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Sample records for nanoparticle pharmacokinetic profiling

  1. Docetaxel-loaded PLGA and PLGA-PEG nanoparticles for intravenous application: pharmacokinetics and biodistribution profile.

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    Rafiei, Pedram; Haddadi, Azita

    2017-01-01

    Docetaxel is a highly potent anticancer agent being used in a wide spectrum of cancer types. There are important matters of concern regarding the drug's pharmacokinetics related to the conventional formulation. Poly(lactide- co -glycolide) (PLGA) is a biocompatible/biodegradable polymer with variable physicochemical characteristics, and its application in human has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration. PLGA gives polymeric nanoparticles with unique drug delivery characteristics. The application of PLGA nanoparticles (NPs) as intravenous (IV) sustained-release delivery vehicles for docetaxel can favorably modify pharmacokinetics, biofate, and pharmacotherapy of the drug in cancer patients. Surface modification of PLGA NPs with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) can further enhance NPs' long-circulating properties. Herein, an optimized fabrication approach has been used for the preparation of PLGA and PLGA-PEG NPs loaded with docetaxel for IV application. Both types of NP formulations demonstrated in vitro characteristics that were considered suitable for IV administration (with long-circulating sustained-release purposes). NP formulations were IV administered to an animal model, and docetaxel's pharmacokinetic and biodistribution profiles were determined and compared between study groups. PLGA and PEGylated PLGA NPs were able to modify the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of docetaxel. Accordingly, the mode of changes made to pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of docetaxel is attributed to the size and surface properties of NPs. NPs contributed to increased blood residence time of docetaxel fulfilling their role as long-circulating sustained-release drug delivery systems. Surface modification of NPs contributed to more pronounced docetaxel blood concentration, which confirms the role of PEG in conferring long-circulation properties to NPs.

  2. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicology of theranostic nanoparticles

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    Kang, Homan; Mintri, Shrutika; Menon, Archita Venugopal; Lee, Hea Yeon; Choi, Hak Soo; Kim, Jonghan

    2015-11-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are considered a promising tool in both diagnosis and therapeutics. Theranostic NPs possess the combined properties of targeted imaging and drug delivery within a single entity. While the categorization of theranostic NPs is based on their structure and composition, the pharmacokinetics of NPs are significantly influenced by the physicochemical properties of theranostic NPs as well as the routes of administration. Consequently, altered pharmacokinetics modify the pharmacodynamic efficacy and toxicity of NPs. Although theranostic NPs hold great promise in nanomedicine and biomedical applications, a lack of understanding persists on the mechanisms of the biodistribution and adverse effects of NPs. To better understand the diagnostic and therapeutic functions of NPs, this review discusses the factors that influence the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicology of theranostic NPs, along with several strategies for developing novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities.

  3. Insulin analogs with improved pharmacokinetic profiles.

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    Brange; Vølund

    1999-02-01

    The aim of insulin replacement therapy is to normalize blood glucose in order to reduce the complications of diabetes. The pharmacokinetics of the traditional insulin preparations, however, do not match the profiles of physiological insulin secretion. The introduction of the rDNA technology 20 years ago opened new ways to create insulin analogs with altered properties. Fast-acting analogs are based on the idea that an insulin with less tendency to self-association than human insulin would be more readily absorbed into the systemic circulation. Protracted-acting analogs have been created to mimic the slow, steady rate of insulin secretion in the fasting state. The present paper provides a historical review of the efforts to change the physicochemical and pharmacological properties of insulin in order to improve insulin therapy. The available clinical studies of the new insulins are surveyed and show, together with modeling results, that new strategies for optimal basal-bolus treatment are required for utilization of the new fast-acting analogs.

  4. Pharmacokinetic characteristics and anticancer effects of 5-Fluorouracil loaded nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Su; Wang, Anxun; Jiang, Wenqi; Guan, Zhongzhen

    2008-01-01

    It is expected that prolonged circulation of anticancer drugs will increase their anticancer activity while decreasing their toxic side effects. The purpose of this study was to prepare 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) loaded block copolymers, with poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate) (PBLG) as the hydrophobic block and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as the hydrophilic block, and then examine the 5-FU release characteristics, pharmacokinetics, and anticancer effects of this novel compound. 5-FU loaded PEG-PBLG (5-FU/PEG-PBLG) nanoparticles were prepared by dialysis and then scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to observe the shape and size of the nanoparticles, and ultraviolet spectrophotometry was used to evaluate the 5-FU in vitro release characteristics. The pharmacokinetic parameters of 5-FU/PEG-PBLG nanoparticles in rabbit plasma were determined by measuring the 5-FUby high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). To study in vivo effects, LoVo cells (human colon cancer cell line) or Tca8113 cells (human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line) were implanted in BALB/c nude mice that were subsequently treated with 5-FU or 5-FU/PEG-PBLG nanospheres. 5-FU/PEG-PBLG nanoparticles had a core-shell spherical structure with a diameter of 200 nm and a shell thickness of 30 nm. The drug loading capacity was 27.1% and the drug encapsulation was 61.5%. Compared with 5-FU, 5-FU/PEG-PBLG nanoparticles had a longer elimination half-life (t 1/2 , 33.3 h vs. 5 min), lower peak concentration (C, 4563.5 μg/L vs. 17047.3 μg/L), and greater distribution volume (V D , 0.114 L vs. 0.069 L). Compared with a blank control, LoVo cell xenografts and Tca8113 cell xenografts treated with 5-FU or 5-FU/PEG-PBLG nanoparticles grew slower and had prolonged tumor doubling times. 5-FU/PEG-PBLG nanoparticles showed greater inhibition of tumor growth than 5-FU (p < 0.01). In the PEG-PBLG nanoparticle control group, there was no tumor inhibition (p > 0.05). In our

  5. Pharmacokinetic characteristics and anticancer effects of 5-Fluorouracil loaded nanoparticles

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    Jiang Wenqi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is expected that prolonged circulation of anticancer drugs will increase their anticancer activity while decreasing their toxic side effects. The purpose of this study was to prepare 5-fluorouracil (5-FU loaded block copolymers, with poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate (PBLG as the hydrophobic block and poly(ethylene glycol (PEG as the hydrophilic block, and then examine the 5-FU release characteristics, pharmacokinetics, and anticancer effects of this novel compound. Methods 5-FU loaded PEG-PBLG (5-FU/PEG-PBLG nanoparticles were prepared by dialysis and then scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM were used to observe the shape and size of the nanoparticles, and ultraviolet spectrophotometry was used to evaluate the 5-FU in vitro release characteristics. The pharmacokinetic parameters of 5-FU/PEG-PBLG nanoparticles in rabbit plasma were determined by measuring the 5-FUby high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. To study in vivo effects, LoVo cells (human colon cancer cell line or Tca8113 cells (human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line were implanted in BALB/c nude mice that were subsequently treated with 5-FU or 5-FU/PEG-PBLG nanospheres. Results 5-FU/PEG-PBLG nanoparticles had a core-shell spherical structure with a diameter of 200 nm and a shell thickness of 30 nm. The drug loading capacity was 27.1% and the drug encapsulation was 61.5%. Compared with 5-FU, 5-FU/PEG-PBLG nanoparticles had a longer elimination half-life (t1/2, 33.3 h vs. 5 min, lower peak concentration (C, 4563.5 μg/L vs. 17047.3 μg/L, and greater distribution volume (VD, 0.114 L vs. 0.069 L. Compared with a blank control, LoVo cell xenografts and Tca8113 cell xenografts treated with 5-FU or 5-FU/PEG-PBLG nanoparticles grew slower and had prolonged tumor doubling times. 5-FU/PEG-PBLG nanoparticles showed greater inhibition of tumor growth than 5-FU (p 0.05. Conclusion In our model system, 5-FU/PEG-PBLG nanoparticles

  6. Factors Controlling the Pharmacokinetics, Biodistribution and Intratumoral Penetration of Nanoparticles

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    Ernsting, Mark J.; Murakami, Mami; Roy, Aniruddha; Li, Shyh-Dar

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle drug delivery to the tumor is impacted by multiple factors: nanoparticles must evade clearance by renal filtration and the reticuloendothelial system, extravasate through the enlarged endothelial gaps in tumors, penetrate through dense stroma in the tumor microenvironment to reach the tumor cells, remain in the tumor tissue for a prolonged period of time, and finally release the active agent to induce pharmacological effect. The physicochemical properties of nanoparticles such as size, shape, surface charge, surface chemistry (PEGylation, ligand conjugation) and composition affect the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, intratumoral penetration and tumor bioavailability. On the other hand, tumor biology (blood flow, perfusion, permeability, interstitial fluid pressure and stroma content) and patient characteristics (age, gender, tumor type, tumor location, body composition and prior treatments) also have impact on drug delivery by nanoparticles. It is now believed that both nanoparticles and the tumor microenvironment have to be optimized or adjusted for optimal delivery. This review provides a comprehensive summary of how these nanoparticle and biological factors impact nanoparticle delivery to tumors, with discussion on how the tumor microenvironment can be adjusted and how patients can be stratified by imaging methods to receive the maximal benefit of nanomedicine. Perspectives and future directions are also provided. PMID:24075927

  7. Factors Controlling Nanoparticle Pharmacokinetics: An Integrated Analysis and Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moien; Hunter, A.C.; Andresen, T.L.

    2012-01-01

    of interrelated core and interfacial physicochemical and biological factors. Pertinent to realizing therapeutic goals, definitive maps that establish the interdependency of nanoparticle size, shape, and surface characteristics in relation to interfacial forces, biodistribution, controlled drug release, excretion......Intravenously injected nanoparticulate drug carriers provide a wide range of unique opportunities for site-specific targeting of therapeutic agents to many areas within the vasculature and beyond. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of these carriers are controlled by a complex array...... are already on the market and many are in late-phase clinical trials. With concomitant advances in extensive computational knowledge of the genomics and epigenomics of interindividual variations in drug responses, the boundaries toward development of personalized nanomedicines can be pushed further....

  8. Improved Safety, Bioavailability and Pharmacokinetics of Zidovudine through Lactoferrin Nanoparticles during Oral Administration in Rats.

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    Prashant Kumar

    Full Text Available Zidovudine (AZT is one of the most referred antiretroviral drug. In spite of its higher bioavailability (50-75% the most important reason of its cessation are bone marrow suppression, anemia, neutropenia and various organs related toxicities. This study aims at the improvement of oral delivery of AZT through its encapsulation in lactoferrin nanoparticles (AZT-lactonano. The nanoparticles (NPs are of 50-60 nm in size and exhibit 67% encapsulation of the AZT. They are stable in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids. Anti-HIV-1 activity of AZT remains unaltered in nanoformulation in acute infection. The bioavailability and tissue distribution of AZT is higher in blood followed by liver and kidney. AZT-lactonano causes the improvement of pharmacokinetic profile as compared to soluble AZT; a more than 4 fold increase in AUC and AUMC in male and female rats. The serum Cmax for AZT-lactonano was increased by 30%. Similarly there was nearly 2-fold increase in Tmax and t1/2. Our in vitro study confirms that, the endosomal pH is ideal for drug release from NPs and shows constant release from up to 96h. Bone marrow micronucleus assay show that nanoformulation exhibits approximately 2fold lower toxicity than soluble form. Histopathological and biochemical analysis further confirms that less or no significant organ toxicities when nanoparticles were used. AZT-lactonano has shown its higher efficacy, low organs related toxicities, improved pharmacokinetics parameter while keeping the antiviral activity intact. Thus, the nanoformulation are safe for the target specific drug delivery.

  9. Factors controlling nanoparticle pharmacokinetics: an integrated analysis and perspective.

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    Moghimi, S M; Hunter, A C; Andresen, T L

    2012-01-01

    Intravenously injected nanoparticulate drug carriers provide a wide range of unique opportunities for site-specific targeting of therapeutic agents to many areas within the vasculature and beyond. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of these carriers are controlled by a complex array of interrelated core and interfacial physicochemical and biological factors. Pertinent to realizing therapeutic goals, definitive maps that establish the interdependency of nanoparticle size, shape, and surface characteristics in relation to interfacial forces, biodistribution, controlled drug release, excretion, and adverse effects must be outlined. These concepts are critically evaluated and an integrated perspective is provided on the basis of the recent application of nanoscience approaches to nanocarrier design and engineering. The future of this exciting field is bright; some regulatory-approved products are already on the market and many are in late-phase clinical trials. With concomitant advances in extensive computational knowledge of the genomics and epigenomics of interindividual variations in drug responses, the boundaries toward development of personalized nanomedicines can be pushed further.

  10. Biodegradable nanoparticles for improved kidney bioavailability of rhein: preparation, characterization, plasma, and kidney pharmacokinetics.

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    Wei, Yinghui; Luo, Xiaoting; Guan, Jiani; Ma, Jianping; Zhong, Yicong; Luo, Jingwen; Li, Fanzhu

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this work is to develop biodegradable nanoparticles for improved kidney bioavailability of rhein (RH). RH-loaded nanoparticles were prepared using an emulsification solvent evaporation method and fully characterized by several techniques. Kidney pharmacokinetics was assessed by implanting a microdialysis probe in rat's kidney cortex. Blood samples were simultaneously collected (via femoral artery) for assessing plasma pharmacokinetics. Optimized nanoparticles were small, with a mean particle size of 132.6 ± 5.95 nm, and homogeneously dispersed. The charge on the particles was nearly zero, the encapsulation efficiency was 62.71 ± 3.02%, and the drug loading was 1.56 ± 0.15%. In vitro release of RH from the nanoparticles showed an initial burst release followed by a sustained release. Plasma and kidney pharmacokinetics showed that encapsulation of RH into nanoparticles significantly increased its kidney bioavailability (AUC kidney /AUC plasma  = 0.586 ± 0.072), clearly indicating that nanoparticles are a promising strategy for kidney drug delivery.

  11. Biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and toxicity of dendrimer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in BALB/c mice

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    Salimi M

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Marzieh Salimi,1,2 Saeed Sarkar,1,2 Samaneh Fathi,3 Ali Mohammad Alizadeh,4 Reza Saber,2,3 Fatemeh Moradi,5 Hamid Delavari6 1Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2Research Center of Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 3Department of Medical Nanotechnology, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 4Cancer Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 5Department of Medical Physiology, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 6Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran Background: The possibility of using a specific nanoparticle in nanomedicine highly depends on its biodistribution profile and biocompatibility. Due to growing demand for iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs and dendrimers in biomedical applications, this study was performed to assess the biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and toxicity of dendrimer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (G4@IONPs. Materials and methods: IONPs were synthesized via co-precipitation and coated with the fourth generation (G4 of polyamidoamine (PAMAM dendrimer. To determine the biodistribution, 5 mg/mL G4@IONPs suspension was intraperitoneally injected into tumor-bearing BALB/c mice, and iron levels in blood and various organs, including the lung, liver, brain, heart, tumor, and kidney, were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS at 4, 8, 12, and 24 h after injection. Also, to investigate the toxicity of G4@IONPs, different concentrations of G4@IONPs were injected into BALB/c mice, and blood, renal, and hepatic factors were measured. Furthermore, histopathological staining was performed to investigate the effect of G4@IONPs on the liver and kidney tissues. Results: The results showed that the iron content was higher in the kidney, liver, and lung tissues 24 h after

  12. Combined image guided monitoring the pharmacokinetics of rapamycin loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles with a split luciferase reporter

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    Wang, Fu; Yang, Kai; Wang, Zhe; Ma, Ying; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Hida, Naoki; Niu, Gang; Tian, Jie

    2016-02-01

    Imaging guided techniques have been increasingly employed to investigate the pharmacokinetics (PK) and biodistribution of nanoparticle based drug delivery systems. In most cases, however, the PK profiles of drugs could vary significantly from those of drug delivery carriers upon administration in the blood circulation, which complicates the interpretation of image findings. Herein we applied a genetically encoded luciferase reporter in conjunction with near infrared (NIR) fluorophores to investigate the respective PK profiles of a drug and its carrier in a biodegradable drug delivery system. In this system, a prototype hydrophobic agent, rapamycin (Rapa), was encapsulated into human serum albumin (HSA) to form HSA Rapa nanoparticles, which were then labeled with Cy5 fluorophore to facilitate the fluorescence imaging of HSA carrier. Meanwhile, we employed transgenetic HN12 cells that were modified with a split luciferase reporter, whose bioluminescence function is regulated by Rapa, to reflect the PK profile of the encapsulated agent. It was interesting to discover that there existed an obvious inconsistency of PK behaviors between HSA carrier and rapamycin in vitro and in vivo through near infrared fluorescence imaging (NIFRI) and bioluminescence imaging (BLI) after treatment with Cy5 labeled HSA Rapa. Nevertheless, HSA Rapa nanoparticles manifested favorable in vivo PK and tumor suppression efficacy in a follow-up therapeutic study. The developed strategy of combining a molecular reporter and a fluorophore in this study could be extended to other drug delivery systems to provide profound insights for non-invasive real-time evaluation of PK profiles of drug-loaded nanoparticles in pre-clinical studies.Imaging guided techniques have been increasingly employed to investigate the pharmacokinetics (PK) and biodistribution of nanoparticle based drug delivery systems. In most cases, however, the PK profiles of drugs could vary significantly from those of drug delivery

  13. Atorvastatin calcium loaded chitosan nanoparticles: in vitro evaluation and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies in rabbits

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    Abdul Baquee Ahmed

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we prepared atorvastatin calcium (AVST loaded chitosan nanoparticles to improve the oral bioavailability of the drug. Nanoparticles were prepared by solvent evaporation technique and evaluated for its particle size, entrapment efficiency, zeta potential, in vitro release and surface morphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. In addition, the pharmacokinetics of AVST from the optimized formulation (FT5 was compared with marketed immediate release formulation (Atorva(r in rabbits. Particle size of prepared nanoparticles was ranged between 179.3 ± 7.12 to 256.8 ± 8.24 nm with a low polydispersity index (PI value. Zeta potential study showed that the particles are stable with positive values between 13.03 ± 0.32 to 46.90 ± 0.49 mV. FT-IR studies confirmed the absence of incompatibility of AVST with excipient used in the formulations. In vitro release study showed that the drug release was sustained for 48 h. Results of pharmacokinetics study showed significant changes in the pharmacokinetic parameter (2.2 fold increase in AUC of the optimized formulation as compared to marketed formulation (Atorva(r. Thus, the developed nanoparticles evidenced the improvement of oral bioavailability of AVST in rabbit model.

  14. Naringenin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles: preparation, controlled delivery, cellular uptake, and pulmonary pharmacokinetics

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    Ji P

    2016-03-01

    size of 98 nm, a polydispersity index of 0.258, a zeta potential of -31.4 mV, a total drug content of 9.76 mg, an EE of 79.11%, and a cumulative drug release of 80% in 48 hours with a sustained profile. In addition, 5% mannitol (w/v was screened as a cryoprotectant. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and powder X-ray diffraction studies confirmed that the drug was encapsulated into SLNs in an amorphous form. The lyophilized powder was stable at both refrigeration (4°C and ambient temperature (25°C for 3 months, and the MTT assay demonstrated that the SLNs were nontoxic. The cellular uptake of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled SLNs in A549 cells was highly time dependent over a period of 3 hours, while the pharmacokinetic study in Sprague Dawley rats showed that the relative bioavailability of NRG-SLNs was 2.53-fold greater than that of NRG suspension after pulmonary administration. This study shows that SLNs offer a promising pulmonary delivery system to increase the bioavailability of the poorly water-soluble drug NRG.Keywords: naringenin, solid lipid nanoparticles, group contribution method, sustained profile, instillation technology, MTT, cellular uptake, pulmonary pharmacokinetics

  15. Solid lipid nanoparticles as promising tool for intraocular tobramycin delivery: Pharmacokinetic studies on rabbits.

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    Chetoni, Patrizia; Burgalassi, Susi; Monti, Daniela; Tampucci, Silvia; Tullio, Vivian; Cuffini, Anna Maria; Muntoni, Elisabetta; Spagnolo, Rita; Zara, Gian Paolo; Cavalli, Roberta

    2016-12-01

    Eye drops are widely accepted as formulations for targeting the anterior segment notwithstanding their limitations in terms of bioavailability. The unique structure of the eye requires specially-designed formulations able to favor the pharmacokinetic profile of administered drugs, mainly minimizing the influence of ocular barriers. Nanotechnology-based delivery systems lead to significant technological and therapeutical advantages in ophthalmic therapy. The aim of the present study was to determine whether tobramycin as ion-pair incorporated in mucoadhesive Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLN) reaches the inner parts of the eye favoring drug activity. After technological characterization of the tobramycin entrapped SLN formulation (Tobra-SLN), a pharmacokinetic study in rabbits after topical instillation and intravenous administration of the formulation has been carried out. In addition, the intracellular activity of Tobra-SLN formulation against phagocytosed Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated. The SLN were spherical in shape, and showed a hydrodynamic diameter of about 80nm, a negative zeta potential (-25.7mV) with a polydispersity index of 0.15, representative of a colloidal dispersion with high quality, characterized by an unimodal relatively narrow size distribution. As demonstrated by FTIR and DSC, tobramycin ion-pair could be concentrated into lipid inner core of SLN, without interaction with the stearic acid, thus promoting a slow and constant drug release profile in the dissolution medium. Surprisingly, the drug concentration was significantly higher in all ocular tissues after ocular and intravenous administration of Tobra-SLN formulation with respect to reference formulations and only Tobra-SLN allowed the penetration of drug into retina. Furthermore, the use of Tobra-SLN resulted in both higher intraphagocytic antibiotic concentrations in polymorphonuclear granulocytes and greater bactericidal activity against intracellular Pseudomonas aeruginosa

  16. The pharmacokinetic profile of synthetic cathinones in a pregnancy model.

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    Strange, Lauren G; Kochelek, Kerri; Keasling, Robert; Brown, Stacy D; Pond, Brooks B

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, the abuse of synthetic cathinones or 'bath salts' has become a major public health concern. Although these compounds were initially sold legally and labeled "not for human consumption", the 'bath salts' are psychostimulants, with similar structures and pharmacologic mechanisms to cocaine, the amphetamines, and 3,4 methylendioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, Molly, or Ecstasy). The reported use of these substances by women of child-bearing age highlights the necessity of studies seeking to delineate risks of prenatal exposure. Three popular drugs of this type are methylone, mephedrone, and 3, 4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV). Unfortunately, there is currently no information available on the teratogenicity of these compounds, or of the extent to which they cross the placenta. As such, the purpose of this study was to examine the pharmacokinetic profile of the 'bath salts' in a pregnancy model. Pregnant mice (E17.5 gestation) were injected intraperitoneally with a cocktail of 5mg/kg methylone, 10mg/kg mephedrone, and 3mg/kg (MDPV) dissolved in sterile saline. Maternal brain, maternal plasma, placenta, and fetal brain were collected at 30s, 1min, 5min, 10min, 15min, 30min, 1h, 2h, 4h, and 8h following injection. Methylone, mephedrone, and MDPV were extracted from tissue by solid phase extraction, and concentrations were determined using a previously validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. Interestingly, all 3 cathinones reached measurable concentrations in the placenta, as well as the fetal brain; in fact, for MDPV, the maximal concentration (Cmax) was highest in fetal brain, while mephedrone's highest Cmax value was achieved in placenta. Additionally, the total drug exposure for all 3 compounds (as represented by area under the curve, AUC) was higher in fetal matrices (placenta and fetal brain) than in maternal matrices (maternal brain and plasma), and the half-lives for the drugs were longer. Given the extensive

  17. A review on dronedarone: Pharmacological, pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profile

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    Farah Iram

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Dronedarone, a benzofuran containing chemical compound, is a derivative of amiodarone which is classified as a Class III antiarrhythmic agent. It is prescribed to the cardiovascular patients who have paroxysmal or persistent atrial fibrillation to lower the chances of hospitalization. Amiodarone, sotalol, procainamide dofetilide, quinidine, ibutilide, flecainide, and propafenone are the other useful medicinal products used to treat atrial fibrillation or cardiac arrhythmia. Dronedarone was approved for clinical use in atrial fibrillation by the Food and Drug Administration in 2009. The generic name for dronedarone is Multaq (Sanofi Aventis. This article briefly highlights the important pharmacological, pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of dronedarone.

  18. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Profiles of Tiamulin in an Experimental Intratracheal Infection Model of Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Xia; Sun, Jian; Yang, Tao; Fang, Xi; Cheng, Jie; Xiong, Yan Q.; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is the most important pathogen in poultry among four pathogenic Mycoplasma species. Tiamulin is a pleuromutilin antibiotic that shows a great activity against M. gallisepticum and has been approved for use in veterinary medicine particularly for poultry. However, the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) profiles of tiamulin against M. gallisepticum are not well understood. Therefore, in the current studies, we investigated the in vivo PK/PD profiles of tiamulin us...

  19. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Profiles of Tiamulin in an Experimental Intratracheal Infection Model of Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    OpenAIRE

    Xia Xiao; Xia Xiao; Jian Sun; Tao Yang; Xi Fang; Jie Cheng; Yan Q. Xiong; Yan Q. Xiong; Ya-Hong Liu; Ya-Hong Liu

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is the most important pathogen in poultry among four pathogenic Mycoplasma species. Tiamulin is a pleuromutilin antibiotic that shows a great activity against M. gallisepticum and has been approved for use in veterinary medicine particularly for poultry. However, the Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) profiles of tiamulin against M. gallisepticum are not well understood. Therefore, in the current studies, we investigated the in vivo PK/PD profiles of tiamulin us...

  20. Determination of Doxorubicin in Stealth Hyalurionic Acid-Based Nanoparticles in Rat Plasma by the Liquid-Liquid Nanoparticles-Breaking Extraction Method: Application to a Pharmacokinetic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaopeng; Wei, Wei; Zhong, Lu; Luo, Cong; Wu, Chunnuan; Jiang, Qikun; Sun, Jin

    2016-09-01

    An efficient extraction of doxorubicin (Dox) from homemade stealth hyalurionic acid (HA)-based nanoparticles (NPs) in rat plasma could not be performed by previously published methods. Therefore, we attempted to establish the novel NPs-breaking and UPLC-MS-MS method for evaluating the pharmacokinetic profiles of the homemade stealth HA NPs in rats. The pretreatment method of plasma samples used the liquid-liquid extraction method with isopropyl alcohol as NPs-breaking and protein-precipitating solvents, and the NPs-breaking efficiency of isopropyl alcohol was as high as 97.2%. The analyte and gliclazide (internal standard) were extracted from plasma samples with isopropyl alcohol and were separated on UPLC BEH C18 with a mobile phase consisting of methanol and water (containing 0.1% formic acid). The method demonstrated good linearity at the concentrations ranging from 5 to 5,000 ng/mL. The intra- and interday relative standard deviations were >10%. Finally, the method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of homemade stealth HA-based NPs in rats following intravenous administration. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Solid lipid nanoparticles as oral delivery systems of phenolic compounds: Overcoming pharmacokinetic limitations for nutraceutical applications.

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    Nunes, Sara; Madureira, Ana Raquel; Campos, Débora; Sarmento, Bruno; Gomes, Ana Maria; Pintado, Manuela; Reis, Flávio

    2017-06-13

    Drug delivery systems, accompanied by nanoparticle technology, have recently emerged as prominent solutions to improve the pharmacokinetic properties, namely bioavailability, of therapeutic and nutraceutical agents. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have received much attention from researchers due to their potential to protect or improve drug properties. SLNs have been reported to be an alternative system to traditional carriers, such as emulsions, liposomes, and polymeric nanoparticles. Phenolic compounds are widespread in plant-derived foodstuffs and therefore abundant in our diet. Over the last decades, phenolic compounds have received considerable attention due to several health promoting properties, mostly related to their antioxidant activity, which can have important implications for health. However, most of these compounds have been associated with poor bioavailability being poorly absorbed, rapidly metabolized and eliminated, which compromises its biological and pharmacological benefits. This paper provides a systematic review of the use of SLNs as oral delivery systems of phenolic compounds, in order to overcome pharmacokinetic limitations of these compounds and improved nutraceutical potential. In vitro studies, as well as works describing topical and oral treatments will be revisited and discussed. The classification, synthesis, and clinical application of these nanomaterials will be also considered in this review article.

  2. Differing disintegration and dissolution rates, pharmacokinetic profiles and gastrointestinal tolerability of over the counter ibuprofen formulations.

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    Bjarnason, Ingvar; Sancak, Ozgur; Crossley, Anne; Penrose, Andrew; Lanas, Angel

    2018-02-01

    Formulations of over the counter (OTC) NSAIDs differ substantially, but information is lacking on whether this alters their gastrointestinal profiles. To assess disintegration and dissolution rates and pharmacokinetics of four preparations of OTC ibuprofen and relate these with spontaneously reported gastrointestinal adverse events. Disintegration and dissolution rates of ibuprofen tablets as (a) acid, (b) sodium salt, (c) lysine salt, and (d) as a liquid gelatine capsule were assessed. Pharmacokinetic data gastrointestinal and spontaneously reported adverse events arising from global sales were obtained from files from Reckitt Benckiser. Disintegration at low pH was progressively shorter for the preparations from a-to-d with formation of correspondingly smaller ibuprofen crystals, while dissolution was consistently poor. Dissolution at a neutral pH was least rapid for the liquid gelatine capsule. Pharmacokinetic data showed a shorter t max and a higher C max for preparations b-d as compared with ibuprofen acid. Spontaneously reported abdominal symptoms were rare with the liquid gelatine preparation. The formulations of OTC ibuprofen differ in their disintegration and dissolution properties, pharmacokinetic profiles and apparent gastrointestinal tolerability. Spontaneously reported abdominal symptoms were five times lower with the liquid gelatine capsule as compared with ibuprofen acid despite a 30% increase in C max . © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  3. Preparation of finasteride capsules-loaded drug nanoparticles: formulation, optimization, in vitro, and pharmacokinetic evaluation

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    Ahmed TA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tarek A Ahmed1,2 1Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Al-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt Abstract: In this study, optimized freeze-dried finasteride nanoparticles (NPs were prepared from drug nanosuspension formulation that was developed using the bottom–up technique. The effects of four formulation and processing variables that affect the particle size and solubility enhancement of the NPs were explored using the response surface optimization design. The optimized formulation was morphologically characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Physicochemical interaction among the studied components was investigated. Crystalline change was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD. Crystal growth of the freeze-dried NPs was compared to the corresponding aqueous drug nanosuspension. Freeze-dried NPs formulation was subsequently loaded into hard gelatin capsules that were examined for in vitro dissolution and pharmacokinetic behavior. Results revealed that in most of the studied variables, some of the quadratic and interaction effects had a significant effect on the studied responses. TEM image illustrated homogeneity and shape of the prepared NPs. No interaction among components was noticed. XRPD confirmed crystalline state change in the optimized NPs. An enhancement in the dissolution rate of more than 2.5 times from capsules filled with optimum drug NPs, when compared to capsules filled with pure drug, was obtained. Crystal growth, due to Ostwald ripening phenomenon and positive Gibbs free energy, was reduced following lyophilization of the nanosuspension formulation. Pharmacokinetic parameters from drug NPs were superior to that of pure drug and drug microparticles. In conclusion, freeze-dried NPs based on drug nanosuspension formulation is a successful

  4. Pharmacokinetic profile of defibrotide in patients with renal impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocchetti, Paola; Tudone, Elena; Marier, Jean-Francois; Marbury, Thomas C; Zomorodi, Katie; Eller, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic veno-occlusive disease, also called sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (VOD/SOS), is an unpredictable, potentially life-threatening complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplant conditioning. Severe VOD/SOS, generally associated with multiorgan dysfunction (pulmonary or renal dysfunction), may be associated with >80% mortality. Defibrotide, recently approved in the US, has demonstrated efficacy treating hepatic VOD/SOS with multiorgan dysfunction. Because renal impairment is prevalent in patients with VOD/SOS, this Phase I, open-label, two-part study in adults examined the effects of hemodialysis and severe or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on defibrotide pharmacokinetics (PK). Part 1 compared defibrotide PK during single 6.25 mg/kg doses infused with and without dialysis. Part 2 assessed defibrotide plasma PK after multiple 6.25 mg/kg doses in nondialysis-dependent subjects with severe/ESRD versus healthy matching subjects. Among six subjects enrolled in Part 1, percent ratios of least-squares mean and 90% confidence intervals (CIs) on dialysis and nondialysis days were 109.71 (CI: 97.23, 123.78) for maximum observed plasma concentration (Cmax); 108.39 (CI: 97.85, 120.07) for area under the concentration-time curve to the time of the last quantifiable plasma concentration (AUC0-t); and 109.98 (CI: 99.39, 121.70) for AUC extrapolated to infinity (AUC0-∞). These ranges were within 80%-125%, indicating no significant effect of dialysis on defibrotide exposure/clearance. In Part 2, defibrotide exposure parameters in six subjects with severe/ESRD after multiple doses (AUC0-t, 113 µg·h/mL; AUC over dosing interval, 113 µg·h/mL; Cmax, 53.8 µg/mL) were within 5%-8% of parameters after the first dose (AUC0-t, 117 µg·h/mL; AUC0-∞, 118 µg·h/mL; Cmax, 54.9 µg/mL), indicating no accumulation. Defibrotide peak and extent of exposures in those with severe/ESRD were ~35%-37% and 50%-60% higher, respectively, versus controls, following single and multiple

  5. Pharmacokinetic profile of defibrotide in patients with renal impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tocchetti P

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Paola Tocchetti,1 Elena Tudone,2 Jean-Francois Marier,3 Thomas C Marbury,4 Katie Zomorodi,5 Mark Eller6 1Gentium, 2Clinical Operations, Gentium, Villa Guardia, Como, Italy; 3Reporting and Analysis Services, Pharsight, a Certara Company, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; 4Orlando Clinical Research Center, Orlando, FL, 5Early Development and Clinical Pharmacology, Jazz Pharmaceuticals, 6Early Drug Development, Jazz Pharmaceuticals, Palo Alto, CA, USA Abstract: Hepatic veno-occlusive disease, also called sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (VOD/SOS, is an unpredictable, potentially life-threatening complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplant conditioning. Severe VOD/SOS, generally associated with multiorgan dysfunction (pulmonary or renal dysfunction, may be associated with >80% mortality. Defibrotide, recently approved in the US, has demonstrated efficacy treating hepatic VOD/SOS with multiorgan dysfunction. Because renal impairment is prevalent in patients with VOD/SOS, this Phase I, open-label, two-part study in adults examined the effects of hemodialysis and severe or end-stage renal disease (ESRD on defibrotide pharmacokinetics (PK. Part 1 compared defibrotide PK during single 6.25 mg/kg doses infused with and without dialysis. Part 2 assessed defibrotide plasma PK after multiple 6.25 mg/kg doses in nondialysis-dependent subjects with severe/ESRD versus healthy matching subjects. Among six subjects enrolled in Part 1, percent ratios of least-squares mean and 90% confidence intervals (CIs on dialysis and nondialysis days were 109.71 (CI: 97.23, 123.78 for maximum observed plasma concentration (Cmax; 108.39 (CI: 97.85, 120.07 for area under the concentration–time curve to the time of the last quantifiable plasma concentration (AUC0–t; and 109.98 (CI: 99.39, 121.70 for AUC extrapolated to infinity (AUC0–∞. These ranges were within 80%–125%, indicating no significant effect of dialysis on defibrotide exposure/clearance. In Part 2, defibrotide

  6. Prediction of Human Pharmacokinetic Profile After Transdermal Drug Application Using Excised Human Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Syunsuke; Karashima, Masatoshi; Arai, Yuta; Tohyama, Kimio; Amano, Nobuyuki

    2017-09-01

    Although several mathematical models have been reported for the estimation of human plasma concentration profiles of drug substances after dermal application, the successful cases that can predict human pharmacokinetic profiles are limited. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the prediction of human plasma concentrations after dermal application using in vitro permeation parameters obtained from excised human skin. The in vitro skin permeability of 7 marketed drug products was evaluated. The plasma concentration-time profiles of the drug substances in humans after their dermal application were simulated using compartment models and the clinical pharmacokinetic parameters. The transdermal process was simulated using the in vitro skin permeation rate and lag time assuming a zero-order absorption. These simulated plasma concentration profiles were compared with the clinical data. The result revealed that the steady-state plasma concentration of diclofenac and the maximum concentrations of nicotine, bisoprolol, rivastigmine, and lidocaine after topical application were within 2-fold of the clinical data. Furthermore, the simulated concentration profiles of bisoprolol, nicotine, and rivastigmine reproduced the decrease in absorption due to drug depletion from the formulation. In conclusion, this simple compartment model using in vitro human skin permeation parameters as zero-order absorption predicted the human plasma concentrations accurately. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pharmacokinetic profile of phytoconstituent(s isolated from medicinal plants—A comprehensive review

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    Piyush Mehta

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicine, the backbone of traditional medicine, has played an important role in human health and welfare for a long period. Traditional therapeutic approaches of regional significance are found in Africa, South and Central America, China, India, Tibet, Indonesia, and the Pacific Islands. The considerable scientific significance and commercial potential of traditional medicines have resulted in increased international attention and global market demands for herbal medicines, especially Chinese herbal medicines. Herbal medicines currently are the primary form of health care for the poor in the developing countries, and also are widely used as a supplement or substitute for conventional drugs in developed countries. These traditional medicines have a pivotal role in the treatment of various ailments and more than 50% of drugs used in Western pharmacopoeia are isolated from herbs or derived from modifications of chemicals found in plants. Herbal medicines usually contain a complex mixture of various bioactive molecules, which make its standardization complicated, and there is little information about all compounds responsible for pharmacological activity. Several research papers have been published that claim pharmacological activity of herbal medicines but few are discussing the role of the exact phytoconstituent. Understanding the pharmacokinetic profile of such phytoconstituents is essential. Although there are research papers that deal with pharmacokinetic properties of phytoconstituents, there are a number of phytoconstituents yet to be explored for their kinetic properties. This article reviews the pharmacokinetic profile of 50 different therapeutically effective traditional medicinal plants from the year 2003 onward.

  8. Formulation, characterization and pharmacokinetics of praziquantel-loaded hydrogenated castor oil solid lipid nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shuyu; Pan, Baoliang; Wang, Ming; Zhu, Luyan; Wang, Fenghua; Dong, Zhao; Wang, Xiaofang; Zhou, WenZhong

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to formulate praziquantel (PZQ)-loaded hydrogenated castor oil (HCO) solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) to enhance the bioavailability and prolong the systemic circulation of the drug. PZQ was encapsulated into HCO nanoparticles by a hot homogenization and ultrasonication method. The physicochemical characteristics of SLN were investigated by optical microscope, scanning electron microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy. Pharmacokinetics were studied after oral, subcutaneous and intramuscular administration in mice. The diameter, polydispersivity index, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency and loading capacity of the nanoparticles were 344.0 +/- 15.1 nm, 0.31 +/- 0.08, -16.7 +/- 0.5 mV, 62.17 +/- 6.53% and 12.43 +/- 1.31%, respectively. In vitro release of PZQ-loaded HCO-SLN exhibited an initial burst release followed by a sustained release. SLN increased the bioavailability of PZQ by 14.9-, 16.1- and 2.6-fold, and extended the mean residence time of the drug from 7.6, 6.6 and 8.2 to 95.9, 151.6 and 48.2 h after oral, subcutaneous and intramuscular administration, respectively. The PZQ-loaded HCO-SLN could be a promising formulation to enhance the pharmacological activity of PZQ.

  9. Pharmacokinetics study of Zr-89-labeled melanin nanoparticle in iron-overload mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Pengjun; Yue, Yuanyuan; Pan, Donghui; Yang, Runlin; Xu, Yuping; Wang, Lizhen; Yan, Junjie; Li, Xiaotian; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Melanin, a natural biological pigment present in many organisms, has been found to exhibit multiple functions. An important property of melanin is its ability to chelate metal ions strongly, which might be developed as an iron chelator for iron overload therapy. Herein, we prepared the ultrasmall water-soluble melanin nanoparticle (MP) and firstly evaluate the pharmacokinetics of MP in iron-overload mice to provide scientific basis for treating iron-overload. To study the circulation time and biodistribution, MP was labeled with 89 Zr, a long half-life (78.4 h) positron-emitting metal which is suited for the labeling of nanoparticles and large bioactive molecule. MP was chelated with 89 Zr directly at pH 5, resulting in non-decay-corrected yield of 89.6% and a radiochemical purity of more than 98%. The specific activity was at least190 MBq/μmol. The 89 Zr-MP was stable in human plasma and PBS for at least 48 h. The half-life of 89 Zr-MP was about 15.70 ± 1.74 h in iron-overload mice. Biodistribution studies and MicroPET imaging showed that 89 Zr-MP mainly accumulated in liver and spleen, which are the target organ of iron-overload. The results indicate that the melanin nanoparticle is promising for further iron overload therapy.

  10. Pharmacokinetics and tolerance study of intravitreal injection of dexamethasone-loaded nanoparticles in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linhua Zhang

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Linhua Zhang1, Yue Li2, Chao Zhang1, Yusheng Wang2, Cunxian Song11Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Tianjin, China; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Institute of Ophthalmology of Chinese PLA, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, ChinaAbstract: The aim of the study was to investigate the tolerance and pharmacokinetics of dexamethasone (DEX-loaded poly(lactic acid–co-glycolic acid nanoparticles (DEX-NPs in rabbits after intravitreal injection. The DEX-NPs were prepared and characterized in terms of morphology, particle size and size distribution, encapsulation efficiency, and in vitro release. Ophthalmic investigations were performed, including fundus observation and photography, intraocular pressure measurement, and B-scan ocular ultrasonography. There were no abnormalities up to 50 days after administration of DEX-NPs in rabbits. The DEX concentrations in plasma and the ocular tissues such as the cornea, aqueous humor, lens, iris, vitreous humor, and chorioretina were determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The DEX-NPs maintained a sustained release of DEX for about 50 days in vitreous and provided relatively constant DEX levels for more than 30 days with a mean concentration of 3.85 mg/L-1. Based on the areas under the curve, the bioavailability of DEX in the experimental group was significantly higher than that in the control group injected with regular DEX. These results suggest that intravitreal injection of DEX-NPs lead to a sustained release of DEX with a high bioavailability, providing a basis for a novel approach to the treatment of posterior segment diseases.Keywords: dexamethasone, nanoparticles, intravitreal injection, pharmacokinetics

  11. Preparation, characterization and pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles: influences of fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shuyu; Zhu, Luyan; Dong, Zhao; Wang, Xiaofang; Wang, Yan; Li, Xihe; Zhou, WenZhong

    2011-04-01

    Enrofloxacin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) were prepared using fatty acids (tetradecanoic acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid) as lipid matrix by hot homogenization and ultrasonication method. The effect of fatty acids on the characteristics and pharmacokinetics of the SLN were investigated. The results showed that the encapsulation efficiency and loading capacity of nanoparticles varied with fatty acids in the order of stearic acid>palmitic acid>tetradecanoic acid. Furthermore, stearic acid-SLN had larger particle size, bigger polydispersity index (PDI) and higher zeta potential compared with the other two fatty acid formulated SLN. The SLN showed sustained releases in vitro and the released enrofloxacin had the same antibacterial activity as that of the native enrofloxacin. Although in vitro release exhibited similar patterns, within 24 h the releasing rates of the three formulations were significantly different (tetradecanoic acid-SLN>palmitic acid-SLN>stearic acid-SLN). Pharmacokinetic study after a single dose of intramuscular administration to mice demonstrated that tetradecanoic acid-SLN, palmitic acid-SLN, and stearic acid-SLN increased the bioavailability by 6.79, 3.56 and 2.39 folds, and extended the mean residence time (MRT) of the drug from 10.60 h to 180.36, 46.26 and 19.09 h, respectively. These results suggest that the enrofloxacin-fatty acid SLN are promising formulations for sustained release while fatty acids had significant influences on the characteristics and performances of the SLN. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization, pharmacokinetics, and hypoglycemic effect of berberine loaded solid lipid nanoparticles

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    Xue M

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Mei Xue, Ming-xing Yang, Wei Zhang, Xiu-min Li, De-hong Gao, Zhi-min Ou, Zhi-peng Li, Su-huan Liu, Xue-jun Li, Shu-yu Yang Xiamen Diabetes Institute, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The high aqueous solubility, poor permeability, and absorption of berberine (BBR result in its low plasma level after oral administration, which greatly limits its clinical application. BBR solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs were prepared to achieve improved bioavailability and prolonged effect. Developed SLNs showed homogeneous spherical shapes, small size (76.8 nm, zeta potential (7.87 mV, encapsulation efficiency (58%, and drug loading (4.2%. The power of X-ray diffraction combined with 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was employed to analyze chemical functional groups and the microstructure of BBR-SLNs, and indicated that the drug was wrapped in a lipid carrier. Single dose (50 mg/kg oral pharmacokinetic studies in rats showed significant improvement (P<0.05 in the peak plasma concentration, area under the curve, and variance of mean residence time of BBR-SLNs when compared to BBR alone (P<0.05, suggesting improved bioavailability. Furthermore, oral administration of both BBR and BBR-SLNs significantly suppressed body weight gain, fasting blood glucose levels, and homeostasis assessment of insulin resistance, and ameliorated impaired glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance in db/db diabetic mice. BBR-SLNs at high dose (100 mg/kg showed more potent effects when compared to an equivalent dose of BBR. Morphologic analysis demonstrated that BBR-SLNs potentially promoted islet function and protected the islet from regeneration. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that by entrapping BBR into SLNs the absorption of BBR and its anti-diabetic action were effectively enhanced. Keywords: berberine, solid lipid nanoparticles, pharmacokinetic, hypoglycemic effect

  13. Characteristics and clinical implications of the pharmacokinetic profile of ibuprofen in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallelli, L; Galasso, O; Urzino, A; Saccà, S; Falcone, D; Palleria, C; Longo, P; Corigliano, A; Terracciano, R; Savino, R; Gasparini, G; De Sarro, G; Southworth, S R

    2012-12-01

    Ibuprofen is a non-selective cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-1/COX-2 inhibitor used to treat pain conditions and inflammation. Limited data have been published concerning the pharmacokinetic profile and clinical effects of ibuprofen in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). In this paper we compared the pharmacokinetic and clinical profile of ibuprofen (at a dosage of from 800 mg/day to 1800 mg/day) administered in patients affected by severe knee OA. Ibuprofen was administered for 7 days to patients who were scheduled to undergo knee arthroplasty due to OA. After 7 days, the ibuprofen concentration in plasma and synovial fluid was measured through both high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-UV and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC/MS), while clinical effects were evaluated through both visual analogue scale (VAS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) scores. The Naranjo scale and the WHO causality assessment scale were used for estimating the probability of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The severity of ADRs was assessed by the modified Hartwig and Siegel scale. Ibuprofen showed a dose-dependent diffusion in both plasma and synovial fluid, which was related to the reduction of pain intensity and improvement of health status, without the development of ADRs. Ibuprofen at higher dosages can be expected to provide better control of OA symptoms as a result of higher tissue distribution.

  14. The Influence of CYP2D6 Phenotype on the Pharmacokinetic Profile of Atomoxetine in Caucasian Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todor Ioana

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze a potential phenotypic variation within the studied group based on the pharmacokinetic profile of atomoxetine and its active metabolite, and to further investigate the impact of CYP2D6 phenotype on atomoxetine pharmacokinetics. Methods: The study was conducted as an open-label, non-randomized clinical trial which included 43 Caucasian healthy volunteers. Each subject received a single oral dose of atomoxetine 25 mg. Subsequently, atomoxetine and 4-hydroxyatomoxetine-O-glucuronide (glucuronidated active metabolite plasma concentrations were determined and a noncompartmental method was used to calculate the pharmacokinetic parameters of both compounds. Further on, the CYP2D6 metabolic phenotype was assessed using the area under the curve (AUC metabolic ratio (atomoxetine/ 4-hydroxyatomoxetine-O-glucuronide and specific statistical tests (Lilliefors (Kolgomorov-Smirnov and Anderson-Darling test. The phenotypic differences in atomoxetine disposition were identified based on the pharmacokinetic profile of the parent drug and its metabolite. Results: The statistical analysis revealed that the AUC metabolic ratio data set did not follow a normal distribution. As a result, two different phenotypes were identified, respectively the poor metabolizer (PM group which included 3 individuals and the extensive metabolizer (EM group which comprised the remaining 40 subjects. Also, it was demonstrated that the metabolic phenotype significantly influenced atomoxetine pharmacokinetics, as PMs presented a 4.5-fold higher exposure to the parent drug and a 3.2-fold lower exposure to its metabolite in comparison to EMs. Conclusions: The pharmacokinetic and statistical analysis emphasized the existence of 2 metabolic phenotypes: EMs and PMs. Furthermore, it was proved that the interphenotype variability had a marked influence on atomoxetine pharmacokinetic profile.

  15. SIMS depth profiling of working environment nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konarski, P.; Iwanejko, I.; Mierzejewska, A.

    2003-01-01

    Morphology of working environment nanoparticles was analyzed using sample rotation technique in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The particles were collected with nine-stage vacuum impactor during gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process of stainless steel and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) of mild steel. Ion erosion of 300-400 nm diameter nanoparticles attached to indium substrate was performed with 2 keV, 100 μm diameter, Ar + ion beam at 45° ion incidence and 1 rpm sample rotation. The results show that both types of particles have core-shell morphology. A layer of fluorine, chlorine and carbon containing compounds covers stainless steel welding fume particles. The cores of these particles are enriched in iron, manganese and chromium. Outer shell of mild steel welding fume particles is enriched in carbon, potassium, chlorine and fluorine, while the deeper layers of these nanoparticles are richer in main steel components.

  16. SIMS depth profiling of working environment nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konarski, P.; Iwanejko, I.; Mierzejewska, A

    2003-01-15

    Morphology of working environment nanoparticles was analyzed using sample rotation technique in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The particles were collected with nine-stage vacuum impactor during gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process of stainless steel and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) of mild steel. Ion erosion of 300-400 nm diameter nanoparticles attached to indium substrate was performed with 2 keV, 100 {mu}m diameter, Ar{sup +} ion beam at 45 deg. ion incidence and 1 rpm sample rotation. The results show that both types of particles have core-shell morphology. A layer of fluorine, chlorine and carbon containing compounds covers stainless steel welding fume particles. The cores of these particles are enriched in iron, manganese and chromium. Outer shell of mild steel welding fume particles is enriched in carbon, potassium, chlorine and fluorine, while the deeper layers of these nanoparticles are richer in main steel components.

  17. Pharmacokinetic profile of dextromethorphan hydrobromide in a syrup formulation in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenin, Eric; Armogida, Marianna; Riff, Dennis

    2014-09-01

    Dextromethorphan hydrobromide (DM) is a widely used antitussive. This study determined, for the first time, the basic pharmacokinetic profile of DM and its active metabolite, dextrorphan (DP) in children and adolescents. Thirty-eight male and female subjects at risk for developing an upper respiratory tract infection (URTI), or symptomatic with cough due to URTI, were enrolled in this single-dose, open-label study: ages 2-5 years (Group A, n = 8), 6-11 years (Group B, n = 17), 12-17 years (Group C, n = 13). Subjects were genotyped for cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 polymorphisms and characterized as poor (PM) or non-poor metabolizers (non-PM). Groups A and B were dosed using an age-weight dosing schedule (DM range 7.5-24.75 mg); a 30-mg dose was used for Group C. Average exposures to total DP increased as age group increased, and average exposure to DM was highest in the adolescent group. One subject in that group was a PM. The terminal half-life (t ½) values were longer in the adolescent group due in part to the single PM subject. No relationship between body weight and pharmacokinetic parameters was noted. This is the first evaluation of the pharmacokinetic characteristics of DM in children and adolescents. A single dose of DM in this population was safe, and well tolerated at all doses tested. The data are used to model and compare pediatric DM exposures with those of adults.

  18. Pharmacokinetic profile and oral bioavailability of Kaurenoic acid from Copaifera spp. in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Dalyara Mendonça de; Viana, Milainy Rocha; Alvim, Marcela Cristina de Oliveira; Carvalho, Lara Soares Aleixo de; Leite, Laura Hora Rios; Da Silva Filho, Ademar Alves; Nascimento, Jorge Willian Leandro

    2018-05-14

    Kaurenoic acid (KA) is a kaurane diterpene found in several medicinal plants that displays biological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, smooth muscle relaxant and hypotensive response. However, there are no pharmacokinetic data available about this molecule. The purpose of the study was to determine the pharmacokinetic profile and the oral bioavailability of KA in rats. Wistar rats submitted to jugular vein cannulation received 50 mg/kg of KA by intravenous or oral route. The implanted cannula allowed intravenous administration and serial blood collection along 10 h. Analytical quantification was performed by reversed phase HPLC-UV and mobile phase composed by acetonitrile:acidified water (70:30 v/v). The validated analytical method showed precision, accuracy, robustness, reliability and linearity between 0.75 and 100 μg/mL. KA administered intravenously showed a linear and two-compartment kinetic behavior at the tested dose. The following pharmacokinetic parameters were determined: C max  = 22.17 ± 1.65 mg/L; V = 14.53 ± 1.47 L/kg; CL = 17.67 ± 1.50 mL/min/kg; AUC 0-∞  = 2859.65 ± 278.42 mg·min/L, K = 0.073 ± 0.005 h -1 and t 1/2β  = 9.52 ± 0.61 h. Oral treatment did not provide detectable plasma levels of KA, avoiding the determination of its bioavailability. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of ionic-complex-based nanostructured lipid carriers to improve the pharmacokinetic profiles of breviscapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei; Zheng, Yong; Shan, Feng-ying; Zhou, Jing; Gong, Tao; Zhang, Zhi-rong

    2013-08-01

    Breviscapine isolated from the Chinese herb Erigeron breviscapus (Vant) Hand-Mazz is widely used to treat cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to improve the pharmacokinetic profiles of breviscapine using nanostructured lipid carrier based on an ionic complex formation. Breviscapine nanostructured lipid carrier (Bre-NLC) was prepared using the thin film homogenization method. The morphology of Bre-NLCs was determined using transmission electron microscopy. The mean particle size, polydispersity index, zeta-potential analysis and entrapment efficiency were analized. In vitro release was studied using the dialysis method. In vitro stability was studied in fresh plasma and liver slurry of rats. In vivo pharmacokinetics was analyzed in rats after intravenous injection of a dose equivalent to breviscapine (10 mg/kg). The Bre-NLCs were spherical with a mean particle size of ~170 nm, a zeta potential of ∼20 mV and a high entrapment efficiency of ~89%. Compared with a commercially available solution, a substantial decrease in the cumulative release of breviscapine was found for the Bre-NLCs. The NLC has a significantly protective effect against the liver enzyme degradation of breviscapine. After intravenous administration in rats, the Bre-NLCs exhibited a 32 times increase in the AUC0-t and a 12 times increase in T1/2 as compared to the commercially available breviscapine solution. The results demonstrate that the NLC has great potential to use as a novel sustained release system for breviscapine.

  20. Pharmacokinetic profile of a sustained-delivery system for physostigmine in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Donna [Defence Medical and Environmental Research Institute, DSO National Laboratories (Kent Ridge), 27 Medical Drive, 12-00, Singapore 117597 (Singapore); Zhao Bin [Defence Medical and Environmental Research Institute, DSO National Laboratories (Kent Ridge), 27 Medical Drive, 12-00, Singapore 117597 (Singapore); Moochhala, Shabbir [Defence Medical and Environmental Research Institute, DSO National Laboratories (Kent Ridge), 27 Medical Drive, 12-00, Singapore 117597 (Singapore)]. E-mail: mshabbir@dso.org.sg; Yang Yiyan [Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, 31 Biopolis Way, The Nanos, 04-01, Singapore 138669 (Singapore)

    2006-07-25

    Physostigmine (PHY) is involved in clinical treatments of glaucoma, Alzheimer's disease and has been suggested as an alternative prophylactic treatment against organophosphate poisoning. However, one of the therapeutic uses of physostigmine is limited by short elimination half-life. In this study, PHY-loaded microparticles, prepared by a spray-drying method with biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) with a size ranging from 1 to 5 {mu}M was developed on a sustained release preparation to prevent multiple dosing and yet maintaining constant plasma level. The release of PHY-loaded microparticles was characterized in vitro and in vivo after oral administration in Sprague-Dawley rats. After oral administration of physostigmine-loaded microparticles in rats, the time course of physostigmine in blood plasma was followed over 48 h and samples were analysed using a validated high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay. In the pharmacokinetics profile of physostigmine for the elimination half-life and area-under-curve, PHY release was sustained in vitro for over 1 week with a low initial burst release. The pharmacokinetics results show a 15-fold increase in the elimination half-life of physostigmine microparticle formulation, coupled with a larger area under the concentration-time curve (AUC), without affecting the peak concentration and the latency to peak concentration, when compared to the standard formulation.

  1. Serum albumin 'camouflage' of plant virus based nanoparticles prevents their antibody recognition and enhances pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitek, Andrzej S; Jameson, Slater A; Veliz, Frank A; Shukla, Sourabh; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2016-05-01

    Plant virus-based nanoparticles (VNPs) are a novel class of nanocarriers with unique potential for biomedical applications. VNPs have many advantageous properties such as ease of manufacture and high degree of quality control. Their biocompatibility and biodegradability make them an attractive alternative to synthetic nanoparticles (NPs). Nevertheless, as with synthetic NPs, to be successful in drug delivery or imaging, the carriers need to overcome several biological barriers including innate immune recognition. Plasma opsonization can tag (V)NPs for clearance by the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS), resulting in shortened circulation half lives and non-specific sequestration in non-targeted organs. PEG coatings have been traditionally used to 'shield' nanocarriers from immune surveillance. However, due to broad use of PEG in cosmetics and other industries, the prevalence of anti-PEG antibodies has been reported, which may limit the utility of PEGylation in nanomedicine. Alternative strategies are needed to tailor the in vivo properties of (plant virus-based) nanocarriers. We demonstrate the use of serum albumin (SA) as a viable alternative. SA conjugation to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-based nanocarriers results in a 'camouflage' effect more effective than PEG coatings. SA-'camouflaged' TMV particles exhibit decreased antibody recognition, as well as enhanced pharmacokinetics in a Balb/C mouse model. Therefore, SA-coatings may provide an alternative and improved coating technique to yield (plant virus-based) NPs with improved in vivo properties enhancing drug delivery and molecular imaging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of dapivirine-loaded nanoparticles after vaginal delivery in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    das Neves, José; Araújo, Francisca; Andrade, Fernanda; Amiji, Mansoor; Bahia, Maria Fernanda; Sarmento, Bruno

    2014-07-01

    To assess the potential of polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) to affect the genital distribution and local and systemic pharmacokinetics (PK) of the anti-HIV microbicide drug candidate dapivirine after vaginal delivery. Dapivirine-loaded, poly(ethylene oxide)-coated poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PEO-PCL) NPs were prepared by a nanoprecipitation method. Genital distribution of NPs and their ability to modify the PK of dapivirine up to 24 h was assessed after vaginal instillation in a female mouse model. Also, the safety of NPs upon daily administration for 14 days was assessed by histological analysis and chemokine/cytokine content in vaginal lavages. PEO-PCL NPs (180-200 nm) were rapidly eliminated after administration but able to distribute throughout the vagina and lower uterus, and capable of tackling mucus and penetrate the epithelial lining. Nanocarriers modified the PK of dapivirine, with higher drug levels being recovered from vaginal lavages and vaginal/lower uterine tissues as compared to a drug suspension. Systemic drug exposure was reduced when NPs were used. Also, NPs were shown safe upon administration for 14 days. Dapivirine-loaded PEO-PCL NPs were able to provide likely favorable genital drug levels, thus attesting the potential value of using this vaginal drug delivery nanosystem in the context of HIV prophylaxis.

  3. Pharmacokinetic profile and pharmacodynamic effects of romifidine hydrochloride in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtasiak-Wypart, M; Soma, L R; Rudy, J A; Uboh, C E; Boston, R C; Driessen, B

    2012-10-01

    Romifidine HCl (romifidine) is an α(2)-agonist commonly used in horses. This study was undertaken to investigate the pharmacokinetics (PK) of romifidine following intravenous (i.v.) administration and describe the relationship between PK parameters and simultaneously recorded pharmacodynamic (PD) parameters. Romifidine (80 μg/kg) was administered by i.v. infusion over 2 min to six adult Thoroughbred horses, and plasma samples were collected and analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Limit of quantification was index and an increase in mean arterial pressure (P analytical technique for the detection of romifidine in equine plasma allowed detailed description of its PK profile. The drug produces long-lasting sedation in horses that corresponds with the long terminal elimination half-life of the drug. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Assessing pharmacokinetics of indocyanine green-loaded nanoparticle in tumor with a dynamic diffuse fluorescence tomography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanqi; Yin, Guoyan; Zhao, Huijuan; Ma, Wenjuan; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Limin

    2018-02-01

    Real-time and continuous monitoring of drug release in vivo is an important task in pharmaceutical development. Here, we devoted to explore a real-time continuous study of the pharmacokinetics of free indocyanine green (ICG) and ICG loaded in the shell-sheddable nanoparticles in tumor based on a dynamic diffuse fluorescence tomography (DFT) system: A highly-sensitive dynamic DFT system of CT-scanning mode generates informative and instantaneous sampling datasets; An analysis procedure extracts the pharmacokinetic parameters from the reconstructed time curves of the mean ICG concentration in tumor, using the Gauss-Newton scheme based on two-compartment model. Compared with the pharmacokinetic parameters of free ICG in tumor, the ICG loaded in the shell-sheddable nanoparticles shows efficient accumulation in tumor. The results demonstrate our proposed dynamic-DFT can provide an integrated and continuous view of the drug delivery of the injected agents in different formulations, which is helpful for the development of diagnosis and therapy for tumors.

  5. Rapid Measurement of Nanoparticle Thickness Profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz-Boon, Hadas; Rossouw, Chris J.; Dwyer, Christian; Etheridge, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    A method to measure the thickness of a single-crystal nanoparticle in the direction parallel to the incident beam from annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscope (ADF-STEM) images is reported, providing a map of thickness versus position across the nanoparticle—a ‘thickness profile’ image. The method is rapid and hence suitable for surveying large numbers of nanoparticles. The method measures the intensity scattered to a characterised ADF detector and compares this to the incident beam intensity, to obtain a normalized ADF image. The normalised intensity is then converted to thickness via dynamical ADF image simulations. The method is accurate within 10% and the precision is dominated primarily by ‘shot noise’. Merits and limitations of this method are discussed. A method to calibrate the response function of the ADF detector without external equipment is also described, which is applicable to the entire range of gain and background settings. -- Highlights: ► A method is developed to convert ADF-STEM images to ‘thickness profile’ images. ► It is applicable in particles survey, facets determination and discrete tomography. ► A method to calibrate the response of the ADF detector is described. ► The response in analysed across a range of conditions. ► Dynamical ADF image simulations are presented, demonstrating intensity vs. thickness dependence.

  6. Heat exposure of Cannabis sativa extracts affects the pharmacokinetic and metabolic profile in healthy male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, Martin; Spinedi, Luca; Unfer-Grauwiler, Sandra; Bodmer, Michael; Surber, Christian; Luedi, Markus; Drewe, Juergen

    2012-05-01

    The most important psychoactive constituent of CANNABIS SATIVA L. is Δ (9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Cannabidiol (CBD), another important constituent, is able to modulate the distinct unwanted psychotropic effect of THC. In natural plant extracts of C. SATIVA, large amounts of THC and CBD appear in the form of THCA-A (THC-acid-A) and CBDA (cannabidiolic acid), which can be transformed to THC and CBD by heating. Previous reports of medicinal use of cannabis or cannabis preparations with higher CBD/THC ratios and use in its natural, unheated form have demonstrated that pharmacological effects were often accompanied with a lower rate of adverse effects. Therefore, in the present study, the pharmacokinetics and metabolic profiles of two different C. SATIVA extracts (heated and unheated) with a CBD/THC ratio > 1 were compared to synthetic THC (dronabinol) in a double-blind, randomized, single center, three-period cross-over study involving 9 healthy male volunteers. The pharmacokinetics of the cannabinoids was highly variable. The metabolic pattern was significantly different after administration of the different forms: the heated extract showed a lower median THC plasma AUC (24 h) than the unheated extract of 2.84 vs. 6.59 pmol h/mL, respectively. The later was slightly higher than that of dronabinol (4.58 pmol h/mL). On the other hand, the median sum of the metabolites (THC, 11-OH-THC, THC-COOH, CBN) plasma AUC (24 h) was higher for the heated than for the unheated extract. The median CBD plasma AUC (24 h) was almost 2-fold higher for the unheated than for the heated extract. These results indicate that use of unheated extracts may lead to a beneficial change in metabolic pattern and possibly better tolerability. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Pharmacokinetics and enhanced oral bioavailability in beagle dogs of cyclosporine A encapsulated in glyceryl monooleate/poloxamer 407 cubic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Lai

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Jie Lai1,2, Yi Lu1, Zongning Yin2, Fuqiang Hu3, Wei Wu11School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Shanghai, China, 2West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China, 3School of Pharmacy, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, ChinaAbstract: Efforts to improve the oral bioavailability of cyclosporine A (CyA remains a challenge in the field of drug delivery. In this study, glyceryl monooleate (GMO/poloxamer 407 cubic nanoparticles were evaluated as potential vehicles to improve the oral bioavailability of CyA. Cubic nanoparticles were prepared via the fragmentation of a bulk GMO/poloxamer 407 cubic phase gel by sonication and homogenization. The cubic inner structure formed was verified using Cryo-TEM. The mean diameters of the nanoparticles were about 180 nm, and the entrapment efficiency of these particles for CyA was over 85%. The in vitro release of CyA from these nanoparticles was less than 5% at 12 h. The results of a pharmacokinetic study in beagle dogs showed improved absorption of CyA from cubic nanoparticles as compared to microemulsion-based Neoral®; higher Cmax (1371.18 ± 37.34 vs 969.68 ± 176.3 ng mL-1, higher AUC0–t (7757.21 ± 1093.64 vs 4739.52 ± 806.30 ng h mL-1 and AUC0–∞ (9004.77 ± 1090.38 vs 5462.31 ± 930.76 ng h mL-1. The relative oral bioavailability of CyA cubic nanoparticles calculated on the basis of AUC0–∞ was about 178% as compared to Neoral®. The enhanced bioavailability of CyA is likely due to facilitated absorption by cubic nanoparticles rather than improved release.Keywords: nanoparticles, cubosomes, cyclosporine A, glyceryl monooleate, oral drug delivery, bioavailability, beagle dogs

  8. Preparation and in vivo pharmacokinetics of curcumin-loaded PCL-PEG-PCL triblock copolymeric nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Runliang Feng,1,* Zhimei Song,1,* Guangxi Zhai2 1Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, College of Medicine and Life Science, University of Jinan, Jinan, Shandong Province, 2Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong Province, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Curcumin (CUR has been linked with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anti amyloid, and antitumor effects, but its application is limited because of its low aqueous solubility and poor oral bioavailability.Methods: To improve its bioavailability and water solubility, we synthesized two series of poly (ε-Caprolactone-poly (ethylene glycol-poly (ε-Caprolactone triblock copolymers by ring-opening polymerization of poly (ethylene glycol and ε-Caprolactone, with stannous 2-ethylhexanoate as the catalyst. Structure of the copolymers was characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and gel permeation chromatography. The nanoparticles (NPs were prepared using a probe-type ultrasonic emulsion and solvent evaporation method. To obtain an optimal delivery system, we explored the effect of the length of the copolymers' hydrophilic and hydrophobic chains on the encapsulation of hydrophobic CUR, performing entrapment efficiency and drug loading evaluations, as well as studying the particle distribution and in vitro release using the direct dispersion method. Finally, study of the in vivo pharmacokinetics of the CUR-loaded NPs was also carried out on selected copolymers in comparison with CUR solution formulations.Results: CUR was encapsulated with 94.3% and 95.5% efficiency in biodegradable nanoparticulate formulations based on NP43 and NP63, respectively. Dynamic laser light scattering and transmission electron microscopy indicated a particle diameter of 55.6 nm and 62.4 nm for NP43 and NP63, respectively. Fourier transform

  9. Imipenem in burn patients: pharmacokinetic profile and PK/PD target attainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, David S; Sanches-Giraud, Cristina; Silva, Carlindo V; Oliveira, Amanda M Ribas Rosa; da Silva, Joao Manoel; Gemperli, Rolf; Santos, Silvia R C J

    2015-03-01

    Unpredictable pharmacokinetics (PK) in burn patients may result in plasma concentrations below concentrations that are effective against common pathogens. The present study evaluated the imipenem PK profile and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) correlation in burn patients. Fifty-one burn patients, 38.7 years of age (mean), 68.0 kg, 36.3% total burn surface area (TBSA), of whom 84% (43/51) exhibited thermal injury, 63% inhalation injury and 16% electrical injury (8/51), all of whom were receiving imipenem treatment were investigated. Drug plasma monitoring, PK study (120 sets of plasma levels) and PK/PD correlation were performed in a series of blood samples. Only 250 μl of plasma samples were required for drug plasma measurements using the ultra filtration technique for the purification of biological matrix and quantification using liquid chromatography. Probability of target attainment (PTA) was calculated using a PD target of 40% free drug concentrations above the minimum inhibitory concentration (40%fT>MIC). Significant differences in PK parameters (medians), such as biological half-life (2.2 vs 5.5 h), plasma clearance (16.2 vs 1.4 l h(-1)) and volume of distribution (0.86 vs 0.19 l kg(-1)), were registered in burn patients via comparisons of set periods with normal renal function against periods of renal failure. Correlations between creatinine clearance and total body plasma clearance were also obtained. In addition, the PK profile did not change according to TBSA during sets when renal function was preserved. PTA was >89% for MIC values up to 4 mg l(-1). In conclusion, imipenem efficacy for the control of hospital infection on the basis of PK/PD correlation was guaranteed for burn in patients at the recommended dose regimens for normal renal function (31.1±9.7 mg kg(-1) daily), but the daily dose must be reduced to 17.2±9.7 mg kg(-1) during renal failure to avoid neurotoxicity.

  10. A novel engineered VEGF blocker with an excellent pharmacokinetic profile and robust anti-tumor activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Lily; Yu, Haijia; Huang, Xin; Tan, Hongzhi; Li, Song; Luo, Yan; Zhang, Li; Jiang, Sumei; Jia, Huifeng; Xiong, Yao; Zhang, Ruliang; Huang, Yi; Chu, Charles C; Tian, Wenzhi

    2015-01-01

    Relatively poor penetration and retention in tumor tissue has been documented for large molecule drugs including therapeutic antibodies and recombinant immunoglobulin constant region (Fc)-fusion proteins due to their large size, positive charge, and strong target binding affinity. Therefore, when designing a large molecular drug candidate, smaller size, neutral charge, and optimal affinity should be considered. We engineered a recombinant protein by molecular engineering the second domain of VEGFR1 and a few flanking residues fused with the Fc fragment of human IgG1, which we named HB-002.1. This recombinant protein was extensively characterized both in vitro and in vivo for its target-binding and target-blocking activities, pharmacokinetic profile, angiogenesis inhibition activity, and anti-tumor therapeutic efficacy. HB-002.1 has a molecular weight of ~80 kDa, isoelectric point of ~6.7, and an optimal target binding affinity of <1 nM. The pharmacokinetic profile was excellent with a half-life of 5 days, maximal concentration of 20.27 μg/ml, and area under the curve of 81.46 μg · days/ml. When tested in a transgenic zebrafish embryonic angiogenesis model, dramatic inhibition in angiogenesis was exhibited by a markedly reduced number of subintestinal vessels. When tested for anti-tumor efficacy, HB-002.1 was confirmed in two xenograft tumor models (A549 and Colo-205) to have a robust tumor killing activity, showing a percentage of inhibition over 90% at the dose of 20 mg/kg. Most promisingly, HB-002.1 showed a superior therapeutic efficacy compared to bevacizumab in the A549 xenograft model (tumor inhibition: 84.7% for HB-002.1 versus 67.6% for bevacizumab, P < 0.0001). HB-002.1 is a strong angiogenesis inhibitor that has the potential to be a novel promising drug for angiogenesis-related diseases such as tumor neoplasms and age-related macular degeneration

  11. Integrated identification, qualification and quantification strategy for pharmacokinetic profile study of Guizhi Fuling capsule in healthy volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Yun-Xi Zhong; Xiao-Liang Jin; Shi-Yin Gu; Ying Peng; Ke-Rong Zhang; Bing-Chen Ou-Yang; Yu Wang; Wei Xiao; Zhen-Zhong Wang; Ji-Ye Aa; Guang-Ji Wang; Jian-Guo Sun

    2016-01-01

    Guizhi Fuling capsule (GZFL), a traditional Chinese medicine formulation, is widely used in China to relieve pain from dysmenorrhea and is now in a Phase II clinical trial in the USA. Due to the low exposure of the five main medicative ingredients (amygdalin, cinnamic acid, gallic acid, paeoniflorin and paeonol) of GZFL in human, a strategy was built to qualitatively and quantitatively identify the possible metabolites of GZFL and to describe the pharmacokinetic profiles of GZFL in human. In ...

  12. Exploration and pharmacokinetic profiling of phenylalanine based carbamates as novel substance p 1-7 analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransson, Rebecca; Nordvall, Gunnar; Bylund, Johan; Carlsson-Jonsson, Anna; Kratz, Jadel M; Svensson, Richard; Artursson, Per; Hallberg, Mathias; Sandström, Anja

    2014-12-11

    The bioactive metabolite of Substance P, the heptapeptide SP1-7 (H-Arg-Pro-Lys-Pro-Gln-Gln-Phe-OH), has been shown to attenuate signs of hyperalgesia in diabetic mice, which indicate a possible use of compounds targeting the SP1-7 binding site as analgesics for neuropathic pain. Aiming at the development of drug-like SP1-7 peptidomimetics we have previously reported on the discovery of H-Phe-Phe-NH2 as a high affinity lead compound. Unfortunately, the pharmacophore of this compound was accompanied by a poor pharmacokinetic (PK) profile. Herein, further lead optimization of H-Phe-Phe-NH2 by substituting the N-terminal phenylalanine for a benzylcarbamate group giving a new type of SP1-7 analogues with good binding affinities is reported. Extensive in vitro as well as in vivo PK characterization is presented for this compound. Evaluation of different C-terminal functional groups, i.e., hydroxamic acid, acyl sulfonamide, acyl cyanamide, acyl hydrazine, and oxadiazole, suggested hydroxamic acid as a bioisosteric replacement for the original primary amide.

  13. Bioavailability and pharmacokinetic profile of grape pomace phenolic compounds in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castello, Fabio; Costabile, Giuseppina; Bresciani, Letizia; Tassotti, Michele; Naviglio, Daniele; Luongo, Delia; Ciciola, Paola; Vitale, Marilena; Vetrani, Claudia; Galaverna, Gianni; Brighenti, Furio; Giacco, Rosalba; Del Rio, Daniele; Mena, Pedro

    2018-05-15

    Grape pomace, the major byproduct of the wine and juice industry, is a relevant source of bioactive phenolic compounds. However, polyphenol bioavailability in humans is not well understood, and the inter-individual variability in the production of phenolic metabolites has not been comprehensively assessed to date. The pharmacokinetic and excretive profiles of phenolic metabolites after the acute administration of a drink made from red grape pomace was here investigated in ten volunteers. A total of 35 and 28 phenolic metabolites were quantified in urine and plasma, respectively. The main circulating metabolites included phenyl-γ-valerolactones, hydroxybenzoic acids, simple phenols, hydroxyphenylpropionic acids, hydroxycinnamates, and (epi)catechin phase II conjugates. A high inter-individual variability was shown both in urine and plasma samples, and different patterns of circulating metabolites were unravelled by applying unsupervised multivariate analysis. Besides the huge variability in the production of microbial metabolites of colonic origin, an important variability was observed due to phase II conjugates. These results are of interest to further understand the potential health benefits of phenolic metabolites on individual basis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The pharmacokinetics and safety profile of oral ganciclovir in combination with trimethoprim in HIV- and CMV-seropositive patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Donald; AbdelHameed, Magdy H; Hunter, John; Teitelbaum, Philip; Dorr, Albert; Griffy, Kay

    1999-01-01

    Aims We investigated the pharmacokinetics and safety profile of oral ganciclovir coadministered with trimethoprim in HIV-and CMV-seropositive patients. Methods In an open-label, randomized, 3-way crossover study, 12 adult males received oral ganciclovir 1000 mg every 8h, oral trimethoprim 200 mg once daily, or both drugs concomitantly in a sequence of three 7-day treatment periods. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined and adverse events recorded for each treatment. Results The presence of trimethoprim significantly decreased CLr (12.9%, P = 0.0068) and increased t1/2 (18.1%, P = 0.0378) of ganciclovir. However, these changes are unlikely to be clinically meaningful. There were no statistically significant changes in trimethoprim pharmacokinetic parameters in the presence of ganciclovir, with the exception of a 12.7% increase in Cmin. Ganciclovir was well tolerated when administered alone or in combination with trimethoprim. Conclusions There was no clinically significant pharmacokinetic interaction between oral ganciclovir and trimethoprim when coadministered. PMID:10215748

  15. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Profiles of Tiamulin in an Experimental Intratracheal Infection Model of Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xia; Sun, Jian; Yang, Tao; Fang, Xi; Cheng, Jie; Xiong, Yan Q; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is the most important pathogen in poultry among four pathogenic Mycoplasma species. Tiamulin is a pleuromutilin antibiotic that shows a great activity against M. gallisepticum and has been approved for use in veterinary medicine particularly for poultry. However, the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) profiles of tiamulin against M. gallisepticum are not well understood. Therefore, in the current studies, we investigated the in vivo PK/PD profiles of tiamulin using a well-established experimental intratracheal infection model of M. gallisepticum. The efficacy of tiamulin against M. gallisepticum was studied in 8-day-old chickens after intramuscular (i.m.) administration at 10 doses between 0-80 mg/kg. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to evaluate the PK parameters of tiamulin following i.m. administration at doses of 5, 40, and 80 mg/kg in Mycoplasma gallisepticum-infected neutropenic chickens. Real-time PCR (RT-PCR) was used for quantitative detection of M. gallisepticum. The MIC of tiamulin against M. gallisepticum strain S6 was 0.03 μg/mL. The PK/PD index, AUC24h/MIC, correlated well with the in vivo antibacterial efficacy. The in vivo data suggest that animal dosage regimens should supply AUC24h/MIC of tiamulin of 382.68 h for 2 log10 ccu equivalents M. gallisepticum reduction. To attain that goal, the administered dose is expected to be 45 mg/kg b.w. for treatment of M. gallisepticum infection with an MIC90 of 0.03 μg/mL.

  16. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Profiles of Tiamulin in an Experimental Intratracheal Infection Model of Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Xiao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma gallisepticum is the most important pathogen in poultry among four pathogenic Mycoplasma species. Tiamulin is a pleuromutilin antibiotic that shows a great activity against M. gallisepticum and has been approved for use in veterinary medicine particularly for poultry. However, the Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamics (PK/PD profiles of tiamulin against M. gallisepticum are not well understood. Therefore, in the current studies, we investigated the in vivo PK/PD profiles of tiamulin using a well-established experimental intratracheal infection model of M. gallisepticum. The efficacy of tiamulin against M. gallisepticum was studied in 8-day-old chickens after intramuscular (i.m. administration at 10 doses between 0-80 mg/kg. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS was used to evaluate the PK parameters of tiamulin following i.m. administration at doses of 5, 40 and 80 mg/kg in Mycoplasma gallisepticum infected neutropenic chickens. Real time PCR (RT-PCR was used for quantitative detection of M. gallisepticum. The MIC of tiamulin against M. gallisepticum strain S6 was 0.03 μg/mL. The PK/PD index, AUC24h/MIC, correlated well with the in vivo antibacterial efficacy. The in vivo data suggest that animal dosage regimens should supply AUC24h/MIC of tiamulin of 382.68 h for 2 log10 ccu equivalents M. gallisepticum reduction. To attain that goal, the administered dose is expected to be 45 mg/kg b.w. for treatment of M. gallisepticum infection with an MIC90 of 0.03 μg/mL.

  17. Effect of cortex mori on pharmacokinetic profiles of main isoflavonoids from pueraria lobata in rat plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bingxin; Sun, Zengxian; Sun, Shu Yang; Dong, Jie; Li, Yanli; Gao, Shan; Pang, Jie; Chang, Qi

    2017-09-14

    Radix pueraria (the root of pueraria lobata (Wild.) Ohwi.), which contains a class of isoflavonoids as the main active components, as well as cortex mori (the root bark of Morus alba L), which contains abundant active alkaloids, have been employed for the treatment of diabetes in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries. In previous studies, pharmacodynamic synergistic reactions have been observed in compatible application of pueraria lobata isoflavonoids extracts (PLF) and cortex mori alkaloids extracts (CME) for inhibiting α-glycosidase activity. It has also been demonstrated that PLF can effectively slow down the absorption of active alkaloid from CME, so as to produce a higher effective concentration in small intestine for depressing the elevation of postprandial blood glucose through inhibiting α-glycosidase activity. In this study, the hypoglycemic effect of PLF, CME or CME-PLF mixture (the mixture of CME and PLF at a ratio of 1:6.3) was further evaluated through in vivo glucose tolerance studies. And the effect of CME on pharmacokinetic profiles of main isoflavonoids from PLF in rat plasma was investigated to further underlie compatibility mechanism of the two herbs. Four groups of rats received an oral dose of starch solution alone or simultaneously with drugs by gavage feeding. The blood samples were collected to determine glucose concentrations by glucose oxidase method. In addition, another two groups of rats were orally administered with PLF or CME-PLF. The plasma samples were collected and assayed using an LC/MS/MS method for comparatively pharmacokinetic studies of five main isoflavonoids. For starch loading, co-administration of CME-PLF resulted in more potent inhibition effects on glucose responses compared to those by CME or PLF in rat. The isoflavonoids from PLF were rapidly absorbed, presenting similarly low concentrations in plasma. When CME was added, the C max and AUC of all the five isoflavonoids were increased. A phenomenon of double

  18. Safety and Pharmacokinetic Profiles of Repeated-Dose Micafungin in Children and Adolescents Treated for Invasive Candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Daniel K.; Deville, Jaime G.; Azie, Nkechi; Kovanda, Laura; Roy, Mike; Wu, Chunzhang; Arrieta, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Background Micafungin is an echinocandin with proven efficacy against a broad range of fungal infections, including those caused by Candida species. Objective To evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of once-daily 3 mg/kg and 4.5 mg/kg micafungin in children with proven, probable, or suspected invasive candidiasis. Methods Micafungin safety and pharmacokinetics were assessed in two Phase I, open-label, repeat-dose trials. In Study 2101, children aged 2–16 years were grouped by weight to receive 3 mg/kg (≥25 kg) or 4.5 mg/kg (<25 kg) intravenous micafungin for 10–14 days. In Study 2102, children aged 4 months to <2 years received 4.5 mg/kg micafungin. Study protocols were otherwise identical. Results Safety was analyzed in seventy-eight and nine children in Studies 2101 and 2102, respectively. Although adverse events were experienced by most children (2101: n = 62; 2102: n = 9), micafungin-related adverse events were less common (2101: n = 28; 2102: n = 1), and the number of patients discontinuing due to adverse events was low (2101: n = 4; 2102: n = 1). The most common micafungin-related adverse events were infusion-associated symptoms, pyrexia, and hypomagnesemia (Study 2101), and liver function abnormalities (Study 2102). The micafungin pharmacokinetic profile was similar to that seen in other studies conducted in children, but different than that observed in adults. Conclusions In this small cohort of children, once-daily doses of 3 mg/kg and 4.5 mg/kg micafungin were well tolerated. Pharmacokinetic data will be combined in a population pharmacokinetic analysis to support U.S. dosing recommendations in children. PMID:23958810

  19. Hyaluronidase: its effects on HI-6 dichloride and dimethanesulphonate pharmacokinetic profile in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasova, Jana Zdarova; Pavlik, Michal; Chladek, Jaroslav; Jun, Daniel; Kuca, Kamil

    2013-07-04

    Pigs were administered intramuscularly molar equivalents of HI-6 salts (HI-6 dichloride 10.71 mg/kg and HI-6 DMS 13.59 mg/kg) either with or without hyaluronidase (60 U/kg). Hyaluronidase is supposed to increase tissue permeability and diminishes discomfort caused by the intramuscular injection. Doses of HI-6 salts corresponded with standard HI-6 dichloride dose in one autoinjector (500 mg) and were recalculated for 1 kg of body weight. According to the results, both HI-6 salts applied in combination with hyaluronidase had increased tissue absorption and improved pharmacokinetic profile. The Cmax was significantly higher in case of HI-6 DMS plus hyaluronidase (29.6 ± 2.98 μg/ml) administration increase compared to HI-6 DMS (23.8 ± 3.04 μg/ml) and HI-6 dichloride (19.0 ± 0.93 μg/ml); both without hyaluronidase. Bioavailability calculated as AUCtotal (HI-6 DMS with hyaluronidase, 4,119 ± 647 min μg/ml) was also significantly higher compared to HI-6 DMS (2,259 ± 329 min μg/ml) and HI-6 dichloride (1,969 ± 254 min μg/ml); both without hyaluronidase. The results suggest that administration of HI-6 salt with higher solubility is the first step in the improvement of application strategy, but use some substances with spreading effect (hyaluronidase) may also leads to better absorption and better bioavailability. Improved bioavailability could to go hand in hand with increased effectiveness of therapy without the need of multiple autoinjector applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The pharmacokinetic profile of crocetin in healthy adult human volunteers after a single oral administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umigai, N; Murakami, K; Ulit, M V; Antonio, L S; Shirotori, M; Morikawa, H; Nakano, T

    2011-05-15

    Crocetin, a unique carotenoid with a short carbon chain length, is an active compound of saffron and Gardenia jasminoides Ellis used as traditional herbal medicine. The present study was undertaken to investigate the pharmacokinetic profiles of crocetin in healthy adult subjects. The study was conducted as an open-label, single dose escalation with 10 Filipino volunteers (5 men and 5 women). The subjects received a single dose of crocetin at three doses (7.5, 15 and 22.5 mg) in one week interval. Blood samples were collected from the brachial vein before and at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 24 h after administration. Plasma concentrations of crocetin were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Crocetin was rapidly absorbed and detected within an hour of administration with a mean time to reach maximum concentration (T(max)) of crocetin ranging from 4.0 to 4.8 h. The mean values of C(max) and AUC(0-24h) ranged from 100.9 to 279.7 ng/ml and 556.5 to 1720.8 ng. h/ml respectively. C(max) and AUC values increased with dose proportional manner. Crocetin was eliminated from human plasma with a mean elimination half life (T(½) of 6.1 to 7.5 h. In summary, there were no serious adverse events up to 22.5 mg dose of crocetin while crocetin was found to be absorbed more quickly than the other carotenoids such as β-carotene, lutein and lycopene. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Luteolin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles synthesis, characterization, & improvement of bioavailability, pharmacokinetics in vitro and vivo studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Hao; Meng, Murtaza Hasan Weiwei; Zhao, Haiwei; Iqbal, Javed; Dai, Rongji; Deng, Yulin; Lv, Fang

    2014-04-01

    Luteolin (LU, 5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyflavone) most active compound in Chinese herbal flavones has been acting as a antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and antimutagen. However, its poor bioavailability, hydrophobicity, and pharmacokinetics restrict clinical application. Here in this study, LU-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles have been prepared by hot-microemulsion ultrasonic technique to improve the bioavailability & pharmacokinetics of compound. LU-loaded solid lipid nanoparticle size was confirmed by particle size analyzer with range from 47 to 118 nm, having zepta potential -9.2 mV and polydisperse index 0.247, respectively. Round-shaped SLNPs were obtained by using transmission electron microscope, and encapsulation efficiency 74.80 % was calculated by using HPLC. Both in vitro and vivo studies, LC-MS/MS technique was used for quantification of Luteolin in rat. The T max value of drug with LU-SLNs after the administration was Ten times shorter than pure Luteolin suspension administration. C max value of drug after the administration of LU-SLNs was five times higher than obtained with native drug suspension. Luteolin with SLNs has increased the half-life approximately up to 2 h. Distribution and clearance of drug with SLNs were significantly decreased by 2.16-10.57 fold, respectively. In the end, the relative bioavailability of SLNs has improved about 4.89 compared to Luteolin with SLNs. From this study, it can be concluded that LU-SLNs have not only great potential for improving solubility but also increased the drug concentration in plasma. Furthermore, use of LC-MS/MS for quantification of LU-SLNs in rat plasma is reliable and of therapeutic usefulness, especially for neurodegenerative and cancerous disorders in humans.

  2. Pharmacokinetic and toxicological evaluation of multi-functional thiol-6-fluoro-6-deoxy-d-glucose gold nanoparticles in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roa, Wilson; Xiong, Yeping; Chen, Jie; Yang, Xiaoyan; Song, Kun; Yang, Xiaohong; Kong, Beihua; Wilson, John; Xing, James Z.

    2012-09-01

    We synthesized a novel, multi-functional, radiosensitizing agent by covalently linking 6-fluoro-6-deoxy-d-glucose (6-FDG) to gold nanoparticles (6-FDG-GNPs) via a thiol functional group. We then assessed the bio-distribution and pharmacokinetic properties of 6-FDG-GNPs in vivo using a murine model. At 2 h, following intravenous injection of 6-FDG-GNPs into the murine model, approximately 30% of the 6-FDG-GNPs were distributed to three major organs: the liver, the spleen and the kidney. PEGylation of the 6-FDG-GNPs was found to significantly improve the bio-distribution of 6-FDG-GNPs by avoiding unintentional uptake into these organs, while simultaneously doubling the cellular uptake of GNPs in implanted breast MCF-7 adenocarcinoma. When combined with radiation, PEG-6-FDG-GNPs were found to increase the apoptosis of the MCF-7 breast adenocarinoma cells by radiation both in vitro and in vivo. Pharmacokinetic data indicate that GNPs reach their maximal concentrations at a time window of two to four hours post-injection, during which optimal radiation efficiency can be achieved. PEG-6-FDG-GNPs are thus novel nanoparticles that preferentially accumulate in targeted cancer cells where they act as potent radiosensitizing agents. Future research will aim to substitute the 18F atom into the 6-FDG molecule so that the PEG-6-FDG-GNPs can also function as radiotracers for use in positron emission tomography scanning to aid cancer diagnosis and image guided radiation therapy planning.

  3. Metabolic profiles of pomalidomide in human plasma simulated with pharmacokinetic data in control and humanized-liver mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Makiko; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Mitsui, Marina; Shibata, Norio; Guengerich, F Peter; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2017-10-01

    1. Pomalidomide has been shown to be potentially teratogenic in thalidomide-sensitive animal species such as rabbits. Screening for thalidomide analogs devoid of teratogenicity/toxicity - attributable to metabolites formed by cytochrome P450 enzymes - but having immunomodulatory properties is a strategic pathway towards development of new anticancer drugs. 2. In this study, plasma concentrations of pomalidomide, its primary 5-hydroxylated metabolite, and its glucuronide conjugate(s) were investigated in control and humanized-liver mice. Following oral administration of pomalidomide (100 mg/kg), plasma concentrations of 7-hydroxypomalidomide and 5-hydroxypomalidomide glucuronide were slightly higher in humanized-liver mice than in control mice. 3. Simulations of human plasma concentrations of pomalidomide were achieved with simplified physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models in both groups of mice in accordance with reported pomalidomide concentrations after low dose administration in humans. 4. The results indicate that pharmacokinetic profiles of pomalidomide were roughly similar between control mice and humanized-liver mice and that control and humanized-liver mice mediated pomalidomide 5-hydroxylation in vivo. Introducing one aromatic amino group into thalidomide resulted in less species differences in in vivo pharmacokinetics in control and humanized-liver mice.

  4. Application of Physiologically Based Absorption Modeling to Characterize the Pharmacokinetic Profiles of Oral Extended Release Methylphenidate Products in Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxia Yang

    Full Text Available A previously presented physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for immediate release (IR methylphenidate (MPH was extended to characterize the pharmacokinetic behaviors of oral extended release (ER MPH formulations in adults for the first time. Information on the anatomy and physiology of the gastrointestinal (GI tract, together with the biopharmaceutical properties of MPH, was integrated into the original model, with model parameters representing hepatic metabolism and intestinal non-specific loss recalibrated against in vitro and in vivo kinetic data sets with IR MPH. A Weibull function was implemented to describe the dissolution of different ER formulations. A variety of mathematical functions can be utilized to account for the engineered release/dissolution technologies to achieve better model performance. The physiological absorption model tracked well the plasma concentration profiles in adults receiving a multilayer-release MPH formulation or Metadate CD, while some degree of discrepancy was observed between predicted and observed plasma concentration profiles for Ritalin LA and Medikinet Retard. A local sensitivity analysis demonstrated that model parameters associated with the GI tract significantly influenced model predicted plasma MPH concentrations, albeit to varying degrees, suggesting the importance of better understanding the GI tract physiology, along with the intestinal non-specific loss of MPH. The model provides a quantitative tool to predict the biphasic plasma time course data for ER MPH, helping elucidate factors responsible for the diverse plasma MPH concentration profiles following oral dosing of different ER formulations.

  5. Intravenous application of HI-6 salts (dichloride and dimethansulphonate) in pigs: comparison with pharmacokinetics profile after intramuscular administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdarova Karasova, Jana; Zemek, Filip; Kunes, Martin; Kvetina, Jaroslav; Chladek, Jaroslav; Jun, Daniel; Bures, Jan; Tachecí, Ilja; Kuca, Kamil

    2013-01-01

    Oxime HI-6 is an acetylcholinesterase reactivator therapeutically efficient against nerve agents. Because of their physico-chemical properties, oximes are typically applied intramuscularly (i.m.). This route of administration has also some disadvantages, and alternative strategies ought to be examined. We evaluated the pharmacokinetic profiles of two HI-6 salts after their intravenous (i.v.) administration, and compare the results with the known pharmacokinetics after i.m. administration. Pigs were administered with HI-6 salts (i.v), either HI-6 dichloride (10.71 mg/kg) or molar equivalent HI-6 dimethansulphonate (13.59 mg/kg). Doses of the HI-6 salts corresponded with a standard HI-6 dichloride dose in one autoinjector (500 mg) and were recalculated for one kilogram of body weight. The main pharmacokinetic parameters are comparable after i.v. and i.m. HI-6 administration. The compared pharmacokinetic parameters were half-life, terminal rate constant, mean residence time of the molecule in the body, clearance, and the apparent volume in the terminal phase. The bioavailability after i.m. administration was comparable with that of i.v.; these results suggest that the oxime is well released from the muscle depot. Significant differences were found in parameters Cmax and Tmax which are important in cases of emergency when rapidity and bioavailability are paramount for the success of treatment. I.v. administration should solve the problem of rapid clearance. Infusion or bolus administration may be considered as a logical subsequent step in oxime treatment strategy. The main advantage is in maintenance of an effective therapeutic plasma concentration, a more easily achievable effective therapeutic concentration, and fewer local adverse reactions.

  6. Poly(n-butylcyanoacrylate nanoparticles for oral delivery of quercetin: preparation, characterization, and pharmacokinetics and biodistribution studies in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagad M

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mayur Bagad, Zaved Ahmed KhanMedical Biotechnology Division, School of Biosciences and Technology, VIT University, Vellore Tamil Nadu, IndiaBackground: Quercetin (QT is a potential bioflavonol and antioxidant with poor bioavailability and very low distribution in the brain. A new oral delivery system comprising of poly(n-butylcyanoacrylate nanoparticles (PBCA NPs was introduced to improve the oral bioavailability of QT and to increase its distribution in the brain. Physicochemical characteristics, in vitro release, stability in simulated gastric fluid and intestinal fluids, and pharmacokinetics and biodistribution studies of QT-PBCA NPs coated with polysorbate-80 (P-80 were investigated.Objective: This study aimed to investigate the physicochemical characteristics, in vitro release, stability in simulated gastric fluid and intestinal fluids, and pharmacokinetics and biodistribution studies of QT-PBCA NPs coated with polysorbate-80 (P-80.Results: The results showed that QT-PBCA NPs and QT-PBCA NPs coated with P-80 (QT-PBCA+P-80 had mean particle sizes of 161.1±0.44 nm and 166.6±0.33 nm respectively, and appeared spherical in shape under transmission electron microscopy. The mean entrapment efficiency was 79.86%±0.45% for QT-PBCA NPs and 74.58%±1.44% for QT-PBCA+P-80. The in vitro release of QT-PBCA NPs and QT-PBCA+P-80 showed an initial burst release followed by a sustained release when compared to free QT. The relative bioavailability of QT-PBCA NPs and QT-PBCA+P-80 enhanced QT bioavailability by 2.38- and 4.93-fold respectively, when compared to free QT. The biodistribution study in rats showed that a higher concentration of QT was detected in the brain after the NPs were coated with P-80.Conclusion: This study indicates that PBCA NPs coated with P-80 can be potential drug carriers for poorly water-soluble drugs. These NPs were observed to improve the drugs’ oral bioavailability and enhance their transport to the brain

  7. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacogenomic profiles of telmisartan after the oral microdose and therapeutic dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieiri, Ichiro; Nishimura, Chisa; Maeda, Kazuya; Sasaki, Tomohiro; Kimura, Miyuki; Chiyoda, Takeshi; Hirota, Tekeshi; Irie, Shin; Shimizu, Hitoshi; Noguchi, Takanori; Yoshida, Kenji; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2011-08-01

    In this study, we evaluated (a) the contribution of SLCO1B3 and UGT1A polymorphisms to the pharmacokinetics of telmisartan in two forms, a microdose (MD) and a therapeutic dose (TD); (b) linkage disequilibrium (LD) between UGT1A1 and UGT1A3; and (c) linearity in the pharmacokinetics of telmisartan between the two forms. Telmisartan was orally administered at MD condition (100 μg), and then at TD condition (80 mg) to 33 healthy volunteers whose genotypes were prescreened by DMET Plus. Plasma concentrations of telmisartan and its glucuronide were measured by LC-MS/MS, and population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed. No obvious effect of SLCO1B3 polymorphisms (334T>G, 699G>A, and rs11045585) on the pharmacokinetics of telmisartan was observed. The strong LD between UGT1A1*6 and UGT1A3*4a, and between UGT1A1*28 and UGT1A3*2a were observed. After both MD and TD administration, the mean area under the curve0-24 (±standard deviation) of telmisartan was significantly lower and higher in individuals with the UGT1A3*2a (TD, 1701±970 ng hr/ml; MD, 978±537 pg hr/ml) and *4a variants (TD, 5340±1168; MD, 3145±1093), respectively, compared with those in individuals with UGT1A3*1/*1 (TD, 2969±1456; MD, 1669±726). These results were quantitatively confirmed by population pharmacokinetic analysis. Nonlinearity of the dose-exposure relationship was observed between the MD and TD. The haplotypes of UGT1A3 significantly influenced pharmacokinetics of telmisartan and a strong LD between UGT1A1 genotype and UGT1A3 haplotype was observed. These findings are potentially of pharmacological and toxicological importance to the development and clinical use of drugs.

  8. Pharmacokinetic profile of nifedipine GITS in hypertensive patients with chronic renal impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, R; Stolero, D; Griffel, L; Kobelt, R; Brendel, E; Iaina, A

    1994-01-01

    25 hypertensive patients with normal or impaired renal function underwent pharmacokinetic and safety studies after single and multiple dose administration of nifedipine GITS (Gastro-Intestinal Therapeutic System) 60mg tablets. Complete pharmacokinetic data were obtained from 23 of these patients. Blood pressure and heart rate changes were compatible with the known properties of the drug. Impaired renal function did not affect the maximum plasma concentrations or bioavailability of nifedipine after single or multiple dose administration of nifedipine GITS, nor was there any evidence of excessive drug accumulation in the presence of renal impairment.

  9. Acute toxicity and pharmacokinetics of 13 nm-sized PEG-coated gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Wan-Seob; Cho, Minjung; Jeong, Jinyoung; Choi, Mina; Cho, Hea-Young; Han, Beom Seok; Kim, Sheen Hee; Kim, Hyoung Ook; Lim, Yong Taik; Chung, Bong Hyun; Jeong, Jayoung

    2009-01-01

    In general, gold nanoparticles are recognized as being as nontoxic. Still, there have been some reports on their toxicity, which has been shown to depend on the physical dimension, surface chemistry, and shape of the nanoparticles. In this study, we carry out an in vivo toxicity study using 13 nm-sized gold nanoparticles coated with PEG (MW 5000). In our findings the 13 nm sized PEG-coated gold nanoparticles were seen to induce acute inflammation and apoptosis in the liver. These nanoparticles were found to accumulate in the liver and spleen for up to 7 days after injection and to have long blood circulation times. In addition, transmission electron microscopy showed that numerous cytoplasmic vesicles and lysosomes of liver Kupffer cells and spleen macrophages contained the PEG-coated gold nanoparticles. These findings of toxicity and kinetics of PEG-coated gold nanoparticles may have important clinical implications regarding the safety issue as PEG-coated gold nanoparticles are widely used in biomedical applications

  10. Identification of intestinal loss of a drug through physiologically based pharmacokinetic simulation of plasma concentration-time profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Sheila Annie

    2008-01-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding of the role of the gut as a metabolizing organ, recognition of gut wall metabolism and/or other factors contributing to intestinal loss of a compound has been a challenging task due to the lack of well characterized methods to distinguish it from first-pass hepatic extraction. The implications of identifying intestinal loss of a compound in drug discovery and development can be enormous. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) simulations of pharmacokinetic profiles provide a simple, reliable and cost-effective way to understand the mechanisms underlying pharmacokinetic processes. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the application of PBPK simulations in bringing to light intestinal loss of orally administered drugs, using two example compounds: verapamil and an in-house compound that is no longer in development (referred to as compound A in this article). A generic PBPK model, built in-house using MATLAB software and incorporating absorption, metabolism, distribution, biliary and renal elimination models, was employed for simulation of concentration-time profiles. Modulation of intrinsic hepatic clearance and tissue distribution parameters in the generic PBPK model was done to achieve a good fit to the observed intravenous pharmacokinetic profiles of the compounds studied. These optimized clearance and distribution parameters are expected to be invariant across different routes of administration, as long as the kinetics are linear, and were therefore employed to simulate the oral profiles of the compounds. For compounds with reasonably good solubility and permeability, an area under the concentration-time curve for the simulated oral profile that far exceeded the observed would indicate some kind of loss in the intestine. PBPK simulations applied to compound A showed substantial loss of the compound in the gastrointestinal tract in humans but not in rats. This accounted for the lower bioavailability of the

  11. Pharmacokinetics and tolerance study of intravitreal injection of dexamethasone-loaded nanoparticles in rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Hongfan

    2009-01-01

    Linhua Zhang1, Yue Li2, Chao Zhang1, Yusheng Wang2, Cunxian Song11Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Tianjin, China; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Institute of Ophthalmology of Chinese PLA, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, ChinaAbstract: The aim of the study was to investigate the tolerance and pharmacokinetics of dexamethasone (DEX)-loaded poly(lactic acid–co-glycolic acid) ...

  12. Pharmacokinetic profile of voriconazole in a critically ill patient on therapeutic plasma exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spriet, I.; Bruggemann, R.J.M.; Annaert, P.; Meersseman, P.; Wijngaerden, E. van; Lagrou, K.; Willems, L.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extracorporeal removal of drugs during therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) can lead to decreased efficacy, as shown in several reports discussing altered pharmacokinetics (PKs) of antibiotics during TPE. In particular, drugs with a low volume of distribution or a high protein binding are

  13. Non-invasive monitoring of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics for pharmacological drug profiling in children and adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrier, Lenneke

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes the potential role of non-invasive measurement of pharmacokinetics (pk) and pharmacodynamics (pd) in the research and development of central nervous system (cns) stimulants or depressants for children and adolescents. First, we evaluated the feasibility of using saliva as an

  14. Nicotine pharmacokinetic profiles of the Tobacco Heating System 2.2, cigarettes and nicotine gum in Japanese smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossard, Patrick; Weitkunat, Rolf; Poux, Valerie; Lama, Nicola; Haziza, Christelle; Picavet, Patrick; Baker, Gizelle; Lüdicke, Frank

    2017-10-01

    Two open-label randomized cross-over studies in Japanese smokers investigated the single-use nicotine pharmacokinetic profile of the Tobacco Heating System (THS) 2.2, cigarettes (CC) and nicotine replacement therapy (Gum). In each study, one on the regular and one on the menthol variants of the THS and CC, both using Gum as reference, 62 subjects were randomized to four sequences: Sequence 1: THS - CC (n = 22); Sequence 2: CC - THS (n = 22); Sequence 3: THS - Gum (n = 9); Sequence 4: Gum - THS (n = 9). Plasma nicotine concentrations were measured in 16 blood samples collected over 24 h after single use. Maximal nicotine concentration (C max ) and area under the curve from start of product use to time of last quantifiable concentration (AUC 0-last ) were similar between THS and CC in both studies, with ratios varying from 88 to 104% for C max and from 96 to 98% for AUC 0-last . Urge-to-smoke total scores were comparable between THS and CC. The THS nicotine pharmacokinetic profile was close to CC, with similar levels of urge-to-smoke. This suggests that THS can satisfy smokers and be a viable alternative to cigarettes for adult smokers who want to continue using tobacco. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Safety and pharmacokinetic profile of fixed-dose ivermectin with an innovative 18mg tablet in healthy adult volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Muñoz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ivermectin is a pivotal drug for the control of onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis, which is increasingly identified as a useful drug for the control of other Neglected Tropical Diseases. Its role in the treatment of soil transmitted helminthiasis through improved efficacy against Trichuris trichiura in combination with other anthelmintics might accelerate the progress towards breaking transmission. Ivermectin is a derivative of Avermectin B1, and consists of an 80:20 mixture of the equipotent homologous 22,23 dehydro B1a and B1b. Pharmacokinetic characteristics and safety profile of ivermectin allow to explore innovative uses to further expand its utilization through mass drug administration campaigns to improve coverage rates. We conducted a phase I clinical trial with 54 healthy adult volunteers who sequentially received 2 experimental treatments using a new 18 mg ivermectin tablet in a fixed-dose strategy of 18 and 36 mg single dose regimens, compared to the standard, weight based 150–200 μg/kg, regimen. Volunteers were recruited in 3 groups based on body weight. Plasma concentrations of ivermectin were measured through HPLC up to 168 hours post treatment. Safety data showed no significant differences between groups and no serious adverse events: headache was the most frequent adverse event in all treatment groups, none of them severe. Pharmacokinetic parameters showed a half-life between 81 and 91 h in the different treatment groups. When comparing the systemic bioavailability (AUC0t and Cmax of the reference product (WA-ref with the other two study groups using fixed doses, we observed an overall increase in AUC0t and Cmax for the two experimental treatments of 18 mg and 36 mg. Body mass index (BMI and weight were associated with t1/2 and V/F, probably reflecting the high liposolubility of IVM with longer retention times proportional to the presence of more adipose tissue. Systemic exposure to ivermectin (AUC0t or Cmax was not

  16. The pharmacokinetic profile of a novel fixed-dose combination tablet of ibuprofen and paracetamol

    OpenAIRE

    Tanner, Trevor; Aspley, Sue; Munn, Andrew; Thomas, Tracy

    2010-01-01

    Background Ibuprofen and paracetamol differ in their mode of action and related therapeutic effects, suggesting that combined administration may offer improved analgesia. Reported here are the results of two studies on the pharmacokinetic properties of a novel ibuprofen (200 mg) and paracetamol (500 mg) fixed-dose combination tablet. Methods Both studies were open-label, randomised studies in healthy volunteers: Study 1 was a four-way crossover, single-dose study; Study 2 was a two-way cross-...

  17. "The relationship between pharmacokinetic variables and pharmacodynamic profiles of bolus versus continuous infusion of furosemide in critically ill patients"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Mojtaba Mojtahedzadeh

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, the pharmacokinetic variables of continuous infusion and intermittent bolus injection of furosemide and the possible relationship between its pharmacokinetic characteristics and pharmacodynamic profile among intensive care unit (ICU patients were studied. In this prospective, randomized, clinical trial, twelve patients received IV bolus of 20 mg of the drug during 3 hours period and, the drug dose was doubled, when the urine output was less than 1 ml/kg/h (group 1. The other nine patients received a continuous intravenous furosemide infusion at the rate of 0.1 mg/kg/h (group 2. The amount of furosemide in serum was measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Results showed a positive correlation between plasma clearance of furosemide and its diuretic activity (P=0.01. The pharmacokinetic parameters such as Vd (l, CL (ml/min, Ke (min-1 and t½ (min in continuous infusion patients were not significantly differed from the bolus patients (P-values 0.5, 0.9, 0.9,0.9, respectively. Nevertheless the observed plasma clearance of drug in the continuous infusion group was clinically higher than bolus injection group and as a result the cumulative urine output per hour per mg of furosemide in a continuous infusion was observed to be higher than bolus(P=0.2. Changes in serum sodium and potassium were similar for both groups, but bolus injection patients were associated with higher potassium depletion (P=0.001. Therefore, continuous infusion seems to be better means of diuretic therapy in critically ill patients.

  18. In silico drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic profiles of natural products from medicinal plants in the Congo basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Lifongo, Lydia L; Mbah, James A; Owono Owono, Luc C; Megnassan, Eugene; Mbaze, Luc Meva'a; Judson, Philip N; Sippl, Wolfgang; Efange, Simon M N

    2013-01-01

    Drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (DMPK) assessment has come to occupy a place of interest during the early stages of drug discovery today. The use of computer modelling to predict the DMPK and toxicity properties of a natural product library derived from medicinal plants from Central Africa (named ConMedNP). Material from some of the plant sources are currently employed in African Traditional Medicine. Computer-based methods are slowly gaining ground in this area and are often used as preliminary criteria for the elimination of compounds likely to present uninteresting pharmacokinetic profiles and unacceptable levels of toxicity from the list of potential drug candidates, hence cutting down the cost of discovery of a drug. In the present study, we present an in silico assessment of the DMPK and toxicity profile of a natural product library containing ~3,200 compounds, derived from 379 species of medicinal plants from 10 countries in the Congo Basin forests and savannas, which have been published in the literature. In this analysis, we have used 46 computed physico-chemical properties or molecular descriptors to predict the absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination and toxicity (ADMET) of the compounds. This survey demonstrated that about 45% of the compounds within the ConMedNP compound library are compliant, having properties which fall within the range of ADME properties of 95% of currently known drugs, while about 69% of the compounds have ≤ 2 violations. Moreover, about 73% of the compounds within the corresponding "drug-like" subset showed compliance. In addition to the verified levels of "drug-likeness", diversity and the wide range of measured biological activities, the compounds from medicinal plants in Central Africa show interesting DMPK profiles and hence could represent an important starting point for hit/lead discovery.

  19. Preparation, characterization, and pharmacokinetics of tilmicosin- and florfenicol-loaded hydrogenated castor oil-solid lipid nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Z; Yonghong, L; Changqing, S; Junfeng, L; Li, Z; Chunyu, J; Xianqiang, L

    2017-06-01

    To effectively control bovine mastitis, tilmicosin (TIL)- and florfenicol (FF)-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) with hydrogenated castor oil (HCO) were prepared by a hot homogenization and ultrasonication method. In vitro antibacterial activity, properties, and pharmacokinetics of the TIL-FF-SLN were studied. The results demonstrated that TIL and FF had a synergistic or additive antibacterial activity against Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis, and Streptococcus agalactiae. The size, polydispersity index, and zeta potential of nanoparticles were 289.1 ± 13.7 nm, 0.31 ± 0.05, and -26.7 ± 1.3 mV, respectively. The encapsulation efficiencies for TIL and FF were 62.3 ± 5.9% and 85.1 ± 5.2%, and the loading capacities for TIL and FF were 8.2 ± 0.6% and 3.3 ± 0.2%, respectively. The TIL-FF-SLN showed no irritation in the injection site and sustained release in vitro. After medication, TIL and FF could maintain about 0.1 μg/mL for 122 and 6 h. Compared to the control solution, the SLN increased the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC 0-t ), elimination half-life (T ½ke ), and mean residence time (MRT) of TIL by 33.09-, 23.29-, and 37.53-fold, and 1.69-, 5.00-, and 3.83-fold for FF, respectively. These results of this exploratory study suggest that the HCO-SLN could be a useful system for the delivery of TIL and FF for bovine mastitis therapy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Examination of the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of a diclofenac poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanoparticle formulation in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harirforoosh, S; West, K O; Murrell, D E; Denham, J W; Panus, P C; Hanley, G A

    2016-12-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are assembled into two categories; cyclooxygenase (COX-1) sparing inhibitors of COX-2 and non-selective NSAIDs. Diclofenac (DICLO) is a non-selective NSAID that has been linked to serious side effects including gastric ulcers and renal injury. In this study, we examine the effect of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanoformulation on DICLO-associated adverse events and pharmacokinetics using a nanoparticle (NP) formulation previously developed in our laboratory. Rats were administered a single dose of methylcellulose (VEH), blank NP, DICLO (10 mg/kg), or a DICLO-NP suspension equivalent to the DICLO dose. Urinary and blood parameters were measured at baseline and following treatment. Duodenal and gastric prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and duodenal myeloperoxidase (MPO) were collected to assess inflammation at 24 hrs post-treatment. The mean percent change from baseline in sodium excretion rate (µmol/min/100 g body weight) differed significantly from VEH in the NP (p < 0.0001), DICLO (p < 0.0001), and DICLO-NP (p = 0.0001) groups. The differences among groups did not reach significance for plasma sodium or potassium concentrations, potassium excretion rate, gastric PGE2, or intestinal biomarker concentrations. Regarding renal histopathology, DICLO produced considerably more necrosis compared to VEH; while DICLO-NP did not elicit notable differences from VEH. Our results suggest that over the duration and dosage examined, DICLO-NP may reduce renal necrosis without influencing other side effects or drug characteristics.

  1. Influence of Polyethylene Glycol Lipid Desorption Rates on Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of siRNA Lipid Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara L Mui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid nanoparticles (LNPs encapsulating short interfering RNAs that target hepatic genes are advancing through clinical trials, and early results indicate the excellent gene silencing observed in rodents and nonhuman primates also translates to humans. This success has motivated research to identify ways to further advance this delivery platform. Here, we characterize the polyethylene glycol lipid (PEG-lipid components, which are required to control the self-assembly process during formation of lipid particles, but can negatively affect delivery to hepatocytes and hepatic gene silencing in vivo. The rate of transfer from LNPs to plasma lipoproteins in vivo is measured for three PEG-lipids with dialkyl chains 14, 16, and 18 carbons long. We show that 1.5 mol % PEG-lipid represents a threshold concentration at which the chain length exerts a minimal effect on hepatic gene silencing but can still modify LNPs pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. Increasing the concentration to 2.5 and 3.5 mol % substantially compromises hepatocyte gene knockdown for PEG-lipids with distearyl (C18 chains but has little impact for shorter dimyristyl (C14 chains. These data are discussed with respect to RNA delivery and the different rates at which the steric barrier disassociates from LNPs in vivo.

  2. In-vivo dermal pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of skin targeting nanoparticles for corticosteroid treatment of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, Muhammad Irfan; Katas, Haliza; Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd; Ng, Shiow-Fern; Zulfakar, Mohd Hanif; Jamil, Adawiyah

    2016-06-30

    The objective of this study was to investigate the in-vivo behavior of topically applied cationic polymeric chitosan nanoparticles (CSNPs) loaded with anti-inflammatory (hydrocortisone, HC) and antimicrobial (hydroxytyrosol, HT) drugs, to elucidate their skin targeting potential for the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD). Compared to the commercial formulation, the HC-HT loaded CSNPs showed significantly improved drug penetration into the epidermal and dermal layers of albino Wistar rat skin without saturation. Dermal pharmacokinetic of CSNPs with a size of 228.5±7nm and +39±5mV charges revealed that they penetrated 2.46-fold deeper than the commercial formulation did, and had greater affinity at the skin target site without spreading to the surrounding tissues, thereby providing substantial safety benefits. In repeated dermal application toxicity studies, the HC-HT CSNPs showed no evidence of toxicity compared to the commercial formulation, which induced skin atrophy and higher liver enzyme levels. In conclusion, the positively charged HC-HT CSNP formulation exhibited promising local delivery and virtually no treatment-related toxicities, suggesting it may be an efficient and viable alternative for commercially available AD treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Mephedrone (4-Methylmethcathinone: Acute Behavioral Effects, Hyperthermic, and Pharmacokinetic Profile in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klára Šíchová

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mephedrone (MEPH is a synthetic cathinone derivative with effects that mimic MDMA and/or cocaine. Our study in male Wistar rats provides detailed investigations of MEPH’s and its primary metabolite nor-mephedrone’s (nor-MEPH pharmacokinetics and bio-distribution to four different substrates (serum, brain, lungs, and liver, as well as comparative analysis of their effects on locomotion [open field test (OFT] and sensorimotor gating [prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle reaction (PPI ASR]. Furthermore, in order to mimic the crowded condition where MEPH is typically taken (e.g., clubs, the acute effect of MEPH on thermoregulation in singly- and group-housed rats was evaluated. Pharmacokinetics of MEPH and nor-MEPH after MEPH (5 mg/kg, sc. were analyzed over 8 h using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. MEPH (2.5, 5, or 20 mg/kg, sc. and nor-MEPH (5 mg/kg, sc. were administered 5 or 40 min before the behavioral testing in the OFT and PPI ASR; locomotion and its spatial distribution, ASR, habituation and PPI itself were quantified. The effect of MEPH on rectal temperature was measured after 5 and 20 mg/kg, sc. Both MEPH and nor-MEPH were detected in all substrates, with the highest levels detected in lungs. Mean brain: serum ratios were 1:1.19 (MEPH and 1:1.91 (nor-MEPH, maximum concentrations were observed at 30 min; at 2 and 4 h after administration, nor-MEPH concentrations were higher compared to the parent drug. While neither of the drugs disrupted PPI, both increased locomotion and affected its spatial distribution. The effects of MEPH were dose dependent, rapid, and short-lasting, and the intensity of locomotor stimulant effects was comparable between MEPH and nor-MEPH. Despite the disappearance of behavioral effects within 40 min after administration, MEPH induced rectal temperature elevations that persisted for 3 h even in singly housed rats. To conclude, we observed a robust, short-lasting, and most

  4. Pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and metabolites of a polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated norcantharidin chitosan nanoparticle formulation in rats and mice, using LC-MS/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding XY

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Xin-Yuan Ding1, Cheng-Jiao Hong2, Yang Liu1, Zong-Lin Gu1, Kong-Lang Xing1, Ai-Jun Zhu1, Wei-Liang Chen1, Lin-Seng Shi1, Xue-Nong Zhang1, Qiang Zhang31Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical science, Soochow University, Suzhou, 2Jiang Su Provincial Key Laboratory of Radiation Medicine and Protection, Suzhou, 3Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Science, Peking University, Beijing, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: A novel formulation containing polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP K30-coated norcantharidin (NCTD chitosan nanoparticles (PVP–NCTD–NPs was prepared by ionic gelation between chitosan and sodium tripolyphosphate. The average particle size of the PVP–NCTD–NPs produced was 140.03 ± 6.23 nm; entrapment efficiency was 56.33% ± 1.41%; and drug-loading efficiency was 8.38% ± 0.56%. The surface morphology of NCTD nanoparticles (NPs coated with PVP K30 was characterized using various analytical techniques, including X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. NCTD and its metabolites were analyzed using a sensitive and specific liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method with samples from mice and rats. The results indicated the importance of the PVP coating in controlling the shape and improving the entrapment efficiency of the NPs. Pharmacokinetic profiles of the NCTD group and PVP–NCTD–NP group, after oral and intravenous administration in rats, revealed that relative bioavailabilities were 173.3% and 325.5%, respectively. The elimination half-life increased, and there was an obvious decrease in clearance. The tissue distribution of NCTD in mice after the intravenous administration of both formulations was investigated. The drug was not quantifiable at 6 hours in all tissues except for the liver and kidneys. The distribution of the drug in the liver and bile was notably improved in the PVP–NCTD–NP group. The metabolites and excretion properties of NCTD were investigated by analyzing

  5. Nε-Acryloyllysine Piperazides as Irreversible Inhibitors of Transglutaminase 2: Synthesis, Structure-Activity Relationships, and Pharmacokinetic Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodtke, Robert; Hauser, Christoph; Ruiz-Gómez, Gloria; Jäckel, Elisabeth; Bauer, David; Lohse, Martin; Wong, Alan; Pufe, Johanna; Ludwig, Friedrich-Alexander; Fischer, Steffen; Hauser, Sandra; Greif, Dieter; Pisabarro, M Teresa; Pietzsch, Jens; Pietsch, Markus; Löser, Reik

    2018-05-24

    Transglutaminase 2 (TGase 2)-catalyzed transamidation represents an important post-translational mechanism for protein modification with implications in physiological and pathophysiological conditions, including fibrotic and neoplastic processes. Consequently, this enzyme is considered a promising target for the diagnosis of and therapy for these diseases. In this study, we report on the synthesis and kinetic characterization of N ε -acryloyllysine piperazides as irreversible inhibitors of TGase 2. Systematic structural modifications on 54 new compounds were performed with a major focus on fluorine-bearing substituents due to the potential of such compounds to serve as radiotracer candidates for positron emission tomography. The determined inhibitory activities ranged from 100 to 10 000 M -1 s -1 , which resulted in comprehensive structure-activity relationships. Structure-activity correlations using various substituent parameters accompanied by covalent docking studies provide an advanced understanding of the molecular recognition for this inhibitor class within the active site of TGase 2. Selectivity profiling of selected compounds for other transglutaminases demonstrated an excellent selectivity toward transglutaminase 2. Furthermore, an initial pharmacokinetic profiling of selected inhibitors was performed, including the assessment of potential membrane permeability and liver microsomal stability.

  6. Linking Suspension Nasal Spray Drug Deposition Patterns to Pharmacokinetic Profiles: A Proof of Concept Study using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygg, Alex; Hindle, Michael; Longest, P. Worth

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to link regional nasal spray deposition patterns of suspension formulations, predicted with computational fluid dynamics (CFD), to in vivo human pharmacokinetic (PK) plasma concentration profiles. This is accomplished through the use of CFD simulations coupled with compartmental PK modeling. Results showed a rapid initial rise in plasma concentration that is due to the absorption of drug particles deposited in the nasal middle passages, followed by a slower increase in plasma concentration that is governed by the transport of drug particles from the nasal vestibule to the middle passages. Although drug deposition locations in the nasal cavity had a significant effect on the shape of the concentration profile, the absolute bioavailability remained constant provided that all of the drug remained in the nose over the course of the simulation. Loss of drug through the nostrils even after long time periods resulted in a significant decrease in bioavailability and increased variability. The results of this study quantify how differences in nasal drug deposition affect transient plasma concentrations and overall bioavailability. These findings are potentially useful for establishing bioequivalence for nasal spray devices and reducing the burden of in vitro testing, pharmacodynamics and clinical studies. PMID:27238495

  7. The preparation, characterization, and pharmacokinetic studies of chitosan nanoparticles loaded with paclitaxel/dimethyl-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye YJ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ya-Jing Ye,1 Yun Wang,1 Kai-Yan Lou,1 Yan-Zuo Chen,1 Rongjun Chen,2 Feng Gao1,3,4 1Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; 3Shanghai Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Chemistry, 4Shanghai Key Laboratory of New Drug Design, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: A novel biocompatible and biodegradable drug-delivery nanoparticle (NP has been developed to minimize the severe side effects of the poorly water-soluble anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX for clinical use. PTX was loaded into the hydrophobic cavity of a hydrophilic cyclodextrin derivative, heptakis (2,6-di-O-methyl-β-cyclodextrin (DM-β-CD, using an aqueous solution-stirring method followed by lyophilization. The resulting PTX/DM-β-CD inclusion complex dramatically enhanced the solubility of PTX in water and was directly incorporated into chitosan (CS to form NPs (with a size of 323.9–407.8 nm in diameter using an ionic gelation method. The formed NPs had a zeta potential of +15.9–23.3 mV and showed high colloidal stability. With the same weight ratio of PTX to CS of 0.7, the loading efficiency of the PTX/DM-β-CD inclusion complex-loaded CS NPs was 30.3-fold higher than that of the PTX-loaded CS NPs. Moreover, it is notable that PTX was released from the DM-β-CD/CS NPs in a sustained-release manner. The pharmacokinetic studies revealed that, compared with reference formulation (Taxol®, the PTX/DM-β-CD inclusion complex-loaded CS NPs exhibited a significant increase in AUC0→24h (the area under the plasma drug concentration–time curve over the period of 24 hours and mean residence time by 2.7-fold and 1.4-fold, respectively. Therefore, the novel drug/DM-β-CD inclusion complex-loaded CS NPs have promising applications for the

  8. Comparative pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution profiles of four major bioactive components in normal and hepatic fibrosis rats after oral administration of Fuzheng Huayu recipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Liu, Shan; Wang, Chang-Hong; Tao, Yan-Yan; Zhou, Hua; Liu, Cheng-Hai

    2015-10-10

    Fuzheng Huayu recipe (FZHY) is a herbal product for the treatment of liver fibrosis approved by the Chinese State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA), but its pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution had not been investigated. In this study, the liver fibrotic model was induced with intraperitoneal injection of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN), and FZHY was given orally to the model and normal rats. The plasma pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution profiles of four major bioactive components from FZHY were analyzed in the normal and fibrotic rat groups using an ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method. Results revealed that the bioavailabilities of danshensu (DSS), salvianolic acid B (SAB) and rosmarinic acid (ROS) in liver fibrotic rats increased 1.49, 3.31 and 2.37-fold, respectively, compared to normal rats. There was no obvious difference in the pharmacokinetics of amygdalin (AMY) between the normal and fibrotic rats. The tissue distribution of DSS, SAB, and AMY trended to be mostly in the kidney and lung. The distribution of DSS, SAB, and AMY in liver tissue of the model rats was significantly decreased compared to the normal rats. Significant differences in the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution profiles of DSS, ROS, SAB and AMY were observed in rats with hepatic fibrosis after oral administration of FZHY. These results provide a meaningful basis for developing a clinical dosage regimen in the treatment of hepatic fibrosis by FZHY. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Aripiprazole loaded poly(caprolactone) nanoparticles: Optimization and in vivo pharmacokinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawant, Krutika; Pandey, Abhijeet; Patel, Sneha

    2016-09-01

    In the present investigation, a Quality by Design strategy was applied for formulation and optimization of aripiprazole (APZ) loaded PCL nanoparticles (APNPs) using nanoprecipitation method keeping entrapment efficiency (%EE) and particle size (PS) as critical quality attributes. Establishment of design space was done followed by analysis of its robustness and sensitivity. Characterization of optimized APNPs was done using DSC, FT-IR, PXRD and TEM studies and was evaluated for drug release, hemocompatibility and nasal toxicity. PS, zeta potential and %EE of optimized APNPs were found to be 199.2 ± 5.65 nm, − 21.4 ± 4.6 mV and 69.2 ± 2.34% respectively. In vitro release study showed 90 ± 2.69% drug release after 8 h. Nasal toxicity study indicated safety of developed formulation for intranasal administration. APNPs administered via intranasal route facilitated the brain distribution of APZ incorporated with the AUC{sub 0→8} in rat brain approximately 2 times higher than that of APNPs administered via intravenous route. Increase in C{sub max} was observed which might help in dose reduction along with reduction in dose related side effects. The results of the study indicate that intranasally administered APZ loaded PCL NPs can potentially transport APZ via nose to brain and can serve as a non-invasive alternative for the delivery of APZ to brain. - Highlights: • It explores intra-nasal route for treatment of schizophrenia. • Quality by Design strategy has been used for optimization and assessesment of design space robustness. • PCL nanoparticles enhance penetration of drug into brain leading to increased C{sub max} and decrease in T{sub max}. • It can act as potential platform for treatment of schizophrenia with decreased dose related toxicities.

  10. Mucuna pruriens for Parkinson's disease: Low-cost preparation method, laboratory measures and pharmacokinetics profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassani, Erica; Cilia, Roberto; Laguna, Janeth; Barichella, Michela; Contin, Manuela; Cereda, Emanuele; Isaias, Ioannis U; Sparvoli, Francesca; Akpalu, Albert; Budu, Kwabena Ofosu; Scarpa, Maria Teresa; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2016-06-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurological condition. Levodopa (LD) is the gold standard therapy for PD patients. Most PD patients in low-income areas cannot afford long-term daily Levodopa therapy. The aim of our study was to investigate if Mucuna pruriens (MP), a legume with high LD content that grows in tropical regions worldwide, might be potential alternative for poor PD patients. We analyzed 25 samples of MP from Africa, Latin America and Asia. We measured the content in LD in various MP preparations (dried, roasted, boiled). LD pharmacokinetics and motor response were recorded in four PD patients, comparing MP vs. LD+Dopa-Decarboxylase Inhibitor (DDCI) formulations. Median LD concentration in dried MP seeds was 5.29%; similar results were obtained in roasted powder samples (5.3%), while boiling reduced LD content up to 70%. Compared to LD+DDCI, MP extract at similar LD dose provided less clinical benefit, with a 3.5-fold lower median AUC. Considering the lack of a DDCI, MP therapy may provide clinical benefit only when content of LD is at least 3.5-fold the standard LD+DDCI. If long-term MP proves to be safe and effective in controlled clinical trials, it may be a sustainable alternative therapy for PD in low-income countries. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Predicting the oral pharmacokinetic profiles of multiple-unit (pellet) dosage forms using a modeling and simulation approach coupled with biorelevant dissolution testing: case example diclofenac sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambayashi, Atsushi; Blume, Henning; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this research was to characterize the dissolution profile of a poorly soluble drug, diclofenac, from a commercially available multiple-unit enteric coated dosage form, Diclo-Puren® capsules, and to develop a predictive model for its oral pharmacokinetic profile. The paddle method was used to obtain the dissolution profiles of this dosage form in biorelevant media, with the exposure to simulated gastric conditions being varied in order to simulate the gastric emptying behavior of pellets. A modified Noyes-Whitney theory was subsequently fitted to the dissolution data. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for multiple-unit dosage forms was designed using STELLA® software and coupled with the biorelevant dissolution profiles in order to simulate the plasma concentration profiles of diclofenac from Diclo-Puren® capsule in both the fasted and fed state in humans. Gastric emptying kinetics relevant to multiple-units pellets were incorporated into the PBPK model by setting up a virtual patient population to account for physiological variations in emptying kinetics. Using in vitro biorelevant dissolution coupled with in silico PBPK modeling and simulation it was possible to predict the plasma profile of this multiple-unit formulation of diclofenac after oral administration in both the fasted and fed state. This approach might be useful to predict variability in the plasma profiles for other drugs housed in multiple-unit dosage forms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Pharmacokinetic profile of an intradeltoid diclofenac injection in obese Indian volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaneshwar Shep

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Dhaneshwar Shep1, Ashwini Ojha2, Sweta Patel3, Manish Nivsarkar4, Vijaya Jaiswal1, Harish Padh51Medical Services, Troikaa Pharmaceuticals Ltd., 2Department of Bio-analytical, 3Department of Biostatistics, 4Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, B.V. Patel Pharmaceutical Education and Research Development Centre, 5Director, B.V. Patel PERD Centre, and Project Director, NIPER, Ahmedabad, IndiaBackground: A new propylene glycol-free and reduced-volume formulation of diclofenac sodium 75 mg/mL designed for intradeltoid administration has been found to be bioequivalent to a reference formulation of diclofenac sodium 75 mg/3 mL given via the intragluteal route in normal healthy volunteers. Standard needles may not reach the gluteus maximus muscle in many cases, especially in the obese. The objective of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of the new formulation and compare the bioavailability of intradeltoid diclofenac sodium 75 mg/mL with that of the intragluteal 75 mg/3 mL reference formulation in obese volunteers.Methods: A comparative, two-way, single-dose, bioavailability study was carried out in 10 obese (body mass index > 25 male Indian volunteers after a washout period of seven days. Blood samples were collected until six hours following drug administration and analyzed using a prevalidated high-pressure liquid chromatography method.Results: The mean maximum plasma concentration and time to reach maximum plasma concentration for the test formulation were 1.30 µg/mL and 0.50 hours, respectively, versus 0.93 µg/mL and 1.08 hours for the reference formulation. The mean areas under the curve from 0 to last measurable time point (AUC0–t for the test and reference formulations were 2.71 µg•h/mL and 2.73 µg•h/mL, respectively. The mean AUCs from 0 to infinity (AUC0–∞ for the test and reference formulations were 3.71 µg•h/mL and 3.75 µg•h/mL, respectively.Conclusion: The results suggest that the test

  13. Melatonin in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Endogenous and Pharmacokinetic Profiles in Relation to Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Suzanne E.; Adkins, Karen W.; Calcutt, M. Wade; Carter, Melissa D.; Goodpaster, Robert L.; Wang, Lily; Shi, Yaping; Burgess, Helen J.; Hachey, David L.; Malow, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    Supplemental melatonin has been used to treat sleep onset insomnia in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), although the mechanism of action is uncertain. We assessed endogenous and supplemental melatonin profiles in relation to sleep in nine children with ASD. In endogenous samples, maximal melatonin concentration (C[subscript max]) and…

  14. Integrated identification, qualification and quantification strategy for pharmacokinetic profile study of Guizhi Fuling capsule in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yun-Xi; Jin, Xiao-Liang; Gu, Shi-Yin; Peng, Ying; Zhang, Ke-Rong; Ou-Yang, Bing-Chen; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Zhen-Zhong; Aa, Ji-Ye; Wang, Guang-Ji; Sun, Jian-Guo

    2016-08-16

    Guizhi Fuling capsule (GZFL), a traditional Chinese medicine formulation, is widely used in China to relieve pain from dysmenorrhea and is now in a Phase II clinical trial in the USA. Due to the low exposure of the five main medicative ingredients (amygdalin, cinnamic acid, gallic acid, paeoniflorin and paeonol) of GZFL in human, a strategy was built to qualitatively and quantitatively identify the possible metabolites of GZFL and to describe the pharmacokinetic profiles of GZFL in human. In this strategy, LC-Q-TOF/MS was used to identify and structurally elucidate the possible metabolites of GZFL in vivo; and a time-based metabolite-confirming step (TBMCs) was used to confirm uncertain metabolites. The simultaneously quantitation results by LC-MS/MS showed low exposure of the five medicative ingredients. According to the strategy we built, a total of 36 metabolites were found and structurally elucidated. The simultaneously semi-quantitative analysis by LC-MS/MS showed that obvious time-concentration curves could be established for 12 of the metabolites, and most of them showed a relatively higher exposure. This study provides a better understanding of the metabolic processes of GZFL in human.

  15. The influence of corneocyte structure on the interpretation of permeation profiles of nanoparticles across skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinheiro, T. [LFI, Instituto Tecnologico Nuclear, and Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade Lisboa E.N. 10, 2685-953 Sacavem (Portugal)]. E-mail: murmur@itn.pt; Pallon, J. [Lund Institute of Technology, Physics Department, Lund University, Lund (Sweden)]. E-mail: Jan.Pallon@pixe.lth.se; Alves, L.C. [LFI, Instituto Tecnologico Nuclear, and Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade Lisboa E.N. 10, 2685-953 Sacavem (Portugal)]. E-mail: lcalves@itn.pt; Verissimo, A. [LFI, Instituto Tecnologico Nuclear, and Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade Lisboa E.N. 10, 2685-953 Sacavem (Portugal)]. E-mail: averissimo@vims.edu; Filipe, P. [Departamento Dermatologia, Hospital Sta. Maria, Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: pfilipe@fm.ul.pt; Silva, J.N. [Departamento Dermatologia, Hospital Sta. Maria, Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: maiasilva@fm.ul.pt; Silva, R. [Departamento Dermatologia, Hospital Sta. Maria, Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: rpalminhas@netcabo.pt

    2007-07-15

    The permeability of skin to nanoparticles of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) used in sunscreens as a reflector of the UV wavelengths of sunlight, was examined using nuclear microscopy techniques. Special attention was given to the permeation characteristics of these nanoparticles across the outer layers of skin, the stratum corneum, in healthy and psoriatic skin condition. Aspects that may influence the interpretation of results such as sample preparation difficulties and skin condition were focused. Sample preparation can damage the integrity of the corneocyte layers inducing unwanted artefacts that may bias the evaluation of results. Irradiation conditions may also introduce distortions in the labile structures of human skin. Skin condition, such as loss of corneocyte cohesion occurring in psoriasis also influence the permeation profile of the nanoparticles. Weighing and accounting for these features in the examination of skin by nuclear microscopy is crucial to accurately assess the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles permeation depth.

  16. Assembly of tantalum porous films with graded oxidation profile from size-selected nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vidyadhar; Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis; Cassidy, Cathal; Benelmekki, Maria; Bohra, Murtaza; Hawash, Zafer; Baughman, Kenneth W.; Sowwan, Mukhles

    2014-05-01

    Functionally graded materials offer a way to improve the physical and chemical properties of thin films and coatings for different applications in the nanotechnology and biomedical fields. In this work, design and assembly of nanoporous tantalum films with a graded oxidation profile perpendicular to the substrate surface are reported. These nanoporous films are composed of size-selected, amorphous tantalum nanoparticles, deposited using a gas-aggregated magnetron sputtering system, and oxidized after coalescence, as samples evolve from mono- to multi-layered structures. Molecular dynamics computer simulations shed light on atomistic mechanisms of nanoparticle coalescence, which govern the films porosity. Aberration-corrected (S) TEM, GIXRD, AFM, SEM, and XPS were employed to study the morphology, phase and oxidation profiles of the tantalum nanoparticles, and the resultant films.

  17. Psychomotor effect differences between l-methamphetamine and d-methamphetamine are independent of murine plasma and brain pharmacokinetics profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Nishimura, Tetsuya; Takahata, Kazue; Kosugi, Yuri; Tanabe, Takaaki; Muraoka, Shizuko

    2017-01-01

    l-Methamphetamine has been occasionally referred to as a stimulant similar to d-methamphetamine, probably owing to insufficient comparative studies. Here, we directly compared psychomotor efficacies and pharmacokinetics of methamphetamine enantiomers in mice. Only d-methamphetamine, but not l-methamphetamine, induced stereotypy and sensitization at 1?10?mg/kg. However, plasma pharmacokinetic parameters of 10?mg/kg l-methamphetamine were ?tenfold those of 1?mg/kg d-methamphetamine. These resul...

  18. Pharmacokinetics of resveratrol metabolic profile in healthy humans after moderate consumption of red wine and grape extract tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotches-Ribalta, Maria; Andres-Lacueva, Cristina; Estruch, Ramon; Escribano, Elvira; Urpi-Sarda, Mireia

    2012-11-01

    A pharmacokinetic study of the metabolic profile of resveratrol has been performed in healthy men after moderate red wine (RW) consumption. The bioavailability of resveratrol is highly influenced by several factors such as the food matrix and, therefore, this study has been compared with a pilot study in which men ingested grape extract (GE) tablets as a nutraceutical, containing similar total amounts of resveratrol than RW. Blood and urine samples were taken before and at several time points after intervention and then analyzed by SPE and LC-ESI-MS/MS. Up to 17 resveratrol and piceid derivatives were identified, including those formed by the intestinal microbiota. Resveratrol glucosides were found in plasma as intact forms and reached the lowest maximum concentrations 1h after both interventions. Higher plasma concentrations and longer times (t(max)) were observed for resveratrol glucuronides due to phase II metabolism and even higher values for conjugates derived from microbiota, such as dihydroresveratrol-glucuronides. The same trend was observed for total excreted amounts in urine samples. When both treatments were compared, statistically significant differences for some metabolites were obtained, which may be due to the different composition of resveratrol and piceid in both sources. However, GE formulation seems to delay resveratrol absorption, staying longer in the gut where could be metabolized to a greater degree, since 2.1-3.6-fold higher urinary concentrations of microbial metabolites were observed after GE intervention at 12-24h urinary fraction. Therefore, supplement intake could be also a way to bring resveratrol benefits to human health. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of long-circulating docetaxel loaded poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) nanoparticles: Optimization, pharmacokinetic, cytotoxicity and in vivo assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardhan, Harsh; Mittal, Pooja; Adena, Sandeep K Reddy; Upadhyay, Mansi; Mishra, Brahmeshwar

    2017-10-01

    Long-circulating nanoparticles (NPs) are promising drug delivery vehicles which target solid tumors via enhanced permeation and retention effect. Plackett-Burman (PBD) and Box-Behnken (BBD) designs were adopted to study the effects of factors viz. polymer concentration, surfactant concentration, homogenizer speed, homogenization time and ultrasonication time on responses. A graphical and numerical optimization technique was used to obtain predicted value of the response. The drug entrapment efficiency was approximately 39±0.85%. The particle size of the nanoparticles was found to be 260±2.85nm, while the zeta potential was -18±2.12mV, indicating more stable particles. SEM, TEM, and AFM were used for characterization of surface morphology and the physicochemical characters of NPs. A pharmacokinetic evaluation carried out intravenous administration in healthy Charles Foster rats displayed enhanced systemic bioavailability and plasma drug concentration. The in vivo-in silico assessment by GastroPlus™ showed good prediction accuracy and presented best-fit model. Nanoparticles were also studied for stability testing and were found to be stable concerning their drug content and physical characters. In vitro cytotoxicity was assessed using MCF-7 for percentage inhibition of human breast cancer cell line. Anticancer studies of optimized NPs showed a significant increase in efficacy as observed by relative tumor volume up to 30 days. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. An HPLC Method for Microanalysis and Pharmacokinetics of Marine Sulfated Polysaccharide PSS-Loaded Poly Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid (PLGA Nanoparticles in Rat Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Shi Guan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at developing a sensitive and selective HPLC method with postcolumn fluorescence derivatization for the detection of propylene glycol alginate sodium sulfate (PSS in rat plasma. Plasma samples were prepared by a simple and fast ultrafiltration method. PSS was extracted from rat plasma with d-glucuronic acid as internal standard. Isocratic chromatographic separation was performed on a TSKgel G2500 PWxL column with the mobile phase of 0.1 M sodium sulfate at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. Analyte detection was achieved by fluorescence detection (FLD at 250 nm (excitation and 435 nm (emission using guanidine hydrochloride as postcolumn derivatizing reagent in an alkaline medium at 120 °C. The calibration curve was linear over a concentration range of 1–500 μg/mL, and the lower limit of detection (LLOD was found to be 250 ng/mL. This validated method was applied successfully to the pharmacokinetic study of PSS and PSS-loaded poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles (PSS-NP in rat plasma after a single intravenous (PSS only and oral administration (PSS and PSS-NP. Significant differences in the main pharmacokinetic parameters of PSS and PSS-NP were observed. The relative bioavailability of PSS-NP was 190.10% compared with PSS which shows that PSS-NP can improve oral bioavailability.

  1. Size and shape-dependent cytotoxicity profile of gold nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak, Anna; Malankowska, Anna; Nowaczyk, Grzegorz; Grześkowiak, Bartosz F; Tuśnio, Karol; Słomski, Ryszard; Zaleska-Medynska, Adriana; Jurga, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    Metallic nanoparticles, in particular gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), offer a wide spectrum of applications in biomedicine. A crucial issue is their cytotoxicity, which depends greatly on various factors, including morphology of nanoparticles. Because metallic nanoparticles have an effect on cell membrane integrity, their shape and size may affect the viability of cells, due to their different geometries as well as physical and chemical interactions with cell membranes. Variations in the size and shape of gold nanoparticles may indicate particular nanoparticle morphologies that provide strong cytotoxicity effects. Synthesis of different sized and shaped bare AuNPs was performed with spherical (~ 10 nm), nanoflowers (~ 370 nm), nanorods (~ 41 nm), nanoprisms (~ 160 nm) and nanostars (~ 240 nm) morphologies. These nanostructures were characterized and interacting with cancer (HeLa) and normal (HEK293T) cell lines and cell viability tests were performed by WST-1 tests and fluorescent live/dead cell imaging experiments. It was shown that various shapes and sizes of gold nanostructures may affect the viability of the cells. Gold nanospheres and nanorods proved to be more toxic than star, flower and prism gold nanostructures. This may be attributed to their small size and aggregation process. This is the first report concerning a comparison of cytotoxic profile in vitro with a wide spectrum of bare AuNPs morphology. The findings show their possible use in biomedical applications.

  2. Differential effects of liver steatosis on pharmacokinetic profile of two closely related hepatoselective NO-donors; V-PYRRO/NO and V-PROLI/NO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kus, Kamil; Kus, Edyta; Zakrzewska, Agnieszka; Jawien, Wojciech; Sitek, Barbara; Walczak, Maria; Chlopicki, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    To analyze the effect of liver steatosis and obesity on pharmacokinetic profile of two structurally-related liver-selective NO-donors - V-PYRRO/NO and V-PROLI/NO. C57BL/6 mice were fed control or high-fat diet for 15 weeks to induced liver steatosis and obesity (HFD mice). Pharmacokinetics and renal elimination studies were conducted in vivo following iv dosing of V-PYRRO/NO and V-PROLI/NO (0.03mmol/kg). Hepatic clearance was evaluated ex vivo in the isolated perfused mice liver and in vitro with the use of liver microsomes. V-PYRRO/NO and V-PROLI/NO, despite similar structure, displayed different pharmacokinetic properties. V-PYRRO/NO was uptaken and metabolized by the liver, while V-PROLI/NO was eliminated unchanged with urine. In HFD mice, despite increased CYP450 metabolism of V-PYRRO/NO the elimination rate was slower most likely due to the impairment of hepatic microcirculation caused by liver fat accumulation. In turn, in HFD mice renal clearence of V-PROLI/NO was accelerated and volume of distribution was increased most likely due to additional intracellular water in HFD mice. The pharmacokinetics of V-PROLI/NO, the novel proline-based analog of V-PYRRO/NO with additional single carboxylic acid moiety, attached to the molecule of V-PYRRO/NO to improve the water solubility, was differently affected by liver steatosis and obesity as compared with the parent compound V-PYRRO/NO. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of pharmacokinetic profiles of brand-name and generic formulations of citalopram and venlafaxine: a crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenu, Franck; Batten, Lisa A; Zernig, Gerald; Ladstaetter, Elisabeth; Hébert, Chantal; Blier, Pierre

    2009-07-01

    Generic drugs are lower-cost versions of patent-expired brand-name medications. Bioequivalence is decreed when the 90% confidence intervals for the ratios of the generic to the reference compound for the area under the curve and maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) fall within a 0.80 to 1.25 range. The aim of the present pilot study was to compare the pharmacokinetic profiles of brand-name and generic formulations of citalopram and extended-release venlafaxine. Effexor XR/Novo-venlafaxine XR 75 mg and Celexa/Gen-citalopram 40 mg were studied in a randomized crossover design. Healthy male volunteers took either Effexor XR or Novo-venlafaxine XR for 4 days, a 4-day washout was allowed, and then participants took the other venlafaxine formulation for 4 days. This was followed by a washout of at least 7 days. The participants then took Celexa or Gen-citalopram for 8 days, a 14-day washout was allowed, and then participants took the other citalopram formulation for 8 days. In each of the study phases, the sequence of treatment (brand-name x generic) was randomly assigned. Plasma levels of drugs were measured at fixed intervals after participants took the drugs and at steady state. The study was conducted from November 2007 through July 2008. Twelve participants completed the venlafaxine study. Nine of the participants, plus 3 new participants, were then enrolled in the citalopram study, to maintain a total of 12. The plasma levels of citalopram were similar after ingestion of the brand-name and generic drugs. After ingestion of venlafaxine, the C(max) values were 36 +/- 6 ng/mL and 52 +/- 8 ng/mL in the brand-name and generic groups, respectively. The ratio of the log-transformed values of C(max) was 150% and, therefore, not within the acceptable 80% to 125% range. The concentration of the active metabolite of venlafaxine (O-desmethyl-venlafaxine [ODV]) was also significantly increased in the generic group (+43% higher in the generic group at 3 h; +48% higher at 5 h; p

  4. Linking Suspension Nasal Spray Drug Deposition Patterns to Pharmacokinetic Profiles: A Proof-of-Concept Study Using Computational Fluid Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygg, Alex; Hindle, Michael; Longest, P Worth

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to link regional nasal spray deposition patterns of suspension formulations, predicted with computational fluid dynamics, to in vivo human pharmacokinetic plasma concentration profiles. This is accomplished through the use of computational fluid dynamics simulations coupled with compartmental pharmacokinetic modeling. Results showed a rapid initial rise in plasma concentration that is due to the absorption of drug particles deposited in the nasal middle passages, followed by a slower increase in plasma concentration that is governed by the transport of drug particles from the nasal vestibule to the middle passages. Although drug deposition locations in the nasal cavity had a significant effect on the shape of the concentration profile, the absolute bioavailability remained constant provided that all the drug remained in the nose over the course of the simulation. Loss of drug through the nostrils even after long periods resulted in a significant decrease in bioavailability and increased variability. The results of this study quantify how differences in nasal drug deposition affect transient plasma concentrations and overall bioavailability. These findings are potentially useful for establishing bioequivalence for nasal spray devices and reducing the burden of in vitro testing, pharmacodynamics, and clinical studies. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dysregulation of Macrophage Activation Profiles by Engineered Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodali, Vamsi; Littke, Matthew H.; Tilton, Susan C.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Shi, Liang; Frevert, Charles W.; Wang, Wei; Pounds, Joel G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-08-27

    Although the potential human health impacts from exposure to engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are uncertain, past epidemiological studies have established correlations between exposure to ambient air pollution particulates and the incidence of pneumonia and lung infections. Using amorphous silica and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) as model high production volume ENPs, we examined how macrophage activation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the lung pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is altered by ENP pretreatment. Neither silica nor SPIO treatment elicited direct cytotoxic or pro-inflammatory effects in bone marrow-derived macrophages. However, pretreatment of macrophages with SPIO caused extensive reprogramming of nearly 500 genes regulated in response to LPS challenge, hallmarked by exaggerated activation of oxidative stress response pathways and suppressed activation of both pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Silica pretreatment altered regulation of only 67 genes, but there was strong correlation with gene sets affected by SPIO. Macrophages exposed to SPIO displayed a phenotype suggesting an impaired ability to transition from an M1 to M2-like activation state, characterized by suppressed IL-10 induction, enhanced TNFα production, and diminished phagocytic activity toward S. pneumoniae. Studies in macrophages deficient in scavenger receptor A (SR-A) showed SR-A participates in cell uptake of both the ENPs and S. pneumonia and co-regulates the anti-inflammatory IL-10 pathway. Thus, mechanisms for dysregulation of innate immunity exist by virtue that common receptor recognition pathways are used by some ENPs and pathogenic bacteria, although the extent of transcriptional reprogramming of macrophage function depends on the physicochemical properties of the ENP after internalization. Our results also illustrate that biological effects of ENPs may be indirectly manifested only after challenging normal cell function. Finally, nanotoxicology screening

  6. 24-hour human urine and serum profiles of bisphenol A following ingestion in soup: Individual pharmacokinetic data and emographics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin G. Teeguarden

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Here we present data to evaluate potential absorption of Bisphenol A through non-metabolizing tissues of the upper digestive tract. Concurrent serum and urine concentrations of d6-BPA, and its glucuronide and sulfate conjugates, were measured over a 24 h period in 10 adult male volunteers following ingestion of 30 μg d6-BPA/kg body weight in soup. The pharmacokinetic behavior of BPA and its metabolites in this cohort (rapid absorption, complete elimination, evidence against sublingual absorption was reported. This Data in Brief article contains the corresponding individual pharmacokinetic data, reports the demographics of the cohort and provides additional details related to the analytical methods employed and is related to [4].

  7. 24-hour human urine and serum profiles of bisphenol A following ingestion in soup: Individual pharmacokinetic data and emographics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Churchwell, Mona I.; Yang, Xiaoxia; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Seryak, Liesel M.; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present data to evaluate potential absorption of Bisphenol A through non-metabolizing tissues of the upper digestive tract. Concurrent serum and urine concentrations of d6-BPA, and its glucuronide and sulfate conjugates, were measured over a 24 h period in 10 adult male volunteers following ingestion of 30 μg d6-BPA/kg body weight in soup. The pharmacokinetic behavior of BPA and its metabolites in this cohort (rapid absorption, complete elimination, evidence against sublingual absorption) was reported. This Data in Brief article contains the corresponding individual pharmacokinetic data, reports the demographics of the cohort and provides additional details related to the analytical methods employed and is related to [4]. PMID:26217767

  8. Use of electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for size profiling of gold and silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyabut, Teerawat; Sirirat, Natnicha; Siripinyanond, Atitaya

    2018-02-13

    Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was applied to investigate the atomization behaviors of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in order to relate with particle size information. At various atomization temperatures from 1400 °C to 2200 °C, the time-dependent atomic absorption peak profiles of AuNPs and AgNPs with varying sizes from 5 nm to 100 nm were examined. With increasing particle size, the maximum absorbance was observed at the longer time. The time at maximum absorbance was found to linearly increase with increasing particle size, suggesting that ETAAS can be applied to provide the size information of nanoparticles. With the atomization temperature of 1600 °C, the mixtures of nanoparticles containing two particle sizes, i.e., 5 nm tannic stabilized AuNPs with 60, 80, 100 nm citrate stabilized AuNPs, were investigated and bimodal peaks were observed. The particle size dependent atomization behaviors of nanoparticles show potential application of ETAAS for providing size information of nanoparticles. The calibration plot between the time at maximum absorbance and the particle size was applied to estimate the particle size of in-house synthesized AuNPs and AgNPs and the results obtained were in good agreement with those from flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Furthermore, the linear relationship between the activation energy and the particle size was observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparative pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution profiles of lignan components in normal and hepatic fibrosis rats after oral administration of Fuzheng Huayu recipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Liu, Shan; Zheng, Tian-Hui; Tao, Yan-Yan; Liu, Cheng-Hai

    2015-05-26

    Fuzheng Huayu recipe (FZHY) is formulated on the basis of Chinese medicine theory in treating liver fibrosis. To illuminate the influence of the pathological state of liver fibrosis on the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution profiles of lignan components from FZHY. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into normal group and Hepatic fibrosis group (induced by dimethylnitrosamine). Six lignan components were detected and quantified by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry(UHPLC-MS/MS)in the plasma and tissue of normal and hepatic fibrosis rats. A rapid, sensitive and convenient UHPLC-MS/MS method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of six lignan components in different rat biological samples successfully. After oral administration of FZHY at a dose of 15g/kg, the pharmacokinetic behaviors of schizandrin A (SIA), schizandrin B (SIB), schizandrin C (SIC), schisandrol A (SOA), Schisandrol B (SOB) and schisantherin A (STA) have been significantly changed in hepatic fibrosis rats compared with the normal rats, and their AUC(0-t) values were increased by 235.09%, 388.44%, 223.30%, 669.30%, 295.08% and 267.63% orderly (Pdistribution results showed the amount of SIA, SIB, SOA and SOB were significant increased in heart, lung, spleen and kidney of hepatic fibrosis rats compared with normal rats at most of the time point (Pdistribution of lignan components in normal and hepatic fibrosis rats. The hepatic fibrosis could alter the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution properties of lignan components in rats after administration of FZHY. The results might be helpful for guide the clinical application of this medicine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative pharmacokinetic profiles of tectorigenin in rat plasma by UPLC-MS/MS after oral administration of Iris tectorum Maxim extract and pure tectoridin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Yang, Xiaolin; An, Jinmeng; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Zhenzhong; Huang, Wenzhe; Yang, Zhonglin; Li, Fei

    2015-10-10

    Iris tectorum Maxim, a well-known herb medicine, is commonly used for treatment of inflammation, cough, and pharyngitis for a long time in China. Tectoridin, main active ingredient of Iris tectorum Maxim, is often used for its quality control. This study was aimed to analyze the pharmacokinetic profile of tectorigenin (the metabolite of tectoridin) after oral administration of I. tectorum Maxim extract, and to compare the pharmacokinetic characterization of tectorigenin after oral administration of I. tectorum Maxim extract (ITME) and pure tectoridin (PT) in rats. In addition, a simple, reliable and sensitive UPLC-MS/MS method was developed for determination of tectorigenin in rat plasma, using kaempferol as internal standard. The processed samples were separated on a Poroshell 120 SB-C₁₈ column and detected by positive electrospray ionization in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The method validation results indicated that the established method was simple, specific and reliable. The pharmacokinetic results showed that the plasma concentration of tectorigenin in ITME group was much higher than that of the PT group (p<0.01). Moreover, compared to PT group, t₁/₂ value and AUC(0-∞) value were also notably increased in ITME group (p<0.01). In conclusion, potential interaction exists between those chemical components in ITME, and the co-existing components in ITME could notably promote the absorption of tectoridin in rats, however, the exact compound(s) which enhance the absorption of tectoridin should be investigated in future study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Pharmacokinetic Profiles of Active Ingredients and Its Metabolites Derived from Rikkunshito, a Ghrelin Enhancer, in Healthy Japanese Volunteers: A Cross-Over, Randomized Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Kitagawa

    Full Text Available Rikkunshito, a traditional Japanese (Kampo medicine, has been used to treat upper gastrointestinal disorders such as functional dyspepsia and gastroesophageal reflux. This study investigated the exposure and pharmacokinetics of the ingredients of rikkunshito in healthy volunteers.First, an exploratory nonrandomized, open-label, one-period, noncrossover study using four healthy Japanese volunteers to detect 32 typical ingredients of rikkunshito in plasma and urine. As a result, 18 or 21 of 32 ingredients was detected in plasma or urine samples after oral administration of rikkunshito (7.5 g/day. Furthermore, a randomized, open-label, three-arm, three-period, crossover study using 21 subjects was conducted to determine the amounts of exposure and pharmacokinetic parameters of nine ingredients derived from rikkunshito (atractylodin, atractylodin carboxylic acid, pachymic acid, 3,3',4',5,6,7,8-heptamethoxyflavone, naringenin, nobiletin, liquiritigenin, isoliquiritigenin, and 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid after oral administration of rikkunshito at three different doses (2.5, 5.0, or 7.5 g/day during each period. The pharmacokinetic profiles of the nine ingredients in plasma were characterized. The geometric means (95% confidence interval for the Cmax of the ingredients at a dose of 7.5 g were 1570 (1210-2040, 14,300 (12,200-16,800, 91.0 (71.8-115, 105 (75.6-144, 1150 (802-1650, 35.9 (24.6-52.5, 800 (672-952, 42.8 (30.4-60.3, and 55,600 (39,600-78,100 pg/mL, respectively, and for the AUC0-last were 1760 (1290-2390, 12700 (11,100-14,600, 1210 (882-1650, 225 (157-322, 4630 (2930-7320, 35.7 (20.4-62.7, 4040 (3260-5010, 122 (88.2-168, and 832,000 (628,000-1,100,000 pg·h/mL respectively.We identified the ingredients of rikkunshito that are absorbed in humans. Furthermore, we determined the pharmacokinetics of nine ingredients derived from rikkunshito. This information will be useful for elucidating the pharmacological effects of rikkunshito

  12. Performance Assessment and Translation of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models From acslX to Berkeley Madonna, MATLAB, and R Language: Oxytetracycline and Gold Nanoparticles As Case Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhoumeng; Jaberi-Douraki, Majid; He, Chunla; Jin, Shiqiang; Yang, Raymond S H; Fisher, Jeffrey W; Riviere, Jim E

    2017-07-01

    Many physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for environmental chemicals, drugs, and nanomaterials have been developed to aid risk and safety assessments using acslX. However, acslX has been rendered sunset since November 2015. Alternative modeling tools and tutorials are needed for future PBPK applications. This forum article aimed to: (1) demonstrate the performance of 4 PBPK modeling software packages (acslX, Berkeley Madonna, MATLAB, and R language) tested using 2 existing models (oxytetracycline and gold nanoparticles); (2) provide a tutorial of PBPK model code conversion from acslX to Berkeley Madonna, MATLAB, and R language; (3) discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each software package in the implementation of PBPK models in toxicology, and (4) share our perspective about future direction in this field. Simulation results of plasma/tissue concentrations/amounts of oxytetracycline and gold from different models were compared visually and statistically with linear regression analyses. Simulation results from the original models were correlated well with results from the recoded models, with time-concentration/amount curves nearly superimposable and determination coefficients of 0.86-1.00. Step-by-step explanations of the recoding of the models in different software programs are provided in the Supplementary Data. In summary, this article presents a tutorial of PBPK model code conversion for a small molecule and a nanoparticle among 4 software packages, and a performance comparison of these software packages in PBPK model implementation. This tutorial helps beginners learn PBPK modeling, provides suggestions for selecting a suitable tool for future projects, and may lead to the transition from acslX to alternative modeling tools. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Molybdenum carbide nanoparticles as catalysts for oil sands upgrading: Dynamics and free-energy profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xingchen; Salahub, Dennis R.

    2015-01-01

    There is no doubt that a huge gap exists in understanding heterogeneous catalysis between a cluster model of a few atoms and a bulk model of periodic slabs. Nanoparticles, which are crucial in heterogeneous catalysis in industry, lie in the middle of the gap. We present here our work on the computational modelling of molybdenum carbide nanoparticles (MCNPs) as the catalysts for the upgrading of oil sands in the in-situ environment, using benzene hydrogenation as a model reaction. With a cluster model, efforts were first made to understand the mechanism of the reaction with a density functional theory (DFT) study on the adsorption of benzene and its hydrogenation product – cyclohexane, as well as the cyclic hydrogenation reaction intermediates on the Mo 2 C(0001) surface. From the thermodynamic data, along with literature information, it was found that the benzene hydrogenation reaction on molybdenum carbide happens most likely through a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism with the gradual lifting up of the benzene molecule. The electron localization function (ELF) was then used to help understand the nature of the interactions between the MCNPs, identifying strong multi-center interactions between the adsorbates and the MCNPs. To enable the treatment of larger nanoparticles, a fast semi-empirical density functional tight-binding (DFTB) method was parameterized. With this method, the potential energy profiles of benzene hydrogenation reactions on different sizes of MCNPs are calculated. The study was then extended to consider a MCNP embedded in solvent (benzene), using a quantum mechanical (DFTB) / molecular mechanical approach. Calculations on the free energies profiles with the umbrella sampling method show that the entropy of the MCNPs and the solvent are essential in understanding the catalytic activity of the transition metal related nanoparticles for solid/liquid heterogeneous catalysis

  14. Molybdenum carbide nanoparticles as catalysts for oil sands upgrading: Dynamics and free-energy profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xingchen; Salahub, Dennis R. [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Quantum Science and Technology, and Centre for Molecular Simulation, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2015-12-31

    There is no doubt that a huge gap exists in understanding heterogeneous catalysis between a cluster model of a few atoms and a bulk model of periodic slabs. Nanoparticles, which are crucial in heterogeneous catalysis in industry, lie in the middle of the gap. We present here our work on the computational modelling of molybdenum carbide nanoparticles (MCNPs) as the catalysts for the upgrading of oil sands in the in-situ environment, using benzene hydrogenation as a model reaction. With a cluster model, efforts were first made to understand the mechanism of the reaction with a density functional theory (DFT) study on the adsorption of benzene and its hydrogenation product – cyclohexane, as well as the cyclic hydrogenation reaction intermediates on the Mo{sub 2}C(0001) surface. From the thermodynamic data, along with literature information, it was found that the benzene hydrogenation reaction on molybdenum carbide happens most likely through a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism with the gradual lifting up of the benzene molecule. The electron localization function (ELF) was then used to help understand the nature of the interactions between the MCNPs, identifying strong multi-center interactions between the adsorbates and the MCNPs. To enable the treatment of larger nanoparticles, a fast semi-empirical density functional tight-binding (DFTB) method was parameterized. With this method, the potential energy profiles of benzene hydrogenation reactions on different sizes of MCNPs are calculated. The study was then extended to consider a MCNP embedded in solvent (benzene), using a quantum mechanical (DFTB) / molecular mechanical approach. Calculations on the free energies profiles with the umbrella sampling method show that the entropy of the MCNPs and the solvent are essential in understanding the catalytic activity of the transition metal related nanoparticles for solid/liquid heterogeneous catalysis.

  15. SLC22A1-ABCB1 haplotype profiles predict imatinib pharmacokinetics in Asian patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onkar Singh

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the influence of SLC22A1, PXR, ABCG2, ABCB1 and CYP3A5 3 genetic polymorphisms on imatinib mesylate (IM pharmacokinetics in Asian patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Healthy subjects belonging to three Asian populations (Chinese, Malay, Indian; n = 70 each and CML patients (n = 38 were enrolled in a prospective pharmacogenetics study. Imatinib trough (C(0h and clearance (CL were determined in the patients at steady state. Haplowalk method was applied to infer the haplotypes and generalized linear model (GLM to estimate haplotypic effects on IM pharmacokinetics. Association of haplotype copy numbers with IM pharmacokinetics was defined by Mann-Whitney U test. RESULTS: Global haplotype score statistics revealed a SLC22A1 sub-haplotypic region encompassing three polymorphisms (rs3798168, rs628031 and IVS7+850C>T, to be significantly associated with IM clearance (p = 0.013. Haplotype-specific GLM estimated that the haplotypes AGT and CGC were both associated with 22% decrease in clearance compared to CAC [CL (10(-2 L/hr/mg: CAC vs AGT: 4.03 vs 3.16, p = 0.017; CAC vs CGC: 4.03 vs 3.15, p = 0.017]. Patients harboring 2 copies of AGT or CGC haplotypes had 33.4% lower clearance and 50% higher C(0h than patients carrying 0 or 1 copy [CL (10(-2 L/hr/mg: 2.19 vs 3.29, p = 0.026; C(0h (10(-6 1/ml: 4.76 vs 3.17, p = 0.013, respectively]. Further subgroup analysis revealed SLC22A1 and ABCB1 haplotypic combinations to be significantly associated with clearance and C(0h (p = 0.002 and 0.009, respectively. CONCLUSION: This exploratory study suggests that SLC22A1-ABCB1 haplotypes may influence IM pharmacokinetics in Asian CML patients.

  16. Control of nanoparticle agglomeration through variation of the time-temperature profile in chemical vapor synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djenadic, Ruzica; Winterer, Markus, E-mail: markus.winterer@uni-due.de [Universität Duisburg-Essen, Nanoparticle Process Technology, Faculty of Engineering and CENIDE (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    The influence of the time-temperature history on the characteristics of nanoparticles such as size, degree of agglomeration, or crystallinity is investigated for chemical vapor synthesis (CVS). A simple reaction-coagulation-sintering model is used to describe the CVS process, and the results of the model are compared to experimental data. Nanocrystalline titania is used as model material. Titania nanoparticles are generated from titanium-tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in a hot-wall reactor. Pure anatase particles and mixtures of anatase, rutile (up to 11 vol.%), and brookite (up to 29 vol.%) with primary particle sizes from 1.7 nm to 10.5 nm and agglomerate particle sizes from 24.3 nm to 55.6 nm are formed depending on the particle time-temperature history. An inductively heated furnace with variable inductor geometry is used as a novel system to control the time-temperature profile in the reactor externally covering a large wall temperature range from 873 K to 2023 K. An appropriate choice of inductor geometry, i.e. time-temperature profile, can significantly reduce the degree of agglomeration. Other particle characteristics such as crystallinity are also substantially influenced by the time-temperature profile.

  17. Probabilistic risk assessment of gold nanoparticles after intravenous administration by integrating in vitro and in vivo toxicity with physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yi-Hsien; Riviere, Jim E; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A; Lin, Zhoumeng

    2018-04-14

    This study aimed to conduct an integrated and probabilistic risk assessment of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) based on recently published in vitro and in vivo toxicity studies coupled to a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Dose-response relationships were characterized based on cell viability assays in various human cell types. A previously well-validated human PBPK model for AuNPs was applied to quantify internal concentrations in liver, kidney, skin, and venous plasma. By applying a Bayesian-based probabilistic risk assessment approach incorporating Monte Carlo simulation, probable human cell death fractions were characterized. Additionally, we implemented in vitro to in vivo and animal-to-human extrapolation approaches to independently estimate external exposure levels of AuNPs that cause minimal toxicity. Our results suggest that under the highest dosing level employed in existing animal studies (worst-case scenario), AuNPs coated with branched polyethylenimine (BPEI) would likely induce ∼90-100% cellular death, implying high cytotoxicity compared to risk prediction, and point of departure estimation of AuNP exposure for humans and illustrate an approach that could be applied to other NPs when sufficient data are available.

  18. Anti-cancer, pharmacokinetics and tumor localization studies of pH-, RF- and thermo-responsive nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanoj Rejinold, N; Thomas, Reju George; Muthiah, Muthunarayanan; Chennazhi, K P; Manzoor, K; Park, In-Kyu; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Jayakumar, R

    2015-03-01

    The curcumin-encapsulated chitosan-graft-poly(N-vinyl caprolactam) nanoparticles containing gold nanoparticles (Au-CRC-TRC-NPs) were developed by ionic cross-linking method. After "optimum RF exposure" at 40 W for 5 min, Au-CRC-TRC-NPs dissipated heat energy in the range of ∼42°C, the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of chitosan-graft-poly(N-vinyl caprolactam), causing controlled curcumin release and apoptosis to cancer cells. Further, in vivo PK/PD studies on swiss albino mice revealed that Au-CRC-TRC-NPs could be sustained in circulation for a week with no harm to internal organs. The colon tumor localization studies revealed that Au-CRC-TRC-NPs were retained in tumor for a week. These results throw light on their feasibility as multi-responsive nanomedicine for RF-assisted cancer treatment modalities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Pharmacodynamic and Pharmacokinetic Profiles of Sacubitril/Valsartan (LCZ696) in Patients with Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobalava, Zhanna; Kotovskaya, Yulia; Averkov, Oleg; Pavlikova, Elena; Moiseev, Valentine; Albrecht, Diego; Chandra, Priya; Ayalasomayajula, Surya; Prescott, Margaret F; Pal, Parasar; Langenickel, Thomas H; Jordaan, Pierre; Rajman, Iris

    2016-08-01

    Concomitant renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade and natriuretic peptide system enhancement may provide unique therapeutic benefits to patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). This study assessed the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of LCZ696 in patients with HFrEF. This was an open-label, noncontrolled single-sequence study. After a 24-h run-in period, patients (n = 30) with HFrEF (EF ≤ 40%; NYHA class II-IV) received LCZ696 100 mg twice daily (bid) for 7 days and 200 mg bid for 14 days, along with standard treatment for heart failure (HF) (except angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors [ACEIs] or angiotensin receptor blockers [ARBs]). On Day 21, significant increases were observed in the plasma biomarkers indicative of neprilysin and RAAS inhibition (ratio-to-baseline: cyclic guanosine monophosphate [cGMP], 1.38; renin concentration and activity, 3.50 and 2.27, respectively; all, P sacubitril (neprilysin inhibitor prodrug), LBQ657 (active neprilysin inhibitor), and valsartan were reached within 0.5, 2.5, and 2 h. Between 100- and 200-mg doses, the Cmax and AUC0-12 h for sacubitril and LBQ657 were approximately dose-proportional while that of valsartan was less than dose-proportional. Treatment with LCZ696 for 21 days was well tolerated and resulted in plasma biomarker changes indicative of neprilysin and RAAS inhibition in patients with HF. The pharmacokinetic exposure of the LCZ696 analytes in patients with HF observed in this study is comparable to that observed in the pivotal Phase III study. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Safety profile of solid lipid nanoparticles loaded with rosmarinic acid for oral use: in vitro and animal approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madureira, Ana Raquel; Nunes, Sara; Campos, Débora A; Fernandes, João C; Marques, Cláudia; Zuzarte, Monica; Gullón, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Alcalá, Luís M; Calhau, Conceição; Sarmento, Bruno; Gomes, Ana Maria; Pintado, Maria Manuela; Reis, Flávio

    2016-01-01

    Rosmarinic acid (RA) possesses several protective bioactivities that have attracted increasing interest by nutraceutical/pharmaceutical industries. Considering the reduced bioavailability after oral use, effective (and safe) delivery systems are crucial to protect RA from gastrointestinal degradation. This study aims to characterize the safety profile of solid lipid nanoparticles produced with Witepsol and Carnauba waxes and loaded with RA, using in vitro and in vivo approaches, focused on genotoxicity and cytotoxicity assays, redox status markers, hematological and biochemical profile, liver and kidney function, gut bacterial microbiota, and fecal fatty acids composition. Free RA and sage extract, empty nanoparticles, or nanoparticles loaded with RA or sage extract (0.15 and 1.5 mg/mL) were evaluated for cell (lymphocytes) viability, necrosis and apoptosis, and antioxidant/prooxidant effects upon DNA. Wistar rats were orally treated for 14 days with vehicle (control) and with Witepsol or Carnauba nanoparticles loaded with RA at 1 and 10 mg/kg body weight/d. Blood, urine, feces, and several tissues were collected for analysis. Free and loaded RA, at 0.15 mg/mL, presented a safe profile, while genotoxic potential was found for the higher dose (1.5 mg/mL), mainly by necrosis. Our data suggest that both types of nanoparticles are safe when loaded with moderate concentrations of RA, without in vitro genotoxicity and cytotoxicity and with an in vivo safety profile in rats orally treated, thus opening new avenues for use in nutraceutical applications.

  1. Evaluation of the nutrient profile of Trachyspermum ammi L. seed under the influence of nanoparticles during germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, I Z; Fatima, U; Tabassum, H; Mabood, A; Ahmad, A; Srivastava, G; Das, M

    2017-07-31

    Trachyspermum ammi L. commonly known as Ajwain is an annual herb belonging to the family Apiaceae. It is enormously grown in Egypt, Iran, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and India as well as European region. Seeds of Ajwain were highly administered by traditional healers and usually employed for different ailments. Nanomaterials are known to have plant growth promoting effects, which could find applications in agriculture. In this study, the nanoparticles (NPs) showed the potential to enhance the primary metabolites when administered during germination. Therefore, nanoparticles elicitation can be used to increase the productivity, nutritional values and metabolite contents in Trachyspermum ammi L. This study aimed to provide new insight of the potential growth promoting effects of the nanoparticles () on plant system. Different concentrations of two nanoparticles, that is, iron pyrite (FeS2) and molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) at three different concentrations of 25ug/ml, 50ug/ml and 75ug/ml were tested on the seeds of Trachyspermum ammi L. The data indicated that nanoparticles enhanced the seedling growth as greener leafs and increased lengths of epicotyl and hypocotyls were seen. These nanoparticles also showed the potential to increase the contents of primary metabolites during germination and the total soluble protein content in seed was increased in nanoparticles-treated seeds as compared to control. The total protein profiling by SDS-PAGE indicated significant differences in number and molecular weights of protein bands upon exposure to nanoparticles.

  2. Human plasma metabolic profiles of benzydamine, a flavin-containing monooxygenase probe substrate, simulated with pharmacokinetic data from control and humanized-liver mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki-Nishioka, Miho; Shimizu, Makiko; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Nishiwaki, Megumi; Mitsui, Marina; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2018-02-01

    1. Benzydamine is used clinically as a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug in oral rinses and is employed in preclinical research as a flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) probe substrate. In this study, plasma concentrations of benzydamine and its primary N-oxide and N-demethylated metabolites were investigated in control TK-NOG mice, in humanized-liver mice, and in mice whose liver cells had been ablated with ganciclovir. 2. Following oral administration of benzydamine (10 mg/kg) in humanized-liver TK-NOG mice, plasma concentrations of benzydamine N-oxide were slightly higher than those of demethyl benzydamine. In contrast, in control and ganciclovir-treated TK-NOG mice, concentrations of demethyl benzydamine were slightly higher than those of benzydamine N-oxide. 3. Simulations of human plasma concentrations of benzydamine and its N-oxide were achieved using simplified physiologically based pharmacokinetic models based on data from control TK-NOG mice and from reported benzydamine concentrations after low-dose administration in humans. Estimated clearance rates based on data from humanized-liver and ganciclovir-treated TK-NOG mice were two orders magnitude high. 4. The pharmacokinetic profiles of benzydamine were different for control and humanized-liver TK-NOG mice. Humanized-liver mice are generally accepted human models; however, drug oxidation in mouse kidney might need to be considered when probe substrates undergo FMO-dependent drug oxidation in mouse liver and kidney.

  3. Pharmacokinetic Profiling of Conjugated Therapeutic Oligonucleotides: A High-Throughput Method Based Upon Serial Blood Microsampling Coupled to Peptide Nucleic Acid Hybridization Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, Bruno M D C; Gilbert, James W; Haraszti, Reka A; Coles, Andrew H; Biscans, Annabelle; Roux, Loic; Nikan, Mehran; Echeverria, Dimas; Hassler, Matthew; Khvorova, Anastasia

    2017-12-01

    Therapeutic oligonucleotides, such as small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), hold great promise for the treatment of incurable genetically defined disorders by targeting cognate toxic gene products for degradation. To achieve meaningful tissue distribution and efficacy in vivo, siRNAs must be conjugated or formulated. Clear understanding of the pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic behavior of these compounds is necessary to optimize and characterize the performance of therapeutic oligonucleotides in vivo. In this study, we describe a simple and reproducible methodology for the evaluation of in vivo blood/plasma PK profiles and tissue distribution of oligonucleotides. The method is based on serial blood microsampling from the saphenous vein, coupled to peptide nucleic acid hybridization assay for quantification of guide strands. Performed with minimal number of animals, this method allowed unequivocal detection and sensitive quantification without the need for amplification, or further modification of the oligonucleotides. Using this methodology, we compared plasma clearances and tissue distribution profiles of two different hydrophobically modified siRNAs (hsiRNAs). Notably, cholesterol-hsiRNA presented slow plasma clearances and mainly accumulated in the liver, whereas, phosphocholine-docosahexaenoic acid-hsiRNA was rapidly cleared from the plasma and preferably accumulated in the kidney. These data suggest that the PK/biodistribution profiles of modified hsiRNAs are determined by the chemical nature of the conjugate. Importantly, the method described in this study constitutes a simple platform to conduct pilot assessments of the basic clearance and tissue distribution profiles, which can be broadly applied for evaluation of new chemical variants of siRNAs and micro-RNAs.

  4. Using physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling for dietary risk assessment of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachler, Gerald; von Goetz, Natalie; Hungerbuhler, Konrad

    2015-05-01

    Nano-sized titanium dioxide particles (nano-TiO2) can be found in a large number of foods and consumer products, such as cosmetics and toothpaste, thus, consumer exposure occurs via multiple sources, possibly involving different exposure routes. In order to determine the disposition of nano-TiO2 particles that are taken up, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed. High priority was placed on limiting the number of parameters to match the number of underlying data points (hence to avoid overparameterization), but still reflecting available mechanistic information on the toxicokinetics of nano-TiO2. To this end, the biodistribution of nano-TiO2 was modeled based on their ability to cross the capillary wall of the organs and to be phagocytosed in the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS). The model's predictive power was evaluated by comparing simulated organ levels to experimentally assessed organ levels of independent in vivo studies. The results of our PBPK model indicate that: (1) within the application domain of the PBPK model from 15 to 150 nm, the size and crystalline structure of the particles had a minor influence on the biodistribution; and (2) at high internal exposure the particles agglomerate in vivo and are subsequently taken up by macrophages in the MPS. Furthermore, we also give an example on how the PBPK model may be used for risk assessment. For this purpose, the daily dietary intake of nano-TiO2 was calculated for the German population. The PBPK model was then used to convert this chronic external exposure into internal titanium levels for each organ.

  5. Pharmacokinetic Profile of Oral Cannabis in Humans: Blood and Oral Fluid Disposition and Relation to Pharmacodynamic Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandrey, Ryan; Herrmann, Evan S; Mitchell, John M; Bigelow, George E; Flegel, Ronald; LoDico, Charles; Cone, Edward J

    2017-03-01

    Most research on cannabis pharmacokinetics has evaluated inhaled cannabis, but oral ("edible") preparations comprise an increasing segment of the cannabis market. To assess oral cannabis pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, healthy adults (N = 6 per dose) were administered cannabis brownies containing 10, 25 or 50 mg 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Whole blood and oral fluid specimens were obtained at baseline and then for 9 days post-exposure; 6 days in a residential research setting and 3 days as outpatients. Measures of subjective, cardiovascular and performance effects were obtained at baseline and for 8 h post-ingestion. The mean Cmax for THC in whole blood was 1, 3.5 and 3.3 ng/mL for the 10, 25 and 50 mg THC doses, respectively. The mean maximum concentration (Cmax) and mean time to maximum concentration (Tmax) of 11-OH-THC in whole blood were similar to THC. Cmax blood concentrations of THCCOOH were generally higher than THC and had longer Tmax values. The mean Tmax for THC in oral fluid occurred immediately following oral dose administration, and appear to reflect local topical residue rather than systemic bioavailbility. Mean Cmax oral fluid concentrations of THCCOOH were lower than THC, erratic over time and mean Tmax occurred at longer times than THC. The window of THC detection ranged from 0 to 22 h for whole blood (limit of quantitation (LOQ) = 0.5 ng/mL) and 1.9 to 22 h for oral fluid (LOQ = 1.0 ng/mL). Subjective drug and cognitive performance effects were generally dose dependent, peaked at 1.5-3 h post-administration, and lasted 6-8 h. Whole blood cannabinoid concentrations were significantly correlated with subjective drug effects. Correlations between blood cannabinoids and cognitive performance measures, and between oral fluid and all pharmacodynamic outcomes were either non-significant or not orderly by dose. Quantitative levels of cannabinoids in whole blood and oral fluid were low compared with levels observed following inhalation of

  6. Anemarrhena asphodeloides Non-Steroidal Saponin Components Alter the Pharmacokinetic Profile of Its Steroidal Saponins in Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhishu; Li, Guolong; Yang, Jie; Duan, Jinao; Qian, Dawei; Guo, Jianming; Zhu, Zhenhua; Song, Zhongxing

    2015-06-26

    A rapid, selective and sensitive UPLC-MS/MS assay was established to determine the plasma concentrations of four steroidal saponins. Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to four groups which were orally administered Anemarrhena asphodeloides extracts (ASE), ASE combined with macromolecular fraction (ASE-MF), ASE combined with small molecule fraction (ASE-SF) and ASE combined with small molecule and macromolecular fraction (ASE-SF-MF) containing approximately the same dose of ASE. At different time points, the concentration of timosaponin BII, anemarsaponin BIII, timosaponin AIII and timosaponin E1 in rat plasma were determined and main pharmacokinetic parameters including Cmax, Tmax, T1/2, AUC were calculated using the DAS 3.2 software package. The statistical analysis was performed using the Student's t-test with p saponins. It was found that Cmax and AUC of four steroidal saponins in group ASE-SF and ASE-SF-MF, were significantly increased compared with those in group ASE. These results indicate that SF in A. asphodeloides extracts could increase the absorption and improve the bioavailability of the steroidal saponins.

  7. Development of an Improved Inhalable Powder Formulation of Pirfenidone by Spray-Drying: In Vitro Characterization and Pharmacokinetic Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Gen; Leung, Sharon Shui Yee; Chan, Hak-Kim; Onoue, Satomi

    2016-06-01

    Previously, a respirable powder (RP) formulation of pirfenidone (PFD) was developed for reducing phototoxic risk; however, PFD-RP demonstrated unacceptable in vitro inhalation performance. The present study aimed to develop a new RP system of PFD with favorable inhalation properties by spray-drying method. Spray-dried PFD (SD/PFD) was prepared by spray-drying with L-leucine, and the physicochemical properties and efficacy in an antigen-sensitized airway inflammation model were assessed. A pharmacokinetic study was also conducted after intratracheal and oral administration of PFD formulations. Regarding powder characterization, SD/PFD had dimpled surface with the mean diameter of 1.793 μm. In next generation impactor analysis, SD/PFD demonstrated high in vitro inhalation performance without the need of carrier particles, and the fine particle fraction of SD/PFD was calculated to be 62.4%. Insufflated SD/PFD (0.3 mg-PFD/rat) attenuated antigen-evoked inflammatory events in the lung, including infiltration of inflammatory cells and myeloperoxidase activity. Systemic exposure level of PFD after insufflation of SD/PFD at the pharmacologically effective dose was 600-fold lower than that after oral administration of PFD at the phototoxic dose. SD/PFD would be suitable for inhalation, and the utilization of an RP system with SD/PFD would provide a safer medication compared with oral administration of PFD.

  8. Gene expression profiling in rat kidney after intratracheal exposure to cadmium-doped nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccini, Teresa; Roda, Elisa; Fabbri, Marco; Sacco, Maria Grazia; Gribaldo, Laura; Manzo, Luigi

    2012-08-01

    While nephrotoxicity of cadmium is well documented, very limited information exists on renal effects of exposure to cadmium-containing nanomaterials. In this work, "omics" methodologies have been used to assess the action of cadmium-containing silica nanoparticles (Cd-SiNPs) in the kidney of Sprague-Dawley rats exposed intratracheally. Groups of animals received a single dose of Cd-SiNPs (1 mg/rat), CdCl2 (400 μg/rat) or 0.1 ml saline (control). Renal gene expression was evaluated 7 and 30 days post exposure by DNA microarray technology using the Agilent Whole Rat Genome Microarray 4x44K. Gene modulating effects were observed in kidney at both time periods after treatment with Cd-SiNPs. The number of differentially expressed genes being 139 and 153 at the post exposure days 7 and 30, respectively. Renal gene expression changes were also observed in the kidney of CdCl2-treated rats with a total of 253 and 70 probes modulated at 7 and 30 days, respectively. Analysis of renal gene expression profiles at day 7 indicated in both Cd-SiNP and CdCl2 groups downregulation of several cluster genes linked to immune function, oxidative stress, and inflammation processes. Differing from day 7, the majority of cluster gene categories modified by nanoparticles in kidney 30 days after dosing were genes implicated in cell regulation and apoptosis. Modest renal gene expression changes were observed at day 30 in rats treated with CdCl2. These results indicate that kidney may be a susceptible target for subtle long-lasting molecular alterations produced by cadmium nanoparticles locally instilled in the lung.

  9. Gene expression profiling in rat kidney after intratracheal exposure to cadmium-doped nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coccini, Teresa; Roda, Elisa; Fabbri, Marco; Sacco, Maria Grazia; Gribaldo, Laura; Manzo, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    While nephrotoxicity of cadmium is well documented, very limited information exists on renal effects of exposure to cadmium-containing nanomaterials. In this work, “omics” methodologies have been used to assess the action of cadmium-containing silica nanoparticles (Cd-SiNPs) in the kidney of Sprague-Dawley rats exposed intratracheally. Groups of animals received a single dose of Cd-SiNPs (1 mg/rat), CdCl 2 (400 μg/rat) or 0.1 ml saline (control). Renal gene expression was evaluated 7 and 30 days post exposure by DNA microarray technology using the Agilent Whole Rat Genome Microarray 4x44K. Gene modulating effects were observed in kidney at both time periods after treatment with Cd-SiNPs. The number of differentially expressed genes being 139 and 153 at the post exposure days 7 and 30, respectively. Renal gene expression changes were also observed in the kidney of CdCl 2 -treated rats with a total of 253 and 70 probes modulated at 7 and 30 days, respectively. Analysis of renal gene expression profiles at day 7 indicated in both Cd-SiNP and CdCl 2 groups downregulation of several cluster genes linked to immune function, oxidative stress, and inflammation processes. Differing from day 7, the majority of cluster gene categories modified by nanoparticles in kidney 30 days after dosing were genes implicated in cell regulation and apoptosis. Modest renal gene expression changes were observed at day 30 in rats treated with CdCl 2 . These results indicate that kidney may be a susceptible target for subtle long-lasting molecular alterations produced by cadmium nanoparticles locally instilled in the lung.

  10. Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Cognitive Function Profile of Rupatadine 10, 20 and 40 mg in Healthy Japanese Subjects: A Randomised Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Täubel

    Full Text Available Rupatadine is a marketed second generation antihistamine, with anti-PAF activity, indicated for symptomatic treatment of allergic rhinitis and urticaria. This study was conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PK, pharmacodynamics (PD, safety and tolerability of rupatadine in healthy Japanese subjects after single and multiple oral doses.In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 27 male and female healthy Japanese subjects were administered single and multiple escalating rupatadine dose of 10, 20 and 40 mg or placebo. Blood samples were collected at different time points for PK measurements and subjects were assessed for safety and tolerability. The effect of rupatadine on cognitive functioning was evaluated by means of computerized cognitive tests: rapid visual information processing (RVP, reaction time (RT, spatial working memory (SWM and visual analogue scales (VAS.Exposure to rupatadine as measured by Cmax and AUC was found to increase in a dose dependent manner over the dose range of 10-40 mg for both single and multiple dose administration. The safety assessments showed that all treatment related side effects were of mild intensity and there were no serious adverse events (SAEs or withdrawals due to treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs in this study. The therapeutic dose of rupatadine did not show any CNS impairment in any of the cognitive tests.This study demonstrated that rupatadine is safe and well tolerated by Japanese healthy subjects. The PK-PD profile confirmed previous experience with rupatadine.

  11. In ovo delivery of Newcastle disease virus conjugated hybrid calcium phosphate nanoparticle and to study the cytokine profile induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, Kaliyaperumal; Rathish, P.; Gopinath, V.P.; Janice, R.; Dhinakar Raj, G.

    2014-01-01

    In this report, the hybrid calcium phosphate (CaP) nanoparticles were synthesized and functionalized with Newcastle disease virus (NDV). These nanoparticles were synthesized by a combination of co-precipitation and polymerization process and functionalized with amino propyl triethoxy silane before coupling to NDV. The 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay of chicken spleen cells incubated with these nanoparticles indicated that, these particles did not exert any significant cytotoxicity. The effects of hybrid CaP nanoparticles on cell cycle were assayed using a flow cytometer. The results demonstrated that the cell viability and proliferation capacity of spleen cells were not affected by hybrid CaP nanoparticles compared with their control cells. The hybrid CaP nanoparticles were characterized by scanning/transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM); Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). These methods revealed that NDV was successfully conjugated on nanoparticles. The ability of the hybrid CaP nanoparticles to induce different cytokine mRNAs in the spleen cells of 18-day old embryonated chicken eggs (ECEs) was studied by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). NDV conjugated particles induced a high expression of Th1 cytokines such as interferon (IFN)-α, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α of and Th2 cytokines, interleukin (IL) 6 and IL-10. Uncoupled NDV induced only Th1 cytokines, IFN-α, INF-γ and TNF-α. The hybrid particles alone did not induce any cytokines. This confirmed that nanoparticle coupling could induce differential cytokine profiles and hence can be used as an alternate strategy to direct favorable immune responses in animals or chickens using appropriate vaccination carrier. - Highlights: • NDV conjugated hybrid CaP NP induced differential cytokine profiles in embryonated chicken eggs.

  12. In ovo delivery of Newcastle disease virus conjugated hybrid calcium phosphate nanoparticle and to study the cytokine profile induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Kaliyaperumal [Translational Research Platform for Veterinary Biologicals (TRPVB), Tamil Nadu Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Chennai 600 051, Tamil Nadu (India); Rathish, P.; Gopinath, V.P.; Janice, R. [Department of Animal Biotechnology, Madras Veterinary College, Tamil Nadu Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Chennai 600 007 (India); Dhinakar Raj, G., E-mail: dhinakarrajg@tanuvas.org.in [Department of Animal Biotechnology, Madras Veterinary College, Tamil Nadu Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Chennai 600 007 (India); Translational Research Platform for Veterinary Biologicals (TRPVB), Tamil Nadu Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Chennai 600 051, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2014-12-01

    In this report, the hybrid calcium phosphate (CaP) nanoparticles were synthesized and functionalized with Newcastle disease virus (NDV). These nanoparticles were synthesized by a combination of co-precipitation and polymerization process and functionalized with amino propyl triethoxy silane before coupling to NDV. The 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay of chicken spleen cells incubated with these nanoparticles indicated that, these particles did not exert any significant cytotoxicity. The effects of hybrid CaP nanoparticles on cell cycle were assayed using a flow cytometer. The results demonstrated that the cell viability and proliferation capacity of spleen cells were not affected by hybrid CaP nanoparticles compared with their control cells. The hybrid CaP nanoparticles were characterized by scanning/transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM); Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). These methods revealed that NDV was successfully conjugated on nanoparticles. The ability of the hybrid CaP nanoparticles to induce different cytokine mRNAs in the spleen cells of 18-day old embryonated chicken eggs (ECEs) was studied by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). NDV conjugated particles induced a high expression of Th1 cytokines such as interferon (IFN)-α, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α of and Th2 cytokines, interleukin (IL) 6 and IL-10. Uncoupled NDV induced only Th1 cytokines, IFN-α, INF-γ and TNF-α. The hybrid particles alone did not induce any cytokines. This confirmed that nanoparticle coupling could induce differential cytokine profiles and hence can be used as an alternate strategy to direct favorable immune responses in animals or chickens using appropriate vaccination carrier. - Highlights: • NDV conjugated hybrid CaP NP induced differential cytokine profiles in embryonated chicken eggs.

  13. Relevance of the Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Profiles of Puerariae lobatae Radix to Aggregation of Multi-Component Molecules in Aqueous Decoctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bili Su

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs is related to their multi-component system. TCM aqueous decoction is a common clinical oral formulation. Between molecules in solution, there exist intermolecular strong interactions to form chemical bonds or weak non-bonding interactions such as hydrogen bonds and Van der Waals forces, which hold molecules together to form “molecular aggregates”. Taking the TCM Puerariae lobatae Radix (Gegen as an example, we explored four Gegen decoctions of different concentration of 0.019, 0.038, 0.075, and 0.30 g/mL, named G-1, G-2, G-3, and G-4. In order of molecular aggregate size (diameter the four kinds of solution were ranked G-1 < G-2 < G-3 < G-4 by Flow Cell 200S IPAC image analysis. A rabbit vertebrobasilar artery insufficiency (VBI model was set up and they were given Gegen decoction (GGD at a clinical dosage of 0.82 g/kg (achieved by adjusting the gastric perfusion volume depending on the concentration. The HPLC fingerprint of rabbit plasma showed that the chemical component absorption into blood in order of peak area values was G-1 < G-2 > G-3 > G-4. Puerarin and daidzin are the major constituents of Gegen, and the pharmacokinetics of G-1 and G-2 puerarin conformed with the two compartment open model, while for G-3 and G-4, they conformed to a one compartment open model. For all four GGDs the pharmacokinetics of daidzin complied with a one compartment open model. FQ-PCR assays of rabbits’ vertebrobasilar arterial tissue were performed to determine the pharmacodynamic profiles of the four GGDs. GGD markedly lowered the level of AT1R mRNA, while the AT2R mRNA level was increased significantly vs. the VBI model, and G-2 was the most effective. In theory the dosage was equal to the blood drug concentration and should be consistent; however, the formation of molecular aggregates affects drug absorption and metabolism, and therefore influences drugs’ effects. Our data provided references for

  14. Toxicity Profile and Pharmacokinetic Study of A Phase I Low-Dose Schedule-Dependent Radiosensitizing Paclitaxel Chemoradiation Regimen for Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yuhchyau; Pandya, Kishan J.; Feins, Richard; Johnstone, David W.; Watson, Thomas; Smudzin, Therese; Keng, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We report the toxicity profile and pharmacokinetic data of a schedule-dependent chemoradiation regimen using pulsed low-dose paclitaxel for radiosensitization in a Phase I study for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Paclitaxel at escalating doses of 15 mg/m 2 , 20 mg/m 2 , and 25 mg/m 2 were infused on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday with daily chest radiation in cohorts of 6 patients. Daily radiation was delayed for maximal G2/M arrest and apoptotic effect, an observation from preclinical investigations. Plasma paclitaxel concentration was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results: Dose-limiting toxicities included 3 of 18 patients with Grade 3 pneumonitis and 3 of 18 patients with Grade 3 esophagitis. There was no Grade 4 or 5 pneumonitis or esophagitis. There was also no Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia or neuropathy. For Dose Levels I (15 mg/m 2 ), II (20 mg/m 2 ), and III (25 mg/m 2 ), the mean peak plasma level was 0.23 ± 0.06 μmol/l, 0.32 ± 0.05 μmol/l, and 0.52 ± 0.14 μmol/l, respectively; AUC was 0.44 ± 0.09 μmol/l, 0.61 ± 0.1 μmol/l, and 0.96 ± 0.23 μmol/l, respectively; and duration of drug concentration >0.05 μmol/l (t > 0.05 μmol/l) was 1.6 ± 0.3 h, 1.9 ± 0.2 h, and 3.0 ± 0.9 h, respectively. Conclusion: Pulsed low-dose paclitaxel chemoradiation is associated with low toxicity. Pharmacokinetic data showed that plasma paclitaxel concentration >0.05 μmol/l for a minimum of 1.6 h was sufficient for effective radiosensitization

  15. Heat Profiling of Three-Dimensionally Optically Trapped Gold Nanoparticles using Vesicle Cargo Release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyrsting, Anders; Bendix, Pól Martin; Stamou, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    Irradiated metallic nanoparticles hold great promise as heat transducers in photothermal applications such as drug delivery assays or photothermal therapy. We quantify the temperature increase of individual gold nanoparticles trapped in three dimensions near lipid vesicles exhibiting temperature...

  16. Growth, characterization and estimation of lattice strain and size in CdS nanoparticles: X-ray peak profile analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, Rekha Garg; Rajaram, Poolla; Bajpai, P. K.

    2018-05-01

    This work is based on the growth, characterization and estimation of lattice strain and crystallite size in CdS nanoparticles by X-ray peak profile analysis. The CdS nanoparticles were synthesized by a non-aqueous solvothermal method and were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman and UV-visible spectroscopy. XRD confirms that the CdS nanoparticles have the hexagonal structure. The Williamson-Hall (W-H) method was used to study the X-ray peak profile analysis. The strain-size plot (SSP) was used to study the individual contributions of crystallite size and lattice strain from the X-rays peaks. The physical parameters such as strain, stress and energy density values were calculated using various models namely, isotropic strain model, anisotropic strain model and uniform deformation energy density model. The particle size was estimated from the TEM images to be in the range of 20-40 nm. The Raman spectrum shows the characteristic optical 1LO and 2LO vibrational modes of CdS. UV-visible absorption studies show that the band gap of the CdS nanoparticles is 2.48 eV. The results show that the crystallite size estimated from Scherrer's formula, W-H plots, SSP and the particle size calculated by TEM images are approximately similar.

  17. Protein profiling as early detection biomarkers for TiO2 nanoparticle toxicity in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá-Pereira, Paula; Diniz, Mário S; Moita, Liliana; Pinheiro, Teresa; Mendonça, Elsa; Paixão, Susana M; Picado, Ana

    2018-05-01

    The mode of action for nanoparticle (NP) toxicity in aquatic organisms is not yet fully understood. In this work, a strategy other than toxicity testing was applied to Daphnia magna exposed to TiO 2 -NPs: the use of nuclear microscopy and the assessment of protein profile. D. magna is a keystone species broadly used as a model system in ecotoxicology. Titanium (Ti) was found in the D. magna digestive tract, mainly in the gut. The penetration of Ti into the epithelial region was greater at higher exposure levels and also observed in eggs in the brood pouch. The protein profile of individuals exposed to different concentrations showed that 2.8 and 5.6 mg/L TiO 2 -NP concentrations induced an over-expression of the majority of proteins, in particular proteins with molecular weight of ∼120, 85 and 15 kDa, while 11.2 mg/L TiO 2 -NP had an inhibitory effect on protein expression. The Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization with tandem time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) analysis of these proteins consistently identified them as vitellogenin (Vtg)-like proteins, associated with enzymes involved in redox balance. These results indicate that Vtg-like proteins are up-regulated in D. magna exposed to TiO 2 -NPs. Vitellogenesis is associated with the reproduction system, suggesting that TiO 2 -NP exposure can impair reproduction by affecting this process. The precise mode of action of TiO 2 -NPs is still unclear and the results from this study are a first attempt to identify specific proteins as potential markers of TiO 2 -NP toxicity in D. magna, providing useful information for future research.

  18. A fixed-dose combination tablet of gemigliptin and metformin sustained release has comparable pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic, and tolerability profiles to separate tablets in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-In; Lee, Howard; Oh, Jaeseong; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Jang, In-Jin; Kim, Jeong-Ae; Jung, Jong Hyuk; Yu, Kyung-Sang

    2015-01-01

    In type 2 diabetes mellitus, fixed-dose combination (FDC) can provide the complementary benefits of correction of multiple pathophysiologic defects such as dysfunctions in glycemic or metabolic control while improving compliance compared with separate tablets taken together. The objective of the study reported here was to compare the pharmacodynamic (PD), pharmacokinetic (PK), and tolerability profiles of gemigliptin and extended-release metformin (metformin XR) between FDC and separate tablets. A randomized, open-label, single-dose, two-way, two-period, crossover study was conducted in 28 healthy male volunteers. Two FDC tablets of gemigliptin/metformin 25/500 mg or separate tablets of gemigliptin (50 mg ×1) and metformin XR (500 mg ×2) were orally administered in each period. Serial blood samples were collected up to 48 hours post-dose to determine dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) activity using spectrophotometric assay and concentrations of gemigliptin and metformin using tandem mass spectrometry. Geometric mean ratios (GMRs) of FDC to separate tablet formulations and their 90% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to compare the PD and PK parameters between the two formulations. Tolerability was assessed throughout the study. The plasma DPP-4 activity-time curves of the FDC and the separate tablets almost overlapped, leading to a GMR (90% CI) of the FDC to separate tablets for the plasma DPP-4 activity and its maximum inhibition of 1.00 (0.97-1.04) and 0.92 (0.82-1.05), respectively. Likewise, all of the GMRs (90% CIs) of FDC to separate tablets for the area under the plasma concentration-time curve and maximum plasma concentration of gemigliptin and metformin fell entirely within the conventional bioequivalence range of 0.80-1.25. Both the FDC and separate tablets were well tolerated. The PD, PK, and tolerability profiles of gemigliptin and metformin XR in FDC and separate tablets were found to be comparable. The FDC tablet of gemigliptin and metformin

  19. Stabilization of Resveratrol in Blood Circulation by Conjugation to mPEG and mPEG-PLA Polymers: Investigation of Conjugate Linker and Polymer Composition on Stability, Metabolism, Antioxidant Activity and Pharmacokinetic Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddalingappa, Basavaraj; Benson, Heather A. E.; Brown, David H.; Batty, Kevin T.; Chen, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol is naturally occurring phytochemical with diverse biological activities such as chemoprevention, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-oxidant. But undergoes rapid metabolism in the body (half life 0.13h). Hence Polymer conjugation utilizing different chemical linkers and polymer compositions was investigated for enhanced pharmacokinetic profile of resveratrol. Ester conjugates such as α-methoxy-ω-carboxylic acid poly(ethylene glycol) succinylamide resveratrol (MeO-PEGN-Succ-RSV) (2 and 20 kDa); MeO-PEG succinyl ester resveratrol (MeO-PEGO-Succ-RSV) (2 kDa); α-methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-co-polylactide succinyl ester resveratrol (MeO-PEG-PLAO-Succ-RSV) (2 and 6.6kDa) were prepared by carbodiimide coupling reactions. Resveratrol-PEG ethers (2 and 5 kDa) were synthesized by alkali-mediated etherification. All polymer conjugates were fully characterized in vitro and the pharmacokinetic profile of selected conjugates was characterized in rats. Buffer and plasma stability of conjugates was dependent on polymer hydrophobicity, aggregation behavior and PEG corona, with MeO-PEG-PLAO-Succ-RSV (2 kDa) showing a 3h half-life in rat plasma in vitro. Polymer conjugates irrespective of linker chemistry protected resveratrol against metabolism in vitro. MeO-PEG-PLAO-Succ-RSV (2 kDa), Resveratrol-PEG ether (2 and 5 kDa) displayed improved pharmacokinetic profiles with significantly higher plasma area under curve (AUC), slower clearance and smaller volume of distribution, compared to resveratrol. PMID:25799413

  20. Novel lansoprazole-loaded nanoparticles for the treatment of gastric acid secretion-related ulcers: in vitro and in vivo pharmacokinetic pharmacodynamic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alai, Milind; Lin, Wen Jen

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study is to combine nanoparticle design and enteric coating technique to sustain the delivery of an acid-labile drug, lansoprazole (LPZ), in the treatment of acid reflux disorders. Lansoprazole-loaded Eudragit® RS100 nanoparticles (ERSNP-LPZ) as well as poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (PLGANP-LPZ) were prepared using a solvent evaporation/extraction method. The effects of nanoparticle charge and permeation enhancers on lansoprazole uptake was assessed in Caco-2 cells. The confocal microscopic images revealed the successful localization of nanoparticles in the cytoplasm of Caco-2 cells. The cellular uptake of positively charged Eudragit nanoparticles was significantly higher than that of negatively charged PLGA nanoparticles, which were enhanced by sodium caprate via the transcellular pathway. Both types of nanoparticles exhibited sustained drug release behavior in vitro. The oral administration of enteric-coated capsules filled with nanoparticles sustained and prolonged the LPZ concentration up to 24 h in ulcer-induced Wistar rats, and 92.4% and 89.2% of gastric ulcers healed after a 7-day treatment with either EC-ERSNP1010-Na caprate or EC-PLGANP1005-Na caprate, respectively.

  1. A fixed-dose combination tablet of gemigliptin and metformin sustained release has comparable pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic, and tolerability profiles to separate tablets in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park SI

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sang-In Park,1,* Howard Lee,1,2,* Jaeseong Oh,1 Kyoung Soo Lim,3 In-Jin Jang,1 Jeong-Ae Kim,4 Jong Hyuk Jung,4 Kyung-Sang Yu1 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Hospital, Seoul, 2Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Clinical Trials Center, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, 3Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, CHA University School of Medicine and CHA Bundang Medical Center, Seongnam, 4LG Life Sciences, Ltd, Seoul, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: In type 2 diabetes mellitus, fixed-dose combination (FDC can provide the complementary benefits of correction of multiple pathophysiologic defects such as dysfunctions in glycemic or metabolic control while improving compliance compared with separate tablets taken together. The objective of the study reported here was to compare the pharmacodynamic (PD, pharmacokinetic (PK, and tolerability profiles of gemigliptin and extended-release metformin (metformin XR between FDC and separate tablets.Methods: A randomized, open-label, single-dose, two-way, two-period, crossover study was conducted in 28 healthy male volunteers. Two FDC tablets of gemigliptin/metformin 25/500 mg or separate tablets of gemigliptin (50 mg ×1 and metformin XR (500 mg ×2 were orally administered in each period. Serial blood samples were collected up to 48 hours post-dose to determine dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4 activity using spectrophotometric assay and concentrations of gemigliptin and metformin using tandem mass spectrometry. Geometric mean ratios (GMRs of FDC to separate tablet formulations and their 90% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated to compare the PD and PK parameters between the two formulations. Tolerability was assessed throughout the study.Results: The plasma DPP-4 activity

  2. Insulin aspart pharmacokinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christian Hove; Roge, Rikke Meldgaard; Ma, Zhulin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Insulin aspart (IAsp) is used by many diabetics as a meal-time insulin to control postprandial glucose levels. As is the case with many other insulin types, the pharmacokinetics (PK), and consequently the pharmacodynamics (PD), is associated with clinical variability, both between...... to investigate and quantify the properties of the subcutaneous depot. Data from Brange et al. (1990) are used to determine the effects of insulin chemistry in subcutis on the absorption rate. Intravenous (i.v.) bolus and infusion PK data for human insulin are used to understand and quantify the systemic...... distribution and elimination (Porksen et al., 1997; Sjostrand et al., 2002). PK and PD profiles for type 1 diabetics from Chen et al. (2005) are analyzed to demonstrate the effects of IAsp antibodies in terms of bound and unbound insulin. PK profiles from Thorisdottir et al. (2009) and Ma et al. (2012b...

  3. Safety profile of solid lipid nanoparticles loaded with rosmarinic acid for oral use: in vitro and animal approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madureira AR

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ana Raquel Madureira,1 Sara Nunes,2 Débora A Campos,1 João C Fernandes,2 Cláudia Marques,3 Monica Zuzarte,2 Beatriz Gullón,1 Luís M Rodríguez-Alcalá,1 Conceição Calhau,3,4 Bruno Sarmento,5–7 Ana Maria Gomes,1 Maria Manuela Pintado,1 Flávio Reis2 1Catholic University of Portugal, CBQF – Center for Biotechnology and Fine Chemistry – Associate Laboratory, Faculty of Biotechnology, Porto, Portugal; 2Laboratory of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Institute for Biomedical Imaging and Life Sciences (IBILI, Faculty of Medicine, and CNC.IBILI Consortium, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal; 3Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal; 4Center for Health Technology and Services Research (CINTESIS, Porto, Portugal; 5Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Institute of Health Sciences-North, CESPU, Gandra, Portugal; 6“I3S” Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal; 7INEB, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal Abstract: Rosmarinic acid (RA possesses several protective bioactivities that have attracted increasing interest by nutraceutical/pharmaceutical industries. Considering the reduced bioavailability after oral use, effective (and safe delivery systems are crucial to protect RA from gastrointestinal degradation. This study aims to characterize the safety profile of solid lipid nanoparticles produced with Witepsol and Carnauba waxes and loaded with RA, using in vitro and in vivo approaches, focused on genotoxicity and cytotoxicity assays, redox status markers, hematological and biochemical profile, liver and kidney function, gut bacterial microbiota, and fecal fatty acids composition. Free RA and sage extract, empty nanoparticles, or nanoparticles loaded with RA or sage extract (0.15 and 1.5 mg/mL were evaluated for cell (lymphocytes viability, necrosis and apoptosis, and antioxidant

  4. Microdosing clinical study: pharmacokinetic, pharmacogenomic (SLCO2B1), and interaction (grapefruit juice) profiles of celiprolol following the oral microdose and therapeutic dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieiri, Ichiro; Doi, Yohei; Maeda, Kazuya; Sasaki, Tomohiro; Kimura, Miyuki; Hirota, Takeshi; Chiyoda, Takeshi; Miyagawa, Mayuko; Irie, Shin; Iwasaki, Kazuhide; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2012-07-01

    The authors evaluated the contribution of the SLCO2B1 polymorphism to the pharmacokinetics of celiprolol at a microdose (MD) and therapeutic dose (TD) and compared pharmacokinetic proportionality between the 2 dose forms in 30 SLCO2B1 genotype-matched healthy volunteers. Three drugs (celiprolol, fexofenadine, and atenolol) were orally administered as a cassette dosing following the MD (totally 97.5 µg) and then a TD (100 mg) of celiprolol, with and without grapefruit juice. The mean AUC(0-24) of celiprolol was lower in SLCO2B1*3/*3 individuals (775 ng·h/mL) than in *1/*3 (1097 ng·h/mL) and *1/*1 (1547 ng·h/mL) individuals following the TD, and this was confirmed in population pharmacokinetic analysis with statistical significances; however, SLCO2B1 genotype-dependent differences disappeared following the MD. Dose-normalized AUC of celiprolol at the MD was much lower than that at the TD, explained by the saturation of the efflux transporter. Thus, the effect of SLCO2B1 polymorphism on the AUC of celiprolol clearly observed only at the TD may be due to the saturation of the efflux transport systems.

  5. Synthesis, characterization, release kinetics and toxicity profile of drug-loaded starch nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Naggar, Mehrez E; El-Rafie, M H; El-sheikh, M A; El-Feky, Gina S; Hebeish, A

    2015-11-01

    The current research work focuses on the medical application of the cost-effective cross-linked starch nanoparticles, for the transdermal delivery using Diclofenac sodium (DS) as a model drug. The prepared DS-cross-linked starch nanoparticles were synthesized using nanoprecipitation technique at different concentrations of sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP) in the presence of Tween 80 as a surfactant. The resultant cross-linked starch nanoparticles loaded with DS were characterized using world-class facilities such as TEM, DLS, FT-IR, XRD, and DSc. The efficiency of DS loading was also evaluated via entrapment efficiency as well as in vitro release and histopathological study on rat skin. The optimum nanoparticles formulation selected by the JMP(®) software was the formula that composed of 5% maize starch, 57.7mg DS and 0.5% STPP and 0.4% Tween 80, with particle diameter of about 21.04nm, polydispersity index of 0.2 and zeta potential of -35.3mV. It is also worth noting that this selected formula shows an average entrapment efficiency of 95.01 and sustained DS release up to 6h. The histophathological studies using the best formula on rat skin advocate the use of designed transdermal DS loaded cross-linked starch nanoparticles as it is safe and non-irritant to rat skin. The overall results indicate that, the starch nanoparticles could be considered as a good carrier for DS drug regarding the enhancement in its controlled release and successful permeation, thus, offering a promising nanoparticulate system for the transdermal delivery non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Cabedo, Patricia; Mondragon, Rosa; Hernandez, Leonor; Martinez-Cuenca, Raul; Cabedo, Luis; Julia, J. Enrique

    2014-10-01

    Thermal energy storage (TES) is extremely important in concentrated solar power (CSP) plants since it represents the main difference and advantage of CSP plants with respect to other renewable energy sources such as wind, photovoltaic, etc. CSP represents a low-carbon emission renewable source of energy, and TES allows CSP plants to have energy availability and dispatchability using available industrial technologies. Molten salts are used in CSP plants as a TES material because of their high operational temperature and stability of up to 500°C. Their main drawbacks are their relative poor thermal properties and energy storage density. A simple cost-effective way to improve thermal properties of fluids is to dope them with nanoparticles, thus obtaining the so-called salt-based nanofluids. In this work, solar salt used in CSP plants (60% NaNO3 + 40% KNO3) was doped with silica nanoparticles at different solid mass concentrations (from 0.5% to 2%). Specific heat was measured by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A maximum increase of 25.03% was found at an optimal concentration of 1 wt.% of nanoparticles. The size distribution of nanoparticle clusters present in the salt at each concentration was evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image processing, as well as by means of dynamic light scattering (DLS). The cluster size and the specific surface available depended on the solid content, and a relationship between the specific heat increment and the available particle surface area was obtained. It was proved that the mechanism involved in the specific heat increment is based on a surface phenomenon. Stability of samples was tested for several thermal cycles and thermogravimetric analysis at high temperature was carried out, the samples being stable.

  7. Gene expression profiling to identify potentially relevant disease outcomes and support human health risk assessment for carbon black nanoparticle exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdon, Julie A; Williams, Andrew; Kuo, Byron; Moffat, Ivy; White, Paul A; Halappanavar, Sabina; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Håkan; Yauk, Carole L

    2013-01-07

    New approaches are urgently needed to evaluate potential hazards posed by exposure to nanomaterials. Gene expression profiling provides information on potential modes of action and human relevance, and tools have recently become available for pathway-based quantitative risk assessment. The objective of this study was to use toxicogenomics in the context of human health risk assessment. We explore the utility of toxicogenomics in risk assessment, using published gene expression data from C57BL/6 mice exposed to 18, 54 and 162 μg Printex 90 carbon black nanoparticles (CBNP). Analysis of CBNP-perturbed pathways, networks and transcription factors revealed concomitant changes in predicted phenotypes (e.g., pulmonary inflammation and genotoxicity), that correlated with dose and time. Benchmark doses (BMDs) for apical endpoints were comparable to minimum BMDs for relevant pathway-specific expression changes. Comparison to inflammatory lung disease models (i.e., allergic airway inflammation, bacterial infection and tissue injury and fibrosis) and human disease profiles revealed that induced gene expression changes in Printex 90 exposed mice were similar to those typical for pulmonary injury and fibrosis. Very similar fibrotic pathways were perturbed in CBNP-exposed mice and human fibrosis disease models. Our synthesis demonstrates how toxicogenomic profiles may be used in human health risk assessment of nanoparticles and constitutes an important step forward in the ultimate recognition of toxicogenomic endpoints in human health risk. As our knowledge of molecular pathways, dose-response characteristics and relevance to human disease continues to grow, we anticipate that toxicogenomics will become increasingly useful in assessing chemical toxicities and in human health risk assessment. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Biodistribution and Pharmacokinetics Study of siRNA-loaded Anti-NTSR1-mAb-functionalized Novel Hybrid Nanoparticles in a Metastatic Orthotopic Murine Lung Cancer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryna Perepelyuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Small interfering RNA (siRNA is effective in silencing critical molecular pathways in cancer. The use of this tool as a treatment modality is limited by lack of an intelligent carrier system to enhance the preferential delivery of this molecule to specific targets in vivo. In the present study, the in vivo behavior of novel anti-NTSR1-mAb-functionalized antimutant K-ras siRNA-loaded hybrid nanoparticles, delivered by i.p. injection to non-small-cell lung cancer in mice models, was investigated and compared to that of a naked siRNA formulation. The siRNA in anti-NTSR1-mAb-functionalized hybrid nanoparticles was preferentially accumulated in tumor-bearing lungs and metastasized tumor for at least 48 hours while the naked siRNA formulation showed lack of preferential accumulation in all of the organs monitored. The plasma terminal half-life of nanoparticle-delivered siRNA was 11 times higher (17–1.5 hours than that of the naked siRNA formulation. The mean residence time and AUClast were 3.4 and 33 times higher than the corresponding naked siRNA formulation, respectively. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis showed that the hybrid nanoparticle carrier system protected the encapsulated siRNA against degradation in vivo. Our novel anti-NTSR1-mAb-functionalized hybrid nanoparticles provide a useful platform for in vivo targeting of siRNA for both experimental and clinical purposes.

  9. An Allometric Model of Remifentanil Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eleveld, Douglas J.; Proost, Johannes H.; Vereecke, Hugo; Absalom, Anthony R.; Olofsen, Erik; Vuyk, Jaap; Struys, Michel M. R. F.

    Background: Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models are used to predict and explore drug infusion schemes and their resulting concentration profiles for clinical application. Our aim was to develop a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model for remifentanil that is accurate in patients with a wide

  10. A Comparative Oncology Study of Iniparib Defines Its Pharmacokinetic Profile and Biological Activity in a Naturally-Occurring Canine Cancer Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey Saba

    Full Text Available Development of iniparib as an anti-cancer agent was hindered in part by lingering questions regarding its mechanism of action, the activity of its metabolites, and their potential accumulation in tumors. Due to strong similarities in metabolism of iniparib between humans and dogs, a veterinary clinical trial in pet dogs with spontaneous cancers was designed to answer specific questions pertaining to pharmacokinetic exposures and tolerability of iniparib. Dogs were treated with iniparib alone and in combination with carboplatin chemotherapy. Iniparib doses ranged between 10-70 mg/kg intravenously (IV. Plasma, tumor and normal tissue samples were collected before and at various time points scheduled after exposure for pharmacokinetic and biologic analysis. The primary endpoints included characterization of dose-limiting toxicities (DLT and determination of the drug exposures that could be achieved in both normal and tumor tissues. Nineteen dogs were treated. DLT included fever, anorexia, diarrhea, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia; most effects were attributable to carboplatin based on the timing of adverse event onset. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD of iniparib was not identified. Moderate to high variability in plasma exposure was noted for iniparib and all metabolites between animals. When quantifiable, iniparib and metabolite plasma:tumor ratios were < 0.088 and <1.7, respectively. In this study, iniparib was well tolerated as a single agent and in combination with carboplatin over a range of doses. However, clinically relevant concentrations of the parent drug and selected metabolites were not detectable in canine tumor tissues at any studied dose, thus eliminating expectations for clinical responses in dogs or humans. Negative clinical trials in humans, and the uncertainties of its mechanism of action, ultimately led to the decision to stop clinical development of the drug. Nevertheless, the questions that can be asked and answered within

  11. The Novel N-Substituted Benztropine Analog GA2-50 Possesses Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Profiles Favorable for a Candidate Substitute Medication for Cocaine Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    OTHMAN, AHMED A.; NEWMAN, AMY H.; EDDINGTON, NATALIE D.

    2009-01-01

    GA2-50 is a novel N-substituted benztropine analog with improved potency and selectivity for the dopamine transporter. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of GA2-50 were characterized as a part of its preclinical evaluation as a substitute medication for cocaine abuse. In vitro transport and metabolism studies as well as pharmacokinetic studies in rats were conducted. Effect of GA2-50 on the extracelluar nucleus accumbens (NAc) dopamine levels and on cocaine’s induced dopamine elevation was evaluated using intracerebral microdialysis. GA2-50 showed high transcellular permeability despite being a P-glycoprotein substrate. GA2-50 was a substrate of human CYP2D6, CYP2C19, CYP2E1, rat CYP2C11, CYP2D1, CYP3A1, and CYP1A2; with low intrinsic clearance values. In vivo, GA2-50 showed high brain uptake (Ri ~ 10), large volume of distribution (Vss =37 L/kg), and long elimination half-life (t½ =19 h). GA2-50 resulted in 1.6- and 2.7-fold dopamine elevation at the 5 and 10 mg/kg i.v. doses. Dopamine elevation induced by GA2-50 was significantly reduced, slower and longer lasting than previously observed for cocaine. GA2-50 had no significant effect on cocaine’s induced dopamine elevation upon simultaneous administration. Results from the present study indicate that GA2-50 possesses several attributes sought after for a substitute medication for cocaine abuse. PMID:18425847

  12. Comparisons of pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution profile of four major bioactive components after oral administration of Xiang-Fu-Si-Wu Decoction effective fraction in normal and dysmenorrheal symptom rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei; Li, Wei; Li, Zhen-hao; Qian, Da-wei; Guo, Jian-ming; Shang, Er-xin; Su, Shu-lan; Tang, Yu-ping; Duan, Jin-ao

    2014-07-03

    Xiang-Fu-Si-Wu Decoction (XFSWD) has been widely used to treat primary dysmenorrhea in clinical practice for hundreds of years and shown great efficacy. One fraction of XFSWD, which was an elution product by macroporous adsorption resin from aqueous extract solution with 60% ethanol (XFSWE), showed great analgesic effect. The present study was conducted to investigate the possible pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution profiles of four major bioactive constituents (berberine, protopine, tetrahydrocoptisine and tetrahydropalmatine) after oral administration of XFSWE in dysmenorrheal symptom rats, and to compare the difference between normal and dysmenorrheal symptom rats. Estradiol benzoate and oxytocin were used to produce dysmenorrheal symptom rat model. The experimental period was seven days. At the final day of experimental period, both normal and dysmenorrheal symptom rats were orally administrated with XFSWE, and then the blood and tissues samples were collected at different time points. Berberine, protopine, tetrahydrocoptisine and tetrahydropalmatine in blood and tissue samples were determined by LC-MS/MS. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated from the plasma concentration-time data using non-compartmental methods. The differences of pharmacokinetic parameters among groups were tested by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). There were statistically significant differences (Pnormal and dysmenorrheal symptom rats that orally administered with same dosage of XFSWE. In tissue distribution study, the results showed that the overall trend was C(Spleen)>C(Liver)>C(Kidney)>C(Uterus)>C(Heart)>C(Lung)>C(Ovary)>C(Brain)>C(Thymus), C(M-60 min)>C(M-120 min)>C(M-30 min)>C(C-60 min)>C(C-120 min)>C(C-30 min). The contents of protopine in liver, spleen and uterus were more than that in other tissues of dysmenorrheal symptom rats. Compared to normal rats, partial contents of the compounds in dysmenorrheal symptom rats׳ tissues at different time points had significant

  13. Pharmacokinetics of Cannabinoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain J McGilveray

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ-9-THC is the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis (marijuana. The present review focuses on the pharmacokinetics of THC, but also includes known information for cannabinol and cannabidiol, as well as the synthetic marketed cannabinoids, dronabinol (synthetic THC and nabilone. The variability of THC in plant material (0.3% to 30% leads to variability in tissue THC levels from smoking, which is, in itself, a highly individual process. THC bioavailability averages 30%. With a 3.55% THC cigarette, a peak plasma level of 152±86.3 ng/mL occured approximately 10 min after inhalation. Oral THC, on the other hand, is only 4% to 12% bioavailable and absorption is highly variable. THC is eliminated from plasma in a multiphasic manner, with low amounts detectable for over one week after dosing. A major active 11-hydroxy metabolite is formed after both inhalation and oral dosing (20% and 100% of parent, respectively. THC is widely distributed, particularly to fatty tissues, but less than 1% of an administered dose reaches the brain, while the spleen and body fat are long-term storage sites. The elimination of THC and its many metabolites (from all routes occurs via the feces and urine. Metabolites persist in the urine and feces for severalweeks. Nabilone is well absorbed and the pharmacokinetics, although variable, appear to be linear from oral doses of 1 mg to 4 mg (these doses show a plasma elimination half-life of approximately 2 h. As with THC, there is a high first-pass effect, and the feces to urine ratio of excretion is similar to other cannabinoids. Pharmacokineticpharmacodynamic modelling with plasma THC versus cardiac and psychotropic effects show that after equilibrium is reached, the intensity of effect is proportional to the plasma THC profile. Clinical trials have found that nabilone produces less tachycardia and less euphoria than THC for a similar antiemetic response.

  14. Alteration of metabolomic profiles by titanium dioxide nanoparticles in human gingivitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Contreras, Rene; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Umemura, Naoki; Kaneko, Miku; Hatakeyama, Yoko; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Scougall-Vilchis, Rogelio J; Contreras-Bulnes, Rosalia; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Sakagami, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    Although nanoparticles (NPs) has afforded considerable benefits in various fields of sciences, several reports have shown their harmful effects, suggesting the necessity of adequate risk assessment. To clarify the mechanism of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs)-enhanced gingival inflammation, we conducted the full-scale metabolomic analyses of human gingival fibroblast cells treated with IL-1β alone or in combination with TiO2 NPs. Observation with transmission electron microscope demonstrated the incorporation of TiO2 NPs into vacuoles of the cells. TiO2 NPs significantly enhanced the IL-1β-induced prostaglandin E2 production and COX-1 and COX-2 protein expression. IL-1β reduced the intracellular concentrations of overall primary metabolites especially those of amino acid, urea cycle, polyamine, S-adenosylmethione and glutathione synthetic pathways. The addition of TiO2 NPs further augmented these IL-1β-induced metabolic changes, recommending careful use of dental materials containing TiO2 NPs towards patients with gingivitis or periodontitis. The impact of the present study is to identify the molecular targets of TiO2 NPs for the future establishment of new metabolic markers and therapeutic strategy of gingival inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanistic profiling of the siRNA delivery dynamics of lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Stefano; Cun, Dongmei; Remaut, Katrien

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the delivery dynamics of nucleic acid nanocarriers is fundamental to improve their design for therapeutic applications. We investigated the carrier structure-function relationship of lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles (LPNs) consisting of poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nano...... of transfection-competent siRNA-DOTAP lipoplexes from the LPNs. Based on these results, we suggest a model for the nanostructural characteristics of the LPNs, in which the siRNA is organized in lamellar superficial assemblies and/or as complexes entrapped in the polymeric matrix.......Understanding the delivery dynamics of nucleic acid nanocarriers is fundamental to improve their design for therapeutic applications. We investigated the carrier structure-function relationship of lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles (LPNs) consisting of poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA......) nanocarriers modified with the cationic lipid dioleoyltrimethyl-ammoniumpropane (DOTAP). A library of siRNA-loaded LPNs was prepared by systematically varying the nitrogen-to-phosphate (N/P) ratio. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) combined with small angle X...

  16. Physicochemical, pharmacokinetic, efficacy and toxicity profiling of a potential nitrofuranyl methyl piperazine derivative IIIM-MCD-211 for oral tuberculosis therapy via in-silico-in-vitro-in-vivo approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magotra, Asmita; Sharma, Anjna; Singh, Samsher; Ojha, Probir Kumar; Kumar, Sunil; Bokolia, Naveen; Wazir, Priya; Sharma, Shweta; Khan, Inshad Ali; Singh, Parvinder Pal; Vishwakarma, Ram A; Singh, Gurdarshan; Nandi, Utpal

    2018-02-01

    Recent tuberculosis (TB) drug discovery programme involve continuous pursuit for new chemical entity (NCE) which can be not only effective against both susceptible and resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) but also safe and faster acting with the target, thereby shortening the prolonged TB treatments. We have identified a potential nitrofuranyl methyl piperazine derivative, IIIM-MCD-211 as new antitubercular agent with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 0.0072 μM against H37Rv strain. Objective of the present study is to investigate physicochemical, pharmacokinetic, efficacy and toxicity profile using in-silico, in-vitro and in-vivo model in comprehensive manner to assess the likelihood of developing IIIM-MCD-211 as a clinical candidate. Results of computational prediction reveal that compound does not violate Lipinski's, Veber's and Jorgensen's rule linked with drug like properties and oral bioavailability. Experimentally, IIIM-MCD-211 exhibits excellent lipophilicity that is optimal for oral administration. IIIM-MCD-211 displays evidence of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) induction but no inhibition ability in rhodamine cell exclusion assay. IIIM-MCD-211 shows high permeability and plasma protein binding based on parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA) and rapid equilibrium dialysis (RED) assay model, respectively. IIIM-MCD-211 has adequate metabolic stability in rat liver microsomes (RLM) and favourable pharmacokinetics with admirable correlation during dose escalation study in Swiss mice. IIIM-MCD-211 has capability to appear into highly perfusable tissues. IIIM-MCD-211 is able to actively prevent progression of TB infection in chronic infection mice model. IIIM-MCD-211 shows no substantial cytotoxicity in HepG2 cell line. In acute toxicity study, significant increase of total white blood cell (WBC) count in treatment group as compared to control group is observed. Overall, amenable preclinical data make IIIM-MCD-211 ideal

  17. Profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Profiles is a synthetic overview of more than 100 national energy markets in the world, providing insightful facts and key energy statistics. A Profile is structured around 6 main items and completed by key statistics: Ministries, public agencies, energy policy are concerned; main companies in the oil, gas, electricity and coal sectors, status, shareholders; reserve, production, imports and exports, electricity and refining capacities; deregulation of prices, subsidies, taxes; consumption trends by sector, energy market shares; main energy projects, production and consumption prospects. Statistical Profiles are present in about 3 pages the main data and indicators on oil, gas, coal and electricity. (A.L.B.)

  18. Comparisons of the pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution profiles of withanolide B after intragastric administration of the effective part of Datura metel L. in normal and psoriasis guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lianrong; Meng, Xin; Kuang, Haixue

    2018-04-15

    A simple, highly sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography- electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) method has been developed to quantify of withanolide B and obakunone (IS) in guinea pig plasma and tissues, and to compare the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of withanolide B in normal and psoriasis guinea pigs. After mixing with IS, plasma and tissues were pretreated by protein precipitation with methanol. Chromatographic separation was performed on a C18 column using aqueous (0.1% formic acid) and acetonitrile (0.1% formic acid) solutions at 0.4 mL/min as the mobile phase. The gradient program was selected (0-4.0 min, 2-98% B; 4.0-4.5 min, 98-2% B; and 4.5-5 min, 2% B). Detection was performed on a 4000 QTRAP UPLC-ESI-MS/MS system from AB Sciex in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. Withanolide B and obakunone (IS) were monitored under positive ionization conditions. The optimized mass transition ion-pairs (m/z) for quantitation were 455.1/109.4 for withanolide B and 455.1/161.1 for obakunone. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Time-course profiling of molecular stress responses to silver nanoparticles in the earthworm Eisenia fetida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, Yuya; Heckmann, Lars-Henrik; Simonsen, Vibeke

    2013-01-01

    ) with reference to dissolved silver salt (AgNO3). Principal component analysis of selected gene and enzyme response profiles revealed dissimilar patterns between AgNO3 and AgNP treatments and also over time. Despite the observed difference in molecular profiles, the body burdens of total Ag were within the same...... range (10–40 mg/kg dry weight worm) for both treatments with apparent correlation to the induction pattern of metallothionein. AgNO3 induced the genes and enzymes related to oxidative stress at day 1, after which markers of energy metabolism were all suppressed at day 2. Exposure to AgNPs likewise led...... to induction of oxidative stress genes at day 2, but with a temporal pattern shift to immune genes at day 14 following metabolic upregulation at day 7. The involvement of oxidative stress and subsequent alterations in immune gene regulation were as predicted by our in vitro study reported previously...

  20. Population Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: An intranasal gel dosage formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness (SMS).The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) was evaluated using data collected in Phase II IND protocols. We reported earlier statistically significant gender differences in PK parameters of INSCOP at a dose level of 0.4 mg. To identify covariates that influence PK parameters of INSCOP, we examined population covariates of INSCOP PK model for 0.4 mg dose. Methods: Plasma scopolamine concentrations versus time data were collected from 20 normal healthy human subjects (11 male/9 female) after a 0.4 mg dose. Phoenix NLME was employed for PK analysis of these data using gender, body weight and age as covariates for model selection. Model selection was based on a likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL). Statistical significance for base model building and individual covariate analysis was set at P less than 0.05{delta(-2LL)=3.84}. Results: A one-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order elimination best described INSCOP concentration ]time profiles. Inclusion of gender, body weight and age as covariates individually significantly reduced -2LL by the cut-off value of 3.84(P less than 0.05) when tested against the base model. After the forward stepwise selection and backward elimination steps, gender was selected to add to the final model which had significant influence on absorption rate constant (ka) and the volume of distribution (V) of INSCOP. Conclusion: A population pharmacokinetic model for INSCOP has been identified and gender was a significant contributing covariate for the final model. The volume of distribution and Ka were significantly higher in males than in females which confirm gender-dependent pharmacokinetics of scopolamine after administration of a 0.4 mg dose.

  1. Mechanistic profiling of the siRNA delivery dynamics of lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Stefano; Cun, Dongmei; Remaut, Katrien; Bunker, Matt; Zhang, Jianxin; Martin-Bertelsen, Birte; Yaghmur, Anan; Braeckmans, Kevin; Nielsen, Hanne M; Foged, Camilla

    2015-03-10

    Understanding the delivery dynamics of nucleic acid nanocarriers is fundamental to improve their design for therapeutic applications. We investigated the carrier structure-function relationship of lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles (LPNs) consisting of poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanocarriers modified with the cationic lipid dioleoyltrimethyl-ammoniumpropane (DOTAP). A library of siRNA-loaded LPNs was prepared by systematically varying the nitrogen-to-phosphate (N/P) ratio. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) combined with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) studies suggested that the siRNA-loaded LPNs are characterized by a core-shell structure consisting of a PLGA matrix core coated with lamellar DOTAP structures with siRNA localized both in the core and in the shell. Release studies in buffer and serum-containing medium combined with in vitro gene silencing and quantification of intracellular siRNA suggested that this self-assembling core-shell structure influences the siRNA release kinetics and the delivery dynamics. A main delivery mechanism appears to be mediated via the release of transfection-competent siRNA-DOTAP lipoplexes from the LPNs. Based on these results, we suggest a model for the nanostructural characteristics of the LPNs, in which the siRNA is organized in lamellar superficial assemblies and/or as complexes entrapped in the polymeric matrix. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of thiamine derivatives especially of benfotiamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loew, D

    1996-02-01

    Pharmacokinetic data of orally administered lipid-soluble thiamine analogues like benfotiamine are reviewed and assessed. It is quite clear that benfotiamine is absorbed much more better than water-soluble thiamine salts: maximum plasma levels of thiamine are about 5 times higher after benfotiamine, the bioavailability is at maximum about 3.6 times as high as that of thiamine hydrochloride and better than other lipophilic thiamine derivates. The physiological activity (alphaETK) increased only after benfotiamine was given. Due to its excellent pharmacokinetic profile benfotiamine should be preferred in treatment of relevant indications.

  3. Recent Advances in Nanoparticle-Based Förster Resonance Energy Transfer for Biosensing, Molecular Imaging and Drug Release Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nai-Tzu Chen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET may be regarded as a “smart” technology in the design of fluorescence probes for biological sensing and imaging. Recently, a variety of nanoparticles that include quantum dots, gold nanoparticles, polymer, mesoporous silica nanoparticles and upconversion nanoparticles have been employed to modulate FRET. Researchers have developed a number of “visible” and “activatable” FRET probes sensitive to specific changes in the biological environment that are especially attractive from the biomedical point of view. This article reviews recent progress in bringing these nanoparticle-modulated energy transfer schemes to fruition for applications in biosensing, molecular imaging and drug delivery.

  4. Development and evaluation of Desvenlafaxine loaded PLGA-chitosan nanoparticles for brain delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui-Feng Tong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a debilitating psychiatric condition that remains the second most common cause of disability worldwide. Currently, depression affects more than 4 per cent of the world’s population. Most of the drugs intended for clinical management of depression augment the availability of neurotransmitters at the synapse by inhibiting their neuronal reuptake. However, the therapeutic efficacy of antidepressants is often compromised as they are unable to reach brain by the conventional routes of administration. The purpose of the present study was to reconnoiter the potential of mucoadhesive PLGA-chitosan nanoparticles for the delivery of encapsulated Desvenlafaxine to the brain by nose to brain delivery route for superior pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of Desvenlafaxine. Desvenlafaxine loaded PLGA-chitosan nanoparticles were prepared by solvent emulsion evaporation technique and optimized for various physiochemical characteristics. The antidepressant efficacy of optimized Desvenlafaxine was evaluated in various rodent depression models together with the biochemical estimation of monoamines in their brain. Further, the levels of Desvenlafaxine in brain and blood plasma were determined at various time intervals for calculation of different pharmacokinetic parameters. The optimized Desvenlafaxine loaded PLGA-chitosan nanoparticles (∼172 nm/+35 mV on intranasal administration significantly reduced the symptoms of depression and enhanced the level of monoamines in the brain in comparison with orally administered Desvenlafaxine. Nose to brain delivery of Desvenlafaxine PLGA-chitosan nanoparticles also enhanced the pharmacokinetic profile of Desvenlafaxine in brain together with their brain/blood ratio at different time points. Thus, intranasal mucoadhesive Desvenlafaxine PLGA-chitosan nanoparticles could be potentially used for the treatment of depression.

  5. Pharmacokinetic profile of PBRM in rodents, a first selective covalent inhibitor of 17β-HSD1 for breast cancer and endometriosis treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltais, René; Trottier, Alexandre; Roy, Jenny; Ayan, Diana; Bertrand, Nicolas; Poirier, Donald

    2018-04-01

    The development of a covalent inhibitor of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (17β-HSD1) is a promising approach for the treatment of hormone-dependent breast cancer and endometriosis. After reporting the steroid derivative PBRM as a first potent covalent inhibitor of 17β-HSD1 without estrogenic activity, we are now interested in studying its pharmaceutical behavior. The metabolism study in a human liver microsomal preparation showed a gradual transformation of PBRM into PBRM-O, an oxidized ketonic form of PBRM at position C17. Interestingly, PBRM-O also inhibits 17β-HSD1 and is not estrogenic in estrogen-sensitive T-47D cells. However, when PBRM was injected subcutaneously (sc) in mice, a very small proportion of PBRM-O was measured in a 24 h-time course experiment. A pharmacokinetic study in mice revealed suitable values for half-life (T 1/2  = 3.4 h), clearance (CL = 2088 mL/h kg), distribution volume (Vz = 10.3 L/kg) and absolute bioavailability (F = 65%) when PBRM was injected sc at 14.7 mg/kg. A good F value of 33% was also obtained when PBRM was given orally. A tritiated version of PBRM, 3 H-PBRM, was synthesized and used for an in vivo biodistribution study that showed its gradual accumulation in various mouse tissues (peak at 6 h) followed by elimination until complete disappearance after 72 h. Elimination was found to occur in feces (93%) and urine (7%) as revealed by a mass balance experiment. PBRM was also evaluated for its toxicity in mice and it was found to be very well tolerated after weekly sc administration (30-405 mg/kg for 8 weeks) or by po administration (300-900 mg/kg for 4 weeks). Overall, these experiments represent important steps in the preclinical characterization of the pharmaceutical behavior of PBRM, as well as for its translation to clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Development, stability and in vitro delivery profile of new loratadine-loaded nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Rafael Rodriguez Amado

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Loratadine is used as antihistaminic without side effects in nervous systems. This drug is a weak base and it is absorbed from the intestine. The nitrogen of the pyridine ring is protonated in the stomach affecting the oral bioavailability. The aim of this paper was obtaining, characterize and evaluate the release profiles and the stability of a gastroresistant loratadine nanosuspension. Methods: The nanosuspension was prepared by the solvent displacement evaporation method, using three different polymers (Eudragit® L 100 55, Kollicoat® MAE 100P and PEG 4000 and Polysorbate 80. Dynamic Light Scattering was used for evaluating the particle size (PS, zeta potential, and conductivity of the nanosuspension. Loratadine release profiles were evaluated in simulated gastrointestinal fluids. The shelf and accelerated stability were assessed during three months. Results: Nanosuspension particle size was 45.94 ± 0.50 nm, with a low polydispersion index (PdI, 0.300. Kollicoat® MAE 100P produced a hard and flexible coating layer. In simulated intestinal fluids, the 100 percent of loratadine was released in 40 min, while in simulated stomach fluids the release was lesser than 5%. Nanosuspension presented a good physicochemical stability showing a reduction in PS and PdI after three months (43.29 ± 0.16 and 0.250; respectively. Conclusions: A promissory loratadine nanosuspension for loratadine intestinal delivery was obtained, by using a low energy method, which is an advantage for a possible scale up for practical purpose.

  7. Hydroxycamptothecin-loaded nanoparticles enhance target drug delivery and anticancer effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Su

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT has been shown to have activity against a broad spectrum of cancers. In order to enhance its tissue-specific delivery and anticancer activity, we prepared HCPT-loaded nanoparticles made from poly(ethylene glycol-poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate (PEG-PBLG, and then studied their release characteristics, pharmacokinetic characteristics, and anticancer effects. PEG-PBLG nanoparticles incorporating HCPT were prepared by a dialysis method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to observe the shape and diameter of the nanoparticles. The HCPT release characteristics in vitro were evaluated by ultraviolet spectrophotometry. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC detection method for determining HCPT in rabbit plasma was established. The pharmacokinetic parameters of HCPT/PEG-PBLG nanoparticles were compared with those of HCPT. Results The HCPT-loaded nanoparticles had a core-shell spherical structure, with a core diameter of 200 nm and a shell thickness of 30 nm. Drug-loading capacity and drug encapsulation were 7.5 and 56.8%, respectively. The HCPT release profile was biphasic, with an initial abrupt release, followed by sustained release. The terminal elimination half-lives (t 1/2 β of HCPT and HCPT-loaded nanoparticles were 4.5 and 10.1 h, respectively. Peak concentrations (Cmax of HCPT and HCPT-loaded nanoparticles were 2627.8 and 1513.5 μg/L, respectively. The apparent volumes of distribution of the HCPT and HCPT-loaded nanoparticles were 7.3 and 20.0 L, respectively. Compared with a blank control group, Lovo cell xenografts or Tca8113 cell xenografts in HCPT or HCPT-loaded nanoparticle treated groups grew more slowly and the tumor doubling times were increased. The tumor inhibition effect in the HCPT-loaded nanosphere-treated group was significantly higher than that of the HCPT-treated group (p 0.05. Conclusion Compared to the HCPT- and control-treated groups, the HCPT-loaded nanoparticle

  8. Pharmacokinetics: curiosity or cure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notari, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    What is the fate of a drug from the time of its introduction into the body to the end of its duration. Pharmacokinetic studies are often designed to provide an answer to this question. But this question may be asked of any drug and research that is limited to answering it will remain empirical. Pharmacokinetic studies can provide answers to many other drug-related questions. In doing so pharmacokinetic research has the potential of improving drug therapy as well as the design and evaluation of drugs. While significant contributions can be cited, the future of pharmacokinetics depends upon its increased impact on clinical practice and drug design. How can a molecule be tailored for site specificity. Can chemical modification selectively alter absorption, distribution, metabolism, binding or excretion. In what new ways can pharmacokinetic information increase the predictability of drug therapy. Such questions, to which pharmacokinetics should provide answers, are numerous and easily identified. But the definitive studies are difficult both to create and conduct. Whether or not pharmacokinetics can achieve its full potential will depend upon the extent to which it can provide answers to these currently unanswered questions

  9. Lisdexamfetamine: A pharmacokinetic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiran, Eloisa; Kessler, Félix Henrique; Fröehlich, Pedro Eduardo; Limberger, Renata Pereira

    2016-06-30

    Lisdexamfetamine (LDX) is a d-amphetamine (d-AMPH) pro-drug used to treat Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Binge Eating Disorder (BED) symptoms. The in vivo pharmacodynamics of LDX is the same as that of its active product d-AMPH, although there are a few qualitative and quantitative differences due to pharmacokinetics. Due to the specific pharmacokinetics of the long-acting stimulants, this article revises the pharmacokinetic studies on LDX, the newest amphetamine pro-drug. The Medline/Pubmed, Science Direct and Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (Lilacs and Ibecs) (2007-2016) databases were searched for articles and their list of references. As for basic pharmacokinetics studies, since LDX is a newly developed medication, there are few results concerning biotransformation, distribution and the use of different biological matrices for analysis. This is the first robust review on this topic, gathering data from all clinical pharmacokinetics studies available in the literature. The particular pharmacokinetics of LDX plays a major role in studying this pro-drug, since this knowledge was essential to understand some reports on clinical effects in literature, e.g. the small likelihood of reducing the effect by interactions, the effect of long duration use and the still questionable reduction of the potential for abuse. In general the already well-known pharmacokinetic properties of amphetamine make LDX relatively predictable, simplifying the use of LDX in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Prediction of human CNS pharmacokinetics using a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamamoto, Yumi; Valitalo, Pyry A.; Wong, Yin Cheong; Huntjens, Dymphy R.; Proost, Johannes H.; Vermeulen, An; Krauwinkel, Walter; Beukers, Margot W.; Kokki, Hannu; Kokki, Merja; Danhof, Meindert; van Hasselt, Johan G. C.; de Lange, Elizabeth C. M.

    2018-01-01

    Knowledge of drug concentration-time profiles at the central nervous system (CNS) target-site is critically important for rational development of CNS targeted drugs. Our aim was to translate a recently published comprehensive CNS physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model from rat to human,

  11. Development of a validated UPLC method for simultaneous estimation of both free and entrapped (in solid lipid nanoparticles) all-trans retinoic acid and cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) and its pharmacokinetic applicability in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Sharma, Gaurav; Singla, Dinesh; Singh, Sukhjeet; Sahwney, Sudhir; Chauhan, Anurag S; Singh, Gagandeep; Kaur, Indu Pal

    2014-03-01

    A sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) method was developed for simultaneous estimation of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) in rat plasma. The method was validated over the linear range of 1.0-5000ng/ml (r(2)=0.999) for both vitamins with a limit of detection of 0.5ng/ml. Chromatographic separation was achieved using liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) on an Acquity BEH RP 18 column (2.1mm×50mm, I.D. 1.7μm), with mobile phase comprising of acetonitrile:methanol:water (90:8:2, v/v/v), at a flow rate of 0.20ml/min and a total run time of 5min. Intra and inter-day variability (RSD) was ≤3.1%, and the accuracy varied between 95.4-99.9% and 95.3-101.1% respectively, for ATRA and 98.5-100.8% and 99.3-101.7%, respectively for vitamin D3. High recovery of ≥96.0% for ATRA and ≥87.80% for vitamin D3 was achieved. ATRA and vitamin D3 were stable in plasma under different storage and processing conditions. The method was applied to estimate the total drug content and entrapment efficiency of ATRA and vitamin D3 loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs). Concentration of these two agents was determined in rat plasma after simultaneous subcutaneous administration in free form or when loaded into SLNs thus establishing pharmacokinetic application of the developed procedure. Results indicated an improvement in AUC0-∞ by 5.4 times and 29.4 times for ATRA and vitamin D3, respectively, upon their incorporation into SLNs. Simultaneous administration of these two vitamins and their improved and prolonged bioavailability has scope for their use in treatment and control of tuberculosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Release Profile and Inhibition Test of The Nanoparticles A. Paniculata Extract as Inhibitor of α-Glucosidase in The Process of Carbohydrates Breakdown Into Glucose Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imansari, Farisa; Sahlan, Muhammad; Arbianti, Rita

    2017-07-01

    Andrographis paniculata (A.paniculata) contain the main active substances Andrographolide which helps lower glucose levels in diabetics by inhibiting the enzyme α-glucosidase. The ability of the extract A.paniculata in lowering glucose levels will increase with the technique encapsulation with a coating of composition Chitosan-STPP as a drug delivery to the target organ. This study aimed to get an overview of A.paniculata release profile of nanoparticles in a synthetic fluid media with various concentrations of coating and inhibition testing nasty shard extract in inhibiting the enzyme α-glucosidase. This research resulted in nanoparticles by coating efficiency and loading capacity of chitosan greatest variation of 2% and 1% STPP 60% and 46.29%. chitosan greatest variation of 2% and 1% STPP 60% and 46.29%. The ability of A.paniculata extracts as α-glucosidase enzyme inhibitors has been demonstrated in this study, the percent inhibition of 33.17%.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of Snake Venom

    OpenAIRE

    Suchaya Sanhajariya; Stephen B. Duffull; Geoffrey K. Isbister

    2018-01-01

    Understanding snake venom pharmacokinetics is essential for developing risk assessment strategies and determining the optimal dose and timing of antivenom required to bind all venom in snakebite patients. This review aims to explore the current knowledge of snake venom pharmacokinetics in animals and humans. Literature searches were conducted using EMBASE (1974–present) and Medline (1946–present). For animals, 12 out of 520 initially identified studies met the inclusion criteria. In general, ...

  14. A signal amplification assay for HSV type 1 viral DNA detection using nanoparticles and direct acoustic profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammond Richard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nucleic acid based recognition of viral sequences can be used together with label-free biosensors to provide rapid, accurate confirmation of viral infection. To enhance detection sensitivity, gold nanoparticles can be employed with mass-sensitive acoustic biosensors (such as a quartz crystal microbalance by either hybridising nanoparticle-oligonucleotide conjugates to complimentary surface-immobilised ssDNA probes on the sensor, or by using biotin-tagged target oligonucleotides bound to avidin-modified nanoparticles on the sensor. We have evaluated and refined these signal amplification assays for the detection from specific DNA sequences of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV type 1 and defined detection limits with a 16.5 MHz fundamental frequency thickness shear mode acoustic biosensor. Results In the study the performance of semi-homogeneous and homogeneous assay formats (suited to rapid, single step tests were evaluated utilising different diameter gold nanoparticles at varying DNA concentrations. Mathematical models were built to understand the effects of mass transport in the flow cell, the binding kinetics of targets to nanoparticles in solution, the packing geometries of targets on the nanoparticle, the packing of nanoparticles on the sensor surface and the effect of surface shear stiffness on the response of the acoustic sensor. This lead to the selection of optimised 15 nm nanoparticles that could be used with a 6 minute total assay time to achieve a limit of detection sensitivity of 5.2 × 10-12 M. Larger diameter nanoparticles gave poorer limits of detection than smaller particles. The limit of detection was three orders of magnitude lower than that observed using a hybridisation assay without nanoparticle signal amplification. Conclusions An analytical model was developed to determine optimal nanoparticle diameter, concentration and probe density, which allowed efficient and rapid optimisation of assay parameters

  15. Development of methodology for alternative testing strategies for the assessment of the toxicological profile of nanoparticles used in medical diagnostics. NanoTEST - EC FP7 project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dusinska, Maria; Fjellsbo, Lise Maria; Heimstad, Eldbjorg; Harju, Mikael; Bartonova, Alena; Tran, Lang; Juillerat-Jeanneret, Lucienne; Halamoda, Blanka; Marano, Francelyne; Boland, Sonja; Saunders, Margaret; Cartwright, Laura; Carreira, Sara; Thawley, Susan; Whelan, Maurice; Klein, Christoph; Housiadas, Christos; Volkovova, Katarina; Tulinska, Jana; Beno, Milan

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have unique, potentially beneficial properties, but their possible impact on human health is still not known. The area of nanomedicine brings humans into direct contact with NPs and it is essential for both public confidence and the nanotech companies that appropriate risk assessments are undertaken in relation to health and safety. There is a pressing need to understand how engineered NPs can interact with the human body following exposure. The FP7 project NanoTEST (www.nanotest-fp7.eu) addresses these requirements in relation to the toxicological profile of NPs used in medical diagnostics.

  16. UNCERTAINTIES IN TRICHLOROETHYLENE PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the pharmacokinetics of a chemical¯its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in humans and laboratory animals ¯ is critical to the assessment of its human health risks. For trichloroethylene (TCE), numerous physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK)...

  17. A correlative study of polymorphisms of CYP2C19 and MDR1 C3435T with the pharmacokinetic profiles of lansoprazole and its main metabolites following single oral administration in healthy adult Chinese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang-Yin; Zhang, Jun; Chu, Ji-Hong; Xu, Mei-Juan; Ju, Wen-Zheng; Liu, Fang; Jian-Dong, Zou

    2014-06-01

    Considering that the genotypes of CYP2C19 and MDRI C3435T are two major factors attributed to the inter-individual pharmacokinetic variability of lansoprazole (LSZ), the aim of the study was to simultaneously elucidate the effects of CYP2C19 and MDRI C3435T polymorphisms on the pharmacokinetics difference of LSZ and its metabolites 5'-hydroxy lansoprazole (HLSZ) and lansoprazole sulphone (LSZS) following oral administration of LSZ tablets in healthy Chinese subjects. Plasma concentration of LSZ, HLSZ and LSZS were quantified by a sensitive and specific LC-MS/MS method, while the genotypes of CYP2C19 and MDRI C3435T for each subject were identified by a direct sequencing method. Statistical analysis was performed in the pharmacokinetic parameters including Cmax, t1/2, Tmax, MRTo_-, AUCO-2 and AUCo_r among different genotype groups of CYP2C 19 and MDRI C3435T. Compared to the CYP2Cl9 EMs, the CYP2C 19 PM group showed slower elimination and betteroral bioavailability of LSZ, much higher plasma concentrations of LSZS and lower concentrations of HLSZ with statistically significance. Despite a tendency of more favorable absorption and rapid elimination of LSZ in wild genotype, no significant pharmacokinetics difference was observed between the wild genotype of MDR1 C3435T and its mutant types. In conclusion, the pharmacokinetics of MDRI C3435T.

  18. Nanoparticle Albumin-Bound-Paclitaxel in the Treatment of Metastatic Urethral Adenocarcinoma: The Significance of Molecular Profiling and Targeted Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin M. Abaza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary urethral cancer is rare and accounts for only 0.003% of all malignancies arising from the female genitourinary tract. Due to the rarity of this disease, no consensus exists regarding the optimal therapeutic approach. Nanoparticle albumin-bound-paclitaxel has been shown to be effective in the treatment of a number of malignancies including metastatic breast, pancreatic, and bladder cancer. We present a 67-year-old woman with advanced metastatic urethral adenocarcinoma resistant to two lines of chemotherapy (ifosfamide/paclitaxel/cisplatin and irinotecan/5-fluorouracil/leucovorin that showed a dramatic response to nanoparticle albumin-bound-paclitaxel. This is the first case report to document the use and efficacy of nanoparticle albumin-bound-paclitaxel in the treatment of unresectable metastatic urethral cancer.

  19. Clinical pharmacokinetics of melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Nathja Groth; Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Gögenur, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    was performed in PubMed and Embase databases. The pharmacokinetic variables included maximal plasma/serum concentration (Cmax), time to maximal plasma/serum concentration (Tmax), elimination half-life (T1/2), area-under-the-curve plasma/serum concentrations (AUC), clearance (Cl), volume of distribution (VD......) and 1602 L (4 mg, oral). Bioavailability of oral melatonin ranged from 9 to 33%. Pharmacokinetics was affected by age, caffeine, smoking, oral contraceptives, feeding status, and fluvoxamine. Critically ill patients displayed accelerated absorption and compromised elimination. CONCLUSIONS: Despite...

  20. HPLC assay for ethiofos in plasma: Application to pharmacokinetics in the beagle dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swynnerton, N.F.; Mangold, D.J.; Ludden, T.M.

    1985-01-01

    An HPLC assay for ethiofos [S-2-(3-amino-propylamino)ethyl phosphorothioate, WR 2727] in plasma is presented. Its application to the development of pharmacokinetic parameters following IV administration of the drug to beagle dogs is demonstrated and preliminary pharmacokinetics of four dosings will be presented. Following a dose of 150 mg kg -1 , the plasma concentration versus time profile was best described by a two-compartment pharmacokinetics model. Mean pharmacokinetic parameters were: terminal elimination half-life = 16.0 minutes, volume of central compartment = 129 mL kg -1 , and clearance = 11.0 mL min -1 kg -1

  1. Nanoparticles and the blood coagulation system. Part I: benefits of nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilinskaya, Anna N; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A

    2013-05-01

    Nanotechnology is proven to provide certain benefits in drug delivery by improving solubility, increasing uptake to target sites and changing pharmacokinetics profiles of traditional drugs. Since properties of many materials change tremendously at the nanoscale levels, nanotechnology is also being explored in various industrial applications. As such, nanoparticles are rapidly entering various areas of industry, biology and medicine. The benefits of using nanotechnology for industrial and biomedical applications are often tempered by concerns about the safety of these new materials. One such area of concern includes their effect on the immune system. While nanoparticle interactions with various constituents of the immune system have been reviewed before, little attention was given to nanoparticle effects on the blood coagulation system. Nanoparticle interface with the blood coagulation system may lead to either benefits to the host or adverse reactions. This article reviews recent advances in our understanding of nanoparticle interactions with plasma coagulation factors, platelets, endothelial cells and leukocytes. Part I is focused on desirable interactions between nanoparticles and the coagulation system, and discusses benefits of using nanotechnology to intervene in coagulation disorders. Undesirable interactions posing safety concerns are covered in part II, which will be published in the June issue of Nanomedicine.

  2. Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacokinetics of Levetiracetam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanin Clark Wright

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Status epilepticus and acute repetitive seizures still pose a management challenge despite the recent advances in the field of epilepsy. Parenteral formulations of old anticonvulsants are still a cornerstone in acute seizure management and are approved by the FDA. Intravenous levetiracetam, a second generation anticonvulsant, is approved by the FDA as an adjunctive treatment in patients 16 years or older when oral administration is not available. Data have shown that it has a unique mechanism of action, linear pharmacokinetics and no known drug interactions with other anticonvulsants. In this paper, we will review the current literature about the pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of intravenous levetiracetam and the safety profile of this new anticonvulsant in acute seizure management of both adults and children.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of Melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Gögenur, Ismail; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Despite widespread clinical application of melatonin, several unanswered questions remain regarding the pharmacokinetics of this drug. This lack of knowledge may contribute to the inconsistency of results in previous clinical studies. Currently, a t max value of 30-45 min and a t ½elimination of ...

  4. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of pemetrexed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2011-01-01

    correlates with renal function and it may be safely used with vitamin supplementation in patients with creatinine clearance ≥ 45 ml/min. The pharmacokinetics of pemetrexed is also largely unchanged in third-space fluids and can be feasibly and safely administered in combination with several other cytotoxic...

  5. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of pemetrexed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2011-01-01

    correlates with renal function and it may be safely used with vitamin supplementation in patients with creatinine clearance = 45 ml/min. The pharmacokinetics of pemetrexed is also largely unchanged in third-space fluids and can be feasibly and safely administered in combination with several other cytotoxic...

  6. Pharmacokinetics of thiamphenicol in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castells, G; Intorre, L; Franquelo, C; Cristòfol, C; Pérez, B; Martí, G; Arboix, M

    1998-11-01

    To determine pharmacokinetic parameters of thiamphenicol (TAP) after IV and IM administration in dogs. 6 healthy 2- to 3-year-old male Beagles. IN a crossover design study, 3 dogs were given TAP IV, and 3 dogs were given TAP IM, each at a dosage of 40 mg/kg of body weight. Three weeks later, the same dogs were given a second dose by the opposite route. At preestablished times after TAP administration, blood samples were collected through a catheter placed in the cephalic vein, and TAP concentration was determined by use of a high-performance liquid chromatography. Results-Kinetics of TAP administered IV were fitted by a biexponential equation with a rapid first disposition phase followed by a slower disposition phase. Elimination half-life was short (1.7+/-0.3 hours), volume of distribution at steady state was 0.66+/-0.05 L/kg, and plasma clearance was 5.3+/-0.7 ml/min/kg. After IM administration, absorption was rapid. Peak plasma concentration (25.1+/-10.3 microg/ml) was reached about 45 minutes after drug administration. The apparent elimination half-life after IM administration (5.6+/-4.6 hours) was longer than that after IV administration probably because of the slow absorption rate from the muscle. Mean bioavailability after IM administration was 96+/-7%. The pharmacokinetic profile of TAP in dogs suggests that it may be therapeutically useful against susceptible microorganisms involved in the most common infections in dogs, such as tracheobronchitis, enterocolitis, mastitis, and urinary tract infections.

  7. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antibiotics in biofilm infections of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hengzhuang, Wang; Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana

    2014-01-01

    Although progress on biofilm research has been obtained during the past decades, the treatment of biofilm infections with antibiotics remains a riddle. The pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles of an antimicrobial agent provide important information helping to establish an effici......Although progress on biofilm research has been obtained during the past decades, the treatment of biofilm infections with antibiotics remains a riddle. The pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles of an antimicrobial agent provide important information helping to establish...

  8. Periodic table-based descriptors to encode cytotoxicity profile of metal oxide nanoparticles: a mechanistic QSTR approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Supratik; Gajewicz, Agnieszka; Puzyn, Tomasz; Roy, Kunal; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2014-09-01

    Nanotechnology has evolved as a frontrunner in the development of modern science. Current studies have established toxicity of some nanoparticles to human and environment. Lack of sufficient data and low adequacy of experimental protocols hinder comprehensive risk assessment of nanoparticles (NPs). In the present work, metal electronegativity (χ), the charge of the metal cation corresponding to a given oxide (χox), atomic number and valence electron number of the metal have been used as simple molecular descriptors to build up quantitative structure-toxicity relationship (QSTR) models for prediction of cytotoxicity of metal oxide NPs to bacteria Escherichia coli. These descriptors can be easily obtained from molecular formula and information acquired from periodic table in no time. It has been shown that a simple molecular descriptor χox can efficiently encode cytotoxicity of metal oxides leading to models with high statistical quality as well as interpretability. Based on this model and previously published experimental results, we have hypothesized the most probable mechanism of the cytotoxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles to E. coli. Moreover, the required information for descriptor calculation is independent of size range of NPs, nullifying a significant problem that various physical properties of NPs change for different size ranges. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of chronic dietary exposure of zinc oxide nanoparticles on the serum protein profile of juvenile common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chupani, Latifeh; Zusková, Eliška; Niksirat, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) have been dramatically used in industry, biology, and medicine. Despite their interesting physico-chemical properties for application in various industrial, medical, and consumer products, safe use of ZnO NPs are under challenges due to the inadequate....... We compared the serum proteome profile from 7 controls and 7 treated fish. In addition, zinc accumulation were measured in intestine, liver, gill and brain. In total, we were able to identify 326 proteins from 6845 distinct peptides. As a result of the data analysis, the abundance levels of four...... fish. No significant difference was observed for zinc accumulation in exposed fish compared to controls. In summary, despite no apparent accumulation, ZnO NPs exposure to common carp probably disturbs the fish homeostasis by affecting proteins of the haematological and the immune systems....

  10. Formulation of enrofloxacin SLNs and its pharmacokinetics in emu ( Dromaius novaehollandiae) birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthil Kumar, P.; Arivuchelvan, A.; Jagadeeswaran, A.; Punniamurthy, N.; Selvaraj, P.; Richard Jagatheesan, P. N.; Mekala, P.

    2015-08-01

    The study was conducted to formulate the enrofloxacin solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) with sustained release profile and improved pharmacological activity and evaluate the pharmacokinetic behaviour of enrofloxacin SLNs after oral routes of administration in emus. The SLNs were prepared using tripalmitin as lipid carrier, Tween 80 and Span 80 as surfactants and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as a stabilizer by a hot homogenization coupled with ultrasonication method. The prepared enrofloxacin SLNs formulations were characterized for further investigation in emu birds. The pharmacokinetics of native enrofloxacin was studied after i.v. and oral bolus administration at 10 mg/kg in emu birds and compared with the disposition kinetics of enrofloxacin SLNs. Enrofloxacin and its metabolite ciprofloxacin in plasma were estimated using HPLC and the pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by a non-compartmental analysis. The results demonstrated that the particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency and loading capacity of the SLNs were 154.72 ± 6.11 nm, 0.42 ± 0.11, -28.83 ± 0.60 mV, 59.66 ± 3.22 and 6.13 ± 0.32 %, respectively. AFM and TEM images showed spherical to circular particles with well-defined periphery. In vitro drug release exhibited biphasic pattern with an initial burst release of 18 % within 2 h followed by sustained release over 96 h. Pharmacokinetic results showed that the t 1/2 β , AUC0-∞, V darea/ F, MRT and bioavailability were 3.107, 1.894, 1.594, 2.993 and 1.895 times enhanced ( p enrofloxacin administered orally. The ratio of AUC0- t cipro/AUC0- t enro after administration of native enrofloxacin and enrofloxacin SLNs was less than 10 %. The t 1/2 β and MRT of the metabolite were longer than those of the parent substance. The PK/PD results confirmed that the SLNs extended the enrofloxacin concentration upto 48 h against pathogens susceptible to 0.125 μg/mL in emus. The results indicated that SLNs might be a

  11. Farmacocinética da associação de glucosamina e sulfato de condroitina em humanos sadios do sexo masculino Pharmacokinetic profile of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate association in healthy male individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odaly Toffoletto

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A osteoartrose é uma doença crônica das articulações que, uma vez instalada, leva seus portadores a uma incapacidade funcional progressiva. Como os proteocondroitins sulfato são os maiores constituintes das cartilagens, espera-se que com a ingestão de glucosamina e condroitina haja uma melhora das condições biológicas desse tecido. Uma vez que não temos conhecimento de estudo da farmacocinética da administração oral dessa associação em seres humanos, o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliá-la utilizando a associação entre o sulfato de glucosamina (SG e o sulfato de condroitina (SC administrada a dois grupos de doze voluntários sadios do sexo masculino (grupo I uma cápsula de (500 mg SG; 400 mg SC e grupo II quatro cápsulas. Amostras de sangue foram retiradas a intervalos de tempo pré-definidos até 48 horas pós-dose. O SG e o SC foram dosados no plasma pelo método de DMMB (azul de 1,9,dimetildimetileno. A concentração máxima foi atingida em 2 horas (média ±SE; 0,893±0,093 µg/mL, grupo I e 2,222±0,313 µg/mL, grupo II. As áreas sob a curva até 48 horas foram de 10,803±0,965 µg-hr/mL e 38,776±2,981 µg-hr/mL, respectivamente para os grupos I e II. Os dois grupos apresentaram um segundo pico após 18 horas, indicando circulação êntero-hepática. Os nossos resultados indicam que essa associação é absorvida por via oral por mecanismo saturável, o que pode facilitar o seu uso em tratamentos clínicos.Osteoarthrosis is a chronic joint disease that, once patent, leads to a progressive functional disability. As proteochondroitin sulfates are the major contents of the cartilage, it is expected that the ingestion of glucosamine and chondroitin might improve the biological status of that tissue. As we could not find any studies on the pharmacokinetic profile of this association by oral administration route in human beings, the objective of this study was to evaluate it by using the association of glucosamine sulfate

  12. Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Agglomeration Influences Dose-Rates and Modulates Oxidative Stress Mediated Dose-Response Profiles In Vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Wang, Wei; Minard, Kevin R.; Karin, Norman J.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-07-31

    Spontaneous agglomeration of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) is a common problem in cell culture media which can confound interpretation of in vitro nanotoxicity studies. The authors created stable agglomerates of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in conventional culture medium, which varied in hydrodynamic size (276 nm-1.5 μm) but were composed of identical primary particles with similar surface potentials and protein coatings. Studies using C10 lung epithelial cells show that the dose rate effects of agglomeration can be substantial, varying by over an order of magnitude difference in cellular dose in some cases. Quantification by magnetic particle detection showed that small agglomerates of carboxylated IONPs induced greater cytotoxicity and redox-regulated gene expression when compared with large agglomerates on an equivalent total cellular IONP mass dose basis, whereas agglomerates of amine-modified IONPs failed to induce cytotoxicity or redox-regulated gene expression despite delivery of similar cellular doses. Dosimetry modelling and experimental measurements reveal that on a delivered surface area basis, large and small agglomerates of carboxylated IONPs have similar inherent potency for the generation of ROS, induction of stress-related genes and eventual cytotoxicity. The results suggest that reactive moieties on the agglomerate surface are more efficient in catalysing cellular ROS production than molecules buried within the agglomerate core. Because of the dynamic, size and density-dependent nature of ENP delivery to cells in vitro, the biological consequences of agglomeration are not discernible from static measures of exposure concentration (μg/ml) alone, highlighting the central importance of integrated physical characterisation and quantitative dosimetry for in vitro studies. The combined experimental and computational approach provides a quantitative framework for evaluating relationships between the biocompatibility of nanoparticles and their

  13. Iron oxide nanoparticle agglomeration influences dose rates and modulates oxidative stress-mediated dose–response profiles in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Kodali, Vamsi; Gaffrey, Matthew; Wang, Wei; Minard, Kevin R.; Karin, Norman J.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous agglomeration of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) is a common problem in cell culture media which can confound interpretation of in vitro nanotoxicity studies. The authors created stable agglomerates of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in conventional culture medium, which varied in hydrodynamic size (276 nm–1.5 μm) but were composed of identical primary particles with similar surface potentials and protein coatings. Studies using C10 lung epithelial cells show that the dose rate effects of agglomeration can be substantial, varying by over an order of magnitude difference in cellular dose in some cases. Quantification by magnetic particle detection showed that small agglomerates of carboxylated IONPs induced greater cytotoxicity and redox-regulated gene expression when compared with large agglomerates on an equivalent total cellular IONP mass dose basis, whereas agglomerates of amine-modified IONPs failed to induce cytotoxicity or redox-regulated gene expression despite delivery of similar cellular doses. Dosimetry modelling and experimental measurements reveal that on a delivered surface area basis, large and small agglomerates of carboxylated IONPs have similar inherent potency for the generation of ROS, induction of stress-related genes and eventual cytotoxicity. The results suggest that reactive moieties on the agglomerate surface are more efficient in catalysing cellular ROS production than molecules buried within the agglomerate core. Because of the dynamic, size and density-dependent nature of ENP delivery to cells in vitro, the biological consequences of agglomeration are not discernible from static measures of exposure concentration (μg/ml) alone, highlighting the central importance of integrated physical characterisation and quantitative dosimetry for in vitro studies. The combined experimental and computational approach provides a quantitative framework for evaluating relationships between the biocompatibility of nanoparticles and their

  14. Nanotoxic Profiling of Novel Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Functionalized with Perchloric Acid and SiPEG as a Radiographic Contrast Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Idham Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Emerging syntheses and findings of new metallic nanoparticles (MNPs have become an important aspect in various fields including diagnostic imaging. To date, iodine has been utilized as a radiographic contrast medium. However, the raise concern of iodine threats on iodine-intolerance patient has led to search of new contrast media with lower toxic level. In this animal modeling study, 14 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs with silane-polyethylene glycol (SiPEG and perchloric acid have been assessed for toxicity level as compared to conventional iodine. The nanotoxicity of IONPs was evaluated in liver biochemistry, reactive oxygen species production (ROS, lipid peroxidation mechanism, and ultrastructural evaluation using transmission electron microscope (TEM. The hematological analysis and liver function test (LFT revealed that most of the liver enzymes were significantly higher in iodine-administered group as compared to those in normal and IONPs groups P<0.05. ROS production assay and lipid peroxidation indicator, malondialdehyde (MDA, also showed significant reductions in comparison with iodine group P<0.05. TEM evaluation yielded the aberration of nucleus structure of iodine-administered group as compared to those in control and IONPs groups. This study has demonstrated the less toxic properties of IONPs and it may postulate that IONPs are safe to be applied as radiographic contrast medium.

  15. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of a telodendrimer micellar paclitaxel nanoformulation in a mouse xenograft model of ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao W

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Wenwu Xiao1, Juntao Luo2, Teesta Jain3, John Riggs3, Harry P Tseng1, Paul T Henderson3, Simon R Cherry4, Douglas Rowland4, Kit S Lam1,31Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, UC Davis Cancer Center, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA; 2Department of Pharmacology, SUNY Upstate Cancer Research Institute, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY; 3Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, 4Department of Biomedical Engineering, UC Davis Cancer Center, University of California Davis, Davis, CABackground: A multifunctional telodendrimer-based micelle system was characterized for delivery of imaging and chemotherapy agents to mouse tumor xenografts. Previous optical imaging studies demonstrated qualitatively that these classes of nanoparticles, called nanomicelles, preferentially accumulate at tumor sites in mice. The research reported herein describes the detailed quantitative imaging and biodistribution profiling of nanomicelles loaded with a cargo of paclitaxel.Methods: The telodendrimer was covalently labeled with 125I and the nanomicelles were loaded with 14C-paclitaxel, which allowed measurement of pharmacokinetics and biodistribution in the mice using microSPECT/CT imaging and liquid scintillation counting, respectively.Results: The radio imaging data showed preferential accumulation of nanomicelles at the tumor site along with a slower clearance rate than paclitaxel formulated in Cremophor EL (Taxol®. Liquid scintillation counting confirmed that 14C-labeled paclitaxel sequestered in nanomicelles had increased uptake by tumor tissue and slower pharmacokinetics than Taxol.Conclusion: Overall, the results indicate that nanomicelle-formulated paclitaxel is a potentially superior formulation compared with Taxol in terms of water solubility, pharmacokinetics, and tumor accumulation, and may be clinically useful for both tumor imaging and improved chemotherapy applications

  16. Triple Drug Combination of Zidovudine, Efavirenz and Lamivudine Loaded Lactoferrin Nanoparticles: an Effective Nano First-Line Regimen for HIV Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prashant; Lakshmi, Yeruva Samrajya; Kondapi, Anand K

    2017-02-01

    To enhance efficacy, bioavailability and reduce toxicity of first-line highly active anti-retroviral regimen, zidovudine + efavirenz + lamivudine loaded lactoferrin nanoparticles were prepared (FLART-NP) and characterized for physicochemical properties, bioactivity and pharmacokinetic profile. Nanoparticles were prepared using sol-oil protocol and characterized using different sources such as FE-SEM, AFM, NanoSight, and FT-IR. In-vitro and in-vivo studies have been done to access the encapsulation-efficiency, cellular localization, release kinetics, safety analysis, biodistribution and pharmacokinetics. FLART-NP with a mean diameter of 67 nm (FE-SEM) and an encapsulation efficiency of >58% for each drug were prepared. In-vitro studies suggest that FLART-NP deliver the maximum of its payload at pH5 with a minimum burst release throughout the study period with negligible toxicity to the erythrocytes plus improved in-vitro anti-HIV activity. FLART-NP has improved the in-vivo pharmacokinetics (PK) profiles over the free drugs; an average of >4fold increase in AUC and AUMC, 30% increase in the C max , >2fold in the half-life of each drug. Biodistribution data suggest that FLART-NP has improved the bioavailability of all drugs with less tissue-related inflammation as suggested with histopathological evaluation CONCLUSIONS: The triple-drug loaded nanoparticles have various advantages against soluble (free) drug combination in terms of enhanced bioavailability, improved PK profile and diminished drug-associated toxicity.

  17. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Paclitaxel Monotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stage, Tore B; Bergmann, Troels K; Kroetz, Deanna L

    2018-01-01

    Paclitaxel is an anticancer agent efficacious in the treatment of ovarian, breast, and lung cancer. Due to a strong link between the pharmacokinetics and therapeutic efficacy of paclitaxel, we reviewed the literature on paclitaxel pharmacokinetics. Systematic data mining was performed to extract ...

  18. Pharmacokinetics of Snake Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchaya Sanhajariya

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding snake venom pharmacokinetics is essential for developing risk assessment strategies and determining the optimal dose and timing of antivenom required to bind all venom in snakebite patients. This review aims to explore the current knowledge of snake venom pharmacokinetics in animals and humans. Literature searches were conducted using EMBASE (1974–present and Medline (1946–present. For animals, 12 out of 520 initially identified studies met the inclusion criteria. In general, the disposition of snake venom was described by a two-compartment model consisting of a rapid distribution phase and a slow elimination phase, with half-lives of 5 to 48 min and 0.8 to 28 h, respectively, following rapid intravenous injection of the venoms or toxins. When the venoms or toxins were administered intramuscularly or subcutaneously, an initial absorption phase and slow elimination phase were observed. The bioavailability of venoms or toxins ranged from 4 to 81.5% following intramuscular administration and 60% following subcutaneous administration. The volume of distribution and the clearance varied between snake species. For humans, 24 out of 666 initially identified publications contained sufficient information and timed venom concentrations in the absence of antivenom therapy for data extraction. The data were extracted and modelled in NONMEM. A one-compartment model provided the best fit, with an elimination half-life of 9.71 ± 1.29 h. It is intended that the quantitative information provided in this review will provide a useful basis for future studies that address the pharmacokinetics of snakebite in humans.

  19. Surface chemistry of gold nanoparticles determines the biocorona composition impacting cellular uptake, toxicity and gene expression profiles in human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Parwathy; Riviere, Jim E; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A

    2017-05-01

    This study investigated the role of nanoparticle size and surface chemistry on biocorona composition and its effect on uptake, toxicity and cellular responses in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), employing 40 and 80 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNP) with branched polyethyleneimine (BPEI), lipoic acid (LA) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) coatings. Proteomic analysis identified 59 hard corona proteins among the various AuNP, revealing largely surface chemistry-dependent signature adsorbomes exhibiting human serum albumin (HSA) abundance. Size distribution analysis revealed the relative instability and aggregation inducing potential of bare and corona-bound BPEI-AuNP, over LA- and PEG-AuNP. Circular dichroism analysis showed surface chemistry-dependent conformational changes of proteins binding to AuNP. Time-dependent uptake of bare, plasma corona (PC) and HSA corona-bound AuNP (HSA-AuNP) showed significant reduction in uptake with PC formation. Cell viability studies demonstrated dose-dependent toxicity of BPEI-AuNP. Transcriptional profiling studies revealed 126 genes, from 13 biological pathways, to be differentially regulated by 40 nm bare and PC-bound BPEI-AuNP (PC-BPEI-AuNP). Furthermore, PC formation relieved the toxicity of cationic BPEI-AuNP by modulating expression of genes involved in DNA damage and repair, heat shock response, mitochondrial energy metabolism, oxidative stress and antioxidant response, and ER stress and unfolded protein response cascades, which were aberrantly expressed in bare BPEI-AuNP-treated cells. NP surface chemistry is shown to play the dominant role over size in determining the biocorona composition, which in turn modulates cell uptake, and biological responses, consequently defining the potential safety and efficacy of nanoformulations.

  20. Preparation and ocular pharmacokinetics of ganciclovir liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yan; Tu, Jiasheng

    2007-12-07

    Ophthalmic liposomes of ganciclovir (GCV) were prepared by the reverse phase evaporation method, and their ocular pharmacokinetics in albino rabbits were compared with those obtained after dosing with GCV solution. The in vitro transcorneal permeability of GCV liposomes was found to be 3.9-fold higher than that of the solution. After in vivo instillation in albino rabbits, no difference was found in the precorneal elimination rate of GCV from liposome vs solution dosing. The aqueous humor concentration-time profiles of both liposomes and solution were well described by 2-compartmental pharmacokinetics with first-order absorption. The area under the curve of the aqueous humor concentration-time profiles of GCV liposomes was found to be 1.7-fold higher than that of GCV solution. Ocular tissue distribution of GCV from liposomes was 2 to 10 times higher in the sclera, cornea, iris, lens, and vitreous humor when compared with those observed after solution dosing. These results suggested that liposomes may hold some promise in ocular GCV delivery.

  1. Effect of different levels of copper nanoparticles and copper sulphate on performance, metabolism and blood biochemical profiles in broiler chicken

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skot, Abdullah Talal Abdullah; Vadalasetty, Krishna Prasad; Lukasiewicz, M.

    2018-01-01

    the final body weight, average daily gain and feed conversion ratio in relation to the control group. Conversely, the provision of Cu in the drinking water had less of an effect on growth performance in comparison with the injected groups. A significant improvement was shown in energy and nitrogen......A study was conducted to investigate the influence of copper administration in ovo to chicken embryos and/or supplied in drinking water to growing chickens in the form copper nanoparticles (Cu-NP) or copper sulphate (CuSO4). The fertilised eggs were assigned to three groups (n = 50 per group......): control (not injected), injected with 50 mg/kg Cu-NP or with 50 mg/kg CuSO4 at day 1 of incubation. Thereafter, 126 one-day-old broiler chickens were randomly assigned to seven post-hatched groups: control not injected and not provided with Cu in the drinking water, injected with 50 mg/kg Cu-NP + 20 mg...

  2. Clinical pharmacology profile of vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Marian; Friedman, Evan J; Sandhu, Punam; Agrawal, Nancy G B; Rubin, Eric H; Wagner, John A

    2013-09-01

    Vorinostat is a histone deacetylase inhibitor that has demonstrated preclinical activity in numerous cancer models. Clinical activity has been demonstrated in patients with a variety of malignancies. Vorinostat is presently indicated for the treatment of patients with advanced cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL). Clinical investigation is ongoing for therapy of other solid tumors and hematological malignancies either as monotherapy or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. This review summarizes the pharmacokinetic properties of vorinostat. Monotherapy pharmacokinetic data across a number of pharmacokinetic studies were reviewed, and data are presented. In addition, literature review was performed to obtain published Phase I and II pharmacokinetic combination therapy data to identify and characterize potential drug interactions with vorinostat. Pharmacokinetic data in special populations were also reviewed. The clinical pharmacology profile of vorinostat is favorable, exhibiting dose-proportional pharmacokinetics and modest food effect. There appear to be no major differences in the pharmacokinetics of vorinostat in special populations, including varying demographics and hepatic dysfunction. Combination therapy pharmacokinetic data indicate that vorinostat has a low propensity for drug interactions. Vorinostat's favorable clinical pharmacology and drug interaction profile aid in the ease of administration of vorinostat for the treatment of advanced CTCL and will be beneficial in continued assessment for other oncologic indications. Although a number of studies have been conducted to elucidate the detailed pharmacokinetic profile of vorinostat, more rigorous assessment of vorinostat pharmacokinetics, including clinical drug interaction studies, will be informative.

  3. Enhanced drug encapsulation and extended release profiles of calcium-alginate nanoparticles by using tannic acid as a bridging cross-linking agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulateefeh, Samer R; Taha, Mutasem O

    2015-01-01

    Calcium alginate nanoparticles (NPs) suffer from sub-optimal stability in bio-relevant media leading to low drug encapsulation efficiency and uncontrolled release profiles. To sort out these drawbacks, a novel approach is proposed herein based on introducing tannic acid into these NPs to act as a bridging cross-linking aid agent. Calcium-alginate NPs were prepared by the ionotropic gelation method and loaded with diltiazem hydrochloride as a model drug. These NPs were characterized in terms of particle size, zeta potential, and morphology, and results were explained in accordance with Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The incorporation of tannic acid led to more than four folds increase in drug encapsulation efficiency (i.e. from 15.3% to 69.5%) and reduced burst drug release from 44% to around 10% within the first 30 min. These findings suggest the possibility of improving the properties of Ca-alginate NPs by incorporating cross-linking aid agents under mild conditions.

  4. A Mathematical Model of the Effect of Immunogenicity on Therapeutic Protein Pharmacokinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiaoying; Hickling, Timothy; Kraynov, Eugenia; Kuang, Bing; Parng, Chuenlei; Vicini, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    A mathematical pharmacokinetic/anti-drug-antibody (PK/ADA) model was constructed for quantitatively assessing immunogenicity for therapeutic proteins. The model is inspired by traditional pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) models, and is based on the observed impact of ADA on protein drug clearance. The hypothesis for this work is that altered drug PK contains information about the extent and timing of ADA generation. By fitting drug PK profiles while accounting for ADA-mediated drug cle...

  5. Pharmacokinetics of clomipramine during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Horst, P G J; Proost, J H; Smit, J P; Vries, M T; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje; Wilffert, B

    2015-01-01

    Clomipramine is one of the drugs for depression during pregnancy; however, pharmacokinetic data of clomipramine and its active metabolite desmethylclomipramine in this vulnerable period are lacking. In this study, we describe clomipramine and desmethylclomipramine concentrations including their

  6. Optimization of caseinate-coated simvastatin-zein nanoparticles: improved bioavailability and modified release characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Osama A A; Hosny, Khaled M; Al-Sawahli, Majid M; Fahmy, Usama A

    2015-01-01

    The current study focuses on utilization of the natural biocompatible polymer zein to formulate simvastatin (SMV) nanoparticles coated with caseinate, to improve solubility and hence bioavailability, and in addition, to modify SMV-release characteristics. This formulation can be utilized for oral or possible depot parenteral applications. Fifteen formulations were prepared by liquid-liquid phase separation method, according to the Box-Behnken design, to optimize formulation variables. Sodium caseinate was used as an electrosteric stabilizer. The factors studied were: percentage of SMV in the SMV-zein mixture (X1), ethanol concentration (X2), and caseinate concentration (X3). The selected dependent variables were mean particle size (Y1), SMV encapsulation efficiency (Y2), and cumulative percentage of drug permeated after 1 hour (Y3). The diffusion of SMV from the prepared nanoparticles specified by the design was carried out using an automated Franz diffusion cell apparatus. The optimized SMV-zein formula was investigated for in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters compared with an oral SMV suspension. The optimized nanosized SMV-zein formula showed a 131 nm mean particle size and 89% encapsulation efficiency. In vitro permeation studies displayed delayed permeation characteristics, with about 42% and 85% of SMV cumulative amount released after 12 and 48 hours, respectively. Bioavailability estimation in rats revealed an augmentation in SMV bioavailability from the optimized SMV-zein formulation, by fourfold relative to SMV suspension. Formulation of caseinate-coated SMV-zein nanoparticles improves the pharmacokinetic profile and bioavailability of SMV. Accordingly, improved hypolipidemic activities for longer duration could be achieved. In addition, the reduced dosage rate of SMV-zein nanoparticles improves patient tolerability and compliance.

  7. PHARMACOKINETIC RESEARCHES AND PRACTICAL MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Belolipetskaya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An article gives in a comprehensive manner the main idea of pharmacokinetics, as the science about rules of substances behavior in the internal environment of the organism, as well as of main parameters of pharmacokinetic researches. The article provides vivid and very  persuasive examples of high practical importance of this science both for creating new medical forms of drugs and for choosing the optimal of therapy regime.

  8. PHARMACOKINETIC RESEARCHES AND PRACTICAL MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Belolipetskaya

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available An article gives in a comprehensive manner the main idea of pharmacokinetics, as the science about rules of substances behavior in the internal environment of the organism, as well as of main parameters of pharmacokinetic researches. The article provides vivid and very  persuasive examples of high practical importance of this science both for creating new medical forms of drugs and for choosing the optimal of therapy regime.

  9. Nanoparticles - A review | Mohanraj | Tropical Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... been used as a physical approach to alter and improve the pharmacokinetic ... They have been used in vivo to protect the drug entity in the systemic ... effect of their characteristics and their applications in delivery of drug molecules and therapeutic genes. Keywords: nanoparticles, drug delivery, targeting, drug release

  10. The effect of particle shape on cellular interaction and drug delivery applications of micro- and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Anil B

    2017-10-30

    Encapsulation of therapeutic agents in nanoparticles offers several benefits including improved bioavailability, site specific delivery, reduced toxicity and in vivo stability of proteins and nucleotides over conventional delivery options. These benefits are consequence of distinct in vivo pharmacokinetic and biodistribution profile of nanoparticles, which is dictated by the complex interplay of size, surface charge and surface hydrophobicity. Recently, particle shape has been identified as a new physical parameter which has exerted tremendous impact on cellular uptake and biodistribution, thereby in vivo performance of nanoparticles. Improved therapeutic efficacy of anticancer agents using non-spherical particles is the recent development in the field. Additionally, immunological response of nanoparticles was also altered when antigens were loaded in non-spherical nanovehicles. The apparent impact of particle shape inspired the new research in the field of drug delivery. The present review therefore details the research in this field. The review focuses on methods of fabrication of particles of non-spherical geometries and impact of particle shape on cellular uptake, biodistribution, tumor targeting and production of immunological responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Elucidation of Arctigenin Pharmacokinetics and Tissue Distribution after Intravenous, Oral, Hypodermic and Sublingual Administration in Rats and Beagle Dogs: Integration of In Vitro and In Vivo Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Jie Li; Jie Li; Jie Li; Xin Li; Xin Li; Xin Li; Yu-Shan Ren; Yu-Shan Ren; Yuan-Yuan Lv; Yuan-Yuan Lv; Yuan-Yuan Lv; Jun-Sheng Zhang; Jun-Sheng Zhang; Jun-Sheng Zhang; Xiao-Li Xu

    2017-01-01

    Although arctigenin (AG) has diverse bioactivities, such as anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, immunoregulatory and neuroprotective activities, its pharmacokinetics have not been systematically evaluated. The purpose of this work was to identify the pharmacokinetic properties of AG via various experiments in vivo and in vitro. In this research, rats and beagle dogs were used to investigate the PK (pharmacokinetics, PK) profiles of AG with different drug-delivery manners, including ...

  12. Pharmacokinetic modeling of therapies for systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xiaoyan; Sherwin, Catherine MT; Yu, Tian; Yellepeddi, Venkata K; Brunner, Hermine I; Vinks, Alexander A

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing use of different types of therapies in treating autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), there is a need to utilize pharmacokinetic (PK) strategies to optimize the clinical outcome of these treatments. Various PK analysis approaches, including population PK modeling and physiologically based PK modeling, have been used to evaluate drug PK characteristics and population variability or to predict drug PK profiles in a mechanistic manner. This review ou...

  13. Bioavailability and Pharmacokinetics of Oral Cocaine in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Marion A; Jufer Phipps, Rebecca A; Cone, Edward J; Walsh, Sharon L

    2018-06-01

    The pharmacokinetic profile of oral cocaine has not been fully characterized and prospective data on oral bioavailability are limited. A within-subject study was performed to characterize the bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of oral cocaine. Fourteen healthy inpatient participants (six males) with current histories of cocaine use were administered two oral doses (100 and 200 mg) and one intravenous (IV) dose (40 mg) of cocaine during three separate dosing sessions. Plasma samples were collected for up to 24 h after dosing and analyzed for cocaine and metabolites by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by non-compartmental analysis, and a two-factor model was used to assess for dose and sex differences. The mean ± SEM oral cocaine bioavailability was 0.32 ± 0.04 after 100 and 0.45 ± 0.06 after 200 mg oral cocaine. Volume of distribution (Vd) and clearance (CL) were both greatest after 100 mg oral (Vd = 4.2 L/kg; CL = 116.2 mL/[min kg]) compared to 200 mg oral (Vd = 2.9 L/kg; CL = 87.5 mL/[min kg]) and 40 mg IV (Vd = 1.3 L/kg; CL = 32.7 mL/[min kg]). Oral cocaine area-under-thecurve (AUC) and peak concentration increased in a dose-related manner. AUC metabolite-to-parent ratios of benzoylecgonine and ecgonine methyl ester were significantly higher after oral compared to IV administration and highest after the lower oral dose. In addition, minor metabolites were detected in higher concentrations after oral compared to IV cocaine. Oral cocaine produced a pharmacokinetic profile different from IV cocaine, which appears as a rightward and downward shift in the concentration-time profile. Cocaine bioavailability values were similar to previous estimates. Oral cocaine also produced a unique metabolic profile, with greater concentrations of major and minor metabolites.

  14. Compartmental analysis, imaging techniques and population pharmacokinetic. Experiences at CENTIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernández, Ignacio; León, Mariela; Leyva, Rene; Castro, Yusniel; Ayra, Fernando E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In pharmacokinetic evaluation small rodents are used in a large extend. Traditional pharmacokinetic evaluations by the two steps approach can be replaced by the sparse data design which may also represent a complicated situation to evaluate satisfactorily from the statistical point of view. In this presentation different situations of sparse data sampling are analyzed based on practical consideration. Non linear mixed effect model was selected in order to estimate pharmacokinetic parameters in simulated data from real experimental results using blood sampling and imaging procedures. Materials and methods: Different scenarios representing several experimental designs of incomplete individual profiles were evaluated. Data sets were simulated based on real data from previous experiments. In all cases three to five blood samples were considered per time point. A combination of compartmental analysis with tumor uptake obtained by gammagraphy of radiolabeled drugs is also evaluated.All pharmacokinetic profiles were analyzed by means of MONOLIX software version 4.2.3. Results: All sampling schedules yield the same results when computed using the MONOLIX software and the SAEM algorithm. Population and individual pharmacokinetic parameters were accurately estimated with three or five determination per sampling point. According with the used methodology and software tool, it can be an expected result, but demonstrating the method performance in such situations, allow us to select a more flexible design using a very small number of animals in preclinical research. The combination with imaging procedures also allows us to construct a completely structured compartmental analysis. Results of real experiments are presented demonstrating the versatility of used methodology in different evaluations. The same sampling approach can be considered in phase I or II clinical trials. (author)

  15. Clinical Population Pharmacokinetics and Toxicodynamics of Linezolid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boak, Lauren M.; Rayner, Craig R.; Grayson, M. Lindsay; Paterson, David L.; Spelman, Denis; Khumra, Sharmila; Capitano, Blair; Forrest, Alan; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common side effect of linezolid, an oxazolidinone antibiotic often used to treat multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacterial infections. Various risk factors have been suggested, including linezolid dose and duration of therapy, baseline platelet counts, and renal dysfunction; still, the mechanisms behind this potentially treatment-limiting toxicity are largely unknown. A clinical study was conducted to investigate the relationship between linezolid pharmacokinetics and toxicodynamics and inform strategies to prevent and manage linezolid-associated toxicity. Forty-one patients received 42 separate treatment courses of linezolid (600 mg every 12 h). A new mechanism-based, population pharmacokinetic/toxicodynamic model was developed to describe the time course of plasma linezolid concentrations and platelets. A linezolid concentration of 8.06 mg/liter (101% between-patient variability) inhibited the synthesis of platelet precursor cells by 50%. Simulations predicted treatment durations of 5 and 7 days to carry a substantially lower risk than 10- to 28-day therapy for platelet nadirs of linezolid therapy and large between-patient variability, close monitoring of patients for development of toxicity is important. Dose individualization based on plasma linezolid concentration profiles and platelet counts should be considered to minimize linezolid-associated thrombocytopenia. Overall, oxazolidinone therapy over 5 to 7 days even at relatively high doses was predicted to be as safe as 10-day therapy of 600 mg linezolid every 12 h. PMID:24514086

  16. Co-delivery of cisplatin and paclitaxel by folic acid conjugated amphiphilic PEG-PLGA copolymer nanoparticles for the treatment of non-small lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zelai; Huang, Jingwen; Xu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xiangyu; Teng, Yanwei; Huang, Can; Wu, Yufeng; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Huijun; Sun, Wenjie

    2015-12-08

    An amphiphilic copolymer, folic acid (FA) modified poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (FA-PEG-PLGA) was prepared and explored as a nanometer carrier for the co-delivery of cisplatin (cis-diaminodichloroplatinum, CDDP) and paclitaxel (PTX). CDDP and PTX were encapsulated inside the hydrophobic inner core and chelated to the middle shell, respectively. PEG provided the outer corona for prolonged circulation. An in vitro release profile of the CDDP + PTX-encapsulated nanoparticles revealed that the PTX chelation cross-link prevented an initial burst release of CDDP. After an incubation period of 24 hours, the CDDP+PTX-encapsulated nanoparticles exhibited a highly synergistic effect for the inhibition of A549 (FA receptor negative) and M109 (FA receptor positive) lung cancer cell line proliferation. Pharmacokinetic experiment and distribution research shows that nanoparticles have longer circulation time in the blood and can prolong the treatment times of chemotherapeutic drugs. For the in vivo treatment of A549 cells xeno-graft lung tumor, the CDDP+PTX-encapsulated nanoparticles displayed an obvious tumor inhibiting effect with an 89.96% tumor suppression rate (TSR). This TSR was significantly higher than that of free chemotherapy drug combination or nanoparticles with a single drug. For M109 cells xeno-graft tumor, the TSR was 95.03%. In vitro and in vivo experiments have all shown that the CDDP+PTX-encapsulated nanoparticles have better targeting and antitumor effects in M109 cells than CDDP+PTX-loaded PEG-PLGA nanoparticles (p nanoparticles came with reduced side-effects. No obvious body weight loss or functional changes occurred within blood components, liver, or kidneys during the treatment of A549 and M109 tumor-bearing mice with the CDDP+PTX-encapsulated nanoparticles. Thus, the FA modified amphiphilic copolymer-based combination of CDDP and PTX may provide useful guidance for effective and safe cancer chemotherapy, especially in tumors with

  17. Pharmacokinetic studies of neuromuscular blocking agents: Good Clinical Research Practice (GCRP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viby-Mogensen, J.; Østergaard, D.; Donati, F.

    2000-01-01

    Good Clinical Research Practice (GCRP), neuromuscular blocking agents, pharmacokinetics, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling, population pharmacokinetics, statistics, study design......Good Clinical Research Practice (GCRP), neuromuscular blocking agents, pharmacokinetics, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling, population pharmacokinetics, statistics, study design...

  18. Modelling delays in pharmacokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooqi, Z.H.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    Linear system analysis has come to form the backbone of pharmacokinetics. Natural systems usually involve time delays, thus models incorporating them would be an order closer approximation to the real world compared to those that do not. Delays may be modelled in several ways. The approach considered in this study is to have a discrete-time delay dependent rate with the delay respresenting the duration between the entry of a drug into a compartment and its release in some form (may be as a metabolite) from the compartment. Such a delay may be because of one or more of several physiological reasons, like, formation of a reservoir, slow metabolism, or receptor binding. The mathematical structure this gives rise to is a system of delay-differential equations. Examples are given of simple one and two compartment systems with drugs like bumetanide, carbamazepine, and quinolone-caffeine interaction. In these examples generally a good fit is obtained and the suggested models form a good approximation. 21 refs., 6 figs

  19. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of SCT800, a new recombinant FVIII, in hemophilia A mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ruo-lan; Liu, Liang; Xie, Liang-zhi; Gai, Wen-lin; Cao, Si-shuo; Meng, Zhi-yun; Gan, Hui; Wu, Zhuo-na; Li, Jian; Zheng, Ying; Zhu, Xiao-xia; Dou, Gui-fang

    2016-01-01

    Aim: SCT800 is a new third-generation recombinant FVIII agent that is undergoing promising preclinical study. This study aimed to investigate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of SCT800 in hemophilia A mice. Methods: After hemophilia A mice were intravenously injected with single dose of SCT800 (80, 180, and 280 IU/kg) or the commercially available product Xyntha (280 IU/kg), pharmacokinetics profiles were evaluated based on measuring plasma FVIII: C. For pharmacodynamics study, dose-response curves of SCT800 and Xyntha (1–200 IU/kg) were constructed using a tail bleeding model monitoring both bleeding time and blood loss. Results: Pharmacokinetics profile analysis showed a dose independency of SCT800 ranging from 80 to 280 IU/kg and comparable pharmacokinetic profiles between SCT800 and Xyntha at the doses tested. Pharmacodynamics study revealed comparable ED50 values of SCT800 and Xyntha in the tail bleeding model: 14.78 and 15.81 IU/kg for bleeding time, respectively; 13.50 and 13.58 IU/kg for blood loss, respectively. Moreover, at the doses tested, the accompanying dose-related safety evaluation in the tail bleeding model showed lower hypercoagulable tendency and wider dosage range potential for SCT800 than Xyntha. Conclusion: In hemophilia A mice, SCT800 shows comparable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics to Xyntha at the doses tested, and possibly with better safety properties. PMID:26806305

  20. Influence of in ovo injection and subsequent provision of silver nanoparticles on growth performance, microbial profile, and immune status of broiler chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pineda, Lane Manalili; Sawosz, Ewa; Lauridsen, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    -hatching, drinking water containing three silver nanoparticle concentrations (0, 10, and 20 mg/kg) was offered for 4 weeks. Body weight and feed consumption were measured weekly. At days 22 and 36, blood samples and intestinal contents were collected to evaluate the effects of the silver nanoparticles on plasma...

  1. Clinical pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital in neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touw, D J; Graafland, O; Cranendonk, A; Vermeulen, R J; van Weissenbruch, M M

    2000-01-01

    Demographic and clinical pharmacokinetic data collected from term and preterm neonates who were treated with intravenous phenobarbital have been analysed to evaluate the role of patient characteristics in pharmacokinetic parameters. Significant relationships between total body weight (TBW) or body

  2. [A study of population pharmacokinetics of linezolid in Chinese].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Bai, N; Liu, Y N; Wang, R

    2016-12-12

    Objective: To study the population pharmacokinetic (PPK) profiles of linezolid in Chinese healthy volunteers and infected patients. Methods: Linezolid 600 mg was administered to 31 Chinese healthy volunteers with a single dose and to 57 infected patients every 12 h for at least 5 doses. High performance liquid chromatography was applied to determine the plasma concentration of linezolid. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling method was applied to analyze the PPK profiles. Results: For healthy volunteers with single dose of linezolid, 2-compartment with linear elimination model was the most appropriate structural pharmacokinetic model. The population typical value of apparent volume of central compartment was 26.99 L, volume of peripheral compartment was 22.22 L, apparent clearance of central compartment was 7.99 L/h, and clearance of peripheral compartment was 101.28 L/h. For each 1 kg deviation of weight from the mean value, 0.62 L of volume of peripheral compartment was correlated. For Chinese infected patients with multiple doses of linezolid, 1-compartment with linear elimination model was the most appropriate structural pharmacokinetic model. The population typical value of apparent volume was 38.85 L, and apparent clearance was 4.70 L/h. For each 1 kg deviation of weight from the mean value, 0.79 L of volume, as well as 0.04 L/h of clearance were correlated. For each 1 year deviation of age from the mean value, -0.045 L/h of clearance was correlated. Conclusions: The pharmacokinetic profiles of linezolid in Chinese simulate a 2-compartment with linear elimination model when single dose is administrated, and the weight is linearly positive-correlated to volume. While a 1-compartment with linear elimination model is appropriate when multiple doses are administrated, and the weight is linearly positive-correlated to volume and clearance, but the age is linearly negative-correlated to clearance.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of 450 mg ropivacaine with and without epinephrine for combined femoral and sciatic nerve block in lower extremity surgery. A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenmakers, K.P.; Vree, T.B.; Jack, N.T.; Bemt, B.J.F van den; Limbeek, J. van; Stienstra, R.

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: No pharmacokinetic data exist on doses of ropivacaine larger than 300 mg for peripheral nerve block in man, although in clinical practice higher doses are frequently used. The purpose of the present study was to describe the pharmacokinetic profile in serum of 450 mg ropivacaine with and

  4. Co-delivery of rapamycin- and piperine-loaded polymeric nanoparticles for breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiyar, Sameer S; Muntimadugu, Eameema; Rafeeqi, Towseef Amin; Domb, Abraham J; Khan, Wahid

    2016-09-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux is the major cause of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumors when using anticancer drugs, moreover, poor bioavailability of few drugs is also due to P-gp efflux in the gut. Rapamycin (RPM) is in the clinical trials for breast cancer treatment, but its P-gp substrate property leads to poor oral bioavailability and efficacy. The objective of this study is to formulate and evaluate nanoparticles of RPM, along with a chemosensitizer (piperine, PIP) for improved oral bioavailability and efficacy. Poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) was selected as polymer as it has moderate MDR reversal activity, which may provide additional benefits. The nanoprecipitation method was used to prepare PLGA nanoparticles with particle size below 150 nm, loaded with both drugs (RPM and PIP). Prepared nanoparticles showed sustained in vitro drug release for weeks, with initial release kinetics of zero order with non-Fickian transport, subsequently followed by Higuchi kinetics with Fickian diffusion. An everted gut sac method was used to study the effect of P-gp efflux on drug transport. This reveals that the uptake of the RPM (P-gp substrate) has been increased in the presence of chemosensitizer. Pharmacokinetic studies showed better absorption profile of RPM from polymeric nanoparticles compared to its suspension counterpart and improved bioavailability of 4.8-folds in combination with a chemosensitizer. An in vitro cell line study indicates higher efficacy of nanoparticles compared to free drug solution. Results suggest that the use of a combination of PIP with RPM nanoparticles would be a promising approach in the treatment of breast cancer.

  5. Ofloxacin pharmacokinetics in renal failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Fillastre, J P; Leroy, A; Humbert, G

    1987-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ofloxacin were investigated in 12 normal subjects and 21 uremic patients after the administration of a single oral 200-mg dose. An open three-compartment body model was used to calculate ofloxacin pharmacokinetic parameters. In healthy subjects, the peak plasma level averaged 2.24 +/- 0.90 micrograms/ml and was obtained at 0.83 +/- 0.31 h. The absorption rate constant was 4.22 +/- 1.64 h-1. The terminal half-life was 7.86 +/- 1.81 h. The apparent volume of distribution...

  6. PHARMACOKINETICS AND PHARMACOKINETIC DYNAMIC RELATIONSHIP OF ROCURONIUM BROMIDE IN HUMANS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIERDA, JMKH; PROOST, JH; SCHIERE, S; HOMMES, FDM

    The existing human pharmacokinetic studies have been reviewed and compared with data derived from animals. The earliest study confirms the similarity of rocuronium to vecuronium with respect to the variables derived from the plasma concentration decay curves and the proportion excreted renally.

  7. The Brain and Propranolol Pharmacokinetics in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy R. Eugene

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Propranolol, a non-selective β-blocker, has been found to have a tremendous array of indications. Recent evidence has suggested that propranolol may be effective in patients suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder by suppressing activity in the amygdala and thereby inhibiting emotional memory formation. Dosage requirements have been well established in the pediatric and adult population, however, there has been no definitive geriatric dose recommended in the package inserts made available to the public. The aim of this paper is to use pharmacokinetic simulations in order to establish a pharmacokinetic profile dosage equivalent for the elderly as has been found in young patients. After completing the Monte-Carlo simulations for the elderly and young patients, a single 10mg dose in the elderly has shown comparable pharmacokinetic profiles as found in young patients administered a 40mg single dose.

  8. Cefazolin pharmacokinetics in cats under surgical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarellos, Gabriela A; Montoya, Laura; Passini, Sabrina M; Lupi, Martín P; Lorenzini, Paula M; Landoni, María F

    2017-10-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the plasma pharmacokinetic profile, tissue concentrations and urine elimination of cefazolin in cats under surgical conditions after a single intravenous dose of 20 mg/kg. Methods Intravenous cefazolin (20 mg/kg) was administered to nine young mixed-breed cats 30 mins before they underwent surgical procedures (ovariectomy or orchiectomy). After antibiotic administration, samples from blood, some tissues and urine were taken. Cefazolin concentrations were determined in all biological matrices and pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated. Results Initial plasma concentrations were high (C p(0) , 134.80 ± 40.54 µg/ml), with fast and moderately wide distribution (distribution half-life [t ½(d) ] 0.16 ± 0.15 h; volume of distribution at steady state [V (d[ss]) ] 0.29 ± 0.10 l/kg) and rapid elimination (body clearance [Cl B ], 0.21 ± 0.06 l/h/kg; elimination half-life [t ½ ], 1.18 ± 0.27 h; mean residence time 1.42 ± 0.36 h). Thirty to 60 mins after intravenous administration, cefazolin tissue concentrations ranged from 9.24 µg/ml (subcutaneous tissue) to 26.44 µg/ml (ovary). The tissue/plasma concentration ratio ranged from 0.18 (muscle) to 0.58 (ovary). Cefazolin urine concentrations were high with 84.2% of the administered dose being eliminated in the first 6 h postadministration. Conclusions and relevance Cefazolin plasma concentrations remained above a minimum inhibitory concentration of ⩽2 µg/ml up to 4 h in all the studied cats. This suggests that a single intravenous dose of 20 mg/kg cefazolin would be adequate for perioperative prophylactic use in cats.

  9. Pharmacokinetic study of gallocatechin-7-gallate from Pithecellobium clypearia Benth. in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacokinetic profile of gallocatechin-7-gallate (J10688 was studied in rats after intravenous administration. Male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD rats received 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg (i.v. of J10688 and plasma drug concentrations were determined by a high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC–MS method. The pharmacokinetic software Data Analysis System (Version 3.0 was used to calculate the pharmacokinetic parameters. For different i.v. doses of J10688, the mean peak plasma concentration (C0 values ranged from 11.26 to 50.82 mg/L, and mean area under the concentration-time curve (AUC0–t values ranged from 1.75 to 11.80 (mg·h/L. J10688 lacked dose-dependent pharmacokinetic properties within doses between 1 and 10 mg/kg, based on the power model. The method developed in this study was sensitive, precise, and stable. The pharmacokinetic properties of J10688 in SD rats were shown to have rapid distribution and clearance values. These pharmacokinetic results may contribute to an improved understanding of the pharmacological actions of J10688.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of mitragynine in man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trakulsrichai S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Satariya Trakulsrichai,1,2 Korbtham Sathirakul,3,4 Saranya Auparakkitanon,5 Jatupon Krongvorakul,5 Jetjamnong Sueajai,5 Nantida Noumjad,5 Chonlaphat Sukasem,5 Winai Wananukul2,6 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, 2Ramathibodi Poison Center, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, 3Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 4Center for Drug Research Discovery and Development, Thammasat Univerisity, Prathumthani, Thailand; 5Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, 6Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand Background: Kratom, known botanically as Mitragyna speciosa (Korth., is an indigenous tree in Southeast Asia. Kratom is currently easily available worldwide via special shops and the Internet to use as a drug of abuse, opioid alternative, or pain killer. So far, the pharmacokinetics of this plant has been studied only in animals, and there is no such study in humans. The major abundant active alkaloid in Kratom, mitragynine, is one of the promising new chemical substances to be developed as a new drug. The aim of this study was to examine the pharmacokinetics of mitragynine and assess the linearity in pharmacokinetics in chronic users.Methods: Since Kratom is illegal in Thailand, studies in healthy subjects would be unethical. We therefore conducted a prospective study by enrolling ten chronic, regular, healthy users. We adjusted the steady state in each subject by giving a known amount of Kratom tea for 7 days before commencement of the experiment. We admitted and gave different oral doses to subjects to confirm linearity in pharmacokinetics. The mitragynine blood concentrations at 17 times points and the urine concentrations during the 24-hour period were collected and measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Results: Ten male subjects completed

  11. (BDMCA) Nanoparticles

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Available online at http://www.tjpr.org. Research Article ... Methods: Nanoparticle formulations were fabricated by a double emulsion solvent evaporation technique using .... Characterization of BDMCA nanoparticles. The nanoparticle ...

  12. Scale up, optimization and stability analysis of Curcumin C3 complex-loaded nanoparticles for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Nanoparticle based delivery of anticancer drugs have been widely investigated. However, a very important process for Research & Development in any pharmaceutical industry is scaling nanoparticle formulation techniques so as to produce large batches for preclinical and clinical trials. This process is not only critical but also difficult as it involves various formulation parameters to be modulated all in the same process. Methods In our present study, we formulated curcumin loaded poly (lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGA-CURC). This improved the bioavailability of curcumin, a potent natural anticancer drug, making it suitable for cancer therapy. Post formulation, we optimized our process by Reponse Surface Methodology (RSM) using Central Composite Design (CCD) and scaled up the formulation process in four stages with final scale-up process yielding 5 g of curcumin loaded nanoparticles within the laboratory setup. The nanoparticles formed after scale-up process were characterized for particle size, drug loading and encapsulation efficiency, surface morphology, in vitro release kinetics and pharmacokinetics. Stability analysis and gamma sterilization were also carried out. Results Results revealed that that process scale-up is being mastered for elaboration to 5 g level. The mean nanoparticle size of the scaled up batch was found to be 158.5 ± 9.8 nm and the drug loading was determined to be 10.32 ± 1.4%. The in vitro release study illustrated a slow sustained release corresponding to 75% drug over a period of 10 days. The pharmacokinetic profile of PLGA-CURC in rats following i.v. administration showed two compartmental model with the area under the curve (AUC0-∞) being 6.139 mg/L h. Gamma sterilization showed no significant change in the particle size or drug loading of the nanoparticles. Stability analysis revealed long term physiochemical stability of the PLGA-CURC formulation. Conclusions A successful effort towards

  13. Different pharmacokinetics of tramadol in mothers treated for labour pain and in their neonates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claahsen-van der Grinten, H.L.; Verbruggen, I.; Berg, P.P. van den; Sporken, J.M.J.; Kollee, L.A.A.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic profile of tramadol hydrochloride in neonates, born from mothers who underwent analgesia with tramadol for the relief of labour pain.METHODS: Intramuscular tramadol (100--250 mg) was administered to 22 mothers giving

  14. Optically enhanced blood-brain-barrier crossing of plasmonic-active nanoparticles in preclinical brain tumor animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Wilson, Christy M.; Li, Shuqin; Fales, Andrew M.; Liu, Yang; Grant, Gerald; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2014-02-01

    Nanotechnology provides tremendous biomedical opportunities for cancer diagnosis, imaging, and therapy. In contrast to conventional chemotherapeutic agents where their actual target delivery cannot be easily imaged, integrating imaging and therapeutic properties into one platform facilitates the understanding of pharmacokinetic profiles, and enables monitoring of the therapeutic process in each individual. Such a concept dubbed "theranostics" potentiates translational research and improves precision medicine. One particular challenging application of theranostics involves imaging and controlled delivery of nanoplatforms across blood-brain-barrier (BBB) into brain tissues. Typically, the BBB hinders paracellular flux of drug molecules into brain parenchyma. BBB disrupting agents (e.g. mannitol, focused ultrasound), however, suffer from poor spatial confinement. It has been a challenge to design a nanoplatform not only acts as a contrast agent but also improves the BBB permeation. In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility of plasmonic gold nanoparticles as both high-resolution optical contrast agent and focalized tumor BBB permeation-inducing agent. We specifically examined the microscopic distribution of nanoparticles in tumor brain animal models. We observed that most nanoparticles accumulated at the tumor periphery or perivascular spaces. Nanoparticles were present in both endothelial cells and interstitial matrices. This study also demonstrated a novel photothermal-induced BBB permeation. Fine-tuning the irradiating energy induced gentle disruption of the vascular integrity, causing short-term extravasation of nanomaterials but without hemorrhage. We conclude that our gold nanoparticles are a powerful biocompatible contrast agent capable of inducing focal BBB permeation, and therefore envision a strong potential of plasmonic gold nanoparticle in future brain tumor imaging and therapy.

  15. Heritability of metoprolol and torsemide pharmacokinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthaei, Johannes; Brockmöller, Jürgen; Tzvetkov, Mladen

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol and torsemide due to polymorphisms in CYP2D6, CYP2C9 and OATP1B1 has been extensively studied. However, it is still unknown how much of variation in pharmacokinetics of these two clinically important drugs in total is due to genetic factors....... of the heritable variability in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol and torsemide remains to be elucidated. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  16. Development of a Pharmacokinetic Model to Describe the Complex Pharmacokinetics of Pazopanib in Cancer Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Huixin; van Erp, Nielka; Bins, Sander; Mathijssen, Ron H J; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H.; Steeghs, Neeltje; Huitema, Alwin D R

    Background and Objective: Pazopanib is a multi-targeted anticancer tyrosine kinase inhibitor. This study was conducted to develop a population pharmacokinetic (popPK) model describing the complex pharmacokinetics of pazopanib in cancer patients. Methods: Pharmacokinetic data were available from 96

  17. Development of a Pharmacokinetic Model to Describe the Complex Pharmacokinetics of Pazopanib in Cancer Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, H.; Erp, N. van; Bins, S.; Mathijssen, R.H.; Schellens, J.H.; Beijnen, J.H.; Steeghs, N.; Huitema, A.D.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Pazopanib is a multi-targeted anticancer tyrosine kinase inhibitor. This study was conducted to develop a population pharmacokinetic (popPK) model describing the complex pharmacokinetics of pazopanib in cancer patients. METHODS: Pharmacokinetic data were available from 96

  18. Pharmacokinetics of drugs in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feghali, Maisa; Venkataramanan, Raman; Caritis, Steve

    2015-11-01

    Pregnancy is a complex state where changes in maternal physiology have evolved to favor the development and growth of the placenta and the fetus. These adaptations may affect preexisting disease or result in pregnancy-specific disorders. Similarly, variations in physiology may alter the pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics that determines drug dosing and effect. It follows that detailed pharmacologic information is required to adjust therapeutic treatment strategies during pregnancy. Understanding both pregnancy physiology and the gestation-specific pharmacology of different agents is necessary to achieve effective treatment and limit maternal and fetal risk. Unfortunately, most drug studies have excluded pregnant women based on often-mistaken concerns regarding fetal risk. Furthermore, over two-thirds of women receive prescription drugs while pregnant, with treatment and dosing strategies based on data from healthy male volunteers and non-pregnant women, and with little adjustment for the complex physiology of pregnancy and its unique disease states. This review will describe basic concepts in pharmacokinetics and their clinical relevance and highlight the variations in pregnancy that may impact the pharmacokinetic properties of medications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Nanodelivery of bioactive components for food applications: types of delivery systems, properties, and their effect on ADME profiles and toxicity of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borel, T; Sabliov, C M

    2014-01-01

    Food bioactives are known to prevent aging, cancer, and other diseases for an overall improved health of the consumer. Nanodelivery provides a means to control stability, solubility, and bioavailability, and also provides controlled release of food bioactives. There are two main types of nanodelivery systems, liquid and solid. Liquid nanodelivery systems include nanoemulsions, nanoliposomes, and nanopolymersomes. Solid nanodelivery systems include nanocrystals, lipid nanoparticles, and polymeric nanoparticles. Each type of nanodelivery system offers distinct benefits depending on the compatibility of nanoparticle properties with the properties of the bioactive and the desired application. Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles such as size, charge, hydrophobicity, and targeting molecules affect the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) of nanodelivery systems. The fate of the bioactive depends on its physicochemical properties and the location of its release. The safety of nanodelivery systems for use in food applications is largely unknown. Toxicological studies consisting of a combination of in silico, in vitro, and in vivo studies are needed to reveal the safety of nanodelivery systems for successful applications in food and agriculture.

  20. Effects of pathological conditions on ocular pharmacokinetics of antimicrobial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Kayoko; Ohtori, Akira; Tojo, Kakuji

    2010-10-01

    A diffusion model of ocular pharmacokinetics was used to estimate the effects of pathological conditions on ocular pharmacokinetics. In vivo rabbit data after topical instillation of ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin were compared with the simulated concentrations in the aqueous and vitreous humors. The barrier capacity of the surrounding membranes such as the retina/choroid/sclera (RCS) membrane and the cornea was characterized by dimensionless Sherwood number derived by the pseudo-steady state approach (PSSA). We assumed the barrier capacity decreased by inflammation; when the barrier capacity of the RCS membrane and the cornea was assumed to be one-tenth for the RCS membrane and a half for the cornea respectively, the in vivo data agreed with the simulated profile without contradiction. The drug concentration gradient simulated in the vitreous body near the RCS membrane was more significant in the inflamed eyes than in the normal eyes, suggesting that the elimination of the drugs from the RCS membrane was enhanced by inflammation. The present diffusion model can better describe the ocular pharmacokinetics in both normal and diseased conditions.

  1. Effect of gemfibrozil and fenofibrate on the pharmacokinetics of atorvastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, Lloyd R; Porcari, Anthony R; Alvey, Christine; Abel, Robert; Bullen, William; Hartman, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Coadministration of statins and fibrates is beneficial in some patients by allowing simultaneous reduction of triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol alongside elevation of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. However, the potential for drug interactions must be taken into consideration. Gemfibrozil increases systemic exposure to various different statins, whereas similar effects are not observed with fenofibrate, suggesting it may be a more appropriate choice for coadministration with statins. Gemfibrozil is reported to cause a moderate increase in the area under the curve (AUC) of atorvastatin, but the effect of fenofibrate on atorvastatin pharmacokinetics has not been described. This study compared the effects of multiple-dose administration of gemfibrozil and fenofibrate on the single-dose pharmacokinetics of atorvastatin. Gemfibrozil coadministration led to significant increases in the AUC of atorvastatin, 2-hydroxyatorvastatin, 2-hydroxyatorvastatin lactone, and 4-hydroxyatorvastatin lactone. In contrast, fenofibrate administration did not lead to clinically meaningful changes in the AUC for atorvastatin, atorvastatin lactone, 2-hydroxyatorvastatin, or 2-hydroxyatorvastatin lactone. The absence of a significant pharmacokinetic interaction between fenofibrate and atorvastatin is consistent with recent results showing no difference in safety profile between atorvastatin as monotherapy or in combination with fenofibric acid. Together, these data suggest that atorvastatin-fenofibrate combination therapy is unlikely to pose a risk to patients.

  2. Lipid nanoparticle interactions and assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiss, Matthew Ryan

    Novel liposome-nanoparticle assemblies (LNAs) provide a biologically inspired route for designing multifunctional bionanotheranostics. LNAs combine the benefits of lipids and liposomes to encapsulate, transport, and protect hydrophilic and hydrophobic therapeutics with functional nanoparticles. Functional nanoparticles endow LNAs with additional capabilities, including the ability to target diseases, triggered drug release, controlled therapeutic output, and diagnostic capabilities to produce a drug delivery system that can effectively and efficiently deliver therapeutics while reducing side effects. Not only could LNAs make existing drugs better, they could also provide an avenue to allow once promising non-approved drugs (rejected due to harmful side effects, inadequate pharmacokinetics, and poor efficacy) to be safely used through targeted and controlled delivery directly to the diseased site. LNAs have the potential to be stimuli responsive, delivering drugs on command by external (ultrasound, RF heating, etc.) or internal (pH, blood sugar, heart rate, etc.) stimuli. Individually, lipids and nanoparticles have been clinically approved for therapy, such as Doxil (a liposomal doxorubicin for cancer treatment), and diagnosis, such as Feridex (an iron oxide nanoparticle an MRI contrast enhancement agent for liver tumors). In order to engineer these multifunctional LNAs for theranostic applications, the interactions between nanoparticles and lipids must be better understood. This research sought to explore the formation, design, structures, characteristics, and functions of LNAs. To achieve this goal, different types of LNAs were formed, specifically magnetoliposomes, bilayer decorated LNAs (DLNAs), and lipid-coated magnetic nanoparticles (LMNPs). A fluorescent probe was embedded in the lipid bilayer of magnetoliposomes allowing the local temperature and membrane fluidity to be observed. When subjected to an electromagnetic field that heated the encapsulated iron

  3. A Three-Pulse Release Tablet for Amoxicillin: Preparation, Pharmacokinetic Study and Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Chai, Hongyu; Li, Yang; Chai, Xuyu; Zhao, Yan; Zhao, Yunfan; Tao, Tao; Xiang, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Amoxicillin is a commonly used antibiotic which has a short half-life in human. The frequent administration of amoxicillin is often required to keep the plasma drug level in an effective range. The short dosing interval of amoxicillin could also cause some side effects and drug resistance, and impair its therapeutic efficacy and patients' compliance. Therefore, a three-pulse release tablet of amoxicillin is desired to generate sustained release in vivo, and thus to avoid the above mentioned disadvantages. The pulsatile release tablet consists of three pulsatile components: one immediate-release granule and two delayed release pellets, all containing amoxicillin. The preparation of a pulsatile release tablet of amoxicillin mainly includes wet granulation craft, extrusion/spheronization craft, pellet coating craft, mixing craft, tablet compression craft and film coating craft. Box-Behnken design, Scanning Electron Microscope and in vitro drug release test were used to help the optimization of formulations. A crossover pharmacokinetic study was performed to compare the pharmacokinetic profile of our in-house pulsatile tablet with that of commercial immediate release tablet. The pharmacokinetic profile of this pulse formulation was simulated by physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model with the help of Simcyp®. Single factor experiments identify four important factors of the formulation, namely, coating weight of Eudragit L30 D-55 (X1), coating weight of AQOAT AS-HF (X2), the extrusion screen aperture (X3) and compression forces (X4). The interrelations of the four factors were uncovered by a Box-Behnken design to help to determine the optimal formulation. The immediate-release granule, two delayed release pellets, together with other excipients, namely, Avicel PH 102, colloidal silicon dioxide, polyplasdone and magnesium stearate were mixed, and compressed into tablets, which was subsequently coated with Opadry® film to produce pulsatile tablet of

  4. Transplacental pharmacokinetics of diclofenac in perfused human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintaku, Kyohei; Hori, Satoko; Tsujimoto, Masayuki; Nagata, Hideaki; Satoh, Shoji; Tsukimori, Kiyomi; Nakano, Hitoo; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Taketani, Yuji; Ohtani, Hisakazu; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2009-05-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the transplacental transfer properties of diclofenac and to determine the effect of L-lactic acid on the transplacental transfer of diclofenac. The maternal and fetal vessels of human placenta were perfused in a single-pass mode with a solution containing diclofenac and antipyrine. The transplacental pharmacokinetic model was fitted to the time profiles of the drug concentrations in the effluent and placenta to obtain transplacental pharmacokinetic parameters. In addition, chloride ion in the perfusate was partially replaced with L-lactic acid to see the change in the transplacental transfer properties of diclofenac. The TPT(ss) value (ratio of the rate of amount transferred across the placenta to that infused in the steady state) of diclofenac was 2.22%, which was approximately one-third that of antipyrine and was significantly reduced in the presence of L-lactic acid. The transplacental pharmacokinetic model could adequately explain the transplacental transfer of diclofenac with influx clearances from maternal and fetal perfusates to placental tissue of 0.276 and 0.0345 ml/min/g cotyledon and efflux rate constants from placental tissue to maternal and fetal perfusates of 0.406 and 0.0337 min(-1), respectively. By taking into account protein binding, the placental tissue/plasma concentration ratio in humans for diclofenac was estimated to be 0.108 ml/g of cotyledon and was smaller than that of antipyrine. In conclusion, human placental perfusion and transplacental pharmacokinetic modeling allowed us to determine the transplacental transfer properties of diclofenac quantitatively. Diclofenac may share transplacental transfer system(s) with L-lactic acid.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of Cefuroxime in Cortical and Cancellous Bone Obtained by Microdialysis - a Porcine Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøttrup, Mikkel; Forsingdal Hardlei, Tore; Bendtsen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    . As reference, free and total plasma concentrations were also measured. The animals received a bolus of 1500 mg cefuroxime over 30 min. No significant differences between key pharmacokinetic parameters for sealed and unsealed drill holes in cortical bone were found. The mean area under the concentration...... (MD) technique for measurement of cefuroxime in bone, and to obtain pharmacokinetic profiles for the same drug in porcine cortical and cancellous bone. Measurements were conducted in bone-wax sealed and unsealed drill holes in cortical bone, in drill holes in cancellous bone and in subcutaneous tissue...

  6. A novel delivery vector for targeted delivery of the antiangiogenic drug paclitaxel to angiogenic blood vessels: TLTYTWS-conjugated PEG–PLA nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Fei, E-mail: tanfeivip@126.com; Mo, Xiao-hui, E-mail: 675382206@qq.com [Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital (China); Zhao, Jian, E-mail: 22459402@qq.com [Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, CCK (Sweden); Liang, Hui, E-mail: nanotan@126.com [People' s Hospital of Longhua New District Shenzhen, Department of urology (China); Chen, Zhong-jian, E-mail: pfjk927627702@126.com; Wang, Xiu-li, E-mail: tanfeit@126.com [Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital (China)

    2017-02-15

    Antiangiogenesis has been widely accepted as an attractive strategy to combat tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. An actively targeting nanoparticle-based drug delivery system (nano-DDS) would provide an alternative method to achieve antiangiogenic antitumor therapy. In the present study, our group fabricated novel nano-DDS, TLTYTWS (TS) peptide-modified poly(ethylene glycol)–poly(lactic acid) (PEG–PLA) nanoparticles (TS-NPs) encapsulating a drug with antiangiogenic potential, paclitaxel (Ptx) (TS-Ptx-NPs). The nanoparticles were uniformly spherical and had a unimodal particle size distribution and slightly negative zeta potential. TS-NPs accumulated significantly in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) via energy-dependent and caveolae- and lipid raft-mediated endocytosis and improved the antiproliferative, antimigratory, and antitube-forming abilities of paclitaxel in vitro. Following intravenous administration, TS-Ptx-NPs presented favorable pharmacokinetic profiles. Melanoma distribution assays confirmed that TS-NPs achieved higher accumulation and penetration at melanoma sites. These results collectively indicated that TLTYTWS-decorated nanoparticles can be considered to be a promising nano-DDS for chemotherapies targeting tumor angiogenesis and have great potential to improve the efficacy of antiangiogenic therapy in melanoma tumor-bearing nude mice.

  7. A novel delivery vector for targeted delivery of the antiangiogenic drug paclitaxel to angiogenic blood vessels: TLTYTWS-conjugated PEG–PLA nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Fei; Mo, Xiao-hui; Zhao, Jian; Liang, Hui; Chen, Zhong-jian; Wang, Xiu-li

    2017-01-01

    Antiangiogenesis has been widely accepted as an attractive strategy to combat tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. An actively targeting nanoparticle-based drug delivery system (nano-DDS) would provide an alternative method to achieve antiangiogenic antitumor therapy. In the present study, our group fabricated novel nano-DDS, TLTYTWS (TS) peptide-modified poly(ethylene glycol)–poly(lactic acid) (PEG–PLA) nanoparticles (TS-NPs) encapsulating a drug with antiangiogenic potential, paclitaxel (Ptx) (TS-Ptx-NPs). The nanoparticles were uniformly spherical and had a unimodal particle size distribution and slightly negative zeta potential. TS-NPs accumulated significantly in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) via energy-dependent and caveolae- and lipid raft-mediated endocytosis and improved the antiproliferative, antimigratory, and antitube-forming abilities of paclitaxel in vitro. Following intravenous administration, TS-Ptx-NPs presented favorable pharmacokinetic profiles. Melanoma distribution assays confirmed that TS-NPs achieved higher accumulation and penetration at melanoma sites. These results collectively indicated that TLTYTWS-decorated nanoparticles can be considered to be a promising nano-DDS for chemotherapies targeting tumor angiogenesis and have great potential to improve the efficacy of antiangiogenic therapy in melanoma tumor-bearing nude mice.

  8. Release Behavior and Toxicity Profiles towards Leukemia (WEHI-3B) Cell Lines of 6-Mercaptopurine-PEG-Coated Magnetite Nanoparticles Delivery System

    OpenAIRE

    Dorniani, Dena; Kura, Aminu Umar; Hussein-Al-Ali, Samer Hasan; Hussein, Mohd Zobir bin; Fakurazi, Sharida; Shaari, Abdul Halim; Ahmad, Zalinah

    2014-01-01

    The coating of an active drug, 6-mercaptopurine, into the iron oxide nanoparticles-polyethylene glycol (FNPs-PEG) in order to form a new nanocomposite, FPEGMP-2, was accomplished using coprecipitation technique. The resulting nanosized with a narrow size distribution magnetic polymeric particles show the superparamagnetic properties with 38.6 emu/g saturation magnetization at room temperature. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the thermal analysis study supported the formation of th...

  9. Drug Transport and Pharmacokinetics for Chemical Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Laurent; Kanneganti, Kumud; Kim, Kwang Seok

    2010-01-01

    Experiments in continuous-stirred vessels were proposed to introduce methods in pharmacokinetics and drug transport to chemical engineering students. The activities can be incorporated into the curriculum to illustrate fundamentals learned in the classroom. An appreciation for the role of pharmacokinetics in drug discovery will also be gained…

  10. Pharmacokinetics of Chinese medicines: strategies and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ru; Yang, Ying; Chen, Yijia

    2018-01-01

    The modernization and internationalization of Chinese medicines (CMs) are hampered by increasing concerns on the safety and the efficacy. Pharmacokinetic (PK) study is indispensable to establish concentration-activity/toxicity relationship and facilitate target identification and new drug discovery from CMs. To cope with tremendous challenges rooted from chemical complexity of CMs, the classic PK strategies have evolved rapidly from PK study focusing on marker/main drug components to PK-PD correlation study adopting metabolomics approaches to characterize associations between disposition of global drug-related components and host metabolic network shifts. However, the majority of PK studies of CMs have adopted the approaches tailored for western medicines and focused on the systemic exposures of drug-related components, most of which were found to be too low to account for the holistic benefits of CMs. With an area under concentration-time curve- or activity-weighted approach, integral PK attempts to understand the PK-PD relevance with the integrated PK profile of multiple co-existing structural analogs (prototyes/metabolites). Cellular PK-PD complements traditional PK-PD when drug targets localize inside the cells, instead of at the surface of cell membrane or extracellular space. Considering the validated clinical benefits of CMs, reverse pharmacology-based reverse PK strategy was proposed to facilitate target identification and new drug discovery. Recently, gut microbiota have demonstrated multifaceted roles in drug efficacy/toxicity. In traditional oral intake, the presystemic interactions of CMs with gut microbiota seem inevitable, which can contribute to the holistic benefits of CMs through biotransforming CMs components, acting as the peripheral target, and regulating host drug disposition. Hence, we propose a global PK-PD approach which includes the presystemic interaction of CMs with gut microbiota and combines omics with physiologically based

  11. Nitro-fatty acid pharmacokinetics in the adipose tissue compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzari, Marco; Khoo, Nicholas K H; Woodcock, Steven R; Jorkasky, Diane K; Li, Lihua; Schopfer, Francisco J; Freeman, Bruce A

    2017-02-01

    Electrophilic nitro-FAs (NO 2 -FAs) promote adaptive and anti-inflammatory cell signaling responses as a result of an electrophilic character that supports posttranslational protein modifications. A unique pharmacokinetic profile is expected for NO 2 -FAs because of an ability to undergo reversible reactions including Michael addition with cysteine-containing proteins and esterification into complex lipids. Herein, we report via quantitative whole-body autoradiography analysis of rats gavaged with radiolabeled 10-nitro-[ 14 C]oleic acid, preferential accumulation in adipose tissue over 2 weeks. To better define the metabolism and incorporation of NO 2 -FAs and their metabolites in adipose tissue lipids, adipocyte cultures were supplemented with 10-nitro-oleic acid (10-NO 2 -OA), nitro-stearic acid, nitro-conjugated linoleic acid, and nitro-linolenic acid. Then, quantitative HPLC-MS/MS analysis was performed on adipocyte neutral and polar lipid fractions, both before and after acid hydrolysis of esterified FAs. NO 2 -FAs preferentially incorporated in monoacyl- and diacylglycerides, while reduced metabolites were highly enriched in triacylglycerides. This differential distribution profile was confirmed in vivo in the adipose tissue of NO 2 -OA-treated mice. This pattern of NO 2 -FA deposition lends new insight into the unique pharmacokinetics and pharmacologic actions that could be expected for this chemically-reactive class of endogenous signaling mediators and synthetic drug candidates. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Population pharmacokinetic model of THC integrates oral, intravenous, and pulmonary dosing and characterizes short- and long-term pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuberger, Jules A A C; Guan, Zheng; Oyetayo, Olubukayo-Opeyemi; Klumpers, Linda; Morrison, Paul D; Beumer, Tim L; van Gerven, Joop M A; Cohen, Adam F; Freijer, Jan

    2015-02-01

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannobinol (THC), the main psychoactive compound of Cannabis, is known to have a long terminal half-life. However, this characteristic is often ignored in pharmacokinetic (PK) studies of THC, which may affect the accuracy of predictions in different pharmacologic areas. For therapeutic use for example, it is important to accurately describe the terminal phase of THC to describe accumulation of the drug. In early clinical research, the THC challenge test can be optimized through more accurate predictions of the dosing sequence and the wash-out between occasions in a crossover setting, which is mainly determined by the terminal half-life of the compound. The purpose of this study is to better quantify the long-term pharmacokinetics of THC. A population-based PK model for THC was developed describing the profile up to 48 h after an oral, intravenous, and pulmonary dose of THC in humans. In contrast to earlier models, the current model integrates all three major administration routes and covers the long terminal phase of THC. Results show that THC has a fast initial and intermediate half-life, while the apparent terminal half-life is long (21.5 h), with a clearance of 38.8 L/h. Because the current model characterizes the long-term pharmacokinetics, it can be used to assess the accumulation of THC in a multiple-dose setting and to forecast concentration profiles of the drug under many different dosing regimens or administration routes. Additionally, this model could provide helpful insights into the THC challenge test used for the development of (novel) compounds targeting the cannabinoid system for different therapeutic applications and could improve decision making in future clinical trials.

  13. Prediction of the Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Efficacy of a Monoclonal Antibody, Using a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic FcRn Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetty, Manoranjenni; Li, Linzhong; Rose, Rachel; Machavaram, Krishna; Jamei, Masoud; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Gardner, Iain

    2015-01-01

    Although advantages of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models (PBPK) are now well established, PBPK models that are linked to pharmacodynamic (PD) models to predict pharmacokinetics (PK), PD, and efficacy of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in humans are uncommon. The aim of this study was to develop a PD model that could be linked to a physiologically based mechanistic FcRn model to predict PK, PD, and efficacy of efalizumab. The mechanistic FcRn model for mAbs with target-mediated drug disposition within the Simcyp population-based simulator was used to simulate the pharmacokinetic profiles for three different single doses and two multiple doses of efalizumab administered to virtual Caucasian healthy volunteers. The elimination of efalizumab was modeled with both a target-mediated component (specific) and catabolism in the endosome (non-specific). This model accounted for the binding between neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) and efalizumab (protective against elimination) and for changes in CD11a target concentration. An integrated response model was then developed to predict the changes in mean Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) scores that were measured in a clinical study as an efficacy marker for efalizumab treatment. PASI scores were approximated as continuous and following a first-order asymptotic progression model. The reported steady state asymptote (Y ss) and baseline score [Y (0)] was applied and parameter estimation was used to determine the half-life of progression (Tp) of psoriasis. Results suggested that simulations using this model were able to recover the changes in PASI scores (indicating efficacy) observed during clinical studies. Simulations of both single dose and multiple doses of efalizumab concentration-time profiles as well as suppression of CD11a concentrations recovered clinical data reasonably well. It can be concluded that the developed PBPK FcRn model linked to a PD model adequately predicted PK, PD, and efficacy of efalizumab. PMID

  14. Pharmacokinetics and dosimetry, an introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notari, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    Classical pharmacokinetic techniques attempt to quantify the time course for drug in the body by assaying samples of blood or urine as a function of time. The mathematical descriptions that have emerged from this approach have proven extremely valuable to both drug research and drug therapy. Since the monitoring of patients' drug blood levels by obtaining a few small blood samples at key times is clinically practical, individualization of dosage regimens has become a reality. This has dramatically altered certain types of drug therapy. These improvements are limited to cases wherein biological response can be related to drug blood levels since the mathematics are capable only of describing the sampled fluids. Non-sampled fluids are considered as additional compartments or pools and described collectively using kinetic equations for mass balance. This limits progress in those areas of research which require assessment of the relationship of specific organ contents to that of the blood. The author suggests that radiopharmaceutical techniques which can provide the time course in specific organs might be coupled with classical pharmacokinetic approaches to provide insight not previously achieved

  15. A comprehensive physiologically based pharmacokinetic ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Published physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models from peer-reviewed articles are often well-parameterized, thoroughly-vetted, and can be utilized as excellent resources for the construction of models pertaining to related chemicals. Specifically, chemical-specific parameters and in vivo pharmacokinetic data used to calibrate these published models can act as valuable starting points for model development of new chemicals with similar molecular structures. A knowledgebase for published PBPK-related articles was compiled to support PBPK model construction for new chemicals based on their close analogues within the knowledgebase, and a web-based interface was developed to allow users to query those close analogues. A list of 689 unique chemicals and their corresponding 1751 articles was created after analysis of 2,245 PBPK-related articles. For each model, the PMID, chemical name, major metabolites, species, gender, life stages and tissue compartments were extracted from the published articles. PaDEL-Descriptor, a Chemistry Development Kit based software, was used to calculate molecular fingerprints. Tanimoto index was implemented in the user interface as measurement of structural similarity. The utility of the PBPK knowledgebase and web-based user interface was demonstrated using two case studies with ethylbenzene and gefitinib. Our PBPK knowledgebase is a novel tool for ranking chemicals based on similarities to other chemicals associated with existi

  16. Pharmacokinetics of metformin during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyal, Sara; Easterling, Thomas R; Carr, Darcy; Umans, Jason G; Miodovnik, Menachem; Hankins, Gary D V; Clark, Shannon M; Risler, Linda; Wang, Joanne; Kelly, Edward J; Shen, Danny D; Hebert, Mary F

    2010-05-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of metformin during pregnancy. Serial blood and urine samples were collected over one steady-state dosing interval in women treated with metformin during early to late pregnancy (n = 35) and postpartum (n = 16). Maternal and umbilical cord blood samples were obtained at delivery from 12 women. Metformin concentrations were also determined in breast milk samples obtained over one dosing interval in 6 women. Metformin renal clearance increased significantly in mid (723 +/- 243 ml/min, P pregnancy (625 +/- 130 ml/min, P metformin net secretion clearance (480 +/- 190 ml/min, P pregnancy versus postpartum, respectively. Metformin concentrations at the time of delivery in umbilical cord plasma ranged between nondetectable (metformin through breast milk was 0.13 to 0.28 mg, and the relative infant dose was metformin pharmacokinetics are affected by pregnancy-related changes in renal filtration and net tubular transport and can be roughly estimated by the use of creatinine clearance. At the time of delivery, the fetus is exposed to metformin concentrations from negligible to as high as maternal concentrations. In contrast, infant exposure to metformin through the breast milk is low.

  17. Disposition pathways and pharmacokinetics of herbal medicines in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, S-M; Li, C G; Liu, J-P; Chan, E; Duan, W; Zhou, S-F

    2010-01-01

    full understanding of their pharmacokinetic profiles. To optimize the use of herbal remedies, further clinical studies to explore their biological fate including the disposition pathways and kinetics in the human body are certainly needed.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of Escalating Doses of Oral Psilocybin in Healthy Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Randall T; Nicholas, Christopher R; Cozzi, Nicholas V; Gassman, Michele C; Cooper, Karen M; Muller, Daniel; Thomas, Chantelle D; Hetzel, Scott J; Henriquez, Kelsey M; Ribaudo, Alexandra S; Hutson, Paul R

    2017-12-01

    Psilocybin is a psychedelic tryptamine that has shown promise in recent clinical trials for the treatment of depression and substance use disorders. This open-label study of the pharmacokinetics of psilocybin was performed to describe the pharmacokinetics and safety profile of psilocybin in sequential, escalating oral doses of 0.3, 0.45, and 0.6 mg/kg in 12 healthy adults. Eligible healthy adults received 6-8 h of preparatory counseling in anticipation of the first dose of psilocybin. The escalating oral psilocybin doses were administered at approximately monthly intervals in a controlled setting and subjects were monitored for 24 h. Blood and urine samples were collected over 24 h and assayed by a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay for psilocybin and psilocin, the active metabolite. The pharmacokinetics of psilocin were determined using both compartmental (NONMEM) and noncompartmental (WinNonlin) methods. No psilocybin was found in plasma or urine, and renal clearance of intact psilocin accounted for less than 2% of the total clearance. The pharmacokinetics of psilocin were linear within the twofold range of doses, and the elimination half-life of psilocin was 3 h (standard deviation 1.1). An extended elimination phase in some subjects suggests hydrolysis of the psilocin glucuronide metabolite. Variation in psilocin clearance was not predicted by body weight, and no serious adverse events occurred in the subjects studied. The small amount of psilocin renally excreted suggests that no dose reduction is needed for subjects with mild-moderate renal impairment. Simulation of fixed doses using the pharmacokinetic parameters suggest that an oral dose of 25 mg should approximate the drug exposure of a 0.3 mg/kg oral dose of psilocybin. Although doses of 0.6 mg/kg are in excess of likely therapeutic doses, no serious physical or psychological events occurred during or within 30 days of any dose. NCT02163707.

  19. Computational Analysis of Pharmacokinetic Behavior of Ampicillin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Ďurišová

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available orrespondence: Institute of Experimental Pharmacology and Toxicology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 841 04 Bratislava, Slovak Republic. Phone + 42-1254775928; Fax +421254775928; E-mail: maria.durisova@savba.sk 84 RESEARCH ARTICLE The objective of this study was to perform a computational analysis of the pharmacokinetic behavior of ampicillin, using data from the literature. A method based on the theory of dynamic systems was used for modeling purposes. The method used has been introduced to pharmacokinetics with the aim to contribute to the knowledge base in pharmacokinetics by including the modeling method which enables researchers to develop mathematical models of various pharmacokinetic processes in an identical way, using identical model structures. A few examples of a successful use of the modeling method considered here in pharmacokinetics can be found in full texts articles available free of charge at the website of the author, and in the example given in the this study. The modeling method employed in this study can be used to develop a mathematical model of the pharmacokinetic behavior of any drug, under the condition that the pharmacokinetic behavior of the drug under study can be at least partially approximated using linear models.

  20. Elucidation of Arctigenin Pharmacokinetics and Tissue Distribution after Intravenous, Oral, Hypodermic and Sublingual Administration in Rats and Beagle Dogs: Integration of In Vitro and In Vivo Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Li, Xin; Ren, Yu-Shan; Lv, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Jun-Sheng; Xu, Xiao-Li; Wang, Xian-Zhen; Yao, Jing-Chun; Zhang, Gui-Min; Liu, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Although arctigenin ( AG ) has diverse bioactivities, such as anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, immunoregulatory and neuroprotective activities, its pharmacokinetics have not been systematically evaluated. The purpose of this work was to identify the pharmacokinetic properties of AG via various experiments in vivo and in vitro . In this research, rats and beagle dogs were used to investigate the PK (pharmacokinetics, PK) profiles of AG with different drug-delivery manners, including intravenous (i.v), hypodermic injection (i.h), and sublingual (s.l) administration. The data shows that AG exhibited a strong absorption capacity in both rats and beagle dogs (absorption rate 100%), and a strong elimination ability ( t 1/2 beagle dog (25.9 ± 3.24%) > rat (15.7 ± 9%) > monkey (3.69 ± 0.12%). This systematic investigation of pharmacokinetic profiles of arctigenin (AG) in vivo and in vitro is worthy of further exploration.

  1. Self-assembled nanoparticles of cholesterol-conjugated carboxymethyl curdlan as a novel carrier of epirubicin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lei; Gao Fuping; Tang Hongbo; Ba, Yonggang; Li Ruifeng; Li Xuemin; Liu Lingrong; Wang Yinsong; Zhang Qiqing

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop nanoparticles made of cholesterol-conjugated carboxymethyl curdlan (CCMC) entrapping epirubicin (EPB) and establish their in vitro and in vivo potential. CCMC was synthesized and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra ( 1 H NMR). The degrees of substitution (DS) of the cholesterol moiety were 2.3, 3.5 and 6.4, respectively. EPB-loaded CCMC-3.5 nanoparticles were prepared by the remote loading method. The physicochemical characteristics, drug loading efficiency and drug release kinetics of EPB-loaded CCMC-3.5 nanoparticles were characterized. The in vitro release profiles revealed that EPB release was sensitive to the pH as well as the drug loading contents. The cellular cytotoxicity and cellular uptake were accessed by using human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells. The EPB-loaded CCMC-3.5 nanoparticles were found to be more cytotoxic and have a broader distribution within the cells than the free EPB. The in vivo pharmacokinetics and biodistribution were investigated after intravenous injection in rats. Promisingly, a 4.0-fold increase in the mean residence time (MRT), a 4.31-fold increase in the half-life time and a 6.69-fold increase in the area under the curve (AUC 0→∞ ) of EPB were achieved for the EPB-loaded CCMC-3.5 self-assembled nanoparticles compared with the free EPB. The drug level was significantly increased in liver at 24 and 72 h; however, it decreased in heart at 8 and 24 h compared with the free EPB. The in vivo anti-tumor study indicated that the EPB-loaded CCMC-3.5 self-assembled nanoparticles showed greater anti-tumor efficacy than the free EPB. Taken together, the novel CCMC self-assembled nanoparticles might have potential application as anti-cancer drug carriers in a drug delivery system due to good results in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Optimization of caseinate-coated simvastatin-zein nanoparticles: improved bioavailability and modified release characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed OA

    2015-01-01

    from the optimized SMV-zein formulation, by fourfold relative to SMV suspension. Formulation of caseinate-coated SMV-zein nanoparticles improves the pharmacokinetic profile and bioavailability of SMV. Accordingly, improved hypolipidemic activities for longer duration could be achieved. In addition, the reduced dosage rate of SMV-zein nanoparticles improves patient tolerability and compliance.Keywords: Box–Behnken design, simvastatin, zein, sodium caseinate

  3. Pharmacokinetics, Dose Proportionality, and Bioavailability of Bazedoxifene in Healthy Postmenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeand, William

    2017-09-01

    Bazedoxifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator that has estrogen agonist effects on bone and lipid metabolism while having neutral or estrogen antagonist effects on the breast and endometrium. The present report describes findings from 3 Phase I clinical studies that evaluated the single-dose pharmacokinetics (study 1; n = 84), multiple-dose pharmacokinetics (study 2; n = 23), and absolute bioavailability (study 3; n = 18) of bazedoxifene. All 3 studies enrolled healthy postmenopausal women who were either naturally postmenopausal or had undergone bilateral oophorectomy at least 6 months before the start of the study. Study 1 showed that unconjugated and total (unconjugated and conjugated) bazedoxifene levels increased proportionally with ascending oral doses of bazedoxifene (through the dose range of 5-120 mg). Evaluation with or without food intake was conducted at the 10-mg dose, with no clinically relevant effect on pharmacokinetic parameters. Study 2 showed that bazedoxifene achieved steady state in 1 week and exhibited linear pharmacokinetics in doses of 5 to 40 mg with no unexpected accumulation over the dose range. In accordance with a linear pharmacokinetic profile, mean maximum plasma concentration values increased with increasing dose, with values of 1.6, 6.2, and 12.5 ng/mL for the 5-, 20-, and 40-mg doses, respectively. In study 3, tablet and capsule formulations of bazedoxifene formulations had an estimated oral bioavailability of ~6%. The clearance of bazedoxifene was 0.4 (0.1) L/h/kg based on intravenous administration. The oral formulations had comparable exposure profiles with respect to AUC and AUC0-t, and the 90% CIs for these values were within the bioequivalence limits of 80% to 125%. Bazedoxifene was safe and well tolerated in all 3 studies. These pharmacokinetic evaluations in healthy postmenopausal women found that bazedoxifene displayed linear pharmacokinetics with doses ranging from 5 to 40 mg, with no unexpected accumulation

  4. [Pharmacokinetics of crocetin in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong-zheng; Qian, Zhi-yu

    2002-05-01

    To develop an HPLC method for the determination of crocetin in rat plasma and study the pharmacokinetics in rats. Hypersil C18 column (5 microns, 4.6 mm x 200 mm) was used at column temperature 30 degrees C. The mobile phase consisted of methanol-water-acetic acid (75:24.5:0.5) at the flow rate of 1.0 mL.min-1. The UV detection wave length was 423 nm. The calibration curve was linear (gamma = 0.9996) in the range from 0.49 microgram.mL-1 to 7.87 micrograms.mL-1 for crocetin. The mean recovery was 105.2%. The lowest detectable concentration of crocetin was 0.14 microgram.mL-1 (S/N = 3). The RSDs of within-day and between-day were all less than 5%. The plasma crocetin was steady. The HPLC method of determination of crocetin in the plasma was established. After single dose of 50 mg.kg-1 ig in 10 rats, the main pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated as follows: T1/2 alpha (30 +/- 6) min, Tmax(65 +/- 16) min, Cmax(5.0 +/- 1.0) microgram.mL-1, AUC0-T(845 +/- 109) microgram.min.mL-1, Vd(5.0 +/- 0.8) L.kg-1. Crocetin was shown to be absorbed into the blood through the gastrointestinal tract. This method is quick, precise and reliable. Crocetin was shown to be quickly absorbed in rats.

  5. Glipizide Pharmacokinetics in Healthy and Diabetic Volunteers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Purpose: Disease state may contribute to alteration in drug pharmacokinetics. The purpose of .... dependency or drug abuse, known allergy to ... HPLC analysis of glipizide ... months when stored at 4 0C, protected from .... plasma and urine.

  6. Chiral Pesticide Pharmacokinetics: A Range of Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Approximately 30% of pesticides are chiral and used as mixtures of two or more stereoisomers. In biological systems, these stereoisomers can exhibit significantly different pharmacokinetics (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination). In spite of these differences, th...

  7. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Systemically Administered Antileishmanial Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kip, Anke E; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H; Dorlo, Thomas P C

    This review describes the pharmacokinetic properties of the systemically administered antileishmanial drugs pentavalent antimony, paromomycin, pentamidine, miltefosine and amphotericin B (AMB), including their absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion and potential drug-drug interactions.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of heparin and related polysaccharides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boneu, B.; Dol, F.; Caranobe, C.; Sie, P.; Houin, G.

    1989-01-01

    The pharmacodynamic profile of standard heparin (SH), a low molecular weight derivative (CY 216) and of dermatan sulfate (DS), a new potential antithrombotic drug, was investigated in the rabbit over a large range of doses. After bolus i.v. injection of low doses, the biological activity of SH disappeared exponentially; however, its half-life was prolonged when the dose injected increased, and over 158 micrograms/kg (100 anti-factor Xa U/kg) the biological activity disappeared as a concave-convex curve. CY 216 disappeared more slowly than SH at low doses but faster than SH at higher doses. More than 90% of the DS biological activity present 1 minute after the i.v. injection disappeared exponentially without dose-dependent effects. Increasing doses of the three drugs were then delivered for 5 h under continuous infusions. Below 500 micrograms/kg/h the DS and CY 216 plateau concentrations were higher than that of SH while above this dose the SH concentration was higher than that of DS and CY 216. These observations may be explained by the results of pharmacokinetics experiments where 125 I-labeled compounds were delivered by bolus i.v. injection in association with increasing doses of their unlabeled counterparts. For SH there was a 10-fold difference between the half-life of the lower dose (32 micrograms/kg or 5 anti-factor Xa U/kg) and that of the higher dose (3200 micrograms/kg); it was demonstrated that the half-life of SH continuously shortened as its plasma concentration decreased. In contrast the CY 216 and DS half-lives were very close, independent of the dose delivered, and therefore longer than that of SH at low doses and shorter than that of SH at higher doses

  9. Improving maraviroc oral bioavailability by formation of solid drug nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Alison C; Tatham, Lee M; Siccardi, Marco; Scott, Trevor; Vourvahis, Manoli; Clark, Andrew; Rannard, Steve P; Owen, Andrew

    2018-05-17

    Oral drug administration remains the preferred approach for treatment of HIV in most patients. Maraviroc (MVC) is the first in class co-receptor antagonist, which blocks HIV entry into host cells. MVC has an oral bioavailability of approximately 33%, which is limited by poor permeability as well as affinity for CYP3A and several drug transporters. While once-daily doses are now the favoured option for HIV therapy, dose-limiting postural hypotension has been of theoretical concern when administering doses high enough to achieve this for MVC (particularly during coadministration of enzyme inhibitors). To overcome low bioavailability and modify the pharmacokinetic profile, a series of 70 wt% MVC solid drug nanoparticle (SDN) formulations (containing 30 wt% of various polymer/surfactant excipients) were generated using emulsion templated freeze-drying. The lead formulation contained PVA and AOT excipients ( MVC SDN PVA/AOT ), and was demonstrated to be fully water-dispersible to release drug nanoparticles with z-average diameter of 728 nm and polydispersity index of 0.3. In vitro and in vivo studies of MVC SDN PVA/AOT showed increased apparent permeability of MVC, compared to a conventional MVC preparation, with in vivo studies in rats showing a 2.5-fold increase in AUC (145.33 vs. 58.71 ng h ml -1 ). MVC tissue distribution was similar or slightly increased in tissues examined compared to the conventional MVC preparation, with the exception of the liver, spleen and kidneys, which showed statistically significant increases in MVC for MVC SDN PVA/AOT . These data support a novel oral format with the potential for dose reduction while maintaining therapeutic MVC exposure and potentially enabling a once-daily fixed dose combination product. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of Botanical Drugs and Plant Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez More, Gina Paola; Cardenas, Paola Andrea; Costa, Geison M; Simoes, Claudia M O; Aragon, Diana Marcela

    2017-01-01

    Botanical drugs contain plant extracts, which are complex mixtures of compounds. As with conventional drugs, it is necessary to validate their efficacy and safety through preclinical and clinical studies. However, pharmacokinetic studies for active constituents or characteristic markers in botanical drugs are rare. The objective of this review was to investigate the global state of the art in pharmacokinetic studies of active ingredients present in plant extracts and botanical drugs. A review of pharmacokinetics studies of chemical constituents of plant extracts and botanical drugs was performed, with a total of 135 studies published between January 2004 and February 2015 available in recognized scientific databases. Botanical preparations were mainly found in the form of aqueous extracts of roots and rhizomes. The most widely studied species was Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, and the compound most frequently used as a pharmacokinetic marker was berberine. Most studies were performed using the Sprague Dawley rat model, and the preparations were mainly administered orally in a single dose. Quantification of plasma concentrations of pharmacokinetic markers was performed mainly by liquid-liquid extraction, followed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry detector. In conclusion, in recent years there has been an increasing interest among researchers worldwide in the study of pharmacokinetics of bioactive compounds in botanical drugs and plant extracts, especially those from the Traditional Chinese Medicine. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PB/PK) model for multiple exposure routes for soman in multiple species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sweeney, R.E.; Langenberg, J.P.; Maxwell, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PB/PK) model has been developed in advanced computer simulation language (ACSL) to describe blood and tissue concentration-time profiles of the C(±)P(-) stereoisomers of soman after inhalation, subcutaneous and intravenous exposures at low (0.8-1.0 × LD50),

  12. Sex- and dose-dependency in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of (+)-methamphetamine and its metabolite (+)-amphetamine in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milesi-Halle, Alessandra; Hendrickson, Howard P.; Laurenzana, Elizabeth M.; Gentry, W. Brooks; Owens, S. Michael

    2005-01-01

    These studies investigated how (+)-methamphetamine (METH) dose and rat sex affect the pharmacological response to METH in Sprague-Dawley rats. The first set of experiments determined the pharmacokinetics of METH and its pharmacologically active metabolite (+)-amphetamine (AMP) in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats after 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg METH doses. The results showed significant sex-dependent changes in METH pharmacokinetics, and females formed significantly lower amounts of AMP. While the area under the serum concentration-time curve in males increased proportionately with the METH dose, the females showed a disproportional increase. The sex differences in systemic clearance, renal clearance, volume of distribution, and percentage of unchanged METH eliminated in the urine suggested dose-dependent pharmacokinetics in female rats. The second set of studies sought to determine the behavioral implications of these pharmacokinetic differences by quantifying locomotor activity in male and female rats after saline, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg METH. The results showed sex- and dose-dependent differences in METH-induced locomotion, including profound differences in the temporal profile of effects at higher dose. These findings show that the pharmacokinetic and metabolic profile of METH (slower METH clearance and lower AMP metabolite formation) plays a significant role in the differential pharmacological response to METH in male and female rats

  13. Integrated pharmacokinetics of major bioactive components in MCAO rats after oral administration of Huang-Lian-Jie-Du-Tang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huaxu; Qian, Zhilei; Li, Huan; Guo, Liwei; Pan, Linmei; Zhang, Qichun; Tang, Yuping

    2012-05-07

    Huang-Lian-Jie-Du-Tang (HLJDT, or Oren-gedoku-to in Japanese), an important multi-herb remedy in China and other Asia countries, has been used clinically to treat cerebral ischemia for decades. According to the previous studies we have reported, an HPLC method was developed and validated for determination of berberine, palmatine, baicalin, baicalein and geniposide simultaneously in MCAO rat plasma after administration of HLJDT aqueous extract. A classified integral pharmacokinetic method was put forward after having compared the integrated concentration-time profile with that of single component. An AUC based weighting approach was used for integrated principle. The results indicated the classified integral pharmacokinetic profile of index components from HLJDT could reveal the pharmacokinetic behavior of original components, and was corresponding to the holistic pharmacological effects of anti-ischemia with HLJDT. This study was aimed to explore an approach that could be applied to integrate the pharmacokinetic behavior of different components derived from HLJDT. The integrated pharmacokinetic results also provided more information for further understanding of the clinical cerebrovascular disease in use of HLJDT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Gene expression profiles in primary duodenal chick cells following transfection with avian influenza virus H5 DNA plasmid encapsulated in silver nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jazayeri SD

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Seyed Davoud Jazayeri,1 Aini Ideris,1,2 Kamyar Shameli,3 Hassan Moeini,1 Abdul Rahman Omar1,21Institute of Bioscience, 2Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 3Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, MalaysiaAbstract: In order to develop a systemically administered safe and effective nonviral gene delivery system against avian influenza virus (AIV that induced cytokine expression, the hemagglutinin (H5 gene of AIV, A/Ck/Malaysia/5858/04 (H5N1 and green fluorescent protein were cloned into a coexpression vector pIRES (pIREGFP-H5 and formulated using green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs with poly(ethylene glycol and transfected into primary duodenal cells taken from 18-day-old specific-pathogen-free chick embryos. The AgNPs were prepared using moderated temperature and characterized for particle size, surface charge, ultraviolet-visible spectra, DNA loading, and stability. AgNPs and AgNP-pIREGFP-H5 were prepared in the size range of 13.9 nm and 25 nm with a positive charge of +78 ± 0.6 mV and +40 ± 6.2 mV, respectively. AgNPs with a positive surface charge could encapsulate pIREGFP-H5 efficiently. The ultraviolet-visible spectra for AgNP-pIREGFP-H5 treated with DNase I showed that the AgNPs were able to encapsulate pIREGFP-H5 efficiently. Polymerase chain reaction showed that AgNP-pIREGFP-H5 entered into primary duodenal cells rapidly, as early as one hour after transfection. Green fluorescent protein expression was observed after 36 hours, peaked at 48 hours, and remained stable for up to 60 hours. In addition, green fluorescent protein expression generally increased with increasing DNA concentration and time. Cells were transfected using Lipocurax in vitro transfection reagent as a positive control. A multiplex quantitative mRNA gene expression assay in the transfected primary duodenal cells via the transfection reagent and AgNPs with pIREGFP-H5 revealed expression of interleukin (IL-18, IL-15, and IL-12

  15. Time-dependent pharmacokinetics of dexamethasone and its efficacy in human breast cancer xenograft mice: a semi-mechanism-based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Chen, Rong; Yao, Qing-Yu; Liu, Sheng-Jun; Tian, Xiu-Yun; Hao, Chun-Yi; Lu, Wei; Zhou, Tian-Yan

    2018-03-01

    Dexamethasone (DEX) is the substrate of CYP3A. However, the activity of CYP3A could be induced by DEX when DEX was persistently administered, resulting in auto-induction and time-dependent pharmacokinetics (pharmacokinetics with time-dependent clearance) of DEX. In this study we investigated the pharmacokinetic profiles of DEX after single or multiple doses in human breast cancer xenograft nude mice and established a semi-mechanism-based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model for characterizing the time-dependent PK of DEX as well as its anti-cancer effect. The mice were orally given a single or multiple doses (8 mg/kg) of DEX, and the plasma concentrations of DEX were assessed using LC-MS/MS. Tumor volumes were recorded daily. Based on the experimental data, a two-compartment model with first order absorption and time-dependent clearance was established, and the time-dependence of clearance was modeled by a sigmoid E max equation. Moreover, a semi-mechanism-based PK/PD model was developed, in which the auto-induction effect of DEX on its metabolizing enzyme CYP3A was integrated and drug potency was described using an E max equation. The PK/PD model was further used to predict the drug efficacy when the auto-induction effect was or was not considered, which further revealed the necessity of adding the auto-induction effect into the final PK/PD model. This study established a semi-mechanism-based PK/PD model for characterizing the time-dependent pharmacokinetics of DEX and its anti-cancer effect in breast cancer xenograft mice. The model may serve as a reference for DEX dose adjustments or optimization in future preclinical or clinical studies.

  16. Skin permeability and pharmacokinetics of diclofenac epolamine administered by dermal patch in Yorkshire-Landrace pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Tse S; Powell KD; MacLennan SJ; Moorman AR; Paterson C; Bell RR

    2012-01-01

    Susanna Tse,1 Kendall D Powell,2 Stephen MacLennan,3 Allan R Moorman,4 Craig Paterson,5 Rosonald R Bell11Pfizer Inc, Groton, CT, USA; 2Tandem Labs, Durham, NC, USA; 3BioCryst Pharmaceuticals Inc, Durham, NC, USA; 4Alta Vetta Pharmaceutical Consulting LLC, Durham, NC, USA; 5Salix Pharmaceuticals Inc, Raleigh, NC, USAPurpose: This study compared the pharmacokinetic profile, and systemic and local absorption of diclofenac, following dermal patch application and oral administration in Yorkshire- ...

  17. Pharmacokinetics and metabolites of 10B-containing compounds in biological fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauri, P.L.; Basilico, F.; Wittig, A.; Sauerwein, W.; Heimans, J.; Huiskamp, R.

    2006-01-01

    Mass spectrometry method has been applied for determining the pharmacokinetics profile of 10 B-containing compounds in urine and plasma of patients treated in the trials EORTC 11001 and 11011 with BSH or BPA. For these analyses a very small volume (1μl) of diluted samples (urine and plasma, diluted 10000 and 1000-fold, respectively) were used. These data were compared with those obtained using other analytical methods. (author)

  18. Pharmacokinetics, Tissue Distribution and Therapeutic Effect of Cationic Thermosensitive Liposomal Doxorubicin Upon Mild Hyperthermia

    OpenAIRE

    Dicheva, Bilyana M.; Seynhaeve, Ann L. B.; Soulie, Thomas; Eggermont, Alexander M. M.; ten Hagen, Timo L. M.; Koning, Gerben A.

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To evaluate pharmacokinetic profile, biodistribution and therapeutic effect of cationic thermosensitive liposomes (CTSL) encapsulating doxorubicin (Dox) upon mild hyperthermia (HT). Methods: Non-targeted thermosensitive liposomes (TSL) and CTSL were developed, loaded with Dox and characterized. Blood kinetics and biodistribution of Dox-TSL and Dox-CTSL were followed in B16BL6 tumor bearing mice upon normothermia (NT) or initial hyperthermia conditions. Efficacy study in B...

  19. Pharmacokinetics and Concentration-Effect Relationship of Oral LSD in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolder, Patrick C; Schmid, Yasmin; Haschke, Manuel; Rentsch, Katharina M; Liechti, Matthias E

    2015-06-24

    The pharmacokinetics of oral lysergic acid diethylamide are unknown despite its common recreational use and renewed interest in its use in psychiatric research and practice. We characterized the pharmacokinetic profile, pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship, and urine recovery of lysergic acid diethylamide and its main metabolite after administration of a single oral dose of lysergic acid diethylamide (200 μg) in 8 male and 8 female healthy subjects. Plasma lysergic acid diethylamide concentrations were quantifiable (>0.1 ng/mL) in all the subjects up to 12 hours after administration. Maximal concentrations of lysergic acid diethylamide (mean±SD: 4.5±1.4 ng/mL) were reached (median, range) 1.5 (0.5-4) hours after administration. Concentrations then decreased following first-order kinetics with a half-life of 3.6±0.9 hours up to 12 hours and slower elimination thereafter with a terminal half-life of 8.9±5.9 hours. One percent of the orally administered lysergic acid diethylamide was eliminated in urine as lysergic acid diethylamide, and 13% was eliminated as 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-lysergic acid diethylamide within 24 hours. No sex differences were observed in the pharmacokinetic profiles of lysergic acid diethylamide. The acute subjective and sympathomimetic responses to lysergic acid diethylamide lasted up to 12 hours and were closely associated with the concentrations in plasma over time and exhibited no acute tolerance. These first data on the pharmacokinetics and concentration-effect relationship of oral lysergic acid diethylamide are relevant for further clinical studies and serve as a reference for the assessment of intoxication with lysergic acid diethylamide. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  20. Pharmacokinetic study of mycophenolic acid in Iranian kidney transplant patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Rezaee

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetic parameters of mycophenolic acid (MPA in Iranian kidney transplant patients. Methods: Plasma MPA concentration of mycophenolate mofetile (MMF 1 gram two times a day was measured in 21 Iranian kidney transplant recipients receiving treatment. Patients who entered the study had been transplanted for more than 3 months and their drug level was supposed to be at steady state. MMF concentration was measured with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Results: The plasma MPA concentration-time curve was characterized by an early sharp peak at about 1 hour postdose. The mean Area Under Curve (AUC, Cmax and Tmax were 47.0±18.3 µg.h/ml, 18.6±8.5 µg/ml and 1.0±0.5 hours respectively. Conclusion: The plasma MPA concentration-time curve pattern of Iranian patients was similar and consistent with previously reported profiles in other populations taking the same dose. Keywords: Mycophenolate mofetil, Mycophenolic acid, Pharmacokinetics, Area Under Curve, Kidney transplantation

  1. Dose selection based on physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Hannah M; Mayawala, Kapil; Poulin, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are built using differential equations to describe the physiology/anatomy of different biological systems. Readily available in vitro and in vivo preclinical data can be incorporated into these models to not only estimate pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters and plasma concentration-time profiles, but also to gain mechanistic insight into compound properties. They provide a mechanistic framework to understand and extrapolate PK and dose across in vitro and in vivo systems and across different species, populations and disease states. Using small molecule and large molecule examples from the literature and our own company, we have shown how PBPK techniques can be utilised for human PK and dose prediction. Such approaches have the potential to increase efficiency, reduce the need for animal studies, replace clinical trials and increase PK understanding. Given the mechanistic nature of these models, the future use of PBPK modelling in drug discovery and development is promising, however some limitations need to be addressed to realise its application and utility more broadly.

  2. Pharmacokinetics and toxicology of therapeutic proteins: Advances and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vugmeyster, Yulia; Xu, Xin; Theil, Frank-Peter; Khawli, Leslie A; Leach, Michael W

    2012-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in understanding pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), as well as toxicity profiles of therapeutic proteins in animals and humans, which have been in commercial development for more than three decades. However, in the PK arena, many fundamental questions remain to be resolved. Investigative and bioanalytical tools need to be established to improve the translation of PK data from animals to humans, and from in vitro assays to in vivo readouts, which would ultimately lead to a higher success rate in drug development. In toxicology, it is known, in general, what studies are needed to safely develop therapeutic proteins, and what studies do not provide relevant information. One of the major complicating factors in nonclinical and clinical programs for therapeutic proteins is the impact of immunogenicity. In this review, we will highlight the emerging science and technology, as well as the challenges around the pharmacokinetic- and safety-related issues in drug development of mAbs and other therapeutic proteins. PMID:22558487

  3. Pharmacokinetic properties and in silico ADME modeling in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honório, Kathia M; Moda, Tiago L; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2013-03-01

    The discovery and development of a new drug are time-consuming, difficult and expensive. This complex process has evolved from classical methods into an integration of modern technologies and innovative strategies addressed to the design of new chemical entities to treat a variety of diseases. The development of new drug candidates is often limited by initial compounds lacking reasonable chemical and biological properties for further lead optimization. Huge libraries of compounds are frequently selected for biological screening using a variety of techniques and standard models to assess potency, affinity and selectivity. In this context, it is very important to study the pharmacokinetic profile of the compounds under investigation. Recent advances have been made in the collection of data and the development of models to assess and predict pharmacokinetic properties (ADME--absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) of bioactive compounds in the early stages of drug discovery projects. This paper provides a brief perspective on the evolution of in silico ADME tools, addressing challenges, limitations, and opportunities in medicinal chemistry.

  4. Improved Antitumor Efficacy and Pharmacokinetics of Bufalin via PEGylated Liposomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jiani; Zhou, Xuanxuan; Cao, Wei; Bi, Linlin; Zhang, Yifang; Yang, Qian; Wang, Siwang

    2017-11-01

    Bufalin was reported to show strong pharmacological effects including cardiotonic, antiviral, immune-regulation, and especially antitumor effects. The objective of this study was to determine the characterization, antitumor efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of bufalin-loaded PEGylated liposomes compared with bufalin entity, which were prepared by FDA-approved pharmaceutical excipients. Bufalin-loaded PEGylated liposomes and bufalin-loaded liposomes were prepared reproducibly with homogeneous particle size by the combination of thin film evaporation method and high-pressure homogenization method. Their mean particle sizes were 127.6 and 155.0 nm, mean zeta potentials were 2.24 and - 18.5 mV, and entrapment efficiencies were 76.31 and 78.40%, respectively. In vitro release profile revealed that the release of bufalin in bufalin-loaded PEGylated liposomes was slower than that in bufalin-loaded liposomes. The cytotoxicity of blank liposomes has been found within acceptable range, whereas bufalin-loaded PEGylated liposomes showed enhanced cytotoxicity to U251 cells compared with bufalin entity. In vivo pharmacokinetics indicated that bufalin-loaded PEGylated liposomes could extend or eliminate the half-life time of bufalin in plasma in rats. The results suggested that bufalin-loaded PEGylated liposomes improved the solubility and increased the drug concentration in plasma.

  5. The influence of stereoisomerism on the pharmacokinetics of Tc radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, L.; Taylor, A. [Atlanta, Emory Univ. School of Medicine, GA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Marzilli, L.G. [Atlanta, Emory Univ. School of Medicine, GA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1998-12-01

    The influence of stereoisomerism on the pharmacokinetics of Tc mono-oxo complexes is reviewed. Tc(V) mono-oxo complexes formed with N/S ligands have four donor groups from the ligands in an equatorial plane; the oxo ligand coordinates in an axial position. Stereoisomerism in Tc(V) mono-oxo complexes can be centered within the ligand (carbon atom in the chelate ring of ligating nitrogen of amine donors) or at the Tc. The metal center becomes chiral when an equatorial ligand has a head and a tail (i.e. the two ends of the ligand differ). All types of stereocenter can produce significantly different pharmacokinetic profiles for individual isomers. Thus, biological evaluation of separated stereoisomers is necessary to identify the optimal stereochemical configuration, particularly for radiopharmaceuticals targeted to receptor molecules with low specificity. Because of inter species variation, there is ultimately no substitute for human testing. Although it is possible that the increase in nonspecific binding of agents incorporating L- vs D-amino acids may more than offset any increased receptor binding, much more information is needed. Stereochemical factors can also lead to unpredictable differences in coordination geometry and thermodynamic preference of a single isomer; thus chemical characterization of stereo-isomers continues to be an important component of radiopharmaceutical development.

  6. Impact of Pregnancy on Zonisamide Pharmacokinetics in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal M. Matar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy is associated with various physiological changes which may lead to significant alterations in the pharmacokinetics of many drugs. The present study was aimed to investigate the potential effects of pregnancy on the pharmacokinetic profile of zonisamide (ZNM in the rabbit. Seven female rabbits were used in this study. The pregnant and nonpregnant rabbits received ZNM orally at a dose of 10 mg/kg and blood samples were collected from the animals just before receiving the drug and then serially for up to 24 h. The plasma samples were analyzed using tandem mass spectrometric method. Following a single oral dose of ZNM to the rabbits, the mean values of ZNM plasma concentrations at different times were consistently low in pregnant compared to nonpregnant rabbits. The mean values of ZNM’s Cmax and AUC0-∞ were significantly (P<0.05 decreased, whereas the CL/F exhibited substantial increase (P<0.05 in pregnant compared to nonpregnant rabbits. Tmax, t1/2abs, t1/2el, MRT, and Vd/F showed no significant differences between the two groups. The present study demonstrates that pregnancy decreased ZNM plasma concentrations in rabbits and that the decrease could be due to decreased extent of gastrointestinal absorption, induced hepatic metabolism, or enhanced renal elimination of the drug.

  7. Antimicrobial breakpoint estimation accounting for variability in pharmacokinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nekka Fahima

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD indices are increasingly being used in the microbiological field to assess the efficacy of a dosing regimen. In contrast to methods using MIC, PK/PD-based methods reflect in vivo conditions and are more predictive of efficacy. Unfortunately, they entail the use of one PK-derived value such as AUC or Cmax and may thus lead to biased efficiency information when the variability is large. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the efficacy of a treatment by adjusting classical breakpoint estimation methods to the situation of variable PK profiles. Methods and results We propose a logical generalisation of the usual AUC methods by introducing the concept of "efficiency" for a PK profile, which involves the efficacy function as a weight. We formulated these methods for both classes of concentration- and time-dependent antibiotics. Using drug models and in silico approaches, we provide a theoretical basis for characterizing the efficiency of a PK profile under in vivo conditions. We also used the particular case of variable drug intake to assess the effect of the variable PK profiles generated and to analyse the implications for breakpoint estimation. Conclusion Compared to traditional methods, our weighted AUC approach gives a more powerful PK/PD link and reveals, through examples, interesting issues about the uniqueness of therapeutic outcome indices and antibiotic resistance problems.

  8. Identification, characterization and expression profiles of Chironomus riparius glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes in response to cadmium and silver nanoparticles exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, Prakash M. Gopalakrishnan [School of Environmental Engineering and Graduate School of Energy and Environmental System Engineering, University of Seoul, 90 Jeonnong-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-743 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jinhee, E-mail: jinhchoi@uos.ac.kr [School of Environmental Engineering and Graduate School of Energy and Environmental System Engineering, University of Seoul, 90 Jeonnong-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-743 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    In this study, we report the identification and characterization of 13 cytosolic GST genes in Chironomus riparius from Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) database generated using pyrosequencing. Comparative and phylogenetic analyses were undertaken with Drosophila melanogaster and Anopheles gambiae GSTs and 3 Delta, 4 Sigma, 1 each in Omega, Epsilon, Theta, Zeta and 2 unclassified classes of GSTs were identified and characterized. The relative mRNA expression levels of all of the C. riparius GSTs (CrGSTs) genes under different developmental stages were varied with low expression in the larval stage. The antioxidant role of CrGSTs was studied by exposing fourth instar larvae to a known oxidative stress inducer Paraquat and the relative mRNA expression to different concentrations of cadmium (Cd) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) for various time intervals were also studied. All the CrGSTs showed up- or down regulation to varying levels based upon the concentration, and duration of exposure. The highest mRNA expression was noticed in Delta3, Sigma4 and Epsilon1 GST class in all treatments. These results show the role of CrGST genes in defense against oxidative stress and its potential as a biomarker to Cd and AgNPs exposure.

  9. Release Behavior and Toxicity Profiles towards Leukemia (WEHI-3B Cell Lines of 6-Mercaptopurine-PEG-Coated Magnetite Nanoparticles Delivery System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dena Dorniani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The coating of an active drug, 6-mercaptopurine, into the iron oxide nanoparticles-polyethylene glycol (FNPs-PEG in order to form a new nanocomposite, FPEGMP-2, was accomplished using coprecipitation technique. The resulting nanosized with a narrow size distribution magnetic polymeric particles show the superparamagnetic properties with 38.6 emu/g saturation magnetization at room temperature. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the thermal analysis study supported the formation of the nanocomposite and the enhancement of thermal stability in the resulting nanocomposite comparing with its counterpart in free state. The loading of 6-mercaptopurine (MP in the FPEGMP-2 nanocomposite was estimated to be about 5.6% and the kinetic experimental data properly correlated with the pseudo-second order model. Also, the release of MP from the FPEGMP-2 nanocomposite shows the sustained release manner which is remarkably lower in phosphate buffered solution at pH 7.4 than pH 4.8, due to different release mechanism. The maximum percentage release of MP from the nanocomposite reached about 60% and 97% within about 92 and 74 hours when exposed to pH 7.4 and 4.8, respectively.

  10. Release behavior and toxicity profiles towards leukemia (WEHI-3B) cell lines of 6-mercaptopurine-PEG-coated magnetite nanoparticles delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorniani, Dena; Kura, Aminu Umar; Hussein-Al-Ali, Samer Hasan; bin Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Fakurazi, Sharida; Shaari, Abdul Halim; Ahmad, Zalinah

    2014-01-01

    The coating of an active drug, 6-mercaptopurine, into the iron oxide nanoparticles-polyethylene glycol (FNPs-PEG) in order to form a new nanocomposite, FPEGMP-2, was accomplished using coprecipitation technique. The resulting nanosized with a narrow size distribution magnetic polymeric particles show the superparamagnetic properties with 38.6 emu/g saturation magnetization at room temperature. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the thermal analysis study supported the formation of the nanocomposite and the enhancement of thermal stability in the resulting nanocomposite comparing with its counterpart in free state. The loading of 6-mercaptopurine (MP) in the FPEGMP-2 nanocomposite was estimated to be about 5.6% and the kinetic experimental data properly correlated with the pseudo-second order model. Also, the release of MP from the FPEGMP-2 nanocomposite shows the sustained release manner which is remarkably lower in phosphate buffered solution at pH 7.4 than pH 4.8, due to different release mechanism. The maximum percentage release of MP from the nanocomposite reached about 60% and 97% within about 92 and 74 hours when exposed to pH 7.4 and 4.8, respectively.

  11. Formulation and pharmacokinetics of diclofenac lipid nanoemulsions for parenteral application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramreddy, Srividya; Kandadi, Prabhakar; Veerabrahma, Kishan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to formulate and determine the pharmacokinetics of stable o/w parenteral lipid nanoemulsions (LNEs) of diclofenac acid used to treat arthritic conditions. The LNEs of diclofenac acid with a mean size ranging from 200 to 240 nm and a zeta potential of -29.4 ± 1.04 mV (negatively charged LNEs) and 62.1 ± 3.5 (positively charged LNEs) emulsions were prepared by hot homogenization and ultrasonication process. The influence of formulation variables, such as the change in proportion of cholesterol, was studied, and optimized formulations were developed. The optimized formulations were relatively stable during centrifugal stress, dilution stress, and storage. The drug content and entrapment efficiency were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. The in vitro drug release was carried out in phosphate-buffered saline pH 7.4 and cumulative amount of drug released was estimated using a UV-visible spectro-photometer. During in vivo pharmacokinetic studies in male Wistar rats, diclofenac serum concentration from LNEs was higher than that of Voveran injection and was detectable up to 12 h. Diclofenac in LNEs showed improved pharmacokinetic profile with increase in area under the curve, elimination half-life and mean residence time in comparison to Voveran. Our aim was to prepare and determine the pharmacokinetics of injectable lipid nanoemulsions of diclofenac acid for treating arthritic conditions by reducing the frequency of dosing and pain at site of injection. The nanoemulsions of diclofenac acid were prepared by homogenization and ultrasonication process. The sizes and charges of oil globules were determined. The effect of cholesterol on stability of emulsion was studied, and an optimized preparation was developed. The optimized formulations were stable during centrifugation, dilution, and storage. The total amount of drug in emulsion and percentage amount of drug present in emulsion globules were determined using

  12. Characterization of pulmonary protein profiles in response to zinc oxide nanoparticles in mice: a 24-hour and 28-day follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan CH

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chih-Hong Pan,1,2,* Kai-Jen Chuang,3,4,* Jen-Kun Chen,5 Ta-Chih Hsiao,6 Ching-Huang Lai,2 Tim P Jones,7 Kelly A BéruBé,8 Gui-Bing Hong,9 Kin-Fai Ho,10,11 Hsiao-Chi Chuang12,13 1Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Council of Labor Affairs, Executive Yuan, 2School of Public Health, National Defense Medical Center, 3School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, 4Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 5Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Nanomedicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli, 6Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 7School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, 8School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, UK; 9Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan; 10Jockey Club School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China; 11Shenzhen Municipal Key Laboratory for Health Risk Analysis, Shenzhen Research Institute, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen, People’s Republic of China; 12School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, 13Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Although zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs are recognized to cause systemic disorders, little is known about the mechanisms that underlie the time-dependent differences that occur after exposure. The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanistic differences at 24 hours and 28 days after the exposure of BALB/c mice to ZnONPs via intratracheal instillation. An isobaric tag for the relative and absolute quantitation coupled with liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the differential

  13. Endocytic mechanisms and osteoinductive profile of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in human umbilical cord Wharton’s jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Wang, Chen

    2018-01-01

    Background As a potentially bioactive material, the widespread application of nanosized hydroxyapatite (nano-HAP) in the field of bone regeneration has increased the risk of human exposure. However, our understanding of the interaction between nano-HAP and stem cells implicated in bone repair remains incomplete. Methods Here, we characterized the adhesion and cellular internalization of HAP nanoparticles (HANPs) with different sizes (20 nm np20 and 80 nm np80) and highlighted the involved pathway in their uptake using human umbilical cord Wharton’s jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hWJ-MSCs). In addition, the effects of HANPs on cell viability, apoptosis response, osteogenic differentiation, and underlying related mechanisms were explored. Results It was shown that both types of HANPs readily adhered to the cellular membrane and were transported into the cells compared to micro-sized HAP particles (m-HAP; 12 μm). Interestingly, the endocytic routes of np20 and np80 differed, although they exhibited similar kinetics of adhesion and uptake. Our study revealed involvement of clathrin- and caveolin-mediated endocytosis as well as macropinocytosis in the np20 uptake. However, for np80, clathrin-mediated endocytosis and some as-yet-unidentified important uptake routes play central roles in their internalization. HANPs displayed a higher preference to accumulate in the cytoplasm compared to m-HAP, and HANPs were not detected in the nucleolus. Exposure to np20 for 24 h caused a decrease in cell viability, while cells completely recovered with an exposure time of 72 h. Furthermore, HANPs did not influence apoptosis and necrosis of hWJ-MSCs. Strikingly, HANPs enhanced mRNA levels of osteoblast-related genes and stimulated calcium mineral deposition, and this directly correlated with the activation in c-Jun N-terminal kinases and p38 pathways. Conclusion Our data provide additional insight about the interactions of HANPs with MSCs and suggest their application

  14. The pharmacokinetic behaviour of hypoxoside taken orally by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    measured with a high-performance liquid chromatography . method. For the ... the South African Medicines Control Council to conduct a phase I pharmacokinetic and ... The significance of various factors that influence the pharmacokinetic ...

  15. Developmental pharmacokinetics of gentamicin in preterm and term neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Elisabet I; Sandström, Marie; Honoré, Per Hartvig

    2009-01-01

    0-45 days) were enrolled in the study. In total, 894 serum gentamicin samples were included in the analysis. The concentration-time profile was described using a three-compartment model. Gentamicin clearance increased with the GA and PNA (included in a nonlinear fashion). The GA was also identified...... in this patient population. METHODS: Data were collected in a prospective study performed in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the University Children's Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. Population pharmacokinetic modelling was performed using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling (NONMEM) software. Bodyweight...... was included as the primary covariate according to an allometric power model. Other evaluated covariates were age (postmenstrual age, gestational age [GA], postnatal age [PNA]), markers for renal function (serum creatinine, serum cystatin C) and concomitant medication with cefuroxime, vancomycin or indometacin...

  16. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Terbinafine in Rats and Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini-Yeganeh, Mahboubeh; McLachlan, Andrew J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) model capable of describing and predicting terbinafine concentrations in plasma and tissues in rats and humans. A PB-PK model consisting of 12 tissue and 2 blood compartments was developed using concentration-time data for tissues from rats (n = 33) after intravenous bolus administration of terbinafine (6 mg/kg of body weight). It was assumed that all tissues except skin and testis tissues were well-stirred compartments with perfusion rate limitations. The uptake of terbinafine into skin and testis tissues was described by a PB-PK model which incorporates a membrane permeability rate limitation. The concentration-time data for terbinafine in human plasma and tissues were predicted by use of a scaled-up PB-PK model, which took oral absorption into consideration. The predictions obtained from the global PB-PK model for the concentration-time profile of terbinafine in human plasma and tissues were in close agreement with the observed concentration data for rats. The scaled-up PB-PK model provided an excellent prediction of published terbinafine concentration-time data obtained after the administration of single and multiple oral doses in humans. The estimated volume of distribution at steady state (Vss) obtained from the PB-PK model agreed with the reported value of 11 liters/kg. The apparent volume of distribution of terbinafine in skin and adipose tissues accounted for 41 and 52%, respectively, of the Vss for humans, indicating that uptake into and redistribution from these tissues dominate the pharmacokinetic profile of terbinafine. The PB-PK model developed in this study was capable of accurately predicting the plasma and tissue terbinafine concentrations in both rats and humans and provides insight into the physiological factors that determine terbinafine disposition. PMID:12069977

  17. Stereoselective pharmacokinetics of moguisteine metabolites in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernareggi, A; Crema, A; Carlesi, R M; Castoldi, D; Ratti, E; Renoldi, M I; Ratti, D; Ceserani, R; Tognella, S

    1995-01-01

    We studied the pharmacokinetics of moguisteine, a racemic non-narcotic peripheral antitussive drug, in 12 healthy male subjects after a single oral administration of 200 mg. The unchanged drug was absent in plasma and urine of all subjects. Moguisteine was immediately and completely hydrolyzed to its main active metabolite, the free carboxylic acid M1. Therefore, we evaluated the kinetic profiles of M1, of its enantiomers R(+)-M1 and S(-)-M1, and of M1 sulfoxide optical isomers M2/I and M2/II by conventional and stereospecific HPLC. Maximum plasma concentrations for M1 (2.83 mg/l), M2/I (0.26 mg/l) and M2/II (0.40 mg/l), were respectively reached at 1.3, 1.6 and 1.5 h after moguisteine administration. Plasma concentrations declined after the peak with mean apparent terminal half-lives of 0.65 h (M1), 0.88 h (M2/I) and 0.84 h (M2/II). Most of the administered dose was recovered in urine within 6 h from moguisteine treatment. The systemic and renal clearance values indicated high renal extraction ratio for all moguisteine metabolites, and particularly for M1 sulfoxide optical isomers. Plasma concentration-time profiles and urinary excretion patterns for M1 enantiomers R(+)-M1 and S(-)-M1 were quite similar. Thus, for later moguisteine pharmacokinetic evaluations the investigation of the plasma concentration-time curve and the urinary excretion of the sole racemic M1 through non-stereospecific analytical methods may suffice in most cases.

  18. Pharmacokinetic characterization of three novel 4-mg nicotine lozenges
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhija, Manpreet; Srivastava, Reena; Kaushik, Aditya

    2018-03-01

    Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) increases the probability of smoking cessation. This study was conducted to determine if three prototype 4-mg nicotine lozenges produced locally in India were bioequivalent to a globally marketed reference product, Nicorette® 4-mg nicotine lozenge. Healthy adult smokers (N = 39) were treated with three prototype 4-mg nicotine lozenges in comparison with a reference 4-mg lozenge in this single-center, randomized, open-label, single-dose, 4-way crossover study. Pharmacokinetic sampling was obtained to test for bioequivalence using maximal plasma concentration (Cmax) and extent of absorption (AUC0-t). Secondarily, AUC;0-∞, time to maximal plasma concentration (tmax), half-life (T1/2), elimination rate constant (Kel), and safety of the prototype lozenges versus the reference lozenge were compared. Each prototype 4-mg nicotine lozenge was found to be bioequivalent to the reference 4-mg nicotine lozenge based on the ratio of geometric means and 90% confidence intervals for Cmax, AUC0-t, and AUC;0-∞. Although tmax; was significantly longer for prototype III, all four lozenges achieved maximum plasma nicotine concentrations at a median of 1.5 hours. The safety profiles of the three prototype 4-mg lozenges did not differ from that of the 4-mg reference product. Each prototype 4-mg nicotine lozenge was bioequivalent to the reference 4-mg nicotine lozenge and was well tolerated. Furthermore, as these bioequivalent prototypes differed in in-vitro dissolution profiles, these data suggest that performance from the in -vitro method deployed is not a firm predictor of pharmacokinetic behavior.
.

  19. Oral delivery of capsaicin using MPEG-PCL nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wei; Jiang, Xin-yi; Zhu, Yuan; Omari-Siaw, E; Deng, Wen-wen; Yu, Jiang-nan; Xu, Xi-ming; Zhang, Wei-ming

    2015-01-01

    To prepare a biodegradable polymeric carrier for oral delivery of a water-insoluble drug capsaicin (CAP) and evaluate its quality. CAP-loaded methoxy poly (ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) nanoparticles (CAP/NPs) were prepared using a modified emulsification solvent diffusion technique. The quality of CAP/NPs were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared techniques. A dialysis method was used to analyze the in vitro release profile of CAP from the CAP/NPs. Adult male rats were orally administered CAP/NPs (35 mg/kg), and the plasma concentrations of CAP were measured with a validated HPLC method. The morphology of rat gastric mucosa was studied with HE staining. CAP/NPs had an average diameter of 82.54 ± 0.51 nm, high drug-loading capacity of 14.0% ± 0.13% and high stability. CAP/NPs showed a biphasic release profile in vitro: the burst release was less than 25% of the loaded drug within 12 h followed by a more sustained release for 60 h. The pharmacokinetics study showed that the mean maximum plasma concentration was observed 4 h after oral administered of CAP/NPs, and approximately 90 ng/mL of CAP was detected in serum after 36 h. The area under the curve for the CAP/NPs group was approximately 6-fold higher than that for raw CAP suspension. Histological studies showed that CAP/NPs markedly reduced CAP-caused gastric mucosa irritation. CAP/NPs significantly enhance the bioavailability of CAP and markedly reduce gastric mucosa irritation in rats.

  20. An interactive program for pharmacokinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, D R; Mao, F

    1993-05-01

    A computer program, PharmK, was developed for pharmacokinetic modeling of experimental data. The program was written in C computer language based on the high-level user-interface Macintosh operating system. The intention was to provide a user-friendly tool for users of Macintosh computers. An interactive algorithm based on the exponential stripping method is used for the initial parameter estimation. Nonlinear pharmacokinetic model fitting is based on the maximum likelihood estimation method and is performed by the Levenberg-Marquardt method based on chi 2 criterion. Several methods are available to aid the evaluation of the fitting results. Pharmacokinetic data sets have been examined with the PharmK program, and the results are comparable with those obtained with other programs that are currently available for IBM PC-compatible and other types of computers.

  1. Curcumin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles with Brij78 and TPGS improved in vivo oral bioavailability and in situ intestinal absorption of curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hongyu; Tang, Jingling; Li, Mengting; Ren, Jinmei; Zheng, Nannan; Wu, Linhua

    2016-01-01

    The present study was to formulate curcumin solid lipid nanoparticles (Cur-SLNs) with P-gp modulator excipients, TPGS and Brij78, to enhance the solubility and bioavailability of curcumin. The formulation was optimized by Plackett-Burman screening design and Box-Behnken experiment design. Then physiochemical properties, entrapment efficiency and in vitro release of Cur-SLNs were characterized. In vivo pharmacokinetics study and in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion were performed to investigate the effects of Cur-SLNs on the bioavailability and intestinal absorption of curcumin. The optimized formulations showed an average size of 135.3 ± 1.5 nm with a zeta potential value of -24.7 ± 2.1 mV and 91.09% ± 1.23% drug entrapment efficiency, meanwhile displayed a sustained release profile. In vivo pharmacokinetic study showed AUC0→t for Cur-SLNs was 12.27-folds greater than curcumin suspension and the relative bioavailability of Cur-SLNs was 942.53%. Meanwhile, Tmax and t(1/2) of curcumin for Cur-SLNs were both delayed comparing to the suspensions (p curcumin for SLNs was significantly improved (p curcumin solution. Cur-SLNs with TPGS and Brij78 could improve the oral bioavailability and intestinal absorption of curcumin effectively.

  2. Clinical pharmacokinetics of 5-methyltetrahydrohomofolate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loo, T.L.; Jiushi, L.; Lu, K.; Savaraj, N.

    1983-01-01

    DL-N5-Methyltetrahydrohomofolate (MTHHF; NSC-139490; N- [(4-[(2-(2-amino-3,4,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-4-oxo-5-methyl-6- pteridinyl)ethyl) amino) benzoyl)] -L-glutamate), a new folate antagonist of relatively low toxicity, is active against experimental tumor systems resistant to methotrexate and consequently now in clinical trial. We investigated its clinical pharmacokinetics in six patients; four of them received by rapid i.v. infusion tracer doses of [N5-methyl- 14 C]MTHHF ranging from 13 to 16 mg/sq m, and 2 received 150 mg/sq m; the total radioactivity dose was 100 to 200 mu Ci/patient. MTHHF was assayed by radiochemical and chromatographic techniques. The elimination of MTHHF from the plasma followed a triexponential pattern, with a harmonic mean initial half-life of 20.1 min, an intermediary half-life of 4.5 hr, and a terminal half-life of 74.6 hr. The apparent volume of distribution was 1.6 liters/kg, suggesting rapid and extensive tissue binding. This, together with the low total clearance of 0.2 ml/kg/min, contributed to the long half-life of this agent. Although 68% of the administered dose was excreted in the urine on the first day, only an additional 1% was excreted on the ensuing 3 days. In the two patients who received the higher dose, very little MTHHF was found in the cerebrospinal fluid. In concentrations ranging from 25 to 500 micrograms/ml, the drug was about 50% bound to plasma protein. MTHHF was not metabolized in humans as also reported in animals. These results suggest that MTHHF is excreted in the bile to certain extent. Moreover, since it tends to localize and persist in the body, to forestall cumulative toxicity, frequent administration of this agent should be undertaken only with caution

  3. (BDMCA) Nanoparticles

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Nanoparticle formulations were fabricated by a double emulsion solvent evaporation technique using polycaprolactone as the polymer. The nanoparticles were characterised for drug content, particles size, in vitro drug release and the drug-polymer interaction. The in vivo properties of the formulations in male ...

  4. Intermetallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dileep; Yusufoglu, Yusuf; Timofeeva, Elena; Routbort, Jules

    2015-07-14

    A process for preparing intermetallic nanoparticles of two or more metals is provided. In particular, the process includes the steps: a) dispersing nanoparticles of a first metal in a solvent to prepare a first metal solution, b) forming a reaction mixture with the first metal solution and a reducing agent, c) heating the reaction mixture to a reaction temperature; and d) adding a second metal solution containing a salt of a second metal to the reaction mixture. During this process, intermetallic nanoparticles, which contain a compound with the first and second metals are formed. The intermetallic nanoparticles with uniform size and a narrow size distribution is also provided. An electrochemical device such as a battery with the intermetallic nanoparticles is also provided.

  5. Pharmacokinetic variability of long-acting stimulants in the treatment of children and adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermer, James C; Adeyi, Ben A; Pucci, Michael L

    2010-12-01

    Methylphenidate- and amfetamine-based stimulants are first-line pharmacotherapies for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, a common neurobehavioural disorder in children and adults. A number of long-acting stimulant formulations have been developed with the aim of providing once-daily dosing, employing various means to extend duration of action, including a transdermal delivery system, an osmotic-release oral system, capsules with a mixture of immediate- and delayed-release beads, and prodrug technology. Coefficients of variance of pharmacokinetic measures can estimate the levels of pharmacokinetic variability based on the measurable variance between different individuals receiving the same dose of stimulant (interindividual variability) and within the same individual over multiple administrations (intraindividual variability). Differences in formulation clearly impact pharmacokinetic profiles. Many medications exhibit wide interindividual variability in clinical response. Stimulants with low levels of inter- and intraindividual variability may be better suited to provide consistent levels of medication to patients. The pharmacokinetic profile of stimulants using pH-dependent bead technology can vary depending on food consumption or concomitant administration of medications that alter gastric pH. While delivery of methylphenidate with the transdermal delivery system would be unaffected by gastrointestinal factors, intersubject variability is nonetheless substantial. Unlike the beaded formulations and, to some extent (when considering total exposure) the osmotic-release formulation, systemic exposure to amfetamine with the prodrug stimulant lisdexamfetamine dimesylate appears largely unaffected by such factors, likely owing to its dependence on systemic enzymatic cleavage of the precursor molecule, which occurs primarily in the blood involving red blood cells. The high capacity but as yet unidentified enzymatic system for conversion of lisdexamfetamine

  6. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the injectable formulation of methadone hydrochloride and methadone in lipid nanocarriers administered orally to horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosignani, N; Luna, S P; Dalla Costa, T; Pimenta, E L; Detoni, C B; Guterres, S S; Puoli Filho, J N; Pantoja, J C; Pigatto, M C

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the thermal, electrical and mechanical antinociceptive and physiological effects (heart rate, respiratory rate, arterial blood pressure, head height and abdominal auscultation score), and pharmacokinetics, of 0.5 mg/kg of the injectable formulation (ORAL) or nanoparticulated methadone (NANO) given orally, in six adult mares, using a crossover, blind and prospective design. Repeated-measure models were used to compare parametric data between and within treatments, followed by Tukey's test. Nonparametric data were analysed with Wilcoxon signed-rank, adjusted by Bonferroni tests. Blood samples were also collected up to 6 h after dosing for plasma drug quantification by LC-MS/MS. Methadone pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by noncompartmental and compartmental approaches. There were no differences in pharmacodynamic parameters. No statistical differences were observed in the pharmacokinetic parameters from noncompartmental analysis for both groups, except a significant decrease in peak plasma concentration, increase in apparent volume of distribution per fraction absorbed (Vd ss /F) and increased mean residence time (MRT) for NANO. One-compartment open model with first order elimination best described the pharmacokinetic profiles for both groups. Neither ORAL nor NANO administered orally to horses produced antinociception. The nanoencapsulated formulation of methadone given orally to horses did not improve methadone pharmacokinetic parameters or increased systemic body exposure to methadone. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Application of Pharmacokinetics Modelling to Predict Human Exposure of a Cationic Liposomal Subunit Antigen Vaccine System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj K. S. Badhan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacokinetics of a liposomal subunit antigen vaccine system composed of the cationic lipid dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DDA and the immunostimulatory agent trehalose 6,6-dibehenate (TDB (8:1 molar ratio combined with the Ag85B-ESAT-6 (H1 antigen were modelled using mouse in-vivo data. Compartment modelling and physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK were used to predict the administration site (muscle and target site (lymph temporal concentration profiles and factors governing these. Initial estimates using compartmental modelling established that quadriceps pharmacokinetics for the liposome demonstrated a long half-life (22.6 days compared to the associated antigen (2.62 days. A mouse minimal-PBPK model was developed and successfully predicted quadriceps liposome and antigen pharmacokinetics. Predictions for the popliteal lymph node (PLN aligned well at earlier time-points. A local sensitivity analysis highlighted that the predicted AUCmuscle was sensitive to the antigen degradation constant kdeg (resulting in a 3-log change more so than the fraction escaping the quadriceps (fe (resulting in a 10-fold change, and the predicted AUCPLN was highly sensitive to fe. A global sensitivity analysis of the antigen in the muscle demonstrated that model predictions were within the 50th percentile for predictions and showed acceptable fits. To further translate in-vitro data previously generated by our group, the mouse minimal-PBPK model was extrapolated to humans and predictions made for antigen pharmacokinetics in muscle and PLN. Global analysis demonstrated that both kdeg and fe had a minimal impact on the resulting simulations in the muscle but a greater impact in the PLN. In summary, this study has predicted the in-vivo fate of DDA:TDB:H1 in humans and demonstrated the roles that formulation degradation and fraction escaping the depot site can play upon the overall depot effect within the site of administration.

  8. Application of Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Prediction of Tofacitinib Exposure in Japanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Misaki; Tse, Susanna; Hirai, Midori; Kurebayashi, Yoichi

    2017-05-09

    Tofacitinib (3-[(3R,4R)-4-methyl-3-[methyl(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)amino]piperidin-1-yl]-3 -oxopropanenitrile) is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor that is approved in countries including Japan and the United States for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, and is being developed across the globe for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. In the present study, a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model was applied to compare the pharmacokinetics of tofacitinib in Japanese and Caucasians to assess the potential impact of ethnicity on the dosing regimen in the two populations. Simulated plasma concentration profiles and pharmacokinetic parameters, i.e. maximum concentration and area under plasma concentration-time curve, in Japanese and Caucasian populations after single or multiple doses of 1 to 30 mg tofacitinib were in agreement with clinically observed data. The similarity in simulated exposure between Japanese and Caucasian populations supports the currently approved dosing regimen in Japan and the United States, where there is no recommendation for dose adjustment according to race. Simulated results for single (1 to 100 mg) or multiple doses (5 mg twice daily) of tofacitinib in extensive and poor metabolizers of CYP2C19, an enzyme which has been shown to contribute in part to tofacitinib elimination and is known to exhibit higher frequency in Japanese compared to Caucasians, were also in support of no recommendation for dose adjustment in CYP2C19 poor metabolizers. This study demonstrated a successful application of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling in evaluating ethnic sensitivity in pharmacokinetics at early stages of development, presenting its potential value as an efficient and scientific method for optimal dose setting in the Japanese population.

  9. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Lisdexamfetamine Compared with D-Amphetamine in Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick C. Dolder

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Lisdexamfetamine is a prodrug of D-amphetamine used for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Lisdexamfetamine is thought to have a prolonged pharmacokinetic profile compared with oral D-amphetamine, possibly associated with lower drug liking and a lower risk of oral misuse. However, differences in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of lisdexamfetamine and D-amphetamine have not been directly compared.Methods: Equimolar doses of D-amphetamine (40 mg and lisdexamfetamine (100 mg, and placebo were administered in 24 healthy subjects in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. Plasma concentrations of amphetamine, subjective effects, and vital signs were repeatedly assessed. The pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using compartmental modeling.Results: The increase in plasma concentrations of amphetamine had a 0.6 ± 0.6 h (mean ± SD longer lag time and reached peak levels 1.1 ± 1.5 h later after lisdexamfetamine administration compared with D-amphetamine administration, but no differences in maximal concentrations or total exposure (AUC were found between the two treatments. Consistent with the pharmacokinetics, the subjective and cardiovascular stimulant effects of lisdexamfetamine also occurred later compared with D-amphetamine. However, no differences in peak ratings of potentially abuse-related subjective drug effects (e.g., drug liking, drug high, stimulation, happy, well-being, and self-confidence were observed after lisdexamfetamine administration compared with D-amphetamine administration. Lisdexamfetamine and D-amphetamine also produced similar peak increases in mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature, pupil size, and adverse effects.Conclusion: The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of lisdexamfetamine are similar to D-amphetamine administered 1h later. Lisdexamfetamine is likely associated with a similar risk of oral abuse as D

  10. Evaluation of the whole body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (WB-PBPK) modeling of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Anum; Azam, Shumaila; Fazal, Sahar; Bhatti, A I

    2018-08-14

    The Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling is a supporting tool in drug discovery and improvement. Simulations produced by these models help to save time and aids in examining the effects of different variables on the pharmacokinetics of drugs. For this purpose, Sheila and Peters suggested a PBPK model capable of performing simulations to study a given drug absorption. There is a need to extend this model to the whole body entailing all another process like distribution, metabolism, and elimination, besides absorption. The aim of this scientific study is to hypothesize a WB-PBPK model through integrating absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination processes with the existing PBPK model.Absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination models are designed, integrated with PBPK model and validated. For validation purposes, clinical records of few drugs are collected from the literature. The developed WB-PBPK model is affirmed by comparing the simulations produced by the model against the searched clinical data. . It is proposed that the WB-PBPK model may be used in pharmaceutical industries to create of the pharmacokinetic profiles of drug candidates for better outcomes, as it is advance PBPK model and creates comprehensive PK profiles for drug ADME in concentration-time plots. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pharmacokinetic study of benfotiamine and the bioavailability assessment compared to thiamine hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Feifan; Cheng, Zeneng; Li, Sanwang; Liu, Xingling; Guo, Xin; Yu, Peng; Gu, Zhenkun

    2014-06-01

    Benfotiamine is a lipid-soluble thiamine precursor which can transform to thiamine in vivo and subsequently be metabolized to thiamine monophosphate (TMP) and thiamine diphosphate (TDP). This study investigated the pharmacokinetic profiles of thiamine and its phosphorylated metabolites after single- and multiple-dose administration of benfotiamine in healthy Chinese volunteers, and assessed the bioavailability of orally benfotiamine administration compared to thiamine hydrochloride. In addition, concentration of hippuric acid in urine which is produced in the transformation process of benfotiamine was determined. The results showed that thiamine and its phosphorylated metabolites exhibited different pharmacokinetic characteristics in plasma, blood and erythrocyte, and one-compartment model provided the best fit for pharmacokinetic profiles of thiamine. The transformation process of benfotiamine to thiamine produced large amount of hippuric acid. No accumulation of hippuric acid was observed after multiple-dose of benfotiamine. Compared to thiamine hydrochloride, the bioavailability of thiamine in plasma and TDP in erythrocyte after oral administration of benfotiamine were 1147.3 ± 490.3% and 195.8 ± 33.8%, respectively. The absorption rate and extent of benfotiamine systemic availability of thiamine were significantly increased indicating higher bioavailability of thiamine from oral dose of benfotiamine compared to oral dose of thiamine hydrochloride. © 2014, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  12. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacokinetic variability of heroin and its metabolites: review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rook, Elisabeth J.; Huitema, Alwin D. R.; van den Brink, Wim; van Ree, Jan M.; Beijnen, Jos H.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the pharmacokinetics of heroin after intravenous, oral, intranasal, intramuscular and rectal application and after inhalation in humans, with a special focus on heroin maintenance therapy in heroin dependent patients. In heroin maintenance therapy high doses pharmaceutically

  13. A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model to Predict the Pharmacokinetics of Highly Protein-Bound Drugs and Impact of Errors in Plasma Protein Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Min; Nagar, Swati; Korzekwa, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the pharmacokinetics of highly protein-bound drugs is difficult. Also, since historical plasma protein binding data was often collected using unbuffered plasma, the resulting inaccurate binding data could contribute to incorrect predictions. This study uses a generic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict human plasma concentration-time profiles for 22 highly protein-bound drugs. Tissue distribution was estimated from in vitro drug lipophilicity data, plasma protein binding, and blood: plasma ratio. Clearance was predicted with a well-stirred liver model. Underestimated hepatic clearance for acidic and neutral compounds was corrected by an empirical scaling factor. Predicted values (pharmacokinetic parameters, plasma concentration-time profile) were compared with observed data to evaluate model accuracy. Of the 22 drugs, less than a 2-fold error was obtained for terminal elimination half-life (t1/2, 100% of drugs), peak plasma concentration (Cmax, 100%), area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0–t, 95.4%), clearance (CLh, 95.4%), mean retention time (MRT, 95.4%), and steady state volume (Vss, 90.9%). The impact of fup errors on CLh and Vss prediction was evaluated. Errors in fup resulted in proportional errors in clearance prediction for low-clearance compounds, and in Vss prediction for high-volume neutral drugs. For high-volume basic drugs, errors in fup did not propagate to errors in Vss prediction. This is due to the cancellation of errors in the calculations for tissue partitioning of basic drugs. Overall, plasma profiles were well simulated with the present PBPK model. PMID:26531057

  14. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to predict the pharmacokinetics of highly protein-bound drugs and the impact of errors in plasma protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Min; Nagar, Swati; Korzekwa, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Predicting the pharmacokinetics of highly protein-bound drugs is difficult. Also, since historical plasma protein binding data were often collected using unbuffered plasma, the resulting inaccurate binding data could contribute to incorrect predictions. This study uses a generic physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict human plasma concentration-time profiles for 22 highly protein-bound drugs. Tissue distribution was estimated from in vitro drug lipophilicity data, plasma protein binding and the blood: plasma ratio. Clearance was predicted with a well-stirred liver model. Underestimated hepatic clearance for acidic and neutral compounds was corrected by an empirical scaling factor. Predicted values (pharmacokinetic parameters, plasma concentration-time profile) were compared with observed data to evaluate the model accuracy. Of the 22 drugs, less than a 2-fold error was obtained for the terminal elimination half-life (t1/2 , 100% of drugs), peak plasma concentration (Cmax , 100%), area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-t , 95.4%), clearance (CLh , 95.4%), mean residence time (MRT, 95.4%) and steady state volume (Vss , 90.9%). The impact of fup errors on CLh and Vss prediction was evaluated. Errors in fup resulted in proportional errors in clearance prediction for low-clearance compounds, and in Vss prediction for high-volume neutral drugs. For high-volume basic drugs, errors in fup did not propagate to errors in Vss prediction. This is due to the cancellation of errors in the calculations for tissue partitioning of basic drugs. Overall, plasma profiles were well simulated with the present PBPK model. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Amenamevir in Healthy Subjects: Analysis of Four Randomized Phase 1 Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusawake, Tomohiro; Keirns, James J; Kowalski, Donna; den Adel, Martin; Groenendaal-van de Meent, Dorien; Takada, Akitsugu; Ohtsu, Yoshiaki; Katashima, Masataka

    2017-12-01

    Amenamevir (ASP2151) is a nonnucleoside antiherpesvirus compound available for the treatment of varicella-zoster virus infections. In this article we summarize the findings of four phase 1 studies in healthy participants. Four randomized phase 1 studies investigated the safety and pharmacokinetics of single and multiple doses of amenamevir, including the assessment of age group effect (nonelderly vs elderly), food effect, and the relative bioavailability of two formulations. Amenamevir was administered orally at various doses as a single dose (5-2400 mg) or daily (300 or 600 mg/day) for 7 days. Following single and multiple oral doses, amenamevir demonstrated a less than dose proportional increase in the pharmacokinetic parameters area under the plasma drug concentration versus time curve from time zero to infinity (AUC inf ) and C max . After single and multiple oral 300-mg doses of amenamevir, no apparent differences in pharmacokinetics were observed between nonelderly and elderly participants. In contrast, with the amenamevir 600-mg dose both the area under the plasma drug concentration versus time curve from time zero to 24 h and C max were slightly increased and renal clearance was decreased in elderly participants. The pharmacokinetics of amenamevir was affected by food, with AUC inf increased by about 90%. In the bioavailability study, AUC inf and C max were slightly lower following tablet versus capsule administration (decreased by 14 and 12%, respectively), with relative bioavailability of 86%. The different amenamevir doses and formulations were safe and well tolerated; no deaths or serious adverse events were reported. Amenamevir had less than dose proportional pharmacokinetic characteristics. Age may have an influence on amenamevir pharmacokinetics; however, the effect was considered minimal. The pharmacokinetics of amenamevir were affected by food, with AUC inf almost doubling when amenamevir was administered with food. The concentration versus

  16. Isolation, characterization, and in rats plasma pharmacokinetic study of a new triterpenoid saponin from Dianthus superbus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yina; Xu, Xiaobao; Zhang, Qianlan; Lu, Yongzhuang; Li, Ximin; Zhang, Lin; Tian, Jingkui

    2017-02-01

    One new oleanolic acid triterpenoid saponin, 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl olean-11, 13(18)-diene-23,28-dioic acid, (hereafter referred to as DS-1) was isolated from the traditional Chinese medicinal plant Dianthus superbus (D. superbus). DS-1 plays an important role in the bioactivity of D. superbus. Thus, a sensitive, reliable and accurate reversed-phased liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in negative ion mode was developed and validated for the quantification and pharmacokinetic study of DS-1 in rats plasma. The pharmacokinetic profile showed that DS-1 was rapidly absorbed and eliminated in plasma, indicating that significant accumulation of the compound in biological specimen is unlikely. In addition, poor absorption into systemic circulation was observed after oral administration of DS-1, resulting in low absolute bioavailability (0.92 %).

  17. Pharmacokinetics of penciclovir after oral administration of its prodrug famciclovir to horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Koji; Yamada, Masayuki; Nagata, Shun-ichi; Yamanaka, Takashi; Nemoto, Manabu; Kondo, Takashi; Kurosawa, Masahiko; Matsumura, Tomio

    2010-03-01

    We investigated the pharmacokinetics of penciclovir after oral administration of its prodrug famciclovir to horses. Following an oral dose of famciclovir at 20 mg/kg, maximum plasma concentrations of penciclovir occurred between 0.75 and 1.5 hr (mean 0.94 + or - 0.38 hr) after dosing and were in the range 2.22 to 3.56 microg/ml (mean 2.87 + or - 0.61 microg/ml). The concentrations of penciclovir declined in a biphasic manner after the peak concentration was attained. The mean half-life of the rapid elimination phase was 1.73 + or - 0.34 hr whereas that of the slow elimination phase was 34.34 + or - 13.93 hr. These pharmacokinetic profiles observed were similar to those of another antiherpesvirus drug, acyclovir, previously reported in horses following oral dosing of its prodrug valacyclovir.

  18. Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Albiglutide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønden, Andreas; Knop, Filip K; Christensen, Mikkel B

    2017-01-01

    Albiglutide is a long-acting, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist for subcutaneous administration with a recommended dose of 30-50 mg once weekly. The aim of this article is to outline the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of albiglutide including the clinical efficacy and safet...

  19. Glipizide Pharmacokinetics in Healthy and Diabetic Volunteers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Purpose: Disease state may contribute to alteration in drug pharmacokinetics. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) on the ... assayed using a sensitive and validated reverse phase high performance liquid ..... factors may contribute to these variations. [17].

  20. Pharmacological activities and pharmacokinetic study of hyperoside ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies on its pharmacokinetic (PK) properties revealed that it is a stable compound ... attention in drug discovery and food supplement research ... neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cAMP response element ... antidepressant effect of hyperoside is mediated through .... Saposhnikovia divaricata by high performance counter-.

  1. The role of pharmacokinetics in risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitz, R.H.; Fox, T.R.; Watanabe, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics can aid in the formulation of risk estimations by selection of doses for toxicity studies, by distinguishing between ''internal dose or toxifor concentration'' and ''applied dose,'' by providing a physiological basis for extrapolating between species, and by helping us to visualize the toxicological consequences of processes which we cannot quantify. 10 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Human pharmacokinetics of proguanil and its metabolites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Ravn, P; Rønn, A

    1987-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of proguanil and its metabolites cycloguanil and p-chlorophenylbiguanide were studied in five healthy volunteers taking 200 mg orally for 14 days. A highly sensitive and specific high-performance liquid chromatographic assay was applied, clearly identifying all three compounds...

  3. Circadian variation in the pharmacokinetics of verapamil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, C M; Frederiksen, M; Hansen, J F

    1989-01-01

    greater bioavailability (AUC) and a prolonged time to peak concentration was found. During the night (24.00 h-06.00 h) the half-life of verapamil was significantly longer than during the day (16.00 h-22.00 h). These differences in pharmacokinetics may be due to reduced hepatic blood flow at night...

  4. [Impact of ECMO on drugs pharmacokinetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasni, Nesrine; Lemaitre, Florian; Fernandez, Christine; Combes, Alain; Farinotti, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a life support system used in the treatment of patients of all ages with severe respiratory or cardiorespiratory failure. Despite the intensive use of drugs in the treatment of patients on ECMO, few studies have been conducted to determine the impact of this device on the pharmacokinetics of drugs. Publications in this field have shown pharmacokinetics changes resulting in an increase in volume of distribution of drugs and/or decreased clearance with consequent increase of their half-life. Reduced plasma concentrations of some drugs due to their adsorption on the different components of the circuit further complicates the determination of pharmacokinetic parameters of patients treated by ECMO. The literature published up to now on the pharmacokinetic changes associated with ECMO provide preliminary support for dosage adjustment. However, more research is needed to identify dosage strategies for this patient population. © 2011 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  5. Pharmacokinetics and effect on the corrected QT interval of single-dose escitalopram in healthy elderly compared with younger adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyewon; Kim, Anhye; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Park, Sang-In; Yu, Kyung-Sang; Yoon, Seo Hyun; Cho, Joo-Youn; Chung, Jae-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Escitalopram is the (S)-enantiomer of citalopram that has a potential QT prolonging effect. In this study, 12 healthy elderly individuals received a single oral dose of escitalopram (20 mg), and their pharmacokinetics and QT effect data were compared with data from 33 younger adults obtained in a previous study. Serial blood samples for pharmacokinetic analysis were collected and ECG was performed up to 48 h postdose. The elderly and younger adults showed similar pharmacokinetic profiles. The geometric mean ratios (90% confidence interval) of the elderly compared with the younger adults were 1.02 (0.89-1.17) and 1.01 (0.86-1.17) for the maximum plasma concentration and area under the concentration-time curve, respectively. The mean baseline-adjusted QT (dQT) time profiles were similar and the mean values of maximum dQT were not significantly different between the elderly and the younger adults. The linear mixed-effect model indicated a weak but positive relationship between the escitalopram concentration and dQT, with an estimated coefficient of concentration of 0.43-0.54. In conclusion, the pharmacokinetics and QT effect of a single dose of escitalopram observed in the elderly without comorbidities and younger adults were generally similar.

  6. Using Dried Blood Spot Sampling to Improve Data Quality and Reduce Animal Use in Mouse Pharmacokinetic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickremsinhe, Enaksha R; Perkins, Everett J

    2015-01-01

    Traditional pharmacokinetic analysis in nonclinical studies is based on the concentration of a test compound in plasma and requires approximately 100 to 200 µL blood collected per time point. However, the total blood volume of mice limits the number of samples that can be collected from an individual animal—often to a single collection per mouse—thus necessitating dosing multiple mice to generate a pharmacokinetic profile in a sparse-sampling design. Compared with traditional methods, dried blood spot (DBS) analysis requires smaller volumes of blood (15 to 20 µL), thus supporting serial blood sampling and the generation of a complete pharmacokinetic profile from a single mouse. Here we compare plasma-derived data with DBS-derived data, explain how to adopt DBS sampling to support discovery mouse studies, and describe how to generate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data from a single mouse. Executing novel study designs that use DBS enhances the ability to identify and streamline better drug candidates during drug discovery. Implementing DBS sampling can reduce the number of mice needed in a drug discovery program. In addition, the simplicity of DBS sampling and the smaller numbers of mice needed translate to decreased study costs. Overall, DBS sampling is consistent with 3Rs principles by achieving reductions in the number of animals used, decreased restraint-associated stress, improved data quality, direct comparison of interanimal variability, and the generation of multiple endpoints from a single study. PMID:25836959

  7. Nanoparticle-protein corona in invertebrate in vitro testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, Yuya; Miclaus, Teodora; Scavenius, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    , and the primary cells were thus exposed to silver nanoparticles with pre-formed corona of serum albumin (a major serum protein). Here we have profiled proteins forming the hard corona around silver nanoparticles (OECD reference materials, 15 nm and 75 nm) using gel electrophoresis techniques to identify proteins...... that strongly interact with the nanoparticles. This study was accompanied by multi-parametric flow-cytometry analysis of the cellular responses, in particular nanoparticle accumulation and cytotoxicity. The formation of and differential cellular responses to nanoparticle-protein complexes underscore the need...

  8. (shell) nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the quasistatic approximation shows good agreement with the Mie theory results. .... medium, respectively, and f = (rcore/rshell)1/3 is the fraction of the total particle ..... [27] Michael Quinten, Optical properties of nanoparticle systems: Mie and ...

  9. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the proton pump inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jai Moo; Kim, Nayoung

    2013-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) is a prodrug which is activated by acid. Activated PPI binds covalently to the gastric H(+), K(+)-ATPase via disulfide bond. Cys813 is the primary site responsible for the inhibition of acid pump enzyme, where PPIs bind. Omeprazole was the first PPI introduced in market, followed by pantoprazole, lansoprazole and rabeprazole. Though these PPIs share the core structures benzimidazole and pyridine, their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are a little different. Several factors must be considered in understanding the pharmacodynamics of PPIs, including: accumulation of PPI in the parietal cell, the proportion of the pump enzyme located at the canaliculus, de novo synthesis of new pump enzyme, metabolism of PPI, amounts of covalent binding of PPI in the parietal cell, and the stability of PPI binding. PPIs have about 1hour of elimination half-life. Area under the plasmic concentration curve and the intragastric pH profile are very good indicators for evaluating PPI efficacy. Though CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 polymorphism are major components of PPI metabolism, the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of racemic mixture of PPIs depend on the CYP2C19 genotype status. S-omeprazole is relatively insensitive to CYP2C19, so better control of the intragastric pH is achieved. Similarly, R-lansoprazole was developed in order to increase the drug activity. Delayed-release formulation resulted in a longer duration of effective concentration of R-lansoprazole in blood, in addition to metabolic advantage. Thus, dexlansoprazole showed best control of the intragastric pH among the present PPIs. Overall, PPIs made significant progress in the management of acid-related diseases and improved health-related quality of life.

  10. Hypericum perforatum: a 'modern' herbal antidepressant: pharmacokinetics of active ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurglics, Mario; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    Hypericum perforatum (St John's Wort [SJW]) counts among the most favourite herbal drugs, and is the only herbal alternative to classic synthetic antidepressants in the therapy of mild to moderate depression. Several clinical studies have been conducted to verify the effectiveness of ethanolic or methanolic extracts of SJW. Alcoholic SJW extracts are a mixture of substances with widely varying physical and chemical properties and activities. Hyperforin, a phloroglucinol derivative, is the main source of pharmacological effects caused by the consumption of alcoholic extracts of SJW in the therapy of depression. However, several studies indicate that flavone derivatives, e.g. rutin, and also the naphthodianthrones hypericin and pseudohypericin, take part in the antidepressant efficacy. In contrast to the amount of documentation concerning clinical efficacy, oral bioavailability and pharmacokinetic data about the active components are rather scarce. The hyperforin plasma concentration in humans was investigated in a small number of studies. The results of these studies indicate a relevant plasma concentration, comparable with that used in in vitro tests. Furthermore, hyperforin is the only ingredient of H. perforatum that could be determined in the brain of rodents after oral administration of alcoholic extracts. The plasma concentrations of the hypericins were, compared with hyperforin, only one-tenth and, until now, the hypericins could not be found in the brain after oral administration of alcoholic H. perforatum extracts or pure hypericin. Until now, the pharmacokinetic profile of the flavonoids in humans after oral administration of an alcoholic H. perforatum extract has been investigated in only one study. More data are available for rutin and the aglycone quercetin after administration of pure substances or other flavonoid sources.

  11. Pharmacokinetics of bisphenol A in neonatal and adult rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerge, Daniel R.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Woodling, Kellie A.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2010-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high-production volume industrial chemical used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastic products and epoxy resin-based food can liners. The presence of BPA in urine of > 90% of Americans aged 6-60 is controversial because of the potential for endocrine disruption, particularly during perinatal development, as suggested by in vitro, experimental animal, and epidemiological studies. The current study used LC/MS/MS to measure serum pharmacokinetics of aglycone (active) and conjugated (inactive) BPA in adult and neonatal rhesus monkeys by oral (PND 5, 35, 70) and intravenous injection (PND 77) routes using d6-BPA to avoid sample contamination. The concentration-time profiles observed in adult monkeys following oral administration of 100 μg/kg bw were remarkably similar to those previously reported in human volunteers given a similar dose; moreover, minimal pharmacokinetic differences were observed between neonatal and adult monkeys for the receptor-active aglycone form of BPA. Circulating concentrations of BPA aglycone were quite low following oral administration (< 1% of total), which reflects the redundancy of active UDP-glucuronosyl transferase isoforms in both gut and liver. No age-related changes were seen in internal exposure metrics for aglycone BPA in monkeys, a result clearly different from developing rats where significant inverse age-related changes, based on immaturity of Phase II metabolism and renal excretion, were recently reported. These observations imply that any toxicological effect observed in rats from early postnatal exposures to BPA could over-predict those possible in primates of the same age, based on significantly higher internal exposures and overall immaturity at birth.

  12. Etravirine Pharmacokinetics In HIV-Infected Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikki Mulligan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The study goal was to describe etravirine pharmacokinetics during pregnancy and postpartum in HIV-infected women. Methods: IMPAACT P1026s and PANNA are on-going, nonrandomized, open-label, parallel-group, multi-center phase-IV prospective studies in HIV-infected pregnant women. Intensive steady-state 12 or 24 hour pharmacokinetic profiles were performed from 2nd trimester through postpartum. Etravirine was measured at two labs using validated ultra performance liquid chromatography (detection limits: 0.020 mcg/mL and 0.026 mcg/mL. Results: Fifteen women took etravirine 200 mg twice-daily dosing and one took 400 mg once-daily. Etravirine AUC0-12 was significantly higher in the 3rd trimester compared to paired postpartum data by 45% (median 8.3 mcg*hr/mL versus 5.7 mcg*hr/mL, p = 0.086. Etravirine apparent oral clearance was significantly lower in the 3rd trimester of pregnancy compared to paired postpartum data (median 24 L/h versus 35 L/h, p = 0.038. The median ratio of cord blood to maternal plasma concentration at delivery was 0.56 (range: 0.19 - 4.25 and no perinatal transmission occurred. Conclusion: Etravirine apparent oral clearance is reduced and exposure increased during the third trimester of pregnancy. Based on prior dose-ranging and safety data, no dose adjustment is necessary for maternal health but the effects of etravirine in utero are unknown. Maternal health and infant outcomes should be closely monitored until further infant safety data are available. The IMPAACT protocol P1026s and PANNA study are registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under NCT00042289 and NCT00825929.

  13. Physiochemical and biochemical factors influencing the pharmacokinetics of antibody therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumbaca, Daniela; Boswell, C Andrew; Fielder, Paul J; Khawli, Leslie A

    2012-09-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are increasingly being developed to treat multiple disease areas, including those related to oncology, immunology, neurology, and ophthalmology. There are multiple factors, such as charge, size, neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) binding affinity, target affinity and biology, immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass, degree and type of glycosylation, injection route, and injection site, that could affect the pharmacokinetics (PK) of these large macromolecular therapeutics, which in turn could have ramifications on their efficacy and safety. This minireview examines how characteristics of the antibodies could be altered to change their PK profiles. For example, it was observed that a net charge modification of at least a 1-unit shift in isoelectric point altered antibody clearance. Antibodies with enhanced affinity for FcRn at pH 6.0 display longer serum half-lives and slower clearances than wild type. Antibody fragments have different clearance rates and tissue distribution profiles than full length antibodies. Fc glycosylation is perceived to have a minimal effect on PK while that of terminal high mannose remains unclear. More investigation is warranted to determine if injection route and/or site impacts PK. Nonetheless, a better understanding of the effects of all these variations may allow for the better design of antibody therapeutics.

  14. A Review on Pharmacokinetic Modeling and the Effects of Environmental Stressors on Pharmacokinetics for Operational Medicine: Operational Pharmacokinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Manning et al. 1986), which may cause physiological changes. For example, emotional distress may lead to elevated heart rate, blood pressure and...related changes in renal functions were reported during a Stroop word color conflict test (Fauvel, Hadj-Aissa et al. 1991). Emotional stressors could...M. Skee, et al. (2001). "Pharmacokinetics of norelgestromin and ethinyl estradiol delivered by a contraceptive patch (Ortho Evra (TM)/Evra (TM

  15. Imaging carbon nanoparticles and related cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C; Porter, A E; Welland, M; Muller, K; Skepper, J N; Koziol, K; Midgley, P

    2009-01-01

    the cell, essential for identifying the toxicological profiles of carbon nanoparticles.

  16. Solid lipid nanoparticles: A drug carrier system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi R Kokardekar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN are a type of nanoparticles. They are submicron colloidal carriers which are composed of physiological lipids, dispersed in water or in aqueous surfactant solutions. SLN have wide range of advantages over other types of nanoparticles. These include availability of large-scale production methods and no signs of cytotoxicity, which are main hindrances in the application of other types of nanoparticles. Hot and cold homogenization techniques are mainly employed for its production. They are mainly evaluated on the basis of their drug release profile and particle internal structure. The products based on SLN are under development. They have a very wide range of applications in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. They can be applied for any purpose, for which nanoparticles have a distinct advantage. Thus, SLN can be used extensively as an alternative to the existing drug carrier systems, providing more flexibility with respect to the area of applications and also aspects for commercialization.

  17. Species Differences Take Shape at Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, Yuya; Miclaus, Teodora; Scavenius, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Cells recognize the biomolecular corona around a nanoparticle, but the biological identity of the complex may be considerably different among various species. This study explores the importance of protein corona composition for nanoparticle recognition by coelomocytes of the earthworm Eisenia...... fetida using E. fetida coelomic proteins (EfCP) as a native repertoire and fetal bovine serum (FBS) as a non-native reference. We have profiled proteins forming the long-lived corona around silver nanoparticles (75 nm OECD reference materials) and compared the responses of coelomocytes to protein coronas...... pre-formed of EfCP or FBS. We find that over time silver nanoparticles can competitively acquire a biological identity native to the cells in situ even in non-native media, and significantly greater cellular accumulation of the nanoparticles was observed with corona complexes pre-formed of EfCP (p

  18. Pharmacodynamics and Pharmacokinetics Following Once-Daily and Twice-Daily Dosing of Tiotropium Respimat(®) in Asthma Using Standardized Sample-Contamination Avoidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beeh, Kai-Michael; Kirsten, Anne-Marie; Dusser, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was conducted to confirm the 24-hour bronchodilator efficacy and pharmacokinetic profile of once-daily tiotropium Respimat(®) 5 μg add-on to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) in adults with symptomatic asthma. It used a trial protocol designed to minimize the risk of pharmacoki...

  19. Magnetic induced heating of nanoparticle solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murph, S. Hunyadi [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Brown, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Coopersmith, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Fulmer, S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Sessions, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Ali, M. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2016-12-02

    Magnetic induced heating of nanoparticles (NP) provides a useful advantage for many energy transfer applications. This study aims to gain an understanding of the key parameters responsible for maximizing the energy transfer leading to nanoparticle heating through the use of simulations and experimental results. It was found that magnetic field strength, NP concentration, NP composition, and coil size can be controlled to generate accurate temperature profiles in NP aqueous solutions.

  20. Hybrid gold nanoparticles in molecular imaging and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katti, K.V.; Kannan, R.; Katti, K.; Kattumuri, V.; Pandrapragada, R.; Rahing, V.; Cutler, C.; Boote, E.; Casteel, S.W.; Smith, C.J.; Robertson, J.D.; Jurrison, S.

    2006-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles, because of their size, chemical and physical properties, are particularly attractive as therapeutic probes in treating cancer. Central to any clinical advances in nanoparticulate based therapy will be to produce hybrid nanoparticles that can be targeted to vascular, extracellular or cell surface receptors. Development of hybrid nanoparticles that specifically target cancer vasculature has received considerable attention. Most cancers have leaky vasculature and the defective vascular architecture, created due to the rapid vascularisation necessary to serve fast growing cancers, in combination with poor lymphatic drainage allows increased permeation and retention effects. The leaky vasculature, because of higher porosity and permeability, serve as natural high affinity targets to metallic nanoparticles. Another attractive approach toward the application of nanotechnology to nanomedicine is the utility of nanoparticles that display inherent therapeutic properties. For example radioactive gold nanoparticles present attractive prospects in therapy of cancer. The radioactive properties of Au-198 (β(max) = 0.96 MeV; t(1/2) = 2.7 d) and Au-199 (β(max) 0.46 MeV; t(1/2) = 3.14 d) make them ideal candidates for use in radiotherapeutic applications. In addition, they both have imageable gamma emissions for dosimetry and pharmacokinetic studies and Au-199 can be made carrier-free by indirect methods. Gold nanoparticles are of interest for treatment of disease as they can deliver agents directly into cells and cellular components with a higher concentration of radioactivity, e.g. higher dose of radioactivity, to cancerous tumor cells

  1. PHARMACOKINETICS OF PIROXICAM IN CRANES (FAMILY GRUIDAE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiper, Naomi L; Cox, Sherry K; Doss, Grayson A; Elsmo, Betsy; Franzen-Klein, Dana; Hartup, Barry K

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the pharmacokinetics of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) piroxicam in cranes, three brolgas (Antigone rubicunda) were administered piroxicam as a single oral dose at 0.5 mg/kg and 1.0 mg/kg during separate trials. Serial blood samples were collected for quantification of piroxicam in plasma. Piroxicam was readily absorbed at both dosages, and no adverse effects were observed. Plasma concentrations peaked at 3.67 hr with a concentration of 4.00 μg/ml for the lower dosage, and at 0.83 hr at 8.77 μg/ml for the higher dosage. Piroxicam may exhibit linear kinetics and dose proportionality in brolgas, but will require further study. Mean peak plasma concentrations in brolgas were comparable to concentrations demonstrated to be analgesic in humans. To the authors' knowledge, this study represents the first pharmacokinetic investigation of piroxicam in an avian species.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of Alternative Administration Routes of Melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zetner, D.; Andersen, L. P.H.; Rosenberg, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Melatonin is traditionally administered orally but has a poor and variable bioavailability. This study aims to present an overview of studies investigating the pharmacokinetics of alternative administration routes of melatonin. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed...... and included experimental or clinical studies, investigating pharmacokinetics of alternative administration routes of melatonin in vivo. Alternative administration routes were defined as all administration routes except oral and intravenous. Results: 10 studies were included in the review. Intranasal....... Subcutaneous injection of melatonin displayed a rapid absorption rate compared to oral administration. Conclusion: Intranasal administration of melatonin has a large potential, and more research in humans is warranted. Transdermal application of melatonin has a possible use in a local application, due to slow...

  3. Tubocurarine and pancuronium: a pharmacokinetic view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, C A; Somogyi, A A; Ramzan, M I; Triggs, E J

    1980-02-01

    This review is an attempt to bring together the pharmacokinetic data on d-tubocurarine and pancuronium with clinical observations on relaxant dosage and effect. The modelling techniques used here represent an oversimplification of the relationships between relaxant plasma concentration and response as they do not predict either the time of onset of paralysis or its peak intensity. However, they do enable calculation of a bolus dose of relaxant required to achieve a particular intensity of paralysis for the average patient once pseudo-distribution equilibrium has been achieved. This has been further extended to predict the cumulation of the relaxants with subsequent dosage in average patients. Suggested regimens incorporating bolus and infusion doses of the relaxants to achieve continuous neuromuscular blockade have been calculated also. Averaged pharmacokinetic parameters derived from patients with renal or hepatic dysfunction have been used to predict the likely duration and intensities of paralysis for the relaxants.

  4. The pharmacokinetics of the interstitial space in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Levitt, David G

    2003-01-01

    Background The pharmacokinetics of extracellular solutes is determined by the blood-tissue exchange kinetics and the volume of distribution in the interstitial space in the different organs. This information can be used to develop a general physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model applicable to most extracellular solutes. Methods The human pharmacokinetic literature was surveyed to tabulate the steady state and equilibrium volume of distribution of the solutes mannitol, EDTA, morphi...

  5. Preparation and ocular pharmacokinetics of ganciclovir liposomes

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Yan; Tu, Jiasheng

    2007-01-01

    Ophthalmic liposomes of ganciclovir (GCV) were prepared by the reverse phase evaporation method, and their ocular pharmacokinetics in albino rabbits were compared with those obtained after dosing with GCV solution. The in vitro transcorneal permeability of GCV liposomes was found to be 3.9-fold higher than that of the solution. After in vivo instillation in albino rabbits, no difference was found in the precorneal elimination rate of GCV from liposome vs solution dosing. The aqueous humor con...

  6. Perioperative pharmacokinetics of methadone in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anshuman; Tallchief, Danielle; Blood, Jane; Kim, Thomas; London, Amy; Kharasch, Evan D

    2011-12-01

    Methadone is frequently administered to adults experiencing anesthesia and receiving pain treatment. Methadone pharmacokinetics in adults are well characterized, including the perioperative period. Methadone is also used in children. There is, however, no information on methadone pharmacokinetics in children of any age. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the pharmacokinetics of intravenous methadone in children undergoing surgery. Perioperative opioid-sparing effects were also assessed. Eligible subjects were children 5-18 yr undergoing general anesthesia and surgery, with an anticipated postoperative inpatient stay exceeding 3 days. Three groups of 10 to 11 patients each received intravenous methadone hydrochloride after anesthetic induction in ascending dose groups of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 mg/kg (up to 20 mg). Anesthetic care was not otherwise changed. Venous blood was obtained for 4 days, for stereoselective determination of methadone and metabolites. Pain assessments were made each morning. Daily and total opioid consumption was determined. Perioperative opioid consumption and pain was determined in a second cohort, which was matched to age, sex, race, ethnicity, surgical procedure, and length of stay, but not receiving methadone. The final methadone study cohort was 31 adolescents (14 ± 2 yr, range 10-18) undergoing major spine surgery for a diagnosis of scoliosis. Methadone pharmacokinetics were linear over the dose range 0.1-0.3 mg/kg. Disposition was stereoselective. Methadone administration did not dose-dependently affect postoperative pain scores, and did not dose-dependently decrease daily or total postoperative opioid consumption in spinal fusion patients. Methadone enantiomer disposition in adolescents undergoing surgery was similar to that in healthy adults.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of linezolid in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazdanovic, Predrag; Jankovic, Slobodan M; Kostic, Marina; Dimitrijevic, Aleksandra; Stefanovic, Srdjan

    2016-06-01

    Linezolid is an oxazolidinone antibiotic active against Gram-positive bacteria, and is most commonly used to treat life-threatening infections in critically ill patients. The pharmacokinetics of linezolid are profoundly altered in critically ill patients, partly due to decreased function of vital organs, and partly because life-sustaining drugs and devices may change the extent of its excretion. This article is summarizes key changes in the pharmacokinetics of linezolid in critically ill patients. The changes summarized are clinically relevant and may serve as rationale for dosing recommendations in this particular population. While absorption and penetration of linezolid to tissues are not significantly changed in critically ill patients, protein binding of linezolid is decreased, volume of distribution increased, and metabolism may be inhibited leading to non-linear kinetics of elimination; these changes are responsible for high inter-individual variability of linezolid plasma concentrations, which requires therapeutic plasma monitoring and choice of continuous venous infusion as the administration method. Acute renal or liver failure decrease clearance of linezolid, but renal replacement therapy is capable of restoring clearance back to normal, obviating the need for dosage adjustment. More population pharmacokinetic studies are necessary which will identify and quantify the influence of various factors on clearance and plasma concentrations of linezolid in critically ill patients.

  8. Enantioselective pharmacokinetics of sibutramine in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Keumhan; Bae, Kyoungjin; Min, Bokyoung; Kim, Eunyoung; Kwon, Kwang-il; Jeong, Taecheon; Kang, Wonku

    2010-02-01

    Racemic sibutramine is widely used to treat obesity owing to its inhibition of serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake in synapses. Although the enantioselective effects of sibutramine and its two active desmethyl-metabolites, monodesmethylsibutramine (MDS) and didesmethylsibutramine (DDS), on anorexia and energy expenditure have been elucidated, the enantioselective pharmacokinetics of sibutramine are still unclear. Therefore, we aimed to characterize the enantioselective pharmacokinetics of sibutramine and its metabolites in plasma and urine following an intravenous and a single oral administration of sibutramine in rats. The absolute bioavailability of sibutramine was only about 7%. The pharmacologically less effective S-isomer of DDS was predominant in the plasma: the C ( max ) and the AUC ( inf ) were 28 and 30 times higher than those of the R-isomer, respectively (psibutramine metabolites MDS and DDS were present at lower concentrations, owing to their rapid biotransformation to hydroxylated and/or carbamoylglucuronized forms and their faster excretion in the urine. The present study is the first to elucidate the enantioselective pharmacokinetics of sibutramine in rats.

  9. Two-dose-level confirmatory study of the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of everolimus in Chinese patients with advanced solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jappe Annette

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This phase I, randomized, multicenter, open-label study investigated the pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of the oral mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus in Chinese patients with advanced solid tumors. Methods A total of 24 patients with advanced breast cancer (n = 6, gastric cancer (n = 6, non-small cell lung cancer (n = 6, or renal cell carcinoma (n = 6 who were refractory to/unsuitable for standard therapy were randomized 1:1 to oral everolimus 5 or 10 mg/day. Primary end points were pharmacokinetic parameters and safety and tolerability. Pharmacokinetic 24-h profiles were measured on day 15; trough level was measured on days 2, 8, 15, 16, and 22. Tolerability was assessed continuously. This final analysis was performed after all patients had received 6 months of study drug or had discontinued. Results Everolimus was absorbed rapidly; median Tmax was 3 h (range, 1-4 and 2 h (range, 0.9-6 in the 5 and 10 mg/day groups, respectively. Pharmacokinetic parameters increased dose proportionally from the 5 and 10 mg/day doses. Steady-state levels were achieved by day 8 or earlier. The most common adverse events suspected to be related to everolimus therapy were increased blood glucose (16.7% and 41.7% and fatigue (16.7% and 33.3% in the everolimus 5 and 10 mg/day dose cohorts, respectively. Best tumor response was stable disease in 10 (83% and 6 (50% patients in the 5 and 10 mg/day groups, respectively. Conclusions Everolimus 5 or 10 mg/day was well tolerated in Chinese patients with advanced solid tumors. The observed safety and pharmacokinetic profile of everolimus from this study were consistent with previous studies. Trial registration Chinese Health Authorities 2008L09346

  10. ZD0473 pharmacokinetics in Japanese patients: a Phase I dose-escalation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, H; Tamura, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, N; Ueda, Y; Shimoyama, T; Saijo, N

    2002-12-01

    ZD0473 is new platinum agent that was rationally designed to circumvent platinum resistance and reduce the potential for nephro-and neurotoxicity. This Phase I dose-escalating study investigated the pharmacokinetics, tolerability and efficacy of ZD0473 in Japanese patients with solid, refractory tumours. ZD0473 was administered as a 1-h intravenous infusion every 3 weeks. Nine patients received a total of 16 cycles of ZD0473 (median 1 cycle/patient), with 3 patients treated at each of 3 doses (60, 90, 120 mg/m2). The maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) and the area under the concentration-time curve to infinity (AUC(0-infinity)) increased with dose in a linear fashion for both total platinum and ZD0473 in plasma ultrafiltrate, suggesting that the pharmacokinetics of ZD0473 are linear. Haematological and non-haematological toxicities such as nausea and vomiting were mild (grade 1 or 2) and transient. No clinically significant nephro-, oto- or neurotoxicity was observed. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was not observed and the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was not identified. ZD0473 treatment showed evidence of disease stabilisation in 3 patients (33%). In conclusion, ZD0473 appears to have linear pharmacokinetics, and an acceptable tolerability profile at doses up to 120 mg/m2 in Japanese patients with refractory solid malignancies. Following evaluation of the data from all the Western trials, the ZD0473 development programme changed and this Japanese trial was stopped.

  11. Pharmacokinetics of nicotine following the controlled use of a prototype novel tobacco vapor product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuki, Dai; Sakaguchi, Chikako; Kikuchi, Akira; Futamura, Yasuyuki

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this clinical study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of nicotine following the use of a prototype novel tobacco vapor (PNTV) product in comparison to a conventional cigarette (CC1). The study was conducted in Japanese healthy adult male smokers, using an open-label, randomized, two-period crossover design, to assess the pharmacokinetics of nicotine after controlled use of a PNTV product or CC1. During the study period, blood samples were drawn from subjects for the measurement of plasma nicotine concentrations and nicotine intake was estimated from the mouth level exposure (MLE). The C max and AUC last following the use of PNTV product were 45.7% and 68.3%, respectively, of those obtained with CC1 and there were no significant differences in the tmax and t 1/2 between PNTV product and CC1. The estimated MLE following the use of PNTV product was approximately two-thirds of that obtained following the smoking of CC1, but the relative bioavailability of PNTV product to CC1 was approximately 104%. The differences in C max and AUC last between PNTV product and CC1 therefore are explained by differences in nicotine intake. These results suggest that the PNTV product shows a similar pharmacokinetic profile to CC1, while delivering less nicotine following controlled use. Copyright © 2017 Japan Tobacco Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of dietary kaempferol and its metabolite 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabela, Volha; Sampath, Chethan; Oufir, Mouhssin; Moradi-Afrapoli, Fahimeh; Butterweck, Veronika; Hamburger, Matthias

    2016-12-01

    Kaempferol is a major flavonoid in the human diet and in medicinal plants. The compound exerts anxiolytic activity when administered orally in mice, while no behavioural changes were observed upon intraperitoneal administration, or upon oral administration in gut sterilized animals. 4-Hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4-HPAA), which possesses anxiolytic effects when administered intraperitoneally, is a major intestinal metabolite of kaempferol. Pharmacokinetic properties of the compounds are currently not clear. UHPLC-MS/MS methods were validated to support pharmacokinetic studies of kaempferol and 4-HPAA in rats. Non-compartmental and compartmental analyses were performed. After intravenous administration, kaempferol followed a one-compartment model, with a rapid clearance (4.40-6.44l/h/kg) and an extremely short half-life of 2.93-3.79min. After oral gavage it was not possible to obtain full plasma concentration-time profiles of kaempferol. Pharmacokinetics of 4-HPAA was characterized by a two-compartment model, consisting of a quick distribution phase (half-life 3.04-6.20min) followed by a fast elimination phase (half-life 19.3-21.1min). Plasma exposure of kaempferol is limited by poor oral bioavailability and extensive metabolism. Both compounds are rapidly eliminated, so that effective concentrations at the site of action do not appear to be reached. At present, it is not clear how the anxiolytic-like effects reported for the compounds can be explained. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A safety and pharmacokinetic trial assessing delivery of dapivirine from a vaginal ring in healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, Annalene; Haazen, Wouter; Nuttall, Jeremy; Romano, Joseph; Rosenberg, Zeda; van Niekerk, Neliëtte

    2014-06-19

    Women-initiated HIV-prevention products are urgently needed. To address this need, a trial was conducted to assess the safety and pharmacokinetics of a silicone elastomer matrix vaginal ring containing 25 mg of the antiretroviral drug dapivirine when used continuously for 28 consecutive days. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in 16 healthy, HIV-negative women, 18-40 years of age, who were randomized 1:1 to use either the active or matching placebo ring for 28 days. Participants were followed during and for 28 days after ring use for safety and pharmacokinetic evaluations. The dapivirine vaginal ring was safe and well tolerated with no differences in safety endpoints between the active and placebo ring. The concentration-time plots of dapivirine in vaginal fluid were indicative of a sustained release of dapivirine over the 28 days of use. Dapivirine vaginal fluid concentrations were highest near the ring, followed by the cervix and introïtus (mean Cmax of 80, 67 and 31 μg/g, respectively). Vaginal fluid concentrations of dapivirine on the day of ring removal (day 28) at all three collection sites exceeded by more than 3900-fold the IC99 for dapivirine in a tissue explant infection model. Plasma dapivirine concentrations were low (dapivirine vaginal ring has a safety and pharmacokinetic profile that supports its use as a sustained-release topical microbicide for HIV-1 prevention in women.

  14. Abnormal clinical pharmacokinetics of the developmental radiosensitizers pimonidazole (Ro 03-8799) and etanidazole (SR 2508)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maughan, T.S.; Newman, H.F.; Bleehen, N.M.; Ward, R.; Workman, P.

    1990-01-01

    The hypoxic cell radiosensitizers Ro 03-8799 (pimonidazole) and SR 2508 (etanidazole) are under evaluation as single agents (Phase III) and in combination (Phase I). Ro 03-8799 produces an acute, transient central nervous system syndrome, whereas SR 2508 causes cumulative, peripheral neurotoxicity; both effects are dose-limiting. Pharmacokinetic studies have shown the importance of area under the plasma drug concentration versus time curve (AUC) in predicting the risk of peripheral neuropathy. Most patients have very similar pharmacokinetic parameters. This study reports 2/25 patients receiving 0.75 g/m2 Ro 03-8799 plus 2.0 g/m2 SR 2508 who showed significant discrepancies in drug handling. One patient exhibited a markedly elevated AUC and prolonged t1/2 beta for SR 2508 and this was associated with an unusually rapid onset of peripheral neuropathy. A second patient showed normal handling of SR 2508 but prolonged values for both t1/2 alpha and t1/2 beta for Ro 03-8799 and unusually low levels of its N-oxide metabolite. In addition a low peak Ro 03-8799 concentration combined with a very high volume of distribution was found in this patient, leading to a normal AUC value and toxicity profile. Both patients exhibited a relatively low creatinine clearance. The mechanisms which may underlie these findings are discussed, and the importance of pharmacokinetic monitoring in the use of these agents is emphasized

  15. PKSolver: An add-in program for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data analysis in Microsoft Excel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Huo, Meirong; Zhou, Jianping; Xie, Shaofei

    2010-09-01

    This study presents PKSolver, a freely available menu-driven add-in program for Microsoft Excel written in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), for solving basic problems in pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) data analysis. The program provides a range of modules for PK and PD analysis including noncompartmental analysis (NCA), compartmental analysis (CA), and pharmacodynamic modeling. Two special built-in modules, multiple absorption sites (MAS) and enterohepatic circulation (EHC), were developed for fitting the double-peak concentration-time profile based on the classical one-compartment model. In addition, twenty frequently used pharmacokinetic functions were encoded as a macro and can be directly accessed in an Excel spreadsheet. To evaluate the program, a detailed comparison of modeling PK data using PKSolver and professional PK/PD software package WinNonlin and Scientist was performed. The results showed that the parameters estimated with PKSolver were satisfactory. In conclusion, the PKSolver simplified the PK and PD data analysis process and its output could be generated in Microsoft Word in the form of an integrated report. The program provides pharmacokinetic researchers with a fast and easy-to-use tool for routine and basic PK and PD data analysis with a more user-friendly interface. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interaction between rosuvastatin and valsartan in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jin Ah; Lee, Soo-Yun; Kim, Jung-Ryul; Ko, Jae-Wook; Jang, Seong Bok; Nam, Su Youn; Huh, Wooseong

    2015-01-01

    Valsartan, an angiotensin-receptor blocker, and rosuvastatin, a competitive inhibitor of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, are frequently coadministered to treat patients with hypertension and dyslipidemia. The study reported here sought to evaluate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between rosuvastatin and valsartan in healthy Korean subjects. Thirty healthy male Korean subjects were administered with rosuvastatin (20 mg/day), valsartan (160 mg/day), and both drugs concomitantly for 4 days in a randomized, open-label, multiple-dose, three-treatment, three-period crossover study. Plasma concentrations of rosuvastatin, N-desmethyl rosuvastatin, and valsartan were determined using validated high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Lipid profiles and vital signs (systolic and diastolic blood pressure and pulse rate) were measured for the pharmacodynamic assessment. For rosuvastatin, the geometric mean ratios (90% confidence intervals [CIs]) of coadministration to mono-administration were 0.8809 (0.7873-0.9857) for maximum plasma concentration at steady state and 0.9151 (0.8632-0.9701) for area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) over a dosing interval at steady state. For valsartan, the geometric mean ratios (90% CIs) of those were 0.9300 (0.7946-1.0884) and 1.0072 (0.8893-1.1406), respectively. There were no significant differences in the metabolic ratio of N-desmethyl rosuvastatin AUC to rosuvastatin AUC between coadministration and rosuvastatin alone. No interaction was found in terms of systolic or diastolic blood pressure or lipid profiles. Combined treatment with valsartan and rosuvastatin was generally well tolerated without serious adverse events. The pharmacokinetic profiles of rosuvastatin and valsartan in combination were comparable with those of rosuvastatin and valsartan administered individually, suggesting that their individual pharmacokinetics were not affected by their

  17. Magnetic Nanoparticles: Material Engineering and Emerging Applications in Lithography and Biomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuping; Wen, Tianlong; Samia, Anna Cristina S.; Khandhar, Amit; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-01-01

    We present an interdisciplinary overview of material engineering and emerging applications of iron oxide nanoparticles. We discuss material engineering of nanoparticles in the broadest sense, emphasizing size and shape control, large-area self-assembly, composite/hybrid structures, and surface engineering. This is followed by a discussion of several non-traditional, emerging applications of iron oxide nanoparticles, including nanoparticle lithography, magnetic particle imaging, magnetic guided drug delivery, and positive contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. We conclude with a succinct discussion of the pharmacokinetics pathways of iron oxide nanoparticles in the human body –– an important and required practical consideration for any in vivo biomedical application, followed by a brief outlook of the field. PMID:26586919

  18. Advanced Therapeutic Strategies for Chronic Lung Disease Using Nanoparticle-Based Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Young Yhee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lung diseases include a variety of obstinate and fatal diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, cystic fibrosis (CF, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, and lung cancers. Pharmacotherapy is important for the treatment of chronic lung diseases, and current progress in nanoparticles offers great potential as an advanced strategy for drug delivery. Based on their biophysical properties, nanoparticles have shown improved pharmacokinetics of therapeutics and controlled drug delivery, gaining great attention. Herein, we will review the nanoparticle-based drug delivery system for the treatment of chronic lung diseases. Various types of nanoparticles will be introduced, and recent innovative efforts to utilize the nanoparticles as novel drug carriers for the effective treatment of chronic lung diseases will also be discussed.

  19. Cubic phase nanoparticles for sustained release of ibuprofen: formulation, characterization, and enhanced bioavailability study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dian, Linghui; Yang, Zhiwen; Li, Feng; Wang, Zhouhua; Pan, Xin; Peng, Xinsheng; Huang, Xintian; Guo, Zhefei; Quan, Guilan; Shi, Xuan; Chen, Bao; Li, Ge; Wu, Chuanbin

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the oral bioavailability of ibuprofen, ibuprofen-loaded cubic nanoparticles were prepared as a delivery system for aqueous formulations. The cubic inner structure was verified by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. With an encapsulation efficiency greater than 85%, the ibuprofen-loaded cubic nanoparticles had a narrow size distribution around a mean size of 238 nm. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction determined that ibuprofen was in an amorphous and molecular form within the lipid matrix. The in vitro release of ibuprofen from cubic nanoparticles was greater than 80% at 24 hours, showing sustained characteristics. The pharmacokinetic study in beagle dogs showed improved absorption of ibuprofen from cubic nanoparticles compared to that of pure ibuprofen, with evidence of a longer half-life and a relative oral bioavailability of 222% (P ibuprofen-loaded cubic nanoparticles provide a promising carrier candidate with an efficient drug delivery for therapeutic treatment. PMID:23468008

  20. Biopolymeric nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundar, Sushmitha; Kundu, Joydip; Kundu, Subhas C

    2010-01-01

    This review on nanoparticles highlights the various biopolymers (proteins and polysaccharides) which have recently revolutionized the world of biocompatible and degradable natural biological materials. The methods of their fabrication, including emulsification, desolvation, coacervation and electrospray drying are described. The characterization of different parameters for a given nanoparticle, such as particle size, surface charge, morphology, stability, structure, cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, drug loading and drug release, is outlined together with the relevant measurement techniques. Applications in the fields of medicine and biotechnology are discussed along with a promising future scope. (topical review)

  1. [Dependence of the pharmacokinetics of captopril on the type of adaptation reactions in the organism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udut, V V; Khazanov, V A; Gurto, R V; Borodulina, E V; Postnikova, Iu E

    2007-01-01

    The dependence of the pharmacokinetic profiles (PhP) of captopril in the phase of adaptation reactions in the organism has been studied within the framework of randomized, comparative, double cross research of bioeqivalency of captopril (Aspharma Co, Anzhero-Sudzhensk) and capoten (Bristol Myers Squibb Co.; official Russian producer, Akrikhin KhimFarmKombinat). It is established that the maximum bioaccessibility and high concentration of captopril in the blood plasma is determined on the background of physiologically optimum reactions of training and in the zone of quiet activation. These characteristics decrease during the reactions of general adaptation syndrome according to the type of increased activation and reactivation.

  2. Population pharmacokinetics and dosing regimen design of milrinone in preterm infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisis, Mary; Jiang, Xuemin; McLachlan, Andrew J; Evans, Nick; Kluckow, Martin; Osborn, David

    2007-01-01

    Aims To define the pharmacokinetics of milrinone in very preterm infants and determine an optimal dose regimen to prevent low systemic blood flow in the first 12 h after birth. Methods A prospective open‐labelled, dose‐escalation pharmacokinetic study was undertaken in two stages. In stage one, infants received milrinone at 0.25 μg/kg/min (n = 8) and 0.5 μg/kg/min (n = 11) infused from 3 to 24 h of age. Infants contributed 4–5 blood samples for concentration–time data which were analysed using a population modelling approach. A simulation study was used to explore the optimal dosing regimen to achieve target milrinone concentrations (180–300 ng/ml). This milrinone regimen was evaluated in stage two (n = 10). Results Infants (n = 29) born before 29 weeks gestation were enrolled. Milrinone pharmacokinetics were described using a one‐compartment model with first‐order elimination rate, with a population mean clearance (CV%) of 35 ml/h (24%) and volume of distribution of 512 ml (21%) and estimated half‐life of 10 h. The 0.25 and 0.5 μg/kg/min dosage regimens did not achieve optimal milrinone concentration‐time profiles to prevent early low systemic blood flow. Simulation studies predicted a loading infusion (0.75 μg/kg/min for 3 h) followed by maintenance infusion (0.2 μg/kg/min until 18 h of age) would provide an optimal milrinone concentration profile. This was confirmed in stage two of the study. Conclusion Population pharmacokinetic modelling in the preterm infant has established an optimal dose regimen for milrinone that increases the likelihood of achieving therapeutic aims and highlights the importance of pharmacokinetic studies in neonatal clinical pharmacology. PMID:16690639

  3. Pharmacokinetics of Naja sumatrana (equatorial spitting cobra venom and its major toxins in experimentally envenomed rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Khai Khun Yap

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of snakebite management and the use of antivenom depend greatly on the knowledge of the venom's composition as well as its pharmacokinetics. To date, however, pharmacokinetic reports on cobra venoms and their toxins are still relatively limited. In the present study, we investigated the pharmacokinetics of Naja sumatrana (Equatorial spitting cobra venom and its major toxins (phospholipase A2, neurotoxin and cardiotoxin, following intravenous and intramuscular administration into rabbits.The serum antigen concentration-time profile of the N. sumatrana venom and its major toxins injected intravenously fitted a two-compartment model of pharmacokinetics. The systemic clearance (91.3 ml/h, terminal phase half-life (13.6 h and systemic bioavailability (41.9% of N. sumatrana venom injected intramuscularly were similar to those of N. sputatrix venom determined in an earlier study. The venom neurotoxin and cardiotoxin reached their peak concentrations within 30 min following intramuscular injection, relatively faster than the phospholipase A2 and whole venom (Tmax=2 h and 1 h, respectively. Rapid absorption of the neurotoxin and cardiotoxin from the injection site into systemic circulation indicates fast onsets of action of these principal toxins that are responsible for the early systemic manifestation of envenoming. The more prominent role of the neurotoxin in N. sumatrana systemic envenoming is further supported by its significantly higher intramuscular bioavailability (Fi.m.=81.5% compared to that of the phospholipase A2 (Fi.m.=68.6% or cardiotoxin (Fi.m.=45.6%. The incomplete absorption of the phospholipase A2 and cardiotoxin may infer the toxins' affinities for tissues at the injection site and their pathological roles in local tissue damages through synergistic interactions.Our results suggest that the venom neurotoxin is absorbed very rapidly and has the highest bioavailability following intramuscular injection, supporting its

  4. Comparative pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation of branded and generic formulations of meloxicam in healthy male volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del Tacca M

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mario Del Tacca,1,2 Giuseppe Pasqualetti,3 Giovanni Gori,1 Pasquale Pepe,1 Antonello Di Paolo,2 Marianna Lastella,2 Ferdinando De Negri,1 Corrado Blandizzi2 1Clinical Pharmacology Centre for Drug Experimentation, Pisa University Hospital, 2Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, 3Geriatrics Unit, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy Purpose: The primary aim of the present study was to assess the pharmacokinetic bioequivalence between a generic formulation of meloxicam 15 mg tablets (Meloxicam Hexal and its respective brand product (Mobic, in order to verify whether the generic product conforms to the regulatory standards of bioequivalence in the postmarketing setting. As a secondary exploratory aim, the pharmacodynamic effects of the two formulations were also evaluated by means of rating scales following hyperalgesia induced by cutaneous freeze injury. Subjects and methods: A single 15 mg dose of generic or branded meloxicam tablets was administered to 24 healthy male volunteers in a crossover fashion. Plasma samples, collected for 24 hours after dosing, were assayed for meloxicam concentration by a validated high-performance liquid chromatography method. Results: The analysis of pharmacokinetic parameters did not show any significant difference between the two meloxicam formulations: the 90% confidence intervals fell within the acceptance range of 80%–125% (0.84–1.16 for area under the curve [0–24], and 0.89–1.23 for peak concentration. No difference in the pharmacodynamic end point was observed between the two groups. Conclusion: The pharmacokinetic profiles of the two meloxicam formulations confirm the regulatory criteria for bioequivalence; pharmacodynamic data indicate a similar antihyperalgesic effect. The two formulations can be used interchangeably in the clinical setting. Keywords: meloxicam, pharmacokinetics, healthy volunteers, generic drug, bioequivalence, postmarketing

  5. Comparative Pharmacokinetics of Levofloxacin in Healthy and Renal Damaged Muscovy Ducks following Intravenous and Oral Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Aboubakr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacokinetics aspects of levofloxacin were studied in healthy and experimentally renal damaged Muscovy ducks after single intravenous (IV and oral (PO dose of 10 mg kg−1 bwt. Following IV administration, elimination half-life (t1/2(β and mean residence time (MRT were longer in renal damaged ducks than in healthy ones. Total clearance (Cltot in renal damaged ducks (0.20 L kg−1 h−1 was significantly lower as compared to that in healthy ones (0.41 L kg−1 h−1. Following PO administration, the peak serum concentration (Cmax was higher in renal damaged than in healthy ducks and was achieved at maximum time (tmax of 2.47 and 2.05 h, respectively. The drug was eliminated (t1/2(el at a significant slower rate (3.94 h in renal damaged than in healthy ducks (2.89 h. The pharmacokinetic profile of levofloxacin is altered in renal damaged ducks due to the increased serum levofloxacin concentrations compared with that in clinically healthy ducks. Oral administration of levofloxacin at 10 mg kg−1 bwt may be highly efficacious against susceptible bacteria in ducks. Also, the dose of levofloxacin should be reduced in renal damaged ducks. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic integration revealed significantly higher values for Cmax/MIC and AUC/MIC ratios in renal damaged ducks than in healthy ones, indicating the excellent pharmacokinetic characteristics of levofloxacin in renal damaged ducks.

  6. Dose Assessment of Cefquinome by Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling in Mouse Model of Staphylococcus aureus Mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to characterize the mammary gland pharmacokinetics of cefquinome after an intramammary administration and integrate pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model. The pharmacokinetic profiles of cefquinome in gland tissue were measured using high performance liquid chromatograph. Therapeutic regimens covered various dosages ranging from 25 to 800 μg/gland and multiple dosing intervals of 8, 12, and 24 h. The in vivo bacterial killing activity elevated when dosage increased or when dosing intervals were shortened. The best antibacterial effect was demonstrated by a mean 1.5 log10CFU/gland visible count reduction. On the other hand, the results showed that the percentage of time duration of drug concentration exceeding the MIC during a dose interval (%T > MIC was generally 100% because of the influence of drug distribution caused by the blood-milk barrier. Therefore, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic parameter of the ratio of area under the concentration-time curve over 24 h to the MIC (AUC0-24/MIC was used to describe the efficacy of cefquinome instead of %T > MIC. When the magnitude of AUC0-24/MIC exceeding 16571.55 h•mL/g, considerable activity of about 1.5 log10CFU/g gland bacterial count reduction was observed in vivo. Based on the Monte Carlo simulation, the clinical recommended regimen of three infusions of 75 mg per quarter every 12 h can achieve a 76.67% cure rate in clinical treatment of bovine mastitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection.

  7. Enhanced oral bioavailability of docetaxel by lecithin nanoparticles: preparation, in vitro, and in vivo evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kaili; Cao, Shan; Hu, Fuqiang; Feng, Jianfang

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research work was to investigate the potential of lecithin nanoparticles (LNs) in improving the oral bioavailability of docetaxel. Docetaxel-loaded LNs (DTX-LNs) were prepared from oil-in-water emulsions and characterized in terms of morphology, size, zeta potential, and encapsulation efficiency. The in vitro release of docetaxel from the nanoparticles was studied by using dialysis bag method. Caco-2 cell monolayer was used for the in vitro permeation study of DTX-LNs. Bioavailability studies were conducted in rats and different pharmacokinetic parameters were evaluated after oral administration of DTX-LNs. The results showed that DTX-LNs had a mean diameter of 360 ± 8 nm and exhibited spherical shape with smooth surface under transmission electron microscopy. The DTX-LNs showed a sustained-release profile, with about 80% of docetaxel released within 72 hours. The apical to basolateral transport of docetaxel across the Caco-2 cell monolayer from the DTX-LNs was 2.14 times compared to that of the docetaxel solution (0.15 × 10−5 ± 0.016 × 10−5 cm/second versus 0.07 × 10−5 ± 0.003 × 10−5 cm/second). The oral bioavailability of the DTX-LNs was 3.65 times that of docetaxel solution (8.75% versus 2.40%). These results indicate that DTX-LNs were valuable as an oral drug delivery system to enhance the absorption of docetaxel. PMID:22848177

  8. Radiolabelled multifunctional nanoparticles for targeted diagnostic and therapeutic applications in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangger, C.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles, liposomes in particular, have gained great attention as easily engineerable nanoscale systems with distinct properties, offering an ideal platform for a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The aim of this PhD thesis was the design, synthesis as well as the in vitro and in vivo evaluation of several radiolabelled multifunctional liposomal nanoparticles for the targeted imaging of tumour cells and tumour-induced angiogenesis. Radiolabelling methods for different radionuclides were developed and the liposomes were functionalised with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to improve the pharmacokinetic profile. Targeting sequences such as the tripeptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), the neuropeptide substance P (SP), the somatostatin analogue tyrosine-3-octreotide (TOC), and the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) were tested for their applicability as tools for the targeted delivery of imaging agents. Finally, by the combination of two targeting sequences, namely RGD and SP, on one liposome multireceptor-targeting (hybrid-targeting) was investigated. These multifunctional vehicles were also functionalized with imaging labels for the detection and imaging of tumours by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), fluorescence microscopy as well as magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The liposomes developed in this thesis showed multifunctional properties combining several imaging approaches with specific targeting for oncological applications. In vitro behaviour, e.g., receptor binding could be improved, resulting in optimised targeting shown both by the radiolabel and fluorescent label. However, the in vivo properties, especially the tumour targeting characteristics remained suboptimal, revealing the challenges of targeting approaches in nanoscience. Nonetheless, these results brought important insights for the development and optimisation of multifunctional nanocarriers. (author) [de

  9. Preparation, characterization, and in vitro/vivo studies of oleanolic acid-loaded lactoferrin nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia X

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Xiaojing Xia,1,2 Haowei Liu,1 Huixia Lv,1 Jing Zhang,1 Jianping Zhou,1 Zhiying Zhao3 1Department of Pharmaceutics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, 2Department of Pharmaceutics, ZheJiang Pharmaceutical College, Ningbo, 3Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Oleanolic acid (OA, a pentacyclic triterpene, is used to safely and economically treat hepatopathy. However, OA, a Biopharmaceutics Classification System IV category drug, has low bioavailability owing to low solubility (<1 µg/mL and biomembrane permeability. We developed a novel OA nanoparticle (OA-NP-loaded lactoferrin (Lf nanodelivery system with enhanced in vitro OA dissolution and improved oral absorption and bioavailability. The OA-NPs were prepared using NP albumin-bound technology and characterized using dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and in vitro dissolution test. The in vivo pharmacokinetics was investigated in Sprague Dawley rats using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. OA-NPs (OA:Lf =1:6, w/w% exhibited spherical morphology, 202.2±8.3 nm particle size, +(27.1±0.32 mV ζ potential, 92.59%±3.24% encapsulation efficiency, and desirable in vitro release profiles. An effective in vivo bioavailability (340.59% was achieved compared to the free drug following oral administration to rats. The Lf novel nanodelivery vehicle enhanced the dissolution rate, intestinal absorption, and bioavailability of OA. These results demonstrate that Lf NPs are a new strategy for improving oral absorption and bioavailability of poorly soluble and poorly absorbed drugs. Keywords: oleanolic acid, nanoparticle, lactoferrin nanodelivery system, drug absorption, bioavailability

  10. Vectorization of copper complexes via biocompatible and biodegradable PLGA nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courant, T; Roullin, V G; Cadiou, C; Delavoie, F; Molinari, M; Andry, M C; Gafa, V; Chuburu, F

    2010-04-23

    A double emulsion-solvent diffusion approach with fully biocompatible materials was used to encapsulate copper complexes within biodegradable nanoparticles, for which the release kinetics profiles have highlighted their potential use for a prolonged circulating administration.

  11. Vectorization of copper complexes via biocompatible and biodegradable PLGA nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courant, T; Roullin, V G; Andry, M C [Institut de Chimie Moleculaire de Reims, CNRS UMR 6229, UFR Pharmacie Reims, 51 rue Cognacq-Jay, F-51100 Reims (France); Cadiou, C; Chuburu, F [Institut de Chimie Moleculaire de Reims, CNRS UMR 6229, UFR des Sciences Exactes et Naturelles, Batiment 18-Europol' Agro, BP 1039, F-51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Delavoie, F [Laboratoire de Microscopie Electronique Analytique, INSERM UMRS 926, 21 rue Clement Ader, F-51685 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Molinari, M [Laboratoire de Microscopies et d' Etudes des Nanostructures, UFR des Sciences, Universite de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, 21 rue Clement Ader, F-51685 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Gafa, V, E-mail: gaelle.roullin@univ-reims.fr, E-mail: francoise.chuburu@univ-reims.fr [EA4303 ' Inflammation et Immunite de l' Epithelium Respiratoire' , IFR53, UFR de Pharmacie, Universite de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, 51 rue Cognacq-Jay, F-51100 Reims (France)

    2010-04-23

    A double emulsion-solvent diffusion approach with fully biocompatible materials was used to encapsulate copper complexes within biodegradable nanoparticles, for which the release kinetics profiles have highlighted their potential use for a prolonged circulating administration.

  12. Vectorization of copper complexes via biocompatible and biodegradable PLGA nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courant, T; Roullin, V G; Andry, M C; Cadiou, C; Chuburu, F; Delavoie, F; Molinari, M; Gafa, V

    2010-01-01

    A double emulsion-solvent diffusion approach with fully biocompatible materials was used to encapsulate copper complexes within biodegradable nanoparticles, for which the release kinetics profiles have highlighted their potential use for a prolonged circulating administration.

  13. Effects of imatinib mesylate on the pharmacokinetics of paracetamol (acetaminophen) in Korean patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Wook; Tan, Eugene Y; Jin, Yu; Park, Sahee; Hayes, Michael; Demirhan, Eren; Schran, Horst; Wang, Yanfeng

    2011-02-01

    The major objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of imatinib on the pharmacokinetics of paracetamol in patients with chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML). Patients (n = 12) received a single oral dose of acetaminophen 1000 mg on day 1 (control). On days 2-8, imatinib 400 mg was administered daily. On day 8 (treatment), another 1000 mg dose of paracetamol was administered 1 h after the morning dose of imatinib 400 mg. Blood and urine samples were collected for bioanalytical analyses. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) for paracetamol, paracetamol glucuronide and paracetamol sulphate under control conditions was similar to that after treatment with imatinib; the 90% confidence interval of the log AUC ratio was within 0.8 to 1.25. Urinary excretion of paracetamol, paracetamol glucuronide and paracetamol sulphate was also unaffected by imatinib. The pharmacokinetics of paracetamol and imatinib in Korean patients with CML were similar to previous pharmacokinetic results in white patients with CML. Co-administration of a single dose of paracetamol and multiple doses of imatinib was well tolerated and safety profiles were similar to those of either drug alone. The pharmacokinetics of paracetamol and its major metabolites in the presence of imatinib were similar to those of the control conditions and the combination was well tolerated. These findings suggest that imatinib can be safely administered with paracetamol without dose adjustment of either drug. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  14. Robust Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-21

    avenues for creating flexible conducting and semiconducting materials in a variety of simple or complex geometries. B. Conducting nanoparticle...coated with poly(MPC-co-DHLA) proved stable against challenging conditions, and resisted cyanide ion digestion. Au NRs coated with poly(MPC-co-DHLA

  15. Fabrication and evaluation of valsartan–polymer– surfactant composite nanoparticles by using the supercritical antisolvent process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Soo; Baek, In-hwan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to fabricate valsartan composite nanoparticles by using the supercritical antisolvent (SAS) process, and to evaluate the correlation between in vitro dissolution and in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters for the poorly water-soluble drug valsartan. Spherical composite nanoparticles with a mean size smaller than 400 nm, which contained valsartan, were successfully fabricated by using the SAS process. X-ray diffraction and thermal analyses indicated that valsartan was present in an amorphous form within the composite nanoparticles. The in vitro dissolution and oral bioavailability of valsartan were dramatically enhanced by the composite nanoparticles. Valsartan–hydroxypropyl methylcellulose–poloxamer 407 nanoparticles exhibited faster drug release (up to 90% within 10 minutes under all dissolution conditions) and higher oral bioavailability than the raw material, with an approximately 7.2-fold higher maximum plasma concentration. In addition, there was a positive linear correlation between the pharmacokinetic parameters and the in vitro dissolution efficiency. Therefore, the preparation of composite nanoparticles with valsartan–hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and poloxamer 407 by using the SAS process could be an effective formulation strategy for the development of a new dosage form of valsartan with high oral bioavailability. PMID:25404856

  16. Population pharmacokinetics and relationship between demographic and clinical variables and pharmacokinetics of gentamicin in neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, L M L; Degraeuwe, P L J; Nieman, F H M; de Wolf, M C; de Boer, A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075097346

    Population pharmacokinetic parameter estimates were calculated from 725 routine plasma gentamicin concentrations obtained in 177 neonates of 24 to 42 weeks' gestational age in their first week of life. Kel increases and V/W decreases with increasing gestational age. Almost identical results were

  17. Dermal pharmacokinetics of microemulsion formulations determined by in vivo microdialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreilgaard, Mads

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the potential of improving dermal drug delivery of hydrophilic and lipophilic substances by formulation in microemulsion vehicles and to establish a reliable pharmacokinetic model to analyze cutaneous microdialysis data.......To investigate the potential of improving dermal drug delivery of hydrophilic and lipophilic substances by formulation in microemulsion vehicles and to establish a reliable pharmacokinetic model to analyze cutaneous microdialysis data....

  18. Pharmacokinetics of first-line tuberculosis drugs in tanzanian patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tostmann, A.; Mtabho, C.M.; Semvua, H.H.; Boogaard, J. van den; Kibiki, G.S.; Boeree, M.J.; Aarnoutse, R.E.

    2013-01-01

    East Africa has a high tuberculosis (TB) incidence and mortality, yet there are very limited data on exposure to TB drugs in patients from this region. We therefore determined the pharmacokinetic characteristics of first-line TB drugs in Tanzanian patients using intensive pharmacokinetic sampling.

  19. [Pharmacokinetics of digoxin in hyperthyroidism. Effect of methimazole].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izbicka, Maria; Gasińska, Teresa; Dec, Renata

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular abnormalities may be the only manifestations of overt hyperthyroidism. In patients with heart failure and atrial fibrillation digoxin can be beneficial in controlling the symptoms and signs, but hyperthyroid patients show an impaired response or even resistance to digoxin treatment. The aim of the study is to establish: 1. Are there any differences in the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of digoxin between hypertyroid and euthyroid patients? 2. Does simultaneous administration of digoxin and methimazole affect the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of dogoxin? 3. Does methimazole-induced euthyroidism change the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of digoxin? The subject of the study were 28 patients with hyperthyroidism and 15 healthy persons. We evaluated the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of digoxin. Moreover we evaluated pharmacokinetics of a single dose of digoxin after simultaneous administration of digoxin and methimazole in 12 patients and 12 methimazole treated patients werere-assessed once they had become euthyroid. Hyperthyroid patients showed significantly lower serum digoxin concentrations, shorter T1/2 beta and a significantly smaller area under the concentration curve (AUC) that the control group. Administration of methimazole did not affect digoxin pharmacokinetics. In hyperthyroid patients: 1. the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of digoxin does differ from that observed in healthy subjects. 2.methimazole do not alter digoxin pharmacokinetics.

  20. Acetaminophen developmental pharmacokinetics in premature neonates and infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Brian J; van Lingen, Richard A; Hansen, Tom G

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe acetaminophen developmental pharmacokinetics in premature neonates through infancy to suggest age-appropriate dosing regimens.......The aim of this study was to describe acetaminophen developmental pharmacokinetics in premature neonates through infancy to suggest age-appropriate dosing regimens....

  1. Pharmacokinetic Variability of Drugs Used for Prophylactic Treatment of Migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Ågesen, Frederik Nybye; Pavbro, Agniezka

    2017-01-01

    In this review, we evaluate the variability in the pharmacokinetics of 11 drugs with established prophylactic effects in migraine to facilitate 'personalized medicine' with these drugs. PubMed was searched for 'single-dose' and 'steady-state' pharmacokinetic studies of these 11 drugs. The maximum...

  2. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Absorption Modeling for Osmotic Pump Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Zhanglin; Talattof, Arjang; Fan, Jianghong; Tsakalozou, Eleftheria; Sharan, Satish; Sun, Dajun; Wen, Hong; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Xinyuan

    2017-07-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) and absorption modeling approaches were employed for oral extended-release (ER) drug products based on an osmotic drug delivery system (osmotic pumps). The purpose was to systemically evaluate the in vivo relevance of in vitro dissolution for this type of formulation. As expected, in vitro dissolution appeared to be generally predictive of in vivo PK profiles, because of the unique feature of this delivery system that the in vitro and in vivo release of osmotic pump drug products is less susceptible to surrounding environment in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract such as pH, hydrodynamic, and food effects. The present study considered BCS (Biopharmaceutics Classification System) class 1, 2, and 3 drug products with half-lives ranging from 2 to greater than 24 h. In some cases, the colonic absorption models needed to be adjusted to account for absorption in the colon. C max (maximum plasma concentration) and AUCt (area under the concentration curve) of the studied drug products were sensitive to changes in colon permeability and segmental GI transit times in a drug product-dependent manner. While improvement of the methodology is still warranted for more precise prediction (e.g., colonic absorption and dynamic movement in the GI tract), the results from the present study further emphasized the advantage of using PBPK modeling in addressing product-specific questions arising from regulatory review and drug development.

  3. Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Two Nicotine Patches in Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Scott; Horkan, Kathleen Halabuk; Kotler, Mitchell

    2018-02-02

    Smoking continues to be a major preventable cause of early mortality worldwide, and nicotine replacement therapy has been demonstrated to increase rates of abstinence among smokers attempting to quit. Nicotine transdermal systems (also known as nicotine patches) attach to the skin via an adhesive layer composed of a mixture of different-molecular-weight polyisobutylenes (PIBs) in a specific ratio. This randomized, single-dose, 2-treatment, crossover pharmacokinetic (PK) trial assessed the bioequivalence of nicotine patches including a replacement PIB adhesive (test) compared with the PIB adhesive historically used on marketed patches (reference). The test and reference patches were bioequivalent, as determined by the PK parameters of C max and AUC 0-t . In addition, the parameters T max and t 1/2 did not significantly differ between the 2 patches, supporting the bioequivalence finding from the primary analysis. The tolerability profiles of the patches containing the replacement and previously used PIB adhesives were similar; application-site adverse events did not significantly differ between test and reference patches. Overall, these data establish the bioequivalence of the nicotine patch with the replacement PIB adhesive formulation and the previously utilized PIB adhesive formulation. © 2018 The Authors. Clinical Pharmacology in Drug Development published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  4. Pharmacokinetics and absolute bioavailability of phenobarbital in neonates and young infants, a population pharmacokinetic modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsot, Amélie; Brevaut-Malaty, Véronique; Vialet, Renaud; Boulamery, Audrey; Bruguerolle, Bernard; Simon, Nicolas

    2014-08-01

    Phenobarbital is widely used for treatment of neonatal seizures. Its optimal use in neonates and young infants requires information regarding pharmacokinetics. The objective of this study is to characterize the absolute bioavailability of phenobarbital in neonates and young infants, a pharmacokinetic parameter which has not yet been investigated. Routine clinical pharmacokinetic data were retrospectively collected from 48 neonates and infants (weight: 0.7-10 kg; patient's postnatal age: 0-206 days; GA: 27-42 weeks) treated with phenobarbital, who were administered as intravenous or suspension by oral routes and hospitalized in a paediatric intensive care unit. Total mean dose of 4.6 mg/kg (3.1-10.6 mg/kg) per day was administered by 30-min infusion or by oral route. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using a nonlinear mixed-effect population model software). Data were modelled with an allometric pharmacokinetic model, using three-fourths scaling exponent for clearance (CL). The population typical mean [per cent relative standard error (%RSE)] values for CL, apparent volume of distribution (Vd ) and bioavailability (F) were 0.0054 L/H/kg (7%), 0.64 L/kg (15%) and 48.9% (22%), respectively. The interindividual variability of CL, Vd , F (%RSE) and residual variability (%RSE) was 17% (31%), 50% (27%), 39% (27%) and 7.2 mg/L (29%), respectively. The absolute bioavailability of phenobarbital in neonates and infants was estimated. The dose should be increased when switching from intravenous to oral administration. © 2013 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Investigating pulmonary and systemic pharmacokinetics of inhaled olodaterol in healthy volunteers using a population pharmacokinetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghardt, Jens Markus; Weber, Benjamin; Staab, Alexander; Kunz, Christina; Formella, Stephan; Kloft, Charlotte

    2016-03-01

    Olodaterol, a novel β2-adrenergic receptor agonist, is a long-acting, once-daily inhaled bronchodilator approved for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The aim of the present study was to describe the plasma and urine pharmacokinetics of olodaterol after intravenous administration and oral inhalation in healthy volunteers by population pharmacokinetic modelling and thereby to infer its pulmonary fate. Plasma and urine data after intravenous administration (0.5-25 μg) and oral inhalation (2.5-70 μg via the Respimat® inhaler) were available from a total of 148 healthy volunteers (single and multiple dosing). A stepwise model building approach was applied, using population pharmacokinetic modelling. Systemic disposition parameters were fixed to estimates obtained from intravenous data when modelling data after inhalation. A pharmacokinetic model, including three depot compartments with associated parallel first-order absorption processes (pulmonary model) on top of a four-compartment body model (systemic disposition model), was found to describe the data the best. The dose reaching the lung (pulmonary bioavailable fraction) was estimated to be 49.4% [95% confidence interval (CI) 46.1, 52.7%] of the dose released from the device. A large proportion of the pulmonary bioavailable fraction [70.1% (95% CI 66.8, 73.3%)] was absorbed with a half-life of 21.8 h (95% CI 19.7, 24.4 h). The plasma and urine pharmacokinetics of olodaterol after intravenous administration and oral inhalation in healthy volunteers were adequately described. The key finding was that a high proportion of the pulmonary bioavailable fraction had an extended pulmonary residence time. This finding was not expected based on the physicochemical properties of olodaterol. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. [Research progress on current pharmacokinetic evaluation of Chinese herbal medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guofu; Zhao, Haoru; Yang, Jin

    2011-03-01

    In order to prove safety and efficacy, herbal medicines must undergo the rigorous scientific researches such as pharmacokinetic and bioavailability, before they are put on the market in the foreign countries. Botanical Drug Products promulgated by the US FDA could guide industry sponsors to develop herbal drugs, which was also an important reference for investigating Chinese herbal medicines. This paper reviews and discusses novel approaches for how to assess systemic exposure and pharmacokinetic of Chinese herbal medicines, which were in line with FDA guidance. This mainly focus on identifying pharmacokinetic markers of botanical products, integral pharmacokinetic study of multiple components, Biopharmaceutics drug disposition classification system, and population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic study in herb-drug interaction.

  7. [Advances on pharmacokinetics of traditional Chinese medicine under disease states].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zi-peng; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Rui-jie; Yang, Qing; Zhu, Xiao-xin

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, more and more research shows that the pharmacokinetic parameter of traditional Chinese medicine can be affected by the disease states. It's possible that drug metabolic enzymes, transporters, cell membrane permeability and the change of microbes group could be interfered with physiological and pathological changes, which enables the pharmacokinetics of traditional Chinese medicine in the body to be altered, including the process of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion, and then the pharmacokinetic parameters of traditional chinese medicine are altered. It's found that investigating the pharmacokinetic of traditional Chinese medicine in the pathological state is more useful than that of in normal state because the great part of traditional Chinese medicine is mainly used to treat disease. This article reflects the latest research on the pharmacokinetic of traditional Chinese medicine in the disease state such as diabete, cerebral ischemia, liver injury, inflammatory disease, nervous system disorders and fever in order to provide certain reference for clinicians designing reasonable administration dose.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of oral terbinafine in adult horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younkin, T J; Davis, E G; Kukanich, B

    2017-08-01

    The primary study objective was to compare the pharmacokinetics of p.o. terbinafine alone to p.o. terbinafine administered with p.o. cimetidine in healthy adult horses. The second objective was to assess the pharmacokinetics of terbinafine when administered per rectum in two different suspensions at 30 mg/kg to adult horses. Six healthy adult horses were included in this crossover study. Plasma terbinafine concentrations were quantified with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. The half-life (geometric mean) was 8.38 and 10.76 h, for p.o. alone and p.o. with cimetidine, respectively. The mean maximum plasma concentrations were 0.291 μg/mL at 1.54 h and 0.418 μg/mL at 1.28 h for p.o. alone and p.o. with cimetidine, respectively. Terbinafine with cimetidine had an average C MAX 44% higher and the relative F was 153% compared p.o. terbinafine alone, but was not statistically different (P > 0.05). Terbinafine was infrequently detected when administered per rectum in two different suspensions (water or olive oil). Minor adverse effects included oral irritation, fever, and colic. All resolved spontaneously. More pharmacokinetic studies are indicated assessing drug-drug interactions and using multiple dosing intervals to improve our knowledge of effective oral dosing, the potential for drug accumulation, and systemic adverse effect of terbinafine in horses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interaction between rosuvastatin and valsartan in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung JA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Jin Ah Jung,1 Soo-Yun Lee,2 Jung-Ryul Kim,1 Jae-Wook Ko,1,2 Seong Bok Jang,3 Su Youn Nam,3 Wooseong Huh1,41Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Samsung Medical Center, 2Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, Sungkyunkwan University, 3Yuhan Research Institute, Yuhan Corporation, 4Department of Internal Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, KoreaPurpose: Valsartan, an angiotensin-receptor blocker, and rosuvastatin, a competitive inhibitor of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, are frequently coadministered to treat patients with hypertension and dyslipidemia. The study reported here sought to evaluate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between rosuvastatin and valsartan in healthy Korean subjects. Subjects and methods: Thirty healthy male Korean subjects were administered with rosuvastatin (20 mg/day, valsartan (160 mg/day, and both drugs concomitantly for 4 days in a randomized, open-label, multiple-dose, three-treatment, three-period crossover study. Plasma concentrations of rosuvastatin, N-desmethyl rosuvastatin, and valsartan were determined using validated high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Lipid profiles and vital signs (systolic and diastolic blood pressure and pulse rate were measured for the pharmacodynamic assessment.Results: For rosuvastatin, the geometric mean ratios (90% confidence intervals [CIs] of coadministration to mono-administration were 0.8809 (0.7873-0.9857 for maximum plasma concentration at steady state and 0.9151 (0.8632-0.9701 for area under the concentration–time curve (AUC over a dosing interval at steady state. For valsartan, the geometric mean ratios (90% CIs of those were 0.9300 (0.7946-1.0884 and 1.0072 (0.8893-1.1406, respectively. There were no significant differences in the metabolic ratio of N

  10. Low heritability in pharmacokinetics of talinolol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthaei, Johannes; Tzvetkov, Mladen V; Gal, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Efflux transporters like MDR1 and MRP2 may modulate the pharmacokinetics of about 50 % of all drugs. It is currently unknown how much of the variation in the activities of important drug membrane transporters like MDR1 or MRP2 is determined by genetic or by environmental factors...... of talinolol was predefined as the primary parameter. Heritability was analyzed by structural equation modeling and by within- and between-subject variance and talinolol clearance was correlated with polymorphisms in MDR1, MRP2, BCRP, MDR5, OATP1B1, and OCT1. RESULTS: Talinolol clearance varied approximately...

  11. Human physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for propofol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnider Thomas W

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Propofol is widely used for both short-term anesthesia and long-term sedation. It has unusual pharmacokinetics because of its high lipid solubility. The standard approach to describing the pharmacokinetics is by a multi-compartmental model. This paper presents the first detailed human physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK model for propofol. Methods PKQuest, a freely distributed software routine http://www.pkquest.com, was used for all the calculations. The "standard human" PBPK parameters developed in previous applications is used. It is assumed that the blood and tissue binding is determined by simple partition into the tissue lipid, which is characterized by two previously determined set of parameters: 1 the value of the propofol oil/water partition coefficient; 2 the lipid fraction in the blood and tissues. The model was fit to the individual experimental data of Schnider et. al., Anesthesiology, 1998; 88:1170 in which an initial bolus dose was followed 60 minutes later by a one hour constant infusion. Results The PBPK model provides a good description of the experimental data over a large range of input dosage, subject age and fat fraction. Only one adjustable parameter (the liver clearance is required to describe the constant infusion phase for each individual subject. In order to fit the bolus injection phase, for 10 or the 24 subjects it was necessary to assume that a fraction of the bolus dose was sequestered and then slowly released from the lungs (characterized by two additional parameters. The average weighted residual error (WRE of the PBPK model fit to the both the bolus and infusion phases was 15%; similar to the WRE for just the constant infusion phase obtained by Schnider et. al. using a 6-parameter NONMEM compartmental model. Conclusion A PBPK model using standard human parameters and a simple description of tissue binding provides a good description of human propofol kinetics. The major advantage of a

  12. Cocrystals and alloys of nitazoxanide: enhanced pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Kuthuru; Mannava, M K Chaitanya; Nangia, Ashwini

    2016-03-18

    Two isomorphous cocrystals of nitazoxanide (NTZ) with p-aminosalicylic acid (PASA) and p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) as well as their alloys were prepared by slurry and grinding techniques. The cocrystals exhibit faster dissolution rates and higher pharmacokinetic properties compared to the reference drug, and surprisingly the cocrystal alloy NTZ-PABA : NTZ-PASA (0.75 : 0.25) exhibited 4 fold higher bioavailability of NTZ in Sprague Dawley rats. This study opens the opportunity for cocrystal alloys as improved medicines.

  13. Clinical pharmacokinetics of nisoldipine coat-core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinig, R

    1998-09-01

    Nisoldipine, a calcium antagonist of the dihydropyridine type, is the active ingredient of the controlled release nisoldipine coat-core (CC) formulation. In humans, the absorption from nisoldipine CC occurs across the entire gastrointestinal tract with an increase in bioavailability in the colon because of the lower concentrations of metabolising enzymes in the distal gut wall. Although nisoldipine is almost completely absorbed, its absolute bioavailability from the CC tablet is only 5.5%, as a result of significant first-pass metabolism in the gut and liver. Nisoldipine is a high-clearance drug with substantial interindividual and relatively lower intraindividual variability in pharmacokinetics, dependent on liver blood flow. Nisoldipine is highly (> 99%) protein bound. Its elimination is almost exclusively via the metabolic route and renal excretion of metabolites dominates over excretion in the faeces. Although nisoldipine is administered as a racemic mixture, its plasma concentrations are almost entirely caused by the eutomer as a result of highly stereoselective intrinsic clearance. Nisoldipine CC demonstrates linear pharmacokinetics in the therapeutic dose range and its steady-state pharmacokinetics are predictable from single dose data. Steady-state is reached with the second dose when the drug is given once daily and the peak-trough fluctuations in plasma concentration is minimal. Plasma-concentrations of nisoldipine increase with age. Careful dose titration according to individual clinical response is recommended in the elderly. Nisoldipine CC should not be used in patients with liver cirrhosis, though dosage adjustments in patients with renal impairment are not necessary. Inter-ethnic differences in its pharmacokinetics are not evident. Owing to inhibition of metabolising enzymes, a small dosage adjustment decrement for nisoldipine CC may be required when it is given in combination with cimetidine. Concomitant ingestion of nisoldipine with grapefruit

  14. Pharmacokinetic comparison of seven 8-methoxypsoralen brands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menne, T; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Larsen, E

    1981-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of seven 8-MOP brands were evaluated in 7 volunteers using an incomplete bloc design. After a single oral dose the 8-MOP plasma level was followed for 3 hours. The plasma concentration was measured with a gas chromatographic - mass spectrometric method, using an isotopic...... dilution technique. The different brands could be divided into three groups. Two gave a high maximum concentration, four a medium, and one a low concentration. The large interbrand variation observed in this study can explain the variations in the results of the treatment and the differing numbers...

  15. The pharmacokinetics of enteral antituberculosis drugs in patients requiring intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koegelenberg, C F N; Nortje, A; Lalla, U; Enslin, A; Irusen, E M; Rosenkranz, B; Seifart, H I; Bolliger, C T

    2013-04-05

    There is a paucity of data on the pharmacokinetics of fixed-dose combination enteral antituberculosis treatment in critically ill patients. To establish the pharmacokinetic profile of a fixed-dose combination of rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide and ethambutol given according to weight via a nasogastric tube to patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). We conducted a prospective, observational study on 10 patients (mean age 32 years, 6 male) admitted to an ICU and treated for tuberculosis (TB). Serum concentrations of the drugs were determined at eight predetermined intervals over 24 hours by means of high-performance liquid chromatography. The therapeutic maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) for rifampicin at time to peak concentration was achieved in only 4 patients, whereas 2 did not achieve therapeutic Cmax for isoniazid. No patient reached sub-therapeutic Cmax for pyrazinamide (6 were within and 4 above therapeutic range). Three patients reached sub-therapeutic Cmax for ethambutol, and 6 patients were within and 1 above the therapeutic range. Patients with a sub-therapeutic rifampicin level had a higher mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score (p=0.03) and a lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) (p=0.03). A fixed-dose combination tablet, crushed and mixed with water, given according to weight via a nasogastric tube to patients with TB admitted to an ICU resulted in sub-therapeutic rifampicin plasma concentrations in the majority of patients, whereas the other drugs had a more favourable pharmacokinetic profile. Patients with a sub-therapeutic rifampicin concentration had a higher APACHE II score and a lower estimated GFR, which may contribute to suboptimal outcomes in critically ill patients. Studies in other settings have reported similar proportions of patients with 'sub-therapeutic' rifampicin concentrations.

  16. Ibogaine: complex pharmacokinetics, concerns for safety, and preliminary efficacy measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mash, D C; Kovera, C A; Pablo, J; Tyndale, R F; Ervin, F D; Williams, I C; Singleton, E G; Mayor, M

    2000-09-01

    Ibogaine is an indole alkaloid found in the roots of Tabernanthe Iboga (Apocynaceae family), a rain forest shrub that is native to western Africa. Ibogaine is used by indigenous peoples in low doses to combat fatigue, hunger and thirst, and in higher doses as a sacrament in religious rituals. Members of American and European addict self-help groups have claimed that ibogaine promotes long-term drug abstinence from addictive substances, including psychostimulants and opiates. Anecdotal reports attest that a single dose of ibogaine eliminates opiate withdrawal symptoms and reduces drug craving for extended periods of time. The purported efficacy of ibogaine for the treatment of drug dependence may be due in part to an active metabolite. The majority of ibogaine biotransformation proceeds via CYP2D6, including the O-demethylation of ibogaine to 12-hydroxyibogamine (noribogaine). Blood concentration-time effect profiles of ibogaine and noribogaine obtained for individual subjects after single oral dose administrations demonstrate complex pharmacokinetic profiles. Ibogaine has shown preliminary efficacy for opiate detoxification and for short-term stabilization of drug-dependent persons as they prepare to enter substance abuse treatment. We report here that ibogaine significantly decreased craving for cocaine and heroin during inpatient detoxification. Self-reports of depressive symptoms were also significantly lower after ibogaine treatment and at 30 days after program discharge. Because ibogaine is cleared rapidly from the blood, the beneficial aftereffects of the drug on craving and depressed mood may be related to the effects of noribogaine on the central nervous system.

  17. Pharmacodynamic-pharmacokinetic integration as a guide to medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsson, Johan; Fjellström, Ola; Ulander, Johan; Rowley, Michael; Van Der Graaf, Piet H

    2011-01-01

    A primary objective of pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) reasoning is to identify key in vivo drug and system proper¬ties, enabling prediction of the magnitude and time course of drug responses under physiological and pathological conditions in animals and man. Since the pharmacological response generated by a drug is highly dependent on the actual system used to study its action, knowledge about its potency and efficacy at a given concentration or dose is insufficient to obtain a proper understanding of its pharmacodynamic profile. Hence, the output of PKPD activities extends beyond the provision of quantitative measures (models) of results, to the design of future protocols. Furthermore, because PKPD integrates DMPK (e.g. clearance) and pharmacology (e.g. potency),it provides an anchor point for compound selection, and, as such, should be viewed as an important weapon in medicinal chemistry. Here we outline key PK concepts relevant to PD, and then consider real-life experiments to illustrate the importance to the medicinal chemist of data obtained by PKPD. Useful assumptions and potential pitfalls are described, providing a holistic view of the plethora of determinants behind in vitro-in vivo correlations. By condensing complexity to simplicity, there are not only consequences for experimental design, and for the ranking and design of compounds, but it is also possible to make important predictions such as the impact of changes in drug potency and kinetics. In short, by using quantitative methods to tease apart pharmacodynamic complexities such as temporal differences and changes in plasma protein binding, it is possible to target the changes necessary for improving a compound's profile.

  18. Metabolism, oral bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of chemopreventive kaempferol in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barve, Avantika; Chen, Chi; Hebbar, Vidya; Desiderio, Joseph; Saw, Constance Lay-Lay; Kong, Ah-Ng

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the hepatic and small intestinal metabolism, and examine bioavailability and gastro-intestinal first-pass effects of Kaempferol in the rats. Liver and small intestinal microsomes fortified with either NADPH or UDPGA were incubated with varying concentrations of Kaempferol for upto 120 minutes. Based on the values of the kinetic constants (Km and Vmax), the propensity for UDPGA-dependent conjugation as compared to NADPH-dependent oxidative metabolism was higher for both hepatic and small intestinal microsomes. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered Kaempferol intravenously (IV) (10, 25 mg/kg) or orally (100, 250 mg/kg). Gastro-intestinal first pass effects were observed by collecting portal blood after oral administration of 100 mg/kg Kaempferol. Pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained by Noncompartmental analysis using WinNonlin. After IV administration, the plasma concentration-time profiles for 10 and 25 mg/kg were consistent with high clearance (~ 3 L/hr/kg) and large volumes of distribution (8-12 L/kg). The disposition was characterized by a terminal half-life value of 3-4 hours. After oral administration the plasma concentration-time profiles demonstrated fairly rapid absorption (tmax ~ 1-2 hours). The area under the curve (AUC) values after IV and oral doses increased proportional to the dose. The bioavailability (F) was poor at ~ 2%. Analysis of portal plasma after oral administration revealed low to moderate absorption. Taken together, the low F of Kaempferol is attributed in part to extensive first-pass metabolism by glucuronidation and other metabolic pathways in the gut and in the liver. PMID:19722166

  19. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibody T1h and variant anti-CD6 murine 10D12 in healthy animals and in experimental arthritis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    León, M; Hernández, I; Aldana, L; Ayra, F; Castro, Y; Leyva, R; García, L; Pérez, S.; Casaco, A.

    2016-01-01

    Biodistribution and pharmacokinetic of two radio labeled monoclonal antibodies was performed with the help of imaging techniques. Isotopic labeling was carried out by means of standardized methods. Pharmacokinetic evaluation was performed using the population approach and sparse data design. Introduction: Targeted therapy with monoclonal antibodies (MAb) is an efficient option for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Th1 is a MAb anti human CD6 developed for the treatment of autoimmune disease and 10D12 is its counterpart anti murine CD6 developed as a pharmacological tool to get deep into the response mechanisms in animals models of rheumatoid arthritis.To investigate the behavior of both antibodies in the assay system, molecules were labeled with 125I to evaluate pharmacokinetic in healthy animals and with 99mTc to evaluate the antibody uptake in inflamed area of induced arthritis. Materials and methods: Antibodies were supplied by the Center of Molecular immunology. Iodination was performed by the iodogen method and technetium labeling was carried out directly by Schwarz method. Female C57BL6 from CENPALAB were used for experiments. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetic was performed by a sparse data design using the population approach. Uptake in region of inflammation was quantified by gammagraphy at the same time points of blood sampling. A compartmental model was build to quantify uptake kinetic. Pharmacokinetic profiles were analyzed using MONOLIX software version 4.2. Results: Minor pharmacokinetic differences were found between monoclonal antibodies labeled with 125I and 99mTc. As a humanized antibody, T1h shows a faster clearance than 10D12 and a biodistribution pattern reflecting preference for excretion mechanisms. The arthritis accumulation was not consistent with a targeted mediated uptake. On the other hand, radio labeled 10D12 shows an accumulation profile in arthritis with two peaks of maximum concentration representing an initial transit to

  20. Comparative pharmacokinetics of swertiamarin in rats after oral administration of swertiamarin alone, Qing Ye Dan tablets and co-administration of swertiamarin and oleanolic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gui-li; Li, Hong-liang; He, Jian-chang; Feng, En-fu; Shi, Pan-pan; Liu, Yue-qiong; Liu, Chang-xiao

    2013-08-26

    Qing Ye Dan is a well-known herbal drug that is widely used to treat viral hepatitis in the Yi and Hani minority regions in the Yunnan province of China. An LC-MS/MS method was developed to determine the levels of swertiamarin in rat plasma. Swertiamarin and naringin (internal standard, IS) were extracted from rat plasma using solid-phase extraction (SPE) to purify the samples. The pharmacokinetics of the following different administration methods of swertiamarin in rats were studied: oral administration of swertiamarin alone, a Qing Ye Dan tablet (QYDT) and co-administration of swertiamarin and oleanolic acid, with each method delivering approximately 20mg/kg of swertiamarin. Non-compartmental pharmacokinetic profiles were constructed by using the software DAS (version 2.1.1), and the pharmacokinetic parameters were compared using an unpaired Student's t-test. The results showed that the pharmacokinetic parameters Cmax, AUC0-∞, Vz/F and CLz/F were significantly different (P<0.05) among the three types of swertiamarin administration. The data indicate that oleanolic acid and the other ingredients present in QYDT could affect the pharmacokinetic behaviour of swertiamarin in rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of Renal Impairment on the Pharmacokinetics of Afatinib: An Open-Label, Single-Dose Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, Sabrina; Schnell, David; Külzer, Raimund; Gansser, Dietmar; Weber, Anne; Wallenstein, Gudrun; Halabi, Atef; Conrad, Anja; Wind, Sven

    2017-06-01

    Afatinib is an oral irreversible ErbB-Family Blocker indicated for treatment of patients with EGFR mutation positive advanced non-small cell lung cancer. This trial assessed whether renal impairment influences the pharmacokinetics and safety of afatinib. This was an open-label, single-dose study. Pharmacokinetic parameters after afatinib 40 mg were investigated in subjects with moderate (n = 8) or severe (n = 8) renal impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate 30-59 mL/min/1.73 m 2 and 15-29 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , respectively) and healthy matched controls (n = 14). Plasma and urine samples were collected before and up to 14 days after dosing for pharmacokinetic and plasma protein-binding assessment. Primary endpoints were area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to the last quantifiable concentration (AUC last ) and maximum plasma concentration (C max ) between subjects with renal impairment and healthy matched controls. Pharmacokinetic profiles and plasma protein binding were similar in all groups. The extent of exposure, as indicated by AUC last and C max , was generally similar between the matched treatment groups, with the exception of the geometric mean ratio of AUC last for subjects with severe renal impairment, which showed a trend towards a higher value compared with matched healthy subjects (150.0 % [90 % CI 105.3-213.7]) Inter-individual variability was moderate (geometric mean coefficient of variation 28-39 % for moderate impairment, 34-42 % for severe impairment). Afatinib was well tolerated and urinary excretion was minimal. Moderate-to-severe renal impairment had a minor influence on the pharmacokinetics of afatinib that was within the observed inter-individual variability, suggesting that afatinib treatment can be considered in this patient population. Registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT02096718.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of Oral and Intravenous Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) When Co-Administered with Intravenous Morphine in Healthy Adult Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, Robert B; Pawasauskas, Jayne; Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Lu, Luke; Chen, Yin; Wu, Sutan; Jarrett, Brant; Fain, Randi; Hill, Lawrence; Devarakonda, Krishna

    2018-03-01

    Several features favor paracetamol (acetaminophen) administration by the intravenous rather than the oral route in the postoperative setting. This study compared the pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of oral and intravenous paracetamol when given with or without an opioid, morphine. In this randomized, single-blind, parallel, repeat-dose study in healthy adults, subjects received four repeat doses of oral or intravenous 1000 mg paracetamol at 6-h intervals, and morphine infusions (0.125 mg/kg) at the 2nd and 3rd intervals. Comparisons of plasma pharmacokinetic profiles were conducted before, during, and after opioid co-administrations. Twenty-two subjects were included in the pharmacokinetic analysis. Observed paracetamol peak concentration (C max ) and area under the plasma concentration-time curve over the dosing interval (AUC 0-6 ) were reduced when oral paracetamol was co-administered with morphine (reduced from 11.6 to 7.25 µg/mL and from 31.00 to 25.51 µg·h/mL, respectively), followed by an abruptly increased C max and AUC 0-6 upon discontinuation of morphine (to 13.5 µg/mL and 52.38 µg·h/mL, respectively). There was also a significantly prolonged mean time to peak plasma concentration (T max ) after the 4th dose of oral paracetamol (2.84 h) compared to the 1st dose (1.48 h). However, pharmacokinetic parameters of paracetamol were not impacted when intravenous paracetamol was co-administered with morphine. Morphine co-administration significantly impacted the pharmacokinetics of oral but not intravenous paracetamol. The abrupt release of accumulated paracetamol at the end of morphine-mediated gastrointestinal inhibition following oral but not intravenous administration of paracetamol suggests that intravenous paracetamol provides a better option for the management of postoperative pain. CLINICALTRIALS. NCT02848729.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of a Sustained-release Formulation of Meloxicam After Subcutaneous Administration to Hispaniolan Amazon Parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon; Court, Michael H; Zhu, Zhaohui; Summa, Noémie; Paul-Murphy, Joanne R

    2017-09-01

    Meloxicam has been shown to have a safe and favorable pharmacodynamic profile with individual variability in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis). In the current study, we determined the pharmacokinetics of a sustained-release formulation of meloxicam after subcutaneous administration to Hispaniolan Amazon parrots. Twelve healthy adult parrots, 6 males and 6 females, were used in the study. Blood samples were collected before (time 0) and at 0.5, 1, 2, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hours after a single dose of the sustained-release meloxicam formulation (3 mg/kg SC). Plasma meloxicam concentrations were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by noncompartmental analysis. Plasma concentrations reached a mean C max of 23.4 μg/mL (range, 14.7-46.0 μg/mL) at 1.8 hours (range, 0.5-6 hours), with a terminal half-life of 7.4 hours (range, 1.4-40.9 hours). Individual variation was noticeable, such that some parrots (4 of 12 birds) had very low plasma meloxicam concentrations, similar to the high variability reported in a previous pharmacokinetic study of the standard meloxicam formulation in the same group of birds. Two birds developed small self-resolving scabs at the injection site. On the basis of these results, the sustained-release meloxicam formulation could be administered every 12 to 96 hours in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots to manage pain. Because of these highly variable results, the use of this formulation in this species cannot be recommended until further pharmacokinetic, safety, and pharmacogenomic evaluations are performed to establish accurate dosing recommendations and to understand the high pharmacokinetic variability.

  4. Computational Assessment of Pharmacokinetics and Biological Effects of Some Anabolic and Androgen Steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Marin; Roman, Diana Larisa; Ostafe, Vasile; Ciorsac, Alecu; Isvoran, Adriana

    2018-02-05

    The aim of this study is to use computational approaches to predict the ADME-Tox profiles, pharmacokinetics, molecular targets, biological activity spectra and side/toxic effects of 31 anabolic and androgen steroids in humans. The following computational tools are used: (i) FAFDrugs4, SwissADME and admetSARfor obtaining the ADME-Tox profiles and for predicting pharmacokinetics;(ii) SwissTargetPrediction and PASS online for predicting the molecular targets and biological activities; (iii) PASS online, Toxtree, admetSAR and Endocrine Disruptomefor envisaging the specific toxicities; (iv) SwissDock to assess the interactions of investigated steroids with cytochromes involved in drugs metabolism. Investigated steroids usually reveal a high gastrointestinal absorption and a good oral bioavailability, may inhibit someof the human cytochromes involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics (CYP2C9 being the most affected) and reflect a good capacity for skin penetration. There are predicted numerous side effects of investigated steroids in humans: genotoxic carcinogenicity, hepatotoxicity, cardiovascular, hematotoxic and genitourinary effects, dermal irritations, endocrine disruption and reproductive dysfunction. These results are important to be known as an occupational exposure to anabolic and androgenic steroids at workplaces may occur and because there also is a deliberate human exposure to steroids for their performance enhancement and anti-aging properties.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of cotinine in rats: a potential therapeutic agent for disorders of cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei; Beck, Wayne D; Callahan, Patrick M; Terry, Alvin V; Bartlett, Michael G

    2015-06-01

    Attention has been paid to cotinine (COT), one of the major metabolites of nicotine (NIC), for its pro-cognitive effects and potential therapeutic activities against Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other types of cognitive impairment. In order to facilitate pharmacological and toxicological studies on COT for its pro-cognitive activities, we conducted a pharmacokinetic (PK) study of COT in rats, providing important oral and intravenously (iv) PK information. In this study, plasma samples were obtained up to 48 h after COT was dosed to rats orally and iv at a dose of 3mg/kg. Plasma samples were prepared and analyzed using a sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) bioanalytical method, providing concentration profiles of COT and metabolites after oral and iv administrations. The data were fitted into a one-compartment model and a two-compartment model for the oral and iv groups, respectively, providing important PK information for COT including PK profiles, half-life, clearance and bioavailability. The results suggested fast absorption, slow elimination and high bioavailability of COT in rats. Several important facts about the PK properties in rats suggested COT could be a potential pro-cognitive agent. Information about the pharmacokinetics of COT in rats revealed in this study is of great importance for the future studies on COT or potential COT analogs as agents for improving cognition. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  6. The pharmacokinetics of propofol in ICU patients undergoing long-term sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smuszkiewicz, Piotr; Wiczling, Paweł; Przybyłowski, Krzysztof; Borsuk, Agnieszka; Trojanowska, Iwona; Paterska, Marta; Matysiak, Jan; Kokot, Zenon; Grześkowiak, Edmund; Bienert, Agnieszka

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK) of propofol in ICU patients undergoing long-term sedation and to assess the influence of routinely collected covariates on the PK parameters. Propofol concentration-time profiles were collected from 29 patients. Non-linear mixed-effects modelling in NONMEM 7.2 was used to analyse the observed data. The propofol pharmacokinetics was best described with a three-compartment disposition model. Non-parametric bootstrap and a visual predictive check were used to evaluate the adequacy of the developed model to describe the observations. The typical value of the propofol clearance (1.46 l/min) approximated the hepatic blood flow. The volume of distribution at steady state was high and was equal to 955.1 l, which is consistent with other studies involving propofol in ICU patients. There was no statistically significant covariate relationship between PK parameters and opioid type, SOFA score on the day of admission, APACHE II, predicted death rate, reason for ICU admission (sepsis, trauma or surgery), gender, body weight, age, infusion duration and C-reactive protein concentration. The population PK model was developed successfully to describe the time-course of propofol concentration in ICU patients undergoing prolonged sedation. Despite a very heterogeneous group of patients, consistent PK profiles were observed. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Investigation of clinical pharmacokinetic variability of an opioid antagonist through physiologically based absorption modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xuan; He, Minxia; Kulkarni, Rajesh; Patel, Nita; Zhang, Xiaoyu

    2013-08-01

    Identifying the source of inter- and/or intrasubject variability in pharmacokinetics (PK) provides fundamental information in understanding the pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics relationship of a drug and project its efficacy and safety in clinical populations. This identification process can be challenging given that a large number of potential causes could lead to PK variability. Here we present an integrated approach of physiologically based absorption modeling to investigate the root cause of unexpectedly high PK variability of a Phase I clinical trial drug. LY2196044 exhibited high intersubject variability in the absorption phase of plasma concentration-time profiles in humans. This could not be explained by in vitro measurements of drug properties and excellent bioavailability with low variability observed in preclinical species. GastroPlus™ modeling suggested that the compound's optimal solubility and permeability characteristics would enable rapid and complete absorption in preclinical species and in humans. However, simulations of human plasma concentration-time profiles indicated that despite sufficient solubility and rapid dissolution of LY2196044 in humans, permeability and/or transit in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract may have been negatively affected. It was concluded that clinical PK variability was potentially due to the drug's antagonism on opioid receptors that affected its transit and absorption in the GI tract. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Toxicokinetics of zinc oxide nanoparticles in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H E; Yu, J; Baek, M; Lee, J A; Choi, S J; Kim, M S; Kim, S H; Maeng, E H; Lee, J K; Jeong, J

    2013-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle have been extensively applied to diverse industrial fields because they possess UV light absorption, catalytic, semi-conducting, and magnetic characteristics as well as antimicrobial property. However, up to date, toxicological effects of ZnO nanoparticles in animal models have not been completely determined. Moreover, little information is available about kinetic behaviors of ZnO nanoparticles in vivo, which will be crucial to predict their potential chronic toxicity after long-term exposure. The aim of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and toxicokinetics of ZnO nanoparticles after single-dose and repeated dose 90-day oral administration in male and female rats, respectively. The blood samples were collected following administration of three different doses (125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) and ZnO concentration was assessed by measuring zinc level with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The result showed that the plasma ZnO concentration significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner, but decreased within 24 h after single-dose oral administration up to 500 mg/kg, without any significant difference between gender. However, when repeated dose 90-day oral toxicity study was performed, the elevated plasma concentrations did not return to normal control levels in all the cases, indicating their toxicity potential. These findings suggest that repeated oral exposure to ZnO nanoparticles up to the dose of 125 mg/kg could accumulate in the systemic circulation, thereby implying that the NOAEL values could be less than 125 mg/kg via oral intake.

  9. Drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics: Technological considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wolf, A.P.

    1992-01-01

    Additionally, the use of PET to examine drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacadynamics and the relationship of these properties to the behavioral, therapeutic and toxic properties of drugs and substances of abuse is emerging as a powerful new scientific tool. The pharmacokinetic properties of a drug, which comprises all of the biological processes which determine the fraction of the drug available, can be measured using the labeled drug itself. For example, the labeled drug can be used to measure the absolute uptake, regional distribution and kinetics of a drug at its site of action in the body. Additionally the labeled drug and whole body its labeled metabolites and thus provide information an potential toxic effects as well as tissue half lives. On the other hand, different labeled tracers can be used to assess drug pharmacodynamics which include the biological Processes involved in the drug's effects. For example, with appropriate radiotracers, the effects of a drug on metabolism, neurotransmitter activity, blood flew, enzyme activity or other processes can be probed

  10. Pharmacokinetics of rilmenidine in healthy subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genissel, P.; Bromet, N.; Fourtillan, J.B.; Mignot, A.; Albin, H.

    1988-01-01

    Rilmenidine is a novel alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, used in the treatment of mild or moderate hypertension at the oral dose of 1 mg once or twice daily. The pharmacokinetic parameters were investigated after single or repeated administration in healthy subjects, using labeled and unlabeled compounds. Rilmenidine was rapidly and extensively absorbed, with an absolute bioavailability factor close to 1 and a maximal plasma concentration achieved within 2 hours. Rilmenidine was not subject to presystemic metabolism. Distribution was independent of the free fraction because rilmenidine was weakly bound to plasma proteins (less than 10%). The volume of distribution was approximately 5 l.kg-1 (315 liters). Elimination was rapid with a total body plasma clearance of approximately 450 ml.min-1 and an elimination half-life of approximately 8 hours. Renal excretion was the major elimination process (two-thirds of the total clearance). Metabolism was very poor, with a renal elimination of rilmenidine as the parent drug (urinary fraction of rilmenidine was about 65% and no metabolite plasma levels were detected). Linear pharmacokinetics were demonstrated for rilmenidine from 0.5 to 2 mg but, at 3 mg, a slight deviation from linearity was observed. In repeated administration, the linear disposition of rilmenidine with dose was confirmed

  11. Physiologic and Pharmacokinetic Changes in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maged eCostantine

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Physiologic changes in pregnancy induce profound alterations to the pharmacokinetic properties of many medications. These changes affect distribution, absorption, metabolism, and excretion of drugs, and thus may impact their pharmacodynamic properties during pregnancy. Pregnant women undergo several adaptations in many organ systems. Some adaptations are secondary to hormonal changes in pregnancy, while others occur to support the gravid woman and her developing fetus. Some of the changes in maternal physiology during pregnancy include, for example, increased maternal fat and total body water, decreased plasma protein concentrations, especially albumin, increased maternal blood volume, cardiac output and blood flow to the kidneys and uteroplacental unit, and decreased blood pressure. The maternal blood volume expansion occurs at a larger proportion than the increase in red blood cell mass, which results in physiologic anemia and hemodilution. Other physiologic changes include increased tidal volume, partially compensated respiratory alkalosis, delayed gastric emptying and gastrointestinal motility, and altered activity of hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes. Understating these changes and their profound impact on the pharmacokinetic properties of drugs in pregnancy is essential to optimize maternal and fetal health.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of procaterol in thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, K; Nomura, M; Toju, K; Ishikawa, Y; Minamijima, Y; Yamashita, S; Nagata, S

    2016-06-01

    Procaterol (PCR) is a beta-2-adrenergic bronchodilator widely used in Japanese racehorses for treating lower respiratory disease. The pharmacokinetics of PCR following single intravenous (0.5 μg/kg) and oral (2.0 μg/kg) administrations were investigated in six thoroughbred horses. Plasma and urine concentrations of PCR were measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Plasma PCR concentration following intravenous administration showed a biphasic elimination pattern. The systemic clearance was 0.47 ± 0.16 L/h/kg, the steady-state volume of the distribution was 1.21 ± 0.23 L/kg, and the elimination half-life was 2.85 ± 1.35 h. Heart rate rapidly increased after intravenous administration and gradually decreased thereafter. A strong correlation between heart rate and plasma concentration of PCR was observed. Plasma concentrations of PCR after oral administration were not quantifiable in all horses. Urine concentrations of PCR following intravenous and oral administrations were quantified in all horses until 32 h after administration. Urine PCR concentrations were not significantly different on and after 24 h between intravenous and oral administrations. These results suggest that the bioavailability of orally administrated PCR in horses is very poor, and the drug was eliminated from the body slowly based on urinary concentrations. This report is the first study to demonstrate the pharmacokinetic character of PCR in thoroughbred horses. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Preparation and characterization of β-cyclodextrin grafted N-maleoyl chitosan nanoparticles for drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Hou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available β-cyclodextrin (CD grafted N-maleoyl chitosan (CD-g-NMCS with two different degrees of substitution (DS of N-maleoyl (DS = 21.2% and 30.5% were synthesized from maleic anhydride and chitosan bearing pendant cyclodextrin (CD-g-CS. CD-g-NMCS based nanoparticles were prepared via an ionic gelation method together with chitosan and CD-g-CS nanoparticles. The size and zeta potential of prepared CD-g-NMCS nanoparticles were 179.2~274.0 nm and 36.2~42.4 mV, respectively. In vitro stability test indicated that CD-g-NMCS nanoparticles were more stable in phosphate-buffered saline compared with chitosan nanoparticles. Moreover, a poorly water-soluble drug, ketoprofen (KTP, was selected as a model drug to study the obtained nanoparticle's potentials as drug delivery carriers. The drug loading efficiency of CD-g-NMCS20 nanoparticles were 14.8% for KTP. MTT assay showed that KTP loaded CD-g-NMCS nanoparticles were safe drug carriers. Notably, in vitro drug release studies showed that KTP was released in a sustained-release manner for the nanoparticles. The pharmacokinetic of drug loaded CD-g-NMCS20 nanoparticles were evaluated in rats after intravenous administration. The results of studies revealed that, compared with free KTP, KTP loaded CD-g-NMCS20 nanoparticles exhibited a significant increase in AUC0→24h and mean residence time by 6.6-fold and 2.9-fold, respectively. Therefore, CD-g-NMCS nanoparticles could be used as a novel promising nanoparticle-based drug delivery system for sustained release of poorly water-soluble drugs. The carboxylic acid groups of the CD-g-NMCS molecule provide convenient sites for further structural modifications including introduction of tissue- or disease- specific targeting groups.

  14. Pharmacokinetic comparison and bioequivalence evaluation of losartan/ hydrochlorothiazide tablet between Asian Indian and Japanese volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sudershan; Monif, Tausif; Khuroo, Arshad; Reyar, Simrit; Jain, Rakesh; Singla, Ajay K; Kurachi, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    To demonstrate the bioequivalence between the test and reference formulations of losartan/hydrochlorothiazide 50 + 12.5 mg tablet and evaluate the effect of ethnicity on pharmacokinetics properties of losartan, losartan carboxylic acid and hydrochlorothiazide on healthy Asian Indian and Japanese volunteers. Randomized, open-label, crossover, bioavailability studies were conducted separately in healthy Asian Indian and Japanese volunteers. One tablet either of test or of reference product was administered after 10 hours of overnight fasting. After dosing, serial blood samples were collected for a period of 48 hours for both the studies. Plasma samples were analyzed for losartan, losartan carboxylic acid and hydrochlorothiazide by a validated liquid chromatographic and mass spectrometric method (LC-MS/MS). The pharmacokinetic parameters AUC0-t, AUC0-∞, Cmax, tmax, and other pharmacokinetics parameters were determined from plasma concentration-time profiles for both test and reference formulations of losartan/hydrochlorothiazide 50 + 12.5 mg tablets. Statistical evaluations were done to evaluate bioequivalence between generic test formulation (EPR0001) and Japanese reference product (Preminent®). Losartan, losartan carboxylic acid and hydrochlorothiazide were well tolerated by subjects in all periods of each study under fasted conditions. No serious adverse events were observed. The ratios of least square means for AUC0-t and Cmax and the affiliated 90% confidence intervals were within acceptance range recommended by PMDA. Marginal differences were observed in pharmacokinetic values of Asian Indian and Japanese volunteers. The results of these bioavailability studies indicate that the test formulation of losartan/hydrochlorothiazide 50 + 12.5 mg (EPR0001) tablets is bioequivalent to marketed Preminent® reference formulation in Asian Indian and Japanese volunteers, when administered under fasting conditions. Both test and reference formulations were well tolerated

  15. Development of a paediatric population-based model of the pharmacokinetics of rivaroxaban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Stefan; Becker, Corina; Burghaus, Rolf; Coboeken, Katrin; Edginton, Andrea; Lippert, Jörg; Siegmund, Hans-Ulrich; Thelen, Kirstin; Mück, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism has been increasingly recognised as a clinical problem in the paediatric population. Guideline recommendations for antithrombotic therapy in paediatric patients are based mainly on extrapolation from adult clinical trial data, owing to the limited number of clinical trials in paediatric populations. The oral, direct Factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban has been approved in adult patients for several thromboembolic disorders, and its well-defined pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics and efficacy and safety profiles in adults warrant further investigation of this agent in the paediatric population. The objective of this study was to develop and qualify a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for rivaroxaban doses of 10 and 20 mg in adults and to scale this model to the paediatric population (0-18 years) to inform the dosing regimen for a clinical study of rivaroxaban in paediatric patients. Experimental data sets from phase I studies supported the development and qualification of an adult PBPK model. This adult PBPK model was then scaled to the paediatric population by including anthropometric and physiological information, age-dependent clearance and age-dependent protein binding. The pharmacokinetic properties of rivaroxaban in virtual populations of children were simulated for two body weight-related dosing regimens equivalent to 10 and 20 mg once daily in adults. The quality of the model was judged by means of a visual predictive check. Subsequently, paediatric simulations of the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC), maximum (peak) plasma drug concentration (C max) and concentration in plasma after 24 h (C 24h) were compared with the adult reference simulations. Simulations for AUC, C max and C 24h throughout the investigated age range largely overlapped with values obtained for the corresponding dose in the adult reference simulation for both body weight-related dosing regimens. However

  16. Data Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Hladíková, Radka

    2010-01-01

    Title: Data Profiling Author: Radka Hladíková Department: Department of Software Engineering Supervisor: Ing. Vladimír Kyjonka Supervisor's e-mail address: Abstract: This thesis puts mind on problems with data quality and data profiling. This Work analyses and summarizes problems of data quality, data defects, process of data quality, data quality assessment and data profiling. The main topic is data profiling as a process of researching data available in existing...

  17. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic evaluation of marbofloxacin as a single injection for Pasteurellaceae respiratory infections in cattle using population pharmacokinetics and Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulin, A; Schneider, M; Dron, F; Woehrle, F

    2018-02-01

    Population pharmacokinetic of marbofloxacin was investigated with 52 plasma concentration-time profiles obtained after intramuscular administration of Forcyl® in cattle. Animal's status, pre-ruminant, ruminant, or dairy cow, was retained as a relevant covariate for clearance. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using a stratification by status, and 1000 virtual disposition curves were generated in each bovine subpopulation for the recommended dosage regimen of 10 mg/kg as a single injection. The probability of target attainment (PTA) of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) ratios associated with clinical efficacy and prevention of resistance was determined in each simulated subpopulation. The cumulative fraction of response (CFR) of animals achieving a PK/PD ratio predictive of positive clinical outcome was then calculated for the simulated dosage regimen, taking into account the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) distribution of Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica, and Histophilus somni. When considering a ratio of AUC 0-24 hr /MIC (area under the curve/minimum inhibitory concentration) greater than 125 hr, CFRs ranging from 85% to 100% against the three Pasteurellaceae in each bovine subpopulation were achieved. The PTA of the PK/PD threshold reflecting the prevention of resistances was greater than 90% up to MPC (mutant prevention concentration) values of 1 μg/ml in pre-ruminants and ruminants and 0.5 μg/ml in dairy cows. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Drug Delivery Nanoparticles in Skin Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianzani, Chiara; Zara, Gian Paolo; Maina, Giovanni; Pettazzoni, Piergiorgio; Pizzimenti, Stefania; Rossi, Federica; Gigliotti, Casimiro Luca; Ciamporcero, Eric Stefano; Daga, Martina; Barrera, Giuseppina

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology involves the engineering of functional systems at nanoscale, thus being attractive for disciplines ranging from materials science to biomedicine. One of the most active research areas of the nanotechnology is nanomedicine, which applies nanotechnology to highly specific medical interventions for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases, including cancer disease. Over the past two decades, the rapid developments in nanotechnology have allowed the incorporation of multiple therapeutic, sensing, and targeting agents into nanoparticles, for detection, prevention, and treatment of cancer diseases. Nanoparticles offer many advantages as drug carrier systems since they can improve the solubility of poorly water-soluble drugs, modify pharmacokinetics, increase drug half-life by reducing immunogenicity, improve bioavailability, and diminish drug metabolism. They can also enable a tunable release of therapeutic compounds and the simultaneous delivery of two or more drugs for combination therapy. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in the use of different types of nanoparticles for systemic and topical drug delivery in the treatment of skin cancer. In particular, the progress in the treatment with nanocarriers of basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma has been reported. PMID:25101298

  19. Liquid Crystalline Nanoparticles as an Ophthalmic Delivery System for Tetrandrine: Development, Characterization, and In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Wang, Shuangshuang; Fang, Shiming; Wang, Jialu; Chen, Jingjing; Huang, Xingguo; He, Xin; Liu, Changxiao

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop novel liquid crystalline nanoparticles (LCNPs) that display improved pre-ocular residence time and ocular bioavailability and that can be used as an ophthalmic delivery system for tetrandrine (TET). The delivery system consisted of three primary components, including glyceryl monoolein, poloxamer 407, and water, and two secondary components, including Gelucire 44/14 and amphipathic octadecyl-quaternized carboxymethyl chitosan. The amount of TET, the amount of glyceryl monoolein, and the ratio of poloxamer 407 to glyceryl monoolein were selected as the factors that were used to optimize the dependent variables, which included encapsulation efficiency and drug loading. A three-factor, five-level central composite design was constructed to optimize the formulation. TET-loaded LCNPs (TET-LCNPs) were characterized to determine their particle size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency, drug loading capacity, particle morphology, inner crystalline structure, and in vitro drug release profile. Corneal permeation in excised rabbit corneas was evaluated. Pre-ocular retention was determined using a noninvasive fluorescence imaging system. Finally, pharmacokinetic study in the aqueous humor was performed by microdialysis technique. The optimal formulation had a mean particle size of 170.0 ± 13.34 nm, a homogeneous distribution with polydispersity index of 0.166 ± 0.02, a positive surface charge with a zeta potential of 29.3 ± 1.25 mV, a high entrapment efficiency of 95.46 ± 4.13 %, and a drug loading rate of 1.63 ± 0.07 %. Transmission electron microscopy showed spherical particles that had smooth surfaces. Small-angle X-ray scattering profiles revealed an inverted hexagonal phase. The in vitro release assays showed a sustained drug release profile. A corneal permeation study showed that the apparent permeability coefficient of the optimal formulation was 2.03-fold higher than that of the TET solution. Pre-ocular retention

  20. Positron emission tomography (PET) study of the alterations in brain pharmacokinetics of methamphetamine in methamphetamine sensitized animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hitoshi

    2001-01-01

    I investigated the differences in brain pharmacokinetics of [ 11 C]methamphetamine ([ 11 C]MAP) in normal and MAP sensitized animals using positron emission tomography (PET). [ 11 C]MAP was synthesized by an automated on-line [ 11 C]methylation system. I newly produced MAP sensitized dog and monkey by repeated MAP treatment. The maximal level of accumulation of [ 11 C]MAP in the sensitized dog brain was 1.4 times higher than that in the control. This result suggests the changes in the pharmacokinetic profile of MAP in the brain affect the development or expression of MAP-induced behavioral sensitization. However, the overaccumulation of [ 11 C]MAP in the sensitized monkey brain was not observed due to the influence of anesthesia. (author)

  1. Positron emission tomography (PET) study of the alterations in brain pharmacokinetics of methamphetamine in methamphetamine sensitized animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hitoshi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Hospital

    2001-08-01

    I investigated the differences in brain pharmacokinetics of [{sup 11}C]methamphetamine ([{sup 11}C]MAP) in normal and MAP sensitized animals using positron emission tomography (PET). [{sup 11}C]MAP was synthesized by an automated on-line [{sup 11}C]methylation system. I newly produced MAP sensitized dog and monkey by repeated MAP treatment. The maximal level of accumulation of [{sup 11}C]MAP in the sensitized dog brain was 1.4 times higher than that in the control. This result suggests the changes in the pharmacokinetic profile of MAP in the brain affect the development or expression of MAP-induced behavioral sensitization. However, the overaccumulation of [{sup 11}C]MAP in the sensitized monkey brain was not observed due to the influence of anesthesia. (author)

  2. Review of some pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of anti-infective medicines administered to the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govendir, M

    2018-02-01

    Although koalas are iconic Australian animals, no pharmacokinetic studies of any first-line medicines used to treat diseased or injured koalas had been published prior to 2010. Traditionally, medicine dosages suggested for this species underwent linear extrapolation from those recommended for domesticated species. The koala, a specialist folivore whose natural diet consists of almost exclusively Eucalyptus spp. foliage has anatomical and physiological adaptations for detoxifying their diet which also affect medicine pharmacokinetic profiles. This review addresses aspects of medicine absorption, clearance, and other indices (such as medicine binding to plasma proteins) of enrofloxacin/marbofloxacin and chloramphenicol used for the systemic treatment of chlamydiosis, and fluconazole ± amphotericin, and posaconazole for the treatment of cryptococcosis. Based on observations from published studies, this review includes suggestions to improve therapeutic outcomes when administering medicines to diseased koalas. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Current understanding of interactions between nanoparticles and the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovolskaia, Marina A; Shurin, Michael; Shvedova, Anna A

    2016-05-15

    The delivery of drugs, antigens, and imaging agents benefits from using nanotechnology-based carriers. The successful translation of nanoformulations to the clinic involves thorough assessment of their safety profiles, which, among other end-points, includes evaluation of immunotoxicity. The past decade of research focusing on nanoparticle interaction with the immune system has been fruitful in terms of understanding the basics of nanoparticle immunocompatibility, developing a bioanalytical infrastructure to screen for nanoparticle-mediated immune reactions, beginning to uncover the mechanisms of nanoparticle immunotoxicity, and utilizing current knowledge about the structure-activity relationship between nanoparticles' physicochemical properties and their effects on the immune system to guide safe drug delivery. In the present review, we focus on the most prominent pieces of the nanoparticle-immune system puzzle and discuss the achievements, disappointments, and lessons learned over the past 15years of research on the immunotoxicity of engineered nanomaterials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Discussion about traditional Chinese medicine pharmacokinetics study based on first botanical drug approved by FDA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fanghua

    2010-04-01

    Pharmacokinetics study is one of main components of pharmaceuticals development. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Veregen as the first botanical drug in 2006. This article introduced FDA's requirement on pharmacokinetics study of botanical drug and pharmacokinetics studies of Veregen, summarized current requirement and status quo of pharmacokinetics study on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and natural medicine in China, and discussed about pharmacokinetics study strategy for TCM and natural medicine.

  5. Accelerated Brain DCE-MRI Using Iterative Reconstruction With Total Generalized Variation Penalty for Quantitative Pharmacokinetic Analysis: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunhao; Yin, Fang-Fang; Kirkpatrick, John P; Chang, Zheng

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the feasibility of using undersampled k-space data and an iterative image reconstruction method with total generalized variation penalty in the quantitative pharmacokinetic analysis for clinical brain dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Eight brain dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging scans were retrospectively studied. Two k-space sparse sampling strategies were designed to achieve a simulated image acquisition acceleration factor of 4. They are (1) a golden ratio-optimized 32-ray radial sampling profile and (2) a Cartesian-based random sampling profile with spatiotemporal-regularized sampling density constraints. The undersampled data were reconstructed to yield images using the investigated reconstruction technique. In quantitative pharmacokinetic analysis on a voxel-by-voxel basis, the rate constant K trans in the extended Tofts model and blood flow F B and blood volume V B from the 2-compartment exchange model were analyzed. Finally, the quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters calculated from the undersampled data were compared with the corresponding calculated values from the fully sampled data. To quantify each parameter's accuracy calculated using the undersampled data, error in volume mean, total relative error, and cross-correlation were calculated. The pharmacokinetic parameter maps generated from the undersampled data appeared comparable to the ones generated from the original full sampling data. Within the region of interest, most derived error in volume mean values in the region of interest was about 5% or lower, and the average error in volume mean of all parameter maps generated through either sampling strategy was about 3.54%. The average total relative error value of all parameter maps in region of interest was about 0.115, and the average cross-correlation of all parameter maps in region of interest was about 0.962. All investigated pharmacokinetic parameters had no significant differences between

  6. Task-based exposure assessment of nanoparticles in the workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, Seunghon; Yoon, Chungsik; Lee, Euiseung; Lee, Kiyoung; Park, Donguk; Chung, Eunkyo; Kim, Pilje; Lee, Byoungcheun

    2012-01-01

    Although task-based sampling is, theoretically, a plausible approach to the assessment of nanoparticle exposure, few studies using this type of sampling have been published. This study characterized and compared task-based nanoparticle exposure profiles for engineered nanoparticle manufacturing workplaces (ENMW) and workplaces that generated welding fumes containing incidental nanoparticles. Two ENMW and two welding workplaces were selected for exposure assessments. Real-time devices were utilized to characterize the concentration profiles and size distributions of airborne nanoparticles. Filter-based sampling was performed to measure time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations, and off-line analysis was performed using an electron microscope. Workplace tasks were recorded by researchers to determine the concentration profiles associated with particular tasks/events. This study demonstrated that exposure profiles differ greatly in terms of concentrations and size distributions according to the task performed. The size distributions recorded during tasks were different from both those recorded during periods with no activity and from the background. The airborne concentration profiles of the nanoparticles varied according to not only the type of workplace but also the concentration metrics. The concentrations measured by surface area and the number concentrations measured by condensation particle counter, particulate matter 1.0, and TWA mass concentrations all showed a similar pattern, whereas the number concentrations measured by scanning mobility particle sizer indicated that the welding fume concentrations at one of the welding workplaces were unexpectedly higher than were those at workplaces that were engineering nanoparticles. This study suggests that a task-based exposure assessment can provide useful information regarding the exposure profiles of nanoparticles and can therefore be used as an exposure assessment tool.

  7. Assessment of chimeric mice with humanized livers in new drug development: generation of pharmacokinetics, metabolism and toxicity data for selecting the final candidate compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Hidetaka; Ito, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    1. Chimeric mice with humanized livers are expected to be a novel tool for new drug development. This review discusses four applications where these animals can be used efficiently to collect supportive data for selecting the best compound in the final stage of drug discovery. 2. The first application is selection of the final compound based on estimated pharmacokinetic parameters in humans. Since chimeric mouse livers are highly repopulated with human hepatocytes, hepatic clearance values in vivo could be used preferentially to estimate pharmacokinetic profiles for humans. 3. The second is prediction of human-specific or disproportionate metabolites. Chimeric mice reproduce human-specific metabolites of drugs under development to conform to ICH guidance M3(R2), except for compounds that were extensively eliminated by co-existing mouse hepatocytes. 4. The third is identifying metabolites with distinct pharmacokinetic profiles in humans. Slow metabolite elimination specifically in humans increases its exposure level, but if its elimination is faster in laboratory animals, the animal exposure level might not satisfy ICH guidance M3(R2). 5. Finally, two examples of reproducing acute liver toxicity in chimeric mice are introduced. Integrated pharmacokinetics, metabolism and toxicity information are expected to assist pharmaceutical scientists in selecting the best candidate compound in new drug development.

  8. Population Pharmacokinetics of Tracers: A New Tool for Medical Imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandia, Peggy; Jaudet, Cyril; Chatelut, Etienne; Concordet, Didier

    2017-02-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography is a medical imaging method measuring the activity of a radiotracer chosen to accumulate in cancer cells. A recent trend of medical imaging analysis is to account for the radiotracer's pharmacokinetic properties at a voxel (three-dimensional-pixel) level to separate the different tissues. These analyses are closely linked to population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling. Kineticists possess the cultural background to improve medical imaging analysis. This article stresses the common points with population pharmacokinetics and highlights the methodological locks that need to be lifted.

  9. Formulation, optimization and characterization of cationic polymeric nanoparticles of mast cell stabilizing agent using the Box-Behnken experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajra, Balaram; Patel, Ravi R; Dalwadi, Chintan

    2016-01-01

    The present research work was intended to develop and optimize sustained release of biodegradable chitosan nanoparticles (CSNPs) as delivery vehicle for sodium cromoglicate (SCG) using the circumscribed Box-Behnken experimental design (BBD) and evaluate its potential for oral permeability enhancement. The 3-factor, 3-level BBD was employed to investigate the combined influence of formulation variables on particle size and entrapment efficiency (%EE) of SCG-CSNPs prepared by ionic gelation method. The generated polynomial equation was validated and desirability function was utilized for optimization. Optimized SCG-CSNPs were evaluated for physicochemical, morphological, in-vitro characterizations and permeability enhancement potential by ex-vivo and uptake study using CLSM. SCG-CSNPs exhibited particle size of 200.4 ± 4.06 nm and %EE of 62.68 ± 2.4% with unimodal size distribution having cationic, spherical, smooth surface. Physicochemical and in-vitro characterization revealed existence of SCG in amorphous form inside CSNPs without interaction and showed sustained release profile. Ex-vivo and uptake study showed the permeability enhancement potential of CSNPs. The developed SCG-CSNPs can be considered as promising delivery strategy with respect to improved permeability and sustained drug release, proving importance of CSNPs as potential oral delivery system for treatment of allergic rhinitis. Hence, further studies should be performed for establishing the pharmacokinetic potential of the CSNPs.

  10. Polyethylene glycol-conjugated chondroitin sulfate A derivative nanoparticles for tumor-targeted delivery of anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Young; Park, Ju-Hwan; Lee, Jeong-Jun; Lee, Song Yi; Chung, Suk-Jae; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Kim, Dae-Duk

    2016-10-20

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-decorated chondroitin sulfate A-deoxycholic acid (CSD) nanoparticles (NPs) were fabricated for the selective delivery of doxorubicin (DOX) to ovarian cancer. CSD-PEG was synthesized via amide bond formation between the NH2 group of methoxypolyethylene glycol amine and the COOH group of CSD. CSD-PEG/DOX NPs with a 247nm mean diameter, negative zeta potential, and >90% drug encapsulation efficiency were prepared. Sustained and pH-dependent DOX release profiles from CSD-PEG NPs were observed in dissolution tests. Endocytosis of NPs by SKOV-3 cells (CD44 receptor-positive human ovarian cancer cells), based on the CSA-CD44 receptor interaction, was determined by flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) studies. PEGylation of NPs also resulted in reduced drug clearance (CL) in vivo and improved relative bioavailability, compared to non-PEGylated NPs, as determined by the pharmacokinetic study performed after intravenous administration in rats. Developed CSD-PEG NPs can be a promising delivery vehicle for the therapy of CD44 receptor-expressing ovarian cancers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Karolinske psychodynamic profile (KAPP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Birgit Bork; Søgaard, Ulf

    2006-01-01

    psykologiske testmetoder, assesment, Karolinska psychodynamic profile (KAPP), psykodynamisk profil......psykologiske testmetoder, assesment, Karolinska psychodynamic profile (KAPP), psykodynamisk profil...

  12. Humid Heat Autoclaving of Hybrid Nanoparticles Achieved by Decreased Nanoparticle Concentration and Improved Nanoparticle Stability Using Medium Chain Triglycerides as a Modifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Jingxin; Chao, Yanhui; Liang, Yuheng; Zhang, Ning; He, Haibing; Yin, Tian; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Hui; Tang, Xing

    2016-09-01

    Humid heat autoclaving is a facile technique widely used in the sterilization of injections, but the high temperature employed would destroy nanoparticles composed of biodegradable polymers. The aim of this study was to investigate whether incorporation of medium chain triglycerides (MCT) could stabilize nanoparticles composed of poly (ethylene glycol)-b-polycaprolactone (PEG-b-PCL) during autoclaving (121°C, 10 min). Polymeric nanoparticles with different MCT contents were prepared by dialysis. Block copolymer degradation was studied by GPC. The critical aggregation concentrations of nanoparticles at different temperatures were determined using pyrene fluorescence. The size, morphology and weight averaged molecular weight of pristine/autoclaved nanoparticles were studied using DLS, TEM and SLS, respectively. Drug loading content and release profile were determined using RP-HPLC. The protecting effect of MCT on nanoparticles was dependent on the amount of MCT incorporated. Nanoparticles with high MCT contents, which assumed an emulsion-like morphology, showed reduced block copolymer degradation and particle disassociation after incubation at 100°C for 24 h. Nanoparticles with high MCT content showed the lowest critical aggregation concentration (CAC) under either room temperature or 60°C and the lowest particle concentration among all samples. And the particle size, drug loading content, physical stability and release profile of nanoparticles with high MCT contents remained nearly unchanged after autoclaving. Incorporation of high amount of MCT changed the morphology of PEG-b-PCL based nanoparticles to an emulsion-like structure and the nanoparticles prepared could withstand autoclaving due to improved particle stability and decreased particle concentration caused by MCT incorporation.

  13. Gentamicin coated iron oxide nanoparticles as novel antibacterial agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Proma; Neogi, Sudarsan

    2017-09-01

    Applications of different types of magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical purposes started a long time back. The concept of surface functionalization of the iron oxide nanoparticles with antibiotics is a novel technique which paves the path for further application of these nanoparticles by virtue of their property of superparamagnetism. In this paper, we have synthesized novel iron oxide nanoparticles surface functionalized with Gentamicin. The average size of the particles, concluded from the HR-TEM images, came to be around 14 nm and 10 nm for unmodified and modified nanoparticles, respectively. The magnetization curve M(H) obtained for these nanoparticles are typical of superparamagnetic nature and having almost zero values of coercivity and remanance. The release properties of the drug coated nanoparticles were studied; obtaining an S shaped profile, indicating the initial burst effect followed by gradual sustained release. In vitro investigations against various gram positive and gram negative strains viz Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus subtilis indicated significant antibacterial efficiency of the drug-nanoparticle conjugate. The MIC values indicated that a small amount like 0.2 mg ml-1 of drug capped particles induce about 98% bacterial death. The novelty of the work lies in the drug capping of the nanoparticles, which retains the superparamagnetic nature of the iron oxide nanoparticles and the medical properties of the drug simultaneously, which is found to extremely blood compatible.

  14. Prediction of a Therapeutic Dose for Buagafuran, a Potent Anxiolytic Agent by Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling Starting from Pharmacokinetics in Rats and Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Yang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK/pharmacodynamic (PD models can contribute to animal-to-human extrapolation and therapeutic dose predictions. Buagafuran is a novel anxiolytic agent and phase I clinical trials of buagafuran have been completed. In this paper, a potentially effective dose for buagafuran of 30 mg t.i.d. in human was estimated based on the human brain concentration predicted by a PBPK/PD modeling. The software GastroPlusTM was used to build the PBPK/PD model for buagafuran in rat which related the brain tissue concentrations of buagafuran and the times of animals entering the open arms in the pharmacological model of elevated plus-maze. Buagafuran concentrations in human plasma were fitted and brain tissue concentrations were predicted by using a human PBPK model in which the predicted plasma profiles were in good agreement with observations. The results provided supportive data for the rational use of buagafuran in clinic.

  15. Self-assembled liquid crystalline nanoparticles as a novel ophthalmic delivery system for dexamethasone: Improving preocular retention and ocular bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Li; Han, Shun; Shen, Jinqiu; Zhu, Jiabi; Zhu, Chunliu; Zhang, Xinxin; Gan, Yong

    2010-08-30

    The object of this study was to design novel self-assembled liquid crystalline nanoparticles (cubosomes) as an ophthalmic delivery system for dexamethasone (DEX) to improve its preocular retention and ocular bioavailability. DEX cubosome particles were produced by fragmenting a cubic crystalline phase of monoolein and water in the presence of stabilizer Poloxamer 407. Small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXR) profiles revealed its internal structure as Pn3m space group, indicating the diamond cubic phase. In vitro, the apparent permeability coefficient of DEX administered in cubosomes exhibited a 4.5-fold (F1) and 3.5-fold (F2) increase compared to that of Dex-Na phosphate eye drops. Preocular retention studies revealed that the retention of cubosomes was significantly longer than that of solution and carbopol gel, with AUC(0-->180min) of Rh B cubosomes being 2-3-fold higher than that of the other two formulations. In vivo pharmacokinetics in aqueous humor was evaluated by microdialysis, which indicated a 1.8-fold (F1) increase in AUC(0-->240min) of DEX administered in cubosomes relative to that of Dex-Na phosphate eye drops, with about an 8-fold increase compared to that of DEX suspension. Corneal cross-sections after incubation with DEX cubosomes demonstrated an unaffected corneal structure and tissue integrity, which indicated the good biocompatibility of DEX cubosomes. In conclusion, self-assembled liquid crystalline nanoparticles might represent a promising vehicle for effective ocular drug delivery. Crown Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. GOLD NANOPARTICLES: A REVIVAL IN PRECIOUS METAL ADMINISTRATION TO PATIENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakor, AS; Jokerst, J; Zaveleta, C; Massoud, TF; Gambhir, SS

    2011-01-01

    Gold has been used as a therapeutic agent to treat a wide variety of rheumatic diseases including psoriatic arthritis, juvenile arthritis and discoid lupus erythematosus. Although the use of gold has been largely superseded by newer drugs, gold nanoparticles are being used effectively in laboratory based clinical diagnostic methods whilst concurrently showing great promise in vivo either as a diagnostic imaging agent or a therapeutic agent. For these reasons, gold nanoparticles are therefore well placed to enter mainstream clinical practice in the near future. Hence, the present review summarizes the chemistry, pharmacokinetics, bio-distribution, metabolism and toxicity of bulk gold in humans based on decades of clinical observation and experiments in which gold was used to treat patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The beneficial attributes of gold nanoparticles, such as their ease of synthesis, functionalization and shape control are also highlighted demonstrating why gold nanoparticles are an attractive target for further development and optimization. The importance of controlling the size and shape of gold nanoparticles to minimize any potential toxic side effects is also discussed. PMID:21846107

  17. Pharmacokinetics of vinyl chloride in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolt, H.M.; Laib, R.J.; Kappus, H.; Buchter, A.

    1977-01-01

    When rats are exposed to [ 14 C]vinyl chloride in a closed system, the vinyl chloride present in the atmosphere equilibrates with the animals' organism within 15 min. The course of equilibration could be determined using rats which had been given 6-nitro-1,2,3-benzothiadiazole. This compound completely blocks metabolism of vinyl chloride. The enzymes responsible for metabolism of vinyl chloride are saturated at an atmospheric concentration of vinyl chloride of 250 ppm. Pharmacokinetic analysis shows that no significant cumulation of vinyl chloride or its major metabolites is to be expected on repeated administration of vinyl chlorides. This may be consistent with the theory that a reactive, shortly living metabolite which occurs in low concentration only, may be responsible for the toxic effects of vinyl chloride

  18. Minocycline pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maaland, Marit Gaastra; Guardabassi, Luca; Papich, Mark G.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although minocycline is not licensed for use in dogs, this tetracycline has therapeutic potential against meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius. HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to establish rational dosage recommendations for minocycline use in dogs....... Specific objectives were to generate and analyse minocycline pharmacokinetic (PK) data on plasma and interstitial fluid (ISF) concentrations, plasma protein binding and pharmacodynamic (PD) data on antimicrobial activity against S. pseudintermedius. ANIMALS: Six healthy dogs from a research colony were...... used in this study. METHODS: Dogs were administered 5 mg/kg intravenously and 10 mg/kg orally (p.o.) of minocycline hydrochloride in separate crossover experiments. In vivo drug concentrations in plasma and in ISF collected by ultrafiltration were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography...

  19. Pharmacokinetics of topically applied sparfloxacin in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satia Milan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Fluoroquinolones are antimicrobial agents that have a broad spectrum of activity and are widely used against many of the ocular pathogens, responsible for conjunctivitis, blepharitis, corneal ulcers etc. The aim of our study was to evaluate the ocular pharmacokinetics of sparfloxacin (0.3% w/v in the aqueous humour of rabbits. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Pharmacokinetics of topically administered sparfloxacin were determined after a single application of 50 µl topically. The aqueous humour samples were collected at 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6 hours after instillation. High Performance Thin Layer Chromatographic method was used to analyse the drug concentration in the aqueous humour samples. RESULTS: Fifteen minutes after the instillation of 50 µl of sparfloxacin 0.3% solution, the mean concentration in aqueous humour was found to be 1.4 µg/ml, which reaches the peak level of 3.7 µg/ml after 1.3 hours. At 6 hours, the sparfloxacin aqueous levels were 0.562 µg/ml. The clinical efficacy was predicted based on the Maximum Concentration (Cmax: Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC and Area Under the Concentration-time curve (AUC:MIC ratios. CONCLUSION: The sparfloxacin levels in aqueous humour of rabbits are sufficiently high up to the 6 hours after instillation in the conjunctival sac to provide bactericidal effect against most of the ocular pathogens. Both Cmax:MIC and AUC:MIC ratios are high enough to provide bactericidal effect against most of the ocular pathogens. Sparfloxacin (0.3% ophthalmic preparation has excellent penetration through cornea.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of terbutaline in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiansen, Anders; Eggert, Sarah; Pedersen, Erland

    2013-11-01

    In healthy individuals upwards of 90 % of an injected dose of terbutaline is excreted in the urine. The purpose of this study is to determine the pharmacokinetic properties of terbutaline in patients with severe renal impairment as defined by a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) below 30 mL/min. Ten patients were included in the study. GFR was measured with Cr-EDTA clearance. They were given an intravenous injection of 0.500 mg of terbutaline. Blood samples were collected at intervals for 60 h and urine samples were collected for 96 h. The concentration of terbutaline in the blood and in the urine was used to calculate pharmacokinetic parameters. In patients with normal renal function the total clearance of terbutaline is 2.23-3 mL/min/kg. In our population the total clearance of terbutaline was found to be 1.72 (SD: 0.49) mL/min/kg of which approximately 15 % (0.25 mL/min/kg) was renal clearance. We calculated a distribution volume at steady state of 0.74 (SD: 0.22) L/kg with a terminal half-life of 7.93 (SD: 4.06) hours. The mean residence time (MRT) was 8.35 (SD: 4.93) hours. In healthy individuals the excretion of terbutaline is foremost renal but this study shows that severe renal impairment does not lower the total clearance of terbutaline to a degree that might be expected from the Cr-EDTA clearance. However, more research is needed to determine if dosage adjustment is warranted in patients with CKD.

  1. A systems approach for tumor pharmacokinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Michael Thurber

    Full Text Available Recent advances in genome inspired target discovery, small molecule screens, development of biological and nanotechnology have led to the introduction of a myriad of new differently sized agents into the clinic. The differences in small and large molecule delivery are becoming increasingly important in combination therapies as well as the use of drugs that modify the physiology of tumors such as anti-angiogenic treatment. The complexity of targeting has led to the development of mathematical models to facilitate understanding, but unfortunately, these studies are often only applicable to a particular molecule, making pharmacokinetic comparisons difficult. Here we develop and describe a framework for categorizing primary pharmacokinetics of drugs in tumors. For modeling purposes, we define drugs not by their mechanism of action but rather their rate-limiting step of delivery. Our simulations account for variations in perfusion, vascularization, interstitial transport, and non-linear local binding and metabolism. Based on a comparison of the fundamental rates determining uptake, drugs were classified into four categories depending on whether uptake is limited by blood flow, extravasation, interstitial diffusion, or local binding and metabolism. Simulations comparing small molecule versus macromolecular drugs show a sharp difference in distribution, which has implications for multi-drug therapies. The tissue-level distribution differs widely in tumors for small molecules versus macromolecular biologic drugs, and this should be considered in the design of agents and treatments. An example using antibodies in mouse xenografts illustrates the different in vivo behavior. This type of transport analysis can be used to aid in model development, experimental data analysis, and imaging and therapeutic agent design.

  2. Pharmacokinetics and efficacy of intraocular flurbiprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazaki, S; Tsika, C; Tzatzarakis, M; Naoumidi, E; Tsatsakis, A; Tsatsanis, C; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis K

    2017-12-01

    Intravitreal delivery of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs could be an effective way to treat macular edema caused by posterior segment inflammation. In this study, we evaluated the intravitreal bioavailability and anti-inflammatory efficacy of flurbiprofen in rabbit eyes. For pharmacokinetics, 0.1 ml of 7.66 mg/ml flurbiprofen solution was injected intravitreally and vitreous drug levels were analyzed at specific time points using LC-MS technique. For efficacy, 100 ng lipopolysaccharide of E.coli was injected intravitreally in rabbits to induce inflammation. The animals were separated in three groups and received intraocular flurbiprofen, dexamethasone and PBS to serve as control. Complete ocular examination and total cell count in aqueous fluid were determined to evaluate the extent of inflammation. Eyes were then enucleated for histopathology analysis. The efficacy in the uveitis model was determined by clinical signs of inflammation, total leukocyte count and histology findings. No adverse events were observed during pharmacokinetic assessment. No signs of inflammation, hemorrhage or retina detachment were detected. The recovery of flurbiprofen from vitreous samples was 92.6%. The half-life of flurbiprofen was estimated to be 1.92 h with an elimination constant rate (K) of 0.36. Treatment with intraocular injections of flurbiprofen and dexamethasone significantly reduced total leukocyte count in a manner comparable to dexamethasone [reduction of 96.84% (p flurbiprofen injection compared to control eyes. Flurbiprofen is effective in suppressing inflammation in this experimental uveitis model. In our experimental setting, intravitreal flurbiprofen seem to have a therapeutic result comparable to dexamethasone. However, the half-life of the drug remains short, necessitating further research to prolong its presence in the vitreous cavity.

  3. [Pharmacokinetics of salazosulfapyridine in a hemodialysis patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Yuji; Fujimaki, Toshihisa; Sakurai, Yusei

    2003-06-01

    The patient was a 62-year-old female. Total gastrectomy was performed due to gastric ulcer in 1969. She was diagnosed as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in 1985 and was developed to amyloidosis in 1991. She was started on hemodialysis (HD) for chronic renal failure in 1996. In 1998, her arthralgia was aggravated, and 100 mg/day of bucillamine was administered on the day of HD. Her arthralgia persisted, and switching to salazosulfapyridine (SASP) was considered. As there were no standards and no reports for the use of SASP in HD patients, we examined the pharmacokinetics of SASP and its metabolites, and compared our patient with the results of phase one study in normal subjects in Japan. In this case, the blood concentration of SASP was similar to that in healthy controls after single administration of 500 mg of SASP on the day of non-HD, while the concentration of sulfapyridine (SP) was higher than that in healthy donors. However, the blood concentrations of SASP, SP, and N4-acetyl-SP (AcSP) at 24 hours after administration were similar to those obtained in healthy men. SASP was not dialyzed, while about half of SP and AcSP, were dialyzed. In a five-day consecutive administration study also, the blood concentrations of these compounds on Day 5 were similar to those of phase one study, suggesting no accumulation. No adverse drug reaction was observed. As this case had the past history of total gastrectomy and amyloidosis, it is possible that this result is influenced by the factors. Therefore it is necessary to examine pharmacokinetics of SASP and its metabolites beforehand when administering this agent to other HD/RA patients.

  4. Rhetorical gamesmanship in the nano debates over sunscreens and nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berube, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Communication of risk profiles associated with sunscreens incorporating nanoparticles has been challenging when some communicators shift risk profiles from highly problematic nanoparticles to others, which are much less problematic. This article vets a popular publication from a civic advocacy group that cited scientific research papers to make environmental health and safety claims. The phenomenon of risk profile shifts is demonstrated by re-examining the scientific articles being cited. In addition, the authors for correspondence for each of the articles cited were interviewed via email and their comments about the claims made are included.

  5. Effect of Smoking on Pharmacokinetics of Clopidogrel, an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in patients undergoing PCI. Keywords: Antiplatelet, Clopidogrel, Pharmacokinetics, Smoking, Cigarette ..... regimen of choice to prevent thrombotic complications. [2,16]. ... either the parent drug [19] or the carboxylic acid metabolite as an ...

  6. Pharmacokinetics of Rhodamine 110 and Its Organ Distribution in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shiau-Han; Cheng, Yung-Yi; Huo, Teh-Ia; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2017-09-06

    Rhodamine dyes have been banned as food additives due to their potential tumorigenicity. Rhodamine 110 is illegal as a food additive, although its pharmacokinetics have not been characterized, and no accurate bioanalytical methods are available to quantify rhodamine 110. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a fast, stable, and sensitive method to quantify rhodamine 110 using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) to assess its pharmacokinetics and organ distribution in awake rats. Rhodamine 110 exhibited linear pharmacokinetics and slow elimination after oral administration. Furthermore, its oral bioavailability was approximately 34-35%. The distribution in the liver and kidney suggests that these organs are primarily responsible for rhodamine 110 metabolism and elimination. Our investigation describes the pharmacokinetics and a quantification method for rhodamine 110, improving our understanding of the food safety of rhodamine dyes.

  7. A Comparative Study of the Pharmacokinetics of Conventional and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Purpose: To examine the pharmacokinetics of a formulated aceclofenac sustained release ... over 24 h and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). .... The response factor .... slower drug disposition and prolonged effect.

  8. Pharmacokinetically guided dosing of (high-dose) chemotherapeutic agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attema-de Jonge, M.E. (Milly Ellen)

    2004-01-01

    Due to variation in drug distribution, metabolism and elimination processes between patients, systemic exposure to chemotherapeutic agents may be highly variable from patient to patient after administration of similar doses. This pharmacokinetic variability may explain in part the large variability

  9. Synthetic lipid nanoparticles targeting steroid organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merian, Juliette; Boisgard, Raphael; Theze, Benoit; Decleves, Xavier; Texier, Isabelle; Tavitian, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Lipidots are original nano-particulate lipid delivery vectors for drugs and contrast agents made from materials generally regarded as safe. Here, we characterized the in vivo stability, biodistribution, and pharmacokinetics of lipidots. Lipidots 55 nm in diameter and coated with a phospholipid/poly(ethyleneglycol) surfactant shell were triply labeled with 3 H-cholesteryl-hexadecyl-ether, cholesteryl- 14 C-oleate, and the 1,19-dioctadecyl-3,3,39,39-tetramethyl-indo-tri-carbocyanine infrared fluorescent dye and injected intravenously into immunocompetent Friend virus B-type mice. The pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of lipidots were analyzed quantitatively in serial samples of blood and tissue and with in vivo optical imaging and were refined by microscopic examination of selected target tissues. The plasmatic half-life of lipidots was approximately 30 min. Radioactive and fluorescent tracers displayed a similar nanoparticle-driven biodistribution, indicative of the lipidots' integrity during the first hours after injection. Lipidots distributed in the liver and, surprisingly, in the steroid-rich organs adrenals and ovaries, but not in the spleen. This tropism was confirmed at the microscopic level by histologic detection of 1,19-dioctadecyl- 3,3,39,39-tetramethyl-indo-tri-carbocyanine. Nanoparticle loading with cholesterol derivatives increased accumulation in ovaries in a dose dependent manner. This previously unreported distribution pattern is specific to lipidots and attributed to their nano-metric size and composition, conferring on them a lipoprotein-like behavior. The affinity of lipidots for steroid hormone-rich areas is of interest to address drugs and contrast agents to lipoprotein-receptor-over-expressing cancer cells found in hormone-dependent tumors. (authors)

  10. Absorption and pharmacokinetics of grapefruit flavanones in beagles

    OpenAIRE

    Mata Bilbao, María de Lourdes; Andrés Lacueva, Ma. Cristina; Roura Carvajal, Elena; Jáuregui Pallarés, Olga; Escribano Ferrer, Elvira; Torre, Celina; Lamuela Raventós, Rosa Ma.

    2007-01-01

    The present study evaluated the pharmacokinetics of three different grapefruit flavanone forms in dog plasma and demonstrated their absorption after an oral intake of a grapefruit extract; pharmacokinetic parameters of these forms were also determined. Ten healthy beagles were administered 70 mg citrus flavonoids as a grapefruit extract contained in capsules, while two additional dogs were used as controls and given an excipient. The grapefruit flavanone naringin, along with its metabolites n...

  11. Endostar-loaded PEG-PLGA nanoparticles: in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanyuan Hu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Sanyuan Hu1, Yangde Zhang21Xiangya School of Medicine and 2National Hepatobiliary and Enteric Surgery Research Center, Ministry of Health, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan Province, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Endostar, a novel recombinant human endostatin, which was approved by the Chinese State Food and Drug Administration in 2005, has a broad spectrum of activity against solid tumors. In this study, we aimed to determine whether the anticancer effect of Endostar is increased by using a nanocarrier system. It is expected that the prolonged circulation of endostar will improve its anticancer activity. Endostar-loaded nanoparticles were prepared to improve controlled release of the drug in mice and rabbits, as well as its anticancer effects in mice with colon cancer. A protein release system could be exploited to act as a drug carrier. Nanoparticles were formulated from poly (ethylene glycol modified poly (DL-lactide-co-glycolide (PEG-PLGA by a double emulsion technique. Physical and release characteristics of endostar-loaded nanoparticles in vitro were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS, and micro bicinchoninic acid protein assay. The pharmacokinetic parameters of endostar nanoparticles in rabbit and mice plasma were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Western blot was used to detect endostatin in different tissues. To study the effects of endostar-loaded nanoparticles in vivo, nude mice in which tumor cells HT-29 were implanted, were subsequently treated with endostar or endostar-loaded PEG-PLGA nanoparticles. Using TEM and PCS, endostar-loaded PEG-PLGA nanoparticles were found to have a spherical core-shell structure with a diameter of 169.56 ± 35.03 nm. Drug-loading capacity was 8.22% ± 2.35% and drug encapsulation was 80.17% ± 7.83%. Compared with endostar, endostar-loaded PEG-PLGA nanoparticles had a longer elimination half-life and lower peak

  12. Metabolic and pharmacokinetic studies of scutellarin in rat plasma, urine, and feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jian-feng; You, Hai-sheng; Dong, Ya-lin; Lu, Jun; Chen, Si-ying; Zhu, Hui-fang; Dong, Qian; Wang, Mao-yi; Dong, Wei-hua

    2011-05-01

    To study the metabolic and pharmacokinetic profile of scutellarin, an active component from the medical plant Erigeron breviscapus (Vant) Hand-Mazz, and to investigate the mechanisms underlying the low bioavailability of scutellarin though oral or intravenous administration in rats. HPLC method was developed for simultaneous detection of scutellarin and scutellarein (the aglycone of scutellarin) in rat plasma, urine and feces. The in vitro metabolic stability study was carried out in rat liver microsomes from different genders. After a single oral dose of scutellarin (400 mg/kg), the plasma concentrations of scutellarin and scutellarein in female rats were significantly higher than in male ones. Between the female and male rats, significant differences in AUC, t(max2) and C(max2) for scutellarin were found. The pharmacokinetic parameters of scutellarin in the urine also showed significant gender differences. After a single oral dose of scutellarin (400 mg/kg), the total percentage excretion of scutellarein in male and female rats was 16.5% and 8.61%, respectively. The total percentage excretion of scutellarin and scutellarein in the feces was higher with oral administration than with intravenous administration. The in vitro t(1/2) and CL(int) value for scutellarin in male rats was significantly higher than that in female rats. The results suggest that a large amount of ingested scutellarin was metabolized into scutellarein in the gastrointestinal tract and then excreted with the feces, leading to the extremely low oral bioavailability of scutellarin. The gender differences of pharmacokinetic parameters of scutellarin and scutellarein are due to the higher CL(int) and lower absorption in male rats.

  13. Population pharmacokinetic modelling of the enterohepatic recirculation of diclofenac and rofecoxib in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntjens, D R H; Strougo, A; Chain, A; Metcalf, A; Summerfield, S; Spalding, D J M; Danhof, M; Della Pasqua, O

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Enterohepatic recirculation (EHC) is a common pharmacokinetic phenomenon that has been poorly modelled in animals. The presence of EHC leads to the appearance of multiple peaks in the concentration-time profile and increased exposure, which may have implications for drug effect and extrapolation across species. The aim of this investigation was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model for diclofenac and rofecoxib that describes EHC and to assess its consequence for the pharmacodynamics of both drugs. Experimental approach: The pharmacokinetics of diclofenac and rofecoxib was characterized in male rats following intravenous, intraperitoneal and oral administration. Blood samples were collected at pre-defined time points after dosing to determine plasma concentrations over time. A parametric approach using nonlinear mixed effects modelling was applied to describe EHC, whilst simulations were used to evaluate its impact on PGE2 inhibition. Key results: For diclofenac, EHC was described by a compartmental model with periodic transfer rate and metabolite formation rate. For rofecoxib, EHC modelling required a conversion compartment with first-order recycling rate and lag time. Based on model predictions, EHC causes an increase of 95% in the systemic exposure to diclofenac and of 15% in the exposure to rofecoxib. In addition, EHC prolongs the inhibition of PGE2 and increases the duration of the anti-inflammatory effect (24 h for rofecoxib 10 mg kg−1) without affecting maximum inhibition. Conclusions and implications: Our findings show the relevance of exploring EHC in a quantitative manner to accurately interpret pharmacodynamic findings in vivo, in particular when scaling across species. PMID:18193075

  14. Population pharmacokinetics of proguanil in patients with acute P. falciparum malaria after combined therapy with atovaquone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Z; Eaves, C J; Hutchinson, D B; Canfield, C J

    1996-11-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of proguanil were evaluated in patients with acute P. falciparum malaria receiving concomitantly proguanil hydrochloride and atovaquone. The population consisted of 203 Blacks, 112 Orientals and 55 Malays; 274 males and 96 females. Of the 370 patients, 114 and 256 patients were classified as 'poor' and 'extensive' metabolizers of proguanil, respectively. Body weight and age ranged between 11-110 kg and 3-65 years, respectively. 2. A one compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination was fitted to proguanil plasma concentration-time profiles, using non-linear mixed effect modelling (NONMEM). 3. Oral clearance (CLo) showed a 0.785 power relationship with body weight and was 13% higher in Orientals than Blacks and Malays and 17% lower in 'poor' than 'extensive' metabolizers. According to the mean weight of each population, the final population estimates of CLo in Blacks, Orientals and Malays who are 'extensive' metabolizers were 54.0, 61.5 and 64.3 l h-1, respectively. Age, gender and dose had no significant effects on CLo. 4. Apparent volume of distribution (V/F) showed a 0.88 power relationship with body weight. The final population estimates were 562 and 1629 l in children ( 15 years, respectively, who had a mean body weight of 22.6 and 54.8 kg, respectively. The effect of other covariates on V/F was not examined. 5. The final magnitudes of interpatient variability in CLo and V/F were relatively low at 22.5 and 17.0%, respectively. 6. Population pharmacokinetic parameter estimates in Black, Oriental and Malay patients with acute P. falciparum malaria are in good agreement with results of pharmacokinetic studies in healthy Caucasian volunteers. In view of the 30-50% residual variability in proguanil plasma concentrations, the slight effects of Orientals and 'poor' metabolizers on CLo are unlikely to be clinically significant. Hence, dose recommendation will be solely based on body weight.

  15. Pharmacokinetic studies of active triterpenoid saponins and the total secondary saponin from Anemone raddeana Regel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dandan; Lei, Tianli; Lv, Chongning; Zhao, Huimin; Xu, Haiyan; Lu, Jincai

    2017-02-15

    The rhizome of Anemone raddeana Regel, a Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) which has a robust history treating rheumatism and neuralgia. The total secondary saponin (TSS) from it has demonstrated antitumor activity. In this study, a rapid and validated LC-MS/MS method was developed to simultaneously determine the active compounds (Hederacolchiside A1 and Eleutheroside K). Analytes were separated on a reverse-phase C18 column with acetonitrile-water (5mmol/L ammonium acetate) as the mobile phase. This assay showed acceptable linearity (r>0.99) over the concentration range 5-1000 nmol/L for two analytes. The intra- and inter-day precision was within 8.06% and accuracy was ranged from -3.16% to 3.34% for two analytes. The mean extraction recoveries of analytes and IS from rat plasma were all more than 76.0%. Under the developed analytical conditions, the obtained values of main pharmacokinetic parameters (C max and AUC 0-t ) indicated that the pure compounds were more efficient than the TSS extract in Hederacolchiside A1 and Eleutheroside K absorption. In addition, pharmacokinetic studies of two individual compounds demonstrated their poor oral absorption in rat ( a F%, 0.019-1.521). In the study of absorption and transportation of Hederacolchiside A1 and Eleutheroside K in Caco-2 cell monolayer model, the uptake permeability was in 10 -6 cm/sec range suggesting poor absorption, which confirmed the previous pharmacokinetic profiles in vivo. Interestingly, the uptake ratio of them declined significantly when treated with phloridzin (SGLT1 inhibitor). It indicated that the absorption of Hederacolchiside A1 in intestine was mainly through positive transport and SGLT1 might participate in its active absorption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Optimisation of the dosage of tranexamic acid in trauma patients with population pharmacokinetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassin-Delyle, S; Theusinger, O M; Albrecht, R; Mueller, S; Spahn, D R; Urien, S; Stein, P

    2018-06-01

    Tranexamic acid is used both pre-hospital and in-hospital as an antifibrinolytic drug to treat or prevent hyperfibrinolysis in trauma patients; dosing, however, remains empirical. We aimed to measure plasma levels of tranexamic acid in patients receiving pre-hospital anti-hyperfibrinolytic therapy and to build a population pharmacokinetic model to propose an optimised dosing regimen. Seventy-three trauma patients were enrolled and each received tranexamic acid 1 g intravenously pre-hospital. A blood sample was drawn after arrival in the emergency department, and we measured the plasma tranexamic acid concentration using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and modelled the data using non-linear mixed effect modelling. Tranexamic acid was administered at a median (IQR [range]) time of 43 (30-55 [5-135]) min after trauma. Plasma tranexamic acid levels were determined on arrival at hospital, 57 (43-70 [20-148]) min after pre-hospital administration of the drug. The measured concentration was 28.7 (21.5-38.5 [8.7-89.0]) μg.ml -1 . Our subjects had sustained severe trauma; injury severity score 20 (16-29 [5-75]), including penetrating injury in 2.8% and isolated traumatic brain injury in 19.7%. The pharmacokinetics were ascribed a two-compartment open model with body-weight as the main covariate. As tranexamic acid concentrations may fall below therapeutic levels during initial hospital treatment, we propose additional dosing schemes to maintain a specific target blood concentration for as long as required. This is the first study to investigate plasma level and pharmacokinetics of tranexamic acid after pre-hospital administration in trauma patients. Our proposed dosing regimen could be used in subsequent clinical trials to better study efficacy and tolerance profiles with controlled blood concentrations. © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of sugammadex in subjects with moderate and severe renal impairment
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, K Chris; Lasseter, Kenneth C; Marbury, Thomas C; Wrishko, Rebecca E; Hanley, William D; Wolford, Dennis G; Udo de Haes, Joanna; Reitmann, Christina; Gutstein, David E

    2017-09-01

    Sugammadex rapidly reverses moderate and deep rocuronium- or vecuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade at doses of 4 mg/kg and 2 mg/kg, respectively. Sugammadex is renally eliminated. This study evaluated the pharmacokinetics of sugammadex in subjects with renal impairment versus those with normal renal function. This open-label, two-part, phase 1 study included adults with moderate (creatinine clearance (CLcr) 30 - cr cr ≥ 80 mL/min). A single intravenous (IV) bolus injection of sugammadex 4 mg/kg was administered into a peripheral vein over 10 seconds directly by straight needle in part 1 (n = 24; 8/group), and via an IV catheter followed by a saline flush in part 2 (n = 18; 6/group). Plasma concentrations of sugammadex were collected after drug administration. Due to dosing issues in part 1, pharmacokinetic parameters were determined for part 2 only. Safety was assessed throughout the study. Pharmacokinetic data were obtained from 18 subjects. Mean sugammadex exposure (AUC0-∞) in subjects with moderate and severe renal impairment was 2.42- and 5.42-times, respectively, that of healthy controls. Clearance decreased and apparent terminal half-life was prolonged with increasing renal dysfunction. Similar Cmax values were observed in subjects with renal impairment and healthy controls. There were no serious adverse events. Sugammadex exposure is increased in subjects with moderate and severe renal insufficiency due to progressively decreased clearance as a function of worsening renal function. Sugammadex 4 mg/kg was well tolerated in subjects with renal impairment, with a safety profile similar to that of healthy subjects. These results indicate that dose adjustment of sugammadex is not required in patients with moderate renal impairment; however, current safety experience is insufficient to support the use of sugammadex in patients with CLcr < 30 mL/min.
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  18. Preparation of goreisan suppository and pharmacokinetics of trans-cinnamic acid after administration to rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, Yukiko; Miyazaki, Yasunori; Uchino, Tomonobu; Kagawa, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Goreisan suppository is prepared as a hospital preparation, and successfully used for the treatment of diarrhea and vomiting in young children with common cold. While clinical efficacy of the suppository has been reported, few studies have been carried out to clarify the preparation procedure and pharmacokinetics of the suppository. In this study, trans-cinnamic acid (CA) was used as a representative substance of goreisan constituents, and assayed by HPLC-UV. We investigated the properties of goreisan suppositories prepared using various sizes of pulverized goreisan extract granules, in vitro dissolution profiles using the reciprocating dialysis tube method, and pharmacokinetics in rabbits compared with those for goreisan enema. Mass and content uniformity tests on the suppositories of three size fractions, 0-75, 75-150, and 150-300 µm, showed good acceptance for all kinds of suppository. Storage stability at 4°C was maintained until 4 months. In vitro dissolution of CA from the suppository was proportional to time until 45 min, and slower than that from the enema. Finally, 80% of CA had dissolved at 60 min. Pharmacokinetic study in rabbits revealed that the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to 120 min (AUC0-120 min) of the suppository was twice that of the enema. Moreover, from a study in rabbits using CA injection and CA suppository, we revealed that CA was rapidly and well absorbed from the rectum, showing 84% absolute bioavailability. Thus, we illustrated the defined preparation procedure of the suppository and the superiority of the suppository over the enema. This study will support evidence that the suppository is fast-acting and efficacious in clinical use.

  19. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Momelotinib in Subjects With Hepatic or Renal Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yan; Kawashima, Jun; Weng, Winnie; Kwan, Ellen; Tarnowski, Thomas; Silverman, Jeffrey A

    2018-04-01

    Momelotinib is a Janus kinase 1/2 inhibitor in clinical development for the treatment of myelofibrosis. Two phase 1 open-label, parallel-group, adaptive studies were conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of a single 200-mg oral dose of momelotinib in subjects with hepatic or renal impairment compared with healthy matched control subjects with normal hepatic or renal function. Plasma pharmacokinetics of momelotinib and its major active metabolite, M21, were evaluated, and geometric least-squares mean ratios (GMRs) and associated 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for impaired versus each control group were calculated for plasma exposures (area under concentration-time curve from time 0 to ∞ [AUC ∞ ] and maximum concentration) of momelotinib and M21. There was no clinically significant difference in plasma exposures of momelotinib and M21 between subjects with moderate or severe renal impairment or moderate hepatic impairment and healthy control subjects. Compared with healthy control subjects, momelotinib AUC ∞ was increased (GMR, 197%; 90%CI, 129%-301%), and M21 AUC ∞ was decreased (GMR, 52%; 90%CI, 34%-79%) in subjects with severe hepatic impairment. The safety profile following a single dose of momelotinib was similar between subjects with hepatic or renal dysfunction and healthy control subjects. These pharmacokinetic and safety results indicate that dose adjustment is not necessary for momelotinib in patients with renal impairment or mild to moderate hepatic impairment. In patients with severe hepatic impairment, however, the dose of momelotinib should be reduced. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of posaconazole in koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) after intravenous and oral administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharibi, S; Kimble, B; Vogelnest, L; Barnes, J; Stadler, C K; Govendir, M

    2017-12-01

    The pharmacokinetic profile of posaconazole in clinically normal koalas (n = 8) was investigated. Single doses of posaconazole were administered intravenously (i.v.; 3 mg/kg; n = 2) or orally (p.o.; 6 mg/kg; n = 6) with serial plasma samples collected over 24 and 36 hr, respectively. Plasma concentrations of posaconazole were quantified by validated high-performance liquid chromatography. A noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analysis of data was performed. Following i.v. administration, estimates of the median (range) of plasma clearance (CL) and steady-state volume of distribution (V ss ) were 0.15 (0.13-0.18) L hr -1  kg -1 and 1.23 (0.93-1.53) L/kg, respectively. The median (range) elimination half-life (t 1/2 ) after i.v. and p.o. administration was 7.90 (7.62-8.18) and 12.79 (11.22-16.24) hr, respectively. Oral bioavailability varied from 0.43 to 0.99 (median: 0.66). Following oral administration, maximum plasma concentration (C max ; median: 0.72, range: 0.55-0.93 μg/ml) was achieved in 8 (range 6-12) hr. The in vitro plasma protein binding of posaconazole incubated at 37°C was 99.25 ± 0.29%. Consideration of posaconazole pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) targets for some yeasts such as disseminated candidiasis suggests that posaconazole could be an efficacious treatment for cryptococcosis in koalas. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Population pharmacokinetics of ticagrelor in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianguo; Tang, Weifeng; Storey, Robert F; Husted, Steen; Teng, Renli

    2016-09-01

    Ticagrelor is an orally administered antiplatelet agent used to reduce thrombotic events in patients with acute coronary syndromes. Data from two studies in patients with acute coronary syndromes with large amounts of pharmacokinetic (PK) data (phase IIb DISPERSE-2 study (n = 609)); phase III PLATO PK substudy (n = 6,381)), along with non-linear mixed effects modeling software, were used to develop population PK models for ticagrelor and its metabolite, AR-C124910XX, and to evaluate the impact of demographic and clinical factors on the PK of ticagrelor and AR-C124910XX. 32 covariates relating to disease history, biomarkers, clinical chemistry, and concomitant medications were assessed. A one-compartment model with population mean PK parameters of firstorder absorption rate constant (0.67/h), apparent systemic clearance (14 L/h), and apparent volume of distribution (221 L) was shown to best describe the PK profile of ticagrelor. Patients co-administered moderate CYP3A inducers or inhibitors increased (by 110%, 95% confidence interval (CI), 52 - 192%) or decreased (by 64%, 95% CI, 39 - 73%) apparent ticagrelor clearance, respectively, while habitual smoking decreased apparent ticagrelor clearance by 22% (95% CI, 19 - 25%). Ticagrelor bioavailability was 21% (95% CI, 19 - 22%) lower at treatment initiation (visit 1) versus subsequent visits. Compared with Caucasian patients, ticagrelor bioavailability was 39% (95% CI, 33 - 46%) higher in Asian patients and 18% (95% CI, 6 - 28%) lower in Black patients. In the current analyses, the population PK models developed for ticagrelor and AR-C124910XX described the data obtained in the DISPERSE-2 and PLATO studies well, and were consistent with previous phase I PK studies.

  2. Pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence study of itopride HCl in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyung-Jin; Cho, Wonkyung; Cha, Kwang-Ho; Park, Junsung; Kim, Min-Soo; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Hwang, Sung-Joo

    2010-01-01

    In the present study two different formulations containing 50 mg itopride HCl (N-[4-12-(dimethylamino)ethoxylbenzyl]-3,4-dimethoxybenzamide HCl, CAS 122898-67-3) were compared in 28 healthy male volunteers in order to compare the bioavailability and prove the bioequivalence. The study was performed in an open, single dose randomized, 2-sequence, crossover design in 28 healthy male volunteers with a one-week washout period. Blood samples for pharmacokinetic profiling were drawn at selected times during 24 h. The serum concentrations of itopride HCl were determined using a specific and sensitive HPLC method with fluorescence detection. The detection limit of itopride HCl was 5 ng/ml and no endogenous compounds were found to interfere with analysis. The mean AUC(0-4h), AUC(0 --> infinity), C(max), T(max) and T1/2 were 865.28 ng x h/ml, 873.04 ng x h/ml, 303.72 ng/ml, 0.75 h, and 2.95 h, respectively, for the test formulations, and 833.00 ng x h/ml, 830.97 ng x h/ml, 268.01 ng/ml, 0.78 h, and 2.83 h, respectively, for the reference formulation. Both primary target parameters AUC(0 --> infinity) and C(max) were log-transformed and tested parametrically by analysis of variance (ANOVA). 90% confidence intervals of AUC(0 --> infinity) and C(max) were 100.57%-109.56% and 105.46%-121.18%, respectively, and were in the range of acceptable limits of bioequivalence (80-125%). Based on these results, the two formulations of itopride HCl are considered to be bioequivalent.

  3. Fluoride loaded polymeric nanoparticles for dental delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Sanko; Escudero, Carlos; Sediqi, Nadia; Smistad, Gro; Hiorth, Marianne

    2017-06-15

    The overall aim of the present paper was to develop fluoride loaded nanoparticles based on the biopolymers chitosan, pectin, and alginate, for use in dental delivery. First, the preparation of nanoparticles in the presence of sodium fluoride (NaF) as the active ingredient by ionic gelation was investigated followed by an evaluation of their drug entrapment and release properties. Chitosan formed stable, spherical, and monodisperse nanoparticles in the presence of NaF and tripolyphoshate as the crosslinker, whereas alginate and pectin were not able to form any definite nanostructures in similar conditions. The fluoride loading capacity was found to be 33-113ppm, and the entrapment efficiency 3.6-6.2% for chitosan nanoparticles prepared in 0.2-0.4% (w/w) NaF, respectively. A steady increase in the fluoride release was observed for chitosan nanoparticles prepared in 0.2% NaF both in pH5 and 7 until it reached a maximum at time point 4h and maintained at this level for at least 24h. Similar profiles were observed for formulations prepared in 0.4% NaF; however the fluoride was released at a higher level at pH5. The low concentration, but continuous delivery of fluoride from the chitosan nanoparticles, with possible expedited release in acidic environment, makes these formulations highly promising as dental delivery systems in the protection against caries development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of bioactive molecules; Quantification of tricyclic pyrones from pharmacokinetic studies; Nanodelivery of siRNA; and Synthesis of viral protease inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasekara, Sahani Manjitha

    Four research projects were carried out and they are described in this dissertation. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK3?) plays a pivotal and central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and protein kinase C (PKC) controls the function of other proteins via phosphorylation and involves in tumor promotion. In pursuit of identifying novel GSK3beta and/or PKC inhibitors, substituted quinoline molecules were designed and synthesized based on the structure-activity-relationship studies. Synthesized molecules were evaluated for their neural protective activities and selected molecules were further tested for inhibitory activities on GSK3beta and PKC enzymes. Among these compounds, compound 2 was found to have better GSK3beta enzyme inhibitory and MC65 cell protection activities at low nanomolar concentrations and poor PKC inhibitory activity whereas compound 3 shows better PKC inhibitory activity. This demonstrates the potential for uses of quinoline scaffold in designing novel compounds for AD and cancer. Pharmacokinetics and distribution profiles of two anti-Alzheimer molecules, CP2 and TP70, discovered in our laboratory were assessed using HPLC/MS. Plasma samples of mice and rats fed with TP70 via different routes over various times were analyzed to quantify the amounts of TP70 in plasma of both species. Distribution profiles of TP70 in various tissues of mice were studied and results show that TP70 penetrated the blood brain barrier and accumulated in the brain tissue in significant amounts. Similarly, the amount of CP2 in plasma of mice was analyzed. The HPLC analysis revealed that both compounds have good PK profiles and bioavailability, which would make them suitable candidates for further in vivo efficacy studies. Nanodelivery of specific dsRNA for suppressing the western corn rootworm (WCR, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) genes was studied using modified chitosan or modified polyvinylpyrrolidinone (PVP) as nanocarriers. Computational

  5. Recombinant human tripeptidyl peptidase-1 infusion to the monkey CNS: Safety, pharmacokinetics, and distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuillemenot, Brian R., E-mail: bvuillemenot@bmrn.com [BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc., Novato, CA (United States); Kennedy, Derek [BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc., Novato, CA (United States); Reed, Randall P.; Boyd, Robert B. [Northern Biomedical Research, Inc., Muskegon, MI (United States); Butt, Mark T. [Tox Path Specialists, LLC, Hagerstown, MD (United States); Musson, Donald G.; Keve, Steve; Cahayag, Rhea; Tsuruda, Laurie S.; O' Neill, Charles A. [BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc., Novato, CA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    CLN2 disease is caused by deficiency in tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1), leading to neurodegeneration and death. The safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and CNS distribution of recombinant human TPP1 (rhTPP1) were characterized following a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intrathecal-lumbar (IT-L) infusion to cynomolgus monkeys. Animals received 0, 5, 14, or 20 mg rhTPP1, ICV, or 14 mg IT-L, in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) vehicle. Plasma and CSF were collected for PK analysis. Necropsies occurred at 3, 7, and 14 days post-infusion. CNS tissues were sampled for rhTPP1 distribution. TPP1 infusion was well tolerated and without effect on clinical observations or ECG. A mild increase in CSF white blood cells (WBCs) was detected transiently after ICV infusion. Isolated histological changes related to catheter placement and infusion were observed in ICV treated animals, including vehicle controls. The CSF and plasma exposure profiles were equivalent between animals that received an ICV or IT-L infusion. TPP1 levels peaked at the end of infusion, at which point the enzyme was present in plasma at 0.3% to 0.5% of CSF levels. TPP1 was detected in brain tissues with half-lives of 3–14 days. CNS distribution between ICV and IT-L administration was similar, although ICV resulted in distribution to deep brain structures including the thalamus, midbrain, and striatum. Direct CNS infusion of rhTPP1 was well tolerated with no drug related safety findings. The favorable nonclinical profile of ICV rhTPP1 supports the treatment of CLN2 by direct administration to the CNS. - Highlights: • TPP1 enzyme replacement therapy to the CNS is in development for CLN2 disease. • Toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and CNS distribution were assessed in monkeys. • TPP1 infusion directly to the brain did not result in any safety concerns. • A positive pharmacokinetic and distribution profile resulted from TPP1 infusion. • This study demonstrates the feasibility of ICV administered

  6. Recombinant human tripeptidyl peptidase-1 infusion to the monkey CNS: Safety, pharmacokinetics, and distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuillemenot, Brian R.; Kennedy, Derek; Reed, Randall P.; Boyd, Robert B.; Butt, Mark T.; Musson, Donald G.; Keve, Steve; Cahayag, Rhea; Tsuruda, Laurie S.; O'Neill, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    CLN2 disease is caused by deficiency in tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1), leading to neurodegeneration and death. The safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and CNS distribution of recombinant human TPP1 (rhTPP1) were characterized following a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intrathecal-lumbar (IT-L) infusion to cynomolgus monkeys. Animals received 0, 5, 14, or 20 mg rhTPP1, ICV, or 14 mg IT-L, in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) vehicle. Plasma and CSF were collected for PK analysis. Necropsies occurred at 3, 7, and 14 days post-infusion. CNS tissues were sampled for rhTPP1 distribution. TPP1 infusion was well tolerated and without effect on clinical observations or ECG. A mild increase in CSF white blood cells (WBCs) was detected transiently after ICV infusion. Isolated histological changes related to catheter placement and infusion were observed in ICV treated animals, including vehicle controls. The CSF and plasma exposure profiles were equivalent between animals that received an ICV or IT-L infusion. TPP1 levels peaked at the end of infusion, at which point the enzyme was present in plasma at 0.3% to 0.5% of CSF levels. TPP1 was detected in brain tissues with half-lives of 3–14 days. CNS distribution between ICV and IT-L administration was similar, although ICV resulted in distribution to deep brain structures including the thalamus, midbrain, and striatum. Direct CNS infusion of rhTPP1 was well tolerated with no drug related safety findings. The favorable nonclinical profile of ICV rhTPP1 supports the treatment of CLN2 by direct administration to the CNS. - Highlights: • TPP1 enzyme replacement therapy to the CNS is in development for CLN2 disease. • Toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and CNS distribution were assessed in monkeys. • TPP1 infusion directly to the brain did not result in any safety concerns. • A positive pharmacokinetic and distribution profile resulted from TPP1 infusion. • This study demonstrates the feasibility of ICV administered

  7. Comparison of the Pharmacokinetics of Nicotine Following Single and Ad Libitum Use of a Tobacco Heating System or Combustible Cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picavet, Patrick; Haziza, Christelle; Lama, Nicola; Weitkunat, Rolf; Lüdicke, Frank

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to compare the pharmacokinetics of nicotine between the heat-not-burn Tobacco Heating System 2.1 (THS 2.1) and combustible cigarettes (CCs). We also examined whether the subjective urge to smoke was associated with the pharmacokinetics of nicotine. This open-label, randomized, two-period, two-sequence