WorldWideScience

Sample records for nanoscale apatite biomimetically

  1. UV photofunctionalization promotes nano-biomimetic apatite deposition on titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saita, Makiko; Ikeda, Takayuki; Yamada, Masahiro; Kimoto, Katsuhiko; Lee, Masaichi Chang-Il; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Although biomimetic apatite coating is a promising way to provide titanium with osteoconductivity, the efficiency and quality of deposition is often poor. Most titanium implants have microscale surface morphology, and an addition of nanoscale features while preserving the micromorphology may provide further biological benefit. Here, we examined the effect of ultraviolet (UV) light treatment of titanium, or photofunctionalization, on the efficacy of biomimetic apatite deposition on titanium and its biological capability. Methods and results Micro-roughed titanium disks were prepared by acid-etching with sulfuric acid. Micro-roughened disks with or without photofunctionalization (20-minute exposure to UV light) were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 1 or 5 days. Photofunctionalized titanium disks were superhydrophilic and did not form surface air bubbles when immersed in SBF, whereas non-photofunctionalized disks were hydrophobic and largely covered with air bubbles during immersion. An apatite-related signal was observed by X-ray diffraction on photofunctionalized titanium after 1 day of SBF immersion, which was equivalent to the one observed after 5 days of immersion of control titanium. Scanning electron microscopy revealed nodular apatite deposition in the valleys and at the inclines of micro-roughened structures without affecting the existing micro-configuration. Micro-roughened titanium and apatite-deposited titanium surfaces had similar roughness values. The attachment, spreading, settling, proliferation, and alkaline phosphate activity of bone marrow-derived osteoblasts were promoted on apatite-coated titanium with photofunctionalization. Conclusion UV-photofunctionalization of titanium enabled faster deposition of nanoscale biomimetic apatite, resulting in the improved biological capability compared to the similarly prepared apatite-deposited titanium without photofunctionalization. Photofunctionalization-assisted biomimetic apatite

  2. UV photofunctionalization promotes nano-biomimetic apatite deposition on titanium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saita M

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Makiko Saita,1 Takayuki Ikeda,1,2 Masahiro Yamada,1,3 Katsuhiko Kimoto,4 Masaichi Chang-Il Lee,5 Takahiro Ogawa1 1Division of Advanced Prosthodontics, Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology, UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Complete Denture Prosthodontics, Nihon University School of Dentistry, Yokosuka, Japan; 3Division of Molecular and Regenerative Prosthodontics, Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan; 4Department of Prosthodontics and Oral Rehabilitation, 5Yokosuka-Shonan Disaster Health Emergency Research Center and ESR Laboratories, Kanagawa Dental University Graduate School of Dentistry, Yokosuka, Japan Background: Although biomimetic apatite coating is a promising way to provide titanium with osteoconductivity, the efficiency and quality of deposition is often poor. Most titanium implants have microscale surface morphology, and an addition of nanoscale features while preserving the micromorphology may provide further biological benefit. Here, we examined the effect of ultraviolet (UV light treatment of titanium, or photofunctionalization, on the efficacy of biomimetic apatite deposition on titanium and its biological capability.Methods and results: Micro-roughed titanium disks were prepared by acid-etching with sulfuric acid. Micro-roughened disks with or without photofunctionalization (20-minute exposure to UV light were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF for 1 or 5 days. Photofunctionalized titanium disks were superhydrophilic and did not form surface air bubbles when immersed in SBF, whereas non-photofunctionalized disks were hydrophobic and largely covered with air bubbles during immersion. An apatite-related signal was observed by X-ray diffraction on photofunctionalized titanium after 1 day of SBF immersion, which was equivalent to the one observed after 5 days of immersion of control titanium. Scanning electron microscopy revealed nodular apatite deposition

  3. Biomimetic nanocrystalline apatite coatings synthesized by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visan, A. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, RO-77125, MG-36, Magurele-Ilfov (Romania); Grossin, D. [CIRIMAT – Carnot Institute, University of Toulouse, ENSIACET, 4 Allée Emile Monso, 31030 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Stefan, N.; Duta, L.; Miroiu, F.M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, RO-77125, MG-36, Magurele-Ilfov (Romania); Stan, G.E. [National Institute of Materials Physics, RO-077125, Magurele-Ilfov (Romania); Sopronyi, M.; Luculescu, C. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, RO-77125, MG-36, Magurele-Ilfov (Romania); Freche, M.; Marsan, O.; Charvilat, C. [CIRIMAT – Carnot Institute, University of Toulouse, ENSIACET, 4 Allée Emile Monso, 31030 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Ciuca, S. [Politehnica University of Bucharest, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Mihailescu, I.N., E-mail: ion.mihailescu@inflpr.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, RO-77125, MG-36, Magurele-Ilfov (Romania)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • We report the deposition by MAPLE of biomimetic apatite coatings on Ti substrates. • This is the first report of MAPLE deposition of hydrated biomimetic apatite films. • Biomimetic apatite powder was synthesized by double decomposition process. • Non-apatitic environments, of high surface reactivity, are preserved post-deposition. • We got the MAPLE complete transfer as thin film of a hydrated, delicate material. -- Abstract: We report the deposition by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) technique of biomimetic nanocrystalline apatite coatings on titanium substrates, with potential application in tissue engineering. The targets were prepared from metastable, nanometric, poorly crystalline apatite powders, analogous to mineral bone, synthesized through a biomimetic approach by double decomposition process. For the deposition of thin films, a KrF* excimer laser source was used (λ = 248 nm, τ{sub FWHM} ≤ 25 ns). The analyses revealed the existence, in synthesized powders, of labile non-apatitic mineral ions, associated with the formation of a hydrated layer at the surface of the nanocrystals. The thin film analyses showed that the structural and chemical nature of the nanocrystalline apatite was prevalently preserved. The perpetuation of the non-apatitic environments was also observed. The study indicated that MAPLE is a suitable technique for the congruent transfer of a delicate material, such as the biomimetic hydrated nanohydroxyapatite.

  4. Biomimetic synthesis and biocompatibility evaluation of carbonated apatites template-mediated by heparin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Yi [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Laboratory of Interdisciplinary Studies, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Peking University, Beijing 100081 (China); Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Sun, Yuhua [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Laboratory of Interdisciplinary Studies, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Peking University, Beijing 100081 (China); Chen, Xiaofang [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhu, Peizhi, E-mail: pzzhu@umich.edu [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); Wei, Shicheng, E-mail: sc-wei@pku.edu.cn [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Laboratory of Interdisciplinary Studies, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Peking University, Beijing 100081 (China); Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-07-01

    Biomimetic synthesis of carbonated apatites with good biocompatibility is a promising strategy for the broadening application of apatites for bone tissue engineering. Most researchers were interested in collagen or gelatin-based templates for synthesis of apatite minerals. Inspired by recent findings about the important role of polysaccharides in bone biomineralization, here we reported that heparin, a mucopolysaccharide, was used to synthesize carbonated apatites in vitro. The results indicated that the Ca/P ratio, carbon content, crystallinity and morphology of the apatites varied depending on the heparin concentration and the initial pH value. The morphology of apatite changed from flake-shaped to needle-shaped, and the degree of crystallinity decreased with the increasing of heparin concentration. Biocompatibility of the apatites was tested by proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity of MC3T3-E1 cells. The results suggested that carbonated apatites synthesized in the presence of heparin were more favorable to the proliferation and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells compared with traditional method. In summary, the heparin concentration and the initial pH value play a key role in the chemical constitution and morphology, as well as biological properties of apatites. These biocompatible nano-apatite crystals hold great potential to be applied as bioactive materials for bone tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Heparin was used as a template to synthesize needle-shaped nano-apatite. • Changing the pH value and concentration led to different properties of apatite. • Apatite prepared by heparin was more favorable to the osteogenic differentiation. • Possible synthesis mechanism of apatite templated by heparin was described.

  5. Biomimetic magnesium–carbonate-apatite nanocrystals endowed with strontium ions as anti-osteoporotic trigger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iafisco, Michele, E-mail: michele.iafisco@istec.cnr.it; Ruffini, Andrea; Adamiano, Alessio; Sprio, Simone; Tampieri, Anna

    2014-02-01

    The present work investigates the preparation of biomimetic nanocrystalline apatites co-substituted with Mg, CO{sub 3} and Sr to be used as starting materials for the development of nanostructured bio-devices for regeneration of osteoporotic bone. Biological-like amounts of Mg and CO{sub 3} ions were inserted in the apatite structure to mimic the composition of bone apatite, whereas the addition of increasing quantities of Sr ions, from 0 up to 12 wt.%, as anti-osteoporotic agent, was evaluated. The chemical–physical features, the morphology, the degradation rates, the ion release kinetics as well as the in vitro bioactivity of the as-prepared apatites were fully evaluated. The results indicated that the incorporation of 12 wt.% of Sr can be viewed as a threshold for the structural stability of Mg–CO{sub 3}-apatite. Indeed, incorporation of lower quantity of Sr did not induce considerable variations in the chemical structure of Mg–CO{sub 3}-apatite, while when the Sr doping extent reached 12 wt.%, a dramatically destabilizing effect was detected on the crystal structure thus yielding alteration of the symmetry and distortion of the PO{sub 4}. As a consequence, this apatite exhibited the fastest degradation kinetic and the highest amount of Sr ions released when tested in physiological conditions. In this respect, the surface crystallization of new calcium phosphate phase when immersed in physiological-like solution occurred by different mechanisms and extents due to the different structural chemistry of the variously doped apatites. Nevertheless, all the apatites synthesized in this work exhibited in vitro bioactivity demonstrating their potential use to develop biomedical devices with anti-osteoporotic functionality. - Highlights: • Biomimetic nanocrystalline apatites co-substituted with Mg, CO{sub 3} and Sr were prepared. • Biological-like amounts of Mg and CO{sub 3} were inserted to mimic the composition of bone apatite. • The addition of increasing

  6. Biomimetic magnesium–carbonate-apatite nanocrystals endowed with strontium ions as anti-osteoporotic trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iafisco, Michele; Ruffini, Andrea; Adamiano, Alessio; Sprio, Simone; Tampieri, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The present work investigates the preparation of biomimetic nanocrystalline apatites co-substituted with Mg, CO 3 and Sr to be used as starting materials for the development of nanostructured bio-devices for regeneration of osteoporotic bone. Biological-like amounts of Mg and CO 3 ions were inserted in the apatite structure to mimic the composition of bone apatite, whereas the addition of increasing quantities of Sr ions, from 0 up to 12 wt.%, as anti-osteoporotic agent, was evaluated. The chemical–physical features, the morphology, the degradation rates, the ion release kinetics as well as the in vitro bioactivity of the as-prepared apatites were fully evaluated. The results indicated that the incorporation of 12 wt.% of Sr can be viewed as a threshold for the structural stability of Mg–CO 3 -apatite. Indeed, incorporation of lower quantity of Sr did not induce considerable variations in the chemical structure of Mg–CO 3 -apatite, while when the Sr doping extent reached 12 wt.%, a dramatically destabilizing effect was detected on the crystal structure thus yielding alteration of the symmetry and distortion of the PO 4 . As a consequence, this apatite exhibited the fastest degradation kinetic and the highest amount of Sr ions released when tested in physiological conditions. In this respect, the surface crystallization of new calcium phosphate phase when immersed in physiological-like solution occurred by different mechanisms and extents due to the different structural chemistry of the variously doped apatites. Nevertheless, all the apatites synthesized in this work exhibited in vitro bioactivity demonstrating their potential use to develop biomedical devices with anti-osteoporotic functionality. - Highlights: • Biomimetic nanocrystalline apatites co-substituted with Mg, CO 3 and Sr were prepared. • Biological-like amounts of Mg and CO 3 were inserted to mimic the composition of bone apatite. • The addition of increasing quantities of Sr (from 0 to 12

  7. Surface Enamel Remineralization: Biomimetic Apatite Nanocrystals and Fluoride Ions Different Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norberto Roveri

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method for altered enamel surface remineralization has been proposed. To this aim carbonate-hydroxyapatite nanocrystals which mimic for composition, structure, nanodimensions, and morphology dentine apatite crystals and resemble closely natural apatite chemical-physical properties have been used. The results underline the differences induced by the use of fluoride ions and hydroxyapatite nanocrystals in contrasting the mechanical abrasions and acid attacks to which tooth enamel is exposed. Fluoride ions generate a surface modification of the natural enamel apatite crystals increasing their crystallinity degree and relative mechanical and acid resistance. On the other hand, the remineralization produced by carbonate-hydroxyapatite consists in a deposition of a new apatitic mineral into the eroded enamel surface scratches. A new biomimetic mineral coating, which progressively fills and shadows surface scratches, covers and safeguards the enamel structure by contrasting the acid and bacteria attacks.

  8. Adsorption of nucleotides on biomimetic apatite: The case of adenosine 5⿲ triphosphate (ATP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, Khaled; El-Feki, Hafed; Marsan, Olivier; Drouet, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    ATP is a well-known energy supplier in cells. The idea to associate ATP to pharmaceutical formulations/biotechnological devices to promote cells activity by potentially modulating their microenvironment thus appears as an appealing novel approach. Since biomimetic nanocrystalline apatites have shown great promise for biomedical applications (bone regeneration, cells diagnostics/therapeutics, ⿦), thanks to a high surface reactivity and an intrinsically high biocompatibility, the present contribution was aimed at exploring ATP/apatite interactions. ATP adsorption on a synthetic carbonated nanocrystalline apatite preliminarily characterized (by XRD, FTIR, Raman, TG-DTA and SEM-EDX) was investigated in detail, pointing out a good agreement with Sips isothermal features. Adsorption characteristics were compared to those previously obtained on monophosphate nucleotides (AMP, CMP), unveiling some specificities. ATP was found to adsorb effectively onto biomimetic apatite: despite smaller values of the affinity constant KS and the exponential factor m, larger adsorbed amounts were reached for ATP as compared to AMP for any given concentration in solution. m guided by direct surface bonding rather than through stabilizing intermolecular interactions. Although standard οGads ° was estimated to only ⿿4 kJ/mol, the large value of Nmax led to significantly negative effective οGads values down to ⿿33 kJ/mol, reflecting the spontaneous character of adsorption process. Vibrational spectroscopy data (FTIR and Raman) pointed out spectral modifications upon adsorption, confirming chemical-like interactions where both the triphosphate group of ATP and its nucleic base were involved. The present study is intended to serve as a basis for future research works involving ATP and apatite nanocrystals/nanoparticles in view of biomedical applications (e.g. bone tissue engineering, intracellular drug delivery, ⿦).

  9. Formation of Apatite Coatings on an Artificial Ligament Using a Plasma- and Precursor-Assisted Biomimetic Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Oyane

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A plasma- and precursor-assisted biomimetic process utilizing plasma and alternate dipping treatments was applied to a Leed-Keio artificial ligament to produce a thin coating of apatite in a supersaturated calcium phosphate solution. Following plasma surface modification, the specimen was alternately dipped in calcium and phosphate ion solutions three times (alternate dipping treatment to create a precoating containing amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP which is an apatite precursor. To grow an apatite layer on the ACP precoating, the ACP-precoated specimen was immersed for 24 h in a simulated body fluid with ion concentrations approximately equal to those in human blood plasma. The plasma surface modification was necessary to create an adequate apatite coating and to improve the coating adhesion depending on the plasma power density. The apatite coating prepared using the optimized conditions formed a thin-film that covered the entire surface of the artificial ligament. The resulting apatite-coated artificial ligament should exhibit improved osseointegration within the bone tunnel and possesses great potential for use in ligament reconstructions.

  10. Comparison of fluoridated apatites with pure hydroxyapatite as potential biomimetic alternatives to enamel for laboratory-based bond strength studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Steven P; Cheuk, Godwin C Y; Georgiou, George; Moles, David R

    2009-05-01

    To investigate whether fluoridated apatites have a shear bond strength which more closely equates to that of natural enamel than pure hydroxyapatite, making them potentially useful as biomimetic alternatives to natural enamel for ex vivo laboratory bonding studies. Discs of pure hydroxyapatite, pure fluorapatite and a 1:1 mixture of hydroxyapatite-fluorapatite were produced by cold uni-axial pressing. The discs were sintered at 1300 degrees C, embedded in epoxy resin, ground and polished. X-ray diffraction technique was used to analyse the purity of the apatites. Scanning electron microscopy was employed to investigate the etch patterns of the apatite specimens. Ninely-six upper left central incisor brackets were bonded to each of the three groups of discs. Shear bond strengths were determined by debonding the brackets using a loaded metal jig in an Instron Universal Testing Machine. The sites of bond failure were recorded using the Adhesive Remnant Index. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni post-hoc comparisons were used to determine statistical differences between the mean shear bond strengths of the three specimen groups. The mean shear bond strength of pure hydroxyapatite (20.44 MPa; SD: 8.03; 95% CI: 18.81, 22.07) was significantly higher than those of fluorapatite (13.13 MPa; SD: 6.76; 95% CI: 11.76, 14.50) and hydroxyapatitefluorapatite (13.62 MPa; SD: 7.03; 95% CI: 12.19, 15.04) (p hydroxyapatite-fluorapatite (p > 0.99), and both were below the normal range ascribed to enamel (15-20 MPa). More than 90 per cent of the fluorapatite and the hydroxyapatite-fluorapatite specimens demonstrated bond failure at the substrate-adhesive interface, while only one-third of the hydroxyapatite specimens exhibited bond failure at that interface. Pure fluorapatite and hydroxyapatite-fluorapatite specimens offer no advantage over pure hydroxyapatite as a suitable artificial substrate for ex vivo bond strength testing.

  11. Biomimetic patterned surfaces for controllable friction in micro- and nanoscale devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arvind; Suh, Kahp-Yang

    2013-12-01

    Biomimetics is the study and simulation of biological systems for desired functional properties. It involves the transformation of underlying principles discovered in nature into man-made technologies. In this context, natural surfaces have significantly inspired and motivated new solutions for micro- and nano-scale devices (e.g., Micro/Nano-Electro-Mechanical Systems, MEMS/NEMS) towards controllable friction, during their operation. As a generic solution to reduce friction at small scale, various thin films/coatings have been employed in the last few decades. In recent years, inspiration from `Lotus Effect' has initiated a new research direction for controllable friction with biomimetic patterned surfaces. By exploiting the intrinsic hydrophobicity and ability to reduce contact area, such micro- or nano-patterned surfaces have demonstrated great strength and potential for applications in MEMS/NEMS devices. This review highlights recent advancements on the design, development and performance of these biomimetic patterned surfaces. Also, we present some hybrid approaches to tackle current challenges in biomimetic tribological applications for MEMS/NEMS devices.

  12. In vitro biomimetic deposition of apatite on alkaline and heat treated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) treated in NaOH can form apa- tite after soaking in SBF. It was found that after soaking in SBF, the Ti–OH groups formed on the alloy via ex- change of Na. + ions with H3O. + ions which induced apatite formation indirectly by forming an amorphous sodium titanate layer on the Ti6Al4V surface.

  13. The development, characterization, and application of biomimetic nanoscale enzyme immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Nicholas R.

    The utilization of enzymes is of interest for applications such as biosensors and biofuel cells. Immobilizing enzymes provides a means to develop these applications. Previous immobilization efforts have been accomplished by exposing surfaces on which silica-forming molecules are present to solutions containing an enzyme and a silica precursor. This approach leads to the enzyme being entrapped in a matrix three orders of magnitude larger than the enzyme itself, resulting in low retention of enzyme activity. The research herein introduces a method for the immobilization of enzymes during the layer-by-layer buildup of Si-O and Ti-O coatings which are nanoscale in thickness. This approach is an application of a peptide-induced mineral deposition method developed in the Sandhage and Kroger groups, and it involves the alternating exposure of a surface to solutions containing the peptide protamine and then an aqueous precursor solution of silicon- or titanium-oxide at near-neutral pH. A method has been developed that enables in situ immobilization of enzymes in the protamine/mineral oxide coatings. Depending on the layer and mineral (silica or titania) within which the enzyme is incorporated, the resulting multilayer biocatalytic hybrid materials retain 20 -- 100% of the enzyme activity. Analyses of kinetic properties of the immobilized enzyme, coupled with characterization of physical properties of the mineral-bearing layers (thickness, porosity, pore size distribution), indicates that the catalytic activities of the enzymes immobilized in the different layers are largely determined by substrate diffusion. The enzyme was also found to be substantially stabilized against heat-induced denaturation and largely protected from proteolytic attack. These functional coatings are then developed for use as antimicrobial materials. Glucose oxidase, which catalyzes production of the cytotoxic agent hydrogen peroxide, was immobilized with silver nanoparticles, can release

  14. Biomimetic apatite-coated porous PVA scaffolds promote the growth of breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Mao; Mohanty, Pravansu; Ghosh, Gargi, E-mail: gargi@umich.edu

    2014-11-01

    Recapitulating the native environment of bone tissue is essential to develop in vitro models of breast cancer bone metastasis. The bone is a composite material consisting of organic matrix and inorganic mineral phase, primarily hydroxyapatite. In this study, we report the mineralization of porous poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) scaffolds upon incubation in modified Hanks' Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) for 14 days. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the deposited minerals have composition similar to hydroxyapatite. The study demonstrated that the rate of nucleation and growth of minerals was faster on surfaces of less porous scaffolds. However, upon prolonged incubation, formation of mineral layer was observed on the surface of all the scaffolds. In addition, the study also demonstrated that 3D mineralization only occurred for scaffolds with highly interconnected porous networks. The mineralization of the scaffolds promoted the adsorption of serum proteins and consequently, the adhesion and proliferation of breast cancer cells. - Highlights: • Porous PVA scaffolds fabricated via mechanical agitation followed by freeze-drying. • Mineralization of the scaffold was carried out by utilizing biomimetic approach. • Mineralization resulted in increased protein adsorption on the scaffold. • Increased breast cancer cell growth was observed on mineralized scaffolds.

  15. Production and in vitro characterization of 3D porous scaffolds made of magnesium carbonate apatite (MCA)/anionic collagen using a biomimetic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sader, Marcia S., E-mail: msader@metalmat.ufrj.br [Prog. Engenharia Metalúrgica e Materiais, COPPE/UFRJ, RJ (Brazil); Martins, Virginia C.A. [Depto. de Química e Física Molecular, IQSC/USP, SP (Brazil); Gomez, Santiago [Dept. Anatomía Patológica, Universidad de Cádiz, Cadiz (Spain); LeGeros, Racquel Z. [Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University College of Dentistry, NY (United States); Soares, Gloria A. [Prog. Engenharia Metalúrgica e Materiais, COPPE/UFRJ, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-10-15

    3D porous scaffolds are relevant biomaterials to bone engineering as they can be used as templates to tissue reconstruction. The aim of the present study was to produce and characterize in vitro 3D magnesium-carbonate apatite/collagen (MCA/col) scaffolds. They were prepared by using biomimetic approach, followed by cross-linking with 0.25% glutaraldehyde solution (GA) and liofilization. Results obtained with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) confirmed the type-B carbonate substitution, while by X-ray diffraction (XRD), a crystallite size of ∼ 10 nm was obtained. Optical and electron microscopy showed that the cylindrical samples exhibited an open-porous morphology, with apatite nanocrystals precipitated on collagen fibrils. The cross-linked 3D scaffolds showed integrity when immersed in culture medium up to 14 days. Also, the immersion of such samples into an acid buffer solution, to mimic the osteoclastic resorption environment, promotes the release of important ions for bone repair, such as calcium, phosphorus and magnesium. Bone cells (SaOs2) adhered, and proliferated on the 3D composite scaffolds, showing that synthesis and the cross-linking processes did not induce cytotoxicity. Highlights: • 3D scaffolds of Mg-carbonate–apatite and anionic-collagen were produced. • The biomimetic approach and the cross-linking with 0.25% GA solution were employed. • The scaffolds showed open-porous structure and apatite crystals on collagen fibrils. • The cross-linked scaffolds exhibited integrity when immersed in culture medium. • SaOs2 cells adhered and proliferated on the cross-linked scaffolds confirming no cytotoxicity.

  16. Production and in vitro characterization of 3D porous scaffolds made of magnesium carbonate apatite (MCA)/anionic collagen using a biomimetic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sader, Marcia S.; Martins, Virginia C.A.; Gomez, Santiago; LeGeros, Racquel Z.; Soares, Gloria A.

    2013-01-01

    3D porous scaffolds are relevant biomaterials to bone engineering as they can be used as templates to tissue reconstruction. The aim of the present study was to produce and characterize in vitro 3D magnesium-carbonate apatite/collagen (MCA/col) scaffolds. They were prepared by using biomimetic approach, followed by cross-linking with 0.25% glutaraldehyde solution (GA) and liofilization. Results obtained with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) confirmed the type-B carbonate substitution, while by X-ray diffraction (XRD), a crystallite size of ∼ 10 nm was obtained. Optical and electron microscopy showed that the cylindrical samples exhibited an open-porous morphology, with apatite nanocrystals precipitated on collagen fibrils. The cross-linked 3D scaffolds showed integrity when immersed in culture medium up to 14 days. Also, the immersion of such samples into an acid buffer solution, to mimic the osteoclastic resorption environment, promotes the release of important ions for bone repair, such as calcium, phosphorus and magnesium. Bone cells (SaOs2) adhered, and proliferated on the 3D composite scaffolds, showing that synthesis and the cross-linking processes did not induce cytotoxicity. Highlights: • 3D scaffolds of Mg-carbonate–apatite and anionic-collagen were produced. • The biomimetic approach and the cross-linking with 0.25% GA solution were employed. • The scaffolds showed open-porous structure and apatite crystals on collagen fibrils. • The cross-linked scaffolds exhibited integrity when immersed in culture medium. • SaOs2 cells adhered and proliferated on the cross-linked scaffolds confirming no cytotoxicity

  17. Biomimetic scaffolds based on hydroxyapatite nanorod/poly(D,L) lactic acid with their corresponding apatite-forming capability and biocompatibility for bone-tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nga, Nguyen Kim; Hoai, Tran Thanh; Viet, Pham Hung

    2015-04-01

    This study presents a facile synthesis of biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanorod/poly(D,L) lactic acid (HAp/PDLLA) scaffolds with the use of solvent casting combined with a salt-leaching technique for bone-tissue engineering. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to observe the morphologies, pore structures of synthesized scaffolds, interactions between hydroxyapatite nanorods and poly(D,L) lactic acid, as well as the compositions of the scaffolds, respectively. Porosity of the scaffolds was determined using the liquid substitution method. Moreover, the apatite-forming capability of the scaffolds was evaluated through simulated body fluid (SBF) incubation tests, whereas the viability, attachment, and distribution of human osteoblast cells (MG 63 cell line) on the scaffolds were determined through alamarBlue assay and confocal laser microscopy after nuclear staining with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole and actin filaments of a cytoskeleton with Oregon Green 488 phalloidin. Results showed that hydroxyapatite nanorod/poly(D,L) lactic acid scaffolds that mimic the structure of natural bone were successfully produced. These scaffolds possessed macropore networks with high porosity (80-84%) and mean pore sizes ranging 117-183 μm. These scaffolds demonstrated excellent apatite-forming capabilities. The rapid formation of bone-like apatites with flower-like morphology was observed after 7 days of incubation in SBFs. The scaffolds that had a high percentage (30 wt.%) of hydroxyapatite demonstrated better cell adhesion, proliferation, and distribution than those with low percentages of hydroxyapatite as the days of culture increased. This work presented an efficient route for developing biomimetic composite scaffolds, which have potential applications in bone-tissue engineering. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Photoluminescence in the characterization and early detection of biomimetic bone-like apatite formation on the surface of alkaline-treated titanium implant: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepahvandi, Azadeh; Moztarzadeh, Fathollah; Mozafari, Masoud; Ghaffari, Maryam; Raee, Nahid

    2011-09-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) property is particularly important in the characterization of materials that contain significant proportions of noncrystalline components, multiple phases, or low concentrations of mineral phases. In this research, the ability of biomimetic bone-like apatite deposition on the surface of titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) substrates in simulated body fluid (SBF) right after alkaline-treatment and subsequent heat-treatment was studied by the inherent luminescence properties of apatite. For this purpose, the metallic substrates were treated in 5 M NaOH solution at 60 °C. Subsequently, the substrates were heat-treated at 600 °C for 1 h for consolidation of the sodium titanate hydrogel layer. Then, they were soaked in SBF for different periods of time. Finally, the possibility to use of PL monitoring as an effective method and early detection tool is discussed. According to the obtained results, it was concluded that the PL emission peak did not have any significant shift to the shorter or higher wavelengths, and the PL intensity increased as the exposure time increased. This research proved that the observed inherent PL of the newly formed apatite coatings might be of specific interest for histological probing and bone remodelling monitoring. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Biomimetics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. The well-organised multifunctional structures, systems and biogenic materials found in nature have attracted the interest of scientists working in many disciplines. The efforts have resulted in the development of a new and rapidly growing field of scientific effort called biomimetics. In this article we present a.

  20. Biomimetics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Bone serves a metabolic function also being a store for calcium, phosphorous and other ions. It can repair itself and exhibit several physical properties such as ... fibrils and their possible self-arrangements leading to bone formation. ... Even though biomimetics literally means to mimic biology, Vincent (1997) has argued.

  1. In vitro study on the osteogenesis enhancement effect of BMP-2 incorporated biomimetic apatite coating on titanium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Xinchun; Ning, Chengyun; Wang, Yan

    2017-09-26

    To fabricate a sustained-release delivery system of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-2) on titanium surface, explore the effect of BMP-2 concentration on the loading/release behavior of BMP-2 and evaluate the cell compatibility of the system in vitro, pure titanium specimens were immersed into supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions (SCP) containing 4 different concentrations of BMP-2: 0, 50, 100, 200 and 400 ng/mL. Biomimetic calcium phosphate coating was formed on titanium surface and BMP-2 was incorporated into the coating through co-deposition. The release profile of BMP-2 suggested that BMP-2 were delivered sustainably up to 20 days. CCK-8 and ALP assay showed that 200 group and 400 ng/mL BMP-2 group have significant effect on promoting MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation and differentiation. The BMP-2 incorporated into the hybrid coating released in a sustained manner and significantly promoted the proliferation and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 on the titanium surface.

  2. Plastic deformation in nano-scale multilayer materials — A biomimetic approach based on nacre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lackner, Juergen M., E-mail: juergen.lackner@joanneum.at [JOANNEUM RESEARCH Forschungsges.m.b.H., Institute for Surface Technologies and Photonics, Functional Surfaces, Leobner Strasse 94, A-8712 Niklasdorf (Austria); Waldhauser, Wolfgang [JOANNEUM RESEARCH Forschungsges.m.b.H., Institute for Surface Technologies and Photonics, Functional Surfaces, Leobner Strasse 94, A-8712 Niklasdorf (Austria); Major, Boguslaw; Major, Lukasz [Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Sciences, IMIM-PAN, ul. Reymonta 25, PL-30059 Krakow (Poland); Kot, Marcin [University of Science and Technology, AGH, Aleja Adama Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)

    2013-05-01

    The paper reports about a biomimetic based comparison of deformation in magnetron sputtered multilayer coatings based on titanium (Ti), titanium nitride (TiN) and diamond-like carbon (DLC) layers and the deformation mechanisms in nacre of mollusc shells. Nacre as highly mineralized tissue combines high stiffness and hardness with high toughness, enabling resistance to fracture and crack propagation during tensile loading. Such behaviour is based on a combination of load transmission by tensile stressed aragonite tablets and shearing in layers between the tablets. Shearing in these polysaccharide and protein interlayers demands hydrated conditions. Otherwise, nacre has similar brittle behaviour to aragonite. To prevent shear failure, shear hardening occurs by progressive tablet locking due to wavy dovetail-like surface geometry of the tablets. Similar effects by shearing and strain hardening mechanisms were found for Ti interlayers between TiN and DLC layers in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy studies, performed in deformed zones beneath spherical indentations. 7 nm thin Ti films are sufficient for strong toughening of the whole multi-layered coating structure, providing a barrier for propagation of cracks, starting from tensile-stressed, hard, brittle TiN or DLC layers. - Highlights: • Biomimetic approach to TiN-diamond-like carbon (DLC) multilayers by sputtering • Investigation of deformation in/around hardness indents by HR-TEM • Plastic deformation with shearing in 7-nm thick Ti interlayers in TiN–DLC multilayers • Biomimetically comparable to nacre deformation.

  3. An anti-bacterial approach to nanoscale roughening of biomimetic rice-like pattern PP by thermal annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari Nodoushan, Emad; Ebrahimi, Nadereh Golshan; Ayazi, Masoumeh

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we introduced thermal annealing treatment as an effective way of increasing the nanoscale roughness of a semi-crystalline polymer surface. Annealing treatment applied to a biomimetic microscale pattern of rice leaf to achieve a superhydrophobic surface with a hierarchical roughness. Resulted surfaces was characterized by XRD, AFM and FE-SEM instruments and showed an increase of roughness and cristallinity within both time and temperature of treatment. These two parameters also impact on measured static contact angle up to 158°. Bacterial attachment potency has an inverse relationship with the similarity of surface pattern dimensions and bacterial size and due to that, thermal annealing could be an effective way to create anti-bacterial surface beyond its effect on water repellency. Point in case, the anti-bacterial properties of produced water-repellence surfaces of PP were measured and counted colonies of both gram-negative (E. coli) and gram-positive (S. aureus) bacteria reduced with the nature of PP and hierarchical pattern on that. Anti-bacterial characterization of the resulted surface reveals a stunning reduction in adhesion of gram-positive bacteria to the surface. S. aureus reduction rates equaled to 95% and 66% when compared to control blank plate and smooth surface of PP. Moreover, it also could affect the other type of bacteria, gram-negative (E. coli). In the latter case, adhesion reduction rates calculated 66% and 53% when against to the same controls, respectively.

  4. Revisiting carbonate quantification in apatite (bio)minerals: a validated FTIR methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Grunenwald, Anne; Keyser, Christine; Sautereau, Anne-Marie; Crubézy, Eric; Ludes, Bertrand; Drouet, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Carbonated apatites represent an important class of compounds encountered in many fields including anthropology, archeology, geology, medicine and biomaterials engineering. They constitute, in particular, the mineral part of bones and teeth, are found in sedimentary settings, and are used as biomimetic compounds for the development of bone tissue engineering scaffolds. Whether for assessing the degree of biomimetism of synthetic apatites or for better understanding dia...

  5. The lunar apatite paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, J W; Tomlinson, S M; McCubbin, F M; Greenwood, J P; Treiman, A H

    2014-04-25

    Recent discoveries of water-rich lunar apatite are more consistent with the hydrous magmas of Earth than the otherwise volatile-depleted rocks of the Moon. Paradoxically, this requires H-rich minerals to form in rocks that are otherwise nearly anhydrous. We modeled existing data from the literature, finding that nominally anhydrous minerals do not sufficiently fractionate H from F and Cl to generate H-rich apatite. Hydrous apatites are explained as the products of apatite-induced low magmatic fluorine, which increases the H/F ratio in melt and apatite. Mare basalts may contain hydrogen-rich apatite, but lunar magmas were most likely poor in hydrogen, in agreement with the volatile depletion that is both observed in lunar rocks and required for canonical giant-impact models of the formation of the Moon.

  6. Protein-free formation of bone-like apatite: New insights into the key role of carbonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deymier, Alix C; Nair, Arun K; Depalle, Baptiste; Qin, Zhao; Arcot, Kashyap; Drouet, Christophe; Yoder, Claude H; Buehler, Markus J; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Genin, Guy M; Pasteris, Jill D

    2017-05-01

    The nanometer-sized plate-like morphology of bone mineral is necessary for proper bone mechanics and physiology. However, mechanisms regulating the morphology of these mineral nanocrystals remain unclear. The dominant hypothesis attributes the size and shape regulation to organic-mineral interactions. Here, we present data supporting the hypothesis that physicochemical effects of carbonate integration within the apatite lattice control the morphology, size, and mechanics of bioapatite mineral crystals. Carbonated apatites synthesized in the absence of organic molecules presented plate-like morphologies and nanoscale crystallite dimensions. Experimentally-determined crystallite size, lattice spacing, solubility and atomic order were modified by carbonate concentration. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and density functional theory (DFT) calculations predicted changes in surface energy and elastic moduli with carbonate concentration. Combining these results with a scaling law predicted the experimentally observed scaling of size and energetics with carbonate concentration. The experiments and models describe a clear mechanism by which crystal dimensions are controlled by carbonate substitution. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that carbonate substitution is sufficient to drive the formation of bone-like crystallites. This new understanding points to pathways for biomimetic synthesis of novel, nanostructured biomaterials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Iodine immobilization in apatites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audubert, F.; Lartigue, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    In the context of a scientific program on long-lived radionuclide conditioning, a matrix for iodine 129 immobilization has been studied. A lead vanado-phosphate apatite was prepared from the melt of lead vanado-phosphate Pb 3 (VO 4 ) 1.6 (PO 4 ) 0.4 and lead iodide PbI 2 in stoichiometric proportions by calcination at 700 deg. C during 3 hours. Natural sintering of this apatite is not possible because the product decomposition occurs at 400 deg. C. Reactive sintering is the solution. The principle depends on the coating of lead iodide with lead vanado-phosphate. Lead vanado-phosphate coating is used as iodo-apatite reactant and as dense covering to confine iodine during synthesis. So the best condition to immobilize iodine during iodo-apatite synthesis is a reactive sintering at 700 deg. C under 25 MPa. We obtained an iodo-apatite surrounded with dense lead vanadate. Leaching behaviour of the matrix synthesized by solid-solid reaction is under progress in order to determine chemical durability, basic mechanisms of the iodo-apatite alteration and kinetic rate law. Iodo-apatite dissolution rates were pH and temperature dependent. We obtained a rate of 2.5 10 -3 g.m -2 .d -1 at 90 deg. C in initially de-ionised water. (authors)

  8. Hanford Apatite Treatability Test Report Errata: Apatite Mass Loading Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szecsody, James E.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Williams, Mark D.; Truex, Michael J.

    2014-05-19

    The objective of this errata report is to document an error in the apatite loading (i.e., treatment capacity) estimate reported in previous apatite treatability test reports and provide additional calculation details for estimating apatite loading and barrier longevity. The apatite treatability test final report (PNNL-19572; Vermeul et al. 2010) documents the results of the first field-scale evaluation of the injectable apatite PRB technology. The apatite loading value in units of milligram-apatite per gram-sediment is incorrect in this and some other previous reports. The apatite loading in units of milligram phosphate per gram-sediment, however, is correct, and this is the unit used for comparison to field core sample measurements.

  9. Biomimetic dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchetana Goswami

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available “Biomimetics” is the field of science that uses the natural system of synthesizing materials through biomimicry. This method can be widely used in dentistry for regeneration of dental structures and replacement of lost dental tissues. This is a review paper that states its scope, history, different fields of biomimetic dentistry, and its future conditions in India.

  10. Biomimetic dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Suchetana Goswami

    2018-01-01

    “Biomimetics” is the field of science that uses the natural system of synthesizing materials through biomimicry. This method can be widely used in dentistry for regeneration of dental structures and replacement of lost dental tissues. This is a review paper that states its scope, history, different fields of biomimetic dentistry, and its future conditions in India.

  11. Biomimetic modelling.

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent, Julian F V

    2003-01-01

    Biomimetics is seen as a path from biology to engineering. The only path from engineering to biology in current use is the application of engineering concepts and models to biological systems. However, there is another pathway: the verification of biological mechanisms by manufacture, leading to an iterative process between biology and engineering in which the new understanding that the engineering implementation of a biological system can bring is fed back into biology, allowing a more compl...

  12. An efficient biomimetic coating methodology for a prosthetic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adawy, Alaa; Abdel-Fattah, Wafa I.

    2013-01-01

    The combination of the load-bearing metallic implants with the bioactive materials in the design of synthetic implants is an important aspect in the biomaterials research. Biomimetic coating of bioinert alloys with calcium phosphate phases provides a good alternative to the prerequisite for the continual replacement of implants because of the failure of bone-implant integration. We attempted to accelerate the biomimetic coating process of stainless steel alloy (316L) with biomimetic apatite. In addition, we investigated the incorporation of functioning minerals such as strontianite and smithsonite into the deposited layer. In order to develop a highly mature apatite coating, our method requires soaking of the pre-treated alloy in highly concentrated synthetic body fluid for only few hours. Surface characterizations were performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Also, the deposited apatitic layers were analysed by powder diffraction X-ray analysis (XRD). 316L surface showed the growth of highly crystalline, low carbonated hydroxyapatite, after only 6 h of the whole soaking process. Highlights: ► The manuscript describes a fast and efficient biomimetic coating methodology. ► This methodology can be used for metallic implants. ► 316L was coated with crystalline hydroxyapatite. ► Addition of strontium and zinc lead to the deposition of brushite. ► Coating of all synthetic solutions is highly crystalline

  13. Freeze-casting for PLGA/carbonated apatite composite scaffolds: Structure and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schardosim, M; Soulié, J; Poquillon, D; Cazalbou, S; Duployer, B; Tenailleau, C; Rey, C; Hübler, R; Combes, C

    2017-08-01

    This paper focuses on the fabrication of three-dimensional porous PLGA-biomimetic carbonated apatite composite scaffolds by freeze-casting and using dimethyl carbonate as a solvent. Several charge/polymer ratios were tested in order to finely understand the influence of the filler rate on the scaffold porosity and mechanical and degradation properties using complementary characterization techniques (SEM, mercury porosimetry and X-ray microtomography). It was demonstrated that the apatite ratio within the composite scaffold has a strong influence in terms of architecture, material cohesion, mechanical properties and in vitro degradation properties. An optimum biomimetic apatite ratio was reached to combine good mechanical properties (higher rigidity) and material cohesion. In vitro degradation studies showed that higher apatite filler rates limited PLGA degradation and enhanced the hydrophilicity of the scaffolds which is expected to improve the biological properties of the scaffolds in addition to the bioactivity related to the presence of the apatite analogous to bone mineral. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Thermodynamic basis for evolution of apatite in calcified tissues (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navrotsky, A.; Drouet, C.; Rollin-Martinet, S.; Champion, E.; Grossin, D.

    2013-12-01

    Bone remodeling and tooth enamel maturation are biological processes which alter the physico-chemical features of biominerals with time. However, although the ubiquity of bone remodeling is clear, why is well crystallized bone mineral systematically replaced by immature nanocrystalline inorganic material? In enamel, a clear evolution is also seen from the first mineral formed during the secretory stage to its mature well crystalline form, which then changes little in the adult tooth. This contribution provides the thermodynamic basis underlying these biological processes. We determined the energetics of biomimetic apatites corresponding to an increasing degree of maturation. Our data point out the progressive evolution of the enthalpy (ΔHf°) and free energy (ΔGf°) of formation toward more negative values upon maturation. Entropy contributions to ΔGf° values are small compared to enthalpy contributions. ΔHf° varies from -12058.9 × 12.2 to -12771.0 × 21.4 kJ/mol for maturation times increasing from 20 min to 3 weeks, approaching the value for stoichiometric hydroxyapatite, -13431.0 × 22.7 kJ/mol. Apatite thermodynamic stability increases as its composition moved toward stoichiometry. These findings imply diminishing aqueous solubility of calcium and phosphate ions as well as decreased surface reactivity. Such thermodynamically-driven maturation is favorable for enamel maturation since this biomineral must resist external aggressions such as contact with acids. In contrast, maintaining a metastable highly reactive and soluble form of apatite is essential to the effective participation of bone as a source of calcium and phosphate for homeostasis. Therefore our data strongly suggest that, far from being trivial, the intrinsic thermodynamic properties of apatite represent a critical driving force for continuous bone remodeling, in contrast to current views favoring a purely biologically driven cycle. These thermodynamic data may prove helpful in other domains

  15. BIOMINERALOGICAL INVESTIGATION OF APATITE PIEZOELECTRICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pawlikowski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of apatite piezoelectricity was conducted in order to assess piezoelectric properties of bone. In the first stage, mineralogical analysis of different apatite crystals, regarding their purity and fitness for the experiments was performed. After the crystals had been chosen, 0.8 mm-thick plates were cut, perpendicular and parallel to the crystallographic Z axis. The plates were then polished and dusted with gold. Electrodes were attached to the opposite surfaces of the plates with conductive glue. So prepared plates were hooked up to the EEG machine used for measuring electrical activity in the brain. The plates were then gently tapped to observe and register currents generated in them. Acquired data was processed by subtracting from the resulting graphs those generated by a hand movement, without tapping the plate. Results indicate that apatite plates have weak piezoelectric properties. Observed phenomenon may be translated to bone apatite, which would explain, at least partially, piezoelectric properties of bone. Acquired results suggest that there is a relation between the mechanical workload of bones (bone apatite and theirelectrical properties. Considering the massive internal surface of bones, they may be treated as a kind of internal “antenna” reacting not only to mechanical stimuli, but to changes in electromagnetic field as well. Observed phenomena no doubt significantly influence the biological processes occurring in bones and the whole human body.

  16. Acceleration of biomimetic mineralization to apply in bone regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayasuriya, A Champa; Shah, Chiragkumar; Ebraheim, Nabil A; Jayatissa, Ahalapitiya H

    2008-01-01

    The delivery of growth factors and therapeutic drugs into bone defects is a major clinical challenge. Biomimetically prepared bone-like mineral (BLM) containing a carbonated apatite layer can be used to deliver growth factors and drugs in a controlled manner. In the conventional biomimetic process, BLM can be deposited on the biodegradable polymer surfaces by soaking them in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 16 days or more. The aim of this study was to accelerate the biomimetic process of depositing BML in the polymer surfaces. We accelerated the deposition of mineral on 3D poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) porous scaffolds to 36-48 h by modifying the biomimetic process parameters and applying surface treatments to PLGA scaffolds. The BLM was coated on scaffolds after surface treatments followed by incubation at 37 0 C in 15 ml of 5x SBF. We characterized the BLM created using the accelerated biomineralization process with wide angle x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The FTIR and XRD analyses of mineralized scaffolds show similarities between biomimetically prepared BLM, and bone bioapatite and carbonated apatite. We also found that the BLM layer on the surface of scaffolds was stable even after 21 days immersed in Tris buffered saline and cell culture media. This study suggests that BLM was stable for at least 3 weeks in both media, and therefore, BLM has a potential for use as a carrier for biological molecules for localized release applications as well as bone tissue engineering applications

  17. Remineralization of artificial dentinal caries lesions by biomimetically modified Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yi-pin; Li, Nan; Niu, Li-na; Primus, Carolyn M.; Ling, Jun-Qi; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2011-01-01

    Fluoride-releasing restorative materials are available for remineralization of enamel and root caries. However, dentin remineralization is more difficult than enamel remineralization due to the paucity of apatite seed crystallites along the lesion surface for heterogeneous crystal growth. Extracellular matrix proteins play critical roles in controlling apatite nucleation/growth in collagenous tissues. This study examined the remineralization efficacy of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) in phosphate-containing simulated body fluid (SBF) by incorporating polyacrylic acid and sodium tripolyphosphate as biomimetic analogs of matrix proteins for remineralizing caries-like dentin. Artificial caries-like dentin lesions incubated in SBF were remineralized over a 6-week period using MTA or MTA containing biomimetic analogs in the absence or presence of dentin adhesive application. Lesion depths and integrated mineral loss were monitored with micro-computed tomography. Ultrastructure of baseline and remineralized lesions were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Dentin remineralization was best achieved using MTA containing biomimetic analogs regardless of whether an adhesive was applied; dentinal tubules within the remineralized dentin were occluded by apatite. It is concluded that the MTA version employed in the study may be doped with biomimetic analogs for remineralization of unbonded and bonded artificial caries-like lesions in the presence of SBF. PMID:22085925

  18. Biomimetic Flow Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casas, J.; Liu, Chang; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Biomimetic flow sensors are biologically inspired devices that measure the speed and direction of fluids. This survey starts by describing the role and functioning of airflow-sensing hairs in arthropods and in fishes, carries on with the biomimetic MEMS implementations, both for air and water flow

  19. The role of the counter-ions present in syntheses on the thermal stabilization of strontium and/or calcium apatites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo da Silva, Leila; Santos Menezes, Daniela dos; Almeida, Luis Eduardo [Laboratório de Biomateriais – P" 2CEM, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Av. Marechal Rondon, s/n, São Cristóvão, 49100-000 Sergipe (Brazil); Anselme, Karine; Dentzer, Joseph [Institut de Science des Matériaux de Mulhouse (IS2M), CNRS UMR7361, Université de Haute-Alsace, 15, rue Jean Starcky, BP 2488, 68057 Mulhouse (France); Araujo dos Santos, Euler, E-mail: euler@ufs.br [Laboratório de Biomateriais – P" 2CEM, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Av. Marechal Rondon, s/n, São Cristóvão, 49100-000 Sergipe (Brazil)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Counter-ions present in syntheses can affect thermal stabilization of apatites. • Ions with different charges and sizes can stabilize the apatite structure. • Co-substitution is an important way to design biomimetic hydroxyapatites. - Abstract: The goal of this work was to study the thermal stabilization of calcium apatites in which the Ca{sup 2+} ions were substituted for Sr{sup 2+} in increasing concentrations via ionic co-substitutions. Two distinct standard syntheses were proposed for comparative purposes: one using counter-ions that were not easily incorporated into the apatite structure (NH{sub 4}{sup +}/NO{sub 3}{sup −}) and one using counter-ions that can be easily incorporated into the structure (Na{sup +}/Cl{sup −}). After calcination, only the apatites synthesized in the presence of NH{sub 4}{sup +}/NO{sub 3}{sup −} presented phase transformation. In contrast, the apatites synthesized in the presence of Na{sup +}/Cl{sup −} formed a solid solution after calcination, with Na{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+} and Cl{sup −} sharing the same apatite lattice. Wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (WDXRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) techniques showed that the counter-ions present during the syntheses that are associated with CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} play an important role in the thermal stabilization of the apatites.

  20. FTIR absorption reflection study of biomimetic growth of phosphates on titanium implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoch, A.; Jastrzębski, W.; Brożek, A.; Stoch, J.; Szaraniec, J.; Trybalska, B.; Kmita, G.

    2000-11-01

    Titanium has been used for many medical applications; however, its joining to a living bone still is not satisfactorily good, challenging appropriate investigations. The aim of this work was to generate chemical modifications at its surface such that in vivo conditions, heterogeneous nucleation, and then growth of apatite from the body fluid could be easily induced and successfully performed. For this purpose, on the titanium samples, the oxide sublayers containing titanium, calcium and silicon (TCS) were deposited from a suitable solution using the sol-gel deep-coating procedure. Dried samples were heated at 400°C then cooled and thermostatically held in synthetic body fluids (SBF, SBFIII) under physiological conditions to mimic the natural process of apatite formation. Changes in surface composition of TCS sublayers caused by the heating were studied with XPS. Infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy monitored successive steps of apatite growth. It was found that in SBF, at the precoated titanium surface, nucleation and growth of the apatite containing carbonate took place. In SBFIII, for a higher concentration of calcium ions in comparison with SBF, a much-enhanced growth of the apatite free of carbonate was observed. TCS precoatings applied on stainless steel and Cr-Co-Mo alloy (Micromed) act also as bioactive interfaces with high ability to nucleation of biologically equivalent apatite. Biomimetic formation of this apatite on biologically inactive materials can be an important step in implant surgery.

  1. Biomimetics: nature based innovation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2012-01-01

    "Based on the concept that nature offers numerous sources of inspiration for inventions related to mechanisms, materials, processes, and algorithms, this book covers the topic of biomimetics and the inspired innovation...

  2. Apatite glass-ceramics: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duminis, Tomas; Shahid, Saroash; Hill, Robert Graham

    2016-12-01

    This article is a review of the published literature on apatite glass-ceramics (GCs). Topics covered include crystallization mechanisms of the various families of the apatite GCs and an update on research and development on apatite GCs for applications in orthopedics, dentistry, optoelectronics and nuclear waste management. Most apatite GCs crystallize through a homogenous nucleation and crystallization mechanism, which is aided by a prior liquid-liquid phase separation. Careful control of the base glass composition and heat-treatment conditions, which determine the nature and morphology of the crystal phases in the GC can produce GC materials with exceptional thermal, mechanical, optical and biological properties. The GCs reviewed for orthopedic applications exhibit suitable mechanical properties and can chemically bond to bone and stimulate its regeneration. The most commercially successful apatite GCs are those developed for dental veneering. These materials exhibit excellent translucency and clinical esthetics, and mimic the natural tooth mineral. Due to the ease of solid solution of the apatite lattice, rare earth doped apatite GCs are discussed for potential applications in optoelectronics and nuclear waste management. One of the drawbacks of the commercial apatite GCs used in orthopedics is the lack of resorbability, therefore the review provides a direction for future research in the field.

  3. Advances in surfaces and osseointegration in implantology. Biomimetic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, Matteo; Fernandez-Yague, Marc; Lázaro, Pedro; Herrero-Climent, Mariano; Bullon, Pedro; Gil, Francisco-Javier

    2015-01-01

    The present work is a revision of the processes occurring in osseointegration of titanium dental implants according to different types of surfaces -namely, polished surfaces, rough surfaces obtained from subtraction methods, as well as the new hydroxyapatite biomimetic surfaces obtained from thermochemical processes. Hydroxyapatite’s high plasma-projection temperatures have proven to prevent the formation of crystalline apatite on the titanium dental implant, but lead to the formation of amorphous calcium phosphate (i.e., with no crystal structure) instead. This layer produce some osseointegration yet the calcium phosphate layer will eventually dissolve and leave a gap between the bone and the dental implant, thus leading to osseointegration failure due to bacterial colonization. A new surface -recently obtained by thermochemical processes- produces, by crystallization, a layer of apatite with the same mineral content as human bone that is chemically bonded to the titanium surface. Osseointegration speed was tested by means of minipigs, showing bone formation after 3 to 4 weeks, with the security that a dental implant can be loaded. This surface can be an excellent candidate for immediate or early loading procedures. Key words:Dental implants, implants surfaces, osseointegration, biomimetics surfaces. PMID:25662555

  4. Apatite-Melt Partitioning at 1 Bar: An Assessment of Apatite-Melt Exchange Equilibria Resulting from Non-Ideal Mixing of F and Cl in Apatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, F. M.; Ustunisik, G.; Vander Kaaden, K. E.

    2016-01-01

    The mineral apatite [Ca5(PO4)3(F,Cl,OH)] is present in a wide range of planetary materials. Due to the presence of volatiles within its crystal structure (X-site), many recent studies have attempted to use apatite to constrain the volatile contents of planetary magmas and mantle sources. In order to use the volatile contents of apatite to precisely determine the abundances of volatiles in coexisting silicate melt or fluids, thermodynamic models for the apatite solid solution and for the apatite components in multi-component silicate melts and fluids are required. Although some thermodynamic models for apatite have been developed, they are incomplete. Furthermore, no mixing model is available for all of the apatite components in silicate melts or fluids, especially for F and Cl components. Several experimental studies have investigated the apatite-melt and apatite-fluid partitioning behavior of F, Cl, and OH in terrestrial and planetary systems, which have determined that apatite-melt partitioning of volatiles are best described as exchange equilibria similar to Fe-Mg partitioning between olivine and silicate melt. However, McCubbin et al. recently reported that the exchange coefficients may vary in portions of apatite compositional space where F, Cl, and OH do not mix ideally in apatite. In particular, solution calorimetry data of apatite compositions along the F-Cl join exhibit substantial excess enthalpies of mixing. In the present study, we conducted apatite-melt partitioning experiments in evacuated, sealed silica-glass tubes at approximately 1 bar and 950-1050 degrees Centigrade on a synthetic Martian basalt composition equivalent to the basaltic shergottite Queen Alexandria Range (QUE) 94201. These experiments were conducted dry, at low pressure, to assess the effects of temperature and apatite composition on the partitioning behavior of F and Cl between apatite and basaltic melt along the F-Cl apatite binary join, where there is non-ideal mixing of F and Cl

  5. Nanoscale flexoelectricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh D; Mao, Sheng; Yeh, Yao-Wen; Purohit, Prashant K; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-02-20

    Electromechanical effects are ubiquitous in biological and materials systems. Understanding the fundamentals of these coupling phenomena is critical to devising next-generation electromechanical transducers. Piezoelectricity has been studied in detail, in both the bulk and at mesoscopic scales. Recently, an increasing amount of attention has been paid to flexoelectricity: electrical polarization induced by a strain gradient. While piezoelectricity requires crystalline structures with no inversion symmetry, flexoelectricity does not carry this requirement, since the effect is caused by inhomogeneous strains. Flexoelectricity explains many interesting electromechanical behaviors in hard crystalline materials and underpins core mechanoelectric transduction phenomena in soft biomaterials. Most excitingly, flexoelectricity is a size-dependent effect which becomes more significant in nanoscale systems. With increasing interest in nanoscale and nano-bio hybrid materials, flexoelectricity will continue to gain prominence. This Review summarizes work in this area. First, methods to amplify or manipulate the flexoelectric effect to enhance material properties will be investigated, particularly at nanometer scales. Next, the nature and history of these effects in soft biomaterials will be explored. Finally, some theoretical interpretations for the effect will be presented. Overall, flexoelectricity represents an exciting phenomenon which is expected to become more considerable as materials continue to shrink. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Biomimetic Materials for Pathogen Neutralization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ingber, Donald

    1997-01-01

    ...) and polymer chemistry fabrication technologies for the production of synthetic 'biomimetic' materials that exhibit the mechanical responsiveness and biochemical processing capabilities of living cells and tissues...

  7. Biomimetic Scaffolds for Osteogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Nance; Rezzadeh, Kameron S.; Lee, Justine C.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal regenerative medicine emerged as a field of investigation to address large osseous deficiencies secondary to congenital, traumatic, and post-oncologic conditions. Although autologous bone grafts have been the gold standard for reconstruction of skeletal defects, donor site morbidity remains a significant limitation. To address these limitations, contemporary bone tissue engineering research aims to target delivery of osteogenic cells and growth factors in a defined three dimensional space using scaffolding material. Using bone as a template, biomimetic strategies in scaffold engineering unite organic and inorganic components in an optimal configuration to both support osteoinduction as well as osteoconduction. This article reviews the various structural and functional considerations behind the development of effective biomimetic scaffolds for osteogenesis and highlights strategies for enhancing osteogenesis. PMID:26413557

  8. Biomimetic magnetic nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Klem, Michael T.; Young, Mark; Douglas, Trevor

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are of considerable interest because of their potential use in high-density memory devices, spintronics, and applications in diagnostic medicine. The conditions for synthesis of these materials are often complicated by their high reaction temperatures, costly reagents, and post-processing requirements. Practical applications of magnetic nanoparticles will require the development of alternate synthetic strategies that can overcome these impediments. Biomimetic approaches...

  9. A Biomimetic Haptic Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Mitchinson; Ian Gilhespy; Chris Melhuish; Mokhtar Nibouche; Tony J. Prescott; Anthony G. Pipe; Martin J. Pearson

    2008-01-01

    The design and implementation of the periphery of an artificial whisker sensory system is presented. It has been developed by adopting a biomimetic approach to model the structure and function of rodent facial vibrissae. The artificial vibrissae have been formed using composite materials and have the ability to be actively moved or whisked. The sensory structures at the root of real vibrissae has been modelled and implemented using micro strain gauges and Digital Signal Processors. The primar...

  10. Biomimetic hydrogel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertozzi, Carolyn; Mukkamala, Ravindranath; Chen, Qing; Hu, Hopin; Baude, Dominique

    2000-01-01

    Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

  11. Biomimetic engineering: towards a self-assembled nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braach-Maksvytis, V.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The Nanoscience and Systems program was set up within CSIRO Telecommunications and Industrial Physics three years ago with an emphasis on biomimetic engineering, with the aim of developing new cross-disciplinary research in traditional physics areas. By combining expertise in experimental and theoretical physics with biology and chemistry, new approaches towards understanding and using nanoscale systems and devices are being explored. Research in the program ranges from using self-assembled lipid membranes for surface passivation of GaAs transistors to the electrical properties of nanoparticle films and devices. An overview of the research will be given, highlighting the diversity of nanotechnology applications

  12. Natural bone-like biomimetic surface modification of titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Il-Kyu; Hwang, Ji-Young; Jang, Won-Cheoul; Kim, Hae-Won; Shin, Ueon Sang

    2014-05-01

    An implantable metallic surface consisting of titanium (Ti) was modified with natural bone-mimicking CNT-Gelatin-HA nanohybrids to create a new surface with similar properties to the surrounding bone tissue in terms of the chemical constitution, nanotopography, wettability, and biocompatibility. The biomimetic surface modification was achieved through the covalent immobilization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) onto the Ti surface, the covalent tethering of gelatin molecules onto the CNT surface, and then the deposition of hydroxyl apatite (HA) crystals onto the gelatin-tethered CNTs in SBF solution. The SEM microscopic images demonstrated that the modified Ti surface continually maintained a fibrous structure of CNTs, but that the CNT fibers were hybridized with gelatin and HA in a multi-core-shell structure of similar constitution to that of the collagen fibers of natural bone. The new surface of the Ti substrates showed significantly higher mechanical properties and favorable wettability and biocompatibility.

  13. Biomimetism, biomimetic matrices and the induction of bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, Ugo

    2009-09-01

    the induction of bone formation, the emergence of the skeleton, of the vertebrates and of Homo species * Different strategies for the induction of bone formation. Biological significance of redundancy and synergistic induction of bone formation. Biomimetism and biomimetic matrices self-assembling the induction of bone formation The concavity: the shape of life and the induction of bone formation. Influence of geometry on the expression of the osteogenic phenotype. Conclusion and therapeutic perspectives on porous biomimetic matrices with intrinsic osteoinductivity Bone formation by induction initiates by invocation of osteogenic soluble molecular signals of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily; when combined with insoluble signals or substrata, the osteogenic soluble signals trigger the ripple-like cascade of cell differentiation into osteoblastic cell lines secreting bone matrix at site of surgical implantation. A most exciting and novel strategy to initiate bone formation by induction is to carve smart self-inducing geometric concavities assembled within biomimetic constructs. The assembly of a series of repetitive concavities within the biomimetic constructs is endowed with the striking prerogative of differentiating osteoblast-like cells attached to the biomimetic matrices initiating the induction of bone formation as a secondary response. Importantly, the induction of bone formation is initiated without the exogenous application of the osteogenic soluble molecular signals of the TGF-beta superfamily. This manuscript reviews the available data on this fascinating phenomenon, i.e. biomimetic matrices that arouse and set into motion the mammalian natural ability to heal thus constructing biomimetic matrices that in their own right set into motion inductive regenerative phenomena initiating the cascade of bone differentiation by induction biomimetizing the remodelling cycle of the primate cortico-cancellous bone.

  14. Enzymatic hydrolysis of biomimetic bacterial cellulose-hemicellulose composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penttilä, Paavo A; Imai, Tomoya; Hemming, Jarl; Willför, Stefan; Sugiyama, Junji

    2018-06-15

    The production of biofuels and other chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass is limited by the inefficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis. Here a biomimetic composite material consisting of bacterial cellulose and wood-based hemicelluloses was used to study the effects of hemicelluloses on the enzymatic hydrolysis with a commercial cellulase mixture. Bacterial cellulose synthesized in the presence of hemicelluloses, especially xylan, was found to be more susceptible to enzymatic hydrolysis than hemicellulose-free bacterial cellulose. The reason for the easier hydrolysis could be related to the nanoscale structure of the substrate, particularly the packing of cellulose microfibrils into ribbons or bundles. In addition, small-angle X-ray scattering was used to show that the average nanoscale morphology of bacterial cellulose remained unchanged during the enzymatic hydrolysis. The reported easier enzymatic hydrolysis of bacterial cellulose produced in the presence of wood-based xylan offers new insights to overcome biomass recalcitrance through genetic engineering. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of two carbonated apatite ceramics in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habibovic, Pamela; Juhl, Maria V.; Clyens, Stuart; Martinetti, Roberta; Dolcini, Laura; Theilgaard, Naseem; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    2010-01-01

    Carbonated apatite ceramics, with a composition similar to that of bone mineral, are potentially interesting synthetic bone graft substitutes. In the present study, two porous carbonated apatite ceramics were developed, characterized and tested for their bone repair capacity and osteoinductive

  16. Nanoscale Confinement and Fluorescence Effects of Bacterial Light Harvesting Complex LH2 in Mesoporous Silicas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ikemoto, Hideki; Tubasum, Sumera; Pullerits, Tonu

    2013-01-01

    Many key chemical and biochemical reactions, particularly in living cells, take place in confined space at the mesoscopic scale. Towards understanding of physicochemical nature of biomacromolecules confined in nanoscale space, in this work we have elucidated fluorescent effects of a light...... harvesting complex LH2 in nanoscale chemical environments. Mesoporous silicas (SBA-15 family) with different shapes and pore sizes were synthesized and used to create nanoscale biomimetic environments for molecular confinement of LH2. A combination of UV-vis absorption, wide-field fluorescence microscopy...

  17. Biomimetic nanoparticles for inflammation targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Jin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been many recent exciting developments in biomimetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications. Inflammation, a protective response involving immune cells, blood vessels, and molecular mediators directed against harmful stimuli, is closely associated with many human diseases. As a result, biomimetic nanoparticles mimicking immune cells can help achieve molecular imaging and precise drug delivery to these inflammatory sites. This review is focused on inflammation-targeting biomimetic nanoparticles and will provide an in-depth look at the design of these nanoparticles to maximize their benefits for disease diagnosis and treatment.

  18. Biomimetics in Tribology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebeshuber, I. C.; Majlis, B. Y.; Stachelberger, H.

    Science currently goes through a major change. Biology is evolving as new Leitwissenschaft, with more and more causation and natural laws being uncovered. The term `technoscience' denotes the field where science and technology are inseparably interconnected, the trend goes from papers to patents, and the scientific `search for truth' is increasingly replaced by search for applications with a potential economic value. Biomimetics, i.e. knowledge transfer from biology to technology, is a field that has the potential to drive major technical advances. The biomimetic approach might change the research landscape and the engineering culture dramatically, by the blending of disciplines. It might substantially support successful mastering of current tribological challenges: friction, adhesion, lubrication and wear in devices and systems from the meter to the nanometer scale. A highly successful method in biomimectics, the biomimicry innovation method, is applied in this chapter to identify nature's best practices regarding two key issues in tribology: maintenance of the physical integrity of a system, and permanent as well as temporary attachment. The best practices identified comprise highly diverse organisms and processes and are presented in a number of tables with detailed references.

  19. IN SITU LEAD IMMOBILIZATION BY APATITE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lead contamination is of environmental concern due to its effect on human health. The purpose of this study was to develop a technology to immobilize Pb in situ in contaminated soils and wastes using apatite. Hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(O...

  20. Biomimetic oral mucin from polymer micelle networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Authimoolam, Sundar Prasanth

    Mucin networks are formed by the complexation of bottlebrush-like mucin glycoprotein with other small molecule glycoproteins. These glycoproteins create nanoscale strands that then arrange into a nanoporous mesh. These networks play an important role in ensuring surface hydration, lubricity and barrier protection. In order to understand the functional behavior in mucin networks, it is important to decouple their chemical and physical effects responsible for generating the fundamental property-function relationship. To achieve this goal, we propose to develop a synthetic biomimetic mucin using a layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition approach. In this work, a hierarchical 3-dimensional structures resembling natural mucin networks was generated using affinity-based interactions on synthetic and biological surfaces. Unlike conventional polyelectrolyte-based LBL methods, pre-assembled biotin-functionalized filamentous (worm-like) micelles was utilized as the network building block, which from complementary additions of streptavidin generated synthetic networks of desired thickness. The biomimetic nature in those synthetic networks are studied by evaluating its structural and bio-functional properties. Structurally, synthetic networks formed a nanoporous mesh. The networks demonstrated excellent surface hydration property and were able capable of microbial capture. Those functional properties are akin to that of natural mucin networks. Further, the role of synthetic mucin as a drug delivery vehicle, capable of providing localized and tunable release was demonstrated. By incorporating antibacterial curcumin drug loading within synthetic networks, bacterial growth inhibition was also demonstrated. Thus, such bioactive interfaces can serve as a model for independently characterizing mucin network properties and through its role as a drug carrier vehicle it presents exciting future opportunities for localized drug delivery, in regenerative applications and as bio

  1. Bottom-Up Synthesis and Sensor Applications of Biomimetic Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of nanotechnology, biology, and bioengineering greatly improved the developments of nanomaterials with unique functions and properties. Biomolecules as the nanoscale building blocks play very important roles for the final formation of functional nanostructures. Many kinds of novel nanostructures have been created by using the bioinspired self-assembly and subsequent binding with various nanoparticles. In this review, we summarized the studies on the fabrications and sensor applications of biomimetic nanostructures. The strategies for creating different bottom-up nanostructures by using biomolecules like DNA, protein, peptide, and virus, as well as microorganisms like bacteria and plant leaf are introduced. In addition, the potential applications of the synthesized biomimetic nanostructures for colorimetry, fluorescence, surface plasmon resonance, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, electrical resistance, electrochemistry, and quartz crystal microbalance sensors are presented. This review will promote the understanding of relationships between biomolecules/microorganisms and functional nanomaterials in one way, and in another way it will guide the design and synthesis of biomimetic nanomaterials with unique properties in the future.

  2. Manufacture of nanosized apatite coatings on titanium with different surface treatments using a supersaturated calcification solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Paz Ramos

    Full Text Available The biomimetic method is used for the deposition of calcium phosphate coatings (Ca - P on the surface of different biomaterials. However, the application of this method requires long exposure times in order to obtain a suitable layer thickness for its use in medical devices. In this paper, we present a fast approach to obtain apatite coatings on titanium, using a combination of supersaturated calcification solution (SCS with chemical modification of the titanium surface. Also, it was evaluated the effect of four different surface treatments on the apatite deposition rate. Commercially pure titanium plates were activated by chemical or thermochemical treatments. Then, the activated samples were immersed in a solution with high content of calcium and phosphate ions at 37 ºC for 24 h, mimicking the physiological conditions. The coatings were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX. The use of SCS solutions allowed the formation of crystalline hydroxyapatite coatings within a period of 24 h with a thickness between 1 and 5.3 µm. Besides, precipitates of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with a globular configuration, forming aggregates with submicrometer size, were found in SCS solutions.

  3. Inorganic-Organic Nanocomposite Assembly Using Collagen as Template and Sodium Tripolyphosphate as A Biomimetic Analog of Matrix Phosphoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lin; Qi, Yi-Pin; Niu, Li-Na; Liu, Yan; Pucci, Cesar R.; Looney, Stephen W.; Ling, Jun-Qi; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2011-01-01

    Nanocomposites created with polycarboxylic acid alone as a stabilization agent for prenucleation clusters-derived amorphous calcium phosphate exhibit non-periodic apatite deposition. In the present study, we report the use of inorganic polyphosphate as a biomimetic analog of matrix phosphoprotein for directing polyacrylic acid-stabilized amorphous nanoprecursor phases to assemble into periodic apatite-collagen nanocomposites. The sorption and desorption characteristics of sodium tripolyphosphate to type I collagen was examined. Periodic nanocomposite assembly with collagen as a template was demonstrated with TEM and SEM using a Portland cement-based resin composite and a phosphate-containing simulated body fluid. Apatite was detected within the collagen at 24 hours and became more distinct at 48 hours, with prenucleation clusters attaching to the collagen fibril surface during the initial infiltration stage. Apatite-collagen nanocomposites at 72 hours were heavily mineralized with periodically-arranged intrafibrillar apatite platelets. Defect-containing nanocomposites caused by desorption of TPP from collagen fibrils were observed in regions lacking the inorganic phase. PMID:21857797

  4. Influence of vacancy damage on He diffusion in apatite, investigated at atomic to mineralogical scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerin, Chloé; Gautheron, Cécile; Oliviero, Erwan; Bachelet, Cyril; Mbongo Djimbi, Duval; Seydoux-Guillaume, Anne-Magali; Tassan-Got, Laurent; Sarda, Philippe; Roques, Jérôme; Garrido, Frédérico

    2017-01-01

    Helium diffusion in U-Th-rich minerals, especially apatite, is considered as strongly impacted by damage, even at low U-Th content. To get direct evidence and better understand the impact of damage on He diffusion, we conducted a study on vacancy damage in apatite, at nanometric to atomic scales, using different methodologies. Firstly, damage was created on apatite crystals by He implantation at different He fluences ranging from 2 × 1015 to 1 × 1017 He/cm2, corresponding to atomic displacement ranging from 12 to more than 100% of the total structure in the first 200 nm below the surface. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) was used to image the damage structure, for the lowest He fluence. TEM images present no visible damage zone at nano-scale, implying that the created damage corresponds well to Frenkel defects (vacancies and interstitials). Secondly, diffusion experiments were performed on those samples by mapping He concentration vs. depth profiles using Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA). After measurement of implanted-He profiles and He concentrations, the samples were heated in order to diffuse the implanted profile during 15-45 h at temperatures from 145 to 250 °C. The obtained He vs. depth heated profiles and He concentrations reveal the impact of damage on He diffusivity. The results can only be explained by a model where diffusion depends on damage dose, taking into account He trapping in vacancies and damage interconnectivity at higher damage dose. Thirdly, Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations were performed to simulate a vacancy in a F-apatite crystal. The structure becomes slightly deformed by the vacancy and the insertion energy of a He atom in the vacancy is lower than for an usual insertion site. Accordingly, the additional energy for a He atom to jump out of the vacancy is ΔEa ≈ 30-40 kJ/mol, in good agreement with published estimates. This calculation thus shows that small modifications of the structure due to the presence

  5. Nanostructured cobalt phosphates as excellent biomimetic enzymes to sensitively detect superoxide anions released from living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min-Qiang; Ye, Cui; Bao, Shu-Juan; Xu, Mao-Wen; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Ling; Ma, Xiao-Qing; Guo, Jun; Li, Chang-Ming

    2017-01-15

    Monitoring superoxide anion radicals in living cells has been attracting much academic and industrial interest due to the dual roles of the radicals. Herein, we synthesized a novel nanostructured cobalt phosphate nanorods (Co 3 (PO 4 ) 2 NRs) with tunable pore structure using a simple and effective micro-emulsion method and explored their potential utilization in the electrochemical sensing of superoxide anions. As an analytical and sensing platform, the nanoscale biomimetic enzymes Co 3 (PO 4 ) 2 NRs exhibited excellent selectivity and sensitivity towards superoxide anion (O 2 •- ) with a low detection limit (2.25nM), wide linear range (5.76-5396nM), and long-term stability. Further, the nanoscale biomimetic enzyme could be efficiently applied in situ to electrochemically detect O 2 •- released from human malignant melanoma cells and normal keratinocyte, showing excellent real time quantitative detection capability. This material open up exciting opportunities for implementing biomimetic enzymes in nanoscale transition metal phosphates and designing enzyme-free biosensors with much higher sensitivity and durability in health and disease analysis than those of natural one. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A Biomimetic Haptic Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J. Pearson

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The design and implementation of the periphery of an artificial whisker sensory system is presented. It has been developed by adopting a biomimetic approach to model the structure and function of rodent facial vibrissae. The artificial vibrissae have been formed using composite materials and have the ability to be actively moved or whisked. The sensory structures at the root of real vibrissae has been modelled and implemented using micro strain gauges and Digital Signal Processors. The primary afferents and vibrissal trigeminal ganglion have been modelled using empirical data taken from electrophysiological measurements, and implemented in real-time using a Field Programmable Gate Array. Pipelining techniques were employed to maximise the utility of the FPGA hardware. The system is to be integrated into a more complete whisker sensory model, including neural structures within the central nervous system, which can be used to orient a mobile robot.

  7. Investigation of vacancy damage influence on He diffusion in apatite: implication for the (U-Th)/He thermochronometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautheron, Cécile; Gerin, Chloé; Bachelet, Cyril; Mbongo Djimbi, Duval; Seydoux-Guillaume, Anne-Magali; Tassan-Got, Laurent; Roques, Jérôme; Garrido, Frédérico

    2017-04-01

    Helium diffusion in minerals rich in actinides, especially apatite, is considered as strongly impacted by damage, even at low U-Th content. However, no direct evidence exists neither about such an impact nor the damage topology. To better understand the impact of damage on He diffusion, we conducted a study on vacancy damage in apatite, at nanometric to atomic scales, using several methodologies [1]. We investigate the role of vacancy damage that are the one created during alpha decay. Firstly, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) was used to image the damage structure done by He implantation in the first 200 nm below the surface of apatite crystal. TEM images present no visible damage zone at nano-scale, implying that the created damage corresponds well to Frenkel defects (vacancies and interstitials). Secondly, to test the damage impact on diffusion and the trapping efficiency, we conduct both experimental and theoretical studies. Diffusion experiments were performed on He implanted samples by mapping He concentration vs. depth profiles using Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA). After measurement of implanted-He profiles and He concentrations, the samples were heated in order to diffuse the implanted profile. The obtained He vs. depth heated profiles and He concentrations reveal the impact of damage on He diffusivity. The results can only be explained by a model where diffusion depends on damage dose, taking into account He trapping in vacancies and damage interconnectivity at higher damage dose. Thirdly, Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations were performed to simulate a vacancy in a F-apatite crystal, and results are compared with an undamaged apatite cell [2]. The structure becomes slightly deformed by the vacancy and the insertion energy of a He atom in the vacancy is lower than for an usual insertion site. Accordingly, the additional energy for a He atom to jump out of the vacancy is in good agreement with published estimates. This calculation

  8. Lunar apatite with terrestrial volatile abundances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Jeremy W; Liu, Yang; Rossman, George R; Guan, Yunbin; Eiler, John M; Stolper, Edward M; Taylor, Lawrence A

    2010-07-22

    The Moon is thought to be depleted relative to the Earth in volatile elements such as H, Cl and the alkalis. Nevertheless, evidence for lunar explosive volcanism has been used to infer that some lunar magmas exsolved a CO-rich and CO(2)-rich vapour phase before or during eruption. Although there is also evidence for other volatile species on glass spherules, until recently there had been no unambiguous reports of indigenous H in lunar rocks. Here we report quantitative ion microprobe measurements of late-stage apatite from lunar basalt 14053 that document concentrations of H, Cl and S that are indistinguishable from apatites in common terrestrial igneous rocks. These volatile contents could reflect post-magmatic metamorphic volatile addition or growth from a late-stage, interstitial, sulphide-saturated melt that contained approximately 1,600 parts per million H(2)O and approximately 3,500 parts per million Cl. Both metamorphic and igneous models of apatite formation suggest a volatile inventory for at least some lunar materials that is similar to comparable terrestrial materials. One possible implication is that portions of the lunar mantle or crust are more volatile-rich than previously thought.

  9. In vitro biomimetic deposition of apatite on alkaline and heat treated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    According to above explanations, it was determined that the best treatment conditions for Ti6Al4V specimens were immersed in 5 M NaOH solution at 80°C for 3 days followed by heat treatment at 600°C for 1 h. 5. Conclusions. Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) treated in NaOH can form apa- tite after soaking in SBF. It was found that ...

  10. Unusual multiscale mechanics of biomimetic nanoparticle hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yunlong; Damasceno, Pablo F; Somashekar, Bagganahalli S; Engel, Michael; Tian, Falin; Zhu, Jian; Huang, Rui; Johnson, Kyle; McIntyre, Carl; Sun, Kai; Yang, Ming; Green, Peter F; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Glotzer, Sharon C; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2018-01-12

    Viscoelastic properties are central for gels and other materials. Simultaneously, high storage and loss moduli are difficult to attain due to their contrarian requirements to chemical structure. Biomimetic inorganic nanoparticles offer a promising toolbox for multiscale engineering of gel mechanics, but a conceptual framework for their molecular, nanoscale, mesoscale, and microscale engineering as viscoelastic materials is absent. Here we show nanoparticle gels with simultaneously high storage and loss moduli from CdTe nanoparticles. Viscoelastic figure of merit reaches 1.83 MPa exceeding that of comparable gels by 100-1000 times for glutathione-stabilized nanoparticles. The gels made from the smallest nanoparticles display the highest stiffness, which was attributed to the drastic change of GSH configurations when nanoparticles decrease in size. A computational model accounting for the difference in nanoparticle interactions for variable GSH configurations describes the unusual trends of nanoparticle gel viscoelasticity. These observations are generalizable to other NP gels interconnected by supramolecular interactions and lead to materials with high-load bearing abilities and energy dissipation needed for multiple technologies.

  11. Investigation on the effect of collagen and vitamins on biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating formation on titanium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciobanu, Gabriela, E-mail: gciobanu03@yahoo.co.uk [“Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection, Prof. dr. docent Dimitrie Mangeron Rd., no. 63, zip: 700050, Iasi (Romania); Ciobanu, Octavian [“Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medical Bioengineering, Universitatii Str., no. 16, zip: 700115, Iasi (Romania)

    2013-04-01

    This study uses an in vitro experimental approach to investigate the roles of collagen and vitamins in regulating the deposition of hydroxyapatite layer on the pure titanium surface. Titanium implants were coated with a hydroxyapatite layer under biomimetic conditions by using a supersaturated calcification solution (SCS), modified by adding vitamins A and D{sub 3}, and collagen. The hydroxyapatite deposits on titanium were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The results obtained have shown that hydroxyapatite coatings were produced in vitro under vitamins and collagen influence. - Highlights: ► Hydroxyapatite was grown on Ti using a modified supersaturated calcification solution (M-SCS). ► Vitamins (A and D3) and collagen in M-SCS have a significant effect on apatite precipitation. ► M-SCS stimulates a biomimetic apatite deposition with 0.5–1 μm thickness in a short time. ► Hydroxyapatite crystallites have thin plate morphologies and size below 1 μm.

  12. Investigation on the effect of collagen and vitamins on biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating formation on titanium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciobanu, Gabriela; Ciobanu, Octavian

    2013-01-01

    This study uses an in vitro experimental approach to investigate the roles of collagen and vitamins in regulating the deposition of hydroxyapatite layer on the pure titanium surface. Titanium implants were coated with a hydroxyapatite layer under biomimetic conditions by using a supersaturated calcification solution (SCS), modified by adding vitamins A and D 3 , and collagen. The hydroxyapatite deposits on titanium were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The results obtained have shown that hydroxyapatite coatings were produced in vitro under vitamins and collagen influence. - Highlights: ► Hydroxyapatite was grown on Ti using a modified supersaturated calcification solution (M-SCS). ► Vitamins (A and D3) and collagen in M-SCS have a significant effect on apatite precipitation. ► M-SCS stimulates a biomimetic apatite deposition with 0.5–1 μm thickness in a short time. ► Hydroxyapatite crystallites have thin plate morphologies and size below 1 μm

  13. Dynamics at the nanoscale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoneham, A.M.; Gavartin, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    However fascinating structures may be at the nanoscale, time-dependent behaviour at the nanoscale has far greater importance. Some of the dynamics is random, with fluctuations controlling rate processes and making thermal ratchets possible. Some of the dynamics causes the transfer of energy, of signals, or of charge. Such transfers are especially efficiently controlled in biological systems. Other dynamical processes occur when we wish to control the nanoscale, e.g., to avoid local failures of gate dielectrics, or to manipulate structures by electronic excitation, to use spin manipulation in quantum information processing. Our prime purpose is to make clear the enormous range and variety of time-dependent nanoscale phenomena

  14. Nanoscale thermal probing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Yue

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale novel devices have raised the demand for nanoscale thermal characterization that is critical for evaluating the device performance and durability. Achieving nanoscale spatial resolution and high accuracy in temperature measurement is very challenging due to the limitation of measurement pathways. In this review, we discuss four methodologies currently developed in nanoscale surface imaging and temperature measurement. To overcome the restriction of the conventional methods, the scanning thermal microscopy technique is widely used. From the perspective of measuring target, the optical feature size method can be applied by using either Raman or fluorescence thermometry. The near-field optical method that measures nanoscale temperature by focusing the optical field to a nano-sized region provides a non-contact and non-destructive way for nanoscale thermal probing. Although the resistance thermometry based on nano-sized thermal sensors is possible for nanoscale thermal probing, significant effort is still needed to reduce the size of the current sensors by using advanced fabrication techniques. At the same time, the development of nanoscale imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging, provides a great potential solution to resolve the nanoscale thermal probing problem.

  15. RBS and RNRA studies on sorption of europium by apatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Kozai, Naofumi; Isobe, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Murakami, Takashi; Yamamoto, Shunya; Aoki, Yasushi; Naramoto, Hiroshi

    1997-03-01

    The sorption mechanism of europium, alternative of trivalent TRU has been studied based on the depth profiles of elements obtained by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) and Resonant Nuclear Reaction Analysis (RNRA). The positive peak for Eu and the negative peak for Ca were observed in the subtracted RBS spectra of the apatites on which Eu was sorbed from that of the fresh apatite. This indicates that Eu was sorbed on apatite, while a fraction of Ca was released from apatite. The peak height for Eu in the RBS spectrum of the apatite obtained at 75degC was higher than that of the apatite at 40degC. The depth profile of hydrogen of the apatite on which Eu was sorbed was similar to that of the fresh apatite. The concentration of Eu in the solution decreased with increasing temperature. On the contrary, the concentration of Ca increased with increasing temperature. Thus, it is concluded that a fraction of Eu is exchanged for Ca in the structure of apatite. (author)

  16. Biomimetic architectures by plasma processing fabrication and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chattopadhyay, Surojit

    2014-01-01

    Photonic structures in the animal kingdom: valuable inspirations for bio-mimetic applications. Moth eye-type anti-reflecting nanostructures by an electron cyclotron resonance plasma. Plasma-processed biomimetic nano/microstructures. Wetting properties of natural and plasma processed biomimetic surfaces. Biomimetic superhydrophobic surface by plasma processing. Biomimetic interfaces of plasma modified titanium alloy.

  17. Challenges in commercializing biomimetic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Mark; Madsen, Steen Ulrik; Jørgensen, Tine Elkjær

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of selective water channel proteins—aquaporins—has prompted growing interest in using these proteins, as the building blocks for designing new types of membranes. However, as with any other new and potentially disruptive technology, barriers for successful market entry exist. One...... of these barriers and challenges associated with introducing biomimetic aquaporin membranes. These include technical issues in membrane production and product testing. Then we discuss possible business models for introducing new technologies in general, followed by a presentation of beach-head market segments...... relevant for biomimetic aquaporin membranes....

  18. Large scale biomimetic membrane arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Søndergaard; Perry, Mark; Vogel, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    To establish planar biomimetic membranes across large scale partition aperture arrays, we created a disposable single-use horizontal chamber design that supports combined optical-electrical measurements. Functional lipid bilayers could easily and efficiently be established across CO2 laser micro...... peptides and proteins. Next, we tested the scalability of the biomimetic membrane design by establishing lipid bilayers in rectangular 24 x 24 and hexagonal 24 x 27 aperture arrays, respectively. The results presented show that the design is suitable for further developments of sensitive biosensor assays...

  19. Biomimetic Production of Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Devens

    2004-03-01

    The basic reaction for hydrogen generation is formation of molecular hydrogen from two electrons and two protons. Although there are many possible sources for the protons and electrons, and a variety of mechanisms for providing the requisite energy for hydrogen synthesis, the most abundant and readily available source of protons and electrons is water, and the most attractive source of energy for powering the process is sunlight. Not surprisingly, living systems have evolved to take advantage of these sources for materials and energy. Thus, biology provides paradigms for carrying out the reactions necessary for hydrogen production. Photosynthesis in green plants uses sunlight as the source of energy for the oxidation of water to give molecular oxygen, protons, and reduction potential. Some photosynthetic organisms are capable of using this reduction potential, in the form of the reduced redox protein ferredoxin, to reduce protons and produce molecular hydrogen via the action of an hydrogenase enzyme. A variety of other organisms metabolize the reduced carbon compounds that are ultimately the major products of photosynthesis to produce molecular hydrogen. These facts suggest that it might be possible to use light energy to make molecular hydrogen via biomimetic constructs that employ principles similar to those used by natural organisms, or perhaps with hybrid "bionic" systems that combine biomimetic materials with natural enzymes. It is now possible to construct artificial photosynthetic systems that mimic some of the major steps in the natural process.(1) Artificial antennas based on porphyrins, carotenoids and other chromophores absorb light at various wavelengths in the solar spectrum and transfer the harvested excitation energy to artificial photosynthetic reaction centers.(2) In these centers, photoinduced electron transfer uses the energy from light to move an electron from a donor to an acceptor moiety, generating a high-energy charge-separated state

  20. Rare earth elements materials production from apatite ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anufrieva, A V; Buynovskiy, A S; Makaseev, Y N; Mazov, I N; Nefedov, R A; Sachkov, V I; Valkov, A V; Andrienko, O S; Stepanova, O B

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with the study of processing apatite ores with nitric acid and extraction of the rare earth elements. The rare earth elements can be successfully separated and recovered by extraction from the nitrate- phosphate solution, being an tributyl phosphate as extraction agent. The developed scheme of the processing apatite concentrate provides obtaining rare earth concentrates with high qualitative characteristics. (paper)

  1. Bio-mimetic Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Haecheon

    2009-11-01

    Bio-mimetic engineering or bio-mimetics is the application of biological methods and systems found in nature to the study and design of engineering systems and modern technology (from Wikipedia). The concept itself is old, but successful developments have been made recently, especially in the research field of flow control. The objective of flow control based on the bio-mimetic approach is to develop novel concepts for reducing drag, increasing lift and enhancing aerodynamic performance. For skin friction reduction, a few ideas have been suggested such as the riblet from shark, compliant surface from dolphin, microbubble injection and multiple front-body curvature from penguin, and V-shaped protrusion from sailfish. For form drag reduction, several new attempts have been also made recently. Examples include the V-shaped spanwise grooves from saguaro cactus, overall shape of box fish, longitudinal grooves on scallop shell, bill of swordfish, hooked comb on owl wing, trailing-edge protrusion on dragonfly wing, and fillet. For the enhancement of aerodynamic performance, focuses have been made on the birds, fish and insects: e.g., double layered feather of landing bird, leading-edge serration of humpback-whale flipper, pectoral fin of flying fish, long tail on swallowtail-butterfly wing, wing flapping motion of dragonfly, and alula in birds. Living animals adapt their bodies to better performance in multi purposes, but engineering requires single purpose in most cases. Therefore, bio-mimetic approaches often produce excellent results more than expected. However, they are sometimes based on people's wrong understanding of nature and produce unwanted results. Successes and failures from bio-mimetic approaches in flow control will be discussed in the presentation.

  2. IN SITU LEAD STABILIZATION USING NATURAL AND SYNTHETIC APATITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kaluđerović Radoičić

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, mineral apatite was investigated for the remediation of lead contamination. Two different apatite minerals were used: synthetic apatite, Ca10(PO46(OH2 (hereafter denoted as HAP and natural apatite from Lisina, near Bosilegrad, Serbia (hereafter denoted as LA. Phosphate ore from Lisina deposit consists of 43.3 % apatite in the form of fluorapatite, Ca10(PO46(F2. Sorption properties of HAP and LA were investigated. The results show that both of these minerals are effective in lead removal from the water solution. Sorption capacity of HAP obtained in this experiment is 0.216 mmol Pb/g HAP, while the value for LA is 0.162 mmol Pb/g LA. Modeling of these systems was conducted using Visual Minteq computer program. The values obtained from the computer simulation were compared to experimental values.

  3. A natural biomimetic porous medium mimicking hypomineralized enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennat, E; Denis, M; David, B; Attal, J-P

    2015-03-01

    In order to evaluate the clinical impact of low viscosity resin infiltration in hypomineralized enamel, it is necessary to obtain a biomimetic porous substrate capable of mimicking enamel. The specifications for the biomimetic porous medium are defined using the literature data on hypomineralized enamel. Based on these specifications, we propose to use deproteinized dentin, the latter being deproteinized by heat treatment. Thermogravimetry analysis (TGA), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) observations, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) tests and nanoindentation are performed on the deproteinized dentin tissue. Heat treatment is shown to be an effective and reproducible method for removing organic fluids and protein residues in dentin. Deproteinizing dentin also enables forming nanovoids by eliminating its organic matrix. The interconnected open nanoporosities (porosities of less than 100 nm) created at 600°C are distributed between 14 nm and 32 nm and the total porosity is 39% (including 36% due to nanoporosities). At 800°C, they are distributed between 60 nm and 100 nm and total porosity is 37% (including 33% arising from the nanoporosities). The hydroxyapatite crystal structure is transformed less at 600°C, so this temperature should be preferred. Besides providing new understanding of the dentin tissue itself, this study led to characterizing a porous medium made of natural apatite, and proposing and validating its use as a porous medium mimicking hypomineralized enamel. The next logical step of this study is the characterization of resin infiltration in this medium and its mechanical reinforcement. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biomimetics inspired surfaces for drag reduction and oleophobicity/philicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat Bhushan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of biomimetics allows one to mimic biology or nature to develop nanomaterials, nanodevices, and processes which provide desirable properties. Hierarchical structures with dimensions of features ranging from the macroscale to the nanoscale are extremely common in nature and possess properties of interest. There are a large number of objects including bacteria, plants, land and aquatic animals, and seashells with properties of commercial interest. Certain plant leaves, such as lotus (Nelumbo nucifera leaves, are known to be superhydrophobic and self-cleaning due to the hierarchical surface roughness and presence of a wax layer. In addition to a self-cleaning effect, these surfaces with a high contact angle and low contact angle hysteresis also exhibit low adhesion and drag reduction for fluid flow. An aquatic animal, such as a shark, is another model from nature for the reduction of drag in fluid flow. The artificial surfaces inspired from the shark skin and lotus leaf have been created, and in this article the influence of structure on drag reduction efficiency is reviewed. Biomimetic-inspired oleophobic surfaces can be used to prevent contamination of the underwater parts of ships by biological and organic contaminants, including oil. The article also reviews the wetting behavior of oil droplets on various superoleophobic surfaces created in the lab.

  5. Inhibition of osteoblast mineralization by phosphorylated phage-derived apatite-specific peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Janani; Nam, Hwa Kyung; Ramaraju, Harsha; Hatch, Nan E.; Kohn, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Functionalization of biomaterials with material- and cell-specific peptide sequences allows for better control of their surface properties and communication with the surrounding environment. Using a combinatorial phage display approach, we previously identified the peptide VTKHLNQISQSY (VTK) with specific affinity to biomimetic apatite. Phosphorylation of the serine residues of the peptide (pVTK) caused a significant increase in binding to apatite, as well as a dose-dependent inhibition of osteoblast mineralization. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms behind pVTK mediated inhibition of mineralization using MC3T3 cells and testing the hypothesis that mineralization is inhibited via alteration of the Enpp1-TNAP-Ank axis. Inhibition of mineralization was not due to disruption of collagen deposition or calcium chelation by the negatively charged pVTK. The timing of peptide administration was important in inhibiting mineralization - pVTK had a greater effect at later stages of osteogenic differentiation (days 7–12 of culture corresponding to matrix maturation and mineralization), and could prevent progression of mineralization once it had started. pVTK treatment resulted in a significant decrease in ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 (Enpp1) enzyme activity and gene expression. The expression of ankylosis protein (Ank) and osteopontin (OPN) and Pit-1 genes was also significantly reduced with peptide treatment, while tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and Runx2 gene expression was significantly higher. The ability of pVTK to inhibit mineralization can potentially be translated into therapeutics against pathological calcification seen in cardiovascular disease, osteoarthritis or craniosynostosis, or be used to prevent failure of biomaterials due to calcification, such as bioprosthetic heart valves. PMID:26406452

  6. Major Intrinsic Proteins in Biomimetic Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helix Nielsen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    this challenge by developing membranes in the form of lipid bilayers in which specialized transport proteins are incorporated. This raises the question: is it possible to mimic biological membranes and create a membrane based sensor and/or separation device? In the development of a biomimetic sensor...... or as sensor devices based on e.g., the selective permeation of metalloids. In principle a MIP based membrane sensor/separation device requires the supporting biomimetic matrix to be virtually impermeable to anything but water or the solute in question. In practice, however, a biomimetic support matrix...... will generally have finite permeabilities to both electrolytes and non-electrolytes. The feasibility of a biomimetic MIP device thus depends on the relative transport contribution from both protein and biomimetic support matrix. Also the biomimetic matrix must be encapsulated in order to protect it and make...

  7. Biomimetic membranes and methods of making biomimetic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempe, Susan; Brinker, Jeffrey C.; Rogers, David Michael; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Yang, Shaorong

    2016-11-08

    The present disclosure is directed to biomimetic membranes and methods of manufacturing such membranes that include structural features that mimic the structures of cellular membrane channels and produce membrane designs capable of high selectivity and high permeability or adsorptivity. The membrane structure, material and chemistry can be selected to perform liquid separations, gas separation and capture, ion transport and adsorption for a variety of applications.

  8. New Hybrid Route to Biomimetic Synthesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morse, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    To develop economical low-temperature routes to biomimetic synthesis of high-performance composite materials, with control of composition and structure based on the molecular mechanisms controlling...

  9. Biomimetic remineralization of human dentin using promising innovative calcium-silicate hybrid "smart" materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna; Taddei, Paola; Siboni, Francesco; Modena, Enrico; De Stefano, Elettra Dorigo; Prati, Carlo

    2011-11-01

    the experimental materials showed the appearance of carbonated apatite (IR bands at about 1400, 1020, 600 cm(-1)). EDX compositional depth profile through the fractured demineralized dentin slices showed the reappearance of Ca and P peaks (remineralization of dentin surface) to 30-50 μm depth. The ion-leachable experimental composites remineralized the human apatite-depleted dentin. Ion release promotes the formation of a bone-like carbonated-apatite on demineralized dentin within 7 days of immersion in DPBS. The use of bioactive "smart" composites containing reactive calcium-silicate Portland-derived mineral powder as tailored filler may be an innovative method for the biomimetic remineralization of apatite-depleted dentin surfaces and to prevent the demineralization of hypomineralized/carious dentin, with potentially great advantage in clinical applications. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Spintronics in nanoscale devices

    CERN Document Server

    Hedin, Eric R

    2013-01-01

    By exploiting the novel properties of quantum dots and nanoscale Aharonov-Bohm rings together with the electronic and magnetic properties of various semiconductor materials and graphene, researchers have conducted numerous theoretical and computational modeling studies and experimental tests that show promising behavior for spintronics applications. Spin polarization and spin-filtering capabilities and the ability to manipulate the electron spin state through external magnetic or electric fields have demonstrated the promise of workable nanoscale devices for computing and memory applications.

  11. Nanotechnology Biomimetic Cartilage Regenerative Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardinha, Jose Paulo; Myers, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage has a limited regenerative capacity. Faced with the clinical challenge of reconstruction of cartilage defects, the field of cartilage engineering has evolved. This article reviews current concepts and strategies in cartilage engineering with an emphasis on the application of nanotechnology in the production of biomimetic cartilage regenerative scaffolds. The structural architecture and composition of the cartilage extracellular matrix and the evolution of tissue engineering concepts and scaffold technology over the last two decades are outlined. Current advances in biomimetic techniques to produce nanoscaled fibrous scaffolds, together with innovative methods to improve scaffold biofunctionality with bioactive cues are highlighted. To date, the majority of research into cartilage regeneration has been focused on articular cartilage due to the high prevalence of large joint osteoarthritis in an increasingly aging population. Nevertheless, the principles and advances are applicable to cartilage engineering for plastic and reconstructive surgery. PMID:24883273

  12. Biological and Biomimetic Comb Polyelectrolytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristeidis Papagiannopoulos

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Some new phenomena involved in the physical properties of comb polyelectrolyte solutions are reviewed. Special emphasis is given to synthetic biomimetic materials, and the structures formed by these molecules are compared with those of naturally occurring glycoprotein and proteoglycan solutions. Developments in the determination of the structure and dynamics (viscoelasticity of comb polymers in solution are also covered. Specifically the appearance of multi-globular structures, helical instabilities, liquid crystalline phases, and the self-assembly of the materials to produce hierarchical comb morphologies is examined. Comb polyelectrolytes are surface active and a short review is made of some recent experiments in this area that relate to their morphology when suspended in solution. We hope to emphasize the wide variety of phenomena demonstrated by the vast range of naturally occurring comb polyelectrolytes and the challenges presented to synthetic chemists designing biomimetic materials.

  13. Role of magnesium on the biomimetic deposition of calcium phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Bimal K.; Sarma, Bikash

    2016-10-01

    Biomimetic depositions of calcium phosphate (CaP) are carried out using simulated body fluid (SBF), calcifying solution and newly developed magnesium containing calcifying solution. Calcium phosphate has a rich phase diagram and is well known for its excellent biocompatibility and bioactivity. The most common phase is hydroxyapatite (HAp), an integral component of human bone and tooth, widely used in orthopedic and dental applications. In addition, calcium phosphate nanoparticles show promise for the targeted drug delivery. The doping of calcium phosphate by magnesium, zinc, strontium etc. can change the protein uptake by CaP nanocrystals. This work describes the role of magnesium on the nucleation and growth of CaP on Ti and its oxide substrates. X-ray diffraction studies confirm formation of HAp nanocrystals which closely resemble the structure of bone apatite when grown using SBF and calcifying solution. It has been observed that magnesium plays crucial role in the nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate. A low magnesium level enhances the crystallinity of HAp while higher magnesium content leads to the formation of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) phase. Interestingly, the deposition of ACP phase is rapid when magnesium ion concentration in the solution is 40% of calcium plus magnesium ions concentration. Moreover, high magnesium content alters the morphology of CaP films.

  14. Apatite formation on active nanostructured coating based on functionalized gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasile, Eugeniu [METAV Research and Development (Romania); Serafim, Andrada; Dragusin, Diana-Maria; Petrea, Celina; Iovu, Horia; Stancu, Izabela-Cristina, E-mail: stancu.c.i@gmail.com [University Politehnica of Bucharest, Advanced Polymer Materials Group (Romania)

    2012-06-15

    In this work, we developed a simple method of surface functionalization of polymer substrates to provide them with the ability to form biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HA) when incubated in synthetic body fluids (SBF). In a first step, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were used as surface nanostructuring units for a biocompatible polymer, poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate), known to not promote biomineralization in SBF, and under physiological conditions. The treatment of AuNPs-modified substrate with mercaptosuccinic acid leads to brushes of carboxyl-ended chains self-assembled onto the gold-polymer hybrid nanosurface. The main aim of this work was to demonstrate that these multianionic nanosurfaces would induce HA formation when incubated in solutions mimicking physiologic conditions. The formation of apatite and its morphology and composition were successfully investigated by means of high resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Emphasis was put on the nucleation of HA in areas with agglomerated carboxyl-ended functionalized nanoparticles. The results obtained in this study may unlock new applications for smart active coatings based on functionalized AuNPs, such as the induction of biomineralization.

  15. Sensing in nature: using biomimetics for design of sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker; Cheong, Hyunmin; Shu, Li

    2010-01-01

    The paper illustrates how biomimetics can be applied in sensor design. Biomimetics is an engineering discipline that uses nature as an inspiration source for generating ideas for how to solve engineering problems. Using biomimetics involves a search for relevant cases, a proper analysis...... of biomimetic studies of sense organs in animals....

  16. ID ICPMS Lu-Hf Geochronology of Apatite from Iron-Oxide Apatite (IOA) Deposits, Northern Chilean Iron Belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Vervoort, J. D.; Barra, F.; Palma, G.

    2017-12-01

    Determining the age of mineralization of ore deposits is important for understanding the mechanisms and timing of ore formation. In many cases, however, conventional dateable mineral phases (e.g., zircon, monazite) are lacking in the ore mineral assemblages. For example, Iron Oxide Apatite (IOA) and Iron Oxide Gold Copper Gold (IOCG) deposits have the remaining fundamental question as to whether they have formed by hydrothermal or magmatic processes, or some combination of the two. In these deposits, the mineralization of iron oxide is often accompanied by the growth of apatites, which typically have REE concentrations of tens to several thousand ppm and which makes them potentially amenable to dating by the Lu-Hf isochron method. These apatites, however, also have very low concentrations of Hf, which makes determination of precise Hf isotope compositions challenging. In this study, we attempted to date these deposits using the apatite Lu-Hf isochron method, using procedures modified from that of Münker et al., 2001 and Barfod et al., 2003 and report the first Lu-Hf ages for apatites from Carmen, Fresia, and Mariela IOA deposits in northern Chilean Iron Belt. The concentration of Hf in analyzed apatite is 0.001 ppm. To ensure at least 0.5ng of Hf is collected for MS analysis, 0.5g apatite was dissolved for each sample. A single stage of Ln-spec resin chromatographic columns was used to separate Hf from REEs as multi stages of separation columns would decrease the Hf yield considerably. Using these procedures, we determined a Lu-Hf apatite age for the Carmen deposit of 130.0±1.7 Ma, which is in accordance with a previously published U-Pb apatite age of 131.0±1.0 Ma (Gelcich et al., 2005). The apatites from Fresia and Mariela yield Lu-Hf ages of 132.8±5.3 Ma and 117.3±0.4 Ma respectively. The lower points on the isochrons are either a low Lu/Hf phase (actinolite, magnetite) or bulk earth ratios. These are some of the first Lu-Hf ages of directly dating apatite

  17. Electrochemical characterization of hydrogels for biomimetic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peláez, L.; Romero, V.; Escalera, S.

    2011-01-01

    ) or a photoinitiator (P) to encapsulate and stabilize biomimetic membranes for novel separation technologies or biosensor applications. In this paper, we have investigated the electrochemical properties of the hydrogels used for membrane encapsulation. Specifically, we studied the crosslinked hydrogels by using...... for biomimetic membrane encapsulation. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  18. Development of calcium phosphate based apatite from hen's eggshell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Cowin et al 1987). The apatitic calcium phosphate of bone mineral consists of carbonate, small amount of sodium, magnesium and other trace ele- ments. The submicroscopic crystal of calcium phosphate in bone resembles the crystal structure ...

  19. Major Intrinsic Proteins in Biomimetic Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helix Nielsen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    will generally have finite permeabilities to both electrolytes and non-electrolytes. The feasibility of a biomimetic MIP device thus depends on the relative transport contribution from both protein and biomimetic support matrix. Also the biomimetic matrix must be encapsulated in order to protect it and make....../separation technology, a unique class of membrane transport proteins is especially interesting the major intrinsic proteins (MIPs). Generally, MIPs conduct water molecules and selected solutes in and out of the cell while preventing the passage of other solutes, a property critical for the conservation of the cells...... it sufficiently stable in a final application. Here, I specifically discuss the feasibility of developing osmotic biomimetic MIP membranes, but the technical issues are of general concern in the design of biomimetic membranes capable of supporting selective transmembrane fluxes....

  20. Synthetic Biomimetic Membranes and Their Sensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Rok Kim

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic biomimetic membranes provide biological environments to membrane proteins. By exploiting the central roles of biological membranes, it is possible to devise biosensors, drug delivery systems, and nanocontainers using a biomimetic membrane system integrated with functional proteins. Biomimetic membranes can be created with synthetic lipids or block copolymers. These amphiphilic lipids and polymers self-assemble in an aqueous solution either into planar membranes or into vesicles. Using various techniques developed to date, both planar membranes and vesicles can provide versatile and robust platforms for a number of applications. In particular, biomimetic membranes with modified lipids or functional proteins are promising platforms for biosensors. We review recent technologies used to create synthetic biomimetic membranes and their engineered sensors applications.

  1. Biomimetic membranes for sensor and separation applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helix Nielsen, Claus

    2009-01-01

    membrane-based sensor and/or separation devices? In the development of biomimetic sensor/separation technology, both channels (ion and water channels) and carriers (transporters) are important. Generally, each class of transport proteins conducts specific molecular species in and out of the cell while...... generally have a lower turnover but are capable of transport against gradients. For both classes of proteins, their unique flux-properties make them interesting as candidates in biomimetic sensor/separation devices. An ideal sensor/separation device requires the supporting biomimetic matrix to be virtually...... impermeable to anything but the solute in question. In practice, however, a biomimetic support matrix will generally have finite permeabilities to water, electrolytes, and non-electrolytes. The feasibility of a biomimetic device thus depends on the relative transport contribution from both protein...

  2. Biomimetics in drug delivery systems: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhpour, Mojgan; Barani, Leila; Kasaeian, Alibakhsh

    2017-05-10

    Today, the advanced drug delivery systems have been focused on targeted drug delivery fields. The novel drug delivery is involved with the improvement of the capacity of drug loading in drug carriers, cellular uptake of drug carriers, and the sustained release of drugs within target cells. In this review, six groups of therapeutic drug carriers including biomimetic hydrogels, biomimetic micelles, biomimetic liposomes, biomimetic dendrimers, biomimetic polymeric carriers and biomimetic nanostructures, are studied. The subject takes advantage of the biomimetic methods of productions or the biomimetic techniques for the surface modifications, similar to what accrues in natural cells. Moreover, the effects of these biomimetic approaches for promoting the drug efficiency in targeted drug delivery are visible. The study demonstrates that the fabrication of biomimetic nanocomposite drug carriers could noticeably promote the efficiency of drugs in targeted drug delivery systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Insight into Biological Apatite: Physiochemical Properties and Preparation Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological apatite is an inorganic calcium phosphate salt in apatite form and nano size with a biological derivation. It is also the main inorganic component of biological hard tissues such as bones and teeth of vertebrates. Consequently, biological apatite has a wide application in dentistry and orthopedics by using as dental fillers and bone substitutes for bone reconstruction and regeneration. Given this, it is of great significance to obtain a comprehensive understanding of its physiochemical and biological properties. However, upon the previous studies, inconsistent and inadequate data of such basic properties as the morphology, crystal size, chemical compositions, and solubility of biological apatite were reported. This may be ascribed to the differences in the source of raw materials that biological apatite are made from, as well as the effect of the preparation approaches. Hence, this paper is to provide some insights rather than a thorough review of the physiochemical properties as well as the advantages and drawbacks of various preparation methods of biological apatite.

  4. Insight into biological apatite: physiochemical properties and preparation approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quan; Huang, Shishu; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Chen, Zhuofan; Pan, Haobo

    2013-01-01

    Biological apatite is an inorganic calcium phosphate salt in apatite form and nano size with a biological derivation. It is also the main inorganic component of biological hard tissues such as bones and teeth of vertebrates. Consequently, biological apatite has a wide application in dentistry and orthopedics by using as dental fillers and bone substitutes for bone reconstruction and regeneration. Given this, it is of great significance to obtain a comprehensive understanding of its physiochemical and biological properties. However, upon the previous studies, inconsistent and inadequate data of such basic properties as the morphology, crystal size, chemical compositions, and solubility of biological apatite were reported. This may be ascribed to the differences in the source of raw materials that biological apatite are made from, as well as the effect of the preparation approaches. Hence, this paper is to provide some insights rather than a thorough review of the physiochemical properties as well as the advantages and drawbacks of various preparation methods of biological apatite.

  5. Biomimetic and cell-mediated mineralization of hydroxyapatite by carrageenan functionalized graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongyan; Cheng, Ju; Chen, Fengjuan; Hou, Fengping; Bai, Decheng; Xi, Pinxian; Zeng, Zhengzhi

    2014-03-12

    In bone tissue engineering, it is imperative to design multifunctional biomaterials that can induce and assemble bonelike apatite that is close to natural bone. In this study, graphene oxide (GO) was functionalized by carrageenan. The resulting GO-carrageenan (GO-Car) composite was further used as a substrate for biomimetic and cell-mediated mineralization of hydroxyapatite (HA). It was confirmed that carrageenan on the GO surface facilitated the nucleation of HA. The observation of the effect of the GO-Car on the adhesion, morphology, and proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells was investigated. In vitro studies clearly show the effectiveness of GO-Car in promoting HA mineralization and cell differentiation. The results of this study suggested that the GO-Car hybrid will be a promising material for bone regeneration and implantation.

  6. Solid state NMR method development and studies of biological and biomimetic nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Yanyan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes application and development of advanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for complex materials, in particular organic-inorganic nanocomposites and thermoelectric tellurides. The apatite-collagen interface, essential for understanding the biomineralization process in bone and engineering the interface for controlled bio-mimetic synthesis and optimized mechanical properties, is buried within the nanocomposite of bone. We used multinuclear solid-state NMR to study the composition and structure of the interface. Citrate has been identified as the main organic molecule strongly bound to the apatite surface with a density of 1/(2 nm)2, covering 1/6 of the total surface area in bovine bone. Citrate provides more carboxylate groups, one of the key functional groups found to affect apatite nucleation and growth, than all the non-collagenous proteins all together in bone; thus we propose that citrate stabilizes apatite crystals at a very small thickness of ~3 nm (4 unit cells) to increase bone fracture tolerance. The hypothesis has been confirmed in vitro by adding citrate in the bio-mimetic synthesis of polymerhydroxyapatite nanocomposites. The results have shown that the size of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals decreases as increasing citrate concentration. With citrate concentrations comparable to that in body fluids, similar-sized nanocrystals as in bone have been produced. Besides the dimensions of the apatite crystals, the composition of bone also affects its biofunctional and macroscopic mechanical properties; therefore, our team also extended its effort to enhance the inorganic portion in our bio-mimetic synthesis from originally 15 wt% to current 50 wt% compared to 65 wt% in bovine bone, by using Lysine-Leucine hydroxyapatite nucleating diblock co-polypeptide, which forms a gel at very low concentration. In this thesis, various advanced solid state NMR techniques have been employed to characterize nanocomposites

  7. Biomimetic microenvironments for regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Sagar N; Kim, Bogeun; Walma, Alexander M Cruz; Choi, Sung Chul; Wu, Hui; Mao, Jeremy J; Jun, Ho-Wook; Cheon, Kyounga

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative endodontics has been proposed to replace damaged and underdeveloped tooth structures with normal pulp-dentin tissue by providing a natural extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking environment; stem cells, signaling molecules, and scaffolds. In addition, clinical success of the regenerative endodontic treatments can be evidenced by absence of signs and symptoms; no bony pathology, a disinfected pulp, and the maturation of root dentin in length and thickness. In spite of the various approaches of regenerative endodontics, there are several major challenges that remain to be improved: a) the endodontic root canal is a strong harbor of the endodontic bacterial biofilm and the fundamental etiologic factors of recurrent endodontic diseases, (b) tooth discolorations are caused by antibiotics and filling materials, (c) cervical root fractures are caused by endodontic medicaments, (d) pulp tissue is not vascularized nor innervated, and (e) the dentin matrix is not developed with adequate root thickness and length. Generally, current clinical protocols and recent studies have shown a limited success of the pulp-dentin tissue regeneration. Throughout the various approaches, the construction of biomimetic microenvironments of pulp-dentin tissue is a key concept of the tissue engineering based regenerative endodontics. The biomimetic microenvironments are composed of a synthetic nano-scaled polymeric fiber structure that mimics native pulp ECM and functions as a scaffold of the pulp-dentin tissue complex. They will provide a framework of the pulp ECM, can deliver selective bioactive molecules, and may recruit pluripotent stem cells from the vicinity of the pulp apex. The polymeric nanofibers are produced by methods of self-assembly, electrospinning, and phase separation. In order to be applied to biomedical use, the polymeric nanofibers require biocompatibility, stability, and biodegradability. Therefore, this review focuses on the development and application of the

  8. Methane hydroxylation: a biomimetic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shilov, Aleksandr E; Shteinman, Al'bert A

    2012-01-01

    The review addresses direct methane oxidation — an important fundamental problem, which has attracted much attention of researchers in recent years. Analysis of the available results on biomimetic and bio-inspired methane oxygenation has demonstrated that assimilating of the experience of Nature on oxidation of methane and other alkanes significantly enriches the arsenal of chemistry and can radically change the character of the entire chemical production, as well as enables the solution of many material, energetic and environmental problems. The bibliography includes 310 references.

  9. Do Biomimetic Students Think Outside the Box?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker

    2017-01-01

    Biomimetics is a recognized method in ideation for getting access to new and – for the designer – novel knowledge, which hopefully will result in more novel and useful products. But do designers actually find new knowledge, i.e. think outside the box or do they stick to well-known biological...... phenomena? If they concentrate on animals and plants, which they beforehand have knowledge about, it could be expected that solutions will remind of what they would have found without using biomimetics. To investigate this question, the empirical results from a university course in biomimetics have been...

  10. Challenges in biomimetic design and innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker; Barfoed, Michael; Shu, Li

    Biomimetic design copies desired principles found in nature and implement them into artificial applications. Applications could be products we use in our daily life but it can also be used to inspire material innovation. However there are significant challenges in performing biomimetic design. One...... including the terminology and knowledge organisation. It is often easy to recognise the splendour of a biological solution, but it can be much more difficult to understand the underlying mechanisms. Another challenge in biomimetic design is the search and identification of relevant solutions in nature...

  11. Challenges in Commercializing Biomimetic Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Mark; Madsen, Steen Ulrik; Jørgensen, Tine; Braekevelt, Sylvie; Lauritzen, Karsten; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus

    2015-11-05

    The discovery of selective water channel proteins-aquaporins-has prompted growing interest in using these proteins, as the building blocks for designing new types of membranes. However, as with any other new and potentially disruptive technology, barriers for successful market entry exist. One category includes customer-related barriers, which can be influenced to some extent. Another category includes market-technical-related barriers, which can be very difficult to overcome by an organization/company aiming at successfully introducing their innovation on the market-in particular if both the organization and the technology are at early stages. Often, one faces barriers from both these categories at the same time, which makes it necessary to gain insight of the particular market when introducing a new innovative product. In this review we present the basic concepts and discuss some of these barriers and challenges associated with introducing biomimetic aquaporin membranes. These include technical issues in membrane production and product testing. Then we discuss possible business models for introducing new technologies in general, followed by a presentation of beach-head market segments relevant for biomimetic aquaporin membranes.

  12. Challenges in Commercializing Biomimetic Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Perry

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of selective water channel proteins—aquaporins—has prompted growing interest in using these proteins, as the building blocks for designing new types of membranes. However, as with any other new and potentially disruptive technology, barriers for successful market entry exist. One category includes customer-related barriers, which can be influenced to some extent. Another category includes market-technical-related barriers, which can be very difficult to overcome by an organization/company aiming at successfully introducing their innovation on the market—in particular if both the organization and the technology are at early stages. Often, one faces barriers from both these categories at the same time, which makes it necessary to gain insight of the particular market when introducing a new innovative product. In this review we present the basic concepts and discuss some of these barriers and challenges associated with introducing biomimetic aquaporin membranes. These include technical issues in membrane production and product testing. Then we discuss possible business models for introducing new technologies in general, followed by a presentation of beach-head market segments relevant for biomimetic aquaporin membranes.

  13. Biomimetic vibrissal sensing for robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Martin J; Mitchinson, Ben; Sullivan, J Charles; Pipe, Anthony G; Prescott, Tony J

    2011-11-12

    Active vibrissal touch can be used to replace or to supplement sensory systems such as computer vision and, therefore, improve the sensory capacity of mobile robots. This paper describes how arrays of whisker-like touch sensors have been incorporated onto mobile robot platforms taking inspiration from biology for their morphology and control. There were two motivations for this work: first, to build a physical platform on which to model, and therefore test, recent neuroethological hypotheses about vibrissal touch; second, to exploit the control strategies and morphology observed in the biological analogue to maximize the quality and quantity of tactile sensory information derived from the artificial whisker array. We describe the design of a new whiskered robot, Shrewbot, endowed with a biomimetic array of individually controlled whiskers and a neuroethologically inspired whisking pattern generation mechanism. We then present results showing how the morphology of the whisker array shapes the sensory surface surrounding the robot's head, and demonstrate the impact of active touch control on the sensory information that can be acquired by the robot. We show that adopting bio-inspired, low latency motor control of the rhythmic motion of the whiskers in response to contact-induced stimuli usefully constrains the sensory range, while also maximizing the number of whisker contacts. The robot experiments also demonstrate that the sensory consequences of active touch control can be usefully investigated in biomimetic robots.

  14. Towards a Scalable, Biomimetic, Antibacterial Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Mary Nora

    Corneal afflictions are the second leading cause of blindness worldwide. When a corneal transplant is unavailable or contraindicated, an artificial cornea device is the only chance to save sight. Bacterial or fungal biofilm build up on artificial cornea devices can lead to serious complications including the need for systemic antibiotic treatment and even explantation. As a result, much emphasis has been placed on anti-adhesion chemical coatings and antibiotic leeching coatings. These methods are not long-lasting, and microorganisms can eventually circumvent these measures. Thus, I have developed a surface topographical antimicrobial coating. Various surface structures including rough surfaces, superhydrophobic surfaces, and the natural surfaces of insects' wings and sharks' skin are promising anti-biofilm candidates, however none meet the criteria necessary for implementation on the surface of an artificial cornea device. In this thesis I: 1) developed scalable fabrication protocols for a library of biomimetic nanostructure polymer surfaces 2) assessed the potential these for poly(methyl methacrylate) nanopillars to kill or prevent formation of biofilm by E. coli bacteria and species of Pseudomonas and Staphylococcus bacteria and improved upon a proposed mechanism for the rupture of Gram-negative bacterial cell walls 3) developed a scalable, commercially viable method for producing antibacterial nanopillars on a curved, PMMA artificial cornea device and 4) developed scalable fabrication protocols for implantation of antibacterial nanopatterned surfaces on the surfaces of thermoplastic polyurethane materials, commonly used in catheter tubings. This project constitutes a first step towards fabrication of the first entirely PMMA artificial cornea device. The major finding of this work is that by precisely controlling the topography of a polymer surface at the nano-scale, we can kill adherent bacteria and prevent biofilm formation of certain pathogenic bacteria

  15. Study on apatite compounds; Apataitokei kagobutsu ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-28

    To clarify the material properties of apatite compounds, the synthesis method, and the evaluation of physical properties of material and elementary technology were investigated. For the study on synthesis and crystal growth, a method of precipitating calcium phosphate on the surface of metal was investigated by means of relatively mild electrolytic method using liquid phase system. A new molding method of Ca defective apatite was established. Composite similar to vital bone was prepared by means of a new low-temperature sintering. For the study on chemical properties, from the model experiments, it was found that the self-organizing phenomenon, which is observed in the composite of apatite and collagen, happened between the organic single molecular film and crystal of apatite. For the study on evaluation of physical properties and elementary technology, the surface and interface of ceramics such as apatite were investigated by means of spectroscopy, the electronic state was analyzed by the quantum chemical calculation, and the crystalline structure was analyzed using X-ray equipment. 270 refs., 102 figs., 10 tabs.

  16. Biomimetic design method for innovation and sustainability

    CERN Document Server

    Helfman Cohen, Yael

    2017-01-01

    Presenting a novel biomimetic design method for transferring design solutions from nature to technology, this book focuses on structure-function patterns in nature and advanced modeling tools derived from TRIZ, the theory of inventive problem-solving. The book includes an extensive literature review on biomimicry as an engine of both innovation and sustainability, and discusses in detail the biomimetic design process, current biomimetic design methods and tools. The structural biomimetic design method for innovation and sustainability put forward in this text encompasses (1) the research method and rationale used to develop and validate this new design method; (2) the suggested design algorithm and tools including the Findstructure database, structure-function patterns and ideality patterns; and (3) analyses of four case studies describing how to use the proposed method. This book offers an essential resource for designers who wish to use nature as a source of inspiration and knowledge, innovators and sustain...

  17. Photoexcited iron porphyrin as biomimetic catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartocci, C.; Maldotti, A.; Varani, G.; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Ferrara

    1996-01-01

    Photoexcited iron porphyrins can be of some interest in both fine and industrial chemistry in view of the preparation of new efficient biomimetic catalysts, working with high selectivity under mild temperature and pressure

  18. Biomimetic membranes for sensor and separation applications

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    This book addresses the possibilities and challenges in mimicking biological membranes and creating membrane-based sensor and separation devices. It covers recent advances in developing biomimetic membranes for technological applications with a focus on the use of integral membrane protein mediated transport. It describes the fundamentals of biosensing as well as separation and shows how the two processes work together in biological systems. The book provides an overview of the current state of the art, points to areas that need further investigation and anticipates future directions in the field. Biomimetics is a truly cross-disciplinary approach and this is exemplified by the challenges in mimicking osmotic processes as they occur in nature using aquaporin protein water channels as central building blocks. In the development of a biomimetic sensor/separation technology, both channel and carrier proteins are important and examples of how these may be reconstituted and controlled in biomimetic membranes are ...

  19. Biomimetic Membrane Arrays on Cast Hydrogel Supports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roerdink-Lander, Monique; Ibragimova, Sania; Rein Hansen, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Lipid bilayers are intrinsically fragile and require mechanical support in technical applications based on biomimetic membranes. Tethering the lipid bilayer membranes to solid substrates, either directly through covalent or ionic substrate−lipid links or indirectly on substrate-supported cushions......, provides mechanical support but at the cost of small molecule transport through the membrane−support sandwich. To stabilize biomimetic membranes while allowing transport through a membrane−support sandwich, we have investigated the feasibility of using an ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE...

  20. Nanoscale Vacuum Channel Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jin-Woo; Moon, Dong-Il; Meyyappan, M

    2017-04-12

    Vacuum tubes that sparked the electronics era had given way to semiconductor transistors. Despite their faster operation and better immunity to noise and radiation compared to the transistors, the vacuum device technology became extinct due to the high power consumption, integration difficulties, and short lifetime of the vacuum tubes. We combine the best of vacuum tubes and modern silicon nanofabrication technology here. The surround gate nanoscale vacuum channel transistor consists of sharp source and drain electrodes separated by sub-50 nm vacuum channel with a source to gate distance of 10 nm. This transistor performs at a low voltage (3 microamperes). The nanoscale vacuum channel transistor can be a possible alternative to semiconductor transistors beyond Moore's law.

  1. Ellipsometry at the nanoscale

    CERN Document Server

    Hingerl, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    This book presents and introduces ellipsometry in nanoscience and nanotechnology making a bridge between the classical and nanoscale optical behaviour of materials. It delineates the role of the non-destructive and non-invasive optical diagnostics of ellipsometry in improving science and technology of nanomaterials and related processes by illustrating its exploitation, ranging from fundamental studies of the physics and chemistry of nanostructures to the ultimate goal of turnkey manufacturing control. This book is written for a broad readership: materials scientists, researchers, engineers, as well as students and nanotechnology operators who want to deepen their knowledge about both basics and applications of ellipsometry to nanoscale phenomena. It starts as a general introduction for people curious to enter the fields of ellipsometry and polarimetry applied to nanomaterials and progresses to articles by experts on specific fields that span from plasmonics, optics, to semiconductors and flexible electronics...

  2. Nanoscale Organic Hybrid Electrolytes

    KAUST Repository

    Nugent, Jennifer L.

    2010-08-20

    Nanoscale organic hybrid electrolytes are composed of organic-inorganic hybrid nanostructures, each with a metal oxide or metallic nanoparticle core densely grafted with an ion-conducting polyethylene glycol corona - doped with lithium salt. These materials form novel solvent-free hybrid electrolytes that are particle-rich, soft glasses at room temperature; yet manifest high ionic conductivity and good electrochemical stability above 5V. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Biomimetic and Bioinspired Synthesis of Nanomaterials/Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Guangtao; Wu, Qingsheng

    2016-03-16

    In recent years, due to its unparalleled advantages, the biomimetic and bioinspired synthesis of nanomaterials/nanostructures has drawn increasing interest and attention. Generally, biomimetic synthesis can be conducted either by mimicking the functions of natural materials/structures or by mimicking the biological processes that organisms employ to produce substances or materials. Biomimetic synthesis is therefore divided here into "functional biomimetic synthesis" and "process biomimetic synthesis". Process biomimetic synthesis is the focus of this review. First, the above two terms are defined and their relationship is discussed. Next different levels of biological processes that can be used for process biomimetic synthesis are compiled. Then the current progress of process biomimetic synthesis is systematically summarized and reviewed from the following five perspectives: i) elementary biomimetic system via biomass templates, ii) high-level biomimetic system via soft/hard-combined films, iii) intelligent biomimetic systems via liquid membranes, iv) living-organism biomimetic systems, and v) macromolecular bioinspired systems. Moreover, for these five biomimetic systems, the synthesis procedures, basic principles, and relationships are discussed, and the challenges that are encountered and directions for further development are considered. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Molecular biomimetics: nanotechnology through biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikaya, Mehmet; Tamerler, Candan; Jen, Alex K.-Y.; Schulten, Klaus; Baneyx, François

    2003-09-01

    Proteins, through their unique and specific interactions with other macromolecules and inorganics, control structures and functions of all biological hard and soft tissues in organisms. Molecular biomimetics is an emerging field in which hybrid technologies are developed by using the tools of molecular biology and nanotechnology. Taking lessons from biology, polypeptides can now be genetically engineered to specifically bind to selected inorganic compounds for applications in nano- and biotechnology. This review discusses combinatorial biological protocols, that is, bacterial cell surface and phage-display technologies, in the selection of short sequences that have affinity to (noble) metals, semiconducting oxides and other technological compounds. These genetically engineered proteins for inorganics (GEPIs) can be used in the assembly of functional nanostructures. Based on the three fundamental principles of molecular recognition, self-assembly and DNA manipulation, we highlight successful uses of GEPI in nanotechnology.

  5. Contact kinematics of biomimetic scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Ranajay; Ebrahimi, Hamid; Vaziri, Ashkan, E-mail: vaziri@coe.neu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-12-08

    Dermal scales, prevalent across biological groups, considerably boost survival by providing multifunctional advantages. Here, we investigate the nonlinear mechanical effects of biomimetic scale like attachments on the behavior of an elastic substrate brought about by the contact interaction of scales in pure bending using qualitative experiments, analytical models, and detailed finite element (FE) analysis. Our results reveal the existence of three distinct kinematic phases of operation spanning linear, nonlinear, and rigid behavior driven by kinematic interactions of scales. The response of the modified elastic beam strongly depends on the size and spatial overlap of rigid scales. The nonlinearity is perceptible even in relatively small strain regime and without invoking material level complexities of either the scales or the substrate.

  6. Chemical, physical, and histologic studies on four commercial apatites used for alveolar ridge augmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Ruyter, I E; Haanaes, H R

    1992-01-01

    characteristics obtained by chemical analysis and infrared spectrometry. None of the apatites caused osteoinduction or osteoconduction; fibrous encapsulation with multinuclear giant cells was observed around all four types. One of the apatites was fluorapatite and not hydroxylapatite, as claimed...

  7. Electrochemical Studies of Paraquat Adsorbed onto Crystalline Apatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moulay Abderrahim EL MHAMMEDI

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The carbon paste electrode (CPE has been used to analyze the electrochemical behavior of paraquat (PQ adsorbed onto synthesized hydroxyapatite phosphocalcique (HAP in K2SO4 (0.1M. The cyclic voltammetry results obtained corrobate with square wave voltammetry. The influence of variables such as the concentration of paraquat adsorbed onto apatite (PQ/HAP, and the potential scan rate was tested.X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR analysis and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP, AES were used for characterization of the apatite.

  8. Nanoscale thermal transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, David G.; Ford, Wayne K.; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Merlin, Roberto; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2003-01-01

    Rapid progress in the synthesis and processing of materials with structure on nanometer length scales has created a demand for greater scientific understanding of thermal transport in nanoscale devices, individual nanostructures, and nanostructured materials. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation that have occurred in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces between materials become increasingly important on small length scales. The thermal conductance of many solid-solid interfaces have been studied experimentally but the range of observed interface properties is much smaller than predicted by simple theory. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are emerging as a powerful tool for calculations of thermal conductance and phonon scattering, and may provide for a lively interplay of experiment and theory in the near term. Fundamental issues remain concerning the correct definitions of temperature in nonequilibrium nanoscale systems. Modern Si microelectronics are now firmly in the nanoscale regime—experiments have demonstrated that the close proximity of interfaces and the extremely small volume of heat dissipation strongly modifies thermal transport, thereby aggravating problems of thermal management. Microelectronic devices are too large to yield to atomic-level simulation in the foreseeable future and, therefore, calculations of thermal transport must rely on solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation; microscopic phonon scattering rates needed for predictive models are, even for Si, poorly known. Low-dimensional nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes, are predicted to have novel transport properties; the first quantitative experiments of the thermal conductivity of nanotubes have recently been achieved using microfabricated measurement systems. Nanoscale porosity decreases the permittivity of amorphous dielectrics but porosity also strongly decreases the thermal conductivity. The

  9. Biomimetic organic-inorganic nanocomposite coatings for titanium implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikirić, Maja Dutour; Gergely, Csilla; Elkaim, Rene; Wachtel, Ellen; Cuisinier, Frederic J G; Füredi-Milhofer, Helga

    2009-06-01

    A new class of organic-inorganic nanocomposites, to be used as coatings for surface enhancement of metal implants for bone replacement and repair, has been prepared by a biomimetic three-step procedure: (1) embedding amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) particles between organic polyelectrolyte multilayers (PE MLs), (2) in situ transformation of ACP to octacalcium phospate (OCP) and/or poorly crystalline apatite nanocrystals by immersion of the material into a metastable calcifying solution (MCS) and (3) deposition of a final PE ML. The organic polyelectrolytes used were poly-L-glutamic acid and poly-L-lysine. The nanocomposites obtained by each successive step were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS), and XRD, and their suitability as coatings for metal implants was examined by mechanical and in vitro biological tests. Coatings obtained by the first deposition step are mechanically unstable and therefore not suitable. During the second step, upon immersion into MCS, ACP particles were transformed into crystalline calcium phosphate, with large platelike OCP crystals as the top layer. After phase transformation, the nanocomposite was strongly attached to the titanium, but the top layer did not promote cell proliferation. However, when the coating was topped with an additional PE ML (step 3), smoother surfaces were obtained, which facilitated cell adhesion and proliferation as shown by in vitro biological tests using primary human osteoblasts (HO) directly seeded onto the nanocomposites. In fact, cell proliferation on nanocomposites with top PE MLs was far superior than on any of the individual components and was equivalent to proliferation on the golden standard (plastic). 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Biomimetics applied to centering in micro-assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shu, L.H.; Lenau, Torben Anker; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the application of a biomimetic search method to develop ideas for centering objects in micro-assembly. Biomimetics involves the imitation of biological phenomena to solve problems. An obstacle to the use of biomimetics in engineering is knowledge of biological phenomena...

  11. Nano-apatite/polymer composites: mechanical and physicochemical characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Qing; de Wijn, J.R.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    1997-01-01

    Hydrothermally synthesized acicular nano-apatite (Nap) was used as filler to make composites with a polyethylene glycol/poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEG/PBT) block copolymer (Polyactive™70:30). The Nap had a particle diameter of 9–25 nm and a length of 80–200 nm. The mechanical properties and the

  12. Lead Speciation and Bioavailability in Apatite-Amended Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk G. Scheckel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The in situ sequestration of lead (Pb in sediment with a phosphate amendment was investigated by Pb speciation and bioavailability. Sediment Pb in preamendment samples was identified as galena (PbS with trace amounts of absorbed Pb. Sediment exposed to atmospheric conditions underwent conversion to hydrocerussite and anglesite. Sediments mixed with apatite exhibited limited conversion to pyromorphite, the hypothesized end product. Conversion of PbS to pyromorphite is inhibited under reducing conditions, and pyromorphite formation appears limited to reaction with pore water Pb and PbS oxidation products. Porewater Pb values were decreased by 94% or more when sediment was amended with apatite. The acute toxicity of the sediment Pb was evaluated with Hyalella azteca and bioaccumulation of Pb with Lumbriculus variegatus. The growth of H. azteca may be mildly inhibited in contaminated sediment, with apatite-amended sediments exhibiting on average a higher growth weight by approximately 20%. The bioaccumulation of Pb in L. variegatus tissue decreased with increased phosphate loading in contaminated sediment. The study indicates limited effectiveness of apatite in sequestering Pb if present as PbS under reducing conditions, but sequestration of porewater Pb and stabilization of near-surface sediment may be a feasible and alternative approach to decreasing potential toxicity of Pb.

  13. Effect of polydopamine on the biomimetic mineralization of mussel-inspired calcium phosphate cement in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zongguang [Key Lab of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Qu, Shuxin, E-mail: qushuxin@swjtu.edu.cn [Key Lab of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Zheng, Xiaotong; Xiong, Xiong [Key Lab of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Fu, Rong; Tang, Kuangyun; Zhong, Zhendong [Department of Plastic Surgery, Academy of Medical Sciences and Sichuan Provincial People' s Hospital, Chengdu 610041 (China); Weng, Jie [Key Lab of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2014-11-01

    Inspired by the excellent adhesive property of mussel adhesive protein, we added polydopamine (PDA) to calcium phosphate cement (PDA–CPC) to enhance its compressive strength previously. The mineralization and mechanism on PDA–CPC were investigated by soaking it in simulated body fluid in this study. The results indicated that PDA promoted the conversion of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and α-tricalcium phosphate to hydroxyapatite (HA) in the early stage but inhibited this conversion subsequently. PDA promoted the rapid mineralization on PDA–CPC to form a layer of nanoscale calcium phosphate (CaP) whereas there was no CaP formation on the control-CPC after 1 d of soaking. This layer of nanoscale CaP was similar to that of natural bone, which was always observed during soaking. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the peak of C=O of PDA existed in the newly formed CaP on PDA–CPC, indicating the co-precipitation of CaP with PDA. Furthermore, the newly formed CaP on PDA–CPC was HA confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, which the newly formed HA was in association with PDA. Therefore, PDA increased the capacity of mineralization of CPC and induced the formation of nanoscale bone-like apatite on PDA–CPC. Thus, this provides the feasible route for surface modification on CPC. - Highlights: • Effect of polydopamine (PDA) on the in vitro mineralization of PDA-CPC was studied. • PDA promoted the rapid mineralization on PDA-CPC to form a nanoscale HA layer. • The precipitation of the nanoscale HA layer on PDA-CPC accompanied with PDA. • Polydopamine induced mineralization is feasible for surface modification of CaP.

  14. Biomimetic solution against dewetting in a highly hydrophobic nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picaud, Fabien; Paris, Guillaume; Gharbi, Tijani; Balme, Sébastien; Lepoitevin, Mathilde; Tangaraj, Vidhyadevi; Bechelany, Mikhael; Janot, Jean Marc; Balanzat, Emmanuel; Henn, François

    2016-06-14

    A water molecule is the foundation of life and is the primary compound in every living system. While many of its properties are understood in a bulk solvent, its behavior in a small hydrophobic nanopore still raises fundamental questions. For instance, a wetting/dewetting transition in a hydrophobic solid-state or a polymer nanopore occurs stochastically and can only be prevented by external physical stimuli. Controlling these transitions would be a primary requirement to improve many applications. Some biological channels, such as gramicidin A (gA) proteins, show a high rate of water and ion diffusion in their central subnanochannel while their external surface is highly hydrophobic. The diameter of this channel is significantly smaller than the inner size of the lowest artificial nanopore in which water drying occurs (i.e. 1.4 nm). In this paper, we propose an innovative idea to generate nanopore wetting as a result of which the application of an external field is no longer required. In a nanopore, the drying or wetting of the inner walls occurs randomly (in experiments and in simulations). However, we have shown how the confinement of gA, in a dried hydrophobic nanopore, rapidly generates a stable wetting of the latter. We believe that this simple idea, based on biomimetism, could represent a real breakthrough that could help to improve and develop new nanoscale applications.

  15. Design and function of biomimetic multilayer water purification membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Shengjie; Qin, Zhao; Huang, Wenwen; Cao, Sufeng; Kaplan, David L; Buehler, Markus J

    2017-04-01

    Multilayer architectures in water purification membranes enable increased water throughput, high filter efficiency, and high molecular loading capacity. However, the preparation of membranes with well-organized multilayer structures, starting from the nanoscale to maximize filtration efficiency, remains a challenge. We report a complete strategy to fully realize a novel biomaterial-based multilayer nanoporous membrane via the integration of computational simulation and experimental fabrication. Our comparative computational simulations, based on coarse-grained models of protein nanofibrils and mineral plates, reveal that the multilayer structure can only form with weak interactions between nanofibrils and mineral plates. We demonstrate experimentally that silk nanofibril (SNF) and hydroxyapatite (HAP) can be used to fabricate highly ordered multilayer membranes with nanoporous features by combining protein self-assembly and in situ biomineralization. The production is optimized to be a simple and highly repeatable process that does not require sophisticated equipment and is suitable for scaled production of low-cost water purification membranes. These membranes not only show ultrafast water penetration but also exhibit broad utility and high efficiency of removal and even reuse (in some cases) of contaminants, including heavy metal ions, dyes, proteins, and other nanoparticles in water. Our biomimetic design and synthesis of these functional SNF/HAP materials have established a paradigm that could lead to the large-scale, low-cost production of multilayer materials with broad spectrum and efficiency for water purification, with applications in wastewater treatment, biomedicine, food industry, and the life sciences.

  16. Chemical treatment and biomimetic coating evaluating in zirconia-alumina ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, Amanda Abati

    2007-01-01

    Ceramic materials, as alumina and zirconia have been explored along the years as biomaterials application. The bio inert nature has been stimulating the development of new alternatives, as chemical treatments to improve the biological application of these ceramics. The biomimetic process of bio inert ceramics for coating apatite is based on soaking the implant in a simulated body fluid, SBF, with ion concentrations nearly equal to those of human blood plasma. The bioactivity of the material is related with the formation of a layer constituted of hydroxyapatite low crystalline, similar to the biological apatite. The biocompatibility associated to the structural properties of the alumina and zirconia has been stimulating the clinical use of these materials, mainly in areas of larger mechanical requests, places not recommended for bioactive hydroxyapatite, for instance. In this work samples of alumina, zirconia doped with Yttria (3% mol) and composites of alumina and zirconia doped with Yttria (3% mol) were prepared by co-precipitation method, calcinate, sintered, chemically treated with solutions of acid phosphoric and sodium hydroxide and them immersed in 1.0 M and 1.5 M SBF. The calcinate powders were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), gas adsorption (BET) and laser diffraction. The XRD results indicate that the samples are low crystalline. It was observed for BET that the samples present high specific surface area. The results of laser diffraction and SEM showed that the powders are agglomerates. The sintered samples were analyzed by XRD, SEM and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The phases quantified by Rietveld method were: cubic, tetragonal and monoclinic of the zirconia, besides the phase alpha of the alumina. The chemical treatment with phosphoric acid didn't present a tendency of larger apatite formation in relation to the samples no chemically treated. The treatment with sodium hydroxide provoked accentuated transformation of

  17. Evolving application of biomimetic nanostructured hydroxyapatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norberto Roveri

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Norberto Roveri, Michele IafiscoLaboratory of Environmental and Biological Structural Chemistry (LEBSC, Dipartimento di Chimica ‘G. Ciamician’, Alma Mater Studiorum, Università di Bologna, Bologna, ItalyAbstract: By mimicking Nature, we can design and synthesize inorganic smart materials that are reactive to biological tissues. These smart materials can be utilized to design innovative third-generation biomaterials, which are able to not only optimize their interaction with biological tissues and environment, but also mimic biogenic materials in their functionalities. The biomedical applications involve increasing the biomimetic levels from chemical composition, structural organization, morphology, mechanical behavior, nanostructure, and bulk and surface chemical–physical properties until the surface becomes bioreactive and stimulates cellular materials. The chemical–physical characteristics of biogenic hydroxyapatites from bone and tooth have been described, in order to point out the elective sides, which are important to reproduce the design of a new biomimetic synthetic hydroxyapatite. This review outlines the evolving applications of biomimetic synthetic calcium phosphates, details the main characteristics of bone and tooth, where the calcium phosphates are present, and discusses the chemical–physical characteristics of biomimetic calcium phosphates, methods of synthesizing them, and some of their biomedical applications.Keywords: hydroxyapatite, nanocrystals, biomimetism, biomaterials, drug delivery, remineralization

  18. Flexoelectricity in Nanoscale Ferroelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalan, Gustau

    2012-02-01

    All ferroelectrics are piezoelectric and thus have an intrinsic coupling between polarization and strain. There exists an additional electromechanical coupling, however, between polarization and strain gradients. Strain gradients are intrinsically vectorial fields and, therefore, they can in principle be used to modify both the orientation and the sign of the polarization, thanks to the coupling known as flexoelectricity. Flexoelectricity is possible even in paraelectric materials, but is generally stronger in ferroelectrics on account of their high permittivity (the flexoelectric coefficient is proportional to the dielectric constant). Moreover, strain gradients can be large at the nanoscale due to the smallness of the relaxation length and, accordingly, strong flexoelectric effects can be expected in nanoscale ferroelectrics. In this talk we will present two recent results that highlight the above features. In the first part, I will show how polarization tilting can be achieved in a nominally tetragonal ferroelectric (PbTiO3) thanks to the internal flexoelectric fields generated in nano-twinned epitaxial thin films. Flexoelectricity thus offers a purely physical means of achieving rotated polarizations, which are thought to be useful for enhanced piezoelectricity. In the second part, we will show how the large strain gradients generated by pushing the sharp tip of an atomic force microscope against the surface of a thin ferroelectric film can be used to actively switch its polarity by 180^o. This enables a new concept for ``multiferroic'' memory operation in which the memory bits are written mechanically and read electrically.

  19. Nanoscale relaxation oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Regan, Brian C.; Aloni, Shaul

    2009-04-07

    A nanoscale oscillation device is disclosed, wherein two nanoscale droplets are altered in size by mass transport, then contact each other and merge through surface tension. The device may also comprise a channel having an actuator responsive to mechanical oscillation caused by expansion and contraction of the droplets. It further has a structure for delivering atoms between droplets, wherein the droplets are nanoparticles. Provided are a first particle and a second particle on the channel member, both being made of a chargeable material, the second particle contacting the actuator portion; and electrodes connected to the channel member for delivering a potential gradient across the channel and traversing the first and second particles. The particles are spaced apart a specified distance so that atoms from one particle are delivered to the other particle by mass transport in response to the potential (e.g. voltage potential) and the first and second particles are liquid and touch at a predetermined point of growth, thereby causing merging of the second particle into the first particle by surface tension forces and reverse movement of the actuator. In a preferred embodiment, the channel comprises a carbon nanotube and the droplets comprise metal nanoparticles, e.g. indium, which is readily made liquid.

  20. Rocket Science at the Nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Wang, Joseph

    2016-06-28

    Autonomous propulsion at the nanoscale represents one of the most challenging and demanding goals in nanotechnology. Over the past decade, numerous important advances in nanotechnology and material science have contributed to the creation of powerful self-propelled micro/nanomotors. In particular, micro- and nanoscale rockets (MNRs) offer impressive capabilities, including remarkable speeds, large cargo-towing forces, precise motion controls, and dynamic self-assembly, which have paved the way for designing multifunctional and intelligent nanoscale machines. These multipurpose nanoscale shuttles can propel and function in complex real-life media, actively transporting and releasing therapeutic payloads and remediation agents for diverse biomedical and environmental applications. This review discusses the challenges of designing efficient MNRs and presents an overview of their propulsion behavior, fabrication methods, potential rocket fuels, navigation strategies, practical applications, and the future prospects of rocket science and technology at the nanoscale.

  1. Biomimetic heterogenous elastic tissue development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kai Jen; Dixon, Simon; Hale, Luke Richard; Darbyshire, Arnold; Martin, Daniel; de Mel, Achala

    2017-01-01

    There is an unmet need for artificial tissue to address current limitations with donor organs and problems with donor site morbidity. Despite the success with sophisticated tissue engineering endeavours, which employ cells as building blocks, they are limited to dedicated labs suitable for cell culture, with associated high costs and long tissue maturation times before available for clinical use. Direct 3D printing presents rapid, bespoke, acellular solutions for skull and bone repair or replacement, and can potentially address the need for elastic tissue, which is a major constituent of smooth muscle, cartilage, ligaments and connective tissue that support organs. Thermoplastic polyurethanes are one of the most versatile elastomeric polymers. Their segmented block copolymeric nature, comprising of hard and soft segments allows for an almost limitless potential to control physical properties and mechanical behaviour. Here we show direct 3D printing of biocompatible thermoplastic polyurethanes with Fused Deposition Modelling, with a view to presenting cell independent in-situ tissue substitutes. This method can expeditiously and economically produce heterogenous, biomimetic elastic tissue substitutes with controlled porosity to potentially facilitate vascularisation. The flexibility of this application is shown here with tubular constructs as exemplars. We demonstrate how these 3D printed constructs can be post-processed to incorporate bioactive molecules. This efficacious strategy, when combined with the privileges of digital healthcare, can be used to produce bespoke elastic tissue substitutes in-situ, independent of extensive cell culture and may be developed as a point-of-care therapy approach.

  2. Biomimetics, color, and the arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Franziska

    2015-03-01

    Color as dramatic, dynamic and dazzling as the iridescent hues on the wings of certain butterflies has never been encountered in the art world. Unlike and unmatched by the chemical pigments of the artists' palette, this changeable color is created by transparent, colorless nanostructures that, as with prisms, diffract and reflect light to render spectral color visible. Until now, iridescent colors, by their very nature, have defied artists' best efforts to fully capture these rainbow hues. Now, for the first time, the artist and researcher Franziska Schenk employs latest nature-inspired color-shift technology to actually simulate the iridescence of butterflies and beetles on canvas. Crucially, studying the ingenious ways in which a range of such displays are created by insects has provided the artist with vital clues on how to adapt and adopt these challenging optical nano-materials for painting. And indeed, after years of meticulous and painstaking research both in the lab and studio, the desired effect is achieved. The resulting paintings, like an iridescent insect, do in fact fluctuate in perceived color - depending on the light and viewing angle. In tracing the artist's respective biomimetic approach, the paper not only provides an insight into the new color technology's evolution and innovative artistic possibilities, but also suggests what artists can learn from nature.

  3. Forisome as biomimetic smart materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Amy; Hamlington, Benjamin; Knoblauch, Michael; Peters, Winfried; Pickard, William

    2005-05-01

    With the discovery in plants of the proteinaceous forisome crystalloid (Knoblauch et al. 2003), a novel nastic non-living, ATP-independent biological material became available to the designer of smart materials for advanced actuating and sensing. The in vitro studies of Knoblauch et al. show that forisomes (1-3 micron wide and 10-30 micron long) can be repeatedly stimulated to contract and expand anisotropically by shifting either the ambient pH or the ambient calcium ion concentration. In a device, the energy required for the transformations would be provided electrochemically by mini-electrodes inducing pH variation. Because of their unique abilities to develop and reverse strains greater than 20% in time periods less than 1s , forisomes have the potential to outperform current smart materials (such as ATP-dependent actuators or synthetic hydrogels/polymers) as advanced, biomimetic, multi-functional, smart sensors or valves or actuators. To date, studies have been limited to questions of protein engineering explored by Knaublach et al. Probing forisome material properties is therefore an immediate need to lay the foundation for synthesizing forisome-based smart materials for health monitoring of structural integrity in civil infrastructure and aerospace hardware. Here, we use microfluidics to study the surface interaction between forisome and substrate and the conformational dynamics of forisomes within a confined geometry to lay the foundation for forisome-based smart materials synthesis with controlled and repeatable environment.

  4. Biomimetic superwettable materials with structural colours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zelinlan; Guo, Zhiguang

    2017-12-05

    Structural colours and superwettability are of great interest due to their unique characteristics. However, the application of materials with either structural colours or superwettability is limited. Moreover, materials possessing both structural colours and superwettability are crucial for many practical applications. The combination of structural colours and superwettability can result in materials for use various applications, such as in sensors, detectors, bioassays, anti-counterfeiting, and liquid actuators, by controlling surfaces to repel or absorb liquids. Regarding superwettability and structural colours, surface texture and chemical composition are two factors for the construction of materials with superwettable structural colours. This review aims at offering a comprehensive elaboration of the mechanism, recent biomimetic research, and applications of biomimetic superwettable materials with structural colours. Furthermore, this review provides significant insight into the design, fabrication, and application of biomimetic superwettable materials with structural colours.

  5. Laser technology in biomimetics basics and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Belegratis, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Lasers are progressively more used as versatile tools for fabrication purposes. The wide range of available powers, wavelengths, operation modes, repetition rates etc. facilitate the processing of a large spectrum of materials at exceptional precision and quality. Hence, manifold methods were established in the past and novel methods are continuously under development. Biomimetics, the translation from nature-inspired principles to technical applications, is strongly multidisciplinary. This field offers intrinsically a wide scope of applications for laser based methods regarding structuring and modification of materials. This book is dedicated to laser fabrication methods in biomimetics. It introduces both, a laser technology as well as an application focused approach.  The book covers the most important laser lithographic methods and various biomimetics application scenarios ranging from coatings and biotechnology to construction, medical applications and photonics.

  6. Hydroxyapatite coating on stainless steel by biomimetic method; Recobrimento de hidroxiapatita em acos inoxidaveis austeniticos pelo metodo biomimetico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, V.M.; Maia Filho, A.L.M.; Silva, G.; Sousa, E. de; Cardoso, K.R., E-mail: katiarc@univap.b [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (IPD/UNIVAP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento

    2010-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in implants due to their high mechanical strength and corrosion, however, are not able to connect to bone tissue and were classified as bioinert. The calcium phosphate ceramics such as hydroxyapatite (HA) are bioactive materials and create strong chemical bonds with bone tissue, but its brittleness and low fracture toughness render its use in conditions of high mechanical stress. The coating of steel with the bioactive ceramics such as HA, combines the properties of interest of both materials, accelerating bone formation around the implant. In this study, austenitic stainless steel samples were coated with apatite using the biomimetic method. The effect of three different surface conditions of steel and the immersion time in the SBF solution on the coating was evaluated. The samples were characterized by SEM, EDS and X-ray diffraction. (author)

  7. Tissue bionics: examples in biomimetic tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, David W

    2008-01-01

    Many important lessons can be learnt from the study of biological form and the functional design of organisms as design criteria for the development of tissue engineering products. This merging of biomimetics and regenerative medicine is termed 'tissue bionics'. Clinically useful analogues can be generated by appropriating, modifying and mimicking structures from a diversity of natural biomatrices ranging from marine plankton shells to sea urchin spines. Methods in biomimetic materials chemistry can also be used to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds with added functional utility that promise human tissues fit for the clinic

  8. Tissue bionics: examples in biomimetic tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David W

    2008-09-01

    Many important lessons can be learnt from the study of biological form and the functional design of organisms as design criteria for the development of tissue engineering products. This merging of biomimetics and regenerative medicine is termed 'tissue bionics'. Clinically useful analogues can be generated by appropriating, modifying and mimicking structures from a diversity of natural biomatrices ranging from marine plankton shells to sea urchin spines. Methods in biomimetic materials chemistry can also be used to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds with added functional utility that promise human tissues fit for the clinic.

  9. Biomimetic microsensors inspired by marine life

    CERN Document Server

    Kottapalli, Ajay Giri Prakash; Miao, Jianmin; Triantafyllou, Michael S

    2017-01-01

    This book narrates the development of various biomimetic microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) sensors, such as pressure, flow, acceleration, chemical, and tactile sensors, that are inspired by sensing phenomenon that exist in marine life. The research described in this book is multi-faceted and combines the expertise and understanding from diverse fields, including biomimetics, microfabrication, sensor engineering, MEMS design, nanotechnology, and material science. A series of chapters examine the design and fabrication of MEMS sensors that function on piezoresistive, piezoelectric, strain gauge, and chemical sensing principles. By translating nature-based engineering solutions to artificial manmade technology, we could find innovative solutions to critical problems.

  10. Evaporation-induced assembly of biomimetic polypeptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyes, Joseph; Junkin, Michael; Cappello, Joseph; Wu Xiaoyi; Wong, Pak Kin

    2008-01-01

    We report an evaporation assisted plasma lithography (EAPL) process for guided self-assembly of a biomimetic silk-elastinlike protein (SELP). We demonstrate the formation of SELP structures from millimeter to submicrometer range on plasma-treatment surface templates during an evaporation-induced self-assembly process. The self-assembly processes at different humidities and droplet volumes were investigated. The process occurs efficiently in a window of optimized operating conditions found to be at 70% relative humidity and 8 μl volume of SELP solution. The EAPL approach provides a useful technique for the realization of functional devices and systems using these biomimetic materials

  11. Tissue bionics: examples in biomimetic tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, David W [Bone and Joint Research Group, Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, General Hospital, University of Southampton, SO16 6YD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Hindoostuart@googlemail.com

    2008-09-01

    Many important lessons can be learnt from the study of biological form and the functional design of organisms as design criteria for the development of tissue engineering products. This merging of biomimetics and regenerative medicine is termed 'tissue bionics'. Clinically useful analogues can be generated by appropriating, modifying and mimicking structures from a diversity of natural biomatrices ranging from marine plankton shells to sea urchin spines. Methods in biomimetic materials chemistry can also be used to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds with added functional utility that promise human tissues fit for the clinic.

  12. A Nanoscale Tale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Elba

    2008-10-01

    Experimentalists constantly seek to overcome technical limitations. This is especially true in the world of biophysics, where the drive to study molecular targets such as ion channels, a type of membrane transport protein, has resulted in methodological breakthroughs that have merited the Nobel Prize (Hodgkin and Huxley, 1963; Neher and Sakmann, 1991). In this presentation I will explain how nanoscale phenomena that are essential for sensory perception underlie the ability of dancers, gymnasts, and musicians to excel at their artistic endeavors. I will describe how our investigations of sensory mechanotransduction and the quest for improved signal amplification inspired a scientific journey that has culminated in an exciting new line of collaborative NIH-funded research with nanomaterials (quantum dots). I will conclude with a general discussion of how training in physics offers an ideal foundation for interdisciplinary research in health related fields, such as those that deal with neuroscience and disorders of the nervous system.

  13. Evaluation of biological properties of electron beam melted Ti6Al4V implant with biomimetic coating in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High strength porous titanium implants are widely used for the reconstruction of craniofacial defects because of their similar mechanical properties to those of bone. The recent introduction of electron beam melting (EBM technique allows a direct digitally enabled fabrication of patient specific porous titanium implants, whereas both their in vitro and in vivo biological performance need further investigation. METHODS: In the present study, we fabricated porous Ti6Al4V implants with controlled porous structure by EBM process, analyzed their mechanical properties, and conducted the surface modification with biomimetic approach. The bioactivities of EBM porous titanium in vitro and in vivo were evaluated between implants with and without biomimetic apatite coating. RESULTS: The physical property of the porous implants, containing the compressive strength being 163 - 286 MPa and the Young's modulus being 14.5-38.5 GPa, is similar to cortical bone. The in vitro culture of osteoblasts on the porous Ti6Al4V implants has shown a favorable circumstance for cell attachment and proliferation as well as cell morphology and spreading, which were comparable with the implants coating with bone-like apatite. In vivo, histological analysis has obtained a rapid ingrowth of bone tissue from calvarial margins toward the center of bone defect in 12 weeks. We observed similar increasing rate of bone ingrowth and percentage of bone formation within coated and uncoated implants, all of which achieved a successful bridging of the defect in 12 weeks after the implantation. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that the EBM porous Ti6Al4V implant not only reduced the stress-shielding but also exerted appropriate osteoconductive properties, as well as the apatite coated group. The results opened up the possibility of using purely porous titanium alloy scaffolds to reconstruct specific bone defects in the maxillofacial and orthopedic fields.

  14. Preparation and Characterization of Apatitic Biphasic Calcium Phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin Thin Nwe; Kyaw Naing; Khin Mar Tun; Nyunt Wynn

    2005-09-01

    The apatitic biphasic calcium phosphate (ABcp) consisting of hydroxyapatite (HA) and -tricalcium phosphate ( -Tcp) has been prepared by precipitation technique using slaked lime and orthophosphoric acid. The X-ray diffraction analysis of the product I (hydroxyapatite) revealed that ABcp was partially crystalline state. However, on heating at 800 C for 8 hrs, XRD pattern indicated a perfectly crystalline form of ABcp. This observation was supported by FT-IR measurement. The change in morphology regarding in the functional nature was infered by the shift in the FT-IR frequency. The optimization of the apatitic biphasic calcium phosphate was done by the variation of disodium hydrogen phosphate concentration, setting time, hardening time as well as compressive strength. The perpared cement may be used as an artificial substitution bone

  15. Preparation of rare earth fluorides from apatite concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulyarchuk, I.F.; Voloshchenko, M.V.; Zen'kovich, E.G.; Sumenkova, V.V.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Problem Lit'ya)

    1980-01-01

    The processes of preparation of the rare earths element sum from apatite concentrate of the Khibins, connected with preliminary extraction of rare earth phosphates from nitric acid extract using solvent extraction or direct precipitation from the extract by solution of potassium and ammonium fluorides. The sequence of the processes of the first variant is the following: solvent extraction of rare earths by tributylphosphate from clarified nitric acid extract of apatite with subsequent reextraction of rare earths with water and precipitation of rare earth phosphates from aqueous solution during neutralization by ammonia. In case of fluoride preparation from rare earth phosphate the main attention is paid to precipitation and filtration of fluorides. Technological scheme and cost price of industry for the production of 1800 t of rare earth trifluorides a year are calculated. When taking account of TBP losses according to its solubility the industry cost price is 1O times lower the modern cost of rare earth fluorides

  16. Instrumental neutron activation analysis of apatite-nepheline ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajtsev, E.I.; Bakhmatov, B.A.; Lyapunov, S.M.; Sotskov, Yu.P.

    1977-01-01

    Described is the technique for neutron activation determination of rare elements (cerium, samariu, europium, terbium, ytterbium et al.) in apatite-nepheline ores using Ge(Li)-spectrometer. The effect of interference is studied, the recognition threshold and accuracy of analysis of the above elements in this ores are estimated. The technique developed are recommended for the calculation of rare earth element reserves in phosphate raw products

  17. Influence of agitation intensity on flotation rate of apatite particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Gregianin Testa

    Full Text Available Abstract The agitation intensity has a directly influence on flotation performance, lifting the particles and promoting the contact of bubbles and particles. In this paper, the energy input by the agitation on apatite flotation was investigated. The influence of pulp agitation in the flotation rate of particles with different sizes and two dosage levels was evaluated by batch testing. The flotation tests were conducted in an oscillating grid flotation cell (OGC, developed to promote a near isotropic turbulence environment. The cell is able to control the intensity of agitation and measure the energy transferred to the pulp phase. A sample of pure apatite was crushed (P80=310µm, characterized and floated with sodium oleate as collector. Four levels of energy dissipation, from 0.1 to 2 kWm-3, and two levels of collector dosage are used during the tests. The flotation kinetics by particle size were determined in function of the energy transferred. The results show a strong influence of the agitation intensity on the apatite flotation rate with both low and high dosage. For fine particles, when increasing the energy input, the flotation rate increase too, and this fact can be attributed to elevation of bubble-particle collisions. The kinetic result for the coarse particles demonstrated a reduction of the flotation rate whenever the energy input for this particle size was increased, whereby the turbulence caused by the agitation promotes the detachment of bubble-particle.

  18. Biomimetic synthesis and characterization of semiconducting hybrid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Triple hybrid materials based on polyaniline-polyethylene glycol and cadmium sulphide have been prepared by the duffusion–limited biomimetic route and characterized by a number of spectroscopic, XRD, SEM, thermal and electrical measurements. These hybrid materials have been prepared by controlled precipitation of ...

  19. Evolving application of biomimetic nanostructured hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roveri, Norberto; Iafisco, Michele

    2010-11-09

    By mimicking Nature, we can design and synthesize inorganic smart materials that are reactive to biological tissues. These smart materials can be utilized to design innovative third-generation biomaterials, which are able to not only optimize their interaction with biological tissues and environment, but also mimic biogenic materials in their functionalities. The biomedical applications involve increasing the biomimetic levels from chemical composition, structural organization, morphology, mechanical behavior, nanostructure, and bulk and surface chemical-physical properties until the surface becomes bioreactive and stimulates cellular materials. The chemical-physical characteristics of biogenic hydroxyapatites from bone and tooth have been described, in order to point out the elective sides, which are important to reproduce the design of a new biomimetic synthetic hydroxyapatite. This review outlines the evolving applications of biomimetic synthetic calcium phosphates, details the main characteristics of bone and tooth, where the calcium phosphates are present, and discusses the chemical-physical characteristics of biomimetic calcium phosphates, methods of synthesizing them, and some of their biomedical applications.

  20. Proteins and Peptides in Biomimetic Polymeric Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Alfredo Gonzalez

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses recent advances and the main advantages of block copolymers for functional membrane protein reconstitution in biomimetic polymeric membranes. A rational approach to the reconstitution of membrane proteins in a functional form can be addressed by a more holistic view by using...

  1. Energy-based and biomimetic robotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folkertsma, Gerrit Adriaan

    2017-01-01

    All physical systems interact by exchanging power, or energy. This energy can be explicitly taken into account when designing robotic systems, in dynamic models of systems and controllers, leading to more insight in energy-related effects. In this thesis, a biomimetic cheetah robot is developed, by

  2. Biomimetic synthesis and characterization of semiconducting hybrid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Triple hybrid materials based on polyaniline-polyethylene glycol and cadmium sulphide have been prepared by the duffusion–limited biomimetic route and characterized by a number of spectroscopic, XRD, SEM, thermal and electrical measurements. These hybrid materials have been prepared by controlled precipitation of ...

  3. Biomimetic micromechanical adaptive flow-sensor arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Floris, J.; Dijkstra, Marcel; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Wiegerink, Remco J.

    2007-01-01

    We report current developments in biomimetic flow-sensors based on flow sensitive mechano-sensors of crickets. Crickets have one form of acoustic sensing evolved in the form of mechanoreceptive sensory hairs. These filiform hairs are highly perceptive to low-frequency sound with energy sensitivities

  4. Nanoscale friction and wear maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambe, Nikhil S; Bhushan, Bharat

    2008-04-28

    Friction and wear are part and parcel of all walks of life, and for interfaces that are in close or near contact, tribology and mechanics are supremely important. They can critically influence the efficient functioning of devices and components. Nanoscale friction force follows a complex nonlinear dependence on multiple, often interdependent, interfacial and material properties. Various studies indicate that nanoscale devices may behave in ways that cannot be predicted from their larger counterparts. Nanoscale friction and wear mapping can help identify some 'sweet spots' that would give ultralow friction and near-zero wear. Mapping nanoscale friction and wear as a function of operating conditions and interface properties is a valuable tool and has the potential to impact the very way in which we design and select materials for nanotechnology applications.

  5. Oriented and Ordered Biomimetic Remineralization of the Surface of Demineralized Dental Enamel Using HAP@ACP Nanoparticles Guided by Glycine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haorong; Xiao, Zuohui; Yang, Jie; Lu, Danyang; Kishen, Anil; Li, Yanqiu; Chen, Zhen; Que, Kehua; Zhang, Qian; Deng, Xuliang; Yang, Xiaoping; Cai, Qing; Chen, Ning; Cong, Changhong; Guan, Binbin; Li, Ting; Zhang, Xu

    2017-01-01

    Achieving oriented and ordered remineralization on the surface of demineralized dental enamel, thereby restoring the satisfactory mechanical properties approaching those of sound enamel, is still a challenge for dentists. To mimic the natural biomineralization approach for enamel remineralization, the biological process of enamel development proteins, such as amelogenin, was simulated in this study. In this work, carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC) conjugated with alendronate (ALN) was applied to stabilize amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) to form CMC/ACP nanoparticles. Sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) functioned as the protease which decompose amelogenin in vivo to degrade the CMC-ALN matrix and generate HAP@ACP core-shell nanoparticles. Finally, when guided by 10 mM glycine (Gly), HAP@ACP nanoparticles can arrange orderly and subsequently transform from an amorphous phase to well-ordered rod-like apatite crystals to achieve oriented and ordered biomimetic remineralization on acid-etched enamel surfaces. This biomimetic remineralization process is achieved through the oriented attachment (OA) of nanoparticles based on non-classical crystallization theory. These results indicate that finding and developing analogues of natural proteins such as amelogenin involved in the biomineralization by natural macromolecular polymers and imitating the process of biomineralization would be an effective strategy for enamel remineralization. Furthermore, this method represents a promising method for the management of early caries in minimal invasive dentistry (MID).

  6. Extreme biomimetic approach for synthesis of nanocrystalline chitin-(Ti,Zr)O{sub 2} multiphase composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wysokowski, Marcin, E-mail: Marcin.Wysokowski@put.poznan.pl [Poznan University of Technology, Faculty of Chemical Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology and Engineering, Berdychowo 4, 60965, Poznan (Poland); Motylenko, Mykhaylo; Rafaja, David [TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute of Materials Science, Gustav-Zeuner-Str. 5, 09596, Freiberg (Germany); Koltsov, Iwona [Laboratory of Nanostructures, Institute of High Pressure Physics of The Polish Academy of Sciences, Sokołowska 29/37, 01-142, Warsaw (Poland); Stöcker, Hartmut [TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute of Experimental Physics, Leipziger str. 23, 09596, Freiberg (Germany); Szalaty, Tadeusz J. [Poznan University of Technology, Faculty of Chemical Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology and Engineering, Berdychowo 4, 60965, Poznan (Poland); Bazhenov, Vasilii V., E-mail: vasily.bazhenov@gmail.com [TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute of Experimental Physics, Leipziger str. 23, 09596, Freiberg (Germany); Stelling, Allison L. [Duke University, Department of Biochemistry, Durham, NC, 27708 (United States); Beyer, Jan; Heitmann, Johannes [TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute of Applied Physics, Leipziger str. 23, 09596, Freiberg (Germany); Jesionowski, Teofil [Poznan University of Technology, Faculty of Chemical Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology and Engineering, Berdychowo 4, 60965, Poznan (Poland); Petovic, Slavica; Đurović, Mirko [Institute of Marine Biology, Dobrota, 85330, Kotor (Montenegro); Ehrlich, Hermann [TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute of Experimental Physics, Leipziger str. 23, 09596, Freiberg (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    This work presents an extreme biomimetics route for the modification of the surface of fibre-based scaffolds of poriferan origin by the creation of novel nanostructured multiphase biocomposites. The exceptional thermal stability of the nanostructured sponge chitin allowed for the formation of a novel nanocrystalline chitin-(Ti,Zr)O{sub 2} composite with a well-defined nanoscale structure under hydrothermal conditions (160 °C). Using a combination of experimental techniques, including X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, EDX mapping and near-edge electron loss spectroscopy (ELNES) in TEM and thermogravimetry/differential scanning calorimetry coupled with mass spectrometry; we showed that this bioorganic scaffold facilitates selective crystallization of TiO{sub 2}, predominantly in form of anatase, over the monoclinic zirconium dioxide (baddeleyite). The control of the crystal morphology through the chitin templates is also demonstrated. Obtained samples were characterized in terms of their photoluminescent properties and photocatalytic performance. These data confirm the high potential of the extreme biomimetics approach for developing a new generation of multiphase biopolymer-based nanostructured materials. - Highlights: • Extreme biomimetically prepared chitin-(Ti,Zr)O{sub 2} and (Ti,Zr)O{sub 2} composites. • Chitin-(Ti,Zr)O{sub 2} composite contains anatase as the most inorganic component. • The mean crystallite size is (31.7 ± 0.3) nm for chitin-(Ti,Zr)O{sub 2} composite. • The mean crystallite size is (2.4 ± 0.5) nm for (Ti,Zr)O{sub 2} composite. • (Ti,Zr)O{sub 2} composite is 2 times more effective photocatalyst than chitin-(Ti,Zr)O{sub 2}.

  7. Extreme biomimetic approach for synthesis of nanocrystalline chitin-(Ti,Zr)O2 multiphase composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wysokowski, Marcin; Motylenko, Mykhaylo; Rafaja, David; Koltsov, Iwona; Stöcker, Hartmut; Szalaty, Tadeusz J.; Bazhenov, Vasilii V.; Stelling, Allison L.; Beyer, Jan; Heitmann, Johannes; Jesionowski, Teofil; Petovic, Slavica; Đurović, Mirko; Ehrlich, Hermann

    2017-01-01

    This work presents an extreme biomimetics route for the modification of the surface of fibre-based scaffolds of poriferan origin by the creation of novel nanostructured multiphase biocomposites. The exceptional thermal stability of the nanostructured sponge chitin allowed for the formation of a novel nanocrystalline chitin-(Ti,Zr)O 2 composite with a well-defined nanoscale structure under hydrothermal conditions (160 °C). Using a combination of experimental techniques, including X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, EDX mapping and near-edge electron loss spectroscopy (ELNES) in TEM and thermogravimetry/differential scanning calorimetry coupled with mass spectrometry; we showed that this bioorganic scaffold facilitates selective crystallization of TiO 2 , predominantly in form of anatase, over the monoclinic zirconium dioxide (baddeleyite). The control of the crystal morphology through the chitin templates is also demonstrated. Obtained samples were characterized in terms of their photoluminescent properties and photocatalytic performance. These data confirm the high potential of the extreme biomimetics approach for developing a new generation of multiphase biopolymer-based nanostructured materials. - Highlights: • Extreme biomimetically prepared chitin-(Ti,Zr)O 2 and (Ti,Zr)O 2 composites. • Chitin-(Ti,Zr)O 2 composite contains anatase as the most inorganic component. • The mean crystallite size is (31.7 ± 0.3) nm for chitin-(Ti,Zr)O 2 composite. • The mean crystallite size is (2.4 ± 0.5) nm for (Ti,Zr)O 2 composite. • (Ti,Zr)O 2 composite is 2 times more effective photocatalyst than chitin-(Ti,Zr)O 2 .

  8. Nanoscale technology in biological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Greco, Ralph S; Smith, R Lane

    2004-01-01

    Reviewing recent accomplishments in the field of nanobiology Nanoscale Technology in Biological Systems introduces the application of nanoscale matrices to human biology. It focuses on the applications of nanotechnology fabrication to biomedical devices and discusses new physical methods for cell isolation and manipulation and intracellular communication at the molecular level. It also explores the application of nanobiology to cardiovascular diseases, oncology, transplantation, and a range of related disciplines. This book build a strong background in nanotechnology and nanobiology ideal for

  9. Bions: A Family of Biomimetic Mineralo-Organic Complexes Derived from Biological Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Jan; Young, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Mineralo-organic nanoparticles form spontaneously in human body fluids when the concentrations of calcium and phosphate ions exceed saturation. We have shown previously that these mineralo-organic nanoparticles possess biomimetic properties and can reproduce the whole phenomenology of the so-called nanobacteria—mineralized entities initially described as the smallest microorganisms on earth. Here, we examine the possibility that various charged elements and ions may form mineral nanoparticles with similar properties in biological fluids. Remarkably, all the elements tested, including sodium, magnesium, aluminum, calcium, manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, strontium, and barium form mineralo-organic particles with bacteria-like morphologies and other complex shapes following precipitation with phosphate in body fluids. Upon formation, these mineralo-organic particles, which we term bions, invariably accumulate carbonate apatite during incubation in biological fluids; yet, the particles also incorporate additional elements and thus reflect the ionic milieu in which they form. Bions initially harbor an amorphous mineral phase that gradually converts to crystals in culture. Our results show that serum produces a dual inhibition-seeding effect on bion formation. Using a comprehensive proteomic analysis, we identify a wide range of proteins that bind to these mineral particles during incubation in medium containing serum. The two main binding proteins identified, albumin and fetuin-A, act as both inhibitors and seeders of bions in culture. Notably, bions possess several biomimetic properties, including the possibility to increase in size and number and to be sub-cultured in fresh culture medium. Based on these results, we propose that bions represent biological, mineralo-organic particles that may form in the body under both physiological and pathological homeostasis conditions. These mineralo-organic particles may be part of a physiological cycle that

  10. Bions: a family of biomimetic mineralo-organic complexes derived from biological fluids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yeu Wu

    Full Text Available Mineralo-organic nanoparticles form spontaneously in human body fluids when the concentrations of calcium and phosphate ions exceed saturation. We have shown previously that these mineralo-organic nanoparticles possess biomimetic properties and can reproduce the whole phenomenology of the so-called nanobacteria-mineralized entities initially described as the smallest microorganisms on earth. Here, we examine the possibility that various charged elements and ions may form mineral nanoparticles with similar properties in biological fluids. Remarkably, all the elements tested, including sodium, magnesium, aluminum, calcium, manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, strontium, and barium form mineralo-organic particles with bacteria-like morphologies and other complex shapes following precipitation with phosphate in body fluids. Upon formation, these mineralo-organic particles, which we term bions, invariably accumulate carbonate apatite during incubation in biological fluids; yet, the particles also incorporate additional elements and thus reflect the ionic milieu in which they form. Bions initially harbor an amorphous mineral phase that gradually converts to crystals in culture. Our results show that serum produces a dual inhibition-seeding effect on bion formation. Using a comprehensive proteomic analysis, we identify a wide range of proteins that bind to these mineral particles during incubation in medium containing serum. The two main binding proteins identified, albumin and fetuin-A, act as both inhibitors and seeders of bions in culture. Notably, bions possess several biomimetic properties, including the possibility to increase in size and number and to be sub-cultured in fresh culture medium. Based on these results, we propose that bions represent biological, mineralo-organic particles that may form in the body under both physiological and pathological homeostasis conditions. These mineralo-organic particles may be part of a

  11. Bions: a family of biomimetic mineralo-organic complexes derived from biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Yeu; Young, Lena; Young, David; Martel, Jan; Young, John D

    2013-01-01

    Mineralo-organic nanoparticles form spontaneously in human body fluids when the concentrations of calcium and phosphate ions exceed saturation. We have shown previously that these mineralo-organic nanoparticles possess biomimetic properties and can reproduce the whole phenomenology of the so-called nanobacteria-mineralized entities initially described as the smallest microorganisms on earth. Here, we examine the possibility that various charged elements and ions may form mineral nanoparticles with similar properties in biological fluids. Remarkably, all the elements tested, including sodium, magnesium, aluminum, calcium, manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, strontium, and barium form mineralo-organic particles with bacteria-like morphologies and other complex shapes following precipitation with phosphate in body fluids. Upon formation, these mineralo-organic particles, which we term bions, invariably accumulate carbonate apatite during incubation in biological fluids; yet, the particles also incorporate additional elements and thus reflect the ionic milieu in which they form. Bions initially harbor an amorphous mineral phase that gradually converts to crystals in culture. Our results show that serum produces a dual inhibition-seeding effect on bion formation. Using a comprehensive proteomic analysis, we identify a wide range of proteins that bind to these mineral particles during incubation in medium containing serum. The two main binding proteins identified, albumin and fetuin-A, act as both inhibitors and seeders of bions in culture. Notably, bions possess several biomimetic properties, including the possibility to increase in size and number and to be sub-cultured in fresh culture medium. Based on these results, we propose that bions represent biological, mineralo-organic particles that may form in the body under both physiological and pathological homeostasis conditions. These mineralo-organic particles may be part of a physiological cycle that

  12. Colloidal ionic assembly between anionic native cellulose nanofibrils and cationic block copolymer micelles into biomimetic nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Miao; Olszewska, Anna; Walther, Andreas; Malho, Jani-Markus; Schacher, Felix H; Ruokolainen, Janne; Ankerfors, Mikael; Laine, Janne; Berglund, Lars A; Osterberg, Monika; Ikkala, Olli

    2011-06-13

    We present a facile ionic assembly between fibrillar and spherical colloidal objects toward biomimetic nanocomposites with majority hard and minority soft domains based on anionic reinforcing native cellulose nanofibrils and cationic amphiphilic block copolymer micelles with rubbery core. The concept is based on ionic complexation of carboxymethylated nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC, or also denoted as microfibrillated cellulose, MFC) and micelles formed by aqueous self-assembly of quaternized poly(1,2-butadiene)-block-poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) with high fraction of the NFC reinforcement. The adsorption of block copolymer micelles onto nanocellulose is shown by quartz crystal microbalance measurements, atomic force microscopy imaging, and fluorescent optical microscopy. The physical properties are elucidated using electron microscopy, thermal analysis, and mechanical testing. The cationic part of the block copolymer serves as a binder to NFC, whereas the hydrophobic rubbery micellar cores are designed to facilitate energy dissipation and nanoscale lubrication between the NFC domains under deformation. We show that the mechanical properties do not follow the rule of mixtures, and synergistic effects are observed with promoted work of fracture in one composition. As the concept allows wide possibilities for tuning, the work suggests pathways for nanocellulose-based biomimetic nanocomposites combining high toughness with stiffness and strength.

  13. Biomimetic superhydrophobic surface of high adhesion fabricated with micronano binary structure on aluminum alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Liu, Jindan; Li, Shuyi; Liu, Jiaan; Han, Zhiwu; Ren, Luquan

    2013-09-25

    Triggered by the microstructure characteristics of the surfaces of typical plant leaves such as the petals of red roses, a biomimetic superhydrophobic surface with high adhesion is successfully fabricated on aluminum alloy. The essential procedure is that samples were processed by a laser, then immersed and etched in nitric acid and copper nitrate, and finally modified by DTS (CH3(CH2)11Si(OCH3)3). The obtained surfaces exhibit a binary structure consisting of microscale crater-like pits and nanoscale reticula. The superhydrophobicity can be simultaneously affected by the micronano binary structure and chemical composition of the surface. The contact angle of the superhydrophobic surface reaches up to 158.8 ± 2°. Especially, the surface with micronano binary structure is revealed to be an excellent adhesive property with petal-effect. Moreover, the superhydrophobic surfaces show excellent stability in aqueous solution with a large pH range and after being exposed long-term in air. In this way, the multifunctional biomimetic structural surface of the aluminum alloy is fabricated. Furthermore, the preparation technology in this article provides a new route for other metal materials.

  14. Nanoscale waveguiding methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chia-Jean

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWhile 32 nm lithography technology is on the horizon for integrated circuit (IC fabrication, matching the pace for miniaturization with optics has been hampered by the diffraction limit. However, development of nanoscale components and guiding methods is burgeoning through advances in fabrication techniques and materials processing. As waveguiding presents the fundamental issue and cornerstone for ultra-high density photonic ICs, we examine the current state of methods in the field. Namely, plasmonic, metal slot and negative dielectric based waveguides as well as a few sub-micrometer techniques such as nanoribbons, high-index contrast and photonic crystals waveguides are investigated in terms of construction, transmission, and limitations. Furthermore, we discuss in detail quantum dot (QD arrays as a gain-enabled and flexible means to transmit energy through straight paths and sharp bends. Modeling, fabrication and test results are provided and show that the QD waveguide may be effective as an alternate means to transfer light on sub-diffraction dimensions.

  15. Framing biomimetics in a strategic orientation perspective (biopreneuring)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses how design originally rooted in biology can be translated into applications outside its original domain (biomimetics), and thus become strategically important for commercial organisations. This paper will also discuss how concepts from organisation and management theory can...... help conceptualise opportunity exploration and exploitation of bio-inspired designs to commercial applications (biopreneuring). Until now, research on biomimetics has primarily focused on translating design from biology to technology, leaving the application of biomimetics for business purposes...

  16. Electron Microscopy and Analytical X-ray Characterization of Compositional and Nanoscale Structural Changes in Fossil Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatman, Elizabeth Marie

    The nanoscale structure of compact bone contains several features that are direct indicators of bulk tissue mechanical properties. Fossil bone tissues represent unique opportunities to understand the compact bone structure/property relationships from a deep time perspective, offering a possible array of new insights into bone diseases, biomimicry of composite materials, and basic knowledge of bioapatite composition and nanoscale bone structure. To date, most work with fossil bone has employed microscale techniques and has counter-indicated the survival of bioapatite and other nanoscale structural features. The obvious disconnect between the use of microscale techniques and the discernment of nanoscale structure has prompted this work. The goal of this study was to characterize the nanoscale constituents of fossil compact bone by applying a suite of diffraction, microscopy, and spectrometry techniques, representing the highest levels of spatial and energy resolution available today, and capable of complementary structural and compositional characterization from the micro- to the nanoscale. Fossil dinosaur and crocodile long bone specimens, as well as modern ratite and crocodile femurs, were acquired from the UC Museum of Paleontology. Preserved physiological features of significance were documented with scanning electron microscopy back-scattered imaging. Electron microprobe wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDS) revealed fossil bone compositions enriched in fluorine with a complementary loss of oxygen. X-ray diffraction analyses demonstrated that all specimens were composed of apatite. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging revealed preserved nanocrystallinity in the fossil bones and electron diffraction studies further identified these nanocrystallites as apatite. Tomographic analyses of nanoscale elements imaged by TEM and small angle X-ray scattering were performed, with the results of each analysis further indicating that nanoscale structure is

  17. Evaluation of apatite silicates as solid oxide fuel cell electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrero-Lopez, D. [Dpto. de Fisica Aplicada I, Laboratorio de Materiales y Superficies (Unidad Asociada al C.S.I.C.), Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Martin-Sedeno, M.C.; Aranda, M.A.G. [Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Pena-Martinez, J. [Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Instituto de Energias Renovables, Parque Tecnologico, Universidad de Castilla La Mancha, 02006 Albacete (Spain); Ruiz-Morales, J.C.; Nunez, P. [Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Ramos-Barrado, J.R. [Dpto. de Fisica Aplicada I, Laboratorio de Materiales y Superficies (Unidad Asociada al C.S.I.C.), Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain)

    2010-05-01

    Apatite-type silicates have been considered as promising electrolytes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC); however studies on the potential use of these materials in SOFC devices have received relatively little attention. The lanthanum silicate with composition La{sub 10}Si{sub 5.5}Al{sub 0.5}O{sub 26.75} has been evaluated as electrolyte with the electrode materials commonly used in SOFC, i.e. manganite, ferrite and cobaltite as cathode materials and NiO-CGO composite, chromium-manganite and Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} as anode materials. Chemical compatibility, area-specific resistance and fuel cell studies have been performed. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) analysis did not reveal any trace of reaction products between the apatite electrolyte and most of the aforementioned electrode materials. However, the area-specific polarisation resistance (ASR) of these electrodes in contact with apatite electrolyte increased significantly with the sintering temperature, indicating reactivity at the electrolyte/electrode interface. On the other hand, the ASR values are significantly improved using a ceria buffer layer between the electrolyte and electrode materials to prevent reactivity. Maximum power densities of 195 and 65 mWcm{sup -2} were obtained at 850 and 700 C, respectively in H{sub 2} fuel, using an 1 mm-thick electrolyte, a NiO-Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9} composite as anode and La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} as cathode materials. This fuel cell was tested for 100 h in 5%H{sub 2}-Ar atmosphere showing stable performance. (author)

  18. Developing biogeochemical tracers of apatite weathering by ectomycorrhizal fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadeboncoeur, M. A.; Bryce, J. G.; Hobbie, E. A.; Meana-Prado, M. F.; Blichert-Toft, J.

    2012-12-01

    Chronic acid deposition has depleted calcium (Ca) from many New England forest soils, and intensive harvesting may reduce phosphorus (P) available to future rotations. Thin glacial till soils contain trace amounts of apatite, a primary calcium phosphate mineral, which may be an important long-term source of both P and Ca to ecosystems. The extent to which ECM fungi enhance the weathering rate of primary minerals in soil which contain growth-limiting nutrients remains poorly quantified, in part due to biogeochemical tracers which are subsequently masked by within-plant fractionation. Rare earth elements (REEs) and Pb isotope ratios show some potential for revealing differences in soil apatite weathering rates across forest stands and silvicultural treatments. To test the utility of these tracers, we grew birch seedlings semi-hydroponically under controlled P-limited conditions, supplemented with mesh bags containing granite chips. Our experimental design included nonmycorrhizal (NM) as well as ectomycorrhizal cultures (Cortinarius or Leccinum). Resulting mycorrhizal roots and leachates of granite chips were analyzed for these tracers. REE concentrations in roots were greatly elevated in treatments with granite relative to those without granite, demonstrating uptake of apatite weathering products. Roots with different mycorrhizal fungi accumulated similar concentrations of REEs and were generally elevated compared to the NM cultures. Ammonium chloride leaches of granite chips grown in contact with mycorrhizal hyphae show elevated REE concentrations and significantly radiogenic Pb isotope signatures relative to bulk rock, also supporting enhanced apatite dissolution. Our results in culture are consistent with data from field-collected sporocarps from hardwood stands in the Bartlett Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, in which Cortinarius sporocarp Pb isotope ratios were more radiogenic than those of other ectomycorrhizal sporocarps. Taken together, the experimental

  19. H-Isotopic Composition of Apatite in Northwest Africa 7034

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, F. M.; Barnes, J. J.; Santos, A. R.; Boyce, J. W.; Anand, M.; Franchi, I. A.; Agee, C. B.

    2016-01-01

    Northwest Africa (NWA) 7034 and its pairings comprise a regolith breccia with a basaltic bulk composition [1] that yields a better match than any other martian meteorite to estimates of Mars' bulk crust composition [1]. Given the similarities between NWA 7034 and the martian crust, NWA 7034 may represent an important sample for constraining the crustal composition of components that cannot be measured directly by remote sensing. In the present study, we seek to constrain the H isotopic composition of the martian crust using Cl-rich apatite in NWA 7034.

  20. Biomimetic affinity ligands for protein purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Isabel T; Taipa, M Angela

    2014-01-01

    The development of sophisticated molecular modeling software and new bioinformatic tools, as well as the emergence of data banks containing detailed information about a huge number of proteins, enabled the de novo intelligent design of synthetic affinity ligands. Such synthetic compounds can be tailored to mimic natural biological recognition motifs or to interact with key surface-exposed residues on target proteins and are designated as "biomimetic ligands." A well-established methodology for generating biomimetic or synthetic affinity ligands integrates rational design with combinatorial solid-phase synthesis and screening, using the triazine scaffold and analogues of amino acids side chains to create molecular diversity.Triazine-based synthetic ligands are nontoxic, low-cost, highly stable compounds that can replace advantageously natural biological ligands in the purification of proteins by affinity-based methodologies.

  1. Biomimetics of Bone Implants: The Regenerative Road

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Brett

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current strategies for healing bone defects are numerous and varied. At the core of each bone healing therapy is a biomimetic mechanism, which works to enhance bone growth. These range from porous scaffolds, bone mineral usage, collagen, and glycosaminoglycan substitutes to transplanted cell populations. Bone defects face a range of difficulty in their healing, given the composite of dense outer compact bone and blood-rich inner trabecular bone. As such, the tissue possesses a number of inherent characteristics, which may be clinically harnessed as promoters of bone healing. These include mechanical characteristics, mineral composition, native collagen content, and cellular fraction of bone. This review charts multiple biomimetic strategies to help heal bony defects in large and small osseous injury sites, with a special focus on cell transplantation.

  2. Green Tribology Biomimetics, Energy Conservation and Sustainability

    CERN Document Server

    Bhushan, Bharat

    2012-01-01

    Tribology is the study of friction, wear and lubrication. Recently, the concept of “green tribology” as “the science and technology of the tribological aspects of ecological balance and of environmental and biological impacts” was introduced. The field of green tribology includes tribological technology that mimics living nature (biomimetic surfaces) and thus is expected to be environmentally friendly, the control of friction and wear that is of importance for energy conservation and conversion, environmental aspects of lubrication and surface modification techniques, and tribological aspects of green applications such as wind-power turbines or solar panels. This book is the first comprehensive volume on green tribology. The chapters are prepared by leading experts in their fields and cover such topics as biomimetics, environmentally friendly lubrication, tribology of wind turbines and renewable sources of energy, and ecological impact of new technologies of surface treatment.

  3. Robust High Performance Aquaporin based Biomimetic Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helix Nielsen, Claus; Zhao, Yichun; Qiu, C.

    2013-01-01

    Aquaporins are water channel proteins with high water permeability and solute rejection, which makes them promising for preparing high-performance biomimetic membranes. Despite the growing interest in aquaporin-based biomimetic membranes (ABMs), it is challenging to produce robust and defect...... on top of a support membrane. Control membranes, either without aquaporins or with the inactive AqpZ R189A mutant aquaporin served as controls. The separation performance of the membranes was evaluated by cross-flow forward osmosis (FO) and reverse osmosis (RO) tests. In RO the ABM achieved a water...... permeability of ~ 4 L/(m2 h bar) with a NaCl rejection > 97% at an applied hydraulic pressure of 5 bar. The water permeability was ~40% higher compared to a commercial brackish water RO membrane (BW30) and an order of magnitude higher compared to a seawater RO membrane (SW30HR). In FO, the ABMs had > 90...

  4. The state of the art in biomimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepora, Nathan F; Verschure, Paul; Prescott, Tony J

    2013-03-01

    Biomimetics is a research field that is achieving particular prominence through an explosion of new discoveries in biology and engineering. The field concerns novel technologies developed through the transfer of function from biological systems. To analyze the impact of this field within engineering and related sciences, we compiled an extensive database of publications for study with network-based information analysis techniques. Criteria included publications by year and journal or conference, and subject areas judged by popular and common terms in titles. Our results reveal that this research area has expanded rapidly from less than 100 papers per year in the 1990s to several thousand papers per year in the first decade of this century. Moreover, this research is having impact across a variety of research themes, spanning robotics, computer science and bioengineering. In consequence, biomimetics is becoming a leading paradigm for the development of new technologies that will potentially lead to significant scientific, societal and economic impact in the near future.

  5. Nanoscale organization of biomimetic peptide motifs on polymer surfaces: a molecular printing approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rypáček, František; Chánová, Eliška; Popelka, Štěpán; Machová, Luďka; Proks, Vladimír; Bačáková, Lucie

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 5 (2008), s. 759-760 ISSN 1937-3341 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500110564 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : biomaterials * block copolymers * surface modification Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  6. Designing communicating colonies of biomimetic microcapsules

    OpenAIRE

    Kolmakov, German V.; Yashin, Victor V.; Levitan, Steven P.; Balazs, Anna C.

    2010-01-01

    Using computational modeling, we design colonies of biomimetic microcapsules that exploit chemical mechanisms to communicate and alter their local environment. As a result, these synthetic objects can self-organize into various autonomously moving structures and exhibit ant-like tracking behavior. In the simulations, signaling microcapsules release agonist particles, whereas target microcapsules release antagonist particles and the permeabilities of both capsule types depend on the local part...

  7. Recent Progress in Biomimetic Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-19

    by use of smart surfaces, called riblets, inspired by the skin texture of a fast-swimming shark (Walsh, 1982). The success of biomimetic flow...coefficient (CL) with the angle of attack (α) for the wing models with and without tubercles. Note that two large open circles denote the cases...at high angles of attack (Fig. 3a). With tuber- cles, however, a strong vortex rotating in coun- ter-clockwise direction is observed in between the

  8. Biomimetic nanoparticles: preparation, characterization and biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Carmona-Ribeiro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Ana Maria Carmona-RibeiroBiocolloids Lab, Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Mimicking nature is a powerful approach for developing novel lipid-based devices for drug and vaccine delivery. In this review, biomimetic assemblies based on natural or synthetic lipids by themselves or associated to silica, latex or drug particles will be discussed. In water, self-assembly of lipid molecules into supramolecular structures is fairly well understood. However, their self-assembly on a solid surface or at an interface remains poorly understood. In certain cases, hydrophobic drug granules can be dispersed in aqueous solution via lipid adsorption surrounding the drug particles as nanocapsules. In other instances, hydrophobic drug molecules attach as monomers to borders of lipid bilayer fragments providing drug formulations that are effective in vivo at low drug-to-lipid-molar ratio. Cationic biomimetic particles offer suitable interfacial environment for adsorption, presentation and targeting of biomolecules in vivo. Thereby antigens can effectively be presented by tailored biomimetic particles for development of vaccines over a range of defined and controllable particle sizes. Biomolecular recognition between receptor and ligand can be reconstituted by means of receptor immobilization into supported lipidic bilayers allowing isolation and characterization of signal transduction steps.Keywords: cationic lipid, phospholipids, bilayer fragments, vesicles, silica, polymeric particles, antigens, novel cationic immunoadjuvants, drugs

  9. Sensing at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna; Hierold, Christofer

    2013-11-01

    The merits of nanostructures in sensing may seem obvious, yet playing these attributes to their maximum advantage can be a work of genius. As fast as sensing technology is improving, expectations are growing, with demands for cheaper devices with higher sensitivities and an ever increasing range of functionalities and compatibilities. At the same time tough scientific challenges like low power operation, noise and low selectivity are keeping researchers busy. This special issue on sensing at the nanoscale with guest editor Christofer Hierold from ETH Zurich features some of the latest developments in sensing research pushing at the limits of current capabilities. Cheap and easy fabrication is a top priority. Among the most popular nanomaterials in sensing are ZnO nanowires and in this issue Dario Zappa and colleagues at Brescia University in Italy simplify an already cheap and efficient synthesis method, demonstrating ZnO nanowire fabrication directly onto silicon substrates [1]. Meanwhile Nicolae Barson and colleagues in Germany point out the advantages of flame spray pyrolysis fabrication in a topical review [2] and, maximizing on existing resources, researchers in Denmark and Taiwan report cantilever sensing using a US20 commercial DVD-ROM optical pickup unit as the readout source [3]. The sensor is designed to detect physiological concentrations of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor, a protein associated with inflammation due to HIV, cancer and other infectious diseases. With their extreme properties carbon nanostructures feature prominently in the issue, including the demonstration of a versatile and flexible carbon nanotube strain sensor [4] and a graphene charge sensor with sensitivities of the order of 1.3 × 10-3 e Hz-1/2 [5]. The issue of patterning for sensing devices is also tackled by researchers in the US who demonstrate a novel approach for multicomponent pattering metal/metal oxide nanoparticles on graphene [6]. Changes in electrical

  10. Nanoscale phase change memory materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Marissa A; Jeyasingh, Rakesh Gnana David; Wong, H-S Philip; Milliron, Delia J

    2012-08-07

    Phase change memory materials store information through their reversible transitions between crystalline and amorphous states. For typical metal chalcogenide compounds, their phase transition properties directly impact critical memory characteristics and the manipulation of these is a major focus in the field. Here, we discuss recent work that explores the tuning of such properties by scaling the materials to nanoscale dimensions, including fabrication and synthetic strategies used to produce nanoscale phase change memory materials. The trends that emerge are relevant to understanding how such memory technologies will function as they scale to ever smaller dimensions and also suggest new approaches to designing materials for phase change applications. Finally, the challenges and opportunities raised by integrating nanoscale phase change materials into switching devices are discussed.

  11. Using biomimetic polymers in place of noncollagenous proteins to achieve functional remineralization of dentin tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Yung-Ching; Tao, Jinhui; Saeki, Kuniko; Chin, Alexander F; Lau, Jolene L; Chen, Chun-Long; Zuckermann, Ronald N; Marshall, Sally J; Marshall, Grayson W; De Yoreo, James J

    2017-12-11

    In calcified tissues such as bones and teeth, mineralization is regulated by an extracellular matrix, which includes non-collagenous proteins (NCP). This natural process has been adapted or mimicked to restore tissues following physical damage or demineralization by using polyanionic acids in place of NCPs, but the remineralized tissues fail to fully recover their mechanical properties. Here we show that pre-treatment with certain amphiphilic peptoids, a class of peptide-like polymers consisting of N-substituted glycines that have defined monomer sequences, enhances ordering and mineralization of collagen and induces functional remineralization of dentin lesions in vitro . In the vicinity of dentin tubules, the newly formed apatite nano-crystals are co-aligned with the c -axis parallel to the tubular periphery and recovery of tissue ultrastructure is accompanied by development of high mechanical strength. The observed effects are highly sequence-dependent with alternating polar and non-polar groups leading to positive outcomes while diblock sequences have no effect. The observations suggest aromatic groups interact with the collagen while the hydrophilic side chains bind the mineralizing constituents and highlight the potential of synthetic sequence-defined biomimetic polymers to serve as NCP mimics in tissue remineralization.

  12. Hidroxyapatite Coating on CoCrMo Alloy Titanium Nitride Coated Using Biomimetic Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlena; Sukaryo, S.G.; Fajar, M.

    2016-01-01

    Bone implants is a way to cure broken bones which is being developed. The implants can be made of metals, ceramics and polymers. Metallic materials commonly used are titanium (Ti), stainless steel, and metal alloys. This study used Co-based alloys, i.e. CoCrMo coated with titanium nitride (TiN) which was then coated on hidroxyapatite (HAp). The HAp coating on the surface of CoCrMo alloy was done by biomimetic methods, first by soaking the metal alloys in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution for 18, 24, and 36 hours. The immersion in the SBF solution produced white coat on the surface of the metal alloy. The layers formed were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and characterized by x-ray diffractometer (XRD). Based on the SEM results of 36 hours treatment, the morphology of apatite crystal formed fine grains. According to XRD result, there were HAp peaks at angles 2θ 31.86, 32.25, dan 39.48. However, there were also CaCO 3 peaks at angles 2θ 29.46, 36.04, and 46.79. It indicated the pure HAp is not yet formed. (paper)

  13. Hidroxyapatite Coating on CoCrMo Alloy Titanium Nitride Coated Using Biomimetic Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlena; Sukaryo, S. G.; Fajar, M.

    2016-11-01

    Bone implants is a way to cure broken bones which is being developed. The implants can be made of metals, ceramics and polymers. Metallic materials commonly used are titanium (Ti), stainless steel, and metal alloys. This study used Co-based alloys, i.e. CoCrMo coated with titanium nitride (TiN) which was then coated on hidroxyapatite (HAp). The HAp coating on the surface of CoCrMo alloy was done by biomimetic methods, first by soaking the metal alloys in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution for 18, 24, and 36 hours. The immersion in the SBF solution produced white coat on the surface of the metal alloy. The layers formed were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and characterized by x-ray diffractometer (XRD). Based on the SEM results of 36 hours treatment, the morphology of apatite crystal formed fine grains. According to XRD result, there were HAp peaks at angles 2θ 31.86, 32.25, dan 39.48. However, there were also CaCO3 peaks at angles 2θ 29.46, 36.04, and 46.79. It indicated the pure HAp is not yet formed.

  14. Biomimetic Coating on Porous Alumina for Tissue Engineering: Characterisation by Cell Culture and Confocal Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Kolos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study porous alumina samples were prepared and then coated using the biomimetic coating technique using a five times Simulated Body Fluid (5.0SBF as the growth solution. A coating was achieved after pre-treatment with concentrated acid. From elemental analysis, the coating contained calcium and phosphorous, but also sodium and chlorine. Halite was identified by XRD, a sodium chloride phase. Sintering was done to remove the halite phase. Once halite was burnt off, the calcium phosphate crystals were not covered with halite and, therefore, the apatite phases can be clearly observed. Cell culturing showed sufficient cell attachment to the less porous alumina, Sample B, that has more calcium phosphate growth, while the porous alumina, Sample A, with minimal calcium phosphate growth attained very little cell attachment. This is likely due to the contribution that calcium phosphate plays in the attachment of bone-like cells to a bioinert ceramic such as alumina. These results were repeated on both SEM and confocal microscopy analysis. Confocal microscopy was a novel characterisation approach which gave useful information and was a visual aid.

  15. Using Biomimetic Polymers in Place of Noncollagenous Proteins to Achieve Functional Remineralization of Dentin Tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, Yung-Ching [Molecular; Department; Tao, Jinhui [Molecular; Physical; Saeki, Kuniko [Department; Chin, Alexander F. [Department; Lau, Jolene L. [Molecular; Chen, Chun-Long [Molecular; Physical; Zuckermann, Ronald N. [Molecular; Marshall, Sally J. [Department; Marshall, Grayson W. [Department; De Yoreo, James J. [Molecular; Physical; Department

    2017-11-16

    In calcified tissues such as bones and teeth, mineralization is regulated by an extracellular matrix, which includes non-collagenous proteins (NCP). This natural process has been adapted or mimicked to restore tissues following physical damage or demineralization by using polyanionic acids in place of NCPs, but the remineralized tissues fail to fully recover their mechanical properties. Here we show that pre-treatment with certain amphiphilic peptoids, a class of peptide-like polymers consisting of N-substituted glycines that have defined monomer sequences, enhances ordering and mineralization of collagen and induces functional remineralization of dentin lesions in vitro. In the vicinity of dentin tubules, the newly formed apatite nano-crystals are co-aligned with the c-axis parallel to the tubular periphery and recovery of tissue ultrastructure is accompanied by development of high mechanical strength. The observed effects are highly sequence-dependent with alternating polar and non-polar groups leading to positive outcomes while diblock sequences have no effect. The observations suggest aromatic groups interact with the collagen while the hydrophilic side chains bind the mineralizing constituents and highlight the potential of synthetic sequence-defined biomimetic polymers to serve as NCP mimics in tissue remineralization.

  16. Genesis of iron-apatite ores in Posht-e-Badam Block (Central Iran ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A probable source for this large scale ore forming processes is relatively low partial melting of ... REE composition of the parent magma (Taylor .... Location of the iron-apatite deposits in the southern part of the Posht-e-Badam Block (Bafq region) on the satellite image. sandstones. Some iron-apatite ores of this block are.

  17. Mineralogical studies of apatites of Gara-aghaj deposit from mineral processing viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehdilo, A.; Irannajad, M.

    2012-01-01

    Gara-aghaj deposit located 36 km northwest of urumieh is one of the titanium phosphorous resources in Iran. The previous exploration studies indicated that there is 102 Mt phosphorous ore deposit with average grading of 2.3 p ercent P 2 O 5 . In this research, the mineralogical studies of collected representative samples were performed by XRD, XRF, optical microscopy and SEM equipped by EDX. These studies indicated that ilmenite, magnetite and apatite are the main valuable minerals. The gangue minerals consist of the silicate minerals such as pyroxene, olivine, plagioclase and some secondary minerals. Analysis of apatite by EDX showed the presence of fluor-apatite in the ore. From textural viewpoint, apatites is mainly interlocked with ilmenite, magnetite and some gangue minerals with 60 microns liberation degree but there are some inclusions of apatite inside ilmenite and magnetite. The heavy liquid separation tests indicated that the first type of apatites, with density of 3, is mainly concentrated in tailing of gravity separation methods. This type of apatites is recoverable by flotation method. So, apatite concentrate can be obtained as a by-product of ilmenite concentration process by gravity methods.

  18. Heterotopic bone formation by nano-apatite containing poly (D,L-lactide) composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barbieri, D.; Barbieri, D.; Renard, A.J.S.; de Bruijn, Joost Dick; Yuan, Huipin

    2010-01-01

    To render polymeric materials osteoinductive, nano-sized calcium phosphate apatite particles (CaP) were introduced into a low molecular weight poly(D,L-lactide). Homogenous composites were made with 10%, 20% and 40% by weight of apatite content while pure polylactide was used as control. Thereafter

  19. Genesis of iron-apatite ores in Posht-e-Badam Block (Central Iran ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Iran iron-apatite ores are clearly related to an extensional setting where rifting was important (SSE–NNW fault lines). A probable ... and McLennan 1985). Of crucial importance is the ..... at the Esfordi deposit, (c) the Zarigan phosphate deposit and (d) fine to coarse-grained euhedral apatite crystals within the magnetite at the ...

  20. Influence of local charge compensation on site occupation and luminescence of apatites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blasse, G.

    The apatite structure contains two different sites for the larger cations. It is shown that the principle of local charge compensation can predict the site occupation. This is especially important for an interpretation of the luminescence properties of a number of apatites. The predictions are

  1. Effect of apatite cements on human osteoblasts in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuasa, T.; Miyamoto, Y.; Takechi, M.; Momota, Y.; Toh, T.; Nagayama, M. [Tokushima Univ. (Japan). First Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery; Ishikawa, K.; Suzuki, K. [Okayama Univ. Dental School (Japan). Dept. of Biomaterials

    2001-07-01

    A conventional apatite cement (c-AC) used for reconstruction of bony defect takes 30 min to set and decays upon exposure to liquid before setting. Therefore, we have developed two types of new ACs; fast-setting AC and anti-washout type AC. The aims of this study are to investigate the effect of ACs on cultured osteoblasts and to compare effects of new ACs on osteoblasts with that of c-AC. Disc shape set ACs with almost same surface roughness were prepared and evaluated by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). The clonal human osteoblasts were cultured on each specimens. Plastic dish and sintered hydroxyapatite (HAP) were used as control. ACs showed the same apatitic XRD patterns with poor crystallinity when compared with sintered HAP. There were no differences in proliferation of osteoblasts among ACs and sintered HAP. The alkaline phosphatase activity and protein levels for type I collagen and osteocalcin of ACs were greater than those of sintered HAP. There was no difference among ACs. In conclusion, it is suggested that ACs could promote the differentiation of osteoblasts as compared with sintered HAP and plastic. Also, it is suggested that two types of new ACs would show the same cell response as c-AC in vivo (orig.)

  2. NANOSCALE BIOSENSORS IN ECOSYSTEM EXPOSURE RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    This powerpoint presentation presented information on nanoscale biosensors in ecosystem exposure research. The outline of the presentation is as follows: nanomaterials environmental exposure research; US agencies involved in nanosensor research; nanoscale LEDs in biosensors; nano...

  3. Biomimetics of human movement: functional or aesthetic?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Christopher M [SensoriMotor Laboratory, Centre for Theoretical and Computational Neuroscience, Centre for Robotics and Neural Systems, University of Plymouth, Plymouth, Devon PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    How should robotic or prosthetic arms be programmed to move? Copying human smooth movements is popular in synthetic systems, but what does this really achieve? We cannot address these biomimetic issues without a deep understanding of why natural movements are so stereotyped. In this article, we distinguish between 'functional' and 'aesthetic' biomimetics. Functional biomimetics requires insight into the problem that nature has solved and recognition that a similar problem exists in the synthetic system. In aesthetic biomimetics, nature is copied for its own sake and no insight is needed. We examine the popular minimum jerk (MJ) model that has often been used to generate smooth human-like point-to-point movements in synthetic arms. The MJ model was originally justified as maximizing 'smoothness'; however, it is also the limiting optimal trajectory for a wide range of cost functions for brief movements, including the minimum variance (MV) model, where smoothness is a by-product of optimizing the speed-accuracy trade-off imposed by proportional noise (PN: signal-dependent noise with the standard deviation proportional to mean). PN is unlikely to be dominant in synthetic systems, and the control objectives of natural movements (speed and accuracy) would not be optimized in synthetic systems by human-like movements. Thus, employing MJ or MV controllers in robotic arms is just aesthetic biomimetics. For prosthetic arms, the goal is aesthetic by definition, but it is still crucial to recognize that MV trajectories and PN are deeply embedded in the human motor system. Thus, PN arises at the neural level, as a recruitment strategy of motor units and probably optimizes motor neuron noise. Human reaching is under continuous adaptive control. For prosthetic devices that do not have this natural architecture, natural plasticity would drive the system towards unnatural movements. We propose that a truly neuromorphic system with parallel force

  4. Biomimetics of human movement: functional or aesthetic?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Christopher M

    2009-01-01

    How should robotic or prosthetic arms be programmed to move? Copying human smooth movements is popular in synthetic systems, but what does this really achieve? We cannot address these biomimetic issues without a deep understanding of why natural movements are so stereotyped. In this article, we distinguish between 'functional' and 'aesthetic' biomimetics. Functional biomimetics requires insight into the problem that nature has solved and recognition that a similar problem exists in the synthetic system. In aesthetic biomimetics, nature is copied for its own sake and no insight is needed. We examine the popular minimum jerk (MJ) model that has often been used to generate smooth human-like point-to-point movements in synthetic arms. The MJ model was originally justified as maximizing 'smoothness'; however, it is also the limiting optimal trajectory for a wide range of cost functions for brief movements, including the minimum variance (MV) model, where smoothness is a by-product of optimizing the speed-accuracy trade-off imposed by proportional noise (PN: signal-dependent noise with the standard deviation proportional to mean). PN is unlikely to be dominant in synthetic systems, and the control objectives of natural movements (speed and accuracy) would not be optimized in synthetic systems by human-like movements. Thus, employing MJ or MV controllers in robotic arms is just aesthetic biomimetics. For prosthetic arms, the goal is aesthetic by definition, but it is still crucial to recognize that MV trajectories and PN are deeply embedded in the human motor system. Thus, PN arises at the neural level, as a recruitment strategy of motor units and probably optimizes motor neuron noise. Human reaching is under continuous adaptive control. For prosthetic devices that do not have this natural architecture, natural plasticity would drive the system towards unnatural movements. We propose that a truly neuromorphic system with parallel force generators (muscle fibres) and noisy

  5. Biomimetics: The early years | Michael | Annals of Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biomimetics is a relatively new term and an evolving discipline with the potentials for transforming every aspect of medicine. Biomimetics or biomimicry is the imitation of the models, systems, and elements of nature for the purpose of solving complex biological puzzles. Insights into biological processes have already resulted ...

  6. Biomimetic mineral coatings in dental and orthopaedic implantology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.; de Groot, K.; Hunziker, E.B.

    2009-01-01

    Biomimetic techniques are used to deposit coatings of calcium phosphate upon medical devices. The procedure is conducted under near-physiological, or "biomimetic", conditions of temperature and pH primarily to improve their biocompatibility and biodegradability of the materials. The inorganic layers

  7. Towards the LIVING envelope : Biomimetics for building envelope adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badarnah Kadri, L.

    2012-01-01

    Several biomimetic design strategies are available for various applications, though the research on biomimetics as a design tool in architecture is still challenging. This is due to a lack of systematic design tools required for identifying relevant organisms, or natural systems, and abstracting the

  8. Biomimetics: forecasting the future of science, engineering, and medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jangsun; Jeong, Yoon; Park, Jeong Min; Lee, Kwan Hong; Hong, Jong Wook; Choi, Jonghoon

    2015-01-01

    Biomimetics is the study of nature and natural phenomena to understand the principles of underlying mechanisms, to obtain ideas from nature, and to apply concepts that may benefit science, engineering, and medicine. Examples of biomimetic studies include fluid-drag reduction swimsuits inspired by the structure of shark’s skin, velcro fasteners modeled on burrs, shape of airplanes developed from the look of birds, and stable building structures copied from the backbone of turban shells. In this article, we focus on the current research topics in biomimetics and discuss the potential of biomimetics in science, engineering, and medicine. Our report proposes to become a blueprint for accomplishments that can stem from biomimetics in the next 5 years as well as providing insight into their unseen limitations. PMID:26388692

  9. Biomimetics: forecasting the future of science, engineering, and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jangsun; Jeong, Yoon; Park, Jeong Min; Lee, Kwan Hong; Hong, Jong Wook; Choi, Jonghoon

    2015-01-01

    Biomimetics is the study of nature and natural phenomena to understand the principles of underlying mechanisms, to obtain ideas from nature, and to apply concepts that may benefit science, engineering, and medicine. Examples of biomimetic studies include fluid-drag reduction swimsuits inspired by the structure of shark's skin, velcro fasteners modeled on burrs, shape of airplanes developed from the look of birds, and stable building structures copied from the backbone of turban shells. In this article, we focus on the current research topics in biomimetics and discuss the potential of biomimetics in science, engineering, and medicine. Our report proposes to become a blueprint for accomplishments that can stem from biomimetics in the next 5 years as well as providing insight into their unseen limitations.

  10. Tooth apatite as a bone substitute: an experimental study and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eun-Seok Kim; Pill-Hoon Choung

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of calcined teeth powder as biological apatite. The animal experiment was performed in 36 rabbits aging 6 weeks and weighing 1.6 kg. In experimental group, tooth apatite powder was implanted to 10 mm bony defects in diameter made on the cranial bone of the rabbits. As control groups, synthetic porous hydroxyapatite and resorbable type calcium carbonate were implanted to the defects of same size. Each group was sacrificed in 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12 weeks after the surgery. Specimens were prepared for decalcified samples and observed by a light microscope. And we also performed quantitative analysis of new bone formation through image analysis using computer. In clinical applications, we used tooth apatite alone or mixed with decalcified freeze-dried bone for reconstruction of bony defects in 15 patients undergone enucleation of cyst or ameloblastoma. The obtained results were as follows; 1) The powder of the calcined teeth was called as 'tooth apatite' and it seemed to have biocompatibility in rabbits and human. 2) In group of tooth apatite, after 4 weeks of operation, new bone directly bonded to the particles was observed. And in 12 weeks of it, new bone occupied most of the bony defects. In 6 weeks, resorption of the tooth apatite particles was observed. Thus the tooth apatite was regarded as one of resorbable apatite. 3) The group of tooth apatite showed new bone formation similar to the group of porous hydroxyapatite, but they were inferior to the group of resorbable calcium carbonate. 4) In clinical application, tooth apatite had biocompatibility and new bone formation was observed without any complication except for 1 case. So we think it is a useful bone substitute with osteoconductivity

  11. Endogenous Lunar Volatiles: Insights into the Abundances of Volatiles in the Moon from Lunar Apatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, Francis

    2016-01-01

    At the time of publication of New Views of the Moon, it was thought that the Moon was bone dry with less than about 1 ppb H2O. However in 2007, initial reports at the 38th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference speculated that H-species were present in both apatites and pyroclastic volcanic lunar glasses. These early reports were later confirmed through peer-review, which motivated many subsequent studies on magmatic volatiles in and on the Moon within the last decade. Some of these studies have cast into question the post-Apollo view of lunar formation, the distribution and sources of volatiles in the Earth-Moon system, and the thermal and magmatic evolution of the Moon. The mineral apatite has been one of the pillars of this new field of study, and it will be the primary focus of this abstract. Although apatite has been used both to understand the abundances of volatiles in lunar systems as well as the isotopic compositions of those volatiles, the focus here will be on the abundances of F, Cl, and H2O. This work demonstrates the utility of apatite in advancing our understanding of lunar volatiles, hence apatite should be among the topics covered in the endogenous lunar volatile chapter in NVM II. Truncated ternary plot of apatite X-site occupancy (mol%) from highlands apatite and mare basalt apatite plotted on the relative volatile abundance diagram from. The solid black lines delineate fields of relative abundances of F, Cl, and H2O (on a weight basis) in the melt from which the apatite crystallized. The diagram was constructed using available apatite/melt partitioning data for fluorine, chlorine, and hydroxyl.

  12. Nanoscale organic ferroelectric resistive switches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khikhlovskyi, V.; Wang, R.; Breemen, A.J.J.M. van; Gelinck, G.H.; Janssen, R.A.J.; Kemerink, M.

    2014-01-01

    Organic ferroelectric resistive switches function by grace of nanoscale phase separation in a blend of a semiconducting and a ferroelectric polymer that is sandwiched between metallic electrodes. In this work, various scanning probe techniques are combined with numerical modeling to unravel their

  13. Radionuclide Incorporation and Long Term Performance of Apatite Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jianwei [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Lian, Jie [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Gao, Fei [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-01-04

    This project aims to combines state-of-the-art experimental and characterization techniques with atomistic simulations based on density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. With an initial focus on long-lived I-129 and other radionuclides such as Cs, Sr in apatite structure, specific research objectives include the atomic scale understanding of: (1) incorporation behavior of the radionuclides and their effects on the crystal chemistry and phase stability; (2) stability and microstructure evolution of designed waste forms under coupled temperature and radiation environments; (3) incorporation and migration energetics of radionuclides and release behaviors as probed by DFT and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations; and (4) chemical durability as measured in dissolution experiments for long term performance evaluation and model validation.

  14. Magnetic apatite for structural insights on the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanca, Sarmiza E; Müller, Robert; Dellith, Jan; Nietzsche, Sandor; Stöckel, Stephan; Biskup, Christoph; Deckert, Volker; Krafft, Christoph; Popp, Jürgen; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2015-01-21

    The iron oxide-hydroxyapatite (FeOxHA) nanoparticles reported here differ from those reported before by their advantage of homogeneity and simple preparation; moreover, the presence of carboxymethyldextran (CMD), together with hydroxyapatite (HA), allows access to the cellular membrane, which makes our magnetic apatite unique. These nanoparticles combine magnetic behavior, Raman label ability and the property of interaction with the cellular membrane; they therefore represent an interesting material for structural differentiation of the cell membrane. It was observed by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy that FeOxHA adheres to the plasma membrane and does not penetrate the membrane. These insights make the nanoparticles a promising material for magnetic cell sorting, e.g. in microfluidic device applications.

  15. Biotechnologies and biomimetics for civil engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Labrincha, J; Diamanti, M; Yu, C-P; Lee, H

    2015-01-01

    Putting forward an innovative approach to solving current technological problems faced by human society, this book encompasses a holistic way of perceiving the potential of natural systems. Nature has developed several materials and processes which both maintain an optimal performance and are also totally biodegradable, properties which can be used in civil engineering. Delivering the latest research findings to building industry professionals and other practitioners, as well as containing information useful to the public, ‘Biotechnologies and Biomimetics for Civil Engineering’ serves as an important tool to tackle the challenges of a more sustainable construction industry and the future of buildings.

  16. Tailored antireflective biomimetic nanostructures for UV applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morhard, Christoph; Pacholski, Claudia; Spatz, Joachim P [Department of New Materials and Biosystems, Max Planck Institute for Metals Research, Heisenbergstrasse 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Lehr, Dennis; Brunner, Robert; Helgert, Michael [Carl Zeiss Jena GmbH, Technology Center, Carl-Zeiss-Promenade 10, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Sundermann, Michael, E-mail: Pacholski@mf.mpg.de [Carl Zeiss Jena GmbH, Technology Center, Carl-Zeiss-Strasse 56, D-73447 Oberkochen (Germany)

    2010-10-22

    Antireflective surfaces composed of biomimetic sub-wavelength structures that employ the 'moth eye principle' for reflectance reduction are highly desirable in many optical applications such as solar cells, photodetectors and laser optics. We report an efficient approach for the fabrication of antireflective surfaces based on a two-step process consisting of gold nanoparticle mask generation by micellar block copolymer nanolithography and a multi-step reactive ion etching process. Depending on the RIE process parameters nanostructured surfaces with tailored antireflective properties can easily be fabricated that show optimum performance for specific applications.

  17. Biomimetic magnetic nanocomposite for smart skins

    KAUST Repository

    Alfadhel, Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    We report a biomimetic tactile sensor consisting of magnetic nanocomposite artificial cilia and magnetic sensors. The nanocomposite is fashioned from polydimethylsiloxane and iron nanowires and exhibits a permanent magnetic behavior. This enables remote operation without an additional magnetic field to magnetize the nanowires, which simplifies device integration. Moreover, the highly elastic and easy patternable nanocomposite is corrosion resistant and thermally stable. The highly sensitive and power efficient tactile sensors can detect vertical and shear forces from interactions with objects. The sensors can operate in dry and wet environment with the ability to measure different properties such as the texture and the movement or stability of objects, with easily adjustable performance.

  18. Mineralogical and geochemical studies on apatites and phosphate host rocks of Esfordi deposit, Yazd province, to determine the origin and geological setting of the apatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Rajabzadeh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Iron-apatite ore deposits well known as Kiruna iron type formed in association with calc-alkaline volcanism from Proterozoic to Tertiary (Hitzman et al., 1992. Liquid immiscibility in an igneous system was proposed to explain the formation of the iron oxides accompanying apatite in mineralized zones (Förster and Jafarzadeh, 1994; Daliran, 1999. The mode of ore formation however, is a matter in debate. Bafq region in Central Iran is one of the greatest iron mining regions in Iran with 750 million tons of reservoir. The majority of the iron deposits contains apatite as minor mineral and underwent metamorphism-alteration in varying degrees. The mode of formation and geological setting of Esfordi iron-apatite deposit in this region with an average of 13.9 wt% apatite are discussed using geochemical and mineralogical data along with field description. Materials and methods Fifty-three samples of mineralized zones and host rocks collected from 7 cross sections were studied by conventional microscopic methods. Seven representative samples were determined by XRD at Department of Physics, Shiraz University. Fifteen and six samples were also analyzed for major and trace elements using XRF at Binaloud Co. Iran, and ICP-MS at Labwest Minerals Analysis, Australia, respectively. Microprobe analyses were carried out on apatite in Geo Forschungs Zentrum Telegrafenberg at Potsdam University, Germany. Results Field observation shows that igneous host rocks in Esfordi were intensively altered by hydrothermal fluids. The ores are surrounded by wide altered halos. Petrographic investigation indicated that the most important alterations are of potassic, carbonatitic and silicification types. Magnetite and apatite occur as major minerals, accompanied by minor hematite and goethite in the mineralized zones. Rare Earth Element (REE minerals are present as minor phases in the ores. Three apatite mineralization types (vein, massive, and disseminated were

  19. Novel Osteointegrative Sr-Substituted Apatitic Cements Enriched with Alginate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Sprio

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes the synthesis of novel injectable, self-setting bone cements made of strontium-substituted hydroxyapatite (Sr-HA, obtained by single-phase calcium phosphate precursors doped with different amounts of strontium and enriched with alginate. The addition of alginate improved the injectability, cohesion, and compression strength of the cements, without affecting the hardening process. A Sr-HA cement exhibiting adequate hardening times and mechanical strength for clinical applications was further tested in vivo in a rabbit model, in comparison with a commercial calcium phosphate cement, revealing the maintenance of biomimetic composition and porous microstructure even after one month in vivo, as well as enhanced ability to induce new bone formation and penetration.

  20. High phosphate content significantly increases apatite formation of fluoride-containing bioactive glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mneimne, Mohammed; Hill, Robert G; Bushby, Andrew J; Brauer, Delia S

    2011-04-01

    Bioactive glass-containing toothpastes for treating dentine hypersensitivity work by precipitating hydroxycarbonate apatite (HCA) onto the tooth surface, but concerns exist over the long-term durability of HCA in the mouth. Fluoride-containing bioactive glasses form fluorapatite (FAp) in physiological solutions, which is more chemically stable against acid attack. The influence of phosphate content on apatite formation was investigated by producing a low-phosphate (about 1 mol% P(2)O(5)) and a high-phosphate (about 6 mol%) series of melt-derived bioactive glasses in the system SiO(2)P(2)O(5)CaONa(2)O; increasing amounts of CaF(2) were added by keeping the ratio of all other components constant. pH change, ion release and apatite formation during immersion in Tris buffer at 37°C over up to 7 days were investigated. Crystal phases formed in Tris buffer were characterized using infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. An increase in phosphate or fluoride content allowed for apatite formation at lower pH; fluoride enhanced apatite formation due to lower solubility of FAp compared to hydroxyapatite or HCA. High phosphate content glasses formed apatite significantly faster (within 6h) than low phosphate content glasses (within 3 days). In addition, an increase in phosphate content favoured apatite formation rather than fluorite (CaF(2)). (19)F magic angle spinning NMR showed the apatite formed by fluoride-containing glasses to be FAp, which makes these glasses of particular interest for dental applications. This study shows that by varying the phosphate content, the reactivity and apatite formation of bioactive glasses can be controlled successfully. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Embedded SMA wire actuated biomimetic fin: a module for biomimetic underwater propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhenlong; Hang Guanrong; Wang Yangwei; Li Jian; Du Wei

    2008-01-01

    An embedded shape memory alloy (SMA) wire actuated biomimetic fin is presented, and based on this module for biomimetic underwater propulsion, a micro robot fish (146 mm in length, 30 g in weight) and a robot squid (242 mm in length, 360 g in weight) were developed. Fish swim by undulating their body and/or fins. Squid and cuttlefish can also swim by undulating their fins. To simplify engineering modeling, the undulating swimming movement is assumed to be the integration of the movements of many flexible bending segments connected in parallel or in series. According to this idea, a biomimetic fin which can bend flexibly was developed. The musculature of a cuttlefish fin was investigated to aid the design of the biomimetic fin. SMA wires act as 'muscle fibers' to drive the biomimetic fin just like the transverse muscles of the cuttlefish fin. During the bending phase, elastic energy is stored in the elastic substrate and skin, and during the return phase, elastic energy is released to power the return movement. Theorem analysis of the bending angle was performed to estimate the bending performance of the biomimetic fin. Experiments were carried out on single-face fins with latex rubber skin and silicone skin (SF-L and SF-S) to compare the bending angle, return time, elastic energy storage and reliability. Silicone was found to be the better skin. A dual-face fin with silicone skin (DF-S) was tested in water to evaluate the actuating performance and to validate the reliability. Thermal analysis of the SMA temperature was performed to aid the control strategy. The micro robot fish and robot squid employ one and ten DF-S, respectively. Swimming experiments with different actuation frequencies were carried out. The speed and steering radius of the micro robot fish reached 112 mm s −1 and 136 mm, respectively, and the speed and rotary speed of the robot squid reached 40 mm s −1 and 22° s −1 , respectively

  2. Effect of strontium ranelate on bone mineral: Analysis of nanoscale compositional changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, André L; Moldovan, Simona; Querido, William; Rossi, Alexandre; Werckmann, Jacques; Ersen, Ovidiu; Farina, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    Strontium ranelate has been used to prevent bone loss and stimulate bone regeneration. Although strontium may integrate into the bone crystal lattice, the chemical and structural modifications of the bone when strontium interacts with the mineral phase are not completely understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate apatite from the mandibles of rats treated with strontium ranelate in the drinking water and compare its characteristics with those from untreated rats and synthetic apatites with and without strontium. Electron energy loss near edge structures from phosphorus, carbon, calcium and strontium were obtained by electron energy loss spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscope. The strontium signal was detected in the biological and synthetic samples containing strontium. The relative quantification of carbon by analyzing the CK edge at an energy loss of ΔE = 284 eV showed an increase in the number of carbonate groups in the bone mineral of treated rats. A synthetic strontium-containing sample used as control did not exhibit a carbon signal. This study showed physicochemical modifications in the bone mineral at the nanoscale caused by the systemic administration of strontium ranelate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Field Effect Transistor in Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-26

    significant alteration in transport behaviour of these molecular junctions. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Theory , Nanoscale, Field Effect Transistor (FET), Devices...Density Functional Theory (DFT), Non-equilibrium Green Function 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES     13...Keep in mind the amount of funding you received relative to the amount of effort you put into the report. References: 1. J. R. Heath and M

  4. Technological Convergence from the Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, William

    A series of scientific conferences and book-length publications predict that nanoscience will have its greatest impact through the convergence of four fields where research progress and engineering applications are expected to be especially significant. These are the so-called NBIC fields of nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology, and new technologies based on cognitive science. This chapter is a first sociological reconnaissance of the convergenist movement in science and technology, based on the unity of nature at the nanoscale.

  5. Imprinting Technology in Electrochemical Biomimetic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela F. Frasco

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors are a promising tool offering the possibility of low cost and fast analytical screening in point-of-care diagnostics and for on-site detection in the field. Most biosensors in routine use ensure their selectivity/specificity by including natural receptors as biorecognition element. These materials are however too expensive and hard to obtain for every biochemical molecule of interest in environmental and clinical practice. Molecularly imprinted polymers have emerged through time as an alternative to natural antibodies in biosensors. In theory, these materials are stable and robust, presenting much higher capacity to resist to harsher conditions of pH, temperature, pressure or organic solvents. In addition, these synthetic materials are much cheaper than their natural counterparts while offering equivalent affinity and sensitivity in the molecular recognition of the target analyte. Imprinting technology and biosensors have met quite recently, relying mostly on electrochemical detection and enabling a direct reading of different analytes, while promoting significant advances in various fields of use. Thus, this review encompasses such developments and describes a general overview for building promising biomimetic materials as biorecognition elements in electrochemical sensors. It includes different molecular imprinting strategies such as the choice of polymer material, imprinting methodology and assembly on the transduction platform. Their interface with the most recent nanostructured supports acting as standard conductive materials within electrochemical biomimetic sensors is pointed out.

  6. Imprinting Technology in Electrochemical Biomimetic Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasco, Manuela F; Truta, Liliana A A N A; Sales, M Goreti F; Moreira, Felismina T C

    2017-03-06

    Biosensors are a promising tool offering the possibility of low cost and fast analytical screening in point-of-care diagnostics and for on-site detection in the field. Most biosensors in routine use ensure their selectivity/specificity by including natural receptors as biorecognition element. These materials are however too expensive and hard to obtain for every biochemical molecule of interest in environmental and clinical practice. Molecularly imprinted polymers have emerged through time as an alternative to natural antibodies in biosensors. In theory, these materials are stable and robust, presenting much higher capacity to resist to harsher conditions of pH, temperature, pressure or organic solvents. In addition, these synthetic materials are much cheaper than their natural counterparts while offering equivalent affinity and sensitivity in the molecular recognition of the target analyte. Imprinting technology and biosensors have met quite recently, relying mostly on electrochemical detection and enabling a direct reading of different analytes, while promoting significant advances in various fields of use. Thus, this review encompasses such developments and describes a general overview for building promising biomimetic materials as biorecognition elements in electrochemical sensors. It includes different molecular imprinting strategies such as the choice of polymer material, imprinting methodology and assembly on the transduction platform. Their interface with the most recent nanostructured supports acting as standard conductive materials within electrochemical biomimetic sensors is pointed out.

  7. The state of the art in biomimetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepora, Nathan F; Prescott, Tony J; Verschure, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Biomimetics is a research field that is achieving particular prominence through an explosion of new discoveries in biology and engineering. The field concerns novel technologies developed through the transfer of function from biological systems. To analyze the impact of this field within engineering and related sciences, we compiled an extensive database of publications for study with network-based information analysis techniques. Criteria included publications by year and journal or conference, and subject areas judged by popular and common terms in titles. Our results reveal that this research area has expanded rapidly from less than 100 papers per year in the 1990s to several thousand papers per year in the first decade of this century. Moreover, this research is having impact across a variety of research themes, spanning robotics, computer science and bioengineering. In consequence, biomimetics is becoming a leading paradigm for the development of new technologies that will potentially lead to significant scientific, societal and economic impact in the near future. (perspective)

  8. Biomimetic phantom for cardiac diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Irvin; Zhou, Feng-Lei; Hubbard Cristinacce, Penny L; Parker, Geoffrey J M; Schneider, Jürgen E

    2016-03-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to characterize cardiac tissue microstructure, necessitating the use of physiologically relevant phantoms for methods development. Existing phantoms are generally simplistic and mostly simulate diffusion in the brain. Thus, there is a need for phantoms mimicking diffusion in cardiac tissue. A biomimetic phantom composed of hollow microfibers generated using co-electrospinning was developed to mimic myocardial diffusion properties and fiber and sheet orientations. Diffusion tensor imaging was carried out at monthly intervals over 4 months at 9.4T. 3D fiber tracking was performed using the phantom and compared with fiber tracking in an ex vivo rat heart. The mean apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy of the phantom remained stable over the 4-month period, with mean values of 7.53 ± 0.16 × 10(-4) mm(2) /s and 0.388 ± 0.007, respectively. Fiber tracking of the 1st and 3rd eigenvectors generated analogous results to the fiber and sheet-normal direction respectively, found in the left ventricular myocardium. A biomimetic phantom simulating diffusion in the heart was designed and built. This could aid development and validation of novel diffusion MRI methods for investigating cardiac microstructure, decrease the number of animals and patients needed for methods development, and improve quality control in longitudinal and multicenter cardiac diffusion MRI studies. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Biomimetic Mineralization of Recombinamer-Based Hydrogels toward Controlled Morphologies and High Mineral Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuping; Chen, Xi; Fok, Alex; Rodriguez-Cabello, Jose Carlos; Aparicio, Conrado

    2015-11-25

    The use of insoluble organic matrices as a structural template for the bottom-up fabrication of organic-inorganic nanocomposites is a powerful way to build a variety of advanced materials with defined and controlled morphologies and superior mechanical properties. Calcium phosphate mineralization in polymeric hydrogels is receiving significant attention in terms of obtaining biomimetic hierarchical structures with unique mechanical properties and understanding the mechanisms of the biomineralization process. However, integration of organic matrices with hydroxyapatite nanocrystals, different in morphology and composition, has not been well-achieved yet at nanoscale. In this study, we synthesized thermoresponsive hydrogels, composed of elastin-like recombinamers (ELRs), to template mineralization of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals using a biomimetic polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) mineralization process. Different from conventional mineralization where minerals were deposited on the surface of organic matrices, they were infiltrated into the frameworks of ELR matrices, preserving their microporous structure. After 14 days of mineralization, an average of 78 μm mineralization depth was achieved. Mineral density up to 1.9 g/cm(3) was found after 28 days of mineralization, which is comparable to natural bone and dentin. In the dry state, the elastic modulus and hardness of the mineralized hydrogels were 20.3 ± 1.7 and 0.93 ± 0.07 GPa, respectively. After hydration, they were reduced to 4.50 ± 0.55 and 0.10 ± 0.03 GPa, respectively. These values were lower but still on the same order of magnitude as those of natural hard tissues. The results indicated that inorganic-organic hybrid biomaterials with controlled morphologies can be achieved using organic templates of ELRs. Notably, the chemical and physical properties of ELRs can be tuned, which might help elucidate the mechanisms by which living organisms regulate the mineralization process.

  10. On the synthesis of tailored biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanoplates through a bioinspired approach in the presence of collagen or chitosan and L-arginine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsetsekou, A., E-mail: athtse@metal.ntua.gr; Brasinika, D.; Vaou, V.; Chatzitheodoridis, E.

    2014-10-01

    Controlling the structure of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals is vital for acquiring a consistent product. In an effort to synthesize crystals mimicking the morphology of natural bone's apatite, a bioinspired process was developed based on the use of a natural biomacromolecule, collagen or chitosan, in conjunction with L-arginine to direct the formation of hydroxyapatite from H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and Ca(OH){sub 2}. Different cases were investigated by employing various concentrations of the precursors and two molar ratios of Ca/P 1/1 and 10/6. The reaction was carried out at basic pH conditions and at biomimetic temperature (40 °C). The resulting aqueous suspensions were characterized in terms of their rheological behavior, whereas the derived powders were fully evaluated by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and Raman spectroscopy. The analysis showed that in all cases, the only phase detected was hydroxyapatite of a plate-like morphology very similar to that of natural apatite. The homogeneity of the morphology and the crystal size distribution depend on the precursors' final concentration with the mean size ranging from 5 nm up to 20 nm. The powder that demonstrated the best characteristics in terms of homogeneity was that produced in the presence of collagen for molar ratio of Ca/P 1/1. - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite nanoplates similar to those of bone's apatite were developed. • A novel approach simulating the biomineralization environment was developed. • L-Arginine was combined with collagen or chitosan to direct HAp nucleation. • Depending on reaction conditions a very homogeneous nanostructure is attained.

  11. The Promotion of Human Neural Stem Cells Adhesion Using Bioinspired Poly(norepinephrine Nanoscale Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minah Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of versatile biomaterial interfaces that can facilitate cellular adhesion is crucial for elucidating the cellular processes that occur on biomaterial surfaces. Furthermore, biomaterial interfaces can provide physical or chemical cues that are capable of stimulating cellular behaviors by regulating intracellular signaling cascades. Herein, a method of creating a biomimetic functional biointerface was introduced to enhance human neural stem cell (hNSC adhesion. The hNSC-compatible biointerface was prepared by the oxidative polymerization of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine, which generates a nanoscale organic thin layer, termed poly(norepinephrine (pNE. Due to its adhesive property, pNE resulted in an adherent layer on various substrates, and pNE-coated biointerfaces provided a highly favorable microenvironment for hNSCs, with no observed cytotoxicity. Only a 2-hour incubation of hNSCs was required to firmly attach the stem cells, regardless of the type of substrate. Importantly, the adhesive properties of pNE interfaces led to micropatterns of cellular attachment, thereby demonstrating the ability of the interface to organize the stem cells. This highly facile surface-modification method using a biomimetic pNE thin layer can be applied to a number of suitable materials that were previously not compatible with hNSC technology.

  12. Improvement of RVNRL film properties by adding fumed silica and hydroxy apatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adul Thiangchanya

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of adding fumed silica and hydroxy apatite to Radiation Vulcanized Natural Rubber Latex (RVNRL for improving tear strength, aging properties, degradability and water-soluble protein content of rubber films has been investigated. The addition of fumed silica and hydroxy apatite in RVNRL improves tear strength and aging properties of rubber films, whereas tensile strength and degradability of rubber films were unchanged during storage at room temperature. The water-soluble protein content in rubber films was reduced by immobilization of the fumed silica and hydroxy apatite and enhanced by addition of ZnO. This may reduce allergy problems of natural rubber latex products caused by water-soluble protein. The MST of the RVNRL with fumed silica and hydroxy apatite indicated that the latex must be used within two months after mixing because of its stability.

  13. Geochemistry of Apatite in Climactic and Pre-Climactic Tephra from Mt. Mazama, Crater Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandeville, C. W.; Langstaff, M.

    2007-12-01

    Apatite is a common accessory mineral in arc volcanic rocks that potentially records information about the dissolved volatile (S,Cl,F,OH) and trace-element concentrations (Sr, Ba, REEs) of the melt from which it crystallized. In a previous study of apatite from arc and convergent margin volcanic rocks, Peng et al. (1997) reported 0.63 wt.% SO3 in Mazama apatite grains with a corresponding SrO content of 0.18 wt.%, comprising some of the highest SO3 and SrO values in their data. Our electron microprobe study of apatite in climactic and pre-climactic Mazama tephra was done in order to assess possible correlation of apatite SO3 with Sr content of low-Sr and high-Sr recharge magmas identified based on whole-rock and matrix glass data (Bacon and Druitt, 1988) and Sr content of plagioclase (Druitt and Bacon 1989). Samples chosen represent all magmatic components erupted during the ca. 7700 year before present climactic eruption and precursor Llao Rock and Cleetwood eruptions. We compare the S, Cl, and F content of Mazama apatites with recent experimental data for S, Cl, and F partitioning between apatite and melt and with dissolved volatiles previously measured in melt inclusions from corresponding or similar Mazama samples. Our electron microprobe data confirm the presence of rare Mazama apatites with up to 0.78 wt.% SO3 and 0.12 wt.% SrO in Llao Rock, Cleetwood, and climactic scoria and pumice samples. However, high SO3 and SrO apatites are not restricted to high-Sr scoria hosts, but have been observed in low-Sr scoria, in Llao Rock rhyodacitic pumices and in Cleetwood rhyodacitic pumices, thus indicating significant magma mixing prior to the Llao Rock, Cleetwood and climactic eruptions. Most apatite SO3 and SrO data falls within the 0.06 to 0.36 wt.% and 0.04 to 0.12 wt.% range, respectively. Experimental data on SO3 partitioning between apatite and melt and maximum sulfur contents of 300 to 350 ppm measured in climactic and Cleetwood rhyodacitic melt inclusions

  14. Nanolithography using nanoscale ridge apertures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang

    There is a continuous effort to develop techniques for nanoscale feature definition below the diffraction limit. Nanolithography has been a key technique because of its precision and cost effective. A sub-wavelength hole in an opaque screen can be used to provide a small light source with the optical resolution beyond the diffraction limit in the near field. However, a nanometer-sized hole in circular or square shapes is plagued by low transmission and poor contrast. This drawback limits the nanoscale apertures from being employed in nanolithography applications. Ridge apertures in C, H and bowtie shapes, on the other hand, have been numerically and experimentally demonstrated to show the ability of achieving both enhanced light transmission and sub-wavelength optical resolution down to nanometer domain benefiting from the existence of waveguide propagation mode confined in the gap between the ridges. In this report, the detailed field distributions in contact nanolithography are analyzed using finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. It was found that the high imaging contrast, which is necessary for successful lithography, is achieved close to the mask exit plane and decays quickly with the increase of the distance from the mask exit plane. Simulations are also performed for comparable regular shaped apertures and different shape bowtie apertures. Design rules are proposed to optimize the bowtie aperture for producing a sub-wavelength, high transmission field with high imaging contrast. High resolution contact nanolithography was carried on a home constructed lithography setup. It has been experimentally demonstrated that nanoscale bowtie and C apertures can be used for contact lithography to achieve nanometer scale resolution due to its intrinsic advantages of achieving enhanced optical transmission and concentrating light far beyond the diffraction limit. It also has shown the advantages of bowtie and C apertures over conventional apertures in both

  15. Site-specific equilibrium isotopic fractionation of oxygen, carbon and calcium in apatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aufort, Julie; Ségalen, Loïc; Gervais, Christel; Paulatto, Lorenzo; Blanchard, Marc; Balan, Etienne

    2017-12-01

    The stable isotope composition of biogenic apatite is an important geochemical marker that can record environmental parameters and is widely used to infer past climates, biomineralization processes, dietary preferences and habitat of vertebrates. In this study, theoretical equilibrium isotopic fractionation of oxygen, carbon and calcium in hydroxyapatite and carbonate-bearing hydroxyapatite is investigated using first-principles methods based on density-functional theory and compared to the theoretical isotopic fractionation properties of calcite, CO2 and H2O. Considering the variability of apatite crystal-chemistry, special attention is given to specific contributions of crystal sites to isotopic fractionation. Significant internal fractionation is calculated for oxygen and carbon isotopes in CO3 between the different structural sites occupied by carbonate groups in apatite (typically 7‰ for both 18O/16O and 13C/12C fractionation at 37 °C). Compared with calcite-water oxygen isotope fractionation, occurrence of A-type substitution in apatite structure, in addition to the main B-type substitution, could explain the larger temperature dependence of oxygen isotope fractionation measured at low temperature between carbonate in apatite and water. Theoretical internal fractionation of oxygen isotopes between carbonate and phosphate in B-type carbonated apatite (∼8‰ at 37 °C) is consistent with experimental values obtained from modern and well-preserved fossil bio-apatites. Concerning calcium, theoretical results suggest a small fractionation between apatite and calcite (-0.17‰ at 37 °C). Internal fractionation reaching 0.8‰ at 37 °C occurs between the two Ca sites in hydroxyapatite. Furthermore, the Ca isotopic fractionation properties of apatite are affected by the occurrence of carbonate groups, which could contribute to the variability observed on natural samples. Owing to the complexity of apatite crystal-chemistry and in light of the theoretical

  16. A review paper on biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, X.; de Groot, K.; Wang, D.; Hu, Q.; Wismeijer, D.; Liu, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings have been developed for bone regeneration and repair because of their biocompatibility, osteoconductivity, and easy preparation. They can be rendered osteoinductive by incorporating an osteogenic agent, such as bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), into the

  17. Biomimetics as a design methodology – possibilities and challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker

    2009-01-01

    Biomimetics – or bionik as it is called in parts of Europe – offer a number of promising opportunities and challenges for the designer. The paper investigates how biomimetics as a design methodology is used in engineering design by looking at examples of biological searches and highlight...... the possibilities and challenges. Biomimetics for engineering design is explored through an experiment involving 12 design engineering students. For 7 selected problem areas they searched biology literature available at a university library and identified a number of biological solutions. Central solution...... principles were formulated and used for designing technical items that could be used to solve the initial problems. Experiences are that biomimetic design can be made successfully using commonly available biological literature and internet resources and that designers without detailed biological knowledge...

  18. Biomimetic Composite Scaffold for Breast Reconstruction Following Tumor Resection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patrick, Jr, Charles W

    2005-01-01

    ... of life and outcomes are markedly improved. We hypothesized that a novel composite material consisting of silk fibroin and chitosan will act as a biomimetic scaffold amenable to in vivo adipogenesis. The specific aims (SAs...

  19. Biomimetic Designs Inspired by Seashells-Seashells Helping ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 6. Biomimetic Designs Inspired by Seashells - Seashells Helping Engineers Design Better Ceramics. Kiran Akella. General Article Volume 17 Issue 6 June 2012 pp 573-591 ...

  20. Biomimetic Designs Inspired by Seashells-Seashells Helping ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 6. Biomimetic Designs Inspired by Seashells ... Kiran Akella1. Head, Computational Mechanics Center, Research and Development Establishment (Engineers), Defence Research and Development Organisation Kalas, Pune 411015, India.

  1. Biomimetics materials, structures and processes : examples, ideas and case studies

    CERN Document Server

    Bruckner, Dietmar; Hellmich, Christian; Schmiedmayer, Heinz-Bodo; Stachelberger, Herbert; Gebeshuber, Ille

    2011-01-01

    The book presents an outline of current activities in the field of biomimetics and integrates a variety of applications comprising biophysics, surface sciences, architecture and medicine. Biomimetics as innovation method is characterised by interdisciplinary information transfer from the life sciences to technical application fields aiming at increased performance, functionality and energy efficiency. The contributions of the book relate to the research areas: - Materials and structures in nanotechnology and biomaterials - Biomimetic approaches to develop new forms, construction principles and design methods in architecture - Information and dynamics in automation, neuroinformatics and biomechanics Readers will be informed about the latest research approaches and results in biomimetics with examples ranging from bionic nano-membranes to function-targeted design of tribological surfaces and the translation of natural auditory coding strategies.

  2. Apatite formation on non-woven fabric of carboxymethylated chitin in SBF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubo, Tadashi; Hanakawa, Masayuki; Kawashita, Masakazu; Minoda, Masahiko; Beppu, Toshiyuki; Miyamoto, Takeaki; Nakamura, Takashi

    2004-08-01

    Chitin fibres constituting a non-woven fabric were carboxymethylated in monochloro acetic acid and treated with saturated Ca(OH)(2) aqueous solution. Within 3 days in a simulated body fluid with pH value and ion concentrations nearly equal to those of human blood plasma, a bonelike apatite layer formed on the surface of fibres of the treated fabric. The apatite-chitin fibre composite thus prepared is expected to be useful as a flexible bioactive bone-repairing material.

  3. Fluoride enhances transfection activity of carbonate apatite by increasing cytoplasmic stability of plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, E.H.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Cytoplasmic stability of plasmid DNA is enhanced by fluoride incorporation into carbonate apatite carrier. → Fluoridated carbonate apatite promotes a robust increase in transgene expression. → Controlled dissolution of fluoridated carbonate apatite in endosomal acidic environment might buffer the endosomes and prevent degradation of the released DNA. -- Abstract: Intracellular delivery of a functional gene or a nucleic acid sequence to specifically knockdown a harmful gene is a potential approach to precisely treat a critical human disease. The intensive efforts in the last few decades led to the development of a number of viral and non-viral synthetic vectors. However, an ideal delivery tool in terms of the safety and efficacy has yet to be established. Recently, we have developed pH-sensing inorganic nanocrystals of carbonate apatite for efficient and cell-targeted delivery of gene and gene-silencing RNA. Here we show that addition of very low level of fluoride to the particle-forming medium facilitates a robust increase in transgene expression following post-incubation of the particles with HeLa cells. Confocal microscopic observation and Southern blotting prove the cytoplasmic existence of plasmid DNA delivered by likely formed fluoridated carbonate apatite particles while degradation of plasmid DNA presumably by cytoplasmic nucleases was noticed following delivery with apatite particles alone. The beneficial role of fluoride in enhancing carbonate apatite-mediated gene expression might be due to the buffering potential of generated fluoridated apatite in endosomal acidic environment, thereby increasing the half-life of delivered plasmid DNA.

  4. Fluoride enhances transfection activity of carbonate apatite by increasing cytoplasmic stability of plasmid DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, E.H., E-mail: md.ezharul.hoque@med.monash.edu.my [Jeffrey Cheah School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Monash University Sunway Campus, Jalan Lagoon Selatan, Bandar Sunway, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} Cytoplasmic stability of plasmid DNA is enhanced by fluoride incorporation into carbonate apatite carrier. {yields} Fluoridated carbonate apatite promotes a robust increase in transgene expression. {yields} Controlled dissolution of fluoridated carbonate apatite in endosomal acidic environment might buffer the endosomes and prevent degradation of the released DNA. -- Abstract: Intracellular delivery of a functional gene or a nucleic acid sequence to specifically knockdown a harmful gene is a potential approach to precisely treat a critical human disease. The intensive efforts in the last few decades led to the development of a number of viral and non-viral synthetic vectors. However, an ideal delivery tool in terms of the safety and efficacy has yet to be established. Recently, we have developed pH-sensing inorganic nanocrystals of carbonate apatite for efficient and cell-targeted delivery of gene and gene-silencing RNA. Here we show that addition of very low level of fluoride to the particle-forming medium facilitates a robust increase in transgene expression following post-incubation of the particles with HeLa cells. Confocal microscopic observation and Southern blotting prove the cytoplasmic existence of plasmid DNA delivered by likely formed fluoridated carbonate apatite particles while degradation of plasmid DNA presumably by cytoplasmic nucleases was noticed following delivery with apatite particles alone. The beneficial role of fluoride in enhancing carbonate apatite-mediated gene expression might be due to the buffering potential of generated fluoridated apatite in endosomal acidic environment, thereby increasing the half-life of delivered plasmid DNA.

  5. Hydrogels for in situ encapsulation of biomimetic membrane arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibragimova, Sania; Jensen, Karin Bagger Stibius; Szewczykowski, Piotr Przemyslaw

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogels are hydrophilic, porous polymer networks that can absorb up to thousands of times their own weight in water. They have many potential applications, one of which is the encapsulation of freestanding black lipid membranes (BLMs) for novel separation technologies or biosensor applications....... membranes retained their integrity and functionality after encapsulation with hydrogel. Our results show that hydrogel encapsulation is a potential means to provide stability for biomimetic devices based on functional proteins reconstituted in biomimetic membrane arrays....

  6. Apatite deposition on titanium surfaces--the role of albumin adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serro, A P; Fernandes, A C; Saramago, B; Lima, J; Barbosa, M A

    1997-07-01

    Titanium implant surfaces are known to spontaneously nucleate apatite layers when in contact with simulated body fluids. However, adsorption of proteins may influence the process of apatite layer formation. In this study the role of bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption in the process of apatite deposition on titanium substrates is investigated. Deposition of calcium phosphate was induced by immersing titanium substrates in a Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) for times ranging from 1 to 23 days. The resulting substrates were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), wettability measurements and electrochemical impedance determinations. All these methods indicate the presence of a calcium phosphate layer. The same procedure was repeated substituting HBSS with a solution of BSA in HBSS. Although SEM, EDS and electrochemical impedance spectra do not reveal the presence of an apatite layer, XPS analysis strongly indicates that the inhibition of apatite formation by BSA is only partial. The competition between BSA adsorption and apatite deposition seems to lead to a mixed film where the protein co-exists with calcium phosphate. Wettability studies suggest that this surface film is heterogeneous and porous, similar to the thicker films formed in albumin-free HBSS.

  7. Incorporation of iodine into calcium phosphates with apatitic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulon, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    In order to avoid the release of 129 I (long-lived intermediate-level waste) in the environment, we describe a novel material incorporating iodine under the form of iodate in a calcium phosphate based hydroxyapatite. This material is prepared by two synthetic processes: a wet precipitation route followed by a spark plasma sintering and a cementitious route. A high iodine content (with a maximum incorporation rate of 10 wt.%) is reached for both processes, by incorporation of the iodate in the apatitic structure. A monolith with relative density of 88.6% was obtained after shaping of the precipitated powders by spark plasma sintering. This material reveals satisfactory leaching properties, with an initial leaching rate in pure water at 50 C of 10 -2 g.m -2 .j -1 , and a residual leaching rate at 50 C of 10 -5 g.m -2 .j -1 in underground water of potential geological repositories. All in all, this material is a potential candidate for the conditioning of radioactive iodine. (author) [fr

  8. Lanthanum germanate-based apatites as electrolyte for SOFCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrero-Lopez, D.; Diaz-Carrasco, P.; Ramos-Barrado, J.R. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada I, Laboratorio de Materiales y Superficies (Unidad Asociada al C.S.I.C.), Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Pena-Martinez, J. [Instituto de Energias Renovables, Parque Tecnologico, Universidad de Castilla La Mancha, 02006 Albacete (Spain); Ruiz-Morales, J.C. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    Germanate apatites with composition La{sub 10-x}Ge{sub 5.5}Al{sub 0.5}O{sub 26.75-3x/2} have been evaluated for the first time as possible electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Different electrode materials have been considered in this study, i.e. manganite, ferrite, nickelates and cobaltite as cathode materials; and NiO-CGO composite and chromium-manganite as anodes. The chemical compatibility and electrochemical performance of these electrodes with La{sub 9.8}Ge{sub 5.5}Al{sub 0.5}O{sub 26.45} have been studied by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and impedance spectroscopy. The XRPD analysis did not reveal appreciable bulk reactivity with the formation of reaction products between the germanate electrolyte and these electrodes up to 1,200 C. However, a significant cation interdiffusion was observed by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) at the electrode/electrolyte interface, which leads to a significant decrease of the performance of these electrodes. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Synthesis and characterization of implants for bone substitutions made of biomedical apatites containing silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Sprio, Simone

    2008-01-01

    In the last decades the development of bone substitutes characterized by a superior biomimetism has become of particular interest, owing to the increasing economic and societal impact of the bone diseases. In the present work of research the development of bone substitutes characterized by improved biomimetism, has been faced in a chemical, structural and morphological perspective. From a chemical point of view, it has been developed the synthesis of hydroxyapatite powders, exhibiting m...

  10. Metallofoldamers supramolecular architectures from helicates to biomimetics

    CERN Document Server

    Maayan, Galia

    2013-01-01

    Metallofoldamers are oligomers that fold into three-dimensional structures in a controlled manner upon coordination with metal ions. Molecules in this class have shown an impressive ability to form single-handed helical structures and other three-dimensional architectures. Several metallofoldamers have been applied as sensors due to their selective folding when binding to a specific metal ion, while others show promise for applications as responsive materials on the basis of their ability to fold and unfold upon changes in the oxidation state of the coordinated metal ion, and as novel catalysts. Metallofoldamers: From Helicates to Biomimetic Architectures describes the variety of interactions between oligomers and metal species, with a focus on non-natural synthetic molecules. Topics covered include: the major classes of foldamers and their folding driving force metalloproteins and metalloenzymes helicates: self-assembly, structure and applications abiotic metallo-DNA metallo-PNA and iDNA metallopeptides inte...

  11. Biomimetic electrospun nanofibers for tissue regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Susan; Li Bojun; Ma Zuwei; Wei He; Chan Casey; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2006-01-01

    Nanofibers exist widely in human tissue with different patterns. Electrospinning nanotechnology has recently gained a new impetus due to the introduction of the concept of biomimetic nanofibers for tissue regeneration. The advanced electrospinning technique is a promising method to fabricate a controllable continuous nanofiber scaffold similar to the natural extracellular matrix. Thus, the biomedical field has become a significant possible application field of electrospun fibers. Although electrospinning has developed rapidly over the past few years, electrospun nanofibers are still at a premature research stage. Further comprehensive and deep studies on electrospun nanofibers are essential for promoting their biomedical applications. Current electrospun fiber materials include natural polymers, synthetic polymers and inorganic substances. This review briefly describes several typically electrospun nanofiber materials or composites that have great potential for tissue regeneration, and describes their fabrication, advantages, drawbacks and future prospects. (topical review)

  12. Biomimetic polymeric membranes for water treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habel, Joachim Erich Otto

    This project is about the interplay of the three major components of aquaporin based biomimetic polymeric membranes (ABPMs): Aquaporins (AQPs), amphiphilic block copolymers, serving as a vesicular matrix for the hydrophobic AQP exterior (proteopolymersomes) and a polymeric membrane as embedment...... for the proteopolymersomes and mechanical support. To reach maximal functionality of ABPMs, the interplay of each component needs to be optimized. The optimization of AQPs and amphiphilic block copolymers was investigated by mixing bacterial Aquaporin Z (AqpZ) with polybutadiene polyethylene oxide (PB-PEO) diblock...... analysis turned out to give reliable information on polymersome size like known techniques such as Cryo-TEM. Cryo-TEM gave as well reliable information about lamellarity, SAXS/SANS about bilayer thickness. SEM, FTIR and microfluidic experiments on the interaction between all three components of ABPMs...

  13. Biomimetics for architecture & design nature, analogies, technology

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Göran

    2015-01-01

    This book provides the readers with a timely guide to the application of biomimetic principles in architecture and engineering design. As a result of a combined effort by two internationally recognized authorities, the biologist Werner Nachtigall and the architect Göran Pohl, the book describes the principles which can be used to compare nature and technology, and at the same time it presents detailed explanations and examples showing how biology can be used as a source of inspiration and “translated” in building and architectural solutions (biomimicry). Even though nature cannot be directly copied, the living world can provide architects and engineers with a wealth of analogues and inspirations for their own creative designs. But how can analysis of natural entities give rise to advanced and sustainable design? By reporting on the latest bionic design methods and using extensive artwork, the book guides readers through the field of nature-inspired architecture, offering an extraordinary resource for pro...

  14. Surface Chemistry in Nanoscale Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biener, Jürgen; Wittstock, Arne; Baumann, Theodore F.; Weissmüller, Jörg; Bäumer, Marcus; Hamza, Alex V.

    2009-01-01

    Although surfaces or, more precisely, the surface atomic and electronic structure, determine the way materials interact with their environment, the influence of surface chemistry on the bulk of the material is generally considered to be small. However, in the case of high surface area materials such as nanoporous solids, surface properties can start to dominate the overall material behavior. This allows one to create new materials with physical and chemical properties that are no longer determined by the bulk material, but by their nanoscale architectures. Here, we discuss several examples, ranging from nanoporous gold to surface engineered carbon aerogels that demonstrate the tuneability of nanoporous solids for sustainable energy applications.

  15. Surface Chemistry in Nanoscale Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex V. Hamza

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Although surfaces or, more precisely, the surface atomic and electronic structure, determine the way materials interact with their environment, the influence of surface chemistry on the bulk of the material is generally considered to be small. However, in the case of high surface area materials such as nanoporous solids, surface properties can start to dominate the overall material behavior. This allows one to create new materials with physical and chemical properties that are no longer determined by the bulk material, but by their nanoscale architectures. Here, we discuss several examples, ranging from nanoporous gold to surface engineered carbon aerogels that demonstrate the tuneability of nanoporous solids for sustainable energy applications.

  16. Properties of nanoscale metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, Maximilian

    2009-05-20

    Nanoscale hydride particles may exhibit chemical stabilities which differ from those of a macroscopic system. The stabilities are mainly influenced by a surface energy term which contains size-dependent values of the surface tension, the molar volume and an additional term which takes into account a potential reduction of the excess surface energy. Thus, the equilibrium of a nanoparticular hydride system may be shifted to the hydrogenated or to the dehydrogenated side, depending on the size and on the prefix of the surface energy term of the hydrogenated and dehydrogenated material. Additional complexity appears when solid-state reactions of complex hydrides are considered and phase segregation has to be taken into account. In such a case the reversibility of complex hydrides may be reduced if the nanoparticles are free standing on a surface. However, it may be enhanced if the system is enclosed by a nanoscale void which prevents the reaction partners on the dehydrogenated side from diffusing away from each other. Moreover, the generally enhanced diffusivity in nanocrystalline systems may lower the kinetic barriers for the material's transformation and, thus, facilitate hydrogen absorption and desorption.

  17. Nanoscale alterations of corneocytes indicate skin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franz, J; Beutel, M; Gevers, K

    2016-01-01

    , we extended the phenotypic perspective down to the nanoscale. METHODS: Corneocyte samples were obtained non-invasively by a standard tape stripping procedure from 21 indviduals. Scanning electron (SEM) and atomic force microcopy (AFM) were used to record nanoscale topography. Circular nano...

  18. Improvement in crystallinity of apatite coating on titanium with the insertion of CaF2 buffer layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su-Hee; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Kim, Hae-Won

    2008-05-01

    In the apatite coatings on Ti the heat treatment process is necessary to crystallize the apatite structure for improved chemical stability and biological properties. However, the heat treatment normally degrades the mechanical strength of the coating layer associated with thermally induced stress. In this study, we aimed to improve the crystallization of apatite coating by using calcium fluoride (CaF2) as a buffer layer. The insertion of a thin layer of CaF2 (0.2-1 microm) between apatite and Ti significantly improved the crystallization behavior of apatite. Moreover, this crystallization was more enhanced as the thickness of CaF2 was increased. When a 1 microm-thick CaF2 was inserted, the crystallization of apatite initiated at a temperature as low as 320 degrees C, being a dramatic improvement in the crystallization when considering the crystallization initiation temperature of a bare apatite coating on Ti was approximately 450 degrees C. As a result of this crystallization enhancement, the dissolution behavior of CaF2-inserted apatite coatings was more stable than that of the bare apatite coating, showing much reduced initial-burst effect. Preliminary cellular assay showed the CaF2-inserted apatite coating provided a substrate for cells to spread and grow favorably, as being similar to the bare apatite coating. This novel way of apatite coating on Ti using CaF2 buffer layer may be useful in the coating systems particularly requiring low temperature processing and increased crystallinity with high chemical stability.

  19. Interrogating the Effects of Radiation Damage Annealing on Helium Diffusion Kinetics in Apatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, C. D.; Fox, M.; Shuster, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology is commonly used to study landscape evolution and potential links between climate, erosion and tectonics. The technique relies on a quantitative understanding of (i) helium diffusion kinetics in apatite, (ii) an evolving 4He concentration, (iii) accumulating damage to the crystal lattice caused by radioactive decay[1], and (iv) the thermal annealing of such damage[2],[3], which are each functions of both time and temperature. Uncertainty in existing models of helium diffusion kinetics has resulted in conflicting conclusions, especially in settings involving burial heating through geologic time. The effects of alpha recoil damage annealing are currently assumed to follow the kinetics of fission track annealing (e.g., reference [3]), although this assumption is difficult to fully validate. Here, we present results of modeling exercises and a suite of experiments designed to interrogate the effects of damage annealing on He diffusivity in apatite that are independent of empirical calibrations of fission track annealing. We use the existing experimental results for Durango apatite[2] to develop and calibrate a new function that predicts the effects of annealing temperature and duration on measured diffusivity. We also present a suite of experiments conducted on apatite from Sierra Nevada, CA granite to establish whether apatites with different chemical compositions have the same behavior as Durango apatite. Crystals were heated under vacuum to temperatures between 250 and 500°C for 1, 10, or 100 hours. The samples were then irradiated with ~220 MeV protons to produce spallogenic 3He, the diffusant then used in step-heating diffusion experiments. We compare the results of these experiments and model calibrations to existing models. Citations: [1]Shuster, D., Flowers R., and Farley K., (2006), EPSL 249(3-4), 148-161; [2]Shuster, D. and Farley, K., (2009), GCA 73 (1), 6183-6196; [3]Flowers, R., Ketcham, R., Shuster, D. and Farley, K

  20. Adsorption and release of amino acids mixture onto apatitic calcium phosphates analogous to bone mineral

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Rhilassi, A.; Mourabet, M.; El Boujaady, H.; Bennani-Ziatni, M.; Hamri, R. El; Taitai, A.

    2012-10-01

    Study focused on the interaction of adsorbate with poorly crystalline apatitic calcium phosphates analogous to bone mineral. Calcium phosphates prepared in water-ethanol medium at physiological temperature (37 °C) and neutral pH, their Ca/P ratio was between 1.33 and 1.67. Adsorbate used in this paper takes the mixture form of two essential amino acids L-lysine and DL-leucine which have respectively a character hydrophilic and hydrophobic. Adsorption and release are investigated experimentally; they are dependent on the phosphate type and on the nature of adsorbate L-lysine, DL-leucine and their mixture. Adsorption of mixture of amino acids on the apatitic calcium phosphates is influenced by the competition between the two amino acids: L-lysine and DL-leucine which exist in the medium reaction. The adsorption kinetics is very fast while the release kinetics is slow. The chemical composition of apatite has an influence on both adsorption and release. The interactions adsorbate-adsorbent are electrostatic type. Adsorption and release reactions of the amino acid mixture are explained by the existence of the hydrated surface layer of calcium phosphate apatite. The charged sbnd COOsbnd and sbnd NH3+ of adsorbates are the strongest groups that interact with the surface of apatites, the adsorption is mainly due to the electrostatic interaction between the groups sbnd COOsbnd of amino acids and calcium Ca2+ ions of the apatite. Comparative study of interactions between adsorbates (L-lysine, DL-leucine and their mixture) and apatitic calcium phosphates is carried out in vitro by using UV-vis and infrared spectroscopy IR techniques.

  1. The Identification and Synthesis of Lead Apatite Minerals Formed in Lead Water Pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy D. Hopwood

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphate is added to drinking water in the UK to minimise the release of lead from lead water pipes. The phosphate encourages the formation of insoluble lead apatites on the walls of the pipe. Hydroxylpyromorphite Pb5(PO43OH is the lead apatite that is most often used to model lead levels in tap water; however, its presence has not been confirmed. Our aims were to identify the lead pipe apatite and synthesise it. The synthetic mineral would then be used in future solubility studies to produce better predictions of lead levels in tap water. XRD and FTIR were used to characterise the minerals on a range of lead pipes. Pyromorphite and hydroxylpyromorphite were absent and instead a range of mixed calcium lead apatites were present. For every five lead ions in the general formula Pb5(PO43X between one and two ions were replaced with calcium and there was evidence of substitution of PO43- by either CO32- or HPO42-. Calcium lead apatites with similar unit cell dimensions to those found on lead water pipes were then synthesised. The calcium : lead ratio in these reaction mixtures was in excess of 500 : 1 and the resulting crystals were shown by TEM to be nanosized rods and flakes. The synthetic apatites that most closely resembled the unit cell dimensions of the apatites on lead water pipes were shown to be Pb3.4Ca1.3(PO43Cl0.03OH0.97, Pb3.6Ca1.2(PO43Cl0.07OH0.93, and Pb3.6Ca1.2(PO43Cl0.27OH0.73.

  2. Effect of surface silanol groups on the deposition of apatite onto silica surfaces: a computer simulation study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mkhonto, D

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available that bio-active ceramics, including glasses and glass-ceramics, bond to living bone through a collagen-free apatite layer [4], and formation of such an apatite layer on the synthetic material before implantation in the body thus encourages intergrowth... biologically active apatite layer which provides the bonding interface with tissues, such as collagen and other proteins. The sequence of reactions leading to apatite layer formation on bio-active glasses, following immersion in tissue or body fluids is now...

  3. Characterization and in vitro biological evaluation of mineral/osteogenic growth peptide nanocomposites synthesized biomimetically on titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Cen; Kong, Xiangdong [Bio-X Center, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Zhang, Sheng-Min [Advanced Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Lee, In-Seop, E-mail: inseop@yonsei.ac.kr [Bio-X Center, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Institute of Natural Sciences, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Mineral/OGP nanocomposite layers were synthesized biomimetically on Ti substrates. • Incorporated OGP affected the morphology and ultimate structure of mineral. • Incorporated OGP improved the MSCs adhesion, proliferation, and ALP activity. - Abstract: Nanocomposite layers of mineral/osteogenic growth peptide (OGP) were synthesized on calcium phosphate coated titanium substrates by immersing in calcium-phosphate buffer solution containing OGP. Peptide incorporated mineral was characterized by determining quantity loaded, effects on mineral morphology and structure. Also, the biological activity was investigated by cell adhesion, proliferation assay, and measurement of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and micro-bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay revealed that OGP was successfully incorporated with mineral and the amount was increased with immersion time. Incorporated OGP changed the mineral morphology from sharp plate-like shape to more rounded one, and the octacalcium phosphate structure of the mineral was gradually transformed into apatite. With confocal microscopy to examine the incorporation of fluorescently labeled peptide, OGP was evenly distributed throughout mineral layers. Mineral/OGP nanocomposites promoted cell adhesion and proliferation, and also increased ALP activity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Results presented here indicated that the mineral/OGP nanocomposites formed on titanium substrates had the potential for applications in dental implants.

  4. Rapid biomimetic deposition of octacalcium phosphate coatings on zirconia ceramics (Y-TZP) for dental implant applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanic, Martin; Krnel, Kristoffer; Pribosic, Irena; Kosmac, Tomaz

    2012-03-01

    Octacalcium phosphate (OCP) coatings on zirconia oral implants have a great potential to improve the osseointegration of already existing ceramic implants, owing to high osteoconductive characteristics of OCP and its possibility of use as a drug delivery system. Such OCP coatings can be prepared with a simple two-step biomimetic procedure investigated in our study. In the first step, zirconia discs were immersed into the solution with a pH 7.4 and after 1 h of soaking a thin nanostructured calcium phosphate (Ca-P) layer was precipitated on the ceramic substrate via three stages: (i) precipitation of an amorphous Ca-P; (ii) precipitation of the OCP; and (iii) the transformation of the OCP to apatite. This Ca-P layer later served as a template for the rapid deposition of a thicker OCP coating in the second step of the synthesis where the substrate was immersed into the solution with pH 7.0. The main benefits of the method are a relatively quick synthesis, simplicity and a good reproducibility. Moreover, the coatings show good tensile adhesion strength according to the tape tests (ASTM D-3359). In addition, mild physiological conditions of the synthesis may allow incorporation of biologically active molecules in the coating.

  5. Charged Nanowire-Directed Growth of Amorphous Calcium Carbonate Nanosheets in a Mixed Solvent for Biomimetic Composite Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangyi; Liu, Lei; Chen, Si-Ming; Chang, Fu-Jia; Mao, Li-Bo; Gao, Huai-Ling; Ma, Tao; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2018-04-19

    Bio-inspired mineralization is an effective way for fabricating complicated inorganic materials, which inspires us to develop new methods to synthesize materials with fascinating properties. In this article, we report that the charged tellurium nanowires (TeNWs) can be used as bio-macromolecule analogues to direct the formation of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) nanosheets (ACCNs) in a mixed solvent. The effects of surface charges and the concentration of the TeNWs on the formation of ACCNs have been investigated. Particularly, the produced ACCNs can be functionalized by Fe3O4 nanoparticles to produce magnetic ACC/Fe3O4 hybrid nanosheets, which can be used to construct ACC/Fe3O4 composite films through a self-evaporation process. Moreover, sodium alginate-ACC nanocomposite films with remarkable toughness and good transmittance can also be fabricated by using such ACCNs as nanoscale building blocks. This mineralization approach in a mixed solvent using charged tellurium nanowires as bio-macromolecule analogues provides a new way for the synthesis of ACCNs, which can be used as nanoscale building blocks for fabrication of biomimetic composite films.

  6. A biomimetic nano hybrid coating based on the lotus effect and its anti-biofouling behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang; Wang, Guoqing; Meng, Qinghua; Ding, Chunhua; Jiang, Hong; Fang, Yongzeng

    2014-10-01

    To develop an environmentally friendly anti-biofouling coating in virtue of bionics, a block copolymer containing fluorine (Coplm_F) of low surface energy was prepared by copolymerization. The Ag-loaded mesoporous silica (Ag@SBA) acting as a controlled-release antifoulant was prepared from the mesoporous silica (SBA-15). The nano hybrid coating (Ag@SBA/Coplm_F) composing of the Coplm_F and Ag@SBA was to biomimetically simulate the lotus microstructure. The concentration of fluorine element on surface was analyzed by the energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and found rising to 1.45% after hybridation, which could be explained by the driving effect of SBA-15 via the hydrogen bond. This nanoscale morphology of the hybrid coating was measured and found highly semblable to the microstructure of the lotus surface. The contact angle was determined as 151° which confirmed the superhydrophobicity and lotus effect. The adhesion behaviors of Pseudomonas fluorescens, Diatoms, and Chlorella on the surface of the nano hybrid coating (Ag@SBA/Coplm_F) were studied and good effects of anti-biofouling were observed.

  7. Dual-biomimetic superhydrophobic electrospun polystyrene nanofibrous membranes for membrane distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiong; Wang, Ce; Yang, Yin; Wang, Xuefen; Zhu, Meifang; Hsiao, Benjamin S

    2014-02-26

    A new type of dual-biomimetic hierarchically rough polystyrene (PS) superhydrophobic micro/nano-fibrous membrane was fabricated via a one-step electrospinning technique at various polymer concentrations from 15 to 30 wt %. The obtained micro/nano-fibers exhibited a nanopapillose, nanoporous, and microgrooved surface morphology that originated from mimicking the micro/nanoscale hierarchical structures of lotus leaf and silver ragwort leaf, respectively. Superhydrophobicity and high porosity of such resultant electrospun nanofibrous membranes make them attractive candidates for membrane distillation (MD) application with low energy water recovery. In this study, two kinds of optimized PS nanofibrous membranes with different thicknesses were applied for desalination via direct contact MD. The membranes maintained a high and stable permeate water vapor flux (104.8 ± 4.9 kg/m(2)·h, 20 g/L NaCl salt feed for a thinner PS nanofibrous membrane with thickness of 60 μm; 51 ± 4.5 kg/m(2)·h, 35 g/L NaCl salt feed for the thicker sample with thickness of 120 μm; ΔT = 50 °C) for a test period of 10 h without remarkable membrane pores wetting detected. These results were better than those of typical commercial polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) MD membranes or related PVDF nanofibrous membranes reported in literature, suggesting excellent competency of PS nanofibrous membranes for MD applications.

  8. Long-term effect of apatite on ectomycorrhizal growth and community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Christoffer; Johansson, Tomas; Wallander, Håkan

    2012-11-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi are efficient at taking up phosphorus (P) from mineral sources, such as apatite, which are not easily available to the host trees. Since ECM fungal species differ in P uptake rates, it can be expected that the composition of the ECM fungal community will change upon exposure to apatite, provided that the P transfer is rewarded by more carbon being transferred to the fungal symbiont. Control and apatite-amended mesh bags were buried in pairs in the humus layer of a P-poor Norway spruce forest. The ECM fungal community that colonized these bags was analyzed by DNA extraction, PCR amplification of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, cloning, and random sequencing. Fungal biomass was estimated by ergosterol analysis. No change in the ECM fungal community structure was seen after 5 years of apatite exposure, although the fungal biomass increased threefold upon apatite amendment. Our results indicate that host trees enhance carbon allocation to ECM fungi colonizing P sources in P-poor forests but the lack of change in the composition of the ECM fungal community suggests that P transfer rates were similar among the species. Alternatively, higher P transfer among certain species was not rewarded with higher carbon transfer from the host.

  9. Synthesis and luminescence of Eu2+-doped alkaline-earth apatites for application in white LED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xinguo; Zhang Jilin; Huang Jinqing; Tang Xueping; Gong Menglian

    2010-01-01

    A series of Eu 2+ -doped alkaline-earth apatites (alkaline-earth=Ca, Sr and Ba) were synthesized by a solid state reaction method with excess chlorides, and the effect of the used excess chlorides on the luminescent property of the synthesized products was discussed. Photoluminescence measurements showed that Eu 2+ -doped calcium apatite exhibited intensely blue wide-band emission peaking at 457 nm under near UV excitation among the Eu 2+ -doped Ca, Sr and Ba apatites. Blue and white LEDs were successfully fabricated by pre-coating the calcium apatite phosphors onto ∼395 nm-emitting InGaN chips. The CIE coordinates, color temperature, luminous efficacy and rendering index value of the fabricated white LED are (0.3432, 0.3234), 4969 K, 8 lm/W and 80, respectively. The results indicate that the Eu 2+ -activated calcium apatite phosphor is a promising candidate as a blue component for fabrication of near UV-based white LEDs.

  10. Study of thermoluminescence properties of Eppawala apatite mineral and its suitability as a dosimetric material

    CERN Document Server

    Jayalath, A

    2000-01-01

    This study reports TL properties and the dosimetric properties of natural apatite mineral obtained from Eppawala Apatite ore in Sri Lanka. This mineral was used to study glow curve characteristics by using (a) the powder form of the raw mineral (b) sieved raw mineral and (c) the magnetically separated mineral. The glow curves of magnetically separated apatite showed two peaks. Low temperature peak at 120C, and a high temperature peak at 240C. The emission wavelength of the glow curve is 360 nm. The intensity of the 240C peak become stronger after annealing the mineral to about 180C. Apatite has glow peaks similar to other commonly used TL materials, such as synthetically prepared calcium sulphate:Dy and calcium sulphate:Tm show high intensity peak at 220C and low intensity peaks at 80C and 120C. However, the emission wavelengths of the main peaks are at 428nm and 452 nm for calcium sulphate:Dy and calcium sulphate: Tm respectively. Eppawala apatite mineral showed a linear response to both gamma and beta radia...

  11. Chemical treatment and biomimetic coating evaluating in zirconia-alumina ceramics; Avaliacao de tratamentos quimicos e recobrimento biomimetico em ceramicas de alumina-zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Amanda Abati

    2007-07-01

    Ceramic materials, as alumina and zirconia have been explored along the years as biomaterials application. The bio inert nature has been stimulating the development of new alternatives, as chemical treatments to improve the biological application of these ceramics. The biomimetic process of bio inert ceramics for coating apatite is based on soaking the implant in a simulated body fluid, SBF, with ion concentrations nearly equal to those of human blood plasma. The bioactivity of the material is related with the formation of a layer constituted of hydroxyapatite low crystalline, similar to the biological apatite. The biocompatibility associated to the structural properties of the alumina and zirconia has been stimulating the clinical use of these materials, mainly in areas of larger mechanical requests, places not recommended for bioactive hydroxyapatite, for instance. In this work samples of alumina, zirconia doped with Yttria (3% mol) and composites of alumina and zirconia doped with Yttria (3% mol) were prepared by co-precipitation method, calcinate, sintered, chemically treated with solutions of acid phosphoric and sodium hydroxide and them immersed in 1.0 M and 1.5 M SBF. The calcinate powders were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), gas adsorption (BET) and laser diffraction. The XRD results indicate that the samples are low crystalline. It was observed for BET that the samples present high specific surface area. The results of laser diffraction and SEM showed that the powders are agglomerates. The sintered samples were analyzed by XRD, SEM and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The phases quantified by Rietveld method were: cubic, tetragonal and monoclinic of the zirconia, besides the phase alpha of the alumina. The chemical treatment with phosphoric acid didn't present a tendency of larger apatite formation in relation to the samples no chemically treated. The treatment with sodium hydroxide provoked accentuated transformation

  12. BatSLAM: Simultaneous localization and mapping using biomimetic sonar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckel, Jan; Peremans, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    We propose to combine a biomimetic navigation model which solves a simultaneous localization and mapping task with a biomimetic sonar mounted on a mobile robot to address two related questions. First, can robotic sonar sensing lead to intelligent interactions with complex environments? Second, can we model sonar based spatial orientation and the construction of spatial maps by bats? To address these questions we adapt the mapping module of RatSLAM, a previously published navigation system based on computational models of the rodent hippocampus. We analyze the performance of the proposed robotic implementation operating in the real world. We conclude that the biomimetic navigation model operating on the information from the biomimetic sonar allows an autonomous agent to map unmodified (office) environments efficiently and consistently. Furthermore, these results also show that successful navigation does not require the readings of the biomimetic sonar to be interpreted in terms of individual objects/landmarks in the environment. We argue that the system has applications in robotics as well as in the field of biology as a simple, first order, model for sonar based spatial orientation and map building.

  13. BatSLAM: Simultaneous localization and mapping using biomimetic sonar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Steckel

    Full Text Available We propose to combine a biomimetic navigation model which solves a simultaneous localization and mapping task with a biomimetic sonar mounted on a mobile robot to address two related questions. First, can robotic sonar sensing lead to intelligent interactions with complex environments? Second, can we model sonar based spatial orientation and the construction of spatial maps by bats? To address these questions we adapt the mapping module of RatSLAM, a previously published navigation system based on computational models of the rodent hippocampus. We analyze the performance of the proposed robotic implementation operating in the real world. We conclude that the biomimetic navigation model operating on the information from the biomimetic sonar allows an autonomous agent to map unmodified (office environments efficiently and consistently. Furthermore, these results also show that successful navigation does not require the readings of the biomimetic sonar to be interpreted in terms of individual objects/landmarks in the environment. We argue that the system has applications in robotics as well as in the field of biology as a simple, first order, model for sonar based spatial orientation and map building.

  14. Sustainability assessment of a lightweight biomimetic ceiling structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antony, Florian; Speck, Thomas; Speck, Olga; Grießhammer, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    An intensive and continuous debate centres on the question of whether biomimetics has a specific potential to contribute to sustainability. In the context of a case study, the objective of this paper is to contribute to this debate by presenting the first systematic approach to assess the sustainability of a complex biomimetic product. The object of inquiry is a lecture hall's ribbed slab. Based on criteria suggested by the Association of German Engineers (VDI), it has been verified that the slab has been correctly defined as biomimetic. Moreover, a systematic comparative product sustainability assessment has been carefully carried out. For purposes of comparison, estimated static calculations have been performed for conceivable current state-of-the-art lightweight ceiling structures. Alternative options are a hollow article slab and a pre-stressed flat slab. Besides a detailed benefit analysis and a discussion of social effects, their costs have also been compared. A particularly detailed life cycle assessment on the respective environmental impacts has also been performed. Results show that the biomimetic ribbed slab built in the 1960s is able to keep up with the current state-of-the-art lightweight solutions in terms of sustainability. These promising results encourage a systematic search for a broad range of sustainable biomimetic solutions. (paper)

  15. Numerical Analysis of Erosion Caused by Biomimetic Axial Fan Blade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Qiu Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Damage caused by erosion has been reported in several industries for a wide range of situations. In the present work, a new method is presented to improve the erosion resistance of machine components by biomimetic method. A numerical investigation of solid particle erosion in the standard and biomimetic configuration blade of axial fan is presented. The analysis consists in the application of the discrete phase model, for modeling the solid particles flow, and the Eulerian conservation equations to the continuous phase. The numerical study employs computational fluid dynamics (CFD software, based on a finite volume method. User-defined function was used to define wear equation. Gas/solid flow axial fan was simulated to calculate the erosion rate of the particles on the fan blades and comparatively analyzed the erosive wear of the smooth surface, the groove-shaped, and convex hull-shaped biomimetic surface axial flow fan blade. The results show that the groove-shaped biomimetic blade antierosion ability is better than that of the other two fan blades. Thoroughly analyze of antierosion mechanism of the biomimetic blade from many factors including the flow velocity contours and flow path lines, impact velocity, impact angle, particle trajectories, and the number of collisions.

  16. Biomimetic electrochemistry from conducting polymers. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otero, T.F.; Martinez, J.G.; Arias-Pardilla, J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Composition and properties of conducting polymers change during reactions. ► These properties are being exploited to develop biomimetic reactive and soft devices. ► The state of the art for artificial muscles sensing working conditions was reviewed. ► Smart membranes, drug delivery devices and nervous interfaces were also reviewed. - Abstract: Films of conducting polymers in the presence of electrolytes can be oxidized or reduced by the flow of anodic or cathodic currents. Ions and solvent are exchanged during a reaction for charge and osmotic pressure balance. A reactive conducting polymer contains ions and solvent. Such variation of composition during a reaction is reminiscent of the biological processes in cells. Along changes to the composition of the material during a reaction, there are also changes to other properties, including: volume (electrochemomechanical), colour (electrochromic), stored charge (electrical storage), porosity or permselectivity (electroporosity), stored chemicals, wettability and so on. Most of those properties mimic similar property changes in organs during their functioning. These properties are being exploited to develop biomimetic reactive and soft devices: artificial muscles and polymeric actuators; supercapacitors and all organic batteries; smart membranes; electron-ion transducers; nervous interfaces and artificial synapses, or drug delivery devices. In this review we focus on the state of the art for artificial muscles, smart membranes and electron-ion transducers. The reactive nature of those devices provide them with a unique advantage related to the present days technologies: any changes in the surrounding physical or chemical variable acting on the electrochemical reaction rate will be sensed by the device while working. Working under constant current (driving signal), the evolution of the device potential or the evolution of the consumed electrical energy (sensing signals) senses and quantifies the

  17. Nanoscale cryptography: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoumi, Massoud; Shi, Weidong; Xu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    While most of the electronics industry is dependent on the ever-decreasing size of lithographic transistors, this scaling cannot continue indefinitely. To improve the performance of the integrated circuits, new emerging and paradigms are needed. In recent years, nanoelectronics has become one of the most important and exciting forefront in science and engineering. It shows a great promise for providing us in the near future with many breakthroughs that change the direction of technological advances in a wide range of applications. In this paper, we discuss the contribution that nanotechnology may offer to the evolution of cryptographic hardware and embedded systems and demonstrate how nanoscale devices can be used for constructing security primitives. Using a custom set of design automation tools, it is demonstrated that relative to a conventional 45-nm CMOS system, performance gains can be obtained up to two orders of magnitude reduction in area and up to 50 % improvement in speed.

  18. Nanoscale biophysics of the cell

    CERN Document Server

    Ashrafuzzaman, Mohammad

    2018-01-01

    Macroscopic cellular structures and functions are generally investigated using biological and biochemical approaches. But these methods are no longer adequate when one needs to penetrate deep into the small-scale structures and understand their functions. The cell is found to hold various physical structures, molecular machines, and processes that require physical and mathematical approaches to understand and indeed manipulate them. Disorders in general cellular compartments, perturbations in single molecular structures, drug distribution therein, and target specific drug-binding, etc. are mostly physical phenomena. This book will show how biophysics has revolutionized our way of addressing the science and technology of nanoscale structures of cells, and also describes the potential for manipulating the events that occur in them.

  19. Ion Discrimination by Nanoscale Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempe, Susan; Rogers, David

    2013-03-01

    Proteins that form membrane-spanning channels excel at discriminating between molecules on the basis of subtle structural and chemical differences. For example, some channels distinguish between water and ions; others between Na+ (sodium) and K+ (potassium) despite identical charges and only sub-Angstrom differences in size. If we could understand these structure/function relationships, we could potentially harness biological design principles in robust nanoscale devices that mimic biological function for efficient separations. Using ab initio molecular simulations, we have interrogated the link between channel structure and selective transport, both in cellular channels and polymer membranes. Our results emphasize the surprisingly important role of the environment that surrounds ion-binding sites, as well as the coordination chemistry of the binding site for raising or lowering the free energy barrier to transport in both systems. Support for Sandia Laboratory Research & Development Program is gratefully acknowledged.

  20. PNNL Apatite Investigation at 100-NR-2 Quality Assurance Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, N. J.

    2009-04-02

    In 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy, Fluor Hanford, Inc., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the Washington Department of Ecology agreed that the long-term strategy for groundwater remediation at the 100-N Area would include apatite sequestration as the primary treatment, followed by a secondary treatment if necessary. Since then, the agencies have worked together to agree on which apatite sequestration technology has the greatest chance of reducing strontium-90 flux to the Columbia River. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by staff working on the PNNL Apatite Investigation at 100-NR-2 Project. The plan is designed to be used exclusively by project staff.

  1. The relationship between fission track length and track density in apatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laslett, G.M.; Gleadow, A.J.W.; Duddy, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    Fission track dating is based upon an age equation derived from a random line segment model for fission tracks. This equation contains the implicit assumption of a proportional relationship between the true mean length of fission tracks and their track density in an isotropic medium. Previous experimental investigation of this relationship for both spontaneous and induced tracks in apatite during progressive annealment model in an obvious fashion. Corrected equations relating track length and density for apatite, an anisotropic mineral, show that the proportionality in this case is between track density and a length factor which is a generalization of the mean track length combining the actual length and crystallographic orientation of the track. This relationship has been experimentally confirmed for induced tracks in Durango apatite, taking into account bias in sampling of the track lengths, and the effect of the bulk etching velocity. (author)

  2. Bactericidal activity of biomimetic diamond nanocone surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Leanne E; Yang, Yang; Yuen, Muk-Fung; Zhang, Wenjun; Nobbs, Angela H; Su, Bo

    2016-03-17

    The formation of biofilms on implant surfaces and the subsequent development of medical device-associated infections are difficult to resolve and can cause considerable morbidity to the patient. Over the past decade, there has been growing recognition that physical cues, such as surface topography, can regulate biological responses and possess bactericidal activity. In this study, diamond nanocone-patterned surfaces, representing biomimetic analogs of the naturally bactericidal cicada fly wing, were fabricated using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition, followed by bias-assisted reactive ion etching. Two structurally distinct nanocone surfaces were produced, characterized, and the bactericidal ability examined. The sharp diamond nanocone features were found to have bactericidal capabilities with the surface possessing the more varying cone dimension, nonuniform array, and decreased density, showing enhanced bactericidal ability over the more uniform, highly dense nanocone surface. Future research will focus on using the fabrication process to tailor surface nanotopographies on clinically relevant materials that promote both effective killing of a broader range of microorganisms and the desired mammalian cell response. This study serves to introduce a technology that may launch a new and innovative direction in the design of biomaterials with capacity to reduce the risk of medical device-associated infections.

  3. Development of Underwater Microrobot with Biomimetic Locomotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zhang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Microrobots have powerful applications in biomedical and naval fields. They should have a compact structure, be easy to manufacture, have efficient locomotion, be driven by low voltage and have a simple control system. To meet these purposes, inspired by the leg of stick insects, we designed a novel type of microrobot with biomimetic locomotion with 1-DOF (degree of freedom legs. The locomotion includes two ionic conducting polymer film (ICPF actuators to realize the 2-DOF motion. We developed several microrobots with this locomotion. Firstly, we review a microrobot, named Walker-1, with 1-DOF motion. And then a new microrobot, named Walker-2, utilizing six ICPF actuators, with 3-DOF motion is introduced. It is 47 mm in diameter and 8 mm in height (in static state. It has 0.61 g of dried weight. We compared the two microrobot prototypes, and the result shows that Walker-2 has some advantages, such as more flexible moving motion, good balance, less water resistance, more load-carrying ability and so on. We also compared it with some insect-inspired microrobots and some microrobots with 1-DOF legs, and the result shows that a microrobot with this novel type of locomotion has some advantages. Its structure has fewer actuators and joints, a simpler control system and is compact. The ICPF actuator decides that it can be driven by low voltage (less than 5 V and move in water. A microrobot with this locomotion has powerful applications in biomedical and naval fields.

  4. Designing communicating colonies of biomimetic microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmakov, German V; Yashin, Victor V; Levitan, Steven P; Balazs, Anna C

    2010-07-13

    Using computational modeling, we design colonies of biomimetic microcapsules that exploit chemical mechanisms to communicate and alter their local environment. As a result, these synthetic objects can self-organize into various autonomously moving structures and exhibit ant-like tracking behavior. In the simulations, signaling microcapsules release agonist particles, whereas target microcapsules release antagonist particles and the permeabilities of both capsule types depend on the local particle concentration in the surrounding solution. Additionally, the released nanoscopic particles can bind to the underlying substrate and thereby create adhesion gradients that propel the microcapsules to move. Hydrodynamic interactions and the feedback mechanism provided by the dissolved particles are both necessary to achieve the collective dynamics exhibited by these colonies. Our model provides a platform for integrating both the spatial and temporal behavior of assemblies of "artificial cells," and allows us to design a rich variety of structures capable of exhibiting complex, cooperative behavior. Due to the cell-like attributes of polymeric microcapsules and polymersomes, material systems are available for realizing our predictions.

  5. Biomimetic Coacervate Environments for Protein Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Sarah; McCall, Patrick; Srivastava, Samavayan; Kovar, David; Gardel, Margaret; Tirrell, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Living cells have evolved sophisticated intracellular organization strategies that are challenging to reproduce synthetically. Biomolecular function depends on both the structure of the molecule itself and the properties of the surrounding medium. The ability to simulate the in vivo environment and isolate biological networks for study in an artificial milieu without sacrificing the crowding, structure, and compartmentalization of a cellular environment, represent engineering challenges with tremendous potential to impact both biological studies and biomedical applications. Emerging experience has shown that polypeptide-based complex coacervation (electrostatically-driven liquid-liquid phase separation) produces a biomimetic microenvironment capable of tuning protein biochemical activity. We have investigated the effect of polypeptide-based coacervates on the dynamic self-assembly of cytoskeletal actin filaments. Coacervate materials are able to directly affect the nucleation and assembly dynamics. We observe effects that can be attributed to the length and chemical specificity of the encapsulating polypeptides, as well as the overall crowded nature of a polymer-rich coacervate phase. Coacervate-based systems are particularly attractive for use in biochemical assays because the compartmentalization afforded by liquid-liquid phase separation does not necessarily inhibit the transport of molecules across the compartmental barrier.

  6. Biomimetic optical sensor for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Susan A.; Gorospe, George E.; Wright, Cameron H. G.; Barrett, Steven F.

    2015-05-01

    We report on a fiber optic sensor based on the physiological aspects of the eye and vision-related neural layers of the common housefly (Musca domestica) that has been developed and built for aerospace applications. The intent of the research is to reproduce select features from the fly's vision system that are desirable in image processing, including high functionality in low-light and low-contrast environments, sensitivity to motion, compact size, lightweight, and low power and computation requirements. The fly uses a combination of overlapping photoreceptor responses that are well approximated by Gaussian distributions and neural superposition to detect image features, such as object motion, to a much higher degree than just the photoreceptor density would imply. The Gaussian overlap in the biomimetic sensor comes from the front-end optical design, and the neural superposition is accomplished by subsequently combining the signals using analog electronics. The fly eye sensor is being developed to perform real-time tracking of a target on a flexible aircraft wing experiencing bending and torsion loads during flight. We report on results of laboratory experiments using the fly eye sensor to sense a target moving across its field of view.

  7. Software architecture of biomimetic underwater vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praczyk, Tomasz; Szymak, Piotr

    2016-05-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles are vehicles that are entirely or partly independent of human decisions. In order to obtain operational independence, the vehicles have to be equipped with a specialized software. The main task of the software is to move the vehicle along a trajectory with collision avoidance. Moreover, the software has also to manage different devices installed on the vehicle board, e.g. to start and stop cameras, sonars etc. In addition to the software embedded on the vehicle board, the software responsible for managing the vehicle by the operator is also necessary. Its task is to define mission of the vehicle, to start, to stop the mission, to send emergency commands, to monitor vehicle parameters, and to control the vehicle in remotely operated mode. An important objective of the software is also to support development and tests of other software components. To this end, a simulation environment is necessary, i.e. simulation model of the vehicle and all its key devices, the model of the sea environment, and the software to visualize behavior of the vehicle. The paper presents architecture of the software designed for biomimetic autonomous underwater vehicle (BAUV) that is being constructed within the framework of the scientific project financed by Polish National Center of Research and Development.

  8. A Parallel Modular Biomimetic Cilia Sorting Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G. H. Whiting

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aquatic unicellular organism Paramecium caudatum uses cilia to swim around its environment and to graze on food particles and bacteria. Paramecia use waves of ciliary beating for locomotion, intake of food particles and sensing. There is some evidence that Paramecia pre-sort food particles by discarding larger particles, but intake the particles matching their mouth cavity. Most prior attempts to mimic cilia-based manipulation merely mimicked the overall action rather than the beating of cilia. The majority of massive-parallel actuators are controlled by a central computer; however, a distributed control would be far more true-to-life. We propose and test a distributed parallel cilia platform where each actuating unit is autonomous, yet exchanging information with its closest neighboring units. The units are arranged in a hexagonal array. Each unit is a tileable circuit board, with a microprocessor, color-based object sensor and servo-actuated biomimetic cilia actuator. Localized synchronous communication between cilia allowed for the emergence of coordinated action, moving different colored objects together. The coordinated beating action was capable of moving objects up to 4 cm/s at its highest beating frequency; however, objects were moved at a speed proportional to the beat frequency. Using the local communication, we were able to detect the shape of objects and rotating an object using edge detection was performed; however, lateral manipulation using shape information was unsuccessful.

  9. Hydrogen Tunneling in Enzymes and Biomimetic Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layfield, Joshua P.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2014-04-09

    Hydrogen transfer reactions play an important role throughout chemistry and biology. In general, hydrogen transfer reactions encompass proton and hydride transfer, which are associated with the transfer of a positively or negatively charged species, respectively, and proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), which corresponds to the net transfer of one electron and one proton in the simplest case. Such PCET reactions can occur by either a sequential mechanism, in which the proton or electron transfers first, or a concerted mechanism, in which the electron and proton transfer in a single kinetic step with no stable intermediate. Furthermore, concerted PCET reactions can be subdivided into hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), which corresponds to the transfer of an electron and proton between the same donor and acceptor (i.e., the transfer of a predominantly neutral species), and electron-proton transfer (EPT), which corresponds to the transfer of an electron and proton between different donors and acceptors, possibly even in different directions. In all of these types of hydrogen transfer reactions, hydrogen tunneling could potentially play a significant role. The biomimetic portion was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  10. Scaling laws for a compliant biomimetic swimmer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibouin, Florence; Raufaste, Christophe; Bouret, Yann; Argentina, Mederic

    2017-11-01

    Motivated by the seminal work of Lord Lighthill in the sixties, we study the motion of inertial aquatic swimmers that propels with undulatory gaits. In 2014, Gazzola et al. have uncovered the law linking the swimming velocity to the kinematics of the swimmer and the fluid properties. At high Reynolds numbers, the velocity appears to be equal to 0.4 Af /(2 π) , where A and f are respectively the amplitude and the frequency of the oscillating fin. We have constructed a compliant biomimetic swimmer, whose muscles have been modeled through a torque distribution thanks to a servomotor. A soft polymeric material mimics the flesh and provides the flexibility. By immersing our robot into a water tunnel, we find and characterize the operating point for which the propulsive force balances the drag. We bring the first experimental proof of the former law and probe large amplitude undulations which exhibits nonlinear effects. All data collapse perfectly onto a single master curve. We investigate the role of the fin flexibility by varying its length and its thickness and we figured out the existence of an efficient swimming regime. We thank the support of CNRS and Université Côte d'Azur.

  11. Hydrogen Tunneling in Enzymes and Biomimetic Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layfield, Joshua P.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2013-12-20

    Hydrogen transfer reactions play an important role throughout chemistry and biology. In general, hydrogen transfer reactions encompass proton and hydride transfer, which are associated with the transfer of a positively or negatively charged species, respectively, and proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), which corresponds to the net transfer of one electron and one proton in the simplest case. Such PCET reactions can occur by either a sequential mechanism, in which the proton or electron transfers first, or a concerted mechanism, in which the electron and proton transfer in a single kinetic step with no stable intermediate. Furthermore, concerted PCET reactions can be subdivided into hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), which corresponds to the transfer of an electron and proton between the same donor and acceptor (i.e., the transfer of a predominantly neutral species), and electron-proton transfer (EPT), which corresponds to the transfer of an electron and proton between different donors and acceptors, possibly even in different directions. In all of these types of hydrogen transfer reactions, hydrogen tunneling could potentially play a signficant role. The theoretical development portion of this Review was supported by the National Science Foundation under CHE-10-57875. The biological portion of this Review was funded by NIH Grant No. GM056207. The biomimetic portion was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electro-catalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  12. Superhydrophobic surfaces: from natural to biomimetic to functional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin; Su, Bao-Lian

    2011-01-15

    Nature is the creation of aesthetic functional systems, in which many natural materials have vagarious structures. Inspired from nature, such as lotus leaf, butterfly' wings, showing excellent superhydrophobicity, scientists have recently fabricated a lot of biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces by virtue of various smart and easy routes. Whilst, many examples, such as lotus effect, clearly tell us that biomimicry is dissimilar to a simple copying or duplicating of biological structures. In this feature article, we review the recent studies in both natural superhydrophobic surfaces and biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces, and highlight some of the recent advances in the last four years, including the various smart routes to construct rough surfaces, and a lot of chemical modifications which lead to superhydrophobicity. We also review their functions and applications to date. Finally, the promising routes from biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces in the next are proposed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Desalination by biomimetic aquaporin membranes: Review of status and prospects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, C.Y.; Zhao, Y.; Wang, R.

    2013-01-01

    Based on their unique combination of offering high water permeability and high solute rejection aquaporin proteins have attracted considerable interest over the last years as functional building blocks of biomimetic membranes for water desalination and reuse. The purpose of this review is to prov......Based on their unique combination of offering high water permeability and high solute rejection aquaporin proteins have attracted considerable interest over the last years as functional building blocks of biomimetic membranes for water desalination and reuse. The purpose of this review......; including an overview of our own recent developments in aquaporin-based membranes. Finally we outline future prospects of aquaporin based biomimetic membrane for desalination and water reuse....

  14. Theoretical stability assessment of uranyl phosphates and apatites: Selection of amendments for in situ remediation of uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raicevic, S. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences VINCA, Radiation and Environmental Protection Laboratory, P.O.Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)]. E-mail: raich@beotel.yu; Wright, J.V. [PIMS NW, Inc., 201 North Edison, Suite 226, Richland, WA 99336 (United States); Veljkovic, V. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences VINCA, Center for Multidisciplinary Research and Engineering, P.O.Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Conca, J.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, 115 North Main Street, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)

    2006-02-15

    Addition of an amendment or reagent to soil/sediment is a technique that can decrease mobility and reduce bioavailability of uranium (U) and other heavy metals in the contaminated site. According to data from literature and results obtained in field studies, the general mineral class of apatites was selected as a most promising amendment for in situ immobilization/remediation of U. In this work we presented theoretical assessment of stability of U(VI) in four apatite systems (hydroxyapatite (HAP), North Carolina Apatite (NCA), Lisina Apatite (LA), and Apatite II) in order to determine an optimal apatite soil amendment which could be used for in situ remediation of uranium. In this analysis we used a theoretical criterion which is based on calculation of the ion-ion interaction potential, representing the main term of the cohesive energy of the matrix/pollutant system. The presented results of this analysis indicate (i) that the mechanism of immobilization of U by natural apatites depends on their chemical composition and (ii) that all analyzed apatites represent, from the point of view of stability, promising materials which could be used in field remediation of U-contaminated sites.

  15. Theoretical stability assessment of uranyl phosphates and apatites: Selection of amendments for in situ remediation of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raicevic, S.; Wright, J.V.; Veljkovic, V.; Conca, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Addition of an amendment or reagent to soil/sediment is a technique that can decrease mobility and reduce bioavailability of uranium (U) and other heavy metals in the contaminated site. According to data from literature and results obtained in field studies, the general mineral class of apatites was selected as a most promising amendment for in situ immobilization/remediation of U. In this work we presented theoretical assessment of stability of U(VI) in four apatite systems (hydroxyapatite (HAP), North Carolina Apatite (NCA), Lisina Apatite (LA), and Apatite II) in order to determine an optimal apatite soil amendment which could be used for in situ remediation of uranium. In this analysis we used a theoretical criterion which is based on calculation of the ion-ion interaction potential, representing the main term of the cohesive energy of the matrix/pollutant system. The presented results of this analysis indicate (i) that the mechanism of immobilization of U by natural apatites depends on their chemical composition and (ii) that all analyzed apatites represent, from the point of view of stability, promising materials which could be used in field remediation of U-contaminated sites

  16. The study of geochemical behavior of rare earth elements in apatites from the Hormoz Island, Persian Gulf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rostami

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The study area is located about 3 km southwest of the Hormoz Island in the Hormozgan province, in the Persian Gulf. The main rock units in the region consist of a highly altered acidic pluton cratophyre, which is responsible for apatite formation, diabasic dike, marl and altered basalt. Apatite is the only phosphate mineral in the Hormoz Island, which has accumulated REE in its crystal structure. The amount of Na2O and SiO2 oxides in apatite are high and the average content of the main elements Fe, Mg, Al, Ca are 7.5 ppm, 365 ppm, 2880 ppm and 27.8%, respectively. The Y, Mn, Rb contents increase and Sr decreases with increasing magmatic differentiation. It shows that a moderate magmatic differentiation occurred during the crystallization of apatite. The total REE content in the Hormoz apatite is high (1.22-2.25%. LREE/HREE ratio is also high. This means that Hormoz apatites are enriched in light rare earth elements. The REE normalized pattern shows a negative slope with a negative Eu anomaly. According to various diagrams based on apatite composition, it is deduced that the Hormoz apatites belong to mafic I-type granitoids with high oxidation state (Fe2O3/FeO>1.

  17. A new glance at ruthenium sorption mechanism on hydroxy, carbonate, and fluor apatites: Analytical and structural studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tõnsuaadu, K; Gruselle, M; Villain, F; Thouvenot, R; Peld, M; Mikli, V; Traksmaa, R; Gredin, P; Carrier, X; Salles, L

    2006-12-15

    The sorption mechanism of Ru3+ ions on hydroxy (HAp), carbonate (CO3HAp), and fluor apatites (FAp) has been studied in detail. Ru apatites were obtained by reaction of the apatites with RuCl3 in aqueous solution. The structure and composition of the ruthenium-modified apatites were studied by several techniques: elemental analysis, XRD, EXAFS, IR, NMR, SEM-EDS, TEM, and thermal analysis. The amount of Ru in the modified apatite varies from 7.8 to 10.5 wt% and is not related to the initial composition or the specific surface area of the apatite. The different characterization techniques show that in the Ru-modified apatites Ru is surrounded by six oxygen atoms and do not contain any chlorine. For Ru-HAp and Ru-CO3HAp the new phase is amorphous whereas it is crystalline for FAp. The catalytic oxidation ability is higher for Ru-HAp and Ru-CO3HAp compared to Ru-FAp apatite in the oxidation of benzylic alcohol.

  18. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Apatite Investigation at the 100-NR-2 Quality Assurance Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-03-28

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by staff working on the 100-NR-2 Apatite Project. The U.S. Department of Energy, Fluor Hanford, Inc., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the Washington Department of Ecology agreed that the long-term strategy for groundwater remediation at 100-N would include apatite sequestration as the primary treatment, followed by a secondary treatment. The scope of this project covers the technical support needed before, during, and after treatment of the targeted subsurface environment using a new high-concentration formulation.

  19. Chemical, physical, and histologic studies on four commercial apatites used for alveolar ridge augmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Ruyter, I E; Haanaes, H R

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate four commercial apatite products. Subperiosteal alveolar ridge augmentation was performed on the maxilla of rats by implantation of granules of two dense products and of two porous products, and the tissue response was compared with the material character......The purpose of this study was to evaluate four commercial apatite products. Subperiosteal alveolar ridge augmentation was performed on the maxilla of rats by implantation of granules of two dense products and of two porous products, and the tissue response was compared with the material...

  20. Growth of apatite on chitosan-multiwall carbon nanotube composite membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jun; Yao Zhiwen; Tang Changyu; Darvell, B.W.; Zhang Hualin; Pan Lingzhan; Liu Jingsong; Chen Zhiqing

    2009-01-01

    Bioactive membranes for guided tissue regeneration would be of value for periodontal therapy. Chitosan-multiwall carbon nanotube (CS-MWNT) composites were treated to deposit nanoscopic apatite for MWNT proportions of 0-4 mass%. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and X-ray diffraction were used for characterization. Apatite was formed on the CS-MWNT composites at low MWNT concentrations, but the dispersion of the MWNT affects the crystallite size and the Ca/P molar ratio of the composite. The smallest crystallite size was 9 nm at 1 mass% MWNT.

  1. Biomimetic self-assembly of a functional asymmetrical electronic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncheva, Mila; Gracias, David H; Jacobs, Heiko O; Whitesides, George M

    2002-04-16

    This paper introduces a biomimetic strategy for the fabrication of asymmetrical, three-dimensional electronic devices modeled on the folding of a chain of polypeptide structural motifs into a globular protein. Millimeter-size polyhedra-patterned with logic devices, wires, and solder dots-were connected in a linear string by using flexible wire. On self-assembly, the string folded spontaneously into two domains: one functioned as a ring oscillator, and the other one as a shift register. This example demonstrates that biomimetic principles of design and self-organization can be applied to generate multifunctional electronic systems of complex, three-dimensional architecture.

  2. Biomimetic Self-Organization and Self-Healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker; Hesselberg, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    seeds and fruits). Readers will learn to take ideas and concepts like this from nature, implement them in research, and understand and explain diverse phenomena and their related functions. From bioinspired computing and medical products to biomimetic applications like artificial muscles, MEMS, textiles......-growing, cross-disciplinary field in which researchers study biological activities in nature to make critical advancements in science and engineering Introduces bioinspiration, biomimetics, and bioreplication, and provides biological background and practical applications for each Cutting-edge topics include bio...

  3. Towards Nanoscale Biomedical Devices in Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parracino, A.; Gajula, G.P.; di Gennaro, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    Medical interest in nanotechnology originates from a belief that nanoscale therapeutic devices can be constructed and directed towards its target inside the human body. Such nanodevices can be engineered by coupling superparamagnetic nanoparticle to biomedically active proteins. We hereby report ...

  4. Nanoscale Vacuum Electronics: Back to the Future?

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This CIF project developed nanoscale vacuum devices for potential radiation-immune electronics ideal for space applications. Vacuum is superior to any semiconductor...

  5. Simultaneous incorporation of carbonate and fluoride in synthetic apatites: Effect on crystallographic and physico-chemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Fang; LeGeros, John P; LeGeros, Racquel Z

    2009-07-01

    The mineral in bone is an impure hydroxyapatite, with carbonate as the chief minor substituent. Fluoride has been shown to stimulate osteoblastic activity and inhibit osteoclastic resorption in vitro. CO(3)- and F-substituted apatite (CFA) has been considered as potential bone graft material for orthopedic and dental applications. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of simultaneously incorporated CO(3) and F on the crystallographic physico-chemical properties of apatite. The results showed that increasing CO(3) and Na content in apatites with relatively constant F concentration caused a decrease in crystallite size and an increase in the extent of calcium release; increasing F content in apatites with relatively constant CO(3) concentration caused an increase in crystallite size and a decrease in the extent of Ca release. These findings suggest that CFAs as bone graft materials of desired solubility can be prepared by manipulating the relative concentrations of CO(3) and F incorporated in the apatite.

  6. Nanoscale Architectures for Energy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Stanislaus

    2009-03-01

    In my group, we have developed a number of different potential architecture systems for gaining insights into energy storage and photovoltaics. In one manifestation of our efforts, generating a heterojunction comprising nanotubes and nanocrystals, externally bound and connected, has been significant. The unique, innovative, and important aspect of this particular nanoscale architecture is that it takes advantage of the tunability, in terms of size, shape, and chemistry, of nanotubes and nanocrystals, to create a sharp junction interface, whose properties are inherently manipulable, tailorable, and hence, predictable. For example, the electrical resistance of nanotube-nanoparticle networks is dependent on the nanoscale junctions that exist between these constituent nanomaterials as well as on microscale and macroscale connectivity. Thus, rational design of these nanomaterials is critical to a fundamental understanding of charge transport in single molecules and the determination of their conductance. Results on these systems can therefore be used to increase understanding of intrinsic factors affecting carrier mobility, such as electronic structure, carrier trapping, and delocalization. In a second manifestation, three-dimensional, dendritic micron- scale spheres of alkali metal hydrogen titanate 1D nanostructures (i.e.: nanowires and nanotubes) have been generated using a modified hydrothermal technique in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and an alkali metal hydroxide solution. Sea-urchin-like assemblies of these 1D nanostructures have been transformed into their hydrogen titanate analogues by neutralization as well as into their corresponding semiconducting, anatase titania nanostructured counterparts through a moderate high-temperature annealing dehydration process without destroying the 3D hierarchical structural motif. The as-prepared hollow spheres of titanate and titania 1D nanostructures have overall diameters, ranging from 0.8 μm to 1.2 μm, while the

  7. Magnetic Properties of Molecular and Nanoscale Magnets

    OpenAIRE

    Krupskaya, Yulia

    2011-01-01

    The idea of miniaturizing devices down to the nanoscale where quantum ffeffects become relevant demands a detailed understanding of the interplay between classical and quantum properties. Therefore, characterization of newly produced nanoscale materials is a very important part of the research in this fifield. Studying structural and magnetic properties of nano- and molecular magnets and the interplay between these properties reveals new interesting effects and suggests ways to control and op...

  8. High-performance planar nanoscale dielectric capacitors

    OpenAIRE

    Ciraci, S.; Özçelik, V. Ongun

    2016-01-01

    We propose a model for planar nanoscale dielectric capacitor consisting of a single layer, insulating hexagonal boron nitride (BN) stripe placed between two metallic graphene stripes, all forming commensurately a single atomic plane. First-principles density functional calculations on these nanoscale capacitors for different levels of charging and different widths of graphene - BN stripes mark high gravimetric capacitance values, which are comparable to those of supercapacitors made from othe...

  9. Recent advances in nanostructured biomimetic dry adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras ePattantyus-Abraham

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The relatively large size of the gecko and its ability to climb a multitude of structures with ease has often been cited as the inspiration upon which the field of dry adhesives is based. Since 2010, there have been many advances in the field of dry adhesives with much of the new research focusing on developing nanoscale and hierarchical features in a concentrated effort to develop synthetic gecko-like dry adhesives which are strong, durable and self-cleaning. A brief overview of the geckos and the hairs which it uses to adhere to many different surfaces is provided before delving into the current methods and materials used to fabricate synthetic gecko hairs. A summary of the recently published literature on bio-inspired, nanostructured dry adhesives is presented with an emphasis being placed on fabrication techniques.

  10. Molecular Photovoltaics in Nanoscale Dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei V. Pakoulev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the intrinsic charge transport in organic photovoltaic (PVC devices and field-effect transistors (SAM-OFETs fabricated by vapor phase molecular self-assembly (VP-SAM method. The dynamics of charge transport are determined and used to clarify a transport mechanism. The 1,4,5,8-naphthalene-tetracarboxylic diphenylimide (NTCDI SAM devices provide a useful tool to study the fundamentals of polaronic transport at organic surfaces and to discuss the performance of organic photovoltaic devices in nanoscale. Time-resolved photovoltaic studies allow us to separate the charge annihilation kinetics in the conductive NTCDI channel from the overall charge kinetic in a SAM-OFET device. It has been demonstrated that tuning of the type of conductivity in NTCDI SAM-OFET devices is possible by changing Si substrate doping. Our study of the polaron charge transfer in organic materials proposes that a cation-radical exchange (redox mechanism is the major transport mechanism in the studied SAM-PVC devices. The role and contribution of the transport through delocalized states of redox active surface molecular aggregates of NTCDI are exposed and investigated. This example of technological development is used to highlight the significance of future technological development of nanotechnologies and to appreciate a structure-property paradigm in organic nanostructures.

  11. Molecular photovoltaics in nanoscale dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtman, Vladimir; Zelichonok, Alexander; Pakoulev, Andrei V

    2011-01-05

    This review focuses on the intrinsic charge transport in organic photovoltaic (PVC) devices and field-effect transistors (SAM-OFETs) fabricated by vapor phase molecular self-assembly (VP-SAM) method. The dynamics of charge transport are determined and used to clarify a transport mechanism. The 1,4,5,8-naphthalene-tetracarboxylic diphenylimide (NTCDI) SAM devices provide a useful tool to study the fundamentals of polaronic transport at organic surfaces and to discuss the performance of organic photovoltaic devices in nanoscale. Time-resolved photovoltaic studies allow us to separate the charge annihilation kinetics in the conductive NTCDI channel from the overall charge kinetic in a SAM-OFET device. It has been demonstrated that tuning of the type of conductivity in NTCDI SAM-OFET devices is possible by changing Si substrate doping. Our study of the polaron charge transfer in organic materials proposes that a cation-radical exchange (redox) mechanism is the major transport mechanism in the studied SAM-PVC devices. The role and contribution of the transport through delocalized states of redox active surface molecular aggregates of NTCDI are exposed and investigated. This example of technological development is used to highlight the significance of future technological development of nanotechnologies and to appreciate a structure-property paradigm in organic nanostructures.

  12. Biomimetic processing of oriented crystalline ceramic layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesarano, J.; Shelnutt, J.A.

    1997-10-01

    The aim of this project was to develop the capabilities for Sandia to fabricate self assembled Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of various materials and to exploit their two-dimensional crystalline structure to promote the growth of oriented thin films of inorganic materials at room temperature. This includes the design and synthesis of Langmuir-active (amphiphilic) organic molecules with end groups offering high nucleation potential for various ceramics. A longer range goal is that of understanding the underlying principles, making it feasible to use the techniques presented in this report to fabricate unique oriented films of various materials for electronic, sensor, and membrane applications. Therefore, whenever possible, work completed in this report was completed with the intention of addressing the fundamental phenomena underlying the growth of crystalline, inorganic films on template layers of highly organized organic molecules. This problem was inspired by biological processes, which often produce exquisitely engineered structures via templated growth on polymeric layers. Seashells, for example, exhibit great toughness owing to their fine brick-and-mortar structure that results from templated growth of calcium carbonate on top of layers of ordered organic proteins. A key goal in this work, therefore, is to demonstrate a positive correlation between the order and orientation of the template layer and that of the crystalline ceramic material grown upon it. The work completed was comprised of several parallel efforts that encompassed the entire spectrum of biomimetic growth from solution. Studies were completed on seashells and the mechanisms of growth for calcium carbonate. Studies were completed on the characterization of LB films and the capability developed for the in-house fabrication of these films. Standard films of fatty acids were studied as well as novel polypeptides and porphyrins that were synthesized.

  13. Biomimetic photo-actuation: progress and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicker, Michael P. M.; Weaver, Paul M.; Rossiter, Jonathan M.; Bond, Ian P.; Faul, Charl F. J.

    2016-04-01

    Photo-actuation, such as that observed in the reversible sun-tracking movements of heliotropic plants, is produced by a complex, yet elegant series of processes. In the heliotropic leaf movements of the Cornish Mallow, photo-actuation involves the generation, transport and manipulation of chemical signals from a distributed network of sensors in the leaf veins to a specialized osmosis driven actuation region in the leaf stem. It is theorized that such an arrangement is both efficient in terms of materials use and operational energy conversion, as well as being highly robust. We concern ourselves with understanding and mimicking these light driven, chemically controlled actuating systems with the aim of generating intelligent structures which share the properties of efficiency and robustness that are so important to survival in Nature. In this work we present recent progress in mimicking these photo-actuating systems through remote light exposure of a metastable state photoacid and the resulting signal and energy transfer through solution to a pH-responsive hydrogel actuator. Reversible actuation strains of 20% were achieved from this arrangement, with modelling then employed to reveal the critical influence hydrogel pKa has on this result. Although the strong actuation achieved highlights the progress that has been made in replicating the principles of biomimetic photo-actuation, challenges such as photoacid degradation were also revealed. It is anticipated that current work can directly lead to the development of high-performance and low-cost solartrackers for increased photovoltaic energy capture and to the creation of new types of intelligent structures employing chemical control systems.

  14. Biomimetic catalysts responsive to specific chemical signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-03-04

    Part 1. Design of Biomimetic Catalysts Based on Amphiphilic Systems The overall objective of our research is to create biomimetic catalysts from amphiphilic molecules. More specifically, we aim to create supramolecular systems that can be used to control the microenvironment around a catalytic center in a biomimetic fashion and apply the learning to construct supramolecular catalysts with novel functions found in enzymatic catalysts. We have prepared synthetic molecules (i.e., foldamers) that could fold into helical structures with nanometer-sized internal hydrophilic cavities. Cavities of this size are typically observed only in the tertiary and quaternary structures of proteins but were formed in our foldamer prepared in just a few steps from the monomer. Similar to many proteins, our foldamers displayed cooperativity in the folding/unfolding equilibrium and followed a two-state conformational transition. In addition, their conformational change could be triggered by solvent polarity, pH, or presence of metal ions and certain organic molecules. We studied their environmentally dependent conformational changes in solutions, surfactant micelles, and lipid bilayer membranes. Unlike conventional rigid supramolecular host, a foldamer undergoes conformational change during guest binding. Our study in the molecular recognition of an oligocholate host yielded some extremely exciting results. Cooperativity between host conformation and host–guest interactions was found to “magnify” weak binding interactions. In other words, since binding affinity is determined by the overall change of free energy during the binding, guest-induced conformational change of the host, whether near or far from the binding site, affects the binding. This study has strong implications in catalysis because enzymes have been hypothesized to harvest similar intramolecular forces to strengthen their binding with the transition state of an enzyme-catalyzed reaction. The supramolecular and

  15. Syntheses and characterizations of rare earth doped phospho-silicated apatites: application to nuclear waste confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, Laurent

    1998-01-01

    Apatite matrices have been developed for the conditioning of actinides from spent fuels of PWR reactors. Silicated apatites (britholites) containing actinides and lanthanides have been discovered in the natural environment. Synthetic analogues of these britholites can be obtained by solid-solid reaction at high temperature. The compounds of the solid solution of fluorinated britholites are synthesized by the double substitution of (Ca 2+ , PO 4 3- ) by (Ln 3+ , SiO 4 4- ). Trivalent lanthanides are chemical analogues of trivalent actinides. The synthesis was performed with La, Nd and Eu. This study allows to demonstrate that the chemical immobilization comes from the fixation of rare earths at the atomic scale, thanks to their participation to the mineral structure. In part 1, the criteria for the formulation of a matrix for the conditioning of separate radionuclides are given. The structure and the different methods of apatite preparation are shown. Part 2 treats of the study of the solid solution, of the elaboration of the Ca 9 Nd 1 (SiO 4 ) 5 F 2 ceramic and of its physico chemical characterization. The last part deals with the localization of rare earths in the apatite structure, determined by europium luminescence and X-ray diffraction on monocrystal. (J.S.) [fr

  16. Detrital zircon and apatite fission track data in the Liaoxi basins ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    vation events in the northern margin of the North. China Craton (figure 1a). In this paper, detrital zircon and apatite fission track (AFT and ZFT) ages of the sedimentary rocks from the Liaoxi basins are presented. The purposes of this study are: • to study the geothermal status of the basins to understand lithosphere evolution;.

  17. Preparation of fluoride substituted apatite cements as the building blocks for tooth enamel restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jie; Wang, Jiecheng; Liu, Xiaochen; Ma, Jian; Liu, Changsheng; Fang, Jing; Wei, Shicheng

    2011-06-01

    Fluoride substituted apatite cement (fs-AC) was synthesized by using the cement powders of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) and sodium fluoride (NaF), and the cement powders were mixed with diluted phosphoric acid (H 3PO 4) as cement liquid to form fs-AC paste. The fs-AC paste could be directly filled into the carious cavities to repair damaged dental enamel. The results indicated that the fs-AC paste was changed into fluorapatite crystals with the atom molar ratio for calcium to phosphorus of 1.66 and the F ion amount of 3 wt% after self-hardening for 2 days. The solubility of fs-AC in Tris-HCl solution (pH 6) was slightly lower than hydroxyapatite cement (HAC) that was similar to the apatite in enamel, indicating the fs-AC was much insensitive to the weakly acidic solution than the apatite in enamel. The fs-AC was tightly combined with the enamel surface because of the chemical reaction between the fs-AC and the apatite in enamel after the caries cavities was filled with fs-AC. The extracts of fs-AC caused no cytotoxicity on L929 cells, which satisfied the relevant criterion on dental biomaterials, revealing good cytocompatibility. The fs-AC had potential prospect for the reconstitution of carious lesion of dental enamel.

  18. Preparation of fluoride substituted apatite cements as the building blocks for tooth enamel restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Jie; Wang Jiecheng; Liu Xiaochen; Ma Jian; Liu Changsheng; Fang Jing; Wei Shicheng

    2011-01-01

    Fluoride substituted apatite cement (fs-AC) was synthesized by using the cement powders of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) and sodium fluoride (NaF), and the cement powders were mixed with diluted phosphoric acid (H 3 PO 4 ) as cement liquid to form fs-AC paste. The fs-AC paste could be directly filled into the carious cavities to repair damaged dental enamel. The results indicated that the fs-AC paste was changed into fluorapatite crystals with the atom molar ratio for calcium to phosphorus of 1.66 and the F ion amount of 3 wt% after self-hardening for 2 days. The solubility of fs-AC in Tris-HCl solution (pH 6) was slightly lower than hydroxyapatite cement (HAC) that was similar to the apatite in enamel, indicating the fs-AC was much insensitive to the weakly acidic solution than the apatite in enamel. The fs-AC was tightly combined with the enamel surface because of the chemical reaction between the fs-AC and the apatite in enamel after the caries cavities was filled with fs-AC. The extracts of fs-AC caused no cytotoxicity on L929 cells, which satisfied the relevant criterion on dental biomaterials, revealing good cytocompatibility. The fs-AC had potential prospect for the reconstitution of carious lesion of dental enamel.

  19. Adsorption of Pb(II) present in aqueous solution on calcium, strontium and barium hydroxy apatites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilchis G, J.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium, strontium and barium hydroxy apatites were successfully synthesized by chemical precipitation method, the obtained powders were characterized by the techniques of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (Sem), semi-quantitative elemental analysis (EDS), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and N 2 physisorption studies, complementary to these analytical techniques, was determined the surface fractal dimension (Df), and the amount of surface active sites of the materials, in order to know application as ceramic for water remediation. The ability of Pb(II) ion adsorption present in aqueous solution on the hydroxy apatites synthesized by batch type experiments was studied as a function of contact time, concentration of the adsorbate and temperature. The maximum lead adsorption efficiencies obtained were 0.31, 0.32 and 0.26 mg/g for calcium, strontium and barium hydroxy apatites respectively, achieved an equilibrium time of 20 minutes in the three solid-liquid systems studied. Experimental data were adequately adjusted at the adsorption kinetic model pseudo-second order, for the three cases. Moreover, experimental data of the strontium and calcium hydroxy apatites were adjusted to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm, indicating that the adsorption was through a monolayer, whereas barium hydroxyapatite was adjusted to the Freundlich adsorption isotherm, indicating a multilayer adsorption. The thermodynamic parameters obtained during adsorption studies as a function of temperature showed physisorption, exothermic and spontaneous processes respectively. The results showed that the calcium hydroxyapatite, strontium and barium are an alternative for the Pb(II) ion adsorption present in wastewaters. (Author)

  20. Detrital zircon and apatite fission track data in the Liaoxi basins ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    AFT and ZFT ages were performed at Fission. Track Laboratory of Changsha Institute of Geo- tectonics, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Fis- sion Track Laboratory of Institute of Geology,. Chinese Earthquake Administration, respectively. Glass slides with apatites mounted in epoxy resin were etched using 1% HNO3 at ...

  1. Preparation of fluoride substituted apatite cements as the building blocks for tooth enamel restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Jie [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Inter-disciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Wang Jiecheng; Liu Xiaochen [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Inter-disciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ma Jian [Hospital of Stomatology, Tongji University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Liu Changsheng [Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Fang Jing, E-mail: biomater2006@yahoo.com.cn [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Inter-disciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wei Shicheng, E-mail: nic7505@263.net [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Inter-disciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) and School and Hospital of Stomatology, Peking University, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Fluoride substituted apatite cement (fs-AC) was synthesized by using the cement powders of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) and sodium fluoride (NaF), and the cement powders were mixed with diluted phosphoric acid (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) as cement liquid to form fs-AC paste. The fs-AC paste could be directly filled into the carious cavities to repair damaged dental enamel. The results indicated that the fs-AC paste was changed into fluorapatite crystals with the atom molar ratio for calcium to phosphorus of 1.66 and the F ion amount of 3 wt% after self-hardening for 2 days. The solubility of fs-AC in Tris-HCl solution (pH 6) was slightly lower than hydroxyapatite cement (HAC) that was similar to the apatite in enamel, indicating the fs-AC was much insensitive to the weakly acidic solution than the apatite in enamel. The fs-AC was tightly combined with the enamel surface because of the chemical reaction between the fs-AC and the apatite in enamel after the caries cavities was filled with fs-AC. The extracts of fs-AC caused no cytotoxicity on L929 cells, which satisfied the relevant criterion on dental biomaterials, revealing good cytocompatibility. The fs-AC had potential prospect for the reconstitution of carious lesion of dental enamel.

  2. COMPARISON OF APATITE II™ TREATMENT SYSTEM AT TWO MINES FOR METALS REMOVAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two abandoned lead-zinc mine sites, the Nevada Stewart Mine (NSM) and Success Mine, are located within the Coeur d'Alene Mining District, in northern Idaho. An Apatite II™ Treatment System (ATS) was implemented at each site to treat metal-laden water, mainly zinc. In the ATS, f...

  3. Rare earth distribution in Peruvian circons, fluorites, apatites, garnets and allanites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojeda, M.J.; Mendoza A, A.

    1981-12-01

    Using spectrographic methods, the distribution of rare earths in different locations of Peru were determinated. La-Ce-Pr-Nd-Pm-Sm-Eu-Gd-Ts-Dy-Ho-Er-Tm-Ys-Lu and their compounds with Y-Sc-Tm in circon, fluorite, apatite, garnet and allanite. Their geochemistry and frequency as well as the economic aspects exploration and applications were analyzed.

  4. On the biomimetic design of agile-robot legs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Elena; Arevalo, Juan Carlos; Muñoz, Gustavo; Gonzalez-de-Santos, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    The development of functional legged robots has encountered its limits in human-made actuation technology. This paper describes research on the biomimetic design of legs for agile quadrupeds. A biomimetic leg concept that extracts key principles from horse legs which are responsible for the agile and powerful locomotion of these animals is presented. The proposed biomimetic leg model defines the effective leg length, leg kinematics, limb mass distribution, actuator power, and elastic energy recovery as determinants of agile locomotion, and values for these five key elements are given. The transfer of the extracted principles to technological instantiations is analyzed in detail, considering the availability of current materials, structures and actuators. A real leg prototype has been developed following the biomimetic leg concept proposed. The actuation system is based on the hybrid use of series elasticity and magneto-rheological dampers which provides variable compliance for natural motion. From the experimental evaluation of this prototype, conclusions on the current technological barriers to achieve real functional legged robots to walk dynamically in agile locomotion are presented.

  5. On the Biomimetic Design of Agile-Robot Legs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Gonzalez-de-Santos

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of functional legged robots has encountered its limits in human-made actuation technology. This paper describes research on the biomimetic design of legs for agile quadrupeds. A biomimetic leg concept that extracts key principles from horse legs which are responsible for the agile and powerful locomotion of these animals is presented. The proposed biomimetic leg model defines the effective leg length, leg kinematics, limb mass distribution, actuator power, and elastic energy recovery as determinants of agile locomotion, and values for these five key elements are given. The transfer of the extracted principles to technological instantiations is analyzed in detail, considering the availability of current materials, structures and actuators. A real leg prototype has been developed following the biomimetic leg concept proposed. The actuation system is based on the hybrid use of series elasticity and magneto-rheological dampers which provides variable compliance for natural motion. From the experimental evaluation of this prototype, conclusions on the current technological barriers to achieve real functional legged robots to walk dynamically in agile locomotion are presented.

  6. Bio-Mimetic Sensors Based on Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catia Algieri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An important challenge for scientific research is the production of artificial systems able to mimic the recognition mechanisms occurring at the molecular level in living systems. A valid contribution in this direction resulted from the development of molecular imprinting. By means of this technology, selective molecular recognition sites are introduced in a polymer, thus conferring it bio-mimetic properties. The potential applications of these systems include affinity separations, medical diagnostics, drug delivery, catalysis, etc. Recently, bio-sensing systems using molecularly imprinted membranes, a special form of imprinted polymers, have received the attention of scientists in various fields. In these systems imprinted membranes are used as bio-mimetic recognition elements which are integrated with a transducer component. The direct and rapid determination of an interaction between the recognition element and the target analyte (template was an encouraging factor for the development of such systems as alternatives to traditional bio-assay methods. Due to their high stability, sensitivity and specificity, bio-mimetic sensors-based membranes are used for environmental, food, and clinical uses. This review deals with the development of molecularly imprinted polymers and their different preparation methods. Referring to the last decades, the application of these membranes as bio-mimetic sensor devices will be also reported.

  7. Hydroxyapatite coating by biomimetic method on titanium alloy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 28; Issue 6. Hydroxyapatite coating by biomimetic method on titanium alloy using concentrated SBF. S Bharati M K Sinha ... Optical microscopic and SEM observations revealed the deposition of Ca–P layer on the titanium alloy by both the methods. Thickness of coating ...

  8. Biomimetics as a design methodology – possibilities and challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker

    2009-01-01

    the possibilities and challenges. Biomimetics for engineering design is explored through an experiment involving 12 design engineering students. For 7 selected problem areas they searched biology literature available at a university library and identified a number of biological solutions. Central solution...

  9. Design and Implementation of a Modular Biomimetic Infochemical Communication System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rácz, Z.; Cole, M.; Gardner, J.W.; Chowdhury, M.F.; Bula, W.P.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Karout, S.; Capurro, A.; Pearce, T.C.

    2013-01-01

    We describe here the design and implementation of a novel biomimetic infochemical communication system that employs airborne molecules alone to communicate over space and time. The system involves the design and fabrication of a microsystem capable of producing and releasing a precise mix of

  10. Structural Design and Sealing Performance Analysis of Biomimetic Sealing Ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanjun Han

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the failure probability of rubber sealing rings in reciprocating dynamic seal, a new structure of sealing ring based on bionics was designed. The biomimetic ring has three concave ridges and convex bulges on each side which are very similar to earthworms. Bulges were circularly designed and sealing performances of the biomimetic ring in both static seal and dynamic seal were simulated by FEM. In addition, effects of precompression, medium pressure, speed, friction coefficient, and material parameters on sealing performances were discussed. The results show that von Mises stress of the biomimetic sealing ring distributed symmetrically in no-pressure static sealing. The maximum von Mises stress appears on the second bulge of the inner side. High contact stress concentrates on left bulges. Von Mises stress distribution becomes uneven under medium pressure. Both von Mises stress and contact stress increase when precompression, medium pressure, and rubber hardness increase in static sealing. Biomimetic ring can avoid rolling and distortion in reciprocating dynamic seal, and its working life is much longer than O-ring and rectangular ring. The maximum von Mises stress and contact stress increase with the precompression, medium pressure, rubber hardness, and friction coefficient in reciprocating dynamic seal.

  11. Bio-Mimetic Sensors Based on Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algieri, Catia; Drioli, Enrico; Guzzo, Laura; Donato, Laura

    2014-01-01

    An important challenge for scientific research is the production of artificial systems able to mimic the recognition mechanisms occurring at the molecular level in living systems. A valid contribution in this direction resulted from the development of molecular imprinting. By means of this technology, selective molecular recognition sites are introduced in a polymer, thus conferring it bio-mimetic properties. The potential applications of these systems include affinity separations, medical diagnostics, drug delivery, catalysis, etc. Recently, bio-sensing systems using molecularly imprinted membranes, a special form of imprinted polymers, have received the attention of scientists in various fields. In these systems imprinted membranes are used as bio-mimetic recognition elements which are integrated with a transducer component. The direct and rapid determination of an interaction between the recognition element and the target analyte (template) was an encouraging factor for the development of such systems as alternatives to traditional bio-assay methods. Due to their high stability, sensitivity and specificity, bio-mimetic sensors-based membranes are used for environmental, food, and clinical uses. This review deals with the development of molecularly imprinted polymers and their different preparation methods. Referring to the last decades, the application of these membranes as bio-mimetic sensor devices will be also reported. PMID:25196110

  12. On the Biomimetic Design of Agile-Robot Legs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Elena; Arevalo, Juan Carlos; Muñoz, Gustavo; Gonzalez-de-Santos, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    The development of functional legged robots has encountered its limits in human-made actuation technology. This paper describes research on the biomimetic design of legs for agile quadrupeds. A biomimetic leg concept that extracts key principles from horse legs which are responsible for the agile and powerful locomotion of these animals is presented. The proposed biomimetic leg model defines the effective leg length, leg kinematics, limb mass distribution, actuator power, and elastic energy recovery as determinants of agile locomotion, and values for these five key elements are given. The transfer of the extracted principles to technological instantiations is analyzed in detail, considering the availability of current materials, structures and actuators. A real leg prototype has been developed following the biomimetic leg concept proposed. The actuation system is based on the hybrid use of series elasticity and magneto-rheological dampers which provides variable compliance for natural motion. From the experimental evaluation of this prototype, conclusions on the current technological barriers to achieve real functional legged robots to walk dynamically in agile locomotion are presented. PMID:22247667

  13. Diffraction from relief gratings on a biomimetic elastomer cast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero, Raphael A.; Aranas, Erika B.

    2010-01-01

    Biomimetic optical elements combine the optimized designs of nature with the versatility of materials engineering. We employ a beetle carapace as the template for fabricating relief gratings on an elastomer substrate. Biological surface features are successfully replicated by a direct casting procedure. Far-field diffraction effects are discussed in terms of the Fraunhofer approximation in Fourier space.

  14. Case Study in Biomimetic Design: Handling and Assembly of Microparts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shu, Li; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Gegeckaite, Asta

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the biomimetic design process to the development of automated gripping devices for microparts. Handling and assembly of micromechanical parts is complicated by size effects that occur when part dimensions are scaled down. A common complication involves...

  15. Aquaporin-Based Biomimetic Polymeric Membranes: Approaches and Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habel, Joachim Erich Otto; Hansen, Michael; Kynde, Søren

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, aquaporin biomimetic membranes (ABMs) for water separation have gained considerable interest. Although the first ABMs are commercially available, there are still many challenges associated with further ABM development. Here, we discuss the interplay of the main components of ABMs...

  16. Automated sampling and data processing derived from biomimetic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Mark; Vissing, Thomas; Boesen, P.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in biomimetic membrane systems have resulted in an increase in membrane lifetimes from hours to days and months. Long-lived membrane systems demand the development of both new automated monitoring equipment capable of measuring electrophysiological membrane characteristics and new...

  17. Developing the ultimate biomimetic flow-sensor array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinink, C.M.; Jaganatharaja, R.K.; de Boer, Meint J.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Kolster, M.L.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    2009-01-01

    This contribution reports on the major developments and achievements in our group on fabricating highly sensitive biomimetic flow-sensor arrays. The mechanoreceptive sensory hairs of crickets are taken as a model system for their ability to perceive flow signals at thermal noise levels and,

  18. Biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings: : Physicochemistry and biological activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrère, F.

    2002-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed hydroxylapatite coatings on metallic prosthesis significantly increased the success rate of hip arthroplasty, namely from about 90% after 10 years for cemented hip stems to 98% for HA coated ones. Nowadays, the biomimetic approach has received increased interest because of the

  19. Biomimetic synthesis of hybrid nanocomposite scaffolds by freeze

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The aim of this study is to biomimetically synthesize hydroxyapatite–hydrophilic polymer scaffolds for biomedical applications. This organic–inorganic hybrid has been structurally characterized and reveals a good microstructural control as seen by the SEM analysis and the nanosize of the particulates is confirmed by AFM ...

  20. Concentrating molasses distillery wastewater using biomimetic forward osmosis (FO) membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, N.; Petrinic, I.; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus

    2018-01-01

    . This work examines the concentration of distillery wastewater by forward osmosis (FO) using aquaporin biomimetic membranes and magnesium chloride hexahydrate (MgCl2.6H2O) as draw solution. The operational parameters viz. feed solution and draw solution flow rate and draw solution concentration were...

  1. Biomimetic Structural Materials: Inspiration from Design and Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaraghi, Nicholas A; Kisailus, David

    2017-12-13

    Nature assembles weak organic and inorganic constituents into sophisticated hierarchical structures, forming structural composites that demonstrate impressive combinations of strength and toughness. Two such composites are the nacre structure forming the inner layer of many mollusk shells, whose brick-and-mortar architecture has been the gold standard for biomimetic composites, and the cuticle forming the arthropod exoskeleton, whose helicoidal fiber-reinforced architecture has only recently attracted interest for structural biomimetics. In this review, we detail recent biomimetic efforts for the fabrication of strong and tough composite materials possessing the brick-and-mortar and helicoidal architectures. Techniques discussed for the fabrication of nacre- and cuticle-mimetic structures include freeze casting, layer-by-layer deposition, spray deposition, magnetically assisted slip casting, fiber-reinforced composite processing, additive manufacturing, and cholesteric self-assembly. Advantages and limitations to these processes are discussed, as well as the future outlook on the biomimetic landscape for structural composite materials. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Physical Chemistry Volume 69 is April 20, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  2. A biomimetic accelerometer inspired by the cricket's clavate hair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogendijk, H.; de Boer, Meint J.; Sanders, Remco G.P.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Crickets use so-called clavate hairs to sense (gravitational) acceleration to obtain information on their orientation. Inspired by this clavate hair system, a one-axis biomimetic accelerometer has been developed and fabricated using surface micromachining and SU-8 lithography. An analytical model

  3. Array of Biomimetic Hair Sensor Dedicated for Flow Pattern Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dagamseh, A.M.K.; Bruinink, C.M.; Kolster, Marcel; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    Flow sensor arrays can be used to extract features from flow fields rather than averaging or providing local measurements provided the sensors in the array structure can be interrogated individually. This paper addresses the latest developments in fabrication and array interfacing of biomimetic

  4. Bone-like apatite coating on functionalized poly(etheretherketone) surface via tailored silanization layers technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Yanyan; Xiong, Chengdong; Zhang, Shenglan; Li, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Lifang

    2015-01-01

    Poly(etheretherketone) (PEEK) is a rigid semi-crystalline polymer with outstanding mechanical properties, bone-like stiffness and suitable biocompatibility that has attracted much interest as a biomaterial for orthopedic and dental implants. However, the bio-inert surface of PEEK limits its biomedical applications when direct osteointegration between the implants and the host tissue is desired. In this work, –PO 4 H 2 , –COOH and –OH groups were introduced on the PEEK surface by further chemical treatments of the vinyl-terminated silanization layers formed on the hydroxylation-pretreated PEEK surface. Both the surface-functionalized and pristine specimens were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and water contact angle measurements. When placed in 1.5 strength simulated body fluid (SBF) solution, apatite was observed to form uniformly on the functionalized PEEK surface and firmly attach to the substrate. The characterized results demonstrated that the coating was constituted by poorly crystallized bone-like apatite and the effect of surface functional groups on coating formation was also discussed in detail. In addition, in vitro biocompatibility of PEEK, in terms of pre-osteoblast cell (MC3T3-E1) attachment, spreading and proliferation, was remarkably enhanced by the bone-like apatite coating. Thus, this study provides a method to enhance the bioactivity of PEEK and expand its applications in orthopedic and dental implants. - Highlights: • –PO 4 H 2 , –COOH and –OH groups were successfully introduced onto PEEK surface via tailored silanization layer technique. • Bone-like apatite formed uniformly on surface-functionalized PEEK after immersion in SBF, and tightly adhered to the PEEK. • SEM, EDS, FTIR, XPS and XRD results showed that apatite layer is composed of low-crystalline bone-like apatite. • Bone-like apatite coating remarkably enhanced pre

  5. Bone-like apatite coating on functionalized poly(etheretherketone) surface via tailored silanization layers technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yanyan [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xiong, Chengdong; Zhang, Shenglan [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); Li, Xiaoyu [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Zhang, Lifang, E-mail: zhanglfcioc@163.com [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Poly(etheretherketone) (PEEK) is a rigid semi-crystalline polymer with outstanding mechanical properties, bone-like stiffness and suitable biocompatibility that has attracted much interest as a biomaterial for orthopedic and dental implants. However, the bio-inert surface of PEEK limits its biomedical applications when direct osteointegration between the implants and the host tissue is desired. In this work, –PO{sub 4}H{sub 2}, –COOH and –OH groups were introduced on the PEEK surface by further chemical treatments of the vinyl-terminated silanization layers formed on the hydroxylation-pretreated PEEK surface. Both the surface-functionalized and pristine specimens were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and water contact angle measurements. When placed in 1.5 strength simulated body fluid (SBF) solution, apatite was observed to form uniformly on the functionalized PEEK surface and firmly attach to the substrate. The characterized results demonstrated that the coating was constituted by poorly crystallized bone-like apatite and the effect of surface functional groups on coating formation was also discussed in detail. In addition, in vitro biocompatibility of PEEK, in terms of pre-osteoblast cell (MC3T3-E1) attachment, spreading and proliferation, was remarkably enhanced by the bone-like apatite coating. Thus, this study provides a method to enhance the bioactivity of PEEK and expand its applications in orthopedic and dental implants. - Highlights: • –PO{sub 4}H{sub 2}, –COOH and –OH groups were successfully introduced onto PEEK surface via tailored silanization layer technique. • Bone-like apatite formed uniformly on surface-functionalized PEEK after immersion in SBF, and tightly adhered to the PEEK. • SEM, EDS, FTIR, XPS and XRD results showed that apatite layer is composed of low-crystalline bone-like apatite. • Bone-like apatite coating

  6. Biomimetic matrices self-initiating the induction of bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, Ugo; Roden, Laura C; Ferretti, Carlo; Klar, Roland M

    2011-09-01

    The new strategy of tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine at large, is to construct biomimetic matrices to mimic nature's hierarchical structural assemblages and mechanisms of simplicity and elegance that are conserved throughout genera and species. There is a direct spatial and temporal relationship of morphologic and molecular events that emphasize the biomimetism of the remodeling cycles of the osteonic corticocancellous bone versus the "geometric induction of bone formation," that is, the induction of bone by "smart" concavities assembled in biomimetic matrices of macroporous calcium phosphate-based constructs. The basic multicellular unit of the corticocancellous bone excavates a trench across the bone surface, leaving in its wake a hemiosteon rather than an osteon, that is, a trench with cross-sectional geometric cues of concavities after cyclic episodes of osteoclastogenesis, eventually leading to osteogenesis. The concavities per se are geometric regulators of growth-inducing angiogenesis and osteogenesis as in the remodeling processes of the corticocancellous bone. The concavities act as a powerful geometric attractant for myoblastic/myoendothelial and/or endothelial/pericytic stem cells, which differentiate into bone-forming cells. The lacunae, pits, and concavities cut by osteoclastogenesis within the biomimetic matrices are the driving morphogenetic cues that induce bone formation in a continuum of sequential phases of resorption/dissolution and formation. To induce the cascade of bone differentiation, the soluble osteogenic molecular signals of the transforming growth factor β supergene family must be reconstituted with an insoluble signal or substratum that triggers the bone differentiation cascade. By carving a series of repetitive concavities into solid and/or macroporous biomimetic matrices of highly crystalline hydroxyapatite or biphasic hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate, we were able to embed smart biologic functions within

  7. Arsenic in hydrothermal apatite: Oxidation state, mechanism of uptake, and comparison between experiments and nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weihua; Mei, Yuan; Etschmann, Barbara; Brugger, Joël; Pearce, Mark; Ryan, Chris G.; Borg, Stacey; Wykes, Jeremey; Kappen, Peter; Paterson, David; Boesenberg, Ulrike; Garrevoet, Jan; Moorhead, Gareth; Falkenberg, Gerald

    2017-01-01

    Element substitution that occurs during fluid-rock interaction permits assessment of fluid composition and interaction conditions in ancient geological systems, and provides a way to fix contaminants from aqueous solutions. We conducted a series of hydrothermal mineral replacement experiments to determine whether a relationship can be established between arsenic (As) distribution in apatite and fluid chemistry. Calcite crystals were reacted with phosphate solutions spiked with As(V), As(III), and mixed As(III)/As(V) species at 250 °C and water-saturated pressure. Arsenic-bearing apatite rims formed in several hours, and within 48 h the calcite grains were fully replaced. X-ray Absorption Near-edge Spectroscopy (XANES) data show that As retained the trivalent oxidation state in the fully-reacted apatite grown from solutions containing only As(III). Extended X-ray Fine Spectroscopy (EXAFS) data reveal that these As(III) ions are surrounded by about three oxygen atoms at an Assbnd O bond length close to that of an arsenate group (AsO43-), indicating that they occupy tetrahedral phosphate sites. The three-coordinated As(III)-O3 structure, with three oxygen atoms and one lone electron pair around As(III), was confirmed by geometry optimization using ab initio molecular simulations. The micro-XANES imaging data show that apatite formed from solutions spiked with mixed As(III) and As(V) retained only As(V) after completion of the replacement reaction; in contrast, partially reacted samples revealed a complex distribution of As(V)/As(III) ratios, with As(V) concentrated in the center of the grain and As(III) towards the rim. Most natural apatites from the Ernest Henry iron oxide copper gold deposit, Australia, show predominantly As(V), but two grains retained some As(III) in their core. The As-anomalous amphibolite-facies gneiss from Binntal, Switzerland, only revealed As(V), despite the fact that these apatites in both cases formed under conditions where As(III) is

  8. Nanoscale ferroelectrics and multiferroics key processes and characterization issues, and nanoscale effects

    CERN Document Server

    Alguero, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    This book reviews the key issues in processing and characterization of nanoscale ferroelectrics and multiferroics, and provides a comprehensive description of their properties, with an emphasis in differentiating size effects of extrinsic ones like boundary or interface effects. Recently described nanoscale novel phenomena are also addressed. Organized into three parts it addresses key issues in processing (nanostructuring), characterization (of the nanostructured materials) and nanoscale effects. Taking full advantage of the synergies between nanoscale ferroelectrics and multiferroics, it covers materials nanostructured at all levels, from ceramic technologies like ferroelectric nanopowders, bulk nanostructured ceramics and thick films, and magnetoelectric nanocomposites, to thin films, either polycrystalline layer heterostructures or epitaxial systems, and to nanoscale free standing objects with specific geometries, such as nanowires and tubes at different levels of development. The book is developed from t...

  9. Influence of Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) Grown in Elevated CO2 on Apatite Dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, A. A.; Morra, B.

    2016-12-01

    We ran a series of experiments to test the hypothesis that release of plant nutrients contained in apatite will be accelerated by the growth of Langstrath Stringless green bean in the presence of atmospheric CO2 meant to simulate possible future atmospheric conditions due a higher demand of nutrients and growth rate caused by elevated CO2. We hypothesize that elevated atmospheric CO2 will lead to both increased root growth and organic acid exudation. These two traits will lead to improved acquisition of P derived from apatite. Experiments were designed to investigate the effect of these changes on soil mineral weathering using plants grown under two conditions, ambient CO2 (400ppm) and elevated CO2 (1000ppm). Plants were grown in flow-through microcosms consisting of a mixture of quartz and apatite sands. Mini-greenhouses were utilized to control CO2 levels. Plant growth was sustained by a nutrient solution lacking in Ca and P. Calcium and P content of the leachate and plant tissue served as a proxy for apatite dissolution. Plants were harvested biweekly during the eight-week experiment and analyzed for Ca and P to calculate apatite dissolution kinetics. Preliminary results suggest that approximately four times more P and Ca are present in the leachate from experiments containing plants under both ambient and elevated CO2 levels than in abiotic experiments; however, the amounts of both P and Ca released in experiments conducted under both ambient and elevated CO2 levels are similar. Additionally, the amount of P in plant tissue grown under ambient and elevated CO2 conditions is similar. Plants grown in elevated CO2 had a greater root to shoot ratio. The planted microcosms were found to have a lower pH than abiotic controls most likely due to root respiration and exudation of organic acids.

  10. Sulfur isotopic zoning in apatite crystals: A new record of dynamic sulfur behavior in magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economos, Rita; Boehnke, Patrick; Burgisser, Alain

    2017-10-01

    The mobility and geochemical behavior of sulfur in magmas is complex due to its multi-phase (solid, immiscible liquid, gaseous, dissolved ions) and multi-valent (from S2- to S6+) nature. Sulfur behavior is closely linked with the evolution of oxygen fugacity (fO2) in magmas; the record of fO2 evolution is often enigmatic to extract from rock records, particularly for intrusive systems. We apply a novel method of measuring S isotopic ratios in zoned apatite crystals that we interpret as a record of open-system magmatic processes. We interrogate the S concentration and isotopic variations preserved in multiple apatite crystals from single hand specimens from the Cadiz Valley Batholith, CA via electron microprobe and ion microprobe. Isotopic variations in single apatite crystals ranged from 0 to 3.8‰ δ34S and total variation within a single hand sample was 6.1‰ δ34S. High S concentration cores yielded high isotopic ratios while low S concentration rims yielded low isotopic ratios. We discuss a range of possible natural scenarios and favor an explanation of a combination of magma mixing and open-system, ascent-driven degassing under moderately reduced conditions: fO2 at or below NNO+1, although the synchronous crystallization of apatite and anhydrite is also a viable scenario. Our conclusions have implications for the coupled S and fO2 evolution of granitic plutons and suggest that in-situ apatite S isotopic measurements could be a powerful new tool for evaluating redox and S systematics in magmatic systems.

  11. Xe- and U-tracks in apatite and muscovite near the etching threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wauschkuhn, Bastian, E-mail: wauschku@geo.tu-freiberg.de [Geologie, Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany); Jonckheere, Raymond [Geologie, Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany); Mineralogie en Petrologie, Geologie en Bodemkunde, Universiteit Gent (Belgium); Ratschbacher, Lothar [Geologie, Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    Ion irradiation of a wedge-shaped Durango apatite backed by a mica detector allows investigating ion track ranges and etching properties at different points along the tracks. Transmission profiles obtained by irradiation with 2 × 10{sup 6} cm{sup −2} 11.1 MeV/amu {sup 132}Xe and 2 × 10{sup 6} cm{sup −2} 11.1 MeV/amu {sup 238}U parallel to the apatite c-axis correspond to ranges calculated with SRIM (Xe: 76.3 μm; U: 81.1 μm). However, the measured profiles show much greater etchable track-length variations than the calculated longitudinal straggles. The probable cause is that the length deficit exhibits significant variation from track to track. The measured length deficit in muscovite is in agreement with most existing data. In contrast, the length deficit in apatite appears to be close to zero, which is in conflict with all earlier estimates. This probably results from the etching properties of the apatite basal face, which permit surface-assisted sub-threshold etching of track sections in the nuclear stopping regime. These sections are not accessible from the opposite direction, i.e. by etching towards the endpoint of the tracks or in the direction of the ion beam. This conclusion is supported by the fact that linear dislocations are revealed in apatite basal faces and by the observation of imperfect etch pits that are separated from the etched ion track channel by a section that appears unetched under the microscope.

  12. The function of Sn(II)-apatite as a Tc immobilizing agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asmussen, R. Matthew, E-mail: matthew.asmussen@pnnl.gov [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd, Richland, WA, 99352 (United States); Neeway, James J.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd, Richland, WA, 99352 (United States); Lukens, Wayne W. [Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, 94720 (United States); Qafoku, Nikolla P. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd, Richland, WA, 99352 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    At the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site, Tc-99 is a component of low-activity waste (LAW) fractions of the nuclear tank waste and removal of Tc from LAW streams would greatly benefit the site remediation process. In this study, we investigated the removal of Tc(VII), as pertechnetate, from deionized water (DIW) and a LAW simulant through batch sorption testing and solid phase characterization using tin (II) apatite (Sn-A) and SnCl{sub 2}. Sn-A showed higher levels of Tc removal from both DIW and LAW simulant. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/XEDS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of reacted Sn-A in DIW showed that TcO4- is reduced to Tc(IV) on the Sn-A surface. The performance of Sn-A in the LAW simulant was lowered due to a combined effect of the high alkalinity, which lead to an increased dissolution of Sn from the Sn-A, and a preference for the reduction of Cr(VI). - Highlights: • Sn(II)-Apatite shows high proficiency in removing Tc(VII) from neutral solutions. • The removal of the Tc(VII) by Sn(II)-apatite is done via reduction to Tc(IV)O{sub 2} × H{sub 2}O. • In LAW Sn(II)-apatite is less efficient in removing Tc(VII). • Interference in LAW due to a preference for the reduction of Cr(VI) and the high pH. • Sn(II)-apatite can remove Tc(VII) from LAW effectively through increasing material added.

  13. Attosecond physics at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciappina, M F; Pérez-Hernández, J A; Landsman, A S; Okell, W A; Zherebtsov, S; Förg, B; Schötz, J; Seiffert, L; Fennel, T; Shaaran, T; Zimmermann, T; Chacón, A; Guichard, R; Zaïr, A; Tisch, J W G; Marangos, J P; Witting, T; Braun, A; Maier, S A; Roso, L; Krüger, M; Hommelhoff, P; Kling, M F; Krausz, F; Lewenstein, M

    2017-05-01

    Recently two emerging areas of research, attosecond and nanoscale physics, have started to come together. Attosecond physics deals with phenomena occurring when ultrashort laser pulses, with duration on the femto- and sub-femtosecond time scales, interact with atoms, molecules or solids. The laser-induced electron dynamics occurs natively on a timescale down to a few hundred or even tens of attoseconds (1 attosecond  =  1 as  =  10 -18 s), which is comparable with the optical field. For comparison, the revolution of an electron on a 1s orbital of a hydrogen atom is  ∼152 as. On the other hand, the second branch involves the manipulation and engineering of mesoscopic systems, such as solids, metals and dielectrics, with nanometric precision. Although nano-engineering is a vast and well-established research field on its own, the merger with intense laser physics is relatively recent. In this report on progress we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical overview of physics that takes place when short and intense laser pulses interact with nanosystems, such as metallic and dielectric nanostructures. In particular we elucidate how the spatially inhomogeneous laser induced fields at a nanometer scale modify the laser-driven electron dynamics. Consequently, this has important impact on pivotal processes such as above-threshold ionization and high-order harmonic generation. The deep understanding of the coupled dynamics between these spatially inhomogeneous fields and matter configures a promising way to new avenues of research and applications. Thanks to the maturity that attosecond physics has reached, together with the tremendous advance in material engineering and manipulation techniques, the age of atto-nanophysics has begun, but it is in the initial stage. We present thus some of the open questions, challenges and prospects for experimental confirmation of theoretical predictions, as well as experiments aimed at characterizing the

  14. Quantitative analysis from limited sampling: influence of the chemical composition of apatites on their resistance to irradiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribet, I.; Petit, J.C.; CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance

    1998-01-01

    Apatites are investigated as possible high performance radioactive waste matrices for specific actinides. In this paper, we have quantified the influence of the chemical composition of apatites on their fission-track annealing behaviour. We aimed to evaluate the capability of apatites to self-anneal high densities of radiation damages produced during disposal. The thermal annealing kinetics, at 280 deg. C, of induced fission tracks has been determined for six different apatite compositions. We show that the chemical composition of apatites is a critical parameter with respect to their annealing behaviour. A mathematical treatment of the data, based upon the methodology of optimum design of experiments, allowed the quantification of the role of substitution for two major elements, of the apatite structure (Ca, P), for chlorine and for the two groups of minor elements, actinides (U+Th) and lanthanides (La+Ce+Y), which are relevant in the nuclear waste disposal context. A high actinide content enhances the annealing of fission-tracks in apatites, which is a very favourable feature of these minerals as radioactive waste matrices. This work also points to a new strategy for the best use of information provided by geological samples. In particular, the mathematical methodology proposed here allows, first, to evaluate the 'quality' of the information obtained and, second, to improve it by a proper choice of additional samples to investigate. (authors)

  15. Postmagmatic magnetite-apatite assemblage in mafic intrusions: a case study of dolerite at Olympic Dam, South Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apukhtina, Olga B.; Kamenetsky, Vadim S.; Ehrig, Kathy; Kamenetsky, Maya B.; McPhie, Jocelyn; Maas, Roland; Meffre, Sebastien; Goemann, Karsten; Rodemann, Thomas; Cook, Nigel J.; Ciobanu, Cristiana L.

    2016-01-01

    An assemblage of magnetite and apatite is common worldwide in different ore deposit types, including disparate members of the iron-oxide copper-gold (IOCG) clan. The Kiruna-type iron oxide-apatite deposits, a subtype of the IOCG family, are recognized as economic targets as well. A wide range of competing genetic models exists for magnetite-apatite deposits, including magmatic, magmatic-hydrothermal, hydrothermal(-metasomatic), and sedimentary(-exhalative). The sources and mechanisms of transport and deposition of Fe and P remain highly debatable. This study reports petrographic and geochemical features of the magnetite-apatite-rich vein assemblages in the dolerite dykes of the Gairdner Dyke Swarm (~0.82 Ga) that intruded the Roxby Downs Granite (~0.59 Ga), the host of the supergiant Olympic Dam IOCG deposit. These symmetrical, only few mm narrow veins are prevalent in such dykes and comprise besides usually colloform magnetite and prismatic apatite also further minerals (e.g., calcite, quartz). The genetic relationships between the veins and host dolerite are implied based on alteration in the immediate vicinity (~4 mm) of the veins. In particular, Ti-magnetite-ilmenite is partially to completely transformed to titanite and magmatic apatite disappears. We conclude that the mafic dykes were a local source of Fe and P re-concentrated in the magnetite-apatite veins. Uranium-Pb ages for vein apatite and titanite associated with the vein in this case study suggest that alteration of the dolerite and healing of the fractures occurred shortly after dyke emplacement. We propose that in this particular case the origin of the magnetite-apatite assemblage is clearly related to hydrothermal alteration of the host mafic magmatic rocks.

  16. Nanoscale hierarchical optical interactions for secure information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tate Naoya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing demand for novel physical security that can differentiate between real and false specific artifact that have been added to bank bills, certifications, and other vouchers. The most simple and effective method for improving the security level is to scale down the elemental structures so that they cannot be duplicated by attackers. While there is a paradox that the achieved fabrication resolution by a defender can also be realized by an attacker, further improvement in security is possible by the functional fusion of artifact metrics and nanophotonics. The fundamental advantages of this concept are the high-level clone resistance and individuality of nanoscale artifacts, which are based on the super-resolution fabrication and nanoscale hierarchical structure of optical near-field interactions, respectively. In this paper, the basis for the fabrication of nanoscale artifacts by utilizing random phenomena is described, and a quantitative evaluation of the security level is presented. An experimental demonstration using a nano-/macro-hierarchical hologram is presented to demonstrate the fundamental procedure for retrieving nanoscale features as hidden information. Finally, the concept and a simple demonstration of non-scanning probe microscopy are described as a practical application of the retrieval and authentication of nanoscale artifact metrics.

  17. Preparation, anti-biofouling and drag-reduction properties of a biomimetic shark skin surface

    OpenAIRE

    Pu, Xia; Li, Guangji; Huang, Hanlu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Shark skin surfaces show non-smoothness characteristics due to the presence of a riblet structure. In this study, biomimetic shark skin was prepared by using the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-embedded elastomeric stamping (PEES) method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the surface microstructure and fine structure of shark skin and biomimetic shark skin. To analyse the hydrophobic mechanism of the shark skin surface microstructure, the effect of biomimetic shark s...

  18. Human Dental Pulp Cells Responses to Apatite Precipitation from Dicalcium Silicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Yun Lai

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Unraveling the mechanisms behind the processes of cell attachment and the enhanced proliferation that occurs as a response to the presence of calcium silicate-based materials needs to be better understood so as to expand the applications of silicate-based materials. Ions in the environment may influence apatite precipitation and affect silicate ion release from silicate-based materials. Thus, the involvement of apatite precipitate in the regulation of cell behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs is also investigated in the present study, along with an investigation of the specific role of cell morphology and osteocalcin protein expression cultured on calcium silicate (CS with different Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium (DMEM. The microstructure and component of CS cement immersion in DMEM and P-free DMEM are analyzed. In addition, when hDPCs are cultured on CS with two DMEMs, we evaluate fibronectin (FN and collagen type I (COL secretion during the cell attachment stage. The facilitation of cell adhesion on CS has been confirmed and observed both by scanning with an electron microscope and using immunofluorescence imaging. The results indicate that CS is completely covered by an apatite layer with tiny spherical shapes on the surface in the DMEM, but not in the P-free DMEM. Compared to the P-free DMEM, the lower Ca ion in the DMEM may be attributed to the formation of the apatite on the surfaces of specimens as a result of consumption of the Ca ion from the DMEM. Similarly, the lower Si ion in the CS-soaked DMEM is attributed to the shielding effect of the apatite layer. The P-free DMEM group releases more Si ion increased COL and FN secretion, which promotes cell attachment more effectively than DMEM. This study provides new and important clues regarding the major effects of Si-induced cell behavior as well as the precipitated apatite-inhibited hDPC behavior on these materials.

  19. Atomic nanoscale technology in the nuclear industry

    CERN Document Server

    Woo, Taeho

    2011-01-01

    Developments at the nanoscale are leading to new possibilities and challenges for nuclear applications in areas ranging from medicine to international commerce to atomic power production/waste treatment. Progress in nanotech is helping the nuclear industry slash the cost of energy production. It also continues to improve application reliability and safety measures, which remain a critical concern, especially since the reactor disasters in Japan. Exploring the new wide-ranging landscape of nuclear function, Atomic Nanoscale Technology in the Nuclear Industry details the breakthroughs in nanosca

  20. Nanoscale phase-change materials and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qinghui; Wang, Yuxi; Zhu, Jia

    2017-06-01

    Phase-change materials (PCMs) that can reversibly transit between crystalline and amorphous phases have been widely used for data-storage and other functional devices. As PCMs scale down to nanoscale, the properties and transition procedures can vary, bringing both challenges and opportunities in scalability. This article describes the physical structures, properties and applications of nanoscale phase-change materials and devices. The limitations and performance of scaling properties in phase-change materials and the recent progress and challenges in phase-change devices are presented. At the end, some emerging applications related to phase-change materials are also introduced.

  1. Nanoscale phase-change materials and devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Qinghui; Wang, Yuxi; Zhu, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Phase-change materials (PCMs) that can reversibly transit between crystalline and amorphous phases have been widely used for data-storage and other functional devices. As PCMs scale down to nanoscale, the properties and transition procedures can vary, bringing both challenges and opportunities in scalability. This article describes the physical structures, properties and applications of nanoscale phase-change materials and devices. The limitations and performance of scaling properties in phase-change materials and the recent progress and challenges in phase-change devices are presented. At the end, some emerging applications related to phase-change materials are also introduced. (topical review)

  2. Biomimetic Polyaminoacids as Precursors for Optical-Active Intelligent Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Popova, G

    2003-01-01

    ...; function on nanoscale; stimula-responsive study; intelligent materials formation. Modified polyglutamic acid with dyes regular set possesses specific ability to self-assembly with cooperative rearrangement under outer temperature...

  3. Biomimetic material strategies for cardiac tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Molamma P., E-mail: nnimpp@nus.edu.sg [Health Care and Energy Materials Laboratory, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Venugopal, J. [Health Care and Energy Materials Laboratory, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Kai, Dan [NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Ramakrishna, Seeram [Health Care and Energy Materials Laboratory, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2011-04-08

    Cardiovascular disease precedes many serious complications including myocardial infarction (MI) and it remains a major problem for the global community. Adult mammalian heart has limited ability to regenerate and compensate for the loss of cardiomyocytes. Restoration of cardiac function by replacement of diseased myocardium with functional cardiomyocytes is an intriguing strategy because it offers a potential cure for MI. Biomaterials are fabricated in nanometer scale dimensions by combining the chemical, biological, mechanical and electrical aspects of material for potential tissue engineering (TE) applications. Synthetic polymers offer advantageous in their ability to tailor the mechanical properties, and natural polymers offer cell recognition sites necessary for cell, adhesion and proliferation. Cardiac tissue engineering (TE) aim for the development of a bioengineered construct that can provide physical support to the damaged cardiac tissue by replacing certain functions of the damaged extracellular matrix and prevent adverse cardiac remodeling and dysfunction after MI. Electrospun nanofibers are applied as heart muscle patches, while hydrogels serve as a platform for controlled delivery of growth factors, prevent mechanical complications and assist in cell recruitment. This article reviews the applications of different natural and synthetic polymeric materials utilized as cardiac patches, injectables or 3D constructs for cardiac TE. Smart organization of nanoscale assemblies with synergistic approaches of utilizing nanofibers and hydrogels could further advance the field of cardiac tissue engineering. Rapid innovations in biomedical engineering and cell biology will bring about new insights in the development of optimal scaffolds and methods to create tissue constructs with relevant contractile properties and electrical integration to replace or substitute the diseased myocardium.

  4. Enhanced osteointegration of medical titanium implant with surface modifications in micro/nanoscale structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwen Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomimetic design and substrate-based surface modification of medical implants will help to improve the integration of tissue to its material interfaces. Surface energy, composition, roughness, and topography all influence the biological responses of the implants, such as protein adsorption and cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. In the current study, different surface structures of Ti implants were constructed using facile surface techniques to create various micro-, nano-, and nano/micro composite scale topography. We have fabricated three types of hierarchical structures of TiO2 coating on Ti implants, including nanotube structure, nano sponge-like structure, and nano/micro nest-like structure. The osteointegration and biomechanical performance of the coated Ti screws were evaluated by histology and removal of torque force test in vivo. We found that the nano/micro nest-like and nanotube structured surface possessed better osteointegration ability. It indicated that the alkaline hydrothermally treated Ti substrate was the best for bone-implant integration in terms of all in vitro and in vivo testing parameters. The alkaline hydrothermally treated surface displayed a hydrophilic (contact angle value 5.92 ± 1.2, higher roughness (Ra value 911.3 ± 33.8 nm, higher specific surface area (8.26 ± 1.051 m2/g, and greater apatite inductivity. The electrochemical surface modification may become a powerful approach to enhance metal implant to bone integration in orthopaedic applications.

  5. Assessment of copper removal from highway stormwater runoff using Apatite II(TM) and compost : laboratory and field testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    -Stormwater runoff introduces heavy metals to surface waters that are harmful to aquatic organisms, : including endangered salmon. This work evaluates Apatite II, a biogenic fish bone based adsorbent, for removing metal : from stormwater. The meta...

  6. LABORATORY REPORT ON THE REDUCTION AND STABILIZATION (IMMOBILIZATION) OF PERTECHNETATE TO TECHNETIUM DIOXIDE USING TIN(II)APATITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DUNCAN JB; HAGERTY K; MOORE WP; RHODES RN; JOHNSON JM; MOORE RC

    2012-06-01

    This effort is part of the technetium management initiative and provides data for the handling and disposition of technetium. To that end, the objective of this effort was to challenge tin(II)apatite (Sn(II)apatite) against double-shell tank 241-AN-105 simulant spiked with pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}). The Sn(II)apatite used in this effort was synthesized on site using a recipe developed at and provided by Sandia National Laboratories; the synthesis provides a high quality product while requiring minimal laboratory effort. The Sn(II)apatite reduces pertechnetate from the mobile +7 oxidation state to the non-mobile +4 oxidation state. It also sequesters the technetium and does not allow for re-oxidization to the mo bile +7 state under acidic or oxygenated conditions within the tested period oftime (6 weeks). Previous work (RPP-RPT-39195, Assessment of Technetium Leachability in Cement-Stabilized Basin 43 Groundwater Brine) indicated that the Sn(II)apatite can achieve an ANSI leachability index in Cast Stone of 12.8. The technetium distribution coefficient for Sn(II)apatite exhibits a direct correlation with the pH of the contaminated media. Table A shows Sn(II)apatite distribution coefficients as a function of pH. The asterisked numbers indicate that the lower detection limit of the analytical instrument was used to calculate the distribution coefficient as the concentration of technetium left in solution was less than the detection limit. The loaded sample (200 mg of Sn(II)apatite loaded with O.311 mg of Tc-99) was subjected to different molarities of nitric acid to determine if the Sn(II)apatite would release the sequestered technetium. The acid was allowed to contact for 1 minute with gentle shaking ('1st wash'); the aqueous solution was then filtered, and the filtrate was analyzed for Tc-99. Table B shows the results ofthe nitric acid exposure. Another portion of acid was added, shaken for a minute, and filtered ('2nd wash'). The

  7. An NMR Study of Biomimetic Fluorapatite - Gelatine Mesocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyalikh, Anastasia; Simon, Paul; Rosseeva, Elena; Buder, Jana; Scheler, Ulrich; Kniep, Rüdiger

    2015-10-30

    The mesocrystal system fluoroapatite-gelatine grown by double-diffusion is characterized by hierarchical composite structure on a mesoscale. In the present work we apply solid state NMR to characterize its structure on the molecular level and provide a link between the structural organisation on the mesoscale and atomistic computer simulations. Thus, we find that the individual nanocrystals are composed of crystalline fluorapatite domains covered by a thin boundary apatite-like layer. The latter is in contact with an amorphous layer, which fills the interparticle space. The amorphous layer is comprised of the organic matrix impregnated by isolated phosphate groups, Ca3F motifs and water molecules. Our NMR data provide clear evidence for the existence of precursor complexes in the gelatine phase, which were not involved in the formation of apatite crystals, proving hence theoretical predictions on the structural pre-treatment of gelatine by ion impregnation. The interfacial interactions, which may be described as the glue holding the composite materials together, comprise hydrogen bond interactions with the apatite PO4(3-) groups. The reported results are in a good agreement with molecular dynamics simulations, which address the mechanisms of a growth control by collagen fibers, and with experimental observations of an amorphous cover layer in biominerals.

  8. An NMR Study of Biomimetic Fluorapatite – Gelatine Mesocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyalikh, Anastasia; Simon, Paul; Rosseeva, Elena; Buder, Jana; Scheler, Ulrich; Kniep, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    The mesocrystal system fluoroapatite—gelatine grown by double-diffusion is characterized by hierarchical composite structure on a mesoscale. In the present work we apply solid state NMR to characterize its structure on the molecular level and provide a link between the structural organisation on the mesoscale and atomistic computer simulations. Thus, we find that the individual nanocrystals are composed of crystalline fluorapatite domains covered by a thin boundary apatite-like layer. The latter is in contact with an amorphous layer, which fills the interparticle space. The amorphous layer is comprised of the organic matrix impregnated by isolated phosphate groups, Ca3F motifs and water molecules. Our NMR data provide clear evidence for the existence of precursor complexes in the gelatine phase, which were not involved in the formation of apatite crystals, proving hence theoretical predictions on the structural pre-treatment of gelatine by ion impregnation. The interfacial interactions, which may be described as the glue holding the composite materials together, comprise hydrogen bond interactions with the apatite PO43− groups. The reported results are in a good agreement with molecular dynamics simulations, which address the mechanisms of a growth control by collagen fibers, and with experimental observations of an amorphous cover layer in biominerals. PMID:26515127

  9. Preface: Friction at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusc, Claudio; Smith, Roger; Urbakh, Michael; Vanossi, Andrea

    2008-09-01

    Interfacial friction is one of the oldest problems in physics and chemistry, and certainly one of the most important from a practical point of view. Everyday operations on a broad range of scales, from nanometer and up, depend upon the smooth and satisfactory functioning of countless tribological systems. Friction imposes serious constraints and limitations on the performance and lifetime of micro-machines and, undoubtedly, will impose even more severe constraints on the emerging technology of nano-machines. Standard lubrication techniques used for large objects are expected to be less effective in the nano-world. Novel methods for control and manipulation are therefore needed. What has been missing is a molecular level understanding of processes occurring between and close to interacting surfaces to help understand, and later manipulate friction. Friction is intimately related to both adhesion and wear, and all three require an understanding of highly non-equilibrium processes occurring at the molecular level to determine what happens at the macroscopic level. Due to its practical importance and the relevance to basic scientific questions there has been major increase in activity in the study of interfacial friction on the microscopic level during the last decade. Intriguing structural and dynamical features have been observed experimentally. These observations have motivated theoretical efforts, both numerical and analytical. This special issue focusses primarily on discussion of microscopic mechanisms of friction and adhesion at the nanoscale level. The contributions cover many important aspects of frictional behaviour, including the origin of stick-slip motion, the dependence of measured forces on the material properties, effects of thermal fluctuations, surface roughness and instabilities in boundary lubricants on both static and kinetic friction. An important problem that has been raised in this issue, and which has still to be resolved, concerns the

  10. Design of nanocarriers for nanoscale drug delivery to enhance cancer treatment using hybrid polymer and lipid building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui Xue; Ahmed, Taksim; Li, Lily Yi; Li, Jason; Abbasi, Azhar Z; Wu, Xiao Yu

    2017-01-26

    Polymer-lipid hybrid nanoparticles (PLN) are an emerging nanocarrier platform made from building blocks of polymers and lipids. PLN integrate the advantages of biomimetic lipid-based nanoparticles (i.e. solid lipid nanoparticles and liposomes) and biocompatible polymeric nanoparticles. PLN are constructed from diverse polymers and lipids and their numerous combinations, which imparts PLN with great versatility for delivering drugs of various properties to their nanoscale targets. PLN can be classified into two types based on their hybrid nanoscopic structure and assembly methods: Type-I monolithic matrix and Type-II core-shell systems. This article reviews the history of PLN development, types of PLN, lipid and polymer candidates, fabrication methods, and unique properties of PLN. The applications of PLN in delivery of therapeutic or imaging agents alone or in combination for cancer treatment are summarized and illustrated with examples. Important considerations for the rational design of PLN for advanced nanoscale drug delivery are discussed, including selection of excipients, synthesis processes governing formulation parameters, optimization of nanoparticle properties, improvement of particle surface functionality to overcome macroscopic, microscopic and cellular biological barriers. Future directions and potential clinical translation of PLN are also suggested.

  11. Apatite fission track dating and thermal history of Qing-He region in Altay Mountains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Zengkuan; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Yuan Wanming; Dong Jinquan; Gao Shaokai

    2005-01-01

    Fission track ages (FTA) and track lengths of apatite from Qing-He diorite intrusion in Altay Mountains are measured. Apatite fission track ages of three diorite samples is range from (78±5) Ma to (95 ± 5) Ma, and the lengths of horizontal confined spontaneous fission tracks are (13.2 ± 1.2)-(13.5 ±1.3) μm. The distribution of the track length is narrow and symmetrical with a mean length of approximately 13.3 μm and a standard deviation of around 0.1 μm. The inverse modeling results show that thermal history of this region has four stages, two rapid uplift of this region still existed magmatic intrusion and tectonic movements in Yanshanian. (authors)

  12. Characterization and potential application of pataua vegetable oil in apatite flotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, P.S. de; Mansur, H.S.; Peres, A.E.C.

    2016-01-01

    The present research characterizes the Pataua palm (Oenocarpus bataua) oil regarding to its fatty acids profile and acidity index, and evaluates its use for apatite flotation. The Pataua oil evaluated is unsaturated e predominantly composed of cis-9-octadecenoic acid (oleic acid). The mineral sample characterization revealed a material composed by a fluoroapatite deficient in fluorine, a possibly result of isomorphic substitution, and with quartz and monazite inclusions. The analysis of the mineral after reagent conditioning, by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), pointed to the presence of characteristic bands of carbon chains and carboxylate group, suggesting the collector adsorption through the mechanisms of chemisorption and insoluble calcium salts precipitation. Thus, it is proposed the Pataua oil potential use in flotation systems aiming apatite recovery. (author)

  13. Damage morphology of Kr ion tracks in apatite: Dependence on dE/dX

    CERN Document Server

    Villa, F; Rebetez, M; Dubois, C; Chambaudet, A; Chevarier, A; Martin, P; Brossard, F; Blondiaux, G; Sauvage, T; Toulemonde, M

    1999-01-01

    With the aim of characterizing damage along nuclear tracks in apatite, Durango fluoroapatite monocrystals were irradiated under a high fluence sup 8 sup 6 Kr ion beam at the G.A.N.I.L. (Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds, Caen, France). The resulting irradiation damage was studied by associating CRBS spectrometry and chemical etching. By applying Poisson's law to the backscattering results, the nuclear track average effective radius R sub e was calculated for different steps along the ion path. On the other hand, the chemical etching experiments allowed us to deduce three different damaging morphologies in correspondence to the R sub e values. For the first time in apatite, it has been shown that a defect fragmentation produced along the ion paths may be detected by chemical etching. These results were also applied to fission tracks in order to quantify the damage rate and to describe the damage morphology evolution along fission fragment paths.

  14. Biological activity of lactoferrin-functionalized biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocerino, Nunzia; Fulgione, Andrea; Iannaccone, Marco; Tomasetta, Laura; Ianniello, Flora; Martora, Francesca; Lelli, Marco; Roveri, Norberto; Capuano, Federico; Capparelli, Rosanna

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of bacterial strains resistant to antibiotics is a general public health problem. Progress in developing new molecules with antimicrobial properties has been made. In this study, we evaluated the biological activity of a hybrid nanocomposite composed of synthetic biomimetic hydroxyapatite surface-functionalized by lactoferrin (LF-HA). We evaluated the antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties of LF-HA and found that the composite was active against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and that it modulated proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses and enhanced antioxidant properties as compared with LF alone. These results indicate the possibility of using LF-HA as an antimicrobial system and biomimetic hydroxyapatite as a candidate for innovative biomedical applications.

  15. Effects of PEGylation on biomimetic synthesis of magnetoferritin nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Caiyun; Cao, Changqian; Cai, Yao; Xu, Huangtao; Zhang, Tongwei; Pan, Yongxin

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that ferrimagnetic magnetoferritin nanoparticles are a promising novel magnetic nanomaterial in biomedical applications, including biocatalysis, imaging, diagnostics, and tumor therapy. Here we investigated the PEGylation of human H-ferritin (HFn) proteins and the possible influence on biomimetic synthesis of magnetoferritin nanoparticles. The outer surface of HFn proteins was chemically modified with different PEG molecular weights (PEG10K and PEG20K) and different modification ratios (HFn subunit:PEG20K = 1:1, 1:2, 1:4). The PEGylated HFn proteins were used for biomimetic synthesis of ferrimagnetic magnetoferritin nanoparticles. We found that, compared with magnetoferritin using non-PEGylated HFn protein templates, the synthesized magnetoferritin using the PEGylated HFn protein templates possessed larger magnetite cores, higher magnetization and relaxivity values, and improved thermal stability. These results suggest that the PEGylation of H-ferritin may improve the biomineralization of magnetoferritin nanoparticles and enhance their biomedical applications.

  16. Surface Modifications of Support Partitions for Stabilizing Biomimetic Membrane Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Mark; Hansen, Jesper Schmidt; Jensen, Karin Bagger Stibius

    2011-01-01

    Black lipid membrane (BLM) formation across apertures in an ethylene tetra-fluoroethylene (ETFE) partition separating two aqueous compartments is an established technique for the creation of biomimetic membranes. Recently multi-aperture BLM arrays have attracted interest and in order to increase...... with a high signal-to-noise (s/n) ratio. We demonstratesd this by reconstituting gA and α-hemolysin (α-HL) into BLM arrays. The improvement in membrane array lifetime and s/n ratio demonstrates that surface plasma polymerization of the supporting partition can be used to increase the stability of biomimetic...... modified partitions were similar and significantly lower than for arrays formed using untreated ETFE partitions. For single side n-hexene modification average membrane array lifetimes were not significantly changed compared to untreated ETFE. Double-sided n-hexene modification greatly improved average...

  17. Models and prototypes of biomimetic devices to architectural purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Titotto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some results of an ongoing interdisciplinary research about models and prototypes of biomimetic devices via installations and the focus of this paper is to outline this research role in architectural purposes as it perpasses the cultural and heritage contexts by being a way of understanding and living in the world as well as taking place in the world as devices or environments that pass on to future generations to use, learn from and be inspired by. Both the theoretical and the experimental work done so far point out that installations built with association of laser cutting and rapid prototyping techniques might be on the best feasible ways for developing and testing new technologies involved in biomimetic devices to architectural purposes that put both tectonics and nature as their central theme. 

  18. Effects of PEGylation on biomimetic synthesis of magnetoferritin nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Caiyun, E-mail: ycy@mail.iggcas.ac.cn; Cao, Changqian, E-mail: changqiancao@mail.iggcas.ac.cn; Cai, Yao, E-mail: caiyao@mail.iggcas.ac.cn; Xu, Huangtao, E-mail: xuhuangtao@mail.iggcas.ac.cn; Zhang, Tongwei, E-mail: ztw@mail.iggcas.ac.cn; Pan, Yongxin, E-mail: yxpan@mail.iggcas.ac.cn [Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Earth and Planetary Physics (China)

    2017-03-15

    Recent studies have demonstrated that ferrimagnetic magnetoferritin nanoparticles are a promising novel magnetic nanomaterial in biomedical applications, including biocatalysis, imaging, diagnostics, and tumor therapy. Here we investigated the PEGylation of human H-ferritin (HFn) proteins and the possible influence on biomimetic synthesis of magnetoferritin nanoparticles. The outer surface of HFn proteins was chemically modified with different PEG molecular weights (PEG10K and PEG20K) and different modification ratios (HFn subunit:PEG20K = 1:1, 1:2, 1:4). The PEGylated HFn proteins were used for biomimetic synthesis of ferrimagnetic magnetoferritin nanoparticles. We found that, compared with magnetoferritin using non-PEGylated HFn protein templates, the synthesized magnetoferritin using the PEGylated HFn protein templates possessed larger magnetite cores, higher magnetization and relaxivity values, and improved thermal stability. These results suggest that the PEGylation of H-ferritin may improve the biomineralization of magnetoferritin nanoparticles and enhance their biomedical applications.

  19. Biomimetic design processes in architecture: morphogenetic and evolutionary computational design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menges, Achim

    2012-01-01

    Design computation has profound impact on architectural design methods. This paper explains how computational design enables the development of biomimetic design processes specific to architecture, and how they need to be significantly different from established biomimetic processes in engineering disciplines. The paper first explains the fundamental difference between computer-aided and computational design in architecture, as the understanding of this distinction is of critical importance for the research presented. Thereafter, the conceptual relation and possible transfer of principles from natural morphogenesis to design computation are introduced and the related developments of generative, feature-based, constraint-based, process-based and feedback-based computational design methods are presented. This morphogenetic design research is then related to exploratory evolutionary computation, followed by the presentation of two case studies focusing on the exemplary development of spatial envelope morphologies and urban block morphologies. (paper)

  20. Sensing in nature: using biomimetics for design of sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker; Cheong, Hyunmin; Shu, Li

    2008-01-01

    limitations/implications – Biomimetics can be a challenge to engineers due to the terminology from another scientific discipline. Practical implications – Using a formalised search method is a way of solving the problem of finding the relevant biological analogies. Originality/value – The paper is of value...... of sense organs in animals and illustrates how a formal search method developed at University of Toronto can be applied to sensor design. Design/methodology/approach – Using biomimetics involves a search for relevant cases, a proper analysis of the biological solutions, identification of design principles...... and design of the desired artefact. The present search method is based on formulation of relevant keywords and search for occurrences in a standard university biology textbook. Most often a simple formulation of keywords and a following search is not enough to generate a sufficient amount of useful ideas...

  1. Biomimetic design processes in architecture: morphogenetic and evolutionary computational design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menges, Achim

    2012-03-01

    Design computation has profound impact on architectural design methods. This paper explains how computational design enables the development of biomimetic design processes specific to architecture, and how they need to be significantly different from established biomimetic processes in engineering disciplines. The paper first explains the fundamental difference between computer-aided and computational design in architecture, as the understanding of this distinction is of critical importance for the research presented. Thereafter, the conceptual relation and possible transfer of principles from natural morphogenesis to design computation are introduced and the related developments of generative, feature-based, constraint-based, process-based and feedback-based computational design methods are presented. This morphogenetic design research is then related to exploratory evolutionary computation, followed by the presentation of two case studies focusing on the exemplary development of spatial envelope morphologies and urban block morphologies.

  2. Neogene unroofing and incision of the Ethiopian Plateau constrained from apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gani, N. D.; Van Soest, M. C.; Gani, M. R.; Tadesse, K.; Neupane, P. C.; Falster, A.

    2011-12-01

    Ethiopian Plateau in East Africa, one of the large igneous provinces, has been deeply incised by the Blue Nile River. The plateau has experienced extensive volcanisms at ~30 Ma linked to outpouring of the Afar mantle plume that accumulated average 1 km thick flood basalt. This event, along with later repetitive volcanisms in the region, has complicated (e.g., partial resetting of mineral cooling ages, abnormal geothermal gradients) the application of thermochronological modeling to constrain the Cenozoic unroofing and incision history of the plateau. In this study, we used (U-Th)/He thermochronometry of apatite grains extracted from gneissic and granitic basement rocks and overlying sandstones in a 1.2 km vertical elevation profile within the Blue Nile Canyon to partition incision in geologic time. Our apatite cooling ages are comparatively older than that of previous thermochronological studies of the area. These cooling ages show wide range and random distribution with elevation but positively correlate with effective uranium (eU) concentration of apatite minerals. Thus we chose recently developed RDAAM (Radiation Damage Accumulation and Annealing model) inverse modeling in HeFTy that was demonstrated to be appropriate for regions with complex thermal history and variable eU concentration. Initial results of RDAAM model, guided by reasonable thermal history of the plateau, show gradual cooling and thus slow incision during Early Neogene after the rapid heating of the region linked to the accumulation of thick flood basalt around 30 Ma. Importantly, these simulations predict rapid cooling, thus fast incision, during Late Neogene. This incision history of the Ethiopian Plateau interpreted from apatite thermal modeling is consistent with the previous GIS-and-geochronology-based study that showed increased incision rates around 10 Ma and 6 Ma.

  3. Enhanced apatite formation on Ti metal heated in PO2-controlled nitrogen atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Masami; Hayashi, Kazumi; Kitaoka, Satoshi

    2013-10-01

    The oxynitridation of biomedical titanium metal under a precisely regulated oxygen partial pressure (PO2) of 10(-14)Pa in nitrogen atmosphere at 973 K for 1 h strongly enhanced apatite formation compared with that on Ti heated in air. The factors governing the high apatite-forming ability are discussed from the viewpoint of the surface properties of Ti heated under a PO2 of 10(-14)Pa in nitrogen atmosphere determined from X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and zeta potential measurements. Nitrogen (N)-doped TiO2 (interstitial N) was formed on pure Ti heated under a PO2 of 10(-14)Pa in nitrogen atmosphere at 973 K. The XPS O1s main peak shifted toward a lower binding energy upon heating under a PO2 of 10(-14)Pa. This shift may be due to the formation of oxygen vacancies. This Ti surface had a positive zeta potential of approximately 20 mV. According to time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy results, PO4(3-) ions were predominantly adsorbed on Ti soaked in simulated body fluid (SBF) after heat treatment, followed by calcium ions. It was concluded that the apatite formation kinetics can be described using the Avrami-Erofeev equation with an Avrami index of n=2, which implies the instantaneous nucleation of apatite on the surface of Ti soaked in SBF after heat treatment at 973 K under a PO2 of 10(-14)Pa. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Biocompatible and Biomimetic Self-Assembly of Functional Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-15

    ability to combat antibiotic resistance and fungal infections. In a related way, we assessed encapsulation of bacterial cells in silica based...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2017-0047 Biocompatible and Biomimetic Self-Assembly of Functional Nanostructures Jeffrey Brinker UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO Final...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO 1700 LOMAS BLVD NE ALBUQUERQUE, NM 87106 US 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9

  5. Biomimetic polymers of plant cutin: An approach from molecular modeling

    OpenAIRE

    San-Miguel, M. A.; Oviedo, Jaime; Heredia-Guerrero, José A.; Heredia, Antonio; Benítez, José J.

    2014-01-01

    Biomimetics of materials is based on adopting and reproducing a model in nature with a well-defined functionality optimized through evolution. An example is barrier polymers that protect living tissues from the environment. The protecting layer of fruits, leaves, and non-lignified stems is the plant cuticle. The cuticle is a complex system in which the cutin is the main component. Cutin is a biopolyester made of polyhydroxylated carboxylic acids of 16 and 18 carbon atoms. The biosynthesis of ...

  6. Phosphate-induced metal stabilization: Use of apatite and bone char for the removal of soluble radionuclides in authentic and simulated DOE groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostick, W.D.; Jarabek, R.J.; Conca, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    The apatite group of minerals is a family of calcium phosphate phases. Apatite is the principal component of bone tissue, and it also occurs naturally as mineral deposits in the geosphere. Bone char is calcined (coked) animal bone, containing activated carbon as well as calcium phosphate mineral phases. Apatite IItrademark is a more reactive form of apatite, supplied by UFA Ventures, Inc., at a cost of approximately 1/4 that of commercial bone char. Apatite is shown to be effective for the removal of select heavy metal impurities in groundwater. Previous investigations have demonstrated that apatite is an effective medium for the stabilization of soluble lead, cadmium, and zinc from mine waste leachate by the formation of highly insoluble precipitate phases. The performance of bone char and apatite II are compared with other candidate sorption media (including granular activated carbon and anion exchange resin) for the removal of soluble uranyl ion in synthetic DOE Site groundwater supplemented with varying levels of interfering nitrate ion. Apatite II has a greater affinity for U(VI), especially in the presence of nitrate ion, as evidenced by a larger value for the conditional distribution coefficient (Kd) in batch test experiments. Contact of uranyl nitrate solution with apatite II is shown to produce highly insoluble mineral phases of the autunite group (calcium uranyl phosphate hydrates). Apatite II is also demonstrated to be moderately effective for the removal of soluble radioactive isotopes of strontium, but not cesium, when these ions are supplemented into authentic DOE Site groundwater

  7. Traceable nanoscale measurement at NML-SIRIM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlan, Ahmad M.; Abdul Hapip, A. I.

    2012-01-01

    The role of national metrology institute (NMI) has always been very crucial in national technology development. One of the key activities of the NMI is to provide traceable measurement in all parameters under the International System of Units (SI). Dimensional measurement where size and shape are two important features investigated, is one of the important area covered by NMIs. To support the national technology development, particularly in manufacturing sectors and emerging technology such nanotechnology, the National Metrology Laboratory, SIRIM Berhad (NML-SIRIM), has embarked on a project to equip Malaysia with state-of-the-art nanoscale measurement facility with the aims of providing traceability of measurement at nanoscale. This paper will look into some of the results from current activities at NML-SIRIM related to measurement at nanoscale particularly on application of atomic force microscope (AFM) and laser based sensor in dimensional measurement. Step height standards of different sizes were measured using AFM and laser-based sensors. These probes are integrated into a long-range nanoscale measuring machine traceable to the international definition of the meter thus ensuring their traceability. Consistency of results obtained by these two methods will be discussed and presented. Factors affecting their measurements as well as their related uncertainty of measurements will also be presented.

  8. Traceable nanoscale measurement at NML-SIRIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlan, Ahmad M.; Abdul Hapip, A. I.

    2012-06-01

    The role of national metrology institute (NMI) has always been very crucial in national technology development. One of the key activities of the NMI is to provide traceable measurement in all parameters under the International System of Units (SI). Dimensional measurement where size and shape are two important features investigated, is one of the important area covered by NMIs. To support the national technology development, particularly in manufacturing sectors and emerging technology such nanotechnology, the National Metrology Laboratory, SIRIM Berhad (NML-SIRIM), has embarked on a project to equip Malaysia with state-of-the-art nanoscale measurement facility with the aims of providing traceability of measurement at nanoscale. This paper will look into some of the results from current activities at NML-SIRIM related to measurement at nanoscale particularly on application of atomic force microscope (AFM) and laser based sensor in dimensional measurement. Step height standards of different sizes were measured using AFM and laser-based sensors. These probes are integrated into a long-range nanoscale measuring machine traceable to the international definition of the meter thus ensuring their traceability. Consistency of results obtained by these two methods will be discussed and presented. Factors affecting their measurements as well as their related uncertainty of measurements will also be presented.

  9. Dynamic structural disorder in supported nanoscale catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehr, J. J.; Vila, F. D.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the origin and physical effects of “dynamic structural disorder” (DSD) in supported nano-scale catalysts. DSD refers to the intrinsic fluctuating, inhomogeneous structure of such nano-scale systems. In contrast to bulk materials, nano-scale systems exhibit substantial fluctuations in structure, charge, temperature, and other quantities, as well as large surface effects. The DSD is driven largely by the stochastic librational motion of the center of mass and fluxional bonding at the nanoparticle surface due to thermal coupling with the substrate. Our approach for calculating and understanding DSD is based on a combination of real-time density functional theory/molecular dynamics simulations, transient coupled-oscillator models, and statistical mechanics. This approach treats thermal and dynamic effects over multiple time-scales, and includes bond-stretching and -bending vibrations, and transient tethering to the substrate at longer ps time-scales. Potential effects on the catalytic properties of these clusters are briefly explored. Model calculations of molecule-cluster interactions and molecular dissociation reaction paths are presented in which the reactant molecules are adsorbed on the surface of dynamically sampled clusters. This model suggests that DSD can affect both the prefactors and distribution of energy barriers in reaction rates, and thus can significantly affect catalytic activity at the nano-scale

  10. Adsorption Kinetics in Nanoscale Porous Coordination Polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nune, Satish K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; McGrail, Benard Peter; Annapureddy, Harsha V. R.; Dang, Liem X.; Mei, Donghai; Karri, Naveen; Alvine, Kyle J.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Arey, Bruce W.; Dohnalkova, Alice

    2015-10-07

    Nanoscale porous coordination polymers were synthesized using simple wet chemical method. The effect of various polymer surfactants on colloidal stability and shape selectivity was investigated. Our results suggest that the nanoparticles exhibited significantly improved adsorption kinetics compared to bulk crystals due to decreased diffusion path lengths and preferred crystal plane interaction.

  11. Enhanced nanoscale friction on fluorinated graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sangku; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Jeon, Ki-Joon; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Park, Jeong Young

    2012-12-12

    Atomically thin graphene is an ideal model system for studying nanoscale friction due to its intrinsic two-dimensional (2D) anisotropy. Furthermore, modulating its tribological properties could be an important milestone for graphene-based micro- and nanomechanical devices. Here, we report unexpectedly enhanced nanoscale friction on chemically modified graphene and a relevant theoretical analysis associated with flexural phonons. Ultrahigh vacuum friction force microscopy measurements show that nanoscale friction on the graphene surface increases by a factor of 6 after fluorination of the surface, while the adhesion force is slightly reduced. Density functional theory calculations show that the out-of-plane bending stiffness of graphene increases up to 4-fold after fluorination. Thus, the less compliant F-graphene exhibits more friction. This indicates that the mechanics of tip-to-graphene nanoscale friction would be characteristically different from that of conventional solid-on-solid contact and would be dominated by the out-of-plane bending stiffness of the chemically modified graphene. We propose that damping via flexural phonons could be a main source for frictional energy dissipation in 2D systems such as graphene.

  12. Nanoscale science and nanotechnology education in Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nanoscale science and nanotechnology is a rapidly growing and multidisciplinary field with its footing in chemistry, physics, molecular biology and engineering. It has led to breakthroughs in energy, environmental science, agriculture, biotechnology and several others. it is also capable of making a positive and significant ...

  13. Anomalous freezing behavior of nanoscale liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spangler, E. J.; Kumar, P. B. S.; Laradji, M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of the finite size of one-component liposomes on their phase behavior is investigated via simulations of an implicit-solvent model of self-assembled lipid bilayers. We found that the high curvature of nanoscale liposomes has a significant effect on their freezing behavior. While...

  14. Bio-Conjugates for Nanoscale Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Klaus

    Bio-conjugates for Nanoscale Applications is the title of this thesis, which covers three different projects in chemical bio-conjugation research, namely synthesis and applications of: Lipidated fluorescent peptides, carbohydrate oxime-azide linkers and N-aryl O-R2 oxyamine derivatives. Lipidated...

  15. Selective nanoscale growth of lattice mismatched materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung-Chang; Brueck, Steven R. J.

    2017-06-20

    Exemplary embodiments provide materials and methods of forming high-quality semiconductor devices using lattice-mismatched materials. In one embodiment, a composite film including one or more substantially-single-particle-thick nanoparticle layers can be deposited over a substrate as a nanoscale selective growth mask for epitaxially growing lattice-mismatched materials over the substrate.

  16. Nanoscale thermal transport: Theoretical method and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yu-Jia; Liu, Yue-Yang; Zhou, Wu-Xing; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2018-03-01

    With the size reduction of nanoscale electronic devices, the heat generated by the unit area in integrated circuits will be increasing exponentially, and consequently the thermal management in these devices is a very important issue. In addition, the heat generated by the electronic devices mostly diffuses to the air in the form of waste heat, which makes the thermoelectric energy conversion also an important issue for nowadays. In recent years, the thermal transport properties in nanoscale systems have attracted increasing attention in both experiments and theoretical calculations. In this review, we will discuss various theoretical simulation methods for investigating thermal transport properties and take a glance at several interesting thermal transport phenomena in nanoscale systems. Our emphasizes will lie on the advantage and limitation of calculational method, and the application of nanoscale thermal transport and thermoelectric property. Project supported by the Nation Key Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2017YFB0701602) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11674092).

  17. Force modulation for enhanced nanoscale electrical sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelmans, W.W.; Sebastian, A.; Abelmann, Leon; Despont, M.; Pozidis, H.

    2011-01-01

    Scanning probe microscopy employing conductive probes is a powerful tool for the investigation and modification of electrical properties at the nanoscale. Application areas include semiconductor metrology, probe-based data storage and materials research. Conductive probes can also be used to emulate

  18. Nanoscale temperature sensing using the Seebeck effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, F. L.; Flipse, J.; van Wees, B. J.

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally study the effect of Joule heating on the electron temperature in metallic nanoscale devices and compare the results with a diffusive 3D finite element model. The temperature is probed using four thermocouples located at different distances from the heater. A good quantitative

  19. Traceable nanoscale measurement at NML-SIRIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlan, Ahmad M.; Abdul Hapip, A. I. [National Metrology Laboratory SIRIM Berhad (NML-SIRIM), Lot PT 4803, Bandar Baru Salak Tinggi, 43900 Sepang (Malaysia)

    2012-06-29

    The role of national metrology institute (NMI) has always been very crucial in national technology development. One of the key activities of the NMI is to provide traceable measurement in all parameters under the International System of Units (SI). Dimensional measurement where size and shape are two important features investigated, is one of the important area covered by NMIs. To support the national technology development, particularly in manufacturing sectors and emerging technology such nanotechnology, the National Metrology Laboratory, SIRIM Berhad (NML-SIRIM), has embarked on a project to equip Malaysia with state-of-the-art nanoscale measurement facility with the aims of providing traceability of measurement at nanoscale. This paper will look into some of the results from current activities at NML-SIRIM related to measurement at nanoscale particularly on application of atomic force microscope (AFM) and laser based sensor in dimensional measurement. Step height standards of different sizes were measured using AFM and laser-based sensors. These probes are integrated into a long-range nanoscale measuring machine traceable to the international definition of the meter thus ensuring their traceability. Consistency of results obtained by these two methods will be discussed and presented. Factors affecting their measurements as well as their related uncertainty of measurements will also be presented.

  20. Methotrexate- and cyclophosphamide-embedded pure and strontiumsubstituted carbonate apatite nanoparticles for augmentation of chemotherapeutic activities in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiash, Snigdha; Othman, Iekhsan; Rosli, Rosita; Chowdhury, Ezharul Hoque

    2014-01-01

    Most of the classical drugs used today to destroy cancer cells lead to the development of acquired resistance in those cells by limiting cellular entry of the drugs or exporting them out by efflux pumps. As a result, higher doses of drugs are usually required to kill the cancer cells affecting normal cells and causing numerous side effects. Accumulation of the therapeutic level of drugs inside the cancer cells is thus required for an adequate period of time to get drugs' complete therapeutic efficacy minimizing the side effects on normal cells. In order to improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs, nanoparticles of carbonate apatite and its strontium (Sr(2+))-substituted derivative were used in this study to make complexes with three classical anticancer drugs, methotrexate, cyclophosphamide and 5-flurouracil. The binding affinities of these drugs to apatite were evaluated by absorbance and HPLC analysis and the therapeutic efficacy of drug-apatite complexes was determined by cell viability assay. Carbonate apatite demonstrated significant binding affinity towards methotrexate and cyclophosphamide leading to more cellular toxicity than free drugs in MCF-7 and 4T1 breast cancer cells. Moreover, Sr(2+) substitution in carbonate apatite with resulting tiny particles less than 100 nm in diameter further promoted binding of methotrexate to the nanocarriers indicating that Sr(2+)-substituted apatite nanoparticles have the high potential for loading substantial amount of anti-cancer drugs with eventual more therapeutic effectiveness.

  1. BMP4 Expression Following Stem Cells from Human Exfoliated Deciduous and Carbonate Apatite Transplantation on Rattus norvegicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Saskianti

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alveolar bone defects in children still have a high incidence. Conventional bone graft technique that has been used as a defect therapy is still not effective, so new techniques with tissue engineering approach are needed. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 (BMP4 as one of the indicators of osteogenic differentiation has not been widely studied, especially in the transplantation with combination of Stem Cells from Human Exfoliated Deciduous (SHED and carbonate apatite. Aim and Objectives: This research aimed to determine the expression of BMP4 after SHED and carbonate apatite transplantation on Rattus norvegicus. Material and Methods: The combinations of SHED and carbonate apatite were transplanted on alveolar bone defects of 4 rats (Rattus norvegicus as the treatment groups and another 4 rats were transplanted with carbonate apatite as the control groups. After 21 days, staining with Hematoxylin Eosin (HE and Immunohistochemistry (IHC BMP4 was performed. Results: BMP4 expression in the treatment groups was significantly higher when compared to the control groups. Discussion: Carbonate apatite has low crystallization rate and high osteoconductivity that produce more osteoblasts and increased BMP4 expression. Conclusion: The transplantation of SHED and carbonate apatite increased BMP4 expression as an indicator of osteogenic differentiation in rats.

  2. Effect of ion species on apatite-forming ability of silicone elastomer substrates irradiated by cluster ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashita, Masakazu [Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-1306-1 Aramaki-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)], E-mail: m-kawa@ecei.tohoku.ac.jp; Araki, Rei; Takaoka, Gikan H. [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University (Japan)

    2009-04-15

    Indwelling catheters made of silicone elastomers sometimes cause serious infections owing to their poor biocompatibility. It is believed that these infections can be prevented by coating the silicone surface with apatite, which has excellent biocompatibility. If the surface of the silicone elastomer is in advance modified to have an apatite-forming ability, apatite can be coated on the modified silicone surface by soaking it in an aqueous solution such as a simulated body fluid (SBF) supersaturated with respect to apatite. In this study, silicone substrates were irradiated by four types of ion beams (Ar cluster, Ar cluster and monomer (Ar CM), O{sub 2} cluster, and O{sub 2} cluster and monomer (O{sub 2} CM) ion beams) at an acceleration voltage of 7 kV and a dose of 1 x 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}, and subsequently soaked in CaCl{sub 2} solution. The apatite-forming abilities of the substrates were examined using a metastable calcium phosphate solution whose ion concentration was 1.5 times that of SBF (1.5 SBF). Silicon oxide (SiO{sub x}) clusters were formed on the silicone surface and the hydrophilicity of the substrates was improved by the irradiation, irrespective of the ion species used. The irradiation with O{sub 2} CM ion beams resulted in the highest apatite-forming ability among the analyzed ion beams.

  3. Hanford 100-N Area In Situ Apatite and Phosphate Emplacement by Groundwater and Jet Injection: Geochemical and Physical Core Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szecsody, James E.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Williams, Mark D.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Phillips, Jerry L.

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate emplacement of phosphate into subsurface sediments in the Hanford Site 100-N Area by two different technologies: groundwater injection of a Ca-citrate-PO4 solution and water-jet injection of sodium phosphate and/or fish-bone apatite. In situ emplacement of phosphate and apatite adsorbs, then incorporates Sr-90 into the apatite structure by substitution for calcium. Overall, both technologies (groundwater injection of Ca-citrate-PO4) and water-jet injection of sodium phosphate/fish-bone apatite) delivered sufficient phosphate to subsur¬face sediments in the 100-N Area. Over years to decades, additional Sr-90 will incorporate into the apatite precipitate. Therefore, high pressure water jetting is a viable technology to emplace phosphate or apatite in shallow subsurface sediments difficult to emplace by Ca-citrate-PO4 groundwater injections, but further analysis is needed to quantify the relevant areal extent of phosphate deposition (in the 5- to 15-ft distance from injection points) and cause of the high deposition in finer grained sediments.

  4. A collagen-targeted biomimetic RGD peptide to promote osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Rick; Arrabal, Pilar M; Santos-Ruiz, Leonor; Fernandez-Barranco, Raul; Becerra, Jose; Cifuentes, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis is a complex, multifactorial process in which many different signals interact. The bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are the most potent inducers of osteoblastic differentiation, although very high doses of BMPs in combination with collagen type I formulations have to be used for clinical applications. Although integrin-binding arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) biomimetic peptides have shown some promising abilities to promote the attachment of cells to biomaterials and to direct their differentiation, the linking of these peptides to collagen sponges usually implies chemical manipulation steps. In this study, we describe the design and characterization of a synthetic collagen-targeted RGD biomimetic (CBD-RGD) peptide formed from a collagen-binding domain derived from the von Willebrand factor and the integrin-binding RGD sequence. This peptide was demonstrated to bind to absorbable collagen type I sponges (ACSs) without performing any chemical linking, and to induce the differentiation of MC3T3-E1 mouse preosteoblasts and rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Furthermore, in vivo experiments showed that ACSs functionalized with CBD-RGD and loaded with a subfunctional dose of BMP-2-formed ectopic bone in rats, while nonfunctionalized sponges loaded with the same amount of BMP-2 did not. These results indicate that the combination of this biomimetic peptide with the currently used collagen+BMP system might be a promising approach to improve osteogenesis and to reduce the doses of BMPs needed in clinical orthopedics.

  5. Design and Development of Biomimetic Nanovesicles Using a Microfluidic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinaro, Roberto; Evangelopoulos, Michael; Hoffman, Jessica R; Corbo, Claudia; Taraballi, Francesca; Martinez, Jonathan O; Hartman, Kelly A; Cosco, Donato; Costa, Giosue'; Romeo, Isabella; Sherman, Michael; Paolino, Donatella; Alcaro, Stefano; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2018-03-07

    The advancement of nanotechnology toward more sophisticated bioinspired approaches has highlighted the gap between the advantages of biomimetic and biohybrid platforms and the availability of manufacturing processes to scale up their production. Though the advantages of transferring biological features from cells to synthetic nanoparticles for drug delivery purposes have recently been reported, a standardizable, batch-to-batch consistent, scalable, and high-throughput assembly method is required to further develop these platforms. Microfluidics has offered a robust tool for the controlled synthesis of nanoparticles in a versatile and reproducible approach. In this study, the incorporation of membrane proteins within the bilayer of biomimetic nanovesicles (leukosomes) using a microfluidic-based platform is demonstrated. The physical, pharmaceutical, and biological properties of microfluidic-formulated leukosomes (called NA-Leuko) are characterized. NA-Leuko show extended shelf life and retention of the biological functions of donor cells (i.e., macrophage avoidance and targeting of inflamed vasculature). The NA approach represents a universal, versatile, robust, and scalable tool, which is extensively used for the assembly of lipid nanoparticles and adapted here for the manufacturing of biomimetic nanovesicles. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Aloe vera Induced Biomimetic Assemblage of Nucleobase into Nanosized Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Arun; Zubair, Swaleha; Sherwani, Asif; Owais, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Aim Biomimetic nano-assembly formation offers a convenient and bio friendly approach to fabricate complex structures from simple components with sub-nanometer precision. Recently, biomimetic (employing microorganism/plants) synthesis of metal and inorganic materials nano-particles has emerged as a simple and viable strategy. In the present study, we have extended biological synthesis of nano-particles to organic molecules, namely the anticancer agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), using Aloe vera leaf extract. Methodology The 5-FU nano- particles synthesized by using Aloe vera leaf extract were characterized by UV, FT-IR and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. The size and shape of the synthesized nanoparticles were determined by TEM, while crystalline nature of 5-FU particles was established by X-ray diffraction study. The cytotoxic effects of 5-FU nanoparticles were assessed against HT-29 and Caco-2 (human adenocarcinoma colorectal) cell lines. Results Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopic techniques confirmed nano-size of the synthesized particles. Importantly, the nano-assembled 5-FU retained its anticancer action against various cancerous cell lines. Conclusion In the present study, we have explored the potential of biomimetic synthesis of nanoparticles employing organic molecules with the hope that such developments will be helpful to introduce novel nano-particle formulations that will not only be more effective but would also be devoid of nano-particle associated putative toxicity constraints. PMID:22403622

  7. Biomimetic finger extension mechanism for soft wearable hand rehabilitation devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Heo, Si-Hwan; Park, Hyung-Soon

    2017-07-01

    For the rehabilitation and assistance of the hand functions, wearable devices have been developed, and the interest in tendon driven mechanisms have especially increased since it allows light weight and compact design. The tendon driven hand rehabilitation devices provides grasping force via exo-tendons routed on the dorsal and palmar sides of the hand pulled by remotely located actuators. However, most of the devices were not able to provide natural joint extension sequence of the finger and showed hyperextension of finger joints because the tendons for extension were fixed at the fingertip, concentrating the torque at the distal interphalangeal joint. In this study, a ring-type biomimetic finger extension mechanism was developed, which mimics the origin, structure, and orientation of the extensor tendon. The biomimetic mechanism was evaluated by comparing the motion with voluntary finger extension and the motion made by other conventional tendon driven finger extension mechanisms. The biomimetic extension mechanism provided the same joint extension sequence with voluntary finger extension, and the fully extended posture was most close to the voluntary finger extension among the tendon-driven mechanisms used in the experiments. The joint angle differences between the proposed tendon mechanism and the voluntary finger extension was -1.2 °±3.4 °, -2.9°±2.0°, and -3.1°±8.0° for distal phalangeal, proximal phalangeal, and metacarpo-phalangeal joint, respectively.

  8. Biological activity of lactoferrin-functionalized biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nocerino N

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nunzia Nocerino,1 Andrea Fulgione,1 Marco Iannaccone,1 Laura Tomasetta,1 Flora Ianniello,1 Francesca Martora,1 Marco Lelli,2 Norberto Roveri,2 Federico Capuano,3 Rosanna Capparelli1 1Department of Agriculture Special Biotechnology Center Federico II, CeBIOTEC Biotechnology, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, 2Department of Chemistry, G Ciamician, Alma Mater Studiorum, University of Bologna, Bologna, 3Department of Food Inspection IZS ME, Naples, Italy Abstract: The emergence of bacterial strains resistant to antibiotics is a general public health problem. Progress in developing new molecules with antimicrobial properties has been made. In this study, we evaluated the biological activity of a hybrid nanocomposite composed of synthetic biomimetic hydroxyapatite surface-functionalized by lactoferrin (LF-HA. We evaluated the antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties of LF-HA and found that the composite was active against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and that it modulated proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses and enhanced antioxidant properties as compared with LF alone. These results indicate the possibility of using LF-HA as an antimicrobial system and biomimetic hydroxyapatite as a candidate for innovative biomedical applications. Keywords: lactoferrin, hydroxyapatite nanocrystals, biomimetism, biological activity, drug delivery

  9. Aloe vera induced biomimetic assemblage of nucleobase into nanosized particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Arun; Zubair, Swaleha; Sherwani, Asif; Owais, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Biomimetic nano-assembly formation offers a convenient and bio friendly approach to fabricate complex structures from simple components with sub-nanometer precision. Recently, biomimetic (employing microorganism/plants) synthesis of metal and inorganic materials nano-particles has emerged as a simple and viable strategy. In the present study, we have extended biological synthesis of nano-particles to organic molecules, namely the anticancer agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), using Aloe vera leaf extract. The 5-FU nano- particles synthesized by using Aloe vera leaf extract were characterized by UV, FT-IR and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. The size and shape of the synthesized nanoparticles were determined by TEM, while crystalline nature of 5-FU particles was established by X-ray diffraction study. The cytotoxic effects of 5-FU nanoparticles were assessed against HT-29 and Caco-2 (human adenocarcinoma colorectal) cell lines. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopic techniques confirmed nano-size of the synthesized particles. Importantly, the nano-assembled 5-FU retained its anticancer action against various cancerous cell lines. In the present study, we have explored the potential of biomimetic synthesis of nanoparticles employing organic molecules with the hope that such developments will be helpful to introduce novel nano-particle formulations that will not only be more effective but would also be devoid of nano-particle associated putative toxicity constraints.

  10. Influence of strontium for calcium substitution in bioactive glasses on degradation, ion release and apatite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredholm, Yann C.; Karpukhina, Natalia; Brauer, Delia S.; Jones, Julian R.; Law, Robert V.; Hill, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Bioactive glasses are able to bond to bone through the formation of hydroxy-carbonate apatite in body fluids while strontium (Sr)-releasing bioactive glasses are of interest for patients suffering from osteoporosis, as Sr was shown to increase bone formation both in vitro and in vivo. A melt-derived glass series (SiO2–P2O5–CaO–Na2O) with 0–100% of calcium (Ca) replaced by Sr on a molar base was prepared. pH change, ion release and apatite formation during immersion of glass powder in simulated body fluid and Tris buffer at 37°C over up to 8 h were investigated and showed that substituting Sr for Ca increased glass dissolution and ion release, an effect owing to an expansion of the glass network caused by the larger ionic radius of Sr ions compared with Ca. Sr release increased linearly with Sr substitution, and apatite formation was enhanced significantly in the fully Sr-substituted glass, which allowed for enhanced osteoblast attachment as well as proliferation and control of osteoblast and osteoclast activity as shown previously. Studying the composition–structure–property relationship in bioactive glasses enables us to successfully design next-generation biomaterials that combine the bone regenerative properties of bioactive glasses with the release of therapeutically active Sr ions. PMID:21993007

  11. In vivo bioactivity of titanium and fluorinated apatite coatings for orthopaedic implants: a vibrational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddei, Paola; Tinti, Anna; Reggiani, Matteo; Monti, Patrizia; Fagnano, Concezio

    2003-06-01

    The bone integration of implants is a complex process which depends on chemical composition and surface morphology. To accelerate osteointegration, metal implants are coated with porous metal or apatites which have been reported to increase mineralisation, improving prosthesis fixation. To study the influence of composition and morphology on the in vivo bioactivity, titanium screws coated by Plasma Flame Spraying (PFS) with titanium or fluorinated apatite (K690) were implanted in sheep tibia and femur for 10 weeks and studied by micro-Raman and IR spectroscopy. The same techniques, together with thermogravimetry, were used for characterising the pre-coating K690 powder. Contrary to the manufacturer report, the K690 pre-coating revealed to be composed of a partially fluorinated apatite containing impurities of Ca(OH) 2 and CaCO 3. By effect of PFS, the impurities were decomposed and the crystallinity degree of the coating was found to decrease. The vibrational spectra recorded on the implanted screws revealed the presence of newly formed bone; for the K690-coated screws at least, a high level of osteointegration was evidenced.

  12. Influence of fluoride in poly(d,l-lactide)/apatite composites on bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, X; Barbieri, D; Passanisi, G; Yuan, H; de Bruijn, J D

    2015-05-01

    The influence of fluoride in poly(d,l-lactide)/apatite composites on ectopic bone formation was evaluated in sheep. Nano-apatite powders with different replacement levels of OH groups by fluoride (F) (0% (F0), 50% (F50), 100% (F100), and excessive (F200)) were co-extruded with poly (d,l-lactide) at a weight ratio of 1:1. Fluoride release from the composites (CF0, CF50, CF100, and CF200) was evaluated in vitro and bone formation was assessed after intramuscular implantation in sheep. After 24 weeks in simulated physiological solution, CF0 and CF50 showed negligible fluoride release, whereas it was considerable from the CF100 and CF200 composites. Histology showed that the incidence of de novo bone formation decreased in implants with increasing fluoride content indicating a negative influence of fluoride on ectopic bone formation. Furthermore, a significant decrease in resorption of the high fluoride-content composites and a reduction in the number of multinucleated giant cells were seen. These results show that instead of promoting, the presence of fluoride in poly(d,l-lactide)/apatite composites seemed to suppresses their resorption and osteoinductive potential in non-osseous sites. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Impact of Surface Potential on Apatite Formation in Ti Alloys Subjected to Acid and Heat Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Seiji; Hashimoto, Hideki; Nakai, Ryusuke; Takadama, Hiroaki

    2017-09-24

    Titanium metal (Ti) and its alloys are widely used in orthopedic and dental fields. We have previously shown that acid and heat treatment was effective to introduce bone bonding, osteoconduction and osteoinduction on pure Ti. In the present study, acid and heat treatment with or without initial NaOH treatment was performed on typical Ti-based alloys used in orthopedic and dental fields. Dynamic movements of alloying elements were developed, which depended on the kind of treatment and type of alloy. It was found that the simple acid and heat treatment enriched/remained the alloying elements on Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-15Mo-5Zr-3Al and Ti-15Zr-4Nb-4Ta, resulting in neutral surface charges. Thus, the treated alloys did not form apatite in a simulated body fluid (SBF) within 3 days. In contrast, when the alloys were subjected to a NaOH treatment prior to an acid and heat treatment, alloying elements were selectively removed from the alloy surfaces. As a result, the treated alloys became positively charged, and formed apatite in SBF within 3 days. Thus, the treated alloys would be useful in orthopedic and dental fields since they form apatite even in a living body and bond to bone.

  14. A new hydrometallurgical process for extracting rare earths from apatite using solvent extraction with P35

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongfei; Guo Fuqiang; Zhang Zhifeng; Li Deqian; Wang Zhonghuai

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a new process is proposed to recover rare earths from nitric acid leaching of apatite without interfering with the normal route for fertilizer production using solvent extraction with dimethyl heptyl methyl phosphonate CH 3 P(O)(OC 8 H 17 ) 2 (P 35 , B). In the present work, the leaching conditions are studied. In selected condition, apatite was dissolved in 20% (v/v) nitric acid solution at 60-70 deg. C while agitating. The most suitable acidity for extraction is 0.4 M HNO 3 . More than 98% of rare earths in apatite can be recovered using countercurrent extraction process with six stages when phase ratio = 0.5, and defluorination is unnecessary. The influences of phase ratio, stage number, acidity and salting-out agent on extractabilities of P 35 are studied. The results show that rare earths can be separated with P 35 from Ca, P, Fe and other impurities. Mixed rare earth oxides (REO) of which purity is more than 95% with yield over 98% can be obtained

  15. Synthetic apatite nanoparticles as a phosphorus fertilizer for soybean (Glycine max)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruiqiang; Lal, Rattan

    2014-07-01

    Some soluble phosphate salts, heavily used in agriculture as highly effective phosphorus (P) fertilizers, cause surface water eutrophication, while solid phosphates are less effective in supplying the nutrient P. In contrast, synthetic apatite nanoparticles could hypothetically supply sufficient P nutrients to crops but with less mobility in the environment and with less bioavailable P to algae in comparison to the soluble counterparts. Thus, a greenhouse experiment was conducted to assess the fertilizing effect of synthetic apatite nanoparticles on soybean (Glycine max). The particles, prepared using one-step wet chemical method, were spherical in shape with diameters of 15.8 +/- 7.4 nm and the chemical composition was pure hydroxyapatite. The data show that application of the nanoparticles increased the growth rate and seed yield by 32.6% and 20.4%, respectively, compared to those of soybeans treated with a regular P fertilizer (Ca(H2PO4)2). Biomass productions were enhanced by 18.2% (above-ground) and 41.2% (below-ground). Using apatite nanoparticles as a new class of P fertilizer can potentially enhance agronomical yield and reduce risks of water eutrophication.

  16. Diagenesis does not invent anything new: Precise replication of conodont structures by secondary apatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Annalisa; Malferrari, Daniele; Medici, Luca; Savioli, Martina

    2017-05-09

    Conodont elements are important archives of sea/pore water chemistry yet they often exhibit evidence of diagenetic mineral overgrowth which may be biasing measurents. We decided to investigate this phenomenon by characterising chemically and crystallographically, the original biomineral tissue and the diagenetic mineral nature of conodont elements from the Ordovician of Normandy. Diagenetic apatite crystals observed on the surface of conodont elements show distinctive large columnar, blocky or web-like microtextures. We demonstrate that these apatite neo-crystals exhibit the same chemical composition as the original fossil structure. X-ray microdiffraction has been applied herein for the first time to conodont structural investigation. Analyses of the entire conodont element surface of a variety of species have revealed the existence of a clear pattern of crystal preferred orientation. No significant difference in unit cell parameters was documented between the newly formed apatite crystals and those of the smooth conodont surfaces, thus it emerges from our research that diagenesis has strictly replicated the unit cell signature of the older crystals.

  17. Search for stable energy levels in materials exhibiting strong anomalous fading: The case of apatites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polymeris, George S.; Giannoulatou, Valeria; Sfampa, Ioanna K.; Tsirliganis, Nestor C.; Kitis, George

    2014-01-01

    The thermally assisted OSL signal resulting from very deep traps was studied in the case of three fluorapatite samples, one chlorapatite as well as one collophanite cryptocrystalline carbonite phosphorite sample of various origins. Intense thermally assisted OSL signal was monitored while stimulating at 200 °C in all samples subjected to the present study, indicating the prevalence of the existence of these very deep traps. Anomalous fading effect is ubiquitous for all TL and OSL signals of all apatite samples subjected to the present study. The anomalous fading of the thermally assisted OSL signal arising from very deep traps is strongly differentiated from the anomalous fading of electron trap excited at temperatures below 500 °C. The thermally assisted OSL signal arising from very deep traps was found to clearly be more stable, showing much less anomalous fading over time. The possible implications of this finding in dating of both apatites and feldspars are also briefly discussed. - Highlights: • All apatite samples of the present study yield strong thermally assisted OSL (TA-OSL) signal. • In all cases, TA-OSL signal is much more stable compared to TL and conventional OSL, based on the corresponding anomalous fading rates. • This experimental feature could be extremely beneficial for luminescence dating

  18. Bioactive coatings on Portland cement substrates: Surface precipitation of apatite-like crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallego, Daniel; Higuita, Natalia; Garcia, Felipe; Ferrell, Nicholas; Hansford, Derek J.

    2008-01-01

    We report a method for depositing bioactive coatings onto cement materials for bone tissue engineering applications. White Portland cement substrates were hydrated under a 20% CO 2 atmosphere, allowing the formation of CaCO 3 . The substrates were incubated in a calcium phosphate solution for 1, 3, and 6 days (CPI, CPII, and CPIII respectively) at 37 deg. C to induce the formation of carbonated apatite. Cement controls were prepared and hydrated with and without CO 2 atmosphere (C+ and C- respectively). The presence of apatite-like crystals was verified by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). The substrate cytocompatibility was evaluated via SEM after 24 hour cell cultures. SEM revealed the presence Ca(OH) 2 on C-, and CaCO 3 on C+. Apatite-like crystals were detected only on CPIII, confirmed by phosphorus EDS peaks only for CPIII. Cells attached and proliferated similarly well on all the substrates except C-. These results prove the feasibility of obtaining biocompatible and bioactive coatings on Portland cement for bone tissue engineering applications

  19. Formation of Porous Apatite Layer during In Vitro Study of Hydroxyapatite-AW Based Glass Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pat Sooksaen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research discussed the fabrication, characterization, and in vitro study of composites based on the mixture of hydroxyapatite powder and apatite-wollastonite (AW based glass. AW based glass was prepared from the SiO2-CaO-MgO-P2O5-CaF2 glass system. This study focuses on the effect of composition and sintering temperature that influences the properties of these composites. Microstructural study revealed the formation of apatite layer on the composite surfaces when immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF solution at 37°C. Composites containing ≥50 wt% AW based glass showed good bioactivity after 7 days of immersion in the SBF. A porous calcium phosphate (potentially hydroxycarbonate apatite, HCA layer formed at the SBF-composite interface and the layer became denser at longer soaking period, for periods ranging from 7 to 28 days. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES analysis showed that early stage of soaking occurred with the release of Ca and Si ions from the composites and the decrease of P ions with slow exchange rate.

  20. Composition Determination and Cathodoluminescence of Natural Apatite from Different Phosphate Deposits in Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qingfeng; Liao, Libing; Xia, Zhiguo; Liu, Haikun

    2014-06-01

    Two kinds of natural apatite minerals were obtained from two different phosphate deposits in northern China, FanShan, Hebei province and HeiYingShan, Inner Mongolia province. Their chemical compositions, phase structure, and cathodoluminescence (CL) have been comparatively investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicated that the raw phosphate minerals from FanShan mainly are composed of FanShan apatite (FA) and FanShan mica, respectively, while the ore sample from HeiYingShan contained HeiYingshan apatite (HA) and HeiYingshan magnetite. The mineralogical characteristics and crystal structure of FA and HA were further determined by XRD, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray fluorescence spectrometer, and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, respectively. These results indicate that FA belongs to fluorapatite, while the HA belongs to hydroxyapatite. The existence of some trace elements has also been verified by the measured CL spectrum. The origin of the observed CL peaks has been discussed, and the relationship of the CL and the chemical composition has also been investigated.

  1. Effects of liquid phase on basic properties of alpha-tricalcium phosphate-based apatite cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Makoto; Takeuchi, Akari; Lin, Xin; Matsuya, Shigeki; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2008-09-01

    Effects of liquid phase on the basic properties of alpha-tricalcuim phosphate (alpha-TCP)-based cement, BIOPEX, were investigated by employing three liquid phases: distilled water, neutral sodium hydrogen phosphate solution, and succinic acid disodium salt solution containing sodium salt of chondroitin sulfate. When mixed with neutral sodium hydrogen phosphate or succinic acid disodium salt solution, the initial setting times of the cement were 19.4 +/- 0.55 and 11.8 +/- 0.45 minutes respectively. These setting times were much shorter than that of distilled water, 88.4 +/- 0.55 minutes. Formation of needle-like crystals typical of apatite was much faster when neutral sodium hydrogen phosphate solution was used, as compared to distilled water or succinic acid disodium salt solution. Moreover, at 24 hours after mixing, the largest amount of apatite was formed when neutral sodium hydrogen phosphate solution was used, whereas use of succinic acid resulted in the least. On the final mechanical strength of the cement, that yielded with neutral sodium hydrogen phosphate solution was the highest. In contrast, lower mechanical strength was observed--especially at the initial stage--when succinic acid sodium salt was used. It was thus concluded that alpha-TCP-based cement allowed accelerated transformation to apatite, and that higher mechanical strength since the initial stage was achieved when neutral sodium hydrogen phosphate solution was used as the liquid phase.

  2. About the Genetic Mechanisms of Apatites: A Survey on the Methodological Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Pastero

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Apatites are properly considered as a strategic material owing to the broad range of their practical uses, primarily biomedical but chemical, pharmaceutical, environmental and geological as well. The apatite group of minerals has been the subject of a huge number of papers, mainly devoted to the mass crystallization of nanosized hydroxyapatite (or carboapatite as a scaffold for osteoinduction purposes. Many wet and dry methods of synthesis have been proposed. The products have been characterized using various techniques, from the transmission electron microscopy to many spectroscopic methods like IR and Raman. The experimental approach usually found in literature allows getting tailor made micro- and nano- crystals ready to be used in a wide variety of fields. Despite the wide interest in synthesis and characterization, little attention has been paid to the relationships between bulk structure and corresponding surfaces and to the role plaid by surfaces on the mechanisms involved during the early stages of growth of apatites. In order to improve the understanding of their structure and chemical variability, close attention will be focused on the structural complexity of hydroxyapatite (HAp, on the richness of its surfaces and their role in the interaction with the precursor phases, and in growth kinetics and morphology.

  3. Nanoscale hotspots due to nonequilibrium thermal transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Sanjiv; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2004-01-01

    Recent experimental and modeling efforts have been directed towards the issue of temperature localization and hotspot formation in the vicinity of nanoscale heat generating devices. The nonequilibrium transport conditions which develop around these nanoscale devices results in elevated temperatures near the heat source which can not be predicted by continuum diffusion theory. Efforts to determine the severity of this temperature localization phenomena in silicon devices near and above room temperature are of technological importance to the development of microelectronics and other nanotechnologies. In this work, we have developed a new modeling tool in order to explore the magnitude of the additional thermal resistance which forms around nanoscale hotspots from temperatures of 100-1000K. The models are based on a two fluid approximation in which thermal energy is transferred between ''stationary'' optical phonons and fast propagating acoustic phonon modes. The results of the model have shown excellent agreement with experimental results of localized hotspots in silicon at lower temperatures. The model predicts that the effect of added thermal resistance due to the nonequilibrium phonon distribution is greatest at lower temperatures, but is maintained out to temperatures of 1000K. The resistance predicted by the numerical code can be easily integrated with continuum models in order to predict the temperature distribution around nanoscale heat sources with improved accuracy. Additional research efforts also focused on the measurements of the thermal resistance of silicon thin films at higher temperatures, with a focus on polycrystalline silicon. This work was intended to provide much needed experimental data on the thermal transport properties for micro and nanoscale devices built with this material. Initial experiments have shown that the exposure of polycrystalline silicon to high temperatures may induce recrystallization and radically increase the thermal

  4. PREFACE: Nanoscale science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Stefano

    2008-11-01

    , nanopowders) were discussed. Ab initio simulations on the atomic and electronic structure of single-walled BN nanotubes and nanoarches were illustrated by Yu F Zhukovskii. M B Muradov talked about nanoparticles of cadmium selenide and cadmium sulfide, which yield one of the perspective materials for application to solar cell elements, high-speed computing systems, catalyses and biomarkers in medicine. In the presentation, the process of transformation of nanoparticles cadmium of sulfide to nanoparticles of cadmium selenide by an ionic exchange from solutions of electrolytes was considered. The size of particles was controlled by the quantity of growth cycles. After manufacturing, the structures were investigated by atomic force microscope (AFM). Structures CdS:polymer transformed into CdSe:polymer with the help of ion-exchange. For the realization of the process of ionic exchange, solutions were prepared containing bivalent ions of selenium as follows: NaBH4 and Se in a weight parity 2:1 added in water 4NaBH4+2Se+7H2O→2NaHSe+Na2B4O7+14H2 In the prepared solution nanostructures CdS:polymer were immersed. Time of endurance was 2 h. After an ionic exchange the obtained structures were investigated by means of EDAX on a chemical composition. Results of analyses have shown that atoms of sulfur are completely replaced by selenium. The band gap of nanoparticles in comparison with initial samples is displaced in the long-wave area. It is connected with the fact that the width of the band gap of bulk crystals CdSe (1.74 eV) is smaller than the band gap of CdS (2.42 eV). Optical microscopy with spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit obtained by using near field techniques was the subject of S Prato's talk. Scanning near field optical microscopy (SNOM) has developed into a powerful tool to investigate local optical properties that depend on heterogeneity of materials at nanoscale and to study nanoenvironment of biosystems. Crucial topics in SNOM are: force sensitivity and

  5. A future of living machines?: International trends and prospects in biomimetic and biohybrid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Tony J.; Lepora, Nathan; Vershure, Paul F. M. J.

    2014-03-01

    Research in the fields of biomimetic and biohybrid systems is developing at an accelerating rate. Biomimetics can be understood as the development of new technologies using principles abstracted from the study of biological systems, however, biomimetics can also be viewed from an alternate perspective as an important methodology for improving our understanding of the world we live in and of ourselves as biological organisms. A biohybrid entity comprises at least one artificial (engineered) component combined with a biological one. With technologies such as microscale mobile computing, prosthetics and implants, humankind is moving towards a more biohybrid future in which biomimetics helps us to engineer biocompatible technologies. This paper reviews recent progress in the development of biomimetic and biohybrid systems focusing particularly on technologies that emulate living organisms—living machines. Based on our recent bibliographic analysis [1] we examine how biomimetics is already creating life-like robots and identify some key unresolved challenges that constitute bottlenecks for the field. Drawing on our recent research in biomimetic mammalian robots, including humanoids, we review the future prospects for such machines and consider some of their likely impacts on society, including the existential risk of creating artifacts with significant autonomy that could come to match or exceed humankind in intelligence. We conclude that living machines are more likely to be a benefit than a threat but that we should also ensure that progress in biomimetics and biohybrid systems is made with broad societal consent.

  6. Biomimetics in materials science self-healing, self-lubricating, and self-cleaning materials

    CERN Document Server

    Nosonovsky, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Biomimetics in Materials Science provides a comprehensive theoretical and practical review of biomimetic materials with self-healing, self-lubricating and self-cleaning properties. These three topics are closely related and constitute rapidly developing areas of study. The field of self-healing materials requires a new conceptual understanding of this biomimetic technology, which is in contrast to traditional  engineering processes such as wear and fatigue.  Biomimetics in Materials Science is the first monograph to be devoted to these materials. A new theoretical framework for these processes is presented based on the concept of multi-scale structure of entropy and non-equilibrium thermodynamics, together with a detailed review of the available technology. The latter includes experimental, modeling, and simulation results obtained on self-healing/lubricating/cleaning materials since their emergence in the past decade. Describes smart, biomimetic materials in the context of nanotechnology, biotechnology, an...

  7. An Investigation into the Effects of Interface Stress and Interfacial Arrangement on Temperature Dependent Thermal Properties of a Biological and a Biomimetic Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomar, Vikas [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2015-01-12

    A significant effort in the biomimetic materials research is on developing materials that can mimic and function in the same way as biological tissues, on bio-inspired electronic circuits, on bio-inspired flight structures, on bio-mimetic materials processing, and on structural biomimetic materials, etc. Most structural biological and biomimetic material properties are affected by two primary factors: (1) interfacial interactions between an organic and an inorganic phase usually in the form of interactions between an inorganic mineral phase and organic protein network; and (2) structural arrangement of the constituents. Examples are exoskeleton structures such as spicule, nacre, and crustacean exoskeletons. A significant effort is being directed towards making synthetic biomimetic materials based on a manipulation of the above two primary factors. The proposed research is based on a hypothesis that in synthetic materials with biomimetic morphology thermal conductivity, k, (how fast heat is carried away) and thermal diffusivity, D, (how fast a material’s temperature rises: proportional to the ratio of k and heat capacity) can be engineered to be either significantly low or significantly high based on a combination of chosen interface orientation and interfacial arrangement in comparison to conventional material microstructures with the same phases and phase volume fractions. METHOD DEVELOPMENT 1. We have established a combined Raman spectroscopy and nanomechanical loading based experimental framework to perform environment (liquid vs. air vs. vacuum) dependent and temperature dependent (~1000 degree-C) in-situ thermal diffusivity measurements in biomaterials at nanoscale to micron scale along with the corresponding analytical theoretic calculations. (Zhang and Tomar, 2013) 2. We have also established a new classical molecular simulation based framework to measure thermal diffusivity in biomolecular interfaces. We are writing a publication currently (Qu and Tomar

  8. Special section on biomimetics of movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpi, Federico; Erb, Rainer; Jeronimidis, George

    2011-12-01

    Movement in biology is an essential aspect of survival for many organisms, animals and plants. Implementing movement efficiently to meet specific needs is a key attribute of natural living systems, and can provide ideas for man-made developments. If we had to find a subtitle able to essentially convey the aim of this special section, it could read as follows: 'taking inspiration from nature for new materials, actuators, structures and controls for systems that move'. Our world is characterized by a huge variety of technical, engineering systems that move. They surround us in countless products that integrate actuators for different kinds of purposes. Basically, any kind of mechatronic system, such as those used for consumer products, machines, vehicles, industrial systems, robots, etc, is based on one or more devices that move, according to different implementations and motion ranges, often in response to external and internal stimuli. Despite this, technical solutions to develop systems that move do not evolve very quickly as they rely on traditional and well consolidated actuation technologies, which are implemented according to known architectures and with established materials. This fact limits our capability to overcome challenges related to the needs continuously raised by new fields of application, either at small or at large scales. Biomimetics-based approaches may provide innovative thinking and technologies in the field, taking inspiration from nature for smart and effective solutions. In an effort to disseminate current advances in this field, this special section collects some papers that cover different topics. A brief synopsis of the content of each contribution is presented below. The first paper, by Lienhard et al [1], deals with bioinspiration for the realization of structural parts in systems that passively move. It presents a bioinspired hingeless flapping mechanism, considered as a solution to the kinematics of deployable systems for

  9. He, U, and Th Depth Profiling of Apatite and Zircon Using Laser Ablation Noble Gas Mass Spectrometry and SIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, B. D.; van Soest, M. C.; Hodges, K. V.; Hervig, R.; Boyce, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    Conventional (U-Th)/He thermochronology utilizes single or multiple grain analyses of U- and Th-bearing minerals such as apatite and zircon and does not allow for assessment of spatial variation in concentration of He, U, or Th within individual crystals. As such, age calculation and interpretation require assumptions regarding 4He loss through alpha ejection, diffusive redistribution of 4He, and U and Th distribution as an initial condition for these processes. Although models have been developed to predict 4He diffusion parameters, correct for the effect of alpha ejection on calculated cooling ages, and account for the effect of U and Th zonation within apatite and zircon, measurements of 4He, U, and Th distribution have not been combined within a single crystal. We apply ArF excimer laser ablation, combined with noble gas mass spectrometry, to obtain depth profiles within apatite and zircon crystals in order to assess variations in 4He concentration with depth. Our initial results from pre-cut, pre-heated slabs of Durango apatite, each subjected to different T-t schedules, suggest a general agreement of 4He profiles with those predicted by theoretical diffusion models (Farley, 2000). Depth profiles through unpolished grains give reproducible alpha ejection profiles in Durango apatite that deviate from alpha ejection profiles predicted for ideal, homogenous crystals. SIMS depth profiling utilizes an O2 primary beam capable of sputtering tens of microns and measuring sub-micron resolution variation in [U], [Th], and [Sm]. Preliminary results suggest that sufficient [U] and [Th] zonation is present in Durango apatite to influence the form of the 4He alpha ejection profile. Future work will assess the influence of measured [U] and [Th] zonation on previously measured 4He depth profiles. Farley, K.A., 2000. Helium diffusion from apatite; general behavior as illustrated by Durango fluorapatite. J. Geophys. Res., B Solid Earth Planets 105 (2), 2903-2914.

  10. Hybrid, Nanoscale Phospholipid/Block Copolymer Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liedberg

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid phospholipid/block copolymer vesicles, in which the polymeric membrane is blended with phospholipids, display interesting self-assembly behavior, incorporating the robustness and chemical versatility of polymersomes with the softness and biocompatibility of liposomes. Such structures can be conveniently characterized by preparing giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs via electroformation. Here, we are interested in exploring the self-assembly and properties of the analogous nanoscale hybrid vesicles (ca. 100 nm in diameter of the same composition prepared by film-hydration and extrusion. We show that the self-assembly and content-release behavior of nanoscale polybutadiene-b-poly(ethylene oxide (PB-PEO/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC hybrid phospholipid/block copolymer vesicles can be tuned by the mixing ratio of the amphiphiles. In brief, these hybrids may provide alternative tools for drug delivery purposes and molecular imaging/sensing applications and clearly open up new avenues for further investigation.

  11. Anomalous electrical conductivity of nanoscale colloidal suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Suman; Padhy, Sourav

    2008-10-28

    The electrical conductivity of colloidal suspensions containing nanoscale conducting particles is nontrivially related to the particle volume fraction and the electrical double layer thickness. Classical electrochemical models, however, tend to grossly overpredict the pertinent effective electrical conductivity values, as compared to those obtained under experimental conditions. We attempt to address this discrepancy by appealing to the complex interconnection between the aggregation kinetics of the nanoscale particles and the electrodynamics within the double layer. In particular, we model the consequent alterations in the effective electrophoretic mobility values of the suspension by addressing the fundamentals of agglomeration-deagglomeration mechanisms through the pertinent variations in the effective particulate dimensions, solid fractions, as well as the equivalent suspension viscosity. The consequent alterations in the electrical conductivity values provide a substantially improved prediction of the corresponding experimental findings and explain the apparent anomalous behavior predicted by the classical theoretical postulates.

  12. Programmed assembly of nanoscale structures using peptoids.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Jianhua (University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA); Russell, Scott (California State University, Stanislaus, Turlock, CA); Morishetti, Kiran (University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA); Robinson, David B.; Zuckermann, Ronald N. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Buffleben, George M.; Hjelm, Rex P. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Kent, Michael Stuart (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-02-01

    Sequence-specific polymers are the basis of the most promising approaches to bottom-up programmed assembly of nanoscale materials. Examples include artificial peptides and nucleic acids. Another class is oligo(N-functional glycine)s, also known as peptoids, which permit greater sidegroup diversity and conformational control, and can be easier to synthesize and purify. We have developed a set of peptoids that can be used to make inorganic nanoparticles more compatible with biological sequence-specific polymers so that they can be incorporated into nucleic acid or other biologically based nanostructures. Peptoids offer degrees of modularity, versatility, and predictability that equal or exceed other sequence-specific polymers, allowing for rational design of oligomers for a specific purpose. This degree of control will be essential to the development of arbitrarily designed nanoscale structures.

  13. Scanning nanoscale multiprobes for conductivity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Peter; Hansen, Torben Mikael; Kuhn, Oliver

    2000-01-01

    We report fabrication and measurements with two- and four-point probes with nanoscale dimensions, for high spatial resolution conductivity measurements on surfaces and thin films. By combination of conventional microfabrication and additive three-dimensional nanolithography, we have obtained...... electrode spacings down to 200 nm. At the tips of four silicon oxide microcantilevers, narrow carbon tips are grown in converging directions and subsequently coated with a conducting layer. The probe is placed in contact with a conducting surface, whereby the electrode resistance can be determined....... The nanoelectrodes withstand considerable contact force before breaking. The probe offers a unique possibility to position the voltage sensors, as well as the source and drain electrodes in areas of nanoscale dimensions. ©2000 American Institute of Physics....

  14. Structure sensitivity and nanoscale effects in electrocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koper, Marc T. M.

    2011-05-01

    This review discusses the role of the detailed nanoscale structure of catalytic surfaces on the activity of various electrocatalytic reactions of importance for fuel cells, hydrogen production, and other environmentally important catalytic reactions, such as carbon monoxide oxidation, methanol and ethanol oxidation, ammonia oxidation, nitric oxide reduction, hydrogen evolution, and oxygen reduction. Specifically, results and insights obtained from surface-science single-crystal-based model experiments are linked to experiments on well-defined shape-controlled nanoparticles. A classification of structure sensitive effects in electrocatalysis is suggested, based both on empirical grounds and on quantum-chemical viz. thermochemical considerations. The mutual relation between the two classification schemes is also discussed. The review underscores the relevance of single-crystal modeling of nanoscale effects in catalysis, and points to the special role of two kinds of active sites for electrocatalysis on nanoparticulate surfaces: (i) steps and defects in (111) terraces or facets, and (ii) long-range (100) terraces or facets.

  15. The Thermal Evolution of the Southeast Baffin Island Continental Margin: An Integrated Apatite Fission Track and Apatite (U-Th)/He Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jess, S.; Stephenson, R.; Brown, R. W.

    2017-12-01

    The elevated continental margins of the North Atlantic continue to be a focus of considerable geological and geomorphological debate, as the timing of major tectonic events and the age of topographic relief remain controversial. The West Greenland margin, on the eastern flank of Baffin Bay, is believed by some authors to have experienced tectonic rejuvenation and uplift during the Neogene. However, the opposing flank, Baffin Island, is considered to have experienced a protracted erosional regime with little tectonic activity since the Cretaceous. This work examines the thermal evolution of the Cumberland Peninsula, SE Baffin Island, using published apatite fission track (AFT) data with the addition of 103 apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) ages. This expansion of available thermochronological data introduces a higher resolution of thermal modelling, whilst the application of the newly developed `Broken Crystals' technique provides a greater number of thermal constraints for an area dominated by AHe age dispersion. Results of joint thermal modelling of the AFT and AHe data exhibit two significant periods of cooling across the Cumberland Peninsula: Devonian/Carboniferous to the Triassic and Late Cretaceous to present. The earliest phase of cooling is interpreted as the result of major fluvial systems present throughout the Paleozoic that flowed across the Canadian Shield to basins in the north and south. The later stage of cooling is believed to result from rift controlled fluvial systems that flowed into Baffin Bay during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic during the early stages and culmination of rifting along the Labrador-Baffin margins. Glaciation in the Late Cenozoic has likely overprinted these later river systems creating a complex fjordal distribution that has shaped the modern elevated topography. This work demonstrates how surface processes, and not tectonism, can explain the formation of elevated continental margins and that recent methodological developments in the field of

  16. Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Bradley R [Brentwood, CA; Talley, Chad E [Brentwood, CA

    2008-06-10

    Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) having polymer features wherein the size, shape and position are predetermined can be fabricated using an xy piezo stage mounted on an inverted microscope and a laser. Using an AMF controller, a solution containing polymer precursors and a photo initiator are positioned on the xy piezo and hit with a laser beam. The thickness of the polymeric features can be varied from a few nanometers to over a micron.

  17. Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003–2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahill, David G.; Braun, Paul V.; Chen, Gang; Clarke, David R.; Fan, Shanhui; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Keblinski, Pawel; King, William P.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Pop, Eric; Shi, Li

    2014-01-01

    A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale electronics, and nanoparticles for thermal medical therapies are motivating studies of the applied physics of thermal transport at the nanoscale. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces become increasingly important on small length scales. Research during the past decade has extended studies of interfaces between simple metals and inorganic crystals to interfaces with molecular materials and liquids with systematic control of interface chemistry and physics. At separations on the order of ∼1 nm, the science of radiative transport through nanoscale gaps overlaps with thermal conduction by the coupling of electronic and vibrational excitations across weakly bonded or rough interfaces between materials. Major advances in the physics of phonons include first principles calculation of the phonon lifetimes of simple crystals and application of the predicted scattering rates in parameter-free calculations of the thermal conductivity. Progress in the control of thermal transport at the nanoscale is critical to continued advances in the density of information that can be stored in phase change memory devices and new generations of magnetic storage that will use highly localized heat sources to reduce the coercivity of magnetic media. Ultralow thermal conductivity—thermal conductivity below the conventionally predicted minimum thermal conductivity—has been observed in nanolaminates and disordered crystals with strong anisotropy. Advances in metrology by time-domain thermoreflectance have made measurements of the thermal conductivity of a thin layer with micron-scale spatial resolution relatively routine. Scanning thermal microscopy and

  18. Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Research Directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowndes, D. H.; Alivisatos, A. P.; Alper, M.; Averback, R. S.; Jacob Barhen, J.; Eastman, J. A.; Imre, D.; Lowndes, D. H.; McNulty, I.; Michalske, T. A.; Ho, K-M; Nozik, A. J.; Russell, T. P.; Valentin, R. A.; Welch, D. O.; Barhen, J.; Agnew, S. R.; Bellon, P.; Blair, J.; Boatner, L. A.; Braiman, Y.; Budai, J. D.; Crabtree, G. W.; Feldman, L. C.; Flynn, C. P.; Geohegan, D. B.; George, E. P.; Greenbaum, E.; Grigoropoulos, C.; Haynes, T. E.; Heberlein, J.; Hichman, J.; Holland, O. W.; Honda, S.; Horton, J. A.; Hu, M. Z.-C.; Jesson, D. E.; Joy, D. C.; Krauss, A.; Kwok, W.-K.; Larson, B. C.; Larson, D. J.; Likharev, K.; Liu, C. T.; Majumdar, A.; Maziasz, P. J.; Meldrum, A.; Miller, J. C.; Modine, F. A.; Pennycook, S. J.; Pharr, G. M.; Phillpot, S.; Price, D. L.; Protopopescu, V.; Poker, D. B.; Pui, D.; Ramsey, J. M.; Rao, N.; Reichl, L.; Roberto, J.; Saboungi, M-L; Simpson, M.; Strieffer, S.; Thundat, T.; Wambsganss, M.; Wendleken, J.; White, C. W.; Wilemski, G.; Withrow, S. P.; Wolf, D.; Zhu, J. H.; Zuhr, R. A.; Zunger, A.; Lowe, S.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes important future research directions in nanoscale science, engineering and technology. It was prepared in connection with an anticipated national research initiative on nanotechnology for the twenty-first century. The research directions described are not expected to be inclusive but illustrate the wide range of research opportunities and challenges that could be undertaken through the national laboratories and their major national scientific user facilities with the support of universities and industry.

  19. Fourth International Conference on Nanoscale Magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, Bekir; Advances in Nanoscale Magnetism

    2009-01-01

    The book aims to provide an overview of recent progress in the understanding of magnetic properties in nanoscale through recent results of various theoretical and experimental investigations. The papers describe a wide range of physical aspects, together with theoretical and experimental methods. It is of central interest to researchers and specialists in magnetism and magnetic materials science, both in academic and industrial research, as well as advanced students.

  20. Infochemistry Information Processing at the Nanoscale

    CERN Document Server

    Szacilowski, Konrad

    2012-01-01

    Infochemistry: Information Processing at the Nanoscale, defines a new field of science, and describes the processes, systems and devices at the interface between chemistry and information sciences. The book is devoted to the application of molecular species and nanostructures to advanced information processing. It includes the design and synthesis of suitable materials and nanostructures, their characterization, and finally applications of molecular species and nanostructures for information storage and processing purposes. Divided into twelve chapters; the first three chapters serve as an int

  1. DOE - BES Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beecher, Cathy Jo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-14

    These are slides from a powerpoint shown to guests during tours of Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It shows the five DOE-BES nanoscale science research centers (NSRCs), which are located at different national laboratories throughout the country. Then it goes into detail specifically about the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies at LANL, including statistics on its user community and CINT's New Mexico industrial users.

  2. Nanoscale structure dynamics within electrocatalytic materials

    OpenAIRE

    Bentley, Cameron Luke; Kang, Minkyung; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemical interfaces used for sensing, (electro)catalysis, and energy storage are usually nanostructured to expose particular surface sites, but probing the intrinsic activity of these sites is often beyond current experimental capability. Herein, it is demonstrated how a simple meniscus imaging probe of just 30 nm in size can be deployed for direct electrochemical and topographical imaging of electrocatalytic materials at the nanoscale. Spatially resolved topographical and electrochemi...

  3. Static electric field enhancement in nanoscale structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepetit, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.lepetit@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr; Lemoine, Didier, E-mail: didier.lemoine@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr [Université de Toulouse, UPS, Laboratoire Collisions Agrégats Réactivité, IRSAMC, F-31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5589, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Márquez-Mijares, Maykel, E-mail: mmarquez@instec.cu [Université de Toulouse, UPS, Laboratoire Collisions Agrégats Réactivité, IRSAMC, F-31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5589, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Instituto Superior de Tecnologías y Ciencias Aplicadas, Avenida Salvador Allende 1110, Quinta de los Molinos, La Habana (Cuba)

    2016-08-28

    We study the effect of local atomic- and nano-scale protrusions on field emission and, in particular, on the local field enhancement which plays a key role as known from the Fowler-Nordheim model of electronic emission. We study atomic size defects which consist of right angle steps forming an infinite length staircase on a tungsten surface. This structure is embedded in a 1 GV/m ambient electrostatic field. We perform calculations based upon density functional theory in order to characterize the total and induced electronic densities as well as the local electrostatic fields taking into account the detailed atomic structure of the metal. We show how the results must be processed to become comparable with those of a simple homogeneous tungsten sheet electrostatic model. We also describe an innovative procedure to extrapolate our results to nanoscale defects of larger sizes, which relies on the microscopic findings to guide, tune, and improve the homogeneous metal model, thus gaining predictive power. Furthermore, we evidence analytical power laws for the field enhancement characterization. The main physics-wise outcome of this analysis is that limited field enhancement is to be expected from atomic- and nano-scale defects.

  4. Nanoscale-Agglomerate-Mediated Heterogeneous Nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyeongyun; Wu, Alex; Kim, Moon-Kyung; Saigusa, Kosuke; Liu, Aihua; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2017-12-13

    Water vapor condensation on hydrophobic surfaces has received much attention due to its ability to rapidly shed water droplets and enhance heat transfer, anti-icing, water harvesting, energy harvesting, and self-cleaning performance. However, the mechanism of heterogeneous nucleation on hydrophobic surfaces remains poorly understood and is attributed to defects in the hydrophobic coating exposing the high surface energy substrate. Here, we observe the formation of high surface energy nanoscale agglomerates on hydrophobic coatings after condensation/evaporation cycles in ambient conditions. To investigate the deposition dynamics, we studied the nanoscale agglomerates as a function of condensation/evaporation cycles via optical and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), microgoniometric contact angle measurements, nucleation statistics, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The FESEM and EDS results indicated that the nanoscale agglomerates stem from absorption of sulfuric acid based aerosol particles inside the droplet and adsorption of volatile organic compounds such as methanethiol (CH 3 SH), dimethyl disulfide (CH 3 SSCH), and dimethyl trisulfide (CH 3 SSSCH 3 ) on the liquid-vapor interface during water vapor condensation, which act as preferential sites for heterogeneous nucleation after evaporation. The insights gained from this study elucidate fundamental aspects governing the behavior of both short- and long-term heterogeneous nucleation on hydrophobic surfaces, suggest previously unexplored microfabrication and air purification techniques, and present insights into the challenges facing the development of durable dropwise condensing surfaces.

  5. Geometric rectification for nanoscale vibrational energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos-Marún, Raúl A.

    2018-02-01

    In this work, we present a mechanism that, based on quantum-mechanical principles, allows one to recover kinetic energy at the nanoscale. Our premise is that very small mechanical excitations, such as those arising from sound waves propagating through a nanoscale system or similar phenomena, can be quite generally converted into useful electrical work by applying the same principles behind conventional adiabatic quantum pumping. The proposal is potentially useful for nanoscale vibrational energy harvesting where it can have several advantages. The most important one is that it avoids the use of classical rectification mechanisms as it is based on what we call geometric rectification. We show that this geometric rectification results from applying appropriate but quite general initial conditions to damped harmonic systems coupled to electronic reservoirs. We analyze an analytically solvable example consisting of a wire suspended over permanent charges where we find the condition for maximizing the pumped charge. We also studied the effects of coupling the system to a capacitor including the effect of current-induced forces and analyzing the steady-state voltage of operation. Finally, we show how quantum effects can be used to boost the performance of the proposed device.

  6. Nanoscale piezoelectric vibration energy harvester design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foruzande, Hamid Reza; Hajnayeb, Ali; Yaghootian, Amin

    2017-09-01

    Development of new nanoscale devices has increased the demand for new types of small-scale energy resources such as ambient vibrations energy harvesters. Among the vibration energy harvesters, piezoelectric energy harvesters (PEHs) can be easily miniaturized and fabricated in micro and nano scales. This change in the dimensions of a PEH leads to a change in its governing equations of motion, and consequently, the predicted harvested energy comparing to a macroscale PEH. In this research, effects of small scale dimensions on the nonlinear vibration and harvested voltage of a nanoscale PEH is studied. The PEH is modeled as a cantilever piezoelectric bimorph nanobeam with a tip mass, using the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory in conjunction with Hamilton's principle. A harmonic base excitation is applied as a model of the ambient vibrations. The nonlocal elasticity theory is used to consider the size effects in the developed model. The derived equations of motion are discretized using the assumed-modes method and solved using the method of multiple scales. Sensitivity analysis for the effect of different parameters of the system in addition to size effects is conducted. The results show the significance of nonlocal elasticity theory in the prediction of system dynamic nonlinear behavior. It is also observed that neglecting the size effects results in lower estimates of the PEH vibration amplitudes. The results pave the way for designing new nanoscale sensors in addition to PEHs.

  7. Nanoscale Electrochemical Sensing and Processing in Microreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odijk, Mathieu; van den Berg, Albert

    2018-03-08

    In this review, we summarize recent advances in nanoscale electrochemistry, including the use of nanoparticles, carbon nanomaterials, and nanowires. Exciting developments are reported for nanoscale redox cycling devices, which can chemically amplify signal readout. We also discuss promising high-frequency techniques such as nanocapacitive CMOS sensor arrays or heterodyning. In addition, we review electrochemical microreactors for use in (drug) synthesis, biocatalysis, water treatment, or to electrochemically degrade urea for use in a portable artificial kidney. Electrochemical microreactors are also used in combination with mass spectrometry, e.g., to study the mimicry of drug metabolism or to allow electrochemical protein digestion. The review concludes with an outlook on future perspectives in both nanoscale electrochemical sensing and electrochemical microreactors. For sensors, we see a future in wearables and the Internet of things. In microreactors, a future goal is to monitor the electrochemical conversions more precisely or ultimately in situ by combining other spectroscopic techniques. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Analytical Chemistry Volume 11 is June 12, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  8. Sulfur concentration and isotopic variation in apatites from granitic to granodioritic plutons of a Cretaceous Cordilleran Batholith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economos, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Apatite is a common igneous accessory mineral with a high saturation temperature which can therefore crystallize over a significant portion of magmatic compositional space. Sulfur presents an opportunity to identify zoning in apatites. Unlike other trace elements, sulfur is relatively immobile in the apatite crystal structure and can be present in typical concentrations up to 1500 - 2000 ppm (or 0.5 to 1 wt% SO3). Sulfur concentration zoning in igneous apatites from ore producing magmatic systems has been identified (Streck and Dilles, 1998), but the interpretation of the cause of this zoning remains an open question. δ34S isotopic ratios of whole apatites have been used to track isotopic evolution associated with changes in magma fO2 and eruptive degassing (Rye, 2005). The presented work combines sulfur concentration mapping in zoned apatite crystals with in-situ SIMS 34S and 32S isotope measurements. Apatites were extracted from granite to granodiorite samples from the Cadiz Valley Batholith in the central Mojave Desert. This batholith is related to the pulse of Cretaceous Cordilleran magmatism that generated large batholiths in the Sierra Nevada and the Penninsular Ranges. The Mojave segment of the Cretaceous arc is unique in their construction into a full thickness of continental crust which exerted a strong influence on magmatic compositions. Apatite grains were mounted parallel to C axes, ground until grains were approximately bisected, and analyzed by Electron Microprobe at UCLA, for CaO, P2O5, SO3 and SiO2. Grains were surveyed and those yielding anomalous SO3 contents were investigated by micron-scale concentration mapping. Typical SO3 concentrations of apatites from all samples were ~0.2 wt%, while 8 to 10% of apatite grains from two samples contained cores with concentrations ranging up to 0.5 wt%. The sulfur zoning in these samples is oscillatory, in some grains representing 5 to 6 repetitions of high and low concentrations. Based on these textures

  9. Possible secondary apatite fission track age standard from altered volcanic ash beds in the middle Jurassic Carmel Formation, Southwestern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowallis, B.J.; Christiansen, E.H.; Everett, B.H.; Crowley, K.D.; Naeser, C.W.; Miller, D.S.; Deino, A.L.

    1993-01-01

    Secondary age standards are valuable in intra- and interlaboratory calibration. At present very few such standards are available for fission track dating that is older than Tertiary. Several altered volcanic ash beds occur in the Middle Jurassic Carmel Formation in southwestern Utah. The formation was deposited in a shallow marine/sabhka environment. Near Gunlock, Utah, eight ash beds have been identified. Sanidines from one of the ash beds (GUN-F) give a single-crystal laser-probe 40Ar/39Ar age of 166.3??0.8 Ma (2??). Apatite and zircon fission track ages range from 152-185 Ma with typically 15-20 Ma errors (2??). Track densities in zircons are high and most grains are not countable. Apatites are fairly common in most of the ash beds and have reasonable track densities ranging between 1.2-1.5 ?? 106 tracks/cm2. Track length distributions in apatites are unimodal, have standard deviations sieving. GUN-F shows evidence of some reworking and detriaal contamination based on older single grain 40Ar/39Ar analyses and some rounding of grains, but the apatite population appears to be largely uncontaminated. At present BJK has approximately 12 of apatite separate from GUN-F. ?? 1993.

  10. Incorporation of tobramycin into biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating on titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigter, M; de Groot, K; Layrolle, P

    2002-10-01

    Calcium phosphate coatings containing an antibiotic were produced on titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) implants using a biomimetic approach. Thin, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) coatings were first deposited onto Ti6Al4V plates by immersion in 5 times concentrated simulated body fluid (SBF), for 24h at 37 degrees C. The ACP-coated implants were then immersed in a supersaturated calcium phosphate (SCP) solution containing 0, 100, 200, 400, 600 or 800 mg/l of tobramycin for 48 h at 37 degrees C. A carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) layer, approximately 40 microm thick, was formed. Approximately 3 microg/mg of tobramycin was co-precipitated with the CHA crystals onto titanium alloy plates, using 800mg/l tobramycin in the coating solution. For comparison, plasma-sprayed calcium phosphate coatings were also immersed in solutions containing 100, 200, 400 or 1,000 mg/l of tobramycin for 10, 40 min, or 48 h. A maximum of about 0.3 microg/mg could be adsorbed onto the plasma-sprayed calcium phosphate coating with the comparable concentration of 800 mg/l in solution. The dissolution of coating and release of tobramycin were also measured in vitro using saline solution buffered at pH 5.0 or 7.3 at 37 degrees C. The release rate of tobramycin was faster at pH 7.3 than at pH 5, with 50 and 4 microg/ml/min, respectively. Tobramycin released from the biomimetic-coated plates could inhibit growth of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The result of this study, therefore, indicates that the biomimetic CHA coatings containing antibiotics could be used to prevent post-surgical infections in orthopaedic or trauma.

  11. A novel soft biomimetic microrobot with two motion attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liwei; Guo, Shuxiang; Li, Maoxun; Mao, Shilian; Xiao, Nan; Gao, Baofeng; Song, Zhibin; Asaka, Kinji

    2012-12-06

     A variety of microrobots have commonly been used in the fields of biomedical engineering and underwater operations during the last few years. Thanks to their compact structure, low driving power, and simple control systems, microrobots can complete a variety of underwater tasks, even in limited spaces. To accomplish our objectives, we previously designed several bio-inspired underwater microrobots with compact structure, flexibility, and multi-functionality, using ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) actuators. To implement high-position precision for IPMC legs, in the present research, we proposed an electromechanical model of an IPMC actuator and analysed the deformation and actuating force of an equivalent IPMC cantilever beam, which could be used to design biomimetic legs, fingers, or fins for an underwater microrobot. We then evaluated the tip displacement of an IPMC actuator experimentally. The experimental deflections fit the theoretical values very well when the driving frequency was larger than 1 Hz. To realise the necessary multi-functionality for adapting to complex underwater environments, we introduced a walking biomimetic microrobot with two kinds of motion attitudes: a lying state and a standing state. The microrobot uses eleven IPMC actuators to move and two shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators to change its motion attitude. In the lying state, the microrobot implements stick-insect-inspired walking/rotating motion, fish-like swimming motion, horizontal grasping motion, and floating motion. In the standing state, it implements inchworm-inspired crawling motion in two horizontal directions and grasping motion in the vertical direction. We constructed a prototype of this biomimetic microrobot and evaluated its walking, rotating, and floating speeds experimentally. The experimental results indicated that the robot could attain a maximum walking speed of 3.6 mm/s, a maximum rotational speed of 9°/s, and a maximum floating speed of 7.14 mm/s. Obstacle

  12. A Novel Soft Biomimetic Microrobot with Two Motion Attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei Shi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available  A variety of microrobots have commonly been used in the fields of biomedical engineering and underwater operations during the last few years. Thanks to their compact structure, low driving power, and simple control systems, microrobots can complete a variety of underwater tasks, even in limited spaces. To accomplish our objectives, we previously designed several bio-inspired underwater microrobots with compact structure, flexibility, and multi-functionality, using ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC actuators. To implement high-position precision for IPMC legs, in the present research, we proposed an electromechanical model of an IPMC actuator and analysed the deformation and actuating force of an equivalent IPMC cantilever beam, which could be used to design biomimetic legs, fingers, or fins for an underwater microrobot. We then evaluated the tip displacement of an IPMC actuator experimentally. The experimental deflections fit the theoretical values very well when the driving frequency was larger than 1 Hz. To realise the necessary multi-functionality for adapting to complex underwater environments, we introduced a walking biomimetic microrobot with two kinds of motion attitudes: a lying state and a standing state. The microrobot uses eleven IPMC actuators to move and two shape memory alloy (SMA actuators to change its motion attitude. In the lying state, the microrobot implements stick-insect-inspired walking/rotating motion, fish-like swimming motion, horizontal grasping motion, and floating motion. In the standing state, it implements inchworm-inspired crawling motion in two horizontal directions and grasping motion in the vertical direction. We constructed a prototype of this biomimetic microrobot and evaluated its walking, rotating, and floating speeds experimentally. The experimental results indicated that the robot could attain a maximum walking speed of 3.6 mm/s, a maximum rotational speed of 9°/s, and a maximum floating speed of 7

  13. PREFACE: Symposium 13: Ceramics for Medicine, Biotechnology and Biomimetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, Chikara

    2011-10-01

    Preface to Symposium 13 (Ceramics for Medicine, Biotechnology and Biomimetics) of the International Congress on Ceramics III, 14-18 November 2010, Osaka, Japan Ceramic materials are now widely used in biomedical fields, such as applications of artificial bones, joints and teeth. The high potential of ceramics to exhibit biological functionality is expected to produce novel materials supporting biotechnology. These applications are governed by the interactions of materials and biological molecules. So far, 'bioceramics' is a type of biomaterial used for repairing damaged tissues. The orthopaedic application of bioceramics has advanced rapidly since the invention of Bioglass® that was found to encourage direct bonding with living bone. Hydroxyapatite and calcium phosphate ceramics are now popular bioceramics for use in artificial bones. While the bone-bonding behavior of materials was understood phenomenologically, very little has been known about the mechanism of either hard or soft tissue attachment or tissue growth on ceramic-based materials, such as glasses, glass-ceramics, ceramic composites and organic-inorganic hybrids. This symposium discussed the scientific understanding of the interface between biomedical materials and soft/hard tissues, and the design and construction of nanoscopic interfaces. It also involved establishment of biomimetic structures, characterization of natural life-related hard and soft tissues, and their formation mechanisms for a wide range of applications in biotechnology through 45 oral presentations including 5 invited lectures and 45 posters. I wish to express my sincere appreciation to the organizers of this symposium in the ICC3 conference. I am also grateful to the invited speakers, all the participants and organizing committee of the ICC3. It is my great pleasure that this proceedings could be published as the fruit of this symposium's achievement, which includes the contributions in all aspect of scientific understanding and

  14. Apatite fission-track analysis of the tectonic effects of the Arabia-Eurasia collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albino, I.; Cavazza, W.; Zattin, M.; Okay, A. I.; Adamia, S.; Sadradze, N.

    2012-04-01

    The Oligo-Miocene collision between Arabia and Eurasia led to the development of (i) the Bitlis-Zagros orogenic belt, (ii) the North and East Anatolian fault systems, (iii) the structural inversion of the Caucasian basins, and (iv) widespread deformation in the Turkish-Armenian-Iranian plateau. Despite the importance of the event, the exact age of the collision is poorly constrained. The integration of new apatite fission-track (AFT) data from the eastern Pontides, the Lesser Caucasus (Adjara-Trialeti zone), and the eastern part of the Anatolian plateau with preexisting data from the Bitlis suture has provided insights on the syn-and post-collisional evolution not only of eastern Anatolia but also of the entire Eastern Mediterranean area. The AFT samples have a wide spatial distribution and include different types of rocks: Paleogene sandstones and magmatic rocks with Cretaceous-to-Eocene intrusion ages. Despite the disparate lithologies and large distance, apatite fission-track ages from the easternmost Pontides, the Georgian Lesser Caucasus, the eastern Anatolian Plateau, and the Bitlis collision zone show a distinct geographic pattern. Exhumation along the Black Sea coast occurred in the Middle Miocene, mirroring the age of collision between the Eurasian and Arabian plates along the 2,400-km long Bitlis-Zagros suture zone some 200 km to the south. Exhumation in the Anatolian Plateau occurred in the Paleogene (with a cluster of ages in the Middle-Late Eocene), coevally with the development of the Izmir-Ankara-Erzincan suture. Successive development of the Anatolian Plateau did not exhume a new partial annealing zone and thus is not recorded by the apatite fission tracks.

  15. Apatite grown in niobium by two-step plasma electrolytic oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Bruno Leandro; Lepienski, Carlos Maurício; Mazzaro, Irineu; Kuromoto, Neide Kazue

    2017-08-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) of niobium plates were done electrochemically in two steps with electrolytes containing phosphorous and calcium being observed the formation of crystalline apatite. All samples were submitted to a first step of PEO using an electrolyte containing phosphate ions. The second oxidization step was made using three different electrolytes. Some samples were oxidized by PEO in electrolyte containing calcium, while in other samples it was used two mixtures of phosphoric acid and calcium acetate monohydrate solutions. Three different surface layers were obtained. The morphology and chemical composition of the films were analyzed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) respectively. It was observed that all samples submitted to two-step oxidation shown porous surface and a calcium and phosphorus rich layer. Average surface roughness (Ra) was measured by a profilometer remaining in the sub-micrometric range. The contact angle by sessile drop technique, using 1μL of distilled water was performed with an optical goniometer. It was verified a higher hydrophilicity in all surfaces compared to the polished niobium. Orthorhombic Nb 2 O 5 was identified by XRD in the oxide layer. Crystalline apatite was identified by XRD in surfaces after the second oxidation made with the Ca-rich electrolyte and a mixture of an electrolyte richer in Ca compared to P. These results indicate that a two-step oxidized niobium surface present great features for applications in the osseointegration processes: favorable chemical composition that increase the biocompatibility, the formation of crystalline niobium pentoxide (orthorhombic), high hydrophilicity and formation of crystalline calcium phosphate (apatite) under adequate electrolyte composition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Sensing in nature: using biomimetics for design of sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker; Cheong, Hyunmin; Shu, Li

    2010-01-01

    of the biological solutions, identification of design principles and design of the desired artefact. We use a search method developed at University of Toronto. It is based on formulation of relevant keywords and search for occurrences in a standard university biology textbook. Most often a simple formulation...... of keywords and a following search is not enough to generate a sufficient amount of useful ideas or the search gives to many results. This is handled by a more advanced search strategy where the search is either widened or it is focused further mainly using biological synonyms. The paper also reviews a number...... of biomimetic studies of sense organs in animals....

  17. Patterns of Growth—Biomimetics and Architectural Design

    OpenAIRE

    Petra Gruber; Barbara Imhof

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the approach of biomimetic design in architecture applied to the theme of growth in biology by taking two exemplary research projects at the intersection of arts and sciences. The first project, ‘Biornametics’, dealt with patterns from nature; the second project ‘Growing as Building (GrAB)’ took on biological growth as a specific theme for the transfer to architecture and the arts. Within a timeframe of five years (2011–2015), the research was conducted under the Program ...

  18. Touch stimulated pulse generation in biomimetic single-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sul, Onejae; Chun, Hyunsuk; Choi, Eunseok; Choi, Jungbong; Cho, Kyeongwon; Jang, Dongpyo; Chun, Sungwoo; Park, Wanjun; Lee, Seung-Beck

    2016-02-01

    Detecting variation in contact pressure is a separate sensing mode in the human somatosensory system that differs from the detection of pressure magnitude. If pressure magnitude and variation sensing can be achieved simultaneously, an advanced biomimetic tactile system that better emulates human senses may be developed. We report on a novel single-layer graphene based artificial mechanoreceptor that generates a resistance pulse as the contact stimulus passes a specific threshold pressure, mimicking the generation of action potentials in a biological fast-adapting mechanoreceptor. The electric field from a flexible membrane gate electrode placed above a graphene channel raises the Fermi level from the valence band as pressure deflects the membrane. The threshold pressure is reached when the Fermi level crosses the Dirac point in the graphene energy band, which generates a sharp peak in the measured resistance. We found that by changing the gate potential it was possible to modulate the threshold pressure and using a series of graphene channels, a train of pulses were generated during a transient pressurizing stimulus demonstrating biomimetic behaviour.Detecting variation in contact pressure is a separate sensing mode in the human somatosensory system that differs from the detection of pressure magnitude. If pressure magnitude and variation sensing can be achieved simultaneously, an advanced biomimetic tactile system that better emulates human senses may be developed. We report on a novel single-layer graphene based artificial mechanoreceptor that generates a resistance pulse as the contact stimulus passes a specific threshold pressure, mimicking the generation of action potentials in a biological fast-adapting mechanoreceptor. The electric field from a flexible membrane gate electrode placed above a graphene channel raises the Fermi level from the valence band as pressure deflects the membrane. The threshold pressure is reached when the Fermi level crosses the Dirac

  19. Anisotropic Liquid Microcapsules from Biomimetic Self-Folding Polymer Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharchenko, Svetlana; Ionov, Leonid

    2015-06-17

    We demonstrated a novel approach for the fabrication of anisotropic capsules with liquid content using biomimetic self-folding thermoresponsive polymer films. The behavior of self-folding films is very similar to actuation in plants, where nonhomogenous swelling results in complex movements such as twisting, bending, or folding. This approach allows the design of anisotropic liquid capsules with rodlike and dumbbell-like morphologies. We found that these capsules are able to assemble into different complex structures, such as nematic-like one and 3D network depending on their morphology.

  20. Acoustic beam control in biomimetic projector via velocity gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xiaowei; Dong, Erqian; Song, Zhongchang [Key Laboratory of Underwater Acoustic Communication and Marine Information Technology of the Ministry of Education, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zhang, Yu, E-mail: yuzhang@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: dzk@psu.edu; Tang, Liguo [Key Laboratory of Underwater Acoustic Communication and Marine Information Technology of the Ministry of Education, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Cao, Wenwu, E-mail: yuzhang@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: dzk@psu.edu [Department of Mathematics and Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Li, Songhai [Sanya Key Laboratory of Marin Mammal and Marine Bioacoustics, Sanya Institute of Deep-Sea Science and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Science, Sanya 57200 (China); Zhang, Sai [Faculty of Science, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2016-07-04

    A biomimetic projector (BioP) based on computerized tomography of pygmy sperm whale's biosonar system has been designed using gradient-index (GRIN) material. The directivity of this BioP device was investigated as function of frequency and the velocity gradient of the GRIN material. A strong beam control over a broad bandwidth at the subwavelength scale has been achieved. Compared with a bare subwavelength source, the main lobe pressure of the BioP is about five times as high and the angular resolution is one order of magnitude better. Our results indicate that this BioP has excellent application potential in miniaturized underwater sonars.

  1. Artificial cilia of magnetically tagged polymer nanowires for biomimetic mechanosensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, P; Schotter, J; Shoshi, A; Eggeling, M; Brückl, H; Bethge, O; Hütten, A

    2011-01-01

    Polymeric nanowires of polypyrrole have been implemented as artificial cilia on giant-magneto-resistive multilayer sensors for a biomimetic sensing approach. The arrays were tagged with a magnetic material, the stray field of which changes relative to the underlying sensor as a consequence of mechanical stimuli which are delivered by a piezoactuator. The principle resembles balance sensing in mammals. Measurements of the sensor output voltage suggest a proof of concept at frequencies of around 190 kHz and a tag thickness of ∼300 nm. Characterization was performed by scanning electron microscopy and magnetic force microscopy. Micromagnetic and finite-element simulations were conducted to assess basic sensing aspects.

  2. Preparation, anti-biofouling and drag-reduction properties of a biomimetic shark skin surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Xia; Li, Guangji; Huang, Hanlu

    2016-04-15

    Shark skin surfaces show non-smoothness characteristics due to the presence of a riblet structure. In this study, biomimetic shark skin was prepared by using the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-embedded elastomeric stamping (PEES) method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the surface microstructure and fine structure of shark skin and biomimetic shark skin. To analyse the hydrophobic mechanism of the shark skin surface microstructure, the effect of biomimetic shark skin surface microstructure on surface wettability was evaluated by recording water contact angle. Additionally, protein adhesion experiments and anti-algae adhesion performance testing experiments were used to investigate and evaluate the anti-biofouling properties of the surface microstructure of biomimetic shark skin. The recorded values of the water contact angle of differently microstructured surfaces revealed that specific microstructures have certain effects on surface wettability. The anti-biofouling properties of the biomimetic shark skin surface with microstructures were superior to a smooth surface using the same polymers as substrates. Moreover, the air layer fixed on the surface of the biomimetic shark skin was found to play a key role in their antibiont adhesion property. An experiment into drag reduction was also conducted. Based on the experimental results, the microstructured surface of the prepared biomimetic shark skin played a significant role in reducing drag. The maximum of drag reduction rate is 12.5%, which is higher than the corresponding maximum drag reduction rate of membrane material with a smooth surface. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Preparation, anti-biofouling and drag-reduction properties of a biomimetic shark skin surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Pu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Shark skin surfaces show non-smoothness characteristics due to the presence of a riblet structure. In this study, biomimetic shark skin was prepared by using the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS-embedded elastomeric stamping (PEES method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to examine the surface microstructure and fine structure of shark skin and biomimetic shark skin. To analyse the hydrophobic mechanism of the shark skin surface microstructure, the effect of biomimetic shark skin surface microstructure on surface wettability was evaluated by recording water contact angle. Additionally, protein adhesion experiments and anti-algae adhesion performance testing experiments were used to investigate and evaluate the anti-biofouling properties of the surface microstructure of biomimetic shark skin. The recorded values of the water contact angle of differently microstructured surfaces revealed that specific microstructures have certain effects on surface wettability. The anti-biofouling properties of the biomimetic shark skin surface with microstructures were superior to a smooth surface using the same polymers as substrates. Moreover, the air layer fixed on the surface of the biomimetic shark skin was found to play a key role in their antibiont adhesion property. An experiment into drag reduction was also conducted. Based on the experimental results, the microstructured surface of the prepared biomimetic shark skin played a significant role in reducing drag. The maximum of drag reduction rate is 12.5%, which is higher than the corresponding maximum drag reduction rate of membrane material with a smooth surface.

  4. High spatial resolution U-Pb geochronology and Pb isotope geochemistry of magnetite-apatite ore from the Pea Ridge iron oxide-apatite deposit, St. Francois Mountains, southeast Missouri, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neymark, Leonid; Holm-Denoma, Christopher S.; Pietruszka, Aaron; Aleinikoff, John N.; Fanning, C. Mark; Pillers, Renee M.; Moscati, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The Pea Ridge iron oxide-apatite (IOA) deposit is one of the major rhyolite-hosted magnetite deposits of the St. Francois Mountains terrane, which is located within the Mesoproterozoic (1.5–1.3 Ga) Granite-Rhyolite province in the U.S. Midcontinent. Precise and accurate determination of the timing and duration of oreforming processes in this deposit is crucial for understanding its origin and placing it within a deposit-scale and regional geologic context. Apatite and monazite, well-established U-Pb mineral geochronometers, are abundant in the Pea Ridge orebody. However, the potential presence of multiple generations of dateable minerals, processes of dissolution-reprecipitation, and occurrence of micrometer-sized intergrowths and inclusions complicate measurements and interpretations of the geochronological results. Here, we employ a combination of several techniques, including ID-TIMS and high spatial resolution geochronology of apatite and monazite using LA-SC-ICPMS and SHRIMP, and Pb isotope geochemistry of pyrite and magnetite to obtain the first direct age constraints on the formation and alteration history of the Pea Ridge IOA deposit. The oldest apatite TIMS 207Pb*/206Pb* dates are 1471 ± 1 and 1468 ± 1 Ma, slightly younger than (but within error of) the ~1474 to ~1473 Ma U-Pb zircon ages of the host rhyolites. Dating of apatite and monazite inclusions within apatite provides evidence for at least one younger metasomatic event at ~1.44 Ga, and possibly multiple superimposed metasomatic events between 1.47 and 1.44 Ga. Lead isotop analyses of pyrite show extremely radiogenic 206Pb/204Pb ratios up to ~80 unsupported by in situ U decay. This excess radiogenic Pb in pyrite may have been derived from the spatially associated apatite as apatite recrystallized several tens of million years after its formation. The low initial 206Pb/204Pb ratio of ~16.5 and 207Pb/204Pb ratio of ~15.4 for individual magnetite grains indicate closed U-Pb system behavior in

  5. Biomimetic synthesis of hybrid nanocomposite scaffolds by freeze ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    The characterization of such nano-structured composites would allow researchers to design new systems, tailoring properties for ... and implemented in the design and syn- thesis of nanoscale materials, has been successful in cre- ... mechanical properties of HAp but also provides a range of possibilities to create different ...

  6. Organic nano-compartments as biomimetic reactors, and protocells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monnard, Pierre-Alain; Ziock, Hans-Joachim; DeClue, Michael S.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, nanoscale self-assembled structures have attracted ever increasing attention because of their potential to act as molecular templates for the synthesis of novel materials, delivery vehicles for therapeutic agents, and compartments defined at the molecular level that provide envir...

  7. Analytical method to determine flexoelectric coupling coefficient at nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hao; Pei, Yongmao; Hong, Jiawang; Fang, Daining

    2016-03-01

    Flexoelectricity is defined as the coupling between the strain gradient and polarization, which is expected to be remarkable at nanoscale. However, measuring the flexoelectricity at nanoscale is challenging. In the present work, an analytical method for measuring the flexoelectric coupling coefficient based on nanocompression technique is proposed. It is found that the flexoelectricity can induce stiffness softening of the dielectric nano-cone-frustum. This phenomenon becomes more significant when the sample size decreases or the half cone angle increases. This method avoids measuring the electric polarization or current at nanoscale with dynamical loading, which can be beneficial to the flexoelectric measurement at nanoscale and design of flexoelectric nanodevices.

  8. Environmental, Health, and Safety Research Needs for Engineered Nanoscale Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alderson, Norris; Alexander, Catherine; Merzbacher, Celia; Chernicoff, William; Middendorf, Paul; Beck, Nancy; Chow, Flora; Poster, Dianne; Danello, Mary Ann; Barrera, Enriqueta

    2006-01-01

    ...) research and information needs related to understanding and management of potential risks of engineered nanoscale materials that may be used, for example, in commercial or consumer products, medical...

  9. The evaluation of hydroxyl ions as a nucleating agent for apatite on electrospun non-woven poly( ϵ -caprolactone) fabric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung-Sup; Um, Seung-Hoon; Rhee, Sang-Hoon

    2012-01-01

    The capacity of hydroxyl ions when used as a nucleating agent to form apatite in simulated body fluid (SBF) was investigated. A 25 wt% poly(ϵ-caprolactone) solution was prepared using 1,1,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol as a solvent and was electrospun under an electric field of 1 kV/cm. Subsequently, non-woven poly(ϵ-caprolactone) fabrics were dipped into 4 M NaOH solution and the experimental group was then directly air-dried (NaOH coated), while the control group was washed with deionized water and air-dried (NaOH treated) under ambient conditions. The non-woven poly(ϵ-caprolactone) fabrics that were coated and treated with NaOH were exposed to SBF for 1 week, which resulted in the deposition of a layer of apatite crystals on the non-woven poly(ϵ-caprolactone) fabric coated with NaOH only. On the other hand, when the non-woven poly(ϵ-caprolactone) fabrics were dipped into 0.05, 0.1, 1 and 4 M NaOH solutions, respectively, air-dried, and then soaked in SBF, the apatite forming capacity was gradually increased according to the concentration of NaOH solution. These results were explained in terms of the degree of apatite supersaturation in SBF induced by the release of hydroxyl ions from the coated NaOH because hydroxyl ions are one of the constituent elements of apatite. These results suggest that hydroxyl ions have a good potential for use as a nucleating agent for apatite on a previously non-bioactive polymer surface.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of biomimetic nanogels for immunorecognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Claudia S O; Lansalot, Muriel; Garcia, Jaqueline Q; Taipa, M Ângela; Martinho, José M G

    2013-12-01

    Biomimetic nanoparticles are promising materials for biomedical and biotechnological applications. Cationic poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) nanogels containing charged amine groups brought by addition of 2-aminoethylmethacrylate hydrochloride (AEMH) or N-(3-aminopropyl) methacrylamide hydrochloride (APMH) as co-monomers were prepared by surfactant-free precipitation polymerization. The influence of the relative amount and mode of addition of the co-monomer on both the size and the amine group density of the nanogel particles was studied. Two nanogels, one prepared using APMH (1%mol/mol NIPAM, in batch) and another with AEMH (2%mol/mol NIPAM, by shot addition) as co-monomers, were selected for the covalent coupling of a Protein L-mimic ligand to free amine groups on the particles. The ability of the synthesized biomimetic nanoparticles for recognizing and binding human IgG (hIgG) molecules was assessed and the selectivity toward immunoglobulin molecules evaluated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Rapid prototyping of biomimetic vascular phantoms for hyperspectral reflectance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemi, Pejhman; Wang, Jianting; Melchiorri, Anthony J.; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Mathews, Scott A.; Coburn, James C.; Sorg, Brian S.; Chen, Yu; Joshua Pfefer, T.

    2015-12-01

    The emerging technique of rapid prototyping with three-dimensional (3-D) printers provides a simple yet revolutionary method for fabricating objects with arbitrary geometry. The use of 3-D printing for generating morphologically biomimetic tissue phantoms based on medical images represents a potentially major advance over existing phantom approaches. Toward the goal of image-defined phantoms, we converted a segmented fundus image of the human retina into a matrix format and edited it to achieve a geometry suitable for printing. Phantoms with vessel-simulating channels were then printed using a photoreactive resin providing biologically relevant turbidity, as determined by spectrophotometry. The morphology of printed vessels was validated by x-ray microcomputed tomography. Channels were filled with hemoglobin (Hb) solutions undergoing desaturation, and phantoms were imaged with a near-infrared hyperspectral reflectance imaging system. Additionally, a phantom was printed incorporating two disjoint vascular networks at different depths, each filled with Hb solutions at different saturation levels. Light propagation effects noted during these measurements-including the influence of vessel density and depth on Hb concentration and saturation estimates, and the effect of wavelength on vessel visualization depth-were evaluated. Overall, our findings indicated that 3-D-printed biomimetic phantoms hold significant potential as realistic and practical tools for elucidating light-tissue interactions and characterizing biophotonic system performance.

  12. Toward a New Generation of Smart Biomimetic Actuators for Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppinga, Simon; Zollfrank, Cordt; Prucker, Oswald; Rühe, Jürgen; Menges, Achim; Cheng, Tiffany; Speck, Thomas

    2017-10-24

    Motile plant structures (e.g., leaves, petals, cone scales, and capsules) are functionally highly robust and resilient concept generators for the development of biomimetic actuators for architecture. Here, a concise review of the state-of-the-art of plant movement principles and derived biomimetic devices is provided. Achieving complex and higher-dimensional shape changes and passive-hydraulic actuation at a considerable time scale, as well as mechanical robustness of the motile technical structures, is challenging. For example, almost all currently available bioinspired hydraulic actuators show similar limitations due to the poroelastic time scale. Therefore, a major challenge is increasing the system size to the meter range, with actuation times of minutes or below. This means that response speed and flow rate need significant improvement for the systems, and the long-term performance degradation issue of hygroscopic materials needs to be addressed. A theoretical concept for "escaping" the poroelastic regime is proposed, and the possibilities for enhancing the mechanical properties of passive-hydraulic bilayer actuators are discussed. Furthermore, the promising aspects for further studies to implement tropistic movement behavior are presented, i.e., movement that depends on the direction of the triggering stimulus, which can finally lead to "smart building skins" that autonomously and self-sufficiently react to changing environmental stimuli in a direction-dependent manner. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Interplay of static and dynamic features in biomimetic smart ears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannala, Mittu; Meymand, Sajjad Zeinoddini; Müller, Rolf

    2013-06-01

    Horseshoe bats (family Rhinolophidae) have sophisticated biosonar systems with outer ears (pinnae) that are characterized by static local shape features as well as dynamic non-rigid changes to their overall shapes. Here, biomimetic prototypes fabricated from elastic rubber sheets have been used to study the impact of these static and dynamic features on the acoustic device characteristics. The basic shape of the prototypes was an obliquely truncated horn augmented with three static local shape features: vertical ridge, pinna-rim incision and frontal flap (antitragus). The prototype shape was deformed dynamically using a one-point actuation mechanism to produce a biomimetic bending of the prototype's tip. In isolation, the local shape features had little impact on the device beampattern. However, strong interactions were observed between these features and the overall deformation. The further the prototype tip was bent down, the stronger the beampatterns associated with combinations of multiple features differed from the upright configuration in the prominence of sidelobes. This behavior was qualitatively similar to numerical predictions for horseshoe bats. Hence, the interplay between static and dynamic features could be a bioinspired principle for affecting large changes through the dynamic manipulations of interactions that are sensitive to small geometrical changes.

  14. Biomimetic molecular design tools that learn, evolve, and adapt

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A dominant hallmark of living systems is their ability to adapt to changes in the environment by learning and evolving. Nature does this so superbly that intensive research efforts are now attempting to mimic biological processes. Initially this biomimicry involved developing synthetic methods to generate complex bioactive natural products. Recent work is attempting to understand how molecular machines operate so their principles can be copied, and learning how to employ biomimetic evolution and learning methods to solve complex problems in science, medicine and engineering. Automation, robotics, artificial intelligence, and evolutionary algorithms are now converging to generate what might broadly be called in silico-based adaptive evolution of materials. These methods are being applied to organic chemistry to systematize reactions, create synthesis robots to carry out unit operations, and to devise closed loop flow self-optimizing chemical synthesis systems. Most scientific innovations and technologies pass through the well-known “S curve”, with slow beginning, an almost exponential growth in capability, and a stable applications period. Adaptive, evolving, machine learning-based molecular design and optimization methods are approaching the period of very rapid growth and their impact is already being described as potentially disruptive. This paper describes new developments in biomimetic adaptive, evolving, learning computational molecular design methods and their potential impacts in chemistry, engineering, and medicine. PMID:28694872

  15. Biomimetic Sonar for Electrical Activation of the Auditory Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Menniti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Relying on the mechanism of bat’s echolocation system, a bioinspired electronic device has been developed to investigate the cortical activity of mammals in response to auditory sensorial stimuli. By means of implanted electrodes, acoustical information about the external environment generated by a biomimetic system and converted in electrical signals was delivered to anatomically selected structures of the auditory pathway. Electrocorticographic recordings showed that cerebral activity response is highly dependent on the information carried out by ultrasounds and is frequency-locked with the signal repetition rate. Frequency analysis reveals that delta and beta rhythm content increases, suggesting that sensorial information is successfully transferred and integrated. In addition, principal component analysis highlights how all the stimuli generate patterns of neural activity which can be clearly classified. The results show that brain response is modulated by echo signal features suggesting that spatial information sent by biomimetic sonar is efficiently interpreted and encoded by the auditory system. Consequently, these results give new perspective in artificial environmental perception, which could be used for developing new techniques useful in treating pathological conditions or influencing our perception of the surroundings.

  16. Helicoidal microstructure of Scarabaei cuticle and biomimetic research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, B.; Peng, X.; Cai, C.; Niu, H.; Wu, X.

    2006-01-01

    Insect cuticles as a natural biocomposite include many favorable microstructures which have been refined over centuries and endow the cuticles excellent mechanical and physical properties, such as light weight, high strength and toughness, etc. The various microstructures of a Scarabaei cuticle are investigated with a scanning electronic microscope and reported in this paper. It is found that the cuticle is a kind of fiber-reinforced biocomposite composed of chitin-fiber layers and sclerous protein matrixes. Different chitin-fiber layers have different orientations, composed of crossed and helicoidal structures at different location. In the helicoidal structure, each fiber layer rotates with an almost fixed angle against its neighboring layer. The maximum pullout energy of the helicoidal structure is analyzed based on the representative model of the structure. The result shows that the pullout energy of the helicoidal structure is markedly larger than that of the conventional 0 o -structure. A biomimetic composite with the observed helicoidal structure is designed and fabricated. A comparative test shows that the fracture toughness of the biomimetic composite is markedly larger than that of the 0 o -layer composite

  17. Biomimetic molecular design tools that learn, evolve, and adapt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Winkler

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A dominant hallmark of living systems is their ability to adapt to changes in the environment by learning and evolving. Nature does this so superbly that intensive research efforts are now attempting to mimic biological processes. Initially this biomimicry involved developing synthetic methods to generate complex bioactive natural products. Recent work is attempting to understand how molecular machines operate so their principles can be copied, and learning how to employ biomimetic evolution and learning methods to solve complex problems in science, medicine and engineering. Automation, robotics, artificial intelligence, and evolutionary algorithms are now converging to generate what might broadly be called in silico-based adaptive evolution of materials. These methods are being applied to organic chemistry to systematize reactions, create synthesis robots to carry out unit operations, and to devise closed loop flow self-optimizing chemical synthesis systems. Most scientific innovations and technologies pass through the well-known “S curve”, with slow beginning, an almost exponential growth in capability, and a stable applications period. Adaptive, evolving, machine learning-based molecular design and optimization methods are approaching the period of very rapid growth and their impact is already being described as potentially disruptive. This paper describes new developments in biomimetic adaptive, evolving, learning computational molecular design methods and their potential impacts in chemistry, engineering, and medicine.

  18. 9-Fluorenylmethyl (Fm) Disulfides: Biomimetic Precursors for Persulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chung-Min; Johnson, Brett A.; Duan, Jicheng; Park, Jeong-Jin; Day, Jacob J.; Gang, David; Qian, Wei-Jun; Xian, Ming

    2016-03-04

    Protein S-sulfhydration has been recognized as an important post-translational modification that regulates H2S signals. However, the reactivity and biological implications of the products of S-sulfhydration, i.e. persulfides, are still unclear. This is mainly due to the instability of persulfides and difficulty to access these molecules. Under physiological conditions persulfides mainly exist in anionic forms because of their low pKa values. However, current methods do not allow for the direct generation of persulfide anions under biomimetic and non-H2S conditions. Herein we report the development of a functional disulfide, FmSSPy-A (Fm =9-fluorenylmethyl; Py = pyridinyl). This reagent can effectively convert both small molecule and protein thiols (-SH) to form –S-SFm adducts under mild conditions. It allows for a H2S-free and biomimetic protocol to generate highly reactive persulfides (in their anionic forms). We also demonstrated the high nucleophilicity of persulfides toward a number of thiol-blocking reagents. This method holds promise for further understanding the chemical biology of persulfides and S-sulfhydration.

  19. Formation of Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite Coating on Titanium Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ievgen Volodymyrovych PYLYPCHUK

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyapatite (HA has long been used as a coating material in the implant industry for orthopedic implant applications. HA is the natural inorganic constituent of bone and teeth. By coating titanium (base material of implant engineering because of its lightness and durability with hydroxyapatite, we can provide higher biocompatibility of titanium implants, according to HA ability to form a direct biochemical bond with living tissues. This article reports a biomimetic approach for coating hydroxyapatite with titanium A method of modifying the surface of titanium by organic modifiers (for creating functional groups on the surface, followed by formation "self-assembled" layer of biomimetic hydroxyapatite in simulated body fluid (SBF. FTIR and XPS confirmed the formation of hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium surface. Comparative study of the formation of HA on the surface of titanium plates modified by different functional groups: Ti(≡OH, Ti/(≡Si-OH and Ti/(≡COOH is conducted. It was found that the closest to natural stoichiometric hydroxyapatite Ca/P ratio was obtained on Ti/(≡COOH samples. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.3.4974

  20. Spotlight on Biomimetic Systems Based on Lyotropic Liquid Crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana F. de Souza

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of lyotropic biomimetic systems in drug delivery was reviewed. These behaviors are influenced by drug properties, the initial water content, type of lyotropic liquid crystals (LLC, swell ability, drug loading rate, the presence of ions with higher or less kosmotropic or chaotropic force, and the electrostatic interaction between the drug and the lipid bilayers. The in vivo interaction between LCC—drugs, and the impact on the bioavailability of drugs, was reviewed. The LLC with a different architecture can be formed by the self-assembly of lipids in aqueous medium, and can be tuned by the structures and physical properties of the emulsion. These LLC lamellar phase, cubic phase, and hexagonal phase, possess fascinating viscoelastic properties, which make them useful as a dispersion technology, and a highly ordered, thermodynamically stable internal nanostructure, thereby offering the potential as a sustained drug release matrix for drug delivery. In addition, the biodegradable and biocompatible nature of lipids demonstrates a minimum toxicity and thus, they are used for various routes of administration. This review is not intended to provide a comprehensive overview, but focuses on the advantages over non modified conventional materials and LLC biomimetic properties.

  1. Spotlight on Biomimetic Systems Based on Lyotropic Liquid Crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Juliana F; Pontes, Katiusca da S; Alves, Thais F R; Amaral, Venâncio A; Rebelo, Márcia de A; Hausen, Moema A; Chaud, Marco V

    2017-03-07

    The behavior of lyotropic biomimetic systems in drug delivery was reviewed. These behaviors are influenced by drug properties, the initial water content, type of lyotropic liquid crystals (LLC), swell ability, drug loading rate, the presence of ions with higher or less kosmotropic or chaotropic force, and the electrostatic interaction between the drug and the lipid bilayers. The in vivo interaction between LCC-drugs, and the impact on the bioavailability of drugs, was reviewed. The LLC with a different architecture can be formed by the self-assembly of lipids in aqueous medium, and can be tuned by the structures and physical properties of the emulsion. These LLC lamellar phase, cubic phase, and hexagonal phase, possess fascinating viscoelastic properties, which make them useful as a dispersion technology, and a highly ordered, thermodynamically stable internal nanostructure, thereby offering the potential as a sustained drug release matrix for drug delivery. In addition, the biodegradable and biocompatible nature of lipids demonstrates a minimum toxicity and thus, they are used for various routes of administration. This review is not intended to provide a comprehensive overview, but focuses on the advantages over non modified conventional materials and LLC biomimetic properties.

  2. Towards Biomimetic Virtual Constraint Control of a Powered Prosthetic Leg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Robert D; Sensinger, Jonathon W

    2014-01-01

    This brief presents a novel control strategy for a powered prosthetic ankle based on a biomimetic virtual constraint. We first derive a kinematic constraint for the "effective shape" of the human ankle-foot complex during locomotion. This shape characterizes ankle motion as a function of the Center of Pressure (COP)-the point on the foot sole where the resultant ground reaction force is imparted. Since the COP moves monotonically from heel to toe during steady walking, we adopt the COP as a mechanical representation of the gait cycle phase in an autonomous feedback controller. We show that our kinematic constraint can be enforced as a virtual constraint by an output linearizing controller that uses only feedback available to sensors onboard a prosthetic leg. Using simulations of a passive walking model with feet, we show that this novel controller exactly enforces the desired effective shape whereas a standard impedance (i.e., proportional-derivative) controller cannot. This work provides a single, biomimetic control law for the entire single-support period during robot-assisted locomotion.

  3. Biomimetic molecular design tools that learn, evolve, and adapt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, David A

    2017-01-01

    A dominant hallmark of living systems is their ability to adapt to changes in the environment by learning and evolving. Nature does this so superbly that intensive research efforts are now attempting to mimic biological processes. Initially this biomimicry involved developing synthetic methods to generate complex bioactive natural products. Recent work is attempting to understand how molecular machines operate so their principles can be copied, and learning how to employ biomimetic evolution and learning methods to solve complex problems in science, medicine and engineering. Automation, robotics, artificial intelligence, and evolutionary algorithms are now converging to generate what might broadly be called in silico-based adaptive evolution of materials. These methods are being applied to organic chemistry to systematize reactions, create synthesis robots to carry out unit operations, and to devise closed loop flow self-optimizing chemical synthesis systems. Most scientific innovations and technologies pass through the well-known "S curve", with slow beginning, an almost exponential growth in capability, and a stable applications period. Adaptive, evolving, machine learning-based molecular design and optimization methods are approaching the period of very rapid growth and their impact is already being described as potentially disruptive. This paper describes new developments in biomimetic adaptive, evolving, learning computational molecular design methods and their potential impacts in chemistry, engineering, and medicine.

  4. Small-Scale Fabrication of Biomimetic Structures for Periodontal Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David William Green

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The periodontium is the supporting tissues for the tooth organ and is vulnerable to destruction, arising from overpopulating pathogenic bacteria and spirochaetes. The presence of microbes together with host responses can destroy large parts of the periodontium sometimes leading tooth loss. Permanent tissue replacements are made possible with tissue engineering techniques. However, existing periodontal biomaterials cannot promote proper tissue architectures, necessary tissue volumes within the periodontal pocket and a water-tight barrier, to become clinically acceptable. New kinds of small-scale engineered biomaterials, with increasing biological complexity are needed to guide proper biomimetic regeneration of periodontal tissues. So the ability to make compound structures with small modules, filled with tissue components, is a promising design strategy for simulating the anatomical complexity of the periodotium attachement complexes along the tooth root and the abutment with the tooth collar. Anatomical structures such as, intima, adventitia and special compartments such as the epithelial cell rests of Malassez or a stellate reticulum niche need to be engineered from the start of regeneration to produce proper periodontium replacement.. It is our contention that the positioning of tissue components at the origin is also necessary to promote self-organising cell-cell connections, cell-matrix connections. This leads to accelerated, synchronized and well-formed tissue architectures and anatomies. This strategy is a highly effective preparation for tackling periodontitis, periodontium tissue resorption and to ultimately prevent tooth loss. Furthermore, such biomimetic tissue replacements will tackle problems associated with dental implant support and perimimplantitis.

  5. Adhesion of mesenchymal stem cells to biomimetic polymers: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shotorbani, Behnaz Banimohamad; Alizadeh, Effat; Salehi, Roya; Barzegar, Abolfazl

    2017-01-01

    The mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for cell therapy due to the self-renewal, multi-potency, ethically approved state and suitability for autologous transplantation. However, key issue for isolation and manipulation of MSCs is adhesion in ex-vivo culture systems. Biomaterials engineered for mimicking natural extracellular matrix (ECM) conditions which support stem cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation represent a main area of research in tissue engineering. Some of them successfully enhanced cells adhesion and proliferation because of their biocompatibility, biomimetic texture, and chemistry. However, it is still in its infancy, therefore intensification and optimization of in vitro, in vivo, and preclinical studies is needed to clarify efficacies as well as applicability of those bioengineered constructs. The aim of this review is to discuss mechanisms related to the in-vitro adhesion of MSCs, surfaces biochemical, biophysical, and other factors (of cell's natural and artificial micro-environment) which could affect it and a review of previous research attempting for its bio-chemo-optimization. - Highlights: • The main materials utilized for fabrication of biomimetic polymers are presented. • MSCs cell-material adhesion mechanism and involved molecules are reviewed. • Surface modifications of polymers in terms of MSC adhesion improving are discussed.

  6. Calibration of the Fluorine, Chlorine and Hydrogen Content of Apatites With the ChemCam LIBS Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meslin, P.-Y.; Cicutto, L.; Forni, O.; Drouet, C.; Rapin, W.; Nachon, M.; Cousin, A.; Blank, J. G.; McCubbin, F. M.; Gasnault, O.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Determining the composition of apatites is important to understand the behavior of volatiles during planetary differentiation. Apatite is an ubiquitous magmatic mineral in the SNC meteorites. It is a significant reservoir of halogens in these meteorites and has been used to estimate the halogen budget of Mars. Apatites have been identified in sandstones and pebbles at Gale crater by ChemCam, a Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscometer (LIBS) instrument onboard the Curiosity rover. Their presence was inferred from correlations between calcium, fluorine (using the CaF molecular band centered near 603 nm, whose detection limit is much lower that atomic or ionic lines and, in some cases, phosphorus (whose detection limit is much larger). An initial quantification of fluorine, based on fluorite (CaF2)/basalt mixtures and obtained at the LANL laboratory, indicated that the excess of F/Ca (compared to the stoichiometry of pure fluorapatites) found on Mars in some cases could be explained by the presence of fluorite. Chlorine was not detected in these targets, at least above a detection limit of 0.6 wt% estimated from. Fluorapatite was later also detected by X-ray diffraction (with CheMin) at a level of approx.1wt% in the Windjana drill sample (Kimberley area), and several points analyzed by ChemCam in this area also revealed a correlation between Ca and F. The in situ detection of F-rich, Cl-poor apatites contrasts with the Cl-rich, F-poor compositions of apatites found in basaltic shergottites and in gabbroic clasts from the martian meteorite NWA 7034, which were also found to be more Cl-rich than apatites from basalts on Earth, the Moon, or Vesta. The in situ observations could call into question one of the few possible explanations brought forward to explain the SNC results, namely that Mars may be highly depleted in fluorine. The purpose of the present study is to refine the calibration of the F, Cl, OH and P signals measured by the ChemCam LIBS instrument, initiated

  7. Geodynamic risk magnitude as an objective indicator of rockburst prevention effectiveness (in terms of apatite mines in Khibiny)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotova Panin, YuV, VI

    2018-03-01

    The results of the statistical retrospective analysis of the officially recorded geodynamic events in mines of Apatit Company within the Khibiny Massif are presented. The risks and aftereffects of geodynamic events have been calculated. Under discussion are the results of three calculation variants taking into account the scale of human impact on rock mass. The analysis shows that the main damage due to geodynamic events is different-degree destruction of mine workings while the remaining aftereffects account for less than ten percent. That is, the geodynamic risk in apatite mines can be identified as technological.

  8. Effect of Artificial Saliva on the Apatite Structure of Eroded Enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.; Mihailova, B.; Heidrich, S.; Bismayer, U.; Wang, X.; Klocke, A.; Klocke, A.

    2011-01-01

    Citric acid-induced changes in the structure of the mineral component of enamel stored in artificial saliva were studied by attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy as well as complementary electron probe microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate that the application of artificial saliva for several hours (the minimum time period proved is 4 h) leads to slight, partial recovering of the local structure of eroded enamel apatite. However, artificial saliva surrounding cannot stop the process of loosening and breaking of P-O-Ca atomic linkages in enamel subjected to multiple citric acid treatments. Irreversible changes in the atomic bonding within 700 nm thick enamel surface layer are observed after three times exposure for 1 min to aqueous solution of citric acid having a ph value of 2.23, with a 24-hour interval between the individual treatments. The additional treatment with basic fluoride-containing solutions (1.0% NaF) did not demonstrate a protective effect on the enamel apatite structure per se.

  9. Highly porous polymer-derived wollastonite-hydroxycarbonate apatite ceramics for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocco, L; Li, S; Bernardo, E; Stevens, M M; Jones, J R

    2016-04-12

    A novel strategy was employed to synthesize highly porous wollastonite-hydroxycarbonate apatite ceramic scaffolds for bone regeneration. A commercial liquid preceramic polymer filled with micro-CaCO3 powders was foamed at low temperature (at 350 °C), using the decomposition of a hydrazine additive, and then converted into ceramic by a treatment at 700 °C. Hydroxycarbonate apatite was later developed by a phosphatization treatment of ceramized foams, in a P-rich solution, while wollastonite was obtained by a second firing, at 900 °C. The effectiveness of the method was proven by x-ray diffraction analysis, showing the presence of the two expected crystalline phases. Porosity, interconnect size distribution and mechanical strength were in the range that is thought to be suitable for bone regeneration in non-load bearing sites (compressive strength ≈ 3 MPa, porosity ≈ 90%, modal interconnect diameter ≈ 130-160 μm). In addition, bioactivity and ion release rate were assessed in simulated body fluid (SBF). MC3T3 osteoblast precursor cells were able to colonize the material in vitro through the pore architecture and expressed osteogenic markers.

  10. Preparation and biocompatibility evaluation of apatite/wollastonite-derived porous bioactive glass ceramic scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hua; Ye Xiaojian; Li Jiashun

    2009-01-01

    An apatite/wollastonite-derived (A/W) porous glass ceramic scaffold with highly interconnected pores was successfully fabricated by adding a plastic porosifier. The morphology, porosity and mechanical strength were characterized. The results showed that the glass ceramic scaffold with controllable pore size and porosity displayed open macropores. In addition, good in vitro bioactivity was found for the scaffold obtained by soaking it in simulated body fluid. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were cultured, expanded and seeded on the scaffold, and the adhesion and proliferation of MSCs were determined using MTT assay and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The results revealed that the scaffold was biocompatible and had no negative effects on the MSCs in vitro. The in vivo biocompatibility and osteogenicity were investigated by implanting both the pure scaffold and the MSC/scaffold construct in rabbit mandibles and studying histologically. The results showed that the glass ceramic scaffold exhibited good biocompatibility and osteoconductivity. Moreover, the introduction of MSCs into the scaffold observably improved the efficiency of new bone formation, especially at the initial stage after implantation. However, the glass ceramic scaffold showed the same good biocompatibility and osteogenicity as the hybrid one at the later stage. These results indicate that porous bioactive scaffolds based on the original apatite-wollastonite glass ceramic fulfil the basic requirements of a bone tissue engineering scaffold.

  11. Remediation of lead, cadmium and uranium contaminated water and soil by apatite amendment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raicevic, S.; Plecas, I.; Kaludjerovic, T.

    2002-01-01

    During the past years as a consequence of war and some accidents in neighboring countries large areas in Serbia were contaminated by toxic heavy metals, including lead, cadmium and uranium. For example, the concentrations of Pb, Cd, Cu and Cr have been doubled above the allowed maximum value in the Romanian part of the Danube while sediments near the border in Bulgaria have higher concentrations of Pb 3 times, Cu 1400 times and Cd 30 times more than the average long-standing levels. Furthermore, an estimated 10 tons of depleted uranium (DU) was spread mainly throughout the territory of Kosovo. This contamination is a potential source of different chronic diseases including malignant diseases and represents a long-term threat for the population living in the affected areas. For this reason, remediation of contaminated sites represents an urgent need and priority. The standard remediation procedure which includes soil removal, treatment (washing, chelating), conditioning etc. is costly, disruptive and not sustainable. This study was carried out to evaluate apatite from the Lisina deposit as soil amendment for in situ stabilization of toxic heavy metals. Preliminary theoretical and experimentally results presented here point out this natural apatite as an ecological, nontoxic material which can be used for efficient and cost-effective remediation of large areas contaminated with Pb, Cd and U. (author)

  12. Apatite weathering as a geological driver of high uranium concentrations in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banning, Andre; Rüde, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • High groundwater U concentrations occur in a Triassic aquifer of northern Bavaria. • U is hosted by carbonate fluorapatite phases (francolite) in aquifer inclusions. • Distribution of uraniferous facies is congruent with spatial groundwater U pattern. • Carbonate substitution and α-recoil damage from U decay enhance mineral solubility. • Mobilization of U to groundwater occurs during francolite weathering. - Abstract: Uranium is a heavy metal with potential adverse human health effects when consumed via drinking water. Although associated quality regulations have been implemented, geological sources and hydrogeochemical behavior of uranium in groundwater used for drinking water supply remain little understood. This study presents a hydrogeochemical and mineralogical characterization of a Triassic sandstone aquifer on a macro- and micro-scale, and an evaluation of uranium remobilization into groundwater, also considering the paleoenvironment and the distribution of the affected aquifer itself. Syndiagenetic uraniferous carbonate fluorapatite inclusions within the aquifer sandstones (“active arkoses”) were found to show structurally (chemical substitution in the crystal structure) and radiatively (α-recoil damage from uranium decay) enhanced mineral solubility. Extraction experiments indicated that these inclusions release uranium to groundwater during weathering. In conclusion, apatite alteration was identified as the responsible mechanism for widespread groundwater uranium concentrations >10 μg L −1 in the region representing Germany’s most significant problem area in this respect. Therefore, results indicate that the studied sedimentary apatite deposits cause the regional geogenic groundwater uranium problem, and must be considered as potential uranium sources in comparable areas worldwide

  13. Mechanism and Kinetics for the Dissolution of Apatitic Materials in Acid Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calmanovici C.E.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract - This work concerns the study of the digestion step in the production process of phosphoric acid. Some qualitative experiments indicate that the difference between the pH at the surface of the phosphate and that in the bulk of the solution is negligible and that the dissolution is controlled by diffusion of products away from the phosphate particle. In further experiments, to isolate the dissolution phenomenon from the formation of calcium sulfate, the sulfuric acid normally used industrially is replaced by hydrochloric acid. The phosphate material used in our experiments is a model apatitic material: synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAP. The dissolution of calcium hydroxyapatite was studied with increasing amounts of calcium and phosphate at different temperatures. A simple method was developed for this observation based on the time required for complete dissolution of the HAP powder. The results confirm that the dissolution is controlled by a diffusional process through an interface of calcium and phosphate ions released from the solid surface. A kinetic model for the dissolution of apatitic materials is proposed which assumes a shrinking particle behaviour controlled by diffusion of calcium ions. The experimental results are fitted to this model to determine the mass transfer constant for HAP dissolution in acid solutions. The activation energy of the reaction is about 14kJ/mol. This study was carried on in conditions similar to the industrial ones for the production of phosphoric acid by the dihydrate-process

  14. Apatite metaprism twist angle ( φ) as a tool for crystallochemical diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S. C.; Baikie, Tom; Pramana, Stevin S.; Smith, Ron; White, T. J.

    2011-11-01

    [ AI] 4[ AII] 6( BO 4) 6X2 apatites can flexibly accommodate numerous cationic, metalloid and anionic substitutions. Using a combination of new refinements and published structures, this paper reviews correlations between substituent type and framework adaptation through adjustment of the AIO 6 metaprism twist angle, φ. These systematics are illustrated through powder neutron diffraction refinement of the crystal chemistry of A10(PO 4) 6F 2 ( A=Ca, Sr) fluorapatites. Variations in φ reflect changes in the relative size of the AI4( BO 4) 6 framework and AII6X2 tunnel content and can be used to quantitatively assess the reliability of AI/ AII cation partitioning coefficients determined by Rietveld analysis. In the simplest cases of bi-ionic substitution, the metaprism twist systematics conform to three principle trends For A-type divalent substitution, the larger A2 + species preferentially enters the channel before partitioning to the framework. This leads to parabolic modification in φ across the compositional series; For B-type pentavalent compounds, the φ variation will be linear in accord with the relative B5+ ionic size; and For X-type substitution of halide anions, φ will be reduced as the average size increases. Departures from these trends may indicate polymorphism, compositional anomalies, AI/AII order disequilibrium, or poor structure refinement, and may be extended to chemically complex apatites with simultaneous substitutions over the A, B and X sites.

  15. Cellular Adaptation: Culture conditions of R. opacus and bioflotation of apatite and quartz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Gutiérrez Merma

    Full Text Available Abstract It is well known that the culture conditions of microorganisms may affect their surface properties, zeta potential and hydrophobicity via the modification of the cell wall functional groups or metabolic products. The R. opacus bacteria strain was separately adapted to the presence of apatite and quartz, after which a cellular adaptation procedure was developed by repeated sub-culturing with a successive increase in the mineral content. Zeta potential, surface tension, FTIR and microflotation studies were used to evaluate the behavior of the cells that were developed under defined culture conditions. The cellular adaptation induced a modification of the bacterial surface charge. The FTIR results showed a modification of its functional groups. The surface tension results suggested that longer growing time promoted a higher production of metabolites. The use of mineral-adapted cells promoted an improvement in the flotability of both minerals, but it was more significant for apatite flotation. Additionally, the mineral flotability remained unchanged when the cells developed under a longer culture time. Nevertheless, there was a reduction in the surface tension.

  16. Nanodimensional and Nanocrystalline Apatites and Other Calcium Orthophosphates in Biomedical Engineering, Biology and Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Dorozhkin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in biomineralization have already demonstrated that nanosized particles play an important role in the formation of hard tissues of animals. Namely, the basic inorganic building blocks of bones and teeth of mammals are nanodimensional and nanocrystalline calcium orthophosphates (in the form of apatites of a biological origin. In mammals, tens to hundreds nanocrystals of a biological apatite were found to be combined into self-assembled structures under the control of various bioorganic matrixes. In addition, the structures of both dental enamel and bones could be mimicked by an oriented aggregation of nanosized calcium orthophosphates, determined by the biomolecules. The application and prospective use of nanodimensional and nanocrystalline calcium orthophosphates for a clinical repair of damaged bones and teeth are also known. For example, a greater viability and a better proliferation of various types of cells were detected on smaller crystals of calcium orthophosphates. Thus, the nanodimensional and nanocrystalline forms of calcium orthophosphates have a great potential to revolutionize the field of hard tissue engineering starting from bone repair and augmentation to the controlled drug delivery devices. This paper reviews current state of knowledge and recent developments of this subject starting from the synthesis and characterization to biomedical and clinical applications. More to the point, this review provides possible directions of future research and development.

  17. Effect of Artificial Saliva on the Apatite Structure of Eroded Enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojie Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Citric acid-induced changes in the structure of the mineral component of enamel stored in artificial saliva were studied by attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy as well as complementary electron probe microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate that the application of artificial saliva for several hours (the minimum time period proved is 4 h leads to slight, partial recovering of the local structure of eroded enamel apatite. However, artificial saliva surrounding cannot stop the process of loosening and breaking of P–O–Ca atomic linkages in enamel subjected to multiple citric acid treatments. Irreversible changes in the atomic bonding within 700 nm thick enamel surface layer are observed after three times exposure for 1 min to aqueous solution of citric acid having a pH value of 2.23, with a 24-hour interval between the individual treatments. The additional treatment with basic fluoride-containing solutions (1.0% NaF did not demonstrate a protective effect on the enamel apatite structure per se.

  18. In-situ Strontium Isotopes Analysis on Single Conodont Apatite by LA-MC-ICP-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L.; Zhang, L.; Chen, Z. Q.; Ma, D.; Qiu, H.; Lv, Z.; Hu, Z.; Wang, F.

    2014-12-01

    Strontium isotope played an important role in stratigraphic chronology and sedimentary geochemistry research (McArthur et al., 2001). Conodonts is a kind of extinct species of marine animals and widely distributed in marine sediments all over the world. Rich in radiogenic Sr contents and difficulty to be affected during diagenesis alteration makes conodonts a good choice in seawater Sr isotope composition studies (John et al., 2008). Conodont samples were collected from 24th to 39th layer across Permian-Triassic boundary at Meishan D section (GSSP), Zhejiang Province, South China (Yin et al., 2001). Conodonts was originated from fresh limestone and only conodont elements with CAIextinction events during the Permian-Triassic transition. Our study also makes is possible for high resolution 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio testing on the single conodont apatite and riched the in-situ studies on the conodont apatite, which of great significance for the future conodont Sr isotope research (Zhao et al., 2009; Zhao et al., 2013). Keywords: Conodonts, Strontium isotope, LA-MC-ICP-MS, Permian-Triassic transition, Meishan D section [1] John et al., 2008 3P[2] McArthur et al., 2001 J. of Geology [3] Yin et al., 2001 Episodes [4] Zhao et al., 2009 Earth Science J. of CUG [5] Zhao et al., 2013 GPC.

  19. Sorption behavior of Zn(II) ions on synthetic apatitic calcium phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebei, Haroun; Pham Minh, Doan; Nzihou, Ange; Sharrock, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    The synthesis, characterization and the reactivity of apatitic calcium phosphates (Ca-HA, chemical formula Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) is reported. Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate (KH2PO4) were selected as economical starting materials for the synthesis of Ca-HA under atmospheric conditions. Monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM), dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), and octacalcium phosphate pentahydrate (OCP) were identified as the main intermediates of the synthesis reaction. The product obtained after 48 h of reaction contains mainly low-crystalline Ca-HA and small amounts of other calcium phosphates such as octacalcium phosphate (OCP), B-type carbonate apatite (CAP), as well as unreacted calcium carbonate. This Ca-HA was found to be active for the removal of Zn2+ from an aqueous solution. Its sorption capacity reached up to 120 mg of Zn2+ per g of Ca-HA powder after 24 h of reaction. The monitoring of soluble Zn, Ca and P during the sorption experiment allowed characterizing the mechanism of Zn uptake. Dissolution-precipitation, ionic exchange and surface complexation are the three main mechanisms involved in the sorption processes. The contribution of these mechanisms is discussed in detail.

  20. Protein release parameters estimated with a flow system on zinc-containing apatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inaba, M; Kanno, T; Tada, K; Horiuchi, J [Department Biotechnology and Environmental Chemistry, Kitami Institute of Technology, 165 Koen-cho, Kitami 090-8507, Hokkaido Pref. (Japan); Akazawa, T; Itabashi, K, E-mail: kannotr@mail.kitami-it.ac.jp [Hokkaido Industrial Research Institute, Nishi-11 Kita-19, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0819, Hokkaido Pref. (Japan)

    2011-10-29

    Adsorption and desorption properties of proteins on zinc-containing apatite were successively monitored with a newly-developed flow system, and sustained-release ability of the apatite with different zinc contents was evaluated using protein release parameters we suggested. Three sustained-release parameters; initial desorption rate (r{sub init}), time of desorption-completed (T{sub des}), and desorption constant (k{sub d}) were estimated with graphical analysis of dynamic desorption curves in a flow of 20 mM phosphate-buffered solution (PBS). Bovine serum albumin (BSA) of isoelectric point (pI) 4.8 and egg white lysozyme (LSZ) of pI 11.2 were employed as model protein drugs. Incorporation of zinc into hydroxyapatite changed desorption responses of the proteins. Zn(0.15), where the number in parentheses denoted the preparing molar ratio of Zn/Ca, showed the most sustained-release ability: less r{sub init}, longer T{sub des}, and smaller k{sub d}. Furthermore, the adsorbed amounts of the proteins for Zn(0.15) were 1.5 {approx} 4 times larger than Zn(0), which suggested that Zn(0.15) would be promising as a sustained-release carrier of protein drugs.