool that accurately models the dynamical properties of perovskite ferroelectrics we are able to investigate the frequencies of the soft modes in the perovskite crystal. The lowest energy transverse optical soft modes in perovskite ferroelectrics are known to be cause of the ferroelectric phase transition in these materials and affect a number of electrical properties

  1. Outlook and challenges of nano devices, sensors, and MEMS

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ziv

    2017-01-01

    This book provides readers with an overview of the design, fabrication, simulation, and reliability of nanoscale semiconductor devices, MEMS, and sensors, as they serve for realizing the next-generation internet of things. The authors focus on how the nanoscale structures interact with the electrical and/or optical performance, how to find optimal solutions to achieve the best outcome, how these apparatus can be designed via models and simulations, how to improve reliability, and what are the possible challenges and roadblocks moving forward.

  2. Fundamentals of nanoscale polymer-protein interactions and potential contributions to solid-state nanobioarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, Jong-in

    2014-08-26

    Protein adsorption onto polymer surfaces is a very complex, ubiquitous, and integrated process, impacting essential areas of food processing and packaging, health devices, diagnostic tools, and medical products. The nature of protein-surface interactions is becoming much more complicated with continuous efforts toward miniaturization, especially for the development of highly compact protein detection and diagnostic devices. A large body of literature reports on protein adsorption from the perspective of ensemble-averaged behavior on macroscopic, chemically homogeneous, polymeric surfaces. However, protein-surface interactions governing the nanoscale size regime may not be effectively inferred from their macroscopic and microscopic characteristics. Recently, research efforts have been made to produce periodically arranged, nanoscopic protein patterns on diblock copolymer surfaces solely through self-assembly. Intriguing protein adsorption phenomena are directly probed on the individual biomolecule level for a fundamental understanding of protein adsorption on nanoscale surfaces exhibiting varying degrees of chemical heterogeneity. Insight gained from protein assembly on diblock copolymers can be effectively used to control the surface density, conformation, orientation, and biofunctionality of prebound proteins in highly miniaturized applications, now approaching the nanoscale. This feature article will highlight recent experimental and theoretical advances made on these fronts while focusing on single-biomolecule-level investigations of protein adsorption behavior combined with surface chemical heterogeneity on the length scale commensurate with a single protein. This article will also address advantages and challenges of the self-assembly-driven patterning technology used to produce protein nanoarrays and its implications for ultrahigh density, functional, and quantifiable protein detection in a highly miniaturized format.

  3. Osteogenic response of human mesenchymal stem cells to well-defined nanoscale topography in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Peppo GM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Maria de Peppo,1–3 Hossein Agheli,2,3 Camilla Karlsson,2,3 Karin Ekström,2,3 Helena Brisby,3,4 Maria Lennerås,2,3 Stefan Gustafsson,3,5 Peter Sjövall,3,5,6 Anna Johansson,2,3 Eva Olsson,3,5 Jukka Lausmaa,3,6 Peter Thomsen,2,3 Sarunas Petronis3,6 1The New York Stem Cell Foundation Research Institute, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Biomaterials, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 3BIOMATCELL VINN Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, 4Department of Orthopaedics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 5Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden; 6Chemistry, Materials and Surfaces, SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Borås, Sweden Background: Patterning medical devices at the nanoscale level enables the manipulation of cell behavior and tissue regeneration, with topographic features recognized as playing a significant role in the osseointegration of implantable devices. Methods: In this study, we assessed the ability of titanium-coated hemisphere-like topographic nanostructures of different sizes (approximately 50, 100, and 200 nm to influence the morphology, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs. Results: We found that the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs was influenced by the size of the underlying structures, suggesting that size variations in topographic features at the nanoscale level, independently of chemistry, can be exploited to control hMSC behavior in a size-dependent fashion. Conclusion: Our studies demonstrate that colloidal lithography, in combination with coating technologies, can be exploited to investigate the cell response to well defined nanoscale topography and to develop next-generation surfaces that guide tissue regeneration and promote implant integration. Keywords: colloidal lithography, nanotopography, human mesenchymal stem cells, cell proliferation, osteogenic

  4. Optical bistability in artificial composite nanoscale molecules: Towards all optical processing at the nanoscale

    CERN Document Server

    Malyshev, A V

    2010-01-01

    Optical response of artificial composite nanoscale molecules comprising a closely spaced noble metal nanoparticle and a semiconductor quantum dot have been studied theoretically. We consider a system composed of an Au particle and CdSe or CdSe/ZnSe quantum dot and predict optical bistability and hysteresis in its response, which suggests various applications, in particular, all-optical processing and optical memory.

  5. Wireless communication system via nanoscale plasmonic antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Juan M; Nesbitt, Nathan T; Calm, Yitzi M; Rose, Aaron H; D'Imperio, Luke; Yang, Chaobin; Naughton, Jeffrey R; Burns, Michael J; Kempa, Krzysztof; Naughton, Michael J

    2016-08-24

    Present on-chip optical communication technology uses near-infrared light, but visible wavelengths would allow system miniaturization and higher energy confinement. Towards this end, we report a nanoscale wireless communication system that operates at visible wavelengths via in-plane information transmission. Here, plasmonic antenna radiation mediates a three-step conversion process (surface plasmon → photon → surface plasmon) with in-plane efficiency (plasmon → plasmon) of 38% for antenna separation 4λ0 (with λ0 the free-space excitation wavelength). Information transmission is demonstrated at bandwidths in the Hz and MHz ranges. This work opens the possibility of optical conveyance of information using plasmonic antennas for on-chip communication technology.

  6. Focused electrojetting for nanoscale 3-D fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minhee; Kim, Ho-Young

    2012-11-01

    Although extreme miniaturization of components in integrated circuits and biochemical chips has driven the development of various nanofabrication technologies, three-dimensional fabrication of nanoscale objects is still in its infancy. Here we propose a novel method to fabricate a free-standing nanowall by the line-by-line deposition of electrospun polymer nanofibers. We show that the electrified nanojet, which tends to get unstable as traveling in free space due to the Coulombic repulsion, can be stably focused onto a narrow line of metal electrode. On the conducting line, the polymer nanojet is spontaneously folded successively to form a wall-like structure. We rationalize the period of spontaneous folding by balancing the tension in the polymer fiber with the electrostatic interaction of the fiber with the metal ground. This novel fabrication scheme can be applied for the development of three-dimensional bioscaffolds, nanofilters and nanorobots.

  7. Control of friction at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhen, Jacob; Braiman, Yehuda Y.; Protopopescu, Vladimir

    2010-04-06

    Methods and apparatus are described for control of friction at the nanoscale. A method of controlling frictional dynamics of a plurality of particles using non-Lipschitzian control includes determining an attribute of the plurality of particles; calculating an attribute deviation by subtracting the attribute of the plurality of particles from a target attribute; calculating a non-Lipschitzian feedback control term by raising the attribute deviation to a fractionary power .xi.=(2m+1)/(2n+1) where n=1, 2, 3 . . . and m=0, 1, 2, 3 . . . , with m strictly less than n and then multiplying by a control amplitude; and imposing the non-Lipschitzian feedback control term globally on each of the plurality of particles; imposing causes a subsequent magnitude of the attribute deviation to be reduced.

  8. Magnetic switching of nanoscale antidot lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräfe, Joachim; Lebecki, Kristof M; Skripnik, Maxim; Haering, Felix; Schütz, Gisela; Ziemann, Paul; Goering, Eberhard; Nowak, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Summary We investigate the rich magnetic switching properties of nanoscale antidot lattices in the 200 nm regime. In-plane magnetized Fe, Co, and Permalloy (Py) as well as out-of-plane magnetized GdFe antidot films are prepared by a modified nanosphere lithography allowing for non-close packed voids in a magnetic film. We present a magnetometry protocol based on magneto-optical Kerr microscopy elucidating the switching modes using first-order reversal curves. The combination of various magnetometry and magnetic microscopy techniques as well as micromagnetic simulations delivers a thorough understanding of the switching modes. While part of the investigations has been published before, we summarize these results and add significant new insights in the magnetism of exchange-coupled antidot lattices. PMID:27335762

  9. Inelastic transport theory for nanoscale systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes theoretical and numerical investigations of inelastic scat- tering and energy dissipation in electron transport through nanoscale sys- tems. A computational scheme, based on a combination of density functional theory (DFT) and nonequilibrium Green’s functions (NEGF), has been...... the conductance. The methods have been applied to a number of specific systems, includ- ing monatomic gold chains, atomic point contacts, and metal-molecule-metal configurations. These studies have clarified the inelastic effects in the elec- tron transport and characterized the vibrational modes that couple...... to the current. For instance, the dominant scattering for gold chains could be traced back to the longitudinal “alternating bond-length” mode. Furthermore, the results have been compared critically with experimental measurements for the different systems, and provided a microscopic understanding for the im...

  10. Implementation of perception and action at nanoscale

    CERN Document Server

    Marlière, Sylvain; Marchi, Florence; Luciani, Annie; Chevrier, Joel

    2008-01-01

    Real time combination of nanosensors and nanoactuators with virtual reality environment and multisensorial interfaces enable us to efficiently act and perceive at nanoscale. Advanced manipulation of nanoobjects and new strategies for scientific education are the key motivations. We have no existing intuitive representation of the nanoworld ruled by laws foreign to our experience. A central challenge is then the construction of nanoworld simulacrum that we can start to visit and to explore. In this nanoworld simulacrum, object identifications will be based on probed entity physical and chemical intrinsic properties, on their interactions with sensors and on the final choices made in building a multisensorial interface so that these objects become coherent elements of the human sphere of action and perception. Here we describe a 1D virtual nanomanipulator, part of the Cit\\'e des Sciences EXPO NANO in Paris, that is the first realization based on this program.

  11. Improvement in nanoscale contact resistance of alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Manjima; Chakraborty, Riya; Mandal, Ashok Kumar [CSIR - Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata (India); Dey, Arjun [CSIR - Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata (India); ISRO Satellite Centre, Thermal Systems Group, Bangalore (India); Mukhopadhyay, Anoop Kumar [CSIR - Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata (India); Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata 32 (India)

    2012-06-15

    In all contact-related applications such as the wear-resistant inserts, biomedical implants, high strain rate impact-resistant plates, etc., nanohardness, i.e. the intrinsic contact resistance at the nano scale, plays a major role. In spite of the wealth of literature, the studies on nanohardness of dense, coarse-grain alumina ceramics which represent many commercial varieties; have reasonably good hardness at the macro scale and characteristically exhibit R-curve behaviour, are far from significant. Here, to the best of our knowledge, we report for the first time the experimental observations of the increase in intrinsic contact resistance at the nano scale with the loading rate applied to a high-density ({proportional_to}95 % of theoretical) coarse-grain ({proportional_to}20 {mu}m) alumina ceramics. These observations were explained in terms of the initiation of nanoscale plasticity and maximum shear stress generated just underneath the nanoindenter. (orig.)

  12. Wireless communication system via nanoscale plasmonic antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Juan M.; Nesbitt, Nathan T.; Calm, Yitzi M.; Rose, Aaron H.; D'Imperio, Luke; Yang, Chaobin; Naughton, Jeffrey R.; Burns, Michael J.; Kempa, Krzysztof; Naughton, Michael J.

    2016-08-01

    Present on-chip optical communication technology uses near-infrared light, but visible wavelengths would allow system miniaturization and higher energy confinement. Towards this end, we report a nanoscale wireless communication system that operates at visible wavelengths via in-plane information transmission. Here, plasmonic antenna radiation mediates a three-step conversion process (surface plasmon → photon → surface plasmon) with in-plane efficiency (plasmon → plasmon) of 38% for antenna separation 4λ0 (with λ0 the free-space excitation wavelength). Information transmission is demonstrated at bandwidths in the Hz and MHz ranges. This work opens the possibility of optical conveyance of information using plasmonic antennas for on-chip communication technology.

  13. Nanoscale pillar hypersonic surface phononic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudistira, D.; Boes, A.; Graczykowski, B.; Alzina, F.; Yeo, L. Y.; Sotomayor Torres, C. M.; Mitchell, A.

    2016-09-01

    We report on nanoscale pillar-based hypersonic phononic crystals in single crystal Z-cut lithium niobate. The phononic crystal is formed by a two-dimensional periodic array of nearly cylindrical nanopillars 240 nm in diameter and 225 nm in height, arranged in a triangular lattice with a 300-nm lattice constant. The nanopillars are fabricated by the recently introduced nanodomain engineering via laser irradiation of patterned chrome followed by wet etching. Numerical simulations and direct measurements using Brillouin light scattering confirm the simultaneous existence of nonradiative complete surface phononic band gaps. The band gaps are found below the sound line at hypersonic frequencies in the range 2-7 GHz, formed from local resonances and Bragg scattering. These hypersonic structures are realized directly in the piezoelectric material lithium niobate enabling phonon manipulation at significantly higher frequencies than previously possible with this platform, opening new opportunities for many applications in plasmonic, optomechanic, microfluidic, and thermal engineering.

  14. Magnetic switching of nanoscale antidot lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Wiedwald

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the rich magnetic switching properties of nanoscale antidot lattices in the 200 nm regime. In-plane magnetized Fe, Co, and Permalloy (Py as well as out-of-plane magnetized GdFe antidot films are prepared by a modified nanosphere lithography allowing for non-close packed voids in a magnetic film. We present a magnetometry protocol based on magneto-optical Kerr microscopy elucidating the switching modes using first-order reversal curves. The combination of various magnetometry and magnetic microscopy techniques as well as micromagnetic simulations delivers a thorough understanding of the switching modes. While part of the investigations has been published before, we summarize these results and add significant new insights in the magnetism of exchange-coupled antidot lattices.

  15. Nanoscale imaging of RNA with expansion microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Wassie, Asmamaw T; Cote, Allison J; Sinha, Anubhav; Alon, Shahar; Asano, Shoh; Daugharthy, Evan R; Chang, Jae-Byum; Marblestone, Adam; Church, George M; Raj, Arjun; Boyden, Edward S

    2016-08-01

    The ability to image RNA identity and location with nanoscale precision in intact tissues is of great interest for defining cell types and states in normal and pathological biological settings. Here, we present a strategy for expansion microscopy of RNA. We developed a small-molecule linker that enables RNA to be covalently attached to a swellable polyelectrolyte gel synthesized throughout a biological specimen. Then, postexpansion, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) imaging of RNA can be performed with high yield and specificity as well as single-molecule precision in both cultured cells and intact brain tissue. Expansion FISH (ExFISH) separates RNAs and supports amplification of single-molecule signals (i.e., via hybridization chain reaction) as well as multiplexed RNA FISH readout. ExFISH thus enables super-resolution imaging of RNA structure and location with diffraction-limited microscopes in thick specimens, such as intact brain tissue and other tissues of importance to biology and medicine.

  16. Nanoscale Characterization with Laser Picosecond Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Oliver B.

    2007-11-01

    Nanophotonics—the manipulation of light with nanomaterials—is a booming subject, its success owing to the host of nanoscale fabrication techniques now at our disposal. However, for the characterization of such nanomaterials it is expedient to turn to other types of waves with a wavelength commensurate with the nanostructure in question. One such choice is acoustic waves of nanometre wavelength. The aim of this article is to provide an introduction to laser picosecond acoustics, a means by which gigahertz-terahertz ultrasonic waves can be generated and detected by ultrashort light pulses. This method can therefore be used to characterize materials with nanometre spatial resolution. In this article we review the theoretical background for opaque single-layer thin film isotropic samples with reference to key experiments. Solids including metals and semiconductors are discussed, although liquids and, conceivably, gases, are not excluded.

  17. Stochastic behavior of nanoscale dielectric wall buckling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Lawrence H.; Levin, Igor; Cook, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    The random buckling patterns of nanoscale dielectric walls are analyzed using a nonlinear multi-scale stochastic method that combines experimental measurements with simulations. The dielectric walls, approximately 200 nm tall and 20 nm wide, consist of compliant, low dielectric constant (low-k) fins capped with stiff, compressively stressed TiN lines that provide the driving force for buckling. The deflections of the buckled lines exhibit sinusoidal pseudoperiodicity with amplitude fluctuation and phase decorrelation arising from stochastic variations in wall geometry, properties, and stress state at length scales shorter than the characteristic deflection wavelength of about 1000 nm. The buckling patterns are analyzed and modeled at two length scales: a longer scale (up to 5000 nm) that treats randomness as a longer-scale measurable quantity, and a shorter-scale (down to 20 nm) that treats buckling as a deterministic phenomenon. Statistical simulation is used to join the two length scales. Through this approach, the buckling model is validated and material properties and stress states are inferred. In particular, the stress state of TiN lines in three different systems is determined, along with the elastic moduli of low-k fins and the amplitudes of the small-scale random fluctuations in wall properties—all in the as-processed state. The important case of stochastic effects giving rise to buckling in a deterministically sub-critical buckling state is demonstrated. The nonlinear multiscale stochastic analysis provides guidance for design of low-k structures with acceptable buckling behavior and serves as a template for how randomness that is common to nanoscale phenomena might be measured and analyzed in other contexts. PMID:27330220

  18. Blood clotting reactions on nanoscale phospholipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, James H; Pureza, Vincent; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L; Sligar, Stephen G; Ohkubo, Y Zenmei; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2008-01-01

    Blood clotting reactions, such as those catalyzed by the tissue factor:factor VIIa complex (TF:FVIIa), assemble on membrane surfaces containing anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylserine (PS). In fact, membrane binding is critical for the function of most of the steps in the blood clotting cascade. In spite of this, our understanding of how the membrane contributes to catalysis, or even how these proteins interact with phospholipids, is incomplete. Making matters more complicated, membranes containing mixtures of PS and neutral phospholipids are known to spontaneously form PS-rich membrane microdomains in the presence of plasma concentrations of calcium ions, and it is likely that blood-clotting proteases such as TF:FVIIa partition into these PS-rich microdomains. Unfortunately, little is known about how membrane microdomain composition influences the activity of blood-clotting proteases, which is typically not under experimental control even in "simple" model membranes. Our laboratories have developed and applied new technologies for studying membrane proteins to gain insights into how blood-clotting protease-cofactor pairs assemble and function on membrane surfaces. This includes using a novel, nanoscale bilayer system (Nanodiscs) that permits assembling blood-clotting protease-cofactor pairs on stable bilayers containing from 65 to 250 phospholipid molecules per leaflet. We have used this system to investigate how local (nanometer-scale) changes in phospholipid bilayer composition modulate TF:FVIIa activity. We have also used detailed molecular-dynamics simulations of nanoscale bilayers to provide atomic-scale predictions of how the membrane-binding domain of factor VIIa interacts with PS in membranes.

  19. Giant piezoelectric resistance effect of nanoscale zinc oxide tunnel junctions: first principles simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Genghong; Luo, Xin; Zheng, Yue; Wang, Biao

    2012-05-21

    Based on first principles simulations and quantum transport calculations, we have investigated in the present work the effect of the mechanical load on transport characteristics and the relative physical properties of nanoscale zinc oxide (ZnO) tunnel junctions, and verified an intrinsic giant piezoelectric resistance (GPR) effect. Our results show that the transport-relevant properties, e.g., the piezoelectric potential (piezopotential), built-in electric field, conduction band offset and electron transmission probability of the junction etc., can obviously be tuned by the applied strain. Accordingly, it is inspiring to find that the current-voltage characteristics and tunneling electro-resistance of the ZnO tunnel junction can significantly be adjusted with the strain. When the applied strain switches from -5% to 5%, an increase of more than 14 times in the tunneling current at a bias voltage of 1.1 V can be obtained. Meanwhile, an increase of up to 2000% of the electro-resistance ratio with respect to the zero strain state can be reached at the same bias voltage and with a 5% compression. According to our investigations, the giant piezoelectric resistance effect of nanoscale ZnO tunnel junctions exhibits great potential in exploiting tunable electronic devices. Furthermore, the methodology of strain engineering revealed in this work may shed light on the mechanical manipulations of electronic devices.

  20. Interplay of Nanoscale, Hybrid P3HT/ZTO Interface on Optoelectronics and Photovoltaic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jian-Jhong; Li, Yu-Hsun; Feng, Bo-Rui; Tang, Shiow-Jing; Jian, Wen-Bin; Fu, Chuan-Min; Chen, Jiun-Tai; Wang, Xu; Lee, Pooi-See

    2017-09-05

    Photovoltaic effects in poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) attract much attention recently. Here natively p-type doped P3HT nanofibers and n-type doped zinc tin oxide (ZTO) nanowires are used for making not only field-effect transistors but also p-n nanoscale diodes. The hybrid P3HT/ZTO p-n heterojunction shows applications in many directions and it also facilitates the investigation of photoelectrons and photovoltaic effects at the nanoscale. As for applications, the heterojunction device shows simultaneously high on/off ratio of n- and p-type field-effect transistors, gatable p-n junction diodes, tri-state buffer device, gatable photodetectors, and gatable solar cells. On the other hand, P3HT nanofibers are taken as a photoactive layer and the role of p-n heterojunction playing on the photoelectric and photovoltaic effects is investigated. It is found that the hybrid P3HT/ZTO p-n heterojunction assists to increase photocurrents and to enhance photovoltaic effects. Through the controllable gating of the heterojunction, we can discuss the background mechanisms of photocurrent generation and photovoltaic energy harvest.

  1. Nanoscale Electric Characteristics and Oriented Assembly of Halobacterium salinarum Membrane Revealed by Electric Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denghua Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purple membranes (PM of the bacteria Halobacterium salinarum are a unique natural membrane where bacteriorhodopsin (BR can convert photon energy and pump protons. Elucidating the electronic properties of biomembranes is critical for revealing biological mechanisms and developing new devices. We report here the electric properties of PMs studied by using multi-functional electric force microscopy (EFM at the nanoscale. The topography, surface potential, and dielectric capacity of PMs were imaged and quantitatively measured in parallel. Two orientations of PMs were identified by EFM because of its high resolution in differentiating electrical characteristics. The extracellular (EC sides were more negative than the cytoplasmic (CP side by 8 mV. The direction of potential difference may facilitate movement of protons across the membrane and thus play important roles in proton pumping. Unlike the side-dependent surface potentials observed in PM, the EFM capacitive response was independent of the side and was measured to be at a dC/dz value of ~5.25 nF/m. Furthermore, by modification of PM with de novo peptides based on peptide-protein interaction, directional oriented PM assembly on silicon substrate was obtained for technical devices. This work develops a new method for studying membrane nanoelectronics and exploring the bioelectric application at the nanoscale.

  2. Evidence for thermally assisted threshold switching behavior in nanoscale phase-change memory cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Gallo, Manuel; Athmanathan, Aravinthan; Krebs, Daniel; Sebastian, Abu [IBM Research-Zurich, 8803 Rüschlikon (Switzerland)

    2016-01-14

    In spite of decades of research, the details of electrical transport in phase-change materials are still debated. In particular, the so-called threshold switching phenomenon that allows the current density to increase steeply when a sufficiently high voltage is applied is still not well understood, even though there is wide consensus that threshold switching is solely of electronic origin. However, the high thermal efficiency and fast thermal dynamics associated with nanoscale phase-change memory (PCM) devices motivate us to reassess a thermally assisted threshold switching mechanism, at least in these devices. The time/temperature dependence of the threshold switching voltage and current in doped Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} nanoscale PCM cells was measured over 6 decades in time at temperatures ranging from 40 °C to 160 °C. We observe a nearly constant threshold switching power across this wide range of operating conditions. We also measured the transient dynamics associated with threshold switching as a function of the applied voltage. By using a field- and temperature-dependent description of the electrical transport combined with a thermal feedback, quantitative agreement with experimental data of the threshold switching dynamics was obtained using realistic physical parameters.

  3. Performance of a Double Gate Nanoscale MOSFET (DG-MOSFET Based on Novel Channel Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Prasher

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have studied a double gate nanoscale MOSFET for various channel materials using simulation approach. The device metrics considered at the nanometer scale are subthreshold swing (SS, drain induced barrier lowering (DIBL, on and off current, carrier injection velocity (vinj, etc. The channel materials studied are Silicon (Si, Germanium (Ge, Gallium Arsenide (GaAs, Zinc Oxide (ZnO, Zinc Sulfide (ZnS, Indium Arsenide (InAs, Indium Phosphide (InP and Indium Antimonide (InSb. The results suggest that InSb and InAs materials have highest Ion and lowest Ioff values when used in the channel of the proposed MOSFET. Besides, InSb has the highest values for Ion / Ioff ratio, vinj, transconductance (gm and improved short channel effects (SS = 59.71 and DIBL = 1.14, both are very close to ideal values. More results such as effect of quantum capacitance verses gate voltage (Vgs, drain current (Ids vs. gate voltage and drain voltage (Vds, ratio of transconductance (gm and drain current (Id vs. gate voltage, average velocity vs. gate voltage and injection velocity (Vinj for the mentioned channel materials have been investigated. Various results obtained indicate that InSb and InAs as channel material appear to be suitable for high performance logic and even low operating power requirements for future nanoscale devices as suggested by latest ITRS reports.

  4. Exotic optoelectronic properties of organic semiconductors with super-controlled nanoscale sizes and molecular shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Shu; Yamao, Takeshi; Katagiri, Toshifumi

    2014-03-01

    We present several aspects of thiophene/phenylene co-oligomers (TPCOs). TPCOs are regarded as a newly occurring class of organic semiconductors. These materials are synthesized by hybridizing thiophene and phenylene rings at the molecular level with their various mutual arrangements. These materials are characterized by the super-controlled nanoscale sizes and molecular shapes. These produce peculiar crystallographic structures and high-performance optical and electronic properties. The crystals of TPCOs were obtained through both vapor phase and liquid phase. In the TPCO crystals, the molecules take upright configuration. These cause large carrier mobilities of field-effect transistors and laser oscillations under optical excitations. Spectrally-narrowed emissions (SNEs) were also achieved under weak optical excitation using a mercury lamp. The light-emitting field-effect transistors using these crystals for an active layer have shown the current-injected SNEs when the device was combined with an optical cavity and operated by an alternating-current gate-voltage method. Thus the TPCO materials will play an important role in the future in the fields of nanoscale technology and organic semiconductor materials as well as their optoelectronic device applications.

  5. Overview of nanoscale NEXAFS performed with soft X-ray microscopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Guttmann

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Today, in material science nanoscale structures are becoming more and more important. Not only for the further miniaturization of semiconductor devices like carbon nanotube based transistors, but also for newly developed efficient energy storage devices, gas sensors or catalytic systems nanoscale and functionalized materials have to be analysed. Therefore, analytical tools like near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS spectroscopy has to be applied on single nanostructures. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopes (STXM as well as full-field transmission X-ray microscopes (TXM allow the required spatial resolution to study individual nanostructures. In the soft X-ray energy range only STXM was used so far for NEXAFS studies. Due to its unique setup, the TXM operated by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB at the electron storage ring BESSY II is the first one in the soft X-ray range which can be used for NEXAFS spectroscopy studies which will be shown in this review. Here we will give an overview of the different microscopes used for NEXAFS studies and describe their advantages and disadvantages for different samples.

  6. Programmable permanent data storage characteristics of nanoscale thin films of a thermally stable aromatic polyimide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Min; Park, Samdae; Lee, Taek Joon; Hahm, Suk Gyu; Kim, Kyungtae; Kim, Jin Chul; Kwon, Wonsang; Ree, Moonhor

    2009-10-01

    We have synthesized a new thermally and dimensionally stable polyimide, poly(4,4'-amino(4-hydroxyphenyl)diphenylene hexafluoroisopropylidenediphthalimide) (6F-HTPA PI). 6F-HTPA PI is soluble in organic solvents and is thus easily processed with conventional solution coating techniques to produce good quality nanoscale thin films. Devices fabricated with nanoscale thin PI films with thicknesses less than 77 nm exhibit excellent unipolar write-once-read-many-times (WORM) memory behavior with a high ON/OFF current ratio of up to 10(6), a long retention time and low power consumption, less than +/-3.0 V. Furthermore, these WORM characteristics were found to persist even at high temperatures up to 150 degrees C. The WORM memory behavior was found to be governed by trap-limited space-charge limited conduction and local filament formation. The conduction processes are dominated by hole injection. Thus the hydroxytriphenylamine moieties of the PI polymer might play a key role as hole trapping sites in the observed WORM memory behavior. The properties of 6F-HTPA PI make it a promising material for high-density and very stable programmable permanent data storage devices with low power consumption.

  7. Overview of nanoscale NEXAFS performed with soft X-ray microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttmann, Peter; Bittencourt, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Today, in material science nanoscale structures are becoming more and more important. Not only for the further miniaturization of semiconductor devices like carbon nanotube based transistors, but also for newly developed efficient energy storage devices, gas sensors or catalytic systems nanoscale and functionalized materials have to be analysed. Therefore, analytical tools like near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy has to be applied on single nanostructures. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopes (STXM) as well as full-field transmission X-ray microscopes (TXM) allow the required spatial resolution to study individual nanostructures. In the soft X-ray energy range only STXM was used so far for NEXAFS studies. Due to its unique setup, the TXM operated by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) at the electron storage ring BESSY II is the first one in the soft X-ray range which can be used for NEXAFS spectroscopy studies which will be shown in this review. Here we will give an overview of the different microscopes used for NEXAFS studies and describe their advantages and disadvantages for different samples.

  8. SPM system for semiconductor device applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Hiroshi; Odaka, Takahiro; Niitsuma, Junichi

    2014-11-01

    Recently, scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is widely used for development of semiconductor devices. One of the important functions of SPM is high resolution topography, such as shape of the nanoscale devices and surface roughness of the films. Additionally, SPM can measure the electronic structure of the nanoscale-devices. SPM system for thin films was developed to characterize the thin films for device applications.First, SPM system which can be apply short pulses to the sample holder is constructed to evaluate the electronic response of the thin film without using complex patterning on the Si wafer as shown in Fig. 1. Current design rule of the semiconductor devices is around 20 nm. The dimension of the devices are close to the probe radius of conductive SPM probes. The instrument was designed to characterize not only the static properties of nanoscale devices, but also the dynamic electronic properties. Shortest pulses which can be applied to the sample without destroying waveform were less than 50 nS. Time response of the current amplifier is ranging from 50 nS to 200 nS depending on the trans-impedance gains. The conditions (time and dimension) are similar to the active devices on the chip in the circuit. Thus, dynamic electronic properties of the thin films can be tested on a film without fabricating to the nanoscale devices. It is very helpful to optimizing the depositing conditions, such as sputtering parameters, of the thin film for semiconductor devices. For example, the system is used to optimize the film qualities for resistive memories [1].jmicro;63/suppl_1/i13-a/DFU091F1F1DFU091F1Fig. 1.Conductive probe microscopy, which is compatible to the pulse signals ranging to 50nS. The second function of the SPM system is the reproducible roughness measurement. Roughness of the film is also important for optimizing the depositing conditions of the thin film. Virtual reference probe method was developed for removing the variations of the SPM probes [2]. One of

  9. Electromechanical transducers at the nanoscale: actuation and sensing of motion in nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekinci, K L

    2005-08-01

    Electromechanical devices are rapidly being miniaturized, following the trend in commercial transistor electronics. Miniature electromechanical devices--now with dimensions in the deep sub-micrometer range--are envisioned for a variety of applications as well as for accessing interesting regimes in fundamental physics. Among the most important technological challenges in the operation of these nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) are the actuation and detection of their sub-nanometer displacements at high frequencies. In this Review, we shall focus on this most central concern in NEMS technology: realization of electromechanical transducers at the nanoscale. The currently available techniques to actuate and detect NEMS motion are introduced, and the accuracy, bandwidth, and robustness of these techniques are discussed.

  10. Sub-picowatt/kelvin resistive thermometry for probing nanoscale thermal transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jianlin; Wingert, Matthew C.; Dechaumphai, Edward; Chen, Renkun

    2013-11-01

    Advanced instrumentation in thermometry holds the key for experimentally probing fundamental heat transfer physics. However, instrumentation with simultaneously high thermometry resolution and low parasitic heat conduction is still not available today. Here we report a resistive thermometry scheme with ˜50 μK temperature resolution and ˜0.25 pW/K thermal conductance resolution, which is achieved through schemes using both modulated heating and common mode noise rejection. The suspended devices used herein have been specifically designed to possess short thermal time constants and minimal attenuation effects associated with the modulated heating current. Furthermore, we have systematically characterized the parasitic background heat conductance, which is shown to be significantly reduced using the new device design and can be effectively eliminated using a "canceling" scheme. Our results pave the way for probing fundamental nanoscale thermal transport processes using a general scheme based on resistive thermometry.

  11. Nanoscale Cross-Point Resistive Switching Memory Comprising p-Type SnO Bilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Hota, Mrinal Kanti

    2015-02-23

    Reproducible low-voltage bipolar resistive switching is reported in bilayer structures of p-type SnO films. Specifically, a bilayer homojunction comprising SnOx (oxygen-rich) and SnOy (oxygen-deficient) in nanoscale cross-point (300 × 300 nm2) architecture with self-compliance effect is demonstrated. By using two layers of SnO film, a good memory performance is obtained as compared to the individual oxide films. The memory devices show resistance ratio of 103 between the high resistance and low resistance states, and this difference can be maintained for up to 180 cycles. The devices also show good retention characteristics, where no significant degradation is observed for more than 103 s. Different charge transport mechanisms are found in both resistance states, depending on the applied voltage range and its polarity. The resistive switching is shown to originate from the oxygen ion migration and subsequent formation/rupture of conducting filaments.

  12. Broadband Angular Selectivity of Light at the Nanoscale: Progress, Applications and Outlook

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Yichen; Yeng, Yi Xiang; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljacic, Marin

    2015-01-01

    Humankind has long endeavored to control the propagation direction of light. Since time immemorial, shades, lenses and mirrors have been used to control the flow of light. In modern society, with the rapid development of nanotechnology, the control of light is moving toward devices at micrometer and even nanometer scales. At such scales, traditional devices based on geometrical optics reach their fundamental direction limits and cease to work. Nano photonics, on the other hand, has attracted wide attention from researchers, especially in the last decade, due to its ability to manipulate light at the nanoscale. This review focuses on the nano photonics systems that aim to select light based on its propagation direction. In the first half of this review, we survey the literature and the current state of the art focused on enabling optical broadband angular selectivity. The mechanisms we review can be classified into three main categories: (i) microscale geometrical optics, (ii) multilayer birefringent materials...

  13. Evanescent optical trapping of nanoscale particles using slotted tapered optical fibres

    CERN Document Server

    Daly, Mark; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2016-01-01

    While conventional optical trapping techniques can trap objects with submicron dimensions, the underlying limits imposed by the diffraction of light generally restrict their use to larger, or higher refractive index particles. As the index and diameter decrease, the trapping difficulty rapidly increases; hence, the power requirements for stable trapping become so large as to quickly denature the trapped objects in such diffraction-limited systems. Here, we present an evanescent field-based device capable of confining low index nanoscale particles using modest optical powers as low as 1.2 mW, with additional applications in the field of cold atom trapping. Our experiment uses a nanostructured optical micro-nanofibre to trap 200 nm, low-index, fluorescent particles within the structured region, thereby overcoming diffraction limitations. We analyse the trapping potential of this device both experimentally and theoretically, and show how strong optical traps are achieved with low input powers.

  14. Performance Investigation of Nanoscale Strained Ge pMOSFETs with a GeSn Alloy Stressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Chun; Chang, Shu-Tong; Cheng, Sen-Wen; Chian, Bow-Tsin

    2015-11-01

    A germanium (Ge)-based substrate combined with germanium-tin (GeSn) alloy embedded in source/drain (S/D) regions has attracted significant attention because of its ability to satisfy the requirements of a high-mobility channel. Devices are shrunk in their geometries to meet the target of superior density in layout arrangement. Thus, determining the influences of devices on mobility gain is important. Accordingly, several designed factors, including gate width, S/D length, and Sn concentration of the GeSn stressor, are systematically analyzed in this study. A second-order formula composed of piezoresistance coefficients is derived and adopted to achieve a precise mobility gain estimation. A peak of the carrier mobility gain appears when a nanoscale geometry combination of 20 nm gate length and -200 nm gate width is used in the Ge channel, and 10% of the Sn mole proportion of the GeSn alloy is applied.

  15. Nanoscale Control of Phase Variants in Strain-Engineered BiFeO3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasudevan, Rama K [ORNL; Li, J. Y. [University of Washington, Seattle; Liu, Y. Y. [University of Washington, Seattle; Liang, W. -I. [National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan; Kumar, Amit [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Chen, Y. -C. [National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan; Chu, Y.-H. [National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan; Nagarajan, Valanoor [University of New South Wales; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Development of magnetoelectric, electromechanical, and photovoltaic devices based on mixed-phase rhombohedral tetragonal (R-T) BiFeO3 (BFO) systems is possible only if the control of the engineered R phase variants is realized. Accordingly, we explore the mechanism of a bias induced phase transformation in this system. Single point spectroscopy demonstrates that the T->R transition is activated at lower voltages compared to T->T polarization switching. With phase field modeling, the transition is shown to be electrically driven. We further demonstrate that symmetry of formed R-phase rosettes can be broken by a proximal probe motion, allowing controlled creation of R variants with defined orientation. This approach opens a pathway to designing next-generation magnetoelectronic and data storage devices in the nanoscale.

  16. Monte Carlo Simulations of Spin Transport in Nanoscale InGaAs Field Effect Transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Thorpe, B; Langbein, F; Schirmer, S

    2016-01-01

    By augmenting an in-house developed, experimentally verified Monte Carlo device simulator with a Bloch equation model with a spin-orbit interaction Hamiltonian accounting for Dresselhaus and Rashba couplings, we simulate electron spin transport in a \\SI{25}{nm} gate length InGaAs MOSFET. We observe non-uniform decay of the net magnetization between the source and gate electrodes and an interesting magnetization recovery effect due to spin refocusing induced by high electric field between the gate and drain electrodes. We demonstrate coherent control of the polarization vector of the drain current via the source-drain and gate voltages, and show that the magnetization of the drain current is sensitive to strain in the channel, suggesting that the device could act as a room-temperature nanoscale strain sensor.

  17. The Architectural Designs of a Nanoscale Computing Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary M. Eshaghian-Wilner

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available A generic nanoscale computing model is presented in this paper. The model consists of a collection of fully interconnected nanoscale computing modules, where each module is a cube of cells made out of quantum dots, spins, or molecules. The cells dynamically switch between two states by quantum interactions among their neighbors in all three dimensions. This paper includes a brief introduction to the field of nanotechnology from a computing point of view and presents a set of preliminary architectural designs for fabricating the nanoscale model studied.

  18. Nanoscale Morphology in Tensile Fracture of a Brittle Amorphous Ribbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xifeng LI; Kaifeng ZHANG; Guofeng WANG

    2008-01-01

    The paper reports on the observation of nanoscale morphology on the tensile fracture surface of a brittle amorphous Fe-based ribbon. The formation of nanoscale damage cavity structure is a main characteristic morphology on the fracture surfaces. Approaching the ribbon boundary, these damage cavities assemble and form the nanoscale periodic corrugations, which are neither Wallner lines nor crack front waves. The periodic corrugations result from the interactions between the reflected elastic waves by the boundaries of amorphous ribbon and the stress fields of the crack tip.

  19. Refractive index of nanoscale thickness films measured by Brewster refractometry

    CERN Document Server

    Tikhonov, E A; Malyukin, Yu V

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that reflective laser refractometery at Brewster angle can be usefull for precision measurements of refractive indexes (RI) in the transparency band of various films of nanoscale thickness. The RI measurements of nanoscale porous film on the basis of gadolinium orthosilicate and quartz have been carried out as first experience. It is shown that surface light scattering in such films that is connected with clustering of nanoscale pores can decrease the accuracy of the RI measurements at Brewster angle. Estimated physical dependence RI stipulated by the film thickness reduction (3D-2D transition) in the range of (20-160)nm has not been not detected.

  20. Continuous controllable amorphization ratio of nanoscale phase change memory cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Q.; Li, Z.; Peng, J. H.; Deng, Y. F.; Zeng, B. J.; Zhou, W.; Miao, X. S.

    2014-06-01

    The controllable heat behavior, including heat generation and dissipation, is one of the most important physical problems of nanoscale phase-change memory (PCM). A method based on heat accumulation effect to control heat behavior by synthetically modulating the three parameters of applied double pulses is proposed to achieve any expected amorphization ratio. A compact model of nanoscale PCM cells is used to simulate the thermal behavior and amorphization ratio under the condition of single parameter and multi-parameter change of applied double pulses. The results are in good agreement with the experimental results. Repeated experiments also prove the feasibility of continuous controllable amorphization ratio of nanoscale phase-change materials.