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Sample records for nanoscale ag assemblies

  1. New insights into micro/nanoscale combined probes (nanoAuger, μXPS) to characterize Ag/Au@SiO2 core-shell assemblies

    Ledeuil, J. B.; Uhart, A.; Soulé, S.; Allouche, J.; Dupin, J. C.; Martinez, H.

    2014-09-01

    This work has examined the elemental distribution and local morphology at the nanoscale of core@shell Ag/Au@SiO2 particles. The characterization of such complex metal/insulator materials becomes more efficient when using an initial cross-section method of preparation of the core@shell nanoparticles (ion milling cross polisher). The originality of this route of preparation allows one to obtain undamaged, well-defined and planar layers of cross-cut nano-objects. Once combined with high-resolution techniques of characterization (XPS, Auger and SEM), the process appears as a powerful way to minimize charging effects and enhance the outcoming electron signal (potentially affected by the topography of the material) during analysis. SEM experiments have unambiguously revealed the hollow-morphology of the metal core, while Auger spectroscopy observations showed chemical heterogeneity within the particles (as silver and gold are randomly found in the core ring). To our knowledge, this is the first time that Auger nano probe spectroscopy has been used and successfully optimized for the study of some complex metal/inorganic interfaces at such a high degree of resolution (~12 nm). Complementarily, XPS Au 4f and Ag 3d peaks were finally detected attesting the possibility of access to the whole chemistry of such nanostructured assemblies.This work has examined the elemental distribution and local morphology at the nanoscale of core@shell Ag/Au@SiO2 particles. The characterization of such complex metal/insulator materials becomes more efficient when using an initial cross-section method of preparation of the core@shell nanoparticles (ion milling cross polisher). The originality of this route of preparation allows one to obtain undamaged, well-defined and planar layers of cross-cut nano-objects. Once combined with high-resolution techniques of characterization (XPS, Auger and SEM), the process appears as a powerful way to minimize charging effects and enhance the outcoming

  2. Programmed assembly of nanoscale structures using peptoids.

    Ren, Jianhua (University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA); Russell, Scott (California State University, Stanislaus, Turlock, CA); Morishetti, Kiran (University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA); Robinson, David B.; Zuckermann, Ronald N. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Buffleben, George M.; Hjelm, Rex P. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Kent, Michael Stuart (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-02-01

    Sequence-specific polymers are the basis of the most promising approaches to bottom-up programmed assembly of nanoscale materials. Examples include artificial peptides and nucleic acids. Another class is oligo(N-functional glycine)s, also known as peptoids, which permit greater sidegroup diversity and conformational control, and can be easier to synthesize and purify. We have developed a set of peptoids that can be used to make inorganic nanoparticles more compatible with biological sequence-specific polymers so that they can be incorporated into nucleic acid or other biologically based nanostructures. Peptoids offer degrees of modularity, versatility, and predictability that equal or exceed other sequence-specific polymers, allowing for rational design of oligomers for a specific purpose. This degree of control will be essential to the development of arbitrarily designed nanoscale structures.

  3. Enabling complex nanoscale pattern customization using directed self-assembly.

    Doerk, Gregory S; Cheng, Joy Y; Singh, Gurpreet; Rettner, Charles T; Pitera, Jed W; Balakrishnan, Srinivasan; Arellano, Noel; Sanders, Daniel P

    2014-12-16

    Block copolymer directed self-assembly is an attractive method to fabricate highly uniform nanoscale features for various technological applications, but the dense periodicity of block copolymer features limits the complexity of the resulting patterns and their potential utility. Therefore, customizability of nanoscale patterns has been a long-standing goal for using directed self-assembly in device fabrication. Here we show that a hybrid organic/inorganic chemical pattern serves as a guiding pattern for self-assembly as well as a self-aligned mask for pattern customization through cotransfer of aligned block copolymer features and an inorganic prepattern. As informed by a phenomenological model, deliberate process engineering is implemented to maintain global alignment of block copolymer features over arbitrarily shaped, 'masking' features incorporated into the chemical patterns. These hybrid chemical patterns with embedded customization information enable deterministic, complex two-dimensional nanoscale pattern customization through directed self-assembly.

  4. Nanoscale Assembly of Actuating Cilia-Mimetic

    Baird, Lance; Breidenich, Jennifer; Land, Bruce; Hayes, Allen; Benkoski, Jason; Keng, Pei; Pyun, Jeffrey

    2009-03-01

    The cilium is among the smallest mechanical actuators found in nature. We have taken inspiration from this design to create magnetic nanochains, measuring approximately 1-5 μm long and 25 nm in diameter. Fabricated from the self-assembly of cobalt nanoparticles, these flexible filaments actuate in an oscillating magnetic field. The cobalt nanoparticles were functionalized with a polystyrene/benzaldehyde surface coating, thus allowing the particles to form imine bonds with one another in the presence of a diamine terminated polyethylene glycol. These imine bonds effectively cross-linked the particles and held the nanochains together in the absence of a magnetic field. Using design of experiments (DOE) to efficiently screen the effects of cobalt nanoparticle concentration, crosslinker concentration, and surface chemistry, we determined that the morphology of the final structures could be explained primarily by physical interactions (i.e. magnetic forces) rather than chemistry.

  5. Self-assembly from milli- to nanoscales: methods and applications

    Mastrangeli, M; Celis, J-P; Abbasi, S; Varel, C; Böhringer, K F; Van Hoof, C

    2009-01-01

    The design and fabrication techniques for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and nanodevices are progressing rapidly. However, due to material and process flow incompatibilities in the fabrication of sensors, actuators and electronic circuitry, a final packaging step is often necessary to integrate all components of a heterogeneous microsystem on a common substrate. Robotic pick-and-place, although accurate and reliable at larger scales, is a serial process that downscales unfavorably due to stiction problems, fragility and sheer number of components. Self-assembly, on the other hand, is parallel and can be used for device sizes ranging from millimeters to nanometers. In this review, the state-of-the-art in methods and applications for self-assembly is reviewed. Methods for assembling three-dimensional (3D) MEMS structures out of two-dimensional (2D) ones are described. The use of capillary forces for folding 2D plates into 3D structures, as well as assembling parts onto a common substrate or aggregating parts to each other into 2D or 3D structures, is discussed. Shape matching and guided assembly by magnetic forces and electric fields are also reviewed. Finally, colloidal self-assembly and DNA-based self-assembly, mainly used at the nanoscale, are surveyed, and aspects of theoretical modeling of stochastic assembly processes are discussed. (topical review)

  6. Physical controls on directed virus assembly at nanoscale chemical templates

    Cheung, C L; Chung, S; Chatterji, A; Lin, T; Johnson, J E; Hok, S; Perkins, J; De Yoreo, J

    2006-01-01

    Viruses are attractive building blocks for nanoscale heterostructures, but little is understood about the physical principles governing their directed assembly. In-situ force microscopy was used to investigate organization of Cowpea Mosaic Virus engineered to bind specifically and reversibly at nanoscale chemical templates with sub-30nm features. Morphological evolution and assembly kinetics were measured as virus flux and inter-viral potential were varied. The resulting morphologies were similar to those of atomic-scale epitaxial systems, but the underlying thermodynamics was analogous to that of colloidal systems in confined geometries. The 1D templates biased the location of initial cluster formation, introduced asymmetric sticking probabilities, and drove 1D and 2D condensation at subcritical volume fractions. The growth kinetics followed a t 1/2 law controlled by the slow diffusion of viruses. The lateral expansion of virus clusters that initially form on the 1D templates following introduction of polyethylene glycol (PEG) into the solution suggests a significant role for weak interaction

  7. Self-assembled domain structures: From micro- to nanoscale

    Vladimir Shur

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent achievements in studying the self-assembled evolution of micro- and nanoscale domain structures in uniaxial single crystalline ferroelectrics lithium niobate and lithium tantalate have been reviewed. The results obtained by visualization of static domain patterns and kinetics of the domain structure by different methods from common optical microscopy to more sophisticated scanning probe microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman microscopy, have been discussed. The kinetic approach based on various nucleation processes similar to the first-order phase transition was used for explanation of the domain structure evolution scenarios. The main mechanisms of self-assembling for nonequilibrium switching conditions caused by screening ineffectiveness including correlated nucleation, domain growth anisotropy, and domain–domain interaction have been considered. The formation of variety of self-assembled domain patterns such as fractal-type, finger and web structures, broad domain boundaries, and dendrites have been revealed at each of all five stages of domain structure evolution during polarization reversal. The possible applications of self-assembling for micro- and nanodomain engineering were reviewed briefly. The review covers mostly the results published by our research group.

  8. Forces that Drive Nanoscale Self-assembly on Solid Surfaces

    Suo, Z.; Lu, W.

    2000-01-01

    Experimental evidence has accumulated in the recent decade that nanoscale patterns can self-assemble on solid surfaces. A two-component monolayer grown on a solid surface may separate into distinct phases. Sometimes the phases select sizes about 10 nm, and order into an array of stripes or disks. This paper reviews a model that accounts for these behaviors. Attention is focused on thermodynamic forces that drive the self-assembly. A double-welled, composition-dependent free energy drives phase separation. The phase boundary energy drives phase coarsening. The concentration-dependent surface stress drives phase refining. It is the competition between the coarsening and the refining that leads to size selection and spatial ordering. These thermodynamic forces are embodied in a nonlinear diffusion equation. Numerical simulations reveal rich dynamics of the pattern formation process. It is relatively fast for the phases to separate and select a uniform size, but exceedingly slow to order over a long distance, unless the symmetry is suitably broken

  9. The fabrication of Ag nanoflake arrays via self-assembly on the surface of an anodic aluminum oxide template

    Li Xueming; Dong Kun; Tang Libin; Wu, Yongjun; Yang Peizhi; Zhang Pengxiang

    2010-01-01

    Vertical-aligned Ag nanoflake arrays are fabricated on the surface of an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template under a hydrothermal condition for the first time. The porous surface of AAO templates and the precursor solution may play key roles in the process of fabricating Ag nanoflakes. The rim of pores can provide many active sites for nucleation and growth, and then nanoflake arrays gradually form through self-assembly of Ag on the surface of AAO membranes. The product is characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and a growth mechanism of nanoflake is deduced. This work demonstrates that it is possible to make ordered nanoarrays without dissolving templates using the hydrothermal method, and this interesting Ag nanoflake arrays may provide a wider range of nanoscale applications.

  10. The fabrication of Ag nanoflake arrays via self-assembly on the surface of an anodic aluminum oxide template

    Li, Xueming; Dong, Kun; Tang, Libin; Wu, Yongjun; Yang, Peizhi; Zhang, Pengxiang

    2010-02-01

    Vertical-aligned Ag nanoflake arrays are fabricated on the surface of an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template under a hydrothermal condition for the first time. The porous surface of AAO templates and the precursor solution may play key roles in the process of fabricating Ag nanoflakes. The rim of pores can provide many active sites for nucleation and growth, and then nanoflake arrays gradually form through self-assembly of Ag on the surface of AAO membranes. The product is characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and a growth mechanism of nanoflake is deduced. This work demonstrates that it is possible to make ordered nanoarrays without dissolving templates using the hydrothermal method, and this interesting Ag nanoflake arrays may provide a wider range of nanoscale applications.

  11. Vortex pinning in superconductors laterally modulated by nanoscale self-assembled arrays

    Vanacken, J.; Vinckx, W.; Moshchalkov, V.V.

    2008-01-01

    Being the exponent of the so-called "bottom-up" approach, self-assembled structures are now-a-days attracting a lot of attention in the fields of science and technology. In this work, we show that nanoscale self-assembled arrays used as templates can provide periodic modulation in superconducting...

  12. Nanoscale control of Ag nanostructures for plasmonic fluorescence enhancement of near-infrared dyes

    Xie, Fang

    2013-05-23

    Potential utilization of proteins for early detection and diagnosis of various diseases has drawn considerable interest in the development of protein-based detection techniques. Metal induced fluorescence enhancement offers the possibility of increasing the sensitivity of protein detection in clinical applications. We report the use of tunable plasmonic silver nanostructures for the fluorescence enhancement of a near-infrared (NIR) dye (Alexa Fluor 790). Extensive fluorescence enhancement of ∼2 orders of magnitude is obtained by the nanoscale control of the Ag nanostructure dimensions and interparticle distance. These Ag nanostructures also enhanced fluorescence from a dye with very high quantum yield (7.8 fold for Alexa Fluor 488, quantum efficiency (Qy) = 0.92). A combination of greatly enhanced excitation and an increased radiative decay rate, leading to an associated enhancement of the quantum efficiency leads to the large enhancement. These results show the potential of Ag nanostructures as metal induced fluorescence enhancement (MIFE) substrates for dyes in the NIR "biological window" as well as the visible region. Ag nanostructured arrays fabricated by colloidal lithography thus show great potential for NIR dye-based biosensing applications. [Figure not available: see fulltext.] © 2013 Tsinghua University Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  13. DNA origami as a nanoscale template for protein assembly

    Kuzyk, Anton; Laitinen, Kimmo T [Nanoscience Center, Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, PO Box 35, FIN-40014 (Finland); Toermae, Paeivi [Department of Applied Physics, Helsinki University of Technology, PO Box 5100, FIN-02015 (Finland)], E-mail: paivi.torma@hut.fi

    2009-06-10

    We describe two general approaches to the utilization of DNA origami structures for the assembly of materials. In one approach, DNA origami is used as a prefabricated template for subsequent assembly of materials. In the other, materials are assembled simultaneously with the DNA origami, i.e. the DNA origami technique is used to drive the assembly of materials. Fabrication of complex protein structures is demonstrated by these two approaches. The latter approach has the potential to be extended to the assembly of multiple materials with single attachment chemistry.

  14. DNA origami as a nanoscale template for protein assembly

    Kuzyk, Anton; Laitinen, Kimmo T; Toermae, Paeivi

    2009-01-01

    We describe two general approaches to the utilization of DNA origami structures for the assembly of materials. In one approach, DNA origami is used as a prefabricated template for subsequent assembly of materials. In the other, materials are assembled simultaneously with the DNA origami, i.e. the DNA origami technique is used to drive the assembly of materials. Fabrication of complex protein structures is demonstrated by these two approaches. The latter approach has the potential to be extended to the assembly of multiple materials with single attachment chemistry.

  15. Nanoscale protein arrays of rich morphologies via self-assembly on chemically treated diblock copolymer surfaces

    Song Sheng; Milchak, Marissa; Zhou Hebing; Lee, Thomas; Hanscom, Mark; Hahm, Jong-in

    2013-01-01

    Well-controlled assembly of proteins on supramolecular templates of block copolymers can be extremely useful for high-throughput biodetection. We report the adsorption and assembly characteristics of a model antibody protein to various polystyrene-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) templates whose distinctive nanoscale structures are obtained through time-regulated exposure to chloroform vapor. The strong adsorption preference of the protein to the polystyrene segment in the diblock copolymer templates leads to an easily predictable, controllable, rich set of nanoscale protein morphologies through self-assembly. We also demonstrate that the chemical identities of various subareas within individual nanostructures can be readily elucidated by investigating the corresponding protein adsorption behavior on each chemically distinct area of the template. In our approach, a rich set of intricate nanoscale morphologies of protein arrays that cannot be easily attained through other means can be generated straightforwardly via self-assembly of proteins on chemically treated diblock copolymer surfaces, without the use of clean-room-based fabrication tools. Our approach provides much-needed flexibility and versatility for the use of block copolymer-based protein arrays in biodetection. The ease of fabrication in producing well-defined and self-assembled templates can contribute to a high degree of versatility and simplicity in acquiring an intricate nanoscale geometry and spatial distribution of proteins in arrays. These advantages can be extremely beneficial both for fundamental research and biomedical detection, especially in the areas of solid-state-based, high-throughput protein sensing. (paper)

  16. Self-assembly of nanoscale particles with biosurfactants and membrane scaffold proteins.

    Faas, Ramona; Pohle, Annelie; Moß, Karin; Henkel, Marius; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2017-12-01

    Nanodiscs are membrane mimetics which may be used as tools for biochemical and biophysical studies of a variety of membrane proteins. These nanoscale structures are composed of a phospholipid bilayer held together by an amphipathic membrane scaffold protein (MSP). In the past, nanodiscs were successfully assembled with membrane scaffold protein 1D1 and 1,2-dipalmitoyl- sn -glycero-3-phosphorylcholine with a homogeneous diameter of ∼10 nm. In this study, the formation of nanoscale particles from MSP1D1 and rhamnolipid biosurfactants is investigated. Different protein to lipid ratios of 1:80, 1:90 and 1:100 were used for the assembly reaction, which were consecutively separated, purified and analyzed by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Size distributions were measured to determine homogeneity and confirm size dimensions. In this study, first evidence is presented on the formation of nanoscale particles with rhamnolipid biosurfactants and membrane scaffold proteins.

  17. Neural assembly models derived through nano-scale measurements.

    Fan, Hongyou; Branda, Catherine; Schiek, Richard Louis; Warrender, Christina E.; Forsythe, James Chris

    2009-09-01

    This report summarizes accomplishments of a three-year project focused on developing technical capabilities for measuring and modeling neuronal processes at the nanoscale. It was successfully demonstrated that nanoprobes could be engineered that were biocompatible, and could be biofunctionalized, that responded within the range of voltages typically associated with a neuronal action potential. Furthermore, the Xyce parallel circuit simulator was employed and models incorporated for simulating the ion channel and cable properties of neuronal membranes. The ultimate objective of the project had been to employ nanoprobes in vivo, with the nematode C elegans, and derive a simulation based on the resulting data. Techniques were developed allowing the nanoprobes to be injected into the nematode and the neuronal response recorded. To the authors's knowledge, this is the first occasion in which nanoparticles have been successfully employed as probes for recording neuronal response in an in vivo animal experimental protocol.

  18. Nanoscale clusters in the high performance thermoelectric AgPb{sub m}SbTe{sub m+2}

    Lin, H; Bozin, E S; Billinge, S J.L.; Quarez, Eric; Kanatzidis, M G [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2005-11-01

    The local structure of the AgPb{sub m}SbTe{sub m+2} series of thermoelectric materials has been studied using the atomic pair distribution function (PDF) method. Three candidate-models were attempted for the structure of this class of materials using either a one- or a two-phase modeling procedure. Combining modeling the PDF with HRTEM data we show that AgPb{sub m}SbTe{sub m+2} contains nanoscale inclusions with composition close to AgPb{sub 3}SbTe{sub 5} randomly embedded in a PbTe matrix.

  19. Deterministic assembly of linear gold nanorod chains as a platform for nanoscale applications

    Rey, Antje; Billardon, Guillaume; Loertscher, Emanuel

    2013-01-01

    target substrate, thus establishing a platform for a variety of nanoscale electronic and optical applications ranging from molecular electronics to optical and plasmonic devices. As a first example, electrical measurements are performed on contacted gold nanorod chains before and after their immersion......We demonstrate a method to assemble gold nanorods highly deterministically into a chain formation by means of directed capillary assembly. This way we achieved straight chains consisting of end-to-end aligned gold nanorods assembled in one specific direction with well-controlled gaps of similar...... to 6 nm between the individual constituents. We determined the conditions for optimum quality and yield of nanorod chain assembly by investigating the influence of template dimensions and assembly temperature. In addition, we transferred the gold nanorod chains from the assembly template onto a Si/SiO2...

  20. Cluster-assembled cubic zirconia films with tunable and stable nanoscale morphology against thermal annealing

    Borghi, F.; Lenardi, C.; Podestà, A.; Milani, P., E-mail: pmilani@mi.infn.it [CIMAINA and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Sogne, E. [CIMAINA and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); European School of Molecular Medicine (SEMM), IFOM-IEO, Milano (Italy); Merlini, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra “Ardito Desio”, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Mangiagalli 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Ducati, C. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-07

    Nanostructured zirconium dioxide (zirconia) films are very promising for catalysis and biotechnological applications: a precise control of the interfacial properties of the material at different length scales and, in particular, at the nanoscale, is therefore necessary. Here, we present the characterization of cluster-assembled zirconia films produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition possessing cubic structure at room temperature and controlled nanoscale morphology. We characterized the effect of thermal annealing in reducing and oxidizing conditions on the crystalline structure, grain dimensions, and topography. We highlight the mechanisms of film growth and phase transitions, which determine the observed interfacial morphological properties and their resilience against thermal treatments.

  1. Cluster-assembled cubic zirconia films with tunable and stable nanoscale morphology against thermal annealing

    Borghi, F.; Lenardi, C.; Podestà, A.; Milani, P.; Sogne, E.; Merlini, M.; Ducati, C.

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured zirconium dioxide (zirconia) films are very promising for catalysis and biotechnological applications: a precise control of the interfacial properties of the material at different length scales and, in particular, at the nanoscale, is therefore necessary. Here, we present the characterization of cluster-assembled zirconia films produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition possessing cubic structure at room temperature and controlled nanoscale morphology. We characterized the effect of thermal annealing in reducing and oxidizing conditions on the crystalline structure, grain dimensions, and topography. We highlight the mechanisms of film growth and phase transitions, which determine the observed interfacial morphological properties and their resilience against thermal treatments.

  2. Cluster-assembled cubic zirconia films with tunable and stable nanoscale morphology against thermal annealing

    Borghi, F.; Sogne, Elisa; Lenardi, C.; Podestà , A.; Merlini, M.; Ducati, C.; Milani, P.

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured zirconium dioxide (zirconia) films are very promising for catalysis and biotechnological applications: a precise control of the interfacial properties of the material at different length scales and, in particular, at the nanoscale, is therefore necessary. Here, we present the characterization of cluster-assembled zirconia films produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition possessing cubic structure at room temperature and controlled nanoscale morphology. We characterized the effect of thermal annealing in reducing and oxidizing conditions on the crystalline structure, grain dimensions, and topography. We highlight the mechanisms of film growth and phase transitions, which determine the observed interfacial morphological properties and their resilience against thermal treatments. Published by AIP Publishing.

  3. Cluster-assembled cubic zirconia films with tunable and stable nanoscale morphology against thermal annealing

    Borghi, F.

    2016-08-05

    Nanostructured zirconium dioxide (zirconia) films are very promising for catalysis and biotechnological applications: a precise control of the interfacial properties of the material at different length scales and, in particular, at the nanoscale, is therefore necessary. Here, we present the characterization of cluster-assembled zirconia films produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition possessing cubic structure at room temperature and controlled nanoscale morphology. We characterized the effect of thermal annealing in reducing and oxidizing conditions on the crystalline structure, grain dimensions, and topography. We highlight the mechanisms of film growth and phase transitions, which determine the observed interfacial morphological properties and their resilience against thermal treatments. Published by AIP Publishing.

  4. The influence of nanoscale morphology on the resistivity of cluster-assembled nanostructured metallic thin films

    Barborini, E; Bertolini, G; Repetto, P; Leccardi, M; Vinati, S; Corbelli, G; Milani, P

    2010-01-01

    We have studied in situ the evolution of the electrical resistivity of Fe, Pd, Nb, W and Mo cluster-assembled films during their growth by supersonic cluster beam deposition. We observed resistivity of cluster-assembled films several orders of magnitude larger than the bulk, as well as an increase in resistivity by increasing the film thickness in contrast to what was observed for atom-assembled metallic films. This suggests that the nanoscale morphological features typical of ballistic films growth, such as the minimal cluster-cluster interconnection and the evolution of surface roughness with thickness, are responsible for the observed behaviour.

  5. Nanoscale assembly of amine-functionalized colloidal iron oxide

    Barick, K.C. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Aslam, M. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Centre for Research in Nanotechnology and Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Prasad, Pottumarthi V. [Department of Radiology, Evanston Northwestern Healthcare, Evanston, IL 60201 (United States); Dravid, Vinayak P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); International Institute for Nanotechnology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)], E-mail: v-dravid@northwestern.edu; Bahadur, Dhirendra [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Centre for Research in Nanotechnology and Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India)], E-mail: dhirenb@iitb.ac.in

    2009-05-15

    We demonstrate a single-step facile approach for highly water-stable assembly of amine-functionalized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles using thermal decomposition of Fe-chloride precursors in ethylene glycol medium in the presence of ethylenediamine. The average size of nanoassemblies is 40{+-}1 nm, wherein the individual nanoparticles are about 6 nm. Amine-functionalized properties are evident from Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), thermal and elemental analyses. The saturation magnetization and spin-echo r{sub 2} of the nanoassemblies were measured to be 64.3 emu/g and 314.6 mM{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The higher value of relaxivity ratio (r{sub 2}/r{sub 1}=143) indicates that nanoassemblies are a promising high-efficiency T2 contrast agent platform.

  6. Nanoscale assembly of amine-functionalized colloidal iron oxide

    Barick, K.C.; Aslam, M.; Prasad, Pottumarthi V.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Bahadur, Dhirendra

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a single-step facile approach for highly water-stable assembly of amine-functionalized Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles using thermal decomposition of Fe-chloride precursors in ethylene glycol medium in the presence of ethylenediamine. The average size of nanoassemblies is 40±1 nm, wherein the individual nanoparticles are about 6 nm. Amine-functionalized properties are evident from Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), thermal and elemental analyses. The saturation magnetization and spin-echo r 2 of the nanoassemblies were measured to be 64.3 emu/g and 314.6 mM -1 s -1 , respectively. The higher value of relaxivity ratio (r 2 /r 1 =143) indicates that nanoassemblies are a promising high-efficiency T2 contrast agent platform.

  7. Nanoscale isoindigo-carriers: self-assembly and tunable properties

    Tatiana N. Pashirova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade isoindigo derivatives have attracted much attention due to their high potential in pharmacy and in the chemistry of materials. In addition, isoindigo derivatives can be modified to form supramolecular structures with tunable morphologies for the use in drug delivery. Amphiphilic long-chain dialkylated isoindigos have the ability to form stable solid nanoparticles via a simple nanoprecipitation technique. Their self-assembly was investigated using tensiometry, dynamic light scattering, spectrophotometry, and fluorometry. The critical association concentrations and aggregate sizes were measured. The hydrophilic–lipophilic balance of alkylated isoindigo derivatives strongly influences aggregate morphology. In the case of short-chain dialkylated isoindigo derivatives, supramolecular polymers of 200 to 700 nm were formed. For long-chain dialkylated isoindigo derivatives, micellar aggregates of 100 to 200 nm were observed. Using micellar surfactant water-soluble forms of monosubstituted 1-hexadecylisoindigo as well as 1,1′-dimethylisoindigo were prepared for the first time. The formation of mixed micellar structures of different types in micellar anionic surfactant solutions (sodium dodecyl sulfate was determined. These findings are of practical importance and are of potential interest for the design of drug delivery systems and new nanomaterials.

  8. Activated Carbon Fibers "Thickly Overgrown" by Ag Nanohair Through Self-Assembly and Rapid Thermal Annealing

    Yan, Xuefeng; Xu, Sijun; Wang, Qiang; Fan, Xuerong

    2017-11-01

    Anisotropic nanomaterial-modified carbon fibers attract increasing attention because of their superior properties over traditional ones. In this study, activated carbon fibers (ACFs) "thickly overgrown" by Ag nanohair were prepared through self-assembly and rapid thermal annealing. Viscose fibers with well-dispersed silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on surfaces were first prepared through self-assembly of hyperbranched poly(amino-amine) (HBPAA)-capped AgNPs on viscose surfaces. HBPAA endowed the AgNP surfaces with negative charges and abundant amino groups, allowing AgNPs to monodispersively self-assemble to fiber surfaces. Ag nanohair-grown ACFs were prepared by sequential pre-oxidation and carbonization. Because the carbonization furnace was open-ended, ACFs are immediately transferrable to the outside of the furnace. Therefore, the Ag liquid adsorbed by ACF pores squeezed out to form Ag nanowires through thermal contraction. FESEM characterization indicated that Ag nanohairs stood on ACF surface and grew from ACF caps. XPS and XRD characterization showed that Ag successfully assembled to fiber surfaces and retained its metallic state even after high-temperature carbonization. TG analysis suggested that Ag nanohair-grown ACFs maintained their excellent thermal stabilities. Finally, the fabricated ACFs showed excellent and durable antibacterial activities, and the developed method may provide a potential strategy for preparing metal nanowire-grown ACFs.

  9. Self-assembly Ag nanoparticle monolayer film as SERS Substrate for pesticide detection

    Zhang, Li, E-mail: zhlisuzh@163.com [School of Chemistry and Life Science, Anhui Key Laboratory of Spin Electron and Nanomaterials (Cultivating Base), Suzhou University, SuZhou 234000 (China)

    2013-04-01

    A self-assembled protocol is introduced to provide effective platforms for the fabrication of ordered Ag nanosized monolayer film. The assembled Ag nanosized monolayer film was characterized using scanning electronic microscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The results show that the assembled SERS substrate own excellent Raman enhancement and reproducibility. The synthesized SERS-active substrate was further used to detect methyl-parathion, and the limitation of detection can reach 10{sup −7} M.

  10. Self-assembly of micro- and nano-scale particles using bio-inspired events

    McNally, H.; Pingle, M.; Lee, S.W.; Guo, D.; Bergstrom, D.E.; Bashir, R.

    2003-01-01

    High sensitivity chemical and biological detection techniques and the development of future electronic systems can greatly benefit from self-assembly processes and techniques. We have approached this challenge using biologically inspired events such as the hybridization of single (ss)- to double-stranded (ds) DNA and the strong affinity between the protein avidin and its associated Vitamin, biotin. Using these molecules, micro-scale polystyrene beads and nano-scale gold particles were assembled with high efficiency on gold patterns and the procedures used for these processes were optimized. The DNA and avidin-biotin complex was also used to demonstrate the attachment of micro-scale silicon islands to each other in a fluid. This work also provides insight into the techniques for the self-assembly of heterogeneous materials

  11. Self-Assembling Biological Springs Force Transducers on the Micron Nanoscale

    Benedek, George [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Casparay, Alfred H. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2016-08-19

    In this project, we are developing a new system for measuring forces within and between nanoscale biological molecules based on mesoscopic springs made of cholesterol helical ribbons. These ribbons self-assemble in a wide variety of complex fluids containing sterol, a mixture of surfactants and water [1] and have spring constants in the range from 0.5 to 500 pN/nm [2-4]. By the end of this project, we have demonstrated that the cholesterol helical ribbons can be used for measuring forces between biological objects and for mapping the strain fields in hydrogels.

  12. Effects of particle size and coating on nanoscale Ag and TiO₂ exposure in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos.

    Osborne, Olivia J; Johnston, Blair D; Moger, Julian; Balousha, Mohammed; Lead, Jamie R; Kudoh, Tetsuhiro; Tyler, Charles R

    2013-12-01

    Manufactured metal (oxide) nanoparticles are entering the aquatic environment with little understanding on their potential health impacts for exposed organisms. Adopting an integrative approach, we investigated effects of particle size and coating on biological responses for two of the most commonly used metal (oxide) nanoscale particles, silver (Ag) and titanium dioxide (TiO₂) in zebrafish embryos. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nominally, 4 nm, 10 nm, 30 nm and 134 nm) had little or no toxicity on the endpoints measured. Ag both in nano form (10 nm and 35 nm) and its larger counterpart (600-1600 nm) induced dose-dependent lethality and morphological defects, occurring predominantly during gastrula stage. Of the silver material tested 10 nm nanoparticles appeared to be the most toxic. Coating Ag nanoparticles with citrate or fulvic acid decreased toxicity significantly. In situ hybridisation analysis identified the yolk syncytial layer (YSL) as a target tissue for Ag-nano toxicity where there was a significant induction of the heavy metal stress response gene, metallothionein 2 (Mt2) at sub-lethal exposures. Coherent Anti-stroke Raman Scattering (CARS) microscopy provided no evidence for silver particles crossing the chorionic membrane in exposed embryos. Collectively, our data suggest that silver ions play a major role in the toxicity of Ag nanoparticles.

  13. Nanoscale assembly of lanthanum silica with dense and porous interfacial structures.

    Ballinger, Benjamin; Motuzas, Julius; Miller, Christopher R; Smart, Simon; Diniz da Costa, João C

    2015-02-03

    This work reports on the nanoscale assembly of hybrid lanthanum oxide and silica structures, which form patterns of interfacial dense and porous networks. It was found that increasing the molar ratio of lanthanum nitrate to tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) in an acid catalysed sol-gel process alters the expected microporous metal oxide silica structure to a predominantly mesoporous structure above a critical lanthanum concentration. This change manifests itself by the formation of a lanthanum silicate phase, which results from the reaction of lanthanum oxide nanoparticles with the silica matrix. This process converts the microporous silica into the denser silicate phase. Above a lanthanum to silica ratio of 0.15, the combination of growth and microporous silica consumption results in the formation of nanoscale hybrid lanthanum oxides, with the inter-nano-domain spacing forming mesoporous volume. As the size of these nano-domains increases with concentration, so does the mesoporous volume. The absence of lanthanum hydroxide (La(OH)3) suggests the formation of La2O3 surrounded by lanthanum silicate.

  14. Nanoscale Electric Characteristics and Oriented Assembly of Halobacterium salinarum Membrane Revealed by Electric Force Microscopy

    Denghua Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purple membranes (PM of the bacteria Halobacterium salinarum are a unique natural membrane where bacteriorhodopsin (BR can convert photon energy and pump protons. Elucidating the electronic properties of biomembranes is critical for revealing biological mechanisms and developing new devices. We report here the electric properties of PMs studied by using multi-functional electric force microscopy (EFM at the nanoscale. The topography, surface potential, and dielectric capacity of PMs were imaged and quantitatively measured in parallel. Two orientations of PMs were identified by EFM because of its high resolution in differentiating electrical characteristics. The extracellular (EC sides were more negative than the cytoplasmic (CP side by 8 mV. The direction of potential difference may facilitate movement of protons across the membrane and thus play important roles in proton pumping. Unlike the side-dependent surface potentials observed in PM, the EFM capacitive response was independent of the side and was measured to be at a dC/dz value of ~5.25 nF/m. Furthermore, by modification of PM with de novo peptides based on peptide-protein interaction, directional oriented PM assembly on silicon substrate was obtained for technical devices. This work develops a new method for studying membrane nanoelectronics and exploring the bioelectric application at the nanoscale.

  15. Assembly and structural analysis of a covalently closed nano-scale DNA cage

    Andersen, Félicie Faucon; Knudsen, Bjarne; Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto De

    2008-01-01

    for investigations of DNA-interacting enzymes. More recently, strategies for synthesis of more complex two-dimensional (2D) and 3D DNA structures have emerged. However, the building of such structures is still in progress and more experiences from different research groups and different fields of expertise...... be described as a nano-scale DNA cage, Hence, in theory it could hold proteins or other bio-molecules to enable their investigation in certain harmful environments or even allow their organization into higher order structures...... The inherent properties of DNA as a stable polymer with unique affinity for partner molecules determined by the specific Watson-Crick base pairing makes it an ideal component in self-assembling structures. This has been exploited for decades in the design of a variety of artificial substrates...

  16. Mapping Nanoscale Hotspots with Single-Molecule Emitters Assembled into Plasmonic Nanocavities Using DNA Origami

    Chikkaraddy, Rohit; Turek, V. A.; Kongsuwan, Nuttawut; Benz, Felix; Carnegie, Cloudy; van de Goor, Tim; de Nijs, Bart; Demetriadou, Angela; Hess, Ortwin; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2018-01-01

    Fabricating nanocavities in which optically-active single quantum emitters are precisely positioned, is crucial for building nanophotonic devices. Here we show that self-assembly based on robust DNA-origami constructs can precisely position single molecules laterally within sub-5nm gaps between plasmonic substrates that support intense optical confinement. By placing single-molecules at the center of a nanocavity, we show modification of the plasmon cavity resonance before and after bleaching the chromophore, and obtain enhancements of $\\geq4\\times10^3$ with high quantum yield ($\\geq50$%). By varying the lateral position of the molecule in the gap, we directly map the spatial profile of the local density of optical states with a resolution of $\\pm1.5$ nm. Our approach introduces a straightforward non-invasive way to measure and quantify confined optical modes on the nanoscale.

  17. Mapping Nanoscale Hotspots with Single-Molecule Emitters Assembled into Plasmonic Nanocavities Using DNA Origami.

    Chikkaraddy, Rohit; Turek, V A; Kongsuwan, Nuttawut; Benz, Felix; Carnegie, Cloudy; van de Goor, Tim; de Nijs, Bart; Demetriadou, Angela; Hess, Ortwin; Keyser, Ulrich F; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2018-01-10

    Fabricating nanocavities in which optically active single quantum emitters are precisely positioned is crucial for building nanophotonic devices. Here we show that self-assembly based on robust DNA-origami constructs can precisely position single molecules laterally within sub-5 nm gaps between plasmonic substrates that support intense optical confinement. By placing single-molecules at the center of a nanocavity, we show modification of the plasmon cavity resonance before and after bleaching the chromophore and obtain enhancements of ≥4 × 10 3 with high quantum yield (≥50%). By varying the lateral position of the molecule in the gap, we directly map the spatial profile of the local density of optical states with a resolution of ±1.5 nm. Our approach introduces a straightforward noninvasive way to measure and quantify confined optical modes on the nanoscale.

  18. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy substrate based on Ag-coated self-assembled polystyrene spheres

    Mikac, Lara; Ivanda, Mile; Gotić, Marijan; Janicki, Vesna; Zorc, Hrvoje; Janči, Tibor; Vidaček, Sanja

    2017-10-01

    The silver (Ag) films were deposited on the monodispersed polystyrene spheres that were drop-coated on hydrophilic glass substrates in order to form a self-assembled 2D monolayer. Thus prepared Ag films over polystyrene nanospheres (AgFONs) were used to record the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of rhodamine 6G (R6G) and pyridine (λex = 514.5 nm). AgFONs were prepared by depositing 120, 180 and 240 nm thick Ag layer on the 1000 nm polystyrene spheres and 80, 120, 160 and 200 nm thick Ag layer on the 350 nm spheres as well as on their mixture (350 + 1000 nm). The silver was deposited by electron beam evaporation technique. The best enhancement of the Raman signal for both test molecules was obtained using 180 nm Ag film deposited on the 1000 nm spheres and using 80 nm Ag film deposited on the 350 nm polystyrene spheres. The lowest detectable concentrations of R6G and pyridine were 10-9 mol L-1 and 1.2 × 10-3 mol L-1, respectively. This study has shown that AgFONs could be regarded as good and reproducible SERS substrate for analytical detection of various organic molecules.

  19. Assembly, characterization and swelling kinetics of Ag nanoparticles in PDMAA-g-PVA hydrogel networks

    Luo Yanling; Wei Qingbo; Xu Feng; Chen Yashao; Fan Lihua; Zhang Changhu

    2009-01-01

    A series of poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide)-g-poly(vinyl alcohol) (PDMAA-g-PVA) graft hydrogel networks were designed and prepared via a free radical polymerization route initiated by a PVA-(NH 4 ) 2 Ce(NO 3 ) 6 redox reaction. Silver nanoparticles with high stability and good distribution behavior have been self-assembled by using these hydrogel networks as a nanoreactor and in situ reducing system. Meanwhile the PDMAA or PVA chains can efficiently act as stabilizing agents for the Ag nanoparticles in that Ag + would form complex via oxygen atom and nitrogen atom, and form weak coordination bonds, thus astricting Ag + . The structure of the PDMAA-g-PVA/Ag was characterized by a Fourier transform infrared spectroscope (FTIR). The morphologies of pure PDMAA-g-PVA hydrogels and PDMAA-g-PVA/Ag nanocomposite ones were observed by a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). TEM micrographs revealed the presence of nearly spherical and well-separated Ag nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 10 to 20 nm, depending on their reduction routes. XRD results showed all relevant Bragg's reflection for crystal structure of Ag nanoparticles. UV-vis studies apparently showed the characteristic surface plasmon band at 410-440 nm for the existence of Ag nanoparticles within the hydrogel matrix. The swelling kinetics demonstrated that the transport mechanism belongs to non-Fickian mode for the PDMAA-g-PVA hydrogels and PDMAA-g-PVA/Ag nanocomposite ones. With increasing the DMAA proportion, the r 0 and S ∞ are enhanced for each system. The assembly of Ag nanoparticles and the swelling behavior may be controlled and modulated by means of the compositional ratios of PVA to DMAA and reduction systems.

  20. Development of Self-Assembled Nanoscale Templates via Microphase Separation Induced by Polymer Brushes

    Chu, Elza

    Phase separation in soft matter has been the crucial element in generating hybrid materials, such as polymer blends and mixed polymer brushes. This dissertation discusses two methods of developing self-assembled nanoscale templates via microphase separation induced by polymer brush synthesis. This work introduces a novel soft substrate approach with renewable grafting sites where polyacrylamide is "grafted through" chitosan soft substrates. The mechanism of grafting leads to ordered arrays of filament-like nanostructures spanning the chitosan-air interface. Additionally, the chemical composition of the filaments allows for post-chemical modification to change the physical properties of the filaments, and subsequently tailor surfaces for specific application. Unlike traditional materials, multi-functional or "smart" materials, such as binary polymer brushes (BPB) are capable of spontaneously changing the spatial distribution of functional groups and morphology at the surface upon external stimuli. Although promising in principle, the limited range of available complementary polymers with common non-selective solvents confines the diversity of usable materials and restricts any further advancement in the field. This dissertation also covers the fabrication and characterization of responsive nanoscale polystyrene templates or "mosaic" brushes that are capable of changing interfacial composition upon exposure to varying solvent qualities. Using a "mosaic" brush template is a unique approach that allows the fabrication of strongly immiscible polymer BPB without the need for a common solvent. The synthesis of such BPB is exemplified by two strongly immiscible polymers, i.e. polystyrene (polar) and polyacrylamide (non-polar), where polyacrylamide brush is "graft through" a Si-substrate modified with the polystyrene collapsed "mosaic" brush. The surface exhibits solvent-triggered responses, as well as application potential for anti-biofouling.

  1. Assembly of silver Trigons into a buckyball-like Ag180 nanocage

    Wang, Zhi; Su, Hai-Feng; Tan, Yuan-Zhi; Schein, Stan; Lin, Shui-Chao; Liu, Wei; Wang, Shu-Ao; Wang, Wen-Guang; Tung, Chen-Ho; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2017-01-01

    Buckminsterfullerene (C60) represents a perfect combination of geometry and molecular structural chemistry. It has inspired many creative ideas for building fullerene-like nanopolyhedra. These include other fullerenes, virus capsids, polyhedra based on DNA, and synthetic polynuclear metal clusters and cages. Indeed, the regular organization of large numbers of metal atoms into one highly complex structure remains one of the foremost challenges in supramolecular chemistry. Here we describe the design, synthesis, and characterization of a Ag180 nanocage with 180 Ag atoms as 4-valent vertices (V), 360 edges (E), and 182 faces (F)––sixty 3-gons, ninety 4-gons, twelve 5-gons, and twenty 6-gons––in agreement with Euler’s rule V − E + F = 2. If each 3-gon (or silver Trigon) were replaced with a carbon atom linked by edges along the 4-gons, the result would be like C60, topologically a truncated icosahedron, an Archimedean solid with icosahedral (Ih) point-group symmetry. If C60 can be described mathematically as a curling up of a 6.6.6 Platonic tiling, the Ag180 cage can be described as a curling up of a 3.4.6.4 Archimedean tiling. High-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry reveals that {Ag3}n subunits coexist with the Ag180 species in the assembly system before the final crystallization of Ag180, suggesting that the silver Trigon is the smallest building block in assembly of the final cage. Thus, we assign the underlying growth mechanism of Ag180 to the Silver-Trigon Assembly Road (STAR), an assembly path that might be further employed to fabricate larger, elegant silver cages. PMID:29087328

  2. Thin silica shell coated Ag assembled nanostructures for expanding generality of SERS analytes.

    Myeong Geun Cha

    Full Text Available Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS provides a unique non-destructive spectroscopic fingerprint for chemical detection. However, intrinsic differences in affinity of analyte molecules to metal surface hinder SERS as a universal quantitative detection tool for various analyte molecules simultaneously. This must be overcome while keeping close proximity of analyte molecules to the metal surface. Moreover, assembled metal nanoparticles (NPs structures might be beneficial for sensitive and reliable detection of chemicals than single NP structures. For this purpose, here we introduce thin silica-coated and assembled Ag NPs (SiO2@Ag@SiO2 NPs for simultaneous and quantitative detection of chemicals that have different intrinsic affinities to silver metal. These SiO2@Ag@SiO2 NPs could detect each SERS peak of aniline or 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP from the mixture with limits of detection (LOD of 93 ppm and 54 ppb, respectively. E-field distribution based on interparticle distance was simulated using discrete dipole approximation (DDA calculation to gain insight into enhanced scattering of these thin silica coated Ag NP assemblies. These NPs were successfully applied to detect aniline in river water and tap water. Results suggest that SiO2@Ag@SiO2 NP-based SERS detection systems can be used as a simple and universal detection tool for environment pollutants and food safety.

  3. An oil-in-water self-assembly synthesis, characterization and photocatalytic properties of nano Ag@AgCl surface-sensitized K2Ti4O9

    Liang, Yinghua; Lin, Shuanglong; Liu, Li; Hu, Jinshan; Cui, Wenquan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The plasmatic Ag@AgCl surface-sensitized K 2 Ti 4 O 9 composite photocatalysts. • Ag@AgCl greatly increased visible light absorption for K 2 Ti 4 O 9 . • The photocatalysts exhibited enhanced photocatalytic dye degradation. - Abstract: Nano-sized plasmonic Ag@AgCl surface-sensitized K 2 Ti 4 O 9 composite photocatalysts (hereafter designated as Ag@AgCl/K 2 Ti 4 O 9 ) was synthesized via a facile oil-in-water self-assembly method. The photocatalytic activity of the prepared materials for RhB (Rhodamine B) degradation was examined under visible light irradiation. The results reveal that the size of Ag@AgCl, which evenly dispersed on the surface of K 2 Ti 4 O 9 , distributes about 20–50 nm. The UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra indicate that Ag@AgCl/K 2 Ti 4 O 9 samples have a significantly enhanced optical absorption in 380–700 nm. The photocatalytic activities of the Ag@AgCl/K 2 Ti 4 O 9 samples increase first and then decrease with increasing amount of loading Ag@AgCl and the Ag@AgCl(20 wt.%)/K 2 Ti 4 O 9 sample exhibits the best photocatalytic activity and 94.47% RhB was degraded after irradiation for 2 h. Additionally, studies performed using radical scavengers indicated that O 2 · − and Cl 0 acted as the main reactive species. The electronic interaction was systematically studied and confirmed by the photo-electrochemical measurements

  4. Influence of plasticity mismatch and porosity on mechanical behavior of nanoscale Ag/W multilayers

    Wen, S.P.; Zong, R.L.; Zeng, F.; Gao, Y.; Pan, F.

    2007-01-01

    Ag/W multilayers with periodicity ranging from 15 to 200 nm were deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering. The microstructure, hardness and elastic modulus were investigated by X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering, X-ray fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy and nanoindentation. The results show that multilayers with periodicity less than 50 nm have columnar porous structure, which leads to low modulus and brittle fracture. Multilayers with periodicity larger than 50 nm have continuous laminated structure, and they are relatively ductile. All the multilayers have abnormal low hardness far less than a rule of mixture value, which has been attributed to porous structure and the deformation localization due to the plasticity mismatch between Ag and W

  5. Patterned self-assembled monolayers for nanoscale lithography and the control of catalytically produced electroosmosis

    Subramanian, Shyamala

    This thesis explores two applications of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) (a) for developing novel molecular assembly based nanolithography techniques and (b) for tailoring zeta-potential of surfaces towards achieving directional control of catalytically induced fluid flow. The first half of the thesis develops the process of molecular ruler lithography using sacrificial host structures. This is a novel hybrid nanolithography technique which combines chemical self-assembly with conventional fabrication methods for improving the resolution of existing lithography tools to sub-50 nm. Previous work related to molecular ruler lithography have shown the use of thiol-SAMs, placed one on top of the other like a molecular resist, for scaling down feature sizes. In this thesis various engineering solutions for improving the reproducibility, yield, nanoscale roughness and overall manufacturability of the process are introduced. This is achieved by introducing a sacrificial inert layer underneath the gold parent structure. This bilayer sacrificial host allows for preferential, easy and quick removal of the parent structures, isolates the parent metal from the underlying substrate and improves reproducibility of the lift-off process. Also it opens avenues for fabrication of high aspect ratio features. Also molecular layer vapor deposition method is developed for building the multilayer molecular resist via vapor phase to reduce contaminations and yield issues associated with solution phase deposition. The smallest isolated metal features produced using this process were 40 nm in width. The second half of the thesis describes application of thiol-SAMs to tailor surface properties of gold, specifically the surface charge or zeta potential. Previous work has demonstrated that the direction of movement of fluid in the vicinity of a catalytically active bimetallic junction placed in a solution of dilute hydrogen peroxide depends on the charge of the gold surface. SAMs with

  6. Ag nanoparticles formed by femtosecond pulse laser ablation in water: self-assembled fractal structures

    Santillán, Jesica M. J. [CONICET La Plata-CIC, Centro de Investigaciones Ópticas (CIOp) (Argentina); Fernández van Raap, Marcela B., E-mail: raap@fisica.unlp.edu.ar; Mendoza Zélis, Pedro; Coral, Diego [CONICET, Instituto de Física La Plata (IFLP) (Argentina); Muraca, Diego [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin” (IFGW) (Brazil); Schinca, Daniel C.; Scaffardi, Lucía B., E-mail: lucias@ciop.unlp.edu.ar [CONICET La Plata-CIC, Centro de Investigaciones Ópticas (CIOp) (Argentina)

    2015-02-15

    We report for the first time on the formation of self-assembled fractals of spherical Ag nanoparticles (Nps) fabricated by femtosecond pulse laser ablation of a solid silver target in water. Fractal structures grew both in two and three Euclidean dimensions (d). Ramified-fractal assemblies of 2 nm height and 5–14 μm large, decorated with Ag Nps of 3 nm size, were obtained in a 2d geometry when highly diluted drops of colloidal suspension were dried at a fast heating rate over a mica substrate. When less-diluted drops were dried at slow heating rate, isolated single Nps or rosette-like structures were formed. Fractal aggregates about 31 nm size in 3d geometry were observed in the as-prepared colloidal suspension. Electron diffraction and optical extinction spectroscopy (OES) analyses performed on the samples confirmed the presence of Ag and Ag{sub 2}O. The analysis of the optical extinction spectrum, using the electrostatic approximation of Mie theory for small spheres, showed the existence of Ag bare core, Ag–Ag{sub 2}O and air–Ag core–shell Nps, Ag–Ag{sub 2}O being the most frequent type [69 % relative abundance (r.a.)]. Core-size and shell-thickness distribution was derived from OES. In situ scattering measurements of the Ag colloidal suspension, carried out by small-angle X-ray scattering, indicate a mass fractal composed of packaged 〈D{sub SAXS}〉 = (5 ± 1) nm particles and fractal dimension d{sub f} = 2.5. Ex situ atomic force microscopy imaging displayed well-ramified structures, which, analyzed with box-counting method, yield a fractal dimension d{sub f} = 1.67. The growing behavior of these 2d and 3d self-assembled fractals is consistent with the diffusion-limited aggregation model.

  7. Hydrogels Based on Ag+ -Modulated Assembly of 5'-Adenosine Monophosphate for Enriching Biomolecules.

    Hu, Yuanyuan; Xie, Dong; Wu, Yang; Lin, Nangui; Song, Aixin; Hao, Jingcheng

    2017-11-07

    Supramolecular hydrogels obtained by combining 5'-adenosine monophosphate (AMP) with Ag + were fabricated in this work. Their gelation capability was enhanced by increasing the concentration of Ag + or decreasing the pH. The gels are very sensitive to light, which endows them with potential applications as visible-light photosensitive materials. Coordination between the nucleobase of AMP and Ag + , as well as π-π stacking of nucleobases, are considered to be the main driving forces for self-assembly. The hydrogels successfully achieved the encapsulation and enrichment of biomolecules. Hydrogen bonding between the amino group of guest molecules and silver nanoparticles along the nanofibers drives the enrichment and is considered to be a crucial interaction. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. The fabrication and photocatalytic performances of flower-like Ag nanoparticles/ZnO nanosheets-assembled microspheres

    Deng, Quan; Tang, Haibin; Liu, Gang; Song, Xiaoping; Xu, Guoping; Li, Qian; Ng, Dickon H.L.; Wang, Guozhong

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • ZnO nanosheets-assembled microspheres (ZnOs) were prepared. • Ag nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) were decorated onto the whole surface of the ZnOs. • The Ag-NPs/ZnOs composite showed enhanced photocatalytic performance to MB and MO. • Cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectra revealed enhanced charge transportation. - Abstract: A new micro/nanostructure photocatalyst, Ag nanoparticles decorated ZnO nanosheets-assembled microspheres (Ag-NPs/ZnOs), was synthesised by a two-step method. The flower-like micron-sized ZnO spheres assembled with ∼25 nm thick ZnO nanosheets were initially fabricated via a facile solvothermal method. Then, highly dispersed Ag nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) with dimension ranging from 15 to 50 nm were anchored onto the surface of the each ZnO nanosheet by the Sn(II) ion activation method. The as-prepared Ag-NPs/ZnOs demonstrated enhanced photocatalytic performance in eliminating methylene blue and methyl orange aqueous solutions under UV irradiation, showing twice faster reaction rate than the bare ZnOs. The enhanced photocatalytic activity was due to the suppression of electron/hole pair recombination and the acceleration of surface charge transfer induced by the highly dispersive Ag-NPs, which was further demonstrated by the cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectra measurements

  9. Uncovering Design Principles of Intermediate Filaments, a Self-Assembling Biomaterial: Lessons in Nanoscale Materials Design

    Lee, David H

    2007-01-01

    .... Such proteins may be harnessed for military purposes (eg. protective self-healing materials or nanoscale scaffolds) if one had a better understanding of how molecular structure determines material properties. In this final progress report, we summarize our studies on these systems.

  10. Nanoscale nuclei in phase change materials: Origin of different crystallization mechanisms of Ge2Sb2Te5 and AgInSbTe

    Lee, Bong-Sub; Bogle, Stephanie N.; Darmawikarta, Kristof; Abelson, John R.; Shelby, Robert M.; Retter, Charles T.; Burr, Geoffrey W.; Raoux, Simone; Bishop, Stephen G.

    2014-01-01

    Phase change memory devices are based on the rapid and reversible amorphous-to-crystalline transformations of phase change materials, such as Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 and AgInSbTe. Since the maximum switching speed of these devices is typically limited by crystallization speed, understanding the crystallization process is of crucial importance. While Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 and AgInSbTe show very different crystallization mechanisms from their melt-quenched states, the nanostructural origin of this difference has not been clearly demonstrated. Here, we show that an amorphous state includes different sizes and number of nanoscale nuclei, after thermal treatment such as melt-quenching or furnace annealing is performed. We employ fluctuation transmission electron microscopy to detect nanoscale nuclei embedded in amorphous materials, and use a pump-probe laser technique and atomic force microscopy to study the kinetics of nucleation and growth. We confirm that melt-quenched amorphous Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 includes considerably larger and more quenched-in nuclei than its as-deposited state, while melt-quenched AgInSbTe does not, and explain this contrast by the different ratio between quenching time and nucleation time in these materials. In addition to providing insights to the crystallization process in these technologically important devices, this study presents experimental illustrations of temperature-dependence of nucleation rate and growth speed, which was predicted by theory of phase transformation but rarely demonstrated

  11. Solution-processed assembly of ultrathin transparent conductive cellulose nanopaper embedding AgNWs

    Song, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Yaoquan; Shi, Liyi; Cao, Shaomei; Feng, Xin; Miao, Miao; Fang, Jianhui

    2015-08-01

    Natural biomass based cellulose nanopaper is becoming a promising transparent substrate to supersede traditional petroleum based polymer films in realizing future flexible paper-electronics. Here, ultrathin, highly transparent, outstanding conductive hybrid nanopaper with excellent mechanical flexibility was synthesized by the assembly of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) and silver nanowires (AgNWs) using a pressured extrusion paper-making technique. The hybrid nanopaper with a thickness of 4.5 μm has a good combination of transparent conductive performance and mechanical stability using bamboo/hemp NFC and AgNWs cross-linked by hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC). The heterogeneous fibrous structure of BNFC/HNFC/AgNWs endows a uniform distribution and an enhanced forward light scattering, resulting in high electrical conductivity and optical transmittance. The hybrid nanopaper with an optimal weight ratio of BNFC/HNFC to AgNWs shows outstanding synergistic properties with a transmittance of 86.41% at 550 nm and a sheet resistance of 1.90 ohm sq-1, equal to the electronic conductivity, which is about 500 S cm-1. The BNFC/HNFC/AgNW hybrid nanopaper maintains a stable electrical conductivity after the peeling test and bending at 135° for 1000 cycles, indicating remarkably strong adhesion and mechanical flexibility. Of importance here is that the high-performance and low-cost hybrid nanopaper shows promising potential for electronics application in solar cells, flexible displays and other high-technology products.Natural biomass based cellulose nanopaper is becoming a promising transparent substrate to supersede traditional petroleum based polymer films in realizing future flexible paper-electronics. Here, ultrathin, highly transparent, outstanding conductive hybrid nanopaper with excellent mechanical flexibility was synthesized by the assembly of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) and silver nanowires (AgNWs) using a pressured extrusion paper-making technique. The

  12. Visible-light photocatalytic activity of Ag2O coated Bi2WO6 hierarchical microspheres assembled by nanosheets

    Chen, Lin; Hua, Hao; Yang, Qi; Hu, Chenguo

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Bi 2 WO 6 hierarchical microspheres assembled by nanosheets and dispersed nanosheets are synthesized. • Ag 2 O/Bi 2 WO 6 heterostuctures exhibites an enhanced photocatalytic activity compared with the Bi 2 WO 6 nanostructures. • Photocatalytic activity of the Ag 2 O/Bi 2 WO 6 microspheres is higher than that of the nanosheets. • Bi 2 WO 6 hierarchical structure is an excellent architecture for loading of Ag 2 O nanoparticles. - Abstract: Bi 2 WO 6 hierarchical microspheres assembled by nanosheets and dispersed nanosheets were synthesized by hydrothermal reaction in different conditions. Ag 2 O nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of Bi 2 WO 6 microspheres and nanosheets by the chemical precipitation method. The photocatalytic performance of pure Bi 2 WO 6 nanostructures and Ag 2 O/Bi 2 WO 6 heterostructures were evaluated by the photocatalytic decolorization of RhB solution under visible-light irradiation. Compared with the pure Bi 2 WO 6 nanostructures, the Ag 2 O/Bi 2 WO 6 heterostructures exhibited an obviously enhanced photocatalytic activity. And photocatalytic activity of the Ag 2 O/Bi 2 WO 6 microspheres is higher than that of the Ag 2 O/Bi 2 WO 6 nanosheets. This work demonstrates that the Bi 2 WO 6 hierarchical three-dimensional structure is an excellent architecture for the loading of Ag 2 O nanoparticles to build a highly efficient photocatalyst

  13. Polymorphism in Self-Assembled Structures of 9-Anthracene Carboxylic Acid on Ag(111

    Bo Xu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Surface self-assembly process of 9-anthracene carboxylic acid (AnCA on Ag(111 was investigated using STM. Depending on the molecular surface density, four spontaneously formed and one annealed AnCA ordered phases were observed, namely a straight belt phase, a zigzag double-belt phase, two simpler dimer phases, and a kagome phase. The two high-density belt phases possess large unit cells on the scale length of 10 nm, which are seldom observed in molecular self-assembled structures. This structural diversity stems from a complicated competition of different interactions of AnCA molecules on metal surface, including intermolecular and molecular-substrate interactions, as well as the steric demand from high molecular surface density.

  14. Solution scattering studies on a virus capsid protein as a building block for nanoscale assemblies

    Comellas Aragones, M.; Comellas-Aragones, Marta; Sikkema, Friso D.; Delaittre, Guillaume; Terry, Ann E.; King, Stephen M.; Visser, Dirk; Heenan, Richard K.; Nolte, Roeland J.M.; Cornelissen, Jeroen Johannes Lambertus Maria; Feiters, Martin C.

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembled protein cages are versatile building blocks in the construction of biomolecular nanostructures. Because of the defined assembly behaviour the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) protein is often used for such applications. Here we report a detailed solution scattering study of the

  15. Fabrication of SWCNT-Ag nanoparticle hybrid included self-assemblies for antibacterial applications.

    Sayanti Brahmachari

    Full Text Available The present article reports the development of soft nanohybrids comprising of single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT included silver nanoparticles (AgNPs having superior antibacterial property. In this regard aqueous dispersing agent of carbon nanotube (CNT containing a silver ion reducing unit was synthesised by the inclusion of tryptophan and tyrosine within the backbone of the amphiphile. The dispersions were characterized spectroscopically and microscopically using TEM, AFM and Raman spectroscopy. The nanotube-nanoparticle conjugates were prepared by the in situ photoreduction of AgNO3. The phenolate residue and the indole moieties of tyrosine and tryptophan, respectively reduces the sliver ion as well as acts as stabilizing agents for the synthesized AgNPs. The nanohybrids were characterized using TEM and AFM. The antibacterial activity of the nanohybrids was studied against Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus luteus and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Klebsiella aerogenes. The SWCNT dispersions showed moderate killing ability (40-60% against Gram-positive bacteria however no antibacterial activity was observed against the Gram negative ones. Interestingly, the developed SWCNT-amphiphile-AgNP nanohybrids exhibited significant killing ability (∼90% against all bacteria. Importantly, the cell viability of these newly developed self-assemblies was checked towards chinese hamster ovarian cells and high cell viability was observed after 24 h of incubation. This specific killing of bacterial cells may have been achieved due to the presence of higher -SH containing proteins in the cell walls of the bacteria. The developed nanohybrids were subsequently infused into tissue engineering scaffold agar-gelatin films and the films similarly showed bactericidal activity towards both kinds of bacterial strains while allowing normal growth of eukaryotic cells on the surface of the films.

  16. Watching Nanoscale Self-Assembly Kinetics of Gold Prisms in Liquids

    Kim, Juyeong; Ou, Zihao; Jones, Matthew R.; Chen, Qian

    We use liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy to watch self-assembly of gold triangular prisms into polymer-like structures. The in situ dynamics monitoring enabled by liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy, single nanoparticle tracking, and the marked conceptual similarity between molecular reactions and nanoparticle self-assembly combined elucidate the following mechanistic understanding: a step-growth polymerization based assembly statistics, kinetic pathways sampling particle curvature dependent energy minima and their interconversions, and directed assembly into polymorphs (linear or cyclic chains) through in situ modulation of the prism bonding geometry. Our study bridges the constituent kinetics on the molecular and nanoparticle length scales, which enriches the design rules in directed self-assembly of anisotropic nanoparticles.

  17. Self-assembly of fatty acids on hydroxylated Al surface and effects of their stability on wettability and nanoscale organization.

    Liascukiene, Irma; Steffenhagen, Marie; Asadauskas, Svajus J; Lambert, Jean-François; Landoulsi, Jessem

    2014-05-27

    The self-assembly of fatty acids (FA) on the surfaces of inorganic materials is a relevant way to control their wetting properties. While the mechanism of adsorption on model flat substrate is well described in the literature, interfacial processes remain poorly documented on nanostructured surfaces. In this study, we report the self-assembly of a variety of FA on a hydroxylated Al surface which exhibits a random nanoscale organization. Our results revealed a peculiar fingerprint due to the FA self-assembly which consists in the formation of aligned nanopatterns in a state of hierarchical nanostructuration, regardless of the molecular structure of the FA (chain length, level of unsaturation). After a significant removal of adsorbed FA using UV/O3 treatment, a complete wetting was reached, and a noticeable disturbance of the surface morphology was observed, evidencing the pivotal role of FA molecules to maintain these nanostructures. The origin of wetting properties was investigated prior to and after conditioning of FA-modified samples taking into account key parameters, namely the surface roughness and its composition. For this purpose, the Wenzel roughness, defined as the third moment of power spectral density, was used, as it is sensitive to high spatial frequency and thus to the obtained hierarchical level of nanostructuration. Our results revealed that no correlation can be made between water contact angles (θ(w)) and the Wenzel roughness. By contrast, θ(w) strongly increased with the amount of -CHx- groups exhibited by adsorbed FA. These findings suggest that the main origin of hydrophobization is the presence of self-assembled molecules and that the surface roughness has only a small contribution to the wettability.

  18. Ag films deposited on Si and Ti: How the film-substrate interaction influences the nanoscale film morphology

    Ruffino, F.; Torrisi, V.

    2017-11-01

    Submicron-thick Ag films were sputter deposited, at room temperature, on Si, covered by the native SiO2 layer, and on Ti, covered by the native TiO2 layer, under normal and oblique deposition angle. The aim of this work was to study the morphological differences in the grown Ag films on the two substrates when fixed all the other deposition parameters. In fact, the surface diffusivity of the Ag adatoms is different on the two substrates (higher on the SiO2 surface) due to the different Ag-SiO2 and Ag-TiO2 atomic interactions. So, the effect of the adatoms surface diffusivity, as determined by the adatoms-substrate interaction, on the final film morphology was analyzed. To this end, microscopic analyses were used to study the morphology of the grown Ag films. Even if the homologous temperature prescribes that the Ag film grows on both substrates in the zone I described by the structure zone model some significant differences are observed on the basis of the supporting substrate. In the normal incidence condition, on the SiO2/Si surface a dense close-packed Ag film exhibiting a smooth surface is obtained, while on the TiO2/Ti surface a more columnar film morphology is formed. In the oblique incidence condition the columnar morphology for the Ag film occurs both on SiO2/Si and TiO2/Ti but a higher porous columnar film is obtained on TiO2/Ti due to the lower Ag diffusivity. These results indicate that the adatoms diffusivity on the substrate as determined by the adatom-surface interaction (in addition to the substrate temperature) strongly determines the final film nanostructure.

  19. Assembly of Nanoscale Organic Single-Crystal Cross-Wire Circuits

    Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Organic single-crystal transistors and circuits can be assembled by nanomechanical manipulation of nanowires of CuPc, F(16)CuPc, and SnO(2):Sb. The crossed bar devices have low operational voltage, high mobility and are stable in air. They can be combined into circuits, providing varied functions...... including inverters and NOR and NAND logic gates, opening new opportunities for organic nanoelectronics and highly sophisticated integrated logic devices....

  20. Assembly of α-synuclein fibrils in nanoscale studied by peptide truncation and AFM

    Zhang Feng; Lin Xiaojing; Ji Lina; Du Haining; Tang Lin; He Jianhua; Hu Jun; Hu Hongyu

    2008-01-01

    α-Synuclein (α-Syn) fibrils are the major component of Lewy bodies that are closely associated with the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease, but the mechanism for the fibril assembly remains poorly understood. Here we report using a combination of peptide truncation and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to elucidate the self-assembly and morphology of the α-Syn fibrils. The results show that protease K significantly slims the fibrils from the mean height of ∼6.6 to ∼4.7 nm, whereas chaotropic denaturant urea completely breaks down the fibrils into small particles. The in situ enzymatic digestion also results in thinning of the fibrils, giving rise to some nicks on the fibrils. Moreover, N- or C-terminally truncated α-Syn fragments assemble into thinner filaments with the heights depending on the peptide lengths. A nine-residue peptide corresponding to the homologous GAV-motif sequence can form very thin (∼2.2 nm) but long (>1 μm) filaments. Thus, the central sequence of α-Syn forms a fibrillar core by cross-β-structure that is flanked by two flexible termini, and the orientation of the fibril growth is perpendicular to the β-sheet structures

  1. Electrochemical Functionalization of Graphene at the Nanoscale with Self-Assembling Diazonium Salts.

    Xia, Zhenyuan; Leonardi, Francesca; Gobbi, Marco; Liu, Yi; Bellani, Vittorio; Liscio, Andrea; Kovtun, Alessandro; Li, Rongjin; Feng, Xinliang; Orgiu, Emanuele; Samorì, Paolo; Treossi, Emanuele; Palermo, Vincenzo

    2016-07-26

    We describe a fast and versatile method to functionalize high-quality graphene with organic molecules by exploiting the synergistic effect of supramolecular and covalent chemistry. With this goal, we designed and synthesized molecules comprising a long aliphatic chain and an aryl diazonium salt. Thanks to the long chain, these molecules physisorb from solution onto CVD graphene or bulk graphite, self-assembling in an ordered monolayer. The sample is successively transferred into an aqueous electrolyte, to block any reorganization or desorption of the monolayer. An electrochemical impulse is used to transform the diazonium group into a radical capable of grafting covalently to the substrate and transforming the physisorption into a covalent chemisorption. During covalent grafting in water, the molecules retain the ordered packing formed upon self-assembly. Our two-step approach is characterized by the independent control over the processes of immobilization of molecules on the substrate and their covalent tethering, enabling fast (t < 10 s) covalent functionalization of graphene. This strategy is highly versatile and works with many carbon-based materials including graphene deposited on silicon, plastic, and quartz as well as highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  2. Comment on ``(Au-Ag)144(SR)60 alloy nanomolecules'' by C. Kumara and A. Dass, Nanoscale, 2011, 3, 3064

    Barcaro, Giovanni; Sementa, Luca; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Stener, Mauro

    2015-04-01

    A recent paper in this journal reported the synthesis and characterization via electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy of (Au-Ag)144(SR)60 alloy nanomolecules with different compositions, ranging from 1 : 0 to 1 : 0.75 Au : Ag ratios. The UV-vis spectra of such systems were found to exhibit absorption peaks at 310 nm, 425 nm and 560 nm, interpreted as reminiscent of the silver surface plasmon resonance band due to simple atomic replacement of Au by Ag atoms in a fixed structural framework. On the basis of a comparison of experimentally observed and theoretically simulated optical absorption spectra, we conclude that the experimental situation must be more complicated, and that further work is needed to achieve atomistic insight into these fascinating systems.

  3. Surfactant-assisted synthesis of Ag nanostructures and their self-assembled films on copper and aluminum substrate

    Zhuo Yujiang; Sun Wendong; Dong Lihong; Chu Ying

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, silver nanostructures with controlled morphologies, such as plates, rods, belts, sheets and their self-assembled films have been prepared on copper and aluminum substrates by a surfactant-assisted colloidal chemical method. The X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and the selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns indicated that the Ag nanostructures grew on the substrates with cubic symmetry and single-crystalline in nature. An oriented attachment with surfactant-assisted mechanism and a cooperative effect of surfactant and chloride ion on the morphology of Ag nanostructures were investigated systematically and synthetically.

  4. Nanoscale patterning of a self-assembled monolayer by modification of the molecule–substrate bond

    Cai Shen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The intercalation of Cu at the interface of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM and a Au(111/mica substrate by underpotential deposition (UPD is studied as a means of high resolution patterning. A SAM of 2-(4'-methylbiphenyl-4-ylethanethiol (BP2 prepared in a structural phase that renders the Au substrate completely passive against Cu-UPD, is patterned by modification with the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope. The tip-induced defects act as nucleation sites for Cu-UPD. The lateral diffusion of the metal at the SAM–substrate interface and, thus, the pattern dimensions are controlled by the deposition time. Patterning down to the sub-20 nm range is demonstrated. The difference in strength between the S–Au and S–Cu bond is harnessed to develop the latent Cu-UPD image into a patterned binary SAM. Demonstrated by the exchange of BP2 by adamantanethiol (AdSH this is accomplished by a sequence of reductive desorption of BP2 in Cu free areas followed by adsorption of AdSH. The appearance of Au adatom islands upon the thiol exchange suggests that the interfacial structures of BP2 and AdSH SAMs are different.

  5. Spectroscopic imaging studies of nanoscale polarity and mass transport phenomena in self-assembled organic nanotubes.

    Xu, Hao; Nagasaka, Shinobu; Kameta, Naohiro; Masuda, Mitsutoshi; Ito, Takashi; Higgins, Daniel A

    2017-08-02

    Synthetic organic nanotubes self-assembled from bolaamphiphile surfactants are now being explored for use as drug delivery vehicles. In this work, several factors important to their implementation in drug delivery are explored. All experiments are performed with the nanotubes immersed in ethanol. First, Nile Red (NR) and a hydroxylated Nile Red derivative (NR-OH) are loaded into the nanotubes and spectroscopic fluorescence imaging methods are used to determine the apparent dielectric constant of their local environment. Both are found in relatively nonpolar environments, with the NR-OH molecules preferring regions of relatively higher dielectric constant compared to NR. Unique two-color imaging fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (imaging FCS) measurements are then used along with the spectroscopic imaging results to deduce the dielectric properties of the environments sensed by mobile and immobile populations of probe molecules. The results reveal that mobile NR molecules pass through less polar regions, likely within the nanotube walls, while immobile NR molecules are found in more polar regions, possibly near the nanotube surfaces. In contrast, mobile and immobile NR-OH molecules are found to locate in environments of similar polarity. The imaging FCS results also provide quantitative data on the apparent diffusion coefficient for each dye. The mean diffusion coefficient for the NR dye was approximately two-fold larger than that of NR-OH. Slower diffusion by the latter could result from its additional hydrogen bonding interactions with polar triglycine, amine, and glucose moieties near the nanotube surfaces. The knowledge gained in these studies will allow for the development of nanotubes that are better engineered for applications in the controlled transport and release of uncharged, dipolar drug molecules.

  6. Self assembly of amphiphilic C60 fullerene derivatives into nanoscale supramolecular structures

    Casscells S Ward

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amphiphilic fullerene monomer (AF-1 consists of a "buckyball" cage to which a Newkome-like dendrimer unit and five lipophilic C12 chains positioned octahedrally to the dendrimer unit are attached. In this study, we report a novel fullerene-based liposome termed 'buckysome' that is water soluble and forms stable spherical nanometer sized vesicles. Cryogenic electron microscopy (Cryo-EM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and dynamic light scattering (DLS studies were used to characterize the different supra-molecular structures readily formed from the fullerene monomers under varying pH, aqueous solvents, and preparative conditions. Results Electron microscopy results indicate the formation of bilayer membranes with a width of ~6.5 nm, consistent with previously reported molecular dynamics simulations. Cryo-EM indicates the formation of large (400 nm diameter multilamellar, liposome-like vesicles and unilamellar vesicles in the size range of 50–150 nm diameter. In addition, complex networks of cylindrical, tube-like aggregates with varying lengths and packing densities were observed. Under controlled experimental conditions, high concentrations of spherical vesicles could be formed. In vitro results suggest that these supra-molecular structures impose little to no toxicity. Cytotoxicity of 10–200 μM buckysomes were assessed in various cell lines. Ongoing studies are aimed at understanding cellular internalization of these nanoparticle aggregates. Conclusion In this current study, we have designed a core platform based on a novel amphiphilic fullerene nanostructure, which readily assembles into supra-molecular structures. This delivery vector might provide promising features such as ease of preparation, long-term stability and controlled release.

  7. Carbon dot-Au(i)Ag(0) assembly for the construction of an artificial light harvesting system.

    Jana, Jayasmita; Aditya, Teresa; Pal, Tarasankar

    2018-03-06

    Artificial light harvesting systems (LHS) with inorganic counterparts are considered to be robust as well as mechanistically simple, where the system follows the donor-acceptor principle with an unchanged structural pattern. Plasmonic gold or silver nanoparticles are mostly chosen as inorganic counterparts to design artificial LHS. To capitalize on its electron accepting capability, Au(i) has been considered in this work for the synergistic stabilization of a system with intriguingly fluorescing silver(0) clusters produced in situ. Thus a stable fluorescent Au(i)Ag(0) assembly is generated with electron accepting capabilities. On the other hand, carbon dots have evolved as new fluorescent probes due to their unique physicochemical properties. Utilizing the simple electronic behavior of carbon dots, an electronic interaction between the fluorescent Au(i)Ag(0) and a carbon dot has been investigated for the construction of a new artificial light harvesting system. This coinage metal assembly allows surface energy transfer where it acts as an acceptor, while the carbon dot behaves as a good donor. The energy transfer efficiency has been calculated experimentally to be significant (81.3%) and the Au(i)Ag(0)-carbon dot assembly paves the way for efficient artificial LHS.

  8. The challenge of screen printed Ag metallization on nano-scale poly-silicon passivated contacts for silicon solar cells

    Jiang, Lin; Song, Lixin; Yan, Li; Becht, Gregory; Zhang, Yi; Hoerteis, Matthias

    2017-08-01

    Passivated contacts can be used to reduce metal-induced recombination for higher energy conversion efficiency for silicon solar cells, and are obtained increasing attentions by PV industries in recent years. The reported thicknesses of passivated contact layers are mostly within tens of nanometer range, and the corresponding metallization methods are realized mainly by plating/evaporation technology. This high cost metallization cannot compete with the screen printing technology, and may affect its market potential comparing with the presently dominant solar cell technology. Very few works have been reported on screen printing metallization on passivated contact solar cells. Hence, there is a rising demand to realize screen printing metallization technology on this topic. In this work, we investigate applying screen printing metallization pastes on poly-silicon passivated contacts. The critical challenge for us is to build low contact resistance that can be competitive to standard technology while restricting the paste penetrations within the thin nano-scale passivated contact layers. The contact resistivity of 1.1mohm-cm2 and the open circuit voltages > 660mV are achieved, and the most appropriate thickness range is estimated to be around 80 150nm.

  9. Self-assembled monolayers of bimetallic Au/Ag nanospheres with superior surface-enhanced Raman scattering activity for ultra-sensitive triphenylmethane dyes detection.

    Tian, Yue; Zhang, Hua; Xu, Linlin; Chen, Ming; Chen, Feng

    2018-02-15

    The bimetallic Au/Ag self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were constructed by using mono-dispersed Au/Ag nanospheres (Ag: 4.07%-34.53%) via evaporation-based assembly strategy. The composition-dependent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy revealed that the Au/Ag (Ag: 16.83%) SAMs provide maximized activity for triphenylmethane dyes detection. With the inter-metallic synergy, the optimized SAMs enable the Raman intensity of crystal violet molecules to be about 223 times higher than that of monometallic Au SAMs. Moreover, the SERS signals with excellent uniformity (<5% variation) are sensitive down to 10 -13   M concentrations because of the optimal matching between bimetallic plasmon resonance and the incident laser wavelength.

  10. Evaluating print performance of Sn-Ag-Cu lead-free solder pastes used in electronics assembly process

    Mallik, S.; Bauer, R.; Hübner, F.; Ekere, N. N.

    2011-01-01

    Solder paste is the most widely used interconnection material in the electronic assembly process for attaching electronic components/devices directly onto the surface of printed circuit boards, using stencil printing process. This paper evaluates the performance of three different commercially available Sn-Ag-Cu solder pastes formulated with different particle size distributions (PSD), metal content and alloy composition. A series of stencil printing tests were carried out using a specially designed stencil of 75 μm thickness and apertures of 300×300 μm2 dimension and 500 μm pitch sizes. Solder paste printing behaviors were found related to attributes such as slumping and surface tension and printing performance was correlated with metal content and PSD. The results of the study should benefit paste manufacturers and SMT assemblers to improve their products and practices.

  11. Doping-Induced Anisotropic Self-Assembly of Silver Icosahedra in [Pt2Ag23Cl7(PPh3)10] Nanoclusters

    Bootharaju, Megalamane Siddaramappa

    2017-01-09

    Atomically precise self-assembled architectures of noble metals with unique surface structures are necessary for prospective applications. However, the synthesis of such structures based on silver is challenging because of their instability. In this work, by developing a selective and controlled doping strategy, we synthesized and characterized a rod-shaped, charge-neutral, diplatinum-doped Ag nanocluster (NC) of [Pt2Ag23Cl7(PPh3)10]. Its crystal structure revealed the self-assembly of two Pt-centered Ag icosahedra through vertex sharing. Five bridging and two terminal chlorides and 10 PPh3 ligands were found to stabilize the cluster. Electronic structure simulations corroborated structural and optical characterization of the cluster and provided insights into the effect of the Pt dopants on the optical properties and stability of the cluster. Our study will open new avenues for designing novel self-assembled NCs using different elemental dopants.

  12. Doping-Induced Anisotropic Self-Assembly of Silver Icosahedra in [Pt2Ag23Cl7(PPh3)10] Nanoclusters

    Bootharaju, Megalamane Siddaramappa; Kozlov, Sergey M.; Cao, Zhen; Harb, Moussab; Maity, Niladri; Shkurenko, Aleksander; Parida, Manas R.; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Mohammed, Omar F.; Bakr, Osman; Cavallo, Luigi; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Atomically precise self-assembled architectures of noble metals with unique surface structures are necessary for prospective applications. However, the synthesis of such structures based on silver is challenging because of their instability. In this work, by developing a selective and controlled doping strategy, we synthesized and characterized a rod-shaped, charge-neutral, diplatinum-doped Ag nanocluster (NC) of [Pt2Ag23Cl7(PPh3)10]. Its crystal structure revealed the self-assembly of two Pt-centered Ag icosahedra through vertex sharing. Five bridging and two terminal chlorides and 10 PPh3 ligands were found to stabilize the cluster. Electronic structure simulations corroborated structural and optical characterization of the cluster and provided insights into the effect of the Pt dopants on the optical properties and stability of the cluster. Our study will open new avenues for designing novel self-assembled NCs using different elemental dopants.

  13. Fabrication of Poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride)@Ag Spheres with High Surface Charge Intensity and their Self-Assembly into Photonic Crystal Films.

    Bi, Jiajie; Fan, Genrui; Wu, Suli; Su, Xin; Xia, Hongbo; Zhang, Shu-Fen

    2017-10-01

    Herein, we developed a method to prepare monodisperse poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride)@Ag (PSMA@Ag) core-shell microspheres with high surface charge intensity by using an in situ reduction method. In this method, ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid tetrasodium salt (Na 4 EDTA) was used as a reducing agent to promote the growth of Ag, and at the same time endowed the PSMA@Ag spheres with a surface charge. The monodispersity of PSMA and PSMA@Ag and the ordered array of the photonic crystal films were characterized by using SEM. The formation of Ag nanoparticles was confirmed by using TEM, HR-TEM, and XRD characterizations. Due to the existence of surface charges, the obtained PSMA@Ag microspheres easily self-assembled to form photonic crystal structures. In addition, the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity of the PSMA@Ag photonic crystal films was evaluated by detecting the signal from Raman probe molecules, 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP). The PSMA@Ag photonic crystal films exhibited a high SERS effect, a low detection limit of up to 10 -8 for 4-ATP, good uniformity, and reproducibility.

  14. Peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates as nanoscale building blocks for assembly of an artificial three-helix protein mimic

    Lou, Chenguang; Martos-Maldonado, Manuel C.; Madsen, Charlotte Stahl

    2016-01-01

    Peptide-based structures can be designed to yield artificial proteins with specific folding patterns and functions. Template-based assembly of peptide units is one design option, but the use of two orthogonal self-assembly principles, oligonucleotide triple helix and a coiled coil protein domain ...

  15. Nanoscale coupling of photons to vibrational excitation of Ag nanoparticle 2D array studied by scanning tunneling microscope light emission spectroscopy.

    Katano, Satoshi; Toma, Koji; Toma, Mana; Tamada, Kaoru; Uehara, Yoichi

    2010-11-28

    Scanning tunneling microscope light emission (STM-LE) spectroscopy has been utilized to elucidate the luminescence phenomena of Ag nanoparticles capped with myristate (myristate-capped AgNP) and 2-methyl-1-propanethiolate (C(4)S-capped AgNP) on the dodecanethiol-precovered Au substrate. The STM imaging revealed that myristate-capped AgNPs form an ordered hexagonal array whereas C(4)S-capped AgNPs show imperfect ordering, indicating that a shorter alkyl chain of C(4)S-capped AgNP is not sufficient to form rigid interdigitation. It should be noted that such a nanoparticle ordering affects the luminescence properties of the Ag nanoparticle. We found that the STM-LE is only detected from the Ag nanoparticles forming the two-dimensional superlattice. This indicates that the STM-LE of the Ag nanoparticle is radiated via the collective excitation of the local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spread over the Ag nanoparticles. Note that the STM-LE spectra of the Ag nanoparticles exhibit spike-like peaks superimposed on the broad light emission peak. Using Raman spectroscopy, we concluded that the spike-like structure appearing in the STM-LE spectra is associated with the vibrational excitation of the molecule embedded between Ag nanoparticles.

  16. Structural Modification and Self-Assembly of Nanoscale Magnetite Synthesised in the Presence of an Anionic Surfactant

    Malik S.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The earliest reported medical use of magnetite powder for internal applications was in the 10th century A.D. by the Persian physician and philosopher Avicenna of Bokhara [1,2]. Today magnetic nanoparticles are used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and are potential colloidal mediators for cancer magnetic hyperthermia [3]. Twenty years ago magnetite (Fe3O4 was found to be present in the human brain [4] and more recently it has been reported that nanoscale biogenic magnetite (origin and formation uncertain is associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and Alzheimer’s [5]. Here we show that the synthesis of magnetite in the presence of the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS gives rise to a variety of nanoscale morphologies, some of which look remarkably similar to magnetite found in organisms, suggesting that similar processes may be involved. Furthermore, these 1D materials with diameters of quantum confined size are of interest in the areas of biosensors [6] and biomedical imaging [7].

  17. Localized Surface Plasmon-Enhanced Electroluminescence in OLEDs by Self-Assembly Ag Nanoparticle Film

    He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Wenjun; Li, Shuhong; Wang, Qingru; Zheng, Wanquan; Shi, Qiang; Liu, Yunlong

    2015-12-01

    We fabricated Ag nanoparticle (NP) film in organic light emission diodes (OLEDs), and a 23 times increase in electroluminescence (EL) at 518 nm was probed by time-resolved EL measurement. The luminance and relative external quantum efficiency (REQE) were increased by 5.4 and 3.7 times, respectively. There comes a new energy transport way that localized surface plasmons (LSPs) would absorb energy that corresponds to the electron-hole pair before recombination, promoting the formation of electron-hole pair and exciting local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The extended lifetime of Alq3 indicates the existence of strong interaction between LSPR and exciton, which decreases the nonradiative decay rate of OLEDs.

  18. Self-assembled monolayer resists and nanoscale lithography of silicon dioxide thin films by chemically enhanced vapor etching (CEVE)

    Pan, M.; Yun, M.; Kozicki, M. N.; Whidden, T. K.

    1996-10-01

    We report on the use of electron-beam exposed monolayers of undecylenic acid in the etch rate enhancement of silicon dioxide films in HF vapor for the formation of nanoscale features in the oxide. Variations of the etching characteristics with electron beam parameters are examined and the results analyzed in terms of proposed models of the etching mechanism. Apparent variations in the relative concentrations of etch initiator with the thermal history of the samples prior to etching provides support for the dominant etch initiator within this system as the carboxylic acid moiety bound at the oxide surface. Other variations in the etching characteristics are discussed in terms of differences in localized concentrations of hydrocarbon crosslinks and the effect that this has upon the etch initiation. The process has been employed in the production of features in silicon dioxide surface masks with sizes down to 50 nm.

  19. Layer-by-layer strippable Ag multilayer films fabricated by modular assembly.

    Li, Yan; Chen, Xiaoyan; Li, Qianqian; Song, Kai; Wang, Shihui; Chen, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Kai; Fu, Yu; Jiao, Yong-Hua; Sun, Ting; Liu, Fu-Chun; Han, En-Hou

    2014-01-21

    We have developed a new method to fabricate multilayer films, which uses prepared thin films as modular blocks and transfer as operation mode to build up multilayer structures. In order to distinguish it from the in situ fabrication manner, this method is called modular assembly in this study. On the basis of such concept, we have fabricated a multilayer film using the silver mirror film as the modular block and poly(lactic acid) as the transfer tool. Due to the special double-layer structure of the silver mirror film, the resulting multilayer film had a well-defined stratified architecture with alternate porous/compact layers. As a consequence of the distinct structure, the interaction between the adjacent layers was so weak that the multilayer film could be layer-by-layer stripped. In addition, the top layer in the film could provide an effective protection on the morphology and surface property of the underlying layers. This suggests that if the surface of the film was deteriorated, the top layer could be peeled off and the freshly exposed surface would still maintain the original function. The successful preparation of the layer-by-layer strippable silver multilayer demonstrates that modular assembly is a feasible and effective method to build up multilayer films capable of creating novel and attractive micro/nanostructures, having great potential in the fabrication of nanodevices and coatings.

  20. Protein-scaffold Directed Nanoscale Assembly of T Cell Ligands: Artificial Antigen Presentation with Defined Valency, Density and Ratio.

    Smith, Mason R; Tolbert, Stephanie V; Wen, Fei

    2018-05-07

    Tuning antigen presentation to T cells is a critical step in investigating key aspects of T cell activation. However, existing technologies have limited ability to control the spatial and stoichiometric organization of T cell ligands on 3D surfaces. Here, we developed an artificial antigen presentation platform based on protein-scaffold directed assembly that allows fine control over the spatial and stoichiometric organization of T cell ligands on a 3D yeast-cell surface. Using this system, we observed that the T cell activation threshold on a 3D surface is independent of peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) valency, but instead determined by the overall pMHC surface density. When intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) was co-assembled with pMHC, it enhanced antigen recognition sensitivity by 6-fold. Further, T cells responded with different magnitudes to varying ratios of pMHC and ICAM-1 and exhibited a maximum response at a ratio of 15% pMHC and 85% ICAM-1, introducing an additional parameter for tuning T cell activation. This protein-scaffold directed assembly technology is readily transferrable to acellular surfaces for translational research as well as large-scale T-cell manufacturing.

  1. Wall-slip effects in SnAgCu solder pastes used in electronics assembly applications

    Mallik, S.; Ekere, N.N.; Durairaj, R.; Marks, A.E.; Seman, A.

    2009-01-01

    Solder paste is the most important strategic bonding material used in the assembly of surface mount components in electronics manufacturing. As the trend towards miniaturisation of electronic products continues, there is an increasing demand for better understanding of the flow and deformation that is, the rheological behaviour of solder paste formulations. Wall slip plays an important role in characterising the flow behaviour of solder paste materials. The problem of wall slip arises due to the various attractive and repulsive forces acting between the solder particles and the walls of the measuring geometry. These interactions could lead to the presence of a thin solvent layer adjacent to the wall, which gives rise to slippage. In rheological measurements, slip effects can generally be avoided by using roughened surfaces for measuring geometries. In this paper, a novel technique is developed to study the effect of wall slip in the rheological measurements of lead-free solder paste. The viscosity and oscillatory data obtained for three different solder paste samples (from measuring geometries of different surface roughness) have been analysed and compared. In viscosity measurements, slip effects were dominant at low shear rates and the use of serrated surfaces was found to be quite effective in minimizing slip effects. Oscillatory measurements were also affected by roughening the surfaces of measuring geometries.

  2. High-performance ambipolar self-assembled Au/Ag nanowire based vertical quantum dot field effect transistor.

    Song, Xiaoxian; Zhang, Yating; Zhang, Haiting; Yu, Yu; Cao, Mingxuan; Che, Yongli; Wang, Jianlong; Dai, Haitao; Yang, Junbo; Ding, Xin; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-10-07

    Most lateral PbSe quantum dot field effect transistors (QD FETs) show a low on current/off current (I on/I off) ratio in charge transport measurements. A new strategy to provide generally better performance is to design PbSe QD FETs with vertical architecture, in which the structure parameters can be tuned flexibly. Here, we fabricated a novel room-temperature operated vertical quantum dot field effect transistor with a channel of 580 nm, where self-assembled Au/Ag nanowires served as source transparent electrodes and PbSe quantum dots as active channels. Through investigating the electrical characterization, the ambipolar device exhibited excellent characteristics with a high I on/I off current ratio of about 1 × 10(5) and a low sub-threshold slope (0.26 V/decade) in the p-type regime. The all-solution processing vertical architecture provides a convenient way for low cost, large-area integration of the device.

  3. A 3D graphene interface (Si-doped) of Ag matrix with excellent electronic transmission and thermal conductivity via nano-assembly modification

    Ye, Xianzhu; Li, Ming; Zhang, Yafei

    2018-04-01

    The wide development of electronic materials requires higher load capacity and high temperature resistance. In this study, a novel architecture was fabricated consisting of a 3D reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-Si interface using a simple nano-assembly sintering to achieve high current capacity and excellent thermal features. Via the analysis of catalytic oxidation for methanol, the loading catalytic activity of nano-Ag still remained to a certain extent for the composite with 0.8 vol.% rGO. The final Ag-rGO composite apparently possesses a higher initial oxidation temperature and lower rate of oxidation for internal passing and shielding, and the thermal conductivity is significantly enhanced from 344 to 407 W m‑1 K‑1. Importantly, with a 3D synergistic transportation network, the resistivity of the Ag-rGO composite is much lower than pure Ag, and with a longer conductive time under a stress condition of current density of 6.0  ×  104 A cm‑2. Thermal-electronic features demonstrate that the dispersed graphene interface can efficiently suppress the primary failure pathways (high temperature) in Ag matrix and make it uniquely efficient for the advancement of microscale and thermal-management electronics.

  4. Effects of PCB Pad Metal Finishes on the Cu-Pillar/Sn-Ag Micro Bump Joint Reliability of Chip-on-Board (COB) Assembly

    Kim, Youngsoon; Lee, Seyong; Shin, Ji-won; Paik, Kyung-Wook

    2016-06-01

    While solder bumps have been used as the bump structure to form the interconnection during the last few decades, the continuing scaling down of devices has led to a change in the bump structure to Cu-pillar/Sn-Ag micro-bumps. Cu-pillar/Sn-Ag micro-bump interconnections differ from conventional solder bump interconnections in terms of their assembly processing and reliability. A thermo-compression bonding method with pre-applied b-stage non-conductive films has been adopted to form solder joints between Cu pillar/Sn-Ag micro bumps and printed circuit board vehicles, using various pad metal finishes. As a result, various interfacial inter-metallic compounds (IMCs) reactions and stress concentrations occur at the Cu pillar/Sn-Ag micro bumps joints. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the influence of pad metal finishes on the structural reliability of fine pitch Cu pillar/Sn-Ag micro bumps flip chip packaging. In this study, four different pad surface finishes (Thin Ni ENEPIG, OSP, ENEPIG, ENIG) were evaluated in terms of their interconnection reliability by thermal cycle (T/C) test up to 2000 cycles at temperatures ranging from -55°C to 125°C and high-temperature storage test up to 1000 h at 150°C. The contact resistances of the Cu pillar/Sn-Ag micro bump showed significant differences after the T/C reliability test in the following order: thin Ni ENEPIG > OSP > ENEPIG where the thin Ni ENEPIG pad metal finish provided the best Cu pillar/Sn-Ag micro bump interconnection in terms of bump joint reliability. Various IMCs formed between the bump joint areas can account for the main failure mechanism.

  5. SERS microRaman spectral probing of adsorbate-containing, liquid-overlayed nanosponge Ag aggregates assembled from fractal aggregates

    Sutrova, V.; Šloufová, I.; Nevoralová, Martina; Vlčková, B.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 6 (2015), s. 559-565 ISSN 0377-0486 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/0941 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy * Ag nanoparticles * Ag nanosponge aggregate Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.395, year: 2015

  6. Rocket Science at the Nanoscale.

    Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Wang, Joseph

    2016-06-28

    Autonomous propulsion at the nanoscale represents one of the most challenging and demanding goals in nanotechnology. Over the past decade, numerous important advances in nanotechnology and material science have contributed to the creation of powerful self-propelled micro/nanomotors. In particular, micro- and nanoscale rockets (MNRs) offer impressive capabilities, including remarkable speeds, large cargo-towing forces, precise motion controls, and dynamic self-assembly, which have paved the way for designing multifunctional and intelligent nanoscale machines. These multipurpose nanoscale shuttles can propel and function in complex real-life media, actively transporting and releasing therapeutic payloads and remediation agents for diverse biomedical and environmental applications. This review discusses the challenges of designing efficient MNRs and presents an overview of their propulsion behavior, fabrication methods, potential rocket fuels, navigation strategies, practical applications, and the future prospects of rocket science and technology at the nanoscale.

  7. Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray (Final Report)

    EPA announced the release of the final report, Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray. This report represents a case study of engineered nanoscale silver (nano-Ag), focusing on the specific example of nano-Ag as possibly used in disinfectant spr...

  8. Acetylene Gas-Sensing Properties of Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembled Ag-Decorated Tin Dioxide/Graphene Nanocomposite Film

    Jiang, Chuanxing; Zhang, Dongzhi; Yin, Nailiang; Yao, Yao; Shaymurat, Talgar; Zhou, Xiaoyan

    2017-01-01

    This paper demonstrates an acetylene gas sensor based on an Ag-decorated tin dioxide/reduced graphene oxide (Ag–SnO2/rGO) nanocomposite film, prepared by layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly technology. The as-prepared Ag–SnO2/rGO nanocomposite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectrum. The acetylene sensing properties were investigated using different working temperatures and gas concentrations. A...

  9. Coded nanoscale self-assembly

    to research in the generation of materials with controlled microstructural charac- teristics. In an effort to sustain and further such innovative developments, it is ... of molecules) under thermodynamic equilibrium conditions into structurally well-.

  10. Coherent-Interface-Assembled Ag2O-Anchored Nanofibrillated Cellulose Porous Aerogels for Radioactive Iodine Capture.

    Lu, Yun; Liu, Hongwei; Gao, Runan; Xiao, Shaoliang; Zhang, Ming; Yin, Yafang; Wang, Siqun; Li, Jian; Yang, Dongjiang

    2016-10-26

    Nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) has received increasing attention in science and technology because of not only the availability of large amounts of cellulose in nature but also its unique structural and physical features. These high-aspect-ratio nanofibers have potential applications in water remediation and as a reinforcing scaffold in composites, coatings, and porous materials because of their fascinating properties. In this work, highly porous NFC aerogels were prepared based on tert-butanol freeze-drying of ultrasonically isolated bamboo NFC with 20-80 nm diameters. Then nonagglomerated 2-20-nm-diameter silver oxide (Ag 2 O) nanoparticles (NPs) were grown firmly onto the NFC scaffold with a high loading content of ∼500 wt % to fabricate Ag 2 O@NFC organic-inorganic composite aerogels (Ag 2 O@NFC). For the first time, the coherent interface and interaction mechanism between the cellulose I β nanofiber and Ag 2 O NPs are explored by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and 3D electron tomography. Specifically, a strong hydrogen between Ag 2 O and NFC makes them grow together firmly along a coherent interface, where good lattice matching between specific crystal planes of Ag 2 O and NFC results in very small interfacial straining. The resulting Ag 2 O@NFC aerogels take full advantage of the properties of the 3D organic aerogel framework and inorganic NPs, such as large surface area, interconnected porous structures, and supreme mechanical properties. They open up a wide horizon for functional practical usage, for example, as a flexible superefficient adsorbent to capture I - ions from contaminated water and trap I 2 vapor for safe disposal, as presented in this work. The viable binding mode between many types of inorganic NPs and organic NFC established here highlights new ways to investigate cellulose-based functional nanocomposites.

  11. Preparation of Ag/TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} films via photo-assisted deposition and adsorptive self-assembly for catalytic bactericidal application

    Xi, Baojuan, E-mail: baojuanxi@gmail.com [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 10 Kent Ridge Crescent, Singapore 119260 (Singapore); Chu, Xiaona; Hu, Jiangyong [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 10 Kent Ridge Crescent, Singapore 119260 (Singapore); Bhatia, Charanjit Singh; Danner, Aaron James; Yang, Hyunsoo [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 10 Kent Ridge Crescent, Singapore 119260 (Singapore)

    2014-08-30

    Highlights: • We prepared controlledly the silver nanoparticles on TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} film by the facile photoreduction under the aid of structure-directing agents. • We studied the effect of silver loading on the antibactierial behavior of TiO{sub 2} film and optimized the content of silver. • We extended the route to fabricate other metals on substrates. - Abstract: The deterioration of water supply quality due to the waterborne bacteria is an environmental problem requiring the urgent attention. Due to the excellent and synergic antimicrobial capability, Ag-loaded TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst emerges as a feasible measure to guard the water. In our work, Ag nanoparticles have been prepared by the photoassisted reduction of AgNO{sub 3} on the TiO{sub 2} film fabricated by solution-based adsorptive self-assembly approach. The role of surfactant on the growth rate and size controlling of particles is also studied. In this connection, different kinds of surfactants, such as PVP, Tween-20, Tween-40 and so on, are applied in the system to investigate the formation of Ag nanoparticles. The surface profile and elemental analysis of Ag/TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} films are examined by scanning electron microscopy and attached energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, respectively. In the anti-bacteria detection, Ag nanoparticles are found to enhance the bactericidal efficiency strongly comparing with the pure TiO{sub 2} film under the same condition. In addition, by comparison with Ag/TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} film in the dark environment as the reference experiment, UV–visible light plays a vital role in the improved bactericidal behavior, demonstrating the more efficient charge separation induced by metal silver. Because of the versatility of the method, the present photoreductive route is also exploited for the synthesis of Au nanoparticles on TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} films. The corresponding photocatalytical detection results demonstrate the loading of Au nanoparticles can

  12. Assembly of three new POM-based Ag(I) coordination polymers with antibacterial and photocatalytic properties

    Lu, Xin-Xin; Luo, Yu-Hui [Institute of Polyoxometalate Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun, Jilin 130024, PR China (China); Lu, Chen [School of Pharmaceutical and Life Sciences,Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213164 (China); Chen, Xin, E-mail: xinchen@cczu.edu.cn [School of Pharmaceutical and Life Sciences,Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213164 (China); Zhang, Hong, E-mail: zhangh@nenu.edu.cn [Institute of Polyoxometalate Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun, Jilin 130024, PR China (China)

    2015-12-15

    Three new silver coordination polymers, namely, {Ag_3(bpy)_6[PW_1_2O_4_0]} (1), {Ag_5(H_2biim)_2(Hbiim-NO_2)_2[PW_1_2O_4_0]} (2), {Ag_7(pytz)_4[PW_1_2O_4_0]} (3) (bpy=2,2′-bipyridine, H{sub 2}biim=2,2′-biimidazole, pytz=4-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)pyridine), have been synthesized under hydrothermal condition. Compound 1 shows a 3D supramolecular framework based on 0D moieties. Compound 2 exhibits an attractive 2D biologic screw axis. Compound 3 displays a 3D structure, which consists of Ag(I)···π interactions, π···π stacking and weak Ag···Ag interactions. It is noteworthy that nitration happens to compound 2 during the hydrothermal condition, which is quite rare. Through contrasting the antibacterial activities of gram negative and gram positive bacteria, we find compounds 1–3 have better antibacterial property in gram negative bacteria than gram positive bacteria. In addition, compounds 1–3 also exhibit efficiency of photocatalytic decomposition of organic dyes. Those compounds may be used as potential multifunctional materials in wastewater treatment, because they not only can kill bacteria but also degrade organic pollutants. - Highlights: • Three new silver coordination polymers have been synthesized under hydrothermal condition. • Due to different coordination modes of rigid N-donor ligands, structures of the title compounds vary from 0D to 3D frameworks. • It is noteworthy that nitration happens to compound 2 during the hydrothermal condition, which is quite rare. • In addition, these compounds exhibit efficiency of photocatalytic decomposition of dyes and antibacterial activities.

  13. Thermal cycling reliability of Cu/SnAg double-bump flip chip assemblies for 100 μm pitch applications

    Son, Ho-Young; Kim, Ilho; Lee, Soon-Bok; Jung, Gi-Jo; Park, Byung-Jin; Paik, Kyung-Wook

    2009-01-01

    A thick Cu column based double-bump flip chip structure is one of the promising alternatives for fine pitch flip chip applications. In this study, the thermal cycling (T/C) reliability of Cu/SnAg double-bump flip chip assemblies was investigated, and the failure mechanism was analyzed through the correlation of T/C test and the finite element analysis (FEA) results. After 1000 thermal cycles, T/C failures occurred at some Cu/SnAg bumps located at the edge and corner of chips. Scanning acoustic microscope analysis and scanning electron microscope observations indicated that the failure site was the Cu column/Si chip interface. It was identified by a FEA where the maximum stress concentration was located during T/C. During T/C, the Al pad between the Si chip and a Cu column bump was displaced due to thermomechanical stress. Based on the low cycle fatigue model, the accumulation of equivalent plastic strain resulted in thermal fatigue deformation of the Cu column bumps and ultimately reduced the thermal cycling lifetime. The maximum equivalent plastic strains of some bumps at the chip edge increased with an increased number of thermal cycles. However, equivalent plastic strains of the inner bumps did not increase regardless of the number of thermal cycles. In addition, the z-directional normal plastic strain ɛ22 was determined to be compressive and was a dominant component causing the plastic deformation of Cu/SnAg double bumps. As the number of thermal cycles increased, normal plastic strains in the perpendicular direction to the Si chip and shear strains were accumulated on the Cu column bumps at the chip edge at low temperature region. Thus it was found that the Al pad at the Si chip/Cu column interface underwent thermal fatigue deformation by compressive normal strain and the contact loss by displacement failure of the Al pad, the main T/C failure mode of the Cu/SnAg flip chip assembly, then occurred at the Si chip/Cu column interface shear strain deformation

  14. The Thioacetate-Functionalized Self-Assembled Monolayers on Au: Toward High-Performance Ion-Selective Electrode for Ag{sup +}

    Jin, Jian; Zhou, Weijie; Chen, Ying; Liu, Yilong; Sun, Xiaoqiang; Xi Haitao [Changzhou Univ., Changzhou (China)

    2014-02-15

    Two classes of morpholino-substituted thioacetate have been successfully synthesized and their electrochemical properties of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au electrode are measured by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The barrier property of the SAMs-modified surfaces is evaluated by using potassium ferro/ferri cyanide. The results suggest that the arenethioacetate forms higher-quality close-packed blocking monolayers in comparison with alkanethioacetate. Furthermore, it has shown that the barrier properties of these monolayers can be significantly improved by mixed SAMs formation with decanethiol. From our experimental results we find that the electron transfer reaction of [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3-/4-} redox couple occurs predominantly through the pinholes and defects present in the SAM and both SAMs show a good and fast capacity in recognition for Ag{sup +}. The morphological and elementary composition have also been examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS)

  15. Electrostatic Assemblies of Well-Dispersed AgNPs on the Surface of Electrospun Nanofibers as Highly Active SERS Substrates for Wide-Range pH Sensing.

    Yang, Tong; Ma, Jun; Zhen, Shu Jun; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-06-15

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has shown high promise in analysis and bioanalysis, wherein noble metal nanoparticles (NMNPs) such as silver nanoparticles were employed as substrates because of their strong localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties. However, SERS-based pH sensing was restricted because of the aggregation of NMNPs in acidic medium or biosamples with high ionic strength. Herein, by using the electrostatic interaction as a driving force, AgNPs are assembled on the surface of ethylene imine polymer (PEI)/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) electrospun nanofibers, which are then applied as highly sensitive and reproducible SERS substrate with an enhancement factor (EF) of 10(7)-10(8). When p-aminothiophenol (p-ATP) is used as an indicator with its b2 mode, a good and wide linear response to pH ranging from 2.56 to 11.20 could be available, and the as-prepared nanocomposite fibers then could be fabricated as excellent pH sensors in complicated biological samples such as urine, considering that the pH of urine could reflect the acid-base status of a person. This work not only emerges a cost-effective, direct, and convenient approach to homogeneously decorate AgNPs on the surface of polymer nanofibers but also supplies a route for preparing other noble metal nanofibrous sensing membranes.

  16. Transparent nanoscale floating gate memory using self-assembled bismuth nanocrystals in Bi(2) Mg(2/3) Nb(4/3) O(7) (BMN) pyrochlore thin films grown at room temperature.

    Jung, Hyun-June; Yoon, Soon-Gil; Hong, Soon-Ku; Lee, Jeong-Yong

    2012-07-03

    Bismuth nanocrystals for a nanoscale floating gate memory device are self-assembled in Bi(2) Mg(2/3) Nb(4/3) O(7) (BMN) dielectric films grown at room temperature by radio-frequency sputtering. The TEM cross-sectional image shows the "real" structure grown on a Si (001) substrate. The image magnified from the dotted box (red color) in the the cross-sectional image clearly shows bismuth nanoparticles at the interface between the Al(2) O(3) and HfO(2) layer (right image). Nanoparticles approximately 3 nm in size are regularly distributed at the interface. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Development of Sn-Ag-Cu-X Solders for Electronic Assembly by Micro-Alloying with Al

    Boesenberg, Adam J.; Anderson, Iver E.; Harringa, Joel L.

    2012-07-01

    Of Pb-free solder choices, an array of solder alloys based on the Sn-Ag-Cu (SAC) ternary eutectic ( T eut = 217°C) composition have emerged with potential for broad use, including ball grid array (BGA) joints that cool slowly. This work investigated minor substitutional additions of Al (0.05Al), but the suppression effect faded for >0.20Al. Undercooling suppression did not correlate specifically with blade suppression since it became significant at 0.10Al and increased continuously with greater Al to 0.25Al. Surprisingly, an intermediate range of Al content (0.10 wt.% to 0.20 wt.% Al) promoted formation of significant populations of 2- μm to 5- μm faceted Cu-Al particles, identified as Cu33Al17, that clustered at the top of the solder joint matrix and exhibited extraordinary hardness. Clustering of Cu33Al17 was attributed to its buoyancy, from a lower density than Sn liquid, and its early position in the nucleation sequence within the solder matrix, permitting unrestricted migration to the top interface. Joint microstructures and implications for the full nucleation sequence for these SAC + Al solder joints are discussed, along with possible benefits from the clustered particles for improved thermal cycling resistance.

  18. Nanoscale patterning of two metals on silicon surfaces using an ABC triblock copolymer template.

    Aizawa, Masato; Buriak, Jillian M

    2006-05-03

    Patterning technologically important semiconductor interfaces with nanoscale metal films is important for applications such as metallic interconnects and sensing applications. Self-assembling block copolymer templates are utilized to pattern an aqueous metal reduction reaction, galvanic displacement, on silicon surfaces. Utilization of a triblock copolymer monolayer film, polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-P2VP-b-PEO), with two blocks capable of selective transport of different metal complexes to the surface (PEO and P2VP), allows for chemical discrimination and nanoscale patterning. Different regions of the self-assembled structure discriminate between metal complexes at the silicon surface, at which time they undergo the spontaneous reaction at the interface. Gold deposition from gold(III) compounds such as HAuCl4(aq) in the presence of hydrofluoric acid mirrors the parent block copolymer core structure, whereas silver deposition from Ag(I) salts such as AgNO3(aq) does the opposite, localizing exclusively under the corona. By carrying out gold deposition first and silver second, sub-100-nm gold features surrounded by silver films can be produced. The chemical selectivity was extended to other metals, including copper, palladium, and platinum. The interfaces were characterized by a variety of methods, including scanning electron microscopy, scanning Auger microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy.

  19. Acetylene Gas-Sensing Properties of Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembled Ag-Decorated Tin Dioxide/Graphene Nanocomposite Film

    Chuanxing Jiang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates an acetylene gas sensor based on an Ag-decorated tin dioxide/reduced graphene oxide (Ag–SnO2/rGO nanocomposite film, prepared by layer-by-layer (LbL self-assembly technology. The as-prepared Ag–SnO2/rGO nanocomposite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD and Raman spectrum. The acetylene sensing properties were investigated using different working temperatures and gas concentrations. An optimal temperature of 90 °C was determined, and the Ag–SnO2/rGO nanocomposite sensor exhibited excellent sensing behaviors towards acetylene, in terms of response, repeatability, stability and response/recovery characteristics, which were superior to the pure SnO2 and SnO2/rGO film sensors. The sensing mechanism of the Ag–SnO2/rGO sensor was attributed to the synergistic effect of the ternary nanomaterials, and the heterojunctions created at the interfaces between SnO2 and rGO. This work indicates that the Ag–SnO2/rGO nanocomposite is a good candidate for constructing a low-temperature acetylene sensor.

  20. Acetylene Gas-Sensing Properties of Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembled Ag-Decorated Tin Dioxide/Graphene Nanocomposite Film

    Jiang, Chuanxing; Yin, Nailiang; Yao, Yao; Shaymurat, Talgar; Zhou, Xiaoyan

    2017-01-01

    This paper demonstrates an acetylene gas sensor based on an Ag-decorated tin dioxide/reduced graphene oxide (Ag–SnO2/rGO) nanocomposite film, prepared by layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly technology. The as-prepared Ag–SnO2/rGO nanocomposite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectrum. The acetylene sensing properties were investigated using different working temperatures and gas concentrations. An optimal temperature of 90 °C was determined, and the Ag–SnO2/rGO nanocomposite sensor exhibited excellent sensing behaviors towards acetylene, in terms of response, repeatability, stability and response/recovery characteristics, which were superior to the pure SnO2 and SnO2/rGO film sensors. The sensing mechanism of the Ag–SnO2/rGO sensor was attributed to the synergistic effect of the ternary nanomaterials, and the heterojunctions created at the interfaces between SnO2 and rGO. This work indicates that the Ag–SnO2/rGO nanocomposite is a good candidate for constructing a low-temperature acetylene sensor. PMID:28927021

  1. Construction of Ag/AgCl nanostructures from Ag nanoparticles as high-performance visible-light photocatalysts

    Yang, Fan; Liu, Dongzhi; Wang, Tianyang; Li, Wei [Tianjin University, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology (China); Hu, Wenping [Tianjin University, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (China); Zhou, Xueqin, E-mail: zhouxueqin@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin University, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology (China)

    2016-11-15

    A combined strategy of in situ oxidation and assembly is developed to prepare Ag/AgCl nanospheres and nanocubes from Ag nanoparticles under room temperature. It is a new facile way to fabricate Ag/AgCl with small sizes and defined morphologies. Ag/AgCl nanospheres with an average size of 80 nm were achieved without any surfactants, while Ag/AgCl nanocubes with a mean edge length of 150 nm were obtained by introduction of N-dodecyl-N,N-dimethyl-2-ammonio-acetate. The possible formation mechanism involves the self-assembly of AgCl nanoparticles, Ostwald ripening and photoreduction of Ag{sup +} into Ag{sup 0} by the room light. The as-prepared Ag/AgCl nanospheres and nanocubes exhibit excellent photocatalytic activity and stability toward degradation of organic pollutants under visible-light irradiation. It is demonstrated that Ag/AgCl nanocubes display enhanced photocatalytic activity in comparison with Ag/AgCl nanospheres due to the more efficient charge transfer. This work may pave an avenue to construct various functional materials via the assembly strategy using nanoparticles as versatile building blocks.

  2. A nanoscale bio-inspired light-harvesting system developed from self-assembled alkyl-functionalized metallochlorin nano-aggregates

    Ocakoǧlu, Kasim; Joya, Khurram Saleem; Harputlu, Ersan; Tarnowska, Anna; Gryko, Daniel T.

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembled supramolecular organization of nano-structured biomimetic light-harvesting modules inside solid-state nano-templates can be exploited to develop excellent light-harvesting materials for artificial photosynthetic devices. We present here a hybrid light-harvesting system mimicking the chlorosomal structures of the natural photosynthetic system using synthetic zinc chlorin units (ZnChl-C6, ZnChl-C12 and ZnChl-C 18) that are self-aggregated inside the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nano-channel membranes. AAO nano-templates were modified with a TiO2 matrix and functionalized with long hydrophobic chains to facilitate the formation of supramolecular Zn-chlorin aggregates. The transparent Zn-chlorin nano-aggregates inside the alkyl-TiO2 modified AAO nano-channels have a diameter of ∼120 nm in a 60 μm length channel. UV-Vis studies and fluorescence emission spectra further confirm the formation of the supramolecular ZnChl aggregates from monomer molecules inside the alkyl-functionalized nano-channels. Our results prove that the novel and unique method can be used to produce efficient and stable light-harvesting assemblies for effective solar energy capture through transparent and stable nano-channel ceramic materials modified with bio-mimetic molecular self-assembled nano-aggregates. © 2014 the Partner Organisations.

  3. Effect of nano/micro-Ag compound particles on the bio-corrosion, antibacterial properties and cell biocompatibility of Ti-Ag alloys.

    Chen, Mian; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Lan; Han, Yong; Lu, Zheng; Qin, Gaowu; Zhang, Erlin

    2017-06-01

    In this research, Ti-Ag alloys were prepared by powder metallurgy, casting and heat treatment method in order to investigate the effect of Ag compound particles on the bio-corrosion, the antibacterial property and the cell biocompatibility. Ti-Ag alloys with different sizes of Ag or Ag-compounds particles were successfully prepared: small amount of submicro-scale (100nm) Ti 2 Ag precipitates with solid solution state of Ag, large amount of nano-scale (20-30nm) Ti 2 Ag precipitates with small amount of solid solution state of Ag and micro-scale lamellar Ti 2 Ag phases, and complete solid solution state of Ag. The mechanical tests indicated that both nano/micro-scale Ti 2 Ag phases had a strong dispersion strengthening ability and Ag had a high solid solution strengthening ability. Electrochemical results shown the Ag content and the size of Ag particles had a limited influence on the bio-corrosion resistance although nano-scale Ti 2 Ag precipitates slightly improved corrosion resistance. It was demonstrated that the nano Ag compounds precipitates have a significant influence on the antibacterial properties of Ti-Ag alloys but no effect on the cell biocompatibility. It was thought that both Ag ions release and Ti 2 Ag precipitates contributed to the antibacterial ability, in which nano-scale and homogeneously distributed Ti 2 Ag phases would play a key role in antibacterial process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A nanoscale bio-inspired light-harvesting system developed from self-assembled alkyl-functionalized metallochlorin nano-aggregates

    Ocakoglu, Kasim; Joya, Khurram S.; Harputlu, Ersan; Tarnowska, Anna; Gryko, Daniel T.

    2014-07-01

    Self-assembled supramolecular organization of nano-structured biomimetic light-harvesting modules inside solid-state nano-templates can be exploited to develop excellent light-harvesting materials for artificial photosynthetic devices. We present here a hybrid light-harvesting system mimicking the chlorosomal structures of the natural photosynthetic system using synthetic zinc chlorin units (ZnChl-C6, ZnChl-C12 and ZnChl-C18) that are self-aggregated inside the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nano-channel membranes. AAO nano-templates were modified with a TiO2 matrix and functionalized with long hydrophobic chains to facilitate the formation of supramolecular Zn-chlorin aggregates. The transparent Zn-chlorin nano-aggregates inside the alkyl-TiO2 modified AAO nano-channels have a diameter of ~120 nm in a 60 μm length channel. UV-Vis studies and fluorescence emission spectra further confirm the formation of the supramolecular ZnChl aggregates from monomer molecules inside the alkyl-functionalized nano-channels. Our results prove that the novel and unique method can be used to produce efficient and stable light-harvesting assemblies for effective solar energy capture through transparent and stable nano-channel ceramic materials modified with bio-mimetic molecular self-assembled nano-aggregates.Self-assembled supramolecular organization of nano-structured biomimetic light-harvesting modules inside solid-state nano-templates can be exploited to develop excellent light-harvesting materials for artificial photosynthetic devices. We present here a hybrid light-harvesting system mimicking the chlorosomal structures of the natural photosynthetic system using synthetic zinc chlorin units (ZnChl-C6, ZnChl-C12 and ZnChl-C18) that are self-aggregated inside the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nano-channel membranes. AAO nano-templates were modified with a TiO2 matrix and functionalized with long hydrophobic chains to facilitate the formation of supramolecular Zn-chlorin aggregates. The

  5. Systems engineering at the nanoscale

    Benkoski, Jason J.; Breidenich, Jennifer L.; Wei, Michael C.; Clatterbaughi, Guy V.; Keng, Pei Yuin; Pyun, Jeffrey

    2012-06-01

    Nanomaterials have provided some of the greatest leaps in technology over the past twenty years, but their relatively early stage of maturity presents challenges for their incorporation into engineered systems. Perhaps even more challenging is the fact that the underlying physics at the nanoscale often run counter to our physical intuition. The current state of nanotechnology today includes nanoscale materials and devices developed to function as components of systems, as well as theoretical visions for "nanosystems," which are systems in which all components are based on nanotechnology. Although examples will be given to show that nanomaterials have indeed matured into applications in medical, space, and military systems, no complete nanosystem has yet been realized. This discussion will therefore focus on systems in which nanotechnology plays a central role. Using self-assembled magnetic artificial cilia as an example, we will discuss how systems engineering concepts apply to nanotechnology.

  6. Hybrid, Nanoscale Phospholipid/Block Copolymer Vesicles

    Bo Liedberg

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid phospholipid/block copolymer vesicles, in which the polymeric membrane is blended with phospholipids, display interesting self-assembly behavior, incorporating the robustness and chemical versatility of polymersomes with the softness and biocompatibility of liposomes. Such structures can be conveniently characterized by preparing giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs via electroformation. Here, we are interested in exploring the self-assembly and properties of the analogous nanoscale hybrid vesicles (ca. 100 nm in diameter of the same composition prepared by film-hydration and extrusion. We show that the self-assembly and content-release behavior of nanoscale polybutadiene-b-poly(ethylene oxide (PB-PEO/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC hybrid phospholipid/block copolymer vesicles can be tuned by the mixing ratio of the amphiphiles. In brief, these hybrids may provide alternative tools for drug delivery purposes and molecular imaging/sensing applications and clearly open up new avenues for further investigation.

  7. Sonochemical synthesis of Ag/AgCl nanocubes and their efficient visible-light-driven photocatalytic performance.

    Chen, Deliang; Yoo, Seung Hwa; Huang, Qingsong; Ali, Ghafar; Cho, Sung Oh

    2012-04-23

    A novel one-step sonochemical approach to synthesize a plasmonic photocatalyst of AgCl nanocubes (ca. 115 nm in edge length) with a small amount of Ag metal species is presented. The nanoscale Ag/AgCl hybrid photocatalysts with cubic morphology are readily formed under ambient ultrasonic conditions and neither external heat treatment nor reducing agents are required. The size of the Ag/AgCl photocatalysts could be controlled by changing the concentrations of Ag(+) ions and polyvinylpyrrolidone molecules in precursor solutions. The compositions, microstructures, influencing factors, and possible growth mechanism of the Ag/AgCl hybrid nanocubes were systematically investigated. The Ag/AgCl photocatalysts show excellent photocatalytic performance for degradation of various dye molecules under visible light. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Dynamics at the nanoscale

    Stoneham, A.M.; Gavartin, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    However fascinating structures may be at the nanoscale, time-dependent behaviour at the nanoscale has far greater importance. Some of the dynamics is random, with fluctuations controlling rate processes and making thermal ratchets possible. Some of the dynamics causes the transfer of energy, of signals, or of charge. Such transfers are especially efficiently controlled in biological systems. Other dynamical processes occur when we wish to control the nanoscale, e.g., to avoid local failures of gate dielectrics, or to manipulate structures by electronic excitation, to use spin manipulation in quantum information processing. Our prime purpose is to make clear the enormous range and variety of time-dependent nanoscale phenomena

  9. A large-scale superhydrophobic surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) platform fabricated via capillary force lithography and assembly of Ag nanocubes for ultratrace molecular sensing.

    Tan, Joel Ming Rui; Ruan, Justina Jiexin; Lee, Hiang Kwee; Phang, In Yee; Ling, Xing Yi

    2014-12-28

    An analytical platform with an ultratrace detection limit in the atto-molar (aM) concentration range is vital for forensic, industrial and environmental sectors that handle scarce/highly toxic samples. Superhydrophobic surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) platforms serve as ideal platforms to enhance detection sensitivity by reducing the random spreading of aqueous solution. However, the fabrication of superhydrophobic SERS platforms is generally limited due to the use of sophisticated and expensive protocols and/or suffers structural and signal inconsistency. Herein, we demonstrate a high-throughput fabrication of a stable and uniform superhydrophobic SERS platform for ultratrace molecular sensing. Large-area box-like micropatterns of the polymeric surface are first fabricated using capillary force lithography (CFL). Subsequently, plasmonic properties are incorporated into the patterned surfaces by decorating with Ag nanocubes using the Langmuir-Schaefer technique. To create a stable superhydrophobic SERS platform, an additional 25 nm Ag film is coated over the Ag nanocube-decorated patterned template followed by chemical functionalization with perfluorodecanethiol. Our resulting superhydrophobic SERS platform demonstrates excellent water-repellency with a static contact angle of 165° ± 9° and a consequent analyte concentration factor of 59-fold, as compared to its hydrophilic counterpart. By combining the analyte concentration effect of superhydrophobic surfaces with the intense electromagnetic "hot spots" of Ag nanocubes, our superhydrophobic SERS platform achieves an ultra-low detection limit of 10(-17) M (10 aM) for rhodamine 6G using just 4 μL of analyte solutions, corresponding to an analytical SERS enhancement factor of 10(13). Our fabrication protocol demonstrates a simple, cost- and time-effective approach for the large-scale fabrication of a superhydrophobic SERS platform for ultratrace molecular detection.

  10. Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembled Metal-Ion- (Ag-, Co-, Ni-, and Pd- Doped TiO2 Nanoparticles: Synthesis, Characterisation, and Visible Light Degradation of Rhodamine B

    Mphilisi M. Mahlambi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal-ion- (Ag, Co, Ni and Pd doped titania nanocatalysts were successfully deposited on glass slides by layer-by-layer (LbL self-assembly technique using a poly(styrene sulfonate sodium salt (PSS and poly(allylamine hydrochloride (PAH polyelectrolyte system. Solid diffuse reflectance (SDR studies showed a linear increase in absorbance at 416 nm with increase in the number of m-TiO2 thin films. The LbL assembled thin films were tested for their photocatalytic activity through the degradation of Rhodamine B under visible-light illumination. From the scanning electron microscope (SEM, the thin films had a porous morphology and the atomic force microscope (AFM studies showed “rough” surfaces. The porous and rough surface morphology resulted in high surface areas hence the high photocatalytic degradation (up to 97% over a 6.5 h irradiation period using visible-light observed. Increasing the number of multilayers deposited on the glass slides resulted in increased film thickness and an increased rate of photodegradation due to increase in the availability of more nanocatalysts (more sites for photodegradation. The LbL assembled thin films had strong adhesion properties which made them highly stable thus displaying the same efficiencies after five (5 reusability cycles.

  11. Effect of the Fabrication Parameters of the Nanosphere Lithography Method on the Properties of the Deposited Au-Ag Nanoparticle Arrays.

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Chaoyang; Yang, Guangsong; Chen, Yushan; Yang, Cheng-Fu

    2017-04-03

    The nanosphere lithography (NSL) method can be developed to deposit the Au-Ag triangle hexagonal nanoparticle arrays for the generation of localized surface plasmon resonance. Previously, we have found that the parameters used to form the NSL masks and the physical methods required to deposit the Au-Ag thin films had large effects on the geometry properties of the nanoparticle arrays. Considering this, the different parameters used to grow the Au-Ag triangle hexagonal nanoparticle arrays were investigated. A single-layer NSL mask was formed by using self-assembly nano-scale polystyrene (PS) nanospheres with an average radius of 265 nm. At first, the concentration of the nano-scale PS nanospheres in the solution was set at 6 wt %. Two coating methods, drop-coating and spin-coating, were used to coat the nano-scale PS nanospheres as a single-layer NSL mask. From the observations of scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), we found that the matrixes of the PS nanosphere masks fabricated by using the drop-coating method were more uniform and exhibited a smaller gap than those fabricated by the spin-coating method. Next, the drop-coating method was used to form the single-layer NSL mask and the concentration of nano-scale PS nanospheres in a solution that was changed from 4 to 10 wt %, for further study. The SEM images showed that when the concentrations of PS nanospheres in the solution were 6 and 8 wt %, the matrixes of the PS nanosphere masks were more uniform than those of 4 and 10 wt %. The effects of the one-side lifting angle of substrates and the vaporization temperature for the solvent of one-layer self-assembly PS nanosphere thin films, were also investigated. Finally, the concentration of the nano-scale PS nanospheres in the solution was set at 8 wt % to form the PS nanosphere masks by the drop-coating method. Three different physical deposition methods, including thermal evaporation, radio-frequency magnetron sputtering, and e-gun deposition, were used to

  12. Effect of the Fabrication Parameters of the Nanosphere Lithography Method on the Properties of the Deposited Au-Ag Nanoparticle Arrays

    Jing Liu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The nanosphere lithography (NSL method can be developed to deposit the Au-Ag triangle hexagonal nanoparticle arrays for the generation of localized surface plasmon resonance. Previously, we have found that the parameters used to form the NSL masks and the physical methods required to deposit the Au-Ag thin films had large effects on the geometry properties of the nanoparticle arrays. Considering this, the different parameters used to grow the Au-Ag triangle hexagonal nanoparticle arrays were investigated. A single‐layer NSL mask was formed by using self‐assembly nano-scale polystyrene (PS nanospheres with an average radius of 265 nm. At first, the concentration of the nano-scale PS nanospheres in the solution was set at 6 wt %. Two coating methods, drop-coating and spin-coating, were used to coat the nano-scale PS nanospheres as a single‐layer NSL mask. From the observations of scanning electronic microscopy (SEM, we found that the matrixes of the PS nanosphere masks fabricated by using the drop-coating method were more uniform and exhibited a smaller gap than those fabricated by the spin-coating method. Next, the drop-coating method was used to form the single‐layer NSL mask and the concentration of nano-scale PS nanospheres in a solution that was changed from 4 to 10 wt %, for further study. The SEM images showed that when the concentrations of PS nanospheres in the solution were 6 and 8 wt %, the matrixes of the PS nanosphere masks were more uniform than those of 4 and 10 wt %. The effects of the one-side lifting angle of substrates and the vaporization temperature for the solvent of one-layer self-assembly PS nanosphere thin films, were also investigated. Finally, the concentration of the nano-scale PS nanospheres in the solution was set at 8 wt % to form the PS nanosphere masks by the drop-coating method. Three different physical deposition methods, including thermal evaporation, radio-frequency magnetron sputtering, and e

  13. Facile synthesis of new nano sorbent for magnetic solid-phase extraction by self assembling of bis-(2,4,4-trimethyl pentyl)-dithiophosphinic acid on Fe3O4-Ag core-shell nanoparticles: Characterization and application

    Tahmasebi, Elham; Yamini, Yadollah

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Self assembling of bis-(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)-dithiophosphinic acid on Fe 3 O 4 -Ag core-shell nanoparticles and application of it for solid phase extraction of PAHs. Highlights: ► A novel sorbent for magnetic solid-phase extraction of PAHs was introduced. ► Silver was coated on Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles (MNPs) by reduction of AgNO 3 with NaBH 4 . ► Bis-(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)-dithiophosphinic acid self-assembled on silver coated MNPs. ► Size, morphology, composition and properties of the nanoparticles were characterized. ► Extraction efficiency of the sorbent was investigated by extraction of five PAHs. - Abstract: A novel sorbent for magnetic solid-phase extraction by self-assembling of organosulfur compound, (bis-(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)-dithiophosphinic acid), onto the silver-coated Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles was introduced. Due to the formation of covalent bond of S-Ag, the new coating on the silver surface was very stable and showed high thermal stability (up to 320 °C). The size, morphology, composition, and properties of the prepared nanoparticles have also been characterized and determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX), dynamic light scattering (DLS), Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Extraction efficiency of the new sorbent was investigated by extraction of five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as model compounds. The optimum extraction conditions for PAHs were obtained as of extraction time, 20 min; 50 mg sorbent from 100 mL of the sample solution, and elution with 100 μL of 1-propanol under fierce vortex for 2 min. Under the optimal conditions, the calibration curves were obtained in the range of 0.05–100 μg L −1 (R 2 > 0.9980) and the LODs (S/N = 3) were obtained in the range of 0.02–0.10 μg L −1 . Relative standard deviations (RSDs) for intra- and inter-day precision were 2.6–4.2% and 3.6–8

  14. Nitrogen and oxygen co-doped carbon nanofibers with rich sub-nanoscale pores as self-supported electrode material of high-performance supercapacitors

    Li, Qun; Xie, Wenhe; Liu, Dequan; Wang, Qi; He, Deyan

    2016-01-01

    Self-supported porous carbon nanofibers (CNFs) network has been prepared by electrospinning technology assisted with template method. The as-prepared material is rich in sub-nanoscale pores and nitrogen and oxygen functional groups, which can serve as a fast conductive network with abundant electrochemical active sites and greatly facilitates the transport of electrons and ions. When the porous CNFs network is used as an electrode for supercapacitor in a three electrode system, it displays a high capacitance of 233.1 F/g at 0.2 A/g, and a capacitance of 130.2 F/g even at 14 A/g. It maintains a capacitance of 154.0 F/g with 90.17% retention after 4000 cycles at 2 A/g. Moreover, the assembled symmetric supercapacitor not only exhibits excellent rate capability and cycle performance, but also delivers an energy density of 4.17 Wh/kg and a power density of 2500 W/kg. The experimental results demonstrate that the prepared N, O co-doped carbon nanofibers with rich sub-nanoscale pores are a promising electrode material for high-performance supercapacitors.

  15. Microstructural and mechanical characterization of melt spun process Sn-3.5Ag and Sn-3.5Ag-xCu lead-free solders for low cost electronic assembly

    Mostafa Shalaby, Rizk; Kamal, Mustafa [Metal Physics Laboratory, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, P.O.Box: 35516, Mansoura (Egypt); Ali, Esmail A.M. [Basic Science Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Science & Technology (Yemen); Gumaan, Mohammed S., E-mail: m.gumaan1@gmail.com [Metal Physics Laboratory, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, P.O.Box: 35516, Mansoura (Egypt); Basic Science Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Science & Technology (Yemen)

    2017-04-06

    This paper aims to investigate the reliability of mechanical and creep behavior for the eutectic Sn-Ag and Sn-Ag-Cu Solder joints rapidly solidified after hot compressing (HC) in terms of structural changes and its relationship with thermal behavior, which has been discussed and compared with their properties before HC process by Mustafa et al. (2016) . These solder joints were prepared by melt-spinning technique and tested by HC at 30 MPa pressure and 150 °C for 90 min, their structural, mechanical and thermal properties after HC process have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), dynamic resonance techniques (DRT) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques respectively and compared with these solders before HC. The results revealed that the pressure caused some fractures on the solders morphology surfaces. But some benefits for these solders have been occurred, like eliminating the internal stresses through recrystallization process whose evidence by the particle size increases after they HC, stabilized structure after HC was due to the metastable phases rearrangements, new intermetallic compounds (IMCs) formation, decreasing, melting temperature range (∆T), lattice strains (ƹ) and entropy change (S). These sequential benefits are considered to be the main reasons which lead to decreasing energy loss (Q{sup −1}), creep rate (É›) and thermal stability enhancement. Elastic modulus increment might be due to low elastic lattice distortions after HC, while the stress exponent (n) reduction refers to viscous glide mechanism of deformation after HC instead of climb deformation mechanism before HC.

  16. Nanoparticle assemblies and superstructures

    Kotov, Nicholas A

    2006-01-01

    ... building blocks of larger and more complex systems. Therefore, the present challenge of nanoscale science is to shift from making certain building blocks to organizing them in one-, two-, and three-dimensional structures. Such assemblies and superstructures are the next logical step in the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology. In this re...

  17. Nanoscale Mixing of Soft Solids

    Choi, Soo-Hyung; Lee, Sangwoo; Soto, Haidy E.; Lodge, Timothy P.; Bates, Frank S.

    2011-01-01

    Assessing the state of mixing on the molecular scale in soft solids is challenging. Concentrated solutions of micelles formed by self-assembly of polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-alt-propylene) (PS-PEP) diblock copolymers in squalane (C 30 H 62 ) adopt a body-centered cubic (bcc) lattice, with glassy PS cores. Utilizing small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and isotopic labeling ( 1 H and 2 H (D) polystyrene blocks) in a contrast-matching solvent (a mixture of squalane and perdeuterated squalane), we demonstrate quantitatively the remarkable fact that a commercial mixer can create completely random mixtures of micelles with either normal, PS(H), or deuterium-labeled, PS(D), cores on a well-defined bcc lattice. The resulting SANS intensity is quantitatively modeled by the form factor of a single spherical core. These results demonstrate both the possibility of achieving complete nanoscale mixing in a soft solid and the use of SANS to quantify the randomness.

  18. Nanoscale Ionic Liquids

    2006-11-01

    Technical Report 11 December 2005 - 30 November 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Nanoscale Ionic Liquids 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-06-1-0012...Title: Nanoscale Ionic Liquids Principal Investigator: Emmanuel P. Giannelis Address: Materials Science and Engineering, Bard Hall, Cornell University...based fluids exhibit high ionic conductivity. The NFs are typically synthesized by grafting a charged, oligomeric corona onto the nanoparticle cores

  19. Spintronics in nanoscale devices

    Hedin, Eric R

    2013-01-01

    By exploiting the novel properties of quantum dots and nanoscale Aharonov-Bohm rings together with the electronic and magnetic properties of various semiconductor materials and graphene, researchers have conducted numerous theoretical and computational modeling studies and experimental tests that show promising behavior for spintronics applications. Spin polarization and spin-filtering capabilities and the ability to manipulate the electron spin state through external magnetic or electric fields have demonstrated the promise of workable nanoscale devices for computing and memory applications.

  20. The rate of charge tunneling is insensitive to polar terminal groups in self-assembled monolayers in Ag(TS)S(CH2)(n)M(CH2)(m)T//Ga2O3/EGaIn junctions.

    Yoon, Hyo Jae; Bowers, Carleen M; Baghbanzadeh, Mostafa; Whitesides, George M

    2014-01-08

    This paper describes a physical-organic study of the effect of uncharged, polar, functional groups on the rate of charge transport by tunneling across self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based large-area junctions of the form Ag(TS)S(CH2)(n)M(CH2)(m)T//Ga2O3/EGaIn. Here Ag(TS) is a template-stripped silver substrate, -M- and -T are "middle" and "terminal" functional groups, and EGaIn is eutectic gallium-indium alloy. Twelve uncharged polar groups (-T = CN, CO2CH3, CF3, OCH3, N(CH3)2, CON(CH3)2, SCH3, SO2CH3, Br, P(O)(OEt)2, NHCOCH3, OSi(OCH3)3), having permanent dipole moments in the range 0.5 < μ < 4.5, were incorporated into the SAM. A comparison of the electrical characteristics of these junctions with those of junctions formed from n-alkanethiolates led to the conclusion that the rates of charge tunneling are insensitive to the replacement of terminal alkyl groups with the terminal polar groups in this set. The current densities measured in this work suggest that the tunneling decay parameter and injection current for SAMs terminated in nonpolar n-alkyl groups, and polar groups selected from common polar organic groups, are statistically indistinguishable.

  1. Templated electrodeposition of Ag7NO11 nanowires with very high oxidation states of silver

    Rodijk, E.J.B.; Maijenburg, A.W.; Maas, M.G.; Blank, David H.A.; ten Elshof, Johan E.

    2011-01-01

    The templated electrodeposition of 200 nm diameter nanowires of the argentic oxynitrate Ag(Ag3O4)2NO3 phase is reported. Their high surface-to-volume ratio and the high average oxidation state of Ag make these wires promising candidates for nanoscale redox processes in which both a high volumetric

  2. Silver sulfide nanoparticle assembly obtained by reacting an assembled silver nanoparticle template with hydrogen sulfide gas.

    Chen, Rui; Nuhfer, Noel T; Moussa, Laura; Morris, Hannah R; Whitmore, Paul M

    2008-11-12

    A fast, simple procedure is described for obtaining an assembly of silver sulfide nanoparticles (Ag(2)S NPs) on a glass substrate through reaction of a template of an assembled layer of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) with hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) gas. The Ag NP template was prepared by assembling a monolayer of spherical Ag NPs (mean diameter of 7.4 nm) on a polyethylenimine-treated glass substrate. Exposure to pure H(2)S for 10 min converted the Ag NPs of the template to Ag(2)S NPs. The resulting Ag(2)S NP assembly, which retains the template nanostructure and particle distribution, was characterized by optical absorption spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning high resolution TEM, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The Ag(2)S NPs have a crystal structure of monoclinic acanthite, and while they retained the spherical shape of the original Ag NPs, their mean particle size increased to 8.4 nm due to changes to the crystal structure when the Ag NPs are converted into Ag(2)S NPs. The measured optical absorption edge of the Ag(2)S NP assembly indicated an indirect interband transition with a band gap energy of 1.71 eV. The Ag(2)S NP assembly absorbed light with wavelengths below 725 nm, and the absorbance increased monotonically toward the UV region.

  3. Ellipsometry at the nanoscale

    Hingerl, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    This book presents and introduces ellipsometry in nanoscience and nanotechnology making a bridge between the classical and nanoscale optical behaviour of materials. It delineates the role of the non-destructive and non-invasive optical diagnostics of ellipsometry in improving science and technology of nanomaterials and related processes by illustrating its exploitation, ranging from fundamental studies of the physics and chemistry of nanostructures to the ultimate goal of turnkey manufacturing control. This book is written for a broad readership: materials scientists, researchers, engineers, as well as students and nanotechnology operators who want to deepen their knowledge about both basics and applications of ellipsometry to nanoscale phenomena. It starts as a general introduction for people curious to enter the fields of ellipsometry and polarimetry applied to nanomaterials and progresses to articles by experts on specific fields that span from plasmonics, optics, to semiconductors and flexible electronics...

  4. Nanoscale Organic Hybrid Electrolytes

    Nugent, Jennifer L.

    2010-08-20

    Nanoscale organic hybrid electrolytes are composed of organic-inorganic hybrid nanostructures, each with a metal oxide or metallic nanoparticle core densely grafted with an ion-conducting polyethylene glycol corona - doped with lithium salt. These materials form novel solvent-free hybrid electrolytes that are particle-rich, soft glasses at room temperature; yet manifest high ionic conductivity and good electrochemical stability above 5V. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Nanoscale Organic Hybrid Electrolytes

    Nugent, Jennifer L.; Moganty, Surya S.; Archer, Lynden A.

    2010-01-01

    Nanoscale organic hybrid electrolytes are composed of organic-inorganic hybrid nanostructures, each with a metal oxide or metallic nanoparticle core densely grafted with an ion-conducting polyethylene glycol corona - doped with lithium salt. These materials form novel solvent-free hybrid electrolytes that are particle-rich, soft glasses at room temperature; yet manifest high ionic conductivity and good electrochemical stability above 5V. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Sintering of nanoscale silver coated textiles, a new approach to attain conductive fabrics for electromagnetic shielding

    Kardarian, Kasra [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Busani, Tito [CENIMAT/I3N, Departamento de Ciência dos Materiais, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Osório, Inês [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Domingos, Helena; Igreja, Rui [CENIMAT/I3N, Departamento de Ciência dos Materiais, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Franco, Ricardo [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Cortez, João, E-mail: j.cortez@fct.unl.pt [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2014-10-15

    The demand for conductive textiles is increasing, owing to the need for lightweight and flexible conductive materials for a variety of applications, including electromagnetic shielding of electronic equipment. Herein we propose a process that combines the in situ synthesis of silver nanoparticles at the textile fibre surface followed by sintering of the nanoparticles to obtain highly conductive fabrics. The formation of silver particles at the nanoscale allowed for sintering to be performed efficiently, at reduced temperature and time, bestowing fabrics with high conductivity and capability of shielding electromagnetic radiation. The nanoparticle synthesis method entailed the precipitation of 2.0 g L{sup −1} silver nitrate and further reduction with citrate, with the formation of a deposit of silver nanoparticles at the fabric surface. The amount of silver deposited (up to 195 mg of silver per g of fabric) resulted in moderate electrical conductivity with sheet resistance of 803 Ω/sq. Upon sintering, this value decreased dramatically to 5.2 Ω/sq. The sintering process was monitored by SEM, which showed that sintering at 200 °C for 30 min resulted in maximal electrical conductivity with the lowest amount of silver deposited, while forming a homogenous surface. Fabrics submitted to these sintering conditions maintained their sheet resistance and shielding effectiveness values, even after eight washing cycles. - Highlights: • Assembly of highly conductive textiles capable of shielding electromagnetic radiation. • Procedure combines in situ synthesis of AgNPs at the textile surface and sintering. • AgNPs formed by precipitation of AgNO{sub 3} and reduction with citrate, as observed by SEM. • Sintering increased dramatically conductivity and shielding effectiveness. • Treated fabrics maintained conductivity and shielding effectiveness after 8 washes.

  7. Sintering of nanoscale silver coated textiles, a new approach to attain conductive fabrics for electromagnetic shielding

    Kardarian, Kasra; Busani, Tito; Osório, Inês; Domingos, Helena; Igreja, Rui; Franco, Ricardo; Cortez, João

    2014-01-01

    The demand for conductive textiles is increasing, owing to the need for lightweight and flexible conductive materials for a variety of applications, including electromagnetic shielding of electronic equipment. Herein we propose a process that combines the in situ synthesis of silver nanoparticles at the textile fibre surface followed by sintering of the nanoparticles to obtain highly conductive fabrics. The formation of silver particles at the nanoscale allowed for sintering to be performed efficiently, at reduced temperature and time, bestowing fabrics with high conductivity and capability of shielding electromagnetic radiation. The nanoparticle synthesis method entailed the precipitation of 2.0 g L −1 silver nitrate and further reduction with citrate, with the formation of a deposit of silver nanoparticles at the fabric surface. The amount of silver deposited (up to 195 mg of silver per g of fabric) resulted in moderate electrical conductivity with sheet resistance of 803 Ω/sq. Upon sintering, this value decreased dramatically to 5.2 Ω/sq. The sintering process was monitored by SEM, which showed that sintering at 200 °C for 30 min resulted in maximal electrical conductivity with the lowest amount of silver deposited, while forming a homogenous surface. Fabrics submitted to these sintering conditions maintained their sheet resistance and shielding effectiveness values, even after eight washing cycles. - Highlights: • Assembly of highly conductive textiles capable of shielding electromagnetic radiation. • Procedure combines in situ synthesis of AgNPs at the textile surface and sintering. • AgNPs formed by precipitation of AgNO 3 and reduction with citrate, as observed by SEM. • Sintering increased dramatically conductivity and shielding effectiveness. • Treated fabrics maintained conductivity and shielding effectiveness after 8 washes

  8. Nanoscale thermal transport

    Cahill, David G.; Ford, Wayne K.; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Merlin, Roberto; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2003-01-01

    Rapid progress in the synthesis and processing of materials with structure on nanometer length scales has created a demand for greater scientific understanding of thermal transport in nanoscale devices, individual nanostructures, and nanostructured materials. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation that have occurred in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces between materials become increasingly important on small length scales. The thermal conductance of many solid-solid interfaces have been studied experimentally but the range of observed interface properties is much smaller than predicted by simple theory. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are emerging as a powerful tool for calculations of thermal conductance and phonon scattering, and may provide for a lively interplay of experiment and theory in the near term. Fundamental issues remain concerning the correct definitions of temperature in nonequilibrium nanoscale systems. Modern Si microelectronics are now firmly in the nanoscale regime—experiments have demonstrated that the close proximity of interfaces and the extremely small volume of heat dissipation strongly modifies thermal transport, thereby aggravating problems of thermal management. Microelectronic devices are too large to yield to atomic-level simulation in the foreseeable future and, therefore, calculations of thermal transport must rely on solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation; microscopic phonon scattering rates needed for predictive models are, even for Si, poorly known. Low-dimensional nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes, are predicted to have novel transport properties; the first quantitative experiments of the thermal conductivity of nanotubes have recently been achieved using microfabricated measurement systems. Nanoscale porosity decreases the permittivity of amorphous dielectrics but porosity also strongly decreases the thermal conductivity. The

  9. File list: ALL.Oth.50.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Oth.50.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor mm9 All antigens Others Multipotent otic progeni...ncedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Oth.50.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor.bed ...

  10. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors mm9 All antigens Neural Induced neural progeni....biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors.bed ...

  11. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors mm9 All antigens Neural Induced neural progeni....biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors.bed ...

  12. File list: Unc.Oth.10.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Oth.10.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium mm9 Unclassified Others Olfactory epithelium ...SRX112960 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Oth.10.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium.bed ...

  13. File list: Unc.Oth.20.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Oth.20.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium mm9 Unclassified Others Olfactory epithelium ...SRX112960 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Oth.20.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium.bed ...

  14. File list: Unc.Oth.05.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Oth.05.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium mm9 Unclassified Others Olfactory epithelium ...SRX112960 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Oth.05.AllAg.Olfactory_epithelium.bed ...

  15. File list: Unc.Dig.05.AllAg.Intestinal_crypt [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Dig.05.AllAg.Intestinal_crypt mm9 Unclassified Digestive tract Intestinal crypt... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Dig.05.AllAg.Intestinal_crypt.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Dig.50.AllAg.Intestine,_Small [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Dig.50.AllAg.Intestine,_Small hg19 Histone Digestive tract Intestine, Small htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Dig.50.AllAg.Intestine,_Small.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.CDV.50.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.50.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes mm9 TFs and others Cardiovascular Cardiomyocytes ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.CDV.50.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes mm9 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Cardiomyocytes ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes.bed ...

  19. File list: NoD.CDV.10.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available NoD.CDV.10.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes mm9 No description Cardiovascular Cardiomyocytes ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.CDV.10.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.CDV.20.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.20.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes mm9 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Cardiomyocytes ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.CDV.20.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes.bed ...

  1. File list: InP.CDV.10.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.10.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes mm9 Input control Cardiovascular Cardiomyocytes SRX...1121694 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.CDV.10.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes mm9 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Cardiomyocytes ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes mm9 TFs and others Cardiovascular Cardiomyocytes ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes.bed ...

  4. File list: NoD.CDV.05.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available NoD.CDV.05.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes mm9 No description Cardiovascular Cardiomyocytes ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.CDV.05.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes.bed ...

  5. File list: InP.CDV.05.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.05.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes mm9 Input control Cardiovascular Cardiomyocytes SRX...1121694 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.CDV.05.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes.bed ...

  6. File list: InP.CDV.20.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.20.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes mm9 Input control Cardiovascular Cardiomyocytes SRX...1121694 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.CDV.20.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes.bed ...

  7. File list: InP.CDV.50.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.50.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes mm9 Input control Cardiovascular Cardiomyocytes SRX...1121694 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.CDV.50.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.CDV.20.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.20.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes mm9 TFs and others Cardiovascular Cardiomyocytes ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.CDV.20.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes mm9 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Cardiomyocytes ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes mm9 TFs and others Cardiovascular Cardiomyocytes ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes.bed ...

  11. File list: NoD.CDV.50.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available NoD.CDV.50.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes mm9 No description Cardiovascular Cardiomyocytes ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.CDV.50.AllAg.Cardiomyocytes.bed ...

  12. File list: Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Endocardial cel...ls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Endocardial cells ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: His.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Endocardial cells ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Endocardial cells ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: DNS.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Endocardial cells ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Endocardial cel...ls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Endocardial cells ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Endocardial cel...ls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: His.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Endocardial cells ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.05.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: His.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Endocardial cells ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.50.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: His.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Endocardial cells ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.10.AllAg.Endocardial_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_palates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_palates mm9 TFs and others Embryo Embryonic palates http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_palates.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_palates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_palates mm9 TFs and others Embryo Embryonic palates http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_palates.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_palates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_palates mm9 TFs and others Embryo Embryonic palates http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_palates.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_palates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_palates mm9 RNA polymerase Embryo Embryonic palates http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_palates.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_palates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_palates mm9 RNA polymerase Embryo Embryonic palates http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_palates.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_palates [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_palates mm9 TFs and others Embryo Embryonic palates http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_palates.bed ...

  9. File list: Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  10. File list: Unc.Liv.05.AllAg.Carcinoma,_Hepatocellular [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Liv.05.AllAg.Carcinoma,_Hepatocellular mm9 Unclassified Liver Carcinoma, Hepato...cellular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Liv.05.AllAg.Carcinoma,_Hepatocellular.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Liv.10.AllAg.Carcinoma,_Hepatocellular [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Liv.10.AllAg.Carcinoma,_Hepatocellular mm9 Histone Liver Carcinoma, Hepatocellu...lar http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.10.AllAg.Carcinoma,_Hepatocellular.bed ...

  12. File list: Unc.Kid.50.AllAg.Nephrectomy_sample [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Kid.50.AllAg.Nephrectomy_sample hg19 Unclassified Kidney Nephrectomy sample htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Kid.50.AllAg.Nephrectomy_sample.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Kid.20.AllAg.Nephrectomy_sample [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Kid.20.AllAg.Nephrectomy_sample hg19 RNA polymerase Kidney Nephrectomy sample h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Kid.20.AllAg.Nephrectomy_sample.bed ...

  14. File list: DNS.Kid.05.AllAg.Nephrectomy_sample [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Kid.05.AllAg.Nephrectomy_sample hg19 DNase-seq Kidney Nephrectomy sample http:/.../dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Kid.05.AllAg.Nephrectomy_sample.bed ...

  15. File list: Unc.Kid.10.AllAg.Nephrectomy_sample [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Kid.10.AllAg.Nephrectomy_sample hg19 Unclassified Kidney Nephrectomy sample htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Kid.10.AllAg.Nephrectomy_sample.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Kid.10.AllAg.Nephrectomy_sample [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Kid.10.AllAg.Nephrectomy_sample hg19 RNA polymerase Kidney Nephrectomy sample h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Kid.10.AllAg.Nephrectomy_sample.bed ...

  17. File list: DNS.Kid.50.AllAg.Nephrectomy_sample [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Kid.50.AllAg.Nephrectomy_sample hg19 DNase-seq Kidney Nephrectomy sample http:/.../dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Kid.50.AllAg.Nephrectomy_sample.bed ...

  18. File list: Unc.Kid.20.AllAg.Nephrectomy_sample [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Kid.20.AllAg.Nephrectomy_sample hg19 Unclassified Kidney Nephrectomy sample htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Kid.20.AllAg.Nephrectomy_sample.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Kid.05.AllAg.Nephrectomy_sample [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Kid.05.AllAg.Nephrectomy_sample hg19 RNA polymerase Kidney Nephrectomy sample h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Kid.05.AllAg.Nephrectomy_sample.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Gon.05.AllAg.Spermatocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.05.AllAg.Spermatocytes mm9 TFs and others Gonad Spermatocytes SRX717597,SRX... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.05.AllAg.Spermatocytes.bed ...

  1. File list: Oth.Gon.20.AllAg.Spermatocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.20.AllAg.Spermatocytes mm9 TFs and others Gonad Spermatocytes SRX1060566,SR... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.20.AllAg.Spermatocytes.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.Gon.10.AllAg.Spermatocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.10.AllAg.Spermatocytes mm9 TFs and others Gonad Spermatocytes SRX1060567,SR... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.10.AllAg.Spermatocytes.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.Gon.50.AllAg.Spermatocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.50.AllAg.Spermatocytes mm9 TFs and others Gonad Spermatocytes SRX1060566,SR... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.50.AllAg.Spermatocytes.bed ...

  4. File list: DNS.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 DNase-seq Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 RNA polymerase Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 RNA polymerase Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 TFs and others Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  8. File list: DNS.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 DNase-seq Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  9. File list: Unc.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 Unclassified Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  10. File list: DNS.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 DNase-seq Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 Histone Blood Polymorphonuclear ...leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.10.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 TFs and others Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  13. File list: Unc.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 Unclassified Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 Histone Blood Polymorphonuclear ...leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  15. File list: DNS.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 DNase-seq Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 TFs and others Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 RNA polymerase Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 Histone Blood Polymorphonuclear ...leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  19. File list: Unc.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 Unclassified Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Bld.20.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 Histone Blood Polymorphonuclear ...leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.05.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  1. File list: Unc.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes hg19 Unclassified Blood Polymorphonuclear... leukocytes http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Bld.50.AllAg.Polymorphonuclear_leukocytes.bed ...

  2. File list: His.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  3. File list: His.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.10.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  4. File list: His.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  5. File list: Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  6. File list: Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  7. File list: His.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.05.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  8. File list: Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Carotid Arteries... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Carotid_Arteries.bed ...

  9. File list: DNS.Lng.20.AllAg.Lung_adenocarcinoma [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Lng.20.AllAg.Lung_adenocarcinoma mm9 DNase-seq Lung Lung adenocarcinoma http://...dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Lng.20.AllAg.Lung_adenocarcinoma.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.Lng.10.AllAg.Lung_adenocarcinoma [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Lng.10.AllAg.Lung_adenocarcinoma mm9 RNA polymerase Lung Lung adenocarcinoma ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Lng.10.AllAg.Lung_adenocarcinoma.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_pancreas [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_pancreas mm9 RNA polymerase Embryo Embryonic pancreas ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_pancreas.bed ...

  12. File list: Unc.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_pancreas [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_pancreas mm9 Unclassified Embryo Embryonic pancreas http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_pancreas.bed ...

  13. File list: Unc.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_pancreas [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_pancreas mm9 Unclassified Embryo Embryonic pancreas http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Emb.20.AllAg.Embryonic_pancreas.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_pancreas [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_pancreas mm9 RNA polymerase Embryo Embryonic pancreas ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_pancreas.bed ...

  15. File list: Unc.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_pancreas [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_pancreas mm9 Unclassified Embryo Embryonic pancreas http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Emb.10.AllAg.Embryonic_pancreas.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_pancreas [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_pancreas mm9 RNA polymerase Embryo Embryonic pancreas ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Emb.05.AllAg.Embryonic_pancreas.bed ...

  17. File list: Unc.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_pancreas [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_pancreas mm9 Unclassified Embryo Embryonic pancreas http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Emb.50.AllAg.Embryonic_pancreas.bed ...

  18. File list: DNS.Adl.05.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Adl.05.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons dm3 DNase-seq Adult Octopaminergic neurons ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/DNS.Adl.05.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons.bed ...

  19. File list: DNS.Adl.10.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Adl.10.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons dm3 DNase-seq Adult Octopaminergic neurons ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/DNS.Adl.10.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Adl.05.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Adl.05.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons dm3 RNA polymerase Adult Octopaminergic neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Adl.05.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Adl.20.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Adl.20.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons dm3 RNA polymerase Adult Octopaminergic neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Adl.20.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons.bed ...

  2. File list: Unc.Adl.10.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Adl.10.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons dm3 Unclassified Adult Octopaminergic neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Unc.Adl.10.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.Adl.50.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Adl.50.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons dm3 TFs and others Adult Octopaminergic neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Adl.50.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons.bed ...

  4. File list: DNS.Adl.20.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Adl.20.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons dm3 DNase-seq Adult Octopaminergic neurons ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/DNS.Adl.20.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons.bed ...

  5. File list: DNS.Adl.50.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Adl.50.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons dm3 DNase-seq Adult Octopaminergic neurons ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/DNS.Adl.50.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.Adl.20.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Adl.20.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons dm3 TFs and others Adult Octopaminergic neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Adl.20.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons.bed ...

  7. File list: Unc.Adl.05.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Adl.05.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons dm3 Unclassified Adult Octopaminergic neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Unc.Adl.05.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons.bed ...

  8. File list: Unc.Adl.50.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Adl.50.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons dm3 Unclassified Adult Octopaminergic neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Unc.Adl.50.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Adl.50.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Adl.50.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons dm3 RNA polymerase Adult Octopaminergic neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Adl.50.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.Adl.05.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Adl.05.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons dm3 TFs and others Adult Octopaminergic neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Adl.05.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Adl.10.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Adl.10.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons dm3 RNA polymerase Adult Octopaminergic neurons... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Adl.10.AllAg.Octopaminergic_neurons.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  14. File list: His.CDV.05.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.CDV.05.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 Histone Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.05.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  15. File list: Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 Unclassified Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  17. File list: Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 Unclassified Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  18. File list: His.CDV.20.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.CDV.20.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 Histone Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.20.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  19. File list: Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 Unclassified Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  20. File list: DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  1. File list: His.CDV.10.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.CDV.10.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 Histone Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.10.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  2. File list: His.CDV.50.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.CDV.50.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 Histone Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.50.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.CDV.20.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.20.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.CDV.20.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  4. File list: DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  5. File list: DNS.CDV.10.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.10.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.CDV.10.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  6. File list: DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  7. File list: Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals mm9 Unclassified Cardiovascular Atrioventicular canals... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Atrioventicular_canals.bed ...

  8. A Simple Method for the Preparation of TiO2 /Ag-AgCl@Polypyrrole Composite and Its Enhanced Visible-Light Photocatalytic Activity.

    Yao, Tongjie; Shi, Lei; Wang, Hao; Wang, Fangxiao; Wu, Jie; Zhang, Xiao; Sun, Jianmin; Cui, Tieyu

    2016-01-01

    A novel and facile method was developed to prepare a visible-light driven TiO2 /Ag-AgCl@polypyrrole (PPy) photocatalyst with Ag-AgCl nanoparticles supported on TiO2 nanofibers and covered by a thin PPy shell. During the synthesis, the PPy shell and Ag-AgCl nanoparticles were prepared simultaneously onto TiO2 nanofibers, which simplified the preparation procedure. In addition, because Ag-AgCl aggregates were fabricated via partly etching the Ag nanoparticles, their size was well controlled at the nanoscale, which was beneficial for improvement of the contact surface area. Compared with reference photocatalysts, the TiO2 /Ag-AgCl@PPy composite exhibited an enhanced photodegradation activity towards rhodamine B under visible-light irradiation. The superior photocatalytic property originated from synergistic effects between TiO2 nanofibers, Ag-AgCl nanoparticles and the PPy shell. Furthermore, the TiO2 /Ag-AgCl@PPy composite could be easily separated and recycled without obvious reduction in activity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Synthetic Self-Assembled Materials in Biological Environments

    Versluis, F.; van Esch, J.H.; Eelkema, R.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic self-assembly has long been recognized as an excellent approach for the formation of ordered structures on the nanoscale. Although the development of synthetic self-assembling materials has often been inspired by principles observed in nature (e.g., the assembly of lipids, DNA,

  10. Directed Assembly of Gold Nanoparticles

    Westerlund, Axel Rune Fredrik; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    As a complement to common "top-down" lithography techniques, "bottom-up" assembly techniques are emerging as promising tools to build nanoscale structures in a predictable way. Gold nanoparticles that are stable and relatively easy to synthesize are important building blocks in many such structures...... due to their useful optical and electronic properties. Programmed assembly of gold nanoparticles in one, two, and three dimensions is therefore of large interest. This review focuses on the progress from the last three years in the field of directed gold nanoparticle and nanorod assembly using...

  11. PREFACE: Nanoscale science and technology

    Bellucci, Stefano

    2008-11-01

    material. The results show the emergence of specific interactions of cross-linking between a thermosetting matrix and amino-functionalized SWNTs during the cure reaction with an improvement of the mechanical properties with respect to those prepared with unfunctionalized SWNTs. The possibility of using amino-functionalized SWNT to make a 'mix and match' approach towards classes of hybrid materials was reported suggesting the possibility of tuning the electrical properties by combining the electric field in the assembling processing. Moreover, it was demonstrated as electrophoretically deposited SWNT thin films provide a simple route to obtain layered functional nanostructures by growing homogeneous films of carbon nanotubes and infiltrating polymer or monomer, followed by in situ polymerization. Some examples where electrophoretically deposited SWCNT films were infiltrated with monomer and then the monomer was polymerized were reported. The invited lecture by S D'Auria explored the advantages of using either enzymes or binding proteins to develop non-consuming substrate fluorescence nano-biosensors. He reported a novel approach to address the consumption of substrate by enzyme-based biosensors, namely the utilization of apo-enzymes as non-active forms of proteins which are still able to bind the ligand but cannot transform it into product. He also reported recent studies in which fluorescence labelling proteins by a fluorescent probe allows a wireless monitoring of toxic compounds. Then, he presented a cutting-edge methodology for the detection of target analytes at very low concentration, namely single molecule detection. C Falessi described how the 'Finmeccanica Focus Group Nano' is coordinating a multiscale nanoscience engineering integration initiative that is an emerging and unified strategy to link the customer operative requirements with innovative high-tech product. He introduced the audience to the 'NanoTechnology Multiscale Project (NMP)', as a complete

  12. Nanoscale effects in interdiffusion

    Erdelyi, Z.; Langer, G.A.; Beke, D.L.; Csik, A.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Diffusion on the nano/atomic scales in multilayers, thin films has many challenging features even if the role of structural defects can be neglected and 'only' the effects related to the nano/atomic scale raise. The most basic equations to describe the diffusion are Fick's equations. It is important to emphasize that the diffusion coefficient in Fick's equations is in general composition independent and Fick's classical equations do not include the stress effects, which can have important influence onto the diffusion especially on the nano/atomic scale. We illustrate that the continuum descriptions of the diffusion cannot be applied automatically on such short distances, the classical continuum approximations (Fick's laws) cannot describe correctly the atomic movements. They predict faster kinetics than the atomistic models and the interface shift is always proportional to the square root of the time. However, the kinetics can be even linear on the nano/atomic scale. We have shown from computer simulations that Fick's laws violate on the nanoscale either in completely or restricted miscible systems. This is strongly related to the discrete character of the system on the nanoscale and to the highly neglected fact in the literature that the diffusion coefficients depend on the composition. As will be seen the composition dependence of D is very important and has very significant influence on the diffusion kinetics on the nano/atomic scales. It originates from the fact that usually the diffusion coefficients are different in an A and in a B matrix. Consequently in case of a real interface, which is not atomically sharp, i.e. there is a more or less intermixed region between the pure A and B matrixes, the diffusion coefficient changes continuously while e.g. an A atom diffuses from the pure A matrix into the pure B. This feature can be also called diffusion asymmetry. We have also illustrated that in this case not only the

  13. Nanoscale technology in biological systems

    Greco, Ralph S; Smith, R Lane

    2004-01-01

    Reviewing recent accomplishments in the field of nanobiology Nanoscale Technology in Biological Systems introduces the application of nanoscale matrices to human biology. It focuses on the applications of nanotechnology fabrication to biomedical devices and discusses new physical methods for cell isolation and manipulation and intracellular communication at the molecular level. It also explores the application of nanobiology to cardiovascular diseases, oncology, transplantation, and a range of related disciplines. This book build a strong background in nanotechnology and nanobiology ideal for

  14. Friction laws at the nanoscale.

    Mo, Yifei; Turner, Kevin T; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2009-02-26

    Macroscopic laws of friction do not generally apply to nanoscale contacts. Although continuum mechanics models have been predicted to break down at the nanoscale, they continue to be applied for lack of a better theory. An understanding of how friction force depends on applied load and contact area at these scales is essential for the design of miniaturized devices with optimal mechanical performance. Here we use large-scale molecular dynamics simulations with realistic force fields to establish friction laws in dry nanoscale contacts. We show that friction force depends linearly on the number of atoms that chemically interact across the contact. By defining the contact area as being proportional to this number of interacting atoms, we show that the macroscopically observed linear relationship between friction force and contact area can be extended to the nanoscale. Our model predicts that as the adhesion between the contacting surfaces is reduced, a transition takes place from nonlinear to linear dependence of friction force on load. This transition is consistent with the results of several nanoscale friction experiments. We demonstrate that the breakdown of continuum mechanics can be understood as a result of the rough (multi-asperity) nature of the contact, and show that roughness theories of friction can be applied at the nanoscale.

  15. Nanoscale waveguiding methods

    Wang Chia-Jean

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWhile 32 nm lithography technology is on the horizon for integrated circuit (IC fabrication, matching the pace for miniaturization with optics has been hampered by the diffraction limit. However, development of nanoscale components and guiding methods is burgeoning through advances in fabrication techniques and materials processing. As waveguiding presents the fundamental issue and cornerstone for ultra-high density photonic ICs, we examine the current state of methods in the field. Namely, plasmonic, metal slot and negative dielectric based waveguides as well as a few sub-micrometer techniques such as nanoribbons, high-index contrast and photonic crystals waveguides are investigated in terms of construction, transmission, and limitations. Furthermore, we discuss in detail quantum dot (QD arrays as a gain-enabled and flexible means to transmit energy through straight paths and sharp bends. Modeling, fabrication and test results are provided and show that the QD waveguide may be effective as an alternate means to transfer light on sub-diffraction dimensions.

  16. Synthesis, dynamics and photophysics of nanoscale systems

    Mirkovic, Tihana

    The emerging field of nanotechnology, which spans diverse areas such as nanoelectronics, medicine, chemical and pharmaceutical industries, biotechnology and computation, focuses on the development of devices whose improved performance is based on the utilization of self-assembled nanoscale components exhibiting unique properties owing to their miniaturized dimensions. The first phase in the conception of such multifunctional devices based on integrated technologies requires the study of basic principles behind the functional mechanism of nanoscale components, which could originate from individual nanoobjects or result as a collective behaviour of miniaturized unit structures. The comprehensive studies presented in this thesis encompass the mechanical, dynamical and photophysical aspects of three nanoscale systems. A newly developed europium sulfide nanocrystalline material is introduced. Advances in synthetic methods allowed for shape control of surface-functionalized EuS nanocrystals and the fabrication of multifunctional EuS-CdSe hybrid particles, whose unique structural and optical properties hold promise as useful attributes of integrated materials in developing technologies. A comprehensive study based on a new class of multifunctional nanomaterials, derived from the basic unit of barcoded metal nanorods is presented. Their chemical composition affords them the ability to undergo autonomous motion in the presence of a suitable fuel. The nature of their chemically powered self-propulsion locomotion was investigated, and plausible mechanisms for various motility modes were presented. Furthermore functionalization of striped metallic nanorods has been realized through the incorporation of chemically controlled flexible hinges displaying bendable properties. The structural aspect of the light harvesting machinery of a photosynthetic cryptophyte alga, Rhodomonas CS24, and the mobility of the antenna protein, PE545, in vivo were investigated. Information obtained

  17. Enhanced Visible Light Photocatalytic Degradation of Organic Pollutants over Flower-Like Bi2O2CO3 Dotted with Ag@AgBr

    Shuanglong Lin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A facile and feasible oil-in-water self-assembly approach was developed to synthesize flower-like Ag@AgBr/Bi2O2CO3 micro-composites. The photocatalytic activities of the samples were evaluated through methylene blue degradation under visible light irradiation. Compared to Bi2O2CO3, flower-like Ag@AgBr/Bi2O2CO3 micro-composites show enhanced photocatalytic activities. In addition, results indicate that both the physicochemical properties and associated photocatalytic activities of Ag@AgBr/Bi2O2CO3 composites are shown to be dependent on the loading quantity of Ag@AgBr. The highest photocatalytic performance was achieved at 7 wt % Ag@AgBr, degrading 95.18% methylene blue (MB after 20 min of irradiation, which is over 1.52 and 3.56 times more efficient than that of pure Ag@AgBr and pure Bi2O2CO3, respectively. Bisphenol A (BPA was also degraded to further demonstrate the degradation ability of Ag@AgBr/Bi2O2CO3. A photocatalytic mechanism for the degradation of organic compounds over Ag@AgBr/Bi2O2CO3 was proposed. Results from this study illustrate an entirely new approach to fabricate semiconductor composites containing Ag@AgX/bismuth (X = a halogen.

  18. Sensing at the nanoscale

    Demming, Anna; Hierold, Christofer

    2013-11-01

    The merits of nanostructures in sensing may seem obvious, yet playing these attributes to their maximum advantage can be a work of genius. As fast as sensing technology is improving, expectations are growing, with demands for cheaper devices with higher sensitivities and an ever increasing range of functionalities and compatibilities. At the same time tough scientific challenges like low power operation, noise and low selectivity are keeping researchers busy. This special issue on sensing at the nanoscale with guest editor Christofer Hierold from ETH Zurich features some of the latest developments in sensing research pushing at the limits of current capabilities. Cheap and easy fabrication is a top priority. Among the most popular nanomaterials in sensing are ZnO nanowires and in this issue Dario Zappa and colleagues at Brescia University in Italy simplify an already cheap and efficient synthesis method, demonstrating ZnO nanowire fabrication directly onto silicon substrates [1]. Meanwhile Nicolae Barson and colleagues in Germany point out the advantages of flame spray pyrolysis fabrication in a topical review [2] and, maximizing on existing resources, researchers in Denmark and Taiwan report cantilever sensing using a US20 commercial DVD-ROM optical pickup unit as the readout source [3]. The sensor is designed to detect physiological concentrations of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor, a protein associated with inflammation due to HIV, cancer and other infectious diseases. With their extreme properties carbon nanostructures feature prominently in the issue, including the demonstration of a versatile and flexible carbon nanotube strain sensor [4] and a graphene charge sensor with sensitivities of the order of 1.3 × 10-3 e Hz-1/2 [5]. The issue of patterning for sensing devices is also tackled by researchers in the US who demonstrate a novel approach for multicomponent pattering metal/metal oxide nanoparticles on graphene [6]. Changes in electrical

  19. Nanoscale phase change memory materials.

    Caldwell, Marissa A; Jeyasingh, Rakesh Gnana David; Wong, H-S Philip; Milliron, Delia J

    2012-08-07

    Phase change memory materials store information through their reversible transitions between crystalline and amorphous states. For typical metal chalcogenide compounds, their phase transition properties directly impact critical memory characteristics and the manipulation of these is a major focus in the field. Here, we discuss recent work that explores the tuning of such properties by scaling the materials to nanoscale dimensions, including fabrication and synthetic strategies used to produce nanoscale phase change memory materials. The trends that emerge are relevant to understanding how such memory technologies will function as they scale to ever smaller dimensions and also suggest new approaches to designing materials for phase change applications. Finally, the challenges and opportunities raised by integrating nanoscale phase change materials into switching devices are discussed.

  20. File list: ALL.Utr.20.AllAg.Fallopian_tube_secretory_epithelial_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Utr.20.AllAg.Fallopian_tube_secretory_epithelial_cell hg19 All antigens Uterus Fallopian tube secret...hg19/assembled/ALL.Utr.20.AllAg.Fallopian_tube_secretory_epithelial_cell.bed ...

  1. File list: ALL.Utr.50.AllAg.Fallopian_tube_secretory_epithelial_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Utr.50.AllAg.Fallopian_tube_secretory_epithelial_cell hg19 All antigens Uterus Fallopian tube secret...hg19/assembled/ALL.Utr.50.AllAg.Fallopian_tube_secretory_epithelial_cell.bed ...

  2. File list: ALL.Utr.05.AllAg.Fallopian_tube_secretory_epithelial_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Utr.05.AllAg.Fallopian_tube_secretory_epithelial_cell hg19 All antigens Uterus Fallopian tube secret...hg19/assembled/ALL.Utr.05.AllAg.Fallopian_tube_secretory_epithelial_cell.bed ...

  3. Nanoscale form dictates mesoscale function in plasmonic DNA–nanoparticle superlattices

    Ross, Michael B.; Ku, Jessie C.; Vaccarezza, Victoria M.; Schatz, George C.; Mirkin , Chad A. (NWU)

    2016-06-15

    The nanoscale manipulation of matter allows properties to be created in a material that would be difficult or even impossible to achieve in the bulk state. Progress towards such functional nanoscale architectures requires the development of methods to precisely locate nanoscale objects in three dimensions and for the formation of rigorous structure–function relationships across multiple size regimes (beginning from the nanoscale). Here, we use DNA as a programmable ligand to show that two- and three-dimensional mesoscale superlattice crystals with precisely engineered optical properties can be assembled from the bottom up. The superlattices can transition from exhibiting the properties of the constituent plasmonic nanoparticles to adopting the photonic properties defined by the mesoscale crystal (here a rhombic dodecahedron) by controlling the spacing between the gold nanoparticle building blocks. Furthermore, we develop a generally applicable theoretical framework that illustrates how crystal habit can be a design consideration for controlling far-field extinction and light confinement in plasmonic metamaterial superlattices.

  4. NANOSCALE BIOSENSORS IN ECOSYSTEM EXPOSURE RESEARCH

    This powerpoint presentation presented information on nanoscale biosensors in ecosystem exposure research. The outline of the presentation is as follows: nanomaterials environmental exposure research; US agencies involved in nanosensor research; nanoscale LEDs in biosensors; nano...

  5. Nanoscale Electrochemical Sensing and Processing in Microreactors

    Odijk, Mathieu; van den Berg, Albert

    2018-01-01

    In this review, we summarize recent advances in nanoscale electrochemistry, including the use of nanoparticles, carbon nanomaterials, and nanowires. Exciting developments are reported for nanoscale redox cycling devices, which can chemically amplify signal readout. We also discuss promising

  6. Self assembly of organic nanostructures and dielectrophoretic assembly of inorganic nanowires.

    Dholakia, Geetha; Kuo, Steven; Allen, E. L.

    2007-03-01

    Self assembly techniques enable the organization of organic molecules into nanostructures. Currently engineering strategies for efficient assembly and routine integration of inorganic nanoscale objects into functional devices is very limited. AC Dielectrophoresis is an efficient technique to manipulate inorganic nanomaterials into higher dimensional structures. We used an alumina template based sol-gel synthesis method for the growth of various metal oxide nanowires with typical diameters of 100-150 nm, ranging in length from 3-10 μm. Here we report the dielectrophoretic assembly of TiO2 nanowires, an important material for photocatalysis and photovoltaics, onto interdigitated devices. Self assembly in organic nanostructures and its dependence on structure and stereochemistry of the molecule and dielectrophoretic field dependence in the assembly of inorganic nanowires will be compared and contrasted. Tunneling spectroscopy and DOS of these nanoscale systems will also be discussed.

  7. Insight into the electronic structure of the supramolecular “rods-in-belt” Au{sup I}-Cu{sup I} and Au{sup I}-Ag{sup I} self-assembled complexes from X-ray photoelectron and absorption spectroscopy

    Makarova, Anna A. [Department of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Grachova, Elena V.; Krupenya, Dmitry V. [Department of Chemistry, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Vilkov, Oleg [Department of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Fedorov, Alexander [Department of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Leibniz-Institut für Festkörper- und Werkstoffforschung Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Usachov, Dmitry [Department of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Generalov, Alexander [Department of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Koshevoy, Igor O. [Department of Chemistry, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Department of Chemistry, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu 80101 (Finland); Tunik, Sergey P. [Department of Chemistry, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Rühl, Eckart [Physikalische Chemie, Institut für Chemie und Biochemie Freie Universität Berlin (Germany); and others

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Electronic structure of rods-in-belt complexes was described via PES and NEXAFS. • With increasing size the molecule becomes more sensitive to X-ray damage effects. • The HOMO consists of a combination of the d-Cu/Ag and π-C≡C states. • HOMOs are positioned at about 2.2 eV for Au-Cu and 2.5 eV BE for Au-Ag complexes. • LUMOs are located on the C-skeleton including π*-C≡C and π*-C=C{sub aromatic} orbitals. - Abstract: The recently discovered “rods-in-belt” supramolecular complexes with Au-Cu or Au-Ag cluster cores exhibit self-assembly behavior, have a very unusual structural motif, and what is most important, show remarkable light emitting properties. The electronic and photophysical characteristics of these unique objects can be relatively easy tuned by modifying the ligand (alkynyl and phosphine) environment. Because of these properties the “rods-in-belt” supramolecules could serve as building blocks for next generation electronics, and in particular, for light-emitting devices and in bioimaging applications. Herein, we report a comprehensive characterization of the electronic structure of two families of alkynyl-diphosphine supramolecular complexes with the heterometallic Au-Cu and Au-Ag cores. Using X-ray photoemission and absorption spectroscopy we disentangled the structure of their occupied and unoccupied electronic states close to the Fermi level. The results obtained suggest that the major contribution to the highest occupied molecular orbitals is made by the triple bonded carbons hosted in the dialkynyl-gold “rods” and the copper (silver) atoms from the central cluster core of the heterometallic Au-Cu (Au-Ag) molecules. The lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals are located on the carbon skeleton of the complexes and include π*-C≡C and π*-C=C{sub aromatic} orbitals. The onset of the valence band in the Au-Ag systems starts at about 0.3 eV lower than that in the Au-Cu complexes, implying a slightly larger energy

  8. Engineering Platinum Alloy Electrocatalysts in Nanoscale for PEMFC Application

    He, Ting [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-03-01

    Fuel cells are expected to be a key next-generation energy source used for vehicles and homes, offering high energy conversion efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. However, due to large overpotentials on anode and cathode, the efficiency is still much lower than theoretically predicted. During the past decades, considerable efforts have been made to investigate synergy effect of platinum alloyed with base metals. But, engineering the alloy particles in nanoscale has been a challenge. Most important challenges in developing nanostructured materials are the abilities to control size, monodispersity, microcomposition, and even morphology or self-assembly capability, so called Nanomaterials-by-Design, which requires interdisciplinary collaborations among computational modeling, chemical synthesis, nanoscale characterization as well as manufacturing processing. Electrocatalysts, particularly fuel cell catalysts, are dramatically different from heterogeneous catalysts because the surface area in micropores cannot be electrochemically controlled on the same time scale as more transport accessible surfaces. Therefore, electrocatalytic architectures need minimal microporous surface area while maximizing surfaces accessible through mesopores or macropores, and to "pin" the most active, highest performance physicochemical state of the materials even when exposed to thermodynamic forces, which would otherwise drive restructuring, crystallization, or densification of the nanoscale materials. In this presentation, results of engineering nanoscale platinum alloy particles down to 2 ~ 4 nm will be discussed. Based on nature of alloyed base metals, various synthesis technologies have been studied and developed to achieve capabilities of controlling particle size and particle microcomposition, namely, core-shell synthesis, microemulsion technique, thermal decomposition process, surface organometallic chemical method, etc. The results show that by careful engineering the

  9. Stabilization of Ag nanostructures by tuning their Fermi levels

    Tani, Tadaaki; Kan, Ryota; Yamano, Yuka; Uchida, Takayuki

    2018-05-01

    The oxidation of Ag nanostructures has been studied as a key step for their degradation under the guiding principle in the previous paper that they are stable when their Fermi level is lower than those of their surroundings. The drop of the Fermi level of a thin Ag layer was caused by the formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of certain organic compounds including those of photographic interest and a monolayer of AgI, and attributed to the formation of dielectric layers, whose positive charges were closer to the Ag layer than negative charges. A consideration is given on further examinations needed to realize the above guiding principle in individual devices.

  10. Nanoscale organic ferroelectric resistive switches

    Khikhlovskyi, V.; Wang, R.; Breemen, A.J.J.M. van; Gelinck, G.H.; Janssen, R.A.J.; Kemerink, M.

    2014-01-01

    Organic ferroelectric resistive switches function by grace of nanoscale phase separation in a blend of a semiconducting and a ferroelectric polymer that is sandwiched between metallic electrodes. In this work, various scanning probe techniques are combined with numerical modeling to unravel their

  11. Nanoscale Characterization for the Classroom

    Carroll, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the development of a semester course in 'nano-scale characterization'. The interdisciplinary course is opened to both advanced undergraduate and graduate students with a standard undergraduate preparation in Materials Science, Chemistry, or Physics. The approach is formal rather than the typical 'research seminar' and has a laboratory component

  12. Physical principles for DNA tile self-assembly.

    Evans, Constantine G; Winfree, Erik

    2017-06-19

    DNA tiles provide a promising technique for assembling structures with nanoscale resolution through self-assembly by basic interactions rather than top-down assembly of individual structures. Tile systems can be programmed to grow based on logical rules, allowing for a small number of tile types to assemble large, complex assemblies that can retain nanoscale resolution. Such algorithmic systems can even assemble different structures using the same tiles, based on inputs that seed the growth. While programming and theoretical analysis of tile self-assembly often makes use of abstract logical models of growth, experimentally implemented systems are governed by nanoscale physical processes that can lead to very different behavior, more accurately modeled by taking into account the thermodynamics and kinetics of tile attachment and detachment in solution. This review discusses the relationships between more abstract and more physically realistic tile assembly models. A central concern is how consideration of model differences enables the design of tile systems that robustly exhibit the desired abstract behavior in realistic physical models and in experimental implementations. Conversely, we identify situations where self-assembly in abstract models can not be well-approximated by physically realistic models, putting constraints on physical relevance of the abstract models. To facilitate the discussion, we introduce a unified model of tile self-assembly that clarifies the relationships between several well-studied models in the literature. Throughout, we highlight open questions regarding the physical principles for DNA tile self-assembly.

  13. Peroxiredoxins: A Model for a Self-Assembling Nanoscale System

    2014-08-24

    Introduction 24 Chapter Three describes the identification of a potential peroxiredoxin enzyme in the genome of the thermophilic bacterium Thermus...Discussion (TaqPrx) 80 3.9 Summary of results Comparison of the sequences of thermophilic peroxiredoxins showed that the enzyme reported by Logan and...well as that of the other two variants. A second enzyme was also examined, a thermophilic peroxiredoxin from the bacterium Thermus aquaticus. This

  14. Hierarchical Ag mesostructures for single particle SERS substrate

    Xu, Minwei, E-mail: xuminwei@xjtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Yin

    2017-01-30

    Highlights: • Hierarchical Ag mesostructures with the size of 250, 360 and 500 nm are synthesized via a seed-mediated approach. • The Ag mesostructures present the tailorable size and highly roughened surfaces. • The average enhancement factors for individual Ag mesostructures were estimated to be as high as 10{sup 6}. - Abstract: Hierarchical Ag mesostructures with highly rough surface morphology have been synthesized at room temperature through a simple seed-mediated approach. Electron microscopy characterizations indicate that the obtained Ag mesostructures exhibit a textured surface morphology with the flower-like architecture. Moreover, the particle size can be tailored easily in the range of 250–500 nm. For the growth process of the hierarchical Ag mesostructures, it is believed that the self-assembly mechanism is more reasonable rather than the epitaxial overgrowth of Ag seed. The oriented attachment of nanoparticles is revealed during the formation of Ag mesostructures. Single particle surface enhanced Raman spectra (sp-SERS) of crystal violet adsorbed on the hierarchical Ag mesostructures were measured. Results reveal that the hierarchical Ag mesostructures can be highly sensitive sp-SERS substrates with good reproducibility. The average enhancement factors for individual Ag mesostructures are estimated to be about 10{sup 6}.

  15. Nano Ag@AgBr surface-sensitized Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} photocatalyst: oil-in-water synthesis and enhanced photocatalytic degradation

    Lin, Shuanglong; Liu, Li; Hu, Jinshan; Liang, Yinghua, E-mail: liangyh@heuu.edu.cn; Cui, Wenquan, E-mail: wkcui@163.com

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The plasmatic Ag@AgBr surface-sensitized Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} composite photocatalysts. • Ag@AgBr greatly increased visible-light absorption for Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}. • The plasmonic photocatalysts exhibited enhanced activity for the degradation of MB, phenol and salicylic acid. - Abstract: Nano Ag@AgBr decorated on the surface of flower-like Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} (hereafter designated Ag@AgBr/Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}) were prepared via a facile oil-in-water self-assembly method. The photocatalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), etc. The characterization results indicated that nano Ag@AgBr was observed to be evenly dispersed on the surface of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}, and was approximately 20 nm in size. Ag@AgBr/Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} composites exhibited excellent UV–vis absorption, due to quantum dimension effect of Ag@AgBr, the surface plasmonic resonance (SPR) of Ag nanoparticles and the special flower-like structure of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}. The photoelectrochemical measurement verified that the suitable band potential of Ag@AgBr and Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} and the existence of metal Ag resulted in the high efficiency in charge separation of the composite. The photocatalytic activities of the Ag@AgBr/Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} samples were examined under visible-light irradiation for the degradation of methylene blue (MB). The composite presented excellent photocatalytic activity due to the synergetic effect of Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6}, AgBr, and Ag nanoparticles. The Ag@AgBr(20 wt.%)/Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} sample exhibited the best photocatalytic activity, degrading 95.03% MB after irradiation for 2 h, which was respectively 1.29 times and 1.28 times higher than that of Ag@AgBr and Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} photocatalyst. Meanwhile, phenol and salicylic acid were degraded to further prove the degradation ability of Ag@AgBr/Bi{sub 2

  16. Molecular and nanoscale materials and devices in electronics.

    Fu, Lei; Cao, Lingchao; Liu, Yunqi; Zhu, Daoben

    2004-12-13

    Over the past several years, there have been many significant advances toward the realization of electronic computers integrated on the molecular scale and a much greater understanding of the types of materials that will be useful in molecular devices and their properties. It was demonstrated that individual molecules could serve as incomprehensibly tiny switch and wire one million times smaller than those on conventional silicon microchip. This has resulted very recently in the assembly and demonstration of tiny computer logic circuits built from such molecular scale devices. The purpose of this review is to provide a general introduction to molecular and nanoscale materials and devices in electronics.

  17. Nanoscale and single-molecule interfacial electron transfer

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik

    2003-01-01

    for comprehensive later theoretical work and data interpretation in many areas of chemistry, electrochemistry, and biology. We discuss here some new areas of theoretical electrochemical ET science, with focus on nanoscale electrochemical and bioelectrochemical sciences. Particular attention is given to in situ...... scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and single-electron tunneling (SET, or Coulomb blockade) in electrochemical. systems directly in aqueous electrolyte solution and at room temperature. We illustrate the new theoretical formalism and its perspectives by recent cases of electrochemical SET, negative...... differential resistance patterns, and by ET dynamics of organized assemblies of biological macromolecules, such as redox metalloproteins and oligonucleotides on single-crystal Au(III)-electrode surfaces....

  18. Microstructure evolution during 300 °C storage of sintered Ag nanoparticles on Ag and Au substrates

    Paknejad, S.A. [King’s College London, Physics Department, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Dumas, G. [Eltek Semiconductors Ltd, Nelson Road Industrial Estate, Dartmouth, Devon TQ6 9LA (United Kingdom); West, G. [Loughborough University, Materials Department, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Lewis, G. [Eltek Semiconductors Ltd, Nelson Road Industrial Estate, Dartmouth, Devon TQ6 9LA (United Kingdom); Mannan, S.H., E-mail: samjid.mannan@kcl.ac.uk [King’s College London, Physics Department, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-25

    Highlights: • Shear strength of pressure-free sintered Ag found to increase during ageing at 300 °C on Ag substrate. • Rapid collapse of void number density after 24 h ageing in the sintered Ag layer. • Higher porosity at edge of joint compared to the middle. • Shear strength of pressure-free sintered Ag decreases during ageing at 300 °C due to high porosity layer growth. • Void free layer and high porosity layer growth explained in terms of atomic diffusion and grain boundary migration. - Abstract: A silver nanoparticle based die attach material was used in a pressure free process to bond 2.5 mm square Ag plated Si die to Ag and Au plated substrates. The assemblies were stored at 300 °C for up to 500 h and the morphology of the sintered Ag and the shear strength were monitored as a function of time. On Ag substrate it was found that die shear strength increased and that the Ag grains grew in size and porosity decreased over time. There was also a clear difference in morphology between sintered Ag at the die edge and centre. On Au substrate, it was observed that the initially high die shear strength decreased with storage time and that voids migrated away from the Ag/Au interface and into the Ag joint. This has led to the formation of a void free layer at the interface followed by a high porosity region, which weakened the joint. The microstructure reveals a high density of grain and twin boundaries which facilitate the Ag and Au atomic diffusion responsible. The grain structure of the plated Au led to diffusion of Au into the Ag via high-angle tilt grain boundaries, and grain boundary migration further dispersed the Au into the Ag layer.

  19. Inorganic anion-dependent assembly of zero-, one-, two- and three-dimensional Cu(II)/Ag(I) complexes under the guidance of the HSAB theory: Synthesis, structure, and magnetic property

    Liu, Yaru; Xing, Zhiyan [School of Science, North University of China, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030051 (China); Zhang, Xiao [MIIT Key Laboratory of Critical Materials Technology for New Energy Conversion and Storage, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 PR China (China); Liang, Guorui [School of Science, North University of China, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030051 (China)

    2017-02-15

    To systematically explore the influence of inorganic anions on building coordination complexes, five novel complexes based on 1-(benzotriazole-1-methyl)−2-propylimidazole (bpmi), [Cu(bpmi){sub 2}(Ac){sub 2}]·H{sub 2}O (1), [Cu(bpmi){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·2NO{sub 3}·2H{sub 2}O (2), [Cu(bpmi)(N{sub 3}){sub 2}] (3), [Ag(bpmi)(NO{sub 3})] (4) and [Cu{sub 3}(bpmi){sub 2}(SCN){sub 4}(DMF)] (5) (Ac{sup −}=CH{sub 3}COO{sup −}, DMF=N,N-Dimethylformamide) are synthesized through rationally introducing Cu(II) salts and Ag(I) salt with different inorganic anions. X-ray single-crystal analyses reveal that these complexes show interesting structural features from mononuclear (1), one-dimensional (2 and 3), two-dimensional (4) to three-dimensional (5) under the influence of inorganic anions with different basicities. The structural variation can be explained by the hard-soft-acid-base (HSAB) theory. Magnetic susceptibility measurement indicates that complex 3 exhibits an antiferromagnetic coupling between adjacent Cu(II) ions. - Graphical abstract: Five new Cu(II)/Ag(I) complexes show interesting structural features from mononuclear, one-dimension, two-dimension to three-dimension under the influence of inorganic anions. The structural variation can be explained by the HSAB theory. - Highlights: • Five inorganic anion-dependent complexes are synthesized. • Structural variation can be explained by the hard-soft-acid-base (HSAB) theory. • The magnetic property of complex has been studied.

  20. Elucidating the real-time Ag nanoparticle growth on α-Ag2WO4 during electron beam irradiation: experimental evidence and theoretical insights.

    Pereira, Wyllamanney da Silva; Andrés, Juan; Gracia, Lourdes; San-Miguel, Miguel A; da Silva, Edison Z; Longo, Elson; Longo, Valeria M

    2015-02-21

    Why and how Ag is formed when electron beam irradiation takes place on α-Ag2WO4 in a vacuum transmission electron microscopy chamber? To find an answer, the atomic-scale mechanisms underlying the formation and growth of Ag on α-Ag2WO4 have been investigated by detailed in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) studies, density functional theory based calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The growth process at different times, chemical composition, size distribution and element distribution were analyzed in depth at the nanoscale level using FE-SEM, operated at different voltages (5, 10, 15, and 20 kV), and TEM with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) characterization. The size of Ag nanoparticles covers a wide range of values. Most of the Ag particles are in the 20-40 nm range. The nucleation and formation of Ag on α-Ag2WO4 is a result of structural and electronic changes in the AgOx (x = 2,4, 6, and 7) clusters used as constituent building blocks of this material, consistent with metallic Ag formation. First principle calculations point out that Ag-3 and Ag-4-fold coordinated centers, located in the sub-surface of the (100) surface, are the most energetically favorable to undergo the diffusion process to form metallic Ag. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and the nudged elastic band (NEB) method were used to investigate the minimum energy pathways of these Ag atoms from positions in the first slab layer to outward sites on the (100) surface of α-Ag2WO4. The results point out that the injection of electrons decreases the activation barrier for this diffusion step and this unusual behavior results from the presence of a lower energy barrier process.

  1. AGS experiments - 1994, 1995, 1996

    Depken, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    This report contains the following information on the Brookhaven AGS Accelerator complex: FY 1996 AGS schedule as run; FY 1997 AGS schedule (working copy); AGS beams 1997; AGS experimental area FY 1994 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1995 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1996 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1997 physics program (in progress); a listing of experiments by number; two-phage summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; listing of publications of AGS experiments begins here; and listing of AGS experimenters begins here.

  2. AGS experiments - 1994, 1995, 1996

    Depken, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    This report contains the following information on the Brookhaven AGS Accelerator complex: FY 1996 AGS schedule as run; FY 1997 AGS schedule (working copy); AGS beams 1997; AGS experimental area FY 1994 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1995 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1996 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1997 physics program (in progress); a listing of experiments by number; two-phage summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; listing of publications of AGS experiments begins here; and listing of AGS experimenters begins here

  3. AGS experiments -- 1991, 1992, 1993

    Depken, J.C.

    1994-04-01

    This report contains: (1) FY 1993 AGS schedule as run; (2) FY 1994--95 AGS schedule; (3) AGS experiments ≥ FY 1993 (as of 30 March 1994); (4) AGS beams 1993; (5) AGS experimental area FY 1991 physics program; (6) AGS experimental area FY 1992 physics program; (7) AGS experimental area FY 1993 physics program; (8) AGS experimental area FY 1994 physics program (planned); (9) a listing of experiments by number; (10) two-page summaries of each experiment; (11) listing of publications of AGS experiments; and (12) listing of AGS experiments

  4. Transformation of AgCl nanoparticles in a sewer system — A field study

    Kaegi, Ralf, E-mail: ralf.kaegi@eawag.ch [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 133, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Voegelin, Andreas; Sinnet, Brian [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 133, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Zuleeg, Steffen [KUSTER + HAGER Group, Oberstrasse 222, 9014 St. Gallen (Switzerland); Siegrist, Hansruedi [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 133, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Burkhardt, Michael [HSR University of Applied Sciences, Institute of Environmental and Process Engineering (UMTEC), Oberseestrasse 10, 8640 Rapperswil (Switzerland)

    2015-12-01

    sewer system. • Newly formed Ag{sub 2}S remains in the nanoscale throughout the whole wastewater treatment process.

  5. Creating nanoscale emulsions using condensation.

    Guha, Ingrid F; Anand, Sushant; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2017-11-08

    Nanoscale emulsions are essential components in numerous products, ranging from processed foods to novel drug delivery systems. Existing emulsification methods rely either on the breakup of larger droplets or solvent exchange/inversion. Here we report a simple, scalable method of creating nanoscale water-in-oil emulsions by condensing water vapor onto a subcooled oil-surfactant solution. Our technique enables a bottom-up approach to forming small-scale emulsions. Nanoscale water droplets nucleate at the oil/air interface and spontaneously disperse within the oil, due to the spreading dynamics of oil on water. Oil-soluble surfactants stabilize the resulting emulsions. We find that the oil-surfactant concentration controls the spreading behavior of oil on water, as well as the peak size, polydispersity, and stability of the resulting emulsions. Using condensation, we form emulsions with peak radii around 100 nm and polydispersities around 10%. This emulsion formation technique may open different routes to creating emulsions, colloidal systems, and emulsion-based materials.

  6. Nanoscale diffusive memristor crossbars as physical unclonable functions.

    Zhang, R; Jiang, H; Wang, Z R; Lin, P; Zhuo, Y; Holcomb, D; Zhang, D H; Yang, J J; Xia, Q

    2018-02-08

    Physical unclonable functions have emerged as promising hardware security primitives for device authentication and key generation in the era of the Internet of Things. Herein, we report novel physical unclonable functions built upon the crossbars of nanoscale diffusive memristors that translate the stochastic distribution of Ag clusters in a SiO 2 matrix into a random binary bitmap that serves as a device fingerprint. The random dispersion of Ag led to an uneven number of clusters at each cross-point, which in turn resulted in a stochastic ability to switch in the Ag:SiO 2 diffusive memristors in an array. The randomness of the dispersion was a barrier to fingerprint cloning and the unique fingerprints of each device were persistent after fabrication. Using an optimized fabrication procedure, we maximized the randomness and achieved an inter-class Hamming distance of 50.68%. We also discovered that the bits were not flipping after over 10 4 s at 400 K, suggesting superior reliability of our physical unclonable functions. In addition, our diffusive memristor-based physical unclonable functions were easy to fabricate and did not require complicated post-processing for digitization and thus, provide new opportunities in hardware security applications.

  7. Self-assembling peptide semiconductors

    Tao, Kai; Makam, Pandeeswar; Aizen, Ruth; Gazit, Ehud

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductors are central to the modern electronics and optics industries. Conventional semiconductive materials bear inherent limitations, especially in emerging fields such as interfacing with biological systems and bottom-up fabrication. A promising candidate for bioinspired and durable nanoscale semiconductors is the family of self-assembled nanostructures comprising short peptides. The highly ordered and directional intermolecular π-π interactions and hydrogen-bonding network allow the formation of quantum confined structures within the peptide self-assemblies, thus decreasing the band gaps of the superstructures into semiconductor regions. As a result of the diverse architectures and ease of modification of peptide self-assemblies, their semiconductivity can be readily tuned, doped, and functionalized. Therefore, this family of electroactive supramolecular materials may bridge the gap between the inorganic semiconductor world and biological systems. PMID:29146781

  8. Nanoconstruction by welding individual metallic nanowires together using nanoscale solder

    Peng, Y; Inkson, B J; Cullis, A G

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a new bottom-up nanowelding technique enabling building blocks to be assembled and welded together into complex 3D nanostructures using nanovolumes of metal solder. The building blocks of gold nanowires, (Co 72 Pt 28 /Pt) n multilayer nanowires, and nanosolder Sn 99 Au 1 alloy nanowires were successfully fabricated by a template technique. Individual metallic nanowires were picked up and assembled together. Conductive nanocircuits were then welded together using similar or dissimilar nanosolder material. At the weld sites, nanoscale volumes of a chosen metal are deposited using nanosolder of a sacrificial nanowire, which ensures that the nanoobjects to be bonded retain their structural integrity. The whole nanowelding process is clean, controllable and reliable, and ensures both mechanically strong and electrically conductive contacts.

  9. Nanoscale Correlated Disorder in Out-of-Equilibrium Myelin Ultrastructure.

    Campi, Gaetano; Di Gioacchino, Michael; Poccia, Nicola; Ricci, Alessandro; Burghammer, Manfred; Ciasca, Gabriele; Bianconi, Antonio

    2018-01-23

    Ultrastructural fluctuations at nanoscale are fundamental to assess properties and functionalities of advanced out-of-equilibrium materials. We have taken myelin as a model of supramolecular assembly in out-of-equilibrium living matter. Myelin sheath is a simple stable multilamellar structure of high relevance and impact in biomedicine. Although it is known that myelin has a quasi-crystalline ultrastructure, there is no information on its fluctuations at nanoscale in different states due to limitations of the available standard techniques. To overcome these limitations, we have used scanning micro X-ray diffraction, which is a unique non-invasive probe of both reciprocal and real space to visualize statistical fluctuations of myelin order of the sciatic nerve of Xenopus laevis. The results show that the ultrastructure period of the myelin is stabilized by large anticorrelated fluctuations at nanoscale, between hydrophobic and hydrophilic layers. The ratio between the total thickness of hydrophilic and hydrophobic layers defines the conformational parameter, which describes the different states of myelin. Our key result is that myelin in its out-of-equilibrium functional state fluctuates point-to-point between different conformations showing a correlated disorder described by a Levy distribution. As the system approaches the thermodynamic equilibrium in an aged state, the disorder loses its correlation degree and the structural fluctuation distribution changes to Gaussian. In a denatured state at low pH, it changes to a completely disordered stage. Our results aim to clarify the degradation mechanism in biological systems by associating these states with ultrastructural dynamic fluctuations at nanoscale.

  10. CFA-2 and CFA-3 (Coordination Framework Augsburg University-2 and -3); novel MOFs assembled from trinuclear Cu(I)/Ag(I) secondary building units and 3,3',5,5'-tetraphenyl-bipyrazolate ligands.

    Grzywa, Maciej; Geßner, Christof; Denysenko, Dmytro; Bredenkötter, Björn; Gschwind, Fabienne; Fromm, Katharina M; Nitek, Wojciech; Klemm, Elias; Volkmer, Dirk

    2013-05-21

    The syntheses of H2-phbpz, [Cu2(phbpz)]·2DEF·MeOH (CFA-2) and [Ag2(phbpz)] (CFA-3) (H2-phbpz = 3,3',5,5'-tetraphenyl-1H,1'H-4,4'-bipyrazole) compounds and their crystal structures are described. The Cu(I) containing metal-organic framework CFA-2 crystallizes in the tetragonal crystal system, within space group I4(1)/a (no. 88) and the following unit cell parameters: a = 30.835(14), c = 29.306(7) Å, V = 27 865(19) Å(3). CFA-2 features a flexible 3-D three-connected two-fold interpenetrated porous structure constructed of triangular Cu(I) subunits. Upon exposure to different kinds of liquids (MeOH, EtOH, DMF, DEF) CFA-2 shows pronounced breathing effects. CFA-3 crystallizes in the monoclinic crystal system, within space group P2(1)/c (no. 14) and the following unit cell parameters: a = 16.3399(3), b = 32.7506(4), c = 16.2624(3) Å, β = 107.382(2)°, V = 8305.3(2) Å(3). In contrast to the former compound, CFA-3 features a layered 2-D three-connected structure constructed from triangular Ag(i) subunits. Both compounds are characterized by elemental and thermogravimetric analyses, single crystal structure analysis and X-ray powder diffraction, FTIR- and fluorescence spectroscopy. Preliminary results on oxygen activation in CFA-2 are presented and potential improvements in terms of framework robustness and catalytic efficiency are discussed.

  11. Direct optical imaging of nanoscale internal organization of polymer films

    Suran, Swathi; Varma, Manoj

    2018-02-01

    Owing to its sensitivity and precise control at the nanoscale, polyelectrolytes have been immensely used to modify surfaces. Polyelectrolyte multilayers are generally water made and are easy to fabricate on any surface by the layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly process due to electrostatic interactions. Polyelectrolyte multilayers or PEMs can be assembled to form ultrathin membranes which can have potential applications in water filtration and desalination [1-3]. Hydration in PEMs is a consequence of both the bulk and surface phenomenon [4-7]. Bulk behavior of polymer membranes are well understood. Several techniques including reflectivity and contact angle measurements were used to measure the hydration in the bulk of polymer membranes [4, 8]. On the other hand their internal organization at the molecular level which can have a profound contribution in the transport mechanism, are not understood well. Previously, we engineered a technique, which we refer to as Bright-field Nanoscopy, which allows nanoscale optical imaging using local heterogeneities in a water-soluble germanium (Ge) thin film ( 25 nm thick) deposited on gold [8]. We use this technique to study the water transport in PEMs. It is understood that the surface charge and outer layers of the PEMs play a significant role in water transport through polymers [9-11]. This well-known `odd-even' effect arising on having different surface termination of the PEMs was optically observed with a spatial resolution unlike any other reported previously [12]. In this communication, we report that on increasing the etchant's concentration, one can control the lateral etching of the Ge film. This allowed the visualization of the nanoscale internal organization in the PEMs. Knowledge of the internal structure would allow one to engineer polymer membranes specific to applications such as drug delivering capsules, ion transport membranes and barriers etc. We also demonstrate a mathematical model involving a surface

  12. The role of Ag precipitates in Cu-12 wt% Ag

    Yao, D.W.; Song, L.N. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Zheda Road No.38, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Dong, A.P.; Wang, L.T. [China Railway Construction Electrification Bureau Group Co.,Ltd., Beijing 100036 (China); Zhang, L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Meng, L., E-mail: mengliang@zju.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Zheda Road No.38, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China)

    2012-12-15

    The Cu-12 wt% Ag was prepared to investigate the role of Ag precipitates on the properties of the alloy. Two kinds of heat treatment procedures were adopted to produce different amount of Ag precipitates in the Cu-12 wt% Ag. The microstructure of Ag precipitates was systematically observed by optical microscopy and electron microscopy. The Cu-12 wt% Ag with more Ag precipitates exhibits higher strength and lower electrical conductivity. More Ag precipitates results in more phase interface and less Ag atoms dissolved in Cu matrix. By comparing the strengthening effect and electron scattering effect of phase interface and dissolved Ag atoms, it is conclude that the interface between Cu matrix and Ag precipitates could significantly block dislocation movement and enhance electron scattering in Cu-Ag alloys.

  13. Symmetry Breaking by Surface Blocking: Synthesis of Bimorphic Silver Nanoparticles, Nanoscale Fishes and Apples

    Cathcart, Nicole; Kitaev, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    A powerful approach to augment the diversity of well-defined metal nanoparticle (MNP) morphologies, essential for MNP advanced applications, is symmetry breaking combined with seeded growth. Utilizing this approach enabled the formation of bimorphic silver nanoparticles (bi-AgNPs) consisting of two shapes linked by one regrowth point. Bi-AgNPs were formed by using an adsorbing polymer, poly(acrylic acid), PAA, to block the surface of a decahedral AgNP seed and restricting growth of new silver to a single nucleation point. First, we have realized 2-D growth of platelets attached to decahedra producing nanoscale shapes reminiscent of apples, fishes, mushrooms and kites. 1-D bimorphic growth of rods (with chloride) and 3-D bimorphic growth of cubes and bipyramids (with bromide) were achieved by using halides to induce preferential (100) stabilization over (111) of platelets. Furthermore, the universality of the formation of bimorphic nanoparticles was demonstrated by using different seeds. Bi-AgNPs exhibit strong SERS enhancement due to regular cavities at the necks. Overall, the reported approach to symmetry breaking and bimorphic nanoparticle growth offers a powerful methodology for nanoscale shape design.

  14. Bacteriophage Assembly

    Anastasia A. Aksyuk

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages have been a model system to study assembly processes for over half a century. Formation of infectious phage particles involves specific protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions, as well as large conformational changes of assembly precursors. The sequence and molecular mechanisms of phage assembly have been elucidated by a variety of methods. Differences and similarities of assembly processes in several different groups of bacteriophages are discussed in this review. The general principles of phage assembly are applicable to many macromolecular complexes.

  15. Fuel assemblies

    Nakatsuka, Masafumi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent scattering of gaseous fission products released from fuel assemblies stored in an fbr type reactor. Constitution; A cap provided with means capable of storing gas is adapted to amount to the assembly handling head, for example, by way of threading in a storage rack of spent fuel assemblies consisting of a bottom plate, a top plate and an assembly support mechanism. By previously eliminating the gas inside of the assembly and the cap in the storage rack, gaseous fission products upon loading, if released from fuel rods during storage, are stored in the cap and do not scatter in the storage rack. (Horiuchi, T.)

  16. Sequence assembly

    Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Hoffmann, S.; Frankel, Annett Maria

    2009-01-01

    Despite the rapidly increasing number of sequenced and re-sequenced genomes, many issues regarding the computational assembly of large-scale sequencing data have remain unresolved. Computational assembly is crucial in large genome projects as well for the evolving high-throughput technologies and...... in genomic DNA, highly expressed genes and alternative transcripts in EST sequences. We summarize existing comparisons of different assemblers and provide a detailed descriptions and directions for download of assembly programs at: http://genome.ku.dk/resources/assembly/methods.html....

  17. Formation and Characterization of Stacked Nanoscale Layers of Polymers and Silanes on Silicon Surfaces

    Ochoa, Rosie; Davis, Brian; Conley, Hiram; Hurd, Katie; Linford, Matthew R.; Davis, Robert C.

    2008-10-01

    Chemical surface patterning at the nanoscale is a critical component of chemically directed assembly of nanoscale devices or sensitive biological molecules onto surfaces. Complete and consistent formation of nanoscale layers of silanes and polymers is a necessary first step for chemical patterning. We explored methods of silanizing silicon substrates for the purpose of functionalizing the surfaces. The chemical functionalization, stability, flatness, and repeatability of the process was characterized by use of ellipsometry, water contact angle, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). We found that forming the highest quality functionalized surfaces was accomplished through use of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Specifically, surfaces were plasma cleaned and hydrolyzed before the silane was applied. A polymer layer less then 2 nm in thickness was electrostatically bound to the silane layer. The chemical functionalization, stability, flatness, and repeatability of the process was also characterized for the polymer layer using ellipsometry, water contact angle, and AFM.

  18. AGS experiments: 1993 - 1994 - 1995

    Depken, J.C.

    1996-04-01

    This report contains: FY 1995 AGS Schedule as Run; FY 1996-97 AGE Schedule (working copy); AGS Beams 1995; AGS Experimental Area FY 1993 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1994 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1995 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1996 Physics Program (In progress); A listing of experiments by number; Two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; Listing of publications of AGS experiments begins here; and Listing of AGS experimenters begins here. This is the twelfth edition

  19. AGS experiments: 1993 - 1994 - 1995

    Depken, J.C.

    1996-04-01

    This report contains: FY 1995 AGS Schedule as Run; FY 1996-97 AGE Schedule (working copy); AGS Beams 1995; AGS Experimental Area FY 1993 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1994 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1995 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1996 Physics Program (In progress); A listing of experiments by number; Two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; Listing of publications of AGS experiments begins here; and Listing of AGS experimenters begins here. This is the twelfth edition.

  20. Nanoscale current spreading analysis in solution-processed graphene oxide/silver nanowire transparent electrodes via conductive atomic force microscopy

    Shaw, Joseph E.; Perumal, Ajay; Bradley, Donal D. C.; Stavrinou, Paul N.; Anthopoulos, Thomas D., E-mail: t.anthopoulos@ic.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Centre for Plastic Electronics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-21

    We use conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM) to study the origin of long-range conductivity in model transparent conductive electrodes composed of networks of reduced graphene oxide (rGO{sub X}) and silver nanowires (AgNWs), with nanoscale spatial resolution. Pristine networks of rGO{sub X} (1–3 monolayers-thick) and AgNWs exhibit sheet resistances of ∼100–1000 kΩ/□ and 100–900 Ω/□, respectively. When the materials are deposited sequentially to form bilayer rGO{sub X}/AgNW electrodes and thermally annealed at 200 °C, the sheet resistance reduces by up to 36% as compared to pristine AgNW networks. CAFM was used to analyze the current spreading in both systems in order to identify the nanoscale phenomena responsible for this effect. For rGO{sub X} networks, the low intra-flake conductivity and the inter-flake contact resistance is found to dominate the macroscopic sheet resistance, while for AgNW networks the latter is determined by the density of the inter-AgNW junctions and their associated resistance. In the case of the bilayer rGO{sub X}/AgNWs' networks, rGO{sub X} flakes are found to form conductive “bridges” between AgNWs. We show that these additional nanoscopic electrical connections are responsible for the enhanced macroscopic conductivity of the bilayer rGO{sub X}/AgNW electrodes. Finally, the critical role of thermal annealing on the formation of these nanoscopic connections is discussed.

  1. AGS intensity upgrades

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    After the successful completion of the AGS Booster and several upgrades of the AGS, a new intensity record of 6.3 x 10 13 protons per pulse accelerated to 24 GeV was achieved. The high intensity slow-extracted beam program at the AGS typically serves about five production targets and about eight experiments including three rare Kaon decay experiments. Further intensity upgrades are being discussed that could increase the average delivered beam intensity by up to a factor of four

  2. Green and red luminescence in co-precipitation synthesized Pr:LuAG nanophosphor

    Kumar, S. Arun; Kumar, K. Ashok; Gunaseelan, M.; Senthilselvan, J., E-mail: jsselvan@hotmail.com [Department of Nuclear Physics, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai–600 025, Tamil Nadu (India); Asokan, K. [Materials Science Group, Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi-110067 (India)

    2016-05-06

    Pr:LuAG nanophosphor is an effective candidate in magnetic resonance imaging coupled positron emission tomography (MRI-PET) for medical imaging and scintillator applications. LuAG:Pr (0.05, 0.15 mol%) nanoscale ceramic powders were synthesized by co-precipitation method using urea as precipitant. Effect of antisite defect on structure and luminescence behavior was investigated. Pr:LuAG nanoceramic powders are found crystallized in cubic structure by high temperature calcination at 1400 °C and it shows antisite defect. HR-SEM analysis revealed spherically shaped Pr:LuAG nanoceramic particulate powders with ∼100 nm size. By the excitation at 450 nm, Pr:LuAG nanophosphor exhibit green to red luminescence in the wavelength range of 520 to 680 nm, which is originated from multiplet transition of Pr{sup 3+} ions.

  3. Hetero-oligonucleotide Nanoscale Tiles Capable of Two-Dimensional Lattice Formation as Testbeds for a Rapid, Affordable Purification Methodology

    2013-01-01

    devices; however, DNA is not the only polymer that can take advantage of the specicity of the Watson – Crick base-pair to achieve these goals. Central to...14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: New nanoscale hetero-oligonucleotide tiles are assembled from DNA , RNA and morpholino oligos and...purified using size exclusion filtration. Homo-oligonucleotide tiles assembled from RP-cartridge processed DNA oligos are purified by nondenaturing gel

  4. AgSTAR

    AgSTAR promotes biogas recovery projects, which generate renewable energy and other beneficial products from the anaerobic digestion of livestock manure and organic wastes while decreasing greenhouse gas emissions from the agriculture sector.

  5. AGS intensity record

    Bleser, Ed

    1994-01-01

    As flashed in the September issue, this summer the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) reached a proton beam intensity of 4.05 x 10 13 protons per puise, claimed as the highest intensity ever achieved in a proton synchrotron. It is, however, only two-thirds of the way to its final goal of 6 x 10 13 . The achievement is the resuit of many years of effort. The Report of the AGS II Task Force, issued in February 1984, laid out a comprehensive programme largely based on a careful analysis of the PS experience at CERN. The AGS plan had two essential components: the construction of a new booster, and major upgrades to the AGS itself.

  6. Nanoscale biophysics of the cell

    Ashrafuzzaman, Mohammad

    2018-01-01

    Macroscopic cellular structures and functions are generally investigated using biological and biochemical approaches. But these methods are no longer adequate when one needs to penetrate deep into the small-scale structures and understand their functions. The cell is found to hold various physical structures, molecular machines, and processes that require physical and mathematical approaches to understand and indeed manipulate them. Disorders in general cellular compartments, perturbations in single molecular structures, drug distribution therein, and target specific drug-binding, etc. are mostly physical phenomena. This book will show how biophysics has revolutionized our way of addressing the science and technology of nanoscale structures of cells, and also describes the potential for manipulating the events that occur in them.

  7. Nanoscale cryptography: opportunities and challenges.

    Masoumi, Massoud; Shi, Weidong; Xu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    While most of the electronics industry is dependent on the ever-decreasing size of lithographic transistors, this scaling cannot continue indefinitely. To improve the performance of the integrated circuits, new emerging and paradigms are needed. In recent years, nanoelectronics has become one of the most important and exciting forefront in science and engineering. It shows a great promise for providing us in the near future with many breakthroughs that change the direction of technological advances in a wide range of applications. In this paper, we discuss the contribution that nanotechnology may offer to the evolution of cryptographic hardware and embedded systems and demonstrate how nanoscale devices can be used for constructing security primitives. Using a custom set of design automation tools, it is demonstrated that relative to a conventional 45-nm CMOS system, performance gains can be obtained up to two orders of magnitude reduction in area and up to 50 % improvement in speed.

  8. Understanding emergent functions in self-assembled fibrous networks

    Sinko, Robert; Keten, Sinan

    2015-09-01

    Understanding self-assembly processes of nanoscale building blocks and characterizing their properties are both imperative for designing new hierarchical, network materials for a wide range of structural, optoelectrical, and transport applications. Although the characterization and choices of these material building blocks have been well studied, our understanding of how to precisely program a specific morphology through self-assembly still must be significantly advanced. In the recent study by Xie et al (2015 Nanotechnology 26 205602), the self-assembly of end-functionalized nanofibres is investigated using a coarse-grained molecular model and offers fundamental insight into how to control the structural morphology of nanofibrous networks. Varying nanoscale networks are observed when the molecular interaction strength is changed and the findings suggest that self-assembly through the tuning of molecular interactions is a key strategy for designing nanostructured networks with specific topologies.

  9. File list: ALL.Dig.10.AllAg.GIST-48 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Dig.10.AllAg.GIST-48 hg19 All antigens Digestive tract GIST-48 SRX825987,SRX023...216,SRX023215,SRX825986 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Dig.10.AllAg.GIST-48.bed ...

  10. File list: ALL.Dig.50.AllAg.GIST-48 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Dig.50.AllAg.GIST-48 hg19 All antigens Digestive tract GIST-48 SRX825987,SRX023...216,SRX023215,SRX825986 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Dig.50.AllAg.GIST-48.bed ...

  11. File list: ALL.Dig.20.AllAg.GIST-48 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Dig.20.AllAg.GIST-48 hg19 All antigens Digestive tract GIST-48 SRX825987,SRX023...216,SRX825986,SRX023215 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Dig.20.AllAg.GIST-48.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasmablasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasmablasts mm9 TFs and others Blood Plasmablasts SRX1131940,SRX2...45510,SRX1131943,SRX1131942,SRX1131938,SRX1131939 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasmablasts.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasmablasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasmablasts mm9 Histone Blood Plasmablasts SRX1131952,SRX1131954,...SRX1131956,SRX1131950,SRX1131948,SRX1131949,SRX1131947 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasmablasts.bed ...

  14. File list: Unc.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasmablasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasmablasts hg19 Unclassified Blood Plasmablasts SRX1164307,SRX11...64306,SRX1164304,SRX1164308,SRX1164305,SRX1164303 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasmablasts.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Plasma_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Plasma_Cells hg19 TFs and others Blood Plasma Cells SRX203389,SRX2...03388,SRX203391,SRX203387,SRX203395,SRX203390,SRX203394 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Plasma_Cells.bed ...

  16. File list: ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasmablasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasmablasts mm9 All antigens Blood Plasmablasts SRX1131940,SRX245...1948,SRX1131949,SRX1131947 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasmablasts.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasmacytoma [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasmacytoma mm9 Histone Blood Plasmacytoma SRX317641,SRX317647,SR...SRX317623,SRX317629,SRX317627,SRX317642,SRX317630,SRX317625 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasmacytoma.bed ...

  18. File list: ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasmablasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasmablasts hg19 All antigens Blood Plasmablasts SRX1164307,SRX11...64308,SRX1164304,SRX1164306,SRX1164303,SRX1164305 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasmablasts.bed ...

  19. File list: Unc.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasmablasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasmablasts hg19 Unclassified Blood Plasmablasts SRX1164304,SRX11...64306,SRX1164307,SRX1164303,SRX1164308,SRX1164305 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasmablasts.bed ...

  20. File list: ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasmacytoma [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  1. File list: His.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasmacytoma [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasmacytoma mm9 Histone Blood Plasmacytoma SRX317647,SRX317646,SR...SRX317627,SRX317629,SRX317630,SRX317628,SRX317642,SRX317625 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasmacytoma.bed ...

  2. File list: InP.Bld.10.AllAg.Plasma_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available InP.Bld.10.AllAg.Plasma_Cells hg19 Input control Blood Plasma Cells SRX203397,SRX20...3398 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Bld.10.AllAg.Plasma_Cells.bed ...

  3. File list: ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasmablasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasmablasts hg19 All antigens Blood Plasmablasts SRX1164304,SRX11...64306,SRX1164307,SRX1164303,SRX1164308,SRX1164305 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasmablasts.bed ...

  4. File list: ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasmablasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasmablasts hg19 All antigens Blood Plasmablasts SRX1164307,SRX11...64306,SRX1164304,SRX1164308,SRX1164305,SRX1164303 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasmablasts.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasma_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasma_Cells hg19 Histone Blood Plasma Cells SRX203393,SRX203392 h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasma_Cells.bed ...

  6. File list: ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Plasmacytoma [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Plasmacytoma mm9 All antigens Blood Plasmacytoma SRX317641,SRX3176...7640,SRX317643,SRX317629,SRX317627,SRX317628,SRX317642,SRX317630,SRX317625 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Plasmacytoma.bed ...

  7. File list: ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasmablasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasmablasts mm9 All antigens Blood Plasmablasts SRX1131940,SRX245...1948,SRX1131949,SRX1131947 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasmablasts.bed ...

  8. File list: ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasmacytoma [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasmacytoma mm9 All antigens Blood Plasmacytoma SRX317641,SRX3176...7643,SRX317631,SRX317623,SRX317629,SRX317627,SRX317642,SRX317630,SRX317625 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasmacytoma.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasma_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasma_Cells hg19 Histone Blood Plasma Cells SRX203393,SRX203392 h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasma_Cells.bed ...

  10. File list: ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Plasmablasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Plasmablasts hg19 All antigens Blood Plasmablasts SRX1164304,SRX11...64307,SRX1164306,SRX1164308,SRX1164305,SRX1164303 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Plasmablasts.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasma_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasma_Cells hg19 TFs and others Blood Plasma Cells SRX203389,SRX2...03388,SRX203391,SRX203395,SRX203387,SRX203390,SRX203394 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasma_Cells.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasma_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasma_Cells hg19 TFs and others Blood Plasma Cells SRX203389,SRX2...03387,SRX203388,SRX203391,SRX203395,SRX203390,SRX203394 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasma_Cells.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasmablasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasmablasts mm9 Histone Blood Plasmablasts SRX1131954,SRX1131956,...SRX1131952,SRX1131950,SRX1131948,SRX1131949,SRX1131947 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasmablasts.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Bld.10.AllAg.Plasmablasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Bld.10.AllAg.Plasmablasts mm9 Histone Blood Plasmablasts SRX1131949,SRX1131950,...SRX1131948,SRX1131952,SRX1131954,SRX1131956,SRX1131947 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.10.AllAg.Plasmablasts.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasma_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasma_Cells hg19 Histone Blood Plasma Cells SRX203392,SRX203393 h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasma_Cells.bed ...

  16. File list: InP.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasma_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available InP.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasma_Cells hg19 Input control Blood Plasma Cells SRX203398,SRX20...3397 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasma_Cells.bed ...

  17. File list: InP.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasma_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available InP.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasma_Cells hg19 Input control Blood Plasma Cells SRX203397,SRX20...3398 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Bld.20.AllAg.Plasma_Cells.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasmablasts [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasmablasts mm9 TFs and others Blood Plasmablasts SRX1131940,SRX2...45510,SRX1131943,SRX1131942,SRX1131938,SRX1131939 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Plasmablasts.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasmacytoma [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasmacytoma mm9 Histone Blood Plasmacytoma SRX317647,SRX317646,SR...SRX317627,SRX317629,SRX317630,SRX317628,SRX317642,SRX317625 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.50.AllAg.Plasmacytoma.bed ...

  20. File list: ALL.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells hg19 All antigens Prostate Prostate cancer c...ells SRX022582,SRX022577,SRX022578,SRX022581,SRX022579,SRX022580 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: ALL.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells hg19 All antigens Prostate Prostate cancer c...ells SRX022579,SRX022582,SRX022581,SRX022577,SRX022580,SRX022578 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: DNS.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells hg19 DNase-seq Prostate Prostate cancer cell...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells hg19 TFs and others Prostate Prostate cancer... cells SRX022577,SRX022578 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostate_cancer_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: ALL.Oth.50.AllAg.Cornea [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Oth.50.AllAg.Cornea mm9 All antigens Others Cornea SRX437637,SRX437636,SRX24830...2,SRX248301,SRX437638 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Oth.50.AllAg.Cornea.bed ...

  5. File list: ALL.Oth.05.AllAg.Cornea [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Oth.05.AllAg.Cornea mm9 All antigens Others Cornea SRX437637,SRX437636,SRX24830...2,SRX248301,SRX437638 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Oth.05.AllAg.Cornea.bed ...

  6. File list: ALL.Oth.20.AllAg.Cornea [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Oth.20.AllAg.Cornea mm9 All antigens Others Cornea SRX437637,SRX437636,SRX24830...2,SRX248301,SRX437638 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Oth.20.AllAg.Cornea.bed ...

  7. File list: ALL.Oth.10.AllAg.Cornea [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Oth.10.AllAg.Cornea mm9 All antigens Others Cornea SRX437637,SRX248302,SRX43763...6,SRX248301,SRX437638 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Oth.10.AllAg.Cornea.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Myo.20.AllAg.HSMM [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Myo.20.AllAg.HSMM hg19 Histone Muscle HSMM SRX038599,SRX067395,SRX067417,SRX067...038586,SRX038590,SRX038589,SRX067512,SRX038591 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Myo.20.AllAg.HSMM.bed ...

  9. File list: InP.Myo.05.AllAg.HSMM [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available InP.Myo.05.AllAg.HSMM hg19 Input control Muscle HSMM SRX067399,SRX038600,SRX067414,...SRX038601 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Myo.05.AllAg.HSMM.bed ...

  10. File list: DNS.Myo.05.AllAg.HSMM [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Myo.05.AllAg.HSMM hg19 DNase-seq Muscle HSMM SRX069146,SRX193586,SRX201298,SRX0...69153,SRX069123 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Myo.05.AllAg.HSMM.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Myo.05.AllAg.HSMM [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Myo.05.AllAg.HSMM hg19 Histone Muscle HSMM SRX067417,SRX038599,SRX038584,SRX067...038586,SRX038589,SRX038591,SRX038590,SRX038587 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Myo.05.AllAg.HSMM.bed ...

  12. File list: InP.Myo.20.AllAg.HSMM [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available InP.Myo.20.AllAg.HSMM hg19 Input control Muscle HSMM SRX067399,SRX038600,SRX067414,...SRX038601 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Myo.20.AllAg.HSMM.bed ...

  13. File list: DNS.Myo.50.AllAg.HSMM [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Myo.50.AllAg.HSMM hg19 DNase-seq Muscle HSMM SRX193586,SRX201298,SRX069146,SRX0...69153,SRX069123 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Myo.50.AllAg.HSMM.bed ...

  14. File list: ALL.Myo.10.AllAg.HSMM [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Myo.10.AllAg.HSMM hg19 All antigens Muscle HSMM SRX067417,SRX038599,SRX067395,S...512,SRX067453,SRX067468,SRX038591,SRX038589,SRX186699,SRX038587,SRX038586,SRX038588,SRX038590 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Myo.10.AllAg.HSMM.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.Myo.05.AllAg.HSMM [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Myo.05.AllAg.HSMM hg19 TFs and others Muscle HSMM SRX038582,SRX067534,SRX186719...,SRX186680,SRX067513,SRX038583 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Myo.05.AllAg.HSMM.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Myo.10.AllAg.HSMM [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Myo.10.AllAg.HSMM hg19 TFs and others Muscle HSMM SRX186680,SRX186719,SRX067534...,SRX067513,SRX038583,SRX038582 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Myo.10.AllAg.HSMM.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.Myo.50.AllAg.HSMM [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Myo.50.AllAg.HSMM hg19 TFs and others Muscle HSMM SRX067513,SRX067534,SRX038583...,SRX038582,SRX186680,SRX186719 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Myo.50.AllAg.HSMM.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Myo.20.AllAg.HSMM [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Myo.20.AllAg.HSMM hg19 TFs and others Muscle HSMM SRX186680,SRX186719,SRX067513...,SRX067534,SRX038583,SRX038582 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Myo.20.AllAg.HSMM.bed ...

  19. File list: DNS.Myo.10.AllAg.HSMM [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Myo.10.AllAg.HSMM hg19 DNase-seq Muscle HSMM SRX069146,SRX193586,SRX201298,SRX0...69153,SRX069123 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Myo.10.AllAg.HSMM.bed ...

  20. File list: ALL.Myo.05.AllAg.HSMM [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Myo.05.AllAg.HSMM hg19 All antigens Muscle HSMM SRX067417,SRX038599,SRX038584,S...513,SRX038583,SRX067412,SRX038593,SRX038601,SRX038586,SRX038589,SRX038591,SRX038590,SRX038587 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Myo.05.AllAg.HSMM.bed ...

  1. File list: InP.Myo.50.AllAg.HSMM [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available InP.Myo.50.AllAg.HSMM hg19 Input control Muscle HSMM SRX067399,SRX067414,SRX038600,...SRX038601 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Myo.50.AllAg.HSMM.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Myo.10.AllAg.HSMM [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Myo.10.AllAg.HSMM hg19 Histone Muscle HSMM SRX067417,SRX038599,SRX067395,SRX067...186699,SRX038587,SRX038586,SRX038588,SRX038590 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Myo.10.AllAg.HSMM.bed ...

  3. File list: DNS.Myo.20.AllAg.HSMM [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Myo.20.AllAg.HSMM hg19 DNase-seq Muscle HSMM SRX069146,SRX193586,SRX201298,SRX0...69153,SRX069123 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Myo.20.AllAg.HSMM.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Myo.50.AllAg.HSMM [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Myo.50.AllAg.HSMM hg19 Histone Muscle HSMM SRX038599,SRX067395,SRX067417,SRX067...067512,SRX067412,SRX038591,SRX038586,SRX067418 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Myo.50.AllAg.HSMM.bed ...

  5. File list: ALL.Myo.20.AllAg.HSMM [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Myo.20.AllAg.HSMM hg19 All antigens Muscle HSMM SRX038599,SRX067395,SRX067417,S...699,SRX067412,SRX038587,SRX038588,SRX067418,SRX038586,SRX038590,SRX038589,SRX067512,SRX038591 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Myo.20.AllAg.HSMM.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.Epd.20.AllAg.Forearm_skin [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.20.AllAg.Forearm_skin hg19 TFs and others Epidermis Forearm skin SRX200048,...SRX200052,SRX200050,SRX200046 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.20.AllAg.Forearm_skin.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Epd.05.AllAg.Forearm_skin [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Epd.05.AllAg.Forearm_skin hg19 Histone Epidermis Forearm skin SRX200044,SRX2000...42,SRX200038,SRX200036 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.05.AllAg.Forearm_skin.bed ...

  8. File list: Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell mESCs, differentia...ted http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated.bed ...

  9. File list: DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESCs, differentia...ted http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated.bed ...

  10. File list: DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESCs, differentia...ted http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated.bed ...

  11. File list: Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell mESCs, differentia...ted http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell mESCs, differentia...ted SRX590276 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated.bed ...

  13. File list: DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESCs, differentia...ted http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.PSC.20.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.20.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated mm9 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell mESCs, differentia...4,SRX754570,SRX065538,SRX523453,SRX523451,SRX065537 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.20.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated.bed ...

  15. File list: ALL.PSC.50.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.PSC.50.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated mm9 All antigens Pluripotent stem cell mESCs, differentia...barchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.PSC.50.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated.bed ...

  16. File list: ALL.PSC.10.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.PSC.10.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated mm9 All antigens Pluripotent stem cell mESCs, differentia...barchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.PSC.10.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated.bed ...

  17. File list: Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell mESCs, differentia...ted SRX590276 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated mm9 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell mESCs, differentia...8,SRX523453,SRX523451,SRX754570,SRX882858,SRX065537 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.PSC.10.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.10.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated mm9 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell mESCs, differentia...2,SRX065538,SRX523453,SRX754570,SRX065537,SRX523451 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.10.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated.bed ...

  20. File list: ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated mm9 All antigens Pluripotent stem cell mESCs, differentia...barchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated.bed ...

  1. File list: ALL.PSC.05.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.PSC.05.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated mm9 All antigens Pluripotent stem cell mESCs, differentia...barchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.PSC.05.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated mm9 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell mESCs, differentia...8,SRX209322,SRX065538,SRX065537,SRX523453,SRX523451 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell mESCs, differentia...ted SRX590276 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell mESCs, differentia...ted SRX590276 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated.bed ...

  5. File list: DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESCs, differentia...ted http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.mESCs,_differentiated.bed ...

  6. File list: DNS.Myo.10.AllAg.Fetal_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Myo.10.AllAg.Fetal_muscle hg19 DNase-seq Muscle Fetal muscle SRX100979,SRX10098...RX214044,SRX055170,SRX055186,SRX055169 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Myo.10.AllAg.Fetal_muscle.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Muscle_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Muscle_cells dm3 RNA polymerase Embryo Muscle cells SRX110760,SRX1...X110758,SRX110765,SRX110766,SRX110769 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Emb.20.AllAg.Muscle_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Muscle_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Muscle_cells dm3 Input control Embryo Muscle cells SRX110786,SRX11...0794,SRX110789,SRX110785,SRX110790 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.Emb.10.AllAg.Muscle_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Muscle_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Muscle_cells dm3 All antigens Embryo Muscle cells SRX110783,SRX110...X110785,SRX110779,SRX110790,SRX110794 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Emb.50.AllAg.Muscle_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Emb.20.AllAg.Muscle_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Emb.20.AllAg.Muscle_cells dm3 Histone Embryo Muscle cells SRX110783,SRX110777,S...RX110779,SRX110778,SRX110776 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Emb.20.AllAg.Muscle_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Emb.50.AllAg.Muscle_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Emb.50.AllAg.Muscle_cells dm3 Histone Embryo Muscle cells SRX110783,SRX110777,S...RX110778,SRX110776,SRX110779 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Emb.50.AllAg.Muscle_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.Emb.05.AllAg.Muscle_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.05.AllAg.Muscle_cells dm3 RNA polymerase Embryo Muscle cells SRX110762,SRX1...X110759,SRX110770,SRX110768,SRX110763 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Emb.05.AllAg.Muscle_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Emb.50.AllAg.Muscle_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Emb.50.AllAg.Muscle_cells dm3 RNA polymerase Embryo Muscle cells SRX110760,SRX1...X110765,SRX110769,SRX110766,SRX110758 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Pol.Emb.50.AllAg.Muscle_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Muscle_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Muscle_cells dm3 All antigens Embryo Muscle cells SRX110776,SRX110...X110768,SRX110763,SRX110790,SRX066244 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Emb.05.AllAg.Muscle_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: InP.Emb.20.AllAg.Muscle_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available InP.Emb.20.AllAg.Muscle_cells dm3 Input control Embryo Muscle cells SRX110789,SRX11...0794,SRX110786,SRX110790,SRX110785 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.Emb.20.AllAg.Muscle_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: ALL.Myo.05.AllAg.Fetal_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Myo.05.AllAg.Fetal_muscle hg19 All antigens Muscle Fetal muscle SRX213498,SRX30...,SRX300961,SRX213510,SRX121279,SRX055186,SRX214044,SRX214045,SRX300949,SRX300955,SRX213502 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Myo.05.AllAg.Fetal_muscle.bed ...

  17. File list: DNS.Myo.05.AllAg.Fetal_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Myo.05.AllAg.Fetal_muscle hg19 DNase-seq Muscle Fetal muscle SRX100979,SRX10098...RX121279,SRX055186,SRX214044,SRX214045 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Myo.05.AllAg.Fetal_muscle.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Emb.05.AllAg.Muscle_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Emb.05.AllAg.Muscle_cells dm3 Histone Embryo Muscle cells SRX110776,SRX110778,S...RX110777,SRX110779,SRX110783 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Emb.05.AllAg.Muscle_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: ALL.Myo.20.AllAg.Fetal_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Myo.20.AllAg.Fetal_muscle hg19 All antigens Muscle Fetal muscle SRX100979,SRX30...,SRX213495,SRX055170,SRX213492,SRX300947,SRX055186,SRX055169,SRX300955,SRX300949,SRX213502 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Myo.20.AllAg.Fetal_muscle.bed ...

  20. File list: ALL.Myo.10.AllAg.Muscles [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Myo.10.AllAg.Muscles hg19 All antigens Muscle Muscles SRX157639,SRX135224,SRX27...136947,SRX213922 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Myo.10.AllAg.Muscles.bed ...

  1. File list: ALL.Myo.50.AllAg.Fetal_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Myo.50.AllAg.Fetal_muscle hg19 All antigens Muscle Fetal muscle SRX100979,SRX30...,SRX300947,SRX214044,SRX055170,SRX055186,SRX055169,SRX300949,SRX300955,SRX213502,SRX213495 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Myo.50.AllAg.Fetal_muscle.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Emb.10.AllAg.Muscle_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Emb.10.AllAg.Muscle_cells dm3 Histone Embryo Muscle cells SRX110776,SRX110777,S...RX110783,SRX110778,SRX110779 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Emb.10.AllAg.Muscle_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Muscle_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Muscle_cells dm3 All antigens Embryo Muscle cells SRX110776,SRX110...X110790,SRX066244,SRX110778,SRX110779 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Emb.10.AllAg.Muscle_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: DNS.Myo.50.AllAg.Fetal_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Myo.50.AllAg.Fetal_muscle hg19 DNase-seq Muscle Fetal muscle SRX100979,SRX10098...RX214044,SRX055170,SRX055186,SRX055169 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Myo.50.AllAg.Fetal_muscle.bed ...

  5. File list: NoD.Myo.20.AllAg.Fetal_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available NoD.Myo.20.AllAg.Fetal_muscle hg19 No description Muscle Fetal muscle SRX300958,SRX...RX213502 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Myo.20.AllAg.Fetal_muscle.bed ...

  6. File list: ALL.Myo.20.AllAg.Muscles [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Myo.20.AllAg.Muscles hg19 All antigens Muscle Muscles SRX270957,SRX135224,SRX15...213922,SRX347266 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Myo.20.AllAg.Muscles.bed ...

  7. File list: NoD.Myo.50.AllAg.Fetal_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available NoD.Myo.50.AllAg.Fetal_muscle hg19 No description Muscle Fetal muscle SRX300958,SRX...RX213495 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Myo.50.AllAg.Fetal_muscle.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Pan.20.AllAg.PANC-1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Pan.20.AllAg.PANC-1 hg19 Histone Pancreas PANC-1 SRX825369,SRX101484,SRX101485,...SRX825383,SRX152077,SRX190044,SRX825376,SRX825390 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.20.AllAg.PANC-1.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.Pan.20.AllAg.PANC-1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Pan.20.AllAg.PANC-1 hg19 TFs and others Pancreas PANC-1 SRX100415,SRX190241,SRX...100942,SRX644410,SRX825399,SRX1026679,SRX1026680,SRX1026681,SRX1026678,SRX190248,SRX190315 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Pan.20.AllAg.PANC-1.bed ...

  10. File list: ALL.Pan.50.AllAg.PANC-1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Pan.50.AllAg.PANC-1 hg19 All antigens Pancreas PANC-1 SRX825369,SRX101484,SRX19...29,SRX190252,SRX825390,SRX644404,SRX825376,SRX101485 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Pan.50.AllAg.PANC-1.bed ...

  11. File list: InP.Pan.50.AllAg.PANC-1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available InP.Pan.50.AllAg.PANC-1 hg19 Input control Pancreas PANC-1 SRX190309,SRX150696,SRX1...99860,SRX101486,SRX190029,SRX190252,SRX644404 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Pan.50.AllAg.PANC-1.bed ...

  12. File list: InP.Pan.20.AllAg.PANC-1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available InP.Pan.20.AllAg.PANC-1 hg19 Input control Pancreas PANC-1 SRX101486,SRX190309,SRX1...50696,SRX190252,SRX644404,SRX199860,SRX190029 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Pan.20.AllAg.PANC-1.bed ...

  13. File list: ALL.Pan.20.AllAg.PANC-1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Pan.20.AllAg.PANC-1 hg19 All antigens Pancreas PANC-1 SRX825369,SRX101484,SRX19...12,SRX644404,SRX825376,SRX199860,SRX190029,SRX825390 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Pan.20.AllAg.PANC-1.bed ...

  14. File list: ALL.Pan.10.AllAg.PANC-1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Pan.10.AllAg.PANC-1 hg19 All antigens Pancreas PANC-1 SRX825369,SRX101484,SRX19...44,SRX190248,SRX199860,SRX190029,SRX825376,SRX825390 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Pan.10.AllAg.PANC-1.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Pan.05.AllAg.PANC-1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Pan.05.AllAg.PANC-1 hg19 Histone Pancreas PANC-1 SRX825369,SRX101484,SRX101485,...SRX152077,SRX825383,SRX825376,SRX190044,SRX825390 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.05.AllAg.PANC-1.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Pan.50.AllAg.PANC-1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Pan.50.AllAg.PANC-1 hg19 TFs and others Pancreas PANC-1 SRX100415,SRX825399,SRX...1026679,SRX1026680,SRX1026681,SRX1026678,SRX190315,SRX190248,SRX190241,SRX100942,SRX644410 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Pan.50.AllAg.PANC-1.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.Pan.05.AllAg.PANC-1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Pan.05.AllAg.PANC-1 hg19 TFs and others Pancreas PANC-1 SRX100942,SRX100415,SRX...190241,SRX190248,SRX190315,SRX644410,SRX825399,SRX1026680,SRX1026679,SRX1026678,SRX1026681 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Pan.05.AllAg.PANC-1.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Pan.10.AllAg.PANC-1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Pan.10.AllAg.PANC-1 hg19 Histone Pancreas PANC-1 SRX825369,SRX101484,SRX101485,...SRX825383,SRX152077,SRX190044,SRX825376,SRX825390 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.10.AllAg.PANC-1.bed ...

  19. File list: InP.Pan.05.AllAg.PANC-1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available InP.Pan.05.AllAg.PANC-1 hg19 Input control Pancreas PANC-1 SRX190309,SRX101486,SRX1...50696,SRX190252,SRX644404,SRX190029,SRX199860 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Pan.05.AllAg.PANC-1.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Pan.10.AllAg.PANC-1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Pan.10.AllAg.PANC-1 hg19 TFs and others Pancreas PANC-1 SRX100942,SRX100415,SRX...190241,SRX644410,SRX825399,SRX190315,SRX1026680,SRX1026679,SRX1026681,SRX1026678,SRX190248 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Pan.10.AllAg.PANC-1.bed ...

  1. File list: InP.Pan.10.AllAg.PANC-1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available InP.Pan.10.AllAg.PANC-1 hg19 Input control Pancreas PANC-1 SRX190309,SRX101486,SRX1...50696,SRX190252,SRX644404,SRX199860,SRX190029 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Pan.10.AllAg.PANC-1.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Pan.50.AllAg.PANC-1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Pan.50.AllAg.PANC-1 hg19 Histone Pancreas PANC-1 SRX825369,SRX101484,SRX825383,...SRX152077,SRX190044,SRX825390,SRX825376,SRX101485 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.50.AllAg.PANC-1.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Hypothalamus [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Hypothalamus mm9 Unclassified Neural Hypothalamus SRX956253,SRX956...254 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Hypothalamus.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Neu.05.AllAg.Thalamic_Nuclei [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Neu.05.AllAg.Thalamic_Nuclei hg19 Histone Neural Thalamic Nuclei SRX998288,SRX9...98287,SRX998286 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.05.AllAg.Thalamic_Nuclei.bed ...

  9. File list: DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: His.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: His.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: His.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells DRX014747 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells DRX014747 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: His.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Hypothalamus [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Hypothalamus mm9 All antigens Neural Hypothalamus SRX956253,SRX956...254 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Hypothalamus.bed ...

  1. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Thalamic_Nuclei [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Thalamic_Nuclei hg19 All antigens Neural Thalamic Nuclei SRX998288...,SRX998287,SRX998286 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Thalamic_Nuclei.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Brachiocephal...ic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: NoD.Gon.50.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available NoD.Gon.50.AllAg.Testis mm9 No description Gonad Testis ERX144521,ERX221032,ERX0968...144545,ERX144532 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Gon.50.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  6. File list: InP.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available InP.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis mm9 Input control Gonad Testis SRX349389,SRX1011025,SRX1183...X838550,SRX118389 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  7. File list: DNS.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 DNase-seq Gonad Testicular somatic ce...lls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis mm9 Histone Gonad Testis SRX118394,SRX803711,SRX803710,SRX0...SRX671899,SRX185788,SRX185866 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  9. File list: ALL.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 All antigens Gonad Testicular somatic... cells SRX591728,SRX591729,SRX591717,SRX591716 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: NoD.Gon.05.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available NoD.Gon.05.AllAg.Testis mm9 No description Gonad Testis ERX144544,ERX144521,ERX2210...144545,ERX144532 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Gon.05.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Gon.50.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Gon.50.AllAg.Testis mm9 Histone Gonad Testis SRX803711,SRX118394,SRX803710,SRX8...SRX671900,SRX671899,SRX185788 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Gon.50.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 Histone Gonad Testicular somatic cell...s SRX591729,SRX591717 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 TFs and others Gonad Testicular somat...ic cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_germ_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_germ_cells mm9 TFs and others Gonad Testicular germ cel...ls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.20.AllAg.Testicular_germ_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: InP.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available InP.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis hg19 Input control Gonad Testis SRX663452,SRX663439,SRX6634...45,SRX663442 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Adl.10.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Adl.10.AllAg.Testis dm3 Histone Adult Testis SRX017854,SRX017856,SRX390502,SRX3...90501 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Adl.10.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 TFs and others Gonad Testicular somat...ic cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: ALL.Gon.20.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Gon.20.AllAg.Testis hg19 All antigens Gonad Testis ERX096851,SRX663448,SRX12124...444,SRX663451,SRX663439,SRX663438,SRX663445,SRX663442 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Gon.20.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_germ_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_germ_cells mm9 TFs and others Gonad Testicular germ cel...ls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_germ_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis mm9 RNA polymerase Gonad Testis SRX349391,SRX112975,SRX1437...96,SRX237511,SRX237510,SRX244355 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  1. File list: InP.Gon.20.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available InP.Gon.20.AllAg.Testis mm9 Input control Gonad Testis SRX112534,SRX349389,SRX02744...X118388,SRX118389 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Gon.20.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  2. File list: InP.Gon.50.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available InP.Gon.50.AllAg.Testis hg19 Input control Gonad Testis SRX663452,SRX663439,SRX6634...45,SRX663442 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Gon.50.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis hg19 TFs and others Gonad Testis SRX663450,SRX663441,SRX663...438,SRX663444,SRX663451 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Gon.50.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.50.AllAg.Testis hg19 TFs and others Gonad Testis SRX663441,SRX663451,SRX663...450,SRX663444,SRX663438 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Gon.50.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Adl.05.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Adl.05.AllAg.Testis dm3 Histone Adult Testis SRX017854,SRX017856,SRX390501,SRX3...90502 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Adl.05.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_germ_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_germ_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Gonad Testicular germ cel...ls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_germ_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.Gon.05.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.05.AllAg.Testis mm9 RNA polymerase Gonad Testis SRX349391,SRX112975,SRX1437...96,SRX237511,SRX244355,SRX237510 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Gon.05.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 Histone Gonad Testicular somatic cell...s SRX591729,SRX591717 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: ALL.Adl.20.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Adl.20.AllAg.Testis dm3 All antigens Adult Testis SRX017857,SRX390502,SRX390501...,SRX017856,SRX390503,SRX017854 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Adl.20.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  10. File list: ALL.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis mm9 All antigens Gonad Testis SRX118383,SRX112538,SRX118394...ERX144545,ERX144553,SRX118378,SRX118389,SRX112536,ERX144532,SRX112537 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  11. File list: NoD.Gon.50.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available NoD.Gon.50.AllAg.Testis hg19 No description Gonad Testis ERX096851,ERX161924,ERX096...870,ERX096849,ERX096875,ERX096874,ERX096842 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Gon.50.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  12. File list: ALL.Adl.50.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Adl.50.AllAg.Testis dm3 All antigens Adult Testis SRX390502,SRX390501,SRX390503...,SRX017856,SRX017854 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Adl.50.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  13. File list: ALL.Gon.05.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Gon.05.AllAg.Testis hg19 All antigens Gonad Testis ERX096851,ERX096875,SRX66344...441,SRX663438,SRX663451,SRX663439,SRX663445,SRX663442 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Gon.05.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  14. File list: NoD.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available NoD.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis mm9 No description Gonad Testis ERX144544,ERX144521,ERX2210...144553,ERX144532 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Gonad Testicular somat...ic cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: InP.Gon.05.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available InP.Gon.05.AllAg.Testis mm9 Input control Gonad Testis SRX112977,SRX349389,SRX10110...X803713,SRX838550 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Gon.05.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  17. File list: InP.Gon.20.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available InP.Gon.20.AllAg.Testis hg19 Input control Gonad Testis SRX663452,SRX663439,SRX6634...45,SRX663442 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Gon.20.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  18. File list: DNS.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_germ_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_germ_cells mm9 DNase-seq Gonad Testicular germ cells ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Gon.05.AllAg.Testicular_germ_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: NoD.Gon.20.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available NoD.Gon.20.AllAg.Testis hg19 No description Gonad Testis ERX096851,ERX161924,ERX096...849,ERX096874,ERX096842,ERX096870,ERX096875 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Gon.20.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  20. File list: ALL.Adl.10.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Adl.10.AllAg.Testis dm3 All antigens Adult Testis SRX017857,SRX017854,SRX017856...,SRX390502,SRX390501,SRX390503 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Adl.10.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Gon.20.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.Gon.20.AllAg.Testis mm9 RNA polymerase Gonad Testis SRX349391,SRX112975,SRX1437...96,SRX237511,SRX237510,SRX244355 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Gon.20.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Adl.20.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Adl.20.AllAg.Testis dm3 Histone Adult Testis SRX390502,SRX390501,SRX017856,SRX0...17854 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Adl.20.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 Histone Gonad Testicular somatic cell...s SRX591729,SRX591717 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Gon.10.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: InP.Gon.50.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available InP.Gon.50.AllAg.Testis mm9 Input control Gonad Testis SRX112534,SRX349389,SRX02744...X112541,SRX118389 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Gon.50.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  5. File list: NoD.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available NoD.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis hg19 No description Gonad Testis ERX096851,ERX096870,ERX161...924,ERX096849,ERX096875,ERX096874,ERX096842 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Gon.20.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Gon.20.AllAg.Testis mm9 Histone Gonad Testis SRX118394,SRX803711,SRX803710,SRX3...SRX112973,SRX185799,SRX185788 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Gon.20.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Adl.50.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Adl.50.AllAg.Testis dm3 Histone Adult Testis SRX390502,SRX390501,SRX017856,SRX0...17854 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Adl.50.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  8. File list: ALL.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells mm9 All antigens Gonad Testicular somatic... cells SRX591728,SRX591729,SRX591717,SRX591716 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Gon.50.AllAg.Testicular_somatic_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: ALL.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis hg19 All antigens Gonad Testis ERX096851,SRX663448,ERX09687...438,SRX663444,SRX663451,SRX663439,SRX663445,SRX663442 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Gon.10.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  10. File list: ALL.Gon.50.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Gon.50.AllAg.Testis hg19 All antigens Gonad Testis ERX096851,SRX663448,SRX12124...439,ERX096875,SRX663445,SRX663442,ERX096874,ERX096842 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Gon.50.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  11. File list: ALL.Gon.20.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Gon.20.AllAg.Testis mm9 All antigens Gonad Testis SRX118394,SRX349391,SRX803711...SRX112541,SRX118388,SRX118389,ERX144545,ERX144532,SRX112536,SRX112537 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Gon.20.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  12. File list: InP.Gon.05.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available InP.Gon.05.AllAg.Testis hg19 Input control Gonad Testis SRX663452,SRX663439,SRX6634...45,SRX663442 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Gon.05.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  13. File list: ALL.Adl.05.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Adl.05.AllAg.Testis dm3 All antigens Adult Testis SRX017854,SRX017856,SRX017857...,SRX390503,SRX390501,SRX390502 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Adl.05.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  14. File list: ALL.Gon.05.AllAg.Testis [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available ALL.Gon.05.AllAg.Testis mm9 All antigens Gonad Testis SRX803711,SRX118383,SRX118371...ERX144553,SRX803713,SRX838550,ERX144545,ERX144532,SRX112536,SRX112537 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Gon.05.AllAg.Testis.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.Oth.05.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Oth.05.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor mm9 TFs and others Others Multipotent otic progeni...tor SRX736459,SRX736458,SRX736460,SRX736461 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Oth.05.AllAg.Multipotent_otic_progenitor.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors mm9 Histone Neural Induced neural progeni...tors SRX667381,SRX668240 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.20.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors.bed ...

  17. File list: DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors mm9 DNase-seq Neural Induced neural progeni...tors http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Induced_neural_progenitors.bed ...

  18. File list: Unc.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Unc.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Adipocyte Adipose progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Adp.10.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 TFs and others Adipocyte Adipose progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells mm9 DNase-seq Adipocyte Adipose progenito...r cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Adp.20.AllAg.Adipose_progenitor_cells.bed ...