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Sample records for nanoscale multiferroic materials

  1. Nanoscale ferroelectrics and multiferroics key processes and characterization issues, and nanoscale effects

    Alguero, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    This book reviews the key issues in processing and characterization of nanoscale ferroelectrics and multiferroics, and provides a comprehensive description of their properties, with an emphasis in differentiating size effects of extrinsic ones like boundary or interface effects. Recently described nanoscale novel phenomena are also addressed. Organized into three parts it addresses key issues in processing (nanostructuring), characterization (of the nanostructured materials) and nanoscale effects. Taking full advantage of the synergies between nanoscale ferroelectrics and multiferroics, it covers materials nanostructured at all levels, from ceramic technologies like ferroelectric nanopowders, bulk nanostructured ceramics and thick films, and magnetoelectric nanocomposites, to thin films, either polycrystalline layer heterostructures or epitaxial systems, and to nanoscale free standing objects with specific geometries, such as nanowires and tubes at different levels of development. The book is developed from t...

  2. First principles studies of multiferroic materials

    Picozzi, Silvia; Ederer, Claude

    2009-01-01

    Multiferroics, materials where spontaneous long-range magnetic and dipolar orders coexist, represent an attractive class of compounds, which combine rich and fascinating fundamental physics with a technologically appealing potential for applications in the general area of spintronics. Ab initio calculations have significantly contributed to recent progress in this area, by elucidating different mechanisms for multiferroicity and providing essential information on various compounds where these effects are manifestly at play. In particular, here we present examples of density-functional theory investigations for two main classes of materials: (a) multiferroics where ferroelectricity is driven by hybridization or purely structural effects, with BiFeO 3 as the prototype material, and (b) multiferroics where ferroelectricity is driven by correlation effects and is strongly linked to electronic degrees of freedom such as spin-, charge-, or orbital-ordering, with rare-earth manganites as prototypes. As for the first class of multiferroics, first principles calculations are shown to provide an accurate qualitative and quantitative description of the physics in BiFeO 3 , ranging from the prediction of large ferroelectric polarization and weak ferromagnetism, over the effect of epitaxial strain, to the identification of possible scenarios for coupling between ferroelectric and magnetic order. For the second class of multiferroics, ab initio calculations have shown that, in those cases where spin-ordering breaks inversion symmetry (e.g. in antiferromagnetic E-type HoMnO 3 ), the magnetically induced ferroelectric polarization can be as large as a few μC cm -2 . The examples presented point the way to several possible avenues for future research: on the technological side, first principles simulations can contribute to a rational materials design, aimed at identifying spintronic materials that exhibit ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity at or above room temperature. On the

  3. Electrically Controllable Spontaneous Magnetism in Nanoscale Mixed Phase Multiferroics

    He, Q.; Chu, Y. H.; Heron, J. T.; Yang, S. Y.; Wang, C. H.; Kuo, C. Y.; Lin, H. J.; Yu, P.; Liang, C. W.; Zeches, R. J.; Chen, C. T.; Arenholz, E.; Scholl, A.; Ramesh, R.

    2010-08-02

    The emergence of enhanced spontaneous magnetic moments in self-assembled, epitaxial nanostructures of tetragonal (T-phase) and rhombohedral phases (R-phase) of the multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3} system is demonstrated. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism based photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) was applied to investigate the local nature of this magnetism. We find that the spontaneous magnetization of the R-phase is significantly enhanced above the canted antiferromagnetic moment in the bulk phase, as a consequence of a piezomagnetic coupling to the adjacent T-phase and the epitaxial constraint. Reversible electric field control and manipulation of this magnetic moment at room temperature is shown using a combination of piezoresponse force microscopy and PEEM studies.

  4. Magnetic properties of nano-multiferroic materials

    Ramam, Koduri; Diwakar, Bhagavathula S.; Varaprasad, Kokkarachedu; Swaminadham, Veluri; Reddy, Venu

    2017-11-01

    Latent magnetization in the multiferroics can be achieved via the structural distortion with respect to particle size and destroying the spiral spin structure, which plays the vital role in high-performance applications. In this investigation, multifunctional single phase Bi1-xLaxFe1-yCoyO3 nanomaterials were synthesized by co-precipitation technique. The chemical composition, phase genesis, morphology and thermal characteristics of the Bi1-xLaxFe1-yCoyO3 were studied by FTIR, XRD, SEM/EDS, TEM and TGA. XRD studies confirmed single phase distorted rhombohedral structure in Bi1-xLaxFe1-yCoyO3. The novelty in magnetic behavior of the Bi0.85La0.15Fe0.75Co0.25O3 multiferroic at room temperature showed both ferro and anti-ferromagnetic nature with higher order remanent magnetization among other nanocomposites in this study. This magnetic anomaly in Bi0.85La0.15Fe0.75Co0.25O3 is due to doping and size effects on the crystal structure that leads to spin-orbit interactions. Besides, Bi0.85La0.15Fe0.75Co0.25O3 integrated graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposite has shown the change in the magnetic hysteresis that indicates the effect of the semiconducting behavior of GO on the ordered magnetic moments in the multiferroic. This kind of magnetic anomaly could form advanced multiferroic devices.

  5. TOPICAL REVIEW: First principles studies of multiferroic materials

    Picozzi, Silvia; Ederer, Claude

    2009-07-01

    Multiferroics, materials where spontaneous long-range magnetic and dipolar orders coexist, represent an attractive class of compounds, which combine rich and fascinating fundamental physics with a technologically appealing potential for applications in the general area of spintronics. Ab initio calculations have significantly contributed to recent progress in this area, by elucidating different mechanisms for multiferroicity and providing essential information on various compounds where these effects are manifestly at play. In particular, here we present examples of density-functional theory investigations for two main classes of materials: (a) multiferroics where ferroelectricity is driven by hybridization or purely structural effects, with BiFeO3 as the prototype material, and (b) multiferroics where ferroelectricity is driven by correlation effects and is strongly linked to electronic degrees of freedom such as spin-, charge-, or orbital-ordering, with rare-earth manganites as prototypes. As for the first class of multiferroics, first principles calculations are shown to provide an accurate qualitative and quantitative description of the physics in BiFeO3, ranging from the prediction of large ferroelectric polarization and weak ferromagnetism, over the effect of epitaxial strain, to the identification of possible scenarios for coupling between ferroelectric and magnetic order. For the second class of multiferroics, ab initio calculations have shown that, in those cases where spin-ordering breaks inversion symmetry (e.g. in antiferromagnetic E-type HoMnO3), the magnetically induced ferroelectric polarization can be as large as a few µC cm-2. The examples presented point the way to several possible avenues for future research: on the technological side, first principles simulations can contribute to a rational materials design, aimed at identifying spintronic materials that exhibit ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity at or above room temperature. On the

  6. Nanoscale phase change memory materials.

    Caldwell, Marissa A; Jeyasingh, Rakesh Gnana David; Wong, H-S Philip; Milliron, Delia J

    2012-08-07

    Phase change memory materials store information through their reversible transitions between crystalline and amorphous states. For typical metal chalcogenide compounds, their phase transition properties directly impact critical memory characteristics and the manipulation of these is a major focus in the field. Here, we discuss recent work that explores the tuning of such properties by scaling the materials to nanoscale dimensions, including fabrication and synthetic strategies used to produce nanoscale phase change memory materials. The trends that emerge are relevant to understanding how such memory technologies will function as they scale to ever smaller dimensions and also suggest new approaches to designing materials for phase change applications. Finally, the challenges and opportunities raised by integrating nanoscale phase change materials into switching devices are discussed.

  7. Synthesis of magnetic and multiferroic materials from polyvinyl alcohol-based gels

    Lisnevskaya, I.V.; Bobrova, I.A.; Lupeiko, T.G.

    2016-01-01

    This review article summarizes results on the synthesis of the magnetic materials including modified nickel ferrite (Ni{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.1}Cu{sub 0.1}Fe{sub 1.9}O{sub 4−δ}), yttrium iron garnet (Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}), lanthanum-containing manganites (M{sub x}La{sub 1−x}MnO{sub 3} (M=Pb, Ba or Sr; x=0.3−0.35)), and multiferroics (BiFeO{sub 3} and BiFe{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}) from polyvinyl alcohol-based gels. It is shown that the ammonium nitrate accelerates destruction of organic components of xerogels and thus Ni{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.1}Cu{sub 0.1}Fe{sub 1.9}O{sub 4−δ} and BiFeO{sub 3} can be prepared at record low temperatures (100 and 250 °C, respectively) which are 200–300 °C lower compared to the process where air is used as an oxidizing agent. As for the synthesis of Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}, M{sub x}La{sub 1−x}MnO{sub 3} and BiFe{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}, the presence of NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} favors formation of foreign phases, which ultimately complicate reaction mechanisms and lead to the higher temperature to synthesize target products. Developed methods provide nanoscale magnetic and multiferroic materials with an average particle size of ∼20–50 nm. - Highlights: • This review summarizes results on the synthesis of the magnetic materials and multiferroics. • Ammonium nitrate accelerates destruction of organic components of xerogels. • Ni{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.1}Cu{sub 0.1}Fe{sub 1.9}O{sub 4−δ} and BiFeO{sub 3} can be prepared at record low temperatures. • Developed methods provide nanoscale magnetic and multiferroic materials.

  8. Nanoscale materials in chemistry

    Klabunde, Kenneth J; Richards, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    ...: Disordered, Porous Nanostructures Stephanie L. Brock 209 9 Ordered Microporous and Mesoporous Materials Freddy Kleitz 243 10 Applications of Microporous and Mesoporous Materials Anirban Ghosh,...

  9. Nanoscale Ionic Materials

    Rodriguez, Robert; Herrera, Rafael; Archer, Lynden A.; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2008-01-01

    Polymer nanocomposites (nanoparticles dispersed in a polymer matrix) have been the subject of intense research for almost two decades in both academic and industrial settings. This interest has been fueled by the ability of nanocomposites to not only improve the performance of polymers, but also by their ability to introduce new properties. Yet, there are still challenges that polymer nanocomposites must overcome to reach their full potential. In this Research News article we discuss a new class of hybrids termed nanoparticle ionic materials (NIMS). NIMS are organic-inorganic hybrid materials comprising a nanoparticle core functionalized with a covalently tethered ionic corona. They are facilely engineered to display flow properties that span the range from glassy solids to free flowing liquids. These new systems have unique properties that can overcome some of the challenges facing nanocomosite materials. © 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  10. Nanoscale Ionic Materials

    Rodriguez, Robert

    2008-11-18

    Polymer nanocomposites (nanoparticles dispersed in a polymer matrix) have been the subject of intense research for almost two decades in both academic and industrial settings. This interest has been fueled by the ability of nanocomposites to not only improve the performance of polymers, but also by their ability to introduce new properties. Yet, there are still challenges that polymer nanocomposites must overcome to reach their full potential. In this Research News article we discuss a new class of hybrids termed nanoparticle ionic materials (NIMS). NIMS are organic-inorganic hybrid materials comprising a nanoparticle core functionalized with a covalently tethered ionic corona. They are facilely engineered to display flow properties that span the range from glassy solids to free flowing liquids. These new systems have unique properties that can overcome some of the challenges facing nanocomosite materials. © 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  11. Nanoscale thermoelectric materials

    Failamani, F.

    2015-01-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) materials directly convert thermal energy to electrical energy when subjected to a temperature gradient, whereas if electricity is applied to thermoelectric materials, a temperature gradient is formed. The performance of thermoelectric materials is characterized by a dimensionless figure of merit (ZT = S2T/ρλ), which consists of three parameters, Seebeck coefficient (S), electrical resistivity (ρ) and thermal conductivity (λ). To achieve good performance of thermoelectric power generation and cooling, ZT's of thermoelectric materials must be as high as possible, preferably above unity. This thesis comprises three main parts, which are distributed into six chapters: (i) nanostructuring to improve TE performance of trivalent rare earth-filled skutterudites (chapter 1 and 2), (ii) interactions of skutterudite thermolectrics with group V metals as potential electrode or diffusion barrier for TE devices (chapter 3 and 4), and (iii) search for new materials for TE application (chapter 5 and 6). Addition of secondary phases, especially nano sized phases can cause additional reduction of the thermal conductivity of a filled skutterudite which improves the figure of merit (ZT) of thermoelectric materials. In chapter 1 we investigated the effect of various types of secondary phases (silicides, borides, etc.) on the TE properties of trivalent rare earth filled Sb-based skutterudites as commercially potential TE materials. In this context the possibilty to introduce borides as nano-particles (via ball-milling in terms of a skutterudite/boride composite) is also elucidated in chapter 2. As a preliminary study, crystal structure of novel high temperature FeB-type phases found in the ternary Ta-{Ti,Zr,Hf,}-B systems were investigated. In case of Ti and Hf this phase is the high temperature stabilization of binary group IV metal monoborides, whereas single crystal study of (Ta,Zr)B proves that it is a true ternary phase as no stable monoboride exist in the

  12. Multiferroic and magnetoelectric materials – Developments and perspectives

    Shvartsman V. V.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiferroic (MF materials with simultaneous magnetic and electric long range order and occasionally, mutual magnetoelectric (ME coupling, have recently attracted considerable interest. The small linear ME effect has been shown to control spintronic devices very efficiently, e.g. via the classic ME antiferromagnet Cr2O3 using exchange bias. Similar nano-engineering concepts exist also for type-I MF single phase materials, whose magnetic and polar orders have distinct origins like BiFeO3. Strong ME coupling occurs in type-II multiferroics, where ferroelectricity is due to spiral spin order as in TbMnO3. Record high ME response coming close to applicability arises in stress-strain coupled multiphase magnetoelectrics such as PZT/FeBSiC composites. Higher order ME response in disordered systems (“type-III multiferroics” extends the conventional MF scenario toward ME quantum paraelectric and multiglass materials with polarization-induced control of magnetic exchange, as e.g. in EuTiO3, Sr0.98Mn0.02TiO3, and PbFe0.5Nb0.5O3.

  13. Growth and characterization of epitaxial thin films and multiferroic heterostructures of ferromagnetic and ferroelectric materials

    Mukherjee, Devajyoti

    Multiferroic materials exhibit unique properties such as simultaneous existence of two or more of coupled ferroic order parameters (ferromagnetism, ferroelectricity, ferroelasticity or their anti-ferroic counterparts) in a single material. Recent years have seen a huge research interest in multiferroic materials for their potential application as high density non-volatile memory devices. However, the scarcity of these materials in single phase and the weak coupling of their ferroic components have directed the research towards multiferroic heterostructures. These systems operate by coupling the magnetic and electric properties of two materials, generally a ferromagnetic material and a ferroelectric material via strain. In this work, horizontal heterostructures of composite multiferroic materials were grown and characterized using pulsed laser ablation technique. Alternate magnetic and ferroelectric layers of cobalt ferrite and lead zirconium titanate, respectively, were fabricated and the coupling effect was studied by X-ray stress analysis. It was observed that the interfacial stress played an important role in the coupling effect between the phases. Doped zinc oxide (ZnO) heterostructures were also studied where the ferromagnetic phase was a layer of manganese doped ZnO and the ferroelectric phase was a layer of vanadium doped ZnO. For the first time, a clear evidence of possible room temperature magneto-elastic coupling was observed in these heterostructures. This work provides new insight into the stress mediated coupling mechanisms in composite multiferroics.

  14. Selective nanoscale growth of lattice mismatched materials

    Lee, Seung-Chang; Brueck, Steven R. J.

    2017-06-20

    Exemplary embodiments provide materials and methods of forming high-quality semiconductor devices using lattice-mismatched materials. In one embodiment, a composite film including one or more substantially-single-particle-thick nanoparticle layers can be deposited over a substrate as a nanoscale selective growth mask for epitaxially growing lattice-mismatched materials over the substrate.

  15. Nanoscale phase-change materials and devices

    Zheng, Qinghui; Wang, Yuxi; Zhu, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Phase-change materials (PCMs) that can reversibly transit between crystalline and amorphous phases have been widely used for data-storage and other functional devices. As PCMs scale down to nanoscale, the properties and transition procedures can vary, bringing both challenges and opportunities in scalability. This article describes the physical structures, properties and applications of nanoscale phase-change materials and devices. The limitations and performance of scaling properties in phase-change materials and the recent progress and challenges in phase-change devices are presented. At the end, some emerging applications related to phase-change materials are also introduced. (topical review)

  16. Nanoscale phase-change materials and devices

    Zheng, Qinghui; Wang, Yuxi; Zhu, Jia

    2017-06-01

    Phase-change materials (PCMs) that can reversibly transit between crystalline and amorphous phases have been widely used for data-storage and other functional devices. As PCMs scale down to nanoscale, the properties and transition procedures can vary, bringing both challenges and opportunities in scalability. This article describes the physical structures, properties and applications of nanoscale phase-change materials and devices. The limitations and performance of scaling properties in phase-change materials and the recent progress and challenges in phase-change devices are presented. At the end, some emerging applications related to phase-change materials are also introduced.

  17. Multiferroic Memories

    Amritendu Roy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiferroism implies simultaneous presence of more than one ferroic characteristics such as coexistence of ferroelectric and magnetic ordering. This phenomenon has led to the development of various kinds of materials and conceptions of many novel applications such as development of a memory device utilizing the multifunctionality of the multiferroic materials leading to a multistate memory device with electrical writing and nondestructive magnetic reading operations. Though, interdependence of electrical- and magnetic-order parameters makes it difficult to accomplish the above and thus rendering the device to only two switchable states, recent research has shown that such problems can be circumvented by novel device designs such as formation of tunnel junction or by use of exchange bias. In this paper, we review the operational aspects of multiferroic memories as well as the materials used for these applications along with the designs that hold promise for the future memory devices.

  18. Structure-property relationships of multiferroic materials: A nano perspective

    Bai, Feiming

    The integration of sensors, actuators, and control systems is an ongoing process in a wide range of applications covering automotive, medical, military, and consumer electronic markets. Four major families of ceramic and metallic actuators are under development: piezoelectrics, electrostrictors, magnetostrictors, and shape-memory alloys. All of these materials undergo at least two phase transformations with coupled thermodynamic order parameters. These transformations lead to complex domain wall behaviors, which are driven by electric fields (ferroelectrics), magnetic fields (ferromagnetics), or mechanical stress (ferroelastics) as they transform from nonferroic to ferroic states, contributing to the sensing and actuating capabilities. This research focuses on two multiferroic crystals, Pb(Mg1/3Nb 2/3)O3-PbTiO3 and Fe-Ga, which are characterized by the co-existence and coupling of ferroelectric polarization and ferroelastic strain, or ferro-magnetization and ferroelastic strain. These materials break the conventional boundary between piezoelectric and electrostrictors, or magnetostrictors and shape-memory alloys. Upon applying field or in a poled condition, they yield not only a large strain but also a large strain over field ratio, which is desired and much benefits for advanced actuator and sensor applications. In this thesis, particular attention has been given to understand the structure-property relationships of these two types of materials from atomic to the nano/macro scale. X-ray and neutron diffraction were used to obtain the lattice structure and phase transformation characteristics. Piezoresponse and magnetic force microscopy were performed to establish the dependence of domain configurations on composition, thermal history and applied fields. It has been found that polar nano regions (PNRs) make significant contributions to the enhanced electromechanical properties of PMN-x%PT crystals via assisting intermediate phase transformation. With increasing PT

  19. Unfolding of Vortices into Topological Stripes in a Multiferroic Material

    Wang, X.; Mostovoy, M.; Han, M. G.; Horibe, Y.; Aoki, T.; Zhu, Y.; Cheong, S.-W.

    2014-06-01

    Multiferroic hexagonal RMnO3 (R =rare earths) crystals exhibit dense networks of vortex lines at which six domain walls merge. While the domain walls can be readily moved with an applied electric field, the vortex cores so far have been impossible to control. Our experiments demonstrate that shear strain induces a Magnus-type force pulling vortices and antivortices in opposite directions and unfolding them into a topological stripe domain state. We discuss the analogy between this effect and the current-driven dynamics of vortices in superconductors and superfluids.

  20. Synthesis, characterization, properties, and applications of nanosized ferroelectric, ferromagnetic, or multiferroic materials

    Dhak, Debasis; Das, Soma; Communication Engineering.); Dhak, Prasanta

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been an enormous increase in research activity in the field of ferroelectrics and ferromagnetics especially in multiferroic materials which possess both ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties simultaneously. However, the ferroelectric, ferromagnetic, and multiferroic properties should be further improved from the utilitarian and commercial viewpoints. Nanostructural materials are central to the evolution of future electronics and information technologies. Ferroelectrics and ferromagnetics have already been established as a dominant branch in electronics sector because of their diverse applications. The ongoing dimensional downscaling of materials to allow packing of increased numbers of components into integrated circuits provides the momentum for evolution of nanostructural devices. Nanoscaling of the above materials can result in a modification of their functionality. Furthermore, nanoscaling can be used to form high density arrays of nanodomain nanostructures, which is desirable for miniaturization of devices

  1. Filter casting nanoscale porous materials

    Hayes, Joel Ryan; Nyce, Gregory Walker; Kuntz, Jushua David

    2013-12-10

    A method of producing nanoporous material includes the steps of providing a liquid, providing nanoparticles, producing a slurry of the liquid and the nanoparticles, removing the liquid from the slurry, and producing monolith.

  2. Computational materials science: Nanoscale plasticity

    Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2002-01-01

    How does plastic deformation of polycrystalline materials with grain sizes less than 100 nm look at the atomic scale? A large-scale molecular dynamics simulation of nanocrystalline alluminium reveals some surprising behaviour.......How does plastic deformation of polycrystalline materials with grain sizes less than 100 nm look at the atomic scale? A large-scale molecular dynamics simulation of nanocrystalline alluminium reveals some surprising behaviour....

  3. Engineering Nanoscale Multiferroic Composites for Memory Applications with Atomic Layer Deposition of Pb(ZrxTi1-x)O3 Thin Films

    Chien, Diana

    This work focuses on the development of atomic layer deposition (ALD) for lead zirconate titanate, Pb(ZrxTi1-x)O 3 (PZT). Leveraging the surface-reaction controlled process based on alternating self-limiting surface reactions, PZT can be synthesized not only with elemental precision to realize the desired composition (Zr/Ti = 52/48) but also with outstanding conformality. The latter enables the integration of PZT with a ferromagnetic phase to realize multiferroism (MF) and magnetoelectric (ME) effect. Since PZT is one of the best known ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials due the large displacements of the Pb ions at the morphotropic phase boundary, PZT based MF composites could lead to stronger ME coupling through strain coupling at the interface. Specifically, ALD PZT thin films were synthesized by using beta-diketonate metalorganic precursors Pb(TMHD)2, Zr(TMHD)4, and Ti(O.i-Pr) 2(TMHD)2 and H2O. The number of local cycles and global cycles were regulated to achieve the desired stoichiometry and thickness, respectively. ALD of PZT was studied to obtain (100) textured PZT on Pt (111) oriented platinized silicon substrates. In order to attain a highly oriented PZT thin film, a (100) textured PbTiO3 seed layer was required because PZT orientation is governed by nucleation. MF nanocomposites were engineered using ALD PZT thin films to achieve controlled complex nanoscale structures, enabling porosity to be studied as a new additional parameter for nanocomposite architectures to enhance ME effect. Specifically, 3--6 nm-thick ALD PZT thin films were deposited to uniformly coat the walls of mesoporous cobalt ferrite (CFO) template. The PZT/CFO nanocomposites were electrically poled ex-situ and the change in magnetic moment was measured. The inverse magnetoelectric coupling coefficient, a, was determined to be 85.6 Oe-cm/mV. The in-plane results show no significant change in magnetization (1--4%) as a function of electric field, which was expected due to the effect

  4. Tube Formation in Nanoscale Materials

    Yan Chenglin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The formation of tubular nanostructures normally requires layered, anisotropic, or pseudo-layered crystal structures, while inorganic compounds typically do not possess such structures, inorganic nanotubes thus have been a hot topic in the past decade. In this article, we review recent research activities on nanotubes fabrication and focus on three novel synthetic strategies for generating nanotubes from inorganic materials that do not have a layered structure. Specifically, thermal oxidation method based on gas–solid reaction to porous CuO nanotubes has been successfully established, semiconductor ZnS and Nb2O5nanotubes have been prepared by employing sacrificial template strategy based on liquid–solid reaction, and an in situ template method has been developed for the preparation of ZnO taper tubes through a chemical etching reaction. We have described the nanotube formation processes and illustrated the detailed key factors during their growth. The proposed mechanisms are presented for nanotube fabrication and the important pioneering studies are discussed on the rational design and fabrication of functional materials with tubular structures. It is the intention of this contribution to provide a brief account of these research activities.

  5. Bulk nanoscale materials in steel products

    Chehab, B; Wang, X; Masse, J-P; Zurob, H; Embury, D; Bouaziz, O

    2010-01-01

    Although a number of nanoscale metallic materials exhibit interesting mechanical properties the fabrication paths are often complex and difficult to apply to bulk structural materials. However a number of steels which exhibit combinations of plasticity and phase transitions can be deformed to produce ultra high strength levels in the range 1 to 3 GPa. The resultant high stored energy and complex microstructures allow new nanoscale structures to be produced by combinations of recovery and recrystallisation. The resultant structures exhibit totally new combinations of strength and ductility to be achieved. In specific cases this also enables both the nature of the grain boundary structure and the spatial variation in structure to be controlled. In this presentation both the detailed microstructural features and their relation to the strength, work-hardening capacity and ductility will be discussed for a number of martensitic and austenitic steels.

  6. Coupling of order parameters, chirality, and interfacial structures in multiferroic materials.

    Conti, Sergio; Müller, Stefan; Poliakovsky, Arkady; Salje, Ekhard K H

    2011-04-13

    We study optimal interfacial structures in multiferroic materials with a biquadratic coupling between two order parameters. We discover a new duality relation between the strong coupling and the weak coupling regime for the case of isotropic gradient terms. We analyze the phase diagram depending on the coupling constant and anisotropy of the gradient term, and show that in a certain regime the secondary order parameter becomes activated only in the interfacial region.

  7. Environmental, Health, and Safety Research Needs for Engineered Nanoscale Materials

    Alderson, Norris; Alexander, Catherine; Merzbacher, Celia; Chernicoff, William; Middendorf, Paul; Beck, Nancy; Chow, Flora; Poster, Dianne; Danello, Mary Ann; Barrera, Enriqueta

    2006-01-01

    ...) research and information needs related to understanding and management of potential risks of engineered nanoscale materials that may be used, for example, in commercial or consumer products, medical...

  8. Quantum Transport Simulations of Nanoscale Materials

    Obodo, Tobechukwu Joshua

    2016-01-07

    Nanoscale materials have many potential advantages because of their quantum confinement, cost and producibility by low-temperature chemical methods. Advancement of theoretical methods as well as the availability of modern high-performance supercomputers allow us to control and exploit their microscopic properties at the atomic scale, hence making it possible to design novel nanoscale molecular devices with interesting features (e.g switches, rectifiers, negative differential conductance, and high magnetoresistance). In this thesis, state-of-the-art theoretical calculations have been performed for the quantum transport properties of nano-structured materials within the framework of Density Functional Theory (DFT) and the Nonequilibrium Green\\'s Function (NEGF) formalism. The switching behavior of a dithiolated phenylene-vinylene oligomer sandwiched between Au(111) electrodes is investigated. The molecule presents a configurational bistability, which can be exploited in constructing molecular memories, switches, and sensors. We find that protonation of the terminating thiol groups is at the origin of the change in conductance. H bonding at the thiol group weakens the S-Au bond, and thus lowers the conductance. Our results allow us to re-interpret the experimental data originally attributing the conductance reduction to H dissociation. Also examined is current-induced migration of atoms in nanoscale devices that plays an important role for device operation and breakdown. We studied the migration of adatoms and defects in graphene and carbon nanotubes under finite bias. We demonstrate that current-induced forces within DFT are non-conservative, which so far has only been shown for model systems, and can lower migration barrier heights. Further, we investigated the quantum transport behavior of an experimentally observed diblock molecule by varying the amounts of phenyl (donor) and pyrimidinyl (acceptor) rings under finite bias. We show that a tandem configuration of

  9. Quantum Materials at the Nanoscale - Final Report

    Cooper, Stephen Lance [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-01-11

    The central aim of the Quantum Materials at the Nanoscale (QMN) cluster was to understand and control collective behavior involving the interplay of spins, orbitals, and charges, which governs many scientifically interesting and technologically important phenomena in numerous complex materials. Because these phenomena involve various competing interactions, and influence properties on many different length and energy scales in complex materials, tackling this important area of study motivated a collaborative effort that combined the diverse capabilities of QMN cluster experimentalists, the essential theoretical analysis provided by QMN cluster theorists, and the outstanding facilities and staff of the FSMRL. During the funding period 2007-2014, the DOE cluster grant for the Quantum Materials at the Nanoscale (QMN) cluster supported, at various times, 15 different faculty members (14 in Physics and 1 in Materials Science and Engineering), 7 postdoctoral research associates, and 57 physics and materials science PhD students. 41 of these PhD students have since graduated and have gone on to a variety of advanced technical positions at universities, industries, and national labs: 25 obtained postdoctoral positions at universities (14), industrial labs (2 at IBM), DOE national facilities (3 at Argonne National Laboratory, 1 at Brookhaven National Lab, 1 at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, and 1 at Sandia National Lab), and other federal facilities (2 at NIST); 13 took various industrial positions, including positions at Intel (5), Quantum Design (1), Lasque Industries (1), Amazon (1), Bloomberg (1), and J.P. Morgan (1). Thus, the QMN grant provided the essential support for training a large number of technically advanced personnel who have now entered key national facilities, industries, and institutions. Additionally, during the period 2007-2015, the QMN cluster produced 159 publications (see pages 14-23), including 23 papers published in Physical Review Letters; 16

  10. Canopy Dynamics in Nanoscale Ionic Materials

    Jespersen, Michael L.

    2010-07-27

    Nanoscale ionic materials (NIMS) are organic - inorganic hybrids in which a core nanostructure is functionalized with a covalently attached corona and an ionically tethered organic canopy. NIMS are engineered to be liquids under ambient conditions in the absence of solvent and are of interest for a variety of applications. We have used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation and pulse-field gradient (PFG) diffusion experiments to measure the canopy dynamics of NIMS prepared from 18-nm silica cores modified by an alkylsilane monolayer possessing terminal sulfonic acid functionality, paired with an amine-terminated ethylene oxide/propylene oxide block copolymer canopy. Carbon NMR studies show that the block copolymer canopy is mobile both in the bulk and in the NIMS and that the fast (ns) dynamics are insensitive to the presence of the silica nanoparticles. Canopy diffusion in the NIMS is slowed relative to the neat canopy, but not to the degree predicted from the diffusion of hard-sphere particles. Canopy diffusion is not restricted to the surface of the nanoparticles and shows unexpected behavior upon addition of excess canopy. Taken together, these data indicate that the liquid-like behavior in NIMS is due to rapid exchange of the block copolymer canopy between the ionically modified nanoparticles. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  11. Canopy Dynamics in Nanoscale Ionic Materials

    Jespersen, Michael L.; Mirau, Peter A.; Meerwall, Ernst von; Vaia, Richard A.; Rodriguez, Robert; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2010-01-01

    Nanoscale ionic materials (NIMS) are organic - inorganic hybrids in which a core nanostructure is functionalized with a covalently attached corona and an ionically tethered organic canopy. NIMS are engineered to be liquids under ambient conditions in the absence of solvent and are of interest for a variety of applications. We have used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation and pulse-field gradient (PFG) diffusion experiments to measure the canopy dynamics of NIMS prepared from 18-nm silica cores modified by an alkylsilane monolayer possessing terminal sulfonic acid functionality, paired with an amine-terminated ethylene oxide/propylene oxide block copolymer canopy. Carbon NMR studies show that the block copolymer canopy is mobile both in the bulk and in the NIMS and that the fast (ns) dynamics are insensitive to the presence of the silica nanoparticles. Canopy diffusion in the NIMS is slowed relative to the neat canopy, but not to the degree predicted from the diffusion of hard-sphere particles. Canopy diffusion is not restricted to the surface of the nanoparticles and shows unexpected behavior upon addition of excess canopy. Taken together, these data indicate that the liquid-like behavior in NIMS is due to rapid exchange of the block copolymer canopy between the ionically modified nanoparticles. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  12. Quantum Transport Simulations of Nanoscale Materials

    Obodo, Tobechukwu Joshua

    2016-01-01

    -performance supercomputers allow us to control and exploit their microscopic properties at the atomic scale, hence making it possible to design novel nanoscale molecular devices with interesting features (e.g switches, rectifiers, negative differential conductance, and high

  13. The synthesis and properties of nanoscale ionic materials

    Rodriguez, Robert Salgado; Herrer, Rafael; Bourlinos, Athanasios B.; Li, Ruipeng; Amassian, Aram; Archer, Lynden A.; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2010-01-01

    In this article we discuss the effect of constituents on structure, flow, and thermal properties of nanoscale ionic materials (NIMs). NIMs are a new class of nanohybrids consisting of a nanometer-sized core, a charged corona covalently attached

  14. Analytical TEM investigations of nanoscale magnetic materials

    Meingast, A.

    2015-01-01

    Analytical transmission electron microscopy has been applied within this thesis to investigate several novel approaches to design and fabricate nanoscale magnetic materials. As the size of the features of interest rank in the sub-nanometer range, it is necessary to employ techniques with a resolution – both spatial and analytical – well below this magnitude. Only at this performance level it is possible to examine material properties, necessary for the further tailoring of materials. Within this work two key aspects have been covered: First, analytical TEM (transmission electron microscopy) investigations were carried out to get insight into novel magnetic materials with high detail. Second, new analytical and imaging possibilities enabled with the commissioning of the new ASTEM (Austrian scanning transmission electron microscope) were explored. The aberration corrected TITAN® microscope (© FEI Company) allows resolving features in scanning transmission mode (STEM) with 70 pm distance. Thereby, direct imaging of light elements in STEM mode by using the annular bright field method becomes possible. Facilitated through high beam currents within the electron probe, an increased acquisition speed of analytical signals is possible. For energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) a new four detector disc geometry around the specimen was implemented, which increases the accessible collection angle. With the integration of the latest generation of image filter and electron spectrometer (GIF QuantumERS), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is boosted through the high acquisition speed and the dual spectroscopy mode. The high acquisition speed allows to record up to 1000 spectra per second and the possibility to record atomically resolved EELS maps is at hand. Hereby it is important to avoid beam damage and alteration of the material during imaging and analysis. With the simultaneous acquisition of the low and the high loss spectral region, an extended range for

  15. Two-Dimensional Metal-Free Organic Multiferroic Material for Design of Multifunctional Integrated Circuits.

    Tu, Zhengyuan; Wu, Menghao; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2017-05-04

    Coexistence of ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity in a single 2D material is highly desirable for integration of multifunctional units in 2D material-based circuits. We report theoretical evidence of C 6 N 8 H organic network as being the first 2D organic multiferroic material with coexisting ferromagnetic and ferroelectric properties. The ferroelectricity stems from multimode proton-transfer within the 2D C 6 N 8 H network, in which a long-range proton-transfer mode is enabled by the facilitation of oxygen molecule when the network is exposed to the air. Such oxygen-assisted ferroelectricity also leads to a high Curie temperature and coupling between ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism. We also find that hydrogenation and carbon doping can transform the 2D g-C 3 N 4 network from an insulator to an n-type/p-type magnetic semiconductor with modest bandgap. Akin to the dopant induced n/p channels in silicon wafer, a variety of dopant created functional units can be integrated into the g-C 3 N 4 wafer by design for nanoelectronic applications.

  16. Phase transitions and domain structures in multiferroics

    Vlahos, Eftihia

    2011-12-01

    Thin film ferroelectrics and multiferroics are two important classes of materials interesting both from a scientific and a technological prospective. The volatility of lead and bismuth as well as environmental issues regarding the toxicity of lead are two disadvantages of the most commonly used ferroelectric random access memory (FeRAM) materials such as Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 and SrBi2Ta2O9. Therefore lead-free thin film ferroelectrics are promising substitutes as long as (a) they can be grown on technologically important substrates such as silicon, and (b) their T c and Pr become comparable to that of well established ferroelectrics. On the other hand, the development of functional room temperature ferroelectric ferromagnetic multiferroics could lead to very interesting phenomena such as control of magnetism with electric fields and control of electrical polarization with magnetic fields. This thesis focuses on the understanding of material structure-property relations using nonlinear optical spectroscopy. Nonlinear spectroscopy is an excellent tool for probing the onset of ferroelectricity, and domain dynamics in strained ferroelectrics and multiferroics. Second harmonic generation was used to detect ferroelectricity and the antiferrodistortive phase transition in thin film SrTiO3. Incipient ferroelectric CaTiO3 has been shown to become ferroelectric when strained with a combination of SHG and dielectric measurements. The tensorial nature of the induced nonlinear polarization allows for probing of the BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 polarization contributions in nanoscale BaTiO3/SrTiO3 superlattices. In addition, nonlinear optics was used to demonstrate ferroelectricity in multiferroic EuTiO3. Finally, confocal SHG and Raman microscopy were utilized to visualize polar domains in incipient ferroelectric and ferroelastic CaTiO3.

  17. Effects of magnetic correlation on the electric properties in multiferroic materials

    Zhai, Liang-Jun; Wang, Huai-Yu

    2015-01-01

    The effects of magnetic correlation on the electric properties in the multiferroic materials are studied, where the phase transition temperature of the magnetic subsystem T m is lower than that of the electric subsystem T e . A Heisenberg-type Hamiltonian and a transverse Ising model are employed to describe the ferromagnetic and ferroelectric subsystems, respectively. We find that the magnetic correlation can influence the electric properties above the T m , and magnetic transverse and longitudinal correlations have opposite functions. In the curves of temperature dependence of polarization, kinks appear at T m which is dominated by the sharp change of decreasing rate of the magnetic correlation. The kinks can be eliminated by an external magnetic field. The magnetic transverse and longitudinal correlations play contrary roles on the manipulation of polarization by the external magnetic field. - Highlights: • Both magnetic longitudinal and transverse correlations can influence the electric subsystem through magnetoelectric (ME) coupling at any temperature. • The magnetic longitudinal and transverse correlations have contrary effects in influencing the phase transition temperature of electric subsystem. • The electric phase transition temperature decrease with the ME coupling strength, while it was not so by mean-field theory. • An external field can make the influence smoother around the transition point, and can enhance the electric polarization. • Magnetic longitudinal and transverse correlations have contrary effects on the manipulation of polarization by magnetic field at temperature above the magnetic phase transition point

  18. Synthesis and magnetic properties of hexagonal Y(Mn,Cu)O3 multiferroic materials

    Jeuvrey, L.; Peña, O.; Moure, A.; Moure, C.

    2012-01-01

    Single-phase hexagonal-type solid solutions based on the multiferroic YMnO 3 material were synthesized by a modified Pechini process. Copper doping at the B-site (YMn 1−x Cu x O 3 ; x 1+y MnO 3 ; y 3+ two-dimensional lattice. The magnetic transition at T N decreases from 70 K down to 49 K, when x(Cu) goes from 0 to 15 at%. Weak ferromagnetic Mn 3+ –Mn 4+ interactions created by the substitution of Mn 3+ by Cu 2+ , are visible through the coercive field and spontaneous magnetization but do not modify the overall magnetic frustration. Presence of Mn 3+ –Mn 4+ pairs leads to an increase of the electrical conductivity due to thermally-activated small-polaron hopping mechanisms. Results show that local ferromagnetic interactions can coexist within the frustrated state in the hexagonal polar structure. - Highlights: ► Hexagonal-type solid solutions of Y(Mn,Cu)O 3 synthesized by Pechini process. ► Chemical substitution at B site inhibits geometrical magnetic frustration. ► Magnetic transition decreases with Cu-doping. ► Local ferromagnetic Mn–Mn interactions coexist with the frustrated state.

  19. Nano-Scale Positioning Design with Piezoelectric Materials

    Yung Yue Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric materials naturally possess high potential to deliver nano-scale positioning resolution; hence, they are adopted in a variety of engineering applications widely. Unfortunately, unacceptable positioning errors always appear because of the natural hysteresis effect of the piezoelectric materials. This natural property must be mitigated in practical applications. For solving this drawback, a nonlinear positioning design is proposed in this article. This nonlinear positioning design of piezoelectric materials is realized by the following four steps: 1. The famous Bouc–Wen model is utilized to present the input and output behaviors of piezoelectric materials; 2. System parameters of the Bouc–Wen model that describe the characteristics of piezoelectric materials are simultaneously identified with the particle swam optimization method; 3. Stability verification for the identified Bouc–Wen model; 4. A nonlinear feedback linearization control design is derived for the nano-scale positioning design of the piezoelectric material, mathematically. One important contribution of this investigation is that the positioning error between the output displacement of the controlled piezoelectric materials and the desired trajectory in nano-scale level can be proven to converge to zero asymptotically, under the effect of the hysteresis.

  20. Multiferroics and magnetoelectrics: thin films and nanostructures

    Martin, L W; Crane, S P; Chu, Y-H; Holcomb, M B; Gajek, M; Huijben, M; Yang, C-H; Balke, N; Ramesh, R [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)], E-mail: lwmartin@lbl.gov

    2008-10-29

    Multiferroic materials, or materials that simultaneously possess two or more ferroic order parameters, have returned to the forefront of materials research. Driven by the desire to achieve new functionalities-such as electrical control of ferromagnetism at room temperature-researchers have undertaken a concerted effort to identify and understand the complexities of multiferroic materials. The ability to create high quality thin film multiferroics stands as one of the single most important landmarks in this flurry of research activity. In this review we discuss the basics of multiferroics including the important order parameters and magnetoelectric coupling in materials. We then discuss in detail the growth of single phase, horizontal multilayer, and vertical heterostructure multiferroics. The review ends with a look to the future and how multiferroics can be used to create new functionalities in materials.

  1. Multiferroics and magnetoelectrics: thin films and nanostructures

    Martin, L. W.; Crane, S. P.; Chu, Y.-H.; Holcomb, M. B.; Gajek, M.; Huijben, M.; Yang, C.-H.; Balke, N.; Ramesh, R.

    2008-10-01

    Multiferroic materials, or materials that simultaneously possess two or more ferroic order parameters, have returned to the forefront of materials research. Driven by the desire to achieve new functionalities—such as electrical control of ferromagnetism at room temperature—researchers have undertaken a concerted effort to identify and understand the complexities of multiferroic materials. The ability to create high quality thin film multiferroics stands as one of the single most important landmarks in this flurry of research activity. In this review we discuss the basics of multiferroics including the important order parameters and magnetoelectric coupling in materials. We then discuss in detail the growth of single phase, horizontal multilayer, and vertical heterostructure multiferroics. The review ends with a look to the future and how multiferroics can be used to create new functionalities in materials.

  2. Multiferroics and magnetoelectrics: thin films and nanostructures

    Martin, L W; Crane, S P; Chu, Y-H; Holcomb, M B; Gajek, M; Huijben, M; Yang, C-H; Balke, N; Ramesh, R

    2008-01-01

    Multiferroic materials, or materials that simultaneously possess two or more ferroic order parameters, have returned to the forefront of materials research. Driven by the desire to achieve new functionalities-such as electrical control of ferromagnetism at room temperature-researchers have undertaken a concerted effort to identify and understand the complexities of multiferroic materials. The ability to create high quality thin film multiferroics stands as one of the single most important landmarks in this flurry of research activity. In this review we discuss the basics of multiferroics including the important order parameters and magnetoelectric coupling in materials. We then discuss in detail the growth of single phase, horizontal multilayer, and vertical heterostructure multiferroics. The review ends with a look to the future and how multiferroics can be used to create new functionalities in materials.

  3. Two-dimensional multiferroics in monolayer group IV monochalcogenides

    Wang, Hua; Qian, Xiaofeng

    2017-03-01

    Low-dimensional multiferroic materials hold great promises in miniaturized device applications such as nanoscale transducers, actuators, sensors, photovoltaics, and nonvolatile memories. Here, using first-principles theory we predict that two-dimensional (2D) monolayer group IV monochalcogenides including GeS, GeSe, SnS, and SnSe are a class of 2D semiconducting multiferroics with giant strongly-coupled in-plane spontaneous ferroelectric polarization and spontaneous ferroelastic lattice strain that are thermodynamically stable at room temperature and beyond, and can be effectively modulated by elastic strain engineering. Their optical absorption spectra exhibit strong in-plane anisotropy with visible-spectrum excitonic gaps and sizable exciton binding energies, rendering the unique characteristics of low-dimensional semiconductors. More importantly, the predicted low domain wall energy and small migration barrier together with the coupled multiferroic order and anisotropic electronic structures suggest their great potentials for tunable multiferroic functional devices by manipulating external electrical, mechanical, and optical field to control the internal responses, and enable the development of four device concepts including 2D ferroelectric memory, 2D ferroelastic memory, and 2D ferroelastoelectric nonvolatile photonic memory as well as 2D ferroelectric excitonic photovoltaics.

  4. A multiferroic material to search for the permanent electric dipole moment of the electron

    Rushchanskii, K.Z.; Kamba, Stanislav; Goian, Veronica; Vaněk, Přemysl; Savinov, Maxim; Prokleška, J.; Nuzhnyy, Dmitry; Knížek, Karel; Laufek, F.; Eckel, S.; Lamoreaux, S.K.; Sushkov, A.; Ležaič, M.; Spaldin, N.A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 8 (2010), s. 649-654 ISSN 1476-1122 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/09/0682 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : multiferroics * electric dipole moment of the electron * dielectric and magnetic properties Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 29.897, year: 2010

  5. Synthesis and magnetic properties of hexagonal Y(Mn,Cu)O{sub 3} multiferroic materials

    Jeuvrey, L., E-mail: laurent.jeuvrey@univ-rennes1.fr [Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, UMR-CNRS 6226, Universite de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes cedex (France); Pena, O. [Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, UMR-CNRS 6226, Universite de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes cedex (France); Moure, A.; Moure, C. [Electroceramics Department, Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, CSIC, C/Kelsen 5, 28049, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-03-15

    Single-phase hexagonal-type solid solutions based on the multiferroic YMnO{sub 3} material were synthesized by a modified Pechini process. Copper doping at the B-site (YMn{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 3}; x<0.15) and self-doping at the A-site (Y{sub 1+y}MnO{sub 3}; y<0.10) successfully maintained the hexagonal structure. Self-doping was limited to y(Y)=2 at% and confirmed that excess yttrium avoids formation of ferromagnetic manganese oxide impurities but creates vacancies at the Mn site. Chemical substitution at the B-site inhibits the geometrical frustration of the Mn{sup 3+} two-dimensional lattice. The magnetic transition at T{sub N} decreases from 70 K down to 49 K, when x(Cu) goes from 0 to 15 at%. Weak ferromagnetic Mn{sup 3+}-Mn{sup 4+} interactions created by the substitution of Mn{sup 3+} by Cu{sup 2+}, are visible through the coercive field and spontaneous magnetization but do not modify the overall magnetic frustration. Presence of Mn{sup 3+}-Mn{sup 4+} pairs leads to an increase of the electrical conductivity due to thermally-activated small-polaron hopping mechanisms. Results show that local ferromagnetic interactions can coexist within the frustrated state in the hexagonal polar structure. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hexagonal-type solid solutions of Y(Mn,Cu)O{sub 3} synthesized by Pechini process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical substitution at B site inhibits geometrical magnetic frustration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic transition decreases with Cu-doping. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Local ferromagnetic Mn-Mn interactions coexist with the frustrated state.

  6. Synthesis, microstructure and properties of BiFeO3-based multiferroic materials: A review

    Bernardo, M. S.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available BiFeO3-based materials are currently one of the most studied multiferroics due to their possible applications at room temperature. However, among the large number of published papers there is much controversy. For example, possibility of synthesizing a pure BiFeO3 phase is still source of discussion in literature. Not even the nature of the binary Bi2O3-Fe2O3 diagram has been clarified yet. The difficulty in controlling the formation of parasite phases reaches the consolidation step. Accordingly, the sintering conditions must be carefully determined both to get dense materials and to avoid bismuth ferrite decomposition. However, the precise conditions to attain dense bismuth ferrite materials are frequently contradictory among different works. As a consequence, the reported properties habitually result opposed and highly irreproducible hampering the preparation of BiFeO3 materials suitable for practical applications. In this context, the purpose of the present review is to summarize the main researches regarding BiFeO3 synthesis, microstructure and properties in order to provide an easier understanding of these materials.Los materiales basados en BiFeO3 son en la actualidad uno de los multiferroicos más estudiados debido a sus posibles aplicaciones a temperatura ambiente. Sin embargo, entre la multitud de trabajos publicados referentes a estos materiales existe mucha controversia. Por ejemplo, la posibilidad de sintetizar una fase BiFeO3 pura es aún objeto de discusión en la bibliografía y la naturaleza de los diagramas de fases del sistema Bi2O3-Fe2O3 aún no está clara. La dificultad para controlar las fases parásitas se extiende al proceso de consolidación por lo que las condiciones de sinterización deben ser cuidadosamente controladas para obtener materiales densos y al mismo tiempo evitar la descomposición de la ferrita. No obstante, las condiciones precisas para obtener materiales densos de BiFeO3 son frecuentemente

  7. Nanoscale Topographical Characterization of Orbital Implant Materials

    Marco Salerno

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The search for an ideal orbital implant is still ongoing in the field of ocular biomaterials. Major limitations of currently-available porous implants include the high cost along with a non-negligible risk of exposure and postoperative infection due to conjunctival abrasion. In the effort to develop better alternatives to the existing devices, two types of new glass-ceramic porous implants were fabricated by sponge replication, which is a relatively inexpensive method. Then, they were characterized by direct three-dimensional (3D contact probe mapping in real space by means of atomic force microscopy in order to assess their surface micro- and nano-features, which were quantitatively compared to those of the most commonly-used orbital implants. These silicate glass-ceramic materials exhibit a surface roughness in the range of a few hundred nanometers (Sq within 500–700 nm and topographical features comparable to those of clinically-used “gold-standard” alumina and polyethylene porous orbital implants. However, it was noted that both experimental and commercial non-porous implants were significantly smoother than all the porous ones. The results achieved in this work reveal that these porous glass-ceramic materials show promise for the intended application and encourage further investigation of their clinical suitability.

  8. Depositing Materials on the Micro- and Nanoscale

    Mar, Mikkel Dysseholm; Herstrøm, Berit; Shkondin, Evgeniy

    2014-01-01

    on sequential introduction of precursor pulses with intermediate purging steps. The process proceeds by specific surface ligand-exchange reactions and this leads to layer-by-layer growth control. No other thin film deposition technique can approach the conformity achieved by ALD on high aspect ratio structures....... In these systems thin films of different kind are important parts of giving the system the properties needed. This can be properties like light absorbing layers, antireflection coatings or conductive layers in solar cells. It can be low stress layers in membranes, chemicals resistant layers in chemical sensors......, layers with specific optical properties in optical sensors, piezoelectric thin films or insulating layers in many other applications. These different materials and properties impose a demand for different kind of deposition techniques. At DTU Danchip we have a large variety of these deposition techniques...

  9. Fungal nanoscale metal carbonates and production of electrochemical materials.

    Li, Qianwei; Gadd, Geoffrey Michael

    2017-09-01

    Fungal biomineralization of carbonates results in metal removal from solution or immobilization within a solid matrix. Such a system provides a promising method for removal of toxic or valuable metals from solution, such as Co, Ni, and La, with some carbonates being of nanoscale dimensions. A fungal Mn carbonate biomineralization process can be applied for the synthesis of novel electrochemical materials. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Defect-Induced Hedgehog Polarization States in Multiferroics

    Li, Linze; Cheng, Xiaoxing; Jokisaari, Jacob R.; Gao, Peng; Britson, Jason; Adamo, Carolina; Heikes, Colin; Schlom, Darrell G.; Chen, Long-Qing; Pan, Xiaoqing

    2018-03-01

    Continuous developments in nanotechnology require new approaches to materials synthesis that can produce novel functional structures. Here, we show that nanoscale defects, such as nonstoichiometric nanoregions (NSNRs), can act as nano-building blocks for creating complex electrical polarization structures in the prototypical multiferroic BiFeO3 . An array of charged NSNRs are produced in BiFeO3 thin films by tuning the substrate temperature during film growth. Atomic-scale scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging reveals exotic polarization rotation patterns around these NSNRs. These polarization patterns resemble hedgehog or vortex topologies and can cause local changes in lattice symmetries leading to mixed-phase structures resembling the morphotropic phase boundary with high piezoelectricity. Phase-field simulations indicate that the observed polarization configurations are mainly induced by charged states at the NSNRs. Engineering defects thus may provide a new route for developing ferroelectric- or multiferroic-based nanodevices.

  11. Radiation synthesis of the nano-scale materials

    Yonghong, Ni; Zhicheng, Zhang; Xuewu, Ge; Xiangling, Xu [Department of Applied Chemistry, Univ. of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China)

    2000-03-01

    Some recent research jobs on fabricating the nano-scale materials via {gamma}-irradiation in our laboratory are simply summarized in this paper. The main contents contain four aspects: (1) the preparation of metal alloy - powders; (2) the fabrication of polymer -metal nano-composites in aqueous solution, micro-emulsion and emulsion systems; (3) the synthesis of metal sulfide nano-particles and (4) the preparation of the ordered nano-structure materials. The corresponding preparation processes are also simply described. (author)

  12. Radiation synthesis of the nano-scale materials

    Ni Yonghong; Zhang Zhicheng; Ge Xuewu; Xu Xiangling

    2000-01-01

    Some recent research jobs on fabricating the nano-scale materials via γ-irradiation in our laboratory are simply summarized in this paper. The main contents contain four aspects: (1) the preparation of metal alloy - powders; (2) the fabrication of polymer -metal nano-composites in aqueous solution, micro-emulsion and emulsion systems; (3) the synthesis of metal sulfide nano-particles and (4) the preparation of the ordered nano-structure materials. The corresponding preparation processes are also simply described. (author)

  13. Molecular and nanoscale materials and devices in electronics.

    Fu, Lei; Cao, Lingchao; Liu, Yunqi; Zhu, Daoben

    2004-12-13

    Over the past several years, there have been many significant advances toward the realization of electronic computers integrated on the molecular scale and a much greater understanding of the types of materials that will be useful in molecular devices and their properties. It was demonstrated that individual molecules could serve as incomprehensibly tiny switch and wire one million times smaller than those on conventional silicon microchip. This has resulted very recently in the assembly and demonstration of tiny computer logic circuits built from such molecular scale devices. The purpose of this review is to provide a general introduction to molecular and nanoscale materials and devices in electronics.

  14. Charge, spin and orbital order in the candidate multiferroic material LuFe2O4

    Groot, Joost de

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is a detailed study of the magnetic, structural and orbital order parameters of the candidate multiferroic material LuFe 2 O 4 . Multiferroic oxides with a strong magnetoelectric coupling are of high interest for potential information technology applications, but they are rare because the traditional mechanism of ferroelectricity is incompatible with magnetism. Consequently, much attention is focused on various unconventional mechanisms of ferroelectricity. Of these, ferroelectricity originating from charge ordering (CO) is particularly intriguing because it potentially combines large electric polarizations with strong magneto-electric coupling. However, examples of oxides where this mechanism occurs are exceedingly rare and none is really well understood. LuFe 2 O 4 is often cited as the prototypical example of CO-based ferroelectricity. In this material, the order of Fe valences has been proposed to render the triangular Fe/O bilayers polar by making one of the two layers rich in Fe 2+ and the other rich in Fe 3+ , allowing for a possible ferroelectric stacking of the individual bilayers. Because of this new mechanism for ferroelectricity, and also because of the high transition temperatures of charge order (T CO ∝320K) and ferro magnetism (T N ∝240 K) LuFe 2 O 4 has recently attracted increasing attention. Although these polar bilayers are generally accepted in the literature for LuFe 2 O 4 , direct proof is lacking. An assumption-free experimental determination of whether or not the CO in the Fe/O bilayers is polar would be crucial, given the dependence of the proposed mechanism of ferroelectricity from CO in LuFe 2 O 4 on polar bilayers. This thesis starts with a detailed characterization of the macroscopic magnetic properties, where growing ferrimagnetic contributions observed in magnetization could be ascribed to increasing oxygen off-stoichiometry. The main focus is on samples exhibiting a sharp magnetic transition to long-range spin order

  15. Epitaxial Bi2 FeCrO6 Multiferroic Thin Film as a New Visible Light Absorbing Photocathode Material.

    Li, Shun; AlOtaibi, Bandar; Huang, Wei; Mi, Zetian; Serpone, Nick; Nechache, Riad; Rosei, Federico

    2015-08-26

    Ferroelectric materials have been studied increasingly for solar energy conversion technologies due to the efficient charge separation driven by the polarization induced internal electric field. However, their insufficient conversion efficiency is still a major challenge. Here, a photocathode material of epitaxial double perovskite Bi(2) FeCrO(6) multiferroic thin film is reported with a suitable conduction band position and small bandgap (1.9-2.1 eV), for visible-light-driven reduction of water to hydrogen. Photoelectrochemical measurements show that the highest photocurrent density up to -1.02 mA cm(-2) at a potential of -0.97 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode is obtained in p-type Bi(2) FeCrO(6) thin film photocathode grown on SrTiO(3) substrate under AM 1.5G simulated sunlight. In addition, a twofold enhancement of photocurrent density is obtained after negatively poling the Bi(2) FeCrO(6) thin film, as a result of modulation of the band structure by suitable control of the internal electric field gradient originating from the ferroelectric polarization in the Bi(2) FeCrO(6) films. The findings validate the use of multiferroic Bi(2) FeCrO(6) thin films as photocathode materials, and also prove that the manipulation of internal fields through polarization in ferroelectric materials is a promising strategy for the design of improved photoelectrodes and smart devices for solar energy conversion. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. The synthesis and properties of nanoscale ionic materials

    Rodriguez, Robert Salgado

    2010-02-17

    In this article we discuss the effect of constituents on structure, flow, and thermal properties of nanoscale ionic materials (NIMs). NIMs are a new class of nanohybrids consisting of a nanometer-sized core, a charged corona covalently attached to the core, and an oppositely charged canopy. The hybrid nature of NIMs allows for their properties to be engineered by selectively varying their components. The unique properties associated with these systems can help overcome some of the issues facing the implementation of nanohybrids to various commercial applications, including carbon dioxide capture,water desalinization and as lubricants. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Investigation of graphene-based nanoscale radiation sensitive materials

    Robinson, Joshua A.; Wetherington, Maxwell; Hughes, Zachary; LaBella, Michael, III; Bresnehan, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Current state-of-the-art nanotechnology offers multiple benefits for radiation sensing applications. These include the ability to incorporate nano-sized radiation indicators into widely used materials such as paint, corrosion-resistant coatings, and ceramics to create nano-composite materials that can be widely used in everyday life. Additionally, nanotechnology may lead to the development of ultra-low power, flexible detection systems that can be embedded in clothing or other systems. Graphene, a single layer of graphite, exhibits exceptional electronic and structural properties, and is being investigated for high-frequency devices and sensors. Previous work indicates that graphene-oxide (GO) - a derivative of graphene - exhibits luminescent properties that can be tailored based on chemistry; however, exploration of graphene-oxide's ability to provide a sufficient change in luminescent properties when exposed to gamma or neutron radiation has not been carried out. We investigate the mechanisms of radiation-induced chemical modifications and radiation damage induced shifts in luminescence in graphene-oxide materials to provide a fundamental foundation for further development of radiation sensitive detection architectures. Additionally, we investigate the integration of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) with graphene-based devices to evaluate radiation induced conductivity in nanoscale devices. Importantly, we demonstrate the sensitivity of graphene transport properties to the presence of alpha particles, and discuss the successful integration of hBN with large area graphene electrodes as a means to provide the foundation for large-area nanoscale radiation sensors.

  18. Nanoscale defect architectures and their influence on material properties

    Campbell, Branton

    2006-10-01

    Diffraction studies of long-range order often permit one to unambiguously determine the atomic structure of a crystalline material. Many interesting material properties, however, are dominated by nanoscale crystal defects that can't be characterized in this way. Fortunately, advances in x-ray detector technology, synchrotron x-ray source brightness, and computational power make it possible to apply new methods to old problems. Our research group uses multi-megapixel x-ray cameras to map out large contiguous volumes of reciprocal space, which can then be visually explored using graphics engines originally developed by the video-game industry. Here, I will highlight a few recent examples that include high-temperature superconductors, colossal magnetoresistors and piezoelectric materials.

  19. A nanoscale ordered materials diffractometer for the SNS

    Neuefeind, Joerg; Chipley, Kenneth K.; Tulk, Chris A.; Simonson, J. Michael; Winokur, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    The Nanoscale Ordered Materials Diffractometer (NOMAD) is one of five neutron scattering instruments being managed within the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Instruments-Next Generation (SING) project. NOMAD is designed as a high-flux, medium-resolution diffractometer using a large bandwidth of neutron energies and extensive detector coverage to perform structural determinations of local order in crystalline and amorphous materials. The instrument will enable studies of a large variety of samples ranging from liquids, solutions, glasses, polymers, and nanocrystalline materials to long-range ordered crystals and will allow unprecedented access to high-resolution pair distribution functions, small-contrast isotope substitution experiments, small sample sizes, and parametric studies. Project completion for the instrument is anticipated in 2010 and a review of the design status will be given

  20. Nanoscale deformation measurements for reliability assessment of material interfaces

    Keller, Jürgen; Gollhardt, Astrid; Vogel, Dietmar; Michel, Bernd

    2006-03-01

    With the development and application of micro/nano electronic mechanical systems (MEMS, NEMS) for a variety of market segments new reliability issues will arise. The understanding of material interfaces is the key for a successful design for reliability of MEMS/NEMS and sensor systems. Furthermore in the field of BIOMEMS newly developed advanced materials and well known engineering materials are combined despite of fully developed reliability concepts for such devices and components. In addition the increasing interface-to volume ratio in highly integrated systems and nanoparticle filled materials are challenges for experimental reliability evaluation. New strategies for reliability assessment on the submicron scale are essential to fulfil the needs of future devices. In this paper a nanoscale resolution experimental method for the measurement of thermo-mechanical deformation at material interfaces is introduced. The determination of displacement fields is based on scanning probe microscopy (SPM) data. In-situ SPM scans of the analyzed object (i.e. material interface) are carried out at different thermo-mechanical load states. The obtained images are compared by grayscale cross correlation algorithms. This allows the tracking of local image patterns of the analyzed surface structure. The measurement results are full-field displacement fields with nanometer resolution. With the obtained data the mixed mode type of loading at material interfaces can be analyzed with highest resolution for future needs in micro system and nanotechnology.

  1. Multiferroic oxide thin films and heterostructures

    Lu, Chengliang

    2015-05-26

    Multiferroic materials promise a tantalizing perspective of novel applications in next-generation electronic, memory, and energy harvesting technologies, and at the same time they also represent a grand scientific challenge on understanding complex solid state systems with strong correlations between multiple degrees of freedom. In this review, we highlight the opportunities and obstacles in growing multiferroic thin films with chemical and structural integrity and integrating them in functional devices. Besides the magnetoelectric effect, multiferroics exhibit excellent resistant switching and photovoltaic properties, and there are plenty opportunities for them to integrate with other ferromagnetic and superconducting materials. The challenges include, but not limited, defect-related leakage in thin films, weak magnetism, and poor control on interface coupling. Although our focuses are Bi-based perovskites and rare earth manganites, the insights are also applicable to other multiferroic materials. We will also review some examples of multiferroic applications in spintronics, memory, and photovoltaic devices.

  2. Ion beam modification of biological materials in nanoscale

    Yu, L. D.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2012-07-01

    Ion interaction with biological objects in nanoscale is a novel research area stemming from applications of low-energy ion beams in biotechnology and biomedicine. Although the ion beam applications in biotechnology and biomedicine have achieved great successes, many mechanisms remain unclear and many new applications are to be explored. We have carried out some research on exploring the mechanisms and new applications besides attaining ion beam induction of mutation breeding and gene transformation. In the studies on the mechanisms, we focused our investigations on the direct interaction in nanoscale between ions and biological living materials. Our research topics have included the low-energy ion range in DNA, low-energy ion or neutral beam bombardment effect on DNA topological form change and mutation, low-energy ion or neutral beam bombardment effect on the cell envelope and gene transformation, and molecular dynamics simulation of ultra-low-energy ion irradiation of DNA. In the exploration of new applications, we have started experiments on ion irradiation or bombardment, in the nanoscaled depth or area, of human cells for biomedical research. This paper introduces our experiments and reports interesting results.

  3. Ion beam modification of biological materials in nanoscale

    Yu, L.D.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2012-01-01

    Ion interaction with biological objects in nanoscale is a novel research area stemming from applications of low-energy ion beams in biotechnology and biomedicine. Although the ion beam applications in biotechnology and biomedicine have achieved great successes, many mechanisms remain unclear and many new applications are to be explored. We have carried out some research on exploring the mechanisms and new applications besides attaining ion beam induction of mutation breeding and gene transformation. In the studies on the mechanisms, we focused our investigations on the direct interaction in nanoscale between ions and biological living materials. Our research topics have included the low-energy ion range in DNA, low-energy ion or neutral beam bombardment effect on DNA topological form change and mutation, low-energy ion or neutral beam bombardment effect on the cell envelope and gene transformation, and molecular dynamics simulation of ultra-low-energy ion irradiation of DNA. In the exploration of new applications, we have started experiments on ion irradiation or bombardment, in the nanoscaled depth or area, of human cells for biomedical research. This paper introduces our experiments and reports interesting results.

  4. Size effects on magnetoelectric response of multiferroic composite with inhomogeneities

    Yue, Y.M. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Mechanics in Energy Engineering, Department of Mechanics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Xu, K.Y., E-mail: kyxu@shu.edu.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Mechanics in Energy Engineering, Department of Mechanics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Chen, T. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Mechanics in Energy Engineering, Department of Mechanics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Aifantis, E.C. [Laboratory of Mechanics and Materials (LMM), Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki GR-54124 (Greece); Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States); King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); School of Mechanics and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, 610031 (China); International Laboratory for Modern Functional Materials, ITMO University, St. Petersburg 191002 (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-01

    This paper investigates the influence of size effects on the magnetoelectric performance of multiferroic composite with inhomogeneities. Based on a simple model of gradient elasticity for multiferroic materials, the governing equations and boundary conditions are obtained from an energy variational principle. The general formulation is applied to consider an anti-plane problem of multiferroic composites with inhomogeneities. This problem is solved analytically and the effective magnetoelectric coefficient is obtained. The influence of the internal length (grain size or particle size) on the effective magnetoelectric coefficients of piezoelectric/piezomagnetic nanoscale fibrous composite is numerically evaluated and analyzed. The results suggest that with the increase of the internal length of piezoelectric matrix (PZT and BaTiO{sub 3}), the magnetoelectric coefficient increases, but the rate of increase is ratcheting downwards. If the internal length of piezoelectric matrix remains unchanged, the magnetoelectric coefficient will decrease with the increase of internal length scale of piezomagnetic nonfiber (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). In a composite consisiting of a piezomagnetic matrix (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) reinforced with piezoelectric nanofibers (BaTiO{sub 3}), an increase of the internal length in the piezomagnetic matrix, results to a decrease of the magnetoelectric coefficient, with the rate of decrease diminishing.

  5. Size effects on magnetoelectric response of multiferroic composite with inhomogeneities

    Yue, Y. M.; Xu, K. Y.; Chen, T.; Aifantis, E. C.

    2015-12-01

    This paper investigates the influence of size effects on the magnetoelectric performance of multiferroic composite with inhomogeneities. Based on a simple model of gradient elasticity for multiferroic materials, the governing equations and boundary conditions are obtained from an energy variational principle. The general formulation is applied to consider an anti-plane problem of multiferroic composites with inhomogeneities. This problem is solved analytically and the effective magnetoelectric coefficient is obtained. The influence of the internal length (grain size or particle size) on the effective magnetoelectric coefficients of piezoelectric/piezomagnetic nanoscale fibrous composite is numerically evaluated and analyzed. The results suggest that with the increase of the internal length of piezoelectric matrix (PZT and BaTiO3), the magnetoelectric coefficient increases, but the rate of increase is ratcheting downwards. If the internal length of piezoelectric matrix remains unchanged, the magnetoelectric coefficient will decrease with the increase of internal length scale of piezomagnetic nonfiber (CoFe2O3). In a composite consisiting of a piezomagnetic matrix (CoFe2O3) reinforced with piezoelectric nanofibers (BaTiO3), an increase of the internal length in the piezomagnetic matrix, results to a decrease of the magnetoelectric coefficient, with the rate of decrease diminishing.

  6. "Metamagnetoelectric" effect in multiferroics

    Fouokeng, G. C.; Fodouop, F. Kuate; Tchoffo, M.; Fai, L. C.; Randrianantoandro, N.

    2018-05-01

    We present a theoretical calculation of magnetoelectric properties in a quasi-two dimensional spin chain externally controlled by a static electric field in y-direction and magnetic field in z-direction. Given the diversity of properties in functional materials and their applications in physics, the multiferroic model is investigated. By using the Fermi-Dirac statistics of quantum gases and the Landau theory, we assess the effects of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and the electric polarization on the magnetoelectric coupling that induces at low temperature the "metamagnetoelectric" effet, and likewise affects the ferroelectricity induced through symmetry mechanisms and magnetic properties of the multiferroic system. In fact, the variation of the induced polarisation due to spin arrangement through the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction gives rise to a multistep interdependent metamagnetic and metaelectric transitions which are settled up by the corresponding Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya parameter and the system then exhibits a spin gap that results from an electric and a magnetic demagnetization field range. This metamagnetoelectric effect observed in these multiferroic materials model is seem to be highly tunable via the external electric and magnetic fields and thus can be crucial in the design of new mechanisms for the processing and storage of data and other spintronic applications.

  7. Canopy Dynamics in Nanoscale Ionic Materials Probed by NMR

    Mirau, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Nanoscale ionic materials (NIMs) are hybrids prepared from ionically functionalized nanoparticles (NP) neutralized by oligomeric polymer counter-ions. NIMs are designed to behave as liquids under ambient conditions in the absence of solvent and have no volatile organic content, making them useful for a number of applications. We have used NMR relaxation and pulse-field gradient NMR to probe local and collective canopy dynamics in NIMs based on silica nanoparticles (NP), fullerols and proteins in order to understand the relationship between the core and canopy structure and the bulk properties. The NMR studies show that the canopy dynamics depend on the degree of neutralization, the canopy radius of gyration and molecular crowding at the ionically modified NP surface. The viscosity in NIMs can be directly controlled with the addition of ions that enhance the exchange rate for polymers at the NP surface. These results show that NIMs for many applications can be prepared by controlling the dynamics of the NP interface.

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of Nanoscale Ionic Materials

    Oommen, Joanna Mary

    2010-08-13

    Nanoscale ionic materials (NIMs) are a new class of nanomaterials that exhibit interesting properties including negligible vapor pressures and tunable physical states, among others. In this study, we analyzed the temperature-wise performance of NIMs using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. NIMs are relatively stable over a temperature range from 300 to 383 K, rendering them usable in high temperature applications. We confirmed the presence of covalent bonds between the SiO2 core and the sulfonate group and determined relative concentrations of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. These findings serve as first hand proof-of-concept for the usefulness of NMR analyses in further studies on the diffusive properties of NIMs. © 2010 The Electrochemical Society.

  9. Ferroelectricity down to at least 2 nm in multiferroic BiFeO3 epitaxial thin films

    Bea, H.; Fusil, S.; Bouzehouane, K.; Sirena, M.; Herranz, G.; Jacquet, E.; Contour, J.-P.; Barthelemy, A.; Bibes, M.

    2006-01-01

    We report here on the preservation of ferroelectricity down to 2 nm in BiFeO 3 ultrathin films. The electric polarization can be switched reversibly and is stable over several days. Our findings insight on the fundamental problem of ferroelectricity at low thickness and confirm the potential of BiFeO 3 as a lead-free ferroelectric and multiferroic material for nanoscale devices. (author)

  10. Scanning microwave microscopy technique for nanoscale characterization of magnetic materials

    Joseph, C.H., E-mail: hadlee.joseph@artov.imm.cnr.it [National Research Council, Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems (CNR-IMM), Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Department of Electronics Engineering, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Sardi, G.M. [National Research Council, Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems (CNR-IMM), Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Tuca, S.S.; Gramse, G. [Johannes Kepler University, Institute for Biophysics, Gruberstrasse 40, A-4020 Linz (Austria); Lucibello, A.; Proietti, E. [National Research Council, Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems (CNR-IMM), Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Kienberger, F. [Keysight Technologies Austria GmbH, Keysight Laboratories, Gruberstrasse 40, A-4020 Linz (Austria); Marcelli, R. [National Research Council, Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems (CNR-IMM), Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    In this work, microwave characterization of magnetic materials using the scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) technique is presented. The capabilities of the SMM are employed for analyzing and imaging local magnetic properties of the materials under test at the nanoscale. The analyses are performed by acquiring both amplitude and phase of the reflected microwave signal. The changes in the reflection coefficient S{sub 11} are related to the local properties of the material under investigation, and the changes in its magnetic properties have been studied as a function of an external DC magnetic bias. Yttrium iron garnet (YIG) films deposited by RF sputtering and grown by liquid phase epitaxial (LPE) on gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) substrates and permalloy samples have been characterized. An equivalent electromagnetic transmission line model is discussed for the quantitative analysis of the local magnetic properties. We also observed the hysteretic behavior of the reflection coefficient S{sub 11} with an external bias field. The imaging and spectroscopy analysis on the experimental results are evidently indicating the possibilities of measuring local changes in the intrinsic magnetic properties on the surface of the material.

  11. Magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroic BaTiO3-CoFe2O4 composite nanofibers via electrospinning

    Fu, Bi; Lu, Ruie; Gao, Kun; Yang, Yaodong; Wang, Yaping

    2015-07-01

    Magnetoelectric (ME) coupling in Pb-based multiferroic composites has been widely investigated due to the excellent piezoelectric property of lead zirconate titanate (PZT). In this letter, we report a strategy to create a hybrid Pb-free ferroelectric and ferromagnetic material and detect its ME coupling at the nanoscale. Hybrid Pb-free multiferroic BaTiO3-CoFe2O4 (BTO-CFO) composite nanofibers (NFs) were generated by sol-gel electrospinning. The perovskite structure of BTO and the spinel structure of CFO nanograins were homogenously distributed in the composite NFs and verified by bright-field transmission electron microscopy observations along the perovskite [111] zone axis. Multiferroicity was confirmed by amplitude-voltage butterfly curves and magnetic hysteresis loops. ME coupling was observed in terms of a singularity on a dM/dT curve at the ferroelectric Curie temperature (TC) of BaTiO3. The lateral ME coefficient was investigated by the evolution of the piezoresponse under an external magnetic field of 1000 Oe and was estimated to be α31 =0.78× 104 \\text{mV cm}-1 \\text{Oe}-1 . These findings could enable the creation of nanoscale Pb-free multiferroic composite devices.

  12. Domain switching in single-phase multiferroics

    Jia, Tingting; Cheng, Zhenxiang; Zhao, Hongyang; Kimura, Hideo

    2018-06-01

    Multiferroics are a time-honoured research subject by reason for their tremendous application potential in the information industry, such as in multi-state information storage devices and new types of sensors. An outburst of studies on multiferroicity has been witnessed in the 21st century, although this field has a long research history since the 19th century. Multiferroicity has now become one of the hottest research topics in condensed matter physics and materials science. Numerous efforts have been made to investigate the cross-coupling phenomena among ferroic orders such as ferroelectricity, (anti-)ferromagnetism, and ferroelasticity, especially the coupling between electric and magnetic orderings that would account for the magnetoelectric (ME) effect in multiferroic materials. The magnetoelectric properties and coupling behavior of single phase multiferroics are dominated by their domain structures. It was also noted that, however, the multiferroic materials exhibit very complicated domain structures. Studies on domain structure characterization and domain switching are a crucial step in the exploration of approaches to the control and manipulation of magnetic (electric) properties using an electric (magnetic) field or other means. In this review, following a concise outline of our current basic knowledge on the magnetoelectric (ME) effect, we summarize some important research activities on domain switching in single-phase multiferroic materials in the form of single crystals and thin films, especially domain switching behavior involving strain and the related physics in the last decade. We also introduce recent developments in characterization techniques for domain structures of ferroelectric or multiferroic materials, which have significantly advanced our understanding of domain switching dynamics and interactions. The effects of a series of issues such as electric field, magnetic field, and stress effects on domain switching are been discussed as well. It

  13. Molecular Clusters: Nanoscale Building Blocks for Solid-State Materials.

    Pinkard, Andrew; Champsaur, Anouck M; Roy, Xavier

    2018-04-17

    The programmed assembly of nanoscale building blocks into multicomponent hierarchical structures is a powerful strategy for the bottom-up construction of functional materials. To develop this concept, our team has explored the use of molecular clusters as superatomic building blocks to fabricate new classes of materials. The library of molecular clusters is rich with exciting properties, including diverse functionalization, redox activity, and magnetic ordering, so the resulting cluster-assembled solids, which we term superatomic crystals (SACs), hold the promise of high tunability, atomic precision, and robust architectures among a diverse range of other material properties. Molecular clusters have only seldom been used as precursors for functional materials. Our team has been at the forefront of new developments in this exciting research area, and this Account focuses on our progress toward designing materials from cluster-based precursors. In particular, this Account discusses (1) the design and synthesis of molecular cluster superatomic building blocks, (2) their self-assembly into SACs, and (3) their resulting collective properties. The set of molecular clusters discussed herein is diverse, with different cluster cores and ligand arrangements to create an impressive array of solids. The cluster cores include octahedral M 6 E 8 and cubane M 4 E 4 (M = metal; E = chalcogen), which are typically passivated by a shell of supporting ligands, a feature upon which we have expanded upon by designing and synthesizing more exotic ligands that can be used to direct solid-state assembly. Building from this library, we have designed whole families of binary SACs where the building blocks are held together through electrostatic, covalent, or van der Waals interactions. Using single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SCXRD) to determine the atomic structure, a remarkable range of compositional variability is accessible. We can also use this technique, in tandem with vibrational

  14. Magnetization manipulation in multiferroic devices.

    Gajek, Martin; Martin, Lane; Hao Chu, Ying; Huijben, Mark; Barry, Micky; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy

    2008-03-01

    Controlling magnetization by purely electrical means is a a central topic in spintronics. A very recent route towards this goal is to exploit the coupling between multiple ferroic orders which coexist in multiferroic materials. BiFeO3 (BFO) displays antiferromagnetic and ferroelectric orderings at room temperature and can thus be used as an electrically controllable pinning layer for a ferromagnetic electrode. Furthermore BFO remains ferroelectric down to 2nm and can therefore be integrated as a tunnel barrier in MTJ's. We will describe these two architecture schemes and report on our progresses towards the control of magnetization via the multiferroic layer in those structures.

  15. Hierarchical Canopy Dynamics of Electrolyte-Doped Nanoscale Ionic Materials

    Jespersen, Michael L.

    2013-12-23

    Nanoscale ionic materials (NIMs) are organic-inorganic hybrids prepared from ionically functionalized nanoparticles (NP) neutralized by oligomeric polymer counterions. NIMs are designed to behave as liquids under ambient conditions in the absence of solvent and have no volatile organic content, making them useful for a number of applications. We have used nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation and pulsed-field gradient NMR to probe local and collective canopy dynamics in NIMs based on 18-nm silica NPs with a covalently bound anionic corona, neutralized by amine-terminated ethylene oxide/propylene oxide block copolymers. The NMR relaxation studies show that the nanosecond-scale canopy dynamics depend on the degree of neutralization, the canopy radius of gyration, and crowding at the ionically modified NP surface. Two canopy populations are observed in the diffusion experiments, demonstrating that one fraction of the canopy is bound to the NP surface on the time scale (milliseconds) of the diffusion experiment and is surrounded by a more mobile layer of canopy that is unable to access the surface due to molecular crowding. The introduction of electrolyte ions (Na+ or Mg2+) screens the canopy-corona electrostatic interactions, resulting in a reduced bulk viscosity and faster canopy exchange. The magnitude of the screening effect depends upon ion concentration and valence, providing a simple route for tuning the macroscopic properties of NIMs. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  16. Hierarchical Canopy Dynamics of Electrolyte-Doped Nanoscale Ionic Materials

    Jespersen, Michael L.; Mirau, Peter A.; von Meerwall, Ernst D.; Koerner, Hilmar; Vaia, Richard A.; Fernandes, Nikhil J.; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale ionic materials (NIMs) are organic-inorganic hybrids prepared from ionically functionalized nanoparticles (NP) neutralized by oligomeric polymer counterions. NIMs are designed to behave as liquids under ambient conditions in the absence of solvent and have no volatile organic content, making them useful for a number of applications. We have used nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation and pulsed-field gradient NMR to probe local and collective canopy dynamics in NIMs based on 18-nm silica NPs with a covalently bound anionic corona, neutralized by amine-terminated ethylene oxide/propylene oxide block copolymers. The NMR relaxation studies show that the nanosecond-scale canopy dynamics depend on the degree of neutralization, the canopy radius of gyration, and crowding at the ionically modified NP surface. Two canopy populations are observed in the diffusion experiments, demonstrating that one fraction of the canopy is bound to the NP surface on the time scale (milliseconds) of the diffusion experiment and is surrounded by a more mobile layer of canopy that is unable to access the surface due to molecular crowding. The introduction of electrolyte ions (Na+ or Mg2+) screens the canopy-corona electrostatic interactions, resulting in a reduced bulk viscosity and faster canopy exchange. The magnitude of the screening effect depends upon ion concentration and valence, providing a simple route for tuning the macroscopic properties of NIMs. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  17. Multiferroic oxide thin films and heterostructures

    Lu, Chengliang; Hu, Weijin; Tian, Yufeng; Wu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Multiferroic materials promise a tantalizing perspective of novel applications in next-generation electronic, memory, and energy harvesting technologies, and at the same time they also represent a grand scientific challenge on understanding complex

  18. Nanoscale tissue engineering: spatial control over cell-materials interactions

    Wheeldon, Ian; Farhadi, Arash; Bick, Alexander G.; Jabbari, Esmaiel; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Cells interact with the surrounding environment by making tens to hundreds of thousands of nanoscale interactions with extracellular signals and features. The goal of nanoscale tissue engineering is to harness the interactions through nanoscale biomaterials engineering in order to study and direct cellular behaviors. Here, we review the nanoscale tissue engineering technologies for both two- and three-dimensional studies (2- and 3D), and provide a holistic overview of the field. Techniques that can control the average spacing and clustering of cell adhesion ligands are well established and have been highly successful in describing cell adhesion and migration in 2D. Extension of these engineering tools to 3D biomaterials has created many new hydrogel and nanofiber scaffolds technologies that are being used to design in vitro experiments with more physiologically relevant conditions. Researchers are beginning to study complex cell functions in 3D, however, there is a need for biomaterials systems that provide fine control over the nanoscale presentation of bioactive ligands in 3D. Additionally, there is a need for 2- and 3D techniques that can control the nanoscale presentation of multiple bioactive ligands and the temporal changes in cellular microenvironment. PMID:21451238

  19. Nanoscale tissue engineering: spatial control over cell-materials interactions

    Wheeldon, Ian; Farhadi, Arash; Bick, Alexander G; Khademhosseini, Ali; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2011-01-01

    Cells interact with the surrounding environment by making tens to hundreds of thousands of nanoscale interactions with extracellular signals and features. The goal of nanoscale tissue engineering is to harness these interactions through nanoscale biomaterials engineering in order to study and direct cellular behavior. Here, we review two- and three-dimensional (2- and 3D) nanoscale tissue engineering technologies, and provide a holistic overview of the field. Techniques that can control the average spacing and clustering of cell adhesion ligands are well established and have been highly successful in describing cell adhesion and migration in 2D. Extension of these engineering tools to 3D biomaterials has created many new hydrogel and nanofiber scaffold technologies that are being used to design in vitro experiments with more physiologically relevant conditions. Researchers are beginning to study complex cell functions in 3D. However, there is a need for biomaterials systems that provide fine control over the nanoscale presentation of bioactive ligands in 3D. Additionally, there is a need for 2- and 3D techniques that can control the nanoscale presentation of multiple bioactive ligands and that can control the temporal changes in the cellular microenvironment. (topical review)

  20. Fast nanoscale heat-flux modulation with phase-change materials

    Van Zwol , Pieter; Joulain , Karl; Ben-Abdallah , Philippe; Greffet , Jean-Jacques; Chevrier , Joël

    2011-01-01

    International audience; We introduce a new concept for electrically controlled heat flux modulation. A flux contrast larger than 10 dB is expected with switching time on the order of tens of nanoseconds. Heat flux modulation is based on the interplay between radiative heat transfer at the nanoscale and phase change materials. Such large contrasts are not obtainable in solids, or in far field. As such this opens up new horizons for temperature modulation and actuation at the nanoscale.

  1. Plant virus directed fabrication of nanoscale materials and devices

    2015-03-26

    Structural features within the internal and external PVN surfaces are amenable to either chemi- cal or genetic modifications for the display of novel moieties...structures: from nanoboomerangs to tetrapods. Nanoscale 7, 344–355. Eggen, R., Verver, J., Wellink, J., De Jong, A., Goldbach, R., van Kammen, A., 1989...in planta expression and for templates for synthetic biology applica- tions. New Phytol. 200, 16–26. Saunders, K., Sainsbury, F., Lomonossoff, G.P

  2. Effect of Zn doping on the microwave absorption of BFO multiferroic materials

    Bi, S.; Li, J.; Mei, B.; Su, X. J.; Ying, C. Z.; Li, P. H.

    2018-01-01

    The microwave absorbing materials were firstly used in the Second World War. And the BiFeO3 (BFO) based microwave absorbers have been widely applied into the microwave absorbing area due to its possession of excellent electromagnetic properties. Various methods have been conducted to improve the microwave absorption performance of the BFO based materials. In the work, the sol-gel method were used to prepare the BFO, and the Zn were doped into the BFO to prepare the Bi1-xZnxFeO3 nanoparticles. The X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, and vector network analysis (VNA) were conducted to characterize the microstructure and electromagnetic properties of the as-prepared samples. The results indicate that the Bi1-xZnxFeO3 nanoparticles were successfully gained and the as-prepared samples possess excellent microwave absorption properties.

  3. Charge, spin and orbital order in the candidate multiferroic material LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    Groot, Joost de

    2012-06-28

    This thesis is a detailed study of the magnetic, structural and orbital order parameters of the candidate multiferroic material LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Multiferroic oxides with a strong magnetoelectric coupling are of high interest for potential information technology applications, but they are rare because the traditional mechanism of ferroelectricity is incompatible with magnetism. Consequently, much attention is focused on various unconventional mechanisms of ferroelectricity. Of these, ferroelectricity originating from charge ordering (CO) is particularly intriguing because it potentially combines large electric polarizations with strong magneto-electric coupling. However, examples of oxides where this mechanism occurs are exceedingly rare and none is really well understood. LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is often cited as the prototypical example of CO-based ferroelectricity. In this material, the order of Fe valences has been proposed to render the triangular Fe/O bilayers polar by making one of the two layers rich in Fe{sup 2+} and the other rich in Fe{sup 3+}, allowing for a possible ferroelectric stacking of the individual bilayers. Because of this new mechanism for ferroelectricity, and also because of the high transition temperatures of charge order (T{sub CO} {proportional_to}320K) and ferro magnetism (T{sub N}{proportional_to}240 K) LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} has recently attracted increasing attention. Although these polar bilayers are generally accepted in the literature for LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, direct proof is lacking. An assumption-free experimental determination of whether or not the CO in the Fe/O bilayers is polar would be crucial, given the dependence of the proposed mechanism of ferroelectricity from CO in LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} on polar bilayers. This thesis starts with a detailed characterization of the macroscopic magnetic properties, where growing ferrimagnetic contributions observed in magnetization could be ascribed to increasing oxygen off-stoichiometry. The

  4. Uncovering Design Principles of Intermediate Filaments, a Self-Assembling Biomaterial: Lessons in Nanoscale Materials Design

    Lee, David H

    2007-01-01

    .... Such proteins may be harnessed for military purposes (eg. protective self-healing materials or nanoscale scaffolds) if one had a better understanding of how molecular structure determines material properties. In this final progress report, we summarize our studies on these systems.

  5. Multiferroics and magnetoelectrics: thin films and nanostructures

    Martin, L.W.; Crane, S.P.; Chu, Y.H.; Holcomb, M.B.; Gajek, M.; Huijben, Mark; Yang, C.H.; Balke, N.; Ramesh, R.

    2008-01-01

    Multiferroic materials, or materials that simultaneously possess two or more ferroic order parameters, have returned to the forefront of materials research. Driven by the desire to achieve new functionalities—such as electrical control of ferromagnetism at room temperature—researchers have

  6. Tunnel junctions with multiferroic barriers

    Gajek, Martin; Bibes, Manuel; Fusil, Stéphane; Bouzehouane, Karim; Fontcuberta, Josep; Barthélémy, Agnès; Fert, Albert

    2007-04-01

    Multiferroics are singular materials that can exhibit simultaneously electric and magnetic orders. Some are ferroelectric and ferromagnetic and provide the opportunity to encode information in electric polarization and magnetization to obtain four logic states. However, such materials are rare and schemes allowing a simple electrical readout of these states have not been demonstrated in the same device. Here, we show that films of La0.1Bi0.9MnO3 (LBMO) are ferromagnetic and ferroelectric, and retain both ferroic properties down to a thickness of 2nm. We have integrated such ultrathin multiferroic films as barriers in spin-filter-type tunnel junctions that exploit the magnetic and ferroelectric degrees of freedom of LBMO. Whereas ferromagnetism permits read operations reminiscent of magnetic random access memories (MRAM), the electrical switching evokes a ferroelectric RAM write operation. Significantly, our device does not require the destructive ferroelectric readout, and therefore represents an advance over the original four-state memory concept based on multiferroics.

  7. Nanoscale heat transfer in carbon nanotube - sugar alcohol composites as heat storage materials

    Zhang, H.; Rindt, C.C.M.; Smeulders, D.M.J.; Gaastra - Nedea, S.V.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale carbon structures such as graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can greatly improve the effective thermal conductivity of thermally sluggish heat storage materials, such as sugar alcohols (SAs). The specific improvement depends on the heat transfer rate across the carbon structure. Besides,

  8. 76 FR 41178 - Pesticides; Policies Concerning Products Containing Nanoscale Materials; Opportunity for Public...

    2011-07-13

    ... Pesticides; Policies Concerning Products Containing Nanoscale Materials; Opportunity for Public Comment; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed policy statement; extension of comment period. SUMMARY: EPA issued a proposed policy statement in the Federal Register of June...

  9. The mechanical properties modeling of nano-scale materials by molecular dynamics

    Yuan, C.; Driel, W.D. van; Poelma, R.; Zhang, G.Q.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a molecular modeling strategy which is capable of mod-eling the mechanical properties on nano-scale low-dielectric (low-k) materials. Such modeling strategy has been also validated by the bulking force of carbon nano tube (CNT). This modeling framework consists of model generation method,

  10. Super-Resolution Molecular and Functional Imaging of Nanoscale Architectures in Life and Materials Science

    Habuchi, Satoshi

    2014-06-12

    Super-resolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy has been revolutionizing the way in which we investigate the structures, dynamics, and functions of a wide range of nanoscale systems. In this review, I describe the current state of various SR fluorescence microscopy techniques along with the latest developments of fluorophores and labeling for the SR microscopy. I discuss the applications of SR microscopy in the fields of life science and materials science with a special emphasis on quantitative molecular imaging and nanoscale functional imaging. These studies open new opportunities for unraveling the physical, chemical, and optical properties of a wide range of nanoscale architectures together with their nanostructures and will enable the development of new (bio-)nanotechnology.

  11. Multiresolution molecular mechanics: Surface effects in nanoscale materials

    Yang, Qingcheng, E-mail: qiy9@pitt.edu; To, Albert C., E-mail: albertto@pitt.edu

    2017-05-01

    Surface effects have been observed to contribute significantly to the mechanical response of nanoscale structures. The newly proposed energy-based coarse-grained atomistic method Multiresolution Molecular Mechanics (MMM) (Yang, To (2015), ) is applied to capture surface effect for nanosized structures by designing a surface summation rule SR{sup S} within the framework of MMM. Combined with previously proposed bulk summation rule SR{sup B}, the MMM summation rule SR{sup MMM} is completed. SR{sup S} and SR{sup B} are consistently formed within SR{sup MMM} for general finite element shape functions. Analogous to quadrature rules in finite element method (FEM), the key idea to the good performance of SR{sup MMM} lies in that the order or distribution of energy for coarse-grained atomistic model is mathematically derived such that the number, position and weight of quadrature-type (sampling) atoms can be determined. Mathematically, the derived energy distribution of surface area is different from that of bulk region. Physically, the difference is due to the fact that surface atoms lack neighboring bonding. As such, SR{sup S} and SR{sup B} are employed for surface and bulk domains, respectively. Two- and three-dimensional numerical examples using the respective 4-node bilinear quadrilateral, 8-node quadratic quadrilateral and 8-node hexahedral meshes are employed to verify and validate the proposed approach. It is shown that MMM with SR{sup MMM} accurately captures corner, edge and surface effects with less 0.3% degrees of freedom of the original atomistic system, compared against full atomistic simulation. The effectiveness of SR{sup MMM} with respect to high order element is also demonstrated by employing the 8-node quadratic quadrilateral to solve a beam bending problem considering surface effect. In addition, the introduced sampling error with SR{sup MMM} that is analogous to numerical integration error with quadrature rule in FEM is very small. - Highlights:

  12. One-pot Synthesis of Soluble Nanoscale CIGS Photoactive Functional Materials

    Yan Aixia

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Promising alternatives for solar energy utilization are thin film technologies involving various new materials. This contribution describes an easy and inexpensive synthetic method that can be used to prepare soluble nanoscale triphenyl phosphine-coordinated CIGS (TPP-CIGS photoactive functional materials. This complex is stable in the solid state under the irradiation of the ambient light, but its solution becomes a little bit unstable under the illumination of the low intensity laser.

  13. Deep eutectic solvents: sustainable media for nanoscale and functional materials.

    Wagle, Durgesh V; Zhao, Hua; Baker, Gary A

    2014-08-19

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) represent an alternative class of ionic fluids closely resembling room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), although, strictly speaking, they are distinguished by the fact that they also contain an organic molecular component (typically, a hydrogen bond donor like a urea, amide, acid, or polyol), frequently as the predominant constituent. Practically speaking, DESs are attractive alternatives to RTILs, sharing most of their remarkable qualities (e.g., tolerance to humidity, negligible vapor pressure, thermostability, wide electrochemical potential windows, tunability) while overcoming several limitations associated with their RTIL cousins. Particularly, DESs are typically, less expensive, more synthetically accessible (typically, from bulk commodity chemicals using solvent/waste-free processes), nontoxic, and biodegradable. In this Account, we provide an overview of DESs as designer solvents to create well-defined nanomaterials including shape-controlled nanoparticles, electrodeposited films, metal-organic frameworks, colloidal assemblies, hierarchically porous carbons, and DNA/RNA architectures. These breakthroughs illustrate how DESs can fulfill multiple roles in directing chemistry at the nanoscale: acting as supramolecular template, metal/carbon source, sacrificial agent (e.g., ammonia release from urea), and/or redox agent, all in the absence of formal stabilizing ligand (here, solvent and stabilizer are one and the same). The ability to tailor the physicochemical properties of DESs is central to controlling their interfacial behavior. The preorganized "supramolecular" nature of DESs provides a soft template to guide the formation of bimodal porous carbon networks or the evolution of electrodeposits. A number of essential parameters (viscosity, polarity, surface tension, hydrogen bonding), plus coordination with solutes/surfaces, all play significant roles in modulating species reactivity and mass transport properties governing the

  14. Non-collinear magnetism in multiferroic perovskites.

    Bousquet, Eric; Cano, Andrés

    2016-03-31

    We present an overview of the current interest in non-collinear magnetism in multiferroic perovskite crystals. We first describe the different microscopic mechanisms giving rise to the non-collinearity of spins in this class of materials. We discuss, in particular, the interplay between non-collinear magnetism and ferroelectric and antiferrodistortive distortions of the perovskite structure, and how this can promote magnetoelectric responses. We then provide a literature survey on non-collinear multiferroic perovskites. We discuss numerous examples of spin cantings driving weak ferromagnetism in transition metal perovskites, and of spin-induced ferroelectricity as observed in the rare-earth based perovskites. These examples are chosen to best illustrate the fundamental role of non-collinear magnetism in the design of multiferroicity.

  15. Sb-Te Phase-change Materials under Nanoscale Confinement

    Ihalawela, Chandrasiri A.

    Size, speed and efficiency are the major challenges of next generation nonvolatile memory (NVM), and phase-change memory (PCM) has captured a great attention due to its promising features. The key for PCM is rapid and reversible switching between amorphous and crystalline phases with optical or electrical excitation. The structural transition is associated with significant contrast in material properties which can be utilized in optical (CD, DVD, BD) and electronic (PCRAM) memory applications. Importantly, both the functionality and the success of PCM technology significantly depend on the core material and its properties. So investigating PC materials is crucial for the development of PCM technology to realized enhanced solutions. In regards to PC materials, Sb-Te binary plays a significant role as a basis to the well-known Ge-Sb-Te system. Unlike the conventional deposition methods (sputtering, evaporation), electrochemical deposition method is used due to its multiple advantages, such as conformality, via filling capability, etc. First, the controllable synthesis of Sb-Te thin films was studied for a wide range of compositions using this novel deposition method. Secondly, the solid electrolytic nature of stoichiometric Sb2Te3 was studied with respect to precious metals. With the understanding of 2D thin film synthesis, Sb-Te 1D nanowires (18 - 220 nm) were synthesized using templated electrodeposition, where nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) was used as a template for the growth of nanowires. In order to gain the controllability over the deposition in high aspect ratio structures, growth mechanisms of both the thin films and nanowires were investigated. Systematic understanding gained thorough previous studies helped to formulate the ultimate goal of this dissertation. In this dissertation, the main objective is to understand the size effect of PC materials on their phase transition properties. The reduction of effective memory cell size in conjunction with

  16. Monolithic silica aerogel - material design on the nano-scale

    Jensen, Karsten Ingerslev; Schultz, Jørgen Munthe; Kristiansen, Finn Harken

    structure of aerogel could be used for gas filters in the 20 to 100 nm region. - The sound velocity within aerogel is in the range of 100 to 300 m/s, which should be one of lowest for an inorganic material. Due to the low density, low acoustic impedance of aerogel could help boost the efficiency...... of piezoelectric transducers. - Other applications could be; waste encapsulation, spacers for vacuum insulation panels, membranes, etc. Department of Civil Engineering is co-ordinator of a current EU FP5 research project1, which deals with the application of aerogel as transparent insulation materials in windows....... Due to the excellent optical and thermal properties of aerogel, it is possible to develop windows with both high insulation and high transmittance, which is impossible applying the conventional window techniques, i.e. extra layers of glass, low-e coatings and gas fillings. It can be shown...

  17. Final Report: Nanoscale Dynamical Heterogeneity in Complex Magnetic Materials

    Kevan, Stephen [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States)

    2016-05-27

    A magnetic object can be demagnetized by dropping it on a hard surface, but what does ‘demagnetized’ actually mean? In 1919 Heinrich Barkhausen proved the existence of magnetic domains, which are regions of uniform magnetization that are much larger than atoms but much smaller than a macroscopic object. A material is fully magnetized when domain magnetizations are aligned, while it is demagnetized when the domain magnetizations are randomly oriented and the net magnetization is zero. The heterogeneity of a demagnetized object leads to interesting questions. Magnets are unstable when their poles align, and stable when their poles anti-align, so why is the magnetized state ever stable? What do domains look like? What is the structure of a domain wall? How does the magnetized state transform to the demagnetized state? How do domains appear and disappear? What are the statistical properties of domains and how do these vary as the domain pattern evolves? Some of these questions remain the focus of intense study nearly a century after Barkhausen’s discovery. For example, just a few years ago a new kind of magnetic texture called a skyrmion was discovered. A skyrmion is a magnetic domain that is a nanometer-scale, topologically protected vortex. ‘Topologically protected’ means that skyrmions are hard to destroy and so are stable for extended periods. Skyrmions are characterized by integral quantum numbers and are observed to move with little dissipation and so could store and process information with very low power input. Our research project uses soft x-rays, which offer very high magnetic contrast, to probe magnetic heterogeneity and to measure how it evolves in time under external influences. We will condition a soft x-ray beam so that the wave fronts will be coherent, that is, they will be smooth and well-defined. When coherent soft x-ray beam interacts with a magnetic material, the magnetic heterogeneity is imprinted onto the wave fronts and projected into

  18. Collaborative Research: Polymeric Multiferroics

    Ren, Shenqiang [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). College of Engineering

    2017-04-20

    The goal of this project is to investigate room temperature magnetism and magnetoelectric coupling of polymeric multiferroics. A new family of molecular charge-transfer crystals has been emerged as a fascinating opportunity for the development of all-organic electrics and spintronics due to its weak hyperfine interaction and low spin-orbit coupling; nevertheless, direct observations of room temperature magnetic spin ordering have yet to be accomplished in organic charge-transfer solids. Furthermore, room temperature magnetoelectric coupling effect hitherto known multiferroics, is anticipated in organic donor-acceptor complexes because of magnetic field effects on charge-transfer dipoles, yet this is also unexplored. The PI seeks to fundamental understanding of the control of organic crystals to demonstrate and explore room temperature multiferroicity. The experimental results have been verified through the theoretical modeling.

  19. Chapter 23. Single and Heterostructure Multiferroic Thin Films

    Barbier , Antoine

    2018-01-01

    International audience; Multiferroic oxide materials exhibiting several long range ferroic orders are of high interest because of their wide range of potential applications. The incorporation of their genuine properties in new devices, offering additional physical properties, requires often elaborating them in form of thin films. Retaining their multiferroic characteristics is very challenging. However, thin films can be structured on the nanometer scale and additional degrees of freedom, suc...

  20. A study on a nano-scale materials simulation using a PC cluster

    Choi, Deok Kee; Ryu, Han Kyu

    2002-01-01

    Not a few scientists have paid attention to application of molecular dynamics to chemistry, biology and physics. With recent popularity of nano technology, nano-scale analysis has become a major subject in various engineering fields. A underlying nano scale analysis is based on classical molecular theories representing molecular dynamics. Based on Newton's law of motions of particles, the movement of each particles is to be determined by numerical integrations. As the size of computation is closely related with the number of molecules, materials simulation takes up huge amount of computer resources so that it is not until recent days that the application of molecular dynamics to materials simulations draw some attention from many researchers. Thanks to high-performance computers, materials simulation via molecular dynamics looks promising. In this study, a PC cluster consisting of multiple commodity PCs is established and nano scale materials simulations are carried out. Micro-sized crack propagation inside a nano material is displayed by the simulation

  1. Nano-scale Materials and Nano-technology Processes in Environmental Protection

    Vissokov, Gh; Tzvetkoff, T.

    2003-01-01

    A number of environmental and energy technologies have benefited substantially from nano-scale technology: reduced waste and improved energy efficiency; environmentally friendly composite structures; waste remediation; energy conversion. In this report examples of current achievements and paradigm shifts are presented: from discovery to application; a nano structured materials; nanoparticles in the environment (plasma chemical preparation); nano-porous polymers and their applications in water purification; photo catalytic fluid purification; hierarchical self-assembled nano-structures for adsorption of heavy metals, etc. Several themes should be considered priorities in developing nano-scale processes related to environmental management: 1. To develop understanding and control of relevant processes, including protein precipitation and crystallisation, desorption of pollutants, stability of colloidal dispersion, micelle aggregation, microbe mobility, formation and mobility of nanoparticles, and tissue-nanoparticle interaction. Emphasis should be given to processes at phase boundaries (solid-liquid, solid-gas, liquid-gas) that involve mineral and organic soil components, aerosols, biomolecules (cells, microbes), bio tissues, derived components such as bio films and membranes, and anthropogenic additions (e.g. trace and heavy metals); 2. To carry out interdisciplinary research that initiates Noel approaches and adopts new methods for characterising surfaces and modelling complex systems to problems at interfaces and other nano-structures in the natural environment, including those involving biological or living systems. New technological advances such as optical traps, laser tweezers, and synchrotrons are extending examination of molecular and nano-scale processes to the single-molecule or single-cell level; 3. To integrate understanding of the roles of molecular and nano-scale phenomena and behaviour at the meso- and/or macro-scale over a period of time

  2. Two-dimensional Cu2Si sheet: a promising electrode material for nanoscale electronics

    Meng Yam, Kah; Guo, Na; Zhang, Chun

    2018-06-01

    Building electronic devices on top of two-dimensional (2D) materials has recently become one of most interesting topics in nanoelectronics. Finding high-performance 2D electrode materials is one central issue in 2D nanoelectronics. In the current study, based on first-principles calculations, we compare the electronic and transport properties of two nanoscale devices. One device consists of two single-atom-thick planar Cu2Si electrodes, and a nickel phthalocyanine (NiPc) molecule in the middle. The other device is made of often-used graphene electrodes and a NiPc molecule. Planer Cu2Si is a new type of 2D material that was recently predicted to exist and be stable under room temperature [11]. We found that at low bias voltages, the electric current through the Cu2Si–NiPc–Cu2Si junction is about three orders higher than that through graphene–NiPc–graphene. Detailed analysis shows that the surprisingly high conductivity of Cu2Si–NiPc–Cu2Si originates from the mixing of the Cu2Si state near Fermi energy and the highest occupied molecular orbital of NiPc. These results suggest that 2D Cu2Si may be an excellent candidate for electrode materials for future nanoscale devices.

  3. Theory of multiferroics

    Nagaosa, Naoto

    2009-01-01

    Theories of multiferroics are reviewed with a stress on the role of relativistic spin-orbit interaction and spin current. Ground state electric polarization induced by the non-collinear spin structures, and its dynamical fluctuation, i.e., electro-magnon are discussed. Treatments of the non-perturbative large amplitude thermal and quantum fluctuations are also described. (author)

  4. Nanoscale inhomogeneity and photoacid generation dynamics in extreme ultraviolet resist materials

    Wu, Ping-Jui; Wang, Yu-Fu; Chen, Wei-Chi; Wang, Chien-Wei; Cheng, Joy; Chang, Vencent; Chang, Ching-Yu; Lin, John; Cheng, Yuan-Chung

    2018-03-01

    The development of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography towards the 22 nm node and beyond depends critically on the availability of resist materials that meet stringent control requirements in resolution, line edge roughness, and sensitivity. However, the molecular mechanisms that govern the structure-function relationships in current EUV resist systems are not well understood. In particular, the nanoscale structures of the polymer base and the distributions of photoacid generators (PAGs) should play a critical roles in the performance of a resist system, yet currently available models for photochemical reactions in EUV resist systems are exclusively based on homogeneous bulk models that ignore molecular-level details of solid resist films. In this work, we investigate how microscopic molecular organizations in EUV resist affect photoacid generations in a bottom-up approach that describes structure-dependent electron-transfer dynamics in a solid film model. To this end, molecular dynamics simulations and stimulated annealing are used to obtain structures of a large simulation box containing poly(4-hydroxystyrene) (PHS) base polymers and triphenylsulfonium based PAGs. Our calculations reveal that ion-pair interactions govern the microscopic distributions of the polymer base and PAG molecules, resulting in a highly inhomogeneous system with nonuniform nanoscale chemical domains. Furthermore, the theoretical structures were used in combination of quantum chemical calculations and the Marcus theory to evaluate electron transfer rates between molecular sites, and then kinetic Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to model electron transfer dynamics with molecular structure details taken into consideration. As a result, the portion of thermalized electrons that are absorbed by the PAGs and the nanoscale spatial distribution of generated acids can be estimated. Our data reveal that the nanoscale inhomogeneous distributions of base polymers and PAGs strongly affect the

  5. Universal deformation pathways and flexural hardening of nanoscale 2D-material standing folds

    Chacham, Helio; Barboza, Ana Paula M.; de Oliveira, Alan B.; de Oliveira, Camilla K.; Batista, Ronaldo J. C.; Neves, Bernardo R. A.

    2018-03-01

    In the present work, we use atomic force microscopy nanomanipulation of 2D-material standing folds to investigate their mechanical deformation. Using graphene, h-BN and talc nanoscale wrinkles as testbeds, universal force-strain pathways are clearly uncovered and well-accounted for by an analytical model. Such universality further enables the investigation of each fold bending stiffness κ as a function of its characteristic height h 0. We observe a more than tenfold increase of κ as h 0 increases in the 10-100 nm range, with power-law behaviors of κ versus h 0 with exponents larger than unity for the three materials. This implies anomalous scaling of the mechanical responses of nano-objects made from these materials.

  6. Thermal stability, swelling behavior and CO 2 absorption properties of Nanoscale Ionic Materials (NIMs)

    Andrew Lin, Kun-Yi; Park, Youngjune; Petit, Camille; Park, Ah-Hyung Alissa

    2014-01-01

    © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015. Nanoscale Ionic Materials (NIMs) consist of a nanoscale core, a corona of charged brushes tethered on the surface of the core, and a canopy of the oppositely charged species linked to the corona. Unlike conventional polymeric nanocomposites, NIMs can display liquid-like behavior in the absence of solvents, have a negligible vapor pressure and exhibit unique solvation properties. These features enable NIMs to be a promising CO2 capture material. To optimize NIMs for CO2 capture, their structure-property relationships were examined by investigating the roles of the canopy and the core in their thermal stability, and thermally- and CO2-induced swelling behaviors. NIMs with different canopy sizes and core fractions were synthesized and their thermal stability as well as thermally- and CO2-induced swelling behaviors were determined using thermogravimetry, and ATR FT-IR and Raman spectroscopies. It was found that the ionic bonds between the canopy and the corona, as well as covalent bonds between the corona and the core significantly improved the thermal stability compared to pure polymer and polymer/nanofiller mixtures. A smaller canopy size and a larger core fraction led to a greater enhancement in thermal stability. This thermal stability enhancement was responsible for the long-term thermal stability of NIMs over 100 temperature swing cycles. Owing to their ordered structure, NIMs swelled less when heated or when they adsorbed CO2 compared to their corresponding polymers. This journal is

  7. Thermal stability, swelling behavior and CO 2 absorption properties of Nanoscale Ionic Materials (NIMs)

    Andrew Lin, Kun-Yi

    2014-11-11

    © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015. Nanoscale Ionic Materials (NIMs) consist of a nanoscale core, a corona of charged brushes tethered on the surface of the core, and a canopy of the oppositely charged species linked to the corona. Unlike conventional polymeric nanocomposites, NIMs can display liquid-like behavior in the absence of solvents, have a negligible vapor pressure and exhibit unique solvation properties. These features enable NIMs to be a promising CO2 capture material. To optimize NIMs for CO2 capture, their structure-property relationships were examined by investigating the roles of the canopy and the core in their thermal stability, and thermally- and CO2-induced swelling behaviors. NIMs with different canopy sizes and core fractions were synthesized and their thermal stability as well as thermally- and CO2-induced swelling behaviors were determined using thermogravimetry, and ATR FT-IR and Raman spectroscopies. It was found that the ionic bonds between the canopy and the corona, as well as covalent bonds between the corona and the core significantly improved the thermal stability compared to pure polymer and polymer/nanofiller mixtures. A smaller canopy size and a larger core fraction led to a greater enhancement in thermal stability. This thermal stability enhancement was responsible for the long-term thermal stability of NIMs over 100 temperature swing cycles. Owing to their ordered structure, NIMs swelled less when heated or when they adsorbed CO2 compared to their corresponding polymers. This journal is

  8. Advancing Risk Analysis for Nanoscale Materials: Report from an International Workshop on the Role of Alternative Testing Strategies for Advancement: Advancing Risk Analysis for Nanoscale Materials

    Shatkin, J. A. [Vireo Advisors, Boston MA USA; Ong, Kimberly J. [Vireo Advisors, Boston MA USA; Beaudrie, Christian [Compass RM, Vancouver CA USA; Clippinger, Amy J. [PETA International Science Consortium Ltd, London UK; Hendren, Christine Ogilvie [Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology, Duke University, Durham NC USA; Haber, Lynne T. [TERA, Cincinnati OH USA; Hill, Myriam [Health Canada, Ottawa Canada; Holden, Patricia [UC Santa Barbara, Bren School of Environmental Science & Management, ERI, and UC CEIN, University of California, Santa Barbara CA USA; Kennedy, Alan J. [U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Environmental Laboratory, Vicksburg MS USA; Kim, Baram [Independent, Somerville MA USA; MacDonell, Margaret [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division, Argonne IL USA; Powers, Christina M. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Air and Radiation, Office of Transportation and Air Quality, Ann Arbor MI USA; Sharma, Monita [PETA International Science Consortium Ltd, London UK; Sheremeta, Lorraine [Alberta Ingenuity Labs, Edmonton Alberta Canada; Stone, Vicki [John Muir Building Gait 1 Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh Scotland UK; Sultan, Yasir [Environment Canada, Gatineau QC Canada; Turley, Audrey [ICF International, Durham NC USA; White, Ronald H. [RH White Consultants, Silver Spring MD USA

    2016-08-01

    The Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) has a history of bringing thought leadership to topics of emerging risk. In September 2014, the SRA Emerging Nanoscale Materials Specialty Group convened an international workshop to examine the use of alternative testing strategies (ATS) for manufactured nanomaterials (NM) from a risk analysis perspective. Experts in NM environmental health and safety, human health, ecotoxicology, regulatory compliance, risk analysis, and ATS evaluated and discussed the state of the science for in vitro and other alternatives to traditional toxicology testing for NM. Based on this review, experts recommended immediate and near-term actions that would advance ATS use in NM risk assessment. Three focal areas-human health, ecological health, and exposure considerations-shaped deliberations about information needs, priorities, and the next steps required to increase confidence in and use of ATS in NM risk assessment. The deliberations revealed that ATS are now being used for screening, and that, in the near term, ATS could be developed for use in read-across or categorization decision making within certain regulatory frameworks. Participants recognized that leadership is required from within the scientific community to address basic challenges, including standardizing materials, protocols, techniques and reporting, and designing experiments relevant to real-world conditions, as well as coordination and sharing of large-scale collaborations and data. Experts agreed that it will be critical to include experimental parameters that can support the development of adverse outcome pathways. Numerous other insightful ideas for investment in ATS emerged throughout the discussions and are further highlighted in this article.

  9. Revealing Nanoscale Passivation and Corrosion Mechanisms of Reactive Battery Materials in Gas Environments.

    Li, Yuzhang; Li, Yanbin; Sun, Yongming; Butz, Benjamin; Yan, Kai; Koh, Ai Leen; Zhao, Jie; Pei, Allen; Cui, Yi

    2017-08-09

    Lithium (Li) metal is a high-capacity anode material (3860 mAh g -1 ) that can enable high-energy batteries for electric vehicles and grid-storage applications. However, Li metal is highly reactive and repeatedly consumed when exposed to liquid electrolyte (during battery operation) or the ambient environment (throughout battery manufacturing). Studying these corrosion reactions on the nanoscale is especially difficult due to the high chemical reactivity of both Li metal and its surface corrosion films. Here, we directly generate pure Li metal inside an environmental transmission electron microscope (TEM), revealing the nanoscale passivation and corrosion process of Li metal in oxygen (O 2 ), nitrogen (N 2 ), and water vapor (H 2 O). We find that while dry O 2 and N 2 (99.9999 vol %) form uniform passivation layers on Li, trace water vapor (∼1 mol %) disrupts this passivation and forms a porous film on Li metal that allows gas to penetrate and continuously react with Li. To exploit the self-passivating behavior of Li in dry conditions, we introduce a simple dry-N 2 pretreatment of Li metal to form a protective layer of Li nitride prior to battery assembly. The fast ionic conductivity and stable interface of Li nitride results in improved battery performance with dendrite-free cycling and low voltage hysteresis. Our work reveals the detailed process of Li metal passivation/corrosion and demonstrates how this mechanistic insight can guide engineering solutions for Li metal batteries.

  10. Tuning the photovoltaic effect of multiferroic CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/Pb(Zr, Ti)O{sub 3} composite films by magnetic fields

    Pan, Dan-Feng; Chen, Guang-Yi; Bi, Gui-Feng [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang, Hao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States); Liu, Jun-Ming; Wang, Guang-Hou; Wan, Jian-Guo, E-mail: wanjg@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2016-05-30

    The 0–3 type CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} (CFO-PZT) multiferroic composite films have been prepared by a sol-gel process and spin-coating technique. A confirmable photovoltaic effect is observed under ultraviolet light irradiation. Moreover, this photovoltaic effect can be tuned by external magnetic fields. The maximum magnetic modulation ratios of short-circuit current density and open-circuit voltage can reach as high as 13.7% and 12.8% upon the application of 6 kOe DC magnetic field. Through remnant polarization measurements under various magnetic fields and detailed analysis of the energy band structures, we elucidate the mechanism of tuning photovoltaic effect by magnetic fields and attribute it to the combination of two factors. One is the decreased ferroelectric-polarization-induced depolarization electric field and another is the band structure reconstruction at CFO-PZT interfaces, both of which are dominated by the magnetoelectric coupling via interfacial stress transferring at nanoscale. This work makes some attempts of coupling photo-induced effects with magnetoelectric effect in multiferroic materials and will widen the practical ranges of multiferroic-based applications.

  11. Note: Detector collimators for the nanoscale ordered materials diffractometer instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source

    Tamalonis, A. [Materials Development, Inc., Arlington Heights, Illinois 60004 (United States); Weber, J. K. R., E-mail: rweber@anl.gov; Alderman, O. L. G. [Materials Development, Inc., Arlington Heights, Illinois 60004 (United States); Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Neuefeind, J. C.; Carruth, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); Skinner, L. B. [Materials Development, Inc., Arlington Heights, Illinois 60004 (United States); Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Benmore, C. J. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Five neutron collimator designs were constructed and tested at the nanoscale ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) instrument. Collimators were made from High Density PolyEthylene (HDPE) or 5% borated HDPE. In all cases, collimators improved the signal to background ratio and reduced detection of secondary scattering. In the Q-range 10-20 Å{sup −1}, signal to background ratio improved by factors of approximately 1.6 and 2.0 for 50 and 100 mm deep collimators, respectively. In the Q-range 40-50 Å{sup −1}, the improvement factors were 1.8 and 2.7. Secondary scattering as measured at Q ∼ 9.5 Å{sup −1} was significantly decreased when the collimators were installed.

  12. Conduction at domain walls in oxide multiferroics

    Seidel, J.; Martin, L. W.; He, Q.; Zhan, Q.; Chu, Y.-H.; Rother, A.; Hawkridge, M. E.; Maksymovych, P.; Yu, P.; Gajek, M.; Balke, N.; Kalinin, S. V.; Gemming, S.; Wang, F.; Catalan, G.; Scott, J. F.; Spaldin, N. A.; Orenstein, J.; Ramesh, R.

    2009-03-01

    Domain walls may play an important role in future electronic devices, given their small size as well as the fact that their location can be controlled. Here, we report the observation of room-temperature electronic conductivity at ferroelectric domain walls in the insulating multiferroic BiFeO3. The origin and nature of the observed conductivity are probed using a combination of conductive atomic force microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and first-principles density functional computations. Our analyses indicate that the conductivity correlates with structurally driven changes in both the electrostatic potential and the local electronic structure, which shows a decrease in the bandgap at the domain wall. Additionally, we demonstrate the potential for device applications of such conducting nanoscale features.

  13. Optical, magnetic, and dielectric properties of opal matrices with intersphere nanocavities filled with crystalline multiferroic, piezoelectric, and segnetoelectric materials

    Samoilovich, M.I.; Rinkevich, A.B.; Bovtun, Viktor; Belyanin, A.F.; Kempa, Martin; Nuzhnyy, Dmitry; Tsvetkov, M.Yu.; Klescheva, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 11 (2013), s. 2132-2147 ISSN 1070-3632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/12/0232 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : composites * opal matrices * optical, magnetic, and dielectric properties Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 0.418, year: 2013

  14. Designing switchable near room-temperature multiferroics via the discovery of a novel magnetoelectric coupling

    Feng, J. S.; Xu, Ke; Bellaiche, Laurent; Xiang, H. J.

    2018-05-01

    Magnetoelectric (ME) coupling is the key ingredient for realizing the cross-control of magnetism and ferroelectricity in multiferroics. However, multiferroics are not only rare, especially at room-temperature, in nature but also the overwhelming majority of known multiferroics do not exhibit highly-desired switching of the direction of magnetization when the polarization is reversed by an electric field. Here, we report group theory analysis and ab initio calculations demonstrating, and revealing the origin of, the existence of a novel form of ME coupling term in a specific class of materials that does allow such switching. This term naturally explains the previously observed electric field control of magnetism in the first known multiferroics, i.e., the Ni–X boracite family. It is also presently used to design a switchable near room-temperature multiferroic (namely, LaSrMnOsO6 perovskite) having rather large ferroelectric polarization and spontaneous magnetization, as well as strong ME coupling.

  15. Simple top-down preparation of magnetic Bi0.9Gd0.1Fe1−xTixO3 nanoparticles by ultrasonication of multiferroic bulk material

    Basith, M. A.; Ngo, Duc-The; Quader, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple technique to synthesize ultrafine nanoparticles directly from bulk multiferroic perovskitepowder. The starting materials, which were ceramic pellets of the nominal compositions Bi0.9Gd0.1-Fe1−xTixO3 (x = 0.00–0.20), were prepared initially by a solid state reaction technique, ...

  16. Active material, optical mode and cavity impact on nanoscale electro-optic modulation performance

    Amin, Rubab; Suer, Can; Ma, Zhizhen; Sarpkaya, Ibrahim; Khurgin, Jacob B.; Agarwal, Ritesh; Sorger, Volker J.

    2017-10-01

    Electro-optic modulation is a key function in optical data communication and possible future optical compute engines. The performance of modulators intricately depends on the interaction between the actively modulated material and the propagating waveguide mode. While a variety of high-performance modulators have been demonstrated, no comprehensive picture of what factors are most responsible for high performance has emerged so far. Here we report the first systematic and comprehensive analytical and computational investigation for high-performance compact on-chip electro-optic modulators by considering emerging active materials, model considerations and cavity feedback at the nanoscale. We discover that the delicate interplay between the material characteristics and the optical mode properties plays a key role in defining the modulator performance. Based on physical tradeoffs between index modulation, loss, optical confinement factors and slow-light effects, we find that there exist combinations of bias, material and optical mode that yield efficient phase or amplitude modulation with acceptable insertion loss. Furthermore, we show how material properties in the epsilon near zero regime enable reduction of length by as much as by 15 times. Lastly, we introduce and apply a cavity-based electro-optic modulator figure of merit, Δλ/Δα, relating obtainable resonance tuning via phase shifting relative to the incurred losses due to the fundamental Kramers-Kronig relations suggesting optimized device operating regions with optimized modulation-to-loss tradeoffs. This work paves the way for a holistic design rule of electro-optic modulators for high-density on-chip integration.

  17. Nanoscale/multilayer gradient materials for application in electromagnetic gun systems

    Otooni, M.A. [Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ (United States); Brown, I.G.; Anders, S.; Wang, Z. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Analysis of fired rails from electromagnetic railguns indicates severe surface damage occurs due to high current arcing and tribological mismatch. The authors have explored the behavior of several nanoscale multilayered materials as possible routes to improve the thermomechanical properties of the rail and armature materials. Structures investigated include (i) Ti-Co alloy on Ta-Cu alloy on dlc (diamond-like carbon) on stainless steel; (ii) Ti-Co alloy on Ta-Cu alloy on dlc on Cu, (iii) Ti-Co alloy on Ta-Cu on Cu; and (iv) Ti-Co on Ta-Cu alloy on Al. The alloys were all 50:50 at% and film thicknesses were fin the range 400--1,000 {angstrom}. The films were formed using a repetitively pulsed vacuum arc plasma deposition method with substrate biasing- and IBAD-like techniques. The surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, optical microscopy, microhardness measurements, arc erosion resistance and scratch resistance tests. Preliminary results show improvement in the microhardness, arc erosion resistance and scratch resistance, most especially for the dlc-coated surfaces. This kind of multilayered approach to the fabrication of electromagnetic railgun and armature surfaces could be important for future advanced Electromagnetic EM Gun systems.

  18. Measurements of stiff-material compliance on the nanoscale using ultrasonic force microscopy

    Dinelli, F.; Biswas, S. K.; Briggs, G. A. D.; Kolosov, O. V.

    2000-05-01

    Ultrasonic force microscopy (UFM) was introduced to probe nanoscale mechanical properties of stiff materials. This was achieved by vibrating the sample far above the first resonance of the probing atomic force microscope cantilever where the cantilever becomes dynamically rigid. By operating UFM at different set force values, it is possible to directly measure the absolute values of the tip-surface contact stiffness. From this an evaluation of surface elastic properties can be carried out assuming a suitable solid-solid contact model. In this paper we present curves of stiffness as a function of the normal load in the range of 0-300 nN. The dependence of stiffness on the relative humidity has also been investigated. Materials with different elastic constants (such as sapphire lithium fluoride, and silicon) have been successfully differentiated. Continuum mechanics models cannot however explain the dependence of stiffness on the normal force and on the relative humidity. In this high-frequency regime, it is likely that viscous forces might play an important role modifying the tip-surface interaction. Plastic deformation might also occur due to the high strain rates applied when ultrasonically vibrating the sample. Another possible cause of these discrepancies might be the presence of water in between the two bodies in contact organizing in a solidlike way and partially sustaining the load.

  19. Nanoscale Surface Photovoltage Mapping of 2D Materials and Heterostructures by Illuminated Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy

    Shearer, Melinda J.

    2018-02-01

    Nanomaterials are interesting for a variety of applications, such as optoelectronics and photovoltaics. However, they often have spatial heterogeneity, i.e. composition change or physical change in the topography or structure, which can lead to varying properties that would influence their applications. New techniques must be developed to understand and correlate spatial heterogeneity with changes in electronic properties. Here we highlight the technique of surface photovoltage-Kelvin probe force microscopy (SPV-KFM), which is a modified version of non-contact atomic force microscopy capable of imaging not only the topography and surface potential, but also the surface photovoltage on the nanoscale. We demonstrate its utility in probing monolayer WSe2-MoS2 lateral heterostructures, which form an ultrathin p-n junction promising for photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications. We show surface photovoltage maps highlighting the different photoresponse of the two material regions as a result of the effective charge separation across this junction. Additionally, we study the variations between different heterostructure flakes and emphasize the importance of controlling the synthesis and transfer of these materials to obtain consistent properties and measurements.

  20. Nanoscale Surface Photovoltage Mapping of 2D Materials and Heterostructures by Illuminated Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy

    Shearer, Melinda J.; Li, Ming-yang; Li, Lain-Jong; Jin, Song; Hamers, Robert J

    2018-01-01

    Nanomaterials are interesting for a variety of applications, such as optoelectronics and photovoltaics. However, they often have spatial heterogeneity, i.e. composition change or physical change in the topography or structure, which can lead to varying properties that would influence their applications. New techniques must be developed to understand and correlate spatial heterogeneity with changes in electronic properties. Here we highlight the technique of surface photovoltage-Kelvin probe force microscopy (SPV-KFM), which is a modified version of non-contact atomic force microscopy capable of imaging not only the topography and surface potential, but also the surface photovoltage on the nanoscale. We demonstrate its utility in probing monolayer WSe2-MoS2 lateral heterostructures, which form an ultrathin p-n junction promising for photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications. We show surface photovoltage maps highlighting the different photoresponse of the two material regions as a result of the effective charge separation across this junction. Additionally, we study the variations between different heterostructure flakes and emphasize the importance of controlling the synthesis and transfer of these materials to obtain consistent properties and measurements.

  1. Experimental Study of Electron and Phonon Dynamics in Nanoscale Materials by Ultrafast Laser Time-Domain Spectroscopy

    Shen, Xiaohan

    With the rapid advances in the development of nanotechnology, nowadays, the sizes of elementary unit, i.e. transistor, of micro- and nanoelectronic devices are well deep into nanoscale. For the pursuit of cheaper and faster nanoscale electronic devices, the size of transistors keeps scaling down. As the miniaturization of the nanoelectronic devices, the electrical resistivity increases dramatically, resulting rapid growth in the heat generation. The heat generation and limited thermal dissipation in nanoscale materials have become a critical problem in the development of the next generation nanoelectronic devices. Copper (Cu) is widely used conducting material in nanoelectronic devices, and the electron-phonon scattering is the dominant contributor to the resistivity in Cu nanowires at room temperature. Meanwhile, phonons are the main carriers of heat in insulators, intrinsic and lightly doped semiconductors. The thermal transport is an ensemble of phonon transport, which strongly depends on the phonon frequency. In addition, the phonon transport in nanoscale materials can behave fundamentally different than in bulk materials, because of the spatial confinement. However, the size effect on electron-phonon scattering and frequency dependent phonon transport in nanoscale materials remain largely unexplored, due to the lack of suitable experimental techniques. This thesis is mainly focusing on the study of carrier dynamics and acoustic phonon transport in nanoscale materials. The weak photothermal interaction in Cu makes thermoreflectance measurement difficult, we rather measured the reflectivity change of Cu induced by absorption variation. We have developed a method to separately measure the processes of electron-electron scattering and electron-phonon scattering in epitaxial Cu films by monitoring the transient reflectivity signal using the resonant probe with particular wavelengths. The enhancement on electron-phonon scattering in epitaxial Cu films with thickness

  2. Ferroelectric, magnetic and structural studies of the Bi4LaSmFe2Ti3O18 multiferroic material

    Alarcón-Suesca, C.E.; Cardona-Vásquez, J.A.; Salcedo-Fontecha, J.P.; Vargas-Jiménez, A.; Landínez-Téllez, D.A.; Roa-Rojas, J.

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of the new Bi 4 LaSmFe 2 Ti 3 O 18 ferroelectric ceramic. X-ray characterization reveals reflections for layered perovskite Aurivillius system. Rietveld analyses of the powder pattern shows that Bi 4 LaSmFe 2 Ti 3 O 18 crystallizes in orthorhombic structure, which corresponds to the space group F2/mm (#42), with lattice parameters a=5.4240(16) Ǻ, b=5.4078(23) Ǻ and c=50.2440(12) Ǻ. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals the formation of dense material with plate-like morphology. Electric polarization curves were measured by means of a radiant ferroelectric tester, at room temperature in bulk samples and exhibit an intrinsic ferroelectric response, even at low applied fields. Measurements of the magnetization as a function of temperature after Zero field cooling and field cooling were carried out by using a MPMS Quantum Design SQUID magnetometer. We found an effective magnetic moment of 7.95 µB, which is 95.8% in agreement with the expected value calculated from Hund's rules. Magnetization curves as the function of applied fields reveal an incipient hysteretic behavior at room temperature

  3. Nanoscale reference materials for environmental, health and safety measurements: needs, gaps and opportunities.

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Hackley, Vincent A; Roebben, Gert; Ehara, Kensei; Hankin, Steve; Postek, Michael T; Lynch, Iseult; Fu, Wei-En; Linsinger, Thomas P J; Thünemann, Andreas F

    2013-12-01

    The authors critically reviewed published lists of nano-objects and their physico-chemical properties deemed important for risk assessment and discussed metrological challenges associated with the development of nanoscale reference materials (RMs). Five lists were identified that contained 25 (classes of) nano-objects; only four (gold, silicon dioxide, silver, titanium dioxide) appeared on all lists. Twenty-three properties were identified for characterisation; only (specific) surface area appeared on all lists. The key themes that emerged from this review were: 1) various groups have prioritised nano-objects for development as "candidate RMs" with limited consensus; 2) a lack of harmonised terminology hinders accurate description of many nano-object properties; 3) many properties identified for characterisation are ill-defined or qualitative and hence are not metrologically traceable; 4) standardised protocols are critically needed for characterisation of nano-objects as delivered in relevant media and as administered to toxicological models; 5) the measurement processes being used to characterise a nano-object must be understood because instruments may measure a given sample in a different way; 6) appropriate RMs should be used for both accurate instrument calibration and for more general testing purposes (e.g., protocol validation); 7) there is a need to clarify that where RMs are not available, if "(representative) test materials" that lack reference or certified values may be useful for toxicology testing and 8) there is a need for consensus building within the nanotechnology and environmental, health and safety communities to prioritise RM needs and better define the required properties and (physical or chemical) forms of the candidate materials.

  4. Recent advances in energy transfer in bulk and nanoscale luminescent materials: from spectroscopy to applications.

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Qiu, Jianrong

    2015-12-07

    Transfer of energy occurs endlessly in our universe by means of radiation. Compared to energy transfer (ET) in free space, in solid state materials the transfer of energy occurs in a rather confined manner, which is usually mediated by real or virtual particles, including not only photons, but also electrons, phonons, and excitons. In the present review, we discuss the recent advances in optical ET by resonance mediated with photons in solid materials as well as their nanoscale counterparts, with focus on the photoluminescence behavior pertaining to ET between optically active centers, such as rare earth (RE) ions. This review begins with a brief discussion on the classification of optical ET together with an overview of the theoretical formulations and experimental method for the examination of ET. We will then present a comprehensive discussion on the ET in practical systems in which normal photoluminescence, upconversion and quantum cutting resulted from ET involving metal ions, QDs, organic species, 2D materials and plasmonic nanostructures. Diverse ET systems are therefore simply categorized into cases of ion-ion interactions and non-ion interactions. Special attention has been paid to the progress in the manipulation of spatially confined ET in nanostructured systems including core-shell structures, as well as the ET in multiple exciton generation found in QDs and organic molecules, which behave quite similarly to resonance ET between metal ion centers. Afterwards, we will discuss the broad spectrum of applications of ET in the aforementioned systems, including solid state lighting, solar energy utilization, bio-imaging and diagnosis, and sensing. In the closing part, along with a short summary, we discuss further research focus regarding the problems and possible future directions of optical ET in solids.

  5. Designing asymmetric multiferroics with strong magnetoelectric coupling

    Lu, Xuezeng; Xiang, Hongjun; Rondinelli, James; Materials Theory; Design Group Team

    2015-03-01

    Multiferroics offer exciting opportunities for electric-field control of magnetism. Single-phase multiferroics suitable for such applications at room temperature need much more study. Here, we propose the concept of an alternative type of multiferroics, namely, the ``asymmetric multiferroic.'' In asymmetric multiferroics, two locally stable ferroelectric states are not symmetrically equivalent, leading to different magnetic properties between these two states. Furthermore, we predict from first principles that a Fe-Cr-Mo superlattice with the LiNbO3-type structure is such an asymmetric multiferroic. The strong ferrimagnetism, high ferroelectric polarization, and significant dependence of the magnetic transition temperature on polarization make this asymmetric multiferroic an ideal candidate for realizing electric-field control of magnetism at room temperature. Our study suggests that the asymmetric multiferroic may provide an alternative playground for voltage control of magnetism and find its applications in spintronics and quantum computing.

  6. Supercapacitors - nanostructured materials and nanoscale processes contributing to the next mobile generation

    Mahon, P.J.; Drummond, C.J.

    2001-01-01

    Supercapacitors, alternatively known as ultracapacitors, electrical double-layer capacitors or electrochemical capacitors, are energy storage devices that have considerably more specific capacitance than conventional capacitors. In recent years there have been major advancements in the design of low impedance (low resistance) Supercapacitors, which are ideally suited for high-power applications for mobile devices, particularly those using GSM (Global System for Mobile communication) and GPRS (General Packet Radio Service) wireless technologies. Cap-XX Pty Ltd is a global leader in supercapacitor technology. Cap-XX was established in 1997 and evolved from a collaboration that began in 1994 between Plessey Ducon Pty Ltd, a company that manufactured metallized film capacitors, and what is now CSIRO Energy Technology. In this article we outline the physical chemistry, and in particular, the colloid and surface, electro-, and polymer chemistry, elements that underpin supercapacitor performance. The emphasis is placed on high surface area, particulate-carbon-based supercapacitor technology. This is the cap-XX technology. It is a good example of nanostructured materials and nanoscale processes governing device performance. Some application areas for Supercapacitors are highlighted at the end of this article. Copyright (2001) CSIRO Australia

  7. Oxide films at the nanoscale: new structures, new functions, and new materials.

    Giordano, Livia; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2011-11-15

    We all make use of oxide ultrathin films, even if we are unaware of doing so. They are essential components of many common devices, such as mobile phones and laptops. The films in these ubiquitous electronics are composed of silicon dioxide, an unsurpassed material in the design of transistors. But oxide films at the nanoscale (typically just 10 nm or less in thickness) are integral to many other applications. In some cases, they form under normal reactive conditions and confer new properties to a material: one example is the corrosion protection of stainless steel, which is the result of a passive film. A new generation of devices for energy production and communications technology, such as ferroelectric ultrathin film capacitors, tunneling magnetoresistance sensors, solar energy materials, solid oxide fuel cells, and many others, are being specifically designed to exploit the unusual properties afforded by reduced oxide thickness. Oxide ultrathin films also have tremendous potential in chemistry, representing a rich new source of catalytic materials. About 20 years ago, researchers began to prepare model systems of truly heterogeneous catalysts based on thin oxide layers grown on single crystals of metal. Only recently, however, was it realized that these systems may behave quite differently from their corresponding bulk oxides. One of the phenomena uncovered is the occurrence of a spontaneous charge transfer from the metal support to an adsorbed species through the thin insulating layer (or vice versa). The importance of this property is clear: conceptually, the activation and bond breaking of adsorbed molecules begin with precisely the same process, electron transfer into an antibonding orbital. But electron transfer can also be harnessed to make a supported metal particle more chemically active, increase its adhesion energy, or change its shape. Most importantly, the basic principles underlying electron transfer and other phenomena (such as structural

  8. Nanoscale measurement of Nernst effect in two-dimensional charge density wave material 1T-TaS2

    Wu, Stephen M.; Luican-Mayer, Adina; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2017-11-01

    Advances in nanoscale material characterization on two-dimensional van der Waals layered materials primarily involve their optical and electronic properties. The thermal properties of these materials are harder to access due to the difficulty of thermal measurements at the nanoscale. In this work, we create a nanoscale magnetothermal device platform to access the basic out-of-plane magnetothermal transport properties of ultrathin van der Waals materials. Specifically, the Nernst effect in the charge density wave transition metal dichalcogenide 1T-TaS2 is examined on nano-thin flakes in a patterned device structure. It is revealed that near the commensurate charge density wave (CCDW) to nearly commensurate charge density wave (NCCDW) phase transition, the polarity of the Nernst effect changes. Since the Nernst effect is especially sensitive to changes in the Fermi surface, this suggests that large changes are occurring in the out-of-plane electronic structure of 1T-TaS2, which are otherwise unresolved in just in-plane electronic transport measurements. This may signal a coherent evolution of out-of-plane stacking in the CCDW → NCCDW transition.

  9. NANOINTERACT: A rational approach to the interaction between nanoscale materials and living matter?

    Lynch, Iseult; Linse, Sara; Howard, C Vyvyan; Stepnik, Maciej; Rydzynski, Konrad; Hanrahan, John; Jong, Wim de; Langevin, Dominique; Raedler, Joachim; Parak, Wolfgang; Volkov, Yuri; Radomski, Marek; Thomas, Robert; Klein, Jacob; Barron, Andrew A; Janssen, Colin; Lyons, Fiona M; Quinn, Francis; Swennen, Bert; Cuypers, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The importance of understanding the interactions between nanoscale materials and living matter has now begun to be appreciated by an extraordinaryly large range of stakeholders, including researchers, industry, governments and society, all of whom appreciate both the opportunities presented by and challenges raised by this arena of research. Not only does it open up new directions in nanomedicine and nanodiagnostics, but it also offers the chance to implement nanotechnology across all industry in a safe and responsible manner. The underlying reasons for this arena as a new scientific paradigm are real and durable. Less than 100 nm nanoparticles can enter cells, less that 40 nm they can enter cell nucleus, and less that 35 nm they can pass through the blood brain barrier. These are fundamental length scales of biological relevance that will ensure that engineered nanoscience will impinge on biology and medicine for many decades to come. One important issue is the current lack of reproducibility of the outcomes of many experiments in this arena. Differences are likely a consequence of such things as uncontrolled nanoparticle aggregation leading to unpredictable doses being presented to cells, interference of the nanoparticles themselves with many of the tests being applied, differences in the degree of confluency of the cells used, and a host of other factors. NanoInteract has shown how careful control of all aspects of the test system, combined with round robin type approaches, can help resolve these issues and begin to ensure that the field can become a quantitative science. The basic principle of NanoInteract is that given identical nanomaterials, cells and biological materials, and using a common protocol, experiments must yield identical answers. Thus, any deviations result from errors in (applying) the protocol which can be tracked and eliminated, until quantitatively reproducible results are obtained by any researcher in any location. This paper outlines the

  10. NANOINTERACT: A rational approach to the interaction between nanoscale materials and living matter?

    Lynch, Iseult; Linse, Sara; Vyvyan Howard, C.; Stepnik, Maciej; Rydzynski, Konrad; Hanrahan, John; de Jong, Wim; Langevin, Dominique; Rädler, Joachim; Parak, Wolfgang; Volkov, Yuri; Radomski, Marek; Thomas, Robert; Klein, Jacob; Barron, Andrew A.; Janssen, Colin; Lyons, Fiona M.; Quinn, Francis; Swennen, Bert; Cuypers, Peter; Duffy, Angela; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2009-05-01

    The importance of understanding the interactions between nanoscale materials and living matter has now begun to be appreciated by an extraordinaryly large range of stakeholders, including researchers, industry, governments and society, all of whom appreciate both the opportunities presented by and challenges raised by this arena of research. Not only does it open up new directions in nanomedicine and nanodiagnostics, but it also offers the chance to implement nanotechnology across all industry in a safe and responsible manner. The underlying reasons for this arena as a new scientific paradigm are real and durable. Less than 100 nm nanoparticles can enter cells, less that 40 nm they can enter cell nucleus, and less that 35 nm they can pass through the blood brain barrier. These are fundamental length scales of biological relevance that will ensure that engineered nanoscience will impinge on biology and medicine for many decades to come. One important issue is the current lack of reproducibility of the outcomes of many experiments in this arena. Differences are likely a consequence of such things as uncontrolled nanoparticle aggregation leading to unpredictable doses being presented to cells, interference of the nanoparticles themselves with many of the tests being applied, differences in the degree of confluency of the cells used, and a host of other factors. NanoInteract has shown how careful control of all aspects of the test system, combined with round robin type approaches, can help resolve these issues and begin to ensure that the field can become a quantitative science. The basic principle of NanoInteract is that given identical nanomaterials, cells and biological materials, and using a common protocol, experiments must yield identical answers. Thus, any deviations result from errors in (applying) the protocol which can be tracked and eliminated, until quantitatively reproducible results are obtained by any researcher in any location. This paper outlines the

  11. Modeling investigation of the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of nanoscale precipitates in advanced structural materials

    Wirth, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Materials used in extremely hostile environment such as nuclear reactors are subject to a high flux of neutron irradiation, and thus vast concentrations of vacancy and interstitial point defects are produced because of collisions of energetic neutrons with host lattice atoms. The fate of these defects depends on various reaction mechanisms which occur immediately following the displacement cascade evolution and during the longer-time kinetically dominated evolution such as annihilation, recombination, clustering or trapping at sinks of vacancies, interstitials and their clusters. The long-range diffusional transport and evolution of point defects and self-defect clusters drive a microstructural and microchemical evolution that are known to produce degradation of mechanical properties including the creep rate, yield strength, ductility, or fracture toughness, and correspondingly affect material serviceability and lifetimes in nuclear applications. Therefore, a detailed understanding of microstructural evolution in materials at different time and length scales is of significant importance. The primary objective of this work is to utilize a hierarchical computational modeling approach i) to evaluate the potential for nanoscale precipitates to enhance point defect recombination rates and thereby the self-healing ability of advanced structural materials, and ii) to evaluate the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of such nanoscale precipitates resulting from enhanced point defect transport to and annihilation at precipitate interfaces. This project will utilize, and as necessary develop, computational materials modeling techniques within a hierarchical computational modeling approach, principally including molecular dynamics, kinetic Monte Carlo and spatially-dependent cluster dynamics modeling, to identify and understand the most important physical processes relevant to promoting the ''selfhealing'' or radiation resistance in advanced

  12. Modeling investigation of the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of nanoscale precipitates in advanced structural materials

    Wirth, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-04-08

    Materials used in extremely hostile environment such as nuclear reactors are subject to a high flux of neutron irradiation, and thus vast concentrations of vacancy and interstitial point defects are produced because of collisions of energetic neutrons with host lattice atoms. The fate of these defects depends on various reaction mechanisms which occur immediately following the displacement cascade evolution and during the longer-time kinetically dominated evolution such as annihilation, recombination, clustering or trapping at sinks of vacancies, interstitials and their clusters. The long-range diffusional transport and evolution of point defects and self-defect clusters drive a microstructural and microchemical evolution that are known to produce degradation of mechanical properties including the creep rate, yield strength, ductility, or fracture toughness, and correspondingly affect material serviceability and lifetimes in nuclear applications. Therefore, a detailed understanding of microstructural evolution in materials at different time and length scales is of significant importance. The primary objective of this work is to utilize a hierarchical computational modeling approach i) to evaluate the potential for nanoscale precipitates to enhance point defect recombination rates and thereby the self-healing ability of advanced structural materials, and ii) to evaluate the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of such nanoscale precipitates resulting from enhanced point defect transport to and annihilation at precipitate interfaces. This project will utilize, and as necessary develop, computational materials modeling techniques within a hierarchical computational modeling approach, principally including molecular dynamics, kinetic Monte Carlo and spatially-dependent cluster dynamics modeling, to identify and understand the most important physical processes relevant to promoting the “selfhealing” or radiation resistance in advanced materials containing

  13. Piezoelectric control of magnetoelectric coupling driven non-volatile memory switching and self cooling effects in FE/FSMA multiferroic heterostructures

    Singh, Kirandeep; Kaur, Davinder

    2017-02-01

    The manipulation of magnetic states and materials' spin degree-of-freedom via a control of an electric (E-) field has been recently pursued to develop magnetoelectric (ME) coupling-driven electronic data storage devices with high read/write endurance, fast dynamic response, and low energy dissipation. One major hurdle for this approach is to develop reliable materials which should be compatible with prevailing silicon (Si)-based complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology, simultaneously allowing small voltage for the tuning of magnetization switching. In this regard, multiferroic heterostructures where ferromagnetic (FM) and ferroelectric (FE) layers are alternatively grown on conventional Si substrates are promising as the piezoelectric control of magnetization switching is anticipated to be possible by an E-field. In this work, we study the ferromagnetic shape memory alloys based PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3/Ni50Mn35In15 (PZT/Ni-Mn-In) multiferroic heterostructures, and investigate their potential for CMOS compatible non-volatile magnetic data storage applications. We demonstrate the voltage-impulse controlled nonvolatile, reversible, and bistable magnetization switching at room temperature in Si-integrated PZT/Ni-Mn-In thin film multiferroic heterostructures. We also thoroughly unveil the various intriguing features in these materials, such as E-field tuned ME coupling and magnetocaloric effect, shape memory induced ferroelectric modulation, improved fatigue endurance as well as Refrigeration Capacity (RC). This comprehensive study suggests that these novel materials have a great potential for the development of unconventional nanoscale memory and refrigeration devices with self-cooling effect and enhanced refrigeration efficiency, thus providing a new venue for their applications.

  14. Micro- and nano-scale characterization to study the thermal degradation of cement-based materials

    Lim, Seungmin; Mondal, Paramita

    2014-01-01

    The degradation of hydration products of cement is known to cause changes in the micro- and nano-structure, which ultimately drive thermo-mechanical degradation of cement-based composite materials at elevated temperatures. However, a detailed characterization of these changes is still incomplete. This paper presents results of an extensive experimental study carried out to investigate micro- and nano-structural changes that occur due to exposure of cement paste to high temperatures. Following heat treatment of cement paste up to 1000 °C, damage states were studied by compressive strength test, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM image analysis. Using experimental results and research from existing literature, new degradation processes that drive the loss of mechanical properties of cement paste are proposed. The development of micro-cracks at the interface between unhydrated cement particles and paste matrix, a change in C–S–H nano-structure and shrinkage of C–S–H, are considered as important factors that cause the thermal degradation of cement paste. - Highlights: • The thermal degradation of hydration products of cement is characterized at micro- and nano-scale using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). • The interface between unhydrated cement particles and the paste matrix is considered the origin of micro-cracks. • When cement paste is exposed to temperatures above 300 ºC, the nano-structure of C-S-H becomes a more loosely packed globular structure, which could be indicative of C-S-H shrinkage

  15. Engineering Nano-Structured Multiferroic Thin Films

    Cheung, Pui Lam

    Multiferroics exhibit remarkable tunabilities in their ferromagnetic, ferroelectric and magnetoelectric properties that provide the potential in enabling the control of magnetizations by electric field for the next generation non-volatile memories, antennas and motors. In recent research and developments in integrating single-phase ferroelectric and ferromagnetic materials, multiferroic composite demonstrated a promising magnetoelectric (ME) coupling for future applications. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique, on the other hand, allows fabrications of complex multiferroic nanostructures to investigate interfacial coupling between the two materials. In this work, radical-enhanced ALD of cobalt ferrite (CFO) and thermal ALD of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) were combined in fabricating complex multiferroic architectures in investigating the effect of nanostructuring and magnetic shape anisotropy on improving ME coupling. In particular, 1D CFO nanotubes and nanowires; 0D-3D CFO/PZT mesoporous composite; and 1D-1D CFO/PZT core-shell nanowire composite were studied. The potential implementation of nanostructured multiferroic composites into functioning devices was assessed by quantifying the converse ME coupling coefficient. The synthesis of 1D CFO nanostructures was realized by ALD of CFO in anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes. This work provided a simple and inexpensive route to create parallel and high aspect ratio ( 55) magnetic nanostructures. The change in magnetic easy axis of (partially filled) CFO nanotubes from perpendicular to parallel in (fully-filled) nanowires indicated the significance of the geometric factor in controlling magnetizations and ME coupling. The 0D-3D CFO/PZT mesoporous composite demonstrated the optimizations of the strain transfer could be achieved by precise thickness control. 100 nm of mesoporous PZT was synthesized on Pt/TiOx/SiO2/Si using amphiphilic diblock copolymers as a porous ferroelectric template (10 nm pore diameter) for

  16. Nanoscale Electrochemistry of sp(2) Carbon Materials: From Graphite and Graphene to Carbon Nanotubes.

    Unwin, Patrick R; Güell, Aleix G; Zhang, Guohui

    2016-09-20

    -sphere redox processes. (ii) Demonstration of the high activity of basal plane HOPG toward other reactions, with no requirement for catalysis by step edges or defects, as exemplified by studies of proton-coupled electron transfer, redox transformations of adsorbed molecules, surface functionalization via diazonium electrochemistry, and metal electrodeposition. (iii) Rationalization of the complex interplay of different factors that determine electrochemistry at graphene, including the source (mechanical exfoliation from graphite vs chemical vapor deposition), number of graphene layers, edges, electronic structure, redox couple, and electrode history effects. (iv) New methodologies that allow nanoscale electrochemistry of 1D materials (SWNTs) to be related to their electronic characteristics (metallic vs semiconductor SWNTs), size, and quality, with high resolution imaging revealing the high activity of SWNT sidewalls and the importance of defects for some electrocatalytic reactions (e.g., the oxygen reduction reaction). The experimental approaches highlighted for carbon electrodes are generally applicable to other electrode materials and set a new framework and course for the study of electrochemical and interfacial processes.

  17. Ferroics and Multiferroics for Dynamically Controlled Terahertz Wave Propagation

    Dutta, Moumita

    The terahertz (THz) region of electromagnetic spectra, referred roughly to the frequency range of 100 GHz (0.1 THz) to 10 THz, is the bridging gap between the microwave and infrared spectral bands. Previously confined only to astronomy and analytical sciences due to the unavailability of technology, with the recent advancements in non-linear optics, this novel field has now started emerging as a promising area of research and study. Considerable efforts are underway to fill this 'THz gap' by developing efficient THz sources, detectors, switches, modulators etc. Be it any field, to realize this regime as one of the active frontiers, it is essential to have an efficient control over the wave propagation. In this research, functional materials (ferroics/multiferroics) have been explored to attain dynamic control over the THz beam propagation. The objective is to expand the horizon by enabling different family of materials to be incorporated in the design of THz modulators, exploiting the novel properties they exhibit. To reach that goal, following a comprehensive but selective (to dielectrics) review on the current-status of this research field, some preliminary studies on ferroic materials have been performed to understand the crux of ferroism and the novel functionalities they have to offer. An analytical study on microstructural and nanoscale properties of solid-solution ferroelectric Pb(Zr0.52Ti 0.48)O3 (PZT) and composite bio-ferroic seashells have been performed to elucidate the significance of structure-property relationship in intrinsic ferroelectrics. Moving forward, engineered ferroelectricity has been demonstrated. A precise control over fabrication parameters has been exploited to introduce oxygen-vacancy defined nanoscale polar-domains in centrosymmetric BaZrO3. Realizing that structure-property relationship can significantly influence the material properties and therefore the device performance, models for figure of merit analysis have been developed for

  18. Synthesis, fabrication, and spectroscopy of nano-scale photonic noble metal materials

    Egusa, Shunji

    Nanometer is an interesting scale for physicists, chemists, and materials scientists, in a sense that it lies between the macroscopic and the atomic scales. In this regime, materials exhibit distinct physical and chemical properties that are clearly different from those of atoms or macroscopic bulk. This thesis is concerned about both physics and chemistry of noble metal nano-structures. Novel chemical syntheses and physical fabrications of various noble metal nano-structures, and the development of spectroscopic techniques for nano-structures are presented. Scanning microscopy/spectroscopy techniques inherently perturbs the true optical responses of the nano-structures. However, by using scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip as the nanometer-confined excitation source of surface plasmons in the samples, and subsequently collecting the signals in the Fourier space, it is shown that the tip-perturbed part of the signals can be deconvoluted. As a result, the collected signal in this approach is the pure response of the sample. Coherent light is employed to study the optical response of nano-structures, in order to avoid complication from tip-perturbation as discussed above. White-light super-continuum excites the nano-structure, the monolayer of Au nanoparticles self-assembled on silicon nitride membrane substrates. The coherent excitation reveals asymmetric surface plasmon resonance in the nano-structures. One of the most important issues in nano-scale science is to gain control over the shape, size, and assembly of nanoparticles. A novel method is developed to chemically synthesize ligand-passivated atomic noble metal clusters in solution phase. The method, named thermal decomposition method, enables facile yet robust synthesis of fluorescent atomic clusters. Thus synthesized atomic clusters are very stable, and show behaviors of quantum dots. A novel and versatile approach for creation of nanoparticle arrays is developed. This method is different from the

  19. Spintronics with multiferroics

    Béa, H.; Gajek, M.; Bibes, M.; Barthélémy, A.

    2008-10-01

    In this paper, we review the recent research on the functionalization of multiferroics for spintronics applications. We focus more particularly on antiferromagnetic and ferroelectric BiFeO3 and its integration in several types of architectures. For instance, when used as a tunnel barrier, BiFeO3 allows the observation of a large tunnel magnetoresistance with Co and (La,Sr)MnO3 ferromagnetic electrodes. Also, its antiferromagnetic and magnetoelectric properties have been exploited to induce an exchange coupling with a ferromagnet. The mechanisms of such an exchange coupling open ways to electrically control magnetization and possibly the logic state of spintronics devices. We also discuss recent results concerning the use of ferromagnetic and ferroelectric (La,Bi)MnO3 as an active tunnel barrier in magnetic tunnel junctions with Au and (La,Sr)MnO3 electrodes. A four-resistance-state device has been obtained, with two states arising from a spin filtering effect due to the ferromagnetic character of the barrier and two resulting from the ferroelectric behavior of the (La,Bi)MnO3 ultrathin film. These results show that the additional degree of freedom provided by the ferroelectric polarization brings novel functionalities to spintronics, either as a extra order parameter for multiple-state memory elements, or as a handle for gate-controlled magnetic memories.

  20. Spintronics with multiferroics

    Bea, H; Gajek, M; Bibes, M; Barthelemy, A

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we review the recent research on the functionalization of multiferroics for spintronics applications. We focus more particularly on antiferromagnetic and ferroelectric BiFeO 3 and its integration in several types of architectures. For instance, when used as a tunnel barrier, BiFeO 3 allows the observation of a large tunnel magnetoresistance with Co and (La,Sr)MnO 3 ferromagnetic electrodes. Also, its antiferromagnetic and magnetoelectric properties have been exploited to induce an exchange coupling with a ferromagnet. The mechanisms of such an exchange coupling open ways to electrically control magnetization and possibly the logic state of spintronics devices. We also discuss recent results concerning the use of ferromagnetic and ferroelectric (La,Bi)MnO 3 as an active tunnel barrier in magnetic tunnel junctions with Au and (La,Sr)MnO 3 electrodes. A four-resistance-state device has been obtained, with two states arising from a spin filtering effect due to the ferromagnetic character of the barrier and two resulting from the ferroelectric behavior of the (La,Bi)MnO 3 ultrathin film. These results show that the additional degree of freedom provided by the ferroelectric polarization brings novel functionalities to spintronics, either as a extra order parameter for multiple-state memory elements, or as a handle for gate-controlled magnetic memories.

  1. Spintronics with multiferroics

    Bea, H; Gajek, M; Bibes, M; Barthelemy, A [Unite Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales, Route departementale 128, F-91767 Palaiseau (France); Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)], E-mail: agnes.barthelemy@thalesgroup.com

    2008-10-29

    In this paper, we review the recent research on the functionalization of multiferroics for spintronics applications. We focus more particularly on antiferromagnetic and ferroelectric BiFeO{sub 3} and its integration in several types of architectures. For instance, when used as a tunnel barrier, BiFeO{sub 3} allows the observation of a large tunnel magnetoresistance with Co and (La,Sr)MnO{sub 3} ferromagnetic electrodes. Also, its antiferromagnetic and magnetoelectric properties have been exploited to induce an exchange coupling with a ferromagnet. The mechanisms of such an exchange coupling open ways to electrically control magnetization and possibly the logic state of spintronics devices. We also discuss recent results concerning the use of ferromagnetic and ferroelectric (La,Bi)MnO{sub 3} as an active tunnel barrier in magnetic tunnel junctions with Au and (La,Sr)MnO{sub 3} electrodes. A four-resistance-state device has been obtained, with two states arising from a spin filtering effect due to the ferromagnetic character of the barrier and two resulting from the ferroelectric behavior of the (La,Bi)MnO{sub 3} ultrathin film. These results show that the additional degree of freedom provided by the ferroelectric polarization brings novel functionalities to spintronics, either as a extra order parameter for multiple-state memory elements, or as a handle for gate-controlled magnetic memories.

  2. DOE A9024 Final Report Functional and Nanoscale Materials Systems: Frontier Programs of Science at the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory

    Lewis, Jennifer A.

    2009-03-24

    The scientific programs of the FSMRL supported under the DOE A9024 Grant consisted of four interdisciplinary research clusters, as described. The clusters were led by Professors Tai Chiang (Physics), Jeffrey Moore (Chemistry), Paul Goldbart (Physics), and Steven Granick (Materials Science and Engineering). The completed work followed a dominant theme--Nanoscale Materials Systems--and emphasized studies of complex phenomena involving surfaces, interfaces, complex materials, dynamics, energetics, and structures and their transformations. A summary of our key accomplishments is provided for each cluster.

  3. Structural defects in multiferroic BiMnO3 studied by transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    Yang, H.; Chi, Z. H.; Yao, L. D.; Zhang, W.; Li, F. Y.; Jin, C. Q.; Yu, R. C.

    2006-01-01

    The multiferroic material BiMnO 3 synthesized under high pressure has been systematically studied by transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and some important structural defects are revealed in this multiferroic material. The frequently observed defects are characterized to be Σ3(111) twin boundaries, Ruddlesden-Popper [Acta Crystallogr. 11, 54 (1958)] antiphase boundaries, and a p p superdislocations connected with a small segment of Ruddlesden-Popper defect. These defects are present initially in the as-synthesized sample. In addition, we find that ordered voids (oxygen vacancies) are easily introduced into the multiferroic BiMnO 3 by electron-beam irradiation

  4. Molecular Building Blocks for Nanotechnology From Diamondoids to Nanoscale Materials and Applications

    Mansoori, G. Ali; Assoufid, Lahsen; Zhang, Guoping

    2007-01-01

    This book is a result of the research and educational activities of a group of outstanding scientists worldwide who have authored the chapters of this book dealing with the behavior of nanoscale building blocks. It contains a variety of subjects covering computational, dry and wet nanotechnology. The state-of-the-art subject matters presented here provide the reader with the latest developments on ongoing nanoscience and nanotechnology research from the bottom-up approach, which starts with with atoms and molecules as molecular building blocks.

  5. Multifunctional-layered materials for creating membrane-restricted nanodomains and nanoscale imaging

    Srinivasan, P., E-mail: prasri@ece.ucsb.edu, E-mail: srinivasan@lifesci.ucsb.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106, USA and Neuroscience Research Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2016-01-18

    Experimental platform that allows precise spatial positioning of biomolecules with an exquisite control at nanometer length scales is a valuable tool to study the molecular mechanisms of membrane bound signaling. Using micromachined thin film gold (Au) in layered architecture, it is possible to add both optical and biochemical functionalities in in vitro. Towards this goal, here, I show that docking of complementary DNA tethered giant phospholiposomes on Au surface can create membrane-restricted nanodomains. These nanodomains are critical features to dissect molecular choreography of membrane signaling complexes. The excited surface plasmon resonance modes of Au allow label-free imaging at diffraction-limited resolution of stably docked DNA tethered phospholiposomes, and lipid-detergent bicelle structures. Such multifunctional building block enables realizing rigorously controlled in vitro set-up to model membrane anchored biological signaling, besides serving as an optical tool for nanoscale imaging.

  6. Enhanced electrochemical properties of LiNiO{sub 2}-based cathode materials by nanoscale manganese carbonate treatment

    Zhao, Junkai; Wang, Zhixing, E-mail: zxwang.csu@hotmail.com; Guo, Huajun; Li, Xinhai

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • Li residuals are consumed during the process of modification. • MnO{sub 2} coating layer can protect bulk material from the erosion of electrolyte. • The electrochemical performance is enhanced by the nanosacle MnCO{sub 3} treatment. • The enhancement of coating can be strengthened by the removal of lithium impurities. - Abstract: LiNiO{sub 2}-based layered oxides are of great importance as cathode materials for rechargeable batteries. In this paper, illustrating LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2} as an example, the effect of nanoscale MnCO{sub 3} treatment on LiNiO{sub 2}-based materials is investigated for the first time. The structures of materials and the properties about the object surface are characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, EDAX and XPS. The results demonstrate that a part of MnCO{sub 3} is able to react with lithium impurities to form nonstoichiometric Li{sub x}Mn{sub y}O{sub 4} and the rest of MnCO{sub 3} is converted to MnO{sub 2} coating on the surface of the material in situ. After 100 repeated cycles at 1C, the modified material exhibits a capacity retention rate of 91.2%, while the bare material only remains 84.8%. And the modified material exhibits more significantly improved cycling stability when cycling at 60 °C, maintaining 85.7% of its initial capacity at 1C after 100th cycles. The consumption of Li impurities can decelerate the decomposition of electrolyte during cycling, thus result in less resistive byproducts. Moreover, the obtained MnO{sub 2} coating layer acts as an isolating layer to suppress the drastic reaction between active material and electrolyte. This synergistic effect is responsible for the excellent properties of MnCO{sub 3}-modified material.

  7. Induced motion of domain walls in multiferroics with quadratic interaction

    Gerasimchuk, Victor S., E-mail: viktor.gera@gmail.com [National Technical University of Ukraine “Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”, Peremohy Avenue 37, 03056 Kiev (Ukraine); Shitov, Anatoliy A., E-mail: shitov@mail.ru [Donbass National Academy of Civil Engineering, Derzhavina Street 2, 86123 Makeevka, Donetsk Region (Ukraine)

    2013-10-15

    We theoretically study the dynamics of 180-degree domain wall of the ab-type in magnetic materials with quadratic magnetoelectric interaction in external alternating magnetic and electric fields. The features of the oscillatory and translational motions of the domain walls and stripe structures depending on the parameters of external fields and characteristics of the multiferroics are discussed. The possibility of the domain walls drift in a purely electric field is established. - Highlights: • We study DW and stripe DS in multiferroics with quadratic magnetoelectric interaction. • We build up the theory of oscillatory and translational (drift) DW and DS motion. • DW motion can be caused by crossed alternating electric and magnetic fields. • DW motion can be caused by alternating “pure” electric field. • DW drift velocity is formed by the AFM and Dzyaloshinskii interaction terms.

  8. Report of the 2nd RCM on nanoscale radiation engineering of advanced materials for potential biomedical applications

    2010-01-01

    There are critical needs for advanced materials in the area of biomaterial engineering, primarily in generating biomaterials of enhanced specific functionalities, improved biocompatibility, and minimal natural rejection but with enhanced interfacial adhesion. These can be achieved by introduction of proper functionalities at the nanoscale dimensions for which, due to their characteristics, radiation techniques are uniquely suited. Accordingly, many of the IAEA Member States (MS) have interest in creating advanced materials for various health-care applications using a wide array of radiation sources and their broad expertise. In seeking new knowledge to advance the field and tackle this specific problem, to collaborate to enhance the quality of the scientific research and improve their efficiency and effectiveness, MS had requested the support of the IAEA for such collaboration. Based on these requests, and the conclusions and recommendations of the Consultant's meeting on Advanced Materials on the Nano-scale Synthesized by Radiation-Induced Processes, held on 10-14 December 2007, the present CRP was formulated and started in 2009. The first RCM was held in 30 March – 3 April 2009, in Vienna, where the work plan for both individual participants and collaborations were discussed and accepted, as reported in the Meeting Report published as IAEA Working Material (http://www-naweb.iaea.org/napc/iachem/working_materials.html). The second RCM was held on 15-19 November 2010, Paris, France, and was attended by 17 participants (chief scientific investigators or team members) and one cost-free observer from Brazil. The participants presented their research achievements since the first RCM, centred on the main expected outputs of this CRP: a. Methodologies to prepare and characterize nanogels; nanoparticles and nanoporous membranes, as well as to synthesize and modify nanoparticle surfaces by attaching organic ligands by radiation; b. Methodologies to radiation synthesize

  9. Fabrication and Optical Measurements of Nanoscale Meta-Materials: Terahertz and Beyond

    Martin, Michael C.; Hao, Zhao; Liddle, Alex; Anderson, Erik H.; Padilla, Willie J.; Schurig, David; Smith, David R.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, artificial meta-materials have been reported [1] that have a negative index of refraction, which allows a homogeneous flat slab of the material to behave as a perfect lens [2], possibly even creating sub-diffraction limited focusing. These novel artificial materials have numerous potential applications in science, technology, and medicine [3],especially if their novel behavior can be extended to the technologically critical near-infrared and visible region.The meta-materials co...

  10. Nanoscale Ionic Liquids

    2006-11-01

    Technical Report 11 December 2005 - 30 November 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Nanoscale Ionic Liquids 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-06-1-0012...Title: Nanoscale Ionic Liquids Principal Investigator: Emmanuel P. Giannelis Address: Materials Science and Engineering, Bard Hall, Cornell University...based fluids exhibit high ionic conductivity. The NFs are typically synthesized by grafting a charged, oligomeric corona onto the nanoparticle cores

  11. Spintronics in nanoscale devices

    Hedin, Eric R

    2013-01-01

    By exploiting the novel properties of quantum dots and nanoscale Aharonov-Bohm rings together with the electronic and magnetic properties of various semiconductor materials and graphene, researchers have conducted numerous theoretical and computational modeling studies and experimental tests that show promising behavior for spintronics applications. Spin polarization and spin-filtering capabilities and the ability to manipulate the electron spin state through external magnetic or electric fields have demonstrated the promise of workable nanoscale devices for computing and memory applications.

  12. Active damping of multiferroic composite plates using 1-3 piezoelectric composites

    Kattimani, S. C.

    2017-12-01

    A layer-wise shear deformation theory is used to analyze the smart damping of multiferroic composite or magneto-electro-elastic (MEE) plates. The intent of this analysis is to investigate the need for incorporating additional smart elements for controlling the vibrations of multiferroic composite plates. Active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatment has been incorporated to alleviate the vibration of MEE plate. A layer of viscoelastic material is used as constrained layer for the ACLD treatment. The coupled constitutive equations of multiferroic (ferroelectric and ferromagnetic) composite materials along with the total potential energy principle are used to derive the finite element formulation for the overall multiferroic or MEE plate. Maxwell’s electrostatic and electromagnetic relations are used to compute the electric and magnetic potential distribution. Influence of obliquely reinforced piezoelectric fibers in the piezoelectric layer of the ACLD treatment has also been investigated. In order to investigate the importance of using ACLD treatment for an active damping of multiferroic or MEE plate, an active control of MEE plate has also been analyzed by providing the control voltage directly to the piezoelectric layers of the MEE substrate plate without using the ACLD treatment. The present study suggests that for an optimal control of MEE plates, the smartness element such as the ACLD treatment is essentially required.

  13. Report of the 2nd RCM on nanoscale radiation engineering of advanced materials for potential biomedical applications

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    There are critical needs for advanced materials in the area of biomaterial engineering, primarily in generating biomaterials of enhanced specific functionalities, improved biocompatibility, and minimal natural rejection but with enhanced interfacial adhesion. These can be achieved by introduction of proper functionalities at the nanoscale dimensions for which, due to their characteristics, radiation techniques are uniquely suited. Accordingly, many of the IAEA Member States (MS) have interest in creating advanced materials for various health-care applications using a wide array of radiation sources and their broad expertise. In seeking new knowledge to advance the field and tackle this specific problem, to collaborate to enhance the quality of the scientific research and improve their efficiency and effectiveness, MS had requested the support of the IAEA for such collaboration. Based on these requests, and the conclusions and recommendations of the Consultant's meeting on Advanced Materials on the Nano-scale Synthesized by Radiation-Induced Processes, held on 10-14 December 2007, the present CRP was formulated and started in 2009. The first RCM was held in 30 March – 3 April 2009, in Vienna, where the work plan for both individual participants and collaborations were discussed and accepted, as reported in the Meeting Report published as IAEA Working Material (http://www-naweb.iaea.org/napc/iachem/working{sub m}aterials.html). The second RCM was held on 15-19 November 2010, Paris, France, and was attended by 17 participants (chief scientific investigators or team members) and one cost-free observer from Brazil. The participants presented their research achievements since the first RCM, centred on the main expected outputs of this CRP: a. Methodologies to prepare and characterize nanogels; nanoparticles and nanoporous membranes, as well as to synthesize and modify nanoparticle surfaces by attaching organic ligands by radiation; b. Methodologies to radiation

  14. Structural Secrets of Multiferroic Interfaces

    Meyerheim, H. L.; Klimenta, F.; Ernst, A.; Mohseni, K.; Ostanin, S.; Fechner, M.; Parihar, S.; Maznichenko, I. V.; Mertig, I.; Kirschner, J.

    2011-02-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of the geometric structure of ultrathin BaTiO3 films grown on Fe(001). Surface x-ray diffraction reveals that the films are terminated by a BaO layer, while the TiO2 layer is next to the top Fe layer. Cations in termination layers have incomplete oxygen shells inducing strong vertical relaxations. Onset of polarization is observed at a minimum thickness of two unit cells. Our findings are supported by first-principles calculations providing a quantitative insight into the multiferroic properties on the atomic scale.

  15. Exploring Electric Polarization Mechanisms in Multiferroic Oxides

    Tyson, Trevor A. [New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), Newark, NJ (United States)

    2017-01-24

    Multiferroic oxides are a class of systems which exhibit coupling between the electrical polarization and the magnetization. These materials show promise to lead to devices in which ferromagnetic memory can be written with magnetic fields or magnetic bits can be written by an electric field. The work conducted in our research focuses on single phase materials. We studied the detailed coupling of the spin and lattice correlations in these systems. In the first phase of the proposal, we explored the complex spin spiral systems and low temperature behavior of hexagonal layered REMnO3 (RE= rare earth, Y and Sc) system following the detailed structural changes which occurred on crossing into the magnetic states. The techniques were applied to other layered materials such as superconductors and thermoelectric where the same layered motif exists. The second phase of the proposal focused on understanding the mechanisms involved in the onset high temperature ferroelectricity ion hexagonal REMnO3 and at low temperature in E-Type magnetic ordered perovskite REMnO3. We wsynthesized preovskite small A site multiferroics by high pressure and high temperature methods. Detailed measurement of the structural properties and dynamics were conducted over a range of length scales from atomic to mesoscopic scale using, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, x-ray diffuse scattering, x-ray and neutron pair distribution analysis and high resolution x-ray diffraction. Changes in vibration modes which occur with the onset of polarization were probed with temperature and pressure dependent infrared absorption spectroscopy. In addition the orthorhombic system (small radius RE ions) which is believed to exhibit electronically driven ferroelectricity and is also not understood was examined. The multiple length scale synchrotron based measurements may assist in developing more detailed models of these materials and possibly lead to device applications. The experimental

  16. Report of the 1st RCM on ''Nanoscale radiation engineering of advanced materials for potential biomedical applications''. Working document

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    There are critical needs for advanced materials in the area of biomaterial engineering, primarily in generating biomaterials of enhanced specific functionalities, improved biocompatibility, and minimal natural rejection but with enhanced interfacial adhesion. These can be achieved by introduction of proper functionalities at the nanoscale dimensions and radiation techniques are uniquely suited for such a task, due to their favorable characteristics, and in most cases, not possible by other methods of synthesis. Accordingly, many of the developing and developed Member States have an interest in creating advanced materials for various health-care applications using a wide array of radiation sources and their broad expertise. The proposal for this CRP was formulated based on the requests and information received from the member states and the conclusions and recommendations of the Consultant’s meeting on “Advanced Materials on the Nano-scale Synthesized by Radiation-Induced Processes”, held on 10-14 December 2007, in Vienna. Based on these conclusions, this CRP aims to support MS to develop methodologies for the use of radiation in the synthesis, modification, and characterization of nanomaterials - nanogels, nanoparticles, nanovehicles, nanoporous membranes, and surfaces with enhanced biocompatibility for potential biomedical applications, such as cell-sheet engineering and artificial tissue construction; diagnostics and imaging; and drug delivery. Additionally, this CRP facilitates networking between radiation technologists and biomedical scientists for the development of such applications. The CRP generated a huge interest, but due to funding constrains, many good proposals had to be rejected. The first RCM of the CRP was convened in Vienna on 30 March - 03 April 2009. It was attended by 14 representatives and two observers. The participants presented and discussed the status of the field, the needs for further research, and various application possibilities

  17. Report of the 1st RCM on ''Nanoscale radiation engineering of advanced materials for potential biomedical applications''. Working document

    2009-01-01

    There are critical needs for advanced materials in the area of biomaterial engineering, primarily in generating biomaterials of enhanced specific functionalities, improved biocompatibility, and minimal natural rejection but with enhanced interfacial adhesion. These can be achieved by introduction of proper functionalities at the nanoscale dimensions and radiation techniques are uniquely suited for such a task, due to their favorable characteristics, and in most cases, not possible by other methods of synthesis. Accordingly, many of the developing and developed Member States have an interest in creating advanced materials for various health-care applications using a wide array of radiation sources and their broad expertise. The proposal for this CRP was formulated based on the requests and information received from the member states and the conclusions and recommendations of the Consultant’s meeting on “Advanced Materials on the Nano-scale Synthesized by Radiation-Induced Processes”, held on 10-14 December 2007, in Vienna. Based on these conclusions, this CRP aims to support MS to develop methodologies for the use of radiation in the synthesis, modification, and characterization of nanomaterials - nanogels, nanoparticles, nanovehicles, nanoporous membranes, and surfaces with enhanced biocompatibility for potential biomedical applications, such as cell-sheet engineering and artificial tissue construction; diagnostics and imaging; and drug delivery. Additionally, this CRP facilitates networking between radiation technologists and biomedical scientists for the development of such applications. The CRP generated a huge interest, but due to funding constrains, many good proposals had to be rejected. The first RCM of the CRP was convened in Vienna on 30 March - 03 April 2009. It was attended by 14 representatives and two observers. The participants presented and discussed the status of the field, the needs for further research, and various application possibilities

  18. Advanced Nanoscale Characterization of Cement Based Materials Using X-Ray Synchrotron Radiation: A Review

    Chae, Sejung R.; Moon, Juhyuk; Yoon, Seyoon; Bae, Sungchul; Levitz, Pierre; Winarski, Robert; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.

    2013-01-01

    We report various synchrotron radiation laboratory based techniques used to characterize cement based materials in nanometer scale. High resolution X-ray transmission imaging combined with a rotational axis allows for rendering of samples in three

  19. Super-Resolution Molecular and Functional Imaging of Nanoscale Architectures in Life and Materials Science

    Habuchi, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    fluorescence microscopy techniques along with the latest developments of fluorophores and labeling for the SR microscopy. I discuss the applications of SR microscopy in the fields of life science and materials science with a special emphasis on quantitative

  20. Synthesis of Nanoscale Lithium-Ion Battery Cathode Materials Using a Porous Polymer Precursor Method

    Deshazer, H.D.; Mantia, F. La; Wessells, C.; Huggins, R.A.; Cui, Y.

    2011-01-01

    (NiMnCo)1/3O2, which are used in the positive electrodes of lithium-ion batteries, are shown. Experiments have demonstrated that materials made using this method can have electrochemical properties comparable to those typically produced by more elaborate

  1. Computational Methods for Nanoscale X-ray Computed Tomography Image Analysis of Fuel Cell and Battery Materials

    Kumar, Arjun S.

    Over the last fifteen years, there has been a rapid growth in the use of high resolution X-ray computed tomography (HRXCT) imaging in material science applications. We use it at nanoscale resolutions up to 50 nm (nano-CT) for key research problems in large scale operation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) and lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries in automotive applications. PEMFC are clean energy sources that electrochemically react with hydrogen gas to produce water and electricity. To reduce their costs, capturing their electrode nanostructure has become significant in modeling and optimizing their performance. For Li-ion batteries, a key challenge in increasing their scope for the automotive industry is Li metal dendrite growth. Li dendrites are structures of lithium with 100 nm features of interest that can grow chaotically within a battery and eventually lead to a short-circuit. HRXCT imaging is an effective diagnostics tool for such applications as it is a non-destructive method of capturing the 3D internal X-ray absorption coefficient of materials from a large series of 2D X-ray projections. Despite a recent push to use HRXCT for quantitative information on material samples, there is a relative dearth of computational tools in nano-CT image processing and analysis. Hence, we focus on developing computational methods for nano-CT image analysis of fuel cell and battery materials as required by the limitations in material samples and the imaging environment. The first problem we address is the segmentation of nano-CT Zernike phase contrast images. Nano-CT instruments are equipped with Zernike phase contrast optics to distinguish materials with a low difference in X-ray absorption coefficient by phase shifting the X-ray wave that is not diffracted by the sample. However, it creates image artifacts that hinder the use of traditional image segmentation techniques. To restore such images, we setup an inverse problem by modeling the X-ray phase contrast

  2. Voltage control of magnetism in multiferroic heterostructures.

    Liu, Ming; Sun, Nian X

    2014-02-28

    Electrical tuning of magnetism is of great fundamental and technical importance for fast, compact and ultra-low power electronic devices. Multiferroics, simultaneously exhibiting ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism, have attracted much interest owing to the capability of controlling magnetism by an electric field through magnetoelectric (ME) coupling. In particular, strong strain-mediated ME interaction observed in layered multiferroic heterostructures makes it practically possible for realizing electrically reconfigurable microwave devices, ultra-low power electronics and magnetoelectric random access memories (MERAMs). In this review, we demonstrate this remarkable E-field manipulation of magnetism in various multiferroic composite systems, aiming at the creation of novel compact, lightweight, energy-efficient and tunable electronic and microwave devices. First of all, tunable microwave devices are demonstrated based on ferrite/ferroelectric and magnetic-metal/ferroelectric composites, showing giant ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) tunability with narrow FMR linewidth. Then, E-field manipulation of magnetoresistance in multiferroic anisotropic magnetoresistance and giant magnetoresistance devices for achieving low-power electronic devices is discussed. Finally, E-field control of exchange-bias and deterministic magnetization switching is demonstrated in exchange-coupled antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic/ferroelectric multiferroic hetero-structures at room temperature, indicating an important step towards MERAMs. In addition, recent progress in electrically non-volatile tuning of magnetic states is also presented. These tunable multiferroic heterostructures and devices provide great opportunities for next-generation reconfigurable radio frequency/microwave communication systems and radars, spintronics, sensors and memories.

  3. Synthesis of Nanoscale Lithium-Ion Battery Cathode Materials Using a Porous Polymer Precursor Method

    Deshazer, H.D.

    2011-01-01

    Fine particles of metal oxides with carefully controlled compositions can be easily prepared by the thermal decomposition of porous polymers, such as cellulose, into which solutions containing salts of the desired cations have been dissolved. This is a simple and versatile method that can be used to produce a wide variety of materials with a range of particle sizes and carefully controlled chemical compositions. Examples of the use of this method to produce fine particles of LiCoO2 and Li(NiMnCo)1/3O2, which are used in the positive electrodes of lithium-ion batteries, are shown. Experiments have demonstrated that materials made using this method can have electrochemical properties comparable to those typically produced by more elaborate procedures. © 2011 The Electrochemical Society.

  4. In Vitro Evaluation of Nanoscale Hydroxyapatite-Based Bone Reconstructive Materials with Antimicrobial Properties.

    Ajduković, Zorica R; Mihajilov-Krstev, Tatjana M; Ignjatović, Nenad L; Stojanović, Zoran; Mladenović-Antić, Snezana B; Kocić, Branislava D; Najman, Stevo; Petrović, Nenad D; Uskoković, Dragan P

    2016-02-01

    In the field of oral implantology the loss of bone tissue prevents adequate patient care, and calls for the use of synthetic biomaterials with properties that resemble natural bone. Special attention is paid to the risk of infection after the implantation of these materials. Studies have suggested that some nanocontructs containing metal ions have antimicrobial properties. The aim of this study was to examine the antimicrobial and hemolytic activity of cobalt-substituted hydroxyapatite nanoparticles, compared to hydroxyapatite and hydroxyapatite/poly-lactide-co-glycolide. The antibacterial effects of these powders were tested against two pathogenic bacterial strains: Escherichia coi (ATCC 25922) and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923), using the disc diffusion method and the quantitative antimicrobial test in a liquid medium. The quantitative antimicrobial test showed that all of the tested biomaterials have some antibacterial properties. The effects of both tests were more prominent in case of S. aureus than in E coli. A higher percentage of cobalt in the crystal structure of cobalt-substituted hydroxyapatite nanoparticles led to an increased antimicrobial activity. All of the presented biomaterial samples were found to be non-hemolytic. Having in mind that the tested of cobalt-substituted hydroxyapatite (Ca/Co-HAp) material in given concentrations shows good hemocompatibility and antimicrobial effects, along with its previously studied biological properties, the conclusion can be reached that it is a potential candidate that could substitute calcium hydroxyapatite as the material of choice for use in bone tissue engineering and clinical practices in orthopedic, oral and maxillofacial surgery.

  5. Advanced Nanoscale Characterization of Cement Based Materials Using X-Ray Synchrotron Radiation: A Review

    Chae, Sejung R.

    2013-05-22

    We report various synchrotron radiation laboratory based techniques used to characterize cement based materials in nanometer scale. High resolution X-ray transmission imaging combined with a rotational axis allows for rendering of samples in three dimensions revealing volumetric details. Scanning transmission X-ray microscope combines high spatial resolution imaging with high spectral resolution of the incident beam to reveal X-ray absorption near edge structure variations in the material nanostructure. Microdiffraction scans the surface of a sample to map its high order reflection or crystallographic variations with a micron-sized incident beam. High pressure X-ray diffraction measures compressibility of pure phase materials. Unique results of studies using the above tools are discussed-a study of pores, connectivity, and morphology of a 2,000 year old concrete using nanotomography; detection of localized and varying silicate chain depolymerization in Al-substituted tobermorite, and quantification of monosulfate distribution in tricalcium aluminate hydration using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy; detection and mapping of hydration products in high volume fly ash paste using microdiffraction; and determination of mechanical properties of various AFm phases using high pressure X-ray diffraction. © 2013 The Author(s).

  6. Nanoscale definition of substrate materials to direct human adult stem cells towards tissue specific populations.

    Curran, Judith M; Chen, Rui; Stokes, Robert; Irvine, Eleanor; Graham, Duncan; Gubbins, Earl; Delaney, Deany; Amro, Nabil; Sanedrin, Raymond; Jamil, Haris; Hunt, John A

    2010-03-01

    The development of homogenously nano-patterned chemically modified surfaces that can be used to initiate a cellular response, particularly stem cell differentiation, in a highly controlled manner without the need for exogenous biological factors has never been reported, due to that fact that precisely defined and reproducible systems have not been available that can be used to study cell/material interactions and unlock the potential of a material driven cell response. Until now material driven stem cell (furthermore any cell) responses have been variable due to the limitations in definition and reproducibility of the underlying substrate and the lack of true homogeneity of modifications that can dictate a cellular response at a sub-micron level that can effectively control initial cell interactions of all cells that contact the surface. Here we report the successful design and use of homogenously molecularly nanopatterned surfaces to control initial stem cell adhesion and hence function. The highly specified nano-patterned arrays were compared directly to silane modified bulk coated substrates that have previously been proven to initiate mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation in a heterogenous manner, the aim of this study was to prove the efficiency of these previously observed cell responses could be enhanced by the incorporation of nano-patterns. Nano-patterned surfaces were prepared by Dip Pen Nanolithography (DPN) to produce arrays of 70 nm sized dots separated by defined spacings of 140, 280 and 1000 nm with terminal functionalities of carboxyl, amino, methyl and hydroxyl and used to control cell growth. These nanopatterned surfaces exhibited unprecedented control of initial cell interactions and will change the capabilities for stem cell definition in vitro and then cell based medical therapies. In addition to highlighting the ability of the materials to control stem cell functionality on an unprecedented scale this research also introduces the

  7. Nanoscale measurement of Nernst effect in two-dimensional charge density wave material 1T-TaS2

    Wu, Stephen M. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, USA; Luican-Mayer, Adina [Nanoscience and Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5, Canada; Bhattacharya, Anand [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA; Nanoscience and Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA

    2017-11-27

    Advances in nanoscale material characterization on two-dimensional van der Waals layered materials primarily involve their optical and electronic properties. The thermal properties of these materials are harder to access due to the difficulty of thermal measurements at the nanoscale. In this work, we create a nanoscale magnetothermal device platform to access the basic out-of-plane magnetothermal transport properties of ultrathin van der Waals materials. Specifically, the Nernst effect in the charge density wave transition metal dichalcogenide 1T-TaS2 is examined on nano-thin flakes in a patterned device structure. It is revealed that near the commensurate charge density wave (CCDW) to nearly commensurate charge density wave (NCCDW) phase transition, the polarity of the Nernst effect changes. Since the Nernst effect is especially sensitive to changes in the Fermi surface, this suggests that large changes are occurring in the out-of-plane electronic structure of 1T-TaS2, which are otherwise unresolved in just in-plane electronic transport measurements. This may signal a coherent evolution of out-of-plane stacking in the CCDW! NCCDW transition.

  8. Transparent conductors based on microscale/nanoscale materials for high performance devices

    Gao, Tongchuan

    Transparent conductors are important as the top electrode for a variety of optoelectronic devices, including solar cells, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), at panel displays, and touch screens. Doped indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films are the predominant transparent conductor material. However, ITO thin films are brittle, making them unsuitable for the emerging flexible devices, and suffer from high material and processing cost. In my thesis, we developed a variety of transparent conductors toward a performance comparable with or superior to ITO thin films, with lower cost and potential for scalable manufacturing. Metal nanomesh (NM), hierarchical graphene/metal microgrid (MG), and hierarchical metal NM/MG materials were investigated. Simulation methods were used as a powerful tool to predict the transparency and sheet resistance of the transparent conductors by solving Maxwell's equations and Poisson's equation. Affordable and scalable fabrication processes were developed thereafter. Transparent conductors with over 90% transparency and less than 10 O/square sheet resistance were successfully fabricated on both rigid and flexible substrates. Durability tests, such as bending, heating and tape tests, were carried out to evaluate the robustness of the samples. Haze factor, which characterizes how blurry a transparent conductor appears, was also studied in-depth using analytical calculation and numerical simulation. We demonstrated a tunable haze factor for metal NM transparent conductors and analyzed the principle for tuning the haze factor. Plasmonic effects, excited by some transparent conductors, can lead to enhanced performance in photovoltaic devices. We systematically studied the effect of incorporating metal NM into ultrathin film silicon solar cells using numerical simulation, with the aid of optimization algorithms to reduce the optimization time. Mechanisms contributing to the enhanced performance were then identified and analyzed. Over 72% enhancement in short

  9. Expanding the view into complex material systems: From micro-ARPES to nanoscale HAXPES

    Schneider, C.M. [Peter Gruenberg Institute (PGI-6) and JARA-FIT, Research Center Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Fakultaet f. Physik and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CENIDE), Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany); Wiemann, C.; Patt, M. [Peter Gruenberg Institute (PGI-6) and JARA-FIT, Research Center Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Feyer, V. [Peter Gruenberg Institute (PGI-6) and JARA-FIT, Research Center Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., S.S. 14, km 163.5 in Area Science Park, 34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Plucinski, L.; Krug, I.P. [Peter Gruenberg Institute (PGI-6) and JARA-FIT, Research Center Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Escher, M.; Weber, N.; Merkel, M. [FOCUS GmbH, D-65510 Huenstetten (Germany); Renault, O. [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Barrett, N. [DSM/IRAMIS/SPCSI, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2012-10-15

    The analysis of chemical and electronic states in complex and nanostructured material systems requires electron spectroscopy to be carried out with nanometer lateral resolution, i.e. nanospectroscopy. This goal can be achieved by combining a parallel imaging photoelectron emission microscope with a bandpass energy filter. In this contribution we describe selected experiments employing a dedicated spectromicroscope - the NanoESCA. This instrument has a particular emphasis on the spectroscopic aspects and enables laterally resolved photoelectron spectroscopy from the VUV up into the hard X-ray regime.

  10. Specimen preparation for nano-scale investigation of cementitious repair material.

    Azarsa, Pejman; Gupta, Rishi

    2018-04-01

    Cementitious Repair Materials (CRMs) in the construction industry have been used for many decades now and has become a very important part of activities in cement world. The performance of some of these CRMs when applied to retrofitting concrete structural elements is also well documented. However, the characterization of some of the CRMs at the micro- and nano level is not fully documented. The first step to studying materials at the microscopic level is to be able to fabricate proper specimens for microscopy. In this study, a special and newly developed class of CRM was selected and fabricated by Focused Ion Beam (FIB) using well-known "Lift-out" technique. The prepared specimen was later examined using various analytical techniques such as energy dispersive x-ray analysis using one of the highest and most stable Scanning Transmission Electron Holography Microscopy (STEHM) around the world. This process enabled understanding of the composition, morphology, and spatial distribution of various phases of the CRM. It was observed that the microstructure consisted of a very fine, compact, and homogenous amorphous structure. X-ray analysis indicated that there was considerable deviation between the Si/Ca ratios for the hydrated product. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantum formulation for nanoscale optical and material chirality: symmetry issues, space and time parity, and observables

    Andrews, D. L.

    2018-03-01

    To properly represent the interplay and coupling of optical and material chirality at the photon-molecule or photon-nanoparticle level invites a recognition of quantum facets in the fundamental aspects and mechanisms of light-matter interaction. It is therefore appropriate to cast theory in a general quantum form, one that is applicable to both linear and nonlinear optics as well as various forms of chiroptical interaction including chiral optomechanics. Such a framework, fully accounting for both radiation and matter in quantum terms, facilitates the scrutiny and identification of key issues concerning spatial and temporal parity, scale, dissipation and measurement. Furthermore it fully provides for describing the interactions of structured or twisted light beams with a vortex character, and it leads to the complete identification of symmetry conditions for materials to provide for chiral discrimination. Quantum considerations also lend a distinctive perspective to the very different senses in which other aspects of chirality are recognized in metamaterials. Duly attending to the symmetry principles governing allowed or disallowed forms of chiral discrimination supports an objective appraisal of the experimental possibilities and developing applications.

  12. Advancing Risk Analysis for Nanoscale Materials: Report from an International Workshop on the Role of Alternative Testing Strategies for Advancement.

    Shatkin, J A; Ong, Kimberly J; Beaudrie, Christian; Clippinger, Amy J; Hendren, Christine Ogilvie; Haber, Lynne T; Hill, Myriam; Holden, Patricia; Kennedy, Alan J; Kim, Baram; MacDonell, Margaret; Powers, Christina M; Sharma, Monita; Sheremeta, Lorraine; Stone, Vicki; Sultan, Yasir; Turley, Audrey; White, Ronald H

    2016-08-01

    The Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) has a history of bringing thought leadership to topics of emerging risk. In September 2014, the SRA Emerging Nanoscale Materials Specialty Group convened an international workshop to examine the use of alternative testing strategies (ATS) for manufactured nanomaterials (NM) from a risk analysis perspective. Experts in NM environmental health and safety, human health, ecotoxicology, regulatory compliance, risk analysis, and ATS evaluated and discussed the state of the science for in vitro and other alternatives to traditional toxicology testing for NM. Based on this review, experts recommended immediate and near-term actions that would advance ATS use in NM risk assessment. Three focal areas-human health, ecological health, and exposure considerations-shaped deliberations about information needs, priorities, and the next steps required to increase confidence in and use of ATS in NM risk assessment. The deliberations revealed that ATS are now being used for screening, and that, in the near term, ATS could be developed for use in read-across or categorization decision making within certain regulatory frameworks. Participants recognized that leadership is required from within the scientific community to address basic challenges, including standardizing materials, protocols, techniques and reporting, and designing experiments relevant to real-world conditions, as well as coordination and sharing of large-scale collaborations and data. Experts agreed that it will be critical to include experimental parameters that can support the development of adverse outcome pathways. Numerous other insightful ideas for investment in ATS emerged throughout the discussions and are further highlighted in this article. © 2016 Society for Risk Analysis.

  13. Mechanics of mass, energy and momentum transfer in complex textured materials at micro/nanoscales

    Raman, Srikar

    The aim of this work is the investigation of the physical properties associated with nanostructured materials for various advanced applications which include controlled drug release, pressure driven nanofluidics, spray cooling etc. Polymer nanofibers (monolithic or core-shell) and turbostatic carbon nanotube bundles fabricated through electrospinning and co-electrospinning respectively were used as the key materials in this work. For controlled release applications, a model fluorescent dye Rhodamine 610 chloride, proteins, drugs or antigens encapsulated inside electrospun polymer nanofibers and its release to a buffer medium was analyzed. As a result of these experiments, it was discovered that the release process is limited by desorption process from nanopore surfaces. The experimental results were used as foundation as novel theory of release process and also allowed characterization of the relevant physical parameters of different compounds involved. In addition, thermal characterization of these electrospun polymer nanofibers was carried out to investigate their creep properties. The aim of this part was in the establishment of a detailed mechanism responsible for shrinkage of nanofiber mats at elevated temperatures and elucidation of its relation to the microscopic thermally-induced changes occurring in the polymer structure. In particular, thermal behavior of Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), Poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and Polyurethane (PU) in electrospun nanofibers and original pellets were studied using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and linked to the onset of thermally-induced shrinkage of nanofiber mats. The elctrospinning setup was then extended to Co-electrospinning process for fabricating Turbostratic Carbon Nanotube Bundles, for pressure driven flow of suspensions. Using a model water soluble compound, fluorescent dye Rhodamine 610 chloride, it was shown that deposit buildup on the inner walls of the delivery

  14. Atomic-scale observation of lithiation reaction front in nanoscale SnO2 materials

    Nie, Anmin; Gan, Liyong; Cheng, Yingchun; Asayesh-Ardakani, Hasti; Li, Qianqian; Dong, Cezhou; Tao, Runzhe; Mashayek, Farzad; Wang, Hongtao; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Klie, Robert F.; Yassar, Reza Shahbazian

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, taking advantage of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, we show that the dynamic lithiation process of anode materials can be revealed in an unprecedented resolution. Atomically resolved imaging of the lithiation process in SnO2 nanowires illustrated that the movement, reaction, and generation of b = [1Ì...1Ì...1] mixed dislocations leading the lithiated stripes effectively facilitated lithium-ion insertion into the crystalline interior. The geometric phase analysis and density functional theory simulations indicated that lithium ions initial preference to diffuse along the [001] direction in the {200} planes of SnO2 nanowires introduced the lattice expansion and such dislocation behaviors. At the later stages of lithiation, the Li-induced amorphization of rutile SnO2 and the formation of crystalline Sn and LixSn particles in the Li2O matrix were observed. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  15. A Study on Removal of Environmental Pollution Materials with Nano-scale Iron Particles

    Lee, Myung Ho; Ahn, Hong Ju

    2009-07-15

    In this study, a method of nano-sized iron particles with zero valent state was developed. Also, the optimum conditions for the synthesis of silica based micro-particles were obtained for micro particle analysis. Basic physical data for standard particles were obtained in various synthesis conditions for mass production. From the experiment of removal of Pb in the solution with iron particles with zero valent state, most of Pb was removed from the solution over pH 7, as a result of reaction of Pb with iron particles with zero valent state. Nano sized iron particles with zero valent state obtained from this study will be apply for removing heavy metals and radionuclides as well as waste treatment and remediation for contaminated materials in the environment.

  16. Atomic-scale observation of lithiation reaction front in nanoscale SnO2 materials

    Nie, Anmin

    2013-07-23

    In the present work, taking advantage of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, we show that the dynamic lithiation process of anode materials can be revealed in an unprecedented resolution. Atomically resolved imaging of the lithiation process in SnO2 nanowires illustrated that the movement, reaction, and generation of b = [1Ì...1Ì...1] mixed dislocations leading the lithiated stripes effectively facilitated lithium-ion insertion into the crystalline interior. The geometric phase analysis and density functional theory simulations indicated that lithium ions initial preference to diffuse along the [001] direction in the {200} planes of SnO2 nanowires introduced the lattice expansion and such dislocation behaviors. At the later stages of lithiation, the Li-induced amorphization of rutile SnO2 and the formation of crystalline Sn and LixSn particles in the Li2O matrix were observed. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  17. Enhancing heat capacity of colloidal suspension using nanoscale encapsulated phase-change materials for heat transfer.

    Hong, Yan; Ding, Shujiang; Wu, Wei; Hu, Jianjun; Voevodin, Andrey A; Gschwender, Lois; Snyder, Ed; Chow, Louis; Su, Ming

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes a new method to enhance the heat-transfer property of a single-phase liquid by adding encapsulated phase-change nanoparticles (nano-PCMs), which absorb thermal energy during solid-liquid phase changes. Silica-encapsulated indium nanoparticles and polymer-encapsulated paraffin (wax) nanoparticles have been made using colloid method, and suspended into poly-alpha-olefin (PAO) and water for potential high- and low-temperature applications, respectively. The shells prevent leakage and agglomeration of molten phase-change materials, and enhance the dielectric properties of indium nanoparticles. The heat-transfer coefficients of PAO containing indium nanoparticles (30% by mass) and water containing paraffin nanoparticles (10% by mass) are 1.6 and 1.75 times higher than those of corresponding single-phase fluids. The structural integrity of encapsulation allows repeated use of such nanoparticles for many cycles in high heat generating devices.

  18. Nanoscale Roughness of Faults Explained by the Scale-Dependent Yield Stress of Geologic Materials

    Thom, C.; Brodsky, E. E.; Carpick, R. W.; Goldsby, D. L.; Pharr, G.; Oliver, W.

    2017-12-01

    Despite significant differences in their lithologies and slip histories, natural fault surfaces exhibit remarkably similar scale-dependent roughness over lateral length scales spanning 7 orders of magnitude, from microns to tens of meters. Recent work has suggested that a scale-dependent yield stress may result in such a characteristic roughness, but experimental evidence in favor of this hypothesis has been lacking. We employ an atomic force microscope (AFM) operating in intermittent-contact mode to map the topography of the Corona Heights fault surface. Our experiments demonstrate that the Corona Heights fault exhibits isotropic self-affine roughness with a Hurst exponent of 0.75 +/- 0.05 at all wavelengths from 60 nm to 10 μm. If yield stress controls roughness, then the roughness data predict that yield strength varies with length scale as λ-0.25 +/ 0.05. To test the relationship between roughness and yield stress, we conducted nanoindentation tests on the same Corona Heights sample and a sample of the Yair Fault, a carbonate fault surface that has been previously characterized by AFM. A diamond Berkovich indenter tip was used to indent the samples at a nominally constant strain rate (defined as the loading rate divided by the load) of 0.2 s-1. The continuous stiffness method (CSM) was used to measure the indentation hardness (which is proportional to yield stress) and the elastic modulus of the sample as a function of depth in each test. For both samples, the yield stress decreases with increasing size of the indents, a behavior consistent with that observed for many engineering materials and recently for other geologic materials such as olivine. The magnitude of this "indentation size effect" is best described by a power-law with exponents of -0.12 +/- 0.06 and -0.18 +/- 0.08 for the Corona Heights and Yair Faults, respectively. These results demonstrate a link between surface roughness and yield stress, and suggest that fault geometry is the physical

  19. Surface interactions between nanoscale iron and organic material: Potential uses in water treatment process units

    Storms, Max

    Membrane systems are among the primary emergent technologies in water treatment process units due to their ease of use, small physical footprint, and high physical rejection. Membrane fouling, the phenomena by which membranes become clogged or generally soiled, is an inhibitor to optimal efficiency in membrane systems. Novel, composite, and modified surface materials must be investigated to determine their efficacy in improving fouling behavior. Ceramic membranes derived from iron oxide nanoparticles called ferroxanes were coated with a superhydrophillic, zwitterionic polymer called poly (sulfobetaine methacrylate) (polySBMA) to form a composite ceramic-polymeric membrane. Membrane samples with and without polySBMA coating were subjected to fouling with a bovine serum albumin solution and fouling was observed by measuring permeate flux at 10 mL intervals. Loss of polySBMA was measured using total organic carbon analysis, and membrane samples were characterized using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and optical profilometry. The coated membrane samples decreased initial fouling rate by 27% and secondary fouling rate by 24%. Similarly, they displayed a 30% decrease in irreversible fouling during the initial fouling stage, and a 27% decrease in irreversible fouling in the secondary fouling stage; however, retention of polySBMA sufficient for improved performance was not conclusive. The addition of chemical disinfectants into drinking water treatment processes results in the formation of compounds called disinfection by-products (DBPs). The formation of DBPs occurs when common chemical disinfectants (i.e. chlorine) react with organic material. The harmful effects of DBP exposure require that they be monitored and controlled for public safety. This work investigated the ability of nanostructured hematite derived from ferroxane nanoparticles to remove organic precursors to DBPs in the form of humic acid via adsorption processes. The results show that p

  20. Dynamic response in a finite size composite multiferroic thin film

    Wang, Zidong, E-mail: Zidong.Wang@auckland.ac.nz; Grimson, Malcolm J. [Department of Physics, The University of Auckland, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand)

    2016-03-28

    Composite multiferroics, heterostructures of ferromagnetic and ferroelectric materials, are characterized by a remarkable magnetoelectric effect at the interface. Previous work has supported the ferromagnetic structure with magnetic spins and the ferroelectric with pseudospins which act as electric dipoles in a microscopic model, coupled with a magnetoelectric interaction [Wang and Grimson, J. Appl. Phys. 118, 124109 (2015)]. In this work, by solving the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, the electric-field-induced magnetization switching in a twisted boundary condition has been studied, and a behavior of domain wall in the ferromagnetic structure is discussed.

  1. Study of local correlations of magnetic and multiferroic compounds

    Alves, E J

    We propose to study magnetic and multiferroic strongly correlated electron materials using radioactive nuclear probe techniques, at ISOLDE . Following the strategy of a previous project, IS390, our aim is to provide local and element selective information on some of the mechanisms that rule structural, charge and orbital correlations, electronic and magnetic interactions and the coupling of the associated degrees of freedom. The main technique used is Perturbed Angular Correlations (PAC), which allows combined magnetic and electric hyperfine studies. This study is complemented by the use of conventional characterisation techniques, and the investigation of relevant macroscopic properties.

  2. Electronic conduction in doped multiferroic BiFeO3

    Yang, Chan-Ho; Seidel, Jan; Kim, Sang-Yong; Gajek, M.; Yu, P.; Holcomb, M. B.; Martin, L. W.; Ramesh, R.; Chu, Y. H.

    2009-03-01

    Competition between multiple ground states, that are energetically similar, plays a key role in many interesting material properties and physical phenomena as for example in high-Tc superconductors (electron kinetic energy vs. electron-electron repulsion), colossal magnetoresistance (metallic state vs. charge ordered insulating state), and magnetically frustrated systems (spin-spin interactions). We are exploring the idea of similar competing phenomena in doped multiferroics by control of band-filling. In this paper we present systematic investigations of divalent Ca doping of ferroelectric BiFeO3 in terms of structural and electronic conduction properties as well as diffusion properties of oxygen vacancies.

  3. Nanoscale carbon materials from hydrocarbons pyrolysis: Structure, chemical behavior, utilisation for non-aqueous supercapacitors

    Savilov, Serguei V.; Strokova, Natalia E.; Ivanov, Anton S.; Arkhipova, Ekaterina A.; Desyatov, Andrey V.; Hui, Xia; Aldoshin, Serguei M.; Lunin, Valery V.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • N-doped and regular carbon nanomaterials were obtained by pyrolitic technique. • Dynamic vapor sorption of different solvents reveals smaller S BET values. • Steric hindrance and specific chemical interactions are the reasons for this. • Nitrogen doping leads to raise of capacitance and coulombic efficiency with non-aqueous N-containing electrolyte. - Abstract: This work systematically studies adsorption properties of carbon nanomaterials that are synthesized through hydrocarbons that is a powerful technique to fabricate different kinds of carbon materials, e.g., nanotubes, nanoshells, onions, including nitrogen substituted. The adsorption properties of the as-synthesized carbons are achieved by low temperature nitrogen adsorption and organic vapors sorption. Heptane, acetonitrile, water, ethanol, benzene and 1-methylimidazole, which are of great importance for development of supercapacitors, are used as substrates. It is discovered that while nitrogen adsorption reveals a high specific surface area, this parameter for most of organic compounds is rather small depending not only on the size of its molecule but also on chemical interactions for a pair adsorbent–adsorbate. The experimental values of heat of adsorption for carbon and N-substituted structures, when Coulomb cross-coupling of nitrogen atoms in adsorbent and adsorbate takes place, confirms this supposition

  4. Nanoscale carbon materials from hydrocarbons pyrolysis: Structure, chemical behavior, utilisation for non-aqueous supercapacitors

    Savilov, Serguei V., E-mail: savilov@chem.msu.ru [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Chemistry Department (Russian Federation); Strokova, Natalia E.; Ivanov, Anton S.; Arkhipova, Ekaterina A. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Chemistry Department (Russian Federation); Desyatov, Andrey V. [D. Mendeleyev University of Chemical Technology of Russia (Russian Federation); Hui, Xia [Herbert Gleiter Institute of Nanoscience, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology (China); Aldoshin, Serguei M. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Fundamental Physical and Chemical Engineering (Russian Federation); Lunin, Valery V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Chemistry Department (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • N-doped and regular carbon nanomaterials were obtained by pyrolitic technique. • Dynamic vapor sorption of different solvents reveals smaller S{sub BET} values. • Steric hindrance and specific chemical interactions are the reasons for this. • Nitrogen doping leads to raise of capacitance and coulombic efficiency with non-aqueous N-containing electrolyte. - Abstract: This work systematically studies adsorption properties of carbon nanomaterials that are synthesized through hydrocarbons that is a powerful technique to fabricate different kinds of carbon materials, e.g., nanotubes, nanoshells, onions, including nitrogen substituted. The adsorption properties of the as-synthesized carbons are achieved by low temperature nitrogen adsorption and organic vapors sorption. Heptane, acetonitrile, water, ethanol, benzene and 1-methylimidazole, which are of great importance for development of supercapacitors, are used as substrates. It is discovered that while nitrogen adsorption reveals a high specific surface area, this parameter for most of organic compounds is rather small depending not only on the size of its molecule but also on chemical interactions for a pair adsorbent–adsorbate. The experimental values of heat of adsorption for carbon and N-substituted structures, when Coulomb cross-coupling of nitrogen atoms in adsorbent and adsorbate takes place, confirms this supposition.

  5. Characteristics and controllability of vortices in ferromagnetics, ferroelectrics, and multiferroics.

    Zheng, Yue; Chen, W J

    2017-08-01

    Topological defects in condensed matter are attracting e significant attention due to their important role in phase transition and their fascinating characteristics. Among the various types of matter, ferroics which possess a switchable physical characteristic and form domain structure are ideal systems to form topological defects. In particular, a special class of topological defects-vortices-have been found to commonly exist in ferroics. They often manifest themselves as singular regions where domains merge in large systems, or stabilize as novel order states instead of forming domain structures in small enough systems. Understanding the characteristics and controllability of vortices in ferroics can provide us with deeper insight into the phase transition of condensed matter and also exciting opportunities in designing novel functional devices such as nano-memories, sensors, and transducers based on topological defects. In this review, we summarize the recent experimental and theoretical progress in ferroic vortices, with emphasis on those spin/dipole vortices formed in nanoscale ferromagnetics and ferroelectrics, and those structural domain vortices formed in multiferroic hexagonal manganites. We begin with an overview of this field. The fundamental concepts of ferroic vortices, followed by the theoretical simulation and experimental methods to explore ferroic vortices, are then introduced. The various characteristics of vortices (e.g. formation mechanisms, static/dynamic features, and electronic properties) and their controllability (e.g. by size, geometry, external thermal, electrical, magnetic, or mechanical fields) in ferromagnetics, ferroelectrics, and multiferroics are discussed in detail in individual sections. Finally, we conclude this review with an outlook on this rapidly developing field.

  6. Induction of novel macroscopic properties by local symmetry violations in spin-spiral multiferroics

    Meier, D.; Leo, N.; Becker, P.; Bohaty, L.; Ramesh, R.; Fiebig, M.

    2011-03-01

    Incommensurate (IC) structures are omnipresent in strongly correlated electron systems as high-TC superconductors, CMR manganites, as well as multiferroics. In each case they are origin of a pronounced symmetry reduction reflecting the complexity of the underlying microscopic interactions. Macroscopically, this can lead to new phases and possibilities to gain control of the host material. Here we report how the IC nature of a spin-spiral multiferroic induces new physical properties by renormalizing the relevant length scales of the system. Local symmetry violations directly manifest in the macroscopic response of the material and co-determine the multiferroic order giving rise to additional domain states. These usually hidden degrees of freedom become visible when non-homogenous fields are applied and condition for instance the second harmonic generation. Our study shows that incommensurabilities play a vital role in the discussion of the physical properties of multiferroics -- they represent a key ingredient for further enhancing the functionality of this class of materials. This work was supported by the DFG through the SFB 608. D.M. thanks the AvH for financial support.

  7. Evidence for multiferroic characteristics in NdCrTiO5

    Saha, J.; Sharma, G.; Patnaik, S.

    2014-01-01

    We report NdCrTiO 5 to be an unusual multiferroic material with large magnetic field dependent electric polarization. While magneto-electric coupling in this two magnetic sub-lattice oxide is well established, the purpose of this study is to look for spontaneous symmetry breaking at the magnetic transition. The conclusions are based on extensive magnetization, dielectric and polarization measurements around its antiferromagnetic ordering temperature of 18 K. Room temperature X-ray diffraction pattern of NdCrTiO 5 reveals that the sample is single phase with an orthorhombic crystal structure that allows linear magneto-electric coupling. DC magnetization measurement shows magnetization downturn at 11 K together with a small kink corresponding to the Cr +3 sub-lattice ordering at ∼18 K. An anomaly in dielectric constant is observed around the magnetic ordering temperature that increases substantially with increasing magnetic field. Through detailed pyroelectric current measurements at zero magnetic field, particularly as a function of thermal cycling, we establish that NdCrTiO 5 is a genuine multiferroic material that is possibly driven by collinear magneto-striction. - Highlights: • We provide evidence for multiferroicity in NdCrTiO 5 . • Large magnetic field dependent electric polarization is confirmed. • Sign reversal of pyroelectric current upon thermal cycling proves genuine ferroelectricity. • A model based on collinear magneto-striction is proposed. • A new class of multiferroic materials with large ME coupling is established

  8. The single-phase multiferroic oxides: from bulk to thin film

    Prellier, W; Singh, M P; Murugavel, P

    2005-01-01

    Complex perovskite oxides exhibit a rich spectrum of properties, including magnetism, ferroelectricity, strongly correlated electron behaviour, superconductivity and magnetoresistance, which have been research areas of great interest among the scientific and technological community for decades. There exist very few materials which exhibit multiple functional properties; one such class of materials is called the multiferroics. Multiferroics are interesting because they exhibit simultaneously ferromagnetic and ferroelectric polarizations and a coupling between them. Due to the nontrivial lattice coupling between the magnetic and electronic domains (the magnetoelectric effect), the magnetic polarization can be switched by applying an electric field; likewise the ferroelectric polarization can be switched by applying a magnetic field. As a consequence, multiferroics offer rich physics and novel devices concepts, which have recently become of great interest to researchers. In this review article the recent experimental status, for both the bulk single phase and the thin film form, has been presented. Current studies on the ceramic compounds in the bulk form including Bi(Fe,Mn)O 3 , REMnO 3 and the series of REMn 2 O 5 single crystals (RE = rare earth) are discussed in the first section and a detailed overview on multiferroic thin films grown artificially (multilayers and nanocomposites) is presented in the second section. (topical review)

  9. Ferroelectric, magnetic and structural studies of the Bi{sub 4}LaSmFe{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 18} multiferroic material

    Alarcón-Suesca, C.E. [Fachgebiet Synthese und Charakterisierung Innovatiert Materialien, Chemistry Department, Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstrasse D-85748, Garching (Germany); Grupo de Física de Nuevos Materiales, Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, AA 5997 Bogotá DC (Colombia); Cardona-Vásquez, J.A. [Grupo de Física de Nuevos Materiales, Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, AA 5997 Bogotá DC (Colombia); Salcedo-Fontecha, J.P.; Vargas-Jiménez, A. [Maestría en Ciencias Física, Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, AA 5997 Bogotá DC (Colombia); Landínez-Téllez, D.A.; Roa-Rojas, J. [Grupo de Física de Nuevos Materiales, Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, AA 5997 Bogotá DC (Colombia)

    2014-12-15

    We report the synthesis and characterization of the new Bi{sub 4}LaSmFe{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 18} ferroelectric ceramic. X-ray characterization reveals reflections for layered perovskite Aurivillius system. Rietveld analyses of the powder pattern shows that Bi{sub 4}LaSmFe{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 18} crystallizes in orthorhombic structure, which corresponds to the space group F2/mm (#42), with lattice parameters a=5.4240(16) Ǻ, b=5.4078(23) Ǻ and c=50.2440(12) Ǻ. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals the formation of dense material with plate-like morphology. Electric polarization curves were measured by means of a radiant ferroelectric tester, at room temperature in bulk samples and exhibit an intrinsic ferroelectric response, even at low applied fields. Measurements of the magnetization as a function of temperature after Zero field cooling and field cooling were carried out by using a MPMS Quantum Design SQUID magnetometer. We found an effective magnetic moment of 7.95 µB, which is 95.8% in agreement with the expected value calculated from Hund's rules. Magnetization curves as the function of applied fields reveal an incipient hysteretic behavior at room temperature.

  10. Nanoscale Engineering of Multiferroic Hybrid Composites for Micro- and Nano-scale Devices

    2012-09-14

    presented in Fig.1. In the case of laminate structures we proposed to use AIN as a piezoelectric phase [publication 4]. Although commonly used Pb...16-19, 2009, Zhengzhou, China. 30)L. Malkinski, "Magnetic heterostructures with convoluted architectures" (invited) 7th Workshop on Multifunction

  11. Rocket Science at the Nanoscale.

    Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Wang, Joseph

    2016-06-28

    Autonomous propulsion at the nanoscale represents one of the most challenging and demanding goals in nanotechnology. Over the past decade, numerous important advances in nanotechnology and material science have contributed to the creation of powerful self-propelled micro/nanomotors. In particular, micro- and nanoscale rockets (MNRs) offer impressive capabilities, including remarkable speeds, large cargo-towing forces, precise motion controls, and dynamic self-assembly, which have paved the way for designing multifunctional and intelligent nanoscale machines. These multipurpose nanoscale shuttles can propel and function in complex real-life media, actively transporting and releasing therapeutic payloads and remediation agents for diverse biomedical and environmental applications. This review discusses the challenges of designing efficient MNRs and presents an overview of their propulsion behavior, fabrication methods, potential rocket fuels, navigation strategies, practical applications, and the future prospects of rocket science and technology at the nanoscale.

  12. Multiferroicity in oxide thin films and heterostructures

    Glavic, Artur

    2012-01-01

    In this work a variety of different systems of transition metal oxides ABO 3 (perovskite materials, where B stands for a transition metal and A for a rare earth element) were produced as thin films and heterostructures and analyzed for the structural, magnetic and ferroelectric properties. For the epitaxial film preparation mostly pulse laser deposition (PLD) was applied. For one series high pressure oxide sputter deposition was used as well. The bulk multiferroics TbMnO 3 and DyMnO 3 , which develop their electric polarization due to a cycloidal magnetic order, have been prepared as single layers with thicknesses between 2 and 200 nm on YAlO 3 substrates using PLD and sputter deposition. The structural characterization of the surfaces and crystal structure where performed using X-ray reflectometry and diffraction, respectively. These yielded low surface roughness and good epitaxial growth. The magnetic behavior was macroscopically measured with SQUID magnetometry and microscopically with polarized neutron diffraction and resonant magnetic X-ray scattering. While all investigated samples showed antiferromagnetic order, comparable with the collinear magnetic phase of their bulk materials, only the sputter deposited samples exhibited the multiferroic low temperature cycloidal order. The investigation of the optical second harmonic generation in a TbMnO 3 sample could proof the presence of a ferroelectric order in the low temperature phase. The respective transition temperatures of the thin films have been very similar to those of the bulk materials. In contrast an increase in the rare earth ordering temperature has been observed, which reduces the Mn order slightly, an effect not known from bulk TbMnO 3 crystals. The coupling of the antiferromagnetic order in TbMnO 3 to ferromagnetic layers of LaCoO 3 was investigated in super-lattices containing 20 bilayers produced with PLD on the same substrates. The SQUID magnetometry yielded a strong influence of the

  13. The magnetoelectric coupling effect in multiferroic composites based on PZT–ferrite

    Bartkowska, J.A., E-mail: joanna.bartkowska@us.edu.pl

    2015-01-15

    In the multiferroic materials, the dielectric and magnetic properties are closely correlated through the coupling interaction between the ferroelectric and magnetic order. We attempted to determine the values of magnetoelectric coupling coefficient, from the temperature dependences of the dielectric permittivity for the ferroelectric–ferromagnetic composite PZT–ferrite type, namely PSZTC–NiZn and PBZTN–NiZn. The main component of the ferroelectric–ferromagnetic composite was PZT type powder (with ferroelectric properties), which was synthesized using sintering of a mixture of simple oxides in solid phase. The second element of the ferroelectric–ferromagnetic composite was the ferrite powder (with ferromagnetic properties). Ferrite powder was synthesized using calcination. Next, the mixed components were synthesized using sintering of the mixture of simple oxides in a solid phase (compaction by a free sintering method). The temperature dependences of the dielectric permittivity (ε) for the different frequencies and for both multiferroic composites were investigated. Based on dielectric measurements and theoretical considerations, the values of the magnetoelectric coupling coefficient were specified. - Highlights: • The magnetoelectric effect at two different ferroelectric–ferromagnetic composites based on a PZT and nickel–zinc ferrite. • Multiferroics composite incorporate both ferroelectric and magnetic phases. • The mechanism of the magnetoelectric coupling between ferroelectric and magnetic properties, in multiferroic composites, is caused by the strain. • The determination of the magnetoelectric coupling coefficient based on a theoretical model and the measurements of dielectric permittivity.

  14. The magnetoelectric coupling effect in multiferroic composites based on PZT–ferrite

    Bartkowska, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    In the multiferroic materials, the dielectric and magnetic properties are closely correlated through the coupling interaction between the ferroelectric and magnetic order. We attempted to determine the values of magnetoelectric coupling coefficient, from the temperature dependences of the dielectric permittivity for the ferroelectric–ferromagnetic composite PZT–ferrite type, namely PSZTC–NiZn and PBZTN–NiZn. The main component of the ferroelectric–ferromagnetic composite was PZT type powder (with ferroelectric properties), which was synthesized using sintering of a mixture of simple oxides in solid phase. The second element of the ferroelectric–ferromagnetic composite was the ferrite powder (with ferromagnetic properties). Ferrite powder was synthesized using calcination. Next, the mixed components were synthesized using sintering of the mixture of simple oxides in a solid phase (compaction by a free sintering method). The temperature dependences of the dielectric permittivity (ε) for the different frequencies and for both multiferroic composites were investigated. Based on dielectric measurements and theoretical considerations, the values of the magnetoelectric coupling coefficient were specified. - Highlights: • The magnetoelectric effect at two different ferroelectric–ferromagnetic composites based on a PZT and nickel–zinc ferrite. • Multiferroics composite incorporate both ferroelectric and magnetic phases. • The mechanism of the magnetoelectric coupling between ferroelectric and magnetic properties, in multiferroic composites, is caused by the strain. • The determination of the magnetoelectric coupling coefficient based on a theoretical model and the measurements of dielectric permittivity

  15. A novel perovskite oxide chemically designed to show multiferroic phase boundary with room-temperature magnetoelectricity

    Fernández-Posada, Carmen M.; Castro, Alicia; Kiat, Jean-Michel; Porcher, Florence; Peña, Octavio; Algueró, Miguel; Amorín, Harvey

    2016-09-01

    There is a growing activity in the search of novel single-phase multiferroics that could finally provide distinctive magnetoelectric responses at room temperature, for they would enable a range of potentially disruptive technologies, making use of the ability of controlling polarization with a magnetic field or magnetism with an electric one (for example, voltage-tunable spintronic devices, uncooled magnetic sensors and the long-searched magnetoelectric memory). A very promising novel material concept could be to make use of phase-change phenomena at structural instabilities of a multiferroic state. Indeed, large phase-change magnetoelectric response has been anticipated by a first-principles investigation of the perovskite BiFeO3-BiCoO3 solid solution, specifically at its morphotropic phase boundary between multiferroic polymorphs of rhombohedral and tetragonal symmetries. Here, we report a novel perovskite oxide that belongs to the BiFeO3-BiMnO3-PbTiO3 ternary system, chemically designed to present such multiferroic phase boundary with enhanced ferroelectricity and canted ferromagnetism, which shows distinctive room-temperature magnetoelectric responses.

  16. Magnetoelectric coupling characteristics in multiferroic heterostructures with different thickness of nanocrystalline soft magnetic alloy

    Chen, Lei; Wang, Yao

    2016-05-01

    Magnetoelectric(ME) coupling characteristics in multiferroic heterostructures with different thickness of nanocrystalline soft magnetic alloy has been investigated at low frequency. The ME response with obvious hysteresis, self-biased and dual-peak phenomenon is observed for multiferroic heterostructures, which results from strong magnetic interactions between two ferromagnetic materials with different magnetic properties, magnetostrictions and optimum bias magnetic fields Hdc,opti. The proposed multiferroic heterostructures not only enhance ME coupling significantly, but also broaden dc magnetic bias operating range and overcomes the limitations of narrow bias range. By optimizing the thickness of nanocrystalline soft magnetic alloy Tf, a significantly zero-biased ME voltage coefficient(MEVC) of 14.8mV/Oe (185 mV/cmṡ Oe) at Tf = 0.09 mm can be obtained, which is about 10.8 times as large as that of traditional PZT/Terfenol-D composite with a weak ME coupling at zero bias Hdc,zero. Furthermore, when Tf increases from 0.03 mm to 0.18 mm, the maximum MEVC increases nearly linearly with the increased Tf at Hdc,opti. Additionally, the experimental results demonstrate the ME response for multiferroic heterostructures spreads over a wide magnetic dc bias operating range. The excellent ME performance provides a promising and practicable application for both highly sensitive magnetic field sensors without bias and ME energy harvesters.

  17. The magnetic and multiferroic properties in BiMnO{sub 3}

    Zhai, Liang-Jun, E-mail: zhailiangjun@jsut.edu.cn [The School of Mathematics and Physics, Jiangsu University of Technology, Changzhou 213001 (China); Wang, Huai-Yu [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2017-03-15

    In this paper, the magnetic and multiferroic properties in the multiferroic material BiMnO{sub 3} are studied. A Heisenberg type Hamiltonian for BiMnO{sub 3} is proposed, in which the nearest and farther neighbors are considered. Thermodynamic quantities such as magnetization and magnetic susceptibility for different magnetic orderings under high pressure or magnetic field are calculated, and the simulation results fit the experimental results. Farther neighboring exchanges can result in the coexistence of the ferromagnetic ordering and certain antiferromagnetic ordering with no centrosymmetry. Our study demonstrates that the BiMnO{sub 3} should be the type-II multiferroic, and the ferromagnetic and ferroelectric orderings could coexist. The magnetic field control of ferroelectric polarization is also studied. The ferroelectric polarization is always suppressed by the external magnetic field. - Highlights: • A Hamiltonian including the nearest and farther neighbors of BiMnO{sub 3} is proposed. • Thermodynamic quantities for different magnetic orderings are calculated. • It is shown that BiMnO{sub 3} should be the type-II multiferroic. • The obtained results fit the experimental results quite well. • The mechanism of magnetic control of polarization is also studied.

  18. Graduated characterization method using a multi-well microplate for reducing reactivity of nanoscale zero valent iron materials

    Hwang, Yuhoon; Salatas, Apostolos; Mines, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Even though nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) has been intensively studied for the treatment of a plethora of pollutants through reductive reaction, quantification of nZVI reactivity has not yet been standardized. Here, we adapted colorimetric assays for determining reductive activity of n...... with different compounds, combined with the use of a multi-well microplate based color assay, promises to be a useful and simple tool in various nZVI related research topics....

  19. Lead palladium titanate: A room-temperature multiferroic

    Gradauskaite, Elzbieta; Gardner, Jonathan; Smith, Rebecca M.; Morrison, Finlay D.; Lee, Stephen L.; Katiyar, Ram S.; Scott, James F.

    2017-09-01

    There have been a large number of papers on bismuth ferrite (BiFe O3 ) over the past few years, trying to exploit its room-temperature magnetoelectric multiferroic properties. Although these are attractive, BiFe O3 is not the ideal multiferroic due to weak magnetization and the difficulty in limiting leakage currents. Thus there is an ongoing search for alternatives, including such materials as gallium ferrite (GaFe O3 ). In the present work we report a comprehensive study of the perovskite PbT i1 -xP dxO3 with 0

  20. Nanoscale nuclei in phase change materials: Origin of different crystallization mechanisms of Ge2Sb2Te5 and AgInSbTe

    Lee, Bong-Sub; Bogle, Stephanie N.; Darmawikarta, Kristof; Abelson, John R.; Shelby, Robert M.; Retter, Charles T.; Burr, Geoffrey W.; Raoux, Simone; Bishop, Stephen G.

    2014-01-01

    Phase change memory devices are based on the rapid and reversible amorphous-to-crystalline transformations of phase change materials, such as Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 and AgInSbTe. Since the maximum switching speed of these devices is typically limited by crystallization speed, understanding the crystallization process is of crucial importance. While Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 and AgInSbTe show very different crystallization mechanisms from their melt-quenched states, the nanostructural origin of this difference has not been clearly demonstrated. Here, we show that an amorphous state includes different sizes and number of nanoscale nuclei, after thermal treatment such as melt-quenching or furnace annealing is performed. We employ fluctuation transmission electron microscopy to detect nanoscale nuclei embedded in amorphous materials, and use a pump-probe laser technique and atomic force microscopy to study the kinetics of nucleation and growth. We confirm that melt-quenched amorphous Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 includes considerably larger and more quenched-in nuclei than its as-deposited state, while melt-quenched AgInSbTe does not, and explain this contrast by the different ratio between quenching time and nucleation time in these materials. In addition to providing insights to the crystallization process in these technologically important devices, this study presents experimental illustrations of temperature-dependence of nucleation rate and growth speed, which was predicted by theory of phase transformation but rarely demonstrated

  1. Characterization of energy conversion of multiferroic PFN and PFN:Mn

    Lucjan Kozielski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of energy conversion of multiferroic materials is concerned with multifunctional properties of materials, a topic that is fascinating from the scientific point of view and important for the modern technology. The complex characterization of multiferroic structures suffers at present from lack of a systematic experimental approach and deficiency of multifunctional magnetoelectric properties testing capabilities. Compactness and high frequency energy conversion capacity are the main reasons of invention and improvement of sophisticated materials which are prepared for high-speed computer memories and broadband transducer devices. As a consequence, one can easily notice an intense search for new materials for generation, transformation and amplification of magnetic and electric energies. In this scenario, the combination of excellent piezoelectric and magnetic properties makes lead iron niobate Pb(Fe1/2Nb1/2O3 (PFN an attractive host material for application in integrated magnetoelectric energy conversion applications. PFN multiferroic materials are attractive for commercial electroceramics due to high value of dielectric permittivity and magnetoelectric coefficients as well as relatively easy synthesis process. However, synthesis of PFN ceramics is mostly connected with formation of the secondary unwanted pyrochlore phase associated with dramatic decrease of ferroelectric properties. The authors have successfully reduced this negative phenomenon by Mn doping and finally present high piezoelectric and magnetoelectric energy conversion efficiency in fabricated PMFN ceramics.

  2. Separating read and write units in multiferroic devices.

    Roy, Kuntal

    2015-06-18

    Strain-mediated multiferroic composites, i.e., piezoelectric-magnetostrictive heterostructures, hold profound promise for energy-efficient computing in beyond Moore's law era. While reading a bit of information stored in the magnetostrictive nanomagnets using a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), a material selection issue crops up since magnetostrictive materials in general cannot be utilized as the free layer of the MTJ. This is an important issue since we need to achieve a high magnetoresistance for technological applications. We show here that magnetically coupling the magnetostrictive nanomagnet and the free layer e.g., utilizing the magnetic dipole coupling between them can circumvent this issue. By solving stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation of magnetization dynamics in the presence of room-temperature thermal fluctuations, we show that such design can eventually lead to a superior energy-delay product.

  3. Ellipsometry at the nanoscale

    Hingerl, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    This book presents and introduces ellipsometry in nanoscience and nanotechnology making a bridge between the classical and nanoscale optical behaviour of materials. It delineates the role of the non-destructive and non-invasive optical diagnostics of ellipsometry in improving science and technology of nanomaterials and related processes by illustrating its exploitation, ranging from fundamental studies of the physics and chemistry of nanostructures to the ultimate goal of turnkey manufacturing control. This book is written for a broad readership: materials scientists, researchers, engineers, as well as students and nanotechnology operators who want to deepen their knowledge about both basics and applications of ellipsometry to nanoscale phenomena. It starts as a general introduction for people curious to enter the fields of ellipsometry and polarimetry applied to nanomaterials and progresses to articles by experts on specific fields that span from plasmonics, optics, to semiconductors and flexible electronics...

  4. A molecular dynamics investigation into the mechanisms of subsurface damage and material removal of monocrystalline copper subjected to nanoscale high speed grinding

    Li, Jia; Fang, Qihong; Liu, Youwen; Zhang, Liangchi

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the mechanisms of subsurface damage and material removal of monocrystalline copper when it is under a nanoscale high speed grinding of a diamond tip. The analysis was carried out with the aid of three-dimensional molecular dynamics simulations. The key factors that would influence the deformation of the material were carefully explored by analyzing the chip, dislocation movement, and workpiece deformation, which include grinding speed, depth of cut, grid tip radius, crystal orientation and machining angle of copper. An analytical model was also established to predict the emission of partial dislocations during the nanoscale high speed grinding. The investigation showed that a higher grinding velocity, a larger tip radius or a larger depth of cut would result in a larger chipping volume and a greater temperature rise in the copper workpiece. A lower grinding velocity would produce more intrinsic stacking faults. It was also found that the transition of deformation mechanisms depends on the competition between the dislocations and deformation twinning. There is a critical machining angle, at which a higher velocity, a smaller tip radius, or a smaller depth of cut will reduce the subsurface damage and improve the smoothness of a ground surface. The established analytical model showed that the Shockley dislocation emission is most likely to occur with the crystal orientations of (0 0 1)[1 0 0] at 45° angle.

  5. Non-Planar Nano-Scale Fin Field Effect Transistors on Textile, Paper, Wood, Stone, and Vinyl via Soft Material-Enabled Double-Transfer Printing

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto; Sevilla, Galo T.; Alfaraj, Nasir; Ghoneim, Mohamed T.; Kutbee, Arwa T.; Sridharan, Ashvitha; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    The ability to incorporate rigid but high-performance nano-scale non-planar complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics with curvilinear, irregular, or asymmetric shapes and surfaces is an arduous but timely challenge in enabling the production of wearable electronics with an in-situ information-processing ability in the digital world. Therefore, we are demonstrating a soft-material enabled double-transfer-based process to integrate flexible, silicon-based, nano-scale, non-planar, fin-shaped field effect transistors (FinFETs) and planar metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) on various asymmetric surfaces to study their compatibility and enhanced applicability in various emerging fields. FinFET devices feature sub-20 nm dimensions and state-of-the-art, high-κ/metal gate stack, showing no performance alteration after the transfer process. A further analysis of the transferred MOSFET devices, featuring 1 μm gate length exhibits ION ~70 μA/μm (VDS = 2 V, VGS = 2 V) and a low sub-threshold swing of around 90 mV/dec, proving that a soft interfacial material can act both as a strong adhesion/interposing layer between devices and final substrate as well as a means to reduce strain, which ultimately helps maintain the device’s performance with insignificant deterioration even at a high bending state.

  6. Nitrogen and oxygen co-doped carbon nanofibers with rich sub-nanoscale pores as self-supported electrode material of high-performance supercapacitors

    Li, Qun; Xie, Wenhe; Liu, Dequan; Wang, Qi; He, Deyan

    2016-01-01

    Self-supported porous carbon nanofibers (CNFs) network has been prepared by electrospinning technology assisted with template method. The as-prepared material is rich in sub-nanoscale pores and nitrogen and oxygen functional groups, which can serve as a fast conductive network with abundant electrochemical active sites and greatly facilitates the transport of electrons and ions. When the porous CNFs network is used as an electrode for supercapacitor in a three electrode system, it displays a high capacitance of 233.1 F/g at 0.2 A/g, and a capacitance of 130.2 F/g even at 14 A/g. It maintains a capacitance of 154.0 F/g with 90.17% retention after 4000 cycles at 2 A/g. Moreover, the assembled symmetric supercapacitor not only exhibits excellent rate capability and cycle performance, but also delivers an energy density of 4.17 Wh/kg and a power density of 2500 W/kg. The experimental results demonstrate that the prepared N, O co-doped carbon nanofibers with rich sub-nanoscale pores are a promising electrode material for high-performance supercapacitors.

  7. Nonplanar Nanoscale Fin Field Effect Transistors on Textile, Paper, Wood, Stone, and Vinyl via Soft Material-Enabled Double-Transfer Printing.

    Rojas, Jhonathan P; Torres Sevilla, Galo A; Alfaraj, Nasir; Ghoneim, Mohamed T; Kutbee, Arwa T; Sridharan, Ashvitha; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2015-05-26

    The ability to incorporate rigid but high-performance nanoscale nonplanar complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics with curvilinear, irregular, or asymmetric shapes and surfaces is an arduous but timely challenge in enabling the production of wearable electronics with an in situ information-processing ability in the digital world. Therefore, we are demonstrating a soft-material enabled double-transfer-based process to integrate flexible, silicon-based, nanoscale, nonplanar, fin-shaped field effect transistors (FinFETs) and planar metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) on various asymmetric surfaces to study their compatibility and enhanced applicability in various emerging fields. FinFET devices feature sub-20 nm dimensions and state-of-the-art, high-κ/metal gate stacks, showing no performance alteration after the transfer process. A further analysis of the transferred MOSFET devices, featuring 1 μm gate length, exhibits an ION value of nearly 70 μA/μm (VDS = 2 V, VGS = 2 V) and a low subthreshold swing of around 90 mV/dec, proving that a soft interfacial material can act both as a strong adhesion/interposing layer between devices and final substrate as well as a means to reduce strain, which ultimately helps maintain the device's performance with insignificant deterioration even at a high bending state.

  8. Non-Planar Nano-Scale Fin Field Effect Transistors on Textile, Paper, Wood, Stone, and Vinyl via Soft Material-Enabled Double-Transfer Printing

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto

    2015-05-01

    The ability to incorporate rigid but high-performance nano-scale non-planar complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics with curvilinear, irregular, or asymmetric shapes and surfaces is an arduous but timely challenge in enabling the production of wearable electronics with an in-situ information-processing ability in the digital world. Therefore, we are demonstrating a soft-material enabled double-transfer-based process to integrate flexible, silicon-based, nano-scale, non-planar, fin-shaped field effect transistors (FinFETs) and planar metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) on various asymmetric surfaces to study their compatibility and enhanced applicability in various emerging fields. FinFET devices feature sub-20 nm dimensions and state-of-the-art, high-κ/metal gate stack, showing no performance alteration after the transfer process. A further analysis of the transferred MOSFET devices, featuring 1 μm gate length exhibits ION ~70 μA/μm (VDS = 2 V, VGS = 2 V) and a low sub-threshold swing of around 90 mV/dec, proving that a soft interfacial material can act both as a strong adhesion/interposing layer between devices and final substrate as well as a means to reduce strain, which ultimately helps maintain the device’s performance with insignificant deterioration even at a high bending state.

  9. Nanoscale Organic Hybrid Electrolytes

    Nugent, Jennifer L.

    2010-08-20

    Nanoscale organic hybrid electrolytes are composed of organic-inorganic hybrid nanostructures, each with a metal oxide or metallic nanoparticle core densely grafted with an ion-conducting polyethylene glycol corona - doped with lithium salt. These materials form novel solvent-free hybrid electrolytes that are particle-rich, soft glasses at room temperature; yet manifest high ionic conductivity and good electrochemical stability above 5V. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Nanoscale Organic Hybrid Electrolytes

    Nugent, Jennifer L.; Moganty, Surya S.; Archer, Lynden A.

    2010-01-01

    Nanoscale organic hybrid electrolytes are composed of organic-inorganic hybrid nanostructures, each with a metal oxide or metallic nanoparticle core densely grafted with an ion-conducting polyethylene glycol corona - doped with lithium salt. These materials form novel solvent-free hybrid electrolytes that are particle-rich, soft glasses at room temperature; yet manifest high ionic conductivity and good electrochemical stability above 5V. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Introduction to the IEEE International Symposium on Applications of Ferroelectrics and International Symposium on Piezoresponse Force Microscopy and Nanoscale Phenomena in Polar Materials.

    Ye, Zuo-Guang; Tan, Xiaoli; Bokov, Alexei A

    2012-09-01

    The 20th IEEE International Symposium on Applications of Ferroelectrics (ISAF) was held on July 24-27, 2011, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, jointly with the International Symposium on Piezoresponse Force Microscopy and Nanoscale Phenomena in Polar Materials (PFM). Over a period of four days, approximately 400 scientists, engineers, and students from around the world presented their work and discussed the latest developments in the field of ferroelectrics, related materials, and their applications. It is particularly encouraging to see that a large number of students (115) were attracted to the joint conference and presented high-quality research works. This trend is not only important to this conference series, but more importantly, it is vital to the future of the ferroelectrics field.

  12. Dependency of Tunneling-Magnetoresistance Ratio on Nanoscale Spacer Thickness and Material for Double MgO Based Perpendicular-Magnetic-Tunneling-Junction

    Lee, Du-Yeong; Hong, Song-Hwa; Lee, Seung-Eun; Park, Jea-Gun

    2016-12-01

    It was found that in double MgO based perpendicular magnetic tunneling junction spin-valves ex-situ annealed at 400 °C, the tunneling magnetoresistance ratio was extremely sensitive to the material and thickness of the nanoscale spacer: it peaked at a specific thickness (0.40~0.53 nm), and the TMR ratio for W spacers (~134%) was higher than that for Ta spacers (~98%). This dependency on the spacer material and thickness was associated with the (100) body-centered-cubic crystallinity of the MgO layers: the strain enhanced diffusion length in the MgO layers of W atoms (~1.40 nm) was much shorter than that of Ta atoms (~2.85 nm) and the shorter diffusion length led to the MgO layers having better (100) body-centered-cubic crystallinity.

  13. Fabrication and properties of multiferroic nanocomposite films

    Al-Nassar, Mohammed Y.; Ivanov, Yurii P.; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2015-01-01

    A new type of multiferroic polymer nanocomposite is presented, which exhibits excellent ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity simultaneously at room temperature. The multiferroic nanocomposite consists of a ferroelectric copolymer poly(vinylindene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE)] and high aspect ratio ferromagnetic nickel (Ni) nanowires (NWs), which were grown inside anodic aluminum oxide membranes. The fabrication of nanocomposite films with Ni NWs embedded in P(VDF-TrFE) has been successfully carried out via a simple low-temperature spin-coating technique. Structural, ferromagnetic, and ferroelectric properties of the developed nanocomposite have been investigated. The remanent and saturation polarization as well as the coercive field of the ferroelectric phase are slightly affected by the incorporation of the NWs as well as the thickness of the films. While the former two decrease, the last increases by adding the NWs or increasing the thickness. The ferromagnetic properties of the nanocomposite films are found to be isotropic.

  14. Atomically engineered ferroic layers yield a room-temperature magnetoelectric multiferroic

    Mundy, Julia A.; Brooks, Charles M.; Holtz, Megan E.; Moyer, Jarrett A.; Das, Hena; Rébola, Alejandro F.; Heron, John T.; Clarkson, James D.; Disseler, Steven M.; Liu, Zhiqi; Farhan, Alan; Held, Rainer; Hovden, Robert; Padgett, Elliot; Mao, Qingyun; Paik, Hanjong; Misra, Rajiv; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Arenholz, Elke; Scholl, Andreas; Borchers, Julie A.; Ratcliff, William D.; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Fennie, Craig J.; Schiffer, Peter; Muller, David A.; Schlom, Darrell G.

    2016-09-01

    Materials that exhibit simultaneous order in their electric and magnetic ground states hold promise for use in next-generation memory devices in which electric fields control magnetism. Such materials are exceedingly rare, however, owing to competing requirements for displacive ferroelectricity and magnetism. Despite the recent identification of several new multiferroic materials and magnetoelectric coupling mechanisms, known single-phase multiferroics remain limited by antiferromagnetic or weak ferromagnetic alignments, by a lack of coupling between the order parameters, or by having properties that emerge only well below room temperature, precluding device applications. Here we present a methodology for constructing single-phase multiferroic materials in which ferroelectricity and strong magnetic ordering are coupled near room temperature. Starting with hexagonal LuFeO3—the geometric ferroelectric with the greatest known planar rumpling—we introduce individual monolayers of FeO during growth to construct formula-unit-thick syntactic layers of ferrimagnetic LuFe2O4 (refs 17, 18) within the LuFeO3 matrix, that is, (LuFeO3)m/(LuFe2O4)1 superlattices. The severe rumpling imposed by the neighbouring LuFeO3 drives the ferrimagnetic LuFe2O4 into a simultaneously ferroelectric state, while also reducing the LuFe2O4 spin frustration. This increases the magnetic transition temperature substantially—from 240 kelvin for LuFe2O4 (ref. 18) to 281 kelvin for (LuFeO3)9/(LuFe2O4)1. Moreover, the ferroelectric order couples to the ferrimagnetism, enabling direct electric-field control of magnetism at 200 kelvin. Our results demonstrate a design methodology for creating higher-temperature magnetoelectric multiferroics by exploiting a combination of geometric frustration, lattice distortions and epitaxial engineering.

  15. Magnetic susceptibility of multiferroics and chemical ordering

    Maryško, Miroslav; Laguta, Valentyn; Raevski, I. P.; Kuzian, R. O.; Olekhnovich, N.M.; Pushkarev, A.V.; Radyush, Yu.V.; Raevskaya, S. I.; Titov, V.V.; Kubrin, S.P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 5 (2017), s. 1-6, č. článku 056409. ISSN 2158-3226 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-11473S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : multiferroic * spin glass * antiferromagnetic * ferroelectrics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 1.568, year: 2016

  16. Can in vitro assays substitute for in vivo studies in assessing the pulmonary hazards of fine and nanoscale materials?

    Sayes, Christie M.; Reed, Kenneth L. [DuPont Haskell Global Centers for Health and Environmental Sciences (United States); Subramoney, Shekhar; Abrams, Lloyd [DuPont Corporate Center for Analytical Services (United States); Warheit, David B., E-mail: David.B.Warheit@USA.dupont.co [DuPont Haskell Global Centers for Health and Environmental Sciences (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Risk evaluations for nanomaterials require the generation of hazard data as well as exposure assessments. Most of the validated nanotoxicity studies have been conducted using in vivo experimental designs. It would be highly desirable to develop in vitro pulmonary hazard tests to assess the toxicity of fine and nanoscale particle-types. However, in vitro evaluations for pulmonary hazards are known to have limited predictive value for identifying in vivo lung toxicity effects. Accordingly, this study investigated the capacity of in vitro screening studies to predict in vivo pulmonary toxicity of several fine or nanoparticle-types following exposures in rats. Initially, complete physicochemical characterization of particulates was conducted, both in the dry and wet states. Second, rats were exposed by intratracheal instillation to 1 or 5 mg/kg of the following particle-types: carbonyl iron, crystalline silica, amorphous silica, nanoscale zinc oxide, or fine zinc oxide. Inflammation and cytotoxicity endpoints were measured at 24 h, 1 week, 1 month and 3 months post-instillation exposure. In addition, histopathological analyses of lung tissues were conducted at 3 months post-exposure. Pulmonary cell in vitro studies consisted of three different culture conditions at 4 different time periods. These included (1) rat L2 lung epithelial cells, (2) primary rat alveolar macrophages, and (3) alveolar macrophage-L2 lung epithelial cell co-cultures which were incubated with the same particles as tested in the in vivo study for 1, 4, 24, or 48 h. Cell culture fluids were evaluated for cytotoxicity endpoints and inflammatory cytokines at the different time periods in an attempt to match the biomarkers assessed in the in vivo study. Results of in vivo pulmonary toxicity studies demonstrated that instilled carbonyl iron particles produced little toxicity. Crystalline silica and amorphous silica particle exposures produced substantial inflammatory and cytotoxic effects initially, but

  17. Can in vitro assays substitute for in vivo studies in assessing the pulmonary hazards of fine and nanoscale materials?

    Sayes, Christie M.; Reed, Kenneth L.; Subramoney, Shekhar; Abrams, Lloyd; Warheit, David B.

    2009-01-01

    Risk evaluations for nanomaterials require the generation of hazard data as well as exposure assessments. Most of the validated nanotoxicity studies have been conducted using in vivo experimental designs. It would be highly desirable to develop in vitro pulmonary hazard tests to assess the toxicity of fine and nanoscale particle-types. However, in vitro evaluations for pulmonary hazards are known to have limited predictive value for identifying in vivo lung toxicity effects. Accordingly, this study investigated the capacity of in vitro screening studies to predict in vivo pulmonary toxicity of several fine or nanoparticle-types following exposures in rats. Initially, complete physicochemical characterization of particulates was conducted, both in the dry and wet states. Second, rats were exposed by intratracheal instillation to 1 or 5 mg/kg of the following particle-types: carbonyl iron, crystalline silica, amorphous silica, nanoscale zinc oxide, or fine zinc oxide. Inflammation and cytotoxicity endpoints were measured at 24 h, 1 week, 1 month and 3 months post-instillation exposure. In addition, histopathological analyses of lung tissues were conducted at 3 months post-exposure. Pulmonary cell in vitro studies consisted of three different culture conditions at 4 different time periods. These included (1) rat L2 lung epithelial cells, (2) primary rat alveolar macrophages, and (3) alveolar macrophage-L2 lung epithelial cell co-cultures which were incubated with the same particles as tested in the in vivo study for 1, 4, 24, or 48 h. Cell culture fluids were evaluated for cytotoxicity endpoints and inflammatory cytokines at the different time periods in an attempt to match the biomarkers assessed in the in vivo study. Results of in vivo pulmonary toxicity studies demonstrated that instilled carbonyl iron particles produced little toxicity. Crystalline silica and amorphous silica particle exposures produced substantial inflammatory and cytotoxic effects initially, but

  18. Water soluble nano-scale transient material germanium oxide for zero toxic waste based environmentally benign nano-manufacturing

    Almuslem, A. S.

    2017-02-14

    In the recent past, with the advent of transient electronics for mostly implantable and secured electronic applications, the whole field effect transistor structure has been dissolved in a variety of chemicals. Here, we show simple water soluble nano-scale (sub-10 nm) germanium oxide (GeO) as the dissolvable component to remove the functional structures of metal oxide semiconductor devices and then reuse the expensive germanium substrate again for functional device fabrication. This way, in addition to transiency, we also show an environmentally friendly manufacturing process for a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. Every year, trillions of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics are manufactured and billions are disposed, which extend the harmful impact to our environment. Therefore, this is a key study to show a pragmatic approach for water soluble high performance electronics for environmentally friendly manufacturing and bioresorbable electronic applications.

  19. Soapnut extract mediated synthesis of nanoscale cobalt substituted NdFeB ferromagnetic materials and their characterization

    Rao, G. V. S. Jayapala; Prasad, T. N. V. K. V.; Shameer, Syed; Rao, M. Purnachandra

    2018-04-01

    Neodymium iron boron (NdFeB) permanent magnets have high energy product with suitable magnetic and physical properties for an array of applications including power generation and motors. However, synthetic routes of NdFeB permanent magnets involve critical procedures with high energy and needs scientific skills. Herein, we report on soapnut extract mediated synthesis of nanoscale cobalt substituted NdFeB (Co-NdFeB) permanent magnetic powders (Nd: 15%, Fe: 77.5%, B: 7.5% and Co with molar ratios: 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2). A 10 ml of 10% soapnut extract was added to 90 ml of respective chemical composition and heated to 60 °C for 30 min and aged for 24 h. The dried powder was sintered at 500 °C for 1 h. The characterization of the prepared nanoscale Co-NdFeB magnetic powders was done using the techniques such as Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS for size and zeta potential measurements), X-ray diffraction (XRD) for structural determination, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) for surface morphological and elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) for the identification of functional groups associated and hysteresis loop studies to quantify the magnetization. The results revealed that particles were in irregular and tubular shaped and highly stable (Zeta potential: -44.4 mV) with measured size <100 nm. XRD micrographs revealed a tetragonal crystal structure and FTIR showed predominant N-H and O-H stretching indicates the involvement of these functional groups in the reduction and stabilization process of Co-NdFeB magnetic powders. Hysteresis studies signify the effect of an increase in Co concentration.

  20. Nanoscale thermal transport

    Cahill, David G.; Ford, Wayne K.; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Merlin, Roberto; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2003-01-01

    Rapid progress in the synthesis and processing of materials with structure on nanometer length scales has created a demand for greater scientific understanding of thermal transport in nanoscale devices, individual nanostructures, and nanostructured materials. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation that have occurred in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces between materials become increasingly important on small length scales. The thermal conductance of many solid-solid interfaces have been studied experimentally but the range of observed interface properties is much smaller than predicted by simple theory. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are emerging as a powerful tool for calculations of thermal conductance and phonon scattering, and may provide for a lively interplay of experiment and theory in the near term. Fundamental issues remain concerning the correct definitions of temperature in nonequilibrium nanoscale systems. Modern Si microelectronics are now firmly in the nanoscale regime—experiments have demonstrated that the close proximity of interfaces and the extremely small volume of heat dissipation strongly modifies thermal transport, thereby aggravating problems of thermal management. Microelectronic devices are too large to yield to atomic-level simulation in the foreseeable future and, therefore, calculations of thermal transport must rely on solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation; microscopic phonon scattering rates needed for predictive models are, even for Si, poorly known. Low-dimensional nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes, are predicted to have novel transport properties; the first quantitative experiments of the thermal conductivity of nanotubes have recently been achieved using microfabricated measurement systems. Nanoscale porosity decreases the permittivity of amorphous dielectrics but porosity also strongly decreases the thermal conductivity. The

  1. Electric control of emergent magnonic spin current and dynamic multiferroicity in magnetic insulators at finite temperatures

    Wang, Xi-guang; Chotorlishvili, L.; Guo, Guang-hua; Berakdar, J.

    2018-04-01

    Conversion of thermal energy into magnonic spin currents and/or effective electric polarization promises new device functionalities. A versatile approach is presented here for generating and controlling open circuit magnonic spin currents and an effective multiferroicity at a uniform temperature with the aid of spatially inhomogeneous, external, static electric fields. This field applied to a ferromagnetic insulator with a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya type coupling changes locally the magnon dispersion and modifies the density of thermally excited magnons in a region of the scale of the field inhomogeneity. The resulting gradient in the magnon density can be viewed as a gradient in the effective magnon temperature. This effective thermal gradient together with local magnon dispersion result in an open-circuit, electric field controlled magnonic spin current. In fact, for a moderate variation in the external electric field the predicted magnonic spin current is on the scale of the spin (Seebeck) current generated by a comparable external temperature gradient. Analytical methods supported by full-fledge numerics confirm that both, a finite temperature and an inhomogeneous electric field are necessary for this emergent non-equilibrium phenomena. The proposal can be integrated in magnonic and multiferroic circuits, for instance to convert heat into electrically controlled pure spin current using for example nanopatterning, without the need to generate large thermal gradients on the nanoscale.

  2. Low-field Switching Four-state Nonvolatile Memory Based on Multiferroic Tunnel Junctions

    Yau, H. M.; Yan, Z. B.; Chan, N. Y.; Au, K.; Wong, C. M.; Leung, C. W.; Zhang, F. Y.; Gao, X. S.; Dai, J. Y.

    2015-08-01

    Multiferroic tunneling junction based four-state non-volatile memories are very promising for future memory industry since this kind of memories hold the advantages of not only the higher density by scaling down memory cell but also the function of magnetically written and electrically reading. In this work, we demonstrate a success of this four-state memory in a material system of NiFe/BaTiO3/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 with improved memory characteristics such as lower switching field and larger tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR). Ferroelectric switching induced resistive change memory with OFF/ON ratio of 16 and 0.3% TMR effect have been achieved in this multiferroic tunneling structure.

  3. Multiferroic fluoride BaCoF4 Thin Films Grown Via Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Borisov, Pavel; Johnson, Trent; García-Castro, Camilo; Kc, Amit; Schrecongost, Dustin; Cen, Cheng; Romero, Aldo; Lederman, David

    Multiferroic materials exhibit exciting physics related to the simultaneous presence of multiple long-range orders, in many cases consisting of antiferromagnetic (AF) and ferroelectric (FE) orderings. In order to provide a new, promising route for fluoride-based multiferroic material engineering, we grew multiferroic fluoride BaCoF4 in thin film form on Al2O3 (0001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. The films grow with the orthorhombic b-axis out-of-plane and with three in-plane structural twin domains along the polar c-axis directions. The FE ordering in thin films was verified by FE remanent hysteresis loops measurements at T = 14 K and by room temperature piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM). An AF behavior was found below Neel temperature TN ~ 80 K, which is in agreement with the bulk properties. At lower temperatures two additional magnetic phase transitions at 19 K and 41 K were found. First-principles calculations demonstrated that the growth strain applied to the bulk BaCoF4 indeed favors two canted spin orders, along the b- and a-axes, respectively, in addition to the main AF spin order along the c-axis. Supported by FAME (Contract 2013-MA-2382), WV Research Challenge Grant (HEPC.dsr.12.29), and DMREF-NSF 1434897.

  4. Imaging the Spatial Distribution of Transport Currents and the Phenomenon of Nanoscale Phase Separation Phenomenon in CMR Materials

    Banerjee, Satyajit

    2007-01-01

    ... by transport currents sent through materials. Based on the above objective it was planned to apply this technique to investigate fundamental issues like magnetic phase separation in colossal magneto resistive materials as well as to investigate...

  5. PDMS-SiO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2}-CaO hybrid materials – Cytocompatibility and nanoscale surface features

    Almeida, J. Carlos [CICECO - Aveiro Institute of Materials, Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Wacha, András [Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Magyar Tudósok körútja 2, Budapest 1117 (Hungary); Gomes, Pedro S.; Fernandes, M. Helena R. [Laboratory for Bone Metabolism and Regeneration, Faculdade de Medicina Dentária, Universidade do Porto (Portugal); Fernandes, M. Helena Vaz [CICECO - Aveiro Institute of Materials, Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Salvado, Isabel M. Miranda, E-mail: isabelmsalvado@ua.pt [CICECO - Aveiro Institute of Materials, Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2016-07-01

    Two PDMS-SiO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2}-CaO porous hybrid materials were prepared using the same base composition, precursors, and solvents, but following two different sol-gel procedures, based on the authors' previous works where for the first time, in this hybrid system, calcium acetate was used as calcium source. The two different procedures resulted in monolithic materials with different structures, microstructures, and surface wettability. Even though both are highly hydrophobic (contact angles of 127.2° and 150.6°), and present different filling regimes due to different surface topographies, they have demonstrated to be cytocompatible when tested with human osteoblastic cells, against the accepted idea that high-hydrophobic surfaces are not suitable to cell adhesion and proliferation. At the nanoscale, the existence of hydrophilic silica domains containing calcium, where water molecules are physisorbed, is assumed to support this capability, as discussed. - Highlights: • Two hybrid materials were prepared following two different sol-gel procedures. • Both are highly hydrophobic but demonstrated to be cytocompatible. • Different filling regimes were observed.

  6. Grain size and nanoscale effects on the nonlinear pull-in instability and vibrations of electrostatic actuators made of nanocrystalline material

    Gholami, R.; Ansari, R.

    2018-01-01

    Presented herein is the study of grain size, grain surface energy and small scale effects on the nonlinear pull-in instability and free vibration of electrostatic nanoscale actuators made of nanocrystalline silicon (Nc-Si). A Mori-Tanaka micromechanical model is utilized to calculate the effective material properties of Nc-Si considering material structure inhomogeneity, grain size and grain surface energy. The small-scale effect is also taken into account using Mindlin’s strain gradient theory. Governing equations are derived in the discretized weak form using the variational differential quadrature method based on the third-order shear defamation beam theory in conjunction with the von Kármán hypothesis. The electrostatic actuation is modeled considering the fringing field effects based upon the parallel plate approximation. Moreover, the Casimir force effect is considered. The pseudo arc-length continuation technique is used to obtain the applied voltage-deflection curve of Nc-Si actuators. Then, a time-dependent small disturbance around the deflected configuration is assumed to solve the free vibration problem. By performing a numerical study, the influences of various factors such as length scale parameter, volume fraction of the inclusion phase, density ratio, average inclusion radius and Casimir force on the pull-in instability and free vibration of Nc-Si actuators are investigated.

  7. Nanoscale Characterization for the Classroom

    Carroll, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the development of a semester course in 'nano-scale characterization'. The interdisciplinary course is opened to both advanced undergraduate and graduate students with a standard undergraduate preparation in Materials Science, Chemistry, or Physics. The approach is formal rather than the typical 'research seminar' and has a laboratory component

  8. Improved Understanding of Space Radiation Effects on Exploration Electronics by Advanced Modeling of Nanoscale Devices and Novel Materials, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future NASA space exploration missions will use nanometer-scale electronic technologies which call for a shift in how radiation effects in such devices and materials...

  9. Dynamic state switching in nonlinear multiferroic cantilevers

    Wang, Yi; Onuta, Tiberiu-Dan; Long, Christian J.; Lofland, Samuel E.; Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate read-write-read-erase cyclical mechanical-memory properties of all-thin-film multiferroic heterostructured Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48) O3 / Fe0.7Ga0.3 cantilevers when a high enough voltage around the resonant frequency of the device is applied on the Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48) O3 piezo-film. The device state switching process occurs due to the presence of a hysteresis loop in the piezo-film frequency response, which comes from the nonlinear behavior of the cantilever. The reference frequency at which the strain-mediated Fe0.7Ga0.3 based multiferroic device switches can also be tuned by applying a DC magnetic field bias that contributes to the increase of the cantilever effective stiffness. The switching dynamics is mapped in the phase space of the device measured transfer function characteristic for such high piezo-film voltage excitation, providing additional information on the dynamical stability of the devices.

  10. Multiferroic iron oxide thin films at room temperature

    Gich, M.; Fina, I.; Morelli, Alessio; Sánchez, F.; Alexe, M.; Gazquez, J.; Fontcuberta, J.; Roig, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 27 (2014), s. 4645-4652 ISSN 0935-9648 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : multiferroic * iron oxide * thin film Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 17.493, year: 2014

  11. Growth of multiferroic Gd1-xYxMnO3 single crystals by optical floating zone technique

    Sarguna, R.M.; Ganesamoorthy, S.; Sridharan, V.; Subramanian, N.

    2014-01-01

    Rare earth manganites RMnO 3 with distorted perovskite structure are excellent multiferroic materials. The discovery of magnetic spin driven ferroelectricity in orthorhombic manganites (TbMnO 3 ) has sparked a surge in research into understanding the fundamental mechanism of multiferroic behavior. These systems fall under the category of type-2 multiferroics, the change of spatially modulated magnetic moment from sinusoidal to cycloidal gives rise to electric polarization. The magnetic structure depends upon the Mn-O-Mn bond angle. GdMnO 3 shows multiferroic properties only in the presence of applied magnetic field. When a magnetic field is applied along the b-axis, GdMnO 3 enters a ferroelectric state with an electric polarisation along the c-axis. By altering the Mn-O-Mn angle it is expected that GdMnO 3 will show multiferroic property even in the absence of magnetic field like TbMnO 3 . To alter the Mn-O-Mn bond angle GdMnO 3 was substituted with Y having lower ionic radius at Gd site. The effect of Y doping at the rare-earth site in GdMnO 3 investigated on polycrystalline samples of Gd 1-x Y x MnO 3 demonstrated a magneto-electric coupling in x=0.1-0.4. Single crystals are expected to give much amplified signal in respect of ferroelectric and magnetic properties. In this work we have grown Y substituted Gd 1-x Y x MnO 3 (x = 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4) by optical floating zone technique under different gas atmosphere. Growth rate of 1-2 mm/h yielded crack free crystals. Quality of the crystals was checked using Laue diffraction. Effect of growth rate and atmosphere pressure will be presented in this talk. (author)

  12. Magnetic structure analyses of multiferroics RMnO3 and RMn2O5

    Arima, Taka-hisa; Kimura, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic structure of typical multiferroic materials RMnO 3 and RMn 2 O 5 (R:rare earth) has been investigated by neutron diffraction. Magnetic structure analysis using single crystal revealed that both the materials have a cycloidal magnetic structure, where ferroelectricity arises. Polarized neutron diffraction under electric field found the one-to-one correspondence between the direction of cycloidal rotation (spin chirality) and the direction of the electric polarization, evincing that the electric polarization is directly induced by the cycloidal magnetic order. (author)

  13. In vitro Alternative Methodologies for Central Nervous System Assessment: A Critique using Nanoscale Materials as an Example.

    Identifying the potential health hazards to the central nervous system of a new family of materials presents many challenges. Whole-animal toxicity testing has been the tradition, but in vitro methods have been steadily gaining popularity. There are numerous challenges in testing...

  14. Creative scientific research international session of 2nd meeting on advanced pulsed-neutron research on quantum functions in nano-scale materials

    Itoh, Shinichi

    2005-06-01

    1 MW-class pulsed-neutron sources will be constructed in Japan, United State and United Kingdom in a few years. Now is the time for a challenge to innovate on neutron science and extend new science fields. Toward the new era, we develop new pulsed-neutron technologies as well as new neutron devices under the international collaborations with existing pulsed-neutron facilities, such as the UK-Japan collaboration program on neutron scattering. At the same time, the new era will bring international competitions to neutron researchers. We aim to create new neutron science toward the new pulsed-neutron era by introducing the new technologies developed here. For this purpose, we have started the research project, 'Advanced pulsed-neutron research on quantum functions in nano-scale materials,' in the duration between JFY2004 and JFY2008. The 2nd meeting of this project was held on 22-24 February 2005 to summarize activities in FY2004 and to propose research projects in the coming new fiscal year. In this international session as a part of this meeting, the scientific results and research plans on the UK-Japan collaboration program, the research plans on the collaboration between IPNS (Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, Argonne National Laboratory) and KENS (Neutron Science Laboratory, KEK), also the recent scientific results arisen form this project were presented. (author)

  15. Chitosan capped nanoscale Fe-MIL-88B-NH2 metal-organic framework as drug carrier material for the pH responsive delivery of doxorubicin

    Sivakumar, P.; Priyatharshni, S.; Nagashanmugam, K. B.; Thanigaivelan, A.; Kumar, K.

    2017-08-01

    In recent years nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (NMOFs) are contributing as an effective material for use in drug delivery and imaging applications due to their porous surfaces and easy surface modifications. In this work, Fe-MIL-88B-NH2 NMOFs were successfully synthesized on facile hydrothermal route and 2-aminoterephthalic acid (NH2-BDC) was employed as a bridging ligand to activate amine functional groups on the surface. Amine functional groups not only serve as a structure stabilizing agent but also enhance the loading efficiency of the doxorubicin (DOX) anticancer drug. A pH responsive DOX release was realized by introducing a positively charged chitosan (Chi) capping layer. Upon Chi-coating, cleavage was observed in the Fe-MIL-88B-NH2 structure at acidic pH, while gel-like insoluble structure was formed at basic pH. By utilizing this phenomenon, a pH responsive DOX release system was developed by using Chi capped Fe-MIL-88B-NH2 NMOFs under the designed pH (4.0-8.0). The results suggest the Chi capped Fe-MIL-88B-NH2 can be a promising candidate for future pH responsive drug delivery systems.

  16. In vivo micronucleus studies with 6 titanium dioxide materials (3 pigment-grade & 3 nanoscale) in orally-exposed rats.

    Donner, E M; Myhre, A; Brown, S C; Boatman, R; Warheit, D B

    2016-02-01

    Six pigment-grade (pg) or ultrafine (uf)/nanoscale (anatase and/or rutile) titanium dioxide (TiO2) particulates were evaluated for in vivo genotoxicity (OECD 474 Guidelines) in male and female rats by two different laboratories. All test materials were robustly characterized. The BET surface areas of the pg and uf samples ranged from 7 to 17 m(2)/g and 50 to 82 m(2)/g respectively. The materials were assessed for induction of micronuclei and toxicity in bone marrow by analyzing peripheral blood reticulocytes (RETs) by flow cytometry. Single oral gavage doses of 500, 1000 or 2000 mg/kg body weight (bw) of each material were implemented with concurrent negative (water) and positive controls (cyclophosphamide). Approximately 48 and 72 h after exposure, blood samples were collected and 20,000 RETs per animal were analyzed. For each of the six tests, there were no biologically or toxicologically relevant increases in the micronucleated RET frequency in any TiO2 exposed group at either time point at any dose level. In addition, there were a lack of biologically relevant decreases in %RETs among total erythrocytes. All six TiO2 test substances were negative for in vivo genotoxicity effects; however, it is noted that the exposure to target tissues was likely negligible. One pigment grade and one ultrafine material each were evaluated for potential systemic exposure/uptake from the gastrointestinal tract by analysis of TiO2 into blood and liver. No significant increases in TiO2 over controls were measured in blood (48 or 72 h) or liver (72 h) following exposures to 2000 mg/kg bw TiO2. These data indicate that there was no absorption of the test material from the gastrointestinal tract into the blood circulation and the lack of genotoxic effects is therefore attributed to a lack of exposure due to the inability of the test material to migrate from the gastrointestinal tract into the blood and then into target tissues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  17. Removal of Cr(VI from Water Using a New Reactive Material: Magnesium Oxide Supported Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron

    Alessio Siciliano

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The chromium pollution of water is an important environmental and health issue. Cr(VI removal by means of metallic iron is an attractive method. Specifically, nanoscopic zero valent iron (NZVI shows great reactivity, however, its applicability needs to be further investigated. In the present paper, NZVI was supported on MgO grains to facilitate the treatments for remediation of chromium-contaminated waters. The performances and mechanisms of the developed composite, in the removal of hexavalent chromium, were investigated by means of batch and continuous tests. Kinetic studies, under different operating conditions, showed that reduction of Cr(VI could be expressed by a pseudo second-order reaction kinetic. The reaction rate increased with the square of Fe(0 amount, while it was inversely proportional to the initial chromium concentration. The process performance was satisfactory also under uncontrolled pH, and a limited influence of temperature was observed. The reactive material was efficiently reusable for many cycles without any regeneration treatment. The performances in continuous tests were close to 97% for about 80 pore volume of reactive material.

  18. Patterning high explosives at the nanoscale

    Nafday, Omkar A.; Pitchimani, Rajasekar; Weeks, Brandon L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Haaheim, Jason [NanoInk Inc., 8025 Lamon Ave., Skokie, IL 60077 (United States)

    2006-10-15

    For the first time, we have shown that spin coating and Dip pen nanolithography (DPN trademark) are simple methods of preparing energetic materials such as PETN and HMX on the nanoscale, requiring no heating of the energetic material. Nanoscale patterning has been demonstrated by the DPN method while continuous thin films were produced using the spin coating method. Results are presented for preparing continuous PETN thin films of nanometer thickness by the spin coating method and for controlling the architecture of arbitrary nanoscale patterns of PETN and HMX by the DPN method. These methods are simple for patterning energetic materials and can be extended beyond PETN and HMX, opening the door for fundamental studies at the nanoscale. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. Analytical modeling and simulation of subthreshold behavior in nanoscale dual material gate AlGaN/GaN HEMT

    Kumar, Sona P.; Agrawal, Anju; Chaujar, Rishu; Gupta, Mridula; Gupta, R. S.

    2008-07-01

    A two-dimensional (2-D) analytical model for a Dual Material Gate (DMG) AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) has been developed to demonstrate the unique attributes of this device structure in suppressing short channel effects (SCEs). The model accurately predicts the channel potential, electric field variation along the channel, and sub-threshold drain current, taking into account the effect of lengths of the two gate metals, their work functions, barrier layer thicknesses, and applied drain biases. It is seen that the SCEs and hot carrier effects in DMG AlGaN/GaN HEMT are suppressed due to the work function difference of the two metal gates, thereby screening the drain potential variations by the gate near the drain. Besides, a more uniform electric field along the channel leads to improved carrier transport efficiency. The accuracy of the results obtained from our analytical model has been verified using ATLAS device simulations.

  20. Kinetics of the melting front movement in process of centrifugal induction surfacing of powder material with nanoscale modificaters

    Sasnouski, I.; Kurylionak, A.

    2018-03-01

    For solving the problem of improving the powder coatings modified by nanostructure components obtained by induction surfacing method tribological characteristics it is necessary to study the kinetics of the powdered layer melting and define the minimum time of melting. For powdered layer predetermined temperature maintenance at sintering mode stage it is required to determine the temperature difference through blank thickness of the for one hundred-day of the define the warm-up swing on of the stocking up by solving the thermal conductivity stationary problem for quill (hollow) cylinder with internal heat source. Herewith, since in practice thickness of the cylinder wall is much less then its diameter and the temperature difference is comparatively small, the thermal conductivity dependence upon the temperature can be treated as negligible. As it was shown by our previous studies, in the induction heating process under powdered material centrifugal surfacing (i.e. before achieving the melting temperature) the temperature distribution in powdered layer thickness may be considered even. Hereinafter, considering the blank part induction heating process quasi-stationarity under Fo big values, it is possible to consider its internal surface heating as developing with constant velocity. As a result of development the melting front movement mathematical model in a powdered material with nanostructure modifiers the minimum surfacing time is defined. It allows to minimize negative impact of thermal influence on formation of applied coating structure, to raise productivity of the process, to lower power inputs and to ensure saving of nonferrous and high alloys by reducing the allowance for machining. The difference of developed mathematical model of melting front movement from previously known is that the surface temperature from which the heat transfer occures is a variable and varies with a time after the linear law.

  1. Electroless deposition and nanolithography can control the formation of materials at the nano-scale for plasmonic applications

    Coluccio, Maria Laura; Gentile, Francesco; Francardi, Marco; Perozziello, Gerardo; Malara, Natalia; Candeloro, Patrizio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2014-01-01

    The new revolution in materials science is being driven by our ability to manipulate matter at the molecular level to create structures with novel functions and properties. The aim of this paper is to explore new strategies to obtain plasmonic metal nanostructures through the combination of a top down method, that is electron beam lithography, and a bottom up technique, that is the chemical electroless deposition. This technique allows a tight control over the shape and size of bi- and three-dimensional metal patterns at the nano scale. The resulting nanostructures can be used as constituents of Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) substrates, where the electromagnetic field is strongly amplified. Our results indicate that, in electroless growth, high quality metal nanostructures with sizes below 50 nm may be easily obtained. These findings were explained within the framework of a diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) model, that is a simulation model that makes it possible to decipher, at an atomic level, the rules governing the evolution of the growth front; moreover, we give a description of the physical echanisms of growth at a basic level. In the discussion, we show how these findings can be utilized to fabricate dimers of silver nanospheres where the size and shape of those spheres is controlled with extreme precision and can be used for very large area SERS substrates and nano-optics, for single molecule detection. 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  2. Nano-Scale Au Supported on Carbon Materials for the Low Temperature Water Gas Shift (WGS Reaction

    Paula Sánchez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Au-based catalysts supported on carbon materials with different structures such as graphite (G and fishbone type carbon nanofibers (CNF-F were prepared using two different methods (impregnation and gold-sol to be tested in the water gas shift (WGS reaction. Atomic absorption spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Raman spectroscopy, elemental analyses (CNH, N2 adsorption-desorption analysis, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR and temperature-programmed decomposition were employed to characterize both the supports and catalysts. Both the crystalline nature of the carbon supports and the method of gold incorporation had a strong influence on the way in which Au particles were deposited on the carbon surface. The higher crystallinity and the smaller and well dispersed Au particle size were, the higher activity of the catalysts in the WGS reaction was noted. Finally, catalytic activity showed an important dependence on the reaction temperature and steam-to-CO molar ratio.

  3. Electroless deposition and nanolithography can control the formation of materials at the nano-scale for plasmonic applications

    Coluccio, Maria Laura

    2014-03-27

    The new revolution in materials science is being driven by our ability to manipulate matter at the molecular level to create structures with novel functions and properties. The aim of this paper is to explore new strategies to obtain plasmonic metal nanostructures through the combination of a top down method, that is electron beam lithography, and a bottom up technique, that is the chemical electroless deposition. This technique allows a tight control over the shape and size of bi- and three-dimensional metal patterns at the nano scale. The resulting nanostructures can be used as constituents of Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) substrates, where the electromagnetic field is strongly amplified. Our results indicate that, in electroless growth, high quality metal nanostructures with sizes below 50 nm may be easily obtained. These findings were explained within the framework of a diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) model, that is a simulation model that makes it possible to decipher, at an atomic level, the rules governing the evolution of the growth front; moreover, we give a description of the physical echanisms of growth at a basic level. In the discussion, we show how these findings can be utilized to fabricate dimers of silver nanospheres where the size and shape of those spheres is controlled with extreme precision and can be used for very large area SERS substrates and nano-optics, for single molecule detection. 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  4. Electroless Deposition and Nanolithography Can Control the Formation of Materials at the Nano-Scale for Plasmonic Applications

    Maria Laura Coluccio

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The new revolution in materials science is being driven by our ability to manipulate matter at the molecular level to create structures with novel functions and properties. The aim of this paper is to explore new strategies to obtain plasmonic metal nanostructures through the combination of a top down method, that is electron beam lithography, and a bottom up technique, that is the chemical electroless deposition. This technique allows a tight control over the shape and size of bi- and three-dimensional metal patterns at the nano scale. The resulting nanostructures can be used as constituents of Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS substrates, where the electromagnetic field is strongly amplified. Our results indicate that, in electroless growth, high quality metal nanostructures with sizes below 50 nm may be easily obtained. These findings were explained within the framework of a diffusion limited aggregation (DLA model, that is a simulation model that makes it possible to decipher, at an atomic level, the rules governing the evolution of the growth front; moreover, we give a description of the physical mechanisms of growth at a basic level. In the discussion, we show how these findings can be utilized to fabricate dimers of silver nanospheres where the size and shape of those spheres is controlled with extreme precision and can be used for very large area SERS substrates and nano-optics, for single molecule detection.

  5. The First Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Luminescent Multiferroic: (Pyrrolidinium)MnBr3.

    Zhang, Yi; Liao, Wei-Qiang; Fu, Da-Wei; Ye, Heng-Yun; Liu, Cai-Ming; Chen, Zhong-Ning; Xiong, Ren-Gen

    2015-07-08

    A hybrid organic-inorganic compound, (pyrrolidinium)MnBr3 , distinguished from rare earth (RE)-doped inorganic perovskites, is discovered as a new member of the ferroelectrics family, having excellent luminescent properties and relatively large spontaneous polarization of 6 μC cm(-2) , as well as a weak ferromagnetism at about 2.4 K. With a quantum yield of >28% and emission lifetime >0.1 ms, such multiferroic photoluminescence is a suitable candidate for future applications in luminescence materials, photovoltaics, and magneto-optoelectronic devices. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Multiferroic BiFeO3-BiMnO3 Nanocheckerboard From First Principles

    Palova, L.; Chandra, P.; Rabe, K. M.

    2010-01-01

    We present a first principles study of an unusual heterostructure, an atomic-scale checkerboard of BiFeO3-BiMnO3, and compare its properties to the two bulk constituent materials, BiFeO3 and BiMnO3. The "nanocheckerboard" is found to have a multiferroic ground state with the desired properties of each constituent: polar and ferrimagnetic due to BiFeO3 and BiMnO3, respectively. The effect of B-site cation ordering on magnetic ordering in the BiFeO3-BiMnO3 system is studied. The checkerboard ge...

  7. Multicaloric effect in bi-layer multiferroic composites

    Vopson, M. M.; Zhou, D.; Caruntu, G.

    2015-01-01

    The multicaloric effect was theoretically proposed in 2012 and, despite numerous follow up studies, the effect still awaits experimental confirmation. The main limitation is the fact that the multicaloric effect is only observed at a temperature equal to the transition temperature of the magnetic and electric phases coexisting within a multiferroic (MF) (i.e., T ≈ T c m  ≈ T c e ). Such condition is hard to fulfill in single phase MFs and a solution is to develop suitable composite MF materials. Here, we examine the multicaloric effect in a bi-layer laminated composite MF in order to determine the optimal design parameters for best caloric response. We show that magnetically induced multicaloric effect requires magnetic component of heat capacity smaller than that of the electric phase, while the layer thickness of the magnetic phase must be at least 5 times the thickness of the electric phase. The electrically induced multicaloric effect requires the magnetic layer to be 10% of the electric phase thickness, while its heat capacity must be larger than that of the electric phase. These selection rules are generally applicable to bulk as well as thin film MF composites for optimal multicaloric effect

  8. Fast heat flux modulation at the nanoscale

    van Zwol, P. J.; Joulain, K.; Abdallah, P. Ben; Greffet, J. J.; Chevrier, J.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a new concept for electrically controlled heat flux modulation. A flux contrast larger than 10 dB is expected with switching time on the order of tens of nanoseconds. Heat flux modulation is based on the interplay between radiative heat transfer at the nanoscale and phase change materials. Such large contrasts are not obtainable in solids, or in far field. As such this opens up new horizons for temperature modulation and actuation at the nanoscale.

  9. Highly Sensitive Switchable Heterojunction Photodiode Based on Epitaxial Bi2FeCrO6 Multiferroic Thin Films.

    Huang, Wei; Chakrabartty, Joyprokash; Harnagea, Catalin; Gedamu, Dawit; Ka, Ibrahima; Chaker, Mohamed; Rosei, Federico; Nechache, Riad

    2018-04-18

    Perovskite multiferroic oxides are promising materials for the realization of sensitive and switchable photodiodes because of their favorable band gap (heterojunction was fabricated by pulsed laser deposition. The heterojunction photodiode exhibits a large ideality factor ( n = ∼5.0) and a response time as fast as 68 ms, thanks to the effective charge carrier transport and collection at the BFCO/SRO interface. The diode can switch direction when the electric polarization is reversed by an external voltage pulse. The time-resolved photoluminescence decay of the device measured at ∼500 nm demonstrates an ultrafast charge transfer (lifetime = ∼6.4 ns) in BFCO/SRO heteroepitaxial structures. The estimated responsivity value at 500 nm and zero bias is 0.38 mA W -1 , which is so far the highest reported for any FE thin film photodiode. Our work highlights the huge potential for using multiferroic oxides to fabricate highly sensitive and switchable photodiodes.

  10. Dynamics at the nanoscale

    Stoneham, A.M.; Gavartin, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    However fascinating structures may be at the nanoscale, time-dependent behaviour at the nanoscale has far greater importance. Some of the dynamics is random, with fluctuations controlling rate processes and making thermal ratchets possible. Some of the dynamics causes the transfer of energy, of signals, or of charge. Such transfers are especially efficiently controlled in biological systems. Other dynamical processes occur when we wish to control the nanoscale, e.g., to avoid local failures of gate dielectrics, or to manipulate structures by electronic excitation, to use spin manipulation in quantum information processing. Our prime purpose is to make clear the enormous range and variety of time-dependent nanoscale phenomena

  11. Probing the nanoscale interaction forces and elastic properties of organic and inorganic materials using force-distance (F-D) spectroscopy

    Vincent, Abhilash

    Due to their therapeutic applications such as radical scavenging, MRI contrast imaging, Photoluminescence imaging, drug delivery, etc., nanoparticles (NPs) have a significant importance in bio-nanotechnology. The reason that prevents the utilizing NPs for drug delivery in medical field is mostly due to their biocompatibility issues (incompatibility can lead to toxicity and cell death). Changes in the surface conditions of NPs often lead to NP cytotoxicity. Investigating the role of NP surface properties (surface charges and surface chemistry) on their interactions with biomolecules (Cells, protein and DNA) could enhance the current understanding of NP cytotoxicity. Hence, it is highly beneficial to the nanotechnology community to bring more attention towards the enhancement of surface properties of NPs to make them more biocompatible and less toxic to biological systems. Surface functionalization of NPs using specific ligand biomolecules have shown to enhance the protein adsorption and cellular uptake through more favorable interaction pathways. Cerium oxide NPs (CNPs also known as nanoceria) are potential antioxidants in cell culture models and understanding the nature of interaction between cerium oxide NPs and biological proteins and cells are important due to their therapeutic application (especially in site specific drug delivery systems). The surface charges and surface chemistry of CNPs play a major role in protein adsorption and cellular uptake. Hence, by tuning the surface charges and by selecting proper functional molecules on the surface, CNPs exhibiting strong adhesion to biological materials can be prepared. By probing the nanoscale interaction forces acting between CNPs and protein molecules using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based force-distance (F-D) spectroscopy, the mechanism of CNP-protein adsorption and CNP cellular uptake can be understood more quantitatively. The work presented in this dissertation is based on the application of AFM in

  12. Multiferroicity in an organic charge-transfer salt that is suggestive of electric-dipole-driven magnetism

    Lunkenheimer, Peter; Müller, Jens; Krohns, Stephan; Schrettle, Florian; Loidl, Alois; Hartmann, Benedikt; Rommel, Robert; de Souza, Mariano; Hotta, Chisa; Schlueter, John A.; Lang, Michael

    2012-09-01

    Multiferroics, showing simultaneous ordering of electrical and magnetic degrees of freedom, are remarkable materials as seen from both the academic and technological points of view. A prominent mechanism of multiferroicity is the spin-driven ferroelectricity, often found in frustrated antiferromagnets with helical spin order. There, as for conventional ferroelectrics, the electrical dipoles arise from an off-centre displacement of ions. However, recently a different mechanism, namely purely electronic ferroelectricity, where charge order breaks inversion symmetry, has attracted considerable interest. Here we provide evidence for ferroelectricity, accompanied by antiferromagnetic spin order, in a two-dimensional organic charge-transfer salt, thus representing a new class of multiferroics. We propose a charge-order-driven mechanism leading to electronic ferroelectricity in this material. Quite unexpectedly for electronic ferroelectrics, dipolar and spin order arise nearly simultaneously. This can be ascribed to the loss of spin frustration induced by the ferroelectric ordering. Hence, here the spin order is driven by the ferroelectricity, in marked contrast to the spin-driven ferroelectricity in helical magnets.

  13. Magnetodielectric coupling in multiferroic holmium iron garnets

    Malar Selvi, M.; Chakraborty, Deepannita; Venkateswaran, C.

    2017-01-01

    Single phase magneto-electric multiferroics require a large magnetic or electric field for producing magneto-electric (ME) and magnetodielectric (MD) effects. For utilizing these effects in devices investigations on the room temperature and low field MD studies are necessary. Recently, efforts have been largely devoted to the investigation of rare earth iron garnets. In the physical method, the preparation of rare earth iron garnet requires high sintering temperature and processing time. To solve these problems, ball milling assisted microwave sintering technique is used to prepare nanocrystalline holmium iron garnets (Ho_3Fe_5O_1_2). Magnetic and dielectric properties of the prepared sample are investigated. These properties get enhanced in nanocrystalline form when compared to the bulk. The MD coupling of the prepared sample is evident from the anomaly in the temperature dependent dielectric constant plot and the ME coupling susceptibility is derived from the room temperature MD measurements. - Highlights: • Formation of single phase Holmium iron garnet reported. • Ball milling assisted microwave sintering reduces the sintering temperature and time. • Holmium iron garnet shows enhanced magnetic and dielectric properties. • Pyromagnetic and pyroelectric measurements confirm the magnetoelectric coupling. • Room temperature magnetodielectric measurements show the nonlinear behaviour.

  14. Analysis of magnetic correlations in layered or multiferroic transition element oxides using neutron diffraction

    Finger, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Due to a great variety of physical phenomena the material class of transition metal oxides offers a large field of work for researchers, the more so as many underlying mechanisms are not understood yet. Of these materials a set of systems closely related to the manganates is investigated in this thesis via neutron scattering, emphasizing the analysis of magnetic correlations. It is shown, that for doping concentrations 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.5 the Co 2+ -ions in the layered cobaltates always exhibit a high-spin state with S = (3)/(2), whereas existing Co 3+ -ions adopt a low-spin state with S = 0 and stay non-magnetic. Furthermore, the magnetic correlations of three chiral multiferroics are investigated: Firstly, in MnWO 4 a memory effect is described; the crystal remembers its preceding chiral state even in the paramagnetic phase. In TbMnO 3 chiral fluctuations slightly above the multiferroic transition are investigated; it is possible to switch them by an applied external E-field. Finally, in DyMnO 3 the magnetic excitations are examined for the first time; they are comparable to those in TbMnO 3 .

  15. Understanding the spin-driven polarizations in Bi MO3 (M = 3 d transition metals) multiferroics

    Kc, Santosh; Lee, Jun Hee; Cooper, Valentino R.

    Bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) , a promising multiferroic, stabilizes in a perovskite type rhombohedral crystal structure (space group R3c) at room temperature. Recently, it has been reported that in its ground state it possess a huge spin-driven polarization. To probe the underlying mechanism of this large spin-phonon response, we examine these couplings within other Bi based 3 d transition metal oxides Bi MO3 (M = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni) using density functional theory. Our results demonstrate that this large spin-driven polarization is a consequence of symmetry breaking due to competition between ferroelectric distortions and anti-ferrodistortive octahedral rotations. Furthermore, we find a strong dependence of these enhanced spin-driven polarizations on the crystal structure; with the rhombohedral phase having the largest spin-induced atomic distortions along [111]. These results give us significant insights into the magneto-electric coupling in these materials which is essential to the magnetic and electric field control of electric polarization and magnetization in multiferroic based devices. Research is supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering Division and the Office of Science Early Career Research Program (V.R.C) and used computational resources at NERSC.

  16. Electric modulation of conduction in multiferroic Ca-doped BiFeO3 films

    Yang, C.-H.; Seidel, J.; Kim, S. Y.; Rossen, P. B.; Yu, P.; Gajek, M.; Chu, Y. H.; Martin, L. W.; Holcomb, M. B.; He, Q.; Maksymovych, P.; Balke, N.; Kalinin, S. V.; Baddorf, A. P.; Basu, S. R.; Scullin, M. L.; Ramesh, R.

    2009-06-01

    Many interesting materials phenomena such as the emergence of high-Tc superconductivity in the cuprates and colossal magnetoresistance in the manganites arise out of a doping-driven competition between energetically similar ground states. Doped multiferroics present a tantalizing evolution of this generic concept of phase competition. Here, we present the observation of an electronic conductor-insulator transition by control of band-filling in the model antiferromagnetic ferroelectric BiFeO3 through Ca doping. Application of electric field enables us to control and manipulate this electronic transition to the extent that a p-n junction can be created, erased and inverted in this material. A `dome-like' feature in the doping dependence of the ferroelectric transition is observed around a Ca concentration of ~1/8, where a new pseudo-tetragonal phase appears and the electric modulation of conduction is optimized. Possible mechanisms for the observed effects are discussed on the basis of the interplay of ionic and electronic conduction. This observation opens the door to merging magnetoelectrics and magnetoelectronics at room temperature by combining electronic conduction with electric and magnetic degrees of freedom already present in the multiferroic BiFeO3.

  17. A concept for a magnetic field detector underpinned by the nonlinear dynamics of coupled multiferroic devices

    Beninato, A.; Emery, T.; Baglio, S.; Andò, B.; Bulsara, A. R.; Jenkins, C.; Palkar, V.

    2013-12-01

    Multiferroic (MF) composites, in which magnetic and ferroelectric orders coexist, represent a very attractive class of materials with promising applications in areas, such as spintronics, memories, and sensors. One of the most important multiferroics is the perovskite phase of bismuth ferrite, which exhibits weak magnetoelectric properties at room temperature; its properties can be enhanced by doping with other elements such as dysprosium. A recent paper has demonstrated that a thin film of Bi0.7Dy0.3FeO3 shows good magnetoelectric coupling. In separate work it has been shown that a carefully crafted ring connection of N (N odd and N ≥ 3) ferroelectric capacitors yields, past a critical point, nonlinear oscillations that can be exploited for electric (E) field sensing. These two results represent the starting point of our work. In this paper the (electrical) hysteresis, experimentally measured in the MF material Bi0.7Dy0.3FeO3, is characterized with the applied magnetic field (B) taken as a control parameter. This yields a "blueprint" for a magnetic (B) field sensor: a ring-oscillator coupling of N = 3 Sawyer-Tower circuits each underpinned by a mutliferroic element. In this configuration, the changes induced in the ferroelectric behavior by the external or "target" B-field are quantified, thus providing a pathway for very low power and high sensitivity B-field sensing.

  18. Molten salts activated by high-energy milling: A useful, low-temperature route for the synthesis of multiferroic compounds

    Hernández-Ramírez, Anayantzin; Martínez-Luévanos, Antonia [Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Autónoma de Coahuila, V. Carranza s/n, Saltillo, Coahuila 25280 (Mexico); Fuentes, Antonio F. [CINVESTAV Unidad Saltillo, Apdo. Postal 663, Saltillo, Coahuila 25000 (Mexico); Earth and Environmental Science, University of Michigan, 3514 C.C. Little Building, 1100 N. University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1005 (United States); Nelson, Anna-Gay D.; Ewing, Rodney C. [Earth and Environmental Science, University of Michigan, 3514 C.C. Little Building, 1100 N. University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1005 (United States); Montemayor, Sagrario M., E-mail: smmontemayor@gmail.com [Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Autónoma de Coahuila, V. Carranza s/n, Saltillo, Coahuila 25280 (Mexico); Earth and Environmental Science, University of Michigan, 3514 C.C. Little Building, 1100 N. University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1005 (United States)

    2014-01-25

    Highlights: • The synthesis route purposed demonstrates the formation of BiFeO{sub 3} at only 500 °C. • The magnetic and ferroelectric properties are comparable to those of bulk BiFeO{sub 3}. • By this route, several phases in Bi{sub 1−x}La{sub x}FeO{sub 3} system are obtained at only 500 °C. • The route developed here could be useful to synthesize other perovskite-type oxides. -- Abstract: There are only a few multiferroic compounds, among which BiFeO{sub 3} is the most important. Research the synthesis of bismuth ferrite, with novel and improved magnetic and electrical properties, has been mainly based on the use of hydrothermal or sol gel methods. However, these methods require either rather extreme conditions or several steps for synthesis. We demonstrate that the use of molten salts, activated by high energy milling, results in pure nanometric BiFeO{sub 3}, LaFeO{sub 3} and intermediate phases in the Bi{sub 1−x}La{sub x}FeO{sub 3} system. The chemical reagents used are Bi(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}⋅5H{sub 2}O, La(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}⋅6H{sub 2}O, Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}⋅9H{sub 2}O and NaOH. A brief milling process of the reagents creates an amorphous precursor and crystalline NaNO{sub 3}. The thermal treatment of the precursors, at 500 °C for two hours, produces a crystalline mixture of Bi{sub 1−x}La{sub x}FeO{sub 3} and NaNO{sub 3}. Simple washing eliminates the NaNO{sub 3}. The characterization of intermediates and final products, through thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electronic microscopy, allows the inference of possible mechanism. In addition, vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) and ferroelectric tests show the typical magnetic and electric polarization loops characteristic of these materials even when formed at the nano-scale.

  19. Control of Chiral Magnetism Through Electric Fields in Multiferroic Compounds above the Long-Range Multiferroic Transition.

    Stein, J; Baum, M; Holbein, S; Finger, T; Cronert, T; Tölzer, C; Fröhlich, T; Biesenkamp, S; Schmalzl, K; Steffens, P; Lee, C H; Braden, M

    2017-10-27

    Polarized neutron scattering experiments reveal that type-II multiferroics allow for controlling the spin chirality by external electric fields even in the absence of long-range multiferroic order. In the two prototype compounds TbMnO_{3} and MnWO_{4}, chiral magnetism associated with soft overdamped electromagnons can be observed above the long-range multiferroic transition temperature T_{MF}, and it is possible to control it through an electric field. While MnWO_{4} exhibits chiral correlations only in a tiny temperature interval above T_{MF}, in TbMnO_{3} chiral magnetism can be observed over several kelvin up to the lock-in transition, which is well separated from T_{MF}.

  20. Developmental toxicity studies with 6 forms of titanium dioxide test materials (3 pigment-different grade & 3 nanoscale) demonstrate an absence of effects in orally-exposed rats.

    Warheit, D B; Boatman, R; Brown, S C

    2015-12-01

    Six different commercial forms and sizes of titanium dioxide particles were tested in separate developmental toxicity assays. The three pigment-grade (pg) or 3 ultrafine (uf)/nanoscale (anatase and/or rutile) titanium dioxide (TiO2) particle-types were evaluated for potential maternal and developmental toxicity in pregnant rats by two different laboratories. All studies were conducted according to OECD Guideline 414 (Prenatal Developmental Toxicity Study). In addition, all test materials were robustly characterized. The BET surface areas of the pg and uf samples ranged from 7 to 17 m(2)/g and 50-82 m(2)/g respectively (see Table 1). The test substances were formulated in sterile water. In all of the studies, the formulations were administered by oral gavage to time-mated rats daily beginning around the time of implantation and continuing until the day prior to expected parturition. In 3 of the studies (uf-1, uf-3, & pg-1), the formulations were administered to Crl:CD(SD) rats beginning on gestation day (GD) 6 through GD 20. In 3 additional studies (uf-2, and pg-2, pg-3 TiO2 particles), the formulations were administered to Wistar rats beginning on GD 5 through 19. The dose levels used in all studies were 0, 100, 300, or 1000 mg/kg/day; control group animals were administered the vehicle. During the in-life portions of the studies, body weights, food consumption, and clinical observations before and after dosing were collected on a daily basis. All dams were euthanized just prior to expected parturition (GD 21 for Crl:CD(SD) rats and GD 20 for Wistar rats). The gross necropsies included an examination and description of uterine contents including counts of corpora lutea, implantation sites, resorptions, and live and dead fetuses. All live fetuses were sexed, weighed, and examined externally and euthanized. Following euthanasia, fresh visceral and head examinations were performed on selected fetuses. The fetal carcasses were then processed and examined for skeletal

  1. Systems engineering at the nanoscale

    Benkoski, Jason J.; Breidenich, Jennifer L.; Wei, Michael C.; Clatterbaughi, Guy V.; Keng, Pei Yuin; Pyun, Jeffrey

    2012-06-01

    Nanomaterials have provided some of the greatest leaps in technology over the past twenty years, but their relatively early stage of maturity presents challenges for their incorporation into engineered systems. Perhaps even more challenging is the fact that the underlying physics at the nanoscale often run counter to our physical intuition. The current state of nanotechnology today includes nanoscale materials and devices developed to function as components of systems, as well as theoretical visions for "nanosystems," which are systems in which all components are based on nanotechnology. Although examples will be given to show that nanomaterials have indeed matured into applications in medical, space, and military systems, no complete nanosystem has yet been realized. This discussion will therefore focus on systems in which nanotechnology plays a central role. Using self-assembled magnetic artificial cilia as an example, we will discuss how systems engineering concepts apply to nanotechnology.

  2. Theoretical study of the multiferroic properties in M-doped (M=Co, Cr, Mg) ZnO thin films

    Bahoosh, S.G. [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany); Apostolov, A.T. [University of Architecture, Civil Engineering and Geodesy, Faculty of Hydrotechnics, Department of Physics, 1, Hristo Smirnenski Blvd., 1046 Sofia (Bulgaria); Apostolova, I.N. [University of Forestry, Faculty of Forest Industry, 10, Kl. Ohridsky Blvd., 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria); Trimper, S. [Institute of Physics, Martin-Luther-University, D-06099 Halle (Germany); Wesselinowa, Julia M. [University of Sofia, Department of Physics, Blvd. J. Bouchier 5, 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2015-01-01

    The origin of multiferroism is still an open problem in ZnO. We propose a microscopic model to clarify the occurrence of multiferroism in this material. Using Green's function technique we study the influence of ion doping and size effects on the magnetization and polarization of ZnO thin films. The calculations for magnetic Co- and Cr-ions are based on the s–d model, the transverse Ising model in terms of pseudo-spins and a biquadratic magnetoelectric coupling, whereas in case of nonmagnetic Mg-ions the model takes into account the Coulomb interaction and an indirect coupling between the pseudo-spins via the conduction electrons. We show that the magnetization M exhibits a maximum for a fixed concentration of the doping ions. Furthermore M increases with decreasing film thickness N. The polarization increases with increasing concentration of the dopant and decreasing N. The results are in good agreement with the experimental data. - Highlights: • The paper analyzes the multiferroic properties of doped ZnO thin films by a microscopic model. • The magnetization exhibits a maximum at a fixed doping concentration. • The polarization increases with growing dopant concentration. • The ferroelectric transition temperature is enhanced for increasing dopant concentration.

  3. Self-Assembled Layered Supercell Structure of Bi2AlMnO6 with Strong Room-Temperature Multiferroic Properties.

    Li, Leigang; Boullay, Philippe; Lu, Ping; Perez, Olivier; Steciuk, Gwladys; Wang, Xuejing; Jian, Jie; Huang, Jijie; Gao, Xingyao; Zhang, Wenrui; Zhang, Xinghang; Wang, Haiyan

    2017-02-01

    Room-temperature (RT) multiferroics, possessing ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism simultaneously at RT, hold great promise in miniaturized devices including sensors, actuators, transducers, and multi-state memories. In this work, we report a novel 2D layered RT multiferroic system with self-assembled layered supercell structure consisting of two mismatch-layered sub-lattices of [Bi3O3+δ] and [MO2]1.84 (M=Al/Mn, simply named as BAMO), i.e., alternative layered stacking of two mutually incommensurate sublattices made of a three-layer-thick Bi-O slab and a one-layer-thick Al/Mn-O octahedra slab along the out-of-plane direction. Strong room-temperature multiferroic responses, e.g., ferromagnetic and ferroelectric properties, have been demonstrated and attributed to the highly anisotropic 2D nature of the non-ferromagnetic and ferromagnetic sublattices which are highly mismatched. The work demonstrates an alternative design approach for new 2D layered oxide materials that hold promises as single-phase multiferroics, 2D oxides with tunable bandgaps, and beyond.

  4. Enhanced room temperature multiferroicity in Gd doped BFO

    Pradhan, SK

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available deficient Gd doped multiferroic BFO system. At particular doping level of Gd, this bulk ceramics showed spectacular M~H behavior at room temperature which is likely to open a new avenue for the potential applications in information storing technology as well...

  5. Giant multiferroic effects in topological GeTe-Sb2Te3 superlattices

    Tominaga, Junji; Kolobov, Alexander V; Fons, Paul J; Wang, Xiaomin; Saito, Yuta; Nakano, Takashi; Hase, Muneaki; Murakami, Shuichi; Herfort, Jens; Takagaki, Yukihiko

    2015-01-01

    Multiferroics, materials in which both magnetic and electric fields can induce each other, resulting in a magnetoelectric response, have been attracting increasing attention, although the induced magnetic susceptibility and dielectric constant are usually small and have typically been reported for low temperatures. The magnetoelectric response usually depends on d-electrons of transition metals. Here we report that in [(GeTe) 2 (Sb 2 Te 3 ) l ] m superlattice films (where l and m are integers) with topological phase transition, strong magnetoelectric response may be induced at temperatures above room temperature when the external fields are applied normal to the film surface. By ab initio computer simulations, it is revealed that the multiferroic properties are induced due to the breaking of spatial inversion symmetry when the p-electrons of Ge atoms change their bonding geometry from octahedral to tetrahedral. Finally, we demonstrate the existence in such structures of spin memory, which paves the way for a future hybrid device combining nonvolatile phase-change memory and magnetic spin memory. (focus issue paper)

  6. Multiferroic properties of the Y2BiFe5O12 garnet

    Durán, A.; Ostos, C.; Arnache, O.; Siqueiros, J. M.; García-Guaderrama, M.

    2017-10-01

    Multiferroic properties are found in the Yttrium iron garnet (YIG) modified with Bi3+. The X-ray diffraction pattern shows that the Bi3+ ion is completely soluble up to one-third of the Y molar content forming the Y2BiFe5O12 compound as a single phase. Structural analysis did not show signals of other incipient non-centrosymmetric phases in the compound. However, the dielectric and polarization studies clearly exhibit a typical relaxor ferroelectric behavior at room temperature where the maxima of the broad permittivity peaks shift with frequency. The quadratic diffuseness coefficient obtained from the modified Curie-Weiss law suggests polar nanoregion switching in a broad temperature range. Using the Vogel-Fulcher relationship, the activation energy and freezing temperature were found to be 243.1 meV and 322.6 K, respectively. Here, the main contribution to relaxation comes from thermally activated reorientation of the dipole moments, as confirmed by the well-defined hysteresis loops in the P-E measurements. The dipole fluctuations arise from the compositional disorder induced by Bi3+ ions randomly distributed in the lattice, having thermally active polarization fluctuations above the freezing temperature, Tf. Furthermore, it is found that Bi3+ preserves the magnetization features of this compound. Thus, the Bi3+ modified YIG compound is found to be a multiferroic material at room temperature.

  7. Creating nanoscale emulsions using condensation.

    Guha, Ingrid F; Anand, Sushant; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2017-11-08

    Nanoscale emulsions are essential components in numerous products, ranging from processed foods to novel drug delivery systems. Existing emulsification methods rely either on the breakup of larger droplets or solvent exchange/inversion. Here we report a simple, scalable method of creating nanoscale water-in-oil emulsions by condensing water vapor onto a subcooled oil-surfactant solution. Our technique enables a bottom-up approach to forming small-scale emulsions. Nanoscale water droplets nucleate at the oil/air interface and spontaneously disperse within the oil, due to the spreading dynamics of oil on water. Oil-soluble surfactants stabilize the resulting emulsions. We find that the oil-surfactant concentration controls the spreading behavior of oil on water, as well as the peak size, polydispersity, and stability of the resulting emulsions. Using condensation, we form emulsions with peak radii around 100 nm and polydispersities around 10%. This emulsion formation technique may open different routes to creating emulsions, colloidal systems, and emulsion-based materials.

  8. Competing magnetic interactions and low temperature magnetic phase transitions in composite multiferroics

    Borkar, Hitesh; Singh, V N; Kumar, Ashok; Choudhary, R J; Tomar, M; Gupta, Vinay

    2015-01-01

    Novel magnetic properties and magnetic interactions in composite multiferroic oxides Pb[(Zr 0.52 Ti 0.48 ) 0.60 (Fe 0.67 W 0.33 ) .40 ]O 3 ] 0.80 –[CoFe 2 O 4 ] 0.20 (PZTFW–CFO) have been studied from 50 to 1000 Oe field cooled (FC) and zero field cooled (ZFC) probing conditions, and over a wide range of temperatures (4–350 K). Crystal structure analysis, surface morphology, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy images revealed the presence of two distinct phases, where micro- and nano-size spinel CFO were embedded in tetragonal PZTFW matrix and applied a significant built-in compressive strain (∼0.4–0.8%). Three distinct magnetic phase transitions were observed with the subtle effect of CFO magnetic phase on PZTFW magnetic phase transitions below the blocking temperature (T B ). Temperature dependence magnetic property m(T) shows a clear evidence of spin freezing in magnetic order with lowering in thermal vibration. Chemical inhomogeneity and confinement of nanoscale ferrimagnetic phase in paramagnetic/antiferromagnetic matrix restrict the long range interaction of spin which in turn develop a giant spin frustration. A large divergence in the FC and ZFC data and broad hump in ZFC data near 200 (±10) K were observed which suggests that large magnetic anisotropy and short range order magnetic dipoles lead to the development of superparamagnetic states in composite. (paper)

  9. Nanoscale waveguiding methods

    Wang Chia-Jean

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWhile 32 nm lithography technology is on the horizon for integrated circuit (IC fabrication, matching the pace for miniaturization with optics has been hampered by the diffraction limit. However, development of nanoscale components and guiding methods is burgeoning through advances in fabrication techniques and materials processing. As waveguiding presents the fundamental issue and cornerstone for ultra-high density photonic ICs, we examine the current state of methods in the field. Namely, plasmonic, metal slot and negative dielectric based waveguides as well as a few sub-micrometer techniques such as nanoribbons, high-index contrast and photonic crystals waveguides are investigated in terms of construction, transmission, and limitations. Furthermore, we discuss in detail quantum dot (QD arrays as a gain-enabled and flexible means to transmit energy through straight paths and sharp bends. Modeling, fabrication and test results are provided and show that the QD waveguide may be effective as an alternate means to transfer light on sub-diffraction dimensions.

  10. Magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroic heterostructure of rf-sputtered Ni–Mn–Ga thin film on PMN–PT

    Teferi, M.Y.; Amaral, V.S.; Lounrenco, A.C.; Das, S.; Amaral, J.S.; Karpinsky, D.V.; Soares, N.; Sobolev, N.A.; Kholkin, A.L.; Tavares, P.B.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report a preparation of multiferroic heterostructure from thin film of Ni–Mn–Ga (NMG) alloy and lead magnesium niobate–lead titanate (PMN–PT) with effective magnetoelectric (ME) coupling between the film as ferromagnetic material and PMN–PT as piezoelectric material. The heterostructure was prepared by relatively low temperature (400 °C) deposition of the film on single crystal of piezoelectric PMN–PT substrate using rf magnetron co-sputtering of Ni 50 Mn 50 and Ni 50 Ga 50 targets. Magnetic measurements by Superconducting Quantum Interference Design (SQIUD) Magnetometer and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) on the film revealed that the film is in ferromagnetically ordered martensitic state at room temperature with saturation magnetization of ∼240 emu/cm 3 and Curie temperature of ∼337 K. Piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurement done at room temperature on the substrate showed the presence of expected hysteresis loop confirming the stability of the piezoelectric state of the substrate after deposition. Room temperature ME voltage coefficient (α ME ) of the heterostructure was measured as a function of applied bias dc magnetic field in Longitudinal–Transverse (L–T) ME coupling mode by lock-in technique. A maximum ME coefficient α ME of 3.02 mV/cm Oe was measured for multiferroic NMG/PMN–PT heterostructure which demonstrates that there is ME coupling between the film as ferromagnetic material and PMN–PT as piezoelectric material. - Highlights: ► Multiferroic NMG/PMN–PT heterostructure prepared by depositing NMG alloy thin film on PMN–PT substrate. ► The film is in ferromagnetically ordered martensite state at room temperature. ► The substrate maintains its piezoelectric state after deposition. ► The heterostructure exhibits ME effect with maximum of α ME of 3.02 mV/cm Oe.

  11. Solvothermal coating LiNi_0_._8Co_0_._1_5Al_0_._0_5O_2 microspheres with nanoscale Li_2TiO_3 shell for long lifespan Li-ion battery cathode materials

    Wu, Naiteng; Wu, Hao; Liu, Heng; Zhang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    LiNi_0_._8Co_0_._1_5Al_0_._0_5O_2 (NCA) microspheres covered by a nanoscale Li_2TiO_3-based shell were synthesized by a facile strategy based on a solvothermal pre-coating treatment combined with a post-sintering lithiation process. The morphology, structure and composition of the Li_2TiO_3-coated NCA samples were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning scanning electron microscope (SEM) with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Owing to the complete, uniform and nanoscale Li_2TiO_3 coating shell, the resultant surface-modified NCA microspheres used as Li-ion battery cathode materials manifest remarkably enhanced cycling performances, attaining 94% and 84% capacity retention after 200 and 400 cycles at 0.5 C, respectively, which is much better than the pristine NCA counterpart (60% retention, 200 cycles). More impressively, the surface-modified NCA also shows an intriguing storage stability. After being stored at 30 °C for 50 days, the coated NCA-based cells are subjected to be cycled both at room and elevated temperatures, in which the aged cells can still remain 84% capacity retention after 200 cycles at 25 °C and 77% capacity retention after 200 cycles at 55 °C, respectively. All these results demonstrate that the Li_2TiO_3-coated LiNi_0_._8Co_0_._1_5Al_0_._0_5O_2 microsphere is a promising cathode material for Li-ion batteries with long lifespan. - Graphical abstract: Nanoscale Li_2TiO_3-based shell encapsulated LiNi_0_._8Co_0_._1_5Al_0_._0_5O_2 (NCA) microspheres are fabricated through a solvothermal pre-coating treatment combined with post-lithiation process. The surface-coated NCA as cathode materials shows a remarkably enhanced cycling performance and storage stability for long lifespan Li-ion batteries. - Highlights: • Li_2TiO_3 is used as coating materials for layer structured LiNi_0_._8Co_0_._1_5Al_0_._0_5O_2 cathode. • Solvothermal coating

  12. Ultrafast Charge and Triplet State Formation in Diketopyrrolopyrrole Low Band Gap Polymer/Fullerene Blends: Influence of Nanoscale Morphology of Organic Photovoltaic Materials on Charge Recombination to the Triplet State

    René M. Williams

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy of thin films of two types of morphologies of diketopyrrolopyrrole low band gap polymer/fullerene-adduct blends is presented and indicates triplet state formation by charge recombination, an important loss channel in organic photovoltaic materials. At low laser fluence (approaching solar intensity charge formation characterized by a 1350 nm band (in ~250 fs dominates in the two PDPP-PCBM blends with different nanoscale morphologies and these charges recombine to form a local polymer-based triplet state on the sub-ns timescale (in ~300 and ~900 ps indicated by an 1100 nm absorption band. The rate of triplet state formation is influenced by the morphology. The slower rate of charge recombination to the triplet state (in ~900 ps belongs to a morphology that results in a higher power conversion efficiency in the corresponding device. Nanoscale morphology not only influences interfacial area and conduction of holes and electrons but also influences the mechanism of intersystem crossing (ISC. We present a model that correlates morphology to the exchange integral and fast and slow mechanisms for ISC (SOCT-ISC and H-HFI-ISC. For the pristine polymer, a flat and unstructured singlet-singlet absorption spectrum (between 900 and 1400 nm and a very minor triplet state formation (5% are observed at low laser fluence.

  13. Nanoscale chirality in metal and semiconductor nanoparticles.

    Kumar, Jatish; Thomas, K George; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2016-10-18

    The field of chirality has recently seen a rejuvenation due to the observation of chirality in inorganic nanomaterials. The advancements in understanding the origin of nanoscale chirality and the potential applications of chiroptical nanomaterials in the areas of optics, catalysis and biosensing, among others, have opened up new avenues toward new concepts and design of novel materials. In this article, we review the concept of nanoscale chirality in metal nanoclusters and semiconductor quantum dots, then focus on recent experimental and theoretical advances in chiral metal nanoparticles and plasmonic chirality. Selected examples of potential applications and an outlook on the research on chiral nanomaterials are additionally provided.

  14. Optical anisotropy and domain structure of multiferroic Ni-Mn-Ga and Co-Ni-Ga Heusler-type alloys

    Ivanova, A I; Gasanov, O V; Kaplunova, E I; Grechishkin, R M; Kalimullina, E T; Zalyotov, A B

    2015-01-01

    A study is made of the reflectance anisotropy of martensitic and magnetic domains in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys (FSMA) Ni-Mn-Ga and Co-Ni-Ga. The reflectance of metallographic sections of these alloys was measured in the visible with the aid of standard inverted polarized light microscope with a 360° rotatable specimen stage. Calculations are presented for the estimation of image contrast values between neighboring martensite twins. Qualitative and quantitative observations and angular measurements in reflected polarized light proved to be useful for the analysis of specific features of the martensite microstructure of multiferroic materials

  15. Preparation and characterization of single-crystal multiferroic nanofiber composites

    Ren, Zhaohui; Xiao, Zhen; Yin, Simin; Mai, Jiangquan; Liu, Zhenya; Xu, Gang; Li, Xiang; Shen, Ge [State Key Lab of Silicon Materials, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Han, Gaorong, E-mail: hgr@zju.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Silicon Materials, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2013-03-05

    Graphical abstract: One-dimensional single-crystal multiferroic composites composed of PbTiO{sub 3} nanofiber-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanodot have been prepared for the first time by a facile in situ solid state sintering method. The composites demonstrate ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism as well as strong coupling between them. Highlights: ► 1D single-crystal multiferroic PTO-CFO was prepared via in situ solid state sintering method. ► A simple epitaxial growth relation has been found between the PTO–CFO composites. ► The composites reveal ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism as well as coupling between them. -- Abstract: One-dimensional single-crystal multiferroic composites consisting of PbTiO{sub 3} (PTO) nanofiber-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (CFO) nanodot were prepared using an in situ solid state sintering method, where pre-perovskite PTO nanofibers and CFO nanodots were used as precursors. Structural analyses by using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction determined a epitaxial growth relation between the PTO nanofiber and the CFO nanodot. Ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity of the nanofiber composites were investigated by using vibarting sample magnetometer (VSM) and piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM)

  16. Lattice strain induced multiferroicity in PZT-CFO particulate composite

    Pradhan, Lagen Kumar; Pandey, Rabichandra; Kumar, Rajnish; Kar, Manoranjan

    2018-02-01

    Lead Zirconate Titanate [Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3/PZT] and Cobalt Ferrite [CoFe2O4/CFO] based multiferroic composites [(1-x)PZT-(x)CFO] with (x = 0.10-0.40) have been prepared to study its magnetoelectric (ME) and multiferroic properties. X-ray diffraction method along with the Rietveld refinement technique reveals that the crystal symmetries corresponding to PZT and CFO exist independently in the composites. The effect of interfacial strain on lattice distortion in PZT has been observed. It is well correlated with the magnetoelectric coupling of the composites. Dispersion behavior of dielectric constant with frequency can be explained by the modified Debye model. Different relaxation phenomena have been observed in PZT-CFO particulate composites. The ferroelectric properties of composites decrease with the increase in percentage of CFO in the composite. Both saturation (Ms) and remanent (Mr) magnetization increase with the increase in CFO content in the composite. The maximum ME coupling was found to be 1.339 pC/cm2 Oe for the composition (0.80) PZT-(0.20) CFO at the application of maximum magnetic field of 50 Oe. The multiferroic properties in CFO-PZT can be explained by the lattice strain at the CFO-PZT interfaces.

  17. Engineering Ferroic and Multiferroic Materials for Active Cooling Applications

    2014-02-11

    Ferrari , A. Bosacchi , S. Franchi , J. Appl. Phys. 1999 , 86 , 4748 . [ 18 ] B. Bertoli , E. N. Suarez , J. E. Ayers , F. C. Jain...inhomogeneous strains in multi- component superlattices30,31 or by global composition gradients.22−27 Extensive theoretical24,32−34 and experimen

  18. Conduction Mechanisms in Multiferroic Multilayer BaTiO3/NiFe2O4/BaTiO3 Memristors

    Samardzic, N.; Bajac, B.; Srdic, V. V.; Stojanovic, G. M.

    2017-10-01

    Memristive devices and materials are extensively studied as they offer diverse properties and applications in digital, analog and bio-inspired circuits. In this paper, we present an important class of memristors, multiferroic memristors, which are composed of multiferroic multilayer BaTiO3/NiFe2O4/BaTiO3 thin films, fabricated by a spin-coating deposition technique on platinized Si wafers. This cost-effective device shows symmetric and reproducible current-voltage characteristics for the actuating voltage amplitude of ±10 V. The origin of the conduction mechanism was investigated by measuring the electrical response in different voltage and temperature conditions. The results indicate the existence of two mechanisms: thermionic emission and Fowler-Nordheim tunnelling, which alternate with actuating voltage amplitude and operating temperature.

  19. Single molecules and single nanoparticles as windows to the nanoscale

    Caldarola, Martín; Orrit, Michel

    2018-05-01

    Since the first optical detection of single molecules, they have been used as nanometersized optical sensors to explore the physical properties of materials and light-matter interaction at the nanoscale. Understanding nanoscale properties of materials is fundamental for the development of new technology that requires precise control of atoms and molecules when the quantum nature of matter cannot be ignored. In the following lines, we illustrate this journey into nanoscience with some experiments from our group.

  20. Monolithic integration of nanoscale tensile specimens and MEMS structures

    Yilmaz, Mehmet; Kysar, Jeffrey W

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale materials often have stochastic material properties due to a random distribution of material defects and an insufficient number of defects to ensure a consistent average mechanical response. Current methods to measure the mechanical properties employ MEMS-based actuators. The nanoscale specimens are typically mounted manually onto the load platform, so the boundary conditions have random variations, complicating the experimental measurement of the intrinsic stochasticity of the material properties. Here we show methods for monolithic integration of a nanoscale specimen co-fabricated with the loading platform. The nanoscale specimen is gold with dimensions of ∼40 nm thickness, 350 ± 50 nm width, and 7 μm length and the loading platform is an interdigitated electrode electrostatic actuator. The experiment is performed in a scanning electron microscope and digital image correlation is employed to measure displacements to determine stress and strain. The ultimate tensile strength of the nanocrystalline nanoscale specimen approaches 1 GPa, consistent with measurements made by other nanometer scale sample characterization methods on other material samples at the nanometer scale, as well as gold samples at the nanometer scale. The batch-compatible microfabrication method can be used to create nominally identical nanoscale specimens and boundary conditions for a broad range of materials. (paper)

  1. Dynamic structural disorder in supported nanoscale catalysts

    Rehr, J. J.; Vila, F. D.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the origin and physical effects of “dynamic structural disorder” (DSD) in supported nano-scale catalysts. DSD refers to the intrinsic fluctuating, inhomogeneous structure of such nano-scale systems. In contrast to bulk materials, nano-scale systems exhibit substantial fluctuations in structure, charge, temperature, and other quantities, as well as large surface effects. The DSD is driven largely by the stochastic librational motion of the center of mass and fluxional bonding at the nanoparticle surface due to thermal coupling with the substrate. Our approach for calculating and understanding DSD is based on a combination of real-time density functional theory/molecular dynamics simulations, transient coupled-oscillator models, and statistical mechanics. This approach treats thermal and dynamic effects over multiple time-scales, and includes bond-stretching and -bending vibrations, and transient tethering to the substrate at longer ps time-scales. Potential effects on the catalytic properties of these clusters are briefly explored. Model calculations of molecule-cluster interactions and molecular dissociation reaction paths are presented in which the reactant molecules are adsorbed on the surface of dynamically sampled clusters. This model suggests that DSD can affect both the prefactors and distribution of energy barriers in reaction rates, and thus can significantly affect catalytic activity at the nano-scale

  2. Dynamic structural disorder in supported nanoscale catalysts

    Rehr, J. J.; Vila, F. D. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2014-04-07

    We investigate the origin and physical effects of “dynamic structural disorder” (DSD) in supported nano-scale catalysts. DSD refers to the intrinsic fluctuating, inhomogeneous structure of such nano-scale systems. In contrast to bulk materials, nano-scale systems exhibit substantial fluctuations in structure, charge, temperature, and other quantities, as well as large surface effects. The DSD is driven largely by the stochastic librational motion of the center of mass and fluxional bonding at the nanoparticle surface due to thermal coupling with the substrate. Our approach for calculating and understanding DSD is based on a combination of real-time density functional theory/molecular dynamics simulations, transient coupled-oscillator models, and statistical mechanics. This approach treats thermal and dynamic effects over multiple time-scales, and includes bond-stretching and -bending vibrations, and transient tethering to the substrate at longer ps time-scales. Potential effects on the catalytic properties of these clusters are briefly explored. Model calculations of molecule-cluster interactions and molecular dissociation reaction paths are presented in which the reactant molecules are adsorbed on the surface of dynamically sampled clusters. This model suggests that DSD can affect both the prefactors and distribution of energy barriers in reaction rates, and thus can significantly affect catalytic activity at the nano-scale.

  3. Diffraction studies on the origin of giant magneto-electric effects in multiferroics

    Arima, Taka-hisa

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic ferroelectrics termed multiferroics often exhibit a giant magneto-electric response such as an appearance, disappearance, and rotation of ferroelectric polarization by the application of a magnetic field. In most multiferroics, long-wavelength spiral magnetic order arises from the competition among some magnetic exchange interactions. Spin-polarized neutron diffraction studies reveal that the ferroelectric polarization direction corresponds to the helicity of spiral magnetism. A change in magnetic order with the application of a magnetic field has been investigated for various multiferroics by means of synchrotron x-ray diffraction, because it can provide us some information about the periodicity and type of magnetic order. (author)

  4. Optical Second Harmonic Generation in the BaTiO3 phase of magnetically aligned multiferroic nanofibers

    Gasperi, Katia

    Multiferroic materials enable the exploration of electrical control of magnetic properties and vice versa. Their increasing interest is especially due to their potential applications in the industry of information storage. Thanks to recent progress in nanotechnology, they have also been found to have many other applications such as transducers and sensors, and they already occupy a unique place in the biomedical field. The objective of this project is to study multiferroic nanofibers made of cobalt ferrite CoFe2O 4 (CFO) and barium titanate BaTiO3 (BTO) with a specific focus in the characterization of the ferroelectric phase. We researched the state of knowledge concerning the size effects on phase transition for nanoparticles and polycrystals BTO. The ferroelectric phase transition of BTO occurs when it changes from a tetragonal (anisotropic) crystal structure to a cubic (isotropic) structure. This change suggests that optical second harmonic generation (SHG) is a good measurement technique for monitoring the phase transition of the BTO half of the nanofibers. We designed and prepared a temperature dependent SHG experiment on magnetically aligned fibers in transmission with the possibility to investigate the polarization dependence of the signal. We also prepared interdigital electrodes on glass for the future study of the fibers in an external electric field.

  5. Infochemistry Information Processing at the Nanoscale

    Szacilowski, Konrad

    2012-01-01

    Infochemistry: Information Processing at the Nanoscale, defines a new field of science, and describes the processes, systems and devices at the interface between chemistry and information sciences. The book is devoted to the application of molecular species and nanostructures to advanced information processing. It includes the design and synthesis of suitable materials and nanostructures, their characterization, and finally applications of molecular species and nanostructures for information storage and processing purposes. Divided into twelve chapters; the first three chapters serve as an int

  6. Fourth International Conference on Nanoscale Magnetism

    Aktas, Bekir; Advances in Nanoscale Magnetism

    2009-01-01

    The book aims to provide an overview of recent progress in the understanding of magnetic properties in nanoscale through recent results of various theoretical and experimental investigations. The papers describe a wide range of physical aspects, together with theoretical and experimental methods. It is of central interest to researchers and specialists in magnetism and magnetic materials science, both in academic and industrial research, as well as advanced students.

  7. Nanoscale hotspots due to nonequilibrium thermal transport

    Sinha, Sanjiv; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2004-01-01

    Recent experimental and modeling efforts have been directed towards the issue of temperature localization and hotspot formation in the vicinity of nanoscale heat generating devices. The nonequilibrium transport conditions which develop around these nanoscale devices results in elevated temperatures near the heat source which can not be predicted by continuum diffusion theory. Efforts to determine the severity of this temperature localization phenomena in silicon devices near and above room temperature are of technological importance to the development of microelectronics and other nanotechnologies. In this work, we have developed a new modeling tool in order to explore the magnitude of the additional thermal resistance which forms around nanoscale hotspots from temperatures of 100-1000K. The models are based on a two fluid approximation in which thermal energy is transferred between ''stationary'' optical phonons and fast propagating acoustic phonon modes. The results of the model have shown excellent agreement with experimental results of localized hotspots in silicon at lower temperatures. The model predicts that the effect of added thermal resistance due to the nonequilibrium phonon distribution is greatest at lower temperatures, but is maintained out to temperatures of 1000K. The resistance predicted by the numerical code can be easily integrated with continuum models in order to predict the temperature distribution around nanoscale heat sources with improved accuracy. Additional research efforts also focused on the measurements of the thermal resistance of silicon thin films at higher temperatures, with a focus on polycrystalline silicon. This work was intended to provide much needed experimental data on the thermal transport properties for micro and nanoscale devices built with this material. Initial experiments have shown that the exposure of polycrystalline silicon to high temperatures may induce recrystallization and radically increase the thermal

  8. Polarization-tuned diode behaviour in multiferroic BiFeO3 thin films

    Yao, Yingbang; Zhang, Bei; Chen, Long; Yang, Yang; Wang, Zhihong; Alshareef, Husam N.; Zhang, Xixiang

    2012-01-01

    Asymmetric rectifying I-V behaviour of multiferroic BiFeO3 (BFO) thin films grown on transparent ITO-coated glass was quantitatively studied as a function of ferroelectric polarization. Different polarized states were established by unipolar

  9. Study of multiferroic properties of Bi2Fe2WO9 ceramic for device application

    Jyoshna Rout

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Bi2Fe2WO9 ceramic was prepared using a standard solid-state reaction technique. Preliminary analysis of X-ray diffraction pattern revealed the formation of single-phase compound with orthorhombic crystal symmetry. The surface morphology of the material captured using scanning electron microscope (SEM exhibits formation of a densely packed microstructure. Comprehensive study of dielectric properties showed two anomalies at 200∘C and 450∘C: first one may be related to magnetic whereas second one may be related to ferroelectric phase transition. The field dependent magnetic study of the material shows the existence of small remnant magnetization (Mr of 0.052emμ/g at room temperature. The existence of magneto-electric (ME coupling coefficient along with above properties confirms multi-ferroic characteristics of the compound. Selected range temperature and frequency dependent electrical parameters (impedance, modulus, conductivity of the compound shows that electric properties are correlated to its microstructure. Detailed studies of frequency dependence of ac conductivity suggest that the material obeys Jonscher’s universal power law.

  10. Intrinsic Ferroelasticity and/or Multiferroicity in Two-Dimensional Phosphorene and Phosphorene Analogues.

    Wu, Menghao; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-05-11

    Phosphorene and phosphorene analogues such as SnS and SnSe monolayers are promising nanoelectronic materials with desired bandgap, high carrier mobility, and anisotropic structures. Here, we show first-principles calculation evidence that these monolayers are potentially the long-sought two-dimensional (2D) materials that can combine electronic transistor characteristic with nonvolatile memory readable/writeable capability at ambient condition. Specifically, phosphorene is predicted to be a 2D intrinsic ferroelastic material with ultrahigh reversible strain, whereas SnS, SnSe, GeS, and GeSe monolayers are multiferroic with coupled ferroelectricity and ferroelasticity. Moreover, their low-switching barriers render room-temperature nonvolatile memory accessible, and their notable structural anisotropy enables ferroelastic or ferroelectric switching readily readable via electrical, thermal, optical, mechanical, or even spintronic detection upon the swapping of the zigzag and armchair direction. In addition, it is predicted that the GeS and GeSe monolayers as well as bulk SnS and SnSe can maintain their ferroelasticity and ferroelectricity (anti-ferroelectricity) beyond the room temperature, suggesting high potential for practical device application.

  11. Electric-Field-Induced Magnetization Reversal in a Ferromagnet-Multiferroic Heterostructure

    Heron, J. T.; Trassin, M.; Ashraf, K.; Gajek, M.; He, Q.; Yang, S. Y.; Nikonov, D. E.; Chu, Y.-H.; Salahuddin, S.; Ramesh, R.

    2011-11-01

    A reversal of magnetization requiring only the application of an electric field can lead to low-power spintronic devices by eliminating conventional magnetic switching methods. Here we show a nonvolatile, room temperature magnetization reversal determined by an electric field in a ferromagnet-multiferroic system. The effect is reversible and mediated by an interfacial magnetic coupling dictated by the multiferroic. Such electric-field control of a magnetoelectric device demonstrates an avenue for next-generation, low-energy consumption spintronics.

  12. Programmed assembly of nanoscale structures using peptoids.

    Ren, Jianhua (University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA); Russell, Scott (California State University, Stanislaus, Turlock, CA); Morishetti, Kiran (University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA); Robinson, David B.; Zuckermann, Ronald N. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Buffleben, George M.; Hjelm, Rex P. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Kent, Michael Stuart (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-02-01

    Sequence-specific polymers are the basis of the most promising approaches to bottom-up programmed assembly of nanoscale materials. Examples include artificial peptides and nucleic acids. Another class is oligo(N-functional glycine)s, also known as peptoids, which permit greater sidegroup diversity and conformational control, and can be easier to synthesize and purify. We have developed a set of peptoids that can be used to make inorganic nanoparticles more compatible with biological sequence-specific polymers so that they can be incorporated into nucleic acid or other biologically based nanostructures. Peptoids offer degrees of modularity, versatility, and predictability that equal or exceed other sequence-specific polymers, allowing for rational design of oligomers for a specific purpose. This degree of control will be essential to the development of arbitrarily designed nanoscale structures.

  13. Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003-2012

    Cahill, David G.; Braun, Paul V.; Chen, Gang; Clarke, David R.; Fan, Shanhui; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Keblinski, Pawel; King, William P.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Pop, Eric; Shi, Li

    2014-03-01

    A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale electronics, and nanoparticles for thermal medical therapies are motivating studies of the applied physics of thermal transport at the nanoscale. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces become increasingly important on small length scales. Research during the past decade has extended studies of interfaces between simple metals and inorganic crystals to interfaces with molecular materials and liquids with systematic control of interface chemistry and physics. At separations on the order of ˜ 1 nm , the science of radiative transport through nanoscale gaps overlaps with thermal conduction by the coupling of electronic and vibrational excitations across weakly bonded or rough interfaces between materials. Major advances in the physics of phonons include first principles calculation of the phonon lifetimes of simple crystals and application of the predicted scattering rates in parameter-free calculations of the thermal conductivity. Progress in the control of thermal transport at the nanoscale is critical to continued advances in the density of information that can be stored in phase change memory devices and new generations of magnetic storage that will use highly localized heat sources to reduce the coercivity of magnetic media. Ultralow thermal conductivity—thermal conductivity below the conventionally predicted minimum thermal conductivity—has been observed in nanolaminates and disordered crystals with strong anisotropy. Advances in metrology by time-domain thermoreflectance have made measurements of the thermal conductivity of a thin layer with micron-scale spatial resolution relatively routine. Scanning thermal microscopy and thermal

  14. Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003–2012

    Cahill, David G.; Braun, Paul V.; Chen, Gang; Clarke, David R.; Fan, Shanhui; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Keblinski, Pawel; King, William P.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Pop, Eric; Shi, Li

    2014-01-01

    A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale electronics, and nanoparticles for thermal medical therapies are motivating studies of the applied physics of thermal transport at the nanoscale. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces become increasingly important on small length scales. Research during the past decade has extended studies of interfaces between simple metals and inorganic crystals to interfaces with molecular materials and liquids with systematic control of interface chemistry and physics. At separations on the order of ∼1 nm, the science of radiative transport through nanoscale gaps overlaps with thermal conduction by the coupling of electronic and vibrational excitations across weakly bonded or rough interfaces between materials. Major advances in the physics of phonons include first principles calculation of the phonon lifetimes of simple crystals and application of the predicted scattering rates in parameter-free calculations of the thermal conductivity. Progress in the control of thermal transport at the nanoscale is critical to continued advances in the density of information that can be stored in phase change memory devices and new generations of magnetic storage that will use highly localized heat sources to reduce the coercivity of magnetic media. Ultralow thermal conductivity—thermal conductivity below the conventionally predicted minimum thermal conductivity—has been observed in nanolaminates and disordered crystals with strong anisotropy. Advances in metrology by time-domain thermoreflectance have made measurements of the thermal conductivity of a thin layer with micron-scale spatial resolution relatively routine. Scanning thermal microscopy and

  15. Photostriction and elasto-optic response in multiferroics and ferroelectrics from first principles

    Yang, Yurong; Paillard, Charles; Xu, Bin; Bellaiche, L.

    2018-02-01

    The present work reviews a series of recent first-principles studies devoted to the description of the interaction of light and strain in ferroelectric and multiferroic materials. Specifically, the modelling schemes used in these works to describe the so-called photostriction and elasto-optic effects are presented, in addition to the results and analysis provided by these ab initio calculations. In particular, the large importance of the piezoelectric effect in the polar direction in the photostriction of ferroelectric materials is stressed. Similarly, the occurrence of low-symmetry phases in lead titanate thin films under tensile strain is demonstrated to result in large elasto-optic constants. In addition, first-principle calculations allow to gain microscopic knowledge of subtle effects, for instance in the case of photostriction, where the deformation potential effect in directions perpendicular to the polar axis is shown to be almost as significant as the piezoelectric effect. As a result, the numerical methods presented here could propel the design of efficient opto-mechanical devices.

  16. Weak magnetism of Aurivillius-type multiferroic thin films probed by polarized neutron reflectivity

    Zhai, Xiaofang; Grutter, Alexander J.; Yun, Yu; Cui, Zhangzhang; Lu, Yalin

    2018-04-01

    Unambiguous magnetic characterization of room-temperature multiferroic materials remains challenging due in part to the difficulty of distinguishing their very weak ferromagnetism from magnetic impurity phases and other contaminants. In this study, we used polarized neutron reflectivity to probe the magnetization of B i6FeCoT i3O18 and LaB i5FeCoT i3O18 in their epitaxial thin films while eliminating a variety of impurity contributions. Our results show that LaB i5FeCoT i3O18 exhibits a magnetization of about 0.016 ±0.027 μB/Fe -Co pair at room temperature, while the B i6FeCoT i3O18 thin film only exhibits a weak magnetic moment below room temperature, with a saturation magnetization of 0.049 ±0.015 μB/Fe -Co pair at 50 K. This polarized-neutron-reflectivity study places an upper magnetization limit on the matrix material of the magnetically doped Aurivillius oxides and helps to clarify the true mechanism behind the room-temperature magnetic performance.

  17. A review on all-perovskite multiferroic tunnel junctions

    Yuewei Yin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although the basic concept was proposed only about 10 years ago, multiferroic tunnel junctions (MFTJs with a ferroelectric barrier sandwiched between two ferromagnetic electrodes have already drawn considerable interests, driven mainly by its potential applications in multi-level memories and electric field controlled spintronics. The purpose of this article is to review the recent progress of all-perovskite MFTJs. Starting from the key functional properties of the tunneling magnetoresistance, tunneling electroresistance, and tunneling electromagnetoresistance effects, we discuss the main origins of the tunneling electroresistance effect, recent progress in achieving multilevel resistance states in a single device, and the electrical control of spin polarization and transport through the ferroelectric polarization reversal of the tunneling barrier.

  18. Eight-logic memory cell based on multiferroic junctions

    Yang Feng; Zhou, Y C; Tang, M H; Liu Fen; Ma Ying; Zheng, X J; Zhao, W F; Xu, H Y; Sun, Z H

    2009-01-01

    A model is proposed for a device combining a multiferroic tunnel junction with a magnetoelectric (ME) film in which the magnetic configuration is controlled by the electric field. Calculations embodying the Green's function approach show that the magnetic polarization can be switched on and off by an electric field in the ME film due to the effect of elastic coupling interaction. Using a model including the spin-filter effect and screening of polarization charges, we have produced eight logic states of tunnelling resistance in the tunnel junction and have obtained corresponding laws that control them. The results provide some insights into the realization of an eight-logic memory cell. (fast track communication)

  19. Pulsed-voltage atom probe tomography of low conductivity and insulator materials by application of ultrathin metallic coating on nanoscale specimen geometry.

    Adineh, Vahid R; Marceau, Ross K W; Chen, Yu; Si, Kae J; Velkov, Tony; Cheng, Wenlong; Li, Jian; Fu, Jing

    2017-10-01

    We present a novel approach for analysis of low-conductivity and insulating materials with conventional pulsed-voltage atom probe tomography (APT), by incorporating an ultrathin metallic coating on focused ion beam prepared needle-shaped specimens. Finite element electrostatic simulations of coated atom probe specimens were performed, which suggest remarkable improvement in uniform voltage distribution and subsequent field evaporation of the insulated samples with a metallic coating of approximately 10nm thickness. Using design of experiment technique, an experimental investigation was performed to study physical vapor deposition coating of needle specimens with end tip radii less than 100nm. The final geometries of the coated APT specimens were characterized with high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, and an empirical model was proposed to determine the optimal coating thickness for a given specimen size. The optimal coating strategy was applied to APT specimens of resin embedded Au nanospheres. Results demonstrate that the optimal coating strategy allows unique pulsed-voltage atom probe analysis and 3D imaging of biological and insulated samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Nanoscale effects in interdiffusion

    Erdelyi, Z.; Langer, G.A.; Beke, D.L.; Csik, A.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Diffusion on the nano/atomic scales in multilayers, thin films has many challenging features even if the role of structural defects can be neglected and 'only' the effects related to the nano/atomic scale raise. The most basic equations to describe the diffusion are Fick's equations. It is important to emphasize that the diffusion coefficient in Fick's equations is in general composition independent and Fick's classical equations do not include the stress effects, which can have important influence onto the diffusion especially on the nano/atomic scale. We illustrate that the continuum descriptions of the diffusion cannot be applied automatically on such short distances, the classical continuum approximations (Fick's laws) cannot describe correctly the atomic movements. They predict faster kinetics than the atomistic models and the interface shift is always proportional to the square root of the time. However, the kinetics can be even linear on the nano/atomic scale. We have shown from computer simulations that Fick's laws violate on the nanoscale either in completely or restricted miscible systems. This is strongly related to the discrete character of the system on the nanoscale and to the highly neglected fact in the literature that the diffusion coefficients depend on the composition. As will be seen the composition dependence of D is very important and has very significant influence on the diffusion kinetics on the nano/atomic scales. It originates from the fact that usually the diffusion coefficients are different in an A and in a B matrix. Consequently in case of a real interface, which is not atomically sharp, i.e. there is a more or less intermixed region between the pure A and B matrixes, the diffusion coefficient changes continuously while e.g. an A atom diffuses from the pure A matrix into the pure B. This feature can be also called diffusion asymmetry. We have also illustrated that in this case not only the

  1. Enhanced multiferroic properties in scandium doped Bi2Fe4O9

    Dutta, Dimple P.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    Undoped and Sc 3+ doped Bi 2 Fe 4 O 9 nanoparticles have been synthesized using sonochemical method. The phase purity of the samples was checked using powder X-rau diffraction technique. EDS analysis was done to confirm the extent of Sc 3+ doping in the samples. The size and morphology of the nanoparticles have been analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The Bi 2 Fe 4 O 9 nanoparticles show a weak ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature, which is quite different from the linear M–H relationship reported for bulk Bi 2 Fe 4 O 9 . This is mainly attributed to the uncompensated moments at the disordered particle surface resulting from the reduced coordination of the surface spins, arising due to lattice strain or oxygen deficiency. Addition of Sc 3+ dopant in varying concentrations in these Bi 2 Fe 4 O 9 nanoparticles, improves their magnetic as well as ferroelectric properties. The leakage current is considerably reduced and electric polarization increases significantly in case of Bi 2 Fe 4(1-x) Sc x O 9 (x = 0.1) nanoparticles. Hence it can be inferred that Sc 3+ doped Bi 2 Fe 4 O 9 nanoparticles shows promise as good multiferroic materials.

  2. Nanoscale technology in biological systems

    Greco, Ralph S; Smith, R Lane

    2004-01-01

    Reviewing recent accomplishments in the field of nanobiology Nanoscale Technology in Biological Systems introduces the application of nanoscale matrices to human biology. It focuses on the applications of nanotechnology fabrication to biomedical devices and discusses new physical methods for cell isolation and manipulation and intracellular communication at the molecular level. It also explores the application of nanobiology to cardiovascular diseases, oncology, transplantation, and a range of related disciplines. This book build a strong background in nanotechnology and nanobiology ideal for

  3. Friction laws at the nanoscale.

    Mo, Yifei; Turner, Kevin T; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2009-02-26

    Macroscopic laws of friction do not generally apply to nanoscale contacts. Although continuum mechanics models have been predicted to break down at the nanoscale, they continue to be applied for lack of a better theory. An understanding of how friction force depends on applied load and contact area at these scales is essential for the design of miniaturized devices with optimal mechanical performance. Here we use large-scale molecular dynamics simulations with realistic force fields to establish friction laws in dry nanoscale contacts. We show that friction force depends linearly on the number of atoms that chemically interact across the contact. By defining the contact area as being proportional to this number of interacting atoms, we show that the macroscopically observed linear relationship between friction force and contact area can be extended to the nanoscale. Our model predicts that as the adhesion between the contacting surfaces is reduced, a transition takes place from nonlinear to linear dependence of friction force on load. This transition is consistent with the results of several nanoscale friction experiments. We demonstrate that the breakdown of continuum mechanics can be understood as a result of the rough (multi-asperity) nature of the contact, and show that roughness theories of friction can be applied at the nanoscale.

  4. Simple Methods for Production of Nanoscale Metal Oxide Films from Household Sources

    Campbell, Dean J.; Baliss, Michelle S.; Hinman, Jordan J.; Ziegenhorn, John W.; Andrews, Mark J.; Stevenson, Keith J.

    2013-01-01

    Production of thin metal oxide films was recently explored as part of an outreach program with a goal of producing nanoscale structures with household items. Household items coated with various metals or titanium compounds can be heated to produce colorful films with nanoscale thicknesses. As part of a materials chemistry laboratory experiment…

  5. Origin of Ferrimagnetism and Ferroelectricity in Room-Temperature Multiferroic ɛ -Fe2O3

    Xu, K.; Feng, J. S.; Liu, Z. P.; Xiang, H. J.

    2018-04-01

    Exploring and identifying room-temperature multiferroics is critical for developing better nonvolatile random-access memory devices. Recently, ɛ -Fe2O3 was found to be a promising room-temperature multiferroic with a large polarization and magnetization. However, the origin of the multiferroicity in ɛ -Fe2O3 is still puzzling. In this work, we perform density-functional-theory calculations to reveal that the spin frustration between tetrahedral-site Fe3 + spins gives rise to the unexpected ferrimagnetism. For the ferroelectricity, we identify a low-energy polarization switching path with an energy barrier of 85 meV /f .u . by performing a stochastic surface walking simulation. The switching of the ferroelectric polarization is achieved by swapping the tetrahedral Fe ion with the octahedral Fe ion, different from the usual case (e.g., in BaTiO3 and BiFeO3 ) where the coordination number remains unchanged after the switching. Our results not only confirm that ɛ -Fe2O3 is a promising room-temperature multiferroic but also provide guiding principles to design high-performance multiferroics.

  6. Nanoscale shape-memory alloys for ultrahigh mechanical damping.

    San Juan, Jose; Nó, Maria L; Schuh, Christopher A

    2009-07-01

    Shape memory alloys undergo reversible transformations between two distinct phases in response to changes in temperature or applied stress. The creation and motion of the internal interfaces between these phases during such transformations dissipates energy, making these alloys effective mechanical damping materials. Although it has been shown that reversible phase transformations can occur in nanoscale volumes, it is not known whether these transformations have a sample size dependence. Here, we demonstrate that the two phases responsible for shape memory in Cu-Al-Ni alloys are more stable in nanoscale pillars than they are in the bulk. As a result, the pillars show a damping figure of merit that is substantially higher than any previously reported value for a bulk material, making them attractive for damping applications in nanoscale and microscale devices.

  7. Nanoscale microwave microscopy using shielded cantilever probes

    Lai, Keji; Kundhikanjana, Worasom; Kelly, Michael A.; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative dielectric and conductivity mapping in the nanoscale is highly desirable for many research disciplines, but difficult to achieve through conventional transport or established microscopy techniques. Taking advantage of the micro-fabrication technology, we have developed cantilever-based near-field microwave probes with shielded structures. Sensitive microwave electronics and finite-element analysis modeling are also utilized for quantitative electrical imaging. The system is fully compatible with atomic force microscope platforms for convenient operation and easy integration of other modes and functions. The microscope is ideal for interdisciplinary research, with demonstrated examples in nano electronics, physics, material science, and biology.

  8. Micro- and nanoscale phenomena in tribology

    Chung, Yip-Wah

    2011-01-01

    Drawn from presentations at a recent National Science Foundation Summer Institute on Nanomechanics, Nanomaterials, and Micro/Nanomanufacturing, Micro- and Nanoscale Phenomena in Tribology explores the convergence of the multiple science and engineering disciplines involved in tribology and the connection from the macro to nano world. Written by specialists from computation, materials science, mechanical engineering, surface physics, and chemistry, each chapter provides up-to-date coverage of both basic and advanced topics and includes extensive references for further study.After discussing the

  9. Nanoscale microwave microscopy using shielded cantilever probes

    Lai, Keji

    2011-04-21

    Quantitative dielectric and conductivity mapping in the nanoscale is highly desirable for many research disciplines, but difficult to achieve through conventional transport or established microscopy techniques. Taking advantage of the micro-fabrication technology, we have developed cantilever-based near-field microwave probes with shielded structures. Sensitive microwave electronics and finite-element analysis modeling are also utilized for quantitative electrical imaging. The system is fully compatible with atomic force microscope platforms for convenient operation and easy integration of other modes and functions. The microscope is ideal for interdisciplinary research, with demonstrated examples in nano electronics, physics, material science, and biology.

  10. Nanoscale Materials and Architectures for Energy Conversion

    Grulke, Eric A. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Sunkara, Mahendra K. [University of Louisville, KY (United States)

    2011-05-25

    The Kentucky EPSCoR Program supported an inter-university, multidisciplinary energy-related research cluster studying nanomaterials for converting solar radiation and residual thermal energy to electrical energy and hydrogen. It created a collaborative center of excellence based on research expertise in nanomaterials, architectures, and their synthesis. The project strengthened and improved the collaboration between the University of Louisville, the University of Kentucky, and NREL. The cluster hired a new faculty member for ultra-fast transient spectroscopy, and enabled the mentoring of one research scientist, two postdoctoral scholars and ten graduate students. Work was accomplished with three focused cluster projects: organic and photoelectrochemical solar cells, solar fuels, and thermionic energy conversion.

  11. Nanoscale Infrared Spectroscopy of Biopolymeric Materials

    Curtis Marcott; Michael Lo; Kevin Kjoller; Craig Prater; Roshan Shetty; Joseph Jakes; Isao Noda

    2012-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy have been combined in a single instrument capable of producing 100 nm spatial resolution IR spectra and images. This new capability enables the spectroscopic characterization of biomaterial domains at levels not previously possible. A tunable IR laser source generating pulses on the order of 10 ns was used...

  12. Silicon-Based Nanoscale Composite Energetic Materials

    2013-02-01

    1193-1211. 9. Krishnamohan, G., E.M. Kurian, and H.R. Rao, Thermal Analysis and Inverse Burning Rate Studies on Silicon-Potassium Nitrate System...reported in a journal paper and appears in the Appendix. Multiscale Nanoporous Silicon Combustion Introduction for nanoporous silicon effort While

  13. Stable boron nitride diamondoids as nanoscale materials

    Fyta, Maria

    2014-01-01

    We predict the stability of diamondoids made up of boron and nitrogen instead of carbon atoms. The results are based on quantum-mechanical calculations within density functional theory (DFT) and show some very distinct features compared to the regular carbon-based diamondoids. These features are evaluated with respect to the energetics and electronic properties of the boron nitride diamondoids as compared to the respective properties of the carbon-based diamondoids. We find that BN-diamondoids are overall more stable than their respective C-diamondoid counterparts. The electronic band-gaps (E g ) of the former are overall lower than those for the latter nanostructures but do not show a very distinct trend with their size. Contrary to the lower C-diamondoids, the BN-diamondoids are semiconducting and show a depletion of charge on the nitrogen site. Their differences in the distribution of the molecular orbitals, compared to their carbon-based counterparts, offer additional bonding and functionalization possibilities. These tiny BN-based nanostructures could potentially be used as nanobuilding blocks complementing or substituting the C-diamondoids, based on the desired properties. An experimental realization of boron nitride diamondoids remains to show their feasibility. (paper)

  14. Ferrielectricity in DyMn2O5: A golden touchstone for multiferroicity of RMn2O5 family

    J.-M. Liu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The RMn2O5 manganite compounds represent one class of multiferroic family with magnetic origins, which has been receiving continuous attention in the past decade. So far, our understanding of the magnetic origins for ferroelectricity in RMn2O5 is associated with the nearly collinear antiferromagnetic structure of Mn ions, while the exchange striction induced ionic displacements are the consequence of the spin frustration competitions. While this scenario may be applied to almost all RMn2O5 members, its limitation is either clear: the temperature-dependent behaviors of electric polarization and its responses to external stimuli are seriously materials dependent. These inconsistences raise substantial concern with the state-of-the-art physics of ferroelectricity in RMn2O5. In this mini-review, we present our recent experimental results on the roles of the 4f moments from R ions which are intimately coupled with the 3d moments from Mn ions. DyMn2O5 is a golden figure for illustrating these roles. It is demonstrated that the spin structure accommodates two nearly collinear sublattices which generate respectively two ferroelectric (FE sublattices, enabling DyMn2O5 an emergent ferrielectric (FIE system rarely identified in magnetically induced FEs. The evidence is presented from several aspects, including FIE-like phenomena and magnetoelectric responses, proposed structural model, and experimental check by nonmagnetic substitutions of the 3d and 4f moments. Additional perspectives regarding possible challenges in understanding the multiferroicity of RMn2O5 as a generalized scenario are discussed.

  15. Enhanced magnetoelectric coupling in a composite multiferroic system via interposing a thin film polymer

    Xiao, Zhuyun; Mohanchandra, Kotekar P.; Lo Conte, Roberto; Ty Karaba, C.; Schneider, J. D.; Chavez, Andres; Tiwari, Sidhant; Sohn, Hyunmin; Nowakowski, Mark E.; Scholl, Andreas; Tolbert, Sarah H.; Bokor, Jeffrey; Carman, Gregory P.; Candler, Rob N.

    2018-05-01

    Enhancing the magnetoelectric coupling in a strain-mediated multiferroic composite structure plays a vital role in controlling magnetism by electric fields. An enhancement of magnetoelastic coupling between ferroelectric single crystal (011)-cut [Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3](1-x)-[PbTiO3]x (PMN-PT, x≈ 0.30) and ferromagnetic polycrystalline Ni thin film through an interposed benzocyclobutene polymer thin film is reported. A nearly twofold increase in sensitivity of remanent magnetization in the Ni thin film to an applied electric field is observed. This observation suggests a viable method of improving the magnetoelectric response in these composite multiferroic systems.

  16. Electrically driven magnetic relaxation in multiferroic LuFe2O4

    Wang Fen; Li Changhui; Zou Tao; Liu Yi; Sun Young

    2010-01-01

    We report the electrical control of magnetization in multiferroic LuFe 2 O 4 by applying short current pulses. The magnitude of the induced magnetization change depends on the pulse width and current density. The voltage variation during the applied current pulses evidences an electric-field-induced breakdown of charge order and excludes the role of Joule heating. This current driven magnetization change can be interpreted with a three-temperature model in which the delocalized electrons accelerate spin relaxation through a strong spin-charge coupling inherent to multiferroicity. The electrically assisted magnetic relaxation provides a new approach for electrical control of magnetization.

  17. A simple model for the magnetoelectric interaction in multiferroics

    Filho, Cesar J Calderon; Barberis, Gaston E

    2011-01-01

    The (anti)ferromagnetic and ferroelectric transitions in some multiferroic compounds seem to be strongly correlated. Even for systems that do not show spontaneous ferroelectricity such as the LiMPO 4 (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni) compounds, the coupling between magnetic and electric degrees of freedom is evident experimentally. Here, we present a simple numerical calculation to simulate this coupling that leads to the two transitions. We assume a magnetic sublattice consisting of classical magnetic moments coupled to a separated nonmagnetic sublattice consisting of classical electric dipoles. The coupling between them is realized through a phenomenological spin-lattice Hamiltonian, and the solution is obtained using the Monte Carlo technique. In the simplest version, the magnetic system is 2D Ising (anti)ferromagnetic lattice, with nearest neighbors interactions only, and the electric moments are permanent moments, coupled electrically. Within this approximation, the second order magnetic transition induces ferroelectricity in the electric dipoles. We show that these calculations can be extended to other magnetic systems, (x-y model and 3D Heisenberg) and to systems where the electric moments are created by strains, generated via spin-lattice coupling, so the model can be applied to model realistic systems such as the olivines mentioned above.

  18. Heat-Assisted Multiferroic Solid-State Memory.

    Lepadatu, Serban; Vopson, Melvin M

    2017-08-25

    A heat-assisted multiferroic solid-state memory design is proposed and analysed, based on a PbNbZrSnTiO₃ antiferroelectric layer and Ni 81 Fe 19 magnetic free layer. Information is stored as magnetisation direction in the free layer of a magnetic tunnel junction element. The bit writing process is contactless and relies on triggering thermally activated magnetisation switching of the free layer towards a strain-induced anisotropy easy axis. A stress is generated using the antiferroelectric layer by voltage-induced antiferroelectric to ferroelectric phase change, and this is transmitted to the magnetic free layer by strain-mediated coupling. The thermally activated strain-induced magnetisation switching is analysed here using a three-dimensional, temperature-dependent magnetisation dynamics model, based on simultaneous evaluation of the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equation and heat flow equation, together with stochastic thermal fields and magnetoelastic contributions. The magnetisation switching probability is calculated as a function of stress magnitude and maximum heat pulse temperature. An operating region is identified, where magnetisation switching always occurs, with stress values ranging from 80 to 180 MPa, and maximum temperatures normalised to the Curie temperature ranging from 0.65 to 0.99.

  19. Sensing at the nanoscale

    Demming, Anna; Hierold, Christofer

    2013-11-01

    The merits of nanostructures in sensing may seem obvious, yet playing these attributes to their maximum advantage can be a work of genius. As fast as sensing technology is improving, expectations are growing, with demands for cheaper devices with higher sensitivities and an ever increasing range of functionalities and compatibilities. At the same time tough scientific challenges like low power operation, noise and low selectivity are keeping researchers busy. This special issue on sensing at the nanoscale with guest editor Christofer Hierold from ETH Zurich features some of the latest developments in sensing research pushing at the limits of current capabilities. Cheap and easy fabrication is a top priority. Among the most popular nanomaterials in sensing are ZnO nanowires and in this issue Dario Zappa and colleagues at Brescia University in Italy simplify an already cheap and efficient synthesis method, demonstrating ZnO nanowire fabrication directly onto silicon substrates [1]. Meanwhile Nicolae Barson and colleagues in Germany point out the advantages of flame spray pyrolysis fabrication in a topical review [2] and, maximizing on existing resources, researchers in Denmark and Taiwan report cantilever sensing using a US20 commercial DVD-ROM optical pickup unit as the readout source [3]. The sensor is designed to detect physiological concentrations of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor, a protein associated with inflammation due to HIV, cancer and other infectious diseases. With their extreme properties carbon nanostructures feature prominently in the issue, including the demonstration of a versatile and flexible carbon nanotube strain sensor [4] and a graphene charge sensor with sensitivities of the order of 1.3 × 10-3 e Hz-1/2 [5]. The issue of patterning for sensing devices is also tackled by researchers in the US who demonstrate a novel approach for multicomponent pattering metal/metal oxide nanoparticles on graphene [6]. Changes in electrical

  20. Light-matter interaction physics and engineering at the nanoscale

    Weiner, John

    2013-01-01

    This book draws together the essential elements of classical electrodynamics, surface wave physics, plasmonic materials, and circuit theory of electrical engineering to provide insight into the essential physics of nanoscale light-matter interaction and to provide design methodology for practical nanoscale plasmonic devices. A chapter on classical and quantal radiation also highlights the similarities (and differences) between the classical fields of Maxwell's equations and the wave functions of Schrodinger's equation. The aim of this chapter is to provide a semiclassical picture of atomic absorption and emission of radiation, lending credence and physical plausibility to the "rules" of standard wave-mechanical calculations.

  1. Topology optimization for nano-scale heat transfer

    Evgrafov, Anton; Maute, Kurt; Yang, Ronggui

    2009-01-01

    We consider the problem of optimal design of nano-scale heat conducting systems using topology optimization techniques. At such small scales the empirical Fourier's law of heat conduction no longer captures the underlying physical phenomena because the mean-free path of the heat carriers, phonons...... in our case, becomes comparable with, or even larger than, the feature sizes of considered material distributions. A more accurate model at nano-scales is given by kinetic theory, which provides a compromise between the inaccurate Fourier's law and precise, but too computationally expensive, atomistic...

  2. Synthesis, dynamics and photophysics of nanoscale systems

    Mirkovic, Tihana

    The emerging field of nanotechnology, which spans diverse areas such as nanoelectronics, medicine, chemical and pharmaceutical industries, biotechnology and computation, focuses on the development of devices whose improved performance is based on the utilization of self-assembled nanoscale components exhibiting unique properties owing to their miniaturized dimensions. The first phase in the conception of such multifunctional devices based on integrated technologies requires the study of basic principles behind the functional mechanism of nanoscale components, which could originate from individual nanoobjects or result as a collective behaviour of miniaturized unit structures. The comprehensive studies presented in this thesis encompass the mechanical, dynamical and photophysical aspects of three nanoscale systems. A newly developed europium sulfide nanocrystalline material is introduced. Advances in synthetic methods allowed for shape control of surface-functionalized EuS nanocrystals and the fabrication of multifunctional EuS-CdSe hybrid particles, whose unique structural and optical properties hold promise as useful attributes of integrated materials in developing technologies. A comprehensive study based on a new class of multifunctional nanomaterials, derived from the basic unit of barcoded metal nanorods is presented. Their chemical composition affords them the ability to undergo autonomous motion in the presence of a suitable fuel. The nature of their chemically powered self-propulsion locomotion was investigated, and plausible mechanisms for various motility modes were presented. Furthermore functionalization of striped metallic nanorods has been realized through the incorporation of chemically controlled flexible hinges displaying bendable properties. The structural aspect of the light harvesting machinery of a photosynthetic cryptophyte alga, Rhodomonas CS24, and the mobility of the antenna protein, PE545, in vivo were investigated. Information obtained

  3. NANOSCALE BIOSENSORS IN ECOSYSTEM EXPOSURE RESEARCH

    This powerpoint presentation presented information on nanoscale biosensors in ecosystem exposure research. The outline of the presentation is as follows: nanomaterials environmental exposure research; US agencies involved in nanosensor research; nanoscale LEDs in biosensors; nano...

  4. Nanoscale Electrochemical Sensing and Processing in Microreactors

    Odijk, Mathieu; van den Berg, Albert

    2018-01-01

    In this review, we summarize recent advances in nanoscale electrochemistry, including the use of nanoparticles, carbon nanomaterials, and nanowires. Exciting developments are reported for nanoscale redox cycling devices, which can chemically amplify signal readout. We also discuss promising

  5. Adaptive and active materials: selected papers from the ASME 2013 Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems (SMASIS 13) (Snowbird, UT, USA, 16-18 September 2013)

    Johnson, Nancy; Naguib, Hani; Turner, Travis; Anderson, Iain; Bassiri-Gharb, Nazanin; Daqaq, Mohammed; Baba Sundaresan, Vishnu; Sarles, Andy

    2014-10-01

    The sixth annual meeting of the ASME Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems Conference (SMASIS) was held in the beautiful mountain encircled Snowbird Resort and Conference Center in Little Cottonwood Canyon near Salt Lake City, Utah. It is the conference's objective to provide an up-to-date overview of research trends in the entire field of smart materials systems in a friendly casual forum conducive to the exchange of ideas and latest results. As each year we strive to grow and offer new experiences, this year we included special focused topic tracks on nanoscale multiferroic materials and origami engineering. The cross-disciplinary emphasis was reflected in keynote speeches by Professor Kaushik Bhattacharya (California Institute of Technology) on 'Cyclic Deformation and the Interplay between Phase Transformation and Plasticity in Shape Memory Alloys', by Professor Alison Flatau (University of Maryland at College Park) on 'Structural Magnetostrictive Alloys: The Other Smart Material', and by Dr Leslie Momoda (Director of the Sensors and Materials Laboratories, HRL Laboratories, LLC, Malibu, CA) on 'Architecturing New Functional Materials: An Industrial Perspective'. SMASIS 2013 was divided into seven symposia which span basic research, applied technological design and development, and industrial and governmental integrated system and application demonstrations. SYMP 1. Development and Characterization of Multifunctional Materials. SYMP 2. Mechanics and Behavior of Active Materials. SYMP 3. Modeling, Simulation and Control of Adaptive Systems. SYMP 4. Integrated System Design and Implementation. SYMP 5. Structural Health Monitoring. SYMP 6. Bioinspired Smart Materials and Systems. SYMP 7. Energy Harvesting. Authors of selected papers in the materials areas (symposia 1, 2, and 6) as well as energy harvesting (symposium 7) were invited to write a full journal article on their presentation topic for publication in this special issue of Smart

  6. Ferroelectric crystals for photonic applications including nanoscale fabrication and characterization techniques

    Ferraro, Pietro; De Natale, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    This book details the latest achievements in ferroelectric domain engineering and characterization at micro- and nano-scale dimensions and periods. It combines basic research of magnetic materials with device and production orientation.

  7. Feasibility Study of Nanoscale Semiconductor Manufacture Using Thermal Dip Pen Nanolithography

    King, William P

    2006-01-01

    ...) for the purpose of nanoscale electronics manufacturing. In this project, we have demonstrated that using the thermal DPN technique that both indium metal, and semiconducting organic materials (PDDT, PVDF...

  8. Nanoscale organic ferroelectric resistive switches

    Khikhlovskyi, V.; Wang, R.; Breemen, A.J.J.M. van; Gelinck, G.H.; Janssen, R.A.J.; Kemerink, M.

    2014-01-01

    Organic ferroelectric resistive switches function by grace of nanoscale phase separation in a blend of a semiconducting and a ferroelectric polymer that is sandwiched between metallic electrodes. In this work, various scanning probe techniques are combined with numerical modeling to unravel their

  9. Structural Anomalies and Multiferroic Behavior in Magnetically Frustrated TbMn2O5

    Chapon, L.C.; Blake, G.R.; Gutmann, M.J.; Park, S.; Hur, N.; Radaelli, P.G.; Cheong, S-W.

    2004-01-01

    We have studied the magnetostructural phase diagram of multiferroic TbMn2O5 as a function of temperature and magnetic field by neutron diffraction. Dielectric and magnetic anomalies are found to be associated with steps in the magnetic propagation vector, including a rare example of a

  10. Ultrathin Limit of Exchange Bias Coupling at Oxide Multiferroic/Ferromagnetic Interfaces

    Huijben, Mark; Yu, P.; Martin, L.W.; Molegraaf, Hajo; Chu, Y.H.; Holcomb, M.B.; Balke, N.; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.; Ramesh, R.

    2013-01-01

    Exchange bias coupling at the multiferroic- ferromagnetic interface in BiFeO3/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 heterostructures exhibits a critical thickness for ultrathin BiFeO3 layers of 5 unit cells (2 nm). Linear dichroism measurements demonstrate the dependence on the BiFeO3 layer thickness with a strong

  11. Lieb-Mattis ferrimagnetic superstructure and superparamagnetism in Fe-based double perovskite multiferroics

    Kuzian, R. O.; Laguta, Valentyn; Richter, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 13 (2014), "134415-1"-"134415-13" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-11473S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : multiferroics * superantiferromagnetism * DFT calculations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  12. Multiferroic properties of Pb2Fe2O5 ceramics

    Wang, Min; Tan, Guolong

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Simultaneous occurrence of ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity in Pb 2 Fe 2 O 5 ceramics. → The off-centers of shifted Pb 2+ ions as well as the FeO 6 octahedra in the 'Pb 2 Fe 2 O 5 ' lead to a ferroelectric polarization. → Pb 2 Fe 2 O 5 ceramic demonstrates ferromagnetic order state due to the spin arrangement in the double chains of FeO 5 tetrahedral pyramids. -- Abstract: Pb 2 Fe 2 O 5 (PFO) powders in monoclinic structure have been synthesized using lead acetate in glycerin and ferric acetylacetonate as the precursor. The powders were pressed into pellets, which were sintered into ceramics at 800 o C for 1 h. The morphology and structure have been determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Polarization was observed in Pb 2 Fe 2 O 5 ceramics at room temperature, exhibiting a clear ferroelectric hysteresis loop. The remanent polarization of Pb 2 Fe 2 O 5 ceramic is estimated to be Pr ∼ 0.22 μC/cm 2 . The origin of the polarization may be attributed to the off-centers of shifted Pb 2+ ions as well as the FeO 6 octahedra in the perovskite-based structure of Pb 2 Fe 2 O 5 . Magnetic hysteresis loop was also observed at room temperature. The Pb 2 Fe 2 O 5 ceramic shows coexistence of ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism. It provides a new field of research for complex oxides with multiferroic properties.

  13. Facilitation of Nanoscale Thermal Transport by Hydrogen Bonds

    Zhang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Thermal transport performance at the nanoscale and/or of biomaterials is essential to the success of many new technologies including nanoelectronics, biomedical devices, and various nanocomposites. Due to complicated microstructures and chemical bonding, thermal transport process in these materials has not been well understood yet. In terms of chemical bonding, it is well known that the strength of atomic bonding can significantly affect thermal transport across materials or across interfaces...

  14. Nanoscale Science and Engineering in Romania

    Dascalu, Dan; Topa, Vladimir; Kleps, Irina

    2001-01-01

    In spite of difficult working conditions and with very low financial support, many groups from Romania are involved in emerging fields, such as the nanoscale science and technology. Until the last years, this activity was developed without a central coordination and without many interactions between these research groups. In the year 2000, some of the institutes and universities active in the nanotechnology field in Romania founded the MICRONANOTECH network. The aim of this paper is to emphasize the main activities and results of the Romanian groups working in this novel domain. Most of the groups are deal with the nanomaterial technology and only few of them have activities in nanostructure science and engineering, in new concepts and device modeling and technology. This paper describes the nanotechnology research development in two of the most significant institutes from Romania: Centre for Nanotechnologies from National Institute for Research and Development in Microtehnologies (IMT-Bucharest) and from National Institute for Research and Development in Materials Physics (INCD-FM), Magurele. The Romanian research results in nanotechnology field were presented in numerous papers presented in international conferences or published in national and international journals. They are also presented in patents, international awards and fellowships. The research effort and financial support are outlined. Some future trends of the Romanian nanoscale science and technology research are also described

  15. Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide in ...

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide in Water Treatment and in Topical Sunscreen. This report is a starting point to determine what is known and what needs to be known about selected nanomaterials as part of a process to identify and prioritize research to inform future assessments of the potential ecological and health implications of these materials. Two specific applications of nanoscale titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) are considered: (1) as an agent for removing arsenic from drinking water; and (2) as an active ingredient in topical sunscreen. These case studies are organized around a comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) framework that combines a product life cycle perspective with the risk assessment paradigm. They are intended to help identify what may need to be known in order to conduct a comprehensive environmental assessment of the potential risks related to nano-TiO2. These “case studies” do not represent completed or even preliminary assessments, nor are they intended to serve as a basis for risk management decisions in the near term on these specific uses of nano TiO2. Rather, the intent is to use this document in developing the scientific and technical information needed for future assessment efforts.

  16. Direct Probing of Polarization Charge at Nanoscale Level

    Kwon, Owoong [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Republic of Korea). School of Advanced Materials and Engineering; Seol, Daehee [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Republic of Korea). School of Advanced Materials and Engineering; Lee, Dongkyu [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Han, Hee [Korea Research Inst. of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon (South Korea); Lindfors-Vrejoiu, Ionela [Univ. of Cologne (Germany). Physics Inst.; Lee, Woo [Korea Research Inst. of Standards and Science (KRISS), Daejeon (South Korea); Jesse, Stephen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences; Lee, Ho Nyung [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Kalinin, Sergei V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences; Alexe, Marin [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Kim, Yunseok [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Republic of Korea). School of Advanced Materials and Engineering

    2017-11-14

    Ferroelectric materials possess spontaneous polarization that can be used for multiple applications. Owing to a long-term development of reducing the sizes of devices, the preparation of ferroelectric materials and devices is entering the nanometer-scale regime. In order to evaluate the ferroelectricity, there is a need to investigate the polarization charge at the nanoscale. Nonetheless, it is generally accepted that the detection of polarization charges using a conventional conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) without a top electrode is not feasible because the nanometer-scale radius of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip yields a very low signal-to-noise ratio. But, the detection is unrelated to the radius of an AFM tip and, in fact, a matter of the switched area. In this work, the direct probing of the polarization charge at the nanoscale is demonstrated using the positive-up-negative-down method based on the conventional CAFM approach without additional corrections or circuits to reduce the parasitic capacitance. The polarization charge densities of 73.7 and 119.0 µC cm-2 are successfully probed in ferroelectric nanocapacitors and thin films, respectively. The results we obtained show the feasibility of the evaluation of polarization charge at the nanoscale and provide a new guideline for evaluating the ferroelectricity at the nanoscale.

  17. Role of rare-earth ionic radii on the spin-phonon coupling in multiferroic ordered double perovskites

    Macedo Filho, R.B.; Barbosa, D.A.B.; Reichlová, Helena; Martí, Xavier; de Menezes, A.S.; Ayala, A.P.; Paschoal, C.W.A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 2 (2015), 075201 ISSN 2053-1591 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : double perovskites * spin-phonon coupling * multiferroics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.968, year: 2015

  18. Engineering Platinum Alloy Electrocatalysts in Nanoscale for PEMFC Application

    He, Ting [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-03-01

    Fuel cells are expected to be a key next-generation energy source used for vehicles and homes, offering high energy conversion efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. However, due to large overpotentials on anode and cathode, the efficiency is still much lower than theoretically predicted. During the past decades, considerable efforts have been made to investigate synergy effect of platinum alloyed with base metals. But, engineering the alloy particles in nanoscale has been a challenge. Most important challenges in developing nanostructured materials are the abilities to control size, monodispersity, microcomposition, and even morphology or self-assembly capability, so called Nanomaterials-by-Design, which requires interdisciplinary collaborations among computational modeling, chemical synthesis, nanoscale characterization as well as manufacturing processing. Electrocatalysts, particularly fuel cell catalysts, are dramatically different from heterogeneous catalysts because the surface area in micropores cannot be electrochemically controlled on the same time scale as more transport accessible surfaces. Therefore, electrocatalytic architectures need minimal microporous surface area while maximizing surfaces accessible through mesopores or macropores, and to "pin" the most active, highest performance physicochemical state of the materials even when exposed to thermodynamic forces, which would otherwise drive restructuring, crystallization, or densification of the nanoscale materials. In this presentation, results of engineering nanoscale platinum alloy particles down to 2 ~ 4 nm will be discussed. Based on nature of alloyed base metals, various synthesis technologies have been studied and developed to achieve capabilities of controlling particle size and particle microcomposition, namely, core-shell synthesis, microemulsion technique, thermal decomposition process, surface organometallic chemical method, etc. The results show that by careful engineering the

  19. Highly repeatable nanoscale phase coexistence in vanadium dioxide films

    Huffman, T. J.; Lahneman, D. J.; Wang, S. L.; Slusar, T.; Kim, Bong-Jun; Kim, Hyun-Tak; Qazilbash, M. M.

    2018-02-01

    It is generally believed that in first-order phase transitions in materials with imperfections, the formation of phase domains must be affected to some extent by stochastic (probabilistic) processes. The stochasticity would lead to unreliable performance in nanoscale devices that have the potential to exploit the transformation of physical properties in a phase transition. Here we show that stochasticity at nanometer length scales is completely suppressed in the thermally driven metal-insulator transition (MIT) in sputtered vanadium dioxide (V O2 ) films. The nucleation and growth of domain patterns of metallic and insulating phases occur in a strikingly reproducible way. The completely deterministic nature of domain formation and growth in films with imperfections is a fundamental and unexpected finding about the kinetics of this material. Moreover, it opens the door for realizing reliable nanoscale devices based on the MIT in V O2 and similar phase-change materials.

  20. Nanoscale memory devices

    Chung, Andy; Deen, Jamal; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Meyyappan, M

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the current status and future prospects for the use of nanomaterials and devices in memory technology. First, the status and continuing scaling trends of the flash memory are discussed. Then, a detailed discussion on technologies trying to replace flash in the near-term is provided. This includes phase change random access memory, Fe random access memory and magnetic random access memory. The long-term nanotechnology prospects for memory devices include carbon-nanotube-based memory, molecular electronics and memristors based on resistive materials such as TiO 2 . (topical review)

  1. Nanoscale surface characterization using laser interference microscopy

    Ignatyev, Pavel S.; Skrynnik, Andrey A.; Melnik, Yury A.

    2018-03-01

    Nanoscale surface characterization is one of the most significant parts of modern materials development and application. The modern microscopes are expensive and complicated tools, and its use for industrial tasks is limited due to laborious sample preparation, measurement procedures, and low operation speed. The laser modulation interference microscopy method (MIM) for real-time quantitative and qualitative analysis of glass, metals, ceramics, and various coatings has a spatial resolution of 0.1 nm for vertical and up to 100 nm for lateral. It is proposed as an alternative to traditional scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods. It is demonstrated that in the cases of roughness metrology for super smooth (Ra >1 nm) surfaces the application of a laser interference microscopy techniques is more optimal than conventional SEM and AFM. The comparison of semiconductor test structure for lateral dimensions measurements obtained with SEM and AFM and white light interferometer also demonstrates the advantages of MIM technique.

  2. Imaging the Nanoscale Band Structure of Topological Sb

    Soumyanarayanan, Anjan; Yee, Michael M.; He, Yang; Lin, Hsin; Gardner, Dillon R.; Bansil, Arun; Lee, Young S.; Hoffman, Jennifer E.

    2013-01-01

    Many promising building blocks of future electronic technology - including non-stoichiometric compounds, strongly correlated oxides, and strained or patterned films - are inhomogeneous on the nanometer length scale. Exploiting the inhomogeneity of such materials to design next-generation nanodevices requires a band structure probe with nanoscale spatial resolution. To address this demand, we report the first simultaneous observation and quantitative reconciliation of two candidate probes - La...

  3. Sm/Ti co-substituted bismuth ferrite multiferroics: reciprocity between tetragonality and piezoelectricity.

    Jha, Pardeep K; Jha, Priyanka A; Singh, Prabhakar; Ranjan, Rajeev; Dwivedi, R K

    2017-10-04

    BiFeO 3 (BFO) systems co-modified with Ti, Sm and Sm-Ti have been investigated for piezoelectricity together with dielectric and multiferroic properties. Structural studies revealed the coexistence of orthorhombic and rhombohedral (R3c) phases for x > 0.12. Impurity phases were shown to have hardly any effect on the remanent magnetization, which rather depends on the Fe-O-Fe bond angle. The dielectric loss was reduced considerably by substitution. A correlation between the piezoelectric coefficient and tetragonality was observed in these samples. BFO co-substituted with Sm-Ti exhibited a high piezoelectric coefficient with better ferroic properties, which revealed a unique combination of green piezoelectricity and multiferroicity.

  4. Multiferroic properties of BiFeO3/BaTiO3 multilayered thin films

    Sharma, Savita; Tomar, Monika; Kumar, Ashok; Puri, Nitin K.; Gupta, Vinay

    2014-01-01

    Multilayered structures of multiferroic BiFeO 3 (BFO) and ferroelectric BaTiO 3 (BTO) have been fabricated using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Ferromagnetic and ferroelectric properties of the multilayered system (BFO/BTO) have been investigated. It could be inferred that the magnetization increases with the incorporation of BTO buffer layer, which indicates a coupling between the ferroelectric and ferromagnetic orders. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) measurements performed on the prepared multiferroic samples show that the magnetization is significantly increased (M s =56.88 emu/cm 3 ) for the multilayer system with more number of layers (four) keeping the total thickness of the multilayered system constant (350 nm) meanwhile maintaining the sufficiently enhanced ferroelectric properties (P r =29.68 µC/cm 2 )

  5. Ambient template synthesis of multiferroic MnWO4 nanowires and nanowire arrays

    Zhou Hongjun; Yiu Yuen; Aronson, M.C.; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2008-01-01

    The current report describes the systematic synthesis of polycrystalline, multiferroic MnWO 4 nanowires and nanowire arrays with controllable chemical composition and morphology, using a modified template-directed methodology under ambient room-temperature conditions. We were able to synthesize nanowires measuring 55±10, 100±20, and 260±40 nm in diameter, respectively, with lengths ranging in the microns. Extensive characterization of as-prepared samples has been performed using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Magnetic behavior in these systems was also probed. - Graphical abstract: Systematic synthesis of crystalline, multiferroic MnWO4 nanowires and nanowire arrays with controllable chemical composition and morphology, using a modified template-directed methodology under ambient room-temperature conditions

  6. Film size-dependent voltage-modulated magnetism in multiferroic heterostructures

    Hu, J.-M.; Shu, L.; Li, Z.; Gao, Y.; Shen, Y.; Lin, Y. H.; Chen, L. Q.; Nan, C. W.

    2014-01-01

    The electric-voltage-modulated magnetism in multiferroic heterostructures, also known as the converse magnetoelectric (ME) coupling, has drawn increasing research interest recently owing to its great potential applications in future low-power, high-speed electronic and/or spintronic devices, such as magnetic memory and computer logic. In this article, based on combined theoretical analysis and experimental demonstration, we investigate the film size dependence of such converse ME coupling in multiferroic magnetic/ferroelectric heterostructures, as well as exploring the interaction between two relating coupling mechanisms that are the interfacial strain and possibly the charge effects. We also briefly discuss some issues for the next step and describe new device prototypes that can be enabled by this technology. PMID:24421375

  7. EXAFS and XANES analysis of oxides at the nanoscale

    Alexei Kuzmin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide research activity at the nanoscale is triggering the appearance of new, and frequently surprising, materials properties in which the increasing importance of surface and interface effects plays a fundamental role. This opens further possibilities in the development of new multifunctional materials with tuned physical properties that do not arise together at the bulk scale. Unfortunately, the standard methods currently available for solving the atomic structure of bulk crystals fail for nanomaterials due to nanoscale effects (very small crystallite sizes, large surface-to-volume ratio, near-surface relaxation, local lattice distortions etc.. As a consequence, a critical reexamination of the available local-structure characterization methods is needed. This work discusses the real possibilities and limits of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS analysis at the nanoscale. To this end, the present state of the art for the interpretation of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS is described, including an advanced approach based on the use of classical molecular dynamics and its application to nickel oxide nanoparticles. The limits and possibilities of X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES to determine several effects associated with the nanocrystalline nature of materials are discussed in connection with the development of ZnO-based dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMSs and iron oxide nanoparticles.

  8. Structural and Moessbauer Effect Studies of 0.7Bi0.95Dy0.05FeO3-0.3Pb(Fe0.5Nb0.5)O3 Multiferroic

    Stoch, A.; Kulawik, J.; Stoch, P.; Maurin, J.; Zachariasz, P.

    2011-01-01

    0.7Bi 0.95 Dy 0.05 FeO 3 -0.3Pb(Fe 0.5 Nb 0.5 )O 3 is a multiferroic material which exhibits ferroelectric and antiferromagnetic ordering. In this paper the way of the synthesis of 0.7Bi 0.95 Dy 0.05 FeO 3 -0.3Pb(Fe 0.5 Nb 0.5 )O 3 is presented. The detailed X-ray and Moessbauer effect studies were done and crystal and hyperfine interaction parameters were obtained. (authors)

  9. Magnetoelectric excitations in multiferroic Ni.sub.3./sub.TeO.sub.6./sub.

    Skiadopoulou, Styliani; Borodavka, Fedir; Kadlec, Christelle; Kadlec, Filip; Retuerto, M.; Deng, Z.; Greenblatt, M.; Kamba, Stanislav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 18 (2017), 1-6, č. článku 184435. ISSN 2469-9950 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH15122; GA ČR GA15-08389S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : multiferroics * electromagnons * THz * Raman * IR spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.836, year: 2016

  10. Continuous Magnetoelectric Control in Multiferroic DyMnO3 Films with Twin-like Domains

    Lu, Chengliang; Deniz, Hakan; Li, Xiang; Liu, Jun-Ming; Cheong, Sang-Wook

    2016-02-01

    The magnetic control of ferroelectric polarization is currently a central topic in the multiferroic researches, owing to the related gigantic magnetoelectric coupling and fascinating physics. Although a bunch of novel magnetoelectric effect have been discovered in multiferroics of magnetic origin, the manipulation of polarization was found to be fundamentally determined by the microscopic origin in a certain multiferroic phase, hindering the development of unusual magnetoelectric control. Here, we report emergent magnetoelectric control in DyMnO3/Nb:SrTiO3 (001) films showing twin-like domain structure. Our results demonstrate interesting magnetically induced partial switch of polarization due to the coexistence of polarizations along both the a-axis and c-axis enabled by the twin-like domain structure in DyMnO3 films, despite the polarization-switch was conventionally believed to be a one-step event in the bulk counterpart. Moreover, a continuous and periodic control of macroscopic polarization by an in-plane rotating magnetic field is evidenced in the thin films. This distinctive magnetic manipulation of polarization is the consequence of the cooperative action of the twin-like domains and the dual magnetic origin of polarization, which promises additional applications using the magnetic control of ferroelectricity.

  11. Gadolinium substitution induced defect restructuring in multiferroic BiFeO3: case study by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Mukherjee, A.; Banerjee, M.; Basu, S.; Nambissan, P. M. G.; Pal, M.

    2013-12-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) comprising of the measurements of positron lifetime and coincidence Doppler broadening spectra has been carried out to understand and monitor the evolution of the vacancy-type defects arising from the ionic deficiencies at lattice points of the multiferroic perovskite bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) doped with 1, 5 and 10 at% gadolinium (Gd3+) ions. Negatively charged defects in the form of Bi3+ monovacancies (V_{Bi}^{3-} ) were present in the undoped nanocrystallites, which strongly trapped positrons. During the successive doping by Gd3+ ions, the positron trapping efficiency decreased while the doped ions combined with the vacancies to form complexes, which became neutral. A fraction of the positrons got annihilated at the crystallite surfaces too, being evident from the very large positron lifetimes obtained and confirming the nano-size-specific characteristics of the samples. Further, the intercrystallite regions provided favourable sites for orthopositronium formation, although in minute concentrations. The dopant ion-complex formation was also depicted clearly by the defect characteristic S-W plot. Also, the large change of electrical resistivity with Gd concentration has been explained nicely by invoking the defect information from the PAS study. The study has demonstrated the usefulness of an excellent method of defect identification in such a novel material system, which is vital information for exploiting them for further technological applications.

  12. Effects of magnetic annealing on structure and multiferroic properties of pure and dysprosium substituted BiFeO 3

    Zhang, Shuxia; Yao, Yingbang; Chen, Yao; Wang, Dongliang; Zhang, Xianping; Awaji, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuo; Ma, Yanwei

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the effects of magnetic annealing on crystal structure and multiferroic properties of BiFeO 3 and Bi 0.85Dy 0.15FeO 3 have been investigated. It is found that the X-ray diffraction patterns of pure BiFeO 3 samples are obviously broadened after magnetic annealing, whereas those of Bi 0.85Dy 0.15FeO 3 samples are almost unchanged. Magnetic field annealing did not affect the magnetic properties of these two kinds of samples much. However, ferroelectric properties of the two materials exhibited different behaviors after magnetic field annealing. For pure BiFeO 3 samples, the remnant polarizations (P r) are suppressed; in contrast, for Bi 0.85Dy 0.15FeO 3 samples, P r is greatly enhanced. Possible mechanisms for the effects of magnetic field annealing have been discussed. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of magnetic annealing on structure and multiferroic properties of pure and dysprosium substituted BiFeO 3

    Zhang, Shuxia

    2012-07-01

    In this work, the effects of magnetic annealing on crystal structure and multiferroic properties of BiFeO 3 and Bi 0.85Dy 0.15FeO 3 have been investigated. It is found that the X-ray diffraction patterns of pure BiFeO 3 samples are obviously broadened after magnetic annealing, whereas those of Bi 0.85Dy 0.15FeO 3 samples are almost unchanged. Magnetic field annealing did not affect the magnetic properties of these two kinds of samples much. However, ferroelectric properties of the two materials exhibited different behaviors after magnetic field annealing. For pure BiFeO 3 samples, the remnant polarizations (P r) are suppressed; in contrast, for Bi 0.85Dy 0.15FeO 3 samples, P r is greatly enhanced. Possible mechanisms for the effects of magnetic field annealing have been discussed. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Composition-driven magnetic and structural phase transitions in Bi1-xPrxFe1-xMnxO3 multiferroics

    Khomchenko, V. A.; Ivanov, M. S.; Karpinsky, D. V.; Paixão, J. A.

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic ferroelectrics continue to attract much attention as promising multifunctional materials. Among them, BiFeO3 is distinguished by exceptionally high transition temperatures and, thus, is considered as a prototype room-temperature multiferroic. Since its properties are known to be strongly affected by chemical substitution, recognition of the doping-related factors determining the multiferroic behavior of the material would pave the way towards designing the structures with enhanced magnetoelectric functionality. In this paper, we report on the crystal structure and magnetic and local ferroelectric properties of the Bi1-xPrxFe1-xMnxO3 (x ≤ 0.3) compounds prepared by a solid state reaction method. The polar R3c structure specific to the parent BiFeO3 has been found to be unstable with respect to doping for x ≳ 0.1. Depending on the Pr/Mn concentration, either the antipolar PbZrO3-like or nonpolar PrMnO3-type structure can be observed. It has been shown that the non-ferroelectric compounds are weak ferromagnetic with the remanent/spontaneous magnetization linearly decreasing with an increase in x. The samples containing the polar R3c phase exhibit a mixed antiferromagnetic/weak ferromagnetic behavior. The origin of the magnetic phase separation taking place in the ferroelectric phase is discussed as related to the local, doping-introduced structural heterogeneity contributing to the suppression of the cycloidal antiferromagnetic ordering characteristic of the pure BiFeO3.

  15. Electrical conduction at domain walls in multiferroic BiFeO3

    Seidel, Jan; Martin, Lane; He, Qing; Zhan, Qian; Chu, Ying-Hao; Rother, Axel; Hawkridge, Michael; Maksymovych, Peter; Yu, Pu; Gajek, Martin; Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei; Gemming, Sybille; Wang, Feng; Catalán, Gustau; Scott, James; Spaldin, Nicola; Orenstein, Joseph; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy

    2009-03-01

    We report the observation of room temperature electronic conductivity at ferroelectric domain walls in BiFeO3. The origin and nature of the observed conductivity is probed using a combination of conductive atomic force microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and first-principles density functional computations. We show that a structurally driven change in both the electrostatic potential and local electronic structure (i.e., a decrease in band gap) at the domain wall leads to the observed electrical conductivity. We estimate the conductivity in the wall to be several orders of magnitude higher than for the bulk material. Additionally we demonstrate the potential for device applications of such conducting nanoscale features.

  16. PREFACE: Nanoscale science and technology

    Bellucci, Stefano

    2008-11-01

    , nanopowders) were discussed. Ab initio simulations on the atomic and electronic structure of single-walled BN nanotubes and nanoarches were illustrated by Yu F Zhukovskii. M B Muradov talked about nanoparticles of cadmium selenide and cadmium sulfide, which yield one of the perspective materials for application to solar cell elements, high-speed computing systems, catalyses and biomarkers in medicine. In the presentation, the process of transformation of nanoparticles cadmium of sulfide to nanoparticles of cadmium selenide by an ionic exchange from solutions of electrolytes was considered. The size of particles was controlled by the quantity of growth cycles. After manufacturing, the structures were investigated by atomic force microscope (AFM). Structures CdS:polymer transformed into CdSe:polymer with the help of ion-exchange. For the realization of the process of ionic exchange, solutions were prepared containing bivalent ions of selenium as follows: NaBH4 and Se in a weight parity 2:1 added in water 4NaBH4+2Se+7H2O→2NaHSe+Na2B4O7+14H2 In the prepared solution nanostructures CdS:polymer were immersed. Time of endurance was 2 h. After an ionic exchange the obtained structures were investigated by means of EDAX on a chemical composition. Results of analyses have shown that atoms of sulfur are completely replaced by selenium. The band gap of nanoparticles in comparison with initial samples is displaced in the long-wave area. It is connected with the fact that the width of the band gap of bulk crystals CdSe (1.74 eV) is smaller than the band gap of CdS (2.42 eV). Optical microscopy with spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit obtained by using near field techniques was the subject of S Prato's talk. Scanning near field optical microscopy (SNOM) has developed into a powerful tool to investigate local optical properties that depend on heterogeneity of materials at nanoscale and to study nanoenvironment of biosystems. Crucial topics in SNOM are: force sensitivity and

  17. Charge separation at nanoscale interfaces: energy-level alignment including two-quasiparticle interactions.

    Li, Huashan; Lin, Zhibin; Lusk, Mark T; Wu, Zhigang

    2014-10-21

    The universal and fundamental criteria for charge separation at interfaces involving nanoscale materials are investigated. In addition to the single-quasiparticle excitation, all the two-quasiparticle effects including exciton binding, Coulomb stabilization, and exciton transfer are considered, which play critical roles on nanoscale interfaces for optoelectronic applications. We propose a scheme allowing adding these two-quasiparticle interactions on top of the single-quasiparticle energy level alignment for determining and illuminating charge separation at nanoscale interfaces. Employing the many-body perturbation theory based on Green's functions, we quantitatively demonstrate that neglecting or simplifying these crucial two-quasiparticle interactions using less accurate methods is likely to predict qualitatively incorrect charge separation behaviors at nanoscale interfaces where quantum confinement dominates.

  18. Nanoscale form dictates mesoscale function in plasmonic DNA–nanoparticle superlattices

    Ross, Michael B.; Ku, Jessie C.; Vaccarezza, Victoria M.; Schatz, George C.; Mirkin , Chad A. (NWU)

    2016-06-15

    The nanoscale manipulation of matter allows properties to be created in a material that would be difficult or even impossible to achieve in the bulk state. Progress towards such functional nanoscale architectures requires the development of methods to precisely locate nanoscale objects in three dimensions and for the formation of rigorous structure–function relationships across multiple size regimes (beginning from the nanoscale). Here, we use DNA as a programmable ligand to show that two- and three-dimensional mesoscale superlattice crystals with precisely engineered optical properties can be assembled from the bottom up. The superlattices can transition from exhibiting the properties of the constituent plasmonic nanoparticles to adopting the photonic properties defined by the mesoscale crystal (here a rhombic dodecahedron) by controlling the spacing between the gold nanoparticle building blocks. Furthermore, we develop a generally applicable theoretical framework that illustrates how crystal habit can be a design consideration for controlling far-field extinction and light confinement in plasmonic metamaterial superlattices.

  19. Heat transfer across the interface between nanoscale solids and gas.

    Cheng, Chun; Fan, Wen; Cao, Jinbo; Ryu, Sang-Gil; Ji, Jie; Grigoropoulos, Costas P; Wu, Junqiao

    2011-12-27

    When solid materials and devices scale down in size, heat transfer from the active region to the gas environment becomes increasingly significant. We show that the heat transfer coefficient across the solid-gas interface behaves very differently when the size of the solid is reduced to the nanoscale, such as that of a single nanowire. Unlike for macroscopic solids, the coefficient is strongly pressure dependent above ∼10 Torr, and at lower pressures it is much higher than predictions of the kinetic gas theory. The heat transfer coefficient was measured between a single, free-standing VO(2) nanowire and surrounding air using laser thermography, where the temperature distribution along the VO(2) nanowire was determined by imaging its domain structure of metal-insulator phase transition. The one-dimensional domain structure along the nanowire results from the balance between heat generation by the focused laser and heat dissipation to the substrate as well as to the surrounding gas, and thus serves as a nanoscale power-meter and thermometer. We quantified the heat loss rate across the nanowire-air interface, and found that it dominates over all other heat dissipation channels for small-diameter nanowires near ambient pressure. As the heat transfer across the solid-gas interface is nearly independent of the chemical identity of the solid, the results reveal a general scaling relationship for gaseous heat dissipation from nanostructures of all solid materials, which is applicable to nanoscale electronic and thermal devices exposed to gaseous environments.

  20. Nanoscale Rheology and Anisotropic Diffusion Using Single Gold Nanorod Probes

    Molaei, Mehdi; Atefi, Ehsan; Crocker, John C.

    2018-03-01

    The complex rotational and translational Brownian motion of anisotropic particles depends on their shape and the viscoelasticity of their surroundings. Because of their strong optical scattering and chemical versatility, gold nanorods would seem to provide the ultimate probes of rheology at the nanoscale, but the suitably accurate orientational tracking required to compute rheology has not been demonstrated. Here we image single gold nanorods with a laser-illuminated dark-field microscope and use optical polarization to determine their three-dimensional orientation to better than one degree. We convert the rotational diffusion of single nanorods in viscoelastic polyethylene glycol solutions to rheology and obtain excellent agreement with bulk measurements. Extensions of earlier models of anisotropic translational diffusion to three dimensions and viscoelastic fluids give excellent agreement with the observed motion of single nanorods. We find that nanorod tracking provides a uniquely capable approach to microrheology and provides a powerful tool for probing nanoscale dynamics and structure in a range of soft materials.

  1. Adhesion Dynamics in Probing Micro- and Nanoscale Thin Solid Films

    Xiaoling He

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on modeling the probe dynamics in scratching and indenting thin solid films at micro- and nanoscales. The model identifies bifurcation conditions that define the stick-slip oscillation patterns of the tip. It is found that the local energy fluctuations as a function of the inelastic deformation, defect formation, material properties, and contact parameters determine the oscillation behavior. The transient variation of the localized function makes the response nonlinear at the adhesion junction. By quantifying the relation between the bifurcation parameters and the oscillation behavior, this model gives a realistic representation of the complex adhesion dynamics. Specifically, the model establishes the link between the stick-slip behavior and the inelastic deformation and the local potentials. This model justifies the experimental observations and the molecular dynamics simulation of the adhesion and friction dynamics in both the micro- and nanoscale contact.

  2. Nanoscale structural order from the atomic pair distribution function (PDF): There's plenty of room in the middle

    Billinge, Simon J.L.

    2008-01-01

    Emerging materials of scientific and technological interest are generally complex and often nanostructured: they have atomic orderings that extend on nanometer length-scales. These can be discrete nanoparticles; bulk crystals with nanoscale chemical or displacive order within them; mesoporous materials that are bulk materials containing nanoscale holes; and nanocomposites that are intimate heterogeneous mixtures of nano-sized constituents. As always, a quantitative knowledge of the atomic structure within these materials is a prerequisite to understanding and engineering their properties. Traditional crystallographic methods for obtaining this information break down at the nanoscale, sometimes referred to as 'the nanostructure problem'. We describe here some emerging methods for studying nanoscale structure. We present some examples of recent successes. Finally, we discuss future directions and opportunities and draw attention to limitations and potential problems. -

  3. Nanoscale hydroxyapatite particles for bone tissue engineering.

    Zhou, Hongjian; Lee, Jaebeom

    2011-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) exhibits excellent biocompatibility with soft tissues such as skin, muscle and gums, making it an ideal candidate for orthopedic and dental implants or components of implants. Synthetic HAp has been widely used in repair of hard tissues, and common uses include bone repair, bone augmentation, as well as coating of implants or acting as fillers in bone or teeth. However, the low mechanical strength of normal HAp ceramics generally restricts its use to low load-bearing applications. Recent advancements in nanoscience and nanotechnology have reignited investigation of nanoscale HAp formation in order to clearly define the small-scale properties of HAp. It has been suggested that nano-HAp may be an ideal biomaterial due to its good biocompatibility and bone integration ability. HAp biomedical material development has benefited significantly from advancements in nanotechnology. This feature article looks afresh at nano-HAp particles, highlighting the importance of size, crystal morphology control, and composites with other inorganic particles for biomedical material development. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. On the thermodynamic efficiency of a nickel-based multiferroic thermomagnetic generator: From bulk to atomic scale

    Sandoval, Samuel M., E-mail: samuel.m.sandoval@gmail.com; Sepulveda, Abdon E., E-mail: abdon.sepulveda@gmail.com; Keller, Scott M., E-mail: smkeller@ucla.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    A model is developed to correlate the effects of size on the thermodynamic efficiency for a nickel-based multiferroic thermomagnetic generator device. Three existing models are combined in order to estimate this correlation, they are (1) thermodynamic efficiency relations, (2) a model of ferromagnetic transition behavior, and (3) the bond-order length strength correlation. At the smallest size considered, a monolayer of nickel atoms shows a reduction in Curie temperature from its bulk value of T{sub c,Bulk}=630 K to T{sub c,ML}=240 K. This difference is analytically shown to affect the thermodynamic efficiency values when compared to bulk. Various nickel nanofilms are considered as a working body, such that the combined model predicts relative efficiency values that are comparable to the bulk scale, but operating closer to room-temperature when compared to bulk form. This result is unexpected since the absolute efficiency is shown to increase as a function of decreasing size, this discrepancy is explained as a consequence of Curie point suppression. The combined model is also applied to a hypothetical composite made of separated layers of nickel with distinct thicknesses. This composite material is predicted to spread the ferromagnetic transition across a much larger temperature range as compared to bulk nickel, such that this material may be better suited for different applications; for example, as a sensor or thermal switch. Moreover, this combined model is also shown to give a lower-bound estimate for thermodynamic efficiency, since the actual performance depends on material characterizations that have yet to be determined.

  5. Magnetostructural Phase Diagram of Multiferroic (ND4)2FeCl5.H2O

    Clune, A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hughey, K. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Musfeldt, J. L. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Tian, W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Fernandez-Baca, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Singleton, John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-13

    Spin and polarization flop transitions are fascinating, especially when controlled by external stimuli like magnetic and electric field and accompanied by large material responses involving multiple degrees of freedom. Multiferroics like MnWO4, TbMnO3, and Ni3TeO6 are flagship examples and owe their remarkable properties, for instance field control of polarization and polarization flops combined with spin helix reorientation, to the anisotropy and heavy centers that bring in spin-orbit coupling. The family of A2FeX5.H2O erythrosiderites (A = K, Rb, NH4; B = Fe, Mn, Co; X = Cl, Br, H2O) drew our attention due to the rich chemical tuning possibilities, complex phase diagrams, and topological similarities to oxide multiferroics.1 (NH4)2FeCl5.H2O is the flagship example (Fig. 1(a)). It displays a high temperature order-disorder transition involving long-range hydrogen bonding of the NH4+ group and two successive low temperature magnetic transitions below which non-collinear magnetic order and ferroelectricity are established.1 In addition to the magnetically-induced electric polarization that arises below 6.9 K (P = 3 μC/m2 along a and a smaller component along b), applied field reveals a peculiar hysteretic spin flop transition near 4.5 T above which polarization flops from the a- to the c-axis. There are elastic components as well. Taken together, these findings raise questions about the interactions that induce this behavior and whether additional non-equilibrium phases might be accessed under even higher magnetic fields.

  6. TE and TM modes polaritons in multilayer system comprise of a PML-type magnetoelectric multiferroics and ferroelectrics

    Gunawan, Vincensius; Widiyandari, Hendri

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report our study on both bulk and surface polaritons generated in Multilayer system. The multilayer consists of ferroelectric and multiferroic with canted spins structure. The effective medium approximation is employed to derive the dispersion relation for both bulk and surface modes. Surface and bulk polaritons are calculated numerically for the case of Transverse electric (TE) and Transverse magnetic (TM) modes. Example results are presented using parameters appropriate for BaMnF 4 /BaAl 2 O 4 . We found in both TE and TM modes, that the region where the surface modes may exist is affected by the volume fraction of the multiferroics. The region of the surface modes decrease when the volume fraction of the multiferroic is reduced. This region decrement suppress the surface polariton curves which result in shortening the surface modes curves. (paper)

  7. Nanoscale biophysics of the cell

    Ashrafuzzaman, Mohammad

    2018-01-01

    Macroscopic cellular structures and functions are generally investigated using biological and biochemical approaches. But these methods are no longer adequate when one needs to penetrate deep into the small-scale structures and understand their functions. The cell is found to hold various physical structures, molecular machines, and processes that require physical and mathematical approaches to understand and indeed manipulate them. Disorders in general cellular compartments, perturbations in single molecular structures, drug distribution therein, and target specific drug-binding, etc. are mostly physical phenomena. This book will show how biophysics has revolutionized our way of addressing the science and technology of nanoscale structures of cells, and also describes the potential for manipulating the events that occur in them.

  8. Nanoscale cryptography: opportunities and challenges.

    Masoumi, Massoud; Shi, Weidong; Xu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    While most of the electronics industry is dependent on the ever-decreasing size of lithographic transistors, this scaling cannot continue indefinitely. To improve the performance of the integrated circuits, new emerging and paradigms are needed. In recent years, nanoelectronics has become one of the most important and exciting forefront in science and engineering. It shows a great promise for providing us in the near future with many breakthroughs that change the direction of technological advances in a wide range of applications. In this paper, we discuss the contribution that nanotechnology may offer to the evolution of cryptographic hardware and embedded systems and demonstrate how nanoscale devices can be used for constructing security primitives. Using a custom set of design automation tools, it is demonstrated that relative to a conventional 45-nm CMOS system, performance gains can be obtained up to two orders of magnitude reduction in area and up to 50 % improvement in speed.

  9. Nanoscale Mixing of Soft Solids

    Choi, Soo-Hyung; Lee, Sangwoo; Soto, Haidy E.; Lodge, Timothy P.; Bates, Frank S.

    2011-01-01

    Assessing the state of mixing on the molecular scale in soft solids is challenging. Concentrated solutions of micelles formed by self-assembly of polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-alt-propylene) (PS-PEP) diblock copolymers in squalane (C 30 H 62 ) adopt a body-centered cubic (bcc) lattice, with glassy PS cores. Utilizing small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and isotopic labeling ( 1 H and 2 H (D) polystyrene blocks) in a contrast-matching solvent (a mixture of squalane and perdeuterated squalane), we demonstrate quantitatively the remarkable fact that a commercial mixer can create completely random mixtures of micelles with either normal, PS(H), or deuterium-labeled, PS(D), cores on a well-defined bcc lattice. The resulting SANS intensity is quantitatively modeled by the form factor of a single spherical core. These results demonstrate both the possibility of achieving complete nanoscale mixing in a soft solid and the use of SANS to quantify the randomness.

  10. Environmental TEM for Materials Research

    Hansen, Thomas Willum

    Over the last decades, electron microscopy has played a large role in materials research. The increasing use of particularly environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) in materials science provides new possibilities for investigating nanoscale components at work. Careful experimentation...

  11. Environmental TEM in Materials Research

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    Over the last decades, electron microscopy has played a large role in materials research. The increasing use of particularly environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) in materials science provides new possibilities for investigating nanoscale components at work. Careful experimentation...

  12. Nanoscale strontium titanate photocatalysts for overall water splitting.

    Townsend, Troy K; Browning, Nigel D; Osterloh, Frank E

    2012-08-28

    SrTiO(3) (STO) is a large band gap (3.2 eV) semiconductor that catalyzes the overall water splitting reaction under UV light irradiation in the presence of a NiO cocatalyst. As we show here, the reactivity persists in nanoscale particles of the material, although the process is less effective at the nanoscale. To reach these conclusions, Bulk STO, 30 ± 5 nm STO, and 6.5 ± 1 nm STO were synthesized by three different methods, their crystal structures verified with XRD and their morphology observed with HRTEM before and after NiO deposition. In connection with NiO, all samples split water into stoichiometric mixtures of H(2) and O(2), but the activity is decreasing from 28 μmol H(2) g(-1) h(-1) (bulk STO), to 19.4 μmol H(2) g(-1) h(-1) (30 nm STO), and 3.0 μmol H(2) g(-1) h(-1) (6.5 nm STO). The reasons for this decrease are an increase of the water oxidation overpotential for the smaller particles and reduced light absorption due to a quantum size effect. Overall, these findings establish the first nanoscale titanate photocatalyst for overall water splitting.

  13. Extremely flexible nanoscale ultrathin body silicon integrated circuits on plastic.

    Shahrjerdi, Davood; Bedell, Stephen W

    2013-01-09

    In recent years, flexible devices based on nanoscale materials and structures have begun to emerge, exploiting semiconductor nanowires, graphene, and carbon nanotubes. This is primarily to circumvent the existing shortcomings of the conventional flexible electronics based on organic and amorphous semiconductors. The aim of this new class of flexible nanoelectronics is to attain high-performance devices with increased packing density. However, highly integrated flexible circuits with nanoscale transistors have not yet been demonstrated. Here, we show nanoscale flexible circuits on 60 Å thick silicon, including functional ring oscillators and memory cells. The 100-stage ring oscillators exhibit the stage delay of ~16 ps at a power supply voltage of 0.9 V, the best reported for any flexible circuits to date. The mechanical flexibility is achieved by employing the controlled spalling technology, enabling the large-area transfer of the ultrathin body silicon devices to a plastic substrate at room temperature. These results provide a simple and cost-effective pathway to enable ultralight flexible nanoelectronics with unprecedented level of system complexity based on mainstream silicon technology.

  14. Nanoscale Correlated Disorder in Out-of-Equilibrium Myelin Ultrastructure.

    Campi, Gaetano; Di Gioacchino, Michael; Poccia, Nicola; Ricci, Alessandro; Burghammer, Manfred; Ciasca, Gabriele; Bianconi, Antonio

    2018-01-23

    Ultrastructural fluctuations at nanoscale are fundamental to assess properties and functionalities of advanced out-of-equilibrium materials. We have taken myelin as a model of supramolecular assembly in out-of-equilibrium living matter. Myelin sheath is a simple stable multilamellar structure of high relevance and impact in biomedicine. Although it is known that myelin has a quasi-crystalline ultrastructure, there is no information on its fluctuations at nanoscale in different states due to limitations of the available standard techniques. To overcome these limitations, we have used scanning micro X-ray diffraction, which is a unique non-invasive probe of both reciprocal and real space to visualize statistical fluctuations of myelin order of the sciatic nerve of Xenopus laevis. The results show that the ultrastructure period of the myelin is stabilized by large anticorrelated fluctuations at nanoscale, between hydrophobic and hydrophilic layers. The ratio between the total thickness of hydrophilic and hydrophobic layers defines the conformational parameter, which describes the different states of myelin. Our key result is that myelin in its out-of-equilibrium functional state fluctuates point-to-point between different conformations showing a correlated disorder described by a Levy distribution. As the system approaches the thermodynamic equilibrium in an aged state, the disorder loses its correlation degree and the structural fluctuation distribution changes to Gaussian. In a denatured state at low pH, it changes to a completely disordered stage. Our results aim to clarify the degradation mechanism in biological systems by associating these states with ultrastructural dynamic fluctuations at nanoscale.

  15. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and

  16. Sensitivity Enhancement in Magnetic Sensors Based on Ferroelectric-Bimorphs and Multiferroic Composites

    Gollapudi Sreenivasulu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiferroic composites with ferromagnetic and ferroelectric phases have been studied in recent years for use as sensors of AC and DC magnetic fields. Their operation is based on magneto-electric (ME coupling between the electric and magnetic subsystems and is mediated by mechanical strain. Such sensors for AC magnetic fields require a bias magnetic field to achieve pT-sensitivity. Novel magnetic sensors with a permanent magnet proof mass, either on a ferroelectric bimorph or a ferromagnetic-ferroelectric composite, are discussed. In both types, the interaction between the applied AC magnetic field and remnant magnetization of the magnet results in a mechanical strain and a voltage response in the ferroelectric. Our studies have been performed on sensors with a Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet proof mass on (i a bimorph of oppositely-poled lead zirconate titanate (PZT platelets and (ii a layered multiferroic composite of PZT-Metglas-Ni. The sensors have been characterized in terms of sensitivity and equivalent magnetic noise N. Noise N in both type of sensors is on the order of 200 pT/√Hz at 1 Hz, a factor of 10 improvement compared to multiferroic sensors without a proof mass. When the AC magnetic field is applied at the bending resonance for the bimorph, the measured N ≈ 700 pT/√Hz. We discuss models based on magneto-electro-mechanical coupling at low frequency and bending resonance in the sensors and theoretical estimates of ME voltage coefficients are in very good agreement with the data.

  17. Sensitivity Enhancement in Magnetic Sensors Based on Ferroelectric-Bimorphs and Multiferroic Composites.

    Sreenivasulu, Gollapudi; Qu, Peng; Petrov, Vladimir; Qu, Hongwei; Srinivasan, Gopalan

    2016-02-20

    Multiferroic composites with ferromagnetic and ferroelectric phases have been studied in recent years for use as sensors of AC and DC magnetic fields. Their operation is based on magneto-electric (ME) coupling between the electric and magnetic subsystems and is mediated by mechanical strain. Such sensors for AC magnetic fields require a bias magnetic field to achieve pT-sensitivity. Novel magnetic sensors with a permanent magnet proof mass, either on a ferroelectric bimorph or a ferromagnetic-ferroelectric composite, are discussed. In both types, the interaction between the applied AC magnetic field and remnant magnetization of the magnet results in a mechanical strain and a voltage response in the ferroelectric. Our studies have been performed on sensors with a Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet proof mass on (i) a bimorph of oppositely-poled lead zirconate titanate (PZT) platelets and (ii) a layered multiferroic composite of PZT-Metglas-Ni. The sensors have been characterized in terms of sensitivity and equivalent magnetic noise N. Noise N in both type of sensors is on the order of 200 pT/√Hz at 1 Hz, a factor of 10 improvement compared to multiferroic sensors without a proof mass. When the AC magnetic field is applied at the bending resonance for the bimorph, the measured N ≈ 700 pT/√Hz. We discuss models based on magneto-electro-mechanical coupling at low frequency and bending resonance in the sensors and theoretical estimates of ME voltage coefficients are in very good agreement with the data.

  18. Nanoscale science and nanotechnology education in Africa ...

    Nanoscale science and nanotechnology education in Africa: importance and ... field with its footing in chemistry, physics, molecular biology and engineering. ... career/business/development opportunities, risks and policy challenges that would ...

  19. Nanoscale drug delivery for targeted chemotherapy.

    Xin, Yong; Huang, Qian; Tang, Jian-Qin; Hou, Xiao-Yang; Zhang, Pei; Zhang, Long Zhen; Jiang, Guan

    2016-08-28

    Despite significant improvements in diagnostic methods and innovations in therapies for specific cancers, effective treatments for neoplastic diseases still represent major challenges. Nanotechnology as an emerging technology has been widely used in many fields and also provides a new opportunity for the targeted delivery of cancer drugs. Nanoscale delivery of chemotherapy drugs to the tumor site is highly desirable. Recent studies have shown that nanoscale drug delivery systems not only have the ability to destroy cancer cells but may also be carriers for chemotherapy drugs. Some studies have demonstrated that delivery of chemotherapy via nanoscale carriers has greater therapeutic benefit than either treatment modality alone. In this review, novel approaches to nanoscale delivery of chemotherapy are described and recent progress in this field is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Pressure-induced phase transitions of multiferroic BiFeO3

    XiaoLi, Zhang; Ye, Wu; Qian, Zhang; JunCai, Dong; Xiang, Wu; Jing, Liu; ZiYu, Wu; DongLiang, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Pressure-induced phase transitions of multiferroic BiFeO3 have been investigated using synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction with diamond anvil cell technique at room temperature. Present experimental data clearly show that rhombohedral (R3c) phase of BiFeO3 first transforms to monoclinic (C2/m) phase at 7 GPa, then to orthorhombic (Pnma) phase at 11 GPa, which is consistent with recent theoretical ab initio calculation. However, we observe another peak at 2{\\theta}=7{\\deg} in the pressure ...

  1. Correlation between magnetocapacitance effect and polarization flop direction in a slanted magnetic field in multiferroic helimagnets

    Abe, Nobuyuki; Sagayama, Hajime; Arima, Taka-hisa; Taniguchi, Kouji

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between the magnetocapacitance effect and rotation direction of electric polarization (P) in a canted magnetic field has been investigated for multiferroic RMnO 3 (R = Tb 1-x Dy x and Eu 0.6 Y 0.4 ). We observed a clear correlation between the enhancement of the magnetocapacitance effect and the rotation direction of P in a P-flop transition. These results indicate that the mobility and the stability of the 90 deg. domain wall in a P-flop transition are dominated by its thickness.

  2. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Eight-logic memory cell based on multiferroic junctions

    Yang, Feng; Zhou, Y. C.; Tang, M. H.; Liu, Fen; Ma, Ying; Zheng, X. J.; Zhao, W. F.; Xu, H. Y.; Sun, Z. H.

    2009-04-01

    A model is proposed for a device combining a multiferroic tunnel junction with a magnetoelectric (ME) film in which the magnetic configuration is controlled by the electric field. Calculations embodying the Green's function approach show that the magnetic polarization can be switched on and off by an electric field in the ME film due to the effect of elastic coupling interaction. Using a model including the spin-filter effect and screening of polarization charges, we have produced eight logic states of tunnelling resistance in the tunnel junction and have obtained corresponding laws that control them. The results provide some insights into the realization of an eight-logic memory cell.

  3. Multiferroic Properties of o-LuMnO3 Controlled by b-Axis Strain

    Windsor, Y. W.; Huang, S. W.; Hu, Y.; Rettig, L.; Alberca, A.; Shimamoto, K.; Scagnoli, V.; Lippert, T.; Schneider, C. W.; Staub, U.

    2014-10-01

    Strain is a leading candidate for controlling magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroics. Here, we use x-ray diffraction to study the coupling between magnetic order and structural distortion in epitaxial films of the orthorhombic (o-) perovskite LuMnO3. An antiferromagnetic spin canting in the E-type magnetic structure is shown to be related to the ferroelectrically induced structural distortion and to a change in the magnetic propagation vector. By comparing films of different orientations and thicknesses, these quantities are found to be controlled by b-axis strain. It is shown that compressive strain destabilizes the commensurate E-type structure and reduces its accompanying ferroelectric distortion.

  4. Response of multiferroic composites inferred from a fast-Fourier-transform-based numerical scheme

    Brenner, Renald; Bravo-Castillero, Julián

    2010-01-01

    The effective response and the local fields within periodic magneto-electric multiferroic composites are investigated by means of a numerical scheme based on fast Fourier transforms. This computational framework relies on the iterative resolution of coupled series expansions for the magnetic, electric and strain fields. By using an augmented Lagrangian formulation, a simple and robust procedure which makes use of the uncoupled Green operators for the elastic, electrostatics and magnetostatics problems is proposed. Its accuracy is assessed in the cases of laminated and fibrous two-phase composites for which analytical solutions exist

  5. Ferroic materials synthesis and applications

    Virk, Hardev Singh

    2015-01-01

    Ferroics is the generic name given to the study of ferromagnets, ferroelectrics, and ferroelastics. The basis of this study is to understand the large changes in physical characteristics that occur over a very narrow temperature range. In recent years, a new class of ferroic materials has been attracting increased interest. These multiferroics exhibit more than one ferroic property simultaneously in a single phase. The present volume: ""Ferroic Materials: Synthesis and Applications"" has ten Chapters, spread over areas as diverse as Magnetic Oxide Nanomaterials, Ferrites Synthesis, Hexaferrite

  6. Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003–2012

    Cahill, David G.; Braun, Paul V.; Chen, Gang; Clarke, David R.; Fan, Shanhui; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Keblinski, Pawel; King, William P.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Pop, Eric; Shi, Li

    2013-01-01

    A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale electronics, and nanoparticles for thermal medical therapies are motivating studies of the applied physics of thermal transport at the nanoscale. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of th...

  7. Solvothermal coating LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2} microspheres with nanoscale Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} shell for long lifespan Li-ion battery cathode materials

    Wu, Naiteng; Wu, Hao; Liu, Heng; Zhang, Yun, E-mail: y_zhang@scu.edu.cn

    2016-04-25

    LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2} (NCA) microspheres covered by a nanoscale Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}-based shell were synthesized by a facile strategy based on a solvothermal pre-coating treatment combined with a post-sintering lithiation process. The morphology, structure and composition of the Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}-coated NCA samples were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning scanning electron microscope (SEM) with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Owing to the complete, uniform and nanoscale Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} coating shell, the resultant surface-modified NCA microspheres used as Li-ion battery cathode materials manifest remarkably enhanced cycling performances, attaining 94% and 84% capacity retention after 200 and 400 cycles at 0.5 C, respectively, which is much better than the pristine NCA counterpart (60% retention, 200 cycles). More impressively, the surface-modified NCA also shows an intriguing storage stability. After being stored at 30 °C for 50 days, the coated NCA-based cells are subjected to be cycled both at room and elevated temperatures, in which the aged cells can still remain 84% capacity retention after 200 cycles at 25 °C and 77% capacity retention after 200 cycles at 55 °C, respectively. All these results demonstrate that the Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}-coated LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2} microsphere is a promising cathode material for Li-ion batteries with long lifespan. - Graphical abstract: Nanoscale Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}-based shell encapsulated LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2} (NCA) microspheres are fabricated through a solvothermal pre-coating treatment combined with post-lithiation process. The surface-coated NCA as cathode materials shows a remarkably enhanced cycling performance and storage stability for long lifespan Li-ion batteries. - Highlights: • Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} is used as coating

  8. Passive films at the nanoscale

    Maurice, Vincent; Marcus, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Nanoscale data on growth, structure and local properties of passive films reviewed. ► Preferential role of defects of passive films on the corrosion resistance emphasized. ► Effect of grain boundaries on local electronic properties shown by new data. ► Use of atomistic modeling to test mechanistic hypotheses illustrated. - Abstract: The nanometer scale chemical and structural aspects of ultrathin oxide passive films providing self-protection against corrosion to metals and alloys in aqueous environments are reviewed. Data on the nucleation and growth of 2D anodic oxide films, details on the atomic structure and nanostructure of 3D passive films, the preferential role of surface step edges in dissolution in the passive state and the preferential role of grain boundaries of the passive films in passivity breakdown are presented. Future perspectives are discussed, and exemplified by new data obtained on the relationship between the nanostructure of oxide passive films and their local electronic properties. Atomistic corrosion modeling by ab initio density functional theory (DFT) is illustrated by the example of interactions of chloride ions with hydroxylated oxide surfaces, including the role of surface step edges. Data obtained on well-defined substrate surfaces with surface analytical techniques are emphasized.

  9. Magnetism in multiferroic Pb.sub.5./sub.Cr.sub.3./sub.F.sub.19./sub..

    Blinc, R.; Cevc, P.; Tavčar, G.; Žemva, B.; Laguta, Valentyn; Trontelj, Z.; Jagodič, M.; Pajič, D.; Balcytis, A.; Scott, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 5 (2012), "054419-1"-"054419-5" ISSN 1098-0121 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : multiferroic * magnetism * ferroelectricity * magnetic resonance * Pb 5 Cr 3 F 19 Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.767, year: 2012

  10. Excitation of spin waves in BiFeO3 multiferroic film by the slot line transducer

    Korneev, V. I.; Popkov, A. F.; Solov'yov, S. V.

    2018-01-01

    Analysis of the efficiency of magnetoelectric excitation of spin-waves in BiFeO3 multiferroic films by a slot line is performed based on the solution of dynamic Ginzburg-Landau equations for the antiferromagnetic vector. The excitation efficiency is determined by the magnitude of the conversion coefficient of the electromagnetic wave to the spin wave by the slot line transducer or in other words, losses on conversion in the slot line. Calculations are made for a homogeneous antiferromagnetic state of the multiferroic in the presence of a sufficiently large magnetic field and for a spatially modulated spin state (SMSS) at zero magnetic field. It is shown that in the case of a homogeneous antiferromagnetic state, the losses on the excitation of spin waves exceed the excitation efficiency in the SMSS state; however, as the frequency approaches the spin excitation gap, it falls and becomes lower than in the SMSS state. Spin wave excitation in the presence of antiferromagnetic cycloid strongly depends on the relation of the slot width of the transducer to the cycloid periodicity and on the magnitude of the shift of the position of the transducer along the cycloid on its period. The usage of multiferroics for delay lines in the considered frequency range from 100 to 600 GHz requires significant reduction in conversion and propagation losses. More promising seems multiferroic usage in phase shifters and switches for this range.

  11. Possible coupling between magnons and phonons in multiferroic CaMn.sub.7./sub.O.sub.12./sub..

    Kadlec, Filip; Goian, Veronica; Kadlec, Christelle; Kempa, Martin; Vaněk, Přemysl; Taylor, J.; Rols, S.; Prokleška, J.; Orlita, M.; Kamba, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 5 (2014), "054307-1"-"054307-8" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/12/1163 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : electromagnons * phonons * multiferroics * THz and IR spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  12. Introducing Barium in Transition Metal Oxide Frameworks: Impact upon Superconductivity, Magnetism, Multiferroism and Oxygen Diffusion and Storage.

    Raveau, Bernard

    2017-06-01

    The role of barium in the structural chemistry of some transition metal oxides of the series "Cu, Mn, Fe,Co" is reviewed, based on its size effect and its particular chemical bonding. Its impact upon various properties, superconductivity, magnetism, multiferroism, oxygen storage is emphasized. © 2017 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Room-temperature multiferroic and magnetocapacitance effects in M-type hexaferrite BaFe{sub 10.2}Sc{sub 1.8}O{sub 19}

    Tang, Rujun, E-mail: tangrj@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: yanghao@nuaa.edu.cn; Zhou, Hao; You, Wenlong [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Thin Films, College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Yang, Hao, E-mail: tangrj@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: yanghao@nuaa.edu.cn [College of Science, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 211106 (China)

    2016-08-22

    The room-temperature multiferroic and magnetocapacitance (MC) effects of polycrystalline M-type hexaferrite BaFe{sub 10.2}Sc{sub 1.8}O{sub 19} have been investigated. The results show that the magnetic moments of insulating BaFe{sub 10.2}Sc{sub 1.8}O{sub 19} can be manipulated by the electric field at room temperature, indicating the existence of magnetoelectric coupling. Moreover, large MC effects are also observed around the room temperature. A frequency dependence analysis shows that the Maxwell-Wagner type magnetoresistance effect is the dominant mechanism for MC effects at low frequencies. Both the magnetoelectric-type and non-magnetoelectric-type spin-phonon couplings contribute to the MC effects at high frequencies with the former being the dominant mechanism. The above results show that the hexaferrite BaFe{sub 10.2}Sc{sub 1.8}O{sub 19} is a room-temperature multiferroic material that can be potentially used in magnetoelectric devices.

  14. Magnetic and dielectric studies of multiferroic CuO nanoparticles confined to porous glass

    Charnaya, E.V.; Lee, M.K.; Tien, C.; Pak, V.N.; Formus, D.V.; Pirozerskii, A.L.; Nedbai, A.I.; Ubyivovk, E.V.; Baryshnikov, S.V.; Chang, L.J.

    2012-01-01

    Dc magnetization and ac electric permittivity were measured for the CuO-porous glass nanocomposite made and for pressed powder CuO. Magnetization curves showed a bend between two linear segments for both the nanocomposite and bulk cupric oxide at 230 K evidencing that the temperature of the transition from the paramagnetic into multiferroic phase did not change noticeably under nanoconfinement. Results suggested also a reduction of the temperature of the second transition into the collinear antiferromagnetic phase. ZFC and FC magnetizations were found to bifurcate for the nanocomposite and bulk CuO. The bifurcation was accompanied with peaks on ZFC magnetization. - Highlights: ► CuO nanoparticles embedded into porous glass compared to bulk. ► ZFC and FC magnetizations bifurcate in the nanocomposite and bulk CuO. ► Dc magnetization suggests a reduction of the temperature T N1 till about 190 K. ► Temperature T N2 of the transition into multiferroic phase did not change.

  15. Structural and multiferroic properties of barium substituted bismuth ferrite nanocrystallites prepared by sol–gel method

    Anju; Agarwal, Ashish; Aghamkar, Praveen; Lal, Bhajan

    2017-01-01

    Nanocrystalline Bi 1-x Ba x FeO 3 (0≤x≤0.3) multiferroics were efficiently obtained by sol–gel method after sintering at 800 °C for one hour. The Ba substitution in BiFeO 3 (BFO) strongly modifies its structural and multiferroic properties. XRD studies revealed the structural transition from distorted rhombohedral (R3c) to pseudo-cubic (Pm3m) crystal symmetry. The magnetization increases appreciably for x=0.1, which is due to spin canting of magnetic moments at the nanoparticle surfaces and decreases afterward. From the temperature dependent magnetization studies, it is found that magnetic transition temperature (T N ) is 620 K for x=0 and 640 K for x=0.1. Besides, the maximum polarisation value decreases with increasing Ba content. SEM micrographs revealed the formation of cubic nanocrystallites with increased porosity on Ba substitution. FTIR analysis of the samples also supports the structural change towards increased crystal symmetry. - Highlights: • XRD studies revealed the structural transition from distorted rhombohedral (R3c) to pseudo-cubic (Pm3m) crystal symmetry. • The magnetization increases appreciably for x=0.1 and decreases afterward for higher Ba content. • Magnetic transition temperature (T N ) is found to be 620 K for x=0 and 640 K for x=0.1. • Maximum polarisation value is highest for x=0.1.

  16. Enhanced magnetodielectric and multiferroic properties of Er-doped bismuth ferrite nanoparticles

    Mukherjee, A.; Banerjee, M. [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Durgapur 713209 (India); Basu, S., E-mail: soumen.basu@phy.nitdgp.ac.in [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Durgapur 713209 (India); Mukadam, M.D.; Yusuf, S.M. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Pal, M. [CSIR-Central Glass & Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2015-07-15

    An enhancement in multiferroic properties has been achieved for chemically prepared BFO nanoparticles by doping with erbium (Er). XRD along with electron microscopy study reveals the phase purity and nanocrystalline nature of BFO. Enhancement of both the magnetic moment and resistivity is observed by virtue of Er doping. The observed enhanced magnetic moment is considered to be associated with smaller crystallite whereas increase of resistivity may be attributed to a decrease of oxygen vacancies. Doping also display an improvement of leakage behaviour and dielectric constant in nanocrystalline BFO, reflected in well-developed P-E loop. In addition, large enhancement in magnetodielectric coefficient is observed because of Er doping. Therefore, the results provide interesting approaches to improve the multiferroic properties of BFO, which has great implication towards its applications. - Highlights: • Synthesis of pure Er-doped BFO nanoparticles by chemical route. • Large increase in magnetic moment and resistivity due to Er doping. • Er doping produce well developed P-E loop and enhance polarization. • Drastic increase in dielectric constant as well as magnetodielectric coefficient observes because of Er doping.

  17. Study of the B-site ion behaviour in the multiferroic perovskite bismuth iron chromium oxide

    McBride, Bethany R.; Lieschke, Jonathon; Berlie, Adam; Cortie, David L.; Playford, Helen Y.; Lu, Teng; Narayanan, Narendirakumar; Withers, Ray L.; Yu, Dehong; Liu, Yun

    2018-04-01

    A simple, near-ambient pressure solid-state method was developed to nominally synthesize BiFe0.5Cr0.5O3. The procedure allowed the gram-scale production of multiferroic samples with appreciable purity and large amounts of Cr incorporation that were suitable for systematic structural investigation by neutron, X-ray, and electron diffraction in tandem with physical characterization of magnetic and ferroelectric properties. The rhombohedrally distorted perovskite phase was assigned to the space group R3c by way of X-ray and neutron powder diffraction analysis. Through a combination of magnetometry and muon spin relaxation, it is evident that there is magnetic ordering in the BFCO phase consistent with G-type antiferromagnetism and a TN ˜ 400 K. There is no clear evidence for chemical ordering of Fe and Cr in the B-site of the perovskite structure and this result is rationalized by density functional theory and bond valence simulations that show a lowered energy associated with a B-site disordered structure. We believe that our contribution of a new, low-complexity method for the synthesis of BFO type samples, and dialogue about realising certain types of ordering in oxide perovskite systems, will assist in the further development of multiferroics for next-generation devices.

  18. Tunneling magnetoresistance and electroresistance in Fe/PbTiO3/Fe multiferroic tunnel junctions

    Dai, Jian-Qing

    2016-01-01

    We perform first-principles electronic structure and spin-dependent transport calculations for a Fe/PbTiO 3 /Fe multiferroic tunnel junction with asymmetric TiO 2 - and PbO-terminated interfaces. We demonstrate that the interfacial electronic reconstruction driven by the in situ screening of ferroelectric polarization, in conjunction with the intricate complex band structure of barrier, play a decisive role in controlling the spin-dependent tunneling. Reversal of ferroelectric polarization results in a transition from insulating to half-metal-like conducting state for the interfacial Pb 6p z orbitals, which acts as an atomic-scale spin-valve by releasing the tunneling current in antiparallel magnetization configuration as the ferroelectric polarization pointing to the PbO-terminated interface. This effect produces large change in tunneling conductance. Our results open an attractive avenue in designing multiferroic tunnel junctions with excellent performance by exploiting the interfacial electronic reconstruction originated from the in situ screening of ferroelectric polarization.

  19. Magnetic ground state and magnon-phonon interaction in multiferroic h-YMnO3

    Holm, S. L.; Kreisel, A.; Schaeffer, T. K.

    2018-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering has been used to study the magnetoelastic excitations in the multiferroic manganite hexagonal YMnO3. An avoided crossing is found between magnon and phonon modes close to the Brillouin zone boundary in the (a,b) plane. Neutron polarization analysis reveals that this m......Inelastic neutron scattering has been used to study the magnetoelastic excitations in the multiferroic manganite hexagonal YMnO3. An avoided crossing is found between magnon and phonon modes close to the Brillouin zone boundary in the (a,b) plane. Neutron polarization analysis reveals...... that this mode has mixed magnon-phonon character. An external magnetic field along the c axis is observed to cause a linear field-induced splitting of one of the spin-wave branches. A theoretical description is performed, using a Heisenberg model of localized spins, acoustic phonon modes, and a magnetoelastic...... coupling via the single-ion magnetostriction. The model quantitatively reproduces the dispersion and intensities of all modes in the full Brillouin zone, describes the observed magnon-phonon hybridized modes, and quantifies the magnetoelastic coupling. The combined information, including the field...

  20. Magnetic ground state and magnon-phonon interaction in multiferroic h -YMnO3

    Holm, S. L.; Kreisel, A.; Schäffer, T. K.; Bakke, A.; Bertelsen, M.; Hansen, U. B.; Retuerto, M.; Larsen, J.; Prabhakaran, D.; Deen, P. P.; Yamani, Z.; Birk, J. O.; Stuhr, U.; Niedermayer, Ch.; Fennell, A. L.; Andersen, B. M.; Lefmann, K.

    2018-04-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering has been used to study the magnetoelastic excitations in the multiferroic manganite hexagonal YMnO3. An avoided crossing is found between magnon and phonon modes close to the Brillouin zone boundary in the (a ,b ) plane. Neutron polarization analysis reveals that this mode has mixed magnon-phonon character. An external magnetic field along the c axis is observed to cause a linear field-induced splitting of one of the spin-wave branches. A theoretical description is performed, using a Heisenberg model of localized spins, acoustic phonon modes, and a magnetoelastic coupling via the single-ion magnetostriction. The model quantitatively reproduces the dispersion and intensities of all modes in the full Brillouin zone, describes the observed magnon-phonon hybridized modes, and quantifies the magnetoelastic coupling. The combined information, including the field-induced magnon splitting, allows us to exclude several of the earlier proposed models and point to the correct magnetic ground state symmetry, and provides an effective dynamic model relevant for the multiferroic hexagonal manganites.

  1. Tunneling magnetoresistance and electroresistance in Fe/PbTiO{sub 3}/Fe multiferroic tunnel junctions

    Dai, Jian-Qing, E-mail: djqkust@sina.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2016-08-21

    We perform first-principles electronic structure and spin-dependent transport calculations for a Fe/PbTiO{sub 3}/Fe multiferroic tunnel junction with asymmetric TiO{sub 2}- and PbO-terminated interfaces. We demonstrate that the interfacial electronic reconstruction driven by the in situ screening of ferroelectric polarization, in conjunction with the intricate complex band structure of barrier, play a decisive role in controlling the spin-dependent tunneling. Reversal of ferroelectric polarization results in a transition from insulating to half-metal-like conducting state for the interfacial Pb 6p{sub z} orbitals, which acts as an atomic-scale spin-valve by releasing the tunneling current in antiparallel magnetization configuration as the ferroelectric polarization pointing to the PbO-terminated interface. This effect produces large change in tunneling conductance. Our results open an attractive avenue in designing multiferroic tunnel junctions with excellent performance by exploiting the interfacial electronic reconstruction originated from the in situ screening of ferroelectric polarization.

  2. Structural and multiferroic properties of barium substituted bismuth ferrite nanocrystallites prepared by sol–gel method

    Anju [Materials Science Lab, Department of Physics, Chaudhary Devi Lal University, Sirsa 125055 (India); Agarwal, Ashish [Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science & Technology, Hisar 125001 (India); Aghamkar, Praveen, E-mail: praveenaghamkar@gmail.com [Materials Science Lab, Department of Physics, Chaudhary Devi Lal University, Sirsa 125055 (India); Lal, Bhajan [Department of Applied Sciences, Goverment Polytechnic for Women, Sirsa 125055 (India)

    2017-03-15

    Nanocrystalline Bi{sub 1-x}Ba{sub x}FeO{sub 3} (0≤x≤0.3) multiferroics were efficiently obtained by sol–gel method after sintering at 800 °C for one hour. The Ba substitution in BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) strongly modifies its structural and multiferroic properties. XRD studies revealed the structural transition from distorted rhombohedral (R3c) to pseudo-cubic (Pm3m) crystal symmetry. The magnetization increases appreciably for x=0.1, which is due to spin canting of magnetic moments at the nanoparticle surfaces and decreases afterward. From the temperature dependent magnetization studies, it is found that magnetic transition temperature (T{sub N}) is 620 K for x=0 and 640 K for x=0.1. Besides, the maximum polarisation value decreases with increasing Ba content. SEM micrographs revealed the formation of cubic nanocrystallites with increased porosity on Ba substitution. FTIR analysis of the samples also supports the structural change towards increased crystal symmetry. - Highlights: • XRD studies revealed the structural transition from distorted rhombohedral (R3c) to pseudo-cubic (Pm3m) crystal symmetry. • The magnetization increases appreciably for x=0.1 and decreases afterward for higher Ba content. • Magnetic transition temperature (T{sub N}) is found to be 620 K for x=0 and 640 K for x=0.1. • Maximum polarisation value is highest for x=0.1.

  3. A phenomenological theory for polarization flop in spiral multiferroic ...

    found to be in good agreement with the experiment. This could be an ... DM energy and a com- petition between DM interaction and other interactions results in polarization flop. ... In the case of soft or amorphous materials character- ized by a ...

  4. Structural, dielectric and multiferroic properties of Er and La ...

    Administrator

    Laser Materials Development & Devices Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced ... enhancing the electrical and magnetic properties of BFO. ... fraction data was carried out using refinement software ... out using DTA (SETARAM model No TG/DTA-92B) to ..... in BLEFOx=0⋅05,0.07,0⋅1 is due to collapse of spiral spin.

  5. Optical spectroscopic study of multiferroic BiFeO3 and LuFe2O4

    Xu, Xiaoshan

    2010-03-01

    Iron-based multiferroics such as BiFeO3 and LuFe2O4 exhibit the highest magnetic and ferroelectric ordering temperatures among known multiferroics. LuFe2O4 is a frustrated system with several phase transitions that result in electronically driven multiferroicity. To understand how this peculiar multiferroic mechanism correlates with magnetism, we studied electronic excitations by optical spectroscopy and other complementary techniques. We show that the charge order, which determines the dielectric properties, is due to the ``order by fluctuation'' mechanism, evidenced by the onset of charge fluctuation well below the charge ordering transition. We also find a low temperature monoclinic distortion driven by both temperature and magnetic field, indicating strong coupling between structure, magnetism and charge order. BiFeO3 is the only known single phase multiferroics with room temperature magnetism and ferroelectricity. To investigate the spin-charge coupling, we measured the optical properties of BiFeO3. We find that the absorption onset occurs due to on-site Fe^3+ excitations at 1.41 and 1.90 eV. Temperature and magnetic-field-induced spectral changes reveal complex interactions between on-site crystal-field and magnetic excitations in the form of magnon sidebands. The sensitivity of the magnon sidebands allows us to map out the magnetic-field temperature phase diagram which demonstrates optical evidence for spin spiral quenching above 20 T and suggests a spin domain reorientation near 10 T. Work done in collaboration with T.V. Brinzari, R.C. Rai, M. Angst, R.P. Hermann, A.D. Christianson, J.-W. Kim, Z. Islam, B.C. Sales, D. Mandrus, S. Lee, Y.H. Chu, L. W. Martin, A. Kumar, R. Ramesh, S.W. Cheong, S. McGill, and J.L. Musfeldt.

  6. Molecular dynamics investigation of nanoscale substrate topography and its interaction with liquids

    Cordeiro Rodrigues, Jhonatam

    Nanotechnology has been presenting successful applications in several areas. However, experimentation with nanoscale materials is costly and limited in analysis capability. This research investigates the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to model and study nanomaterials and manufacturing processes. MD simulations are employed to reduce cost, optimize design, increase productivity and allow for the investigation of material interactions not yet observable through experimentation. This work investigates the interaction of water with substrates at the nanoscale. The effect of temperature, droplet impingement velocities and size, as well as substrate material, are investigated at the nanoscale. Several substrate topography designs were modeled to reveal their influence on the wettability of the substrate. Nanoscale gold and silicon substrates are more hydrophilic at higher temperatures than at room temperature. The reduction in droplet diameter increases its wettability. High impingement velocity of droplets does not influence final wettability of substrates but induces higher diffusion rates of droplets in a heated environment. Droplets deposited over a gradient of surface exposure presents spontaneous movement. The Leidenfrost effect was investigated at the nanoscale. Droplets of 4 and 10nm in diameter presented behaviors pertinent to the Leidenfrost effect at 373K, significantly lower than at micro scale and of potential impact to the field. Topographical features were manipulated using superhydrophobic coating resulting in micro whiskers. Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) was used to manufacture substrate topographies at the nanoscale. Water droplets were deposited on the substrates and their wettability was measured using droplet contact angles. Lower surface area exposure resulted in higher contact angles. The experimental relationships between surface topography and substrate wettability were used to validate the insights gained from MD simulations for

  7. Nanoscale Laser Terahertz Emission Microscopy

    Klarskov, Pernille; Kim, Hyewon; Colvin, Vicki L.

    2017-01-01

    Laser terahertz emission microscopy (LTEM) has become a powerful tool for studying ultrafast dynamics and local fields in many different types of materials. This technique, which relies on acceleration of charge carriers in a material upon femtosecond excitation, can provide insight into the phys......Laser terahertz emission microscopy (LTEM) has become a powerful tool for studying ultrafast dynamics and local fields in many different types of materials. This technique, which relies on acceleration of charge carriers in a material upon femtosecond excitation, can provide insight...

  8. Nanoscale photoelectron ionisation detector based on lanthanum hexaboride

    Zimmer, C.M.; Kunze, U.; Schubert, J.; Hamann, S.; Doll, T.

    2011-01-01

    A nanoscale ioniser is presented exceeding the limitation of conventional photoionisation detectors. It employs accelerated photoelectrons that allow obtaining molecule specificity by the tuning of ionisation energies. The material lanthanum hexaboride (LaB 6 ) is used as air stable photo cathode. Thin films of that material deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) show quantum efficiency (QE) in the range of 10 -5 which is comparable to laser photo stimulation results. A careful treatment of the material yields reasonable low work functions even after surface reoxidation which opens up the possibility of using ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV LEDs) in replacement of discharge lamps. Schematic diagram of a photoelectron ionisation detector (PeID) operating by an electron emitter based on the photoelectric effect of lanthanum hexaboride. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Nanoscale Metal Oxide Semiconductors for Gas Sensing

    Hunter, Gary W.; Evans, Laura; Xu, Jennifer C.; VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.; Kulis, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    A report describes the fabrication and testing of nanoscale metal oxide semiconductors (MOSs) for gas and chemical sensing. This document examines the relationship between processing approaches and resulting sensor behavior. This is a core question related to a range of applications of nanotechnology and a number of different synthesis methods are discussed: thermal evaporation- condensation (TEC), controlled oxidation, and electrospinning. Advantages and limitations of each technique are listed, providing a processing overview to developers of nanotechnology- based systems. The results of a significant amount of testing and comparison are also described. A comparison is made between SnO2, ZnO, and TiO2 single-crystal nanowires and SnO2 polycrystalline nanofibers for gas sensing. The TECsynthesized single-crystal nanowires offer uniform crystal surfaces, resistance to sintering, and their synthesis may be done apart from the substrate. The TECproduced nanowire response is very low, even at the operating temperature of 200 C. In contrast, the electrospun polycrystalline nanofiber response is high, suggesting that junction potentials are superior to a continuous surface depletion layer as a transduction mechanism for chemisorption. Using a catalyst deposited upon the surface in the form of nanoparticles yields dramatic gains in sensitivity for both nanostructured, one-dimensional forms. For the nanowire materials, the response magnitude and response rate uniformly increase with increasing operating temperature. Such changes are interpreted in terms of accelerated surface diffusional processes, yielding greater access to chemisorbed oxygen species and faster dissociative chemisorption, respectively. Regardless of operating temperature, sensitivity of the nanofibers is a factor of 10 to 100 greater than that of nanowires with the same catalyst for the same test condition. In summary, nanostructure appears critical to governing the reactivity, as measured by electrical

  10. Topologically Allowed Nonsixfold Vortices in a Sixfold Multiferroic Material: Observation and Classification

    Cheng, Shaobo

    2017-04-06

    We report structural transformation of sixfold vortex domains into two-, four-, and eightfold vortices via a different type of topological defect in hexagonal manganites. Combining high-resolution electron microscopy and Landau-theory-based numerical simulations, we investigate the remarkable atomic arrangement and the intertwined relationship between the vortex structures and the topological defects. The roles of their displacement field, formation temperature, and nucleation sites are revealed. All conceivable vortices in the system are topologically classified using homotopy group theory, and their origins are identified.

  11. Topologically Allowed Nonsixfold Vortices in a Sixfold Multiferroic Material: Observation and Classification

    Cheng, Shaobo; Li, Jun; Han, Myung-Geun; Deng, Shiqing; Tan, Guotai; Zhang, Xixiang; Zhu, Jing; Zhu, Yimei

    2017-01-01

    We report structural transformation of sixfold vortex domains into two-, four-, and eightfold vortices via a different type of topological defect in hexagonal manganites. Combining high-resolution electron microscopy and Landau

  12. Lithium-Rich Nanoscale Li 1.2 Mn 0.54 Ni 0.13 Co 0.13 O 2 Cathode Material Prepared by Co-Precipitation Combined Freeze Drying (CP-FD) for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Bai, Ying; Li, Yu; Wu, Chuan; Lu, Jun; Li, Hui; Liu, Zhaolin; Zhong, Yunxia; Chen, Shi; Zhang, Cunzhong; Amine, Khalil; Wu, Feng

    2015-07-14

    Nanoscale Li-rich Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2 material is synthesized by a co-precipitation combined freeze drying (CP-FD) method, and compared with a conventional co-precipitation method combined vacuum drying (CP-VD). With the combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), it is found that the sample from CP-FD method consists of a pure phase with good crystallinity and small, homogenous particles (100-300 nm) with uniform particle size distribution. Inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP) shows that the sample has a stoichiometric ratio of n((Li)): n((Mn)): n((Ni)): n((Co))=9: 4: 1: 1; and its Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) specific surface area is 5.749 m(2)g(-1). This sample achieves excellent electrochemical properties: its initial discharge capacities are 298.9 mAhg(-1) at 0.1C (20 mAg(-1)), 246.1 mAhg(-1) at 0.5C, 215.8 mAhg(-1) at 1C, and 154.2 mAhg(-1) at 5C (5C charge and 5C discharge), as well as good cycling performance. In addition, the Li+ chemical diffusion coefficient of Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2 material prepared by the CP-FD method is 4.59 x 10(-11) cm(2) s(-1), which is higher than that of the Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2 material prepared by CP-VD. This phenomenon illustrates the potential for Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2 with good rate performance synthesized by CP-FD method.

  13. Cluster-assembled cubic zirconia films with tunable and stable nanoscale morphology against thermal annealing

    Borghi, F.; Lenardi, C.; Podestà, A.; Milani, P., E-mail: pmilani@mi.infn.it [CIMAINA and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Sogne, E. [CIMAINA and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); European School of Molecular Medicine (SEMM), IFOM-IEO, Milano (Italy); Merlini, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra “Ardito Desio”, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Mangiagalli 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Ducati, C. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-07

    Nanostructured zirconium dioxide (zirconia) films are very promising for catalysis and biotechnological applications: a precise control of the interfacial properties of the material at different length scales and, in particular, at the nanoscale, is therefore necessary. Here, we present the characterization of cluster-assembled zirconia films produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition possessing cubic structure at room temperature and controlled nanoscale morphology. We characterized the effect of thermal annealing in reducing and oxidizing conditions on the crystalline structure, grain dimensions, and topography. We highlight the mechanisms of film growth and phase transitions, which determine the observed interfacial morphological properties and their resilience against thermal treatments.

  14. Electrostatic potential fluctuation induced by charge discreteness in a nanoscale trench

    Lee, Taesang; Kim, S. S.; Jho, Y. S.; Park, Gunyoung; Chang, C. S.

    2007-01-01

    A simplified two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation is performed to estimate the charging potential fluctuations caused by strong binary Coulomb interactions between discrete charged particles in nanometer scale trenches. It is found that the discrete charge effect can be an important part of the nanoscale trench research, inducing scattering of ion trajectories in a nanoscale trench by a fluctuating electric field. The effect can enhance the ion deposition on the side walls and disperse the material contact energy of the incident ions, among others

  15. Cluster-assembled cubic zirconia films with tunable and stable nanoscale morphology against thermal annealing

    Borghi, F.; Lenardi, C.; Podestà, A.; Milani, P.; Sogne, E.; Merlini, M.; Ducati, C.

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured zirconium dioxide (zirconia) films are very promising for catalysis and biotechnological applications: a precise control of the interfacial properties of the material at different length scales and, in particular, at the nanoscale, is therefore necessary. Here, we present the characterization of cluster-assembled zirconia films produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition possessing cubic structure at room temperature and controlled nanoscale morphology. We characterized the effect of thermal annealing in reducing and oxidizing conditions on the crystalline structure, grain dimensions, and topography. We highlight the mechanisms of film growth and phase transitions, which determine the observed interfacial morphological properties and their resilience against thermal treatments.

  16. Cluster-assembled cubic zirconia films with tunable and stable nanoscale morphology against thermal annealing

    Borghi, F.; Sogne, Elisa; Lenardi, C.; Podestà , A.; Merlini, M.; Ducati, C.; Milani, P.

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured zirconium dioxide (zirconia) films are very promising for catalysis and biotechnological applications: a precise control of the interfacial properties of the material at different length scales and, in particular, at the nanoscale, is therefore necessary. Here, we present the characterization of cluster-assembled zirconia films produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition possessing cubic structure at room temperature and controlled nanoscale morphology. We characterized the effect of thermal annealing in reducing and oxidizing conditions on the crystalline structure, grain dimensions, and topography. We highlight the mechanisms of film growth and phase transitions, which determine the observed interfacial morphological properties and their resilience against thermal treatments. Published by AIP Publishing.

  17. Cluster-assembled cubic zirconia films with tunable and stable nanoscale morphology against thermal annealing

    Borghi, F.

    2016-08-05

    Nanostructured zirconium dioxide (zirconia) films are very promising for catalysis and biotechnological applications: a precise control of the interfacial properties of the material at different length scales and, in particular, at the nanoscale, is therefore necessary. Here, we present the characterization of cluster-assembled zirconia films produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition possessing cubic structure at room temperature and controlled nanoscale morphology. We characterized the effect of thermal annealing in reducing and oxidizing conditions on the crystalline structure, grain dimensions, and topography. We highlight the mechanisms of film growth and phase transitions, which determine the observed interfacial morphological properties and their resilience against thermal treatments. Published by AIP Publishing.

  18. Non-oxidic nanoscale composites: single-crystalline titanium carbide nanocubes in hierarchical porous carbon monoliths.

    Sonnenburg, Kirstin; Smarsly, Bernd M; Brezesinski, Torsten

    2009-05-07

    We report the preparation of nanoscale carbon-titanium carbide composites with carbide contents of up to 80 wt%. The synthesis yields single-crystalline TiC nanocubes 20-30 nm in diameter embedded in a hierarchical porous carbon matrix. These composites were generated in the form of cylindrical monoliths but can be produced in various shapes using modern sol-gel and nanocasting methods in conjunction with carbothermal reduction. The monolithic material is characterized by a combination of microscopy, diffraction and physisorption. Overall, the results presented in this work represent a concrete design template for the synthesis of non-oxidic nanoscale composites with high surface areas.

  19. Special Issue on the Second International Workshop on Micro- and Nano-Scale Thermal Radiation

    Zhang, Zhuomin; Liu, Linhua; Zhu, Qunzhi; Mengüç, M. Pinar

    2015-06-01

    Micro- and nano-scale thermal radiation has become one of the fastest growing research areas because of advances in nanotechnology and the development of novel materials. The related research and development includes near-field radiation transfer, spectral and directional selective emitters and receivers, plasmonics, metamaterials, and novel nano-scale fabrication techniques. With the advances in these areas, important applications in energy harvesting such as solar cells and thermophotovoltaics, nanomanufacturing, biomedical sensing, thermal imaging as well as data storage with the localized heating/cooling have been pushed to higher levels.

  20. Materialism.

    Melnyk, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Materialism is nearly universally assumed by cognitive scientists. Intuitively, materialism says that a person's mental states are nothing over and above his or her material states, while dualism denies this. Philosophers have introduced concepts (e.g., realization and supervenience) to assist in formulating the theses of materialism and dualism with more precision, and distinguished among importantly different versions of each view (e.g., eliminative materialism, substance dualism, and emergentism). They have also clarified the logic of arguments that use empirical findings to support materialism. Finally, they have devised various objections to materialism, objections that therefore serve also as arguments for dualism. These objections typically center around two features of mental states that materialism has had trouble in accommodating. The first feature is intentionality, the property of representing, or being about, objects, properties, and states of affairs external to the mental states. The second feature is phenomenal consciousness, the property possessed by many mental states of there being something it is like for the subject of the mental state to be in that mental state. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:281-292. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1174 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. A hard X-ray nanoprobe beamline for nanoscale microscopy

    Winarski, Robert P., E-mail: winarski@anl.gov; Holt, Martin V. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60441 (United States); Rose, Volker [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60441 (United States); Fuesz, Peter; Carbaugh, Dean; Benson, Christa; Shu, Deming; Kline, David; Stephenson, G. Brian; McNulty, Ian [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60441 (United States); Maser, Jörg [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60441 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    The Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline is a precision platform for scanning probe and full-field microscopy with 3–30 keV X-rays. A combination of high-stability X-ray optics and precision motion sensing and control enables detailed studies of the internal features of samples with resolutions approaching 30 nm. The Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline (or Nanoprobe Beamline) is an X-ray microscopy facility incorporating diffraction, fluorescence and full-field imaging capabilities designed and operated by the Center for Nanoscale Materials and the Advanced Photon Source at Sector 26 of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. This facility was constructed to probe the nanoscale structure of biological, environmental and material sciences samples. The beamline provides intense focused X-rays to the Hard X-ray Nanoprobe (or Nanoprobe) which incorporates Fresnel zone plate optics and a precision laser sensing and control system. The beamline operates over X-ray energies from 3 to 30 keV, enabling studies of most elements in the periodic table, with a particular emphasis on imaging transition metals.

  2. Nanoscale transformation of sp2 to sp3 of graphite by slow highly charged ion irradiation

    Meguro, T.; Hida, A.; Koguchi, Y.; Miyamoto, S.; Yamamoto, Y.; Takai, H.; Maeda, K.; Aoyagi, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Nanoscale transformation of electronic states by highly charged ion (HCI) impact on graphite surfaces is described. The high potential energy of slow HCI, which induces multiple emission of electrons from the surface, provides a strong modification of the electronic states of the local area upon graphite surfaces. The HCI impact and the subsequent surface treatment either by electron injection from a scanning tunneling microscopy tip or by He-Cd laser irradiation induce a localized transition from sp 2 to sp 3 hybridization in graphite, resulting in the formation of nanoscale diamond-like structures (nanodiamond) at the impact region. From Raman spectroscopic measurements on sp 2 related peaks, it is found that the HCI irradiation creates vacancy complexes in contrast to ions having a lower charge state, which generate single vacancies. It is of interest that a single impact of HCI creates one nanodiamond structure, suggesting potential applications of HCI in nanoscale material processing

  3. Atomic nanoscale technology in the nuclear industry

    Woo, Taeho

    2011-01-01

    Developments at the nanoscale are leading to new possibilities and challenges for nuclear applications in areas ranging from medicine to international commerce to atomic power production/waste treatment. Progress in nanotech is helping the nuclear industry slash the cost of energy production. It also continues to improve application reliability and safety measures, which remain a critical concern, especially since the reactor disasters in Japan. Exploring the new wide-ranging landscape of nuclear function, Atomic Nanoscale Technology in the Nuclear Industry details the breakthroughs in nanosca

  4. Coded nanoscale self-assembly

    to research in the generation of materials with controlled microstructural charac- teristics. In an effort to sustain and further such innovative developments, it is ... of molecules) under thermodynamic equilibrium conditions into structurally well-.

  5. Quantitative phase separation in multiferroic Bi0.88Sm0.12FeO3 ceramics via piezoresponse force microscopy

    Alikin, D. O.; Turygin, A. P.; Shur, V. Ya.; Walker, J.; Rojac, T.; Shvartsman, V. V.; Kholkin, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    BiFeO 3 (BFO) is a classical multiferroic material with both ferroelectric and magnetic ordering at room temperature. Doping of this material with rare-earth oxides was found to be an efficient way to enhance the otherwise low piezoelectric response of unmodified BFO ceramics. In this work, we studied two types of bulk Sm-modified BFO ceramics with compositions close to the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) prepared by different solid-state processing methods. In both samples, coexistence of polar R3c and antipolar P bam phases was detected by conventional X-ray diffraction (XRD); the non-polar P nma or P bnm phase also has potential to be present due to the compositional proximity to the polar-to-non-polar phase boundary. Two approaches to separate the phases based on the piezoresponse force microscopy measurements have been proposed. The obtained fractions of the polar and non-polar/anti-polar phases were close to those determined by quantitative XRD analysis. The results thus reveal a useful method for quantitative determination of the phase composition in multi-phase ceramic systems, including the technologically most important MPB systems

  6. Magneto-thermal conduction and magneto-caloric effect in poly and nano crystalline forms of multiferroic GdCrO3

    Uma, S; Philip, J

    2014-01-01

    Gadolinium chromite, GdCrO 3 , belongs to the family of rare earth chromites, exhibiting multiferroism with coupling between electric polarization and magnetic ordering. It is understood that the interaction between Gd 3+ and Cr 3+ ions is responsible for switchable polarization in this system. Below Néel temperature the spins of Cr 3+ ions interact in anti-parallel through super exchange mechanism, giving rise to antiferromagnetic ordering at around 169 K in poly and nanocrystalline phases of this material. In order to understand the nature of spin–lattice coupling and magnon–phonon interaction in the intermediate temperature range (150–250 K), the magneto-thermal conduction and magneto-caloric effect in poly and nanocrystalline forms of this material are reported. These properties show anomalies around 169 K, which is described as due to spin–phonon coupling. When particle sizes are reduced to nanometer scales, thermal conductivity decreases significantly while specific heat capacity increases. The former is explained as due to reduction in phonon mean free path and phonon scattering from nanoparticle interfaces, while the latter is ascribed to contributions from Einstein oscillators at weakly bound atoms at the interfaces of nanocrystals. (paper)

  7. TbxBi1-xFeO3 nanoparticulate multiferroics fabricated by micro-emulsion technique: Structural elucidation and magnetic behavior evaluation

    Anwar, Zobia

    2014-04-01

    Tb-doped BiFeO3 multiferroics nanoparticles fabricated via micro-emulsion route were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The fully characterized TbxBi1-xFeO3 nanoparticles were then subjected to magnetic behavior evaluation for various technological applications. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) conducted in the range 25-1000 C predicted the temperature (~960 C) for phase formation. XRD estimated the crystallite size 30-47 nm, while the particles size estimated by SEM was found (80-120 nm). The XRD data confirmed the rhombohedral (space group R3c) phase with average cell volume 182.66 Å3 (for BiFeO 3). Various other physical parameters like bulk density, X-ray density and porosity were also determined from the XRD data and found in agreement with theoretical predictions. The magnetic studies showed that as Bi3+ was substituted by Tb3+, all magnetic parameters were altered. The maximum saturation magnetization (Ms) (0.6691 emug -1) was exhibited by Tb0.02Bi0.98FeO 3 while the Tb0.00Bi1.00Fe1.00O 3 showed the maximum (549 Oe) coercivity. The evaluated magnetic behavior categorized these materials as soft magnetic materials that may be useful for fabricating advanced technological applications. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  8. Nanoscale intimacy in bifunctional catalysts for selective conversion of hydrocarbons

    Zecevic, Jovana; Vanbutsele, Gina; de Jong, Krijn P.; Martens, Johan A.

    2015-12-01

    The ability to control nanoscale features precisely is increasingly being exploited to develop and improve monofunctional catalysts. Striking effects might also be expected in the case of bifunctional catalysts, which are important in the hydrocracking of fossil and renewable hydrocarbon sources to provide high-quality diesel fuel. Such bifunctional hydrocracking catalysts contain metal sites and acid sites, and for more than 50 years the so-called intimacy criterion has dictated the maximum distance between the two types of site, beyond which catalytic activity decreases. A lack of synthesis and material-characterization methods with nanometre precision has long prevented in-depth exploration of the intimacy criterion, which has often been interpreted simply as ‘the closer the better’ for positioning metal and acid sites. Here we show for a bifunctional catalyst—comprising an intimate mixture of zeolite Y and alumina binder, and with platinum metal controllably deposited on either the zeolite or the binder—that closest proximity between metal and zeolite acid sites can be detrimental. Specifically, the selectivity when cracking large hydrocarbon feedstock molecules for high-quality diesel production is optimized with the catalyst that contains platinum on the binder, that is, with a nanoscale rather than closest intimacy of the metal and acid sites. Thus, cracking of the large and complex hydrocarbon molecules that are typically derived from alternative sources, such as gas-to-liquid technology, vegetable oil or algal oil, should benefit especially from bifunctional catalysts that avoid locating platinum on the zeolite (the traditionally assumed optimal location). More generally, we anticipate that the ability demonstrated here to spatially organize different active sites at the nanoscale will benefit the further development and optimization of the emerging generation of multifunctional catalysts.

  9. Nanoscale size effect in in situ titanium based composites with cell viability and cytocompatibility studies

    Miklaszewski, Andrzej, E-mail: andrzej.miklaszewski@put.poznan.pl [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Poznan University of Technology, Jana Pawla II 24, 61-138 Poznan (Poland); Jurczyk, Mieczysława U. [Division Mother' s and Child' s Health, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Polna 33, 60-535 Poznan (Poland); Kaczmarek, Mariusz [Department of Immunology, Chair of Clinical Immunology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Rokietnicka 5D, 60-806 Poznan (Poland); Paszel-Jaworska, Anna; Romaniuk, Aleksandra; Lipińska, Natalia [Department of Clinical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnostics, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Przybyszewskiego 49, 60-355 Poznan (Poland); Żurawski, Jakub [Department of Immunobiochemistry, Chair of Biology and Environmental Sciences, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Rokietnicka 8, 60-806 Poznan (Poland); Urbaniak, Paulina [Department of Cell Biology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Rokietnicka 5D, 60-806 Poznan (Poland); Jurczyk, Mieczyslaw [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Poznan University of Technology, Jana Pawla II 24, 61-138 Poznan (Poland)

    2017-04-01

    Novel in situ Metal Matrix Nanocomposite (MMNC) materials based on titanium and boron, revealed their new properties in the nanoscale range. In situ nanocomposites, obtained through mechanical alloying and traditional powder metallurgy compaction and sintering, show obvious differences to their microstructural analogue. A unique microstructure connected with good mechanical properties reliant on the processing conditions favour the nanoscale range of results of the Ti-TiB in situ MMNC example. The data summarised in this work, support and extend the knowledge boundaries of the nanoscale size effect that influence not only the mechanical properties but also the studies on the cell viability and cytocompatibility. Prepared in the same bulk, in situ MMNC, based on titanium and boron, could be considered as a possible candidate for dental implants and other medical applications. The observed relations and research conclusions are transferable to the in situ MMNC material group. Aside from all the discussed relations, the increasing share of these composites in the ever-growing material markets, heavily depends on the attractiveness and a possible wider application of these composites as well as their operational simplicity presented in this work. - Highlights: • Nano and microscale size precursor influence the final composite microstructure and properties. • Obtained from the nanoscale precursor sinters, characterise with a uniform and highly dispersed microstructure • Mechanical properties favoured Nano scale size precursor • Boron addition could be significantly reduced for moderate properties range. • A possible candidate for dental implants and other medical applications.

  10. Investigating Nanoscale Electrochemistry with Surface- and Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    Zaleski, Stephanie; Wilson, Andrew J; Mattei, Michael; Chen, Xu; Goubert, Guillaume; Cardinal, M Fernanda; Willets, Katherine A; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2016-09-20

    The chemical sensitivity of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) methodologies allows for the investigation of heterogeneous chemical reactions with high sensitivity. Specifically, SERS methodologies are well-suited to study electron transfer (ET) reactions, which lie at the heart of numerous fundamental processes: electrocatalysis, solar energy conversion, energy storage in batteries, and biological events such as photosynthesis. Heterogeneous ET reactions are commonly monitored by electrochemical methods such as cyclic voltammetry, observing billions of electrochemical events per second. Since the first proof of detecting single molecules by redox cycling, there has been growing interest in examining electrochemistry at the nanoscale and single-molecule levels. Doing so unravels details that would otherwise be obscured by an ensemble experiment. The use of optical spectroscopies, such as SERS, to elucidate nanoscale electrochemical behavior is an attractive alternative to traditional approaches such as scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). While techniques such as single-molecule fluorescence or electrogenerated chemiluminescence have been used to optically monitor electrochemical events, SERS methodologies, in particular, have shown great promise for exploring electrochemistry at the nanoscale. SERS is ideally suited to study nanoscale electrochemistry because the Raman-enhancing metallic, nanoscale substrate duly serves as the working electrode material. Moreover, SERS has the ability to directly probe single molecules without redox cycling and can achieve nanoscale spatial resolution in combination with super-resolution or scanning probe microscopies. This Account summarizes the latest progress from the Van Duyne and Willets groups toward understanding nanoelectrochemistry using Raman spectroscopic methodologies. The first half of this Account highlights three techniques that have been recently used to probe few- or single-molecule electrochemical

  11. Pressure-induced phase transitions of multiferroic BiFeO3

    Zhang Xiaoli; Dong Juncai; Liu Jing; Chen Dongliang; Wu Ye; Zhang Qian; Wu Xiang; Wu Ziyu

    2013-01-01

    Pressure-induced phase transitions of multiferroic BiFeO 3 have been investigated using synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction with diamond anvil cell technique at room temperature. Present experimental data clearly show that rhombohedral (R3c) phase of BiFeO 3 first transforms to monoclinic (C2/m) phase at 7 GPa, then to orthorhombic (Pnma) phase at 11 GPa, which is consistent with recent theoretical ab initio calculation. However, we observe another peak at 2θ=7° in the pressure range of 5-7 GPa that has not been reported previously. Further analysis reveals that this reflection peak is attributed to the orthorhombic (Pbam) phase, indicating the coexistence of monoclinic phase with orthorhombic phase in low pressure range. (authors)

  12. Anisotropic magnetoelectric characteristics in five-layer magnetization-graded multiferroic composites

    Lei Chen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the anisotropic magnetoelectric(ME characteristics for the five-layer magnetization-graded multiferroic composites(MGMC. The magnetic anisotropy and corresponding anisotropic magnetomechanical effect, demagnetization effect and magneto-mechanical damping’s dependence on magnetic field direction result in an obvious anisotropic ME coupling effect. The experimental results show that ME voltage coefficient in H33 mode is remarkably larger than the other ones (H11, H31 and H13 over the whole Hdc range. Correspondingly, ∂VME/∂Hdc arrives about 420mV/Oe at an optimum bias magnetic field of 46Oe, which is approximately 40 times larger than that of the previous reported composite. Furthermore, it also demonstrates an obvious angular dependence on dc magnetic field. Taking advantage of these specifications, the MGMC can be used to detect weak dc magnetic field and its spatial orientation.

  13. Controlled self-assembly of multiferroic core-shell nanoparticles exhibiting strong magneto-electric effects

    Sreenivasulu, Gollapudi; Hamilton, Sean L.; Lehto, Piper R.; Srinivasan, Gopalan, E-mail: srinivas@oakland.edu [Physics Department, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309-4401 (United States); Popov, Maksym [Physics Department, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309-4401 (United States); Radiophysics Department, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Kyiv 01601 (Ukraine); Chavez, Ferman A. [Chemistry Department, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309-4401 (United States)

    2014-02-03

    Ferromagnetic-ferroelectric composites show strain mediated coupling between the magnetic and electric sub-systems due to magnetostriction and piezoelectric effects associated with the ferroic phases. We have synthesized core-shell multiferroic nano-composites by functionalizing 10–100 nm barium titanate and nickel ferrite nanoparticles with complementary coupling groups and allowing them to self-assemble in the presence of a catalyst. The core-shell structure was confirmed by electron microscopy and magnetic force microscopy. Evidence for strong strain mediated magneto-electric coupling was obtained by static magnetic field induced variations in the permittivity over 16–18 GHz and polarization and by electric field induced by low-frequency ac magnetic fields.

  14. Electric field control of magnon-induced magnetization dynamics in multiferroics.

    Risinggård, Vetle; Kulagina, Iryna; Linder, Jacob

    2016-08-24

    We consider theoretically the effect of an inhomogeneous magnetoelectric coupling on the magnon-induced dynamics of a ferromagnet. The magnon-mediated magnetoelectric torque affects both the homogeneous magnetization and magnon-driven domain wall motion. In the domains, we predict a reorientation of the magnetization, controllable by the applied electric field, which is almost an order of magnitude larger than that observed in other physical systems via the same mechanism. The applied electric field can also be used to tune the domain wall speed and direction of motion in a linear fashion, producing domain wall velocities several times the zero field velocity. These results show that multiferroic systems offer a promising arena to achieve low-dissipation magnetization rotation and domain wall motion by exciting spin-waves.

  15. Polarization-tuned diode behaviour in multiferroic BiFeO3 thin films

    Yao, Yingbang

    2012-12-28

    Asymmetric rectifying I-V behaviour of multiferroic BiFeO3 (BFO) thin films grown on transparent ITO-coated glass was quantitatively studied as a function of ferroelectric polarization. Different polarized states were established by unipolar or bipolar poling with various applied electric fields. The effects of polarization relaxation and fatigue on the currents were also investigated. We found that the conduction currents and the associated rectifications were controlled by the amplitude and direction of the polarization. We clearly observed the linear dependence of the current on the polarization. It is suggested that the space-charge-limited conduction and the charge injection at the Schottky interface between the film and the electrodes dominate the current. The electrically controlled rectifying behaviour observed in this study may be useful in nonvolatile resistance memory devices or tunable diodes. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  16. Magnetic Biasing of a Ferroelectric Hysteresis Loop in a Multiferroic Orthoferrite

    Tokunaga, Y.; Taguchi, Y.; Arima, T.; Tokura, Y.

    2014-01-01

    In a multiferroic orthoferrite Dy0.7Tb0.3FeO3, which shows electric-field-(E-)driven magnetization (M) reversal due to a tight clamping between polarization (P) and M, a gigantic effect of magnetic-field (H) biasing on P-E hysteresis loops is observed in the case of rapid E sweeping. The magnitude of the bias E field can be controlled by varying the magnitude of H, and its sign can be reversed by changing the sign of H or the relative clamping direction between P and M. The origin of this unconventional biasing effect is ascribed to the difference in the Zeeman energy between the +P and -P states coupled with the M states with opposite sign.

  17. Electric-field control of spin waves in multiferroic BiFeO3: Theory

    de Sousa, Rogério; Rovillain, P.; Gallais, Y.; Sacuto, A.; Méasson, M. A.; Colson, D.; Forget, A.; Bibes, M.; Barthélémy, A.; Cazayous, M.

    2011-03-01

    Our recent experiment demonstrated gigantic (30%) electric-field tuning of magnon frequencies in multiferroic BiFeO3. We demonstrate that the origin of this effect is related to two linear magnetoelectric interactions that couple the component of electric field perpendicular to the ferroelectric vector to a quadratic form of the Néel vector. We calculate the magnon spectra due to each of these interactions and show that only one of them is consistent with experimental data. At high electric fields, this interaction induces a phase transition to a homogeneous state, and the multi-magnon spectra will fuse into two magnon frequencies. We discuss the possible microscopic mechanisms responsible for this novel interaction and the prospect for applications in magnonics. We acknowledge support from NSERC-Discovery (Canada) and the Agence Nationale pour la Recherche (France).

  18. Temperature dependence of electric field tunable ferromagnetic resonance lineshape in multiferroic heterostructure

    Fenglong Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we experimentally investigate the effect of temperature on the electric field tunable ferromagnetic resonance (FMR in a ferroelectric/ferromagnetic heterostructure, and demonstrate the tuning of abnormal change in FMR using the polarization of the ferroelectric layer above 200 K. The FMR was found to be almost unchanged under different electric field strength at 100 K owing to frozen polarization, which causes extremely weak magnetoelectric coupling. More interestingly, negative effective linewidth was observed when an electric field greater than 10 kV/cm was applied above 220 K. The simultaneous electrical control of magnetization and its damping via FMR based on linear magnetoelectric coupling are directly relevant to use of composite multiferroics for a wide range of devices.

  19. Structural transitions and multiferroic properties of high Ni-doped BiFeO3

    Betancourt-Cantera, L. G.; Bolarín-Miró, A. M.; Cortés-Escobedo, C. A.; Hernández-Cruz, L. E.; Sánchez-De Jesús, F.

    2018-06-01

    Nickel doped bismuth ferrite powders, BiFe1-x NixO3 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.5), were synthesized by high-energy ball milling followed by an annealing at 700 °C. A detailed study about the substitution of Fe3+ by Ni2+ on the crystal structure and multiferroic properties is presented. The X-ray diffraction patterns reveal the formation of rhombohedral structure with small amounts of Bi2Fe4O9 as a secondary phase for x behavior indicates the frustration of the G-antiferromagnetic order typical of the un-doped BiFeO3, caused by the presence of small amounts of Ni2+ (x Behavior modifications of electrical conductivity, permittivity and dielectric loss versus frequency are related with crystal structure transformations, when nickel concentration is increased.

  20. Magnetic Field Control of Cycloidal Domains and Electric Polarization in Multiferroic BiFeO3

    Bordács, S.; Farkas, D. G.; White, J. S.; Cubitt, R.; DeBeer-Schmitt, L.; Ito, T.; Kézsmárki, I.

    2018-04-01

    The magnetic field induced rearrangement of the cycloidal spin structure in ferroelectric monodomain single crystals of the room-temperature multiferroic BiFeO3 is studied using small-angle neutron scattering. The cycloid propagation vectors are observed to rotate when magnetic fields applied perpendicular to the rhombohedral (polar) axis exceed a pinning threshold value of ˜5 T . In light of these experimental results, a phenomenological model is proposed that captures the rearrangement of the cycloidal domains, and we revisit the microscopic origin of the magnetoelectric effect. A new coupling between the magnetic anisotropy and the polarization is proposed that explains the recently discovered magnetoelectric polarization perpendicular to the rhombohedral axis.

  1. Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory Annual Report 2005

    Hamza, A V; Lesuer, D R

    2006-01-03

    The Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory's (NSCL) primary mission is to create and advance interdisciplinary research and development opportunities in nanoscience and technology. The initial emphasis of the NSCL has been on development of scientific solutions in support of target fabrication for the NIF laser and other stockpile stewardship experimental platforms. Particular emphasis has been placed on the design and development of innovative new materials and structures for use in these targets. Projects range from the development of new high strength nanocrystalline alloys to graded density materials to high Z nanoporous structures. The NSCL also has a mission to recruit and train personnel for Lab programs such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF), Defense and Nuclear Technologies (DNT), and Nonproliferation, Arms control and International security (NAI). The NSCL continues to attract talented scientists to the Laboratory.

  2. Benchtop Nanoscale Patterning Using Soft Lithography

    Meenakshi, Viswanathan; Babayan, Yelizaveta; Odom, Teri W.

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines several benchtop nanoscale patterning experiments that can be incorporated into undergraduate laboratories or advanced high school chemistry curricula. The experiments, supplemented by an online video lab manual, are based on soft lithographic techniques such as replica molding, micro-molding in capillaries, and micro-contact…

  3. Traceable nanoscale measurement at NML-SIRIM

    Dahlan, Ahmad M.; Abdul Hapip, A. I.

    2012-01-01

    The role of national metrology institute (NMI) has always been very crucial in national technology development. One of the key activities of the NMI is to provide traceable measurement in all parameters under the International System of Units (SI). Dimensional measurement where size and shape are two important features investigated, is one of the important area covered by NMIs. To support the national technology development, particularly in manufacturing sectors and emerging technology such nanotechnology, the National Metrology Laboratory, SIRIM Berhad (NML-SIRIM), has embarked on a project to equip Malaysia with state-of-the-art nanoscale measurement facility with the aims of providing traceability of measurement at nanoscale. This paper will look into some of the results from current activities at NML-SIRIM related to measurement at nanoscale particularly on application of atomic force microscope (AFM) and laser based sensor in dimensional measurement. Step height standards of different sizes were measured using AFM and laser-based sensors. These probes are integrated into a long-range nanoscale measuring machine traceable to the international definition of the meter thus ensuring their traceability. Consistency of results obtained by these two methods will be discussed and presented. Factors affecting their measurements as well as their related uncertainty of measurements will also be presented.

  4. Traceable nanoscale measurement at NML-SIRIM

    Dahlan, Ahmad M.; Abdul Hapip, A. I.

    2012-06-01

    The role of national metrology institute (NMI) has always been very crucial in national technology development. One of the key activities of the NMI is to provide traceable measurement in all parameters under the International System of Units (SI). Dimensional measurement where size and shape are two important features investigated, is one of the important area covered by NMIs. To support the national technology development, particularly in manufacturing sectors and emerging technology such nanotechnology, the National Metrology Laboratory, SIRIM Berhad (NML-SIRIM), has embarked on a project to equip Malaysia with state-of-the-art nanoscale measurement facility with the aims of providing traceability of measurement at nanoscale. This paper will look into some of the results from current activities at NML-SIRIM related to measurement at nanoscale particularly on application of atomic force microscope (AFM) and laser based sensor in dimensional measurement. Step height standards of different sizes were measured using AFM and laser-based sensors. These probes are integrated into a long-range nanoscale measuring machine traceable to the international definition of the meter thus ensuring their traceability. Consistency of results obtained by these two methods will be discussed and presented. Factors affecting their measurements as well as their related uncertainty of measurements will also be presented.

  5. Enhanced nanoscale friction on fluorinated graphene.

    Kwon, Sangku; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Jeon, Ki-Joon; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Park, Jeong Young

    2012-12-12

    Atomically thin graphene is an ideal model system for studying nanoscale friction due to its intrinsic two-dimensional (2D) anisotropy. Furthermore, modulating its tribological properties could be an important milestone for graphene-based micro- and nanomechanical devices. Here, we report unexpectedly enhanced nanoscale friction on chemically modified graphene and a relevant theoretical analysis associated with flexural phonons. Ultrahigh vacuum friction force microscopy measurements show that nanoscale friction on the graphene surface increases by a factor of 6 after fluorination of the surface, while the adhesion force is slightly reduced. Density functional theory calculations show that the out-of-plane bending stiffness of graphene increases up to 4-fold after fluorination. Thus, the less compliant F-graphene exhibits more friction. This indicates that the mechanics of tip-to-graphene nanoscale friction would be characteristically different from that of conventional solid-on-solid contact and would be dominated by the out-of-plane bending stiffness of the chemically modified graphene. We propose that damping via flexural phonons could be a main source for frictional energy dissipation in 2D systems such as graphene.

  6. Neuromorphic computing with nanoscale spintronic oscillators.

    Torrejon, Jacob; Riou, Mathieu; Araujo, Flavio Abreu; Tsunegi, Sumito; Khalsa, Guru; Querlioz, Damien; Bortolotti, Paolo; Cros, Vincent; Yakushiji, Kay; Fukushima, Akio; Kubota, Hitoshi; Yuasa, Shinji; Stiles, Mark D; Grollier, Julie

    2017-07-26

    Neurons in the brain behave as nonlinear oscillators, which develop rhythmic activity and interact to process information. Taking inspiration from this behaviour to realize high-density, low-power neuromorphic computing will require very large numbers of nanoscale nonlinear oscillators. A simple estimation indicates that to fit 10 8 oscillators organized in a two-dimensional array inside a chip the size of a thumb, the lateral dimension of each oscillator must be smaller than one micrometre. However, nanoscale devices tend to be noisy and to lack the stability that is required to process data in a reliable way. For this reason, despite multiple theoretical proposals and several candidates, including memristive and superconducting oscillators, a proof of concept of neuromorphic computing using nanoscale oscillators has yet to be demonstrated. Here we show experimentally that a nanoscale spintronic oscillator (a magnetic tunnel junction) can be used to achieve spoken-digit recognition with an accuracy similar to that of state-of-the-art neural networks. We also determine the regime of magnetization dynamics that leads to the greatest performance. These results, combined with the ability of the spintronic oscillators to interact with each other, and their long lifetime and low energy consumption, open up a path to fast, parallel, on-chip computation based on networks of oscillators.

  7. Inelastic transport theory for nanoscale systems

    Frederiksen, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes theoretical and numerical investigations of inelastic scat- tering and energy dissipation in electron transport through nanoscale sys- tems. A computational scheme, based on a combination of density functional theory (DFT) and nonequilibrium Green’s functions (NEGF), has been...

  8. Effects of nanoscale contacts to graphene

    Franklin, A.D.; Han, S.-J.; Bol, A.A.; Haensch, W.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding and optimizing transport between metal contacts and graphene is one of the foremost challenges for graphene devices. In this letter, we present the first results on the effects of reducing contact dimensions to the nanoscale in single-layer graphene transistors. Using noninvasive

  9. Bio-Conjugates for Nanoscale Applications

    Villadsen, Klaus

    Bio-conjugates for Nanoscale Applications is the title of this thesis, which covers three different projects in chemical bio-conjugation research, namely synthesis and applications of: Lipidated fluorescent peptides, carbohydrate oxime-azide linkers and N-aryl O-R2 oxyamine derivatives. Lipidated...

  10. Nanoscale thermal transport: Theoretical method and application

    Zeng, Yu-Jia; Liu, Yue-Yang; Zhou, Wu-Xing; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2018-03-01

    With the size reduction of nanoscale electronic devices, the heat generated by the unit area in integrated circuits will be increasing exponentially, and consequently the thermal management in these devices is a very important issue. In addition, the heat generated by the electronic devices mostly diffuses to the air in the form of waste heat, which makes the thermoelectric energy conversion also an important issue for nowadays. In recent years, the thermal transport properties in nanoscale systems have attracted increasing attention in both experiments and theoretical calculations. In this review, we will discuss various theoretical simulation methods for investigating thermal transport properties and take a glance at several interesting thermal transport phenomena in nanoscale systems. Our emphasizes will lie on the advantage and limitation of calculational method, and the application of nanoscale thermal transport and thermoelectric property. Project supported by the Nation Key Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2017YFB0701602) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11674092).

  11. Traceable nanoscale measurement at NML-SIRIM

    Dahlan, Ahmad M.; Abdul Hapip, A. I. [National Metrology Laboratory SIRIM Berhad (NML-SIRIM), Lot PT 4803, Bandar Baru Salak Tinggi, 43900 Sepang (Malaysia)

    2012-06-29

    The role of national metrology institute (NMI) has always been very crucial in national technology development. One of the key activities of the NMI is to provide traceable measurement in all parameters under the International System of Units (SI). Dimensional measurement where size and shape are two important features investigated, is one of the important area covered by NMIs. To support the national technology development, particularly in manufacturing sectors and emerging technology such nanotechnology, the National Metrology Laboratory, SIRIM Berhad (NML-SIRIM), has embarked on a project to equip Malaysia with state-of-the-art nanoscale measurement facility with the aims of providing traceability of measurement at nanoscale. This paper will look into some of the results from current activities at NML-SIRIM related to measurement at nanoscale particularly on application of atomic force microscope (AFM) and laser based sensor in dimensional measurement. Step height standards of different sizes were measured using AFM and laser-based sensors. These probes are integrated into a long-range nanoscale measuring machine traceable to the international definition of the meter thus ensuring their traceability. Consistency of results obtained by these two methods will be discussed and presented. Factors affecting their measurements as well as their related uncertainty of measurements will also be presented.

  12. Multifunctional magnetoelectric materials for device applications

    Ortega, N; Katiyar, Ram S; Kumar, Ashok; Scott, J F

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade magnetoelectric (ME) mutiferroic (MF) materials and their devices are one of the highest priority research topics that has been investigated by the scientific ferroics community to develop the next generation of novel multifunctional materials. These systems show the simultaneous existence of two or more ferroic orders, and cross-coupling between them, such as magnetic spin, polarisation, ferroelastic ordering, and ferrotoroidicity. Based on the type of ordering and coupling, they have drawn increasing interest for a variety of device applications, such as magnetic field sensors, nonvolatile memory elements, ferroelectric photovoltaics, nano-electronics etc. Since single-phase materials exist rarely in nature with strong cross-coupling properties, intensive research activity is being pursued towards the discovery of new single-phase multiferroic materials and the design of new engineered materials with strong magneto-electric (ME) coupling. This review article summarises the development of different kinds of multiferroic material: single-phase and composite ceramic, laminated composite and nanostructured thin films. Thin-film nanostructures have higher magnitude direct ME coupling values and clear evidence of indirect ME coupling compared with bulk materials. Promising ME coupling coefficients have been reported in laminated composite materials in which the signal to noise ratio is good for device fabrication. We describe the possible applications of these materials. (topical review)

  13. Materials

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available . It is generally included as part of a structurally insulated panel (SIP) where the foam is sandwiched between external skins of steel, wood or cement. Cement composites Cement bonded composites are an important class of building materials. These products... for their stone buildings, including the Egyptians, Aztecs and Inca’s. As stone is a very dense material it requires intensive heating to become warm. Rocks were generally stacked dry but mud, and later cement, can be used as a mortar to hold the rocks...

  14. Multiferroic properties of BiFeO{sub 3}/BaTiO{sub 3} multilayered thin films

    Sharma, Savita [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Delhi 110042 (India); Tomar, Monika [Physics Department, Miranda House, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Kumar, Ashok [CSIR—National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Puri, Nitin K. [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Delhi 110042 (India); Gupta, Vinay, E-mail: drguptavinay@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2014-09-01

    Multilayered structures of multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) and ferroelectric BaTiO{sub 3} (BTO) have been fabricated using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Ferromagnetic and ferroelectric properties of the multilayered system (BFO/BTO) have been investigated. It could be inferred that the magnetization increases with the incorporation of BTO buffer layer, which indicates a coupling between the ferroelectric and ferromagnetic orders. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) measurements performed on the prepared multiferroic samples show that the magnetization is significantly increased (M{sub s}=56.88 emu/cm{sup 3}) for the multilayer system with more number of layers (four) keeping the total thickness of the multilayered system constant (350 nm) meanwhile maintaining the sufficiently enhanced ferroelectric properties (P{sub r}=29.68 µC/cm{sup 2})

  15. Terfenol-D/Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} disk-ring multiferroic heterostructures coupled through normal stresses

    Li, Lei; Chen, Xiang Ming [Zhejiang University, Laboratory of Dielectric Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hangzhou (China)

    2010-03-15

    Disk-ring multiferroic heterostructures composed of Terfenol-D and Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} (PZT) were prepared and characterized, for which the ferromagnetic and ferroelectric phases were coupled through normal stresses instead of the shear stresses that acted in most of the previous multiferroic heterostructures. High low-frequency magnetoelectric coefficients of 0.10-0.75 V cm{sup -1} Oe{sup -1} were attained for the disk-ring heterostructures, which indicated the strong magnetoelectric coupling. Moreover, a symmetrical resonant peak was observed for dE{sub 3}/dH{sub 3} in the frequency range of 1-200 kHz, while another weak peak with asymmetrical shape also existed at a lower frequency for dE{sub 3}/dH{sub 1}, which was due to the combination of two vibration modes. (orig.)

  16. Multiferroic BiFeO3 thin films and nanodots grown on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite substrates

    Shin, Hyun Wook; Son, Jong Yeog

    2017-12-01

    Multiferroic BiFeO3 (BFO) thin films and nanodots are deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) substrates via a pulsed laser deposition technique, where the HOPG surface has a honeycomb lattice structure made of carbon atoms, similar to graphene. A graphene/BFO/HOPG capacitor exhibited multiferroic properties, namely ferroelectricity (a residual polarization of 26.8 μC/cm2) and ferromagnetism (a residual magnetization of 1.1 × 10-5 emu). The BFO thin film had high domain wall energies and demonstrated switching time of approximately 82 ns. An 8-nm BFO nanodot showed a typical piezoelectric hysteresis loop with an effective residual piezoelectric constant of approximately 110 pm/V and exhibited two clearly separated current curves depending on the ferroelectric polarization direction.

  17. Symposium GC: Nanoscale Charge Transport in Excitonic Solar Cells

    Bommisetty, Venkat [Univ. of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD (United States)

    2011-06-23

    This paper provides a summary only and table of contents of the sessions. Excitonic solar cells, including all-organic, hybrid organic-inorganic and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), offer strong potential for inexpensive and large-area solar energy conversion. Unlike traditional inorganic semiconductor solar cells, where all the charge generation and collection processes are well understood, these excitonic solar cells contain extremely disordered structures with complex interfaces which results in large variations in nanoscale electronic properties and has a strong influence on carrier generation, transport, dissociation and collection. Detailed understanding of these processes is important for fabrication of highly efficient solar cells. Efforts to improve efficiency are underway at a large number of research groups throughout the world focused on inorganic and organic semiconductors, photonics, photophysics, charge transport, nanoscience, ultrafast spectroscopy, photonics, semiconductor processing, device physics, device structures, interface structure etc. Rapid progress in this multidisciplinary area requires strong synergetic efforts among researchers from diverse backgrounds. Such effort can lead to novel methods for development of new materials with improved photon harvesting and interfacial treatments for improved carrier transport, process optimization to yield ordered nanoscale morphologies with well defined electronic structures.

  18. Laser ablation of nanoscale particles with 193 nm light

    Choi, J H; Lucas, D; Koshland, C P

    2007-01-01

    Laser interaction with nanoscale particles is distinct and different from laser-bulk material interaction, where a hot plasma is normally created. Here, we review our studies on 193 nm laser ablation of various nanoscale particles including NaCl, soot, polystyrene, and gold. The 20 ns laser beam with fluences up to 0.3 J/cm 2 irradiates nanoparticles in a gas stream at laser repetition rates from 10 to 100 Hz. The particle size distributions before and after irradiation are measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), and particle morphology is examined with electron microscopy. All the nanomaterials studied exhibit a similar disintegration pattern and similar particle formation characteristics. No broadband emission associated with particle heating or optical breakdown is observed. The nanoparticles formed after irradiation have a smaller mean diameter and an order of magnitude higher number concentration with a more spherical shape compared to the original particles. We use the photon-atom ratio (PAR) to interpret the laser-particle interaction energetics

  19. Design Optimization of Radionuclide Nano-Scale Batteries

    Schoenfeld, D.W.; Tulenko, J.S.; Wang, J.; Smith, B.

    2004-01-01

    Radioisotopes have been used for power sources in heart pacemakers and space applications dating back to the 50's. Two key properties of radioisotope power sources are high energy density and long half-life compared to chemical batteries. The tritium battery used in heart pacemakers exceeds 500 mW--hr, and is being evaluated by the University of Florida for feasibility as a MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems) power source. Conversion of radioisotope sources into electrical power within the constraints of nano-scale dimensions requires cutting-edge technologies and novel approaches. Some advances evolving in the III-V and II-IV semiconductor families have led to a broader consideration of radioisotopes rather free of radiation damage limitations. Their properties can lead to novel battery configurations designed to convert externally located emissions from a highly radioactive environment. This paper presents results for the analytical computational assisted design and modeling of semiconductor prototype nano-scale radioisotope nuclear batteries from MCNP and EGS programs. The analysis evaluated proposed designs and was used to guide the selection of appropriate geometries, material properties, and specific activities to attain power requirements for the MEMS batteries. Plans utilizing high specific activity radioisotopes were assessed in the investigation of designs employing multiple conversion cells and graded junctions with varying band gap properties. Voltage increases sought by serial combination of VOC s are proposed to overcome some of the limitations of a low power density. The power density is directly dependent on the total active areas

  20. Nanoscale electron manipulation in metals with intense THz electric fields

    Takeda, Jun; Yoshioka, Katsumasa; Minami, Yasuo; Katayama, Ikufumi

    2018-03-01

    Improved control over the electromagnetic properties of metals on a nanoscale is crucial for the development of next-generation nanoelectronics and plasmonic devices. Harnessing the terahertz (THz)-electric-field-induced nonlinearity for the motion of electrons is a promising method of manipulating the local electromagnetic properties of metals, while avoiding undesirable thermal effects and electronic transitions. In this review, we demonstrate the manipulation of electron delocalization in ultrathin gold (Au) films with nanostructures, by intense THz electric-field transients. On increasing the electric-field strength of the THz pulses, the transmittance in the THz-frequency region abruptly decreases around the percolation threshold. The observed THz-electric-field-induced nonlinearity is analysed, based on the Drude-Smith model. The results suggest that ultrafast electron delocalization occurs by electron tunnelling across the narrow insulating bridge between the Au nanostructures, without material breakdown. In order to quantitatively discuss the tunnelling process, we perform scanning tunnelling microscopy with carrier-envelope phase (CEP)-controlled single-cycle THz electric fields. By applying CEP-controlled THz electric fields to the 1 nm nanogap between a metal nanotip and graphite sample, many electrons could be coherently driven through the quantum tunnelling process, either from the nanotip to the sample or vice versa. The presented concept, namely, electron tunnelling mediated by CEP-controlled single-cycle THz electric fields, can facilitate the development of nanoscale electron manipulation, applicable to next-generation ultrafast nanoelectronics and plasmonic devices.

  1. Ceramic nanostructure materials, membranes and composite layers

    Burggraaf, A.J.; Keizer, Klaas; van Hassel, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    Synthesis methods to obtain nanoscale materials will be briefly discussed with a focus on sol-gel methods. Three types of nanoscale composites (powders, membranes and ion implanted layers) will be discussed and exemplified with recent original research results. Ceramic membranes with a thickness of

  2. Optical Diode Effect at Spin-Wave Excitations of the Room-Temperature Multiferroic BiFeO_{3}.

    Kézsmárki, I; Nagel, U; Bordács, S; Fishman, R S; Lee, J H; Yi, Hee Taek; Cheong, S-W; Rõõm, T

    2015-09-18

    Multiferroics permit the magnetic control of the electric polarization and the electric control of the magnetization. These static magnetoelectric (ME) effects are of enormous interest: The ability to read and write a magnetic state current-free by an electric voltage would provide a huge technological advantage. Dynamic or optical ME effects are equally interesting, because they give rise to unidirectional light propagation as recently observed in low-temperature multiferroics. This phenomenon, if realized at room temperature, would allow the development of optical diodes which transmit unpolarized light in one, but not in the opposite, direction. Here, we report strong unidirectional transmission in the room-temperature multiferroic BiFeO_{3} over the gigahertz-terahertz frequency range. The supporting theory attributes the observed unidirectional transmission to the spin-current-driven dynamic ME effect. These findings are an important step toward the realization of optical diodes, supplemented by the ability to switch the transmission direction with a magnetic or electric field.

  3. Magnetoelectric coupling study in multiferroic Pb(Fe0.5Nb0.5)O3 ceramics through small and large electric signal standard measurements

    Raymond, Oscar; Siqueiros, Jesus M.; Font, Reynaldo; Portelles, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Multifunctional multiferroic materials such as the single phase compound Pb(Fe 0.5 Nb 0.5 )O 3 (PFN), where ferroelectric and antiferromagnetic order coexist, are very promising and have great interest from the academic and technological points of view. In this work, coupling of the ferroelectric and magnetic moments is reported. For this study, a combination of the small signal response using the impedance spectroscopy technique and the electromechanical resonance method with the large signal response through standard ferroelectric hysteresis measurement, has been used with and without an applied magnetic field. The measurements to determine the electrical properties of the ceramic were performed as functions of the bias and poling electric fields. A simultaneous analysis of the complex dielectric constant ε-tilde, impedance Z-tilde, electric modulus M-tilde, admittance Y-tilde, and the electromechanical parameters and coupling factors is presented. The results are correlated with a previous study of structural, morphological, small signal dielectric frequency-temperature response, and the ferroelectric hysteretic, magnetic and magnetodielectric behaviors. The observed shifts of the resonance and antiresonance frequency values can be associated with change of the ferroelectric domain size favored by the readjustment of the oxygen octahedron when the magnetic field is applied. From P-E hysteresis loops obtained without and with an external applied magnetic field, a dc magnetoelectric coupling effect with maximum value of 4 kV/cm T (400 mV/cm Oe) was obtained.

  4. Room temperature multiferroic properties of (Fe{sub x}, Sr{sub 1−x})TiO{sub 3} thin films

    Kim, Kyoung-Tae; Kim, Cheolbok; Fang, Sheng-Po; Yoon, Yong-Kyu, E-mail: ykyoon@ece.ufl.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2014-09-08

    This letter reports the structural, dielectric, ferroelectric, and magnetic properties of Fe substituted SrTiO{sub 3} thin films in room temperature. The structural data obtained from x-ray diffraction indicates that (Fe{sub x},Sr{sub 1−x})TiO{sub 3}, the so called FST, transforms from pseudocubic to tetragonal structures with increase of the Fe content in SrTiO{sub 3} thin films, featuring the ferroelectricity, while vibrating sample magnetometer measurements show magnetic hysteresis loops for the samples with low iron contents indicating their ferromagnetism. The characterized ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism confirms strong multiferroitism of the single phase FST thin films in room temperature. Also, an FST thin film metal-insulator-metal multiferroic capacitor has been fabricated and characterized in microwave frequencies between 10 MHz and 5 GHz. A capacitor based on Fe{sub 0.1}Sr{sub 0.9}TiO{sub 3} with a thickness of 260 nm shows a high electric tunability of 18.6% at 10 V and a maximum magnetodielectric value of 1.37% at 0.4 mT with a loss tangent of 0.021 at 1 GHz. This high tuning and low loss makes this material as a good candidate for frequency agile microwave devices such as tunable filters, phase shifters, and antennas.

  5. Thermal energy at the nanoscale

    Fisher, Timothy S

    2014-01-01

    These lecture notes provide a detailed treatment of the thermal energy storage and transport by conduction in natural and fabricated structures. Thermal energy in two carriers, i.e. phonons and electrons -- are explored from first principles. For solid-state transport, a common Landauer framework is used for heat flow. Issues including the quantum of thermal conductance, ballistic interface resistance, and carrier scattering are elucidated. Bulk material properties, such as thermal and electrical conductivity, are derived from particle transport theories, and the effects of spatial confinement on these properties are established. Readership: Students and professionals in physics and engineering.

  6. Advanced energy materials (Preface)

    Titus, Elby; Ventura, João; Araújo, João Pedro; Campos Gil, João

    2017-12-01

    Advances in material science make it possible to fabricate the building blocks of an entirely new generation of hierarchical energy materials. Recent developments were focused on functionality and areas connecting macroscopic to atomic and nanoscale properties, where surfaces, defects, interfaces and metastable state of the materials played crucial roles. The idea is to combine both, the top-down and bottom-up approach as well as shape future materials with a blend of both the paradigms.

  7. Nanoscale microstructural characterization of a nanobainitic steel

    Timokhina, I.B., E-mail: ilana.timokhina@eng.monash.edu.au [Centre for Material and Fibre Innovation, Deakin University, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Beladi, H. [Centre for Material and Fibre Innovation, Deakin University, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Xiong, X.Y. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Adachi, Y. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Hodgson, P.D. [Centre for Material and Fibre Innovation, Deakin University, Victoria 3216 (Australia)

    2011-08-15

    A 0.79 C-1.5 Si-1.98 Mn-0.98 Cr-0.24 Mo-1.06 Al-1.58 Co (wt.%) steel was isothermally heat treated at 200 deg. C for 10 days and 350 deg. C for 1 day to form a nanoscale bainitic microstructure consisting of nanobainitic ferrite laths with high dislocation density and retained austenite films. The microstructures of the samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Despite the formation of nanoscale bainite with a high volume fraction of retained austenite in both steels, the ductility of both steels was surprisingly low. It is believed that this was associated with the formation of carbon-depleted retained austenite after isothermal transformation at 200 deg. C due to the formation of high number of Fe-C clusters and particles in the bainitic ferrite laths and carbon-enriched austenite after isothermal transformation at 350 deg. C.

  8. Hybrid, Nanoscale Phospholipid/Block Copolymer Vesicles

    Bo Liedberg

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid phospholipid/block copolymer vesicles, in which the polymeric membrane is blended with phospholipids, display interesting self-assembly behavior, incorporating the robustness and chemical versatility of polymersomes with the softness and biocompatibility of liposomes. Such structures can be conveniently characterized by preparing giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs via electroformation. Here, we are interested in exploring the self-assembly and properties of the analogous nanoscale hybrid vesicles (ca. 100 nm in diameter of the same composition prepared by film-hydration and extrusion. We show that the self-assembly and content-release behavior of nanoscale polybutadiene-b-poly(ethylene oxide (PB-PEO/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC hybrid phospholipid/block copolymer vesicles can be tuned by the mixing ratio of the amphiphiles. In brief, these hybrids may provide alternative tools for drug delivery purposes and molecular imaging/sensing applications and clearly open up new avenues for further investigation.

  9. Scanning nanoscale multiprobes for conductivity measurements

    Bøggild, Peter; Hansen, Torben Mikael; Kuhn, Oliver

    2000-01-01

    We report fabrication and measurements with two- and four-point probes with nanoscale dimensions, for high spatial resolution conductivity measurements on surfaces and thin films. By combination of conventional microfabrication and additive three-dimensional nanolithography, we have obtained...... electrode spacings down to 200 nm. At the tips of four silicon oxide microcantilevers, narrow carbon tips are grown in converging directions and subsequently coated with a conducting layer. The probe is placed in contact with a conducting surface, whereby the electrode resistance can be determined....... The nanoelectrodes withstand considerable contact force before breaking. The probe offers a unique possibility to position the voltage sensors, as well as the source and drain electrodes in areas of nanoscale dimensions. ©2000 American Institute of Physics....

  10. DOE - BES Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs)

    Beecher, Cathy Jo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-14

    These are slides from a powerpoint shown to guests during tours of Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It shows the five DOE-BES nanoscale science research centers (NSRCs), which are located at different national laboratories throughout the country. Then it goes into detail specifically about the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies at LANL, including statistics on its user community and CINT's New Mexico industrial users.

  11. Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Research Directions

    Lowndes, D. H.; Alivisatos, A. P.; Alper, M.; Averback, R. S.; Jacob Barhen, J.; Eastman, J. A.; Imre, D.; Lowndes, D. H.; McNulty, I.; Michalske, T. A.; Ho, K-M; Nozik, A. J.; Russell, T. P.; Valentin, R. A.; Welch, D. O.; Barhen, J.; Agnew, S. R.; Bellon, P.; Blair, J.; Boatner, L. A.; Braiman, Y.; Budai, J. D.; Crabtree, G. W.; Feldman, L. C.; Flynn, C. P.; Geohegan, D. B.; George, E. P.; Greenbaum, E.; Grigoropoulos, C.; Haynes, T. E.; Heberlein, J.; Hichman, J.; Holland, O. W.; Honda, S.; Horton, J. A.; Hu, M. Z.-C.; Jesson, D. E.; Joy, D. C.; Krauss, A.; Kwok, W.-K.; Larson, B. C.; Larson, D. J.; Likharev, K.; Liu, C. T.; Majumdar, A.; Maziasz, P. J.; Meldrum, A.; Miller, J. C.; Modine, F. A.; Pennycook, S. J.; Pharr, G. M.; Phillpot, S.; Price, D. L.; Protopopescu, V.; Poker, D. B.; Pui, D.; Ramsey, J. M.; Rao, N.; Reichl, L.; Roberto, J.; Saboungi, M-L; Simpson, M.; Strieffer, S.; Thundat, T.; Wambsganss, M.; Wendleken, J.; White, C. W.; Wilemski, G.; Withrow, S. P.; Wolf, D.; Zhu, J. H.; Zuhr, R. A.; Zunger, A.; Lowe, S.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes important future research directions in nanoscale science, engineering and technology. It was prepared in connection with an anticipated national research initiative on nanotechnology for the twenty-first century. The research directions described are not expected to be inclusive but illustrate the wide range of research opportunities and challenges that could be undertaken through the national laboratories and their major national scientific user facilities with the support of universities and industry.

  12. Nanoscale-Agglomerate-Mediated Heterogeneous Nucleation.

    Cha, Hyeongyun; Wu, Alex; Kim, Moon-Kyung; Saigusa, Kosuke; Liu, Aihua; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2017-12-13

    Water vapor condensation on hydrophobic surfaces has received much attention due to its ability to rapidly shed water droplets and enhance heat transfer, anti-icing, water harvesting, energy harvesting, and self-cleaning performance. However, the mechanism of heterogeneous nucleation on hydrophobic surfaces remains poorly understood and is attributed to defects in the hydrophobic coating exposing the high surface energy substrate. Here, we observe the formation of high surface energy nanoscale agglomerates on hydrophobic coatings after condensation/evaporation cycles in ambient conditions. To investigate the deposition dynamics, we studied the nanoscale agglomerates as a function of condensation/evaporation cycles via optical and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), microgoniometric contact angle measurements, nucleation statistics, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The FESEM and EDS results indicated that the nanoscale agglomerates stem from absorption of sulfuric acid based aerosol particles inside the droplet and adsorption of volatile organic compounds such as methanethiol (CH 3 SH), dimethyl disulfide (CH 3 SSCH), and dimethyl trisulfide (CH 3 SSSCH 3 ) on the liquid-vapor interface during water vapor condensation, which act as preferential sites for heterogeneous nucleation after evaporation. The insights gained from this study elucidate fundamental aspects governing the behavior of both short- and long-term heterogeneous nucleation on hydrophobic surfaces, suggest previously unexplored microfabrication and air purification techniques, and present insights into the challenges facing the development of durable dropwise condensing surfaces.

  13. Nanoscale piezoelectric vibration energy harvester design

    Foruzande, Hamid Reza; Hajnayeb, Ali; Yaghootian, Amin

    2017-09-01

    Development of new nanoscale devices has increased the demand for new types of small-scale energy resources such as ambient vibrations energy harvesters. Among the vibration energy harvesters, piezoelectric energy harvesters (PEHs) can be easily miniaturized and fabricated in micro and nano scales. This change in the dimensions of a PEH leads to a change in its governing equations of motion, and consequently, the predicted harvested energy comparing to a macroscale PEH. In this research, effects of small scale dimensions on the nonlinear vibration and harvested voltage of a nanoscale PEH is studied. The PEH is modeled as a cantilever piezoelectric bimorph nanobeam with a tip mass, using the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory in conjunction with Hamilton's principle. A harmonic base excitation is applied as a model of the ambient vibrations. The nonlocal elasticity theory is used to consider the size effects in the developed model. The derived equations of motion are discretized using the assumed-modes method and solved using the method of multiple scales. Sensitivity analysis for the effect of different parameters of the system in addition to size effects is conducted. The results show the significance of nonlocal elasticity theory in the prediction of system dynamic nonlinear behavior. It is also observed that neglecting the size effects results in lower estimates of the PEH vibration amplitudes. The results pave the way for designing new nanoscale sensors in addition to PEHs.

  14. Static electric field enhancement in nanoscale structures

    Lepetit, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.lepetit@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr; Lemoine, Didier, E-mail: didier.lemoine@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr [Université de Toulouse, UPS, Laboratoire Collisions Agrégats Réactivité, IRSAMC, F-31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5589, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Márquez-Mijares, Maykel, E-mail: mmarquez@instec.cu [Université de Toulouse, UPS, Laboratoire Collisions Agrégats Réactivité, IRSAMC, F-31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5589, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Instituto Superior de Tecnologías y Ciencias Aplicadas, Avenida Salvador Allende 1110, Quinta de los Molinos, La Habana (Cuba)

    2016-08-28

    We study the effect of local atomic- and nano-scale protrusions on field emission and, in particular, on the local field enhancement which plays a key role as known from the Fowler-Nordheim model of electronic emission. We study atomic size defects which consist of right angle steps forming an infinite length staircase on a tungsten surface. This structure is embedded in a 1 GV/m ambient electrostatic field. We perform calculations based upon density functional theory in order to characterize the total and induced electronic densities as well as the local electrostatic fields taking into account the detailed atomic structure of the metal. We show how the results must be processed to become comparable with those of a simple homogeneous tungsten sheet electrostatic model. We also describe an innovative procedure to extrapolate our results to nanoscale defects of larger sizes, which relies on the microscopic findings to guide, tune, and improve the homogeneous metal model, thus gaining predictive power. Furthermore, we evidence analytical power laws for the field enhancement characterization. The main physics-wise outcome of this analysis is that limited field enhancement is to be expected from atomic- and nano-scale defects.

  15. Capillary-induced crack healing between surfaces of nanoscale roughness.

    Soylemez, Emrecan; de Boer, Maarten P

    2014-10-07

    Capillary forces are important in nature (granular materials, insect locomotion) and in technology (disk drives, adhesion). Although well studied in equilibrium state, the dynamics of capillary formation merit further investigation. Here, we show that microcantilever crack healing experiments are a viable experimental technique for investigating the influence of capillary nucleation on crack healing between rough surfaces. The average crack healing velocity, v̅, between clean hydrophilic polycrystalline silicon surfaces of nanoscale roughness is measured. A plot of v̅ versus energy release rate, G, reveals log-linear behavior, while the slope |d[log(v̅)]/dG| decreases with increasing relative humidity. A simplified interface model that accounts for the nucleation time of water bridges by an activated process is developed to gain insight into the crack healing trends. This methodology enables us to gain insight into capillary bridge dynamics, with a goal of attaining a predictive capability for this important microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) reliability failure mechanism.

  16. Resolving ultrafast exciton migration in organic solids at the nanoscale

    Ginsberg, Naomi

    The migration of Frenkel excitons, tightly-bound electron-hole pairs, in photosynthesis and in organic semiconducting films is critical to the efficiency of natural and artificial light harvesting. While these materials exhibit a high degree of structural heterogeneity on the nanoscale, traditional measurements of exciton migration lengths are performed on bulk samples. Since both the characteristic length scales of structural heterogeneity and the reported bulk diffusion lengths are smaller than the optical diffraction limit, we adapt far-field super-resolution fluorescence imaging to uncover the correlations between the structural and energetic landscapes that the excitons explore. By combining the ultrafast super-resolved measurements with exciton hopping simulations we furthermore specify the nature (in addition to the extent) of exciton migration as a function of the intrinsic and ensemble chromophore energy scales that determine a spatio-energetic landscape for migration. In collaboration with: Samuel Penwell, Lucas Ginsberg, University of California, Berkeley and Rodrigo Noriega University of Utah.

  17. The mechanical behavior of nanoscale metallic multilayers: A survey

    Zhou, Q.; Xie, J. Y.; Wang, F.; Huang, P.; Xu, K. W.; Lu, T. J.

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical behavior of nanoscale metallic multilayers (NMMs) has attracted much attention from both scientific and practical views. Compared with their monolithic counterparts, the large number of interfaces existing in the NMMs dictates the unique behavior of this special class of structural composite materials. While there have been a number of reviews on the mechanical mechanism of microlaminates, the rapid development of nanotechnology brought a pressing need for an overview focusing exclusively on a property-based definition of the NMMs, especially their size-dependent microstructure and mechanical performance. This article attempts to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date review on the microstructure, mechanical property and plastic deformation physics of NMMs. We hope this review could accomplish two purposes: (1) introducing the basic concepts of scaling and dimensional analysis to scientists and engineers working on NMM systems, and (2) providing a better understanding of interface behavior and the exceptional qualities the interfaces in NMMs display at atomic scale.

  18. High efficiency polymer solar cells with vertically modulated nanoscale morphology

    Kumar, Ankit; Hong Ziruo; Yang Yang; Li Gang

    2009-01-01

    Nanoscale morphology has been shown to be a critical parameter governing charge transport properties of polymer bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. Recent results on vertical phase separation have intensified the research on 3D morphology control. In this paper, we intend to modify the distribution of donors and acceptors in a classical BHJ polymer solar cell by making the active layer richer in donors and acceptors near the anode and cathode respectively. Here, we chose [6,6]-phenyl- C 61 -butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) to be the acceptor material to be thermally deposited on top of [poly(3-hexylthiophene)] P3HT: the PCBM active layer to achieve a vertical composition gradient in the BHJ structure. Here we report on a solar cell with enhanced power conversion efficiency of 4.5% which can be directly correlated with the decrease in series resistance of the device.

  19. Nanoscale electron transport at the surface of a topological insulator

    Bauer, Sebastian; Bobisch, Christian A.

    2016-04-01

    The use of three-dimensional topological insulators for disruptive technologies critically depends on the dissipationless transport of electrons at the surface, because of the suppression of backscattering at defects. However, in real devices, defects are unavoidable and scattering at angles other than 180° is allowed for such materials. Until now, this has been studied indirectly by bulk measurements and by the analysis of the local density of states in close vicinity to defect sites. Here, we directly measure the nanoscale voltage drop caused by the scattering at step edges, which occurs if a lateral current flows along a three-dimensional topological insulator. The experiments were performed using scanning tunnelling potentiometry for thin Bi2Se3 films. So far, the observed voltage drops are small because of large contributions of the bulk to the electronic transport. However, for the use of ideal topological insulating thin films in devices, these contributions would play a significant role.

  20. Nanoscale strain engineering of graphene and graphene-based devices

    N-C Yeh; C-C Hsu; M L Teague; J-Q Wang; D A Boyd; C-C Chen

    2016-01-01

    Structural distortions in nano-materials can induce dramatic changes in their electronic properties. This situation is well manifested in graphene, a two-dimensional honeycomb structure of carbon atoms with only one atomic layer thickness. In particular, strained graphene can result in both charging effects and pseudo-magnetic fields, so that controlled strain on a perfect graphene lattice can be tailored to yield desirable electronic properties. Here, we describe the theoretical foundation for strain-engineering of the electronic properties of graphene, and then provide experimental evidence for strain-induced pseudo-magnetic fields and charging effects in monolayer graphene. We further demonstrate the feasibility of nano-scale strain engineering for graphene-based devices by means of theoretical simula-tions and nano-fabrication technology.

  1. Methods and devices for fabricating three-dimensional nanoscale structures

    Rogers, John A.; Jeon, Seokwoo; Park, Jangung

    2010-04-27

    The present invention provides methods and devices for fabricating 3D structures and patterns of 3D structures on substrate surfaces, including symmetrical and asymmetrical patterns of 3D structures. Methods of the present invention provide a means of fabricating 3D structures having accurately selected physical dimensions, including lateral and vertical dimensions ranging from 10s of nanometers to 1000s of nanometers. In one aspect, methods are provided using a mask element comprising a conformable, elastomeric phase mask capable of establishing conformal contact with a radiation sensitive material undergoing photoprocessing. In another aspect, the temporal and/or spatial coherence of electromagnetic radiation using for photoprocessing is selected to fabricate complex structures having nanoscale features that do not extend entirely through the thickness of the structure fabricated.

  2. Theory of quantum transport at nanoscale an introduction

    Ryndyk, Dmitry A

    2016-01-01

    This book is an introduction to a rapidly developing field of modern theoretical physics – the theory of quantum transport at nanoscale. The theoretical methods considered in the book are in the basis of our understanding of charge, spin and heat transport in nanostructures and nanostructured materials and are widely used in nanoelectronics, molecular electronics, spin-dependent electronics (spintronics) and bio-electronics. The book is based on lectures for graduate and post-graduate students at the University of Regensburg and the Technische Universität Dresden (TU Dresden). The first part is devoted to the basic concepts of quantum transport: Landauer-Büttiker method and matrix Green function formalism for coherent transport, Tunneling (Transfer) Hamiltonian and master equation methods for tunneling, Coulomb blockade, vibrons and polarons. The results in this part are obtained as possible without sophisticated techniques, such as nonequilibrium Green functions, which are considered in detail in the...

  3. Nanoconstruction by welding individual metallic nanowires together using nanoscale solder

    Peng, Y; Inkson, B J; Cullis, A G

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a new bottom-up nanowelding technique enabling building blocks to be assembled and welded together into complex 3D nanostructures using nanovolumes of metal solder. The building blocks of gold nanowires, (Co 72 Pt 28 /Pt) n multilayer nanowires, and nanosolder Sn 99 Au 1 alloy nanowires were successfully fabricated by a template technique. Individual metallic nanowires were picked up and assembled together. Conductive nanocircuits were then welded together using similar or dissimilar nanosolder material. At the weld sites, nanoscale volumes of a chosen metal are deposited using nanosolder of a sacrificial nanowire, which ensures that the nanoobjects to be bonded retain their structural integrity. The whole nanowelding process is clean, controllable and reliable, and ensures both mechanically strong and electrically conductive contacts.

  4. Lessons learned from nanoscale specimens tested by MEMS-based apparatus

    Elhebeary, Mohamed; Saif, M. Taher A.

    2017-06-01

    The last two decades were marked by the innovative synthesis of nanomaterials and devices. The success of these devices hinges on the mechanical properties of nanomaterials and an understanding of their deformation and failure mechanisms. Many novel testing techniques have been developed to test materials at small scale. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) apparatus developed to characterize materials at nanoscale, and the key insights gained on structure-property relations of materials through these characterizations. Finally, new applications of MEMS in testing living materials, such as tissues and cells, for disease diagnosis and prognosis are discussed.

  5. Lessons learned from nanoscale specimens tested by MEMS-based apparatus

    Elhebeary, Mohamed; Saif, M Taher A

    2017-01-01

    The last two decades were marked by the innovative synthesis of nanomaterials and devices. The success of these devices hinges on the mechanical properties of nanomaterials and an understanding of their deformation and failure mechanisms. Many novel testing techniques have been developed to test materials at small scale. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) apparatus developed to characterize materials at nanoscale, and the key insights gained on structure-property relations of materials through these characterizations. Finally, new applications of MEMS in testing living materials, such as tissues and cells, for disease diagnosis and prognosis are discussed. (topical review)

  6. EDITORIAL: Big science at the nanoscale Big science at the nanoscale

    Reed, Mark

    2009-10-01

    In 1990, the journal Nanotechnology was the first academic publication dedicated to disseminating the results of research in what was then a new field of scientific endeavour. To celebrate the 20th volume of Nanotechnology, we are publishing a special issue of top research papers covering all aspects of this multidisciplinary science, including biology, electronics and photonics, quantum phenomena, sensing and actuating, patterning and fabrication, material synthesis and the properties of nanomaterials. In the early 1980s, scanning probe microscopes brought the concepts of matter and interactions at the nanoscale into visual reality, and hastened a flurry of activity in the burgeoning new field of nanoscience. Twenty years on and nanotechnology has truly come of age. The ramifications are pervasive throughout daily life in communication, health care and entertainment technology. For example, DVDs have now consigned videotapes to the ark and mobile phones are as prevalent as house keys, and these technologies already look set to be superseded by internet phones and Blu-Ray discs. Nanotechnology has been in the unique position of following the explosive growth of this discipline from its outset. The surge of activity in the field is notable in the number of papers published by the journal each year, which has skyrocketed. The journal is now published weekly, publishing over 1400 articles a year. What is more, the quality of these articles is also constantly improving; the average number of citations to articles within two years of publication, quantified by the ISI impact factor, continues to increase every year. The rate of activity in the field shows no signs of slowing down, as is evident from the wealth of great research published each week. The aim of the 20th volume special issue is to present some of the very best and most recent research in many of the wide-ranging fields covered by the journal, a celebration of the present state of play in nanotechnology and

  7. Using mathematical models to understand the effect of nanoscale roughness on protein adsorption for improving medical devices

    Ercan B

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Batur Ercan,1 Dongwoo Khang,2 Joseph Carpenter,3 Thomas J Webster1 1Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 2School of Materials Science and Engineering and Center for PRC and RIGET, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, South Korea; 3School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: Surface roughness and energy significantly influence protein adsorption on to biomaterials, which, in turn, controls select cellular adhesion to determine the success and longevity of an implant. To understand these relationships at a fundamental level, a model was originally proposed by Khang et al to correlate nanoscale surface properties (specifically, nanoscale roughness and energy to protein adsorption, which explained the greater cellular responses on nanostructured surfaces commonly reported in the literature today. To test this model for different surfaces from what was previously used to develop that model, in this study we synthesized highly ordered poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid surfaces of identical chemistry but altered nanoscale surface roughness and energy using poly(dimethylsiloxane molds of polystyrene beads. Fibronectin and collagen type IV adsorption studies showed a linear adsorption behavior as the surface nanoroughness increased. This supported the general trends observed by Khang et al. However, when fitting such data to the mathematical model established by Khang et al, a strong correlation did not result. Thus, this study demonstrated that the equation proposed by Khang et al to predict protein adsorption should be modified to accommodate for additional nanoscale surface property contributions (ie, surface charge to make the model more accurate. In summary, results from this study provided an important step in developing future mathematical models that can correlate surface properties (such as nanoscale roughness and surface energy to initial protein adsorption events important to

  8. Environmental, Health, and Safety Research Needs for Engineered Nanoscale Materials

    2006-09-01

    tubes ), the report addresses concerns over potential environmental and health risks of nanomaterials. Following the publication of the RS... microfine titanium dioxide as physical UV filter, Int. J. Cosmetic Sci. 22(4), 271–283 (2000). J. Brant, H. Lecoanet, M. Hotze, M. Wiesner, Comparison of

  9. Nanoscale Radiation Engineering of Advanced Materials for Potential Biomedical Applications

    Hoffman, Allan S., E-mail: hoffman@u.washington.edu [Bioengineering Department, Box 355061—Foege, room N530R 1705 NE Pacific St., University of Washington Seattle WA 98195-5061 (United States)

    2010-07-01

    We are using RAFT polymerization to synthesize smart polymer nanocarriers for intracellular delivery of protein, peptide and nucleic acid drugs. In the coming program period we plan to synthesize these carriers using radiation to initiate the RAFT polymerizations. In this way we will avoid the need to add free radical initiators to initiate this polymerization, yielding a purer polymer-drug nanocarrier. (author)

  10. Nanoscale Radiation Engineering of Advanced Materials for Potential Biomedical Applications

    Hoffman, Allan S.

    2010-01-01

    We are using RAFT polymerization to synthesize smart polymer nanocarriers for intracellular delivery of protein, peptide and nucleic acid drugs. In the coming program period we plan to synthesize these carriers using radiation to initiate the RAFT polymerizations. In this way we will avoid the need to add free radical initiators to initiate this polymerization, yielding a purer polymer-drug nanocarrier. (author)

  11. Synthesis, Transfer, and Characterization of Nanoscale 2-Dimensional Materials

    2015-09-01

    Shi Y, Hamsen C, Jia X, Kim KK, Reina A, Hofmann M, Kong J. Synthesis of few-layer hexagonal boron nitride thin film by chemical vapor deposition...hexagonal boron nitride layers. Nano Letters. 2010;10(8):3209–3215. 12. Kim KK, Hsu A, Jia X, Kim SM, Shi Y, Hofmann M, Kong J. Synthesis of...microscopy. Physical Review B. 2009;80(15):155425. 33. Kim KK, Hsu A, Jia X, Kim SM, Shi Y, Hofmann M, Kong J. Synthesis of monolayer hexagonal boron

  12. Engineered Nanoscale Materials and Derivative Products: Regulatory Challenges

    Schierow, Linda-Jo

    2008-01-01

    .... government has invested billions of dollars to ensure that American industry remains a global leader in the field, because the products of nanotechnology are seen to have great economic potential...

  13. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of Nanoscale Ionic Materials

    Oommen, Joanna Mary; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Agarwal, Praveen; Archer, Lynden A.

    2010-01-01

    using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. NIMs are relatively stable over a temperature range from 300 to 383 K, rendering them usable in high temperature applications. We confirmed the presence of covalent bonds between the SiO2 core

  14. Growth of and defect reduction in nanoscale materials

    Jensen, Kenneth J [Berkeley, CA; Mickelson, William E [San Francisco, CA; Zettl, Alex K [Kensington, CA

    2011-01-04

    Methods by which the growth of a nanostructure may be precisely controlled by an electrical current are described here. In one embodiment, an interior nanostructure is grown to a predetermined geometry inside another nanostructure, which serves as a reaction chamber. The growth is effected by a catalytic agent loaded with feedstock for the interior nanostructure. Another embodiment allows a preexisting marginal quality nanostructure to be zone refined into a higher-quality nanostructure by driving a catalytic agent down a controlled length of the nanostructure with an electric current. In both embodiments, the speed of nanostructure formation is adjustable, and the growth may be stopped and restarted at will. The catalytic agent may be doped or undoped to produce semiconductor effects, and the bead may be removed via acid etching.

  15. Quantitative nanoscale electrostatics of viruses.

    Hernando-Pérez, M; Cartagena-Rivera, A X; Lošdorfer Božič, A; Carrillo, P J P; San Martín, C; Mateu, M G; Raman, A; Podgornik, R; de Pablo, P J

    2015-11-07

    Electrostatics is one of the fundamental driving forces of the interaction between biomolecules in solution. In particular, the recognition events between viruses and host cells are dominated by both specific and non-specific interactions and the electric charge of viral particles determines the electrostatic force component of the latter. Here we probe the charge of individual viruses in liquid milieu by measuring the electrostatic force between a viral particle and the Atomic Force Microscope tip. The force spectroscopy data of co-adsorbed ϕ29 bacteriophage proheads and mature virions, adenovirus and minute virus of mice capsids is utilized for obtaining the corresponding density of charge for each virus. The systematic differences of the density of charge between the viral particles are consistent with the theoretical predictions obtained from X-ray structural data. Our results show that the density of charge is a distinguishing characteristic of each virus, depending crucially on the nature of the viral capsid and the presence/absence of the genetic material.

  16. TUTORIAL: Focused-ion-beam-based rapid prototyping of nanoscale magnetic devices

    Khizroev, S.; Litvinov, D.

    2004-03-01

    In this tutorial, focused-ion-beam (FIB)-based fabrication is considered from a very unconventional angle. FIB is considered not as a fabrication tool that can be used for mass production of electronic devices, similar to optical and E-beam—based lithography, but rather as a powerful tool to rapidly fabricate individual nanoscale magnetic devices for prototyping future electronic applications. Among the effects of FIB-based fabrication of magnetic devices, the influence of Ga+-ion implantation on magnetic properties is presented. With help of magnetic force microscopy (MFM), it is shown that there is a critical doze of ions that a magnetic material can be exposed to without experiencing a change in the magnetic properties. Exploiting FIB from such an unconventional perspective is especially favourable today when the future of so many novel technologies depends on the ability to rapidly fabricate prototype nanoscale magnetic devices. As one of the most illustrative examples, the multi-billion-dollar data storage industry is analysed as the technology field that strongly benefited from implementing FIB in the above-described role. The essential role of FIB in the most recent trend of the industry towards perpendicular magnetic recording is presented. Moreover, other emerging and fast-growing technologies are considered as examples of nanoscale technologies whose future could strongly depend on the implementation of FIB in the role of a nanoscale fabrication tool for rapid prototyping. Among the other described technologies are 'ballistic' magnetoresistance, patterned magnetic media, magnetoresistive RAM (MRAM), and magnetic force microscopy.

  17. Visualizing nanoscale phase morphology for understanding photovoltaic performance of PTB7: PC71BM solar cell

    Supasai, Thidarat; Amornkitbamrung, Vittaya; Thanachayanont, Chanchana; Tang, I.-Ming; Sutthibutpong, Thana; Rujisamphan, Nopporn

    2017-11-01

    Visualizing and controlling the phase separation of the donor and acceptor domains in organic bulk-hetero-junction (BHJ) solar devices made with poly([4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl][3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethyl-hexyl)carbon-yl]thieno[3,4-bthiophenediyl]) (PTB7) and [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) are needed to achieve high power conversion efficiency (PCE). Traditional bright-field (BF) imaging, especially of polymeric materials, produces images of poor contrast when done at the nanoscale level. Clear nanoscale morphologies of the PTB7:PC71BM blends prepared with different 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO) concentrations were seen when using the energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM). The electron energy loss (EELS) spectra of the pure PTB7 and PC71BM samples are centered at 22.7 eV and 24.5 eV, respectively. Using the electrons whose energy losses are in the range of 16-30 eV, detail information of the phase morphology at the nanoscale was obtained. Correlations between the improvement in the photovoltaic performances and the increased electron mobility were seen. These correlations are discussed in terms of the changes (at the nanoscale level) in blending phase morphology when different DIO concentrations are added.

  18. Nanoscale MOS devices: device parameter fluctuations and low-frequency noise (Invited Paper)

    Wong, Hei; Iwai, Hiroshi; Liou, J. J.

    2005-05-01

    It is well-known in conventional MOS transistors that the low-frequency noise or flicker noise is mainly contributed by the trapping-detrapping events in the gate oxide and the mobility fluctuation in the surface channel. In nanoscale MOS transistors, the number of trapping-detrapping events becomes less important because of the large direct tunneling current through the ultrathin gate dielectric which reduces the probability of trapping-detrapping and the level of leakage current fluctuation. Other noise sources become more significant in nanoscale devices. The source and drain resistance noises have greater impact on the drain current noise. Significant contribution of the parasitic bipolar transistor noise in ultra-short channel and channel mobility fluctuation to the channel noise are observed. The channel mobility fluctuation in nanoscale devices could be due to the local composition fluctuation of the gate dielectric material which gives rise to the permittivity fluctuation along the channel and results in gigantic channel potential fluctuation. On the other hand, the statistical variations of the device parameters across the wafer would cause the noise measurements less accurate which will be a challenge for the applicability of analytical flicker noise model as a process or device evaluation tool for nanoscale devices. Some measures for circumventing these difficulties are proposed.

  19. Electrical tuning of magnetization rotation and microwave properties in FeCoZr/[Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3]0.68-[PbTiO3]0.32(011) multiferroic heterostructure

    Phuoc, Nguyen N; Ong, C K

    2015-01-01

    The permeability spectra of a multiferroic heterostructure composed of a FeCoZr thin film grown onto a [Pb(Mg 1/3 Nb 2/3 )O 3 ] 0.68 -[PbTiO 3 ] 0.32 (011) (PMN-PT) substrate are characterized as a function of an electrical field applied through the thickness of the substrate. When the sample is in an unpoled state and the applied electrical field is increased from 0 kV cm −1 to 2 kV cm −1 , the resonance frequency remains relatively the same. However, as the electrical field is increased beyond 2 kV cm −1 , the resonance frequency is drastically increased from 2.17 GHz to 3.28 GHz and the peak of the permeability spectra becomes much broader. When the electrical field is further increased from 2 kV cm −1 to 6 kV cm −1 , the resonance frequency is gradually increased and finally reaches 4 GHz. As the electrical field is reduced from 6 kV cm −1 back to 2 kV cm −1 , the resonance frequency is reduced in the same manner, and the peak disappears when the electrical field is reduced to less than 2 kV cm −1 . These behaviors are discussed in terms of the magnetization rotation and magnetic anisotropy dispersion based on the stress distribution of the piezoelectric substrate as a function of the applied electrical field. This argument is consistent with the hysteresis loops measured before and after poling. The result suggests that the electrical tunability of the magnetization rotation in multiferroic heterostructures can be employed to electrically turn on and off the microwave operation of the materials, which is promising for applications. (paper)

  20. Atomic layer deposition: an enabling technology for the growth of functional nanoscale semiconductors

    Biyikli, Necmi; Haider, Ali

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we present the progress in the growth of nanoscale semiconductors grown via atomic layer deposition (ALD). After the adoption by semiconductor chip industry, ALD became a widespread tool to grow functional films and conformal ultra-thin coatings for various applications. Based on self-limiting and ligand-exchange-based surface reactions, ALD enabled the low-temperature growth of nanoscale dielectric, metal, and semiconductor materials. Being able to deposit wafer-scale uniform semiconductor films at relatively low-temperatures, with sub-monolayer thickness control and ultimate conformality, makes ALD attractive for semiconductor device applications. Towards this end, precursors and low-temperature growth recipes are developed to deposit crystalline thin films for compound and elemental semiconductors. Conventional thermal ALD as well as plasma-assisted and radical-enhanced techniques have been exploited to achieve device-compatible film quality. Metal-oxides, III-nitrides, sulfides, and selenides are among the most popular semiconductor material families studied via ALD technology. Besides thin films, ALD can grow nanostructured semiconductors as well using either template-assisted growth methods or bottom-up controlled nucleation mechanisms. Among the demonstrated semiconductor nanostructures are nanoparticles, nano/quantum-dots, nanowires, nanotubes, nanofibers, nanopillars, hollow and core-shell versions of the afore-mentioned nanostructures, and 2D materials including transition metal dichalcogenides and graphene. ALD-grown nanoscale semiconductor materials find applications in a vast amount of applications including functional coatings, catalysis and photocatalysis, renewable energy conversion and storage, chemical sensing, opto-electronics, and flexible electronics. In this review, we give an overview of the current state-of-the-art in ALD-based nanoscale semiconductor research including the already demonstrated and future applications.