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Sample records for nanoparticles conformational control

  1. Computer controlled multi-leaf conformation radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, T [Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital (Japan); Inamura, K

    1981-10-01

    A conformation radiotherapy system with 5-split collimators of which openings can be controlled symmetrically by computerized techniques during rotational irradiation by a linear accelerator has been developed. Outline of the system performance and its clinical applications are described as follows. 1. Profile of the system: The hardware is composed of three parts, namely, the multi-split collimator, the electronic data processor, and the interface between those two parts. 1) The multi-leaf collimator is composed of 5 pairs (10 leaves) diaphragms. It can be mounted to the X-ray head of a linear accelerator when used, and can be dismounted after its use. 2) The electronic data processor sends control signal to the collimator according to the 5-leaf target volume data which can be stored into a minifloppy disc through the curve digitizer previously. This part is composed of a) dedicated micro processor, b) I/O expansion unit, c) color CRT display with key board, d) dual mini-floppy disc unit, e) curve digitizer and f) digital plotter for recording and verification of resulted accuracy. 2. Performance of the system: 1) Maximum field size: 15 cm x 15 cm at isocenter. 2) Maximum elongation ratio of the target volume: 3 : 1 when the longer diameter is 15 cm. 3) Control accuracy: Within +-3 mm deviation from planned beam focus at isocenter. 3. Clinical application: The method of treatment planning and clinical advantages of this irradiation method are explained by raising clinical experiences such as treating brain tumor and rectal cancer.

  2. Computer controlled multi-leaf conformation radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Tadayoshi; Inamura, Kiyonari.

    1981-01-01

    A conformation radiotherapy system with 5-split collimators of which openings can be controlled symmetrically by computerized techniques during rotational irradiation by a linear accelerator has been developed. Outline of the system performance and its clinical applications are described as follows. 1. Profile of the system: The hardware is composed of three parts, namely, the multi-split collimator, the electronic data processor, and the interface between those two parts. 1) The multi-leaf collimator is composed of 5 pairs (10 leaves) diaphragms. It can be mounted to the X-ray head of a linear accelerator when used, and can be dismounted after its use. 2) The electronic data processor sends control signal to the collimator according to the 5-leaf target volume data which can be stored into a minifloppy disc through the curve digitizer previously. This part is composed of a) dedicated micro processor, b) I/O expansion unit, c) color CRT display with key board, d) dual mini-floppy disc unit, e) curve digitizer and f) digital plotter for recording and verification of resulted accuracy. 2. Performance of the system: 1) Maximum field size: 15 cm x 15 cm at isocenter. 2) Maximum elongation ratio of the target volume: 3 : 1 when the longer diameter is 15 cm. 3) Control accuracy: Within +-3 mm deviation from planned beam focus at isocenter. 3. Clinical application: The method of treatment planning and clinical advantages of this irradiation method are explained by raising clinical experiences such as treating brain tumor and rectal cancer. (author)

  3. Transparent, Flexible, Conformal Capacitive Pressure Sensors with Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeohn; Kim, Gwangmook; Kim, Taehoon; Lee, Sangwoo; Kang, Donyoung; Hwang, Min-Soo; Chae, Youngcheol; Kang, Shinill; Lee, Hyungsuk; Park, Hong-Gyu; Shim, Wooyoung

    2018-02-01

    The fundamental challenge in designing transparent pressure sensors is the ideal combination of high optical transparency and high pressure sensitivity. Satisfying these competing demands is commonly achieved by a compromise between the transparency and usage of a patterned dielectric surface, which increases pressure sensitivity, but decreases transparency. Herein, a design strategy for fabricating high-transparency and high-sensitivity capacitive pressure sensors is proposed, which relies on the multiple states of nanoparticle dispersity resulting in enhanced surface roughness and light transmittance. We utilize two nanoparticle dispersion states on a surface: (i) homogeneous dispersion, where each nanoparticle (≈500 nm) with a size comparable to the visible light wavelength has low light scattering; and (ii) heterogeneous dispersion, where aggregated nanoparticles form a micrometer-sized feature, increasing pressure sensitivity. This approach is experimentally verified using a nanoparticle-dispersed polymer composite, which has high pressure sensitivity (1.0 kPa -1 ), and demonstrates excellent transparency (>95%). We demonstrate that the integration of nanoparticle-dispersed capacitor elements into an array readily yields a real-time pressure monitoring application and a fully functional touch device capable of acting as a pressure sensor-based input device, thereby opening up new avenues to establish processing techniques that are effective on the nanoscale yet applicable to macroscopic processing. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Fabrication of silk fibroin nanoparticles for controlled drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Zheng; Chen Aizheng; Li Yi, E-mail: tcliyi@polyu.edu.hk; Hu Junyan; Liu Xuan; Li Jiashen; Zhang Yu; Li Gang; Zheng Zijian [Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Institute of Textiles and Clothing (Hong Kong)

    2012-03-15

    A novel solution-enhanced dispersion by supercritical CO{sub 2} (SEDS) was employed to prepare silk fibroin (SF) nanoparticles. The resulting SF nanoparticles exhibited a good spherical shape, a smooth surface, and a narrow particle size distribution with a mean particle diameter of about 50 nm. The results of X-ray powder diffraction, thermo gravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis of the SF nanoparticles before and after ethanol treatment indicated conformation transition of SF nanoparticles from random coil to {beta}-sheet form and thus water insolubility. The MTS assay also suggested that the SF nanoparticles after ethanol treatment imposed no toxicity. A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, indomethacin (IDMC), was chosen as the model drug and was encapsulated in SF nanoparticles by the SEDS process. The resulting IDMC-SF nanoparticles, after ethanol treatment, possessed a theoretical average drug load of 20%, an actual drug load of 2.05%, and an encapsulation efficiency of 10.23%. In vitro IDMC release from the IDMC-SF nanoparticles after ethanol treatment showed a significantly sustained release over 2 days. These studies of SF nanoparticles indicated the suitability of the SF nanoparticles prepared by the SEDS process as a biocompatible carrier to deliver drugs and also the feasibility of using the SEDS process to reach the goal of co-precipitation of drug and SF as composite nanoparticles for controlled drug delivery.

  5. Fabrication of silk fibroin nanoparticles for controlled drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Zheng; Chen Aizheng; Li Yi; Hu Junyan; Liu Xuan; Li Jiashen; Zhang Yu; Li Gang; Zheng Zijian

    2012-01-01

    A novel solution-enhanced dispersion by supercritical CO 2 (SEDS) was employed to prepare silk fibroin (SF) nanoparticles. The resulting SF nanoparticles exhibited a good spherical shape, a smooth surface, and a narrow particle size distribution with a mean particle diameter of about 50 nm. The results of X-ray powder diffraction, thermo gravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis of the SF nanoparticles before and after ethanol treatment indicated conformation transition of SF nanoparticles from random coil to β-sheet form and thus water insolubility. The MTS assay also suggested that the SF nanoparticles after ethanol treatment imposed no toxicity. A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, indomethacin (IDMC), was chosen as the model drug and was encapsulated in SF nanoparticles by the SEDS process. The resulting IDMC–SF nanoparticles, after ethanol treatment, possessed a theoretical average drug load of 20%, an actual drug load of 2.05%, and an encapsulation efficiency of 10.23%. In vitro IDMC release from the IDMC–SF nanoparticles after ethanol treatment showed a significantly sustained release over 2 days. These studies of SF nanoparticles indicated the suitability of the SF nanoparticles prepared by the SEDS process as a biocompatible carrier to deliver drugs and also the feasibility of using the SEDS process to reach the goal of co-precipitation of drug and SF as composite nanoparticles for controlled drug delivery.

  6. Antibacterial action mode of quaternized carboxymethyl chitosan/poly(amidoamine) dendrimer core–shell nanoparticles against Escherichia coli correlated with molecular chain conformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Yan [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); School of Science, Tianjin University of Commerce, Tianjin 300134 (China); Yao, Fanglian, E-mail: yaofanglian@tju.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Sun, Fang [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tan, Zhilei [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); College of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300222 (China); Tian, Liang [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Xie, Lei; Song, Qingchao [College of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300222 (China)

    2015-03-01

    The action mode of quaternized carboxymethyl chitosan/poly(amidoamine) dendrimer core–shell nanoparticles (CM-HTCC/PAMAM) against Escherichia coli (E. coli) was investigated via a combination of approaches including measurements of cell membrane integrity, outer membrane (OM) and inner membrane (IM) permeability, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). CM-HTCC/PAMAM dendrimer nanoparticles likely acted in a sequent event-driven mechanism, beginning with the binding of positively charged groups from nanoparticle surface with negative cell surface, thereby causing the disorganization of cell membrane, and subsequent leakage of intracellular components which might ultimately lead to cell death. Moreover, the chain conformation of polymers was taken into account for a better understanding of the antibacterial action mode by means of viscosity and GPC measurements. High utilization ratio of positive charge and large specific surface area generated from a compacted conformation of CM-HTCC/PAMAM, significantly different from the extended conformation of HTCC, were proposed to be involved in the antibacterial action. - Highlights: • The nanoparticles exerted antibacterial activity in a sequent event-driven manner. • Electrostatic interaction and surface adsorption shared roles in antibacterial mode. • The two factors were controlled by the compacted conformation of nanoparticles.

  7. Antibacterial action mode of quaternized carboxymethyl chitosan/poly(amidoamine) dendrimer core–shell nanoparticles against Escherichia coli correlated with molecular chain conformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Yan; Yao, Fanglian; Sun, Fang; Tan, Zhilei; Tian, Liang; Xie, Lei; Song, Qingchao

    2015-01-01

    The action mode of quaternized carboxymethyl chitosan/poly(amidoamine) dendrimer core–shell nanoparticles (CM-HTCC/PAMAM) against Escherichia coli (E. coli) was investigated via a combination of approaches including measurements of cell membrane integrity, outer membrane (OM) and inner membrane (IM) permeability, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). CM-HTCC/PAMAM dendrimer nanoparticles likely acted in a sequent event-driven mechanism, beginning with the binding of positively charged groups from nanoparticle surface with negative cell surface, thereby causing the disorganization of cell membrane, and subsequent leakage of intracellular components which might ultimately lead to cell death. Moreover, the chain conformation of polymers was taken into account for a better understanding of the antibacterial action mode by means of viscosity and GPC measurements. High utilization ratio of positive charge and large specific surface area generated from a compacted conformation of CM-HTCC/PAMAM, significantly different from the extended conformation of HTCC, were proposed to be involved in the antibacterial action. - Highlights: • The nanoparticles exerted antibacterial activity in a sequent event-driven manner. • Electrostatic interaction and surface adsorption shared roles in antibacterial mode. • The two factors were controlled by the compacted conformation of nanoparticles

  8. Programmable Self-assembly of Hydrocarbon-capped Nanoparticles: Role of Chain Conformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltmann, Curt; Horst, Nathan; Travesset, Alex

    Nanoparticle superlattices (NPS), i.e. crystalline arrangements of nanoparticles, are materials with fascinating structures, which in many cases are not possible to attain from simple atoms or molecules. They also span a wide range of possible applications such as metamaterials, new energy sources, catalysis, and many others. In this talk, we present a theoretical and computational description of the self-assembly of nanoparticles with hydrocarbons as capping ligands. Usually, these systems have been described with hard sphere packing models. In this talk, we show that the conformations of the hydrocarbon chains play a fundamental role in determining the equilibrium phases, including and especially in binary systems. The work of CW was supported by a DOE-SULI internship from May-December 2016, and by NSF, DMR-CMMT 1606336 CDS&E: Design Principles for Ordering Nanoparticles into Super-crystals after January 1st.

  9. Vibration atomic layer deposition for conformal nanoparticle coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Suk Won; Woo Kim, Jun; Jong Choi, Hyung; Hyung Shim, Joon, E-mail: shimm@korea.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    A vibration atomic layer deposition reactor was developed for fabricating a conformal thin-film coating on nanosize particles. In this study, atomic layer deposition of 10–15-nm-thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films was conducted on a high-surface-area acetylene black powder with particle diameters of 200–250 nm. Intense vibration during the deposition resulted in the effective separation of particles, overcoming the interparticle agglomeration force and enabling effective diffusion of the precursor into the powder chunk; this phenomenon led to the formation of a conformal film coating on the nanopowder particles. It was also confirmed that the atomic layer deposition Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films initially grew on the high-surface-area acetylene black powder particles as discrete islands, presumably because chemisorption of the precursor and water occurred only on a few sites on the high-surface-area acetylene black powder surface. Relatively sluggish growth of the films during the initial atomic layer deposition cycles was identified from composition analysis.

  10. Investigating the conformation of polymeric dispersant molecules on nanoparticle surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasin, S.; Luckham, P.F.; Iqbal, T

    2016-01-01

    Block copolymers are widely used as stabilizers in industrial dispersions. These polymers adsorb on surfaces by an anchor chain and extend by a hydrophilic chain. Scaling model or de Gennes theory has been used to determine the grafting density of the block copolymers. By implementing this theory to the block copolymers, conformation of the polymer molecules as a function of distance between adjacent anchor chains can be determined. The scaling model was applied to a selection of block copolymers (PE/F 103, PE/F 108, NPE1800, Triton X100, Triton X405, Lugalvan BNO12, Hypermer LP1, Hypermer B246 and OLOA 11000) in this study. The cross sectional area sc, distance s (square root of sc) and the Flory radius (end to end dimension of polymer), Rf, for all the polymers was determined. The cross sectional area per PEO (Poly Ethylene Oxide) chain (nm2) was found to be increasing with the size of stabilizing chain. Triton X100 and Lugalvan BNO12 has the smaller stabilizing chains so occupy smaller cross sectional areas whereas PE/F108 and triton X405 have larger number of PEO units and occupy a larger cross sectional area. This shows that stabilizing chain regulates the adsorption amounts that are lower in case of lower number of EO units. The application of de Gennes theory to experimental results suggested brush configuration of adsorbed polymer molecules in case of PE/F 103, PE/F 108, Triton X100, Triton X405, NPE1800, Lugalvan BNO12, Hypermer B246 and OLOA 11000. Whereas, Hypermer LP1 is more likely found to be adsorbed on graphitic carbon black in loops and trains. (author)

  11. Green Nanoparticles for Mosquito Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namita Soni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we have used the green method for synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles. In the present study the silver (Ag and gold (Au nanoparticles (NPs were synthesized by using the aqueous bark extract of Indian spice dalchini (Cinnamomum zeylanicum (C. zyelanicum or C. verum J. Presl. Additionally, we have used these synthesized nanoparticles for mosquito control. The larvicidal activity has been tested against the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi and filariasis vector Culex quinquefasciatus. The results were obtained using UV-visible spectrophotometer and the images were recorded with a transmission electron microscope (TEM. The efficacy tests were then performed at different concentrations and varying numbers of hours by probit analysis. The synthesized AgNPs were in spherical shape and average sizes (11.77 nm AgNPs and 46.48 nm AuNPs. The larvae of An. stephensi were found highly susceptible to the synthesized AgNPs and AuNPs than the Cx. quinquefasciatus. These results suggest that the C. zeylanicum synthesized silver and gold nanoparticles have the potential to be used as an ideal ecofriendly approach for the control of mosquito.

  12. A computer-controlled conformal radiotherapy system I: overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraass, Benedick A.; McShan, Daniel L.; Kessler, Marc L.; Matrone, Gwynne M.; Lewis, James D.; Weaver, Tamar A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Equipment developed for use with computer-controlled conformal radiotherapy (CCRT) treatment techniques, including multileaf collimators and/or computer-control systems for treatment machines, are now available. The purpose of this work is to develop a system that will allow the safe, efficient, and accurate delivery of CCRT treatments as routine clinical treatments, and permit modifications of the system so that the delivery process can be optimized. Methods and Materials: The needs and requirements for a system that can fully support modern computer-controlled treatment machines equipped with multileaf collimators and segmental or dynamic conformal therapy capabilities have been analyzed and evaluated. This analysis has been used to design and then implement a complete approach to the delivery of CCRT treatments. Results: The computer-controlled conformal radiotherapy system (CCRS) described here consists of a process for the delivery of CCRT treatments, and a complex software system that implements the treatment process. The CCRS system described here includes systems for plan transfer, treatment delivery planning, sequencing of the actual treatment delivery process, graphical simulation and verification tools, as well as an electronic chart that is an integral part of the system. The CCRS system has been implemented for use with a number of different treatment machines. The system has been used clinically for more than 2 years to perform CCRT treatments for more than 200 patients. Conclusions: A comprehensive system for the implementation and delivery of computer-controlled conformal radiation therapy (CCRT) plans has been designed and implemented for routine clinical use with multisegment, computer-controlled, multileaf-collimated conformal therapy. The CCRS system has been successfully implemented to perform these complex treatments, and is considered quite important to the clinical use of modern computer-controlled treatment techniques

  13. Size-controlled synthesis of nickel nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Y.; Kondoh, H.; Ohta, T.; Gao, S.

    2005-01-01

    A facile reduction approach with nickel acetylacetonate, Ni(acac) 2 , and sodium borohydride or superhydride leads to monodisperse nickel nanoparticles in the presence of hexadecylamine (HDA) and trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO). The combination of HDA and TOPO used in the conventional synthesis of semiconductor nanocrystals also provides better control over particle growth in the metal nanoparticle synthesis. The size of Ni nanoparticles can be readily tuned from 3 to 11 nm, depending on the ratio of HDA to TOPO in the reaction system. As-synthesized Ni nanoparticles have a cubic structure as characterized by power X-ray diffraction (XRD), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images show that Ni nanoparticles have narrow size distribution. SQUID magnetometry was also used in the characterization of Ni nanoparticles. The synthetic procedure can be extended to the preparation of high quality metal or alloy nanoparticles

  14. A computer-controlled conformal radiotherapy system. IV: Electronic chart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraass, Benedick A.; McShan, Daniel L.; Matrone, Gwynne M.; Weaver, Tamar A.; Lewis, James D.; Kessler, Marc L.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The design and implementation of a system for electronically tracking relevant plan, prescription, and treatment data for computer-controlled conformal radiation therapy is described. Methods and Materials: The electronic charting system is implemented on a computer cluster coupled by high-speed networks to computer-controlled therapy machines. A methodical approach to the specification and design of an integrated solution has been used in developing the system. The electronic chart system is designed to allow identification and access of patient-specific data including treatment-planning data, treatment prescription information, and charting of doses. An in-house developed database system is used to provide an integrated approach to the database requirements of the design. A hierarchy of databases is used for both centralization and distribution of the treatment data for specific treatment machines. Results: The basic electronic database system has been implemented and has been in use since July 1993. The system has been used to download and manage treatment data on all patients treated on our first fully computer-controlled treatment machine. To date, electronic dose charting functions have not been fully implemented clinically, requiring the continued use of paper charting for dose tracking. Conclusions: The routine clinical application of complex computer-controlled conformal treatment procedures requires the management of large quantities of information for describing and tracking treatments. An integrated and comprehensive approach to this problem has led to a full electronic chart for conformal radiation therapy treatments

  15. Magnetic nanoparticles based nano-composites: synthesis, contribution of the fillers dispersion and the chains conformation on the reinforcement properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbes, Anne-Sophie

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical properties of polymeric nano-composite films can be considerably enhanced by the inclusion of inorganic nanoparticles due to two main effects: (i) the local structure of fillers dispersion and (ii) the potential modification of the chains conformation and dynamics in the vicinity of the filler/polymer interface. However, the precise mechanisms which permit to correlate these contributions at nano-metric scale to the macroscopic mechanical properties of the materials are actually poorly described. In such a context, we have synthesized model nano-composites based on magnetic nanoparticles of maghemite γ-Fe 2 O 3 (naked or grafted with a polystyrene (PS) corona by radical controlled polymerization) dispersed in a PS matrix, that we have characterized by combining small angle scattering (X-Ray and neutron) and transmission electronic microscopy. By playing on different parameters such as the particle size, the concentration, or the size ratio between the grafted chains and the ones of the matrix in the case of the grafted fillers, we have obtained nano-composite films a large panel of controlled and reproducible controlled filler structures, going from individual nanoparticles or fractal aggregates up to the formation of a connected network of fillers. By applying an external magnetic field during the film processing, we succeeded in aligning the different structures along the direction of the field and we obtained materials with remarkable anisotropic reinforcement properties. The conformation of the chains of the matrix, experimentally determined thanks to the specific properties of neutron contrast of the system, is not affected by the presence of the fillers, whatever their confinement, the dispersion the fillers or their chemical state surface. The alignment of the fillers along the magnetic field has allowed us to describe precisely the evolution of the reinforcement modulus of the materials with the structural reorganization of the fillers and

  16. Interactions Controlling the Slow Dynamic Conformational Motions of Ubiquitin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soichiro Kitazawa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Rational mutation of proteins based on their structural and dynamic characteristics is a useful strategy for amplifying specific fluctuations in proteins. Here, we show the effects of mutation on the conformational fluctuations and thermodynamic stability of ubiquitin. In particular, we focus on the salt bridge between K11 and E34 and the hydrogen bond between I36 and Q41, which are predicted to control the fluctuation between the basic folded state, N1, and the alternatively folded state, N2, of the protein, using high-pressure NMR spectroscopy. The E34A mutation, which disrupts the salt bridge, did not alter picosecond–to–nanosecond, microsecond–to–millisecond dynamic motions, and stability of the protein, while the Q41N mutation, which destabilizes the hydrogen bond, specifically amplified the N1–N2 conformational fluctuation and decreased stability. Based on the observed thermodynamic stabilities of the various conformational states, we showed that in the Q41N mutant, the N1 state is more significantly destabilized than the N2 state, resulting in an increase in the relative population of N2. Identifying the interactions controlling specific motions of a protein will facilitate molecular design to achieve functional dynamics beyond native state dynamics.

  17. Molecular conformation changes in alkylthiol ligands as a function of size in gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramallo-Lopez, J.M.; Giovanetti, L.J.; Requejo, F.G. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Isaacs, S.R.; Shon, Y.S. [Western Kentucky University, KY (United States); Salmeron, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The binding of thiol molecules to gold, and in particular to gold nanoparticles (NP), is important in sensors, self-assembled monolayers and many other nanotechnological applications. For example, organic-thiolate s are extensively used as capping agents to prevent metal particle sintering and as ligands that can be functionalized to provide desirable chemical properties. An interesting feature of alkyl hydrocarbon chains is their flexibility, which allows them to change conformation to maximize space filling. This is driven by the inter-chain van der Waals nervy, which is considerably higher for longer chains and can be comparable to the stronger covalent bond of the S head with the Au. On the other hand, chain flexibility is facilitated by the easy formation of gauche distortions which require activation energies of only 0.16 eV. (author)

  18. Electrosprayed nanoparticle delivery system for controlled release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eltayeb, Megdi, E-mail: megdi.eltayeb@sustech.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Sudan University of Science and Technology, PO Box 407, Khartoum (Sudan); Stride, Eleanor, E-mail: eleanor.stride@eng.ox.ac.uk [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Headington OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); Edirisinghe, Mohan, E-mail: m.edirisinghe@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Harker, Anthony, E-mail: a.harker@ucl.ac.uk [London Centre for Nanotechnology, Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    This study utilises an electrohydrodynamic technique to prepare core-shell lipid nanoparticles with a tunable size and high active ingredient loading capacity, encapsulation efficiency and controlled release. Using stearic acid and ethylvanillin as model shell and active ingredients respectively, we identify the processing conditions and ratios of lipid:ethylvanillin required to form nanoparticles. Nanoparticles with a mean size ranging from 60 to 70 nm at the rate of 1.37 × 10{sup 9} nanoparticles per minute were prepared with different lipid:ethylvanillin ratios. The polydispersity index was ≈ 21% and the encapsulation efficiency ≈ 70%. It was found that the rate of ethylvanillin release was a function of the nanoparticle size, and lipid:ethylvanillin ratio. The internal structure of the lipid nanoparticles was studied by transmission electron microscopy which confirmed that the ethylvanillin was encapsulated within a stearic acid shell. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis indicated that the ethylvanillin had not been affected. Extensive analysis of the release of ethylvanillin was performed using several existing models and a new diffusive release model incorporating a tanh function. The results were consistent with a core-shell structure. - Highlights: • Electrohydrodynamic spraying is used to produce lipid-coated nanoparticles. • A new model is proposed for the release rates of active components from nanoparticles. • The technique has potential applications in food science and medicine. • Electrohydrodynamic processing controlled release lipid nanoparticles.

  19. Using Chemicals to Optimize Conformance Control in Fractured Reservoirs; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seright, Randall S.; Liang, Jenn-Tai; Schrader, Richard; Hagstrom II, John; Wang, Ying; Kumar, Ananad; Wavrik, Kathryn

    2001-01-01

    This report describes work performed during the third and final year of the project, Using Chemicals to Optimize Conformance Control in Fractured Reservoirs. This research project had three objectives. The first objective was to develop a capability to predict and optimize the ability of gels to reduce permeability to water more than that to oil or gas. The second objective was to develop procedures for optimizing blocking agent placement in wells where hydraulic fractures cause channeling problems. The third objective was to develop procedures to optimize blocking agent placement in naturally fractured reservoirs

  20. Controlled functionalization of nanoparticles & practical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashwan, Khaled

    With the increasing use of nanoparticles in both science and industry, their chemical modification became a significant part of nanotechnology. Unfortunately, most commonly used procedures provide just randomly functionalized materials. The long-term objective of our work is site- and stoichiometrically-controlled functionalization of nanoparticles with the utilization of solid supports and other nanostructures. On the examples of silica nanoparticles and titanium dioxide nanorods, we have obtained results on the solid-phase chemistry, method development, and modeling, which advanced us toward this goal. At the same time, we explored several applications of nanoparticles that will benefit from the controlled functionalization: imaging of titanium-dioxide-based photocatalysts, bioimaging by fluorescent nanoparticles, drug delivery, assembling of bone implants, and dental compositions. Titanium dioxide-based catalysts are known for their catalytic activity and their application in solar energy utilization such as photosplitting of water. Functionalization of titanium dioxide is essential for enhancing bone-titanium dioxide nanotube adhesion, and, therefore, for its application as an interface between titanium implants and bones. Controlled functionalization of nanoparticles should enhance sensitivity and selectivity of nanoassemblies for imaging and drug delivery applications. Along those lines, we studied the relationship between morphology and surface chemistry of nanoparticles, and their affinity to organic molecules (salicylic and caffeic acid) using Langmuir adsorption isotherms, and toward material surfaces using SEM- and TEM-imaging. We focused on commercial samples of titanium dioxide, titanium dioxide nanorods with and without oleic acid ligands, and differently functionalized silica nanoparticles. My work included synthesis, functionalization, and characterization of several types of nanoparticles, exploring their application in imaging, dentistry, and bone

  1. Conformational and functional variants of CD44-targeted protein nanoparticles bio-produced in bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesarrodona, Mireia; Conchillo-Solé, Oscar; Unzueta, Ugutz; Xu, Zhikun; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Daura, Xavier; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio; Fernández, Yolanda; Foradada, Laia; Schwartz, Simó Jr; Abasolo, Ibane; Sánchez-Chardi, Alejandro; Roldán, Mónica; Villegas, Sandra; Rinas, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Biofabrication is attracting interest as a means to produce nanostructured functional materials because of its operational versatility and full scalability. Materials based on proteins are especially appealing, as the structure and functionality of proteins can be adapted by genetic engineering. Furthermore, strategies and tools for protein production have been developed and refined steadily for more than 30 years. However, protein conformation and therefore activity might be sensitive to production conditions. Here, we have explored whether the downstream strategy influences the structure and biological activities, in vitro and in vivo, of a self-assembling, CD44-targeted protein-only nanoparticle produced in Escherichia coli. This has been performed through the comparative analysis of particles built from soluble protein species or protein versions obtained by in vitro protein extraction from inclusion bodies, through mild, non-denaturing procedures. These methods have been developed recently as a convenient alternative to the use of toxic chaotropic agents for protein resolubilization from protein aggregates. The results indicate that the resulting material shows substantial differences in its physicochemical properties and its biological performance at the systems level, and that its building blocks are sensitive to the particular protein source. (paper)

  2. Effect of bidispersity in grafted chain length on grafted chain conformations and potential of mean force between polymer grafted nanoparticles in a homopolymer matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Nitish; Wentzel, Nathaniel; Jayaraman, Arthi

    2011-05-21

    In efforts to produce polymeric materials with tailored physical properties, significant interest has grown around the ability to control the spatial organization of nanoparticles in polymer nanocomposites. One way to achieve controlled particle arrangement is by grafting the nanoparticle surface with polymers that are compatible with the matrix, thus manipulating the interfacial interactions between the nanoparticles and the polymer matrix. Previous work has shown that the molecular weight of the grafted polymer, both at high grafting density and low grafting density, plays a key role in dictating the effective inter-particle interactions in a polymer matrix. At high grafting density nanoparticles disperse (aggregate) if the graft molecular weight is higher (lower) than the matrix molecular weight. At low grafting density the longer grafts can better shield the nanoparticle surface from direct particle-particle contacts than the shorter grafts and lead to the dispersion of the grafted particles in the matrix. Despite the importance of graft molecular weight, and evidence of non-trivial effects of polydispersity of chains grafted on flat surfaces, most theoretical work on polymer grafted nanoparticles has only focused on monodisperse grafted chains. In this paper, we focus on how bidispersity in grafted chain lengths affects the grafted chain conformations and inter-particle interactions in an implicit solvent and in a dense homopolymer polymer matrix. We first present the effects of bidispersity on grafted chain conformations in a single polymer grafted particle using purely Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. This is followed by calculations of the potential of mean force (PMF) between two grafted particles in a polymer matrix using a self-consistent Polymer Reference Interaction Site Model theory-Monte Carlo simulation approach. Monte Carlo simulations of a single polymer grafted particle in an implicit solvent show that in the bidisperse polymer grafted particles

  3. Controlling non-conformities propagation in manufacturing. Case study in an electromechanical assembly plant.

    OpenAIRE

    Fiegenwald , Valérie; Bassetto , Samuel; Tollenaere , Michel

    2011-01-01

    International audience; The purpose of this paper is to control the propagation of non-conformities. The control methods implemented to ensure the quality performance of a production system present weaknesses, inherent to their constitution, which can let non-conformities propagate along the value stream. This propagation cannot be avoided, but it can be mastered. This paper presents a method to master non-conformities propagation in a production system by building the associated control char...

  4. Influence of functionalized nanoparticles on conformational stability of type I collagen for possible biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandamchira, Aswathy; Selvam, Sangeetha; Marimuthu, Nidhin; Janardhanan, Sreeram Kalarical; Fathima, Nishter Nishad

    2013-12-01

    Collagen-nanoparticle interactions are vital for many biomedical applications including drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. Iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized using starch template according to our earlier reported procedures were functionalized by treating them with Gum Arabic (GA), a biocompatible polysaccharide, so as to enhance the interaction between nanoparticle surfaces and collagen. Viscosity, circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques have been used to study the collagen-nanoparticle interactions. The relative viscosity for collagen-nanoparticle conjugate was found to increase with increase in concentration of the nanoparticle within the concentration range investigated, which is due to the aggregation of protein onto the surface of nanoparticle. The CD spectra for the collagen-nanoparticle at different concentration ratios do not have much variation in the Rpn values (ratio of positive peak intensity over negative peak intensity) after functionalization with GA. The variation of molar ellipticity values for collagen-nanoparticle is due to the glycoprotein present in GA. The collagen triple helical structure is maintained after interaction with nanoparticles. The FTIR spectra of native collagen, Coll-Fs (nanoparticle without functionalization) and Coll-FsG (nanoparticle functionalized with GA) show clearly the amide I, II, III bands, with respect to collagen. The ability of polysaccharide stabilized/functionalized nanoparticles to maintain the collagen properties would help in its biomedical applications. © 2013.

  5. Control of carbon nanotube growth using cobalt nanoparticles as catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Yoon; Green, Malcolm L.H.; Kim, Young Heon; Lee, Jeong Yong; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2005-01-01

    We have controllably grown carbon nanotubes using uniformly distributed cobalt nanoparticles as catalyst. Cobalt nanoparticles with a uniform size were synthesized by chemical reaction and colloidal solutions including the cobalt nanoparticles were prepared. The cobalt nanoparticles were uniformly distributed on silicon substrates by a spin-coating method. Carbon nanotubes with a uniform diameter were synthesized on the cobalt nanoparticles by thermal chemical vapor deposition of acetylene gas. The density and vertical alignment of carbon nanotubes could be controlled by adjusting the density of cobalt (Co) nanoparticles

  6. Torsional Arming of Thiomannosyl Donors & Conformational Control of Hexahydropyridazines via pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jacob Ingemar

    The overall objective of the research presented in this PhD thesis was to investigate torsional arming of thiogalacto- and thiomannosyl donors (part 1) and to investigate the possible synthesis and attachment of a pH regulated conformational switch to an α-cyclodextrin (part 2). Part 1: It is well...... demonstrated their ability to change conformation under different conditions. These conformational changes are connected to various intramolecular interactions and can to some extent, be controlled by pH (Chapter 3). Fusing these conformationally labile compounds to the rim of a cyclodextrin would create...... compounds that could release molecules at a specified change in pH conditions. To investigate this, four hexahydropyridazines were synthesized and investigated for their pH induced conformational change (Chapter 4). Out of the four compounds, one revealed to flip between two conformations depending on pH...

  7. Atomic cranks and levers control sugar ring conformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qingmin; Lee, Gwangrog; Marszalek, Piotr E

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we review the conformational analysis of sugar rings placed under tension during mechanical manipulations of single polysaccharide molecules with the atomic force microscope and during steered molecular dynamics simulations. We examine the role of various chemical bonds and linkages between sugar rings in inhibiting or promoting their conformational transitions by means of external forces. Small differences in the orientation of one chemical bond on the sugar ring can produce significantly different mechanical properties at the polymer level as exemplified by two polysaccharides: cellulose, composed of β-1→4-linked D-glucose, and amylose, composed of α-1→4-linked D-glucose. In contrast to β-glucose rings, which are mechanically stable and produce simple entropic elasticity of the chain, α-glucose rings flip under tension from their chair to a boat-like structure and these transitions produce deviations of amylose elasticity from the freely jointed chain model. We also examine the deformation of two mechanically complementary 1→6-linked polysaccharides: pustulan, a β-1→6-linked glucan, and dextran, a α-1→6-linked glucan. Forced rotations about the C 5 -C 6 bonds govern the elasticity of pustulan, and complex conformational transitions that involve simultaneous C 5 -C 6 rotations and chair-boat transitions govern the elasticity of dextran. Finally, we discuss the likelihood of various conformational transitions in sugar rings in biological settings and speculate on their significance

  8. Sequence-independent control of peptide conformation in liposomal vaccines for targeting protein misfolding diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hickman, D.T.; Nand, D.; Baldus, M.; Muhs, A.

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic peptide immunogens which mimic the conformation of a target epitope of pathological relevance offer the possibility to precisely control the immune response specificity. Here, we performed conformational analyses using a panel of peptides in order to investigate the key parameters

  9. Nanoparticles for mosquito control: Challenges and constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Benelli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mosquito control programs are facing important and timely challenges, including the recent outbreaks of novel arbovirus, the development of resistance in several Culicidae species, and the rapid spreading of highly invasive mosquitoes worldwide. Current control tools mainly rely on the employment of (i synthetic or microbial pesticides, (ii insecticide-treated bed nets, (iii adult repellents, (iv biological control agents against mosquito young instars (mainly fishes, amphibians and copepods (v Sterile Insect Technique (SIT, (vi “boosted SIT”, (vii symbiont-based methods and (viii transgenic mosquitoes. Currently, none of these single strategies is fully successful. Novel eco-friendly strategies to manage mosquito vectors are urgently needed. The plant-mediated fabrication of nanoparticles is advantageous over chemical and physical methods, since it is cheap, single-step, and does not require high pressure, energy, temperature, or the use of highly toxic chemicals. In the latest years, a growing number of plant-borne compounds have been proposed for efficient and rapid extracellular synthesis of metal nanoparticles effective against mosquitoes at very low doses (i.e. 1–30 ppm. In this review, we focused on the promising potential of green-fabricated nanoparticles as toxic agents against mosquito young instars, and as adult oviposition deterrents. Furthermore, we analyzed current evidences about non-target effects of these nanocomposites used for mosquito control, pointing out their moderate acute toxicity for non-target aquatic organisms, absence of genotoxicity at the doses tested against mosquitoes, and the possibility to boost the predation rates of biological control agents against mosquitoes treating the aquatic environment with ultra-low doses (e.g. 1–3 ppm of green-synthesized nanoparticles, which reduce the motility of mosquito larvae. Challenges for future research should shed light on (i the precise mechanism(s of action of

  10. Nanoparticles from a controlled polymerization process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirumala, V.R.; Caneba, G.T.; Dar, Y.; Wang, H.-H.; Mancini, D.C.

    2003-01-01

    Free-radical retrograde precipitation polymerization process in the past has shown excellent control characteristics over reaction rate, molecular weight, and in the entrapment of live radicals for the generation of block copolymers. The same principle has now been extended to study the reaction confinement to a nanoscale region. Nanosized polymer particles have been reported to form from block copolymers, conventional precipitation polymerization methods, or through emulsion polymerization approaches. In this work, we present a new method of generating nanosized polymer particles by polymerizing the monomer in an environment that precipitates the polymer above the lower critical solution temperature. The nanoparticles have been characterized by both tapping-mode atomic force microscopy observations and in situ synchrotron time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering analysis. The results from both the techniques showed the formation of nanoparticles in the size range of 15-30 nm, directly from the polymerization process.

  11. Supercooling of Water Controlled by Nanoparticles and Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Wei; Jia, Lisi; Chen, Ying; Li, Yi'ang; Li, Jun; Mo, Songping

    2018-05-01

    Nanoparticles, including Al2O3 and SiO2, and ultrasound were adopted to improve the solidification properties of water. The effects of nanoparticle concentration, contact angle, and ultrasonic intensity on the supercooling degree of water were investigated, as well as the dispersion stability of nanoparticles in water during solidification. Experimental results show that the supercooling degree of water is reduced under the combined effect of ultrasound and nanoparticles. Consequently, the reduction of supercooling degree increases with the increase of ultrasonic intensity and nanoparticle concentration and decrease of contact angle of nanoparticles. Moreover, the reduction of supercooling degree caused by ultrasound and nanoparticles together do not exceed the sum of the supercooling degree reductions caused by ultrasound and nanoparticles separately; the reduction is even smaller than that caused by ultrasound individually under certain conditions of controlled nanoparticle concentration and contact angle and ultrasonic intensity. The dispersion stability of nanoparticles during solidification can be maintained only when the nanoparticles and ultrasound together show a superior effect on reducing the supercooling degree of water to the single operation of ultrasound. Otherwise, the aggregation of nanoparticles appears in water solidification, which results in failure. The relationships among the meaningful nanoparticle concentration, contact angle, and ultrasonic intensity, at which the requirements of low supercooling and high stability could be satisfied, were obtained. The control mechanisms for these phenomena were analyzed.

  12. Conformational change results in loss of enzymatic activity of jack bean urease on its interaction with silver nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnuvel, Shobana; Subramanian, Balakumar; Ponnuraj, Karthe

    2015-10-01

    Urease is an enzyme produced by microbes such as bacteria, yeast and fungi. Plants also produce this enzyme. Urease action splits urea into ammonia and carbamate. This action is having important implications in agro-chemical, medicinal and environment. Therefore there is always a constant search for new and novel compounds which could inhibit this enzyme. Here we have studied the interaction of jack bean urease (JBU) with silver nanoparticle to analyze the influence of the resultant protein corona formation on the catalytic property of JBU. Several techniques like UV-Vis, gel shift assay and CD spectroscopy have been used to characterize this interaction. Urease activity assay suggests that the protein corona formation inhibits the enzymatic action of JBU. The loss of enzymatic action could be either due to the nanoparticle blocking the active site of JBU or a conformational change in the protein. The CD spectra of JBU-AgNP complexes clearly revealed significant changes in the secondary structural composition of the JBU and this could be the reason for the loss of enzymatic activity of JBU. This study revealed an interesting observation, where the interaction of AgNP with JBU resulted destabilization of hexameric nature of JBU which is otherwise highly stable. The results of the present study could be useful in the development of nanoparticle based material for inhibiting the ureolytic activity of ureases in different fields.

  13. 3-D conformal radiation therapy - Part II: Computer-controlled 3-D treatment delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedick, A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: This course will describe the use of computer-controlled treatment delivery techniques for treatment of patients with sophisticated conformal therapy. In particular, research and implementation issues related to clinical use of computer-controlled conformal radiation therapy (CCRT) techniques will be discussed. The possible/potential advantages of CCRT techniques will be highlighted using results from clinical 3-D planning studies. Materials and Methods: In recent years, 3-D treatment planning has been used to develop and implement 3-D conformal therapy treatment techniques, and studies based on these conformal treatments have begun to show the promise of conformal therapy. This work has been followed by the development of commercially-available multileaf collimator and computer control systems for treatment machines. Using these (and other) CCRT devices, various centers are beginning to clinically use complex computer-controlled treatments. Both research and clinical CCRT treatment techniques will be discussed in this presentation. General concepts and requirements for CCRT will be mentioned. Developmental and clinical experience with CCRT techniques from a number of centers will be utilized. Results: Treatment planning, treatment preparation and treatment delivery must be approached in an integrated fashion in order to clinically implement CCRT treatment techniques, and the entire process will be discussed. Various CCRT treatment methodologies will be reviewed from operational, dosimetric, and technical points of view. The discussion will concentrate on CCRT techniques which are likely to see rather wide dissemination over the next several years, including particularly the use of multileaf collimators (MLC), dynamic and segmental conformal therapy, conformal field shaping, and other related techniques. More advanced CCRT techniques, such as the use of individualized intensity modulation of beams or segments, and the use of computer-controlled

  14. ATMP-stabilized iron nanoparticles: chelator-controlled nanoparticle synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Lauren F.; Rentz, Nikki S.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we characterize iron nanoparticles synthesized in water in the presence of a phosphonate chelator, amino tris(methylene phosphonic acid) (ATMP) for a range of molar ratios of ATMP to iron. An increase in the molar ratio from 0.05 to 0.8 decreases nanoparticle size from approximately 150 nm to less than 10 nm. Zeta potential measurements were used to evaluate colloidal stability. Zeta potential values varied as a function of pH, and zeta potential values decreased with increasing pH. At lower molar ratios of ATMP to iron, the zeta potential varied between 15 and -40 mV, passing through an isoelectric point at pH 7.5. At higher ratios, the zeta potential was negative across the measured pH range of 2-12 and varied from -2 to -55 mV. Diffraction analysis indicates that ATMP-stabilized iron nanoparticles may have a nano-crystalline structure, potentially with regions of amorphous iron. Characterization results of ATMP-stabilized iron nanoparticles are compared to results obtained for carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-stabilized iron nanoparticles. CMC stabilization caused similar peak broadening in diffraction spectra as for ATMP, suggesting similar nano-crystalline/amorphous structure; however, an increase in the molar ratio of CMC to iron did not cause the same reduction in nanoparticle size as was observed for ATMP-stabilized iron nanoparticles.

  15. Conformation and elasticity of a charged polymer chain bridging two nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowicki, W.; Nowicka, G.

    2013-01-01

    A complex composed of a charged flexible polymer chain irreversibly attached with its ends to surfaces of two nanoparticles was investigated using the Metropolis Monte Carlo method on a simple cubic lattice. The simulations were performed in the presence of explicit ions. The bridging chain and the nanoparticles bearing the same and the opposite sign charges were considered. Changes in the free energy of the complex upon its stretching or compression, together with the magnitude of the elastic force, were examined. The relative roles of energetic and entropic effects in determining the properties of the complex were identified. Also, the adsorption of charged monomers on the opposite-sign charged nanoparticles and its influence on the examined quantities was studied. Moreover, a simple semi-analytical approach to the thermodynamics of the polymer bridge was derived

  16. PEGylated nanoparticles bind to and alter amyloid-beta peptide conformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brambilla, Davide; Verpillot, Romain; Le Droumaguet, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the polyethylene glycol (PEG) corona of long-circulating polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) favors interaction with the amyloid-beta (Aß(1-42)) peptide both in solution and in serum. The influence of PEGylation of poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate) and poly(lactic acid) NPs on the int......We have demonstrated that the polyethylene glycol (PEG) corona of long-circulating polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) favors interaction with the amyloid-beta (Aß(1-42)) peptide both in solution and in serum. The influence of PEGylation of poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate) and poly(lactic acid) NPs...

  17. Size Controlled Synthesis of Starch Nanoparticles by a Microemulsion Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk Fun Chin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Controllable particles sizes of starch nanoparticles were synthesized via a precipitation in water-in-oil microemulsion approach. Microemulsion method offers the advantages of ultralow interfacial tension, large interfacial area, and being thermodynamically stable and affords monodispersed nanoparticles. The synthesis parameters such as stirring rates, ratios of oil/cosurfactant, oil phases, cosurfactants, and ratios of water/oil were found to affect the mean particle size of starch nanoparticles. Starch nanoparticles with mean particles sizes of 109 nm were synthesized by direct nanoprecipitation method, whereas by using precipitation in microemulsion approach, starch nanoparticles with smaller mean particles sizes of 83 nm were obtained.

  18. Conformational Control of Energy Transfer: A Mechanism for Biocompatible Nanocrystal-Based Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Kay, Euan R.; Lee, Jungmin; Nocera, Daniel; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2012-01-01

    Fold-up fluorophore: A new paradigm for designing self-referencing fluorescent nanosensors is demonstrated by interfacing a pH-triggered molecular conformational switch with quantum dots. Analytedependent, large-amplitude conformational motion controls the distance between the nanocrystal energy donor and an organic FRET acceptor. The result is a fluorescence signal capable of reporting pH values from individual endosomes in living cells.

  19. Size-controlled and redox-responsive supramolecular nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weinhart-Mejia, R.; Kronig, G.A.; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2015-01-01

    Control over the assembly and disassembly of nanoparticles is pivotal for their use as drug delivery vehicles. Here, we aim to form supramolecular nanoparticles (SNPs) by combining advantages of the reversible assembly properties of SNPs using host–guest interactions and of a stimulus-responsive

  20. Nanoparticle layer deposition for highly controlled multilayer formation based on high-coverage monolayers of nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yue; Williams, Mackenzie G.; Miller, Timothy J.; Teplyakov, Andrew V.

    2016-01-01

    This paper establishes a strategy for chemical deposition of functionalized nanoparticles onto solid substrates in a layer-by-layer process based on self-limiting surface chemical reactions leading to complete monolayer formation within the multilayer system without any additional intermediate layers — nanoparticle layer deposition (NPLD). This approach is fundamentally different from previously established traditional layer-by-layer deposition techniques and is conceptually more similar to well-known atomic and molecular layer deposition processes. The NPLD approach uses efficient chemical functionalization of the solid substrate material and complementary functionalization of nanoparticles to produce a nearly 100% coverage of these nanoparticles with the use of “click chemistry”. Following this initial deposition, a second complete monolayer of nanoparticles is deposited using a copper-catalyzed “click reaction” with the azide-terminated silica nanoparticles of a different size. This layer-by-layer growth is demonstrated to produce stable covalently-bound multilayers of nearly perfect structure over macroscopic solid substrates. The formation of stable covalent bonds is confirmed spectroscopically and the stability of the multilayers produced is tested by sonication in a variety of common solvents. The 1-, 2- and 3-layer structures are interrogated by electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy and the thickness of the multilayers formed is fully consistent with that expected for highly efficient monolayer formation with each cycle of growth. This approach can be extended to include a variety of materials deposited in a predesigned sequence on different substrates with a highly conformal filling. - Highlights: • We investigate the formation of high-coverage monolayers of nanoparticles. • We use “click chemistry” to form these monolayers. • We form multiple layers based on the same strategy. • We confirm the formation of covalent bonds

  1. Human serum albumin as protecting agent of silver nanoparticles: role of the protein conformation and amine groups in the nanoparticle stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarcon, Emilio I.; Bueno-Alejo, Carlos J.; Noel, Christopher W.; Stamplecoskie, Kevin G. [Centre for Catalysis Research and Innovation, University of Ottawa, Department of Chemistry (Canada); Pacioni, Natalia L. [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, INFIQC, Departamento de Quimica Organica (Argentina); Poblete, Horacio [Center for Bioinformatics and Molecular Simulations, Universidad de Talca (Chile); Scaiano, J. C., E-mail: tito@photo.chem.uottawa.ca [Centre for Catalysis Research and Innovation, University of Ottawa, Department of Chemistry (Canada)

    2013-01-15

    Thermally denatured human serum albumin interacts with {approx}3.0 nm spherical AgNP enhancing the fluorescence of Trp-214 at large protein/nanoparticle ratios. However, using native HSA, no changes in the emission were observed. The observation is likely due to differences between native and denatured protein packing resulting from protein corona formation. We have also found that NH{sub 2} blocking of the protein strongly affects the ability of the protein to protect AgNP from different salts/ions such as NaCl, PBS, Hank's buffer, Tris-HCl, MES, and DMEM. Additionally, AgNP can be readily prepared in aqueous solutions by a photochemical approach employing HSA as an in situ protecting agent. The role of the protein in this case is beyond that of protecting agent; thus, Ag{sup +} ions and I-2959 complexation within the protein structure also affects the efficiency of AgNP formation. Blocking NH{sub 2} in HSA modified the AgNP growth profile, surface plasmon band shape, and long-term stability suggesting that amine groups are directly involved in the formation and post-stabilization of AgNP. In particular, AgNP size and shape are extensively influenced by NH{sub 2} blocking, leading primarily to cubes and plates with sizes around 5-15 nm; in contrast, spherical monodisperse 4.0 nm AgNP are observed for native HSA. The nanoparticles prepared by this protocol are non-toxic in primary cells and have remarkable antibacterial properties. Finally, surface plasmon excitation of native HSA-AgNP promoted loss of protein conformation in just 5 min, suggesting that plasmon heating causes protein denaturation using continuous light sources such as commercial LED.

  2. Human serum albumin as protecting agent of silver nanoparticles: role of the protein conformation and amine groups in the nanoparticle stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alarcon, Emilio I.; Bueno-Alejo, Carlos J.; Noel, Christopher W.; Stamplecoskie, Kevin G.; Pacioni, Natalia L.; Poblete, Horacio; Scaiano, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Thermally denatured human serum albumin interacts with ∼3.0 nm spherical AgNP enhancing the fluorescence of Trp-214 at large protein/nanoparticle ratios. However, using native HSA, no changes in the emission were observed. The observation is likely due to differences between native and denatured protein packing resulting from protein corona formation. We have also found that NH 2 blocking of the protein strongly affects the ability of the protein to protect AgNP from different salts/ions such as NaCl, PBS, Hank’s buffer, Tris–HCl, MES, and DMEM. Additionally, AgNP can be readily prepared in aqueous solutions by a photochemical approach employing HSA as an in situ protecting agent. The role of the protein in this case is beyond that of protecting agent; thus, Ag + ions and I-2959 complexation within the protein structure also affects the efficiency of AgNP formation. Blocking NH 2 in HSA modified the AgNP growth profile, surface plasmon band shape, and long-term stability suggesting that amine groups are directly involved in the formation and post-stabilization of AgNP. In particular, AgNP size and shape are extensively influenced by NH 2 blocking, leading primarily to cubes and plates with sizes around 5–15 nm; in contrast, spherical monodisperse 4.0 nm AgNP are observed for native HSA. The nanoparticles prepared by this protocol are non-toxic in primary cells and have remarkable antibacterial properties. Finally, surface plasmon excitation of native HSA-AgNP promoted loss of protein conformation in just 5 min, suggesting that plasmon heating causes protein denaturation using continuous light sources such as commercial LED.

  3. Building Strategic Conformal Automation for Air Traffic Control Using Machine Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regtuit, Robert; Borst, C.; van Kampen, E.; van Paassen, M.M.

    2018-01-01

    Acceptance of automation has been a bottleneck for successful introduction of automation in Air Trac Control. Strategic conformal automation has been proven to increase automation acceptance, by creating a better match between automation and operator decision-making. In this paper strategic

  4. Influence of locus of control on conformity to authority in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of locus of control on conformity to authority in a multicultural organisation - A case of IITA Nigeria. John O Ekore. Abstract. No Abstract Available African Journal for the Psychological Study of Social Issues Vol.5(2) 2000: 90-96. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  5. Controlled synthesis of Zn{sup 0} nanoparticles by bioreduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canizal, G. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Apartado Postal 14-805, C.P. 07730, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Schabes-Retchkiman, P.S. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nal. Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 20-364, C.P. 01000, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Pal, U. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Apdo. Postal J-48, Puebla, Pue. 72570 (Mexico); Liu, Hong Bo [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Apartado Postal 14-805, C.P. 07730, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ascencio, J.A. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Apartado Postal 14-805, C.P. 07730, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: ascencio@imp.mx

    2006-06-10

    Synthesis of metallic Zn nanoparticles through bio-reduction methods is reported for the first time. The structure, shape and size of the nanoparticles are critically controlled through the pH used in the sample preparation. High resolution electron microscopy was used in order to determine the structure of individual nanoparticles. Formation of quantum dots and the efficiency of ion reduction in the synthesis process are studied through the optical absorption in colloids. The structure and stability of the Zn clusters (up to 4000 atoms) were determined through the calculation of minimum energy configurations using molecular and quantum mechanics approximations and image simulation. The structure of the obtained nanoparticles was preferentially hexagonal, although multiple twinned and fcc-like structures were identified. The size controlled synthesis of small nanoparticles in the quantum-dot range was demonstrated successfully.

  6. Controlled synthesis of Zn0 nanoparticles by bioreduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canizal, G.; Schabes-Retchkiman, P.S.; Pal, U.; Liu, Hong Bo; Ascencio, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Synthesis of metallic Zn nanoparticles through bio-reduction methods is reported for the first time. The structure, shape and size of the nanoparticles are critically controlled through the pH used in the sample preparation. High resolution electron microscopy was used in order to determine the structure of individual nanoparticles. Formation of quantum dots and the efficiency of ion reduction in the synthesis process are studied through the optical absorption in colloids. The structure and stability of the Zn clusters (up to 4000 atoms) were determined through the calculation of minimum energy configurations using molecular and quantum mechanics approximations and image simulation. The structure of the obtained nanoparticles was preferentially hexagonal, although multiple twinned and fcc-like structures were identified. The size controlled synthesis of small nanoparticles in the quantum-dot range was demonstrated successfully

  7. Photoresponsive lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles for controlled doxorubicin release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Cuiping; Wu, Ming; Zhang, Cecheng; Lin, Xinyi; Wei, Zuwu; Zheng, Youshi; Zhang, Da; Zhang, Zhenxi; Liu, Xiaolong

    2017-06-01

    Currently, photoresponsive nanomaterials are particularly attractive due to their spatial and temporal controlled drug release abilities. In this work, we report a photoresponsive lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticle for remote controlled delivery of anticancer drugs. This hybrid nanoparticle comprises three distinct functional components: (i) a poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) core to encapsulate doxorubicin; (ii) a soybean lecithin monolayer at the interface of the core and shell to act as a molecular fence to prevent drug leakage; (iii) a photoresponsive polymeric shell with anti-biofouling properties to enhance nanoparticle stability, which could be detached from the nanoparticle to trigger the drug release via a decrease in the nanoparticle’s stability under light irradiation. In vitro results revealed that this core-shell nanoparticle had excellent light-controlled drug release behavior (76% release with light irradiation versus 10% release without light irradiation). The confocal microscopy and flow cytometry results also further demonstrated the light-controlled drug release behavior inside the cancer cells. Furthermore, a CCK8 assay demonstrated that light irradiation could significantly improve the efficiency of killing cancer cells. Meanwhile, whole-animal fluorescence imaging of a tumor-bearing mouse also confirmed that light irradiation could trigger drug release in vivo. Taken together, our data suggested that a hybrid nanoparticle could be a novel light controlled drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

  8. Controllable Catalysis with Nanoparticles: Bimetallic Alloy Systems and Surface Adsorbates

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tianyou

    2016-05-16

    Transition metal nanoparticles are privileged materials in catalysis due to their high specific surface areas and abundance of active catalytic sites. While many of these catalysts are quite useful, we are only beginning to understand the underlying catalytic mechanisms. Opening the “black box” of nanoparticle catalysis is essential to achieve the ultimate goal of catalysis by design. In this Perspective we highlight recent work addressing the topic of controlled catalysis with bimetallic alloy and “designer” adsorbate-stabilized metal nanoparticles.

  9. Controllable Catalysis with Nanoparticles: Bimetallic Alloy Systems and Surface Adsorbates

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tianyou; Rodionov, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    Transition metal nanoparticles are privileged materials in catalysis due to their high specific surface areas and abundance of active catalytic sites. While many of these catalysts are quite useful, we are only beginning to understand the underlying catalytic mechanisms. Opening the “black box” of nanoparticle catalysis is essential to achieve the ultimate goal of catalysis by design. In this Perspective we highlight recent work addressing the topic of controlled catalysis with bimetallic alloy and “designer” adsorbate-stabilized metal nanoparticles.

  10. Dynamic and Progressive Control of DNA Origami Conformation by Modulating DNA Helicity with Chemical Adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haorong; Zhang, Hanyu; Pan, Jing; Cha, Tae-Gon; Li, Shiming; Andréasson, Joakim; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2016-05-24

    DNA origami has received enormous attention for its ability to program complex nanostructures with a few nanometer precision. Dynamic origami structures that change conformation in response to environmental cues or external signals hold great promises in sensing and actuation at the nanoscale. The reconfiguration mechanism of existing dynamic origami structures is mostly limited to single-stranded hinges and relies almost exclusively on DNA hybridization or strand displacement. Here, we show an alternative approach by demonstrating on-demand conformation changes with DNA-binding molecules, which intercalate between base pairs and unwind DNA double helices. The unwinding effect modulates the helicity mismatch in DNA origami, which significantly influences the internal stress and the global conformation of the origami structure. We demonstrate the switching of a polymerized origami nanoribbon between different twisting states and a well-constrained torsional deformation in a monomeric origami shaft. The structural transformation is shown to be reversible, and binding isotherms confirm the reconfiguration mechanism. This approach provides a rapid and reversible means to change DNA origami conformation, which can be used for dynamic and progressive control at the nanoscale.

  11. Probing Conformational Change of Bovine Serum Albumin–Dextran Conjugates under Controlled Dry Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Shuqin; Li, Yunqi; Zhao, Qin; Li, Ji; Xia, Qiuyang; Zhang, Xiaoming; Huang, Qingrong (Rutgers); (Chinese Aca. Sci.); (Jiangnan)

    2015-04-29

    The time-dependent conformational change of bovine serum album (BSA) during Maillard reaction with dextran under controlled dry heating has been studied by small-angle X-ray scattering, fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and circular dichroism analysis. Through the research on the radii of gyration (Rg), intrinsic fluorescence, and secondary structure, conjugates with dextran coating were found to inhibit BSA aggregation and preserve the secondary structure of native BSA against long-time heat treatment during Maillard reaction. The results suggested that the hydrophilic dextran was conjugated to the compact protein surface and enclosed it and more dextran chains were attached to BSA with the increase of the heating time. The study presented here will be beneficial to the understanding of the conformational evolution of BSA molecules during the dry-heating Maillard reaction and to the control of the protein–polysaccharide conjugate structure.

  12. Controlled formation of metallic nanowires via Au nanoparticle ac trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, L; Calame, M; Molen, S J van der; Liao, J; Schoenenberger, C

    2007-01-01

    Applying ac voltages, we trapped gold nanoparticles between micro-fabricated electrodes under well-defined conditions. We demonstrate that the nanoparticles can be controllably fused together to form homogeneous gold nanowires with pre-defined diameters and conductance values. Whereas electromigration is known to form a gap when a dc voltage is applied, this ac technique achieves the opposite, thereby completing the toolkit for the fabrication of nanoscale junctions

  13. Controlled formation of metallic nanowires via Au nanoparticle ac trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, L; Calame, M; Molen, S J van der; Liao, J; Schoenenberger, C [Institute of Physics, University of Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2007-06-13

    Applying ac voltages, we trapped gold nanoparticles between micro-fabricated electrodes under well-defined conditions. We demonstrate that the nanoparticles can be controllably fused together to form homogeneous gold nanowires with pre-defined diameters and conductance values. Whereas electromigration is known to form a gap when a dc voltage is applied, this ac technique achieves the opposite, thereby completing the toolkit for the fabrication of nanoscale junctions.

  14. Microfluidic Reactors for the Controlled Synthesis of Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Emine Yegan

    Nanoparticles have attracted a lot of attention in the past few decades due to their unique, size-dependent properties. In order to use these nanoparticles in devices or sensors effectively, it is important to maintain uniform properties throughout the system; therefore nanoparticles need to have uniform sizes -- or monodisperse. In order to achieve monodispersity, an extreme control over the reaction conditions is required during their synthesis. These reaction conditions such as temperature, concentration of reagents, residence times, etc. affect the structure of nanoparticles dramatically; therefore when the conditions vary locally in the reaction vessel, different sized nanoparticles form, causing polydispersity. In widely-used batch wise synthesis techniques, large sized reaction vessels are used to mix and heat reagents. In these types of systems, it is very hard to avoid thermal gradients and to achieve rapid mixing times as well as to control residence times. Also it is not possible to make rapid changes in the reaction parameters during the synthesis. The other drawback of conventional methods is that it is not possible to separate the nucleation of nanoparticles from their growth; this leads to combined nucleation and growth and subsequently results in polydisperse size distributions. Microfluidics is an alternative method by which the limitations of conventional techniques can be addressed. Due to the small size, it is possible to control temperature and concentration of reagents precisely as well as to make rapid changes in mixing ratios of reagents or temperature of the reaction zones. There have been several microfluidic reactors -- (microreactors) in literature that were designed to improve the size distribution of nanoparticles. In this work, two novel microfluidic systems were developed for achieving controlled synthesis of nanoparticles. The first microreactor was made out of a chemically robust polymer, polyurethane, and it was used for low

  15. Phospholipid-assisted synthesis of size-controlled gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Peng; Zhu Xinyuan

    2007-01-01

    Morphology and size control of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by phospholipids (PLs) has been reported. It was found that gold entities could form nanostructures with different sizes controlled by PLs in an aqueous solution. During the preparation of 1.5 nm gold seeds, AuNPs were obtained from the reduction of gold complex by sodium borohydride and capped by citrate for stabilization. With the different ratios between seed solution and growth solution, which was composed by gold complex and PLs, gold seeds grew into larger nanoparticles step by step until enough large size up to 30 nm. The main discovery of this work is that common biomolecules, such as PLs can be used to control nanoparticle size. This conclusion has been confirmed by transmission electron micrographs, particle size analysis, and UV-vis spectra

  16. Coordination of KSHV Latent and Lytic Gene Control by CTCF-Cohesin Mediated Chromosome Conformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyojeung; Wiedmer, Andreas; Yuan, Yan; Robertson, Erle; Lieberman, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Herpesvirus persistence requires a dynamic balance between latent and lytic cycle gene expression, but how this balance is maintained remains enigmatic. We have previously shown that the Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) major latency transcripts encoding LANA, vCyclin, vFLIP, v-miRNAs, and Kaposin are regulated, in part, by a chromatin organizing element that binds CTCF and cohesins. Using viral genome-wide chromatin conformation capture (3C) methods, we now show that KSHV latency control region is physically linked to the promoter regulatory region for ORF50, which encodes the KSHV immediate early protein RTA. Other linkages were also observed, including an interaction between the 5′ and 3′ end of the latency transcription cluster. Mutation of the CTCF-cohesin binding site reduced or eliminated the chromatin conformation linkages, and deregulated viral transcription and genome copy number control. siRNA depletion of CTCF or cohesin subunits also disrupted chromosomal linkages and deregulated viral latent and lytic gene transcription. Furthermore, the linkage between the latent and lytic control region was subject to cell cycle fluctuation and disrupted during lytic cycle reactivation, suggesting that these interactions are dynamic and regulatory. Our findings indicate that KSHV genomes are organized into chromatin loops mediated by CTCF and cohesin interactions, and that these inter-chromosomal linkages coordinate latent and lytic gene control. PMID:21876668

  17. Controlled positioning of nanoparticles on graphene by noninvasive AFM lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellido, Elena; Ojea-Jiménez, Isaac; Ghirri, Alberto; Alvino, Christian; Candini, Andrea; Puntes, Victor; Affronte, Marco; Domingo, Neus; Ruiz-Molina, Daniel

    2012-08-21

    Atomic force microscopy is shown to be an excellent lithographic technique to directly deposit nanoparticles on graphene by capillary transport without any previous functionalization of neither the nanoparticles nor the graphene surface while preserving its integrity and conductivity properties. Moreover this technique allows for (sub)micrometric control on the positioning thanks to a new three-step protocol that has been designed with this aim. With this methodology the exact target coordinates are registered by scanning the tip over the predetermined area previous to its coating with the ink and deposition. As a proof-of-concept, this strategy has successfully allowed the controlled deposition of few nanoparticles on 1 μm(2) preselected sites of a graphene surface with high accuracy.

  18. Controlled delivery of acyclovir from porous silicon micro- and nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maniya, Nalin H.; Patel, Sanjaykumar R.; Murthy, Z.V.P., E-mail: zvpm2000@yahoo.com

    2015-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Porous silicon (PSi) was fabricated by electrochemical etching process. • Micro- and nanoparticles were prepared by ultrasonic fracture of PSi films. • Acyclovir was loaded into native, oxidized, and hydrosilylated PSi particles. • Micro- and nanoparticles displays controlled release behaviour for several days. • Drug release behaviour and release kinetics from PSi particles were studied. - Abstract: In this work, micro- and nanoparticles of porous silicon (PSi) are demonstrated to act as effective carrier for the controlled delivery of acyclovir (ACV). PSi films prepared by electrochemical etching were fractured by ultrasonication to prepare micro- and nanoparticles. PSi native particles were thermally oxidized (TOPSi) and thermally hydrosilylated using undecylenic acid (UnPSi). PSi particles with three different surface chemistries were then loaded with ACV by physical adsorption and covalent attachment. Such particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In vitro ACV release experiments in phosphate buffered saline showed sustained release behaviour from both micro- and nanoparticles and order of release was found to be native PSi > TOPSi > UnPSi. Drug release kinetics study using Korsmeyer-Peppas model suggested a combination of both drug diffusion and Si scaffold erosion based drug release mechanisms.

  19. Controlled delivery of acyclovir from porous silicon micro- and nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniya, Nalin H.; Patel, Sanjaykumar R.; Murthy, Z.V.P.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Porous silicon (PSi) was fabricated by electrochemical etching process. • Micro- and nanoparticles were prepared by ultrasonic fracture of PSi films. • Acyclovir was loaded into native, oxidized, and hydrosilylated PSi particles. • Micro- and nanoparticles displays controlled release behaviour for several days. • Drug release behaviour and release kinetics from PSi particles were studied. - Abstract: In this work, micro- and nanoparticles of porous silicon (PSi) are demonstrated to act as effective carrier for the controlled delivery of acyclovir (ACV). PSi films prepared by electrochemical etching were fractured by ultrasonication to prepare micro- and nanoparticles. PSi native particles were thermally oxidized (TOPSi) and thermally hydrosilylated using undecylenic acid (UnPSi). PSi particles with three different surface chemistries were then loaded with ACV by physical adsorption and covalent attachment. Such particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In vitro ACV release experiments in phosphate buffered saline showed sustained release behaviour from both micro- and nanoparticles and order of release was found to be native PSi > TOPSi > UnPSi. Drug release kinetics study using Korsmeyer-Peppas model suggested a combination of both drug diffusion and Si scaffold erosion based drug release mechanisms

  20. Size Controlled Synthesis of Transition Metal Nanoparticles for Catalytic Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Esparza, Angel

    2011-07-07

    Catalysis offers cleaner and more efficient chemical reactions for environmental scientists. More than 90% of industrial processes are performed with a catalyst involved, however research it is still required to improve the catalyst materials. The purpose of this work is to contribute with the development of catalysts synthesis with two different approaches. First, the precise size control of non-noble metals nanoparticles. Second, a new one-pot synthesis method based on a microemulsion system was developed to synthesize size-controlled metal nanoparticles in oxide supports. The one-pot method represents a simple approach to synthesize both support and immobilized nanometer-sized non-noble metal nanoparticles in the same reaction system. Narrow size distribution nickel, cobalt, iron and cobalt-nickel nanoparticles were obtained. High metal dispersions are attainable regardless the metal or support used in the synthesis. Thus, the methodology is adaptable and robust. The sizecontrolled supported metal nanoparticles offer the opportunity to study size effects and metal-support interactions on different catalytic reactions with different sets of metals and supports.

  1. A computer-controlled conformal radiotherapy system. III: graphical simulation and monitoring of treatment delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, Marc L.; McShan, Daniel L.; Fraass, Benedick A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Safe and efficient delivery of radiotherapy using computer-controlled machines requires new procedures to design and verify the actual delivery of these treatments. Graphical simulation and monitoring techniques for treatment delivery have been developed for this purpose. Methods and Materials: A graphics-based simulator of the treatment machine and a set of procedures for creating and manipulating treatment delivery scripts are used to simulate machine motions, detect collisions, and monitor machine positions during treatment. The treatment delivery simulator is composed of four components: a three-dimensional dynamic model of the treatment machine; a motion simulation and collision detection algorithm, user-interface widgets that mimic the treatment machine's control and readout devices; and an icon-based interface for creating and manipulating treatment delivery scripts. These components are used in a stand-alone fashion for interactive treatment delivery planning and integrated with a machine control system for treatment implementation and monitoring. Results: A graphics-based treatment delivery simulator and a set of procedures for planning and monitoring computer-controlled treatment delivery have been developed and implemented as part of a comprehensive computer-controlled conformal radiotherapy system. To date, these techniques have been used to design and help monitor computer-controlled treatments on a radiotherapy machine for more than 200 patients. Examples using these techniques for treatment delivery planning and on-line monitoring of machine motions during therapy are described. Conclusion: A system that provides interactive graphics-based tools for defining the sequence of machine motions, simulating treatment delivery including collision detection, and presenting the therapists with continual visual feedback from the treatment machine has been successfully implemented for routine clinical use as part of an overall system for computer-controlled

  2. Control surface wettability with nanoparticles from phase-change materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Brink, G. H.; van het Hof, P. J.; Chen, B.; Sedighi, M.; Kooi, B. J.; Palasantzas, G.

    2016-01-01

    The wetting state of surfaces can be controlled physically from the highly hydrophobic to hydrophilic states using the amorphous-to-crystalline phase transition of Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) nanoparticles as surfactant. Indeed, contact angle measurements show that by increasing the surface coverage of the

  3. Interaction of carbon nanoparticles to serum albumin: elucidation of the extent of perturbation of serum albumin conformations and thermodynamical parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Samir [Molecular and Human Genetics Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Kolkata 700032 (India); Hossain, Maidul [Biophysical Chemistry Laboratory, CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Kolkata 700032 (India); Devi, P. Sujatha [Nano-Structured Materials Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata 700032 (India); Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh [Biophysical Chemistry Laboratory, CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Kolkata 700032 (India); Chaudhuri, Keya, E-mail: keya.chaudhuri@gmail.com [Molecular and Human Genetics Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Strong interaction of serum albumins to CNPs and potential toxicity. ► Partial unfolding and alteration of BSA and HSA secondary structure by CNP. ► Significant insight into design of nanoparticles in biomedical applications. -- Abstract: Carbon nanoparticles continuously generated from industries and vehicles due to incomplete combustion of fuels is one of the potent causes of air pollution. The exposure of this polluted air with carbon nanoparticles, introduced into the bloodstream of animals in the course of respiration, motivated us to study their interaction with plasma proteins, bovine serum albumin and human serum albumin. Carbon nanoparticles with very small size and high purity were synthesized by dehydration of D-glucose using concentrated sulphuric acid as dehydrating agent. These were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy and UV–visible spectroscopy. Carbon nanoparticles-protein interactions were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry. The fluorescence quenching constants and thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy change (ΔH°), entropy change (ΔS°) and free energy change (ΔG°) were calculated, which indicated a strong static quenching and primary electrostatic interaction between the carbon nanoparticles and blood proteins. Circular dichroism spectra provided the information about the secondary structure alteration of the proteins in presence of carbon nanoparticles. These findings have shed light towards an understanding of the interactions between carbon nanoparticles and serum proteins which may clarify the potential risks and undesirable health effects of carbon nanoparticles, as well as the related cellular trafficking and systemic translocation.

  4. Quantitatively Probing the Means of Controlling Nanoparticle Assembly on Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patete, J.m.; Wong, S.; Peng, X.; Serafin, J.M.

    2011-05-17

    As a means of developing a simple, cost-effective, and reliable method for probing nanoparticle behavior, we have used atomic force microscopy to gain a quantitative 3D visual representation of the deposition patterns of citrate-capped Au nanoparticles on a substrate as a function of (a) sample preparation, (b) the choice of substrate, (c) the dispersion solvent, and (d) the number of loading steps. Specifically, we have found that all four parameters can be independently controlled and manipulated in order to alter the resulting pattern and quantity of as-deposited nanoparticles. From these data, the sample preparation technique appears to influence deposition patterns most broadly, and the dispersion solvent is the most convenient parameter to use in tuning the quantity of nanoparticles deposited onto the surface under spin-coating conditions. Indeed, we have quantitatively measured the effect of surface coverage for both mica and silicon substrates under preparation techniques associated with (i) evaporation under ambient air, (ii) heat treatment, and (iii) spin-coating preparation conditions. In addition, we have observed a decrease in nanoparticle adhesion to a substrate when the ethylene glycol content of the colloidal dispersion solvent is increased, which had the effect of decreasing interparticle-substrate interactions. Finally, we have shown that substrates prepared by these diverse techniques have potential applicability in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

  5. Quantitatively Probing the Means of Controlling Nanoparticle Assembly on Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patete, J.M.; Wong, S.; Peng, X.; Serafin, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    As a means of developing a simple, cost-effective, and reliable method for probing nanoparticle behavior, we have used atomic force microscopy to gain a quantitative 3D visual representation of the deposition patterns of citrate-capped Au nanoparticles on a substrate as a function of (a) sample preparation, (b) the choice of substrate, (c) the dispersion solvent, and (d) the number of loading steps. Specifically, we have found that all four parameters can be independently controlled and manipulated in order to alter the resulting pattern and quantity of as-deposited nanoparticles. From these data, the sample preparation technique appears to influence deposition patterns most broadly, and the dispersion solvent is the most convenient parameter to use in tuning the quantity of nanoparticles deposited onto the surface under spin-coating conditions. Indeed, we have quantitatively measured the effect of surface coverage for both mica and silicon substrates under preparation techniques associated with (i) evaporation under ambient air, (ii) heat treatment, and (iii) spin-coating preparation conditions. In addition, we have observed a decrease in nanoparticle adhesion to a substrate when the ethylene glycol content of the colloidal dispersion solvent is increased, which had the effect of decreasing interparticle-substrate interactions. Finally, we have shown that substrates prepared by these diverse techniques have potential applicability in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

  6. Functionally-interdependent shape-switching nanoparticles with controllable properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halman, Justin R.; Satterwhite, Emily; Roark, Brandon; Chandler, Morgan; Viard, Mathias; Ivanina, Anna; Bindewald, Eckart; Kasprzak, Wojciech K.; Panigaj, Martin; Bui, My N.; Lu, Jacob S.; Miller, Johann; Khisamutdinov, Emil F.; Shapiro, Bruce A.; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We introduce a new concept that utilizes cognate nucleic acid nanoparticles which are fully complementary and functionally-interdependent to each other. In the described approach, the physical interaction between sets of designed nanoparticles initiates a rapid isothermal shape change which triggers the activation of multiple functionalities and biological pathways including transcription, energy transfer, functional aptamers and RNA interference. The individual nanoparticles are not active and have controllable kinetics of re-association and fine-tunable chemical and thermodynamic stabilities. Computational algorithms were developed to accurately predict melting temperatures of nanoparticles of various compositions and trace the process of their re-association in silico. Additionally, tunable immunostimulatory properties of described nanoparticles suggest that the particles that do not induce pro-inflammatory cytokines and high levels of interferons can be used as scaffolds to carry therapeutic oligonucleotides, while particles with strong interferon and mild pro-inflammatory cytokine induction may qualify as vaccine adjuvants. The presented concept provides a simple, cost-effective and straightforward model for the development of combinatorial regulation of biological processes in nucleic acid nanotechnology. PMID:28108656

  7. Controlled delivery of acyclovir from porous silicon micro- and nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniya, Nalin H.; Patel, Sanjaykumar R.; Murthy, Z. V. P.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, micro- and nanoparticles of porous silicon (PSi) are demonstrated to act as effective carrier for the controlled delivery of acyclovir (ACV). PSi films prepared by electrochemical etching were fractured by ultrasonication to prepare micro- and nanoparticles. PSi native particles were thermally oxidized (TOPSi) and thermally hydrosilylated using undecylenic acid (UnPSi). PSi particles with three different surface chemistries were then loaded with ACV by physical adsorption and covalent attachment. Such particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In vitro ACV release experiments in phosphate buffered saline showed sustained release behaviour from both micro- and nanoparticles and order of release was found to be native PSi > TOPSi > UnPSi. Drug release kinetics study using Korsmeyer-Peppas model suggested a combination of both drug diffusion and Si scaffold erosion based drug release mechanisms.

  8. Chloride (Cl−) ion-mediated shape control of palladium nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nalajala, Naresh; Chakraborty, Arup; Bera, Bapi; Neergat, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    The shape control of Pd nanoparticles is investigated using chloride (Cl − ) ions as capping agents in an aqueous medium in the temperature range of 60–100 °C. With weakly adsorbing and strongly etching Cl − ions, oxygen plays a crucial role in shape control. The experimental factors considered are the concentration of the capping agents, reaction time and reaction atmosphere. Thus, Pd nanoparticles of various shapes with high selectivity can be synthesized. Moreover, the removal of Cl − ions from the nanoparticle surface is easier than that of Br − ions (moderately adsorbing and etching) and I − ions (strongly adsorbing and weakly etching). The cleaned Cl − ion-mediated shape-controlled Pd nanoparticles are electrochemically characterized and the order of the half-wave potential of the oxygen reduction reaction in oxygen-saturated 0.1 M HClO 4 solution is of the same order as that observed with single-crystal Pd surfaces. (paper)

  9. Ribosome-induced changes in elongation factor Tu conformation control GTP hydrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Elizabeth; Sengupta, Jayati; Trabuco, Leonard G.

    2009-01-01

    In translation, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) molecules deliver aminoacyl-tRNAs to the mRNA-programmed ribosome. The GTPase activity of EF-Tu is triggered by ribosome-induced conformational changes of the factor that play a pivotal role in the selection of the cognate aminoacyl-tRNAs. We present a 6.......7-A cryo-electron microscopy map of the aminoacyl-tRNA x EF-Tu x GDP x kirromycin-bound Escherichia coli ribosome, together with an atomic model of the complex obtained through molecular dynamics flexible fitting. The model reveals the conformational changes in the conserved GTPase switch regions...... of EF-Tu that trigger hydrolysis of GTP, along with key interactions, including those between the sarcin-ricin loop and the P loop of EF-Tu, and between the effector loop of EF-Tu and a conserved region of the 16S rRNA. Our data suggest that GTP hydrolysis on EF-Tu is controlled through a hydrophobic...

  10. Controlled Fab installation onto polymeric micelle nanoparticles for tuned bioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaoyi; Florinas, Stelios; Teitgen, Abigail; Xu, Ze-Qi; Gao, Changshou; Wu, Herren; Kataoka, Kazunori; Cabral, Horacio; Christie, R. James

    2017-12-01

    Antibodies and antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) can be used to modify the surface of nanoparticles for enhanced target binding. In our previous work, site-specific conjugation of Fabs to polymeric micelles using conventional methods was limited to approximately 30% efficiency, possibly due to steric hindrance related to macromolecular reactants. Here, we report a new method that enables conjugation of Fabs onto a micelle surface in a controlled manner with up to quantitative conversion of nanoparticle reactive groups. Variation of (i) PEG spacer length in a heterofunctionalized cross-linker and (ii) Fab/polymer feed ratios resulted in production of nanoparticles with a range of Fab densities on the surface up to the theoretical maximum value. The biological impact of variable Fab density was evaluated in vitro with respect to cell uptake and cytotoxicity of a drug-loaded (SN38) targeted polymeric micelle bearing anti-EphA2 Fabs. Fab conjugation increased cell uptake and potency compared with non-targeted micelles, although a Fab density of 60% resulted in decreased uptake and potency of the targeted micelles. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that conjugation strategies can be optimized to allow control of Fab density on the surface of nanoparticles and also that Fab density may need to be optimized for a given cell-surface target to achieve the highest bioactivity.

  11. Stabilization of silver nanoparticles in nonanoic acid: A temperature activated conformation reaction observed with surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henneke, Dale E.; Malyavanatham, Gokul; Kovar, Desiderio; O'Brien, D.T.; Becker, M.F.; Nichols, William T.; Keto, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles were synthesized by ultraviolet (λ=248 nm) laser ablation of an aerosol of micron-sized source particles entrained in nitrogen. As a result of thermionic electron emission and photoionization, nanoparticles produced in this manner were highly charged. The resulting aerosol was primarily composed of nanometer sized particles. The charged nanoparticles were deflected by an electric field that was perpendicular to the aerosol flow. Deflected nanoparticles were deposited directly into n-nonanoic acid flowing along the negative collection electrode. Suspensions of nanoparticles collected in this manner were dark gray in color and were found to be flocculated. When the suspensions were heated to temperatures above 75 deg. C, a color change from gray to clear was observed. Ultraviolet/visible extinction spectroscopy was performed on each suspension following annealing at different temperatures and times. By modeling the absorption decrease as a first order reaction, a good fit for the data was found. Analysis by dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that the initial mean flocculent size of the gray suspensions was 602 nm. DLS analysis of the suspensions taken at different annealing intervals showed that the flocculent size decreased, but maintained a narrow size distribution until the size shrank below the instrument resolution limit. The reduction in flocculent size coincided with the observed color change, and an irreversible transition to a deflocculated primary nanoparticle suspension is observed. Surface enhanced Raman scattering is used to confirm that the reaction results from a change in the orientation of the nonanoic molecule on the surface of the nanoparticle

  12. Controlled synthesis of PbS-Au nanostar-nanoparticle heterodimers and cap-like Au nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nana; Li, Lianshan; Huang, Teng; Qi, Limin

    2010-11-01

    Uniform PbS-Au nanostar-nanoparticle heterodimers consisting of one Au nanoparticle grown on one horn of a well-defined six-horn PbS nanostar were prepared using the PbS nanostars as growth substrates for the selective deposition of Au nanoparticles. The size of the Au nanoparticles on the horns of the PbS nanostars could be readily adjusted by changing the PbS concentration for the deposition of Au nanoparticles. An optimum cetyltrimethylammonium bromide concentration and temperature were essential for the selective deposition of uniform Au nanoparticles on single horns of the PbS nanostars. Unusual PbS-Au nanoframe-nanoparticle heterodimers were obtained by etching the PbS-Au nanostar-nanoparticle heterodimers with oxalic acid while novel cap-like Au nanoparticles were obtained by etching with hydrochloric acid. The obtained heterodimeric nanostructures and cap-like nanoparticles are promising candidates for anisotropic nanoscale building blocks for the controllable assembly of useful, complex architectures.

  13. Visual Outcome and Tumor Control After Conformal Radiotherapy for Patients With Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvold, Nils D.; Lessell, Simmons; Bussiere, Marc; Beaudette, Kevin; Rizzo, Joseph F.; Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) is a rare tumor that almost uniformly leads to visual dysfunction and even blindness without intervention. Because surgical extirpation carries a high risk of postoperative blindness, vision-sparing treatment strategies are desirable. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 25 patients (25 optic nerves) with ONSM, treated at a single institution with conformal fractionated radiotherapy by either stereotactic photon or proton radiation. Primary endpoints were local control and visual acuity. Results: The patients presented with symptoms of visual loss (21) or orbital pain (3) or were incidentally diagnosed by imaging (3). The mean age was 44 years, and 64% were female patients. The indication for treatment was the development or progression of symptoms. Of the patients, 13 were treated with photons, 9 were treated with protons, and 3 received a combination of photons and protons. The median dose delivered was 50.4 gray equivalents (range, 45-59.4 gray equivalents). Median follow-up after radiotherapy was 30 months (range, 3-168 months), with 3 patients lost to follow-up. At most recent follow-up, 21 of 22 patients (95%) had improved (14) or stable (7) visual acuity. One patient had worsened visual acuity after initial postirradiation improvement. Of the 22 patients, 20 (95%) had no radiographic progression. Three patients had evidence of asymptomatic, limited retinopathy on ophthalmologic examination, and one had recurrent ONSM 11 years after treatment. Conclusions: Highly conformal, fractionated radiation therapy for symptomatic primary ONSM provides tumor control and improvement in visual function in most cases, with minimal treatment-induced morbidity. Longer follow-up is needed to assess the durability of tumor control and treatment-related late effects.

  14. SMART design to control over conformation and molecular packing in blue luminescent oligofluorenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Meng-Na; Ou, Chang-Jin; Liu, Bin; Xie, Ling-Hai; Lin, Jin-Yi; Wang, Sha-Sha; Wei, Ying; Huang, Wei

    2018-01-01

    The uncertainty evolution of conformation and molecular packing from solution to film is key challenge for the repeatability of procedures in organic optoelectronics. Herein, we observed the noncovalent force at the bulky groups to decode the supramolecular steric hindrance (SSH) effect and to propose synergistically molecular attractor-repulsor theory (SMART). The fine difference between ideal and real bulks were described and the SSH effect have been proved by two comparable stat-of-the-art models. The SMART design guide us to discover blue oligo/polydiarylfluorenes with beta phase as well as nanosheets with the paradigm of Interdigital Lipid Bilayer-like (ILB) mode. SMART address one kind of AR molecules with potential controllable behaviors. The design of bulk-withdraw and bulk-rich will exhibit the unreplaceable role in morphology-directed design that is just like the role of donor-acceptor molecular design of organic polymer semiconductors.

  15. Actin retrograde flow controls natural killer cell response by regulating the conformation state of SHP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matalon, Omri; Ben-Shmuel, Aviad; Kivelevitz, Jessica; Sabag, Batel; Fried, Sophia; Joseph, Noah; Noy, Elad; Biber, Guy; Barda-Saad, Mira

    2018-03-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a powerful weapon against viral infections and tumor growth. Although the actin-myosin (actomyosin) cytoskeleton is crucial for a variety of cellular processes, the role of mechanotransduction, the conversion of actomyosin mechanical forces into signaling cascades, was never explored in NK cells. Here, we demonstrate that actomyosin retrograde flow (ARF) controls the immune response of primary human NK cells through a novel interaction between β-actin and the SH2-domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1), converting its conformation state, and thereby regulating NK cell cytotoxicity. Our results identify ARF as a master regulator of the NK cell immune response. Since actin dynamics occur in multiple cellular processes, this mechanism might also regulate the activity of SHP-1 in additional cellular systems. © 2018 The Authors.

  16. Reaction parameters for controlled sonosynthesis of gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez M, A. L. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Quimica, Paseo Colon esq. Paseo Tollocan s/n, 50120 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Cabrera L, L. I. [UNAM-UAEM, Centro Conjunto de Investigacion en Quimica Sustentable, Km 14.5 Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco, 50200 San Cayetano-Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-07-01

    The synthesis of gold nanoparticles by sonochemical technique has been previously performed with excellent results. The synthesis has been carried out in the presence of citric acid, a strong reducing agent, which allows the nucleation and growth of gold nanoparticles, at the same time that controls particle size. In this work we report the use of sodium tartrate as a mild reducing agent that allows a better understanding of the effect of the reaction parameters during gold nanoparticle synthesis. A conventional sonication bath (37 k Hz) was used for the sonochemical synthesis. This work focuses on the reaction temperature effect and the effect of sodium tartrate concentration. It was confirmed that particle size, and particle morphology is dependent of these two reaction parameters. Equally, colloidal stabilization was related to reaction temperature and sodium tartrate concentration. It was also determined that Ostwald ripening takes place during sonochemical reaction under our conditions, allowing to understand the mechanism that takes place during synthesis. Gold nanoparticles with main particle size of 17 nm were achieved by this method. Characterization techniques used: Fourier transform infrared spectra (Ftir), X-ray diffraction and Atomic Force Microscope was used in order to determine particle size of the synthetic product of reaction M10c by tapping mode. (Author)

  17. Reaction parameters for controlled sonosynthesis of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez M, A. L.; Cabrera L, L. I.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of gold nanoparticles by sonochemical technique has been previously performed with excellent results. The synthesis has been carried out in the presence of citric acid, a strong reducing agent, which allows the nucleation and growth of gold nanoparticles, at the same time that controls particle size. In this work we report the use of sodium tartrate as a mild reducing agent that allows a better understanding of the effect of the reaction parameters during gold nanoparticle synthesis. A conventional sonication bath (37 k Hz) was used for the sonochemical synthesis. This work focuses on the reaction temperature effect and the effect of sodium tartrate concentration. It was confirmed that particle size, and particle morphology is dependent of these two reaction parameters. Equally, colloidal stabilization was related to reaction temperature and sodium tartrate concentration. It was also determined that Ostwald ripening takes place during sonochemical reaction under our conditions, allowing to understand the mechanism that takes place during synthesis. Gold nanoparticles with main particle size of 17 nm were achieved by this method. Characterization techniques used: Fourier transform infrared spectra (Ftir), X-ray diffraction and Atomic Force Microscope was used in order to determine particle size of the synthetic product of reaction M10c by tapping mode. (Author)

  18. Thermosensitive liposomes entrapping iron oxide nanoparticles for controllable drug release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, L-A; Wang, Y-C; Wang, Y-J; Yang, C-S; Tsai, P-J; Lo, L-W

    2009-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles can serve as a heating source upon alternative magnetic field (AMF) exposure. Iron oxide nanoparticles can be mixed with thermosensitive nanovehicles for hyperthermia-induced drug release, yet such a design and mechanism may not be suitable for controllable drug release applications in which the tissues are susceptible to environmental temperature change such as brain tissue. In the present study, iron oxide nanoparticles were entrapped inside of thermosensitive liposomes for AMF-induced drug release while the environmental temperature was maintained at a constant level. Carboxyfluorescein was co-entrapped with the iron oxide nanoparticles in the liposomes as a model compound for monitoring drug release and environmental temperature was maintained with a water circulator jacket. These experiments have been successfully performed in solution, in phantom and in anesthetized animals. Furthermore, the thermosensitive liposomes were administered into rat forearm skeletal muscle, and the release of carboxylfluorescein triggered by the external alternative magnetic field was monitored by an implanted microdialysis perfusion probe with an on-line laser-induced fluorescence detector. In the future such a device could be applied to simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging and non-invasive drug release in temperature-sensitive applications.

  19. Polymer nanoparticles containing essential oils: new options for mosquito control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werdin González, Jorge Omar; Jesser, Emiliano Nicolás; Yeguerman, Cristhian Alan; Ferrero, Adriana Alicia; Fernández Band, Beatriz

    2017-07-01

    Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) are vectors of important parasites and pathogens causing death, poverty and social disability worldwide. The overuse of synthetic insecticides to control mosquito vectors lead to resistance, adverse environmental effects and high operational costs. Therefore, the development of eco-friendly control tools is an important public health challenge. In this study, two different essential oils (EO) (geranium, Geranium maculatum, and bergamot, Citrus bergamia) loaded polymeric nanoparticle (PN) were elaborated using polyethylene glycol (PEG) and chitosan (Qx) as the polymeric matrix/coating. In addition, the mosquito larvicidal acute and residual activity of the PN was evaluated on Culex pipiens pipiens. The physicochemical characterization of PN revealed that PEG-PN had sizes nanoparticles containing essential oil are a promising source of eco-friendly mosquito larvicidal products.

  20. Cavity Control and Cooling of Nanoparticles in High Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millen, James

    2016-05-01

    Levitated systems are a fascinating addition to the world of optically-controlled mechanical resonators. It is predicted that nanoparticles can be cooled to their c.o.m. ground state via the interaction with an optical cavity. By freeing the oscillator from clamping forces dissipation and decoherence is greatly reduced, leading to the potential to produce long-lived, macroscopically spread, mechanical quantum states, allowing tests of collapse models and any mass limit of quantum physics. Reaching the low pressures required to cavity-cool to the ground state has proved challenging. Our approach is to cavity cool a beam of nanoparticles in high vacuum. We can cool the c.o.m. motion of nanospheres, and control the rotation of nanorods, with the potential to produce cold, aligned nanostructures. Looking forward, we will utilize novel microcavities to enhance optomechanical cooling, preparing particles in a coherent beam ideally suited to ultra-high mass interferometry at 107 a.m.u.

  1. A computational study of vicinal fluorination in 2,3-difluorobutane: implications for conformational control in alkane chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Stephen J; Gourdain, Stephanie; Coulthurst, Anton; Fox, Clare; Kuprov, Ilya; Essex, Jonathan W; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton; Linclau, Bruno

    2015-01-19

    A comprehensive conformational analysis of both 2,3-difluorobutane diastereomers is presented based on density functional theory calculations in vacuum and in solution, as well as NMR experiments in solution. While for 1,2-difluoroethane the fluorine gauche effect is clearly the dominant effect determining its conformation, it was found that for 2,3-difluorobutane there is a complex interplay of several effects, which are of similar magnitude but often of opposite sign. As a result, unexpected deviations in dihedral angles, relative conformational energies and populations are observed which cannot be rationalised only by chemical intuition. Furthermore, it was found that it is important to consider the free energies of the various conformers, as these lead to qualitatively different results both in vacuum and in solvent, when compared to calculations based only on the electronic energies. In contrast to expectations, it was found that vicinal syn-difluoride introduction in the butane and by extension, longer hydrocarbon chains, is not expected to lead to an effective stabilisation of the linear conformation. Our findings have implications for the use of the vicinal difluoride motif for conformational control. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. PH Sensitive Polymers for Improving Reservoir Sweep and Conformance Control in Chemical Flooring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukul Sharma; Steven Bryant; Chun Huh

    2008-03-31

    There is an increasing opportunity to recover bypassed oil from depleted, mature oilfields in the US. The recovery factor in many reservoirs is low due to inefficient displacement of the oil by injected fluids (typically water). The use of chemical flooding methods to increase recovery efficiencies is severely constrained by the inability of the injected chemicals to contact the bypassed oil. Low sweep efficiencies are the primary cause of low oil recoveries observed in the field in chemical flooding operations even when lab studies indicate high oil recovery efficiency. Any technology that increases the ability of chemical flooding agents to better contact the remaining oil and reduce the amount of water produced in conjunction with the produced oil will have a significant impact on the cost of producing oil domestically in the US. This translates directly into additional economically recoverable reserves, which extends the economic lives of marginal and mature wells. The objective of this research project was to develop a low-cost, pH-triggered polymer for use in IOR processes to improve reservoir sweep efficiency and reservoir conformance in chemical flooding. Rheological measurements made on the polymer solution, clearly show that it has a low viscosity at low pH and exhibits a sudden increase in viscosity (by 2 orders of magnitude or more) at a pH of 3.5 to 4. This implies that the polymer would preferentially flow into zones containing water since the effective permeability to water is highest in these zones. As the pH of the zone increases due to the buffering capacity of the reservoir rock, the polymer solution undergoes a liquid to gel transition causing a sharp increase in the viscosity of the polymer solution in these zones. This allows operationally robust, in-depth conformance treatment of such water bearing zones and better mobility control. The rheological properties of HPAM solutions were measured. These include: steady-shear viscosity and

  3. Controlling energy transfer between multiple dopants within a single nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMaio, Jeffrey R.; Sabatier, Clément; Kokuoz, Baris; Ballato, John

    2008-01-01

    Complex core-shell architectures are implemented within LaF3 nanoparticles to allow for a tailored degree of energy transfer (ET) between different rare earth dopants. By constraining specific dopants to individual shells, their relative distance to one another can be carefully controlled. Core-shell LaF3 nanoparticles doped with Tb3+ and Eu3+ and consisting of up to four layers were synthesized with an outer diameter of ≈10 nm. It is found that by varying the thicknesses of an undoped layer between a Tb3+-doped layer and a Eu3+-doped layer, the degree of ET can be engineered to allow for zero, partial, or total ET from a donor ion to an acceptor ion. More specifically, the ratio of the intensities of the 541-nm Tb3+ and 590 nm Eu3+ peaks was tailored from core-shell configuration that restricts ET is used. Beyond simply controlling ET, which can be limiting when designing materials for optical applications, this approach can be used to obtain truly engineered spectral features from nanoparticles and composites made from them. Further, it allows for a single excitation source to yield multiple discrete emissions from numerous lanthanide dopants that heretofore would have been quenched in a more conventional active optical material. PMID:18250307

  4. Controlled self assembly of collagen nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papi, Massimiliano; Palmieri, Valentina; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Arcovito, Giuseppe; Greco, Emanuela; Quintiliani, Gianluca; Fraziano, Maurizio; De Spirito, Marco

    2011-11-01

    In recent years carrier-mediated drug delivery has emerged as a powerful methodology for the treatment of various pathologies. The therapeutic index of traditional and novel drugs is enhanced via the increase of specificity due to targeting of drugs to a particular tissue, cell or intracellular compartment, the control over release kinetics, the protection of the active agent, or a combination of the above. Collagen is an important biomaterial in medical applications and ideal as protein-based drug delivery platform due to its special characteristics, such as biocompatibility, low toxicity, biodegradability, and weak antigenicity. While some many attempts have been made, further work is needed to produce fully biocompatible collagen hydrogels of desired size and able to release drugs on a specific target. In this article we propose a novel method to obtain spherical particles made of polymerized collagen surrounded by DMPC liposomes. The liposomes allow to control both the particles dimension and the gelling environment during the collagen polymerization. Furthermore, an optical based method to visualize and quantify each step of the proposed protocol is detailed and discussed.

  5. Study on a Novel Gelled Foam for Conformance Control in High Temperature and High Salinity Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel gelled foam for conformance control was investigated for its ability to enhance oil recovery (EOR in high temperature and high salinity reservoirs. The formulation optimization, foaming performance, and core flooding performance of the gelled foam were systematically evaluated under harsh reservoir conditions. The gelled foam formulation was optimized with 0.4% polymer (hydrolyzed polyacrylamide; HPAM, 0.06% cross-linker (phenolic and 0.2% foaming agent (sulphobetaine; SB. The addition of the gel improved the stability of the foam system by 3.8 times that of traditional foam. A stabilization mechanism in the gelled foam was proposed to describe the stabilization process of the foam film. The uniformly distributed three-dimensional network structure of the gel provided a thick protective layer for the foam system that maintained the stability of the foam and improved the strength and thickness of the liquid film. The gelled foam exhibited good formation adaptability, profile control, and EOR performance. The foam flowed into the high permeability layer, plugged the dominant channel, and increased the swept volume. Oil recovery was enhanced by 29.4% under harsh high -temperature and high salinity conditions.

  6. Nanoparticle-Based Surface Modifications for Microtribology Control and Superhydrophobicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Kendall Matthew

    2010-11-01

    The emergence of miniaturization techniques for consumer electronics has brought forth the relatively new and exciting field of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). However, due to the inherent forces that exist between surfaces at the micro- and nanoscale, scientists and semiconductor manufacturers are still struggling to improve the lifetime and reliability of complex microdevices. Due to the extremely large surface area-to-volume ratio of typical MEMS and microstructured surfaces, dominant interfacial forces exist which can be detrimental to their operational lifetime. In particular, van der Waals, capillary, and electrostatic forces contribute to the permanent adhesion, or stiction , of microfabricated surfaces. This strong adhesion force also contributes to the friction and wear of these silicon-based systems. The scope of this work was to examine the effect of utilizing nanoparticles as the basis for roughening surfaces for the purpose of creating films with anti-adhesive and/or superhydrophobic properties. All of the studies presented in this work are focused around a gas-expanded liquid (GXL) process that promotes the deposition of colloidal gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) into conformal thin films. The GXL particle deposition process is finalized by a critical point drying step which is advantageous to the microelectromechanical systems and semiconductor (IC) industries. In fact, preliminary results illustrated that the GXL particle deposition process can easily be integrated into current MEMS microfabrication processes. Thin films of AuNPs deposited onto the surfaces of silicon-based MEMS and tribology test devices were shown to have a dramatic effect on the adhesion of microstructures. In the various investigations, the apparent work of adhesion between surfaces was reduced by 2-4 orders of magnitude. This effect is greatly attributed to the roughening of the typically smooth silicon oxide surfaces which, in turn, dramatically decreases the "real are of

  7. Multigeometry Nanoparticle Engineering via Kinetic Control through Multistep assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingchao; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Fuwu; Mays, Jimmy; Wooley, Karen; Pochan, Darrin

    2014-03-01

    Organization of block copolymers into complicated multicompartment (MCM) and multigeometry (MGM) nanostructures is of increasing interest. Multistep, co-assembly methods resulting in kinetic control processing was used to produce complex nanoparticles that are not obtained via other assembly methods. Vesicle-cylinder, separate vesicle and cylinder, disk-cylinder, and mixed vesicle nanoparticles were constructed by binary blends of distinct diblock copolymers. Initially, the vesicle former polyacrylic acid-polyisoprene and cylinder former polyacrylic acid-polystyrene which share the same hydrophilic domain but immiscible hydrophobic domain were blended in THF. Secondly, dimaine molecules are added to associate with the common hydrophilic PAA. Importantly, and lastly, by tuning the kinetic addition rate of selective, miscible solvent water, the unlike hydrophobic blocks are kinetically trapped into one particle and eventually nanophase separate to form multiple compartments and multigeometries. The effective bottom-up multistep assembly strategies can be applied in other binary/ternary blends, in which new vesicle-sphere, disk-disk and cylinder-cylinder MCM/MGM nanoparticles were programed. We are grateful for the financial support from the National Science Funding DMR-0906815 (D.J.P. and K.L.W.) and NIST METROLOGY POCHAN 2012.

  8. Physical Property Control on the Cellular Uptake Pathway and Spatial Distribution of Nanoparticles in Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sungsook; Seo, Eunseok; Kim, Ki Hean; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-06-01

    Nanoparticles have been developed in broad biomedical research in terms of effective cellular interactions to treat and visualize diseased cells. Considering the charge and polar functional groups of proteins that are embedded in cellular membranes, charged nanoparticles have been strategically developed to enhance electrostatic cellular interactions. In this study, we show that cellular uptake efficiency, pathway, and spatial distribution of gold nanoparticles in a cell are significantly modulated based on the surface condition of gold nanoparticles and human cancer cells that were tuned by controlling the pH of the medium and by introducing an electron beam. Cellular uptake efficiency is increased when electrostatic attraction is induced between the cells and the gold nanoparticles. Cell surface modification changes the cellular uptake pathways of the gold nanoparticles and concentrates the gold nanoparticles at the membrane region. Surface modification of the gold nanoparticles also contributes to deep penetration and homogeneous spatial distributions in a cell.

  9. Conformational control of the binding of diatomic gases to cytochrome c'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manole, Andreea; Kekilli, Demet; Svistunenko, Dimitri A; Wilson, Michael T; Dobbin, Paul S; Hough, Michael A

    2015-06-01

    The cytochromes c' (CYTcp) are found in denitrifying, methanotrophic and photosynthetic bacteria. These proteins are able to form stable adducts with CO and NO but not with O2. The binding of NO to CYTcp currently provides the best structural model for the NO activation mechanism of soluble guanylate cyclase. Ligand binding in CYTcps has been shown to be highly dependent on residues in both the proximal and distal heme pockets. Group 1 CYTcps typically have a phenylalanine residue positioned close to the distal face of heme, while for group 2, this residue is typically leucine. We have structurally, spectroscopically and kinetically characterised the CYTcp from Shewanella frigidimarina (SFCP), a protein that has a distal phenylalanine residue and a lysine in the proximal pocket in place of the more common arginine. Each monomer of the SFCP dimer folds as a 4-alpha-helical bundle in a similar manner to CYTcps previously characterised. SFCP exhibits biphasic binding kinetics for both NO and CO as a result of the high level of steric hindrance from the aromatic side chain of residue Phe 16. The binding of distal ligands is thus controlled by the conformation of the phenylalanine ring. Only a proximal 5-coordinate NO adduct, confirmed by structural data, is observed with no detectable hexacoordinate distal NO adduct.

  10. Direct electrical control of IgG conformation and functional activity at surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghisellini, Paola; Caiazzo, Marialuisa; Alessandrini, Andrea; Eggenhöffner, Roberto; Vassalli, Massimo; Facci, Paolo

    2016-11-01

    We have devised a supramolecular edifice involving His-tagged protein A and antibodies to yield surface immobilized, uniformly oriented, IgG-type, antibody layers with Fab fragments exposed off an electrode surface. We demonstrate here that we can affect the conformation of IgGs, likely pushing/pulling electrostatically Fab fragments towards/from the electrode surface. A potential difference between electrode and solution acts on IgGs’ charged aminoacids modulating the accessibility of the specific recognition regions of Fab fragments by antigens in solution. Consequently, antibody-antigen affinity is affected by the sign of the applied potential: a positive potential enables an effective capture of antigens; a negative one pulls the fragments towards the electrode, where steric hindrance caused by neighboring molecules largely hampers the capture of antigens. Different experimental techniques (electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, fluorescence confocal microscopy and electrochemical atomic force spectroscopy) were used to evaluate binding kinetics, surface coverage, effect of the applied electric field on IgGs, and role of charged residues on the phenomenon described. These findings expand the concept of electrical control of biological reactions and can be used to gate electrically specific recognition reactions with impact in biosensors, bioactuators, smart biodevices, nanomedicine, and fundamental studies related to chemical reaction kinetics.

  11. Fractionated stereotactic conformal radiotherapy following conservative surgery in the control of craniopharyngiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Saran, Frank; Traish, Daphne; Soomal, Rubin; Sardell, Susan; Gonsalves, Adam; Ashley, Susan; Warrington, Jim; Burke, Kevin; Mosleh-Shirazi, Amin; Brada, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the technique and results of stereotactically guided conformal radiotherapy (SCRT) in patients with craniopharyngioma after conservative surgery. Methods and materials: Thirty-nine patients with craniopharyngioma aged 3-68 years (median age 18 years) were treated with SCRT between June 1994 and January 2003. All patients were referred for radiotherapy after undergoing one or more surgical procedures. Treatment was delivered in 30-33 daily fractions over 6-6.5 weeks to a total dose of 50 Gy using 6 MV photons. Outcome was assessed prospectively. Results: At a median follow-up of 40 months (range 3-88 months) the 3- and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 97% and 92%, and 3- and 5-year survival 100%. Two patients required further debulking surgery for progressive disease 8 and 41 months after radiotherapy. Twelve patients (30%) had acute clinical deterioration due to cystic enlargement of craniopharyngioma following SCRT and required cyst aspiration. One patient with severe visual impairment prior to radiotherapy had visual deterioration following SCRT. Seven out of 10 patients with a normal pituitary function before SCRT had no endocrine deficits following treatment. Conclusion: SCRT as a high-precision technique of localized RT is suitable for the treatment of incompletely excised craniopharyngioma. The local control, toxicity and survival outcomes are comparable to results reported following conventional external beam RT. Longer follow-up is required to assess long-term efficacy and toxicity, particularly in terms of potential reduction in treatment related late toxicity

  12. Disease Control After Reduced Volume Conformal and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Childhood Craniopharyngioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Radiological Sciences, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Kun, Larry E.; Hua, Chia-Ho [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Radiological Sciences, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Biostatistics, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Sanford, Robert A.; Boop, Frederick A. [Semmes Murphey Neurologic and Spine Institute, Neurosurgery, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To estimate the rate of disease control after conformal radiation therapy using reduced clinical target volume (CTV) margins and to determine factors that predict for tumor progression. Methods and Materials: Eighty-eight children (median age, 8.5 years; range, 3.2-17.6 years) received conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy between 1998 and 2009. The study group included those prospectively treated from 1998 to 2003, using a 10-mm CTV, defined as the margin surrounding the solid and cystic tumor targeted to receive the prescription dose of 54 Gy. The CTV margin was subsequently reduced after 2003, yielding 2 groups of patients: those treated with a CTV margin greater than 5 mm (n=26) and those treated with a CTV margin less than or equal to 5 mm (n=62). Disease progression was estimated on the basis of additional variables including sex, race, extent of resection, tumor interventions, target volume margins, and frequency of weekly surveillance magnetic resonance (MR) imaging during radiation therapy. Median follow-up was 5 years. Results: There was no difference between progression-free survival rates based on CTV margins (>5 mm vs ≤5 mm) at 5 years (88.1% ± 6.3% vs 96.2% ± 4.4% [P=.6386]). There were no differences based on planning target volume (PTV) margins (or combined CTV plus PTV margins). The PTV was systematically reduced from 5 to 3 mm during the time period of the study. Factors predictive of superior progression-free survival included Caucasian race (P=.0175), no requirement for cerebrospinal fluid shunting (P=.0066), and number of surveillance imaging studies during treatment (P=.0216). Patients whose treatment protocol included a higher number of weekly surveillance MR imaging evaluations had a lower rate of tumor progression. Conclusions: These results suggest that targeted volume reductions for radiation therapy using smaller margins are feasible and safe but require careful monitoring. We are currently investigating

  13. Research in Korea on Gas Phase Synthesis and Control of Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Mansoo

    2001-01-01

    Research activity into the gas phase synthesis of nanoparticles has witnessed rapid growth on a worldwide basis, which is also reflected by Korean research efforts. Nanoparticle research is inherently a multi-disciplinary activity involving both science and engineering. In this paper, the recent studies undertaken in Korea on the gas phase synthesis and control of nanoparticles are reviewed. Studies on the synthesis of various kinds of nanoparticles are first discussed with a focus on the different types of reactors used. Recent experimental and theoretical studies and newly developed methods of measuring and modeling nanoparticle growth are also reviewed

  14. Rate of hydrolysis in ATP synthase is fine-tuned by  -subunit motif controlling active site conformation

    KAUST Repository

    Beke-Somfai, T.; Lincoln, P.; Norden, B.

    2013-01-01

    Computer-designed artificial enzymes will require precise understanding of how conformation of active sites may control barrier heights of key transition states, including dependence on structure and dynamics at larger molecular scale. F(o)F(1) ATP synthase is interesting as a model system: a delicate molecular machine synthesizing or hydrolyzing ATP using a rotary motor. Isolated F(1) performs hydrolysis with a rate very sensitive to ATP concentration. Experimental and theoretical results show that, at low ATP concentrations, ATP is slowly hydrolyzed in the so-called tight binding site, whereas at higher concentrations, the binding of additional ATP molecules induces rotation of the central γ-subunit, thereby forcing the site to transform through subtle conformational changes into a loose binding site in which hydrolysis occurs faster. How the 1-Å-scale rearrangements are controlled is not yet fully understood. By a combination of theoretical approaches, we address how large macromolecular rearrangements may manipulate the active site and how the reaction rate changes with active site conformation. Simulations reveal that, in response to γ-subunit position, the active site conformation is fine-tuned mainly by small α-subunit changes. Quantum mechanics-based results confirm that the sub-Ångström gradual changes between tight and loose binding site structures dramatically alter the hydrolysis rate.

  15. Rate of hydrolysis in ATP synthase is fine-tuned by  -subunit motif controlling active site conformation

    KAUST Repository

    Beke-Somfai, T.

    2013-01-23

    Computer-designed artificial enzymes will require precise understanding of how conformation of active sites may control barrier heights of key transition states, including dependence on structure and dynamics at larger molecular scale. F(o)F(1) ATP synthase is interesting as a model system: a delicate molecular machine synthesizing or hydrolyzing ATP using a rotary motor. Isolated F(1) performs hydrolysis with a rate very sensitive to ATP concentration. Experimental and theoretical results show that, at low ATP concentrations, ATP is slowly hydrolyzed in the so-called tight binding site, whereas at higher concentrations, the binding of additional ATP molecules induces rotation of the central γ-subunit, thereby forcing the site to transform through subtle conformational changes into a loose binding site in which hydrolysis occurs faster. How the 1-Å-scale rearrangements are controlled is not yet fully understood. By a combination of theoretical approaches, we address how large macromolecular rearrangements may manipulate the active site and how the reaction rate changes with active site conformation. Simulations reveal that, in response to γ-subunit position, the active site conformation is fine-tuned mainly by small α-subunit changes. Quantum mechanics-based results confirm that the sub-Ångström gradual changes between tight and loose binding site structures dramatically alter the hydrolysis rate.

  16. Controlling semiconductor nanoparticle size distributions with tailored ultrashort pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hergenroeder, R; Miclea, M; Hommes, V

    2006-01-01

    The laser generation of size-controlled semiconductor nanoparticle formation under gas phase conditions is investigated. It is shown that the size distribution can be changed if picosecond pulse sequences of tailored ultra short laser pulses (<200 fs) are employed. By delivering the laser energy in small packages, a temporal energy flux control at the target surface is achieved, which results in the control of the thermodynamic pathway the material takes. The concept is tested with silicon and germanium, both materials with a predictable response to double pulse sequences, which allows deduction of the materials' response to complicated pulse sequences. An automatic, adaptive learning algorithm was employed to demonstrate a future strategy that enables the definition of more complex optimization targets such as particle size on materials less predictable than semiconductors

  17. Role of proteins in controlling selenium nanoparticle size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobias, J; Suvorova, E I; Bernier-Latmani, R

    2011-01-01

    This work investigates the potential for harnessing the association of bacterial proteins to biogenic selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) to control the size distribution and the morphology of the resultant SeNPs. We conducted a proteomic study and compared proteins associated with biogenic SeNPs produced by E. coli to chemically synthesized SeNPs as well as magnetite nanoparticles. We identified four proteins (AdhP, Idh, OmpC, AceA) that bound specifically to SeNPs and observed a narrower size distribution as well as more spherical morphology when the particles were synthesized chemically in the presence of proteins. A more detailed study of AdhP (alcohol dehydrogenase propanol-preferring) confirmed the strong affinity of this protein for the SeNP surface and revealed that this protein controlled the size distribution of the SeNPs and yielded a narrow size distribution with a three-fold decrease in the median size. These results support the assertion that protein may become an important tool in the industrial-scale synthesis of SeNPs of uniform size and properties.

  18. Pore fabrication in various silica-based nanoparticles by controlled etching

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Lan

    2010-07-20

    A novel method based on controlled etching was developed to fabricate nanopores on preformed silica nanoparticles (<100 nm in diameter). The obtained monodisperse nanoporous particles could form highly stable homogeneous colloidal solution. Fluorescent silica nanoparticles and magnetic silica-coated γ-Fe 2O 3 nanoparticles were investigated as examples to illustrate that this strategy could be generally applied to various silica-based functional nanoparticles. The results indicated that this method was effective for generating pores on these nanoparticles without altering their original functionalities. The obtained multifunctional nanoparticles would be useful for many biological and biomedical applications. These porous nanoparticles could also serve as building blocks to fabricate three-dimensionally periodic structures that have the potential to be used as photonic crystals. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  19. Can acyclic conformational control be achieved via a sulfur-fluorine gauche effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiehoff, C; Holland, M C; Daniliuc, C; Houk, K N; Gilmour, R

    2015-06-01

    The gauche conformation of the 1,2-difluoroethane motif is known to involve stabilising hyperconjugative interactions between donor (bonding, σ C-H ) and acceptor (antibonding, σ *C-F) orbitals. This model rationalises the generic conformational preference of F-C β -C α -X systems ( φ FCCX ≈ 60°), where X is an electron deficient substituent containing a Period 2 atom. Little is known about the corresponding Period 3 systems, such as sulfur and phosphorus, where multiple oxidation states are possible. Conformational analyses of β-fluorosulfides, -sulfoxides and -sulfones are disclosed here, thus extending the scope of the fluorine gauche effect to the 3rd Period (F-C-C-S(O) n ; φ FCCS ≈ 60°). Synergy between experiment and computation has revealed that the gauche effect is only pronounced in structures bearing an electropositive vicinal sulfur atom (S + -O - , SO 2 ).

  20. Morphology Control of Platinum Nanoparticles and their Catalytic Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Akane; Balint, Ioan; Nakano, Yoshio

    2003-01-01

    Platinum nanoparticles with different morphology were prepared by reduction of K 2 PtCl 4 solution in the presence of different capping polymers. It was found that the shapes and the sizes of the Pt nanocrystals resulted were related to the kind of capping polymer used. When poly(vinylpyrrolidon) (PVP), poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (NIPA) and sodium poly(acrylate) (SPA) were used as capping agents, the dominant shapes of the Pt nanocrystals observed by transmission electron microscopy were hexagonal (∼62%), square (∼67%) and triangular (∼41%), respectively. The average sizes of Pt nanocrystals were 6.9, 13.6 and 14.6 nm for capping polymers of PVP, NIPA and SPA, respectively. The colloidal Pt nanoparticles with different morphologies were supported on γ-Al 2 O 3 (1 wt.% Pt) and then their catalytic activity for NO reduction by CH 4 was tested in the 350-600 deg. C temperature range. Additionally, the catalytic activities of these alumina-supported Pt nanocrystals were compared with a conventional catalyst having the average size of Pt particles of ∼2.4 nm. Over the alumina-supported Pt nanocrystals as compared with the conventional Pt/Al 2 O 3 , it was observed that the NO/CH 4 reaction yields to NH 3 and CO decreased significantly and on the other hand, the yield to N 2 O increased. The experimental results are suggesting that the catalytic behavior can be tuned in a convenient way through the morphological control of the metal nanoparticles

  1. Morphology Control of Platinum Nanoparticles and their Catalytic Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Akane [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Technology (Japan)], E-mail: akanem@chemenv.titech.ac.jp; Balint, Ioan [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Romanian Academy (Romania); Nakano, Yoshio [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Technology (Japan)

    2003-04-15

    Platinum nanoparticles with different morphology were prepared by reduction of K{sub 2}PtCl{sub 4} solution in the presence of different capping polymers. It was found that the shapes and the sizes of the Pt nanocrystals resulted were related to the kind of capping polymer used. When poly(vinylpyrrolidon) (PVP), poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (NIPA) and sodium poly(acrylate) (SPA) were used as capping agents, the dominant shapes of the Pt nanocrystals observed by transmission electron microscopy were hexagonal ({approx}62%), square ({approx}67%) and triangular ({approx}41%), respectively. The average sizes of Pt nanocrystals were 6.9, 13.6 and 14.6 nm for capping polymers of PVP, NIPA and SPA, respectively. The colloidal Pt nanoparticles with different morphologies were supported on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (1 wt.% Pt) and then their catalytic activity for NO reduction by CH{sub 4} was tested in the 350-600 deg. C temperature range. Additionally, the catalytic activities of these alumina-supported Pt nanocrystals were compared with a conventional catalyst having the average size of Pt particles of {approx}2.4 nm. Over the alumina-supported Pt nanocrystals as compared with the conventional Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, it was observed that the NO/CH{sub 4} reaction yields to NH{sub 3} and CO decreased significantly and on the other hand, the yield to N{sub 2}O increased. The experimental results are suggesting that the catalytic behavior can be tuned in a convenient way through the morphological control of the metal nanoparticles.

  2. Controlled evaluation of silver nanoparticle dissolution using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Ronald D; Vikesland, Peter J

    2012-07-03

    Incorporation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) into an increasing number of consumer products has led to concern over the potential ecological impacts of their unintended release to the environment. Dissolution is an important environmental transformation that affects the form and concentration of AgNPs in natural waters; however, studies on AgNP dissolution kinetics are complicated by nanoparticle aggregation. Herein, nanosphere lithography (NSL) was used to fabricate uniform arrays of AgNPs immobilized on glass substrates. Nanoparticle immobilization enabled controlled evaluation of AgNP dissolution in an air-saturated phosphate buffer (pH 7.0, 25 °C) under variable NaCl concentrations in the absence of aggregation. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to monitor changes in particle morphology and dissolution. Over the first day of exposure to ≥10 mM NaCl, the in-plane AgNP shape changed from triangular to circular, the sidewalls steepened, the in-plane radius decreased by 5-11 nm, and the height increased by 6-12 nm. Subsequently, particle height and in-plane radius decreased at a constant rate over a 2-week period. Dissolution rates varied linearly from 0.4 to 2.2 nm/d over the 10-550 mM NaCl concentration range tested. NaCl-catalyzed dissolution of AgNPs may play an important role in AgNP fate in saline waters and biological media. This study demonstrates the utility of NSL and AFM for the direct investigation of unaggregated AgNP dissolution.

  3. Nanoparticles for Control of Biofilms of Acinetobacter Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Singh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are the cause of 80% of microbial infections. Acinetobacter species have emerged as multi- and pan-drug-resistant bacteria and pose a great threat to human health. These act as nosocomial pathogens and form excellent biofilms, both on biotic and abiotic surfaces, leading to severe infections and diseases. Various methods have been developed for treatment and control of Acinetobacter biofilm including photodynamic therapy, radioimmunotherapy, prophylactic vaccines and antimicrobial peptides. Nanotechnology, in the present scenario, offers a promising alternative. Nanomaterials possess unique properties, and multiple bactericidal mechanisms render them more effective than conventional drugs. This review intends to provide an overview of Acinetobacter biofilm and the significant role of various nanoparticles as anti-biofouling agents, surface-coating materials and drug-delivery vehicles for biofilm control and treatment of Acinetobacter infections.

  4. Factors Controlling Nanoparticle Pharmacokinetics: An Integrated Analysis and Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moien; Hunter, A.C.; Andresen, T.L.

    2012-01-01

    of interrelated core and interfacial physicochemical and biological factors. Pertinent to realizing therapeutic goals, definitive maps that establish the interdependency of nanoparticle size, shape, and surface characteristics in relation to interfacial forces, biodistribution, controlled drug release, excretion......Intravenously injected nanoparticulate drug carriers provide a wide range of unique opportunities for site-specific targeting of therapeutic agents to many areas within the vasculature and beyond. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of these carriers are controlled by a complex array...... are already on the market and many are in late-phase clinical trials. With concomitant advances in extensive computational knowledge of the genomics and epigenomics of interindividual variations in drug responses, the boundaries toward development of personalized nanomedicines can be pushed further....

  5. Conformal Nets II: Conformal Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Arthur; Douglas, Christopher L.; Henriques, André

    2017-08-01

    Conformal nets provide a mathematical formalism for conformal field theory. Associated to a conformal net with finite index, we give a construction of the `bundle of conformal blocks', a representation of the mapping class groupoid of closed topological surfaces into the category of finite-dimensional projective Hilbert spaces. We also construct infinite-dimensional spaces of conformal blocks for topological surfaces with smooth boundary. We prove that the conformal blocks satisfy a factorization formula for gluing surfaces along circles, and an analogous formula for gluing surfaces along intervals. We use this interval factorization property to give a new proof of the modularity of the category of representations of a conformal net.

  6. Use of 1–4 interaction scaling factors to control the conformational equilibrium between α-helix and β-strand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Yuan-Ping, E-mail: pang@mayo.edu

    2015-02-06

    Highlights: • 1–4 interaction scaling factors are used to adjust conformational energy. • This article reports the effects of these factors on protein conformations. • Reducing these factors changes a helix to a strand in molecular dynamics simulation. • Increasing these factors causes the reverse conformational change. • These factors control the conformational equilibrium between helix and strand. - Abstract: 1–4 interaction scaling factors are used in AMBER forcefields to reduce the exaggeration of short-range repulsion caused by the 6–12 Lennard-Jones potential and a nonpolarizable charge model and to obtain better agreements of small-molecule conformational energies with experimental data. However, the effects of these scaling factors on protein secondary structure conformations have not been investigated until now. This article reports the finding that the 1–4 interactions among the protein backbone atoms separated by three consecutive covalent bonds are more repulsive in the α-helix conformation than in two β-strand conformations. Therefore, the 1–4 interaction scaling factors of protein backbone torsions ϕ and ψ control the conformational equilibrium between α-helix and β-strand. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that reducing the ϕ and ψ scaling factors readily converts the α-helix conformation of AcO-(AAQAA){sub 3}-NH{sub 2} to a β-strand conformation, and the reverse occurs when these scaling factors are increased. These results suggest that the ϕ and ψ scaling factors can be used to generate the α-helix or β-strand conformation in situ and to control the propensities of a forcefield for adopting secondary structure elements.

  7. Use of 1–4 interaction scaling factors to control the conformational equilibrium between α-helix and β-strand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, Yuan-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • 1–4 interaction scaling factors are used to adjust conformational energy. • This article reports the effects of these factors on protein conformations. • Reducing these factors changes a helix to a strand in molecular dynamics simulation. • Increasing these factors causes the reverse conformational change. • These factors control the conformational equilibrium between helix and strand. - Abstract: 1–4 interaction scaling factors are used in AMBER forcefields to reduce the exaggeration of short-range repulsion caused by the 6–12 Lennard-Jones potential and a nonpolarizable charge model and to obtain better agreements of small-molecule conformational energies with experimental data. However, the effects of these scaling factors on protein secondary structure conformations have not been investigated until now. This article reports the finding that the 1–4 interactions among the protein backbone atoms separated by three consecutive covalent bonds are more repulsive in the α-helix conformation than in two β-strand conformations. Therefore, the 1–4 interaction scaling factors of protein backbone torsions ϕ and ψ control the conformational equilibrium between α-helix and β-strand. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that reducing the ϕ and ψ scaling factors readily converts the α-helix conformation of AcO-(AAQAA) 3 -NH 2 to a β-strand conformation, and the reverse occurs when these scaling factors are increased. These results suggest that the ϕ and ψ scaling factors can be used to generate the α-helix or β-strand conformation in situ and to control the propensities of a forcefield for adopting secondary structure elements

  8. COMBINED MICROBIAL SURFACTANT-POLYMER SYSTEM FOR IMPROVED OIL MOBILITY AND CONFORMANCE CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2005-08-01

    show a significant influence of nutrient regime on alternate production of surfactants or polymers for a Bacillus licheniformis strain, NIPER 1A. The main conclusion of this work is that NIPER 1A can produce both surfactant and polymer by nutrient regime manipulation. Our experiments proved that this property leads to improved oil recovery by increasing alternatively, oil mobility and conformance control.

  9. Controlled synthesis of colloidal silver nanoparticles in capillary micro-flow reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Shengtai; Liu Yulan; Maeda, Hideaki

    2008-01-01

    In this study, using a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) capillary tube as a micro-flow reactor, well-dispersed colloidal silver nanoparticles were controllably synthesized with different flow rates of precursory solution. Scanning transmission electron microscopy images and UV-visible absorbance spectra showed that silver nanoparticles with large size can be prepared with slow flow rate in the PTFE capillary reactor. The effects of tube diameters on the growth of colloidal silver nanoparticles were investigated. Experiment results demonstrated that using tube with small diameter was more propitious for the controllable synthesis of silver nanoparticles with different sizes.

  10. Surfactant effects in magnetite nanoparticles of controlled size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guardia, P.; Batlle-Brugal, B.; Roca, A.G.; Iglesias, O.; Morales, M.P.; Serna, C.J.; Labarta, A.; Batlle, X.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetite Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles of controlled size within 6 and 20 nm in diameter were synthesised by thermal decomposition of an iron organic precursor in an organic medium. Particles were coated with oleic acid. For all samples studied, saturation magnetisation M s is size-independent, and reaches a value close to that expected for bulk magnetite, in contrast to results in small particle systems for which M s is usually much smaller due to surface spin disorder. The coercive field for the 6 nm particles is in agreement with coherent rotation, taking the bulk magnetocrystalline anisotropy into account. Both results suggest that the oleic acid molecules covalently bonded to the nanoparticle surface yield a strong reduction in the surface spin disorder. However, although the saturated state may be similar, the approach to saturation is different and, in particular, the high-field differential susceptibility is one order of magnitude larger than in bulk materials. The relevance of these results in biomedical applications is discussed

  11. Novel hybrid coatings with controlled wettability by composite nanoparticle aggregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hritcu, Doina, E-mail: dhritcu@ch.tuiasi.ro; Dodi, Gianina; Iordache, Mirabela L.; Draganescu, Dan; Sava, Elena; Popa, Marcel I.

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Magnetite-grafted chitosan composite nanoparticles were synthesized. • The particles are able to assemble under the influence of a silane derivative. • Thin films containing composites, chitosan and hydrolyzed silane were optimized. • The novel hybrid coatings show hierarchical roughness and high wetting angle. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to evaluate novel hybrid materials as potential candidates for producing coatings with hierarchical roughness and controlled wetting behaviour. Magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles obtained by co-precipitation were embedded in matrices synthesized by radical graft co-polymerization of butyl acrylate (BA), butyl methacrylate (BMA), hexyl acrylate (HA) or styrene (ST) with ethylene glycol di-methacrylate (EGDMA) onto previously modified chitosan bearing surface vinyl groups. The resulting composite particles were characterized regarding their average size, composition and magnetic properties. Hybrid thin films containing suspension of composite particles in ethanol and pre-hydrolysed hexadecyltrimethoxysilane (HDTS) as a coupling/crosslinking agent were deposited by spin coating or spraying. The films were cured by heating and subsequently characterized regarding their morphology (scanning electron microscopy), contact angle with water and adhesion to substrate (scratch test). The structure-property relationship is discussed.

  12. Solvent polarity controls the helical conformation of short peptides rich in Calpha-tetrasubstituted amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellanda, Massimo; Mammi, Stefano; Geremia, Silvano; Demitri, Nicola; Randaccio, Lucio; Broxterman, Quirinus B; Kaptein, Bernard; Pengo, Paolo; Pasquato, Lucia; Scrimin, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    The two peptides, rich in C(alpha)-tetrasubstituted amino acids, Ac-[Aib-L-(alphaMe)Val-Aib](2)-L-His-NH(2) (1) and Ac-[Aib-L-(alphaMe)Val-Aib](2)-O-tBu (2 a) are prevalently helical. They present the unique property of changing their conformation from the alpha- to the 3(10)-helix as a function of the polarity of the solvent: alpha in more polar solvents, 3(10) in less polar ones. Conclusive evidence of this reversible change of conformation is reported on the basis of the circular dichroism (CD) spectra and a detailed two-dimensional NMR analysis in two solvents (trifluoroethanol and methanol) refined with molecular dynamics calculations. The X-ray diffractometric analysis of the crystals of both peptides reveals that they assume a prevalent 3(10)-helix conformation in the solid state. This conformation is practically superimposable on that obtained from the NMR analysis of 1 in methanol. The NMR results further validate the reported CD signature of the 3(10)-helix and the use of the CD technique for its assessment.

  13. Control of Reaction Surface in Low Temperature CVD to Enhance Nucleation and Conformal Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Navneet

    2009-01-01

    The Holy Grail in CVD community is to find precursors that can afford the following: good nucleation on a desired substrate and conformal deposition in high AR features. Good nucleation is not only necessary for getting ultra-thin films at low thicknesses; it also offers films that are smooth at higher thickness values. On the other hand,…

  14. Biosynthesis of size-controlled gold nanoparticles using fungus, Penicillium sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaorong; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Huimin; Tan, Weihong

    2009-10-01

    The unique optoelectronic and physicochemical properties of gold nanoparticles are significantly dependent on the particle size, shape and structure. In this paper, biosynthesis of size-controlled gold nanoparticles using fungus Penicillium sp. is reported. Fungus Penicillium sp. could successfully bioreduce and nucleate AuCl4(-) ions, and lead to the assembly and formation of intracellular Au nanoparticles with spherical morphology and good monodispersity after exposure to HAuCl4 solution. Reaction temperature, as an important physiological parameter for fungus Penicillium sp. growth, could significantly control the size of the biosynthesized Au nanoparticles. The biological compositions and FTIR spectra analysis of fungus Penicillium sp. exposed to HAuCl4 solution indicated the intracellular reducing sugar played an important role in the occurrence of intracellular reduction of AuCl4(-) ions and the growth of gold nanoparticles. Furthermore, the intracellular gold nanoparticles could be easily separated from the fungal cell lysate by ultrasonication and centrifugation.

  15. Controlling amyloid-beta peptide(1-42) oligomerization and toxicity by fluorinated nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Ana M; Cardoso, Isabel; Pereira, M Carmo; Coelho, Manuel A N; Saraiva, Maria João; Möhwald, Helmuth; Brezesinski, Gerald

    2010-09-03

    The amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) is a major fibrillar component of neuritic plaques in Alzheimer's disease brains and is related to the pathogenesis of the disease. Soluble oligomers that precede fibril formation have been proposed as the main neurotoxic species that contributes to neurodegeneration and dementia. We hypothesize that oligomerization and cytotoxicity can be repressed by nanoparticles (NPs) that induce conformational changes in Abeta42. We show here that fluorinated and hydrogenated NPs with different abilities to change Abeta42 conformation influence oligomerization as assessed by atomic force microscopy, immunoblot and SDS-PAGE. Fluorinated NPs, which promote an increase in alpha-helical content, exert an antioligomeric effect, whereas hydrogenated analogues do not and lead to aggregation. Cytotoxicity assays confirmed our hypothesis by indicating that the conformational conversion of Abeta42 into an alpha-helical-enriched secondary structure also has antiapoptotic activity, thereby increasing the viability of cells treated with oligomeric species.

  16. Conformal house

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryttov, Thomas Aaby; Sannino, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    fixed point. As a consistency check we recover the previously investigated bounds of the conformal windows when restricting to a single matter representation. The earlier conformal windows can be imagined to be part now of the new conformal house. We predict the nonperturbative anomalous dimensions...... at the infrared fixed points. We further investigate the effects of adding mass terms to the condensates on the conformal house chiral dynamics and construct the simplest instanton induced effective Lagrangian terms...

  17. Fluorescent Silica Nanoparticles in the Detection and Control of the Growth of Pathogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitra, K.; Annadurai, G.

    2013-01-01

    In this present study the bio conjugated fluorescent silica nanoparticles give an efficient fluorescent-based immunoassay for the detection of pathogen. The synthesized silica nanoparticles were poly dispersed and the size of the silica nanoparticles was in the range of 114-164 nm. The energy dispersive X-ray spectrophotometer showed the presence of silica at 1.8 keV and the selected area diffractometer showed amorphous nature of silica nanoparticles. The FTIR spectrum confirmed the attachment of dye and carboxyl group onto the silica nanoparticles surface. The fluorescent silica nanoparticles showed highly efficient fluorescence and the fluorescent emission of silica nanoparticles occurred at 536 nm. The SEM image showed the aggregation of nanoparticles and bacteria. The growth of the pathogenic E. coli was controlled using silica nanoparticles; therefore silica nanoparticles could be used in food packaging material, biomedical material, and so forth. This work provides a rapid, simple, and accurate method for the detection of pathogen using fluorescent-based immunoassay.

  18. PtPb nanoparticle electrocatalysts: control of activity through synthetic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Tanushree; Matsumoto, Futoshi; McInnis, Jennifer; Weiss, Marilyn; Abruna, Hector D.; DiSalvo, Francis J.

    2009-01-01

    Solution phase synthesis of intermetallic nanoparticles without using surfactants (for catalytic applications) and subsequent control of size distribution remains a challenge: of growing interest, but not widely explored yet. To understand the questions in the syntheses of Pt containing intermetallic nanoparticles (as electrocatalysts for direct fuel cells) by using sodium naphthalide as the reducing agent, the effects of the Pt precursors' organic ligands were investigated. PtPb syntheses were studied as the model case. In particular, methods that lead to nanoparticles that are independent single crystals are desirable. Platinum acetylacetonate, which is soluble in many organic solvents, has ligands that may interfere less with nanoparticle growth and ordering. Interesting trends, contrary to expectations, were observed when precursors were injected into a reducing agent solution at high temperatures. The presence of acetylacetonate, from the precursor, on the nanoparticles was confirmed by ATR, while SEM imaging showed evidence of morphological changes in the nanoparticles with increasing reaction temperature. A definite relationship between domain size and extent of observed residue (organic material and sodium) present on the particles could be established. By varying post-reaction solvent removal techniques, room temperature crystallization of PtPb nanoparticles was also achieved. Electrochemical activity of the nanoparticles was also much higher than that of nanoparticles synthesized by previous reaction schemes using sodium naphthalide as the reducing agent. Along with the above mentioned techniques, BET, TEM, CBED, SAED, and XRD were used as characterization tools for the prepared nanoparticles.

  19. Shape control of the magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles under different chain length of reducing agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngoi, Kuan Hoon; Chia, Chin-Hua; Zakaria, Sarani; Chiu, Wee Siong

    2015-01-01

    We report on the effect of using reducing agents with different chain-length on the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles by thermal decomposition of iron (III) acetylacetonate in 1-octadecene. This modification allows us to control the shape of nanoparticles into spherical and cubic iron oxide nanoparticles. The highly monodisperse 14 nm spherical nanoparticles are obtained under 1,2-dodecanediol and average 14 nm edge-length cubic iron oxide nanoparticles are obtained under 1,2-tetradecanediol. The structural characterization such as transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows similar properties between two particles with different shapes. The vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) shows no significant difference between spherical and cubic nanoparticles, which are 36 emu/g and 37 emu/g respectively and superparamagnetic in nature

  20. Shape control of the magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles under different chain length of reducing agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngoi, Kuan Hoon; Chia, Chin-Hua, E-mail: chia@ukm.edu.my; Zakaria, Sarani [School of Applied Physics, Faculty Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Chiu, Wee Siong [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Lembah Pantai, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    We report on the effect of using reducing agents with different chain-length on the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles by thermal decomposition of iron (III) acetylacetonate in 1-octadecene. This modification allows us to control the shape of nanoparticles into spherical and cubic iron oxide nanoparticles. The highly monodisperse 14 nm spherical nanoparticles are obtained under 1,2-dodecanediol and average 14 nm edge-length cubic iron oxide nanoparticles are obtained under 1,2-tetradecanediol. The structural characterization such as transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows similar properties between two particles with different shapes. The vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) shows no significant difference between spherical and cubic nanoparticles, which are 36 emu/g and 37 emu/g respectively and superparamagnetic in nature.

  1. Design parameters for voltage-controllable directed assembly of single nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, Benjamin F; Bhaskaran, Harish; Abelmann, Leon

    2013-01-01

    Techniques to reliably pick-and-place single nanoparticles into functional assemblies are required to incorporate exotic nanoparticles into standard electronic circuits. In this paper we explore the use of electric fields to drive and direct the assembly process, which has the advantage of being able to control the nano-assembly process at the single nanoparticle level. To achieve this, we design an electrostatic gating system, thus enabling a voltage-controllable nanoparticle picking technique. Simulating this system with the nonlinear Poisson–Boltzmann equation, we can successfully characterize the parameters required for single particle placement, the key being single particle selectivity, in effect designing a system that can achieve this controllably. We then present the optimum design parameters required for successful single nanoparticle placement at ambient temperature, an important requirement for nanomanufacturing processes. (paper)

  2. Controlled growth of silica-titania hybrid functional nanoparticles through a multistep microfluidic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, K; Sugiyama, T; Takei, T; Yoshikawa, G

    2015-11-11

    Silica/titania-based functional nanoparticles were prepared through controlled nucleation of titania and subsequent encapsulation by silica through a multistep microfluidic approach, which was successfully applied to obtaining aminopropyl-functionalized silica/titania nanoparticles for a highly sensitive humidity sensor.

  3. Controlled release and intracellular protein delivery from mesoporous silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deodhar, Gauri V; Adams, Marisa L; Trewyn, Brian G

    2017-01-01

    Protein therapeutics are promising candidates for disease treatment due to their high specificity and minimal adverse side effects; however, targeted protein delivery to specific sites has proven challenging. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) have demonstrated to be ideal candidates for this application, given their high loading capacity, biocompatibility, and ability to protect host molecules from degradation. These materials exhibit tunable pore sizes, shapes and volumes, and surfaces which can be easily functionalized. This serves to control the movement of molecules in and out of the pores, thus entrapping guest molecules until a specific stimulus triggers release. In this review, we will cover the benefits of using MSN as protein therapeutic carriers, demonstrating that there is great diversity in the ways MSN can be used to service proteins. Methods for controlling the physical dimensions of pores via synthetic conditions, applications of therapeutic protein loaded MSN materials in cancer therapies, delivering protein loaded MSN materials to plant cells using biolistic methods, and common stimuli-responsive functionalities will be discussed. New and exciting strategies for controlled release and manipulation of proteins are also covered in this review. While research in this area has advanced substantially, we conclude this review with future challenges to be tackled by the scientific community. Copyright © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Size controlled synthesis of biocompatible gold nanoparticles and their activity in the oxidation of NADH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandran, Parvathy R; Sandhyarani, N; Naseer, M; Udupa, N

    2012-01-01

    Size and shape controlled synthesis remains a major bottleneck in the research on nanoparticles even after the development of different methods for their preparation. By tuning the size and shape of a nanoparticle, the intrinsic properties of the nanoparticle can be controlled leading tremendous potential applications in different fields of science and technology. We describe a facile route for the one pot synthesis of gold nanoparticles in water using monosodium glutamate as the reducing and stabilizing agent in the absence of seed particles. The particle diameter can be easily controlled by varying the pH of the reaction medium. Nanoparticles were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, UV–vis absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and dynamic light scattering. Zeta potential measurements were made to compare the stability of the different nanoparticles. The results suggest that lower pH favours a nucleation rate giving rise to smaller particles and higher pH favours a growth rate leading to the formation of larger particles. The synthesized nanoparticles are found to be stable and biocompatible. The nanoparticles synthesized at high pH exhibited a good electrocatalytic activity towards oxidation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH).

  5. Controlled growth of gold nanoparticles in zeolite L via ion-exchange reactions and thermal reduction processes

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Shangjing; Ding, Shuang; Li, Shangyu; Wang, Runwei; Zhang, Zongtao

    2014-01-01

    The growth of gold nanoparticles in zeolite can be controlled using ion-exchange reactions and thermal reduction processes. We produce a number of different sizes of the gold nanoparticles with the particle size increasing with increased temperature

  6. Size-controllable synthesis of bare gold nanoparticles by femtosecond laser fragmentation in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maximova, Ksenia; Aristov, Andrei; Sentis, Marc; Kabashin, Andrei V

    2015-01-01

    We report a size-controllable synthesis of stable aqueous solutions of ultrapure low-size-dispersed Au nanoparticles by methods of femtosecond laser fragmentation from preliminary formed colloids. Such approach makes possible the tuning of mean nanoparticle size between a few nm and several tens of nm under the size dispersion lower than 70% by varying the fluence of pumping radiation during the fragmentation procedure. The efficient size control is explained by 3D geometry of laser fragmentation by femtosecond laser-induced white light super-continuum and plasma-related phenomena. Despite the absence of any protective ligands, the nanoparticle solutions demonstrate exceptional stability due to electric repulsion effect associated with strong negative charging of formed nanoparticles. Stable aqueous solutions of bare gold nanoparticles present a unique object with a variety of potential applications in catalysis, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, photovoltaics, biosensing and biomedicine. (paper)

  7. Controlled Deposition of Tin Oxide and Silver Nanoparticles Using Microcontact Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo C. Chan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This report describes extensive studies of deposition processes involving tin oxide (SnOx nanoparticles on smooth glass surfaces. We demonstrate the use of smooth films of these nanoparticles as a platform for spatially-selective electroless deposition of silver by soft lithographic stamping. The edge and height roughness of the depositing metallic films are 100 nm and 20 nm, respectively, controlled by the intrinsic size of the nanoparticles. Mixtures of alcohols as capping agents provide further control over the size and shape of nanoparticles clusters. The distribution of cluster heights obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM is modeled through a modified heterogeneous nucleation theory as well as Oswald ripening. The thermodynamic modeling of the wetting properties of nanoparticles aggregates provides insight into their mechanism of formation and how their properties might be further exploited in wide-ranging applications.

  8. Factors controlling nanoparticle pharmacokinetics: an integrated analysis and perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghimi, S M; Hunter, A C; Andresen, T L

    2012-01-01

    Intravenously injected nanoparticulate drug carriers provide a wide range of unique opportunities for site-specific targeting of therapeutic agents to many areas within the vasculature and beyond. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of these carriers are controlled by a complex array of interrelated core and interfacial physicochemical and biological factors. Pertinent to realizing therapeutic goals, definitive maps that establish the interdependency of nanoparticle size, shape, and surface characteristics in relation to interfacial forces, biodistribution, controlled drug release, excretion, and adverse effects must be outlined. These concepts are critically evaluated and an integrated perspective is provided on the basis of the recent application of nanoscience approaches to nanocarrier design and engineering. The future of this exciting field is bright; some regulatory-approved products are already on the market and many are in late-phase clinical trials. With concomitant advances in extensive computational knowledge of the genomics and epigenomics of interindividual variations in drug responses, the boundaries toward development of personalized nanomedicines can be pushed further.

  9. Natural Non-Mulberry Silk Nanoparticles for Potential-Controlled Drug Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Yin, Zhuping; Xue, Xiang; Kundu, Subhas C.; Mo, Xiumei; Lu, Shenzhou

    2016-01-01

    Natural silk protein nanoparticles are a promising biomaterial for drug delivery due to their pleiotropic properties, including biocompatibility, high bioavailability, and biodegradability. Chinese oak tasar Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin (ApF) nanoparticles are easily obtained using cations as reagents under mild conditions. The mild conditions are potentially advantageous for the encapsulation of sensitive drugs and therapeutic molecules. In the present study, silk fibroin protein nanoparticles are loaded with differently-charged small-molecule drugs, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride, ibuprofen, and ibuprofen-Na, by simple absorption based on electrostatic interactions. The structure, morphology and biocompatibility of the silk nanoparticles in vitro are investigated. In vitro release of the drugs from the nanoparticles depends on charge-charge interactions between the drugs and the nanoparticles. The release behavior of the compounds from the nanoparticles demonstrates that positively-charged molecules are released in a more prolonged or sustained manner. Cell viability studies with L929 demonstrated that the ApF nanoparticles significantly promoted cell growth. The results suggest that Chinese oak tasar Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin nanoparticles can be used as an alternative matrix for drug carrying and controlled release in diverse biomedical applications. PMID:27916946

  10. Control of the conformations of ion Coulomb crystals in a Penning trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R. C.; Mavadia, S.; Goodwin, J. F.; Stutter, G.; Bharadia, S.; Crick, D. R.; Segal, D. M.

    2015-01-01

    Ion Coulomb crystals containing small numbers of ions have been created and manipulated in a wide range of configurations in a Penning trap, from a linear string, through various three-dimensional conformations, to a planar crystal. We show that the dynamics of the system simplifies enormously in a frame which rotates at half the cyclotron frequency and we discuss the effect of the radial cooling laser beam in this frame. Simulations show that the crystal conformations can be reproduced by finding the minimum energy configuration in a frame whose radial potential is modified by the rotation of the ion crystal. The rotation frequency of the crystal deduced from the simulations is consistent with the known laser parameters. We also show that even though the number of ions in our system is small (typically less than 20), the system still behaves like a plasma and its static properties can be calculated using the standard model for a single-component plasma in a trap

  11. Control of the conformations of ion Coulomb crystals in a Penning trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, R. C.; Mavadia, S.; Goodwin, J. F.; Stutter, G.; Bharadia, S.; Crick, D. R.; Segal, D. M. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-29

    Ion Coulomb crystals containing small numbers of ions have been created and manipulated in a wide range of configurations in a Penning trap, from a linear string, through various three-dimensional conformations, to a planar crystal. We show that the dynamics of the system simplifies enormously in a frame which rotates at half the cyclotron frequency and we discuss the effect of the radial cooling laser beam in this frame. Simulations show that the crystal conformations can be reproduced by finding the minimum energy configuration in a frame whose radial potential is modified by the rotation of the ion crystal. The rotation frequency of the crystal deduced from the simulations is consistent with the known laser parameters. We also show that even though the number of ions in our system is small (typically less than 20), the system still behaves like a plasma and its static properties can be calculated using the standard model for a single-component plasma in a trap.

  12. Silver ions-mediated conformational switch: facile design of structure-controllable nucleic acid probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongxiang; Li, Jishan; Wang, Hao; Jin, Jianyu; Liu, Jinhua; Wang, Kemin; Tan, Weihong; Yang, Ronghua

    2010-08-01

    Conformationally constraint nucleic acid probes were usually designed by forming an intramolecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. The disadvantages of these approaches are the inflexibility and instability in complex environment of the Watson-Crick-based duplex. We report that this hydrogen bonding pattern can be replaced by metal-ligation between specific metal ions and the natural bases. To demonstrate the feasibility of this principle, two linear oligonucleotides and silver ions were examined as models for DNA hybridization assay and adenosine triphosphate detection. The both nucleic acids contain target binding sequences in the middle and cytosine (C)-rich sequences at the lateral portions. The strong interaction between Ag(+) ions and cytosines forms stable C-Ag(+)-C structures, which promises the oligonucleotides to form conformationally constraint formations. In the presence of its target, interaction between the loop sequences and the target unfolds the C-Ag(+)-C structures, and the corresponding probes unfolding can be detected by a change in their fluorescence emission. We discuss the thermodynamic and kinetic opportunities that are provided by using Ag(+) ion complexes instead of traditional Watson-Crick-based duplex. In particular, the intrinsic feature of the metal-ligation motif facilitates the design of functional nucleic acids probes by independently varying the concentration of Ag(+) ions in the medium.

  13. Trioctylphosphine-assisted morphology control of ZnO nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yun-Kun; Cho, GeonHee; Park, YoonSu; Oh, Soong Ju; Ha, Don-Hyung

    2018-06-01

    This study investigates the morphological change in colloidal ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized with trioctylphosphine (TOP). The addition of TOP to the synthesis causes an evolution in the shape of ZnO NPs to tadpole-like particles from quasi-spherical particles at 300 °C. The total length of the tadpole-like ZnO NPs can be modified by controlling the molar ratio of TOP to oleylamine (OLAM). The tadpole-like particles are elongated as the concentration of TOP increased but decreased when the addition of TOP is excessive. These tadpole-like ZnO NPs transform to quasi-spherical NPs regardless of the amount of TOP at a reaction time of 3 h at 300 °C. At 200 °C, the effect of TOP on the ZnO NP synthesis differs from that at 300 °C. The ZnO NPs synthesized by controlling the molar ratios of surfactant ligands (TOP:OLAM = 2:100 and 70:100) at 200 °C share similar amorphous structures, while a crystalline ZnO phase is formed when the reaction time is 3 h. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis shows that TOP influences the oxidation of ZnO and suggests that a combination of OLAM and TOP plays a role in controlling the shape of ZnO NPs. These results provide critical insights to the utilization of TOP for a shape controlling ligand in ZnO NPs and suggest a new route to design oxide NPs.

  14. Nanoparticle bioconjugate for controlled cellular delivery of doxorubicin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangtani, Ajmeeta; Petryayeva, Eleonora; Wu, Miao; Susumu, Kimihiro; Oh, Eunkeu; Huston, Alan L.; Lasarte-Aragones, Guillermo; Medintz, Igor L.; Algar, W. Russ; Delehanty, James B.

    2018-02-01

    Nanoparticle (NP)-mediated drug delivery offers the potential to overcome limitations of systemic delivery, including the ability to specifically target cargo and control release of NP-associated drug cargo. Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely used FDA-approved cancer therapeutic; however, multiple side effects limit its utility. Thus, there is wide interest in modulating toxicity after cell delivery. Our goal here was to realize a NP-based DOX-delivery system that can modulate drug toxicity by controlling the release kinetics of DOX from the surface of a hard NP carrier. To achieve this, we employed a quantum dot (QD) as a central scaffold which DOX was appended via three different peptidyl linkages (ester, disulfide, hydrazone) that are cleavable in response to various intracellular conditions. Attachment of a cell penetrating peptide (CPP) containing a positively charged polyarginine sequence facilitates endocytosis of the ensemble. Polyhistidine-driven metal affinity coordination was used to self-assemble both peptides to the QD surface, allowing for fine control over both the ratio of peptides attached to the QD as well as DOX dose delivered to cells. Microplate-based Förster resonance energy transfer assays confirmed the successful ratiometric assembly of the conjugates and functionality of the linkages. Cell delivery experiments and cytotoxicity assays were performed to compare the various cleavable linkages to a control peptide where DOX is attached through an amide bond. The role played by various attachment chemistries used in QD-peptide-drug assemblies and their implications for the rationale in design of NPbased constructs for drug delivery is described here.

  15. Controlled specific placement of nanoparticles into microdomains of block copolymer thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Joonwon, E-mail: joonwonbae@gmail.com [Department of Applied Chemistry, Dongduk Women' s University, Seoul 136-714 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jungwook [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jongnam, E-mail: jnpark@unist.ac.kr [Interdisciplinary School of Green Energy, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Conceptually attractive hybrid materials composed of nanoparticles and elegant block copolymers have become important for diverse applications. In this work, controlled specific placement of nanoparticles such as gold (Au) and titania (TiO{sub 2}) into microphase separated domains in poly(styrene)-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) block copolymer thin films was demonstrated. The effect of nanoparticle surface functionality on the spatial location of particles inside polymer film was observed by transmission electron microscopy. It was revealed that the location of nanoparticles was highly dependent on the surface ligand property of nanoparticle. In addition, the microphase separation behavior of thin block copolymer film was also affected by the nanoparticle surface functional groups. This study might provide a way to understand the properties and behaviors of numerous block copolymer/nanoparticle hybrid systems. - Highlights: • Controlled location of nanoparticles in the block copolymer matrix • Tailoring surface functionality of metal nanocrystals • Fabrication of homogeneous nanocomposites using organic inorganic components • Possibility for the preparation of nanohybrids.

  16. Controlled specific placement of nanoparticles into microdomains of block copolymer thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Joonwon; Kim, Jungwook; Park, Jongnam

    2014-01-01

    Conceptually attractive hybrid materials composed of nanoparticles and elegant block copolymers have become important for diverse applications. In this work, controlled specific placement of nanoparticles such as gold (Au) and titania (TiO 2 ) into microphase separated domains in poly(styrene)-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) block copolymer thin films was demonstrated. The effect of nanoparticle surface functionality on the spatial location of particles inside polymer film was observed by transmission electron microscopy. It was revealed that the location of nanoparticles was highly dependent on the surface ligand property of nanoparticle. In addition, the microphase separation behavior of thin block copolymer film was also affected by the nanoparticle surface functional groups. This study might provide a way to understand the properties and behaviors of numerous block copolymer/nanoparticle hybrid systems. - Highlights: • Controlled location of nanoparticles in the block copolymer matrix • Tailoring surface functionality of metal nanocrystals • Fabrication of homogeneous nanocomposites using organic inorganic components • Possibility for the preparation of nanohybrids

  17. Factors Controlling the Pharmacokinetics, Biodistribution and Intratumoral Penetration of Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernsting, Mark J.; Murakami, Mami; Roy, Aniruddha; Li, Shyh-Dar

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle drug delivery to the tumor is impacted by multiple factors: nanoparticles must evade clearance by renal filtration and the reticuloendothelial system, extravasate through the enlarged endothelial gaps in tumors, penetrate through dense stroma in the tumor microenvironment to reach the tumor cells, remain in the tumor tissue for a prolonged period of time, and finally release the active agent to induce pharmacological effect. The physicochemical properties of nanoparticles such as size, shape, surface charge, surface chemistry (PEGylation, ligand conjugation) and composition affect the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, intratumoral penetration and tumor bioavailability. On the other hand, tumor biology (blood flow, perfusion, permeability, interstitial fluid pressure and stroma content) and patient characteristics (age, gender, tumor type, tumor location, body composition and prior treatments) also have impact on drug delivery by nanoparticles. It is now believed that both nanoparticles and the tumor microenvironment have to be optimized or adjusted for optimal delivery. This review provides a comprehensive summary of how these nanoparticle and biological factors impact nanoparticle delivery to tumors, with discussion on how the tumor microenvironment can be adjusted and how patients can be stratified by imaging methods to receive the maximal benefit of nanomedicine. Perspectives and future directions are also provided. PMID:24075927

  18. Transportation Conformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    This section provides information on: current laws, regulations and guidance, policy and technical guidance, project-level conformity, general information, contacts and training, adequacy review of SIP submissions

  19. Gold nanoparticle growth control - Implementing novel wet chemistry method on silicon substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Ameer, Ammar; Katsiev, Habib; Sinatra, Lutfan; Hussein, Irshad; Bakr, Osman

    2013-01-01

    Controlling particle size, shape, nucleation, and self-assembly on surfaces are some of the main challenges facing electronic device fabrication. In this work, growth of gold nanoparticles over a wide range of sizes was investigated by using a novel

  20. Multi-Temperature Zone, Droplet-based Microreactor for Increased Temperature Control in Nanoparticle Synthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Erdem, E. Yegâ n; Cheng, Jim C.; Doyle, Fiona M.; Pisano, Albert P.

    2013-01-01

    Microreactors are an emerging technology for the controlled synthesis of nanoparticles. The Multi-Temperature zone Microreactor (MTM) described in this work utilizes thermally isolated heated and cooled regions for the purpose of separating

  1. Colloidal templating : a route towards controlled synthesis of functional polymeric nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, S.I.

    2010-01-01

    Template-directed synthesis of polymeric nanoparticles offers better control over particle morphology, shape, structure, composition and properties compare to the conventional emulsion polymerization routes. For the production of anisotropic polymer-clay composite latex particles and polymeric

  2. A conformal mapping based fractional order approach for sub-optimal tuning of PID controllers with guaranteed dominant pole placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Suman; Das, Saptarshi; Das, Shantanu; Gupta, Amitava

    2012-09-01

    A novel conformal mapping based fractional order (FO) methodology is developed in this paper for tuning existing classical (Integer Order) Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) controllers especially for sluggish and oscillatory second order systems. The conventional pole placement tuning via Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) method is extended for open loop oscillatory systems as well. The locations of the open loop zeros of a fractional order PID (FOPID or PIλDμ) controller have been approximated in this paper vis-à-vis a LQR tuned conventional integer order PID controller, to achieve equivalent integer order PID control system. This approach eases the implementation of analog/digital realization of a FOPID controller with its integer order counterpart along with the advantages of fractional order controller preserved. It is shown here in the paper that decrease in the integro-differential operators of the FOPID/PIλDμ controller pushes the open loop zeros of the equivalent PID controller towards greater damping regions which gives a trajectory of the controller zeros and dominant closed loop poles. This trajectory is termed as "M-curve". This phenomena is used to design a two-stage tuning algorithm which reduces the existing PID controller's effort in a significant manner compared to that with a single stage LQR based pole placement method at a desired closed loop damping and frequency.

  3. Controlling the net charge on a nanoparticle optically levitated in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimmer, Martin; Luszcz, Karol; Ferreiro, Sandra; Jain, Vijay; Hebestreit, Erik; Novotny, Lukas

    2017-06-01

    Optically levitated nanoparticles in vacuum are a promising model system to test physics beyond our current understanding of quantum mechanics. Such experimental tests require extreme control over the dephasing of the levitated particle's motion. If the nanoparticle carries a finite net charge, it experiences a random Coulomb force due to fluctuating electric fields. This dephasing mechanism can be fully excluded by discharging the levitated particle. Here, we present a simple and reliable technique to control the charge on an optically levitated nanoparticle in vacuum. Our method is based on the generation of charges in an electric discharge and does not require additional optics or mechanics close to the optical trap.

  4. Control of the conformations of ion Coulomb crystals in a Penning trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavadia, Sandeep; Goodwin, Joseph F.; Stutter, Graham; Bharadia, Shailen; Crick, Daniel R.; Segal, Daniel M.; Thompson, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Laser-cooled atomic ions form ordered structures in radiofrequency ion traps and in Penning traps. Here we demonstrate in a Penning trap the creation and manipulation of a wide variety of ion Coulomb crystals formed from small numbers of ions. The configuration can be changed from a linear string, through intermediate geometries, to a planar structure. The transition from a linear string to a zigzag geometry is observed for the first time in a Penning trap. The conformations of the crystals are set by the applied trap potential and the laser parameters, and agree with simulations. These simulations indicate that the rotation frequency of a small crystal is mainly determined by the laser parameters, independent of the number of ions and the axial confinement strength. This system has potential applications for quantum simulation, quantum information processing and tests of fundamental physics models from quantum field theory to cosmology. PMID:24096901

  5. Effective Control of Molds Using a Combination of Nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana Auyeung

    Full Text Available Molds are filamentous fungi able to grow on a variety of surfaces, including constructed surfaces, food, rotten organic matter, and humid places. Mold growth is characterized by having an unpleasant odor in enclosed or non-ventilated places and a non-aesthetic appearance. They represent a health concern because of their ability to produce and release mycotoxins, compounds that are toxic to animals and humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate commercial nanoparticles (NPs that can be used as an additive in coatings and paints to effectively control the growth of harmful molds. Four different NPs were screened for their antifungal activities against the mycotoxin producing mold strains Aspergillus flavus and A. fumigatus. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of the NPs were determined in broth media, whereas an agar diffusion test was used to assess the antimold activity on acrylic- and water-based paints. The cytotoxic activity and the inflammatory response of the NPs were also evaluated using the established human derived macrophage cell line THP-1. Results showed that a combination of mix metallic- and ZnO-NPs (50:10 μg/mL effectively inhibited the fungal growth when exposed to fluorescent light. Neither cytotoxic effect nor inflammatory responses were recorded, suggesting that this combination can be safely used in humid or non-ventilated environments without any health concerns.

  6. Controllable synthesis and characterization of highly fluorescent silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Junlin [Nanjing Normal University, School of Chemistry and Materials Science (China); An Xueqing, E-mail: anxueqin@ecust.edu.cn [East China University of Science and Technology, School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering (China); Zhu Yinyan [Nanjing Normal University, School of Chemistry and Materials Science (China)

    2012-12-15

    Highly fluorescent silver nanoparticles (AgFNPs) have been prepared by microemulsion method and the sizes of AgFNPs were controlled by altering the molar ratio ({omega}) of water-to-surfactant in the water-in-oil microemulsion. The results were shown that the AgFNPs sizes increased with incremental molar ratio ({omega}) of water-to-surfactant. The AgFNPs have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy, and fluorescence lifetime study. Study of the spectral characteristics was shown that the absorbance of AgFNPs increased significantly with the {omega}, and linear relationship between absorbance and the size of AgFNPs was observed. The increase of AgFNPs size caused a red shift of maximum absorption wavelength in the UV-Vis spectra, and the relationship between maximum absorption wavelength and AgFNPs size appeared linear dependence. The maximum fluorescence emission wavelength did not shift with the change of particles size, but the emission intensity increases with the {omega}. The results were shown that the other factors to affect the fluorescence properties of AgFNPs were the surface properties and microstructure, except the AgFNPs size. These surface properties depend upon the stabilizing agent, reactant concentration, and solvents and so on.

  7. Controlled intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species in human mesenchymal stem cells using porphyrin conjugated nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavado, Andrea S.; Chauhan, Veeren M.; Alhaj Zen, Amer; Giuntini, Francesca; Jones, D. Rhodri E.; Boyle, Ross W.; Beeby, Andrew; Chan, Weng C.; Aylott, Jonathan W.

    2015-08-01

    Nanoparticles capable of generating controlled amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), that advance the study of oxidative stress and cellular communication, were synthesized by functionalizing polyacrylamide nanoparticles with zinc(ii) porphyrin photosensitisers. Controlled ROS production was demonstrated in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through (1) production of nanoparticles functionalized with varying percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and (2) modulating the number of doses of excitation light to internalized nanoparticles. hMSCs challenged with nanoparticles functionalized with increasing percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and high numbers of irradiations of excitation light were found to generate greater amounts of ROS. A novel dye, which is transformed into fluorescent 7-hydroxy-4-trifluoromethyl-coumarin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, provided an indirect indicator for cumulative ROS production. The mitochondrial membrane potential was monitored to investigate the destructive effect of increased intracellular ROS production. Flow cytometric analysis of nanoparticle treated hMSCs suggested irradiation with excitation light signalled controlled apoptotic cell death, rather than uncontrolled necrotic cell death. Increased intracellular ROS production did not induce phenotypic changes in hMSC subcultures.Nanoparticles capable of generating controlled amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), that advance the study of oxidative stress and cellular communication, were synthesized by functionalizing polyacrylamide nanoparticles with zinc(ii) porphyrin photosensitisers. Controlled ROS production was demonstrated in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through (1) production of nanoparticles functionalized with varying percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and (2) modulating the number of doses of excitation light to internalized nanoparticles. hMSCs challenged with nanoparticles functionalized with increasing percentages of Zn

  8. Conformational control of cofactors in nature: The effect of methoxy group orientation on the electronic structure of ubisemiquinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Almeida, Wagner B.; O'Malley, Patrick J.

    2018-03-01

    Ubiquinone is the key electron and proton transfer agent in biology. Its mechanism involves the formation of its intermediate one-electron reduced form, the ubisemiquinone radical. This is formed in a protein-bound form which permits the semiquinone to vary its electronic and redox properties. This can be achieved by hydrogen bonding acceptance by one or both oxygen atoms or as we now propose by restricted orientations for the methoxy groups of the headgroup. We show how the orientation of the two methoxy groups of the quinone headgroup affects the electronic structure of the semiquinone form and demonstrate a large dependence of the ubisemiquinone spin density distribution on the orientation each methoxy group takes with respect to the headgroup ring plane. This is shown to significantly modify associated hyperfine couplings which in turn needs to be accounted for in interpreting experimental values in vivo. The study uncovers the key potential role the methoxy group orientation can play in controlling the electronic structure and spin density of ubisemiquinone and provides an electronic-level insight into the variation in electron affinity and redox potential of ubiquinone as a function of the methoxy orientation. Taken together with the already known influence of cofactor conformation on heme and chlorophyll electronic structure, it reveals a more widespread role for cofactor conformational control of electronic structure and associated electron transfer in biology.

  9. Size-controlled Synthesis and Characterization of Fe3O4 Nanoparticles by Chemical Coprecipitation Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chia Chin Hua; Sarani Zakaria; Farahiyan, R.; Liew Tze Khong; Mustaffa Abdullah; Sahrim Ahmad; Nguyen, K.L.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) nanoparticles have been synthesized using the chemical coprecipitation method. The Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles were likely formed via dissolution-recrystallization process. During the precipitation process, ferrihydrite and Fe(OH) 2 particles formed aggregates and followed by the formation of spherical Fe 3 O 4 particles. The synthesized Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles exhibited superparamagnetic behavior and in single crystal form. The synthesis temperature and the degree of agitation during the precipitation were found to be decisive in controlling the crystallite and particle size of the produced Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles. Lower temperature and higher degree of agitation were the favorable conditions for producing smaller particle. The magnetic properties (saturation magnetization and coercivity) of the Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles increased with the particle size. (author)

  10. Nano-particles - A recent approach to insect pest control

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-14

    Jun 14, 2010 ... Nanoparticles possess distinct physical, biological and chemical properties .... bees use geomagnetic field information for orientation, homing and ... The observation which was made through electron microscope technique .... Preparation, characterization and properties evaluation of nano-. Imidacloprid.

  11. Workers’ Conformism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Ivantchev

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Conformism was studied among 46 workers with different kinds of occupations by means of two modified scales measuring conformity by Santor, Messervey, and Kusumakar (2000 – scale for perceived peer pressure and scale for conformism in antisocial situations. The hypothesis of the study that workers’ conformism is expressed in a medium degree was confirmed partly. More than a half of the workers conform in a medium degree for taking risk, and for the use of alcohol and drugs, and for sexual relationships. More than a half of the respondents conform in a small degree for anti-social activities (like a theft. The workers were more inclined to conform for risk taking (10.9%, then – for the use of alcohol, drugs and for sexual relationships (8.7%, and in the lowest degree – for anti-social activities (6.5%. The workers who were inclined for the use of alcohol and drugs tended also to conform for anti-social activities.

  12. Size control synthesis of starch capped-gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajammul Hussain, S.; Iqbal, M.; Mazhar, M.

    2009-01-01

    Metallic gold nanoparticles have been synthesized by the reduction of chloroaurate anions [AuCl 4 ] - solution with hydrazine in the aqueous starch and ethylene glycol solution at room temperature and at atmospheric pressure. The characterization of synthesized gold nanoparticles by UV-vis spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), electron diffraction analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-rays photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicate that average size of pure gold nanoparticles is 3.5 nm, they are spherical in shape and are pure metallic gold. The concentration effects of [AuCl 4 ] - anions, starch, ethylene glycol, and hydrazine, on particle size, were investigated, and the stabilization mechanism of Au nanoparticles by starch polymer molecules was also studied by FT-IR and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). FT-IR and TGA analysis shows that hydroxyl groups of starch are responsible of capping and stabilizing gold nanoparticles. The UV-vis spectrum of these samples shows that there is blue shift in surface plasmon resonance peak with decrease in particle size due to the quantum confinement effect, a supporting evidence of formation of gold nanoparticles and this shift remains stable even after 3 months.

  13. Controlling thin film structure for the dewetting of catalyst nanoparticle arrays for subsequent carbon nanofiber growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randolph, S J; Fowlkes, J D; Melechko, A V; Klein, K L; III, H M Meyer; Simpson, M L; Rack, P D

    2007-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofiber (CNF) growth is a catalytic chemical vapor deposition process in which structure and functionality is controlled by the plasma conditions and the properties of the catalyst nanoparticles that template the fiber growth. We have found that the resultant catalyst nanoparticle network that forms by the dewetting of a continuous catalyst thin film is dependent on the initial properties of the thin film. Here we report the ability to tailor the crystallographic texture and composition of the nickel catalyst film and subsequently the nanoparticle template by varying the rf magnetron sputter deposition conditions. After sputtering the Ni catalyst thin films, the films are heated and exposed to an ammonia dc plasma, to chemically reduce the native oxide on the films and induce dewetting of the film to form nanoparticles. Subsequent nanoparticle treatment in an acetylene plasma at high substrate temperature results in CNF growth. Evidence is presented that the texture and composition of the nickel thin film has a significant impact on the structure and composition of the formed nanoparticle, as well as the resultant CNF morphology. Nickel films with a preferred (111) or (100) texture were produced and conditions favoring interfacial silicidation reactions were identified and investigated. Both compositional and structural analysis of the films and nanoparticles indicate that the properties of the as-deposited Ni catalyst film influences the subsequent nanoparticle formation and ultimately the catalytic growth of the carbon nanofibers

  14. Quality controls in intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy. S.F.P.M. report nr 26, January 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valinta, Danielle; Poinsignon, Anne; Caron, Jerome; Dejean, Catherine; Corsetti, Dominique; Marcie, Serge; Mazurier, Jocelyne; Naudy, Suzanne; Aget, Helene; Marchesi, Vincent; Vieillevigne, Laure; Dedieu, Veronique; Bramoule, Celine; Caselles, Olivier; Lacaze, Brigitte; Mazurier, Jocelyne

    2009-08-01

    This report proposes a comprehensive presentation of the different controls which can be performed for the implementation of 3D intensity-modulated conformal radiation therapy (IMCR). The authors first present the IMCR principle by describing modes of production of modulated beams, the practical realisation of intensity modulation with Multi Leaf Collimator (MLC), multi leaf collimators, and the inverse planning system. They present the quality control of the accelerator (pre-requisites, linearity of the monitor chamber, symmetry and homogeneity), the quality control of multi leaf collimators (prerequisites, leaf absolute calibration, static mode, dynamic mode), the quality control of the treatment planning system (prerequisites, tests specific to IMCR, example in dynamic mode with the chair test), the quality control of the treatment plan (objective, necessary equipment and software solutions, measurement of point absolute dose, control of dose distribution, independent calculation of the number of monitor units), and the treatment verification (pre-treatment verification, patient repositioning during treatment). Finally, they indicate human means required for IMCR implementation, and formulate some recommendations for this implementation

  15. Size control in the synthesis of 1-6 nm gold nanoparticles via solvent-controlled nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jieun; Kim, Dukhan; Lee, Dongil

    2011-11-15

    We report a facile synthetic route for size-controlled preparation of gold nanoparticles. Nearly monodisperse gold nanoparticles with core diameters of 1-6 nm were obtained by reducing AuP(Phenyl)(3)Cl with tert-butylamine borane in the presence of dodecanethiol in the solvent mixture of benzene and CHCl(3). Mechanism studies have shown that the size control is achieved by the solvent-controlled nucleation in which the nuclei concentration increases with increasing the fraction of CHCl(3), leading to smaller particles. It was also found that, following the solvent-controlled nucleation, particle growth occurs via ligand replacement of PPh(3) on the nuclei by Au(I)thiolate generated by the digestive etching of small particles. This synthetic strategy was successfully demonstrated with other alkanethiols of different chain length with which size-controlled, monodisperse gold nanoparticles were prepared in remarkable yield without requiring any postsynthesis treatments.

  16. nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Cabedo, Patricia; Mondragon, Rosa; Hernandez, Leonor; Martinez-Cuenca, Raul; Cabedo, Luis; Julia, J. Enrique

    2014-10-01

    Thermal energy storage (TES) is extremely important in concentrated solar power (CSP) plants since it represents the main difference and advantage of CSP plants with respect to other renewable energy sources such as wind, photovoltaic, etc. CSP represents a low-carbon emission renewable source of energy, and TES allows CSP plants to have energy availability and dispatchability using available industrial technologies. Molten salts are used in CSP plants as a TES material because of their high operational temperature and stability of up to 500°C. Their main drawbacks are their relative poor thermal properties and energy storage density. A simple cost-effective way to improve thermal properties of fluids is to dope them with nanoparticles, thus obtaining the so-called salt-based nanofluids. In this work, solar salt used in CSP plants (60% NaNO3 + 40% KNO3) was doped with silica nanoparticles at different solid mass concentrations (from 0.5% to 2%). Specific heat was measured by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A maximum increase of 25.03% was found at an optimal concentration of 1 wt.% of nanoparticles. The size distribution of nanoparticle clusters present in the salt at each concentration was evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image processing, as well as by means of dynamic light scattering (DLS). The cluster size and the specific surface available depended on the solid content, and a relationship between the specific heat increment and the available particle surface area was obtained. It was proved that the mechanism involved in the specific heat increment is based on a surface phenomenon. Stability of samples was tested for several thermal cycles and thermogravimetric analysis at high temperature was carried out, the samples being stable.

  17. Multi-Temperature Zone, Droplet-based Microreactor for Increased Temperature Control in Nanoparticle Synthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Erdem, E. Yegân

    2013-12-12

    Microreactors are an emerging technology for the controlled synthesis of nanoparticles. The Multi-Temperature zone Microreactor (MTM) described in this work utilizes thermally isolated heated and cooled regions for the purpose of separating nucleation and growth processes as well as to provide a platform for a systematic study on the effect of reaction conditions on nanoparticle synthesis. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Controlled Fabrication of Gelatin Nanoparticles as Drug Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanshahi, M.; Sanati, M. H.; Minuchehr, Z.; Hajizadeh, S.; Babaei, Z.

    2007-08-01

    In recent years, significant effort has been devoted to develop nanotechnology for drug delivery since it offers a suitable means of delivering small molecular weight drugs, as well as macromolecules such as proteins, peptides or genes by either localized or targeted delivery to the tissue of interest. Nanotechnology focuses on formulating therapeutic agents in biocompatible nanocomposites such as nanoparticles, nanocapsules, micellar systems, and conjugates. Protein nanoparticles (BSA, HAS and gelatin) generally vary in size from 50-300 nm and they hold certain advantages such as greater stability during storage, stability in vivo, non-toxicity, non-antigen and ease to scale up during manufacture over the other drug delivery systems. The primary structure of gelatin offers many possibilities for chemical modification and covalent drug attachment. Here nanoparticles of gelatin type A were prepared by a two-step desolvation method as a colloidal drug delivery system and the essential parameters in fabrication were considered. Gelatin was dissolved in 25 mL distilled water under room temperature range. Then acetone was added to the gelatin solution as a desolvating agent to precipitate the high molecular weight (HMW) gelatin. The supernatant was discarded and the HMW gelatin re-dissolved by adding 25 mL distilled water and stirring at 600 rpm. Acetone were added drop-wise to form nanoparticles. At the end of the process, glutaraldehyde solution was used for preparing nanoparticles as a cross-linking agent, and stirred for 12h at 600 rpm. For purification stage we use centrifuge with 600rpm for 3 times. The objective of the present study is consideration of some factors such as temperature, gelatin concentration, agitation speed and the amount of acetone and their effects on size and distribution of nanoparticles. Among the all conditions, 60° C, 50 mg/ml gelatin concentration, 75 ml acetone had the best result and the nanoparticle size was under 170 nm. The effect

  19. Conformal Infinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frauendiener Jörg

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available The notion of conformal infinity has a long history within the research in Einstein's theory of gravity. Today, ``conformal infinity'' is related with almost all other branches of research in general relativity, from quantisation procedures to abstract mathematical issues to numerical applications. This review article attempts to show how this concept gradually and inevitably evolved out of physical issues, namely the need to understand gravitational radiation and isolated systems within the theory of gravitation and how it lends itself very naturally to solve radiation problems in numerical relativity. The fundamental concept of null-infinity is introduced. Friedrich's regular conformal field equations are presented and various initial value problems for them are discussed. Finally, it is shown that the conformal field equations provide a very powerful method within numerical relativity to study global problems such as gravitational wave propagation and detection.

  20. Conformal Infinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauendiener, Jörg

    2004-01-01

    The notion of conformal infinity has a long history within the research in Einstein's theory of gravity. Today, "conformal infinity" is related to almost all other branches of research in general relativity, from quantisation procedures to abstract mathematical issues to numerical applications. This review article attempts to show how this concept gradually and inevitably evolved from physical issues, namely the need to understand gravitational radiation and isolated systems within the theory of gravitation, and how it lends itself very naturally to the solution of radiation problems in numerical relativity. The fundamental concept of null-infinity is introduced. Friedrich's regular conformal field equations are presented and various initial value problems for them are discussed. Finally, it is shown that the conformal field equations provide a very powerful method within numerical relativity to study global problems such as gravitational wave propagation and detection.

  1. Conformal Infinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frauendiener Jörg

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The notion of conformal infinity has a long history within the research in Einstein's theory of gravity. Today, 'conformal infinity' is related to almost all other branches of research in general relativity, from quantisation procedures to abstract mathematical issues to numerical applications. This review article attempts to show how this concept gradually and inevitably evolved from physical issues, namely the need to understand gravitational radiation and isolated systems within the theory of gravitation, and how it lends itself very naturally to the solution of radiation problems in numerical relativity. The fundamental concept of null-infinity is introduced. Friedrich's regular conformal field equations are presented and various initial value problems for them are discussed. Finally, it is shown that the conformal field equations provide a very powerful method within numerical relativity to study global problems such as gravitational wave propagation and detection.

  2. General Conformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The General Conformity requirements ensure that the actions taken by federal agencies in nonattainment and maintenance areas do not interfere with a state’s plans to meet national standards for air quality.

  3. Clean Photothermal Heating and Controlled Release From Near Infrared Dye Doped Nanoparticles Without Oxygen Photosensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Samit; Shaw, Scott K.; Spence, Graeme T.; Roland, Felicia M.; Smith, Bradley D.

    2015-01-01

    The photothermal heating and release properties of biocompatible organic nanoparticles, doped with a near-infrared croconaine (Croc) dye, were compared with analogous nanoparticles doped with the common near-infrared dyes ICG and IR780. Separate formulations of lipid-polymer-hybrid nanoparticles and liposomes, each containing Croc dye, absorbed strongly at 808 nm and generated clean laser-induced heating (no production of 1O2 and no photobleaching of the dye). In contrast, laser-induced heating of nanoparticles containing ICG or IR780 produced reactive 1O2 leading to bleaching of the dye and also decomposition of co-encapsulated payload such as the drug Doxorubicin. Croc dye was especially useful as a photothermal agent for laser controlled release of chemically sensitive payload from nanoparticles. Solution state experiments demonstrated repetitive fractional release of water soluble fluorescent dye from the interior of thermosensitive liposomes. Additional experiments used a focused laser beam to control leakage from immobilized liposomes with very high spatial and temporal precision. The results indicate that fractional photothermal leakage from nanoparticles doped with Croc dye is a promising method for a range of controlled release applications. PMID:26149326

  4. The synthesis and characterization of platinum nanoparticles: a method of controlling the size and morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Nguyen Viet; Hayakawa, Tomokatsu; Lakshminarayana, Gandham; Nogami, Masayuki; Chien, Nguyen Duc; Hirata, Hirohito

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, Pt nanoparticles with good shapes of nanocubes and nano-octahedra and well-controlled sizes in the range 5-7 and 8-12 nm, respectively, have been successfully synthesized. The modified polyol method by adding silver nitrate and varying the molar ratio of the solutions of silver nitrate and H 2 PtCl 6 has been used to produce Pt nanoparticles of the size and shape to be controlled. The size and morphology of Pt nanoparticles have been studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM (HRTEM). The results have shown that their very sharp and good shapes exist in the main forms of cubic, cuboctahedral, octahedral and tetrahedral shapes directly related to the crystal nucleation along various directions of the {100} cubic, {111} octahedral and {111} tetrahedral facets during synthesis. In particular, various irregular and new shapes of Pt nanoparticles have been found. Here, it is concluded that the role of silver ions has to be considered as an important factor for promoting and controlling the development of Pt nanoparticles of {100} cubic, {111} octahedral and {111} tetrahedral facets, and also directly orienting the growth and formation of Pt nanoparticles.

  5. Controlled intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species in human mesenchymal stem cells using porphyrin conjugated nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavado, Andrea S; Chauhan, Veeren M; Zen, Amer Alhaj; Giuntini, Francesca; Jones, D Rhodri E; Boyle, Ross W; Beeby, Andrew; Chan, Weng C; Aylott, Jonathan W

    2015-09-14

    Nanoparticles capable of generating controlled amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), that advance the study of oxidative stress and cellular communication, were synthesized by functionalizing polyacrylamide nanoparticles with zinc(II) porphyrin photosensitisers. Controlled ROS production was demonstrated in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through (1) production of nanoparticles functionalized with varying percentages of Zn(II) porphyrin and (2) modulating the number of doses of excitation light to internalized nanoparticles. hMSCs challenged with nanoparticles functionalized with increasing percentages of Zn(II) porphyrin and high numbers of irradiations of excitation light were found to generate greater amounts of ROS. A novel dye, which is transformed into fluorescent 7-hydroxy-4-trifluoromethyl-coumarin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, provided an indirect indicator for cumulative ROS production. The mitochondrial membrane potential was monitored to investigate the destructive effect of increased intracellular ROS production. Flow cytometric analysis of nanoparticle treated hMSCs suggested irradiation with excitation light signalled controlled apoptotic cell death, rather than uncontrolled necrotic cell death. Increased intracellular ROS production did not induce phenotypic changes in hMSC subcultures.

  6. Conformal Infinity

    OpenAIRE

    Frauendiener, J?rg

    2000-01-01

    The notion of conformal infinity has a long history within the research in Einstein's theory of gravity. Today, 'conformal infinity' is related to almost all other branches of research in general relativity, from quantisation procedures to abstract mathematical issues to numerical applications. This review article attempts to show how this concept gradually and inevitably evolved from physical issues, namely the need to understand gravitational radiation and isolated systems within the theory...

  7. Use of Soybean Lecithin in Shape Controlled Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Benjamin Robert

    The work presented in this dissertation is a composite of experiments in the growth of gold nanoparticles with specific optical properties of interest. The goal is to synthesize these gold nanoparticles using soybean extract for not only shape control, but for propensity as a biocompatible delivery system. The optical properties of these nanoparticles has found great application in coloring glass during the Roman empire and, over the centuries, has grown into its own research field in applications of nanoparticulate materials. Many of the current functions include use in biological systems as biosensors and therapeutic applications, thus making biocompatibility a necessity. Current use of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide leads to rod-shaped gold nanoparticles, however, the stability of these gold nanoparticles does not endure for extended periods of time in aqueous media. In my research, two important components were found to be necessary for stable, anisotropic growth of gold nanoparticles. In the first experiments, it was found that bromide played a key role in shape control. Bromide exchange on the gold atoms led to specific packing of the growing crystals, allowing for two-dimensional growth of gold nanoparticles. It was also discerned that soybean lecithin contained ligands that blocked specific gold facets leading to prismatic gold nanoparticle growth. These gold nanoprisms give a near infrared plasmon absorption similar to that of rod-shaped gold nanoparticles. These gold nanoprisms are discovered to be extremely stable in aqueous media and remain soluble for extended periods of time, far longer than that of gold nanoparticles grown using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. Since soy lecithin has a plethora of compounds present, it became necessary to discover which compound was responsible for the shape control of the gold nanoprisms in order to optimize the synthesis and allow for a maximum yield of the gold nanoprisms. Many of these components were identified

  8. Biomimetic synthesis of hybrid hydroxyapatite nanoparticles using nanogel template for controlled release of bovine serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jinli; Zhong, Zhenyu; Ma, Jun

    2016-05-01

    A biomimetic method was used to prepare hybrid hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanoparticles with chitosan/polyacrylic acid (CS-PAA) nanogel. The morphology, structure, crystallinity, thermal properties and biocompatibility of the obtained hybrid nanogel-HAP nanoparticles have been characterized. In addition, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a model protein to study the loading and release behaviors of the hybrid nanogel-HAP nanoparticles. The results indicated that the obtained HAP nanoparticles were agglomerated and the nanogel could regulate the formation of HAP. When the nanogel concentration decreased, different HAP crystal shapes and agglomerate structures were obtained. The loading amount of BSA reached 67.6 mg/g for the hybrid nanoparticles when the mineral content was 90.4%, which decreased when the nanogel concentration increased. The release profile of BSA was sustained in neutral buffer. Meanwhile, an initial burst release was found at pH 4.5 due to the desorption of BSA from the surface, followed by a slow release. The hemolysis percentage of the hybrid nanoparticles was close to the negative control, and these particles were non-toxic to bone marrow stromal stem cells. The results suggest that these hybrid nanogel-HAP nanoparticles are promising candidate materials for biocompatible drug delivery systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Chitosan-based nanoparticles of avermectin to control pine wood nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wenlong; Yu, Aixin; Wang, Guodong; Zheng, Feng; Jia, Jinliang; Xu, Hanhong

    2018-06-01

    Pine wood nematode disease is a most devastating disease of pine trees. Avermectin (AVM) is a widely used bio-nematocide which can effectively to kill the pine wood nematode (PWN). However, its poor solubility in water and rapid photolysis are responsible for its poor bioavailability, which causes environmental pollution because of excessive applied rates. Here, a simple electrostatic interaction method was used to encapsulate AVM within nanoparticles composed of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) and chitosan (CS). The loading capacity of the resulting AVM-CS/γ-PGA nanoparticles was as much as 30.5%. The encapsulation of AVM within these nanoparticles reduced its losses by more than 20.0% through photolysis. An in vitro test showed that the rate of release of AVM from the nanoparticles was dependent on the ambient pH, with rapid release occurring in an alkaline environment. The mortality rate of nematodes which were treated with 1ppm of AVM content of AVM-CS/γ-PGA was 98.6% after 24h, while one of free AVM was only 69.9%. In addition, FITC-labeled CS/γ-PGA nanoparticles (FITC-CS/γ-PGA) showed that the nanoparticles could enrich in intestines and head of nematodes. All of these results showed that those nanoparticles of AVM are a potential multifunctional formulation to control the pest and reduce environment pollution. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Formation of Nanoparticles Controlled by the Yield and Properties of the γ-Generated Radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Q.

    2009-01-01

    In the past two decades, nanoparticles have attracted much attention because of their novel properties. Among the numerous synthetic methods, ionizing irradiation, which is simple and can take at normal temperature and pressure, even at low temperature, is a powerful method for preparing metals, alloys, metal oxides, metal chalcogenides, metal halides and insoluble sulphate nanoparticles. In this method, dose rate is always used to affect the shape, component and size of synthesized nanoparticles. In addition, to eliminate the effect of ·OH on the formation of nanoparticles, alcohol (such as isopropyl alcohol) is always added and a lot of reductive radicals with wide range of reduction potentials are generated. At the same time, these radicals transformed from ·OH can also reduce the reactant, which have been used to control the growth of nanoparticles. However, so far, most nanoparticles synthesized by ionizing irradiation are spherical. In our previous work, ''solid'' BaSO 4 microspheres, mainly consisting of quasi-spherical nanoparticles, have been synthesized by precipitating Ba 2+ ions with SO 4 2- ions, which were generated from the reduction of K 2 S 2 O 8 in the presence of EDTA under N 2 atmosphere by γ-irradiation

  11. Formation of Nanoparticles Controlled by the Yield and Properties of the γ-Generated Radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Q. [Department of Applied Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing (China)

    2009-07-01

    In the past two decades, nanoparticles have attracted much attention because of their novel properties. Among the numerous synthetic methods, ionizing irradiation, which is simple and can take at normal temperature and pressure, even at low temperature, is a powerful method for preparing metals, alloys, metal oxides, metal chalcogenides, metal halides and insoluble sulphate nanoparticles. In this method, dose rate is always used to affect the shape, component and size of synthesized nanoparticles. In addition, to eliminate the effect of ·OH on the formation of nanoparticles, alcohol (such as isopropyl alcohol) is always added and a lot of reductive radicals with wide range of reduction potentials are generated. At the same time, these radicals transformed from ·OH can also reduce the reactant, which have been used to control the growth of nanoparticles. However, so far, most nanoparticles synthesized by ionizing irradiation are spherical. In our previous work, ''solid'' BaSO{sub 4} microspheres, mainly consisting of quasi-spherical nanoparticles, have been synthesized by precipitating Ba{sup 2+} ions with SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ions, which were generated from the reduction of K{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} in the presence of EDTA under N{sub 2} atmosphere by γ-irradiation.

  12. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles and its application for mosquito control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naba Kumar Mondal

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To synthesize and characterize silver nanoparticles from aqueous root extract of Parthenium hysterophorus (P. hysterophorus and also to evaluate the potentiality of synthesized silver nanoparticles as larvacidal agent against Culex quinquefasciatus (Cx. quinquefasciatus. Methods: The silver nano particles were generated using root extract of P. hysterophorus. The characterization of synthesized nanoparticles was done by visual color change, UV-Vis spectrum, scanning electron micrograph, fluorescent microscope and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results: It was found that aqueous silver ions can be reduced by aqueous root extract of P. hysterophorus to generate extremely stable silver nanoparticles in aqueous medium. Larvae were exposed to varying concentrations of plant extracts, aqueous silver nitrate solution and synthesized silver nanoparticles for 0, 24 and 48 h separately. Aqueous root extract showed moderate larvicidal effects; however, the maximum efficacy (60.18% was observed with the synthesized silver nanoparticles against the larvae of Cx. quinquefasciatus. Conclusions: These results suggest that the green synthesis of silver nanoparticles have the potential to be used as an ideal eco-friently approach for the control of the Cx. quinquefasciatus. This is the first report on the mosquito larvicidal activity of the nano particle synthesized by P. hysterophorus.

  13. Conformational diversity of flexible ligand in metal-organic frameworks controlled by size-matching mixed ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, Xiu-Ni; Qin, Lan; Yan, Xiao-Zhi; Yu, Lei; Xie, Yi-Xin; Han, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal reactions of N-auxiliary flexible exo-bidentate ligand 1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane (bpp) and carboxylates ligands naphthalene-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (2,6-H_2ndc) or 4,4′-(hydroxymethylene)dibenzoic acid (H_2hmdb), in the presence of cadmium(II) salts have given rise to two novel metal-organic frameworks based on flexible ligands (FL-MOFs), namely, [Cd_2(2,6-ndc)_2(bpp)(DMF)]·2DMF (1) and [Cd_3(hmdb)_3(bpp)]·2DMF·2EtOH (2) (DMF=N,N-Dimethylformamide). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that compound 1 exhibits a three-dimensional self-penetrating 6-connected framework based on dinuclear cluster second building unit. Compound 2 displays an infinite three-dimensional ‘Lucky Clover’ shape (2,10)-connected network based on the trinuclear cluster and V-shaped organic linkers. The flexible bpp ligand displays different conformations in 1 and 2, which are successfully controlled by size-matching mixed ligands during the self-assembly process. - Graphical abstract: Compound 1 exhibits a 3D self-penetrating 6-connected framework based on dinuclear cluster, and 2 displays an infinite 3D ‘Lucky Clover’ shape (2,10)-connected network based on the trinuclear cluster. The flexible 1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane ligand displays different conformations in 1 and 2, which successfully controlled by size-matching mixed ligands during the self-assembly process.

  14. Conformational diversity of flexible ligand in metal-organic frameworks controlled by size-matching mixed ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Xiu-Ni; Qin, Lan; Yan, Xiao-Zhi; Yu, Lei; Xie, Yi-Xin; Han, Lei, E-mail: hanlei@nbu.edu.cn

    2015-12-15

    Hydrothermal reactions of N-auxiliary flexible exo-bidentate ligand 1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane (bpp) and carboxylates ligands naphthalene-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (2,6-H{sub 2}ndc) or 4,4′-(hydroxymethylene)dibenzoic acid (H{sub 2}hmdb), in the presence of cadmium(II) salts have given rise to two novel metal-organic frameworks based on flexible ligands (FL-MOFs), namely, [Cd{sub 2}(2,6-ndc){sub 2}(bpp)(DMF)]·2DMF (1) and [Cd{sub 3}(hmdb){sub 3}(bpp)]·2DMF·2EtOH (2) (DMF=N,N-Dimethylformamide). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that compound 1 exhibits a three-dimensional self-penetrating 6-connected framework based on dinuclear cluster second building unit. Compound 2 displays an infinite three-dimensional ‘Lucky Clover’ shape (2,10)-connected network based on the trinuclear cluster and V-shaped organic linkers. The flexible bpp ligand displays different conformations in 1 and 2, which are successfully controlled by size-matching mixed ligands during the self-assembly process. - Graphical abstract: Compound 1 exhibits a 3D self-penetrating 6-connected framework based on dinuclear cluster, and 2 displays an infinite 3D ‘Lucky Clover’ shape (2,10)-connected network based on the trinuclear cluster. The flexible 1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane ligand displays different conformations in 1 and 2, which successfully controlled by size-matching mixed ligands during the self-assembly process.

  15. Development of a dose-controlled multiculture cell exposure chamber for efficient delivery of airborne and engineered nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asimakopoulou, Akrivi; Daskalos, Emmanouil; Papaioannou, Eleni; Konstandopoulos, Athanasios G; Lewinski, Nastassja; Riediker, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the various health influencing parameters related to engineered nanoparticles as well as to soot emitted by Diesel engines, there is an urgent need for appropriate sampling devices and methods for cell exposure studies that simulate the respiratory system and facilitate associated biological and toxicological tests. The objective of the present work was the further advancement of a Multiculture Exposure Chamber (MEC) into a dose-controlled system for efficient delivery of nanoparticles to cells. It was validated with various types of nanoparticles (Diesel engine soot aggregates, engineered nanoparticles for various applications) and with state-of-the-art nanoparticle measurement instrumentation to assess the local deposition of nanoparticles on the cell cultures. The dose of nanoparticles to which cell cultures are being exposed was evaluated in the normal operation of the in vitro cell culture exposure chamber based on measurements of the size specific nanoparticle collection efficiency of a cell free device. The average efficiency in delivering nanoparticles in the MEC was approximately 82%. The nanoparticle deposition was demonstrated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Analysis and design of the MEC employs Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and true to geometry representations of nanoparticles with the aim to assess the uniformity of nanoparticle deposition among the culture wells. Final testing of the dose-controlled cell exposure system was performed by exposing A549 lung cell cultures to fluorescently labeled nanoparticles. Delivery of aerosolized nanoparticles was demonstrated by visualization of the nanoparticle fluorescence in the cell cultures following exposure. Also monitored was the potential of the aerosolized nanoparticles to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) (e.g. free radicals and peroxides generation), thus expressing the oxidative stress of the cells which can cause extensive cellular damage or damage on DNA.

  16. Development of a dose-controlled multiculture cell exposure chamber for efficient delivery of airborne and engineered nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimakopoulou, Akrivi; Daskalos, Emmanouil; Lewinski, Nastassja; Riediker, Michael; Papaioannou, Eleni; Konstandopoulos, Athanasios G.

    2013-04-01

    In order to study the various health influencing parameters related to engineered nanoparticles as well as to soot emitted by Diesel engines, there is an urgent need for appropriate sampling devices and methods for cell exposure studies that simulate the respiratory system and facilitate associated biological and toxicological tests. The objective of the present work was the further advancement of a Multiculture Exposure Chamber (MEC) into a dose-controlled system for efficient delivery of nanoparticles to cells. It was validated with various types of nanoparticles (Diesel engine soot aggregates, engineered nanoparticles for various applications) and with state-of-the-art nanoparticle measurement instrumentation to assess the local deposition of nanoparticles on the cell cultures. The dose of nanoparticles to which cell cultures are being exposed was evaluated in the normal operation of the in vitro cell culture exposure chamber based on measurements of the size specific nanoparticle collection efficiency of a cell free device. The average efficiency in delivering nanoparticles in the MEC was approximately 82%. The nanoparticle deposition was demonstrated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Analysis and design of the MEC employs Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and true to geometry representations of nanoparticles with the aim to assess the uniformity of nanoparticle deposition among the culture wells. Final testing of the dose-controlled cell exposure system was performed by exposing A549 lung cell cultures to fluorescently labeled nanoparticles. Delivery of aerosolized nanoparticles was demonstrated by visualization of the nanoparticle fluorescence in the cell cultures following exposure. Also monitored was the potential of the aerosolized nanoparticles to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) (e.g. free radicals and peroxides generation), thus expressing the oxidative stress of the cells which can cause extensive cellular damage or damage on DNA.

  17. A Nanoparticle Approach towards Morphology Controlled Organic Photovoltaics (OPV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Rieks; Yan, Quanxiang; Larsen-Olsen, Thue Trofod

    2012-01-01

    Silicon nano-particles grafted with two different organic oligomers were prepared; the oligomers used were a phenylene-vinylene (PV) oligomer and a 3,3'''-didodecylquaterthiophene. The graftings were performed by the use of two different functional groups, the PV oligomer was grafted by a hydroxy...

  18. Size Control Technology of Silver Nanoparticles Using Electron Beam Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hyun Suk; Kim, Byungnam; Kim, Hye Won; Koo, Yong Hwan; Lee, Byung Cheol; Park, Ji Hyun; Bae, Hyung Bin; Park, Changmoon

    2013-01-01

    The manufacturing of silver nanoparticles using an electron beam is easy, fast, and highly productive, and it is possible at room temperature with no chemical residuals. Its various advantages therefore make this an important method for manufacturing nanoparticles such as silver, copper, and platinum. In particular, despite the use of electron beam irradiation, the results show that this method makes it possible to produce silver nanoparticles at low cost since low beam energy and low doses are used. This means that middle and high-energy electron beam accelerators are very expensive, but a low-energy electron beam accelerator has a relatively low cost of around 4-5 times, and mass production for a flow reaction without the need for extra radiation shielding is possible. Silver nanoparticles are of great interest to many researchers owing to their ability to be used in many applications such as catalysis, nanoelectronics, optical filters, electromagnetic interference shielding, surface Raman scattering, medical supplies, fabrics, cosmetics, hygiene and kitchen supplies, and electric home appliances

  19. Biosynthesized silver nanoparticles to control fungal infections in indoor environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyá, Cecilia; Bellotti, Natalia

    2017-06-01

    Fungi grow especially in dark and moist areas, deteriorating the indoor environment and causing infections that particularly affect immunosuppressed individuals. Antimicrobial coatings have as principal objective to prevent biofilm formation and infections by incorporation of bioactive additives. In this sense, metallic nanoparticles, such as silver, have proven to be active against different microorganisms specially bacteria. Biosynthesized method is a promising environmentally friendly option to obtain nanoparticles. The aim of this research was assess the employment of plants extracts of Aloysia triphylla (cedrón), Laurelia sempervirens (laurel) and Ruta chalepensis (ruda) to obtain silver nanoparticles to be used as an antimicrobial additive to a waterborne coating formulation. The products obtained were assessed against fungal isolates from biodeteriorated indoor coatings. The fungi were identified by conventional and molecular techniques as Chaetomium globosum and Alternaria alternate. The results revealed that the coating with silver nanoparticles obtained with L. sempervirens extract at 60 °C with a size of 9.8 nm was the most efficient against fungal biofilm development.

  20. Silver nanoparticles: synthesis and size control by electron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogle, K A; Dhole, S D; Bhoraskar, V N [Microtron Accelerator Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune-411007 (India)

    2006-07-14

    Silver nanoparticles were synthesized by irradiating solutions, prepared by mixing AgNO{sub 3} and poly-vinyl alcohol (PVA), with 6 MeV electrons. The electron-irradiated solutions and the thin coatings cast from them were characterized using the ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis), x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. During electron irradiation, the process of formation of the silver nanoparticles appeared to be initiated at an electron fluence of {approx}2 x 10{sup 13} e cm{sup -2}. This was evidenced from the solution, which turned yellow and exhibited the characteristic plasmon absorption peak around 455 nm. Silver nanoparticles of different sizes in the range 60-10 nm, with a narrow size distribution, could be synthesized by varying the electron fluence from 2 x 10{sup 13} to 3 x 10{sup 15} e cm{sup -2}. Silver nanoparticles of sizes in the range 100-200 nm were also synthesized by irradiating an aqueous AgNO{sub 3} solution with 6 MeV electrons.

  1. Nano-particles - A recent approach to insect pest control

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-14

    Jun 14, 2010 ... Available online at http://www.academicjournals.org/AJB ... It is now known that many insects possess ferromagnetic materials in the head ... nanoparticles in insects and their potential for use in insect pest management. ... often synthesized using chemical methods. ..... opacus termite: FMR characterization.

  2. Size Control Technology of Silver Nanoparticles Using Electron Beam Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun Suk; Kim, Byungnam; Kim, Hye Won; Koo, Yong Hwan; Lee, Byung Cheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Hyun [Univ. of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Hyung Bin [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Changmoon [Chungnam National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    The manufacturing of silver nanoparticles using an electron beam is easy, fast, and highly productive, and it is possible at room temperature with no chemical residuals. Its various advantages therefore make this an important method for manufacturing nanoparticles such as silver, copper, and platinum. In particular, despite the use of electron beam irradiation, the results show that this method makes it possible to produce silver nanoparticles at low cost since low beam energy and low doses are used. This means that middle and high-energy electron beam accelerators are very expensive, but a low-energy electron beam accelerator has a relatively low cost of around 4-5 times, and mass production for a flow reaction without the need for extra radiation shielding is possible. Silver nanoparticles are of great interest to many researchers owing to their ability to be used in many applications such as catalysis, nanoelectronics, optical filters, electromagnetic interference shielding, surface Raman scattering, medical supplies, fabrics, cosmetics, hygiene and kitchen supplies, and electric home appliances.

  3. Application of a pilot control banding tool for risk level assessment and control of nanoparticle exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Samuel Y; Zalk, David M; Swuste, Paul

    2008-08-01

    Control banding (CB) strategies offer simplified solutions for controlling worker exposures to constituents that are found in the workplace in the absence of firm toxicological and exposure data. These strategies may be particularly useful in nanotechnology applications, considering the overwhelming level of uncertainty over what nanomaterials and nanotechnologies present as potential work-related health risks, what about these materials might lead to adverse toxicological activity, how risk related to these might be assessed and how to manage these issues in the absence of this information. This study introduces a pilot CB tool or 'CB Nanotool' that was developed specifically for characterizing the health aspects of working with engineered nanoparticles and determining the level of risk and associated controls for five ongoing nanotechnology-related operations being conducted at two Department of Energy research laboratories. Based on the application of the CB Nanotool, four of the five operations evaluated in this study were found to have implemented controls consistent with what was recommended by the CB Nanotool, with one operation even exceeding the required controls for that activity. The one remaining operation was determined to require an upgrade in controls. By developing this dynamic CB Nanotool within the realm of the scientific information available, this application of CB appears to be a useful approach for assessing the risk of nanomaterial operations, providing recommendations for appropriate engineering controls and facilitating the allocation of resources to the activities that most need them.

  4. Fabrication and characterization of size-controlled starch-based nanoparticles as hydrophobic drug carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fei; Gao, Chunmei; Liu, Mingzhu

    2013-10-01

    Acetylated corn starch was successfully synthesized and optimized by the reaction of native corn starch with acetic anhydride and acetic acid in the presence of sulfuric acid as a catalyst. The optimal degree of substitution of 2.85 was obtained. Starch-based nanoparticles were fabricated by a simple and novel nanoprecipitation procedure, by the dropwise addition of water to acetone solution of acetylated starch under stirring. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry showed that acetylated starch had some new bands at 1750, 1375 and 1240 cm(-1) while acetylated starch nanoparticles presented the identical peaks as the drug-loaded acetylated starch nanoparticles and the acetylated starch. Wide angle X-ray diffraction indicated that A-type pattern of native starch was completely transformed into the V-type pattern of Acetylated starch and starch-based nanoparticles show the similar type pattern with the acetylated starch. The scanning electron microscopy showed that the different sizes of pores formed on the acetylated starch granules were utterly converted into the uniform-sized spherical nanoparticles after the nanoprecipitation. The encapsulation efficiency and diameter of nanoparticle can be adjusted by the degree of substitution, the volume ratio of nonsolvent to solvent and the weight ratio of acetylated starch to drug. It was also depicted that the release behaviors of drug-loaded nanoparticles depend on the size of nanoparticles and the degree of substitution of the acetylated starch. Release studies prove that the starch-based nanoparticles with uniform size can be used for the encapsulation of hydrophobic drug and attained the sustained and controllable drug release carriers.

  5. Conformation radiotherapy and conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Kozo

    1999-01-01

    In order to coincide the high dose region to the target volume, the 'Conformation Radiotherapy Technique' using the multileaf collimator and the device for 'hollow-out technique' was developed by Prof. S. Takahashi in 1960. This technique can be classified a type of 2D-dynamic conformal RT techniques. By the clinical application of this technique, the late complications of the lens, the intestine and the urinary bladder after radiotherapy for the maxillary cancer and the cervical cancer decreased. Since 1980's the exact position and shape of the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues can be easily obtained by the tremendous development of the CT/MRI imaging technique. As a result, various kinds of new conformal techniques such as the 3D-CRT, the dose intensity modulation, the tomotherapy have been developed since the beginning of 1990'. Several 'dose escalation study with 2D-/3D conformal RT' is now under way to improve the treatment results. (author)

  6. Controlling the interparticle distance in a 2D molecule-nanoparticle network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guedon, C M; Zonneveld, J; Van der Molen, S J [Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratorium, Leiden University, PO Box 9504, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Valkenier, H; Hummelen, J C [Stratingh Institute for Chemistry, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-03-25

    Mechanically controllable break junctions allow for an impressive level of control over the distance between two electrodes, but lack stability at room temperature. On the other hand, two-dimensional (2D) networks of nanoparticles bridged by molecules form a stable device structure for investigating molecular conductance properties. Here, we combine both techniques to create a robust platform for molecular charge transport with control over the inter-electrode distance on the picometer scale. The resistance change due to bending of our structures is dependent on the molecular species present between the nanoparticles.

  7. Controlling the interparticle distance in a 2D molecule-nanoparticle network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedon, C M; Zonneveld, J; Van der Molen, S J; Valkenier, H; Hummelen, J C

    2011-01-01

    Mechanically controllable break junctions allow for an impressive level of control over the distance between two electrodes, but lack stability at room temperature. On the other hand, two-dimensional (2D) networks of nanoparticles bridged by molecules form a stable device structure for investigating molecular conductance properties. Here, we combine both techniques to create a robust platform for molecular charge transport with control over the inter-electrode distance on the picometer scale. The resistance change due to bending of our structures is dependent on the molecular species present between the nanoparticles.

  8. Controllable synthesis of rice-shape Alq3 nanoparticles with single crystal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wanfeng; Fan, Jihui; Song, Hui; Jiang, Feng; Yuan, Huimin; Wei, Zhixian; Ji, Ziwu; Pang, Zhiyong; Han, Shenghao

    2016-10-01

    We report the controllable growth of rice-shape nanoparticles of Alq3 by an extremely facile self-assembly approach. Possible mechanisms have been proposed to interpret the formation and controlled process of the single crystal nanoparticles. The field-emission performances (turn-on field 7 V μm-1, maximum current density 2.9 mA cm-2) indicate the potential application on miniaturized nano-optoelectronics devices of Alq3-based. This facile method can potentially be used for the controlled synthesis of other functional complexes and organic nanostructures.

  9. Size-Controlled Synthesis of Fe3O4 Magnetic Nanoparticles in the Layers of Montmorillonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katayoon Kalantari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4-NPs were synthesized using chemical coprecipitation method. Fe3O4-NPs are located in interlamellar space and external surfaces of montmorillonite (MMT as a solid supported at room temperature. The size of magnetite nanoparticles could be controlled by varying the amount of NaOH as reducing agent in the medium. The interlamellar space changed from 1.24 nm to 2.85 nm and average diameter of Fe3O4 nanoparticles was from 12.88 nm to 8.24 nm. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using some instruments such as transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  10. Controllable synthesis and characterization of Fe3O4/Au composite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Yan; Jin, Yan-Yan; Si, Jian-Chao; Peng, Ming-Li; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Chen, Chao; Cui, Ya-Li

    2015-01-01

    Fe 3 O 4 /Au composite nanoparticles (GoldMag NPs) have received considerable attention because of their advantageous properties arisen from both individual Au and Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles. Many efforts have been devoted to the synthesis of these composite nanoparticles. Herein, GoldMag NPs were reported to be synthesized by two-step method. Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles were prepared by co-precipitation and modified by the citric acid, and then citric acid-coated Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles were used as seeds in sodium citrate solution to reduce the HAuCl 4 . The size of obtained nanoparticles was geared from 25 to 300 nm by controlling the concentration of reactants. The GoldMag NPs were characterized by UV–vis spectrometer, dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The GoldMag NPs showed good superparamagnetism at room temperature and were well dispersed in water with surface plasmon resonance absorption peak varied from 538 nm to 570 nm. - Highlights: • A low cost, simple manipulation and nontoxic approach was designed for preparation of magnetic Fe 3 O 4 /Au (GoldMag NPs) nanocomposites. • The size of GoldMag NPs could be controlled from 25 to 300 nm by varying the concentration of reactants. • GoldMag NPs possessed good magnetic response, high dispersion, and good stability

  11. Control of In Vivo Transport and Toxicity of Nanoparticles by Tea Melanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Shiun Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles are unfamiliar to researchers in toxicology. Toxicity may be generated simply due to the reduction in size. Compounds that prevent or cure toxic materials may not work on nanoparticles. Furthermore, as there are more and more applications of nanoparticles in drug delivery and in vivo imaging, controlling the transport and toxicity will be primary concerns for medical application of nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs if injected intraperitoneally into mice can enter hippocampus and induce cognitive impairment. GNPs caused a global imbalance of monoamine levels, specifically affecting the dopaminergic and serotonergic neurons. Pretreatment of tea melanin significantly prevented the deposition of GNPs in mouse brains, especially in the hippocampus. Pretreatment of melanin completely alleviated GNP-induced impairment of cognition. Pre-administration of melanin stably maintained monoamines at normal profiles. Melanin completely prevented the invasion of GNPs into the Cornu Ammonis region of the hippocampus shown by coherent anti-Stoke Raman scattering microscopy. Here we show that the administration of tea melanin prevented the accumulation of Au in brain, the imbalance of monoamines, and the impairment of cognition in mice. The current study provides a therapeutic approach to toxicity of nanoparticles and a novel strategy to control the transport of GNP in mouse brain.

  12. Facile biofunctionalization of silver nanoparticles for enhanced antibacterial properties, endotoxin removal, and biofilm control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambadi PR

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Paramesh Ramulu Lambadi,1,* Tarun Kumar Sharma,1,* Piyush Kumar,1 Priyanka Vasnani,2 Sitaramanjaneya Mouli Thalluri,2 Neha Bisht,1 Ranjana Pathania,1,2 Naveen Kumar Navani1,21Department of Biotechnology, 2Centre of Nanotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee, Uttarakhand, India*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Infectious diseases cause a huge burden on healthcare systems worldwide. Pathogenic bacteria establish infection by developing antibiotic resistance and modulating the host’s immune system, whereas opportunistic pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa adapt to adverse conditions owing to their ability to form biofilms. In the present study, silver nanoparticles were biofunctionalized with polymyxin B, an antibacterial peptide using a facile method. The biofunctionalized nanoparticles (polymyxin B-capped silver nanoparticles, PBSNPs were assessed for antibacterial activity against multiple drug-resistant clinical strain Vibrio fluvialis and nosocomial pathogen P. aeruginosa. The results of antibacterial assay revealed that PBSNPs had an approximately 3-fold higher effect than the citrate-capped nanoparticles (CSNPs. Morphological damage to the cell membrane was followed by scanning electron microscopy, testifying PBSNPs to be more potent in controlling the bacterial growth as compared with CSNPs. The bactericidal effect of PBSNPs was further confirmed by Live/Dead staining assays. Apart from the antibacterial activity, the biofunctionalized nanoparticles were found to resist biofilm formation. Electroplating of PBSNPs onto stainless steel surgical blades retained the antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa. Further, the affinity of polymyxin for endotoxin was exploited for its removal using PBSNPs. It was found that the prepared nanoparticles removed 97% of the endotoxin from the solution. Such multifarious uses of metal nanoparticles are an attractive means of enhancing the potency of antimicrobial

  13. The conformity of asset control software to the principles of CPC 27 and ICPC 10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto da Cunha

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The convergence of Brazilian accounting to international standards also requires adjusting accounting software to the new rules. In 2009, SEC Resolution No. 583 and CFC Resolution No. 1177 made it mandatory toapply Pronouncement 27 of the Accounting Procedures Committee, concerning Fixed Assets. The goal of this study is to verify whether the asset control software meets the requirements of CPC 27 and ICPC 10. A descriptive, qualitative study was carried out using a multi case study. An interview guide, with the items discussed in CPC 27 and ICPC 10, was applied to the software developers to control assets of three software companies in southern Brazil. The survey results show that the overall average of the three companies examined was 86% of compliance to the topics covered in this research. It was concluded that, in general, asset control software meets the precepts of CPC 27 and ICPC10, except for impairment and deemed cost concepts, which were not covered.

  14. Conformal Gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooft, G.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamical degree of freedom for the gravitational force is the metric tensor, having 10 locally independent degrees of freedom (of which 4 can be used to fix the coordinate choice). In conformal gravity, we split this field into an overall scalar factor and a nine-component remainder. All unrenormalizable infinities are in this remainder, while the scalar component can be handled like any other scalar field such as the Higgs field. In this formalism, conformal symmetry is spontaneously broken. An imperative demand on any healthy quantum gravity theory is that black holes should be described as quantum systems with micro-states as dictated by the Hawking-Bekenstein theory. This requires conformal symmetry that may be broken spontaneously but not explicitly, and this means that all conformal anomalies must cancel out. Cancellation of conformal anomalies yields constraints on the matter sector as described by some universal field theory. Thus black hole physics may eventually be of help in the construction of unified field theories. (author)

  15. Externally controlled triggered-release of drug from PLGA micro and nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Hua

    Full Text Available Biofilm infections are extremely hard to eradicate and controlled, triggered and controlled drug release properties may prolong drug release time. In this study, the ability to externally control drug release from micro and nanoparticles was investigated. We prepared micro/nanoparticles containing ciprofloxacin (CIP and magnetic nanoparticles encapsulated in poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid PLGA. Both micro/nanoparticles were observed to have narrow size distributions. We investigated and compared their passive and externally triggered drug release properties based on their different encapsulation structures for the nano and micro systems. In passive release studies, CIP demonstrated a fast rate of release in first 2 days which then slowed and sustained release for approximately 4 weeks. Significantly, magnetic nanoparticles containing systems all showed ability to have triggered drug release when exposed to an external oscillating magnetic field (OMF. An experiment where the OMF was turned on and off also confirmed the ability to control the drug release in a pulsatile manner. The magnetically triggered release resulted in a 2-fold drug release increase compared with normal passive release. To confirm drug integrity following release, the antibacterial activity of released drug was evaluated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in vitro. CIP maintained its antimicrobial activity after encapsulation and triggered release.

  16. Externally controlled triggered-release of drug from PLGA micro and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xin; Tan, Shengnan; Bandara, H M H N; Fu, Yujie; Liu, Siguo; Smyth, Hugh D C

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm infections are extremely hard to eradicate and controlled, triggered and controlled drug release properties may prolong drug release time. In this study, the ability to externally control drug release from micro and nanoparticles was investigated. We prepared micro/nanoparticles containing ciprofloxacin (CIP) and magnetic nanoparticles encapsulated in poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) PLGA. Both micro/nanoparticles were observed to have narrow size distributions. We investigated and compared their passive and externally triggered drug release properties based on their different encapsulation structures for the nano and micro systems. In passive release studies, CIP demonstrated a fast rate of release in first 2 days which then slowed and sustained release for approximately 4 weeks. Significantly, magnetic nanoparticles containing systems all showed ability to have triggered drug release when exposed to an external oscillating magnetic field (OMF). An experiment where the OMF was turned on and off also confirmed the ability to control the drug release in a pulsatile manner. The magnetically triggered release resulted in a 2-fold drug release increase compared with normal passive release. To confirm drug integrity following release, the antibacterial activity of released drug was evaluated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in vitro. CIP maintained its antimicrobial activity after encapsulation and triggered release.

  17. Conforming to partnership values: a qualitative case study of public–private mix for TB control in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Amo-Adjei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Public–private mix (PPM can supplement public sector initiatives, including public health. As National Tuberculosis Control Programmes around the world embrace PPM, conforming to the four key principles of partnership values of beneficence, non-maleficence, autonomy, and equity as espoused by the World Health Organization can provide a useful framework to guide successful implementation. Design: This is a qualitative case study of PPM in tuberculosis (TB control, which utilised a purposive sample of 30 key stakeholders involved in TB control in Ghana. Respondents comprised an equal number of respondents from both the public and private sectors. Semi-structured in-depth interviews (IDI were conducted with respondents. Data emanating from the IDIs were analysed deductively. Results: Although the respondents’ perceptions about beneficence were unanimous, their views about non-maleficence, autonomy, and equity appeared incongruous with the underlying meanings of the PPM values. Underlying the unfavourable perceptions were disruptions in funding, project implementers’ failure to follow-up on promised incentives, and private providers lost interest. This was perceived to have negatively affected the smooth implementation of PPM in the country. Conclusions: Going forward, it is imperative that future partnerships are built around utilitarian principles and also adhere to the dictates of agreements, whether they are ‘soft’ or standard contracts.

  18. Conforming to partnership values: a qualitative case study of public-private mix for TB control in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amo-Adjei, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Public-private mix (PPM) can supplement public sector initiatives, including public health. As National Tuberculosis Control Programmes around the world embrace PPM, conforming to the four key principles of partnership values of beneficence, non-maleficence, autonomy, and equity as espoused by the World Health Organization can provide a useful framework to guide successful implementation. This is a qualitative case study of PPM in tuberculosis (TB) control, which utilised a purposive sample of 30 key stakeholders involved in TB control in Ghana. Respondents comprised an equal number of respondents from both the public and private sectors. Semi-structured in-depth interviews (IDI) were conducted with respondents. Data emanating from the IDIs were analysed deductively. Although the respondents' perceptions about beneficence were unanimous, their views about non-maleficence, autonomy, and equity appeared incongruous with the underlying meanings of the PPM values. Underlying the unfavourable perceptions were disruptions in funding, project implementers' failure to follow-up on promised incentives, and private providers lost interest. This was perceived to have negatively affected the smooth implementation of PPM in the country. Going forward, it is imperative that future partnerships are built around utilitarian principles and also adhere to the dictates of agreements, whether they are 'soft' or standard contracts.

  19. Size-controlled magnetic nanoparticles with lecithin for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S. I.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, C. G.; Kim, C. O.

    2007-05-01

    Lecithin-adsorbed magnetic nanoparticles were prepared by three-step process that the thermal decomposition was combined with ultrasonication. Experimental parameters were three items—molar ratio between Fe(CO) 5 and oleic acid, keeping time at decomposition temperature and lecithin concentration. As the molar ratio between Fe(CO) 5 and oleic acid, and keeping time at decomposition temperature increased, the particle size increased. However, the change of lecithin concentration did not show the remarkable particle size variation.

  20. Size-controlled magnetic nanoparticles with lecithin for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.I.; Kim, J.H.; Kim, C.G.; Kim, C.O.

    2007-01-01

    Lecithin-adsorbed magnetic nanoparticles were prepared by three-step process that the thermal decomposition was combined with ultrasonication. Experimental parameters were three items-molar ratio between Fe(CO) 5 and oleic acid, keeping time at decomposition temperature and lecithin concentration. As the molar ratio between Fe(CO) 5 and oleic acid, and keeping time at decomposition temperature increased, the particle size increased. However, the change of lecithin concentration did not show the remarkable particle size variation

  1. A simple route to shape controlled CdS nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejo, Ayorinde O.; Nejo, Adeola A.; Pullabhotla, Rajasekhar V. S. R.; Revaprasadu, Neerish

    2013-02-01

    We report the synthesis of CdS nanoparticles in the form of spheres, triangles and wire-like structures. The method involves the reaction of reduced sulfur with a cadmium salt followed by thermolysis in hexadecylamine (HDA). The different shapes were obtained by variation of reaction conditions such as reaction time, temperature and cadmium source. The optical studies show the particles to be quantum confined and luminescent at room temperature.

  2. Controlled antisolvent precipitation of spironolactone nanoparticles by impingement mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yuancai; Ng, Wai Kiong; Shen, Shoucang; Kim, Sanggu; Tan, Reginald B H

    2011-05-30

    Continuous antisolvent precipitation of spironolactone nanoparticles were performed by impingement mixing in this work. In the range of Reynolds numbers (Re) 2108-6325 for the antisolvent water stream and 1771-5313 for the solvent stream, i.e. acetonic drug solution, 302-360 nm drug nanoparticles were achieved. Increasing drug concentration from 25 to 50 and 100 mg/ml led to a significant size increase from 279.0±2.6 to 302.7±4.9 and 446.0±17.3 nm, respectively. "Two-step crystallization" was first observed for spironolactone in the water/acetone system: the drug was precipitated initially as spherical cluster, which rearranged into ordered cuboidal nanocrystals finally. The nanoformulation showed faster dissolution rate in comparison with the raw drug. By combining the impingement mixing and an on-line spray drying, a fully continuous process may be developed for mass-production of dried drug nanoparticles. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A facile route to shape controlled CdTe nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mntungwa, Nhlakanipho; Rajasekhar, Pullabhotla V.S.R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Zululand, Private Bag X1001, KwaDlangezwa 3886, Empangeni, KZN (South Africa); Revaprasadu, Neerish, E-mail: nrevapra@pan.uzulu.ac.za [Department of Chemistry, University of Zululand, Private Bag X1001, KwaDlangezwa 3886, Empangeni, KZN (South Africa)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} A facile hybrid solution based/thermolysis route has been used for the synthesis of hexadecylamine capped CdTe nanoparticles. {yields} This method involves the reaction by the addition of an aqueous suspension of a cadmium salt to a freshly prepared NaHTe solution. {yields} The cadmium salt plays an important role in the growth mechanism of the particles and hence its final morphology. - Abstract: Hexadecylamine (HDA) capped CdTe nanoparticles have been synthesized using a facile hybrid solution based/thermolysis route. This method involves the reaction by the addition of an aqueous suspension or solution of a cadmium salt (chloride, acetate, nitrate or carbonate) to a freshly prepared NaHTe solution. The isolated CdTe was then dispersed in tri-octylphosphine (TOP) and injected into pre-heated HDA at temperatures of 190, 230 and 270 deg. C for 2 h. The particle growth and size distribution of the CdTe particles synthesized using cadmium chloride as the cadmium source were monitored using absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The final morphology of the CdTe nanoparticles synthesized from the various cadmium sources was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM. The cadmium source has an influence on the final morphology of the particles.

  4. A facile route to shape controlled CdTe nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mntungwa, Nhlakanipho; Rajasekhar, Pullabhotla V.S.R.; Revaprasadu, Neerish

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → A facile hybrid solution based/thermolysis route has been used for the synthesis of hexadecylamine capped CdTe nanoparticles. → This method involves the reaction by the addition of an aqueous suspension of a cadmium salt to a freshly prepared NaHTe solution. → The cadmium salt plays an important role in the growth mechanism of the particles and hence its final morphology. - Abstract: Hexadecylamine (HDA) capped CdTe nanoparticles have been synthesized using a facile hybrid solution based/thermolysis route. This method involves the reaction by the addition of an aqueous suspension or solution of a cadmium salt (chloride, acetate, nitrate or carbonate) to a freshly prepared NaHTe solution. The isolated CdTe was then dispersed in tri-octylphosphine (TOP) and injected into pre-heated HDA at temperatures of 190, 230 and 270 deg. C for 2 h. The particle growth and size distribution of the CdTe particles synthesized using cadmium chloride as the cadmium source were monitored using absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The final morphology of the CdTe nanoparticles synthesized from the various cadmium sources was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM. The cadmium source has an influence on the final morphology of the particles.

  5. Scalable fabrication of size-controlled chitosan nanoparticles for oral delivery of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiyu; Santos, Jose Luis; Tian, Houkuan; Huang, Huahua; Hu, Yizong; Liu, Lixin; Leong, Kam W; Chen, Yongming; Mao, Hai-Quan

    2017-06-01

    Controlled delivery of protein would find diverse therapeutic applications. Formulation of protein nanoparticles by polyelectrolyte complexation between the protein and a natural polymer such as chitosan (CS) is a popular approach. However, the current method of batch-mode mixing faces significant challenges in scaling up while maintaining size control, high uniformity, and high encapsulation efficiency. Here we report a new method, termed flash nanocomplexation (FNC), to fabricate insulin nanoparticles by infusing aqueous solutions of CS, tripolyphosphate (TPP), and insulin under rapid mixing condition (Re > 1600) in a multi-inlet vortex mixer. In comparison with the bulk-mixing method, the optimized FNC process produces CS/TPP/insulin nanoparticles with a smaller size (down to 45 nm) and narrower size distribution, higher encapsulation efficiency (up to 90%), and pH-dependent nanoparticle dissolution and insulin release. The CS/TPP/insulin nanoparticles can be lyophilized and reconstituted without loss of activity, and produced at a throughput of 5.1 g h -1 when a flow rate of 50 mL min -1 is used. Evaluated in a Type I diabetes rat model, the smaller nanoparticles (45 nm and 115 nm) control the blood glucose level through oral administration more effectively than the larger particles (240 nm). This efficient, reproducible and continuous FNC technique is amenable to scale-up in order to address the critical barrier of manufacturing for the translation of protein nanoparticles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Size and morphology controlled NiSe nanoparticles as efficient catalyst for the reduction reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subbarao, Udumula; Marakatti, Vijaykumar S. [New Chemistry Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur P.O., Bangalore 560064 (India); Amshumali, Mungalimane K. [New Chemistry Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur P.O., Bangalore 560064 (India); Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, Vijayanagara Sri Krishnadevaraya University, Jnanasagara Campus, Cantonment, Bellary 583105 (India); Loukya, B. [International Center for Materials Science, Jakkur P.O., Bangalore 560064 (India); Singh, Dheeraj Kumar [Chemistry & Physics of Materials Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur P.O., Bangalore 560064 (India); Datta, Ranjan [International Center for Materials Science, Jakkur P.O., Bangalore 560064 (India); Peter, Sebastian C., E-mail: sebastiancp@jncasr.ac.in [New Chemistry Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur P.O., Bangalore 560064 (India)

    2016-12-15

    Facile and efficient ball milling and polyol methods were employed for the synthesis of nickel selenide (NiSe) nanoparticle. The particle size of the NiSe nanoparticle has been controlled mechanically by varying the ball size in the milling process. The role of the surfactants in the formation of various morphologies was studied. The compounds were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The efficiency of the NiSe nanoparticle as a catalyst was tested for the reduction of para-nitroaniline (PNA) to para-phenyldiamine (PPD) and para-nitrophenol (PNP) to para-aminophenol (PAP) using NaBH{sub 4} as the reducing agent. Particle size, morphology and the presence of surfactant played a crucial role in the reduction process. - Graphical abstract: NiSe nanoparticles in different size and morphology were synthesized using facile ball milling and polyol methods. Particle size, morphology and the presence of surfactant in these materials played a crucial role in the hydrogenation of PNA and PNP. - Highlights: • NiSe nanoparticles synthesized using ball milling and solution phase methods. • NiSe nanoparticle is an efficient catalyst for the reduction of PNA and PNP. • NiSe is found to be better than the best reported noble metal catalysts.

  7. Size and morphology controlled NiSe nanoparticles as efficient catalyst for the reduction reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbarao, Udumula; Marakatti, Vijaykumar S.; Amshumali, Mungalimane K.; Loukya, B.; Singh, Dheeraj Kumar; Datta, Ranjan; Peter, Sebastian C.

    2016-01-01

    Facile and efficient ball milling and polyol methods were employed for the synthesis of nickel selenide (NiSe) nanoparticle. The particle size of the NiSe nanoparticle has been controlled mechanically by varying the ball size in the milling process. The role of the surfactants in the formation of various morphologies was studied. The compounds were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The efficiency of the NiSe nanoparticle as a catalyst was tested for the reduction of para-nitroaniline (PNA) to para-phenyldiamine (PPD) and para-nitrophenol (PNP) to para-aminophenol (PAP) using NaBH 4 as the reducing agent. Particle size, morphology and the presence of surfactant played a crucial role in the reduction process. - Graphical abstract: NiSe nanoparticles in different size and morphology were synthesized using facile ball milling and polyol methods. Particle size, morphology and the presence of surfactant in these materials played a crucial role in the hydrogenation of PNA and PNP. - Highlights: • NiSe nanoparticles synthesized using ball milling and solution phase methods. • NiSe nanoparticle is an efficient catalyst for the reduction of PNA and PNP. • NiSe is found to be better than the best reported noble metal catalysts.

  8. Organic-inorganic hybrid nanoparticles controlled delivery system for anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Martino, Antonio; Guselnikova, Olga A; Trusova, Marina E; Postnikov, Pavel S; Sedlarik, Vladimir

    2017-06-30

    The use of organic-inorganic hybrid nanocarriers for controlled release of anticancer drugs has been gained a great interest, in particular, to improve the selectivity and efficacy of the drugs. In this study, iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared then surface modified via diazonium chemistry and coated with chitosan, and its derivative chitosan-grafted polylactic acid. The purpose was to increase the stability of the nanoparticles in physiological solution, heighten drug-loading capacity, prolong the release, reduce the initial burst effect and improve in vitro cytotoxicity of the model drug doxorubicin. The materials were characterized by DLS, ζ-potential, SEM, TGA, magnetization curves and release kinetics studies. Results confirmed the spherical shape, the presence of the coat and the advantages of using chitosan, particularly its amphiphilic derivative, as a coating agent, thereby surpassing the qualities of simple iron oxide nanoparticles. The coated nanoparticles exhibited great stability and high encapsulation efficiency for doxorubicin, at over 500μg per mg of carrier. Moreover, the intensity of the initial burst was clearly diminished after coating, hence represents an advantage of using the hybrid system over simple iron oxide nanoparticles. Cytotoxicity studies demonstrate the increase in cytotoxicity of doxorubicin when loaded in nanoparticles, indirectly proving the role played by the carrier and its surface properties in cell uptake. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Controllable synthesis and sintering of silver nanoparticles for inkjet-printed flexible electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhiliang; Zhu, Weiyue

    2015-01-01

    An effective and facile strategy was developed to successfully synthesize nearly uniform silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with particle size of <10 nm, and demonstrated to achieve the sintering of AgNPs at room temperature for inkjet-printed flexible electronics. In such system, a series of different chain-length alkylamines were exploited as capped molecules to controllable synthesis of uniform AgNPs with the mean nanoparticle size in rang of 8.6 ± 0.9, 8.9 ± 1.2 and 9.2 ± 1.6 nm, and these ultra-small nanoparticles were very favorable to attain an excellent printing fluency. Based on the as-synthesized AgNPs, a sequence of flexible electrocircuits was successfully fabricated by ink-jet printing technique. After the dipped treatment, the printed AgNPs were achieved to spontaneous coalescence and aggregation at room temperature induced by preferential dissolution of capped molecules on AgNPs surfaces into methanol solution. These aggregated AgNPs demonstrated superior controllability, excellent stability and low resistivity in the range of 31.6–26.5 μΩ cm, and would have enormous potential in the application to be tailored for assembly of optoelectronics devices. - Highlights: • Silver nanoparticles with particle size of <10 nm was controllably synthesized. • The sintering of silver nanoparticles was conducted at room temperature. • The resistivity was reached as low as 26.5 μΩ cm for flexible electronics

  10. Precise control of polymer coated nanopores by nanoparticle additives: Insights from computational modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskandari Nasrabad, Afshin; Coalson, Rob D. [Department of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Jasnow, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Zilman, Anton [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A7 (Canada)

    2016-08-14

    Polymer-nanoparticle composites are a promising new class of materials for creation of controllable nano-patterned surfaces and nanopores. We use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations augmented with analytical theory to study the structural transitions of surface grafted polymer layers (brushes) induced by infiltration of nanoparticles that are attracted to the polymers in the layer. We systematically compare two different polymer brush geometries: one where the polymer chains are grafted to a planar surface and the other where the chains are grafted to the inside of a cylindrical nanochannel. We perform a comprehensive study of the effects of the material parameters such as the polymer chain length, chain grafting density, nanoparticle size, strength of attraction between nanoparticles and polymer monomers, and, in the case of the cylindrically grafted brush, the radius of the cylinder. We find a very general behavioral motif for all geometries and parameter values: the height of the polymer brush is non-monotonic in the nanoparticle concentration in solution. As the nanoparticle concentration increases, the brush height first decreases and after passing through a minimum value begins to increase, resulting in the swelling of the nanoparticle infused brush. These morphological features may be useful for devising tunable “smart” nano-devices whose effective dimensions can be reversibly and precisely adjusted by changing the nanoparticle concentration in solution. The results of approximate Self-Consistent Field Theory (SCFT) calculations, applicable in the regime of strong brush stretching, are compared to the simulation results. The SCFT calculations are found to be qualitatively, even semi-quantitatively, accurate when applied within their intended regime of validity, and provide a useful and efficient tool for modeling such materials.

  11. Magnetic agglomeration method for size control in the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Dale L [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-07-05

    A method for controlling the size of chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles that employs magnetic interaction between particles to control particle size and does not rely on conventional kinetic control of the reaction to control particle size. The particles are caused to reversibly agglomerate and precipitate from solution; the size at which this occurs can be well controlled to provide a very narrow particle size distribution. The size of particles is controllable by the size of the surfactant employed in the process; controlling the size of the surfactant allows magnetic control of the agglomeration and precipitation processes. Agglomeration is used to effectively stop particle growth to provide a very narrow range of particle sizes.

  12. A computer-controlled high resolution micro-multi-leaf collimator for stereotactic conformal radio-therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, Wolfgang; Pastyr, Otto; Kubesch, Rudolf; Diemer, Torsten; Kuester, Gunnilla; Rhein, Bernhard; Hoever, Karl-Heinz

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective In stereotactic conformal radiotherapy of irregularly shaped lesions, either multi-isocentric convergent beam treatment techniques with circular collimators or irregular shaped beams are being used. While the treatment technique with multiple isocenters has the disadvantage of producing inhomogeneous dose distributions, the use of irregular shaped fields is not yet satisfying from a technical point of view: Cerrobend blocking or the use of static micro MLCs need a long preparation time and only allow static treatment techniques, MLC collimators which are commercially available in connection with modern LINACs have leaf-thickness of at least 1 cm which is too coarse for stereotactic radiotherapy of lesions in the brain and head and neck area. For this reason, we developed a computer controlled micro-MLC with technical specifications matched to the needs of stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery. Materials and Methods The mechanical specifications of the computer controlled micro-MLC were derived from our experience with stereotactic treatment techniques, from the requirement that the MLC has to be attachable as an external device to the accessory holders of standard LINACs, including cost considerations, dosimetric measurements as well as Monte Carlo calculations. The Micro-MLC is controlled by an electronic equipment consisting of a standard PC under Windows 95, an interface board, 14 Micro-controller boards, a verification system and 80 driving units equipped with DC motors and potentiometers. The control program has calibrating, operating, visualizing and test options. Irregular field data are transferred from the treatment planning computer to the control PC and distributed to the micro-controllers, which in parallel are driving three leaves each. Beside the special control unit, we are currently investigating whether the electronics of commercially available integrated large field MLCs can also be used for operating the Micro-MLC. Results

  13. Novel Polysaccharide Based Polymers and Nanoparticles for Controlled Drug Delivery and Biomedical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalviri, Alireza

    controlled delivery applications of larger molecular size compounds. The starch based hydrogels, polymers and nanoparticles developed in this work have shown great potentials for controlled drug delivery and biomedical imaging applications.

  14. Dose prescription complexity versus tumor control probability in biologically conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    South, C. P.; Evans, P. M.; Partridge, M.

    2009-01-01

    The technical feasibility and potential benefits of voxel-based nonuniform dose prescriptions for biologically heterogeneous tumors have been widely demonstrated. In some cases, an ''ideal'' dose prescription has been generated by individualizing the dose to every voxel within the target, but often this voxel-based prescription has been discretized into a small number of compartments. The number of dose levels utilized and the methods used for prescribing doses and assigning tumor voxels to different dose compartments have varied significantly. The authors present an investigation into the relationship between the complexity of the dose prescription and the tumor control probability (TCP) for a number of these methods. The linear quadratic model of cell killing was used in conjunction with a number of modeled tumors heterogeneous in clonogen density, oxygenation, or proliferation. Models based on simple mathematical functions, published biological data, and biological image data were investigated. Target voxels were assigned to dose compartments using (i) simple rules based on the initial biological distribution, (ii) iterative methods designed to maximize the achievable TCP, or (iii) methods based on an ideal dose prescription. The relative performance of the simple rules was found to depend on the form of heterogeneity of the tumor, while the iterative and ideal dose methods performed comparably for all models investigated. In all cases the maximum achievable TCP was approached within the first few (typically two to five) compartments. Results suggest that irrespective of the pattern of heterogeneity, the optimal dose prescription can be well approximated using only a few dose levels but only if both the compartment boundaries and prescribed dose levels are well chosen.

  15. COMBINED MICROBIAL SURFACTANT-POLYMER SYSTEM FOR IMPROVED OIL MOBILITY AND CONFORMANCE CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2004-08-01

    Many domestic oil fields are facing abandonment even though they still contain two-thirds of their original oil. A significant number of these fields can yield additional oil using advanced oil recovery (AOR) technologies. To maintain domestic oil production at current levels, AOR technologies are needed that are affordable and can be implemented by independent oil producers of the future. Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) technologies have become established as cost-effective solutions for declining oil production. MEOR technologies are affordable for independent producers operating stripper wells and can be used to extend the life of marginal fields. The demonstrated versatility of microorganisms can be used to design advanced microbial systems to treat multiple production problems in complex, heterogeneous reservoirs. The proposed research presents the concept of a combined microbial surfactant-polymer system for advanced oil recovery. The surfactant-polymer system utilizes bacteria that are capable of both biosurfactant production and metabolically-controlled biopolymer production. This novel technology combines complementary mechanisms to extend the life of marginal fields and is applicable to a large number of domestic reservoirs. The research project described in this report is performed jointly by, Bio-Engineering Inc., a woman owned small business, Texas A&M University and Prairie View A&M University, a Historically Black College and University. This report describes the results of our laboratory work to grow microbial cultures and the work done on recovery experiments on core rocks. We have selected two bacterial strains capable of producing both surfactant and polymers. We have conducted laboratory experiments to determine under what conditions surfactants and polymers can be produced from one single strain. We have conduct recovery experiments to determine the performance of these strains under different conditions. Our results do not show a

  16. pH-Responsive PLGA Nanoparticle for Controlled Payload Delivery of Diclofenac Sodium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalil Khanal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA based nanoparticles have gained increasing attention in delivery applications due to their capability for controlled drug release characteristics, biocompatibility, and tunable mechanical, as well as degradation, properties. However, thorough study is always required while evaluating potential toxicity of the particles from dose dumping, inconsistent release and drug-polymer interactions. In this research, we developed PLGA nanoparticles modified by chitosan (CS, a cationic and pH responsive polysaccharide that bears repetitive amine groups in its backbone. We used a model drug, diclofenac sodium (DS, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID, to study the drug loading and release characteristics. PLGA nanoparticles were synthesized by double-emulsion solvent evaporation technique. The nanoparticles were evaluated based on their particle size, surface charge, entrapment efficacy, and effect of pH in drug release profile. About 390–420 nm of average diameters and uniform morphology of the particles were confirmed by scanning electron microscope (SEM imaging and dynamic light scattering (DLS measurement. Chitosan coating over PLGA surface was confirmed by FTIR and DLS. Drug entrapment efficacy was up to 52%. Chitosan coated PLGA showed a pH responsive drug release in in vitro. The release was about 45% more at pH 5.5 than at pH 7.4. The results of our study indicated the development of chitosan coating over PLGA nanoparticle for pH dependent controlled release DS drug for therapeutic applications.

  17. Controlling “chemical nose” biosensor characteristics by modulating gold nanoparticle shape and concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit S. Verma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Conventional lock-and-key biosensors often only detect a single pathogen because they incorporate biomolecules with high specificity. “Chemical nose” biosensors are overcoming this limitation and identifying multiple pathogens simultaneously by obtaining a unique set of responses for each pathogen of interest, but the number of pathogens that can be distinguished is limited by the number of responses obtained. Herein, we use a gold nanoparticle-based “chemical nose” to show that changing the shapes of nanoparticles can increase the number of responses available for analysis and expand the types of bacteria that can be identified. Using four shapes of nanoparticles (nanospheres, nanostars, nanocubes, and nanorods, we demonstrate that each shape provides a unique set of responses in the presence of different bacteria, which can be exploited for enhanced specificity of the biosensor. Additionally, the concentration of nanoparticles controls the detection limit of the biosensor, where a lower concentration provides better detection limit. Thus, here we lay a foundation for designing “chemical nose” biosensors and controlling their characteristics using gold nanoparticle morphology and concentration. Keywords: Morphology, Color change, Staphylococcus aureus, Point-of-care, Nanocubes, Nanorods

  18. Tuning dipolar magnetic interactions by controlling individual silica coating of iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas Rojas, P. C.; Tancredi, P.; Moscoso Londoño, O.; Knobel, M.; Socolovsky, L. M.

    2018-04-01

    Single and fixed size core, core-shell nanoparticles of iron oxides coated with a silica layer of tunable thickness were prepared by chemical routes, aiming to generate a frame of study of magnetic nanoparticles with controlled dipolar interactions. The batch of iron oxides nanoparticles of 4.5 nm radii, were employed as cores for all the coated samples. The latter was obtained via thermal decomposition of organic precursors, resulting on nanoparticles covered with an organic layer that was subsequently used to promote the ligand exchange in the inverse microemulsion process, employed to coat each nanoparticle with silica. The amount of precursor and times of reaction was varied to obtain different silica shell thicknesses, ranging from 0.5 nm to 19 nm. The formation of the desired structures was corroborated by TEM and SAXS measurements, the core single-phase spinel structure was confirmed by XRD, and superparamagnetic features with gradual change related to dipolar interaction effects were obtained by the study of the applied field and temperature dependence of the magnetization. To illustrate that dipolar interactions are consistently controlled, the main magnetic properties are presented and analyzed as a function of center to center minimum distance between the magnetic cores.

  19. Design of a temperature measurement and feedback control system based on an improved magnetic nanoparticle thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhongzhou; Sun, Yi; Liu, Jie; Su, Rijian; Yang, Ming; Li, Nana; Gan, Yong; Ye, Na

    2018-04-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia, as a novel cancer treatment, requires precise temperature control at 315 K-319 K (42 °C-46 °C). However, the traditional temperature measurement method cannot obtain the real-time temperature in vivo, resulting in a lack of temperature feedback during the heating process. In this study, the feasibility of temperature measurement and feedback control using magnetic nanoparticles is proposed and demonstrated. This technique could be applied in hyperthermia. Specifically, the triangular-wave temperature measurement method is improved by reconstructing the original magnetization response of magnetic nanoparticles based on a digital phase-sensitive detection algorithm. The standard deviation of the temperature in the magnetic nanoparticle thermometer is about 0.1256 K. In experiments, the temperature fluctuation of the temperature measurement and feedback control system using magnetic nanoparticles is less than 0.5 K at the expected temperature of 315 K. This shows the feasibility of the temperature measurement method for temperature control. The method provides a new solution for temperature measurement and feedback control in hyperthermia.

  20. Conformation of dehydropentapeptides containing four achiral amino acid residues – controlling the role of L-valine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Jewgiński

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Structural studies of pentapeptides containing an achiral block, built from two dehydroamino acid residues (ΔZPhe and ΔAla and two glycines, as well as one chiral L-Val residue were performed using NMR spectroscopy. The key role of the L-Val residue in the generation of the secondary structure of peptides is discussed. The obtained results suggest that the strongest influence on the conformation of peptides arises from a valine residue inserted at the C-terminal position. The most ordered conformation was found for peptide Boc-Gly-ΔAla-Gly-ΔZPhe-Val-OMe (3, which adopts a right-handed helical conformation.

  1. Control size of silver nanoparticles in sol-gel glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renteria, Victor M.; Celis, Antonio C.; Garcia-Macedo, Jorge A.

    2000-10-01

    By the sol-gel processing, silver ions in presence of stabilizing function (3-thiocyanatopropyl)triethoxysilane are reduced by heating gels at 180 C for several times in air atmosphere. The spectroscopic Uv-Vis observations, confirm silver nanoparticles presence with peak maximum around 350 nm. The optical properties of the metallic particles are observed at room temperature as function of time, and the absorption spectra practically do not change, which indicated they are trapped and stabilized within the fine porous silica cage. Mie theory calculations, considering the mean free path effect of the conduction electrons, are compatible with experimental spectra, indicating homogeneity in size and form of the metallic nanoparticles. Smithard correlation curve, between half width height (W1/2) of the optical absorption and the particle diameter 2r, predict silver particles size between 4 and 10 nm, during composite heating. Activation energy was measured and compared with previous data on similar systems and the probable reduction process are discussed.

  2. siRNA nanoparticle functionalization of nanostructured scaffolds enables controlled multilineage differentiation of stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Ø; Nygaard, Jens V; Burns, Jorge S

    2010-01-01

    The creation of complex tissues and organs is the ultimate goal in tissue engineering. Engineered morphogenesis necessitates spatially controlled development of multiple cell types within a scaffold implant. We present a novel method to achieve this by adhering nanoparticles containing different ...

  3. Shape-and size-controlled Ag nanoparticles stabilized by in situ generated secondary amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramírez-Meneses, E., E-mail: esther.ramirez@ibero.mx [Departamento de Ingeniería y Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Iberoamericana, Prolongación Paseo de la Reforma 880, Lomas de Santa Fe, Distrito Federal C.P. 01219 (Mexico); Montiel-Palma, V. [Centro de Investigaciones Químicas, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001 Col. Chamilpa, Cuernavaca, Morelos C.P. 62209 (Mexico); Domínguez-Crespo, M.A.; Izaguirre-López, M.G. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada-IPN, Unidad Altamira. Km 14.5 Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial, 89600 Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Palacios-Gonzalez, E. [Laboratorio de Microscopia de Ultra alta Resolución, Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo, Eje Central Lázaro Cárdenas No. 152, C.P. 07730 México D.F. (Mexico); Dorantes-Rosales, H. [Departamento de Metalurgia, E.S.I.Q.I.E.-I.P.N., Unidad Profesional Adolfo López Mateos, Zacatenco, Delegación. Gustavo A. Madero, C.P. 07738 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Ag nanoparticles were generated from Ag amido complexes AgN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} and AgN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}. • Ag nanoparticles were stabilized by in situ generated HN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} or HN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}. • 1 or 5 equiv. of ethylenediamine as additional capping agent decreases the average size of the particles. • Ethylenediamine favor the formation of spherical particles. - Abstract: Silver amides such as AgN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} and AgN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2} have been employed successfully as precursors for the yield synthesis of silver nanoparticles under mild conditions of dihydrogen gas reduction (2 atm) in organic media. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the formation of silver nanoparticles with FCC structure, variously sized from 26 to 35 nm for AgN{sup i}Pr{sub 2} and from 14 to 86 nm for AgN(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}, the synthesis could take place in absence of added stabilizers due to the in situ formation of secondary amines from the reaction of dihydrogen gas with the amide ligands of the silver precursor. Indeed, the presence of HNR{sub 2} (R = iPr{sub 2}, N(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}) on the surface of the nanoparticle was confirmed by spectroscopic means. Finally, the addition of ethylenediamine as additional capping agent allowed not only the control of the structural characteristics of the resulting Ag nanoparticles (well-dispersed with spherical shape), but that regarding the nanoparticle size as it inhibited overgrowth, limiting it to ca. 25 nm.

  4. Blueshift of the silver plasmon band using controlled nanoparticle dissolution in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Kneipp, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report the size-dependent blue shift of the silver nanoparticle plasmon band in aqueous solution by means of UV/VIS spectroscopy. An oxidative dissolution scheme allows a gradual decrease in the particle sizes by controlled oxidation during recording of the optical spectra. Hence......-dependence of the plasmon peak energy is seen, which is interpreted as an increase in the free electron density of the nanoparticles. Utilization of the size-dependent electronic contribution to the optical response in nanoplasmonic sensors is shown to be a promising extension to improve the sensitivity and specificity...

  5. Functional polythiophene nanoparticles: Size-controlled electropolymerization and ion selective response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Si, P.C.; Chi, Qijin; Li, Z.S.

    2007-01-01

    polymerization to form polymer nanoparticles or clusters by which the size of the polymer nanoparticles can further be controlled electrochemically. The electropolymerization was monitored in situ by scanning tunneling microscopy to unravel the dynamics of the process and possible mechanisms. These are further......We have synthesized a thiophene derivative, (4-benzeno-15-crown-5 ether)-thiophene-3-methylene-amine (BTA), which was used as a monomer for electrochemical polymerization on metallic surfaces to prepare functional polymer films. Self-assembly of BTA monomers on Au(111) surfaces promotes ordered...

  6. Controlling exchange bias in Co-CoOx nanoparticles by oxygen content

    OpenAIRE

    Kovylina, Miroslavna; del Muro, Montserrat Garcia; Konstantinovic, Zorica; Varela, Manuel; Iglesias, Oscar; Labarta, Amilcar; Batlle, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    We report on the occurrence of exchange bias on laser-ablated granular thin films composed of Co nanoparticles embedded in amorphous zirconia matrix. The deposition method allows controlling the degree of oxidation of the Co particles by tuning the oxygen pressure at the vacuum chamber (from 2x10^{-5} to 10^{-1} mbar). The nature of the nanoparticles embedded in the nonmagnetic matrix is monitored from metallic, ferromagnetic (FM) Co to antiferromagnetic (AFM) CoOx, with a FM/AFM intermediate...

  7. Self-assembled nanoparticles of glycol chitosan – Ergocalciferol succinate conjugate, for controlled release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quinones, Javier Perez; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager; Kjems, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Glycol chitosan was linked to vitamin D2 hemisuccinate (ergocalciferol hemisuccinate) for controlled release through water-soluble carbodiimide activation. The resulting conjugate formed self-assembled nanoparticles in aqueous solution with particle size of 279 nm and ergocalciferol hemisuccinate...... content of 8.4% (w/w). Almost spherical 50–90 nm nanoparticles were observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy upon drying. Drug linking to glycol chitosan was confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy and proton NMR. Particles were also characterized by differential scanning calorimetry and wide...

  8. Conformality lost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, David B.; Lee, Jong-Wan; Son, Dam T.; Stephanov, Mikhail A.

    2009-01-01

    We consider zero-temperature transitions from conformal to nonconformal phases in quantum theories. We argue that there are three generic mechanisms for the loss of conformality in any number of dimensions: (i) fixed point goes to zero coupling, (ii) fixed point runs off to infinite coupling, or (iii) an IR fixed point annihilates with a UV fixed point and they both disappear into the complex plane. We give both relativistic and nonrelativistic examples of the last case in various dimensions and show that the critical behavior of the mass gap behaves similarly to the correlation length in the finite temperature Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) phase transition in two dimensions, ξ∼exp(c/|T-T c | 1/2 ). We speculate that the chiral phase transition in QCD at large number of fermion flavors belongs to this universality class, and attempt to identify the UV fixed point that annihilates with the Banks-Zaks fixed point at the lower end of the conformal window.

  9. Dual drug-loaded nanoparticles on self-integrated scaffold for controlled delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennet D

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Devasier Bennet,1 Mohana Marimuthu,1 Sanghyo Kim,1 Jeongho An21Department of Bionanotechnology, Gachon University, Gyeonggi, Republic of Korea; 2Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, SunKyunKwan University, Gyeonggi, Republic of KoreaAbstract: Antioxidant (quercetin and hypoglycemic (voglibose drug-loaded poly-D,L-lactide-co-glycolide nanoparticles were successfully synthesized using the solvent evaporation method. The dual drug-loaded nanoparticles were incorporated into a scaffold film using a solvent casting method, creating a controlled transdermal drug-delivery system. Key features of the film formulation were achieved utilizing several ratios of excipients, including polyvinyl alcohol, polyethylene glycol, hyaluronic acid, xylitol, and alginate. The scaffold film showed superior encapsulation capability and swelling properties, with various potential applications, eg, the treatment of diabetes-associated complications. Structural and light scattering characterization confirmed a spherical shape and a mean particle size distribution of 41.3 nm for nanoparticles in the scaffold film. Spectroscopy revealed a stable polymer structure before and after encapsulation. The thermoresponsive swelling properties of the film were evaluated according to temperature and pH. Scaffold films incorporating dual drug-loaded nanoparticles showed remarkably high thermoresponsivity, cell compatibility, and ex vivo drug-release behavior. In addition, the hybrid film formulation showed enhanced cell adhesion and proliferation. These dual drug-loaded nanoparticles incorporated into a scaffold film may be promising for development into a transdermal drug-delivery system.Keywords: quercetin, voglibose, biocompatible materials, encapsulation, transdermal

  10. Physically Targeted Intravenous Polyurethane Nanoparticles for Controlled Release of Atorvastatin Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhari, Behnaz Sadat; Karkhaneh, Akbar; Alizadeh, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Background: Intravenous drug delivery is an advantageous choice for rapid administration, immediate drug effect, and avoidance of first-pass metabolism in oral drug delivery. In this study, the synthesis, formulation, and characterization of atorvastatin-loaded polyurethane (PU) nanoparticles were investigated for intravenous route of administration. Method: First, PU was synthesized and characterized. Second, nanoparticles were prepared in four different ratios of drug to polymer through two different techniques, including emulsion-diffusion and single-emulsion. Finally, particle size and polydispersity index, shape and surface morphology, drug entrapment efficiency (EE), drug loading, and in vitro release were evaluated by dynamics light scattering, scanning electron microscopy, and UV visible spectroscopy, respectively. Results: Within two methods, the prepared nanoparticles had a spherical shape and a smooth surface with a diversity of size ranged from 174.04 nm to 277.24 nm in emulsion-diffusion and from 306.5 nm to 393.12 in the single-emulsion method. The highest EE was 84.76%, for (1:4) sample in the emulsion-diffusion method. It has also been shown that in vitro release of nanoparticles, using the emulsion-diffusion method, was sustained up to eight days by two mechanisms: drug diffusion and polymer relaxation. Conclusion: PU nanoparticles, that were prepared by the emulsion-diffusion method, could be used as effective carriers for the controlled drug delivery of poorly water soluble drugs such as atorvastatin calcium. PMID:28532144

  11. Zinc-decorated silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles for protein binding and controlled release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bele, Marjan; Hribar, Gorazd; Campelj, Stanislav; Makovec, Darko; Gaberc-Porekar, Vladka; Zorko, Milena; Gaberscek, Miran; Jamnik, Janko; Venturini, Peter

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to be able to reversibly bind histidine-rich proteins to the surface of maghemite magnetic nanoparticles via coordinative bonding using Zn ions as the anchoring points. We showed that in order to adsorb Zn ions on the maghemite, the surface of the latter needs to be modified. As silica is known to strongly adsorb zinc ions, we chose to modify the maghemite nanoparticles with a nanometre-thick silica layer. This layer appeared to be thin enough for the maghemite nanoparticles to preserve their superparamagnetic nature. As a model the histidine-rich protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used. The release of the BSA bound to Zn-decorated silica-coated maghemite nanoparticles was analysed using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). We demonstrated that the bonding of the BSA to such modified magnetic nanoparticles is highly reversible and can be controlled by an appropriate change of the external conditions, such as a pH decrease or the presence/supply of other chelating compounds.

  12. Environment friendly approach for size controllable synthesis of biocompatible Silver nanoparticles using diastase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddinedi, Sireesh Babu; Mandal, Badal Kumar; Anna, Kiran Kumar

    2017-01-01

    A green, facile method for the size selective synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using diastase as green reducing and stabilizing agent is reported. The thiol groups present in the diastase are mainly responsible for the rapid reaction rate of silver nanoparticles synthesis. The variation in the size and morphology of AgNPs were studied by changing the pH of diastase. The prepared silver nanoparticles were characterized by using UV-vis, XRD, FTIR, TEM and SAED. The FTIR analysis revealed the stabilization of diastase molecules on the surface of AgNPs. Additionally, in-vitro cytotoxicity experiments concluded that the cytotoxicity of the as-synthesized AgNPs towards mouse fibroblast (3T3) cell lines is dose and size dependent. Furthermore, the present method is an alternative to the traditional chemical methods of size controlled AgNPs synthesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Nanoparticle-doped Polymer Foils for Use in Solar Control Glazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G. B.; Deller, C. A.; Swift, P. D.; Gentle, A.; Garrett, P. D.; Fisher, W. K.

    2002-04-01

    Since nanoparticles can provide spectrally selective absorption without scattering they can be used to dope polymers for use in windows, to provide a clear view while strongly attenuating both solar heat gain and UV, at lower cost than alternative technologies. The underlying physics and how it influences the choice and concentration of nanoparticle materials is outlined. Spectral data, visible and solar transmittance, and solar heat gain coefficient are measured for clear polymers and some laminated glass, in which the polymer layer is doped with conducting oxide nanoparticles. Simple models are shown to apply making general optical design straightforward. Use with clear glass and tinted glass is considered and performance shown to match existing solar control alternatives. A potential for widespread adoption in buildings and cars is clearly demonstrated, and scopes for further improvements are identified, so that ultimately both cost and performance are superior.

  14. A microfluidic tubing method and its application for controlled synthesis of polymeric nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jidong; Chen, Wenwen; Sun, Jiashu; Liu, Chao; Yin, Qifang; Zhang, Lu; Xianyu, Yunlei; Shi, Xinghua; Hu, Guoqing; Jiang, Xingyu

    2014-05-21

    This report describes a straightforward but robust tubing method for connecting polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices to external equipment. The interconnection is irreversible and can sustain a pressure of up to 4.5 MPa that is characterized experimentally and theoretically. To demonstrate applications of this high-pressure tubing technique, we fabricate a semicircular microfluidic channel to implement a high-throughput, size-controlled synthesis of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles ranging from 55 to 135 nm in diameter. This microfluidic device allows for a total flow rate of 410 mL h(-1), resulting in enhanced convective mixing which can be utilized to precipitate small size nanoparticles with a good dispersion. We expect that this tubing technique would be widely used in microfluidic chips for nanoparticle synthesis, cell manipulation, and potentially nanofluidic applications.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of magnetic Fe/CNTs composites with controllable Fe nanoparticle concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Fan; Duan Hongyan; Wang Weigao; Wang Jun

    2012-01-01

    Fe/CNTs composites, with different concentrations of Fe nanoparticles (NPs) on carbon nanotube (CNT) surfaces, were successfully fabricated via a facile solvothermal method. The lengths of CNTs are up to 10 μm and the mean diameter of the Fe nanoparticles is about 25 nm. The structures, composition and magnetic properties of the Fe/CNTs were characterized by XRD, FTIR, FE-SEM, TEM and PPMS. We found that the concentrations of Fe nanoparticles depositing on the CNTs could be controlled by adjusting the initial mass ratio of ferrocene to CNTs. The Fe/CNTs composites display good ferromagnetic properties at room temperature, with a saturation magnetization of 125 emu/g-Fe and a coercivity of 276 Oe. The Curie temperature of the sample is about 1038 K, slightly lower than that (1043 K) of the bulk iron.

  16. Nanoparticle-doped Polymer Foils for Use in Solar Control Glazing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.B.; Deller, C.A.; Swift, P.D.; Gentle, A.; Garrett, P.D.; Fisher, W.K.

    2002-01-01

    Since nanoparticles can provide spectrally selective absorption without scattering they can be used to dope polymers for use in windows, to provide a clear view while strongly attenuating both solar heat gain and UV, at lower cost than alternative technologies. The underlying physics and how it influences the choice and concentration of nanoparticle materials is outlined. Spectral data, visible and solar transmittance, and solar heat gain coefficient are measured for clear polymers and some laminated glass, in which the polymer layer is doped with conducting oxide nanoparticles. Simple models are shown to apply making general optical design straightforward. Use with clear glass and tinted glass is considered and performance shown to match existing solar control alternatives. A potential for widespread adoption in buildings and cars is clearly demonstrated, and scopes for further improvements are identified, so that ultimately both cost and performance are superior

  17. Natural material-decorated mesoporous silica nanoparticle container for multifunctional membrane-controlled targeted drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Y

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Yan Hu,1 Lei Ke,2 Hao Chen,1 Ma Zhuo,1 Xinzhou Yang,1 Dan Zhao,1 Suying Zeng,1 Xincai Xiao1 1Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Science, South-Central University for Nationalities, 2Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: To avoid the side effects caused by nonspecific targeting, premature release, weak selectivity, and poor therapeutic efficacy of current nanoparticle-based systems used for drug delivery, we fabricated natural material-decorated nanoparticles as a multifunctional, membrane-controlled targeted drug delivery system. The nanocomposite material coated with a membrane was biocompatible and integrated both specific tumor targeting and responsiveness to stimulation, which improved transmission efficacy and controlled drug release. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs, which are known for their biocompatibility and high drug-loading capacity, were selected as a model drug container and carrier. The membrane was established by the polyelectrolyte composite method from chitosan (CS which was sensitive to the acidic tumor microenvironment, folic acid-modified CS which recognizes the folate receptor expressed on the tumor cell surface, and a CD44 receptor-targeted polysaccharide hyaluronic acid. We characterized the structure of the nanocomposite as well as the drug release behavior under the control of the pH-sensitive membrane switch and evaluated the antitumor efficacy of the system in vitro. Our results provide a basis for the design and fabrication of novel membrane-controlled nanoparticles with improved tumor-targeting therapy. Keywords: multifunctional, membrane-controlled, natural materials, mesoporous silica nanoparticles, targeted drug delivery

  18. Self-limiting atomic layer deposition of conformal nanostructured silver films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golrokhi, Zahra; Chalker, Sophia; Sutcliffe, Christopher J.; Potter, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We grow metallic silver by direct liquid injection thermal atomic layer deposition. • Highly conformal silver nanoparticle coatings on high aspect ratio surfaces. • An ALD temperature growth window between 123 and 128 °C is established. • ALD cycles provides sub nanometre control of silver growth. • Catalytic dehydrogenation ALD mechanism has been elucidated by in-situ QCM. - Abstract: The controlled deposition of ultra-thin conformal silver nanoparticle films is of interest for applications including anti-microbial surfaces, plasmonics, catalysts and sensors. While numerous techniques can produce silver nanoparticles, few are able to produce highly conformal coatings on high aspect ratio surfaces, together with sub-nanometre control and scalability. Here we develop a self-limiting atomic layer deposition (ALD) process for the deposition of conformal metallic silver nanoparticle films. The films have been deposited using direct liquid injection ALD with ((hexafluoroacetylacetonato)silver(I)(1,5-cyclooctadiene)) and propan-1-ol. An ALD temperature window between 123 and 128 °C is identified and within this range self-limiting growth is confirmed with a mass deposition rate of ∼17.5 ng/cm"2/cycle. The effects of temperature, precursor dose, co-reactant dose and cycle number on the deposition rate and on the properties of the films have been systematically investigated. Under self-limiting conditions, films are metallic silver with a nano-textured surface topography and nanoparticle size is dependent on the number of ALD cycles. The ALD reaction mechanisms have been elucidated using in-situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements, showing chemisorption of the silver precursor, followed by heterogeneous catalytic dehydrogenation of the alcohol to form metallic silver and an aldehyde.

  19. A large-scale association study for nanoparticle C60 uncovers mechanisms of nanotoxicity disrupting the native conformations of DNA/RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xue; Wang, Xia; Li, Yan; Wang, Yonghua; Yang, Ling

    2012-09-01

    Nano-scale particles have attracted a lot of attention for its potential use in medical studies, in particular for the diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. However, the toxicity and other side effects caused by the undesired interaction between nanoparticles and DNA/RNA are not clear. To address this problem, a model to evaluate the general rules governing how nanoparticles interact with DNA/RNA is demanded. Here by, use of an examination of 2254 native nucleotides with molecular dynamics simulation and thermodynamic analysis, we demonstrate how the DNA/RNA native structures are disrupted by the fullerene (C60) in a physiological condition. The nanoparticle was found to bind with the minor grooves of double-stranded DNA and trigger unwinding and disrupting of the DNA helix, which indicates C60 can potentially inhibit the DNA replication and induce potential side effects. In contrast to that of DNA, C60 only binds to the major grooves of RNA helix, which stabilizes the RNA structure or transforms the configuration from stretch to curl. This finding sheds new light on how C60 inhibits reverse transcription as HIV replicates. In addition, the binding of C60 stabilizes the structures of RNA riboswitch, indicating that C60 might regulate the gene expression. The binding energies of C60 with different genomic fragments varies in the range of -56 to -10 kcal mol(-1), which further verifies the role of nanoparticle in DNA/RNA damage. Our findings reveal a general mode by which C60 causes DNA/RNA damage or other toxic effects at a systematic level, suggesting it should be cautious to handle these nanomaterials in various medical applications.

  20. Controllably annealed CuO-nanoparticle modified ITO electrodes: Characterisation and electrochemical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tong; Su, Wen; Fu, Yingyi [College of Chemistry, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Hu, Jingbo, E-mail: hujingbo@bnu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2016-12-30

    Graphical abstract: We report a simple and controllable synthesis of CuO-nanoparticle-modified ITO by employing a combination of ion-implantation and annealing methods for the first time. The optimum CuO/ITO electrode shows uniform morphology, highly accessible surface area, long-term stability and excellent electrochemical performance towards biomolecules such as glucose in alkaline solution. - Highlights: • Controllably annealed CuO/ITO electrode was synthesized for the first time. • The generation mechanism of CuO nanoparticles is revealed. • The optimum CuO/ITO electrode shows excellent electrochemical performance. • A reference for the controllable preparation of other metal oxide nanoparticles. - Abstract: In this paper, we report a facile and controllable two-step approach to produce indium tin oxide electrodes modified by copper(II) oxide nanoparticles (CuO/ITO) through ion implantation and annealing methods. After annealing treatment, the surface morphology of the CuO/ITO substrate changed remarkably and exhibited highly electroactive sites and a high specific surface area. The effects of annealing treatment on the synthesis of CuO/ITO were discussed based on various instruments’ characterisations, and the possible mechanism by which CuO nanoparticles were generated was also proposed in this work. Cyclic voltammetric results indicated that CuO/ITO electrodes exhibited effective catalytic responses toward glucose in alkaline solution. Under optimal experimental conditions, the proposed CuO/ITO electrode showed sensitivity of 450.2 μA cm{sup −2} mM{sup −1} with a linear range of up to ∼4.4 mM and a detection limit of 0.7 μM (S/N = 3). Moreover, CuO/ITO exhibited good poison resistance, reproducibility, and stability properties.

  1. Freeze-drying for controlled nanoparticle distribution in Co/SiO 2 Fischer–Tropsch catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggenhuisen, T.M.; Munnik, P.; Talsma, H.; de Jongh, P.E.; de Jong, K.P.

    2013-01-01

    Controlling the nanoparticle distribution over a support is considered essential to arrive at more stable catalysts. By developing a novel freeze drying method, the nanoparticle distribution was successfully manipulated for the preparation of Co/SiO2 Fischer-Tropsch catalysts using a commercial

  2. Controlled growth of gold nanoparticles in zeolite L via ion-exchange reactions and thermal reduction processes

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Shangjing

    2014-09-01

    The growth of gold nanoparticles in zeolite can be controlled using ion-exchange reactions and thermal reduction processes. We produce a number of different sizes of the gold nanoparticles with the particle size increasing with increased temperature of the final heat treatment. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Saturation Mutagenesis of the HIV-1 Envelope CD4 Binding Loop Reveals Residues Controlling Distinct Trimer Conformations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Duenas-Decamp

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The conformation of HIV-1 envelope (Env glycoprotein trimers is key in ensuring protection against waves of neutralizing antibodies generated during infection, while maintaining sufficient exposure of the CD4 binding site (CD4bs for viral entry. The CD4 binding loop on Env is an early contact site for CD4 while penetration of a proximal cavity by CD4 triggers Env conformational changes for entry. The role of residues in the CD4 binding loop in regulating the conformation of the trimer and trimer association domain (TAD was investigated using a novel saturation mutagenesis approach. Single mutations identified, resulted in distinct trimer conformations affecting CD4bs exposure, the glycan shield and the TAD across diverse HIV-1 clades. Importantly, mutations that improve access to the CD4bs without exposing the immunodominant V3 loop were identified. The different trimer conformations identified will affect the specificity and breadth of nabs elicited in vivo and are important to consider in design of Env immunogens for vaccines.

  4. Conformity and statistical tolerancing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblond, Laurent; Pillet, Maurice

    2018-02-01

    Statistical tolerancing was first proposed by Shewhart (Economic Control of Quality of Manufactured Product, (1931) reprinted 1980 by ASQC), in spite of this long history, its use remains moderate. One of the probable reasons for this low utilization is undoubtedly the difficulty for designers to anticipate the risks of this approach. The arithmetic tolerance (worst case) allows a simple interpretation: conformity is defined by the presence of the characteristic in an interval. Statistical tolerancing is more complex in its definition. An interval is not sufficient to define the conformance. To justify the statistical tolerancing formula used by designers, a tolerance interval should be interpreted as the interval where most of the parts produced should probably be located. This tolerance is justified by considering a conformity criterion of the parts guaranteeing low offsets on the latter characteristics. Unlike traditional arithmetic tolerancing, statistical tolerancing requires a sustained exchange of information between design and manufacture to be used safely. This paper proposes a formal definition of the conformity, which we apply successively to the quadratic and arithmetic tolerancing. We introduce a concept of concavity, which helps us to demonstrate the link between tolerancing approach and conformity. We use this concept to demonstrate the various acceptable propositions of statistical tolerancing (in the space decentring, dispersion).

  5. pH-controlled desorption of silver nanoparticles from monolayers deposited on PAH-covered mica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oćwieja, Magdalena, E-mail: ncocwiej@cyf-kr.edu.pl; Adamczyk, Zbigniew, E-mail: ncadamcz@cyf-kr.edu.pl; Morga, Maria, E-mail: ncmorga@cyf-kr.edu.pl [Polish Academy of Sciences, Jerzy Haber Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry (Poland)

    2015-05-15

    Although the release of silver nanoparticles from various surfaces and coatings plays an important role in many practical applications, the mechanisms of these processes are not fully understood. Therefore, in this work, the charge-stabilized silver particles of well-defined surface properties, with average sizes of 15, 28, and 54 nm, were used to quantitatively study this problem. The silver nanoparticles were obtained by the chemical reduction method using trisodium citrate as the stabilizing agent. Their size distributions and stabilities were determined using dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The electrophoretic mobility and zeta potential of nanoparticles were determined for controlled ionic strength as a function of pH. The monolayers were produced on poly(allylamine hydrochloride)-modified mica under diffusion-controlled conditions. The coverage was determined by a direct enumeration of deposited nanoparticles using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Using these well-defined monolayers, the kinetics of the release of nanoparticles was studied under controlled ionic strength and various pH values. The direct AFM and SEM measurements of the monolayer coverage, as a function of desorption time, allowed one to determine the kinetics of the release process. The equilibrium adsorption constant and the binding energy of particles were also determined using the random sequential adsorption model. The experimental results indicated that the release rate of particles is the fastest at lower pH values and for smaller particle sizes. This is confirmed by the binding energy values that at pH 3.5 varied between −15.9 and −18.1 kT for particles of the sizes 15 and 54 nm, respectively. These results were quantitatively interpreted in terms of the ion-pair concept where it was assumed that the binding energy between nanoparticles and the substrate was controlled by electrostatic interactions. Based on the

  6. Differential mobility analysis of nanoparticles generated by laser vaporization and controlled condensation (LVCC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelsayed, Victor; El-Shall, M. Samy; Seto, Takafumi

    2006-01-01

    Silicon and iron aluminide (FeAl) nanoparticles were synthesized by a laser vaporization controlled condensation (LVCC) method. The particles generated by the laser ablation of solid targets were transported and deposited in the presence of well-defined thermal and electric field in a newly designed flow-type LVCC chamber. The deposition process of nanoparticles was controlled by the balance of the external forces; i.e., gas flow, thermophoretic and electrostatic forces. The size distributions of generated nanoparticles were analyzed using a low-pressure differential mobility analyzer (LP-DMA). The effect of synthesis condition on the size distribution was analyzed by changing the pressure of the carrier gas (20-200 Torr), the temperature gradient in the LVCC chamber (ΔT=0-190 deg. C) and the electric field applied between the LVCC chamber plates (E=0-3000 V/m). It was found that electrostatic field was effective to selectively deposit small size nanoparticles (about 10 nm) with expelling large droplet-like particles

  7. Gas-phase laser synthesis of aggregation-free, size-controlled hydroxyapatite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bapat, Parimal V.; Kraft, Rebecca; Camata, Renato P.

    2012-01-01

    Nanophase hydroxyapatite (HA) is finding applications in many areas of biomedical research, including bone tissue engineering, drug delivery, and intracellular imaging. Details in chemical composition, crystal phase makeup, size, and shape of HA nanoparticles play important roles in achieving the favorable biological responses required in these applications. Most of the nanophase HA synthesis techniques involve solution-based methods that exhibit substantial aggregation of particles upon precipitation. Typically these methods also have limited control over the particle size and crystal phase composition. In this study, we describe the gas-phase synthesis of aggregation-free, size-controlled HA nanoparticles with mean size in the 20–70 nm range using laser ablation followed by aerosol electrical mobility classification. Nanoparticle deposits with adjustable number concentration were obtained on solid substrates. Particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Samples are well represented by log-normal size distributions with geometric standard deviation σ g ≈ 1.2. The most suitable conditions for HA nanoparticle formation at a laser fluence of 5 J/cm 2 were found to be a temperature of 800 °C and a partial pressure of water of 160 mbar.

  8. Characteristics of Barium Hexaferrite Nanoparticles Prepared by Temperature-Controlled Chemical Coprecipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Jun Young; Lee, Choong Sub; Kim, Don; Kim, Yeong Il

    2012-01-01

    Ba-ferrite (BaFe 12 O 19 ) nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical coprecipitation method in an aqueous solution. The particle size and the crystallization temperature of the Ba-ferrite nanoparticles were controlled varying the precipitation temperature. The precipitate that was prepared at 0 .deg. C showed the crystal structure of Ba-ferrite in X-ray diffraction when it was calcined at the temperature above 580 .deg. C, whereas what was prepared at 50 .deg. C showed the crystallinity when it was calcined at the temperature higher than about 700 .deg. C. The particle sizes of the synthesized Ba-ferrite were in a range of about 20-30 nm when it was prepared by being precipitated at 0 .deg. C and calcined at 650 .deg. C. When the precipitation temperature increased, the particle size also increased even at the same calcination temperature. The magnetic properties of the Ba-ferrite nanoparticles were also controlled by the synthetic condition of precipitation and calcination temperature. The coercive force could be appreciably lowered without a loss of saturation magnetization when the Ba-ferrite nanoparticles were prepared by precipitation and calcination both at low temperatures

  9. In situ Raman scattering study on a controllable plasmon-driven surface catalysis reaction on Ag nanoparticle arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Z G; Xiao, X H; Zhang, Y P; Ren, F; Wu, W; Zhang, S F; Zhou, J; Jiang, C Z; Mei, F

    2012-01-01

    Control of the plasmon-driven chemical reaction for the transformation of 4-nitrobenzenethiol to p,p′-dimercaptoazobenzene by Ag nanoparticle arrays was studied. The Ag nanoparticle arrays were fabricated by means of nanosphere lithography. By changing the PS particle size, the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peaks of the Ag nanoparticle arrays can be tailored from 460 to 560 nm. The controlled reaction process was monitored by in situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering. The reaction can be dramatically influenced by varying the duration of laser exposure, Ag nanoparticle size, laser power and laser excitation wavelength. The maximum reaction speed was achieved when the LSPR wavelength of the Ag nanoparticle arrays matched the laser excitation wavelength. The experimental results reveal that the strong LSPR can effectively drive the transfer of the ‘hot’ electrons that decay from the plasmon to the reactants. The experimental results were confirmed by theoretical calculations. (paper)

  10. 5-Fluorouracil Encapsulated Chitosan Nanoparticles for pH-Stimulated Drug Delivery: Evaluation of Controlled Release Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Seda Tığlı Aydın

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles consisting of human therapeutic drugs are suggested as a promising strategy for targeted and localized drug delivery to tumor cells. In this study, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU encapsulated chitosan nanoparticles were prepared in order to investigate potentials of localized drug delivery for tumor environment due to pH sensitivity of chitosan nanoparticles. Optimization of chitosan and 5-FU encapsulated nanoparticles production revealed 148.8±1.1 nm and 243.1±17.9 nm particle size diameters with narrow size distributions, which are confirmed by scanning electron microscope (SEM images. The challenge was to investigate drug delivery of 5-FU encapsulated chitosan nanoparticles due to varied pH changes. To achieve this objective, pH sensitivity of prepared chitosan nanoparticle was evaluated and results showed a significant swelling response for pH 5 with particle diameter of ∼450 nm. In vitro release studies indicated a controlled and sustained release of 5-FU from chitosan nanoparticles with the release amounts of 29.1–60.8% due to varied pH environments after 408 h of the incubation period. pH sensitivity is confirmed by mathematical modeling of release kinetics since chitosan nanoparticles showed stimuli-induced release. Results suggested that 5-FU encapsulated chitosan nanoparticles can be launched as pH-responsive smart drug delivery agents for possible applications of cancer treatments.

  11. Size-Controlled Dissolution of Organic-Coated Silver Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Rui; Levard, Clément; Marinakos, Stella M.; Cheng, Yingwen; Liu, Jie; Michel, F. Marc; Brown, Jr., Gordon E.; Lowry, Gregory V. (Duke)

    2012-04-02

    The solubility of Ag NPs can affect their toxicity and persistence in the environment. We measured the solubility of organic-coated silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) having particle diameters ranging from 5 to 80 nm that were synthesized using various methods, and with different organic polymer coatings including poly(vinylpyrrolidone) and gum arabic. The size and morphology of Ag NPs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and synchrotron-based total X-ray scattering and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis were used to determine the local structure around Ag and evaluate changes in crystal lattice parameters and structure as a function of NP size. Ag NP solubility dispersed in 1 mM NaHCO{sub 3} at pH 8 was found to be well correlated with particle size based on the distribution of measured TEM sizes as predicted by the modified Kelvin equation. Solubility of Ag NPs was not affected by the synthesis method and coating as much as by their size. Based on the modified Kelvin equation, the surface tension of Ag NPs was found to be {approx}1 J/m{sup 2}, which is expected for bulk fcc (face centered cubic) silver. Analysis of XAFS, X-ray scattering, and PDFs confirm that the lattice parameter, {alpha}, of the fcc crystal structure of Ag NPs did not change with particle size for Ag NPs as small as 6 nm, indicating the absence of lattice strain. These results are consistent with the finding that Ag NP solubility can be estimated based on TEM-derived particle size using the modified Kelvin equation for particles in the size range of 5-40 nm in diameter.

  12. Controlled synthesis and magnetic properties of monodispersed ceria nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumeet Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, monodispersed CeO2 nanoparticles (NPs of size 8.5 ± 1.0, 11.4 ± 1.0 and 15.4 ± 1.0 nm were synthesized using the sol-gel method. Size-dependent structural, optical and magnetic properties of as-prepared samples were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM, ultra-violet visible (UV-VIS spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM measurements. The value of optical band gap is calculated for each particle size. The decrease in the value of optical band gap with increase of particle size may be attributed to the quantum confinement, which causes to produce localized states created by the oxygen vacancies due to the conversion of Ce4+ into Ce3+ at higher calcination temperature. The Raman spectra showed a peak at ∼461 cm-1 for the particle size 8.5 nm, which is attributed to the 1LO phonon mode. The shift in the Raman peak could be due to lattice strain developed due to variation in particle size. Weak ferromagnetism at room temperature is observed for each particle size. The values of saturation magnetization (Ms, coercivity (Hc and retentivity (Mr are increased with increase of particle size. The increase of Ms and Mr for larger particle size may be explained by increase of density of oxygen vacancies at higher calcination temperature. The latter causes high concentrations of Ce3+ ions activate more coupling between the individual magnetic moments of the Ce ions, leading to an increase of Ms value with the particle size. Moreover, the oxygen vacancies may also produce magnetic moment by polarizing spins of f electrons of cerium (Ce ions located around oxygen vacancies, which causes ferromagnetism in pure CeO2 samples.

  13. Synthesis and polymorphic control for visible light active titania nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewgun, Sujaree

    Titania (TiO2) is useful for many applications in photocatalysis, antimicrobials, pigment, deodorization, and decomposition of harmful organics and undesirable compounds in the air and waste water under UV irradiation. Among the three phases of TiO2, Rutile, Anatase, and Brookite, studies have been more focused on the anatase and rutile phases. Pure brookite is the most difficult phase to prepare, even under hydrothermal conditions. Predominantly brookite phase TiO2 nanoparticles were prepared by the Water-based Ambient Condition Sol (WACS) process in our laboratory. The objectives of this research were to enhance visible light active (VLA) photocatalytic properties of polymorphic brookite TiO2 by minimizing the lattice defects and narrowing band gap of titania by nitrogen and/or carbon chromophone, and to investigate the deactivation, reusability, and regeneration of the VLA titania in order to design better titania catalysts for organic compound degradation applications. In order to study the influence of hydroxyl content on photocatalytic activities (PCAs) of polymorphic titania nanoparticles, the WACS samples were post-treated by a Solvent-based Ambient Condition Sol (SACS) process in sec-butanol (sec-BuOH). All samples were characterized for phase composition, surface area, hydroxyl contamination, and particle morphology by x-ray diffraction, N2 physisorption, FT-IR, solid state 1H NMR and scanning electron microscopy, and then compared to a commercial titania, Degussa P25. Evaluation of methyl orange (MO) degradation under UV irradiation results showed that the lower lattice hydroxyl content in SACS titania enhanced the PCA. As-prepared titania and SACS samples, which have similar surface areas and crystallinity, were compared in order to prove that the superior PCA came from the reduction in the lattice hydroxyl content. To enhance PCA and VLA properties of WACS, an alternative high boiling point polar solvent, N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP), was utilized in the

  14. Functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles for controlling the movement of immune cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ethan E.; Pai, Alex; Weng, Yiming; Suresh, Anil K.; van Haute, Desiree; Pailevanian, Torkom; Alizadeh, Darya; Hajimiri, Ali; Badie, Behnam; Berlin, Jacob M.

    2015-04-01

    Immunotherapy is currently being investigated for the treatment of many diseases, including cancer. The ability to control the location of immune cells during or following activation would represent a powerful new technique for this field. Targeted magnetic delivery is emerging as a technique for controlling cell movement and localization. Here we show that this technique can be extended to microglia, the primary phagocytic immune cells in the central nervous system. The magnetized microglia were generated by loading the cells with iron oxide nanoparticles functionalized with CpG oligonucleotides, serving as a proof of principle that nanoparticles can be used to both deliver an immunostimulatory cargo to cells and to control the movement of the cells. The nanoparticle-oligonucleotide conjugates are efficiently internalized, non-toxic, and immunostimulatory. We demonstrate that the in vitro migration of the adherent, loaded microglia can be controlled by an external magnetic field and that magnetically-induced migration is non-cytotoxic. In order to capture video of this magnetically-induced migration of loaded cells, a novel 3D-printed ``cell box'' was designed to facilitate our imaging application. Analysis of cell movement velocities clearly demonstrate increased cell velocities toward the magnet. These studies represent the initial step towards our final goal of using nanoparticles to both activate immune cells and to control their trafficking within the diseased brain.Immunotherapy is currently being investigated for the treatment of many diseases, including cancer. The ability to control the location of immune cells during or following activation would represent a powerful new technique for this field. Targeted magnetic delivery is emerging as a technique for controlling cell movement and localization. Here we show that this technique can be extended to microglia, the primary phagocytic immune cells in the central nervous system. The magnetized microglia were

  15. Colloidal strategies for controlling the morphology, composition, and crystal structure of inorganic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, James M.

    Emerging applications and fundamental studies require nanomaterials with increasingly sophisticated architectures that have precise composition, morphology, and crystal structure. Colloidal nanochemistry has emerged as one of the most effective methods for generating high quality, monodisperse nanoparticles with diverse structural features and highly complex geometries. These wet-chemical approaches offer an array of synthetic levers that can be used to tailor nanoparticles for targeted applications, and deliver solution-dispersible solids that are easily integrated onto device architectures. Additionally, colloidal nanoparticles can be used as building blocks for constructing periodic superlattices and multicomponent hybrid nanoparticles, which offer unique properties that can support next-generation technologies. As the applications for colloidal nanoparticles continue to expand, the architectural and compositional requirements for these materials are becoming increasingly rigid. Conventional colloidal methods are effective for generating diverse nanoparticle systems, but rely on complex nucleation and growth processes, which are often poorly understood and difficult to control in dynamic reaction environments. For these reasons, there are a number of high profile nanoparticle targets that remain out of reach. Accordingly, new approaches are needed that can circumvent these synthetic bottlenecks and narrow the growing disconnect between nano-design and synthetic capability. In this dissertation, I present several colloidal strategies for engineering synthetically challenging nanomaterials using multistep reaction sequences that, in many ways, parallel the total-synthesis framework that organic chemists use to access complex molecules. A variety of approaches are discussed, including nanoscale ion exchange transformations and seeded-growth protocol for constructing multicomponent hybrid nanoparticles. First, I demonstrate that solution-mediated anion and cation

  16. Ordered arrays of nanoporous gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A combination of a “top-down” approach (substrate-conformal imprint lithography and two “bottom-up” approaches (dewetting and dealloying enables fabrication of perfectly ordered 2-dimensional arrays of nanoporous gold nanoparticles. The dewetting of Au/Ag bilayers on the periodically prepatterned substrates leads to the interdiffusion of Au and Ag and the formation of an array of Au–Ag alloy nanoparticles. The array of alloy nanoparticles is transformed into an array of nanoporous gold nanoparticles by a following dealloying step. Large areas of this new type of material arrangement can be realized with this technique. In addition, this technique allows for the control of particle size, particle spacing, and ligament size (or pore size by varying the period of the structure, total metal layer thickness, and the thickness ratio of the as-deposited bilayers.

  17. Electronic Transitions in Conformationally Controlled Tetrasilanes with a Wide Range of SiSiSiSi Dihedral Angles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tsuji, H.; Fogarty, H. A.; Ehara, M.; Fukuda, R.; Casher, D. L.; Tamao, K.; Nakatsuji, H.; Michl, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 30 (2014), s. 9431-9441 ISSN 0947-6539 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : conformational effects * electronic spectra * SAC-CI calculations * silicon * UV/Vis spectroscopy Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.731, year: 2014

  18. Cellular oxido-reductive proteins of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii control the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barwal Indu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elucidation of molecular mechanism of silver nanoparticles (SNPs biosynthesis is important to control its size, shape and monodispersity. The evaluation of molecular mechanism of biosynthesis of SNPs is of prime importance for the commercialization and methodology development for controlling the shape and size (uniform distribution of SNPs. The unicellular algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was exploited as a model system to elucidate the role of cellular proteins in SNPs biosynthesis. Results The C. reinhardtii cell free extract (in vitro and in vivo cells mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles reveals SNPs of size range 5 ± 1 to 15 ± 2 nm and 5 ± 1 to 35 ± 5 nm respectively. In vivo biosynthesized SNPs were localized in the peripheral cytoplasm and at one side of flagella root, the site of pathway of ATP transport and its synthesis related enzymes. This provides an evidence for the involvement of oxidoreductive proteins in biosynthesis and stabilization of SNPs. Alteration in size distribution and decrease of synthesis rate of SNPs in protein-depleted fractions confirmed the involvement of cellular proteins in SNPs biosynthesis. Spectroscopic and SDS-PAGE analysis indicate the association of various proteins on C. reinhardtii mediated in vivo and in vitro biosynthesized SNPs. We have identified various cellular proteins associated with biosynthesized (in vivo and in vitro SNPs by using MALDI-MS-MS, like ATP synthase, superoxide dismutase, carbonic anhydrase, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, histone etc. However, these proteins were not associated on the incubation of pre-synthesized silver nanoparticles in vitro. Conclusion Present study provides the indication of involvement of molecular machinery and various cellular proteins in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles. In this report, the study is mainly focused towards understanding the role of diverse cellular protein in the synthesis and capping of silver

  19. Cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, I-Ju [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation mainly focuses on the investigation of the cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. We are interested in the study of endocytosis and exocytosis behaviors of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with desired surface functionality. The relationship between mesoporous silica nanoparticles and membrane trafficking of cells, either cancerous cells or normal cells was examined. Since mesoporous silica nanoparticles were applied in many drug delivery cases, the endocytotic efficiency of mesoporous silica nanoparticles needs to be investigated in more details in order to design the cellular drug delivery system in the controlled way. It is well known that cells can engulf some molecules outside of the cells through a receptor-ligand associated endocytosis. We are interested to determine if those biomolecules binding to cell surface receptors can be utilized on mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to improve the uptake efficiency or govern the mechanism of endocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) is a small peptide recognized by cell integrin receptors and it was reported that avidin internalization was highly promoted by tumor lectin. Both RGD and avidin were linked to the surface of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to investigate the effect of receptor-associated biomolecule on cellular endocytosis efficiency. The effect of ligand types, ligand conformation and ligand density were discussed in Chapter 2 and 3. Furthermore, the exocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles is very attractive for biological applications. The cellular protein sequestration study of mesoporous silica nanoparticles was examined for further information of the intracellular pathway of endocytosed mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials. The surface functionality of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials demonstrated selectivity among the materials and cancer and normal cell lines. We aimed to determine

  20. Controlling Hydrogel Mechanics via Bio-Inspired Polymer-Nanoparticle Bond Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiaochu; Barrett, Devin G; Messersmith, Phillip B; Holten-Andersen, Niels

    2016-01-26

    Interactions between polymer molecules and inorganic nanoparticles can play a dominant role in nanocomposite material mechanics, yet control of such interfacial interaction dynamics remains a significant challenge particularly in water. This study presents insights on how to engineer hydrogel material mechanics via nanoparticle interface-controlled cross-link dynamics. Inspired by the adhesive chemistry in mussel threads, we have incorporated iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) into a catechol-modified polymer network to obtain hydrogels cross-linked via reversible metal-coordination bonds at Fe3O4 NP surfaces. Unique material mechanics result from the supra-molecular cross-link structure dynamics in the gels; in contrast to the previously reported fluid-like dynamics of transient catechol-Fe(3+) cross-links, the catechol-Fe3O4 NP structures provide solid-like yet reversible hydrogel mechanics. The structurally controlled hierarchical mechanics presented here suggest how to develop hydrogels with remote-controlled self-healing dynamics.

  1. Photoacoustic-Based-Close-Loop Temperature Control for Nanoparticle Hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaohua, Feng; Fei, Gao; Yuanjin, Zheng

    2015-07-01

    Hyperthermia therapy requires tight temperature control to achieve selective killing of cancerous tissue with minimal damage on surrounding healthy tissues. To this end, accurate temperature monitoring and subsequent heating control are critical. However, an economic, portable, and real-time temperature control solution is currently lacking. To bridge this gap, we present a novel portable close-loop system for hyperthermia temperature control, in which photoacoustic technique is proposed for noninvasive real-time temperature measurement. Exploiting the high sensitivity of photoacoustics, the temperature is monitored with an accuracy of around 0.18 °C and then fed back to a controller implemented on field programmable gate array (FPGA) for temperature control. Dubbed as portable hyperthermia feedback controller (pHFC), it stabilizes the temperature at preset values by regulating the hyperthermia power with a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) algorithm; and to facilitate digital implementation, the pHFC further converts the PID output into switching values (0 and 1) with the pulse width modulation (PWM) algorithm. Proof-of-concept hyperthermia experiments demonstrate that the pHFC system is able to bring the temperature from baseline to predetermined value with an accuracy of 0.3° and a negligible temperature overshoot. The pHFC can potentially be translated to clinical applications with customized hyperthermia system design. This paper can facilitate future efforts in seamless integration of close-loop temperature control solution and various clinical hyperthermia systems.

  2. Controllable ALD synthesis of platinum nanoparticles by tuning different synthesis parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chuandao; Lin, Yuyuan; Marks, Laurence; Hu, Linhua; Poeppelmeier, Kenneth; Stair, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Pt nanoparticles were successfully deposited using three different atomic layer deposition (ALD) methods, e.g. AB-type, ABC-type and static ABC-type ALD, on two different types of strontium titanate nanocuboids (STO-NCs) samples in a reaction temperature window of 125 °C–300 °C. The influence of reaction temperature, number of ALD cycles, type of substrate, 2nd reagent and type of ALD method on Pt nanoparticle deposition are comprehensively studied and discussed in this work. Varying the reaction temperature and number of cycles across the three different ALD methods affects Pt particle size, density, and loading. Surface termination of STO-NCs substrate will change deposited Pt nanoparticle growth orientation and thermodynamic shape. The B reagent besides platinum precursor can lead to different ligand decomposition mechanism when Pt precursors are exposed: oxygen allows more effective ligand combustion compared to water, however, the Pt particles are more oxidized according to XPS studies. We expect this work provides a way for tailoring nanoparticles with desired size, dispersion, exposed surfaces and chemical state etc, which helps controlling and optimizing their performance when applied as catalysts or nanosensors. (paper)

  3. Controlled release of bupivacaine using hybrid thermoresponsive nanoparticles activated via photothermal heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, Teresa; Andreu, Vanesa; Mendoza, Gracia; Sebastian, Victor; Arruebo, Manuel

    2018-08-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) responsive nanoparticles are of great interest in the biomedical field as antennas for photothermal therapy and also as triggers for on-demand drug delivery. The present work reports the preparation of hollow gold nanoparticles (HGNPs) with plasmonic absorption in the NIR region covalently bound to a thermoresponsive polymeric shell that can be used as an on-demand drug delivery system for the release of analgesic drugs. The photothermal heating induced by the nanoparticles is able to produce the collapse of the polymeric shell thus generating the release of the local anesthetic bupivacaine in a spatiotemporally controlled way. Those HGNPs contain a 10 wt.% of polymer and present excellent reversible heating under NIR light excitation. Bupivacaine released at physiological temperature (37 °C) showed a pseudo-zero order release that could be spatiotemporally modified on-demand after applying several pulses of light/temperature above and below the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the polymeric shell. Furthermore, the nanomaterials obtained did not displayed detrimental effects on four mammalian cell lines at doses up to 0.2 mg/mL. From the results obtained it can be concluded than this type of hybrid thermoresponsive nanoparticle can be used as an externally activated on-demand drug delivery system. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Size-controlled synthesis of transition metal nanoparticles through chemical and photo-chemical routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangeysh, Behzad

    The central objective of this work is developing convenient general procedures for controlling the formation and stabilization of nanoscale transition metal particles. Contemporary interest in developing alternative synthetic approaches for producing nanoparticles arises in large part from expanding applications of the nanomaterials in areas such as catalysis, electronics and medicine. This research focuses on advancing the existing nanoparticle synthetic routes by using a new class of polymer colloid materials as a chemical approach, and the laser irradiation of metal salt solution as a photo-chemical method to attain size and shape selectivity. Controlled synthesis of small metal nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 1 to 5nm is still a continuing challenge in nanomaterial synthesis. This research utilizes a new class of polymer colloid materials as nano-reactors and protective agents for controlling the formation of small transition metal nanoparticles. The polymer colloid particles were formed from cross-linking of dinegatively charged metal precursors with partially protonated poly dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate (PDMAEMA). Incorporation of [PtCl6]2- species into the colloidal particles prior to the chemical reduction was effectively employed as a new strategy for synthesis of unusually small platinum nanoparticles with narrow size distributions (1.12 +/-0.25nm). To explore the generality of this approach, in a series of proof-of-concept studies, this method was successfully employed for the synthesis of small palladium (1.4 +/-0.2nm) and copper nanoparticles (1.5 +/-0.6nm). The polymer colloid materials developed in this research are pH responsive, and are designed to self-assemble and/or disassemble by varying the levels of protonation of the polymer chains. This unique feature was used to tune the size of palladium nanoparticles in a small range from 1nm to 5nm. The procedure presented in this work is a new convenient room temperature route for synthesis of

  5. Shape-controlled synthesis of Pt-Pd core-shell nanoparticles exhibiting polyhedral morphologies by modified polyol method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Nguyen Viet; Asaka, Toru; Matsubara, Takashi; Nogami, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    Pt-Pd core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple synthetic method. First, Pt nanoparticles were synthesized in a controlled manner via the reduction of chloroplantinic acid hexahydrate in ethylene glycol (EG) at 160 deg. C in the presence of silver nitrate and the stabilization of polyvinylpyrrolidon. AgNO 3 used acts as a structure-modifying agent to the morphology of the Pt nanoparticles. These Pt nanoparticles function as the seeds for the successive reduction of sodium tetrachloropalladate (II) hydrate in EG under stirring for 15 min at 160 deg. C in order to synthesize Pt-Pd core-shell nanoparticles. To characterize the as-prepared Pt-Pd nanoparticles, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM are used. The high-resolution elemental mappings were carried out using the combination of scanning TEM and X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy. The results also demonstrate the homogeneous nucleation and growth of the Pd metal shell on the definite Pt core. The synthesized Pt-Pd core-shell nanoparticles exhibit a sharp and polyhedral morphology. The epitaxial growth of the controlled Pd shells on the Pt cores via a polyol method was observed. It is suggested that Frank-van der Merwe and Stranski-Krastanov growth modes coexisted in the nucleation and growth of Pt-Pd core-shell nanoparticles.

  6. pH-responsive mesoporous silica nanoparticles employed in controlled drug delivery systems for cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Ke-Ni; Zhang, Chun-Qiu; Wang, Wei; Wang, Paul C.; Zhou, Jian-Ping; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2014-01-01

    In the fight against cancer, controlled drug delivery systems have emerged to enhance the therapeutic efficacy and safety of anti-cancer drugs. Among these systems, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with a functional surface possess obvious advantages and were thus rapidly developed for cancer treatment. Many stimuli-responsive materials, such as nanoparticles, polymers, and inorganic materials, have been applied as caps and gatekeepers to control drug release from MSNs. This review presents an overview of the recent progress in the production of pH-responsive MSNs based on the pH gradient between normal tissues and the tumor microenvironment. Four main categories of gatekeepers can respond to acidic conditions. These categories will be described in detail

  7. Shape-controlled synthesis of Au@Pd core-shell nanoparticles and their corresponding electrochemical properties

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Hyon Min; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2012-01-01

    The shape-controlled synthesis of Au@Pd core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) was successfully achieved through the emulsion phase generated during the phase transfer from organic to aqueous medium. Contrary to conventional epitaxial growth for obtaining

  8. Control of nanoparticle size, reactivity and magnetic properties during the bioproduction of magnetite by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, J. M.; Telling, N. D.; Coker, V. S.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Laan, G. van der; Arenholz, E.; Tuna, F.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2011-08-02

    The bioproduction of nano-scale magnetite by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria offers a potentially tunable, environmentally benign route to magnetic nanoparticle synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to control the size of magnetite nanoparticles produced by Geobacter sulfurreducens, by adjusting the total biomass introduced at the start of the process. The particles have a narrow size distribution and can be controlled within the range of 10-50 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that controlled production of a number of different biominerals is possible via this method including goethite, magnetite and siderite, but their formation is strongly dependent upon the rate of Fe(III) reduction and total concentration and rate of Fe(II) produced by the bacteria during the reduction process. Relative cation distributions within the structure of the nanoparticles has been investigated by X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and indicates the presence of a highly reduced surface layer which is not observed when magnetite is produced through abiotic methods. The enhanced Fe(II)-rich surface, combined with small particle size, has important environmental applications such as in the reductive bioremediation of organics, radionuclides and metals. In the case of Cr(VI), as a model high-valence toxic metal, optimised biogenic magnetite is able to reduce and sequester the toxic hexavalent chromium very efficiently in the less harmful trivalent form.

  9. Ordered mesoporous polymer-silica hybrid nanoparticles as vehicles for the intracellular controlled release of macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Wan; Slowing, Igor I; Chung, Po-Wen; Lin, Victor Shang-Yi

    2011-01-25

    A two-dimensional hexagonal ordered mesoporous polymer-silica hybrid nanoparticle (PSN) material was synthesized by polymerization of acrylate monomers on the surface of SBA-15 mesoporous silica nanoparticles. The structure of the PSN material was analyzed using a series of different techniques, including transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and N(2) sorption analysis. These structurally ordered mesoporous polymer-silica hybrid nanoparticles were used for the controlled release of membrane-impermeable macromolecules inside eukaryotic cells. The cellular uptake efficiency and biocompatibility of PSN with human cervical cancer cells (HeLa) were investigated. Our results show that the inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of PSN is very high (>100 μg/mL per million cells), while the median effective concentration for the uptake (EC(50)) of PSN is low (EC(50) = 4.4 μg/mL), indicating that PSNs are fairly biocompatible and easily up-taken in vitro. A membrane-impermeable macromolecule, 40 kDa FITC-Dextran, was loaded into the mesopores of PSNs at low pH. We demonstrated that the PSN material could indeed serve as a transmembrane carrier for the controlled release of FITC-Dextran at the pH level inside live HeLa cells. We believe that further developments of this PSN material will lead to a new generation of nanodevices for intracellular controlled delivery applications.

  10. Biosensor-controlled gene therapy/drug delivery with nanoparticles for nanomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prow, Tarl W.; Rose, William A.; Wang, Nan; Reece, Lisa M.; Lvov, Yuri; Leary, James F.

    2005-04-01

    Nanomedicine involves cell-by-cell regenerative medicine, either repairing cells one at a time or triggering apoptotic pathways in cells that are not repairable. Multilayered nanoparticle systems are being constructed for the targeted delivery of gene therapy to single cells. Cleavable shells containing targeting, biosensing, and gene therapeutic molecules are being constructed to direct nanoparticles to desired intracellular targets. Therapeutic gene sequences are controlled by biosensor-activated control switches to provide the proper amount of gene therapy on a single cell basis. The central idea is to set up gene therapy "nanofactories" inside single living cells. Molecular biosensors linked to these genes control their expression. Gene delivery is started in response to a biosensor detected problem; gene delivery is halted when the cell response indicates that more gene therapy is not needed. Cell targeting of nanoparticles, both nanocrystals and nanocapsules, has been tested by a combination of fluorescent tracking dyes, fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Intracellular targeting has been tested by confocal microscopy. Successful gene delivery has been visualized by use of GFP reporter sequences. DNA tethering techniques were used to increase the level of expression of these genes. Integrated nanomedical systems are being designed, constructed, and tested in-vitro, ex-vivo, and in small animals. While still in its infancy, nanomedicine represents a paradigm shift in thinking-from destruction of injured cells by surgery, radiation, chemotherapy to cell-by-cell repair within an organ and destruction of non-repairable cells by natural apoptosis.

  11. Controlled surface functionalization of silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles with terminal amino and carboxyl groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kralj, Slavko; Drofenik, Miha; Makovec, Darko

    2011-01-01

    General and versatile methods for the functionalization of superparamagnetic, silica-coated, maghemite nanoparticles by surface amino and/or carboxyl groups have been established. The nanoparticles were synthesized using co-precipitation from aqueous solutions and coated with a thin layer of silica using the hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). For the amino functionalization, 3-(2-aminoethylamino)propylmethyldimethoxysilane (APMS) was grafted onto the nanoparticle surfaces in their aqueous suspensions. The grafting process was followed by measurements of the ζ-potential and a determination of the concentration of the surface amino groups with conductometric titrations. The surface concentration of the amino groups could be varied by increasing the amount of APMS in the grafting process up to approximately 2.3 –NH 2 groups per nm 2 . The carboxyl functionalization was obtained in two ways: (i) by a ring-opening linker elongation reaction of the surface amines at the functionalized nanoparticles with succinic anhydride (SA) in non-aqueous medium, and (ii) by reacting the APMS and SA first, followed by grafting of the carboxyl-terminated reagent onto the nanoparticle surfaces. Using the first method, the SA only reacted with the terminal primary amino groups (–NH 2 ) of the surface-grafted APMS molecules. Infra-red spectroscopy (ATR FTIR) and mass spectrometry (HRMS) showed that the second method enables the bonding of up to two SA molecules per one APMS molecule, since the SA reacted with both the primary (–NH 2 ) and secondary amino (–NH–) groups of the APMS molecule. When using both methods, the ratio between the surface amino and carboxyl groups can be controlled.

  12. Controlled synthesis of size-tunable nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles using water-in-oil microemulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Ajeet; Saxena, Amit; Shankar, Ravi; Mozumdar, Subho; De, Arnab

    2013-01-01

    Industrial demands have generated a growing need to synthesize pure metal and metal–oxide nanoparticles of a desired size. We report a novel and convenient method for the synthesis of spherical, size tunable, well dispersed, stable nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles by reduction of nickel nitrate at room temperature in a TX-100/n-hexanol/cyclohexane/water system by a reverse microemulsion route. We determined that reduction with alkaline sodium borohydrate in nitrogen atmosphere leads to the formation of nickel nanoparticles, while the use of hydrazine hydrate in aerobic conditions leads to the formation of nickel oxide nanoparticles. The influence of several reaction parameters on the size of nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles were evaluated in detail. It was found that the size can be easily controlled either by changing the molar ratio of water to surfactant or by simply altering the concentration of the reducing agent. The morphology and structure of the nanoparticles were characterized by quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), electron diffraction analysis (EDA) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The results show that synthesized nanoparticles are of high purity and have an average size distribution of 5–100 nm. The nanoparticles prepared by our simple methodology have been successfully used for catalyzing various chemical reactions. (paper)

  13. Magnetic control of potential microrobotic drug delivery systems: nanoparticles, magnetotactic bacteria and self-propelled microjets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Islam S M; Magdanz, Veronika; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G; Abelmann, Leon; Misra, Sarthak

    2013-01-01

    Development of targeted drug delivery systems using magnetic microrobots increases the therapeutic indices of drugs. These systems have to be incorporated with precise motion controllers. We demonstrate closed-loop motion control of microrobots under the influence of controlled magnetic fields. Point-to-point motion control of a cluster of iron oxide nanoparticles (diameter of 250 nm) is achieved by pulling the cluster towards a reference position using magnetic field gradients. Magnetotactic bacterium (MTB) is controlled by orienting the magnetic fields towards a reference position. MTB with membrane length of 5 µm moves towards the reference position using the propulsion force generated by its flagella. Similarly, self-propelled microjet with length of 50 µm is controlled by directing the microjet towards a reference position by external magnetic torque. The microjet moves along the field lines using the thrust force generated by the ejecting oxygen bubbles from one of its ends. Our control system positions the cluster of nanoparticles, an MTB and a microjet at an average velocity of 190 µm/s, 28 µm/s, 90 µm/s and within an average region-of-convergence of 132 µm, 40 µm, 235 µm, respectively.

  14. Conformal Tachyons

    CERN Document Server

    Tomaschitz, R

    2000-01-01

    We study tachyons conformally coupled to the background geometry of a Milne universe. The causality of superluminal signal transfer is scrutinized in this context. The cosmic time of the comoving frame determines a distinguished time order for events connected by superluminal signals. An observer can relate his rest frame to the galaxy frame, and compare so the time order of events in his proper time to the cosmic time order. All observers can in this way arrive at identical conclusions on the causality of events connected by superluminal signals. An unambiguous energy concept for tachyonic rays is defined by means of the cosmic time of the comoving reference frame, without resorting to an antiparticle interpretation. On that basis we give an explicit proof that no signals can be sent into the past of observers. Causality violating signals are energetically forbidden, as they would have negative energy in the rest frame of the emitting observer. If an observer emits a superluminal signal, the tachyonic respon...

  15. Control of the interparticle spacing in superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle clusters by surface ligand engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Wang; Bingbing, Lin; Taipeng, Shen; Jun, Wu; Fuhua, Hao; Chunchao, Xia; Qiyong, Gong; Huiru, Tang; Bin, Song; Hua, Ai

    2016-07-01

    Polymer-mediated self-assembly of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles allows modulation of the structure of SPIO nanocrystal cluster and their magnetic properties. In this study, dopamine-functionalized polyesters (DA-polyester) were used to directly control the magnetic nanoparticle spacing and its effect on magnetic resonance relaxation properties of these clusters was investigated. Monodisperse SPIO nanocrystals with different surface coating materials (poly(ɛ-caprolactone), poly(lactic acid)) of different molecular weights containing dopamine (DA) structure (DA-PCL2k, DA-PCL1k, DA-PLA1k)) were prepared via ligand exchange reaction, and these nanocrystals were encapsulated inside amphiphilic polymer micelles to modulate the SPIO nanocrystal interparticle spacing. Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) was applied to quantify the interparticle spacing of SPIO clusters. The results demonstrated that the tailored magnetic nanoparticle clusters featured controllable interparticle spacing providing directly by the different surface coating of SPIO nanocrystals. Systematic modulation of SPIO nanocrystal interparticle spacing can regulate the saturation magnetization (M s) and T 2 relaxation of the aggregation, and lead to increased magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation properties with decreased interparticle spacing. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB933903), the National Key Technology R&D Program of China (Grant No. 2012BAI23B08), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 20974065, 51173117, and 50830107).

  16. Continuous Flow Controlled Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles Using Pulsed Mixing Microfluidic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guojun Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To prepare the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs with uniform sizes, fine morphology, and good monodispersity, a pulsed mixing microfluidic system based on PZT actuation was presented. The system includes PZT micropump and Y type micromixer. By adjusting voltage (entrance flow rate, pulsed frequency, phase, and other parameters, a variety of mixing modes can be achieved, so as to realize the controllable synthesis of nanoparticles in a certain range. By numerical simulation and analysis, the channel section size, entrance angle, and pulse frequency were optimized. Based on the optimized structure and working parameters, the test prototype has been manufactured in lab, and the related synthesis tests of AuNPs were carried out. The test results indicate that AuNPs with uniform morphology and good monodispersity can be synthesized using the system with the section size (0.4 mm × 0.4 mm, the entrance channel angle (60° under condition of the pulsed frequency (300 Hz, and the entrance flow rate (4 mL/min. The average diameter and its standard deviation of AuNPs synthesized were 21.6 nm, 4.83 nm, respectively. The research work above can be applied to the fields such as the controlled synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles, biomedicine, and microchemical system.

  17. Controlling Release of Integral Lipid Nanoparticles Based on Osmotic Pump Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhiqiang; Yu, Qin; Xie, Yunchang; Li, Fengqian; Lu, Yi; Dong, Xiaochun; Zhao, Weili; Qi, Jianping; Wu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    To achieve controlled release of integral nanoparticles by the osmotic pump strategy using nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) as model nanoparticles. NLCs was prepared by a hot-homogenization method, transformed into powder by lyophilization, and formulated into osmotic pump tablets (OPTs). Release of integral NLCs was visualized by live imaging after labeling with a water-quenching fluorescent probe. Effects of formulation variables on in vitro release characteristics were evaluated by measuring the model drug fenofibrate. Pharmacokinetics were studied in beagle dogs using the core tablet and a micronized fenofibrate formulation as references. NLCs are released through the release orifices of the OPTs as integral nanoparticles. Near zero-order kinetics can be achieved by optimizing the influencing variables. After oral administration, decreased C max and steady drug levels for as long as over 24 h are observed. NLC-OPTs show an oral bioavailability of the model drug fenofibrate similar to that of the core tablets, which is about 1.75 folds that of a fast-release formulation. Controlled release of integral NLCs is achieved by the osmotic pump strategy.

  18. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles for stimuli-responsive controlled drug delivery: advances, challenges, and outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Y

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Yuanhui Song, Yihong Li, Qien Xu, Zhe Liu Wenzhou Institute of Biomaterials and Engineering (WIBE, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: With the development of nanotechnology, the application of nanomaterials in the field of drug delivery has attracted much attention in the past decades. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles as promising drug nanocarriers have become a new area of interest in recent years due to their unique properties and capabilities to efficiently entrap cargo molecules. This review describes the latest advances on the application of mesoporous silica nanoparticles in drug delivery. In particular, we focus on the stimuli-responsive controlled release systems that are able to respond to intracellular environmental changes, such as pH, ATP, GSH, enzyme, glucose, and H2O2. Moreover, drug delivery induced by exogenous stimuli including temperature, light, magnetic field, ultrasound, and electricity is also summarized. These advanced technologies demonstrate current challenges, and provide a bright future for precision diagnosis and treatment. Keywords: mesoporous silica nanoparticle, drug delivery system, controlled release, stimuli-responsive, chemotherapy

  19. Controlling the interparticle spacing of Au-salt loaded micelles and Au nanoparticles on flat surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansmann, J; Kielbassa, S; Hoster, H; Weigl, F; Boyen, H G; Wiedwald, U; Ziemann, P; Behm, R J

    2007-09-25

    The self-organization of diblock copolymers into micellar structures in an appropriate solvent allows the deposition of well ordered arrays of pure metal and alloy nanoparticles on flat surfaces with narrow distributions in particle size and interparticle spacing. Here we investigated the influence of the materials (substrate and polymer) and deposition parameters (temperature and emersion velocity) on the deposition of metal salt loaded micelles by dip-coating from solution and on the order and inter-particle spacing of the micellar deposits and thus of the metal nanoparticle arrays resulting after plasma removal of the polymer shell. For identical substrate and polymer, variation of the process parameters temperature and emersion velocity enables the controlled modification of the interparticle distance within a certain length regime. Moreover, also the degree of hexagonal order of the final array depends sensitively on these parameters.

  20. The anisotropy field of FePt L10 nanoparticles controlled by very thin Pt layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Satoshi; Kitakami, Osamu; Kikuchi, Nobuaki; Miyazaki, Takamichi; Shimada, Yutaka; Chiang, Te-Hsuan

    2004-01-01

    We have prepared epitaxial FePt L1 0 (001) nanoparticles covered with Pt [d Pt nm]/Ag[(4-d Pt ) nm] overlayers. The particles are oblate spheroids approximately 10 nm in diameter and 2 nm in height. The anisotropy field H k at 0 K, which is evaluated from the temperature dependences of coercivity H c , decreases from 90 to 60 kOe on increasing the Pt thickness from d Pt 0 to 1.5 nm, while the energy barrier at zero field remains unchanged. The significant reduction of H k due to the presence of the adjacent Pt layer can be attributed to an enhanced magnetic moment caused by the ferromagnetic polarization of Pt atoms at the interface. This finding suggests an effective method of controlling the switching field of FePt L1 0 nanoparticles

  1. Shape-Selection of Thermodynamically Stabilized Colloidal Pd and Pt Nanoparticles Controlled via Support Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmadi, M.; Behafarid, F.; Holse, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal chemistry, in combination with nanoparticle (NP)/support epitaxial interactions is used here to synthesize shape-selected and thermodynamically stable metallic NPs over a broad range of NP sizes. The morphology of three-dimensional palladium and platinum NPs supported on TiO2(110) was i......Colloidal chemistry, in combination with nanoparticle (NP)/support epitaxial interactions is used here to synthesize shape-selected and thermodynamically stable metallic NPs over a broad range of NP sizes. The morphology of three-dimensional palladium and platinum NPs supported on TiO2...... rows and was found to be responsible for the shape control. The ability of synthesizing thermally stable shape-selected metal NPs demonstrated here is expected to be of relevance for applications in the field of catalysis, since the activity and selectivity of NP catalysts has been shown to strongly...

  2. Preparation of size-controlled (30-100 nm) magnetite nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, K.; Ikeda, M.; Gokon, N.; Tsubouchi, S.; Narimatsu, H.; Mochizuki, Y.; Sakamoto, S.; Sandhu, A.; Abe, M.; Handa, H.

    2007-01-01

    Size-controlled magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) with several dozen nanometers (nm) were synthesized for biomedical applications. Nanoparticles of single-phase magnetite, as revealed by X-ray analyses and magnetic measurements, were prepared by oxidizing ferrous hydroxide (Fe(OH) 2 ) with a weak oxidant NaNO 3 in an N 2 -deaerated aqueous NaOH solution (pH=12-13) at various temperatures below 37 deg. C. As the synthesis temperature increases from 4 to 37 deg. C, the MNPs are decreased in size (d) from 102±5.6 to 31.7±4.9 nm and widened in size distribution, Δd/d increases from 5.5% to 15%. Prepared without using any surfactant, the MNPs are advantageous for immobilizing functional molecules stably on the surfaces for biomedical applications

  3. Optical trapping and control of nanoparticles inside evacuated hollow core photonic crystal fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grass, David, E-mail: david.grass@univie.ac.at; Fesel, Julian; Hofer, Sebastian G.; Kiesel, Nikolai; Aspelmeyer, Markus, E-mail: markus.aspelmeyer@univie.ac.at [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology (VCQ), Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-05-30

    We demonstrate an optical conveyor belt for levitated nanoparticles over several centimeters inside both air-filled and evacuated hollow-core photonic crystal fibers (HCPCF). Detection of the transmitted light field allows three-dimensional read-out of the particle center-of-mass motion. An additional laser enables axial radiation pressure based feedback cooling over the full fiber length. We show that the particle dynamics is a sensitive local probe for characterizing the optical intensity profile inside the fiber as well as the pressure distribution along the fiber axis. In contrast to some theoretical predictions, we find a linear pressure dependence inside the HCPCF, extending over three orders of magnitude from 0.2 mbar to 100 mbar. A targeted application is the controlled delivery of nanoparticles from ambient pressure into medium vacuum.

  4. Development of thermosensitive poly(n-isopropylacrylamide-co-((2-dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate))-based nanoparticles for controlled drug release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Cheng-Liang; Luo, Tsai-Yueh; Lin, Wuu-Jyh [Isotope Application Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, PO Box 3-27, Longtan Taoyuan 325, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Han-Min; Yang, Shu-Jyuan; Lin, Chia-Fu; Shieh, Ming-Jium, E-mail: soloman@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine and College of Engineering, National Taiwan University, No 1, Section 1, Jen-Ai Road, Taipei 10051, Taiwan (China)

    2011-07-01

    Thermosensitive nanoparticles based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-((2-dimethylamino)ethylmethacrylate)) (poly(NIPA-co-DMAEMA)) copolymers were successfully fabricated by free radical polymerization. The lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the synthesized nanoparticles was 41 deg. C and a temperature above which would cause the nanoparticles to undergo a volume phase transition from 140 to 100 nm, which could result in the expulsion of encapsulated drugs. Therefore, we used the poly(NIPA-co-DMAEMA) nanoparticles as a carrier for the controlled release of a hydrophobic anticancer agent, 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin (SN-38). The encapsulation efficiency and loading content of SN-38-loaded nanoparticles at an SN-38/poly(NIPA-co-DMAEMA) ratio of 1/10 (D/P = 1/10) were about 80% and 6.293%, respectively. Moreover, the release profile of SN-38-loaded nanoparticles revealed that the release rate at 42 deg. C (above LCST) was higher than that at 37 deg. C (below LCST), which demonstrated that the release of SN-38 could be controlled by increasing the temperature. The cytotoxicity of the SN-38-loaded poly(NIPA-co-DMAEMA) nanoparticles was investigated in human colon cancer cells (HT-29) to compare with the treatment of an anticancer drug, Irinotecan (CPT-11). The antitumor efficacy evaluated in a C26 murine colon tumor model showed that the SN-38-loaded nanoparticles in combination with hyperthermia therapy efficiently suppressed tumor growth. The results indicate that these thermo-responsive nanoparticles are potential carriers for controlled drug delivery.

  5. Controlled release of bioactive PDGF-AA from a hydrogel/nanoparticle composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott Donaghue, Irja; Shoichet, Molly S

    2015-10-01

    Polymer excipients, such as low molar mass poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), have shown contradictory effects on protein stability when co-encapsulated in polymeric nanoparticles. To gain further insight into these effects, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-AA) was encapsulated in polymeric nanoparticles with vs. without PEG. PDGF-AA is a particularly compelling protein, as it has been demonstrated to promote cell survival and induce the oligodendrocyte differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) both in vitro and in vivo. Here we show, for the first time, the controlled release of bioactive PDGF-AA from an injectable nanoparticle/hydrogel drug delivery system (DDS). PDGF-AA was encapsulated, with high efficiency, in poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles, and its release from the drug delivery system was followed over 21 d. Interestingly, the co-encapsulation of low molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) increased the PDGF-AA loading but, unexpectedly, accelerated the aggregation of PDGF-AA, resulting in reduced activity and detection by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In the absence of PEG, released PDGF-AA remained bioactive as demonstrated with NSPC oligodendrocyte differentiation, similar to positive controls, and significantly different from untreated controls. This work presents a novel delivery method for differentiation factors, such as PDGF-AA, and provides insights into the contradictory effects reported in the literature of excipients, such as PEG, on the loading and release of proteins from polymeric nanoparticles. Previously, the polymer poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) has been used in many biomaterials applications, from surface coatings to the encapsulation of proteins. In this work, we demonstrate that, unexpectedly, low molecular weight PEG has a deleterious effect on the release of the encapsulated protein platelet-derived growth factor AA (PDGF-AA). We also demonstrate release of bioactive PDGF-AA (in the absence of PEG

  6. Advances in research of targeting delivery and controlled release of drug-loaded nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Zhonghua

    2003-01-01

    Biochemistry drug, at present, is still the main tool that human struggle to defeat the diseases. So, developing safe and efficacious technique of drug targeting delivery and controlled release is key to enhance curative effect, decrease drug dosage, and lessen its side effect. Drug-loaded nanoparticles, which is formed by conjugate between nanotechnology and modern pharmaceutics, is a new fashioned pharmic delivery carrier. Because of advantages in pharmic targeting transport and controlled or slow release and improving bioavailability, it has been one of developing trend of modern pharmaceutical dosage forms

  7. Nanoparticle size and morphology control using ultrafast laser induced forward transfer of Ni thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Ryan D. [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Abere, Michael J.; Schrider, Keegan J.; Yalisove, Steven M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Torralva, Ben [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2013-08-26

    We have developed a nanoparticle (NP) printing technique using Ni thin film lift-off from glass substrates after ultrafast irradiation in air. Unique interactions of ultrafast laser pulses with thin films allow for control over NP faceting and size distributions. Control is achieved by changing the laser fluence, film thickness, and film-substrate distance. We demonstrate 20 nm Ni film removal from substrates and rapid NP printing, with size distributions centered at a 6 nm diameter. When the Ni film thickness is lowered to 10 nm, NPs are printed with distributions peaked at a 2 nm diameter.

  8. Spatially controlled synthesis of silver nanoparticles and nanowires by photosensitized reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jradi, S; Zeng, X H; Plain, J; Royer, P; Bachelot, R; Akil, S [Laboratoire de Nanotechnologie et d' Instrumentation Optique, ICD CNRS FRE 2848, Universite de Technologie de Troyes, 12 rue Marie Curie, BP 2060, 10010 Troyes (France); Balan, L; Lougnot, D J; Soppera, O; Vidal, L, E-mail: lavinia.balan@uha.fr [Institut de Science des Materiaux de Mulhouse CNRS LRC 7228, 15 rue Jean Starcky, 68057 Mulhouse (France)

    2010-03-05

    The present paper reports on the spatially controlled synthesis of silver nanoparticles (NPs) and silver nanowires by photosensitized reduction. In a first approach, direct photogeneration of silver NPs at the end of an optical fiber was carried out. Control of both size and density of silver NPs was possible by changing the photonic conditions. In a further development, a photochemically assisted procedure allowing silver to be deposited at the surface of a polymer microtip was implemented. Finally, polymer tips terminated by silver nanowires were fabricated by simultaneous photopolymerization and silver photoreduction. The silver NPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

  9. Conformal field theory in conformal space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preitschopf, C.R.; Vasiliev, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    We present a new framework for a Lagrangian description of conformal field theories in various dimensions based on a local version of d + 2-dimensional conformal space. The results include a true gauge theory of conformal gravity in d = (1, 3) and any standard matter coupled to it. An important feature is the automatic derivation of the conformal gravity constraints, which are necessary for the analysis of the matter systems

  10. Final Rule for Control of Air Pollution From New Motor Vehicles and New Motor Vehicle Engines; Non-Conformance Penalties for 2004 and later Model Year Emission Standards for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines and Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Final Rule for Control of Air Pollution From New Motor Vehicles and New Motor Vehicle Engines; Non-Conformance Penalties for 2004 and later Model Year Emission Standards for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines and Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicles

  11. IONP-doped nanoparticles for highly effective NIR-controlled drug release and combination tumor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu X

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Xudong Fu,1 Xinjun Wang,1 Shaolong Zhou,1 Yanyan Zhang2 1The Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, 2School of Basic Medical Sciences, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Despite advances in controlled drug delivery, drug delivery systems (DDSs with controlled activated drug release and high spatial and temporal resolution are still required. Theranostic nanomedicine is capable of diagnosis, therapy, and monitoring the delivery and distribution of drug molecules and has received growing interest. In this study, a near-infrared light-controlled “off–on” DDS with magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic targeting properties was developed using a hybrid nanoplatform (carbon nanotubes [CNTs]-iron oxide nanoparticle. Doxorubicin (DOX and distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-PEG were adsorbed onto CNTs-iron oxide nanoparticle, and then to avoid the unexpected drug release during circulation, 1-myristyl alcohol was used to encapsulate the CNTs–drug complex. Herein, multifunctional DOX-loaded nanoparticles (NPs with “off–on” state were developed. DOX-NPs showed an obvious “off–on” effect (temperature increase, drug release controlled by near-infrared light in vitro and in vivo. In the in vivo and in vitro studies, DOX-NPs exhibited excellent magnetic resonance imaging ability, magnetic targeting property, high biosafety, and high antitumor combined therapeutic efficacy (hyperthermia combined with chemotherapy. These results highlight the great potential of DOX-NPs in the treatment of cancer. Keywords: controlled drug release, magnetic targeting, MRI, combination therapy

  12. Gaining Control over Radiolytic Synthesis of Uniform Sub-3-nanometer Palladium Nanoparticles: Use of Aromatic Liquids in the Electron Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abellan Baeza, Patricia; Parent, Lucas R.; Al Hasan, Naila M.; Park, Chiwoo; Arslan, Ilke; Karim, Ayman M.; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2016-01-07

    Synthesizing nanomaterials of uniform shape and size is of critical importance to access and manipulate the novel structure-property relationships arising at the nanoscale. In this work we synthesize Pd nanoparticles with well-controlled size using in situ liquid-stage scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and demonstrate a match between the reaction kinetics and products of the radiolytic and chemical syntheses of size-stabilized Pd nanoparticles. We quantify the effect of electron dose on the nucleation kinetics, and compare these results with in situ small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments investigating the effect of temperature during chemical synthesis. This work introduces methods for precise control of nanoparticle synthesis in the STEM and provides a means to uncover the fundamental processes behind the size and shape stabilization of nanoparticles.

  13. Control of charge transfer by conformational and electronic effects: Donor-donor and donor-acceptor phenyl pyrroles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubauer, Antje; Bendig, Juergen; Rettig, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Derivatives of N-pyrrolobenzene with a para-donor and a para-acceptor substituent on the benzene ring are compared. It is shown that by a suitable increase of the donor strength of the pyrrolo group, CT fluorescence can be achieved even for donor-donor-substituted benzenes. The ICT emission for sterically hindered compounds is more forbidden than that of unhindered phenyl pyrroles. This suggests conformational effects which induce a narrower twist angle distribution around a perpendicular minimum in the excited state.

  14. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles by coastal plant Prosopis chilensis (L.) and their efficacy in controlling vibriosis in shrimp Penaeus monodon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Kathiresan; Alikunhi, Nabeel M.; Manickaswami, Gayathridevi; Nabikhan, Asmathunisha; Ayyavu, Gopalakrishnan

    2013-02-01

    The present work investigated the effect of leaf extract from coastal plant Prosopis chilensis on synthesis of silver nanoparticles using AgNO3 as a substrate and to find their antibacterial potential on pathogenic Vibrio species in the shrimp, Penaeus monodon. The leaf extract could be able to produce silver nanoparticles, as evident by gradual change in colour of the reaction mixture consisted of the extract and 1 mM AgNO3 to dark brown. The silver nanoparticles exhibited 2 θ values corresponding to the presence of silver nanocrystal, as evident by X-ray diffraction spectrum. The peaks corresponding to flavanones and terpenoids were found to be stabilizing agents of the nanoparticles, as revealed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The size of silver nanoparticles ranged from 5 to 25 nm with an average of 11.3 ± 2.1 nm and was mostly of spherical in shape, as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The silver nanoparticles were found to inhibit Vibrio pathogens viz., Vibrio cholerae, V. harveyi, and V. parahaemolyticus and this antibacterial effect was better than that of leaf extract, as proved by disc diffusion assay. The nanoparticles were then tested in the shrimp Penaeus monodon challenged with the four species of Vibrio pathogens for 30 days. The shrimps fed with silver nanoparticles exhibited higher survival, associated with immunomodulation in terms of higher haemocyte counts, phenoloxidase and antibacterial activities of haemolymph of P. monodon which is on par with that of control. Thus, the present study proved the possibility of using silver nanoparticles produced by coastal Prosopis chilensis as antibacterial agent in controlling vibriosis.

  15. Size control of MnFe2O4 nanoparticles in electric double layered magnetic fluid synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquino, R.; Tourinho, F.A.; Itri, R.; E Lara, M.C.F.L.; Depeyrot, J.

    2002-01-01

    We propose a method based on the pH of the synthesis to control the nanoparticle size during the ferrofluid elaboration. The particle diameter is determined by means of X-ray diffraction experiments. The measured mean size depends on the type of buffer used during the coprecipitation process. The results therefore confirm that the nanoparticle size can be monitored by the hydroxide concentration and suggest to consider the induced interplay between nucleation and crystal growth

  16. Controlled synthesis of Fe3O4/ZIF-8 nanoparticles for magnetically separable nanocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Fei; He, Mingyuan; Ge, Jianping

    2015-04-27

    Fe3O4/ZIF-8 nanoparticles were synthesized through a room-temperature reaction between 2-methylimidazolate and zinc nitrate in the presence of Fe3O4 nanocrystals. The particle size, surface charge, and magnetic loading can be conveniently controlled by the dosage of Zn(NO3)2 and Fe3O4 nanocrystals. The as-prepared particles show both good thermal stability (stable to 550 °C) and large surface area (1174 m(2) g(-1)). The nanoparticles also have a superparamagnetic response, so that they can strongly respond to an external field during magnetic separation and disperse back into the solution after withdrawal of the magnetic field. For the Knoevenagel reaction, which is catalyzed by alkaline active sites on external surface of catalyst, small Fe3O4/ZIF-8 nanoparticles show a higher catalytic activity. At the same time, the nanocatalysts can be continuously used in multiple catalytic reactions through magnetic separation, activation, and redispersion with little loss of activity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Gold nanoparticle assemblies of controllable size obtained by hydroxylamine reduction at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tódor, István Sz.; Szabó, László; Marişca, Oana T.; Chiş, Vasile; Leopold, Nicolae

    2014-12-01

    Colloidal nanoparticle assemblies (NPAs) were obtained in a one-step procedure, by reduction of HAuCl4 by hydroxylamine hydrochloride, at room temperature, without the use of any additional nucleating agent. By changing the order of the reactants, NPAs with mean size of 20 and 120 nm were obtained. Because of their size and irregular popcorn like shape, the larger size NPAs show absorption in the NIR spectral region. The building blocks of the resulted nanoassemblies are spherical nanoparticles with diameters of 4-8 and 10-30 nm, respectively. Moreover, by stabilizing the colloid with bovine serum albumin at different time moments after synthesis, NPAs of controlled size between 20 and 120 nm, could be obtained. The NPAs were characterized using UV-Vis spectroscopy, TEM and SEM electron microscopies. In addition, the possibility of using the here proposed NPAs as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate was assessed and found to provide a higher enhancement compared to conventional citrate-reduced nanoparticles.

  18. Gold nanoparticle assemblies of controllable size obtained by hydroxylamine reduction at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tódor, István Sz.; Szabó, László; Marişca, Oana T.; Chiş, Vasile; Leopold, Nicolae, E-mail: nicolae.leopold@phys.ubbcluj.ro [Babeş-Bolyai University, Faculty of Physics (Romania)

    2014-12-15

    Colloidal nanoparticle assemblies (NPAs) were obtained in a one-step procedure, by reduction of HAuCl{sub 4} by hydroxylamine hydrochloride, at room temperature, without the use of any additional nucleating agent. By changing the order of the reactants, NPAs with mean size of ∼20 and ∼120 nm were obtained. Because of their size and irregular popcorn like shape, the larger size NPAs show absorption in the NIR spectral region. The building blocks of the resulted nanoassemblies are spherical nanoparticles with diameters of 4–8 and 10–30 nm, respectively. Moreover, by stabilizing the colloid with bovine serum albumin at different time moments after synthesis, NPAs of controlled size between 20 and 120 nm, could be obtained. The NPAs were characterized using UV–Vis spectroscopy, TEM and SEM electron microscopies. In addition, the possibility of using the here proposed NPAs as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate was assessed and found to provide a higher enhancement compared to conventional citrate-reduced nanoparticles.

  19. Controlled release of ketorolac through nanocomposite films of hydrogel and LDH nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zhiping; Gu Zi; Cheng Xiaoxi; Rasoul, Firas; Whittaker, Andrew K.; Lu Gaoqing Max

    2011-01-01

    A novel nanocomposite film for sustained release of anionic ophthalmic drugs through a double-control process has been examined in this study. The film, made as a drug-loaded contact lens, consists principally of a polymer hydrogel of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), in whose matrix MgAl-layered double hydroxide (MgAl-LDH) nanoparticles intercalated with the anionic drug are well dispersed. Such nanocomposite films (hydrogel-LDH-drug) contained 0.6–0.8 mg of MgAl-LDH and 0.08–0.09 mg of the ophthalmic drug (ketorolac) in 1.0 g of hydrogel. MgAl-drug-LDH nanoparticles were prepared with the hydrodynamic particle size of 40–200 nm. TEM images show that these nanoparticles are evenly dispersed in the hydrogel matrix. In vitro release tests of hydrogel-LDH-drug in pH 7.4 PBS solution at 32 °C indicate a sustained release profile of the loaded drug for 1 week. The drug release undergoes a rapid initial burst and then a monotonically decreasing rate up to 168 h. The initial burst release is determined by the film thickness and the polymerization conditions, but the following release rate is very similar, with the effective diffusion coefficient being nearly constant (3.0 × 10 −12 m 2 /s). The drug release from the films is mechanistically attributed to anionic exchange and the subsequent diffusion in the hydrogel matrix.

  20. The disclosed transformation of pre-sputtered Ti films into nanoparticles via controlled thermal oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, M. A.; Raaif, M.

    2018-05-01

    Nanoparticles of TiO2 were successfully prepared from pre-sputtered Ti films using the controlled thermal oxidation. The effect of oxidation temperature on structural, morphological and optical properties in addition to photocatalysis activity of the sputtered films was tested and explained. Analysis of XRD and EDAX elucidated the enhancement in crystallization and oxygen content with the increase of oxidation temperature. SEM depicted the formation of very fine nanoparticles with no specific border on the films oxidized at 550 and 600 °C, whilst crystallites with larger size of approximately from 16 to 23 nm have been observed for the film oxidized at 650 °C. Both optical transmission and refractive index were increased with increasing the oxidation temperature. A red shift in the absorption edge was obtained for the films oxidized at 650 °C compared to that oxidized at 600 °C. The photocatalysis tests demonstrated the priority of 600 °C nanoparticle films to decompose methyl orange (MO) more than 650 °C treated film.

  1. Rapid and controlled transformation of nitrate in water and brine by stabilized iron nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Zhong; Zhao Dongye; Pan Gang

    2009-01-01

    Highly reactive zero-valent iron (ZVI) nanoparticles stabilized with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were tested for reduction of nitrate in fresh water and brine. Batch kinetic tests showed that the pseudo first-order rate constant (k obs ) with the stabilized nanoparticles was five times greater than that for non-stabilized counterparts. The stabilizer not only increased the specific surface area of the nanoparticles, but also increased the reactive particle surface. The allocation between the two reduction products, NH 4 + and N 2 , can be manipulated by varying the ZVI-to-nitrate molar ratio and/or applying a Cu-Pd bimetallic catalyst. Greater CMC-to-ZVI ratios lead to faster nitrate reduction. Application of a 0.05 M HEPES buffer increased the k obs value by 15 times compared to that without pH control. Although the presence of 6% NaCl decreased k obs by 30%, 100% nitrate was transformed within 2 h in the saline water. The technology provides a powerful alternative for treating water with concentrated nitrate such as ion exchange brine.

  2. Control of biofouling on reverse osmosis polyamide membranes modified with biocidal nanoparticles and antifouling polymer brushes

    KAUST Repository

    Rahaman, Md. Saifur

    2014-01-01

    Thin-film composite (TFC) polyamide reverse osmosis (RO) membranes are prone to biofouling due to their inherent physicochemical surface properties. In order to address the biofouling problem, we have developed novel surface coatings functionalized with biocidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and antifouling polymer brushes via polyelectrolyte layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly. The novel surface coating was prepared with polyelectrolyte LBL films containing poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(ethylene imine) (PEI), with the latter being either pure PEI or silver nanoparticles coated with PEI (Ag-PEI). The coatings were further functionalized by grafting of polymer brushes, using either hydrophilic poly(sulfobetaine) or low surface energy poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). The presence of both LBL films and sulfobetaine polymer brushes at the interface significantly increased the hydrophilicity of the membrane surface, while PDMS brushes lowered the membrane surface energy. Overall, all surface modifications resulted in significant reduction of irreversible bacterial cell adhesion. In microbial adhesion tests with E. coli bacteria, a normalized cell adhesion in the range of only 4 to 16% on the modified membrane surfaces was observed. Modified surfaces containing silver nanoparticles also exhibited strong antimicrobial activity. Membranes coated with LBL films of PAA/Ag-PEI achieved over 95% inactivation of bacteria attached to the surface within 1 hour of contact time. Both the antifouling and antimicrobial results suggest the potential of using these novel surface coatings in controlling the fouling of RO membranes. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2014.

  3. Copper-assisted shape control in colloidal synthesis of indium oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selishcheva, Elena; Parisi, Juergen; Kolny-Olesiak, Joanna, E-mail: joanna.kolny@uni-oldenburg.de [University of Oldenburg, Energy and Semiconductor Research Laboratory, Institute of Physics (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Indium oxide is an important n-type transparent semiconductor, finding application in solar cells, sensors, and optoelectronic devices. We present here a novel non-injection synthesis route for the preparation of colloidal indium oxide nanocrystals by using oleylamine (OLA) as ligand and as solvent. Indium oxide with cubic crystallographic structure is formed in a reaction between indium acetate and OLA, the latter is converted to oleylamide during the synthesis. The shape of the nanocrystals can be influenced by the addition of copper ions. When only indium (III) acetate is used as precursor flower-shaped indium oxide nanoparticles are obtained. Addition of copper salts such as copper (I) acetate, copper (II) acetate, copper (II) acetylacetonate, or copper (I) chloride, under otherwise identical reaction conditions changes the shape of nanoparticles to quasi-spherical or elongated. The anions, except for chloride, do not influence the shape of the resulting nanocrystals. This finding suggests that adsorption of copper ions on the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface during the nanoparticles growth is responsible for shape control, whereas changes in the reactivity of the In cations caused by the presence of different anions play a secondary role. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and UV-Vis-absorption spectroscopy are used to characterize the samples.

  4. Copper-assisted shape control in colloidal synthesis of indium oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selishcheva, Elena; Parisi, Jürgen; Kolny-Olesiak, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Indium oxide is an important n-type transparent semiconductor, finding application in solar cells, sensors, and optoelectronic devices. We present here a novel non-injection synthesis route for the preparation of colloidal indium oxide nanocrystals by using oleylamine (OLA) as ligand and as solvent. Indium oxide with cubic crystallographic structure is formed in a reaction between indium acetate and OLA, the latter is converted to oleylamide during the synthesis. The shape of the nanocrystals can be influenced by the addition of copper ions. When only indium (III) acetate is used as precursor flower-shaped indium oxide nanoparticles are obtained. Addition of copper salts such as copper (I) acetate, copper (II) acetate, copper (II) acetylacetonate, or copper (I) chloride, under otherwise identical reaction conditions changes the shape of nanoparticles to quasi-spherical or elongated. The anions, except for chloride, do not influence the shape of the resulting nanocrystals. This finding suggests that adsorption of copper ions on the In 2 O 3 surface during the nanoparticles growth is responsible for shape control, whereas changes in the reactivity of the In cations caused by the presence of different anions play a secondary role. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and UV–Vis-absorption spectroscopy are used to characterize the samples.

  5. Synthesis and controlled self-assembly of UV-responsive gold nanoparticles in block copolymer templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dong-Po; Wang, Xinyu; Lin, Ying; Watkins, James J

    2014-11-06

    We demonstrate the facile synthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) functionalized by UV-responsive block copolymer ligands, poly(styrene)-b-poly(o-nitrobenzene acrylate)-SH (PS-b-PNBA-SH), followed by their targeted distribution within a lamellae-forming poly(styrene)-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) block copolymer. The multilayer, micelle-like structure of the GNPs consists of a gold core, an inner PNBA layer, and an outer PS layer. The UV-sensitive PNBA segment can be deprotected into a layer containing poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) when exposed to UV light at 365 nm, which enables the simple and precise tuning of GNP surface properties from hydrophobic to amphiphilic. The GNPs bearing ligands of different chemical compositions were successfully and selectively incorporated into the PS-b-P2VP block copolymer, and UV light showed a profound influence on the spatial distributions of GNPs. Prior to UV exposure, GNPs partition along the interfaces of PS and P2VP domains, while the UV-treated GNPs are incorporated into P2VP domains as a result of hydrogen bond interactions between PAA on the gold surface and P2VP domains. This provides an easy way of controlling the arrangement of nanoparticles in polymer matrices by tailoring the nanoparticle surface using UV light.

  6. Release Properties and Cellular Uptake in Caco-2 Cells of Size-Controlled Chitosan Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Je, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Eun Suh; Lee, Ji-Soo; Lee, Hyeon Gyu

    2017-12-20

    The influences of particle size on the physicochemical, release, and cellular uptake properties of chitosan nanoparticles (CSNPs) were investigated. Ionotropic CSNPs of different sizes (200-1000 nm) loaded with two model core materials (resveratrol or coumarin-6) were prepared using tripolyphosphate and carrageenan as cross-linkers. With an increase of particle size, zeta potential (34.6 ± 0.5 to 51.1 ± 0.9) and entrapment efficiency (14.9 ± 1.4 to 40.9 ± 1.9) of the CSNPs were significantly (p cellular uptake of CSNPs were significantly increased from 3.70 ± 0.03 to 5.24 ± 0.20 with an increase of particle size from 200 to 600 nm, whereas those significantly decreased from 5.24 ± 0.20 to 4.55 ± 0.2 for particles larger than 600 nm in transwell assay. Moreover, much the same uptake patterns were also observed in confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Investigation of cellular uptake of CSNPs revealed positive correlations between ZP and EE and indicated the effects of complex factors of nanoparticles other than size. These results provide a better understanding of CSNPs absorption and raises the possibility of controlling alternative nanoparticle properties to enhance bioavailability.

  7. Experimental opto-mechanics with levitated nanoparticles: towards quantum control and thermodynamic cycles (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesel, Nikolai; Blaser, Florian; Delic, Uros; Grass, David; Dechant, Andreas; Lutz, Eric; Bathaee, Marzieh; Aspelmeyer, Markus

    2015-08-01

    Combining optical levitation and cavity optomechanics constitutes a promising approach to prepare and control the motional quantum state of massive objects (>10^9 amu). This, in turn, would represent a completely new type of light-matter interface and has, for example, been predicted to enable experimental tests of macrorealistic models or of non-Newtonian gravity at small length scales. Such ideas have triggered significant experimental efforts to realizing such novel systems. To this end, we have recently successfully demonstrated cavity-cooling of a levitated sub-micron silica particle in a classical regime at a pressure of approximately 1mbar. Access to higher vacuum of approx. 10^-6 mbar has been demonstrated using 3D-feedback cooling in optical tweezers without cavity-coupling. Here we will illustrate our strategy towards trapping, 3D-cooling and quantum control of nanoparticles in ultra-high vacuum using cavity-based feedback cooling methods and clean particle loading with hollow-core photonic crystal fibers. We will also discuss the current experimental progress both in 3D-cavity cooling and HCPCF-based transport of nanoparticles. As yet another application of cavity-controlled levitated nanoparticles we will show how to implement a thermodynamic Sterling cycle operating in the underdamped regime. We present optimized protocols with respect to efficiency at maximum power in this little explored regime. We also show that the excellent level of control in our system will allow reproducing all relevant features of such optimized protocols. In a next step, this will enable studies of thermodynamics cycles in a regime where the quantization of the mechanical motion becomes relevant.

  8. Controlling Chain Conformations of High-k Fluoropolymer Dielectrics to Enhance Charge Mobilities in Rubrene Single-Crystal Field-Effect Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Jwala M; Gadinski, Matthew R; Li, Qi; Sun, Kaige G; Reyes-Martinez, Marcos A; Iagodkine, Elissei; Briseno, Alejandro L; Jackson, Thomas N; Wang, Qing; Gomez, Enrique D

    2016-12-01

    A novel photopatternable high-k fluoropolymer, poly(vinylidene fluoride-bromotrifluoroethylene) P(VDF-BTFE), with a dielectric constant (k) between 8 and 11 is demonstrated in thin-film transistors. Crosslinking P(VDF-BTFE) reduces energetic disorder at the dielectric-semiconductor interface by controlling the chain conformations of P(VDF-BTFE), thereby leading to approximately a threefold enhancement in the charge mobility of rubrene single-crystal field-effect transistors. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Lipid nanoparticle interactions and assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiss, Matthew Ryan

    oxide nanoparticles encapsulated in the lipid bilayer, the local temperature and membrane fluidity could be observed. DLNAs were encapsulated with different sized nanoparticles and concentrations in order to observe the effect of the bilayer nanoparticles on the lipid bilayer's phase behavior and leakage. Two different sized nanoparticles were used, a 2 nm gold nanoparticle (GNP) much smaller than the thickness of the bilayer and a 4 nm GNP near the thickness of the lipid bilayer. The 2 nm GNPs were shown to affect the lipid bilayer differently than the 4 nm GNP. Specifically, the two nanoparticles altered the phase behavior and leakage differently in a temperature dependent fashion, demonstrating that embedded nanoparticle size can be used induce or inhibit bilayer leakage. A dual solvent exchange method was used to control the lipid surface composition of an iron oxide nanoparticle with a cationic lipid and a polyethylene glycol (PEG) lipid to produce lipid coated magnetic nanoparticles (LMNPs). PEG is well known for its ability to enhance the pharmacokinetics of nanostructures by preventing uptake by the immune system. By controlling the lipid surface composition, the surface charge and PEG conformation can be controlled which allowed the LMNPs to be used as an MRI contrast agent and a delivery system for siRNA that could be triggered with temperature.

  10. Mechanical control of the plasmon coupling with Au nanoparticle arrays fixed on the elastomeric film via chemical bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedogni, Elena; Kaneko, Satoshi; Fujii, Shintaro; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-03-01

    We have fabricated Au nanoparticle arrays on the flexible poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) film. The nanoparticles were bound to the film via a covalent bond by a ligand exchange reaction. Thanks to the strong chemical bonding, highly stable and uniformly dispersed Au nanoparticle arrays were fixed on the PDMS film. The Au nanoparticle arrays were characterized by the UV-vis, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The UV-vis and SEM measurements showed the uniformity of the surface-dispersed Au nanoparticles, and SERS measurement confirmed the chemistry of the PDMS film. Reflecting the high stability and the uniformity of the Au nanoparticle arrays, the plasmon wavelength of the Au nanoparticles reversely changed with modulation of the interparticle distance, which was induced by the stretching of the PDMS film. The plasmon wavelength linearly decreased from 664 to 591 nm by stretching of 60%. The plasmon wavelength shift can be explained by the change in the strength of the plasmon coupling which is mechanically controlled by the mechanical strain.

  11. Control of light scattering by nanoparticles with optically-induced magnetic responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wei; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional approaches to control and shape the scattering patterns of light generated by different nanostructures are mostly based on engineering of their electric response due to the fact that most metallic nanostructures support only electric resonances in the optical frequency range. Recently, fuelled by the fast development in the fields of metamaterials and plasmonics, artificial optically-induced magnetic responses have been demonstrated for various nanostructures. This kind of response can be employed to provide an extra degree of freedom for the efficient control and shaping of the scattering patterns of nanoparticles and nanoantennas. Here we review the recent progress in this research direction of nanoparticle scattering shaping and control through the interference of both electric and optically-induced magnetic responses. We discuss the magnetic resonances supported by various structures in different spectral regimes, and then summarize the original results on the scattering shaping involving both electric and magnetic responses, based on the interference of both spectrally separated (with different resonant wavelengths) and overlapped dipoles (with the same resonant wavelength), and also other higher-order modes. Finally, we discuss the scattering control utilizing Fano resonances associated with the magnetic responses. (topical review - plasmonics and metamaterials)

  12. Conformational control of the binding of the transactivation domain of the MLL protein and c-Myb to the KIX domain of CREB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Nihal Korkmaz

    Full Text Available The KIX domain of CBP is a transcriptional coactivator. Concomitant binding to the activation domain of proto-oncogene protein c-Myb and the transactivation domain of the trithorax group protein mixed lineage leukemia (MLL transcription factor lead to the biologically active ternary MLL∶KIX∶c-Myb complex which plays a role in Pol II-mediated transcription. The binding of the activation domain of MLL to KIX enhances c-Myb binding. Here we carried out molecular dynamics (MD simulations for the MLL∶KIX∶c-Myb ternary complex, its binary components and KIX with the goal of providing a mechanistic explanation for the experimental observations. The dynamic behavior revealed that the MLL binding site is allosterically coupled to the c-Myb binding site. MLL binding redistributes the conformational ensemble of KIX, leading to higher populations of states which favor c-Myb binding. The key element in the allosteric communication pathways is the KIX loop, which acts as a control mechanism to enhance subsequent binding events. We tested this conclusion by in silico mutations of loop residues in the KIX∶MLL complex and by comparing wild type and mutant dynamics through MD simulations. The loop assumed MLL binding conformation similar to that observed in the KIX∶c-Myb state which disfavors the allosteric network. The coupling with c-Myb binding site faded, abolishing the positive cooperativity observed in the presence of MLL. Our major conclusion is that by eliciting a loop-mediated allosteric switch between the different states following the binding events, transcriptional activation can be regulated. The KIX system presents an example how nature makes use of conformational control in higher level regulation of transcriptional activity and thus cellular events.

  13. Laser printing of nanoparticle toner enables digital control of micropatterned carbon nanotube growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsen, Erik S; Stevens, Adam G; Hart, A John

    2013-05-01

    Commercialization of materials utilizing patterned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests, such as hierarchical composite structures, dry adhesives, and contact probe arrays, will require catalyst patterning techniques that do not rely on cleanroom photolithography. We demonstrate the large scale patterning of CNT growth catalyst via adaptation of a laser-based electrostatic printing process that uses magnetic ink character recognition (MICR) toner. The MICR toner contains iron oxide nanoparticles that serve as the catalyst for CNT growth, which are printed onto a flexible polymer (polyimide) and then transferred to a rigid substrate (silicon or alumina) under heat and mechanical pressure. Then, the substrate is processed for CNT growth under an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) recipe. This process enables digital control of patterned CNT growth via the laser intensity, which controls the CNT density; and via the grayscale level, which controls the pixelation of the image into arrays of micropillars. Moreover, virtually any pattern can be designed using standard software (e.g., MS Word, AutoCAD, etc.) and printed on demand. Using a standard office printer, we realize isolated CNT microstructures as small as 140 μm and isolated catalyst ″pixels″ as small as 70 μm (one grayscale dot) and determine that individual toner microparticles result in features of approximately 5-10 μm . We demonstrate that grayscale CNT patterns can function as dry adhesives and that large-area catalyst patterns can be printed directly onto metal foils or transferred to ceramic plates. Laser printing therefore shows promise to enable high-speed micropatterning of nanoparticle-containing thin films under ambient conditions, possibly for a wide variety of nanostructures by engineering of toners containing nanoparticles of desired composition, size, and shape.

  14. Plasmon interactions between gold nanoparticles in aqueous solution with controlled spatial separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sendroiu, I.E.; Mertens, Stijn; Schiffrin, D.J.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of interparticle distance on the UV-visible absorption spectrum of gold nanocrystals aggregates in aqueous solution have been investigated. The aggregates were produced by ion-templated chelation of omega-mercaptocarboxylic acid ligands covalently attached to the nanoparticles surface....... Variation of the ligand chain length provides control over the interparticle separation in the aggregates. The UV-visible spectra consist typically of a single particle band and a secondary band at higher wavelengths associated with the formation of aggregates in solution. The position of the latter depends...

  15. Chemically controlled interfacial nanoparticle assembly into nanoporous gold films for electrochemical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mikkel U. -B.; Seselj, Nedjeljko; Engelbrekt, Christian

    2018-01-01

    at the liquid/air interface starting from gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in an aqueous solution, providing silver-free gold films. Chloroauric acid is reduced to AuNP building blocks by 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid, which also acts as a protecting agent and pH buffer. By adding potassium chloride before Au......, they can be controlled by varying the temperature, chloride concentration, ionic strength, and protonation of the buffer. cNPGF formation is attributed to the destabilization of AuNPs at the air–liquid interface. The developed method generates electrochemically stable cNPGFs up to 20 cm2 in size...

  16. Septipyridines as conformationally controlled substitutes for inaccessible bis(terpyridine-derived oligopyridines in two-dimensional self-assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Caterbow

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The position of the peripheral nitrogen atoms in bis(terpyridine-derived oligopyridines (BTPs has a strong impact on their self-assembly behavior at the liquid/HOPG (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite interface. The intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions in these peripheral pyridine units show specific 2D structures for each BTP isomer. From nine possible constitutional isomers only four have been described in the literature. The synthesis and self-assembling behavior of an additional isomer is presented here, but the remaining four members of the series are synthetically inaccessible. The self-assembling properties of three of the missing four BTP isomers can be mimicked by making use of the energetically preferred N–C–C–N transoid conformation between 2,2'-bipyridine subunits in a new class of so-called septipyridines. The structures are investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM and a combination of force-field and first-principles electronic structure calculations.

  17. Controlled fabrication of gold nanoparticles biomediated by glucose oxidase immobilized on chitosan layer-by-layer films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caseli, Luciano; Santos, David S. dos; Aroca, Ricardo F.; Oliveira, Osvaldo N.

    2009-01-01

    The control of size and shape of metallic nanoparticles is a fundamental goal in nanochemistry, and crucial for applications exploiting nanoscale properties of materials. We present here an approach to the synthesis of gold nanoparticles mediated by glucose oxidase (GOD) immobilized on solid substrates using the Layer-by-Layer (LbL) technique. The LbL films contained four alternated layers of chitosan and poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS), with GOD in the uppermost bilayer adsorbed on a fifth chitosan layer: (chitosan/PSS) 4 /(chitosan/GOD). The films were inserted into a solution containing gold salt and glucose, at various pHs. Optimum conditions were achieved at pH 9, producing gold nanoparticles of ca. 30 nm according to transmission electron microscopy. A comparative study with the enzyme in solution demonstrated that the synthesis of gold nanoparticles is more efficient using immobilized GOD.

  18. Temperature-controlled cross-linking of silver nanoparticles with diels-alder reaction and its application on antibacterial property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lian; Yang, Pengfei; Li, Junying; Zhang, Zhiliang; Yu, Xi; Lu, Ling

    2017-05-01

    Sliver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized and functionalized with furan group on their surface, followed by the reverse Diels-Alder (DA) reaction with bismaleimide to vary the particle size, so as to give different antibacterial activities. These nanoparticles were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-vis), Nanoparticle Size Analyzer and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that the cross-linking reaction with bismaleimide had a great effect on the size of AgNPs. The size of the AgNPs could be controlled by the temperature of DA/r-DA equilibrium. The antibacterial activity was assessed using the inhibition zone diameter by introducing the particles into a media containing Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, respectively. It was found that these particles were effective bactericides. Furthermore, the antibacterial activity of the nanoparticles decreased orderly as the particle size enlarged.

  19. Physics responsible for heating efficiency and self-controlled temperature rise of magnetic nanoparticles in magnetic hyperthermia therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaterabadi, Zhila; Nabiyouni, Gholamreza; Soleymani, Meysam

    2018-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles as heat-generating nanosources in hyperthermia treatment are still faced with many drawbacks for achieving sufficient clinical potential. In this context, increase in heating ability of magnetic nanoparticles in a biologically safe alternating magnetic field and also approach to a precise control on temperature rise are two challenging subjects so that a significant part of researchers' efforts has been devoted to them. Since a deep understanding of Physics concepts of heat generation by magnetic nanoparticles is essential to develop hyperthermia as a cancer treatment with non-adverse side effects, this review focuses on different mechanisms responsible for heat dissipation in a radio frequency magnetic field. Moreover, particular attention is given to ferrite-based nanoparticles because of their suitability in radio frequency magnetic fields. Also, the key role of Curie temperature in suppressing undesired temperature rise is highlighted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Morphological control of Ni/NiO core/shell nanoparticles and production of hollow NiO nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, Nitin; Claypoole, Leslie; Bachas, Leonidas G.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical synthesis coupled with a microwave irradiation process allowed for the control of size (6-40 nm), shape, and shell thickness of Ni/NiO core/shell nanoparticles. In this unique synthetic route, the size of Ni nanoparticles (NiNPs) was strongly influenced by the nickel salt-to-stabilizer ratio and the amount of the stabilizer. Interestingly, it was observed that the shape of the nanoparticles was altered by varying the reaction time, where longer reaction times resulted in annealing effects and rupture of the stabilizer micelle leading to distinct shapes of Ni/NiO core/shell nanostructures. Product cooling rate was another important parameter identified in this study that not only affected the shape, but also the crystal structure of the core/shell nanoparticles. In addition, a simple and cost-effective method of microwave irradiation of NiNPs led to the formation of distinctly shaped hollow NiO nanoparticles. These high surface area core/shell nanoparticles with well-controlled morphologies are important and can lead to significant advancement in the design of improved fuel cells, electrochromic display devices, and catalysis systems.

  1. Morphological control of Ni/NiO core/shell nanoparticles and production of hollow NiO nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, Nitin [University of Alabama, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Center for Materials for Information Technology (MINT) (United States); Claypoole, Leslie [Fairmont State University (United States); Bachas, Leonidas G., E-mail: bachas@uky.ed [University of Kentucky, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Chemical synthesis coupled with a microwave irradiation process allowed for the control of size (6-40 nm), shape, and shell thickness of Ni/NiO core/shell nanoparticles. In this unique synthetic route, the size of Ni nanoparticles (NiNPs) was strongly influenced by the nickel salt-to-stabilizer ratio and the amount of the stabilizer. Interestingly, it was observed that the shape of the nanoparticles was altered by varying the reaction time, where longer reaction times resulted in annealing effects and rupture of the stabilizer micelle leading to distinct shapes of Ni/NiO core/shell nanostructures. Product cooling rate was another important parameter identified in this study that not only affected the shape, but also the crystal structure of the core/shell nanoparticles. In addition, a simple and cost-effective method of microwave irradiation of NiNPs led to the formation of distinctly shaped hollow NiO nanoparticles. These high surface area core/shell nanoparticles with well-controlled morphologies are important and can lead to significant advancement in the design of improved fuel cells, electrochromic display devices, and catalysis systems.

  2. Controlled Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles Using Aspergillus terreus IF0 and Its Antibacterial Potential against Gram Negative Pathogenic Bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priyadarshini, E.; Pradhan, N.; Sukla, L.B.; Panda, P.K.; Pradhan, N.

    2014-01-01

    Biosynthesis of monodispersed nanoparticles, along with determination of potential responsible biomolecules, is the major bottleneck in the area of bio nano technology research. The present study focuses on an eco friendly, ambient temperature protocol for size controlled synthesis of gold nanoparticles, using the fungus Aspergillus terreus IF0. Gold nanoparticles were formed immediately, with the addition of chloroauric acid to the aqueous fungal extract. Synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, TEM-EDX, and XRD analysis. Particle diameter and dispersity of nanoparticles were controlled by varying the ph of the fungal extract. At ph 10, the average size of the synthesized particles was in the range of 10–19 nm. Dialysis to obtain high and low molecular weight fraction followed by FTIR analysis revealed that biomolecules larger than 12 kDa and having –CH, –NH, and –SH functional groups were responsible for bioreduction and stabilization. In addition, the synthesized gold nanoparticles were found to be selectively bactericidal against the pathogenic gram negative bacteria, Escherichia coli.

  3. Continuous, size and shape-control synthesis of hollow silica nanoparticles enabled by a microreactor-assisted rapid mixing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yujuan; Kim, Ki-Joong; Chang, Chih-Hung

    2017-06-01

    Hollow silica nanoparticles (HSNPs) were synthesized using a microreactor-assisted system with a hydrodynamic focusing micromixer. Due to the fast mixing of each precursor in the system, the poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) thermodynamic-locked (TML) conformations were protected from their random aggregations by the immediately initiated growth of silica shells. When altering the mixing time through varying flow rates and flow rate ratios, the different degrees of the aggregation of PAA TML conformations were observed. The globular and necklace-like TML conformations were successfully captured by modifying the PAA concentration at the optimized mixing condition. Uniform HSNPs with an average diameter ∼30 nm were produced from this system. COMSOL numerical models was established to investigate the flow and concentration profiles, and their effects on the formation of PAA templates. Finally, the quality and utility of these uniform HSNPs were demonstrated by the fabrication of antireflective thin films on monocrystalline photovoltaic cells which showed a 3.8% increase in power conversion efficiency.

  4. Shape-control by microwave-assisted hydrothermal method for the synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles using organic additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzuti, Antonino [Politecnico di Bari, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale, del Territorio, Edile e di Chimica (Italy); Dassisti, Michele [Politecnico di Bari, Dipartimento di Meccanica, Management e Matematica (Italy); Mastrorilli, Piero, E-mail: p.mastrorilli@poliba.it [Politecnico di Bari, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale, del Territorio, Edile e di Chimica (Italy); Sportelli, Maria C.; Cioffi, Nicola; Picca, Rosaria A. [Università di Bari, Dipartimento di Chimica (Italy); Agostinelli, Elisabetta; Varvaro, Gaspare [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Struttura della Materia (Italy); Caliandro, Rocco [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Cristallografia (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    A simple and fast microwave-assisted hydrothermal method is proposed for the synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles. The addition of different surfactants (polyvinylpyrrolidone, oleic acid, or trisodium citrate) was studied to investigate the effect on size distribution, morphology, and functionalization of the magnetite nanoparticles. Microwave irradiation at 150 °C for 2 h of aqueous ferrous chloride and hydrazine without additives resulted in hexagonal magnetite nanoplatelets with a facet-to-facet distance of 116 nm and a thickness of 40 nm having a saturation magnetization of ∼65 Am{sup 2} kg{sup −1}. The use of polyvinylpyrrolidone led to hexagonal nanoparticles with a facet-to-facet distance of 120 nm and a thickness of 53 nm with a saturation magnetization of ∼54 Am{sup 2} kg{sup −1}. Additives such as oleic acid and trisodium citrate yielded quasi-spherical nanoparticles of 25 nm in size with a saturation magnetization of ∼70 Am{sup 2} kg{sup −1} and spheroidal nanoparticles of 60 nm in size with a saturation magnetization up to ∼82 Am{sup 2} kg{sup −1}, respectively. A kinetic control of the crystal growth is believed to be responsible for the hexagonal habit of the nanoparticles obtained without additive. Conversely, a thermodynamic control of the crystal growth, leading to spheroidal nanoparticles, seems to occur when additives which strongly interact with the nanoparticle surface are used. A thorough characterization of the materials was performed. Magnetic properties were investigated by Superconducting Quantum Interference Device and Vibrating Sample magnetometers. Based on the observed magnetic properties, the magnetite obtained using citrate appears to be a promising support for magnetically transportable catalysts.

  5. Controlled Synthesis of Sb 2 O 3 Nanoparticles, Nanowires, and Nanoribbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sb 2 O 3 nanoparticles, nanowires, and nanoribbons have been selectively synthesized in a controlled manner under mild conditions by using CTAB as a soft template. By adopting Sb ( OH 4 − as an inorganic precursor and the concentration of CTAB as an adjusting parameter, morphologies of Sb 2 O 3 nanostructures can be selectively controlled. Typically, C CTAB <0.15 mmol favors the formation of nanoparticles (product one or short form P1; when the concentration of CATB is in the range 0.15–2.0 mmol, nanowires (P2 dominate the products; nanoribbons (P3 form above the concentration of 2.0 mmol, and when the concentration of CTAB goes further higher, treelike bundles of nanoribbons could be achieved. The method in the present study has potential advantages of easy handling, relatively low-cost, and large-scale production. The facile and large-scale synthesis of varied Sb 2 O 3 nanostructures is believed to be useful for the application of catalysis and flame retardance.

  6. Noninvasive control of the transport function of fluorescent coloured liposomal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmashchuk, O.; Zherebtsov, E.; Zherebtsova, A.; Kuznetsova, E.; Vinokurov, A.; Dunaev, A.; Mamoshin, A.; Snimshchikova, I.; Borsukov, A.; Bykov, A.; Meglinski, I.

    2017-06-01

    The use of liposomal nanoparticles with an incorporated active substance is an innovative and promising approach to diagnostics and therapy. The application of liposomal nanoparticle-based drugs allows for targeted localized delivery, overcomes the natural barriers within the body effectively, and minimizes possible side effects. Liposomes are able to contain a variety of ingredients with practically no limitations to their chemical composition, chemical properties, or size of constituent molecules. This study evaluated the ability to control the passage of fluorescent dye-filled liposomes through the intestinal mucosal barrier after oral administration. For this purpose, the increase in transcutaneous registered fluorescence from tetrabromofluorescein dye was recorded and analysed. Fluorescence intensity was measured at the proximal end of the tail of an animal model after oral administration of the liposomes. Measurements were taken at the excitation wavelengths of 365 and 450 nm. The fluorescence intensity in the group treated with the fluorescent contrast agent encapsulated in liposomal particles increased 140% of the initial level, but in the group treated with pure contrast agent, the increase in detected fluorescence intensity did not exceed 110%. Mice that received empty liposomes as well as the control group did not demonstrate statistically significant changes in fluorescence intensity. A potential application of our results is an express laser optical method of monitoring the transport of orally administered liposomal particles. The results can be used to help create new optical tools for use in the development of new drugs and in high-throughput screening used during their testing.

  7. All-optical control of long-lived nuclear spins in rare-earth doped nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, D; Karlsson, J; Fossati, A; Ferrier, A; Goldner, P

    2018-05-29

    Nanoscale systems that coherently couple to light and possess spins offer key capabilities for quantum technologies. However, an outstanding challenge is to preserve properties, and especially optical and spin coherence lifetimes, at the nanoscale. Here, we report optically controlled nuclear spins with long coherence lifetimes (T 2 ) in rare-earth-doped nanoparticles. We detect spins echoes and measure a spin coherence lifetime of 2.9 ± 0.3 ms at 5 K under an external magnetic field of 9 mT, a T 2 value comparable to those obtained in bulk rare-earth crystals. Moreover, we achieve spin T 2 extension using all-optical spin dynamical decoupling and observe high fidelity between excitation and echo phases. Rare-earth-doped nanoparticles are thus the only nano-material in which optically controlled spins with millisecond coherence lifetimes have been reported. These results open the way to providing quantum light-atom-spin interfaces with long storage time within hybrid architectures.

  8. Controlled synthesis of pompon-like self-assemblies of Pd nanoparticles under microwave irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Xia; Zhao Yanxi; Huang Tao; Liu Hanfan; Liew, Kong Yong

    2009-01-01

    Pd nanoparticles with uniform, self-assembled pompon-like nanostructure were synthesized by thermal decomposition of palladium acetate under microwave irradiation with methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) as a solvent in the presence of a little amount of ethylene glycol (EG) and KOH without using any special stabilizers. The as-synthesized Pd nano-pompons were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The results show that the as-prepared Pd nano-pompons with the average diameters in the range of 28-81 nm were self-assemblies organized by hundreds of smaller primary nanoparticles with an average dimension of about 2.4 nm. The sizes of Pd nano-pompons can be well controlled by adjusting the concentration of palladium acetate. A little amount of EG and KOH also plays an important role in controlling the size, uniformity and dispersion of Pd nano-pompons. The Pd nano-pompons can be easily supported on γ-Al 2 O 3 and their catalytic activity was examined preliminarily.

  9. Highly uniform up-converting nanoparticles: Why you should control your synthesis even more

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palo, Emilia; Tuomisto, Minnea; Hyppänen, Iko; Swart, Hendrik C.; Hölsä, Jorma; Soukka, Tero; Lastusaari, Mika

    2017-01-01

    Luminescent β-NaYF 4 :Yb 3+ ,Er 3+ (x Yb : 0.17, x Er : 0.03) nanomaterials were synthesized for use as labels for biomedical applications with high temperature co-precipitation synthesis in 1-octadecene and oleic acid. The effect of the synthesis conditions (e.g. argon flow, cooling and stirring rates) on the products’ up-conversion luminescence intensity, particle size and morphology were studied. The factors contributing to these properties were analysed. It was observed that an efficient inert gas flow is essential to the formation of the preferred highly-luminescent hexagonal structure. Furthermore, the flow rate, together with the stirring rate, crucially affect the Er:Yb molar ratio of the products. The optimization of this ratio is essential when strong up-conversion emission is required from small particles, whereas the morphology and uniformity of the nanoparticles can be controlled with the cooling rate. These results emphasize the importance of controlling the synthesis conditions, especially when nanoparticles need to have a specific morphology because of their use e.g. as luminescent labels in medical diagnostics.

  10. Gold nanoparticle growth control - Implementing novel wet chemistry method on silicon substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Ameer, Ammar

    2013-04-01

    Controlling particle size, shape, nucleation, and self-assembly on surfaces are some of the main challenges facing electronic device fabrication. In this work, growth of gold nanoparticles over a wide range of sizes was investigated by using a novel wet chemical method, where potassium iodide is used as the reducing solution and gold chloride as the metal precursor, on silicon substrates. Four parameters were studied: soaking time, solution temperature, concentration of the solution of gold chloride, and surface pre-treatment of the substrate. Synthesized nanoparticles were then characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The precise control of the location and order of the grown gold overlayer was achieved by using focused ion beam (FIB) patterning of a silicon surface, pre-treated with potassium iodide. By varying the soaking time and temperature, different particle sizes and shapes were obtained. Flat geometrical shapes and spherical shapes were observed. We believe, that the method described in this work is potentially a straightforward and efficient way to fabricate gold contacts for microelectronics. © 2013 IEEE.

  11. Highly uniform up-converting nanoparticles: Why you should control your synthesis even more

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palo, Emilia, E-mail: ekharj@utu.fi [University of Turku, Department of Chemistry, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); University of Turku Graduate School (UTUGS), Doctoral Programme in Physical and Chemical Sciences, Turku (Finland); Turku University Centre for Materials and Surfaces (MatSurf), Turku (Finland); Tuomisto, Minnea [University of Turku, Department of Chemistry, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); University of Turku Graduate School (UTUGS), Doctoral Programme in Physical and Chemical Sciences, Turku (Finland); Turku University Centre for Materials and Surfaces (MatSurf), Turku (Finland); Hyppänen, Iko [University of Turku, Department of Chemistry, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Turku University Centre for Materials and Surfaces (MatSurf), Turku (Finland); Swart, Hendrik C.; Hölsä, Jorma [University of the Free State, Department of Physics, Bloemfontein ZA-9300 (South Africa); Soukka, Tero [University of Turku, Department of Biochemistry, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Lastusaari, Mika [University of Turku, Department of Chemistry, FI-20014 Turku (Finland); Turku University Centre for Materials and Surfaces (MatSurf), Turku (Finland)

    2017-05-15

    Luminescent β-NaYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+},Er{sup 3+} (x{sub Yb}: 0.17, x{sub Er}: 0.03) nanomaterials were synthesized for use as labels for biomedical applications with high temperature co-precipitation synthesis in 1-octadecene and oleic acid. The effect of the synthesis conditions (e.g. argon flow, cooling and stirring rates) on the products’ up-conversion luminescence intensity, particle size and morphology were studied. The factors contributing to these properties were analysed. It was observed that an efficient inert gas flow is essential to the formation of the preferred highly-luminescent hexagonal structure. Furthermore, the flow rate, together with the stirring rate, crucially affect the Er:Yb molar ratio of the products. The optimization of this ratio is essential when strong up-conversion emission is required from small particles, whereas the morphology and uniformity of the nanoparticles can be controlled with the cooling rate. These results emphasize the importance of controlling the synthesis conditions, especially when nanoparticles need to have a specific morphology because of their use e.g. as luminescent labels in medical diagnostics.

  12. A plasmonic nanosensor for lipase activity based on enzyme-controlled gold nanoparticles growth in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Wei; Huo, Fengwei; Tian, Danbi

    2015-03-01

    A plasmonic nanosensor for lipase activity was developed based on one-pot nanoparticle growth. Tween 80 was selected not only as the substrate for lipase recognition but also as the reducing and stabilizing agent for the sensor fabrication. The different molecular groups in Tween 80 could have different roles in the fabrication procedure; the H2O2 produced by the autoxidation of the ethylene oxide subunits in Tween 80 could reduce the AuCl4- ions to Au atoms, meanwhile, the lipase could hydrolyze its carboxyl ester bond, which could, in turn, control the rate of nucleation of the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and tailor the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the AuNP transducers. The color changes, which depend on the absence or presence of the lipase, could be used to sense the lipase activity. A linear response ranging from 0.025 to 4 mg mL-1 and a detection limit of the lipase as low as 3.47 μg mL-1 were achieved. This strategy circumvents the problems encountered by general enzyme assays that require sophisticated instruments and complicated assembling steps. The methodology can benefit the assays of heterogeneous-catalyzed enzymes.A plasmonic nanosensor for lipase activity was developed based on one-pot nanoparticle growth. Tween 80 was selected not only as the substrate for lipase recognition but also as the reducing and stabilizing agent for the sensor fabrication. The different molecular groups in Tween 80 could have different roles in the fabrication procedure; the H2O2 produced by the autoxidation of the ethylene oxide subunits in Tween 80 could reduce the AuCl4- ions to Au atoms, meanwhile, the lipase could hydrolyze its carboxyl ester bond, which could, in turn, control the rate of nucleation of the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and tailor the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the AuNP transducers. The color changes, which depend on the absence or presence of the lipase, could be used to sense the lipase activity. A linear response

  13. 3D conformal MRI-controlled transurethral ultrasound prostate therapy: validation of numerical simulations and demonstration in tissue-mimicking gel phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtnyk, Mathieu; N'Djin, William Apoutou; Kobelevskiy, Ilya; Bronskill, Michael; Chopra, Rajiv

    2010-11-21

    MRI-controlled transurethral ultrasound therapy uses a linear array of transducer elements and active temperature feedback to create volumes of thermal coagulation shaped to predefined prostate geometries in 3D. The specific aims of this work were to demonstrate the accuracy and repeatability of producing large volumes of thermal coagulation (>10 cc) that conform to 3D human prostate shapes in a tissue-mimicking gel phantom, and to evaluate quantitatively the accuracy with which numerical simulations predict these 3D heating volumes under carefully controlled conditions. Eleven conformal 3D experiments were performed in a tissue-mimicking phantom within a 1.5T MR imager to obtain non-invasive temperature measurements during heating. Temperature feedback was used to control the rotation rate and ultrasound power of transurethral devices with up to five 3.5 × 5 mm active transducer elements. Heating patterns shaped to human prostate geometries were generated using devices operating at 4.7 or 8.0 MHz with surface acoustic intensities of up to 10 W cm(-2). Simulations were informed by transducer surface velocity measurements acquired with a scanning laser vibrometer enabling improved calculations of the acoustic pressure distribution in a gel phantom. Temperature dynamics were determined according to a FDTD solution to Pennes' BHTE. The 3D heating patterns produced in vitro were shaped very accurately to the prostate target volumes, within the spatial resolution of the MRI thermometry images. The volume of the treatment difference falling outside ± 1 mm of the target boundary was, on average, 0.21 cc or 1.5% of the prostate volume. The numerical simulations predicted the extent and shape of the coagulation boundary produced in gel to within (mean ± stdev [min, max]): 0.5 ± 0.4 [-1.0, 2.1] and -0.05 ± 0.4 [-1.2, 1.4] mm for the treatments at 4.7 and 8.0 MHz, respectively. The temperatures across all MRI thermometry images were predicted within -0.3 ± 1.6 °C and 0

  14. Development of chitosan-nanoparticle film based materials for controlled quality of minced beef during refrigerated storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdawati

    2010-10-01

    Chitosan nanoparticles were prepared based on the ionic gelation of chitosan with tripolyphosphate anions. The physicochemical properties of the chitosan nanoparticles were determined by FTIR analysis, XRD pattern and TEM. The effects of chitosan nanoparticles treatment on the shelf-life extension of minced beef stored at 20±1° C were studied, including chemical and microbiological,. Results indicated that chitosan nanoparticle treatment reduced the total microbial load of fresh minced beef about 10-fold (from 3.2×104 CFU/g to 5.4×102 CFU/g) before storage and the microbial flora was different with that of raw samples. The wide-spectrum antibacterial property of chitosan against bacteria isolated from minced beef was confirmed, and chitosan concentration of 400 ppm was eventually determined for application in minced beef. Based on microbiological analysis, biochemical indices determination and sensory evaluation, shelf-lives of 2-3 days for control, 4-5 days for nanoparticle chitosan treatment samples, were observed, indicating that chitosan nanoparticle have a great potential for minced beef preservation.

  15. Conformational Dynamics of the Focal Adhesion Targeting Domain Control Specific Functions of Focal Adhesion Kinase in Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kadaré, Gress

    2015-01-02

    Focal adhesion (FA) kinase (FAK) regulates cell survival and motility by transducing signals from membrane receptors. The C-terminal FA targeting (FAT) domain of FAK fulfils multiple functions, including recruitment to FAs through paxillin binding. Phosphorylation of FAT on Tyr925 facilitates FA disassembly and connects to the MAPK pathway through Grb2 association, but requires dissociation of the first helix (H1) of the four-helix bundle of FAT. We investigated the importance of H1 opening in cells by comparing the properties of FAK molecules containing wild-type or mutated FAT with impaired or facilitated H1 openings. These mutations did not alter the activation of FAK, but selectively affected its cellular functions, including self-association, Tyr925 phosphorylation, paxillin binding, and FA targeting and turnover. Phosphorylation of Tyr861, located between the kinase and FAT domains, was also enhanced by the mutation that opened the FAT bundle. Similarly phosphorylation of Ser910 by ERK in response to bombesin was increased by FAT opening. Although FAK molecules with the mutation favoring FAT opening were poorly recruited at FAs, they efficiently restored FA turnover and cell shape in FAK-deficient cells. In contrast, the mutation preventing H1 opening markedly impaired FAK function. Our data support the biological importance of conformational dynamics of the FAT domain and its functional interactions with other parts of the molecule.

  16. Construction and evaluation of controlled-release delivery system of Abamectin using porous silica nanoparticles as carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Cui, Haixin; Sun, Changjiao; Zhao, Xiang; Cui, Bo

    2014-12-01

    Photolysis and poor solubility in water of Abamectin are key issues to be addressed, which causes low bioavailability and residual pollution. In this study, a novel hydrophilic delivery system through loading Abamectin with porous silica nanoparticles (Abam-PSNs) was developed in order to improve the chemical stability, dispersity, and the controlled release of Abamectin. These results suggest that Abam-PSNs can significantly improve the performance of controllable release, photostability, and water solubility of Abamectin by changing the porous structure of silica nanoparticles, which is favorable to improve the bioavailability and reduce the residues of pesticides.

  17. Fabrication of disposable topographic silicon oxide from sawtoothed patterns: control of arrays of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Heesook; Yoo, Hana; Park, Soojin

    2010-05-18

    Disposable topographic silicon oxide patterns were fabricated from polymeric replicas of sawtoothed glass surfaces, spin-coating of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) thin films, and thermal annealing at certain temperature and followed by oxygen plasma treatment of the thin PDMS layer. A simple imprinting process was used to fabricate the replicated PDMS and PS patterns from sawtoothed glass surfaces. Next, thin layers of PDMS films having different thicknesses were spin-coated onto the sawtoothed PS surfaces and annealed at 60 degrees C to be drawn the PDMS into the valley of the sawtoothed PS surfaces, followed by oxygen plasma treatment to fabricate topographic silicon oxide patterns. By control of the thickness of PDMS layers, silicon oxide patterns having various line widths were fabricated. The silicon oxide topographic patterns were used to direct the self-assembly of polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) block copolymer thin films via solvent annealing process. A highly ordered PS-b-P2VP micellar structure was used to let gold precursor complex with P2VP chains, and followed by oxygen plasma treatment. When the PS-b-P2VP thin films containing gold salts were exposed to oxygen plasma environments, gold salts were reduced to pure gold nanoparticles without changing high degree of lateral order, while polymers were completely degraded. As the width of trough and crest in topographic patterns increases, the number of gold arrays and size of gold nanoparticles are tuned. In the final step, the silicon oxide topographic patterns were selectively removed by wet etching process without changing the arrays of gold nanoparticles.

  18. Size control and supporting of palladium nanoparticles made by laser ablation in saline solution as a facile route to heterogeneous catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzun, Galina; Nakamura, Junji; Zhang, Xiaorui; Barcikowski, Stephan; Wagener, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We studied laser-generated, size-controlled palladium nanoparticles in saline solution. • Palladium nanoparticles were electrostatically stabilized by anions. • Photo- and electrocatalyst are prepared by supporting Pd nanoparticles to TiO 2 and graphene. • Particle size does not change during supporting process, while 18 wt% load has been achieved. • Palladium nanoparticles and graphene undergo a redox-reaction during adsorption. - Abstract: In the literature many investigations on colloidal stability and size control of gold nanoparticles are shown but less for ligand-free palladium nanoparticles, which can be promising materials in various applications. Palladium nanoparticles are perspective materials for a manifold of energy application like photo- and electrocatalysis or hydrogen storage. For this purpose, size-controlled nanoparticles with clean surfaces and facile immobilization on catalyst supports are wanted. Laser ablation in saline solution yields ligand-free, charged colloidal palladium nanoparticles that are supported by titania and graphene nanosheets as model systems for photo- and electrocatalysis, respectively. By adjusting the ionic strength during laser ablation in liquid, it is possible to control stability and particle size without compromising subsequent nanoparticle adsorption of supporting materials. A quantitative deposition of nearly 100% yield with up to 18 wt% nanoparticle load was achieved. The average size of the laser-generated nanoparticles remains the same after immobilization on a support material, in contrast to other preparation methods of catalysts. The characterization by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals a redox reaction between the immobilized nanoparticles and the graphene support

  19. Achieving 3-D Nanoparticle Assembly in Nanocomposite Thin Films via Kinetic Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jingyu; Xiao, Yihan; Xu, Ting [UCB

    2017-02-20

    Nanocomposite thin films containing well-ordered nanoparticle (NP) assemblies are ideal candidates for the fabrication of metamaterials. Achieving 3-D assembly of NPs in nanocomposite thin films is thermodynamically challenging as the particle size gets similar to that of a single polymer chain. The entropic penalties of polymeric matrix upon NP incorporation leads to NP aggregation on the film surface or within the defects in the film. Controlling the kinetic pathways of assembly process provides an alternative path forward by arresting the system in nonequilibrium states. Here, we report the thin film 3-D hierarchical assembly of 20 nm NPs in supramolecules with a 30 nm periodicity. By mediating the NP diffusion kinetics in the supramolecular matrix, surface aggregation of NPs was suppressed and NPs coassemble with supramolecules to form new 3-D morphologies in thin films. The present studies opened a viable route to achieve designer functional composite thin films via kinetic control.

  20. Microfluidic Device for Controllable Chemical Release via Field-Actuated Membrane Incorporating Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a robust magnetic-membrane-based microfluidic platform for controllable chemical release. The magnetic membrane was prepared by mixing polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS and carbonyl-iron nanoparticles together to obtain a flexible thin film. With combined, simultaneous regulation of magnetic stimulus and mechanical pumping, the desired chemical release rate can easily be realized. For example, the dose release experimental data was well fitted by a mathematical sigmoidal model, exhibiting a typical dose-response relationship, which shows promise in providing significant guidance for on-demand drug delivery. To test the platform’s feasibility, our microfluidic device was employed in an experiment involving Escherichia coli culture under controlled antibiotic ciprofloxacin exposure, and the expected outcomes were successfully obtained. Our experimental results indicate that such a microfluidic device, with high accuracy and easy manipulation properties, can legitimately be characterized as active chemical release system.

  1. Microfluidic Device for Controllable Chemical Release via Field-Actuated Membrane Incorporating Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xiang; Li, Shunbo; Wang, Limu; Yi, Xin; Hui, Yu Sanna; Qin, Jianhua; Wen, Weijia

    2013-01-01

    We report a robust magnetic-membrane-based microfluidic platform for controllable chemical release. The magnetic membrane was prepared by mixing polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and carbonyl-iron nanoparticles together to obtain a flexible thin film. With combined, simultaneous regulation of magnetic stimulus and mechanical pumping, the desired chemical release rate can easily be realized. For example, the dose release experimental data was well fitted by a mathematical sigmoidal model, exhibiting a typical dose-response relationship, which shows promise in providing significant guidance for on-demand drug delivery. To test the platform’s feasibility, our microfluidic device was employed in an experiment involving Escherichia coli culture under controlled antibiotic ciprofloxacin exposure, and the expected outcomes were successfully obtained. Our experimental results indicate that such a microfluidic device, with high accuracy and easy manipulation properties, can legitimately be characterized as active chemical release system.

  2. Control of cancer growth using single input autonomous fuzzy Nano-particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh Razmi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a single input fuzzy controller is applied on autonomous drug-encapsulated nanoparticles (ADENPs to restrict the cancer growth. The proposed ADENPs, swarmly release the drug in local cancerous tissue and effectively decreases the destruction of normal tissue. The amount of released drug is defined considering to feed backed values of tumor growth rate and the used drug. Some significant characteristics of Nano particles compared to Nano-robots is their ability to recognize the cancerous tissue from the normal one and their simple structure. Nano particles became an attractive topic in Nano science and many efforts have been done to manufacture these particles. Simulation results show that the proposed controlling method not only decreases the cancerous tissue effectively but also reduces the side effects of drug impressively.

  3. Microfluidic Device for Controllable Chemical Release via Field-Actuated Membrane Incorporating Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    We report a robust magnetic-membrane-based microfluidic platform for controllable chemical release. The magnetic membrane was prepared by mixing polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and carbonyl-iron nanoparticles together to obtain a flexible thin film. With combined, simultaneous regulation of magnetic stimulus and mechanical pumping, the desired chemical release rate can easily be realized. For example, the dose release experimental data was well fitted by a mathematical sigmoidal model, exhibiting a typical dose-response relationship, which shows promise in providing significant guidance for on-demand drug delivery. To test the platform’s feasibility, our microfluidic device was employed in an experiment involving Escherichia coli culture under controlled antibiotic ciprofloxacin exposure, and the expected outcomes were successfully obtained. Our experimental results indicate that such a microfluidic device, with high accuracy and easy manipulation properties, can legitimately be characterized as active chemical release system.

  4. Nanoparticles with entrapped {alpha}-tocopherol: synthesis, characterization, and controlled release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zigoneanu, Imola Gabriela [101 E B Doran Building, BAE Department, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Astete, Carlos Ernesto [110 E B Doran Building, BAE Department, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Sabliov, Cristina Mirela [141 E B Doran Building, BAE Department, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)], E-mail: csabliov@lsu.edu

    2008-03-12

    An emulsion evaporation method was used to synthesize spherical poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles with entrapped {alpha}-tocopherol. Two different surfactants were used: sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). For SDS nanoparticles, the size of the nanoparticles decreased significantly with the entrapment of {alpha}-tocopherol in the PLGA matrix, while the size of PVA nanoparticles remained unchanged. The polydispersity index after synthesis was under 0.100 for PVA nanoparticles and around 0.150 for SDS nanoparticles. The zeta potential was negative for all PVA nanoparticles. The entrapment efficiency of {alpha}-tocopherol in the polymeric matrix was approximately 89% and 95% for nanoparticles with 8% and 16% {alpha}-tocopherol theoretical loading, respectively. The residual PVA associated with the nanoparticles after purification was approximately 6% ( w/w relative to the nanoparticles). The release profile showed an initial burst followed by a slower release of the {alpha}-tocopherol entrapped inside the PLGA matrix. The release for nanoparticles with 8% {alpha}-tocopherol theoretical loading (86% released in the first hour) was faster than the release for the nanoparticles with 16% {alpha}-tocopherol theoretical loading (34% released in the first hour)

  5. Nanoparticles with entrapped α-tocopherol: synthesis, characterization, and controlled release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zigoneanu, Imola Gabriela; Astete, Carlos Ernesto; Sabliov, Cristina Mirela

    2008-01-01

    An emulsion evaporation method was used to synthesize spherical poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles with entrapped α-tocopherol. Two different surfactants were used: sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). For SDS nanoparticles, the size of the nanoparticles decreased significantly with the entrapment of α-tocopherol in the PLGA matrix, while the size of PVA nanoparticles remained unchanged. The polydispersity index after synthesis was under 0.100 for PVA nanoparticles and around 0.150 for SDS nanoparticles. The zeta potential was negative for all PVA nanoparticles. The entrapment efficiency of α-tocopherol in the polymeric matrix was approximately 89% and 95% for nanoparticles with 8% and 16% α-tocopherol theoretical loading, respectively. The residual PVA associated with the nanoparticles after purification was approximately 6% ( w/w relative to the nanoparticles). The release profile showed an initial burst followed by a slower release of the α-tocopherol entrapped inside the PLGA matrix. The release for nanoparticles with 8% α-tocopherol theoretical loading (86% released in the first hour) was faster than the release for the nanoparticles with 16% α-tocopherol theoretical loading (34% released in the first hour)

  6. Roles of Bridging Ligand Topology and Conformation in Controlling Exchange Interactions between Paramagnetic Molybdenum Fragments in Dinuclear and Trinuclear Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung VÂ, V&acaron;n Ân; Cargill Thompson, Alexander M. W.; Bardwell, David A.; Gatteschi, Dante; Jeffery, John C.; McCleverty, Jon A.; Totti, Federico; Ward, Michael D.

    1997-07-30

    The magnetic properties of two series of dinuclear complexes, and one trinuclear complex, have been examined as a function of the bridging pathway between the metal centers. The first series of dinuclear complexes is [{Mo(V)(O)(Tp)Cl}(2)(&mgr;-OO)], where "OO" is [1,4-O(C(6)H(4))(n)O](2)(-) (n = 1, 1; n = 2, 3), [4,4'-O(C(6)H(3)-2-Me)(2)O](2)(-) (4), or [1,3-OC(6)H(4)O](2)(-) (2) [Tp = tris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)hydroborate]. The second series of dinuclear complexes is [{Mo(I)(NO)(Tp)Cl}(2)(&mgr;-NN)], where "NN" is 4,4'-bipyridyl (5), 3,3'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridine (6), 3,8-phenanthroline (7), or 2,7-diazapyrene (8). The trinuclear complex is [{Mo(V)(O)(Tp)Cl}(3)(1,3,5-C(6)H(3)O(3))] (9), whose crystal structure was determined [9.5CH(2)Cl(2): C(56)H(81)B(3)Cl(13)Mo(3)N(18)O(6); monoclinic, P2(1)/n; a = 13.443, b = 41.46(2), c = 14.314(6) Å; beta = 93.21(3) degrees; V = 7995(5) Å(3); Z = 4; R(1) = 0.106]. In these complexes, the sign and magnitude of the exchange coupling constant J is clearly related to both the topology and the conformation of the bridging ligand [where J is derived from H = -JS(1)().S(2)() for 1-8 and H = -J(S(1)().S(2)() + S(2)().S(3)() + S(1)().S(3)()) for 9]. The values are as follows: 1, -80 cm(-)(1); 2, +9.8 cm(-)(1); 3, -13.2 cm(-)(1); 4, -2.8 cm(-)(1); 5, -33 cm(-)(1); 6, -3.5 cm(-)(1); 7, -35.6 cm(-)(1); 8, -35.0 cm(-)(1); 9, +14.4 cm(-)(1). In particular the following holds: (1) J is negative (antiferromagnetic exchange) across the para-substituted bridges ligands of 1 and 3-8 but positive (ferromagnetic exchange) across the meta-substituted bridging ligands of 2 and 9. (2) J decreases in magnitude dramatically as the bridging ligand conformation changes from planar to twisted (compare 3 and 4, or 6 and 8). These observations are consistent with a spin-polarization mechanism for the exchange interaction, propagated across the pi-system of the bridging ligand by via overlap of bridging ligand p(pi) orbitals with the d(pi) magnetic

  7. Development of PEGylated PLGA nanoparticle for controlled and sustained drug delivery in cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazur Steven

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene results in CF. The most common mutation, ΔF508-CFTR, is a temperature-sensitive, trafficking mutant with reduced chloride transport and exaggerated immune response. The ΔF508-CFTR is misfolded, ubiquitinated, and prematurely degraded by proteasome mediated- degradation. We recently demonstrated that selective inhibition of proteasomal pathway by the FDA approved drug PS-341 (pyrazylcarbonyl-Phe-Leuboronate, a.k.a. Velcade or bortezomib ameliorates the inflammatory pathophysiology of CF cells. This proteasomal drug is an extremely potent, stable, reversible and selective inhibitor of chymotryptic threonine protease-activity. The apprehension in considering the proteasome as a therapeutic target is that proteasome inhibitors may affect proteostasis and consecutive processes. The affect on multiple processes can be mitigated by nanoparticle mediated PS-341 lung-delivery resulting in favorable outcome observed in this study. Results To overcome this challenge, we developed a nano-based approach that uses drug loaded biodegradable nanoparticle (PLGA-PEGPS-341 to provide controlled and sustained drug delivery. The in vitro release kinetics of drug from nanoparticle was quantified by proteasomal activity assay from days 1-7 that showed slow drug release from day 2-7 with maximum inhibition at day 7. For in vivo release kinetics and biodistribution, these drug-loaded nanoparticles were fluorescently labeled, and administered to C57BL6 mice by intranasal route. Whole-body optical imaging of the treated live animals demonstrates efficient delivery of particles to murine lungs, 24 hrs post treatment, followed by biodegradation and release over time, day 1-11. The efficacy of drug release in CF mice (Cftr-/- lungs was determined by quantifying the changes in proteasomal activity (~2 fold decrease and ability to rescue the Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS (Pa

  8. The role of PEG conformation in mixed layers: from protein corona substrate to steric stabilization avoiding protein adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Comenge

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Although nanoparticles (NPs have been traditionally modified with a single ligand layer, mixture of ligands might help to combine different functionalities and to further engineer the NP surface. A detailed study of the competition between an alkanethiol (11-mercaptoundecanoic acid and SH-PEG for the surface of AuNPs and the resultant behaviors of this model nanoconjugate is presented here. As a result, the physicochemical properties of these conjugates can be progressively tuned by controlling the composition and especially the conformation of the mixed monolayer. This has implications in the physiological stability. The controlled changes on the SH-PEG conformation rather than its concentration induce a change in the stabilization mechanism from electrostatic repulsion to steric hindrance, which changes the biological fate of NPs. Importantly, the adsorption of proteins on the conjugates can be tailored by tuning the composition and conformation of the mixed layer.

  9. Colloidal nanoparticle size control: experimental and kinetic modeling investigation of the ligand-metal binding role in controlling the nucleation and growth kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffari, Saeed; Li, Wenhui; Thompson, Coogan; Ivanov, Sergei; Seifert, Soenke; Lee, Byeongdu; Kovarik, Libor; Karim, Ayman M

    2017-09-21

    Despite the major advancements in colloidal metal nanoparticles synthesis, a quantitative mechanistic treatment of the ligand's role in controlling their size remains elusive. We report a methodology that combines in situ small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and kinetic modeling to quantitatively capture the role of ligand-metal binding (with the metal precursor and the nanoparticle surface) in controlling the synthesis kinetics. We demonstrate that accurate extraction of the kinetic rate constants requires using both, the size and number of particles obtained from in situ SAXS to decouple the contributions of particle nucleation and growth to the total metal reduction. Using Pd acetate and trioctylphosphine in different solvents, our results reveal that the binding of ligands with both the metal precursor and nanoparticle surface play a key role in controlling the rates of nucleation and growth and consequently the final size. We show that the solvent can affect the metal-ligand binding and consequently ligand coverage on the nanoparticles surface which has a strong effect on the growth rate and final size (1.4 nm in toluene and 4.3 nm in pyridine). The proposed kinetic model quantitatively predicts the effects of varying the metal concentration and ligand/metal ratio on nanoparticle size for our work and literature reports. More importantly, we demonstrate that the final size is exclusively determined by the nucleation and growth kinetics at early times and not how they change with time. Specifically, the nanoparticle size in this work and many literature reports can be predicted using a single, model independent kinetic descriptor, (growth-to-nucleation rate ratio) 1/3 , despite the different metals and synthetic conditions. The proposed model and kinetic descriptor could serve as powerful tools for the design of colloidal nanoparticles with specific sizes.

  10. Controllable biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles from a Eucommia ulmoides bark aqueous extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mingxia; Li, Wei; Yang, Feng; Liu, Huihong

    2015-05-01

    The present work reports the green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by water extract of Eucommia ulmoides (E. ulmoides) bark. The effects of various parameters such as the concentration of reactants, pH of the reaction mixture, temperature and the time of incubation were explored to the controlled formation of gold nanoparticles. The characterization through high resolution-transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) infer that the as-synthesized AuNPs were spherical in shape with a face cubic crystal (FCC) structure. The results from zeta potential and dynamic light scattering (DLS) suggest the good stability and narrow size distribution of the AuNPs. This method for synthesis of AuNPs is simple, economic, nontoxic and efficient. The as-synthesized AuNPs show excellent catalytic activity for the catalytic reducing decoloration of model compounds of azo-dye: reactive yellow 179 and Congo red.

  11. Controlling exchange bias in Co-CoOx nanoparticles by oxygen content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovylina, Miroslavna; Muro, Montserrat GarcIa del; Konstantinovic, Zorica; Iglesias, Oscar; Labarta, AmIlcar; Batlle, Xavier; Varela, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    We report on the occurrence of exchange bias on laser-ablated granular thin films composed of Co nanoparticles embedded in an amorphous zirconia matrix. The deposition method allows one to control the degree of oxidation of the Co particles by tuning the oxygen pressure at the vacuum chamber (from 2 x 10 -5 to 10 -1 mbar). The nature of the nanoparticles embedded in the nonmagnetic matrix is monitored from metallic, ferromagnetic (FM) Co to antiferromagnetic (AFM) CoO x , with a FM/AFM intermediate regime for which the percentage of the AFM phase can be increased at the expense of the FM phase, leading to the occurrence of exchange bias in particles of about 2 nm in size. For an oxygen pressure of about 10 -3 mbar the ratio between the FM and AFM phases is optimum with an exchange bias field of about 900 Oe at 1.8 K. The mutual exchange coupling between the AFM and FM is also at the origin of the induced exchange anisotropy on the FM leading to high irreversible hysteresis loops, and the blocking of the AFM clusters due to proximity to the FM phase.

  12. Control of nanoparticle agglomeration through variation of the time-temperature profile in chemical vapor synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djenadic, Ruzica; Winterer, Markus, E-mail: markus.winterer@uni-due.de [Universität Duisburg-Essen, Nanoparticle Process Technology, Faculty of Engineering and CENIDE (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    The influence of the time-temperature history on the characteristics of nanoparticles such as size, degree of agglomeration, or crystallinity is investigated for chemical vapor synthesis (CVS). A simple reaction-coagulation-sintering model is used to describe the CVS process, and the results of the model are compared to experimental data. Nanocrystalline titania is used as model material. Titania nanoparticles are generated from titanium-tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in a hot-wall reactor. Pure anatase particles and mixtures of anatase, rutile (up to 11 vol.%), and brookite (up to 29 vol.%) with primary particle sizes from 1.7 nm to 10.5 nm and agglomerate particle sizes from 24.3 nm to 55.6 nm are formed depending on the particle time-temperature history. An inductively heated furnace with variable inductor geometry is used as a novel system to control the time-temperature profile in the reactor externally covering a large wall temperature range from 873 K to 2023 K. An appropriate choice of inductor geometry, i.e. time-temperature profile, can significantly reduce the degree of agglomeration. Other particle characteristics such as crystallinity are also substantially influenced by the time-temperature profile.

  13. Kinetic control of block copolymer self-assembly into multicompartment and novel geometry nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingchao; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Ke; Wooley, Karen; Mays, Jimmy; Percec, Virgil; Pochan, Darrin

    2012-02-01

    Micelles with the segregation of hydrophobic blocks trapped in the same nanoparticle core have been produced through co-self-assembly of two block copolymers in THF/water dilute solution. The dissolution of two block copolymer sharing the same polyacrylic acid PAA blocks in THF undergoes consequent aggregation and phase separation through either slow water titration or quick water addition that triggers the micellar formation. The combination and comparison of the two water addition kinetic pathways are the keys of forming multicompartment structures at high water content. Importantly, the addition of organic diamine provides for acid-base complexation with the PAA side chains which, in turn, plays the key role of trapping unlike hydrophobic blocks from different block copolymers into one nanoparticle core. The kinetic control of solution assembly can be applied to other molecular systems such as dendrimers as well as other block copolymer molecules. Transmission electron microscopy, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, light scattering have been applied to characterize the micelle structures.

  14. Control of single-electron charging of metallic nanoparticles onto amorphous silicon surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Martin; Gmucová, Katarína; Nádazdy, Vojtech; Capek, Ignác; Satka, Alexander; Kopáni, Martin; Cirák, Július; Majková, Eva

    2008-11-01

    Sequential single-electron charging of iron oxide nanoparticles encapsulated in oleic acid/oleyl amine envelope and deposited by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique onto Pt electrode covered with undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon film is reported. Single-electron charging (so-called quantized double-layer charging) of nanoparticles is detected by cyclic voltammetry as current peaks and the charging effect can be switched on/off by the electric field in the surface region induced by the excess of negative/positive charged defect states in the amorphous silicon layer. The particular charge states in amorphous silicon are created by the simultaneous application of a suitable bias voltage and illumination before the measurement. The influence of charged states on the electric field in the surface region is evaluated by the finite element method. The single-electron charging is analyzed by the standard quantized double layer model as well as two weak-link junctions model. Both approaches are in accordance with experiment and confirm single-electron charging by tunnelling process at room temperature. This experiment illustrates the possibility of the creation of a voltage-controlled capacitor for nanotechnology.

  15. Temperature-controlled cross-linking of silver nanoparticles with Diels-Alder reaction and its application on antibacterial property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lian; Yang, Pengfei, E-mail: ypf@qlu.edu.cn; Li, Junying; Zhang, Zhiliang; Yu, Xi; Lu, Ling

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • Silver nanoparticles were functionalized by furan groups. • The DA reaction of furan with bismaleimide was used to cross-link the particles. • The reverse cross-linking could be controlled by temperature. • The antibacterial activity of silvers could be adjusted by the cross-linking. - Abstract: Sliver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized and functionalized with furan group on their surface, followed by the reverse Diels-Alder (DA) reaction with bismaleimide to vary the particle size, so as to give different antibacterial activities. These nanoparticles were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Ultraviolet-Visible (UV–vis), Nanoparticle Size Analyzer and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that the cross-linking reaction with bismaleimide had a great effect on the size of AgNPs. The size of the AgNPs could be controlled by the temperature of DA/r-DA equilibrium. The antibacterial activity was assessed using the inhibition zone diameter by introducing the particles into a media containing Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, respectively. It was found that these particles were effective bactericides. Furthermore, the antibacterial activity of the nanoparticles decreased orderly as the particle size enlarged.

  16. Temperature-controlled cross-linking of silver nanoparticles with Diels-Alder reaction and its application on antibacterial property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Lian; Yang, Pengfei; Li, Junying; Zhang, Zhiliang; Yu, Xi; Lu, Ling

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Silver nanoparticles were functionalized by furan groups. • The DA reaction of furan with bismaleimide was used to cross-link the particles. • The reverse cross-linking could be controlled by temperature. • The antibacterial activity of silvers could be adjusted by the cross-linking. - Abstract: Sliver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized and functionalized with furan group on their surface, followed by the reverse Diels-Alder (DA) reaction with bismaleimide to vary the particle size, so as to give different antibacterial activities. These nanoparticles were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Ultraviolet-Visible (UV–vis), Nanoparticle Size Analyzer and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that the cross-linking reaction with bismaleimide had a great effect on the size of AgNPs. The size of the AgNPs could be controlled by the temperature of DA/r-DA equilibrium. The antibacterial activity was assessed using the inhibition zone diameter by introducing the particles into a media containing Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, respectively. It was found that these particles were effective bactericides. Furthermore, the antibacterial activity of the nanoparticles decreased orderly as the particle size enlarged.

  17. Synthesis of nanoparticles in a flame aerosol reactor with independent and strict control of their size, crystal phase and morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Jingkun; Chen, D-R; Biswas, Pratim

    2007-01-01

    A flame aerosol reactor (FLAR) was developed to synthesize nanoparticles with desired properties (crystal phase and size) that could be independently controlled. The methodology was demonstrated for TiO 2 nanoparticles, and this is the first time that large sets of samples with the same size but different crystal phases (six different ratios of anatase to rutile in this work) were synthesized. The degree of TiO 2 nanoparticle agglomeration was determined by comparing the primary particle size distribution measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to the mobility-based particle size distribution measured by online scanning mobility particle spectrometry (SMPS). By controlling the flame aerosol reactor conditions, both spherical unagglomerated particles and highly agglomerated particles were produced. To produce monodisperse nanoparticles, a high throughput multi-stage differential mobility analyser (MDMA) was used in series with the flame aerosol reactor. Nearly monodisperse nanoparticles (geometric standard deviation less than 1.05) could be collected in sufficient mass quantities (of the order of 10 mg) in reasonable time (1 h) that could be used in other studies such as determination of functionality or biological effects as a function of size

  18. Synthesis of nanoparticles in a flame aerosol reactor with independent and strict control of their size, crystal phase and morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Jingkun; Chen, D-R; Biswas, Pratim [Aerosol and Air Quality Research Laboratory, Department of Energy, Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Washington University in St Louis, Campus Box 1180, St Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2007-07-18

    A flame aerosol reactor (FLAR) was developed to synthesize nanoparticles with desired properties (crystal phase and size) that could be independently controlled. The methodology was demonstrated for TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, and this is the first time that large sets of samples with the same size but different crystal phases (six different ratios of anatase to rutile in this work) were synthesized. The degree of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle agglomeration was determined by comparing the primary particle size distribution measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to the mobility-based particle size distribution measured by online scanning mobility particle spectrometry (SMPS). By controlling the flame aerosol reactor conditions, both spherical unagglomerated particles and highly agglomerated particles were produced. To produce monodisperse nanoparticles, a high throughput multi-stage differential mobility analyser (MDMA) was used in series with the flame aerosol reactor. Nearly monodisperse nanoparticles (geometric standard deviation less than 1.05) could be collected in sufficient mass quantities (of the order of 10 mg) in reasonable time (1 h) that could be used in other studies such as determination of functionality or biological effects as a function of size.

  19. Facile synthesis of concentrated gold nanoparticles with low size-distribution in water: temperature and pH controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chunfang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The citrate reduction method for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs has known advantages but usually provides the products with low nanoparticle concentration and limits its application. Herein, we report a facile method to synthesize GNPs from concentrated chloroauric acid (2.5 mM via adding sodium hydroxide and controlling the temperature. It was found that adding a proper amount of sodium hydroxide can produce uniform concentrated GNPs with low size distribution; otherwise, the largely distributed nanoparticles or instable colloids were obtained. The low reaction temperature is helpful to control the nanoparticle formation rate, and uniform GNPs can be obtained in presence of optimized NaOH concentrations. The pH values of the obtained uniform GNPs were found to be very near to neutral, and the pH influence on the particle size distribution may reveal the different formation mechanism of GNPs at high or low pH condition. Moreover, this modified synthesis method can save more than 90% energy in the heating step. Such environmental-friendly synthesis method for gold nanoparticles may have a great potential in large-scale manufacturing for commercial and industrial demand.

  20. Facile synthesis of concentrated gold nanoparticles with low size-distribution in water: temperature and pH controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunfang; Li, Dongxiang; Wan, Gangqiang; Xu, Jie; Hou, Wanguo

    2011-07-01

    The citrate reduction method for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) has known advantages but usually provides the products with low nanoparticle concentration and limits its application. Herein, we report a facile method to synthesize GNPs from concentrated chloroauric acid (2.5 mM) via adding sodium hydroxide and controlling the temperature. It was found that adding a proper amount of sodium hydroxide can produce uniform concentrated GNPs with low size distribution; otherwise, the largely distributed nanoparticles or instable colloids were obtained. The low reaction temperature is helpful to control the nanoparticle formation rate, and uniform GNPs can be obtained in presence of optimized NaOH concentrations. The pH values of the obtained uniform GNPs were found to be very near to neutral, and the pH influence on the particle size distribution may reveal the different formation mechanism of GNPs at high or low pH condition. Moreover, this modified synthesis method can save more than 90% energy in the heating step. Such environmental-friendly synthesis method for gold nanoparticles may have a great potential in large-scale manufacturing for commercial and industrial demand.

  1. A nanoscale friction investigation during the manipulation of nanoparticles in controlled environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacio, Manuel; Bhushan, Bharat

    2008-01-01

    Future micro/nanodevices will contain very small features such that liquid lubrication is not practical and inherent lubricity is needed. In this study, a nanoscale friction investigation was carried out during the manipulation of Au and SiO 2 nanoparticles on silicon using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Nanoparticle sliding was characterized by quantifying the lateral force associated with the AFM tip twisting as it hits the particle edge. The friction force varies with particle area and humidity, illustrating how meniscus forces on nanoparticles affect friction. A large tip slid on the nanoparticle-coated surface exhibited friction reduction due to nanoparticle sliding and contact area reduction

  2. Hierarchical Mesoporous Organosilica-Silica Core-Shell Nanoparticles Capable of Controlled Fungicide Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Leilei; Liang, Yucang; Erichsen, Egil Severin; Anwander, Reiner

    2018-05-17

    A new class of hierarchically structured mesoporous silica core-shell nanoparticles (HSMSCSNs) with a periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) core and a mesoporous silica (MS) shell is reported. The applied one-pot, two-step strategy allows rational control over the core/shell chemical composition, topology, and pore/particle size, simply by adjusting the reaction conditions in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as structure-directing agent under basic conditions. The spherical, ethylene- or methylene-bridged PMO cores feature hexagonal (p6mm) or cage-like cubic symmetry (Pm3‾ n) depending on the organosilica precursor. The hexagonal MS shell was obtained by n-hexane-induced controlled hydrolysis of TEOS followed by directional co-assembly/condensation of silicate/CTAB composites at the PMO cores. The HSMSCSNs feature a hierarchical pore structure with pore diameters of about 2.7 and 5.6 nm in the core and shell domains, respectively. The core sizes and shell thicknesses are adjustable in the ranges of 90-275 and 15-50 nm, respectively, and the surface areas (max. 1300 m 2  g -1 ) and pore volumes (max. 1.83 cm 3  g -1 ) are among the highest reported for core-shell nanoparticles. The adsorption and controlled release of the fungicide propiconazole by the HSMSCSNs showed a three-stage release profile. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Low-temperature thermoelectric power factor enhancement by controlling nanoparticle size distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebarjadi, Mona; Esfarjani, Keivan; Bian, Zhixi; Shakouri, Ali

    2011-01-12

    Coherent potential approximation is used to study the effect of adding doped spherical nanoparticles inside a host matrix on the thermoelectric properties. This takes into account electron multiple scatterings that are important in samples with relatively high volume fraction of nanoparticles (>1%). We show that with large fraction of uniform small size nanoparticles (∼1 nm), the power factor can be enhanced significantly. The improvement could be large (up to 450% for GaAs) especially at low temperatures when the mobility is limited by impurity or nanoparticle scattering. The advantage of doping via embedded nanoparticles compared to the conventional shallow impurities is quantified. At the optimum thermoelectric power factor, the electrical conductivity of the nanoparticle-doped material is larger than that of impurity-doped one at the studied temperature range (50-500 K) whereas the Seebeck coefficient of the nanoparticle doped material is enhanced only at low temperatures (∼50 K).

  4. APPROACH REGARDING SOME CONFORMATION AND MILK PRODUCTION TRAITS IN ROMANIAN SIMMENTAL CATTLE FORM HARGHITA AREA INCLUDED IN THE OFFICIAL CONTROLL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. CIGHI

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of performance data regarding the conformation traits (withers height, body weight, thoracic perimeter, including the traits that concur to milk production (total milk production per normal lactation, fat percent, total fat amount from milk, in mothers-cattle of bulls, candidate mothers-cattle of bulls and active population of Romanian Spotted Simmental breed from Harghita region, allow us to ascertain the followings: The body weight of mothers-cattle of bulls, candidate mothers-cattle for bulls and also of those from the active population of Harghita region, prove the existence of a valuable genetic material with a high superiority of 30 kg of the mothers-cattle of bulls related the candidate mothers-cattle of bulls and of 50 kg related the active population; all of these emphasize the stringency of the selection performed. Analyzing the waistline of the three populations, it was possible to ascertain that the mothers-cattle of bulls values over class those of the candidate mothers-cattle of bulls and of the active population with 1 cm, respectively 4,1 cm. This difference indicates the researchers concern for raising the waistline in the Romanian Spotted Simmental breed from Harghita region. The thoracic perimeter values were adjacent those of the mothers-cattle of bulls and of the candidate mothers-cattle of bulls (200,00±3,70 cm respectively 199,30±1,24 cm and 185,70±0,61 cm in the active population. The values of circa 7000 kg milk realized in normal lactation of the mothers-cattle of bulls and candidate mothers-cattle of bulls, are showing a very good intensity of the selection, proved by the selection difference registered between the active population and the above two categories. These high milk productions registered for the mothers-cattle of bulls and candidate mothers-cattle of bulls are indicating a high productivity potential. The 250 kg of total milk fat achieved are showing a high potential of the Romanian Spotted

  5. Viscous conformal gauge theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toniato, Arianna; Sannino, Francesco; Rischke, Dirk H.

    2017-01-01

    We present the conformal behavior of the shear viscosity-to-entropy density ratio and the fermion-number diffusion coefficient within the perturbative regime of the conformal window for gauge-fermion theories.......We present the conformal behavior of the shear viscosity-to-entropy density ratio and the fermion-number diffusion coefficient within the perturbative regime of the conformal window for gauge-fermion theories....

  6. Conformal Einstein spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozameh, C.N.; Newman, E.T.; Tod, K.P.

    1985-01-01

    Conformal transformations in four-dimensional. In particular, a new set of two necessary and sufficient conditions for a space to be conformal to an Einstein space is presented. The first condition defines the class of spaces conformal to C spaces, whereas the last one (the vanishing of the Bach tensor) gives the particular subclass of C spaces which are conformally related to Einstein spaces. (author)

  7. Inorganic nanoparticles for the spatial and temporal control of organic reactions: Applications to radical degradation of biopolymer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Joan Marie

    Nanoparticles of gold and iron oxide not only possess remarkable optical and magnetic properties, respectively, but are also capable of influencing their local environment with an astounding degree of precision. Using nanoparticles to direct the reactivity of organic molecules near their surface provides a unique method of spatial and temporal control. Enediynes represent an exceptional class of compounds that are thermally reactive to produce a diradical intermediate via Bergman cycloaromatization. While natural product enediynes are famously cytotoxic, a rich chemistry of synthetic enediynes has developed utilizing creative means to control this reactivity through structure, electronics, metal chelation, and external triggering mechanisms. In a heretofore unexplored arena for Bergman cyclization, we have investigated the reactivity of enediynes in connection with inorganic nanoparticles in which the physical properties of the nanomaterial are directly excited to thermally promote aromatization. As the first example of this methodology, gold nanoparticles conjugated with (Z)-octa-4-en-2,6-diyne-1,8-dithiol were excited with 514 nm laser irradiation. The formation of aromatic and polymeric products was confirmed through Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Water soluble analogues Au-PEG-EDDA and Fe3O4-PEG-EDDA (EDDA = (Z)-octa-4-en-2,6-diyne-1,8-diamine) show similar reactivity under laser irradiation or alternating magnetic field excitation, respectively. Furthermore, we have used these functionalized nanoparticles to attack proteinaceous substrates including fibrin and extracellular matrix proteins, capitalizing on the ability of diradicals to disrupt peptidic bonds. By delivering a locally high payload of reactive molecules and thermal energy to the large biopolymer, network restructuring and collapse is achieved. As a synthetic extension towards multifunctional nanoparticles, noble metal seed-decorated iron oxides have also been prepared and assessed for

  8. Superspace conformal field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quella, Thomas [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Schomerus, Volker [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Conformal sigma models and WZW models on coset superspaces provide important examples of logarithmic conformal field theories. They possess many applications to problems in string and condensed matter theory. We review recent results and developments, including the general construction of WZW models on type I supergroups, the classification of conformal sigma models and their embedding into string theory.

  9. Superspace conformal field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quella, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Conformal sigma models and WZW models on coset superspaces provide important examples of logarithmic conformal field theories. They possess many applications to problems in string and condensed matter theory. We review recent results and developments, including the general construction of WZW models on type I supergroups, the classification of conformal sigma models and their embedding into string theory.

  10. Shape-controlled synthesis of Au@Pd core-shell nanoparticles and their corresponding electrochemical properties

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Hyon Min

    2012-01-01

    The shape-controlled synthesis of Au@Pd core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) was successfully achieved through the emulsion phase generated during the phase transfer from organic to aqueous medium. Contrary to conventional epitaxial growth for obtaining core-shell structures, this method does not require high temperatures and does not have shape restrictions. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  11. TEA controllable preparation of magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) with excellent magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chengliang; Zhu, Dejie; Wu, Hanzhao; Li, Yao; Cheng, Lu; Hu, Kunhong

    2016-06-01

    A fast and controllable synthesis method for superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) was developed in Fe(III)-triethanolamine (TEA) solution. The phase structure, morphology and particle size of the as-synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that the magnetic particles were pure Fe3O4 with mean sizes of approximately 10 nm. The used TEA has key effects on the formation of well dispersing Fe3O4 NPs. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) result indicated that the as-obtained Fe3O4 NPs exhibited superparamagnetic behavior and the saturation magnetization (Ms) was about 70 emu/g, which had potential applications in magnetic science and technology.

  12. Nanoparticle enabled transdermal drug delivery systems for enhanced dose control and tissue targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Brian C.; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2017-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery systems have been around for decades, and current technologies (e.g. patches, ointments, and creams) enhance the skin permeation of low molecular weight, lipophilic drugs that are efficacious at low doses. The objective of current transdermal drug delivery research is to discover ways to enhance skin penetration of larger, hydrophilic drugs and macromolecules for disease treatment and vaccination. Nanocarriers made of lipids, metals, or polymers have been successfully used to increase penetration of drugs or vaccines, control drug release, and target drugs to specific areas of skin in vivo. While more research is needed to identify the safety of nanocarriers, this technology has the potential to expand the use of transdermal routes of administration to a wide array of therapeutics. Here, we review the current state of nanoparticle skin delivery systems with special emphasis on targeting skin diseases. PMID:27983701

  13. Nanoparticle-Enabled Transdermal Drug Delivery Systems for Enhanced Dose Control and Tissue Targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Brian C; DeLouise, Lisa A

    2016-12-15

    Transdermal drug delivery systems have been around for decades, and current technologies (e.g., patches, ointments, and creams) enhance the skin permeation of low molecular weight, lipophilic drugs that are efficacious at low doses. The objective of current transdermal drug delivery research is to discover ways to enhance skin penetration of larger, hydrophilic drugs and macromolecules for disease treatment and vaccination. Nanocarriers made of lipids, metals, or polymers have been successfully used to increase penetration of drugs or vaccines, control drug release, and target drugs to specific areas of skin in vivo. While more research is needed to identify the safety of nanocarriers, this technology has the potential to expand the use of transdermal routes of administration to a wide array of therapeutics. Here, we review the current state of nanoparticle skin delivery systems with special emphasis on targeting skin diseases.

  14. Controllable assembly of silver nanoparticles induced by femtosecond laser direct writing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Huan; Liu, Sen; Zhang, Yong-Lai; Wang, Jian-Nan; Wang, Lei; Xia, Hong; Chen, Qi-Dai; Sun, Hong-Bo; Ding, Hong

    2015-01-01

    We report controllable assembly of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) for patterning of silver microstructures. The assembly is induced by femtosecond laser direct writing (FsLDW). A tightly focused femtosecond laser beam is capable of trapping and driving Ag NPs to form desired micropatterns with a high resolution of ∼190 nm. Taking advantage of the ‘direct writing’ feature, three microelectrodes have been integrated with a microfluidic chip; two silver-based microdevices including a microheater and a catalytic reactor have been fabricated inside a microfluidic channel for chip functionalization. The FsLDW-induced programmable assembly of Ag NPs may open up a new way to the designable patterning of silver microstructures toward flexible fabrication and integration of functional devices. (focus issue paper)

  15. Nanoparticle-Enabled Transdermal Drug Delivery Systems for Enhanced Dose Control and Tissue Targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian C. Palmer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal drug delivery systems have been around for decades, and current technologies (e.g., patches, ointments, and creams enhance the skin permeation of low molecular weight, lipophilic drugs that are efficacious at low doses. The objective of current transdermal drug delivery research is to discover ways to enhance skin penetration of larger, hydrophilic drugs and macromolecules for disease treatment and vaccination. Nanocarriers made of lipids, metals, or polymers have been successfully used to increase penetration of drugs or vaccines, control drug release, and target drugs to specific areas of skin in vivo. While more research is needed to identify the safety of nanocarriers, this technology has the potential to expand the use of transdermal routes of administration to a wide array of therapeutics. Here, we review the current state of nanoparticle skin delivery systems with special emphasis on targeting skin diseases.

  16. Colloidal polymers with controlled sequence and branching constructed from magnetic field assembled nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannwarth, Markus B; Utech, Stefanie; Ebert, Sandro; Weitz, David A; Crespy, Daniel; Landfester, Katharina

    2015-03-24

    The assembly of nanoparticles into polymer-like architectures is challenging and usually requires highly defined colloidal building blocks. Here, we show that the broad size-distribution of a simple dispersion of magnetic nanocolloids can be exploited to obtain various polymer-like architectures. The particles are assembled under an external magnetic field and permanently linked by thermal sintering. The remarkable variety of polymer-analogue architectures that arises from this simple process ranges from statistical and block copolymer-like sequencing to branched chains and networks. This library of architectures can be realized by controlling the sequencing of the particles and the junction points via a size-dependent self-assembly of the single building blocks.

  17. Controlling photophysical properties of ultrasmall conjugated polymer nanoparticles through polymer chain packing

    KAUST Repository

    Piwonski, Hubert Marek

    2017-05-16

    Applications of conjugated polymer nanoparticles (Pdots) for imaging and sensing depend on their size, fluorescence brightness and intraparticle energy transfer. The molecular design of conjugated polymers (CPs) has been the main focus of the development of Pdots. Here we demonstrate that proper control of the physical interactions between the chains is as critical as the molecular design. The unique design of twisted CPs and fine-tuning of the reprecipitation conditions allow us to fabricate ultrasmall (3.0–4.5 nm) Pdots with excellent photostability. Extensive photophysical and structural characterization reveals the essential role played by the packing of the polymer chains in the particles in the intraparticle spatial alignment of the emitting sites, which regulate the fluorescence brightness and the intraparticle energy migration efficiency. Our findings enhance understanding of the relationship between chain interactions and the photophysical properties of CP nanomaterials, providing a framework for designing and fabricating functional Pdots for imaging applications.

  18. Controlled AFM manipulation of small nanoparticles and assembly of hybrid nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Suenne; Shafiei, Farbod; Ratchford, Daniel; Li Xiaoqin

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate controlled manipulation of semiconductor and metallic nanoparticles (NPs) with 5-15 nm diameters and assemble these NPs into hybrid structures. The manipulation is accomplished under ambient environment using a commercial atomic force microscope (AFM). There are particular difficulties associated with manipulating NPs this small. In addition to spatial drift, the shape of an asymmetric AFM tip has to be taken into account in order to understand the intended and actual manipulation results. Furthermore, small NPs often attach to the tip via electrostatic interaction and modify the effective tip shape. We suggest a method for detaching the NPs by performing a pseudo-manipulation step. Finally, we show by example the ability to assemble these small NPs into prototypical hybrid nanostructures with well-defined composition and geometry.

  19. Structure Sensitivity Study of Waterborne Contaminant Hydrogenation Using Shape- and Size-Controlled Pd Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Shuai, Danmeng; McCalman, Dorrell C.; Choe, Jong Kwon; Shapley, John R.; Schneider, William F.; Werth, Charles J.

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic reduction with Pd has emerged as a promising technology to remove a suite of contaminants from drinking water, such as oxyanions, disinfection byproducts, and halogenated pollutants, but low activity is a major challenge for application. To address this challenge, we synthesized a set of shape- and size-controlled Pd nanoparticles and evaluated the activity of three probe contaminants (i.e., nitrite, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), and diatrizoate) as a function of facet type (e.g., (100), (110), (111)), ratios of low- to high-coordination sites, and ratios of surface sites to total Pd (i.e., dispersion). Reduction results for an initial contaminant concentration of 100 μM show that initial turnover frequency (TOF0) for nitrite increases 4.7-fold with increasing percent of (100) surface Pd sites (from 0% to 95.3%), whereas the TOF0 for NDMA and for diatrizoate increases 4.5- and 3.6-fold, respectively, with an increasing percent of terrace surface Pd sites (from 79.8% to 95.3%). Results for an initial nitrite concentration of 2 mM show that TOF0 is the same for all shape- and size-controlled Pd nanoparticles. Trends for TOF0 were supported by results showing that all catalysts but one were stable in shape and size up to 12 days; for the exception, iodide liberation in diatrizoate reduction appeared to be responsible for a shape change of 4 nm octahedral Pd nanoparticles. Density functional theory (DFT) simulations for the free energy change of hydrogen (H2), nitrite, and nitric oxide (NO) adsorption and a two-site model based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism suggest that competition of adsorbates for different Pd sites can explain the TOF0 results. Our study shows for the first time that catalytic reduction activity for waterborne contaminant removal varies with the Pd shape and size, and it suggests that Pd catalysts can be tailored for optimal performance to treat a variety of contaminants for drinking water. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  20. Structure Sensitivity Study of Waterborne Contaminant Hydrogenation Using Shape- and Size-Controlled Pd Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Shuai, Danmeng

    2013-03-01

    Catalytic reduction with Pd has emerged as a promising technology to remove a suite of contaminants from drinking water, such as oxyanions, disinfection byproducts, and halogenated pollutants, but low activity is a major challenge for application. To address this challenge, we synthesized a set of shape- and size-controlled Pd nanoparticles and evaluated the activity of three probe contaminants (i.e., nitrite, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), and diatrizoate) as a function of facet type (e.g., (100), (110), (111)), ratios of low- to high-coordination sites, and ratios of surface sites to total Pd (i.e., dispersion). Reduction results for an initial contaminant concentration of 100 μM show that initial turnover frequency (TOF0) for nitrite increases 4.7-fold with increasing percent of (100) surface Pd sites (from 0% to 95.3%), whereas the TOF0 for NDMA and for diatrizoate increases 4.5- and 3.6-fold, respectively, with an increasing percent of terrace surface Pd sites (from 79.8% to 95.3%). Results for an initial nitrite concentration of 2 mM show that TOF0 is the same for all shape- and size-controlled Pd nanoparticles. Trends for TOF0 were supported by results showing that all catalysts but one were stable in shape and size up to 12 days; for the exception, iodide liberation in diatrizoate reduction appeared to be responsible for a shape change of 4 nm octahedral Pd nanoparticles. Density functional theory (DFT) simulations for the free energy change of hydrogen (H2), nitrite, and nitric oxide (NO) adsorption and a two-site model based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism suggest that competition of adsorbates for different Pd sites can explain the TOF0 results. Our study shows for the first time that catalytic reduction activity for waterborne contaminant removal varies with the Pd shape and size, and it suggests that Pd catalysts can be tailored for optimal performance to treat a variety of contaminants for drinking water. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  1. Efficacy and safety of nanohybrids comprising silver nanoparticles and silicate clay for controlling Salmonella infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bau IJ

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Shu-Her Chiao,1* Siou-Hong Lin,1* Ching-I Shen,2* Jiunn-Wang Liao,3 I-Jiuan Bau,1 Jiun-Chiou Wei,4 Li-Ping Tseng,1 Shan-hui Hsu,4 Ping-Shan Lai,2 Shinn-Zong Lin,5–7 Jiang-Jen Lin,4 Hong-Lin Su,1,8 1Department of Life Sciences, Agricultural Biotechnology Center, National Chung Hsing University, 2Department of Chemistry, Agricultural Biotechnology Center, National Chung Hsing University, 3Graduate Institute of Veterinary Pathobiology, Agricultural Biotechnology Center, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan; 4Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Center for Neuropsychiatry, China Medical University and Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan; 6Department of Neurosurgery, China Medical University Beigan Hospital, Yunlin, Taiwan; 7Graduate Institute of Immunology, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; 8Department of Physical Therapy, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan*These three authors contributed equallyAbstract: Developing effective and safe drugs is imperative for replacing antibiotics and controlling multidrug-resistant microbes. Nanoscale silicate platelet (NSP and its nanohybrid, silver nanoparticle/NSP (AgNP/NSP, have been developed, and the nanohybrids show a strong and general antibacterial activity in vitro. Here, their efficacy for protecting Salmonella-infected chicks from fatality and septicemia was evaluated. Both orally administrated NSP and AgNP/NSP, but not AgNPs alone, effectively reduced the systemic Salmonella infection and mortality. In addition, quantitative Ag analyses demonstrated that Ag deposition from AgNP/NSP in the intestines was less than that from conventional AgNPs, indicating that the presence of NSP for immobilizing AgNPs reduced Ag accumulation in tissue and improved the safety of AgNPs. These in vivo results illustrated that both NSP and AgNP/NSP nanohybrid represent potential agents for controlling enteric bacterial infections.Keywords: silver

  2. Controlled structure and properties of silicate nanoparticle networks for incorporation of biosystem components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Kawanishi, Toru; Hasegawa, Toshiaki; Takaoka, Akio; Kato, Masaru; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa; Utsunomiya-Tate, Naoko

    2011-01-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles are of technological interest in many fields. We created silicate nanoparticle hydrogels that effectively incorporated biomolecules that are unstable and involved in complicated reactions. The size of the silicate nanoparticles strongly affected both the physical characteristics of the resulting hydrogel and the activity of biomolecules incorporated within the hydrogel. We used high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to analyze in detail the hydrogel network patterns formed by the silicate nanoparticles. We obtained clear nanostructured images of biomolecule-nanoparticle composite hydrogels. The TEM images also showed that larger silicate nanoparticles (22 nm) formed more loosely associated silicate networks than did smaller silicate nanoparticles (7 nm). The loosely associated networks formed from larger silicate nanoparticles might facilitate substrate diffusion through the network, thus promoting the observed increased activity of the entrapped biomolecules. This doubled the activity of the incorporated biosystems compared with that of biosystems prepared by our own previously reported method. We propose a reaction scheme to explain the formation of the silicate nanoparticle networks. The successful incorporation of biomolecules into the nanoparticle hydrogels, along with the high level of activity exhibited by the biomolecules required for complicated reaction within the gels, demonstrates the nanocomposites' potential for use in medical applications.

  3. A facile route to controlled synthesis of Co3O4 nanoparticles and their environmental catalytic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Yuming; He Kun; Yin Lin; Zhang Aimin

    2007-01-01

    Using ammonia and Co(CH 3 COO) 2 ·4H 2 O as starting materials, a facile and surfactant-free route to controlled synthesis of Co 3 O 4 nanoparticles was proposed. Co 3 O 4 nanoparticles with average sizes of 3.5, 6, 11, 19 and 70 nm were obtained through adjusting the ethanol amount in the solvent (the ratio of ethanol to water) or the concentration of raw materials. In this process, the presence of enough O 2 was crucial for the formation of pure Co 3 O 4 phase. The environmental catalytic properties of as-obtained Co 3 O 4 nanoparticles were investigated. The results indicated their remarkable catalysis for ozonation degradation of phenol, which denoted a promising application as catalyst in waste-water treatment

  4. Controllable synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles with high intensity visible photoemission and investigation of its mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv Yunbo; Xiao Wen; Li Weiyan; Xue Junmin; Ding Jun

    2013-01-01

    ZnO is known as a good photoluminescent semiconductor due to its ability to emit visible light. However, the visible emission mechanism is still under debate. In this work, we have successfully synthesized nanoparticles using LiOH, KOH and NaOH as bases and have achieved visible emission of various colours, such as blue, cyan, green and orange. We demonstrate that LiOH is the most efficient base to control the properties of ZnO nanoparticle emission by varying LiOH concentration. Moreover, detailed studies by TEM, UV and XRD show that ZnO particle size plays an important role in the colour of the emitted light and smaller particles tend to emit shorter wavelength photons. The visible emission is suggested to arise from an electron transition from the conduction band to a deep-trapped defect state. Our experimental results suggest the presence of oxygen vacancies on the ZnO nanoparticle surface. (paper)

  5. Controllable deposition of platinum nanoparticles on single-wall carbon nanohorns as catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Ben; Xu, Wei; Guo, Zhengduo; Zhou, Nengzhi; Liu, Yang; Shi, Zujin; Lian, Yongfu

    2012-09-01

    Uniform and well dispersed platinum nanoparticles were successfully deposited on single-walled carbon nanohorns with the assistance of 4,4-dipydine and ion liquids, respectively. In particular, the size of platinum nanoparticles could be controlled in a very narrow range (2.2 to 2.5 nm) when ion liquids were applied. The crystalline nature of these platinum nanoparticles was confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy observation and X-ray power diffraction analysis, and two species of platinum Pt(0) and Pt(II) were detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Electrochemical studies revealed that thus obtained nanocomposites had much better electrocatalytic activity for the methanol oxidation than those prepared with carbon nanotubes as supporter.

  6. Facile and solvent-free routes for the synthesis of size-controllable Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, Thanh Hieu; Tran, Dai Lam; Do, Hung Manh; Le, Van Hong; Nguyen, Xuan Phuc; Tran, Vinh Hoang

    2010-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles are one of the most important materials that are widely used in both medically diagnostic and therapeutic research. In this paper, we present some facile and non-toxic synthetic approaches for size-controllable preparations of magnetite nanoparticles, which are appropriate for biomedical applications, namely (i) co-precipitation; (ii) reduction–precipitation and (iii) oxidation–precipitation. Magnetic characterizations of the obtained nanoparticles have been studied and discussed. The oxidation precipitation route was chosen for investigation of the dependence of kinetic driven activation energy and that of coercive force on particle size (and temperature) during the course of the reaction. The structural–magnetic behavior was also correlated. Being solvent and surfactant-free, these methods are advantageous for synthesis and further functionalization towards biomedical applications

  7. Electrostatically assisted fabrication of silver-dielectric core/shell nanoparticles thin film capacitor with uniform metal nanoparticle distribution and controlled spacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Niitsoo, Olivia; Couzis, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    An electrostatically-assisted strategy for fabrication of thin film composite capacitors with controllable dielectric constant (k) has been developed. The capacitor is composed of metal-dielectric core/shell nanoparticle (silver/silica, Ag@SiO2) multilayer films, and a backfilling polymer. Compared with the simple metal particle-polymer mixtures where the metal nanoparticles (NP) are randomly dispersed in the polymer matrix, the metal volume fraction in our capacitor was significantly increased, owing to the densely packed NP multilayers formed by the electrostatically assisted assembly process. Moreover, the insulating layer of silica shell provides a potential barrier that reduces the tunneling current between neighboring Ag cores, endowing the core/shell nanocomposites with a stable and relatively high dielectric constant (k) and low dielectric loss (D). Our work also shows that the thickness of the SiO2 shell plays a dominant role in controlling the dielectric properties of the nanocomposites. Control over metal NP separation distance was realized not only by variation the shell thickness of the core/shell NPs but also by introducing a high k nanoparticle, barium strontium titanate (BST) of relatively smaller size (∼8nm) compared to 80-160nm of the core/shell Ag@SiO2 NPs. The BST assemble between the Ag@SiO2 and fill the void space between the closely packed core/shell NPs leading to significant enhancement of the dielectric constant. This electrostatically assisted assembly method is promising for generating multilayer films of a large variety of NPs over large areas at low cost. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Anomalous Dimensions of Conformal Baryons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We determine the anomalous dimensions of baryon operators for the three color theory as function of the number of massless flavours within the conformal window to the maximum known order in perturbation theory. We show that the anomalous dimension of the baryon is controllably small, within...

  9. Novel synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Bauhinia variegata: a recent eco-friendly approach for mosquito control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Marimuthu; Rajeswary, Mohan; Veerakumar, Kaliyan; Muthukumaran, Udaiyan; Hoti, S L; Mehlhorn, Heinz; Barnard, Donald R; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    Mosquito vectors are responsible for transmitting diseases such as malaria, dengue, chikungunya, Japanese encephalitis, dengue, and lymphatic filariasis. The use of synthetic insecticides to control mosquito vectors has caused physiological resistance and adverse environmental effects, in addition to high operational cost. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles has been proposed as an alternative to traditional control tools. In the present study, green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using aqueous leaf extract of Bauhinia variegata by reduction of Ag(+) ions from silver nitrate solution has been investigated. The bioreduced silver nanoparticles were characterized by UV–visible spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). Leaf extract and synthesized AgNPs were evaluated against the larvae of Anopheles subpictus, Aedes albopictus, and Culex tritaeniorhynchus. Compared to aqueous extract, synthesized AgNPs showed higher toxicity against An. subpictus, Ae. albopictus, and Cx. tritaeniorhynchus with LC50 and LC90 values of 41.96, 46.16, and 51.92 μg/mL and 82.93, 89.42, and 97.12 μg/mL, respectively. Overall, this study proves that B. variegata is a potential bioresource for stable, reproducible nanoparticle synthesis and may be proposed as an efficient mosquito control agent.

  10. Non-conformable, partial and conformable transposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    König, Thomas; Mäder, Lars Kai

    2013-01-01

    and the Commission regarding a directive’s outcome, play a much more strategic role than has to date acknowledged in the transposition literature. Whereas disagreement of a member state delays conformable transposition, it speeds up non-conformable transposition. Disagreement of the Commission only prolongs...... the transposition process. We therefore conclude that a stronger focus on an effective sanctioning mechanism is warranted for safeguarding compliance with directives....

  11. Green coconut ( Cocos nucifera Linn) shell extract mediated size controlled green synthesis of polyshaped gold nanoparticles and its application in catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Koushik; Bag, Braja Gopal; Samanta, Kousik

    2014-08-01

    The shell extract of green coconut ( Cocos nucifera Linn) has been utilized for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles at room temperature under very mild condition without any extra stabilizing or capping agents. The size of the synthesized gold nanoparticles could be controlled by varying the concentration of the shell extract. The stabilized gold nanoparticles were analyzed by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, HRTEM, Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies. The catalytic activity of the freshly synthesized gold nanoparticles was studied for the sodium borohydride reduction of 4-nitrophenol and the kinetics of the reduction reaction were studied spectrophotometrically.

  12. Phase- and shape-controlled hydrothermal synthesis of CdS nanoparticles, and oriented attachment growth of its hierarchical architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yali; Hu, Pengfei; Jia, Dianzeng

    2013-01-01

    Hydrothermal strategies were successfully used to control the phases and morphologies of CdS nanocrystals. In the absence of an external direction-controlling process, the hexagonal and cubic phase well-defined leaf- and flower-like CdS nanocrystals were controlled obtained via adjusting the reaction duration or the concentration of surfactant. Oriented attachment growth modes were suggested for the formation of CdS superstructures, which was clarified through the tracing of temporal evolution of CdS nanoparticles. The CdS superstructures were structured by primary building nanoparticles, and held excellent visible emission with a peak in the green regions. This strategy is very helpful for studying the phase and morphology controlled fabrication of sulfides nanocrystals.

  13. Synthesis, recognition and evaluation of molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticle using miniemulsion polymerization for controlled release and analysis of risperidone in human plasma samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asadi, Ebadullah; Azodi-Deilami, Saman; Abdouss, Majid; Kordestani, Davood; Rahimi, Alireza; Asadi, Somayeh

    2014-01-01

    We prepared high selective imprinted nanoparticle polymers by a miniemulsion polymerization technique, using risperidone as the template, MAA as the functional monomers, and TRIM as the cross-linker in acetonitrile as solvent. The morphology of the nanoparticles determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and drug release, binding properties and dynamic light scattering (DLS) of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were studied. Controlled release of risperidone from nanoparticles was investigated through in 1% wt sodium dodecyl sulfate aqueous solution and by measuring the absorbance by HPLC-UV. The results showed that the imprinted nanoparticles exhibited a higher binding level and slower release rate than non-imprinted nanoparticles, which contributed to interaction of risperidone with imprinted cavities within nanoparticles. Furthermore, the results from HPLC showed good precision (5% for 50.0 µg L -1 ) and recoveries (between 86-91) using MIP from human plasma samples

  14. Controllable pt nanoparticle deposition on carbon nanotubes as an anode catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yongyan; Liang, Hanpu; Hu, Jinsong; Jiang, Li; Wan, Lijun

    2005-12-01

    We report a novel process to prepare well-dispersed Pt nanoparticles on CNTs. Pt nanoparticles, which were modified by the organic molecule triphenylphosphine, were deposited on multiwalled carbon nanotubes by the organic molecule, which acts as a cross linker. By manipulating the relative ratio of Pt nanoparticles and multiwalled carbon nanotubes in solution, Pt/CNT composites with different Pt content were achieved. The so-prepared Pt/CNT composite materials show higher electrocatalytic activity and better tolerance to poisoning species in methanol oxidation than the commercial E-TEK catalyst, which can be ascribed to the high dispersion of Pt nanoparticles on the multiwalled carbon nanotube surface.

  15. Imparting magnetic dipole heterogeneity to internalized iron oxide nanoparticles for microorganism swarm control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Paul Seung Soo, E-mail: psk25@drexel.edu [Drexel University, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics (United States); Becker, Aaron, E-mail: aaron.becker@childrens.harvard.edu [Harvard University, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery (United States); Ou, Yan, E-mail: ouy2@rpi.edu; Julius, Anak Agung, E-mail: agung@rpi.edu [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering (United States); Kim, Min Jun, E-mail: mkim@coe.drexel.edu [Drexel University, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Tetrahymena pyriformis is a single cell eukaryote that can be modified to respond to magnetic fields, a response called magnetotaxis. Naturally, this microorganism cannot respond to magnetic fields, but after modification using iron oxide nanoparticles, cells are magnetized and exhibit a constant magnetic dipole strength. In experiments, a rotating field is applied to cells using a two-dimensional approximate Helmholtz coil system. Using rotating magnetic fields, we characterize discrete cells’ swarm swimming which is affected by several factors. The behavior of the cells under these fields is explained in detail. After the field is removed, relatively straight swimming is observed. We also generate increased heterogeneity within a population of cells to improve controllability of a swarm, which is explored in a cell model. By exploiting this straight swimming behavior, we propose a method to control discrete cells utilizing a single global magnetic input. Successful implementation of this swarm control method would enable teams of microrobots to perform a variety of in vitro microscale tasks impossible for single microrobots, such as pushing objects or simultaneous micromanipulation of discrete entities.

  16. Controlled p-doping of black phosphorus by integration of MoS2 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sumin; Kim, Minwoo; Jia, Jingyuan; Park, Jin-Hong; Lee, Sungjoo; Song, Young Jae

    2018-05-01

    Black phosphorus (BP), a new family of two dimensional (2D) layered materials, is an attractive material for future electronic, photonic and chemical sensing devices, thanks to its high carrier density and a direct bandgap of 0.3-2.0 eV, depending on the number of layers. Controllability over the properties of BP by electrical or chemical modulations is one of the critical requirements for future various device applications. Herein, we report a new doping method of BP by integration of density-controlled monolayer MoS2 nanoparticles (NPs). MoS2 NPs with different density were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and transferred onto a few-layer BP channel, which induced a p-doping effect. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed the size and distribution of MoS2 NPs with different density. Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were measured to confirm the oxidation on the edge of MoS2 NPs and a doping effect of MoS2 NPs on a BP channel. The doping mechanism was explained by a charge transfer by work function differences between BP and MoS2 NPs, which was confirmed by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and electrical measurements. The hole concentration of BP was controlled with different densities of MoS2 NPs in a range of 1012-1013 cm-2.

  17. Imparting magnetic dipole heterogeneity to internalized iron oxide nanoparticles for microorganism swarm control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Paul Seung Soo; Becker, Aaron; Ou, Yan; Julius, Anak Agung; Kim, Min Jun

    2015-01-01

    Tetrahymena pyriformis is a single cell eukaryote that can be modified to respond to magnetic fields, a response called magnetotaxis. Naturally, this microorganism cannot respond to magnetic fields, but after modification using iron oxide nanoparticles, cells are magnetized and exhibit a constant magnetic dipole strength. In experiments, a rotating field is applied to cells using a two-dimensional approximate Helmholtz coil system. Using rotating magnetic fields, we characterize discrete cells’ swarm swimming which is affected by several factors. The behavior of the cells under these fields is explained in detail. After the field is removed, relatively straight swimming is observed. We also generate increased heterogeneity within a population of cells to improve controllability of a swarm, which is explored in a cell model. By exploiting this straight swimming behavior, we propose a method to control discrete cells utilizing a single global magnetic input. Successful implementation of this swarm control method would enable teams of microrobots to perform a variety of in vitro microscale tasks impossible for single microrobots, such as pushing objects or simultaneous micromanipulation of discrete entities

  18. Conformation Control of a Conjugated Polymer through Complexation with Bile Acids Generates Its Novel Spectral and Morphological Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Youichi; Noguchi, Takao; Yoshihara, Daisuke; Roy, Bappaditya; Yamamoto, Tatsuhiro; Shinkai, Seiji

    2016-11-29

    Control of higher-order polymer structures attracts a great deal of interest for many researchers when they lead to the development of materials having various advanced functions. Among them, conjugated polymers that are useful as starting materials in the design of molecular wires are particularly attractive. However, an equilibrium existing between isolated chains and bundled aggregates is inevitable and has made their physical properties very complicated. As an attempt to simplify this situation, we previously reported that a polymer chain of a water-soluble polythiophene could be isolated through complexation with a helix-forming polysaccharide. More recently, a covalently self-threading polythiophene was reported, the main chain of which was physically protected from self-folding and chain-chain π-stacking. In this report, we wish to report a new strategy to isolate a water-soluble polythiophene and to control its higher-order structure by a supramolecular approach: that is, among a few bile acids, lithocholate can form stoichiometric complexes with cationic polythiophene to isolate the polymer chain, and the higher-order structure is changeable by the molar ratio. The optical and morphological studies have been thoroughly performed, and the resultant complex has been applied to the selective recognition of two AMP structural isomers.

  19. A High-Yield Synthesis of Chalcopyrite CuInS2 Nanoparticles with Exceptional Size Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chivin Sun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report high-yield and efficient size-controlled syntheses of Chalcopyrite CuInS2 nanoparticles by decomposing molecular single source precursors (SSPs via microwave irradiation in the presence of 1,2-ethanedithiol at reaction temperatures as low as 100°C and times as short as 30 minutes. The nanoparticles sizes were 1.8 nm to 10.8 nm as reaction temperatures were varied from 100°C to 200°C with the bandgaps from 2.71 eV to 1.28 eV with good size control and high yields (64%–95%. The resulting nanoparticles were analyzed by XRD, UV-Vis, ICP-OES, XPS, SEM, EDS, and HRTEM. Titration studies by 1H NMR using SSP 1 with 1,2-ethanedithiol and benzyl mercaptan were conducted to elucidate the formation of Chalcopyrite CuInS2 nanoparticles.

  20. Synthesis, characterization, and in vitro evaluation of novel polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles for controlled delivery of doxorubicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbarzadeh A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abolfazl Akbarzadeh1, Nosratollah Zarghami2, Haleh Mikaeili3, Davoud Asgari4, Amir Mohammad Goganian5, Hanie Khaksar Khiabani5, Mohammad Samiei6, Soodabeh Davaran31Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, 2Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine, Division of Medical Biotechnology, Faculty of Medicine, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, 3Tuberculosis and Lung Disease Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, 4Research Center for Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, 5Department of Organic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, 6Faculty of Dentistry, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IranAbstract: Poly (N-isopropylacrylamide-methyl methacrylic acid, PNIPAAm-MAA-grafted magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized using silane-coated magnetic nanoparticles as a template for radical polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide and methacrylic acid. Properties of these nanoparticles, such as size, drug-loading efficiency, and drug release kinetics, were evaluated in vitro for targeted and controlled drug delivery. The resulting nanoparticles had a diameter of 100 nm and a doxorubicin-loading efficiency of 75%, significantly higher doxorubicin release at 40°C compared with 37°C, and pH 5.8 compared with pH 7.4, demonstrating their temperature and pH sensitivity, respectively. In addition, the particles were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry. In vitro cytotoxicity testing showed that the PNIPAAm-MAA-coated magnetic nanoparticles had no cytotoxicity and were biocompatible, indicating their potential for biomedical application.Keywords: magnetic nanoparticles, drug loading, doxorubicin release, biocompatibility

  1. Design parameters for voltage-controllable directed assembly of single nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Porter, Benjamin F.; Abelmann, Leon; Bhaskaran, Harish

    2013-01-01

    Techniques to reliably pick-and-place single nanoparticles into functional assemblies are required to incorporate exotic nanoparticles into standard electronic circuits. In this paper we explore the use of electric fields to drive and direct the assembly process, which has the advantage of being

  2. Tuning complement activation and pathway through controlled molecular architecture of dextran chains in nanoparticle corona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coty, Jean-Baptiste; Eleamen Oliveira, Elquio; Vauthier, Christine

    2017-11-05

    The understanding of complement activation by nanomaterials is a key to a rational design of safe and efficient nanomedicines. This work proposed a systematic study investigating how molecular design of nanoparticle coronas made of dextran impacts on mechanisms that trigger complement activation. The nanoparticles used for this work consisted of dextran-coated poly(isobutylcyanoacrylate) (PIBCA) nanoparticles have already been thoroughly characterized. Their different capacity to trigger complement activation established on the cleavage of the protein C3 was also already described making these nanoparticles good models to investigate the relation between the molecular feature of their corona and the mechanism by which they triggered complement activation. Results of this new study show that complement activation pathways can be selected by distinct architectures formed by dextran chains composing the nanoparticle corona. Assumptions that explain the relation between complement activation mechanisms triggered by the nanoparticles and the nanoparticle corona molecular feature were proposed. These results are of interest to better understand how the design of dextran-coated nanomaterials will impact interactions with the complement system. It can open perspectives with regard to the selection of a preferential complement activation pathway or prevent the nanoparticles to activate the complement system, based on a rational choice of the corona configuration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Nanoparticle orientation to control RNA loading and ligand display on extracellular vesicles for cancer regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Fengmei; Binzel, Daniel W.; Lee, Tae Jin; Li, Zhefeng; Sun, Meiyan; Rychahou, Piotr; Li, Hui; Haque, Farzin; Wang, Shaoying; Croce, Carlo M.; Guo, Bin; Evers, B. Mark; Guo, Peixuan

    2018-01-01

    Nanotechnology offers many benefits, and here we report an advantage of applying RNA nanotechnology for directional control. The orientation of arrow-shaped RNA was altered to control ligand display on extracellular vesicle membranes for specific cell targeting, or to regulate intracellular trafficking of small interfering RNA (siRNA) or microRNA (miRNA). Placing membrane-anchoring cholesterol at the tail of the arrow results in display of RNA aptamer or folate on the outer surface of the extracellular vesicle. In contrast, placing the cholesterol at the arrowhead results in partial loading of RNA nanoparticles into the extracellular vesicles. Taking advantage of the RNA ligand for specific targeting and extracellular vesicles for efficient membrane fusion, the resulting ligand-displaying extracellular vesicles were capable of specific delivery of siRNA to cells, and efficiently blocked tumour growth in three cancer models. Extracellular vesicles displaying an aptamer that binds to prostate-specific membrane antigen, and loaded with survivin siRNA, inhibited prostate cancer xenograft. The same extracellular vesicle instead displaying epidermal growth-factor receptor aptamer inhibited orthotopic breast cancer models. Likewise, survivin siRNA-loaded and folate-displaying extracellular vesicles inhibited patient-derived colorectal cancer xenograft.

  4. Exchange Bias Optimization by Controlled Oxidation of Cobalt Nanoparticle Films Prepared by Sputter Gas Aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo López Antón

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Porous films of cobalt nanoparticles have been obtained by sputter gas aggregation and controllably oxidized by air annealing at 100 °C for progressively longer times (up to more than 1400 h. The magnetic properties of the samples were monitored during the process, with a focus on the exchange bias field. Air annealing proves to be a convenient way to control the Co/CoO ratio in the samples, allowing the optimization of the exchange bias field to a value above 6 kOe at 5 K. The occurrence of the maximum in the exchange bias field is understood in terms of the density of CoO uncompensated spins and their degree of pinning, with the former reducing and the latter increasing upon the growth of a progressively thicker CoO shell. Vertical shifts exhibited in the magnetization loops are found to correlate qualitatively with the peak in the exchange bias field, while an increase in vertical shift observed for longer oxidation times may be explained by a growing fraction of almost completely oxidized particles. The presence of a hummingbird-like form in magnetization loops can be understood in terms of a combination of hard (biased and soft (unbiased components; however, the precise origin of the soft phase is as yet unresolved.

  5. Controllable synthesis and characterization of novel copper-carbon core-shell structured nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Jing; Tao, Xia; Pu, Yuan; Zeng, Xiao-Fei; Chen, Jian-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We reported a facile, green and cheap hydrothermal method to obtain novel copper-carbon core-shell nanoparticles. → The as-formed particles with controllable size and morphology are antioxidant. → The particles with organic-group-loaded surfaces and protective shells are expected to be applied in fields of medicine, electronics, sensors and lubricant. -- Abstract: A facile hydrothermal method was developed for preparing copper-carbon core-shell structured particles through a reaction at 160 o C in which glucose, copper sulfate pentahydrate and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide were used as starting materials. The original copper-carbon core-shell structured particles obtained were sized of 100-250 nm. The thickness of carbonaceous shells was controlled ranging from 25 to 100 nm by adjusting the hydrothermal duration time and the concentrations of glucose in the process. Products were characterized with transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Since no toxic materials were involved in the preparation, particles with stable carbonaceous framework and reactive surface also showed promising applications in medicine, electronics, sensors, lubricant, etc.

  6. Controllable synthesis and characterization of novel copper-carbon core-shell structured nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Jing [Sin-China Nano Technology Center, Key Lab for Nanomaterials, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Research Center of the Ministry of Education for High Gravity Engineering and Technology, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, No. 15 Beisanhuan Dong Lu, Beijing 100029 (China); Tao, Xia; Pu, Yuan; Zeng, Xiao-Fei [Sin-China Nano Technology Center, Key Lab for Nanomaterials, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Chen, Jian-Feng, E-mail: chenjf@mail.buct.edu.cn [Research Center of the Ministry of Education for High Gravity Engineering and Technology, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, No. 15 Beisanhuan Dong Lu, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} We reported a facile, green and cheap hydrothermal method to obtain novel copper-carbon core-shell nanoparticles. {yields} The as-formed particles with controllable size and morphology are antioxidant. {yields} The particles with organic-group-loaded surfaces and protective shells are expected to be applied in fields of medicine, electronics, sensors and lubricant. -- Abstract: A facile hydrothermal method was developed for preparing copper-carbon core-shell structured particles through a reaction at 160 {sup o}C in which glucose, copper sulfate pentahydrate and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide were used as starting materials. The original copper-carbon core-shell structured particles obtained were sized of 100-250 nm. The thickness of carbonaceous shells was controlled ranging from 25 to 100 nm by adjusting the hydrothermal duration time and the concentrations of glucose in the process. Products were characterized with transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Since no toxic materials were involved in the preparation, particles with stable carbonaceous framework and reactive surface also showed promising applications in medicine, electronics, sensors, lubricant, etc.

  7. Engineering the internal structure of magnetic silica nanoparticles by thermal control

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Hyon Min; Zink, Jeffrey I.; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2014-01-01

    Calcination of hydrated iron salts in the pores of both spherical and rod-shaped mesoporous silica nanoparticles (NPs) changes the internal structure from an ordered 2D hexagonal structure into a smaller number of large voids in the particles with sizes ranging from large hollow cores down to ten nanometer voids. The voids only form when the heating rate is rapid at a rate of 30 °C min-1. The sizes of the voids are controlled reproducibly by the final calcination temperature; as the temperature is decreased the number of voids decreases as their size increases. The phase of the iron oxide NPs is α-Fe2O3 when annealed at 500 °C, and Fe3O4 when annealed at lower temperatures. The water molecules in the hydrated iron (III) chloride precursor salts appear to play important roles by hydrolyzing Si-O-Si bonding, and the resulting silanol is mobile enough to affect the reconstruction into the framed hollow structures at high temperature. Along with hexahydrates, trivalent Fe3+ ions are assumed to contribute to the structure disruption of mesoporous silica by replacing tetrahedral Si4+ ions and making Fe-O-Si bonding. Volume fraction tomography images generated from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images enable precise visualization of the structures. These results provide a controllable method of engineering the internal shapes in silica matrices containing superparamagnetic NPs.

  8. Engineering the internal structure of magnetic silica nanoparticles by thermal control

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Hyon Min

    2014-09-30

    Calcination of hydrated iron salts in the pores of both spherical and rod-shaped mesoporous silica nanoparticles (NPs) changes the internal structure from an ordered 2D hexagonal structure into a smaller number of large voids in the particles with sizes ranging from large hollow cores down to ten nanometer voids. The voids only form when the heating rate is rapid at a rate of 30 °C min-1. The sizes of the voids are controlled reproducibly by the final calcination temperature; as the temperature is decreased the number of voids decreases as their size increases. The phase of the iron oxide NPs is α-Fe2O3 when annealed at 500 °C, and Fe3O4 when annealed at lower temperatures. The water molecules in the hydrated iron (III) chloride precursor salts appear to play important roles by hydrolyzing Si-O-Si bonding, and the resulting silanol is mobile enough to affect the reconstruction into the framed hollow structures at high temperature. Along with hexahydrates, trivalent Fe3+ ions are assumed to contribute to the structure disruption of mesoporous silica by replacing tetrahedral Si4+ ions and making Fe-O-Si bonding. Volume fraction tomography images generated from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images enable precise visualization of the structures. These results provide a controllable method of engineering the internal shapes in silica matrices containing superparamagnetic NPs.

  9. A prominent anchoring effect on the kinetic control of drug release from mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Vy Anh; Lee, Sang-Wha

    2018-01-15

    This work demonstrated kinetically controlled release of model drugs (ibuprofen, FITC) from well-tailored mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) depending on the surface charges and molecular sizes of the drugs. The molecular interactions between entrapped drugs and the pore walls of MSNs controlled the release of the drugs through the pore channels of MSNs. Also, polydopamine (PDA) layer-coated MSNs (MSNs@PDA) was quite effective to retard the release of large FITC, in contrast to a slight retardation effect on relatively small Ibuprofen. Of all things, FITC (Fluorescein isothiocyanate)-labeled APTMS (3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane) (APTMS-FITC conjugates) grafted onto the MSNs generate a pinch-effect on the pore channel (so-called a prominent anchoring effect), which was highly effective in trapping (or blocking) drug molecules at the pore mouth of the MSNs. The anchored APTMS-FITC conjugates provided not only tortuous pathways to the diffusing molecules, but also sustained release of the ibuprofen over a long period of time (∼7days). The fast release kinetics was predicted by an exponential equation based on Fick's law, while the slow release kinetics was predicted by Higuchi model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Preparation and Characterization of Starch Nanoparticles for Controlled Release of Curcumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk Fun Chin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin was loaded onto starch nanoparticles by using in situ nanoprecipitation method and water-in-oil microemulsion system. Curcumin loaded starch nanoparticles exhibited enhanced solubility in aqueous solution as compared to free curcumin. Effects of formulation parameters such as types of reaction medium, types of surfactant, surfactant concentrations, oil/ethanol ratios, loading time, and initial curcumin concentration were found to affect the particle size and loading efficiency (LF of the curcumin loaded starch nanoparticles. Under optimum conditions, curcumin loaded starch nanoparticles with mean particles size of 87 nm and maximum loading efficiency of 78% were achieved. Curcumin was observed to release out from starch nanoparticles in a sustained way under physiological pH over a period of 10 days.

  11. Centrifuge Controlled Shape Tuning of Biosynthesized Gold Nanoparticles Obtained from Plumbago zeylanica Leaf Extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankamwar, Balaprasad; Pansare, Sachin; Sur, Ujjal Kumar

    2017-02-01

    Development of cost-efficient and eco-friendly biogenic synthetic protocols for the green synthesis of biocompatible metal nanoparticles has become popular among researchers in recent years. The biogenic synthesis of these nanoparticles and their potential biomedical applications introduces the concept of nanobiotechnology, which has become the latest fascinating area of research. The lower cost and lesser side effects as compare to chemical methods of synthesis are the main advantages of biosynthesis. In the present investigation, aqueous leaf extract of Plumbago zeylanica had been used to synthesize anisotropic gold nanoparticles. The as-synthesized gold nanoparticles were centrifuged at 5000 and 10000 rpm and compared both pellets using UV-visible spectroscopy, XRD, FTIR and TEM techniques. We have studied here the effect of speed of centrifugation on the yield, shape, size as well as size distribution of as synthesized gold nanoparticles.

  12. 78 FR 78310 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; North Carolina; Transportation Conformity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ...] Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; North Carolina; Transportation Conformity Memorandum of... Resources. This submission adopts a memorandum of agreement establishing transportation conformity criteria...-related control measures and mitigation measures. This proposed action streamlines the conformity process...

  13. pH induced protein-scaffold biosynthesis of tunable shape gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiaorong; He Xiaoxiao; Wang Kemin; Ren Fang; Qin Zhihe

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a pH-inductive protein-scaffold biosynthesis of shape-tunable crystalline gold nanoparticles at room temperature has been developed. By simple manipulation of the reaction solution's pH, anisotropic gold nanoparticles including spheres, triangles and cubes could be produced by incubating an aqueous solution of sodium tetrachloroaurate with Dolichomitriopsis diversiformis biomasses after immersion in ultrapure Millipore water overnight. A moss protein with molecular weight of about 71 kDa and pI of 4.9 was the primary biomolecule involved in the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles. The secondary configuration of the proteins by CD spectrum implied that the moss protein could display different secondary configurations including random coil, α-helix and intermediate conformations between random coil and α-helix for the experimental pH solution. The growth process of gold nanoparticles further showed that the moss protein with different configurations provided the template scaffold for the shape-controlled biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles. The constrained shape of the gold nanoparticles, however, disappeared in boiled moss extract. The gold nanoparticles with designed morphology were successfully reconstructed using the moss protein purified from the gold nanoparticles. Structural characterizations by SEM, TEM and SAED showed that the triangular and cubic gold nanoparticles were single crystalline.

  14. Exposure assessment and engineering control strategies for airborne nanoparticles: an application to emissions from nanocomposite compounding processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Candace S.-J.; White, David; Rodriguez, Henoc; Munoz, Christian E.; Huang, Cheng-Yu; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn; Barry, Carol; Ellenbecker, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, nanoalumina and nanoclay particles were compounded separately with ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) polymer to produce nanocomposites using a twin-screw extruder to investigate exposure and effective controls. Nanoparticle exposures from compounding processes were elevated under some circumstances and were affected by many factors including inadequate ventilation, surrounding air flow, feeder type, feeding method, and nanoparticle type. Engineering controls such as improved ventilation and enclosure of releasing sources were applied to the process equipment to evaluate the effectiveness of control. The nanoparticle loading device was modified by installing a ventilated enclosure surrounding the loading chamber. Exposures were studied using designed controls for comparison which include three scenarios: (1) no isolation; (2) enclosed sources; and (3) enclosed sources and improved ventilation. Particle number concentrations for diameters from 5 to 20,000 nm measured by the Fast Mobility Particle Sizer and aerodynamic particle sizer were studied. Aerosol particles were sampled on transmission electron microscope grids to characterize particle composition and morphology. Measurements and samples were taken at the near- and far-field areas relative to releasing sources. Airborne particle concentrations were reduced significantly when using the feeder enclosure, and the concentrations were below the baseline when two sources were enclosed, and the ventilation was improved when using either nanoalumina or nanoclay as fillers.

  15. Synthesis of specifically 15N- and 13C-labeled antitumor (2-Haloethyl)nitrosoureas. The study of their conformations in solution by nitrogen-15 and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance and evidence for stereoelectronic control in their aqueous decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lown, J.W.; Chauhan, S.M.S.

    1981-01-01

    The synthesis of certain specifically 15 N, 13 C, and 2 H isotope labeled 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-alkyl-1-nitrosoureas (CENUs) is described. Spectroscopic examination of CENUs and their isotope-labeled counterparts by 1 H, 15 N, and 13 C NMR and infrared spectra indicates that they adopt preferred conformations in nonpolar aprotic solvents in which the NO group is aligned toward the 2-chloroethyl group. The result is in accord with the conformation of MeCCNU in the crystalline state derived from X-ray diffraction. The chemical shifts and coupling constants in the CENUs change with both solvent polarity and basicity. In aqueous phosphate buffer there is evidence for the formation of a tetrahedral intermediate, the conformation of which alters according to the reaction conditions and ultimately controls the formation of the aqueous decomposition products of CENUs. This is revealed most clearly by 13 C NMR of carbonyl- 13 C- and nitroso- 15 N-labeled BCNU and CCNU where two distinct 15 N-coupled 13 C doublets with different chemical shifts are observed. The rate of conformational change is comparable with the rate of decomposition of CENUs (via the second conformer) and may therefore represent the critical initial step of the latter process in vivo. The intermediacy of the postulated tetrahedral intermediates for CENUs is supported by observed 18 O exchange into the carbonyl group in 18 O-enriched water. Consideration of the conformations of the intermediates and of the alignment of the heteroatom lone pairs provides a satisfactory interpretation of the reactions of CENUs in aqueous solution as well as their pH dependence in terms of strict steroelectronic control and accounts for the formation of the observed products

  16. Nanocomposites of size-controlled gold nanoparticles and graphene oxide: formation and applications in SERS and catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jie; Zhang, Liming; Chen, Biao; Ji, Nan; Chen, Fenghua; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Zhijun

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we describe the formation of Au nanoparticle-graphene oxide (Au-GO) and -reduced GO (Au-rGO) composites by noncovalent attachment of Au nanoparticles premodified with 2-mercaptopyridine to GO and rGO sheets, respectively, viaπ-π stacking and other molecular interactions. Compared with in situ reduction of HAuCl4 on the surface of graphene sheets that are widely used to prepare Au-GO composites, the approach developed by us offers well controlled size, size distribution, and morphology of the metal nanoparticles in the metal-GO nanohybrids. Moreover, we investigated surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and catalysis properties of the Au-graphene composites. We have demonstrated that the Au-GO composites are superior SERS substrates to the Au NPs. Similarly, a comparative study on the catalytic activities of the Au, Au-GO, and Au-rGO composites in the reduction of o-nitroaniline to 1,2-benzenediamine by NaBH4 indicates that both Au-GO and Au-rGO composites exhibit significantly higher catalytic activities than the corresponding Au nanoparticles.

  17. Shape-controlled synthesis of NIR absorbing branched gold nanoparticles and morphology stabilization with alkanethiols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Broek, B; Frederix, F; Bonroy, K; Jans, H; Jans, K; Borghs, G; Maes, G

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are ideal candidates for clinical applications if their plasmon absorption band is situated in the near infrared region (NIR) of the electromagnetic spectrum. Various parameters, including the nanoparticle shape, strongly influence the position of this absorption band. The aim of this study is to produce stabilized NIR absorbing branched gold nanoparticles with potential for biomedical applications. Hereto, the synthesis procedure for branched gold nanoparticles is optimized varying the different synthesis parameters. By subsequent electroless gold plating the plasmon absorption band is shifted to 747.2 nm. The intrinsic unstable nature of the nanoparticles' morphology can be clearly observed by a spectral shift and limits their use in real applications. However, in this article we show how the stabilization of the branched structure can be successfully achieved by exchanging the initial capping agent for different alkanethiols and disulfides. Furthermore, when using alkanethiols/disulfides with poly(ethylene oxide) units incorporated, an increased stability of the gold nanoparticles is achieved in high salt concentrations up to 1 M and in a cell culture medium. These achievements open a plethora of opportunities for these stabilized branched gold nanoparticles in nanomedicine.

  18. Study of dithiol monolayer as the interface for controlled deposition of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cichomski, M.; Tomaszewska, E.; Kosla, K.; Kozlowski, W.; Kowalczyk, P.J.; Grobelny, J.

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayer of dithiol molecules, deposited on polycrystalline Au (111), prepared at room atmosphere, was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Dithiols were used as interface, which chemically bonds to the deposited gold nanoparticles through strong covalent bonds. The size and size distribution of the deposited nanoparticles were measured using dynamic light scattering (DLS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM results showed that nanoparticles are immobilized and stable during scanning procedure and do not contaminate the AFM tip. The size of monodisperse nanoparticles obtained from the DLS measurements is slightly higher than that obtained from the AFM and SEM measurements. This is due to the fact that the DLS measures the hydrodynamic radius, dependent on the protective chemical layer on nanoparticles. - Research Highlights: → Dithiols molecules create chemically bounded layers on a Au (111) surface. → Gold nanoparticles can be chemically bounded to a self-assembled monolayer. → Nanoparticles are stable during AFM probe interactions.

  19. Morphology control of MnO2 nanoparticles: Effect of P123 polymer in ethanol-water system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of MnO2 nanoparticles were synthesized by two-step reaction in the ethanol-water system with urea as reducing agent. During the novel routine, P123 polymer plays a crucial role in controlling the morphology. Then, characterization and systematic investigations of the samples by transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the morphology of MnO2 nanoparticles changed as the raw materials ratio changed. Finally, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to confirm the crystal structure and the exact components. These results indicated the particles showed a rod-like shape without P123 and changed into sheet-like shape after the addition of P123. Therefore, this idea could be developed for the controllable synthesis of other metal oxide-based nanomaterials.

  20. Size control and catalytic activity of bio-supported palladium nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søbjerg, Lina Sveidal; Lindhardt, Anders T; Skrydstrup, Troels; Finster, Kai; Meyer, Rikke Louise

    2011-07-01

    The development of nanoparticles has greatly improved the catalytic properties of metals due to the higher surface to volume ratio of smaller particles. The production of nanoparticles is most commonly based on abiotic processes, but in the search for alternative protocols, bacterial cells have been identified as excellent scaffolds of nanoparticle nucleation, and bacteria have been successfully employed to recover and regenerate platinum group metals from industrial waste. We report on the formation of bio-supported palladium (Pd) nanoparticles on the surface of two bacterial species with distinctly different surfaces: the gram positive Staphylococcus sciuri and the gram negative Cupriavidus necator. We investigated how the type of bacterium and the amount of biomass affected the size and catalytic properties of the nanoparticles formed. By increasing the biomass:Pd ratio, we could produce bio-supported Pd nanoparticles smaller than 10nm in diameter, whereas lower biomass:Pd ratios resulted in particles ranging from few to hundreds of nm. The bio-supported Pd nanoparticle catalytic properties were investigated towards the Suzuki-Miyaura cross coupling reaction and hydrogenation reactions. Surprisingly, the smallest nanoparticles obtained at the highest biomass:Pd ratio showed no reactivity towards the test reactions. The lack of reactivity appears to be caused by thiol groups, which poison the catalyst by binding strongly to Pd. Different treatments intended to liberate particles from the biomass, such as burning or rinsing in acetone, did not re-establish their catalytic activity. Sulphur-free biomaterials should therefore be explored as more suitable scaffolds for Pd(0) nanoparticle formation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. PLGA-lecithin-PEG core-shell nanoparticles for controlled drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Juliana M; Zhang, Liangfang; Yuet, Kai P; Liao, Grace; Rhee, June-Wha; Langer, Robert; Farokhzad, Omid C

    2009-03-01

    Current approaches to encapsulate and deliver therapeutic compounds have focused on developing liposomal and biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles (NPs), resulting in clinically approved therapeutics such as Doxil/Caelyx and Genexol-PM, respectively. Our group recently reported the development of biodegradable core-shell NP systems that combined the beneficial properties of liposomal and polymeric NPs for controlled drug delivery. Herein we report the parameters that alter the biological and physicochemical characteristics, stability, drug release properties and cytotoxicity of these core-shell NPs. We further define scalable processes for the formulation of these NPs in a reproducible manner. These core-shell NPs consist of (i) a poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) hydrophobic core, (ii) a soybean lecithin monolayer, and (iii) a poly(ethylene glycol) shell, and were synthesized by a modified nanoprecipitation method combined with self-assembly. Preparation of the NPs showed that various formulation parameters such as the lipid/polymer mass ratio and lipid/lipid-PEG molar ratio controlled NP physical stability and size. We encapsulated a model chemotherapy drug, docetaxel, in the NPs and showed that the amount of lipid coverage affected its drug release kinetics. Next, we demonstrated a potentially scalable process for the formulation, purification, and storage of NPs. Finally, we tested the cytotoxicity using MTT assays on two model human cell lines, HeLa and HepG2, and demonstrated the biocompatibility of these particles in vitro. Our data suggest that the PLGA-lecithin-PEG core-shell NPs may be a useful new controlled release drug delivery system.

  2. Monodisperse gold-palladium alloy nanoparticles and their composition-controlled catalysis in formic acid dehydrogenation under mild conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metin, Önder; Sun, Xiaolian; Sun, Shouheng

    2013-02-07

    Monodisperse 4 nm AuPd alloy nanoparticles with controlled composition were synthesized by co-reduction of hydrogen tetrachloroaurate(III) hydrate and palladium(II) acetylacetonate with a borane-morpholine complex in oleylamine. These NPs showed high activity (TOF = 230 h(-1)) and stability in catalyzing formic acid dehydrogenation and hydrogen production in water at 50 °C without any additives.

  3. Morphology-controlled synthesis of CdWO4 nanorods and nanoparticles via a molten salt method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yonggang; Ma Junfeng; Tao Jiantao; Zhu Xiaoyi; Zhou Jun; Zhao Zhongqiang; Xie Lijin; Tian Hua

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium tungstate (CdWO 4 ) nanoparticles and nanorods have been successfully synthesized by a molten salt method at 270 deg. C, and the morphology of the nanocrystals can be controlled by adjusting such reaction conditions as the calcined time and the weight ratio of the salt to the CdWO 4 precursor. The resultant sample is a pure phase of CdWO 4 without any other impurities

  4. Strategies to initiate and control the nucleation behavior of bimetallic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Gopi; de Graaf, Sytze; Ten Brink, Gert H; Persson, Per O Å; Kooi, Bart J; Palasantzas, George

    2017-06-22

    In this work we report strategies to nucleate bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) made by gas phase synthesis of elements showing difficulty in homogeneous nucleation. It is shown that the nucleation assisted problem of bimetallic NP synthesis can be solved via the following pathways: (i) selecting an element which can itself nucleate and act as a nucleation center for the synthesis of bimetallic NPs; (ii) introducing H 2 or CH 4 as an impurity/trace gas to initiate nucleation during the synthesis of bimetallic NPs. The latter can solve the problem if none of the elements in a bimetallic NP can initiate nucleation. We illustrate the abovementioned strategies for the case of Mg based bimetallic NPs, which are interesting as hydrogen storage materials and exhibit both nucleation and oxidation issues even under ultra-high vacuum conditions. In particular, it is shown that adding H 2 in small proportions favors the formation of a solid solution/alloy structure even in the case of immiscible Mg and Ti, where normally phase separation occurs during synthesis. In addition, we illustrate the possibility of improving the nucleation rate, and controlling the structure and size distribution of bimetallic NPs using H 2 /CH 4 as a reactive/nucleating gas. This is shown to be associated with the dimer bond energies of the various formed species and the vapor pressures of the metals, which are key factors for NP nucleation.

  5. Preparation of Size-Controlled Silver Nanoparticles and Chitin-Based Composites and Their Antimicrobial Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinh Quang Nguyen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple method for the preparation of size-controlled spherical silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs was reported for their generation by autoclaving a mixture of silver-containing glass powder and glucose. The particle size is regulated by the glucose concentration, with concentrations of 0.25, 1.0, and 4.0 wt% glucose providing small (3.48±1.83 nm in diameter, medium (6.53±1.78 nm, and large (12.9±2.5 nm particles, respectively. In this study, Ag NP/chitin composites were synthesized by mixing each of these three Ag NP suspensions with a <5% deacetylated (DAc chitin powder (pH 7.0 at room temperature. The Ag NPs were homogenously dispersed and stably adsorbed onto the chitin. The Ag NP/chitin composites were obtained as yellow or brown powders. Approximately 5, 15, and 20 μg of the small, medium, and large Ag NPs, respectively, were estimated to maximally adsorb onto 1 mg of chitin. The bactericidal and antifungal activities of the Ag NP/chitin composites increased as the amount of Ag NPs in the chitin increased. Furthermore, smaller Ag NPs (per weight in the chitin composites provided higher bactericidal and anti-fungal activities.

  6. Spectra study and size control of cobalt nanoparticles passivated with oleic acid and triphenylphosphine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Yikun; Ouyang Xing; Tang Jiaoning

    2010-01-01

    This paper compares the performance of two surfactants-triphenylphosphine (TPP) and oleic acid (OA) as a pair of capping agents in the synthesis of magnetic Co nanoparticles (NPs). Magnetic colloids of cobalt NPs are prepared by reducing solute cobalt chloride in the presence of stabilizing agents at a high temperature and characterized by TEM. Infrared spectra reveal that a chemical bond can be formed between O of C=O band and Co atoms while a coordinate bond forms between P and Co atoms around the NPs on the surface. OA binds strongly to the particle surface during synthesis that hinders the particle from growing; the TPP reversibly coordinates neutral metal surface sites that favor rapid growth. We studied the influence of changing the TPP/OA concentration ratio on the particle size distribution and crystallinity of Co NPs. Our results indicate the presence of TPP/OA is able to control particle growth, stabilize the colloidal suspension and prevent the final product from oxidation by air.

  7. Controllable Hydrothermal Conversion from Ni-Co-Mn Carbonate Nanoparticles to Microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanqing Tang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Starting from Ni-Co-Mn carbonate nanoparticles prepared by microreaction technology, uniform spherical particles of Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3CO3 with a size of 3–4 μm were obtained by a controllable hydrothermal conversion with the addition of (NH42CO3. Based on characterizations on the evolution of morphology and composition with hydrothermal treatment time, we clarified the mechanism of this novel method as a dissolution-recrystallization process, as well as the effects of (NH42CO3 concentration on the morphology and composition of particles. By changing concentrations and the ratio of the starting materials for nano-precipitation preparation, we achieved monotonic regulation on the size of the spherical particles, and the synthesis of Ni0.4Co0.2Mn0.4CO3 and Ni0.5Co0.2Mn0.3CO3, respectively. In addition, the spherical particles with a core-shell structure were preliminarily verified to be available by introducing nano-precipitates with different compositions in the hydrothermal treatment in sequence.

  8. High efficiency and low cost preparation of size controlled starch nanoparticles through ultrasonic treatment and precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yanjiao; Yan, Xiaoxia; Wang, Qian; Ren, Lili; Tong, Jin; Zhou, Jiang

    2017-07-15

    The purpose of this work was to develop an approach to produce size controlled starch nanoparticles (SNPs), via precipitation with high efficiency and low cost. High concentration starch aqueous pastes (up to 5wt.%) were treated by ultrasound. Viscosity measurements and size exclusion chromatography characterization revealed that, after 30min ultrasonic treatment, viscosity of the starch pastes decreased two orders of magnitude and the weight average molecular weight of the starch decreased from 8.4×10 7 to 2.7×10 6 g/mol. Dynamic light scattering measurements and scanning electron microscopy observations showed that the SNPs prepared from the starch pastes with ultrasonic treatments were smaller (∼75nm) and more uniform. Moreover, SNPs could be obtained using less non-solvents. X-ray diffraction results indicated that effect of the ultrasonic treatment on crystalline structure of the SNPs was negligible. Ultrasound can be utilized to prepare smaller SNPs through nanoprecipitation with higher efficiency and lower cost. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Water chemistry controlled aggregation and photo-transformation of silver nanoparticles in environmental waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yongguang; Yang, Xiaoya; Zhou, Xiaoxia; Wang, Weidong; Yu, Sujuan; Liu, Jingfu; Jiang, Guibin

    2015-08-01

    The inevitable release of engineered silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) into aquatic environments has drawn great concerns about its environmental toxicity and safety. Although aggregation and transformation play crucial roles in the transport and toxicity of AgNPs, how the water chemistry of environmental waters influences the aggregation and transformation of engineered AgNPs is still not well understood. In this study, the aggregation of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coated AgNPs was investigated in eight typical environmental water samples (with different ionic strengths, hardness, and dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentrations) by using UV-visible spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. Raman spectroscopy was applied to probe the interaction of DOM with the surface of AgNPs. Further, the photo-transformation and morphology changes of AgNPs in environmental waters were studied by UV-visible spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy. The results suggested that both electrolytes (especially Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) and DOM in the surface waters are key parameters for AgNP aggregation, and sunlight could accelerate the morphology change, aggregation, and further sedimentation of AgNPs. This water chemistry controlled aggregation and photo-transformation should have significant environmental impacts on the transport and toxicity of AgNPs in the aquatic environments. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Facile and controllable preparation of glucose biosensor based on Prussian blue nanoparticles hybrid composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Sheng, Qinglin; Zheng, Jianbin; Zhang, Hongfang

    2008-11-01

    A glucose biosensor based on polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) protected Prussian blue nanoparticles (PBNPs)-polyaniline/multi-walled carbon nanotubes hybrid composites was fabricated by electrochemical method. A novel route for PBNPs preparation was applied in the fabrication with the help of PVP, and from scanning electron microscope images, Prussian blue particles on the electrode were found nanoscaled. The biosensor exhibits fast current response (<6 s) and a linearity in the range from 6.7x10(-6) to 1.9x10(-3) M with a high sensitivity of 6.28 microA mM(-1) and a detection limit of 6x10(-7) M (S/N=3) for the detection of glucose. The apparent activation energy of enzyme-catalyzed reaction and the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant are 23.9 kJ mol(-1) and 1.9 mM respectively, which suggests a high affinity of the enzyme-substrate. This easy and controllable construction method of glucose biosensor combines the characteristics of the components of the hybrid composites, which favors the fast and sensitive detection of glucose with improved analytical capabilities. In addition, the biosensor was examined in human serum samples for glucose determination with a recovery between 95.0 and 104.5%.

  11. Induced quantum conformal gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novozhilov, Y.V.; Vassilevich, D.V.

    1988-11-01

    Quantum gravity is considered as induced by matter degrees of freedom and related to the symmetry breakdown in the low energy region of a non-Abelian gauge theory of fundamental fields. An effective action for quantum conformal gravity is derived where both the gravitational constant and conformal kinetic term are positive. Relation with induced classical gravity is established. (author). 15 refs

  12. Thickenings and conformal gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, Claude

    1991-07-01

    A twistor correspondence is given for complex conformal space-times with vanishing Bach and Eastwood-Dighton tensors; when the Weyl curvature is algebraically general, these equations are precisely the conformal version of Einstein's vacuum equations with cosmological constant. This gives a fully curved version of the linearized correspondence of Baston and Mason [B-M].

  13. Thickenings and conformal gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBrun, C. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (USA). Dept. of Mathematics)

    1991-07-01

    A twistor correspondence is given for complex conformal space-times with vanishing Bach and Eastwood-Dighton tensors; when the Weyl curvature is algebraically general, these equations are precisely the conformal version of Einstein's vacuum equations with cosmological constant. This gives a fully curved version of the linearized correspondence of Baston and Mason (B-M). (orig.).

  14. Thickenings and conformal gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBrun, C.

    1991-01-01

    A twistor correspondence is given for complex conformal space-times with vanishing Bach and Eastwood-Dighton tensors; when the Weyl curvature is algebraically general, these equations are precisely the conformal version of Einstein's vacuum equations with cosmological constant. This gives a fully curved version of the linearized correspondence of Baston and Mason [B-M]. (orig.)

  15. Conformal transformations in superspace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao Vong Duc

    1977-01-01

    The spinor extension of the conformal algebra is investigated. The transformation law of superfields under the conformal coordinate inversion R defined in the superspace is derived. Using R-technique, the superconformally covariant two-point and three-point correlation functions are found

  16. Conformational stability of calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, C.S.; Trandum, C.; Larsen, N.

    2005-01-01

    The conformational stability of calreticulin was investigated. Apparent unfolding temperatures (T-m) increased from 31 degrees C at pH 5 to 51 degrees C at pH 9, but electrophoretic analysis revealed that calreticulin oligomerized instead of unfolding. Structural analyses showed that the single C......-terminal a-helix was of major importance to the conformational stability of calreticulin....

  17. Conformity index: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feuvret, Loic; Noel, Georges; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Bey, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    We present a critical analysis of the conformity indices described in the literature and an evaluation of their field of application. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, with or without intensity modulation, is based on medical imaging techniques, three-dimensional dosimetry software, compression accessories, and verification procedures. It consists of delineating target volumes and critical healthy tissues to select the best combination of beams. This approach allows better adaptation of the isodose to the tumor volume, while limiting irradiation of healthy tissues. Tools must be developed to evaluate the quality of proposed treatment plans. Dosimetry software provides the dose distribution in each CT section and dose-volume histograms without really indicating the degree of conformity. The conformity index is a complementary tool that attributes a score to a treatment plan or that can compare several treatment plans for the same patient. The future of conformal index in everyday practice therefore remains unclear

  18. Morphology control of polymer: Fullerene solar cells by nanoparticle self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenluan

    During the past two decades, research in the field of polymer based solar cells has attracted great effort due to their simple processing, mechanical flexibility and potential low cost. A standard polymer solar cell is based on the concept of a bulk-heterojunction composed of a conducting polymer as the electron donor and a fullerene derivative as the electron acceptor. Since the exciton lifetime is limited, this places extra emphasis on control of the morphology to obtain improved device performance. In this thesis, detailed characterization and novel morphological design of polymer solar cells was studied, in addition, preliminary efforts to transfer laboratory scale methods to industrialized device fabrication was made. Magnetic contrast neutron reflectivity was used to study the vertical concentration distribution of fullerene nanoparticles within poly(2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2- b]thiophene (pBTTT) thin film. Due to the wide space between the side chains of polymer, these fullerene nanoparticles intercalate between them creating a stable co-crystal structure. Therefore, a high volume fraction of fullerene was needed to obtain optimal device performance as phase separated conductive pathways are required and resulted in a homogeneous fullerene concentration profile through the film. Small angle neutron scattering was used to find there is amorphous fullerene even at lower concentration since it was previously believed that all fullerene formed a co-crystal. These fullerene molecules evolve into approximately 15 nm sized agglomerates at higher concentrations to improve electron transport. Unfortunately, thermal annealing gives these agglomerates mobility to form micrometer sized crystals and reduce the device performance. In standard poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCMBM) solar cells, a higher concentration of PCBM at the cathode interface is desired due to the band alignment structure. This was

  19. Interaction study on bovine serum albumin physically binding to silver nanoparticles: Evolution from discrete conjugates to protein coronas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun; Zhong, Ruibo; Li, Wanrong; Liu, Yushuang; Bai, Zhijun; Yin, Jun; Liu, Jingran; Gong, Pei; Zhao, Xinmin; Zhang, Feng

    2015-12-01

    The nanostructures formed by inorganic nanoparticles together with organic molecules especially biomolecules have attracted increasing attention from both industries and researching fields due to their unique hybrid properties. In this paper, we systemically studied the interactions between amphiphilic polymer coated silver nanoparticles and bovine serum albumins by employing the fluorescence quenching approach in combination with the Stern-Volmer and Hill equations. The binding affinity was determined to 1.30 × 107 M-1 and the interaction was spontaneously driven by mainly the van der Waals force and hydrogen-bond mediated interactions, and negatively cooperative from the point of view of thermodynamics. With the non-uniform coating of amphiphilic polymer, the silver nanoparticles can form protein coronas which can become discrete protein-nanoparticle conjugates when controlling their molar ratios of mixing. The protein's conformational changes upon binding nanoparticles was also studied by using the three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy.

  20. Phoenix dactylifera L. leaf extract phytosynthesized gold nanoparticles; controlled synthesis and catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayed, Mervat F.; Eisa, Wael H.

    2014-03-01

    A green synthesis route was reported to explore the reducing and capping potential of Phoenix dactylifera extract for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles. The processes of nucleation and growth of gold nanoparticles were followed by monitoring the absorption spectra during the reaction. The size and morphology of these nanoparticles was typically imaged using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The particle size ranged between 32 and 45 nm and are spherical in shape. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis suggests that the synthesized gold nanoparticles might be stabilized through the interactions of hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in the carbohydrates, flavonoids, tannins and phenolic acids present in P. dactylifera. The as-synthesized Au colloids exhibited good catalytic activity for the degradation of 4-nitrophenol.

  1. Preparation and characterization of ketoprofen loaded eudragit RS polymeric nanoparticles for controlled release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuan Anh, Nguyen; Tuyen Dao, T P; Nhan Le, N T; Mau Chien, Dang; To Hoai, Nguyen; T Chi, Nguyen; Tran, T Khai

    2012-01-01

    Nanospheres containing ketoprofen (Keto) and polymer eudragit RS were prepared using an emulsion solvent evaporation method. The ultrasonic probe (VCX500, vibracell) was used as a tool to disperse oil phase into aqueous phase leading to water/oil emulsion. Nanoparticles were successfully prepared and their morphologies and diameters were confirmed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS), respectively. The result showed that particles were spherical with submicron size. The particle size was dependent on the RS concentration, emulsification tools and the types of organic solvents. For the encapsulation ability, Keto-loaded RS nanoparticle showed 9.8% of Keto in nanoparticle, which was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Moreover, the drug release behavior of Keto-loaded eudragit RS nanoparticle was also investigated in vitro at pH 7.4 and compared to referential profenid. (paper)

  2. Conformal invariance in supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergshoeff, E.A.

    1983-01-01

    In this thesis the author explains the role of conformal invariance in supergravity. He presents the complete structure of extended conformal supergravity for N <= 4. The outline of this work is as follows. In chapter 2 he briefly summarizes the essential properties of supersymmetry and supergravity and indicates the use of conformal invariance in supergravity. The idea that the introduction of additional symmetry transformations can make clear the structure of a field theory is not reserved to supergravity only. By means of some simple examples it is shown in chapter 3 how one can always introduce additional gauge transformations in a theory of massive vector fields. Moreover it is shown how the gauge invariant formulation sometimes explains the quantum mechanical properties of the theory. In chapter 4 the author defines the conformal transformations and summarizes their main properties. He explains how these conformal transformations can be used to analyse the structure of gravity. The supersymmetric extension of these results is discussed in chapter 5. Here he describes as an example how N=1 supergravity can be reformulated in a conformally-invariant way. He also shows that beyond N=1 the gauge fields of the superconformal symmetries do not constitute an off-shell field representation of extended conformal supergravity. Therefore, in chapter 6, a systematic method to construct the off-shell formulation of all extended conformal supergravity theories with N <= 4 is developed. As an example he uses this method to construct N=1 conformal supergravity. Finally, in chapter 7 N=4 conformal supergravity is discussed. (Auth.)

  3. Phase controlled synthesis of (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite magnetic nanoparticles with high uniformity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.F.; Li, Q.; Zu, X.T.; Xiang, X.; Liu, W.; Li, S.

    2016-01-01

    (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite magnetic nanoparticles were successfully synthesized through modifying the atomic ratio of polysaccharide and chelating agent at an optimal sintering temperature. In the process, the polysaccharide plays an important role in drastically shrinking the precursor during the gel drying process. In the metal-complex structure, M"2"+ ion active sites were coordinated by −OH of the water molecules except for EDTA anions. The MFe_2O_4 magnetic nanoparticles exhibited enhanced magnetic properties when compared with nano-MFe_2O_4 of similar particle size synthesized by other synthesis route reported in the literature. In particular, the sintering temperature improves the crystallinity and increases the hysteresis loop squareness ratio of (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite nanoparticles significantly. - Graphical abstract: Schematic representation of the proposed model for MFe_2O_4 nanoparticle synthesis, starting from EDTA-chelated M"2"+ (M=Mg, Ca, or Ba) cations (left). High dispersion (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite magnetic nanoparticles were prepared by a modified polyacrylamide gel route. Optimized utilization of polysaccharide, chelating agent, and sintering temperature allowed the formation of (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite nanoparticles with a narrow diameter distribution. - Highlights: • We report a modified polyacrylamide gel route to synthesize (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. • Chelate mechanism of metal ions (Mg, Ca, Ba) and EDTA has been discussed. • Phase transformation process of (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrites has been discussed. • The preparation method increases the hysteresis loop squareness ratio of (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite nanoparticles.

  4. Bioinspired heterostructured bead-on-string fibers via controlling the wet-assembly of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lin; Song, Cheng; Zhang, Miaoxin; Zheng, Yongmei

    2014-09-21

    A kind of bioinspired heterostructured bead-on-string fiber (BHBF), composed of poly-(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4) hydrolyzed nanoparticles, was prepared via integrating a wet-assembly system, including PMMA electrospinning, fog of nanoparticles and water coalescence at multi-stages. The wet-assembly of BHBF was regulated by the difference in surface energy and Laplace pressure. Especially, BHBF is characteristic of a hydrophilic rough bead for excellent water collection ability.

  5. Phase controlled synthesis of (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite magnetic nanoparticles with high uniformity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S.F., E-mail: wangshifa2006@yeah.net [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, Sichuan (China); Science and technology on vacuum technology and physics laboratory, Lanzhou Institute of Physics, Lanzhou 730000, Gansu (China); Li, Q. [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, Sichuan (China); Zu, X.T., E-mail: xtzu@uestc.edu.cn [Institute of Fundamental and Frontier Sciences, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, Sichuan (China); Xiang, X.; Liu, W. [School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, Sichuan (China); Li, S., E-mail: sean.li@unsw.edu.au [School of Material Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia)

    2016-12-01

    (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite magnetic nanoparticles were successfully synthesized through modifying the atomic ratio of polysaccharide and chelating agent at an optimal sintering temperature. In the process, the polysaccharide plays an important role in drastically shrinking the precursor during the gel drying process. In the metal-complex structure, M{sup 2+} ion active sites were coordinated by −OH of the water molecules except for EDTA anions. The MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles exhibited enhanced magnetic properties when compared with nano-MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} of similar particle size synthesized by other synthesis route reported in the literature. In particular, the sintering temperature improves the crystallinity and increases the hysteresis loop squareness ratio of (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite nanoparticles significantly. - Graphical abstract: Schematic representation of the proposed model for MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticle synthesis, starting from EDTA-chelated M{sup 2+} (M=Mg, Ca, or Ba) cations (left). High dispersion (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite magnetic nanoparticles were prepared by a modified polyacrylamide gel route. Optimized utilization of polysaccharide, chelating agent, and sintering temperature allowed the formation of (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite nanoparticles with a narrow diameter distribution. - Highlights: • We report a modified polyacrylamide gel route to synthesize (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. • Chelate mechanism of metal ions (Mg, Ca, Ba) and EDTA has been discussed. • Phase transformation process of (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrites has been discussed. • The preparation method increases the hysteresis loop squareness ratio of (Mg, Ca, Ba)-ferrite nanoparticles.

  6. Gold Nanoparticles with Externally Controlled, Reversible Shifts of Local Surface Plasmon Resonance Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Mustafa S.; Jensen, Gary C.; Penaloza, David P.; Seery, Thomas A. P.; Pendergraph, Samuel A.; Rusling, James F.; Sotzing, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    We have achieved reversible tunability of local surface plasmon resonance in conjugated polymer functionalized gold nanoparticles. This property was facilitated by the preparation of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) containing polynorbornene brushes on gold nanoparticles via surface-initiated ring-opening metathesis polymerization. Reversible tuning of the surface plasmon band was achieved by electrochemically switching the EDOT polymer between its reduced and oxidized states. PMID:19839619

  7. Conformal technique dose escalation in prostate cancer: improved cancer control with higher doses in patients with pretreatment PSA {>=} 10 ngm/ml

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanks, G E; Lee, W R; Hanlon, A L; Kaplan, E; Epstein, B; Schultheiss, T

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: Single institutions and an NCI supported group of institutions have been investigating the value of dose escalation in patients with prostate cancer treated by conformal treatment techniques. Improvement in morbidity has been previously established, while this report identifies the pretreatment PSA level subgroups of patients who benefitted in cancer control from higher dose. Materials and Methods: We report actuarial bNED survival rates for 375 consecutive patients with known pretreatment PSA levels treated with conformal technique between 5/89 and 12/93. The whole pelvis was treated to 45 Gy in 25 fractions in all T2C,3, all Gleason 8, 9, 10 and all patients with pretreatment PSA {>=}20. The prostate {+-} seminal vesicles was boosted at 2.1 Gy/day to the center of the prostate to 65-79 Gy (65-69 N=50), 70-72.49 N=94, 72.5-74.9 N=82, 75-77.49 N=129 and {>=}77.5 N=20). The median followup is 21 mos with a range of 3 to 67 mos. The highest dose patients have the least followup, reducing the impact of the highest dose levels at this time. Patients are analyzed for the entire group divided at 71 Gy and at 73 Gy calculated at the center of the prostate. Each dose group is then subdivided by pretreatment PSA levels <10, 10-19.9, and {>=}20 ngm/ml and dose levels are compared within pretreatment PSA level group. bNED failure is defined as PSA {>=}1.5 ngm/ml and rising on two consecutive values. Results: Table 1 shows the bNED survival rates at 24 and 36 mos for all patients and the three pretreatment PSA level groups. For all patients pooled, there is an overall advantage to using doses {>=}71 Gy (64% vs 85% at 36 mo, p=.006) and {>=}73 Gy (71% vs 86% at 36 mo, p=.07). The subgroup of PSA <10 ngm/ml, however, shows no benefit in bNED survival when using doses over 71 Gy (90% vs 93% at 36 mo) or 73 Gy (91 vs 94% at 36 mo). The subgroup PSA 10 ngm/ml to 19.9 ngm/ml shows improved cancer control when using doses over 71 Gy (61% vs 88% at 36 mo, p=.03) and over 73

  8. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles for the control of mosquito vectors of malaria, filariasis, and dengue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, Naresh Kumar; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Rejeeth, Chandrababu; Madhiyazhagan, Pari; Barnard, Donald R

    2012-03-01

    A biological method was used to synthesize stable silver nanoparticles that were tested as mosquito larvicides against Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi, and Culex quinquefasciatus. Annona squamosa leaf broth (5%) reduced aqueous 1 mM AgNO₃ to stable silver nanoparticles with an average size of 450 nm. The structure and percentage of synthesized nanoparticles was characterized by using ultraviolet spectrophotometry, X-Ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy methods. The median lethal concentrations (LC₅₀) of silver nanoparticles that killed fourth instars of Ae. aegypti, Cx. quinquefasciatus, and An. stephensi were 0.30, 0.41, and 2.12 ppm, respectively. Adult longevity (days) in male and female mosquitoes exposed as larvae to 0.1 ppm silver nanoparticles was reduced by ~30% (p<0.05), whereas the number of eggs laid by females exposed as larvae to 0.1 ppm silver nanoparticles decreased by 36% (p<0.05).

  9. Biohydrogels with magnetic nanoparticles as crosslinker: characteristics and potential use for controlled antitumor drug-delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbucci, Rolando; Giani, Gabriele; Fedi, Serena; Bottari, Severino; Casolaro, Mario

    2012-12-01

    Hybrid magnetic hydrogels are of interest for applications in biomedical science as controlled drug-delivery systems. We have developed a strategy to obtain novel hybrid hydrogels with magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) of CoFe(2)O(3) and Fe(3)O(4) as crosslinker agents of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) or hyaluronic acid (HYAL) polymers and we have tested these systems for controlled doxorubicin release. The magnetic NPs are functionalized with (3-aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane (APTMS) in order to introduce amino groups on the surface. The amino coating is determined and quantified by standard Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy methods, and by cyclic voltammetry, a novel approach that permits us to look at the solution properties of the functionalized NPs. The gel formation involves the creation of an amide bond between the carboxylic groups of CMC or HYAL and the amine groups of functionalized NPs, which work as crosslinking agents of the polymer chains. The hybrid hydrogels are chemically and morphologically characterized. The rheological and the water uptake properties of the hydrogels are also investigated. Under the application of an alternating magnetic field, the CMC-HYAL hybrid hydrogel previously loaded with doxorubicin shows a drug release greater than that showed by the CMC-HYAL hydrogel crosslinked with 1,3-diaminopropane. In conclusion, the presence of magnetic NPs makes the synthesized hybrid hydrogels suitable for application as a drug-delivery system by means of alternating magnetic fields. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Progress in controlling the size, composition and nanostructure of supported gold-palladium nanoparticles for catalytic applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paalanen, P.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370602013; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397; Sankar, M.

    2013-01-01

    This review article gives an overview of the recent developments in the synthesis strategies of supported goldbased bimetallic nanoparticle catalysts. The catalytic efficiency of these supported bimetallic nanoparticles, similar to monometallic nanoparticles, depends on their structural

  11. Conformal expansions and renormalons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathsman, J.

    2000-02-07

    The coefficients in perturbative expansions in gauge theories are factorially increasing, predominantly due to renormalons. This type of factorial increase is not expected in conformal theories. In QCD conformal relations between observables can be defined in the presence of a perturbative infrared fixed-point. Using the Banks-Zaks expansion the authors study the effect of the large-order behavior of the perturbative series on the conformal coefficients. The authors find that in general these coefficients become factorially increasing. However, when the factorial behavior genuinely originates in a renormalon integral, as implied by a postulated skeleton expansion, it does not affect the conformal coefficients. As a consequence, the conformal coefficients will indeed be free of renormalon divergence, in accordance with previous observations concerning the smallness of these coefficients for specific observables. The authors further show that the correspondence of the BLM method with the skeleton expansion implies a unique scale-setting procedure. The BLM coefficients can be interpreted as the conformal coefficients in the series relating the fixed-point value of the observable with that of the skeleton effective charge. Through the skeleton expansion the relevance of renormalon-free conformal coefficients extends to real-world QCD.

  12. Evaluation of environmental filtration control of engineered nanoparticles using the Harvard Versatile Engineered Nanomaterial Generation System (VENGES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarría-Vega, Manuel E.; Sotiriou, Georgios A.; Santeufemio, Christopher; Schmidt, Daniel; Demokritou, Philip; Ellenbecker, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Applying engineering controls to airborne engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) is critical to prevent environmental releases and worker exposure. This study evaluated the effectiveness of two air sampling and six air cleaning fabric filters at collecting ENPs using industrially relevant flame-made engineered nanoparticles generated using a versatile engineered nanomaterial generation system (VENGES), recently designed and constructed at Harvard University. VENGES has the ability to generate metal and metal oxide exposure atmospheres while controlling important particle properties such as primary particle size, aerosol size distribution, and agglomeration state. For this study, amorphous SiO2 ENPs with a 15.4 nm primary particle size were generated and diluted with HEPA-filtered air. The aerosol was passed through the filter samples at two different filtration face velocities (2.3 and 3.5 m/min). Particle concentrations as a function of particle size were measured upstream and downstream of the filters using a specially designed filter test system to evaluate filtration efficiency. Real time instruments (FMPS and APS) were used to measure particle concentration for diameters from 5 to 20,000 nm. Membrane-coated fabric filters were found to have enhanced nanoparticle collection efficiency by 20–46 % points compared to non-coated fabric and could provide collection efficiency above 95 %. PMID:23412707

  13. Evaluation of environmental filtration control of engineered nanoparticles using the Harvard Versatile Engineered Nanomaterial Generation System (VENGES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Candace S.-J.; Echevarría-Vega, Manuel E.; Sotiriou, Georgios A.; Santeufemio, Christopher; Schmidt, Daniel; Demokritou, Philip; Ellenbecker, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Applying engineering controls to airborne engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) is critical to prevent environmental releases and worker exposure. This study evaluated the effectiveness of two air sampling and six air cleaning fabric filters at collecting ENPs using industrially relevant flame-made engineered nanoparticles generated using a versatile engineered nanomaterial generation system (VENGES), recently designed and constructed at Harvard University. VENGES has the ability to generate metal and metal oxide exposure atmospheres while controlling important particle properties such as primary particle size, aerosol size distribution, and agglomeration state. For this study, amorphous SiO 2 ENPs with a 15.4 nm primary particle size were generated and diluted with HEPA-filtered air. The aerosol was passed through the filter samples at two different filtration face velocities (2.3 and 3.5 m/min). Particle concentrations as a function of particle size were measured upstream and downstream of the filters using a specially designed filter test system to evaluate filtration efficiency. Real time instruments (FMPS and APS) were used to measure particle concentration for diameters from 5 to 20,000 nm. Membrane-coated fabric filters were found to have enhanced nanoparticle collection efficiency by 20–46 % points compared to non-coated fabric and could provide collection efficiency above 95%.

  14. Externally controlled on-demand release of anti-HIV drug using magneto-electric nanoparticles as carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Madhavan; Guduru, Rakesh; Liang, Ping; Hong, Jeongmin; Sagar, Vidya; Khizroev, Sakhrat

    2013-01-01

    Although highly active anti-retroviral therapy has resulted in remarkable decline in the morbidity and mortality in AIDS patients, inadequately low delivery of anti-retroviral drugs across the blood-brain barrier results in virus persistence. The capability of high-efficacy-targeted drug delivery and on-demand release remains a formidable task. Here we report an in vitro study to demonstrate the on-demand release of azidothymidine 5'-triphosphate, an anti-human immunodeficiency virus drug, from 30 nm CoFe2O4@BaTiO3 magneto-electric nanoparticles by applying a low alternating current magnetic field. Magneto-electric nanoparticles as field-controlled drug carriers offer a unique capability of field-triggered release after crossing the blood-brain barrier. Owing to the intrinsic magnetoelectricity, these nanoparticles can couple external magnetic fields with the electric forces in drug-carrier bonds to enable remotely controlled delivery without exploiting heat. Functional and structural integrity of the drug after the release was confirmed in in vitro experiments with human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells and through atomic force microscopy, spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared and mass spectrometry studies.

  15. Electronic structure and size of TiO sub 2 nanoparticles of controlled size prepared by aerosol methods

    CERN Document Server

    Soriano, L; Sanchez-Agudo, M; Sanz, J M; Ahonen, P P; Kauppinen, E I; Palomares, F J; Bressler, P R

    2002-01-01

    A complete characterization of nanostructures has to deal both with electronic structure and dimensions. Here we present the characterization of TiO sub 2 nanoparticles of controlled size prepared by aerosol methods. The electronic structure of these nanoparticles was probed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), the particle size by atomic force microscopy (AFM). XAS spectra show that the particles crystallize in the anatase phase upon heating at 500 sup o C, whereas further annealing at 700 sup o C give crystallites of 70 % anatase and 30 % rutile phases. Raising the temperature to 900 sup o C results in a complete transformation of the particles to rutile. AFM images reveal that the mean size of the anatase particles formed upon heating at 500 sup o C is 30 nm, whereas for the rutile particles formed upon annealing at 900 sup o C 90 nm were found. The results obtained by these techniques agree with XRD data. (author)

  16. Has 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) improved the local tumour control for stage I non-small cell lung cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Senan, Suresh; Meerbeeck, Jan P. van; Graveland, Wilfried J.

    2002-01-01

    Aims and background: The high local failure rates observed after radiotherapy in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may be improved by the use of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT). Materials and methods: The case-records of 113 patients who were treated with curative 3D CRT between 1991 and 1999 were analysed. No elective nodal irradiation was performed, and doses of 60 Gy or more, in once-daily fractions of between 2 and 3 Gy, were prescribed. Results: The median actuarial survival of patients was 20 months, with 1-, 3- and 5-year survival of 71, 25 and 12%, respectively. Local disease progression was the cause of death in 30% of patients, and 22% patients died from distant metastases. Grade 2-3 acute radiation pneumonitis (SWOG) was observed in 6.2% of patients. The median actuarial local progression-free survival (LPFS) was 27 months, with 85 and 43% of patients free from local progression at 1 and 3 years, respectively. Endobronchial tumour extension significantly influenced LPFS, both on univariate (P=0.023) and multivariate analysis (P=0.023). The median actuarial cause-specific survival (CSS) was 19 months, and the respective 1- and 3-year rates were 72 and 30%. Multivariate analysis showed T2 classification (P=0.017) and the presence of endobronchial tumour extension (P=0.029) to be adverse prognostic factors for CSS. On multivariate analysis, T-stage significantly correlated with distant failure (P=0.005). Conclusions: Local failure rates remain substantial despite the use of 3D CRT for stage I NSCLC. Additional improvements in local control can come about with the use of radiation dose escalation and approaches to address the problem of tumour mobility

  17. Lanthanide paramagnetic probes for NMR spectroscopic studies of fast molecular conformational dynamics and temperature control. Effective six-site proton exchange in 18-crown-6 by exchange spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babailov, Sergey P

    2012-02-06

    (1)H and (13)C NMR measurements are reported for the CDCl(3) and CD(2)Cl(2) solutions of [La(18-crown-6)(NO(3))(3)] (I), [Pr(18-crown-6) (NO(3))(3)] (II), [Ce(18-crown-6)(NO(3))(3)] (III), and [Nd(18-crown-6)(NO(3))(3)] (IV) complexes. Temperature dependencies of the (1)H NMR spectra of paramagnetic II-IV have been analyzed using the dynamic NMR (DNMR) methods for six-site exchange. Two types of conformational dynamic processes were identified (the first one is conditioned by interconversion of complex enantiomeric forms and pseudorotation of a macrocycle molecule upon the C(2) symmetry axis; the second one is conditioned by macrocycle molecule inversion). Application of exchange spectroscopy (2D-EXSY) of DNMR for investigation of this dynamic system (II-IV) simplifies the assignment of the NMR signals and represents the first experimental study of multisite exchange. In the present work, the methodology of paramagnetic 4f (Ce, Pr, and Nd) probe applications for the study of free-energy, enthalpy, and entropy changes in chemical exchange processes, as well as the advantages of this method in a comparison with DNMR studies of diamagnetic substances, is discussed. In particular, as a result of paramagnetic chemical shifts in 4f complexes, the range of measurable rate constants expands considerably compared to the analogous range in diamagnetic compounds. Coordination compounds investigated in the paper represent new types of thermometric NMR sensors and lanthanide paramagnetic probes for in situ temperature control in solution.

  18. Conformal sequestering simplified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmaltz, Martin; Sundrum, Raman

    2006-01-01

    Sequestering is important for obtaining flavor-universal soft masses in models where supersymmetry breaking is mediated at high scales. We construct a simple and robust class of hidden sector models which sequester themselves from the visible sector due to strong and conformally invariant hidden dynamics. Masses for hidden matter eventually break the conformal symmetry and lead to supersymmetry breaking by the mechanism recently discovered by Intriligator, Seiberg and Shih. We give a unified treatment of subtleties due to global symmetries of the CFT. There is enough review for the paper to constitute a self-contained account of conformal sequestering

  19. Conformally connected universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantor, M.; Piran, T.

    1983-01-01

    A well-known difficulty associated with the conformal method for the solution of the general relativistic Hamiltonian constraint is the appearance of an aphysical ''bag of gold'' singularity at the nodal surface of the conformal factor. This happens whenever the background Ricci scalar is too large. Using a simple model, it is demonstrated that some of these singular solutions do have a physical meaning, and that these can be considered as initial data for Universe containing black holes, which are connected, in a conformally nonsingular way with each other. The relation between the ADM mass and the horizon area in this solution supports the cosmic censorship conjecture. (author)

  20. Investigation and Control of Algal Grwoths in Water Resources Using Zn Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Eskandary

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Increasing nutrients such as nitrates and phosphates in water resources lead to the growth of various algal species, causing undesirable odors and taste in the water. This study investigated the identification and removal of harmful algal growths by Zinc oxide nanoparticles (using Ardabil Yamichi Dam reservoir as a case study. Samples were initially collected from the Yamichi Dam reservoir and the algae in the water samples were cultivated. Enough time was allowed for the algae to grow before they were identified under the microscope. The results showed that most of the algal species grown in the culture medium belonged to the species Cladophora and Euglena. Zinc oxide nanoparticles were then synthesized to be used in the removal and/or inhibition of algal growths. ZnO nanoparticles were subsequently characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD methods which revealed that the size of the ZnO nanoparticles was in the range of 10‒30 nanometers and further that the nanoparticles were pure and of a  hexagonal phase. In continuation, the capability of ZnO nanoparticles with concentrations in the range of 0-3 ppm to inhibit algal growth was investigated. Results showed that no reduction was observed in algal growth for Zinc oxide nanoparticle concentrations below 1 mg/lit. At concentrations between 1 to 2 mg/lit, however, a significant reduction was observed in algal growth. Finally, it was found that algal growths completely stopped at ZnO concentrations beyond 2 mg/lit

  1. Analysis of biopsy outcome after three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy of prostate cancer using dose-distribution variables and tumor control probability models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levegruen, Sabine; Jackson, Andrew; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Venkatraman, Ennapadam S.; Skwarchuk, Mark W.; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Fuks, Zvi; Leibel, Steven A.; Ling, C. Clifton

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate tumor control following three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) of prostate cancer and to identify dose-distribution variables that correlate with local control assessed through posttreatment prostate biopsies. Methods and Material: Data from 132 patients, treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), who had a prostate biopsy 2.5 years or more after 3D-CRT for T1c-T3 prostate cancer with prescription doses of 64.8-81 Gy were analyzed. Variables derived from the dose distribution in the PTV included: minimum dose (Dmin), maximum dose (Dmax), mean dose (Dmean), dose to n% of the PTV (Dn), where n = 1%, ..., 99%. The concept of the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) was evaluated for different values of the surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF 2 ). Four tumor control probability (TCP) models (one phenomenologic model using a logistic function and three Poisson cell kill models) were investigated using two sets of input parameters, one for low and one for high T-stage tumors. Application of both sets to all patients was also investigated. In addition, several tumor-related prognostic variables were examined (including T-stage, Gleason score). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. The ability of the logistic regression models (univariate and multivariate) to predict the biopsy result correctly was tested by performing cross-validation analyses and evaluating the results in terms of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results: In univariate analysis, prescription dose (Dprescr), Dmax, Dmean, dose to n% of the PTV with n of 70% or less correlate with outcome (p 2 : EUD correlates significantly with outcome for SF 2 of 0.4 or more, but not for lower SF 2 values. Using either of the two input parameters sets, all TCP models correlate with outcome (p 2 , is limited because the low dose region may not coincide with the tumor location. Instead, for MSKCC prostate cancer patients with their

  2. Multi-scale Control and Enhancement of Reactor Boiling Heat Flux by Reagents and Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manglik, R M; Athavale, A; Kalaikadal, D S; Deodhar, A; Verma, U

    2011-09-02

    The phenomenological characterization of the use of non-invasive and passive techniques to enhance the boiling heat transfer in water has been carried out in this extended study. It provides fundamental enhanced heat transfer data for nucleate boiling and discusses the associated physics with the aim of addressing future and next-generation reactor thermal-hydraulic management. It essentially addresses the hypothesis that in phase-change processes during boiling, the primary mechanisms can be related to the liquid-vapor interfacial tension and surface wetting at the solidliquid interface. These interfacial characteristics can be significantly altered and decoupled by introducing small quantities of additives in water, such as surface-active polymers, surfactants, and nanoparticles. The changes are fundamentally caused at a molecular-scale by the relative bulk molecular dynamics and adsorption-desorption of the additive at the liquid-vapor interface, and its physisorption and electrokinetics at the liquid-solid interface. At the micro-scale, the transient transport mechanisms at the solid-liquid-vapor interface during nucleation and bubblegrowth can be attributed to thin-film spreading, surface-micro-cavity activation, and micro-layer evaporation. Furthermore at the macro-scale, the heat transport is in turn governed by the bubble growth and distribution, macro-layer heat transfer, bubble dynamics (bubble coalescence, collapse, break-up, and translation), and liquid rheology. Some of these behaviors and processes are measured and characterized in this study, the outcomes of which advance the concomitant fundamental physics, as well as provide insights for developing control strategies for the molecular-scale manipulation of interfacial tension and surface wetting in boiling by means of polymeric reagents, surfactants, and other soluble surface-active additives.

  3. Highly Controlled Synthesis and Super-Radiant Photoluminescence of Plasmonic Cube-in-Cube Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Sungi; Son, Jiwoong; Lee, Yeonhee; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2016-12-14

    The plasmonic properties of metal nanostructures have been heavily utilized for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF), but the direct photoluminescence (PL) from plasmonic metal nanostructures, especially with plasmonic coupling, has not been widely used as much as SERS and MEF due to the lack of understanding of the PL mechanism, relatively weak signals, and the poor availability of the synthetic methods for the nanostructures with strong PL signals. The direct PL from metal nanostructures is beneficial if these issues can be addressed because it does not exhibit photoblinking or photobleaching, does not require dye-labeling, and can be employed as a highly reliable optical signal that directly depends on nanostructure morphology. Herein, we designed and synthesized plasmonic cube-in-cube (CiC) nanoparticles (NPs) with a controllable interior nanogap in a high yield from Au nanocubes (AuNCs). In synthesizing the CiC NPs, we developed a galvanic void formation (GVF) process, composed of replacement/reduction and void formation steps. We unraveled the super-radiant character of the plasmonic coupling-induced plasmon mode which can result in highly enhanced PL intensity and long-lasting PL, and the PL mechanisms of these structures were analyzed and matched with the plasmon hybridization model. Importantly, the PL intensity and quantum yield (QY) of CiC NPs are 31 times and 16 times higher than those of AuNCs, respectively, which have shown the highest PL intensity and QY reported for metallic nanostructures. Finally, we confirmed the long-term photostability of the PL signal, and the signal remained stable for at least 1 h under continuous illumination.

  4. A NIR-remote controlled upconverting nanoparticle: an improved tool for living cell dye-labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Bin; Gong, Xiaoqun; Wang, Hanjie; Wang, Sheng; Chang, Jin; Wang, Huiquan; Li, Wei; Tan, Jian

    2015-01-01

    In living cells, due to the selective permeability and complicated cellular environment, the uptake efficiency and fluorescence decay of organic dyes during dye-labeling may be influenced, which may eventually result in poor fluorescent imaging. In this work, a protocol of UCNs@mSiO_2-(FA and Azo) core–shell nanocarriers was designed and prepared successfully. The core–shell nanocarriers were assembled from two parts, including a mesoporous silica shell surface modified by folate (FA) and azobenzene (Azo), and an upconverting nanocrystal (UCN) core. The mesoporous silica shell is used for loading organic dyes and conjugating folate which helps to enhance the cellular uptake of nanocarriers. The UCN core works as a transducer to convert near infrared (NIR) light to local UV and visible light to activate a back-and-forth wagging motion of azobenzene molecules on the surface, while the azobenzene acts as a molecular impeller for propelling the release of organic dyes. The nanocarriers of loading organic dyes can maintain the stability of the fluorescent imaging effect better than free organic dyes. The experimental results show that with the help of the nanoparticle, cell uptake efficiency of the model dyes of rhodamine and 4′, 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) was significantly improved. The release of dyes can only be triggered by NIR light exposure and their quantity is highly dependent on the duration of NIR light exposure, thus realizing NIR-regulated dye release spatiotemporally. Our work may open a novel avenue for precisely controlling UCN-based living cell imaging in biotechnology and diagnostics, as well as studying cell dynamics, cell–cell interactions, and tissue morphogenesis. (paper)

  5. Multi-scale Control and Enhancement of Reactor Boiling Heat Flux by Reagents and Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manglik, R.M.; Athavale, A.; Kalaikadal, D.S.; Deodhar, A.; Verma, U.

    2011-01-01

    The phenomenological characterization of the use of non-invasive and passive techniques to enhance the boiling heat transfer in water has been carried out in this extended study. It provides fundamental enhanced heat transfer data for nucleate boiling and discusses the associated physics with the aim of addressing future and next-generation reactor thermal-hydraulic management. It essentially addresses the hypothesis that in phase-change processes during boiling, the primary mechanisms can be related to the liquid-vapor interfacial tension and surface wetting at the solidliquid interface. These interfacial characteristics can be significantly altered and decoupled by introducing small quantities of additives in water, such as surface-active polymers, surfactants, and nanoparticles. The changes are fundamentally caused at a molecular-scale by the relative bulk molecular dynamics and adsorption-desorption of the additive at the liquid-vapor interface, and its physisorption and electrokinetics at the liquid-solid interface. At the micro-scale, the transient transport mechanisms at the solid-liquid-vapor interface during nucleation and bubblegrowth can be attributed to thin-film spreading, surface-micro-cavity activation, and micro-layer evaporation. Furthermore at the macro-scale, the heat transport is in turn governed by the bubble growth and distribution, macro-layer heat transfer, bubble dynamics (bubble coalescence, collapse, break-up, and translation), and liquid rheology. Some of these behaviors and processes are measured and characterized in this study, the outcomes of which advance the concomitant fundamental physics, as well as provide insights for developing control strategies for the molecular-scale manipulation of interfacial tension and surface wetting in boiling by means of polymeric reagents, surfactants, and other soluble surface-active additives.

  6. Plant Extract Synthesized PLA Nanoparticles for Controlled and Sustained Release of Quercetin: A Green Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Background Green synthesis of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) has been extensively carried out by using plant extracts (PEs) which have property of stabilizers/ emulsifiers. To our knowledge, there is no comprehensive study on applying a green approach using PEs for fabrication of biodegradable PLA NPs. Conventional methods rely on molecules like polyvinyl alcohol, polyethylene glycol, D-alpha-tocopheryl poly(ethylene glycol 1000) succinate as stabilizers/emulsifiers for the synthesis of such biodegradable NPs which are known to be toxic. So, there is urgent need to look for stabilizers which are biogenic and non-toxic. The present study investigated use of PEs as stabilizers/emulsifiers for the fabrication of stable PLA NPs. Synthesized PLA NPs through this green process were explored for controlled release of the well known antioxidant molecule quercetin. Methodology/Principal Findings Stable PLA NPs were synthesized using leaf extracts of medicinally important plants like Syzygium cumini (1), Bauhinia variegata (2), Cedrus deodara (3), Lonicera japonica (4) and Eleaocarpus sphaericus (5). Small and uniformly distributed NPs in the size range 70±30 nm to 143±36 nm were formed with these PEs. To explore such NPs for drugs/ small molecules delivery, we have successfully encapsulated quercetin a lipophilic molecule on a most uniformly distributed PLA-4 NPs synthesized using Lonicera japonica leaf extract. Quercetin loaded PLA-4 NPs were observed for slow and sustained release of quercetin molecule. Conclusions This green approach based on PEs mediated synthesis of stable PLA NPs pave the way for encapsulating drug/small molecules, nutraceuticals and other bioactive ingredients for safer cellular uptake, biodistribution and targeted delivery. Hence, such PEs synthesized PLA NPs would be useful to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of encapsulated small molecules/drugs. Furthermore, different types of plants can be explored for the synthesis of PLA as well as other

  7. Self-assembled hyaluronic acid nanoparticles for controlled release of agrochemicals and diosgenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñones, Javier Pérez; Brüggemann, Oliver; Covas, Carlos Peniche; Ossipov, Dmitri A

    2017-10-01

    Commercial sodium hyaluronate (HA) and synthetic hydrazide-modified HA were functionalized with diosgenin and two agrochemicals (brassinosteroids DI31 and S7) with degree of substitution ranging from 5.6 to 13.1%. The HA-steroid conjugates were studied with FTIR, 1 H NMR and differential scanning calorimetry. Dynamic light scattering revealed self-assembly of the HA-steroid conjugates into stable negatively charged nanoparticles of around 159nm-441nm in water, which after drying appeared as 140nm-370nm spherically shaped nanoparticles according to transmission electron microscopy. These nanoparticles exhibited almost constant release rates of steroids for the first 8h, demonstrating sustained steroids delivery for 72h in acidic medium. The nanoparticles formed from HA-steroid conjugates were not cytotoxic to human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC), while the HA- brassinosteroid nanoparticles showed in vitro agrochemical activity that was superior to the activity observed for the parent brassinosteroids DI31 and S7 at 10 -5 to 10 -7 mgmL -1 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Preparation of gelatin films incorporated with tea polyphenol nanoparticles for enhancing controlled-release antioxidant properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Antoniou, John; Li, Yue; Yi, Jiang; Yokoyama, Wallace; Ma, Jianguo; Zhong, Fang

    2015-04-22

    Gelatin films incorporated with chitosan nanoparticles in various free/encapsulated tea polyphenol (TP) ratios were prepared in order to investigate the influence of different ratios on the physicochemical and antioxidant properties of films. The TP-containing nanoparticles were prepared by cross-linking chitosan hydrochloride (CSH) with sulfobutyl ether-β-cyclodextrin sodium (SBE-β-CD) at three different encapsulation efficiencies (EE; ∼50%, ∼80%, and ∼100%) of TP. The stability of TP-loaded nanoparticles was maintained during the film drying process from the analysis of free TP content in the redissolved film solutions. Composite films showed no significant difference in visual aspects, while the light transmittance (250-550 nm) was decreased with incorporation of TP. Nanoparticles appeared to be homogeneously dispersed within the film matrix by microstructure analysis (SEM and AFM). TP-loaded films had ferric reducing and DPPH radical scavenging power that corresponded to the EEs. Sunflower oil packaged in bags made of gelatin films embedded with nanoparticles of 80% EE showed the best oxidation inhibitory effect, followed by 100% EE, 50% EE, and free TP, over 6 weeks of storage. However, when the gelatin film was placed over the headspace and was not in contact with the oil, the free TP showed the best effect. The results indicate that sustained release of TP in the contacting surface can ensure the protective effects, which vary with free/encapsulated mass ratios, thus improving antioxidant activities instead of increasing the dosage.

  9. Controllable synthesis, characterization and optical properties of ZnS:Mn nanoparticles as a novel biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohagheghpour, E.; Rabiee, M.; Moztarzadeh, F.; Tahriri, M.; Jafarbeglou, M.; Bizari, D.; Eslami, H.

    2009-01-01

    To be a suitable biolabeling agent (biosensor), the nanoparticles should have high luminescent efficiency and proper surface groups for coupling with biomolecules. In this article, high-quality ZnS:Mn nanoparticles were synthesized from quaternary W/O micro-emulsion system with different Mn% for detecting the best concentration. The addition of biotin and the subsequent specific binding events alter the dielectric environment of the nanoparticle, resulting in a spectral shift of the particle plasmon resonance. Cyclohexane was used as oil, Triton X-100 as surfactant, n-hexanol as a co-surfactant and mercaptoethanol and thioglycolic acid for the best linking of the biological part to the nanoparticle (as linking agents). Surfactant and co-surfactant produce a stable emulsion with connection to the surface of nanoparticles and prevention from contacting together. For qualitative and quantitative analyses of this product scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), inductive coupled plasma (ICP), zeta meter for measurement ZP and spectrograph techniques are used. The results showed that with reducing particle size, emission shifted to the lower wavelengths. In addition, with conjugation between avidin and biotin by mercaptoethanol in biologic media, spectral emission decreased.

  10. Static validation of licence conformance policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rene Rydhof; Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2008-01-01

    Policy conformance is a security property gaining importance due to commercial interest like Digital Rights Management. It is well known that static analysis can be used to validate a number of more classical security policies, such as discretionary and mandatory access control policies, as well...... as communication protocols using symmetric and asymmetric cryptography. In this work we show how to develop a Flow Logic for validating the conformance of client software with respect to a licence conformance policy. Our approach is sufficiently flexible that it extends to fully open systems that can admit new...

  11. Enhanced emission of nile red fluorescent nanoparticles embedded in hybrid sol-gel glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Maria L; del Monte, Francisco

    2005-01-13

    Highly fluorescent Nile Red (NR) nanoparticles embedded in a hybrid sol-gel glass are reported. The crystallite growth within the confined system created by the porous hybrid matrix results in NR nanoparticles of averaged dimensions below 36 nm. The preparation process allows for the control of both the conformation adopted by single NR molecules prior to aggregation (e.g., near planar) and the configuration of the aggregates (e.g., oblique with phi architecture which ultimately forms the nanoparticles. The full preservation of the fluorescent configuration of the aggregates in the nanoparticles is confirmed through the application of the exciton theory, and it is responsible for the significant increase of the fluorescence emission intensity (e.g., up to 525- and 70-fold as compared to that obtained for single NR molecules embedded in pure and hybrid silica glasses, respectively).

  12. Conformable variational iteration method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Acan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we introduce the conformable variational iteration method based on new defined fractional derivative called conformable fractional derivative. This new method is applied two fractional order ordinary differential equations. To see how the solutions of this method, linear homogeneous and non-linear non-homogeneous fractional ordinary differential equations are selected. Obtained results are compared the exact solutions and their graphics are plotted to demonstrate efficiency and accuracy of the method.

  13. Delineating the conformal window

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Mads Toudal; Pickup, Thomas; Teper, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We identify and characterise the conformal window in gauge theories relevant for beyond the standard model building, e.g. Technicolour, using the criteria of metric confinement and causal analytic couplings, which are known to be consistent with the phase diagram of supersymmetric QCD from Seiberg...... duality. Using these criteria we find perturbation theory to be consistent throughout the predicted conformal window for several of these gauge theories and we discuss recent lattice results in the light of our findings....

  14. Comparing morbidity and cancer control after 3D-conformal (70/74 Gy) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (78/82 Gy) for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolezel, Martin; Odrazka, Karel; Zouhar, Milan; Jansa, Jan; Paluska, Petr; Vaculikova, Miloslava; Sefrova, Jana; Kohlova, Tereza; Vanasek, Jaroslav; Kovarik, Josef

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare toxicity and cancer control between patients with prostate cancer treated using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and those treated using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). A total of 553 patients with prostate cancer were treated with 3D-CRT 70-74 Gy (3D-CRT 70, 3D-CRT 74) or IMRT 78-82 Gy (IMRT 78, IMRT/SIB 82). Late toxicity was scored according to FC-RTOG/LENT criteria. Biochemical failure was defined using the Phoenix and ASTRO definitions. The 5-year risk of grade 2-4 genitourinary toxicity was 26.3 % (3D-CRT 70), 27.2 % (3D-CRT 74), 17.3 % (IMRT 78), and 25.1 % (IMRT/SIB 82) without statistical differences. The 5-year risk of grade 2-4 gastrointestinal toxicity was 19.4 % (3D-CRT 70), 42.1 % (3D-CRT 74), 20.5 % (IMRT 78), and 26.6 % (IMRT/SIB 82). The differences between 3D-CRT 74 and 3D-CRT 70 and between 3D-CRT 74 and IMRT 78 were statistically significant (log rank p = 0.03). The 5-year Phoenix PSA relapse-free survival (PSA-RFS) in low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk patients treated using 3D-CRT were 89.4, 65.5, and 57.8 %, respectively. Patients treated with IMRT achieved the following results: 90.9, 89.4, and 83.9 %. Clinical relapse-free survival (C-RFS) in patients treated using 3D-CRT vs. IMRT for the aforementioned groups were 94.7 vs. 100 %, 86.8 vs. 98.6 %, and 84.4 vs. 94.5 %. Disease-free survival (DFS) for patients treated using 3D-CRT were 83.1, 70.9, and 71.5 %. The IMRT group reached 95.8, 89.1, and 87.6 %. The PSA-RFS for intermediate- and high-risk patients were statistically significant, while C-RFS and DFS were marginally better. Dose escalation with IMRT was associated with improved cancer control in intermediate- and high-risk patients in comparison with 3D-CRT, without compromising toxicity. (orig.) [de

  15. Bioactive compound synthesis of Ag nanoparticles from leaves of Melia azedarach and its control for mosquito larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanibai, R; Velayutham, K

    2015-02-01

    Larvicidal activity of synthesized Ag nanoparticles using 2,7.bis[2-[diethylamino]-ethoxy]fluorence isolate from the Melia azedarach leaves against Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus. Six fractions were collected and concentrated, fraction three showed a single spot on TLC which was found to be a pure compound. The structures were elucidated by analyses of UV, MS, and NMR spectral data. The maximum mortality was fluorence against A. aegypti and C. quinquefasciatus (LC50 = 7.94, LC90 = 23.82 ppm and LC50 = 13.58 and LC90 = 40.03 ppm). The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized and confirmed as Ag nanoparticles by using UV-visible spectroscopy, XRD and HRTEM analysis. The maximum activity was observed in synthesized AgNPs against A. aegypti and C. quinquefasciatus (LC50 = 4.27 and 3.43 µg/mL; LC90 = 12.61 and 10.29 µg/mL). Rephrase test was studied to analyze the toxicological effects of Mesocyclops pehpeiensis for 24 h at synthesized AgNPs. This method is considered as an innovative alternative approach that can be used to control mosquitoes. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Controllable fabrication of Pt nanocatalyst supported on N-doped carbon containing nickel nanoparticles for ethanol oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jianguo; Dai, Tangming; Cao, Yuechao; Qu, Yuning; Li, Yao; Li, Juan; Zhao, Yongnan; Gao, Haiyan

    2018-08-15

    In this paper, platinum nanoparticles were deposited on a carbon carrier with the partly graphitized carbon and the highly dispersive carbon-coated nickel particles. An efficient electron transfer structure can be fabricated by controlling the contents of the deposited platinum. The high resolution transmission electron microscopy images of Pt 2 /Ni@C N-doped sample prove the electron transfer channel from Pt (1 1 1) crystal planes to graphite (1 0 0) or Ni (1 1 1) crystal planes due to these linked together crystal planes. The Pt 3 /Ni@C N-doped with low Pt contents cannot form the electron transfer structure and the Pt 1 /Ni@C N-doped with high Pt contents show an obvious aggregation of Pt nanoparticles. The electrochemical tests of all the catalysts show that the Pt 2 /Ni@C N-doped sample presents the highest catalytic activity, the strongest CO tolerance and the best catalytic stability. The high performance is attributed to the efficient electronic transport structure of the Pt 2 /Ni@C N-doped sample and the synergistic effect between Pt and Ni nanoparticles. This paper provides a promising method for enhancing the conductivity of electrode material. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Size-controlled gold nanoparticles obtained from electrodeposited amidoferrocenylpoly(propyleneimine) dendrimer-templates for the electrochemical sensing of dopamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villena, Carlos; Bravo, Marta; Alonso, Beatriz; Casado, Carmen M.; Losada, José; García Armada, M. Pilar

    2017-10-01

    Nanometer-scale gold particles exhibit size-dependent electronic properties with important sensing and biosensing applications. In the same way, a lot of analytes show some type of surface-sensitive reaction and the electrode material has a strong influence on the catalytic activity. In this work we study the kinetics and electrochemistry of electrodes with size controlled gold nanoparticles, obtained by electrodeposited amidoferrocenylpoly(propyleneimine) dendrimers of two generations as templates, and the kinetics and the analytical response to the oxidation of dopamine. We demonstrate that the four-types of modified electrodes show good catalytic responses toward the oxidation of dopamine via different processes in relation with the absence or presence of gold nanoparticles and their size. The best response was obtained with the largest nanoparticles, obtained with the first generation dendrimer-template at 0.3 V vs. SCE, with three linear ranges (0-70, 70-600 and 600-1000 μM), with sensitivities 585.7; 466.0 and 314.3 μA/mM cm2, and limit of detection of 0.01 μM. The effect of interfering substances has been studied by differential pulse voltammetry and the developed sensor has been successfully used for the determination of dopamine in a commercial dopamine hydrochloride injection and in spiked Human urine.

  18. Controllability of the Coulomb charging energy in close-packed nanoparticle arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Chao; Wang, Ying; Sun, Jinling; Guan, Changrong; Grunder, Sergio; Mayor, Marcel; Peng, Lianmao; Liao, Jianhui

    2013-11-07

    We studied the electronic transport properties of metal nanoparticle arrays, particularly focused on the Coulomb charging energy. By comparison, we confirmed that it is more reasonable to estimate the Coulomb charging energy using the activation energy from the temperature-dependent zero-voltage conductance. Based on this, we systematically and comprehensively investigated the parameters that could be used to tune the Coulomb charging energy in nanoparticle arrays. We found that four parameters, including the particle core size, the inter-particle distance, the nearest neighboring number, and the dielectric constant of ligand molecules, could significantly tune the Coulomb charging energy.

  19. Gold Nanoparticles Size Design and Control by Poly(N,N′-diethylaminoethyl methacrylate)

    OpenAIRE

    Cortez-Lemus, Norma A.; Licea-Claverie, Angel; Paraguay-Delgado, Francisco; Alonso-Nuñez, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Poly(N,N′-diethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDEAEM) with different molecular weights was used to stabilize gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) obtained by in situ reduction of tetrachloroauric acid using citrates under acidic conditions and in organic/alcoholic medium. The influence of the pH value on gold nanoparticle size in the presence of PDEAEM was investigated. Results show that the pH of the reacting mixture has a dramatic effect on the size, polydispersity, and morphology of the resulting AuNPs...

  20. 94: Treatment plan optimization for conformal therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, I.I.; Lane, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    Computer-controlled conformal radiation therapy techniques can deliver complex treatments utilizing large numbers of beams, gantry angles and beam shapes. Linear programming is well-suited for planning conformal treatments. Given a list of available treatment beams, linear programming calculates the relative weights of the beams such that the objective function is optimized and doses to constraint points are within the prescribed limits. 5 refs.; 3 figs

  1. Controllable synthesis of a novel magnetic core-shell nanoparticle for dual-modal imaging and pH-responsive drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Yingxi; Li, Liu; Li, Ling; Whittaker, Andrew K.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, novel magnetic core-shell nanoparticles Fe3O4@La-BTC/GO have been synthesized by the layer-by-layer self-assembly (LBL) method and further modified by attachment of amino-modified PEG chains. The nanoparticles were thoroughly characterized by x-ray diffraction, FTIR, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The core-shell structure was shown to be controlled by the LBL method. The drug loading of doxorubicin (DOX) within the Fe3O4@La-BTC/GO-PEG nanoparticles with different numbers of deposited layers was investigated. It was found that DOX loading increased with increasing number of metal organic framework coating layers, indicating that the drug loading can be controlled through the controllable LBL method. Cytotoxicity assays indicated that the Fe3O4@La-BTC/GO-PEG nanoparticles were biocompatible. The DOX was released rapidly at pH 3.8 and pH 5.8, but at pH 7.4 the rate and extent of release was greatly attenuated. The nanoparticles therefore demonstrate an excellent pH-triggered drug release. In addition, the particles could be tracked by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence optical imaging (FOI). A clear dose-dependent contrast enhancement in T 2-weighted MR images and fluorescence images indicate the potential of these nanoparticles as dual-mode MRI/FOI contrast agents.

  2. Size Control of Porous Silicon-Based Nanoparticles via Pore-Wall Thinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secret, Emilie; Leonard, Camille; Kelly, Stefan J; Uhl, Amanda; Cozzan, Clayton; Andrew, Jennifer S

    2016-02-02

    Photoluminescent silicon nanocrystals are very attractive for biomedical and electronic applications. Here a new process is presented to synthesize photoluminescent silicon nanocrystals with diameters smaller than 6 nm from a porous silicon template. These nanoparticles are formed using a pore-wall thinning approach, where the as-etched porous silicon layer is partially oxidized to silica, which is dissolved by a hydrofluoric acid solution, decreasing the pore-wall thickness. This decrease in pore-wall thickness leads to a corresponding decrease in the size of the nanocrystals that make up the pore walls, resulting in the formation of smaller nanoparticles during sonication of the porous silicon. Particle diameters were measured using dynamic light scattering, and these values were compared with the nanocrystallite size within the pore wall as determined from X-ray diffraction. Additionally, an increase in the quantum confinement effect is observed for these particles through an increase in the photoluminescence intensity of the nanoparticles compared with the as-etched nanoparticles, without the need for a further activation step by oxidation after synthesis.

  3. Facet-controlled phase separation in supersaturated Au-Ni nanoparticles upon shape equilibration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herz, A.; Friák, Martin; Rossberg, D.; Hentschel, M.; Theska, F.; Wang, D.; Holec, D.; Šob, Mojmír; Schneeweiss, Oldřich; Schaaf, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 7 (2015), art.n. 073109 ISSN 0003-6951 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : GENERALIZED GRADIENT APPROXIMATION * NANOPOROUS GOLD NANOPARTICLES * AUGMENTED-WAVE METHOD * ELASTIC-CONSTANTS * BILAYER * NICKEL Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.142, year: 2015

  4. Polylactide-co-glycolide nanoparticles for controlled delivery of anticancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouhani H

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available R Dinarvand1,2, N Sepehri1, S Manoochehri1, H Rouhani1, F Atyabi1,21Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, 2Nanotechnology Research Centre, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IranAbstract: The effectiveness of anticancer agents may be hindered by low solubility in water, poor permeability, and high efflux from cells. Nanomaterials have been used to enable drug delivery with lower toxicity to healthy cells and enhanced drug delivery to tumor cells. Different nanoparticles have been developed using different polymers with or without surface modification to target tumor cells both passively and/or actively. Polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA, a biodegradable polyester approved for human use, has been used extensively. Here we report on recent developments concerning PLGA nanoparticles prepared for cancer treatment. We review the methods used for the preparation and characterization of PLGA nanoparticles and their applications in the delivery of a number of active agents. Increasing experience in the field of preparation, characterization, and in vivo application of PLGA nanoparticles has provided the necessary momentum for promising future use of these agents in cancer treatment, with higher efficacy and fewer side effects.Keywords: nanotechnology, polymeric nanocarriers, targeting, anticancer agents, surface modification

  5. The intercomparison of the dose distributions between conformation techniques with pions and photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasawa, K.; Nakagawa, K.; Akanuma, A.

    1990-01-01

    To compare conformation radiation treatment with pions vs photons, dose volume histograms (DVH) to the critical organs, including the spinal cord, kidney, and intestine, were examined in a patient with retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcoma. For photon conformation treatment, the following techniques were used: 360 degree rotation conformation technique (photon conformation), 4 fixed field technique (photon 4-field), and 2-axis conformation technique (photon 2-axial conformation). According to the DVH reduction method, complication probability was estimated. The concave portion of the target was conformed by pion conformation treatment, but not by photon conformation treatment. Pion conformation for the intestine showed the best DVH, whereas photon 4-field technique showed the worst DVH. For the kidney, pion conformation showed better DVH as compared with any other photon conformation treatment technique. In the spinal cord, photon 2-axial conformation was far superior, followed by pion conformation and then photon conformation and 4-field technique. A 2-axial technique showed a bigger inhomogeneity inside the target volume which is critical in curative treatment. TD 50 was 72 Gy for pion conformation, 53 Gy for photon conformation, 51 Gy for photon 4-field, and 68 Gy for photon 2-axial conformation. Complication probabilities for these conformation techniques at 60 Gy were 3%, 85%, 97%, and 9%. In view of tumor control probabilities, pion seems to have the biggest therapeutic ratio among these techniques. (N.K.)

  6. Controlled growth and shape formation of platinum nanoparticles and their electrochemical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inaba, Minoru [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan)]. E-mail: minaba@mail.doshisha.ac.jp; Ando, Miwa [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Hatanaka, Aoi [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Nomoto, Akihiro [Kyoto Prefecture Collaboration of Regional Entities, Keihanna Interaction Plaza Inc., Seika-cho, Soraku-gun, Kyoto 619-0237 (Japan); Faculty of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 669-8531 (Japan); Matsuzawa, Koichi [Kyoto Prefecture Collaboration of Regional Entities, Keihanna Interaction Plaza Inc., Seika-cho, Soraku-gun, Kyoto 619-0237 (Japan); Tasaka, Akimasa [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Kinumoto, Taro [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Iriyama, Yasutoshi [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Ogumi, Zempachi [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2006-12-01

    Cubic Pt nanoparticles were prepared from a solution of K{sub 2}PtCl{sub 4} containing sodium polyacrylate as a capping reagent. The effects of the Pt/polymer molar ratio, the average molecular weight (M {sub w}) of the polymer, and reaction temperature on the shape and size were investigated. When the polymer of M {sub w} = 5100 was added at a molar ratio of Pt/polymer = 1/12, cubic platinum nanoparticles of an average size of 10.3 nm were predominantly formed (ca. 50% in number) at 25 deg. C. The electron diffraction pattern of the cubic nanoparticles revealed that they are single crystals with Pt {l_brace}1 0 0{r_brace} faces on the surface. The cubic nanoparticles were electrochemically active, and showed strong features of Pt {l_brace}1 0 0{r_brace} faces on cyclic voltammogram under argon atmosphere. After repeated potential cycling in the range 0.05-1.4 V, the features of Pt {l_brace}1 0 0{r_brace} were gradually lost, and changed to those of polycrystalline Pt. Rotating ring disk electrode measurements in O{sub 2}-saturated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution revealed that the cubic nanoparticles had a high catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). After polycrystallization by repeated potential cycling, the activity for ORR and hydrogen peroxide formation decreased slightly, which were attributed to the surface structural change from Pt {l_brace}1 0 0{r_brace} to polycrystalline.

  7. Mesoporous Silica Supported Au Nanopa