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Sample records for nanocrystal probe capable

  1. Light-Harvesting Organic Nanocrystals Capable of Photon Upconversion.

    Li, Li; Zeng, Yi; Yu, Tianjun; Chen, Jinping; Yang, Guoqiang; Li, Yi

    2017-11-23

    Harvesting and converting low energy photons into higher ones through upconversion have great potential in solar energy conversion. A light-harvesting nanocrystal assembled from 9,10-distyrylanthracene and palladium(II) meso-tetraphenyltetrabenzoporphyrin as the acceptor and the sensitizer, respectively effects red-to-green upconversion under incoherent excitation of low power density. An upconversion quantum yield of 0.29±0.02 % is obtained upon excitation with 640 nm laser of 120 mW cm -2 . The well-organized packing of acceptor molecules with aggregation-induced emission in the nanocrystals dramatically reduces the nonradiative decay of the excited acceptor, benefits the triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) upconversion and guides the consequent upconverted emission. This work provides a straightforward strategy to develop light-harvesting nanocrystals based on TTA upconversion, which is attractive for energy conversion and photonic applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Hyperspectral Probing of Exciton dynamics and Multiplication in PbSe Nanocrystals

    Bawendi M.G.; Strasfeld D.; Roitblat A.; Sachs H.; Gdor I.; Ruhman S.

    2013-01-01

    Height time hyperspectral near IR probing providing broad-band coverage is employed on PbSe nanocrystals, uncovering spectral evolution following high energy photo-excitation due to hot exciton relaxation and recombination. Separation of single, double and triple exciton state contributions to these spectra is demonstrated, and the mechanisms underlying the course of spectral evolution are investigated. In addition no sign of MEG was detected in this sample up to a photon energy 3.7 times tha...

  3. Surfaces of colloidal PbSe nanocrystals probed by thin-film positron annihilation spectroscopy

    L. Chai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and positron-electron momentum density (PEMD studies on multilayers of PbSe nanocrystals (NCs, supported by transmission electron microscopy, show that positrons are strongly trapped at NC surfaces, where they provide insight into the surface composition and electronic structure of PbSe NCs. Our analysis indicates abundant annihilation of positrons with Se electrons at the NC surfaces and with O electrons of the oleic ligands bound to Pb ad-atoms at the NC surfaces, which demonstrates that positrons can be used as a sensitive probe to investigate the surface physics and chemistry of nanocrystals inside multilayers. Ab initio electronic structure calculations provide detailed insight in the valence and semi-core electron contributions to the positron-electron momentum density of PbSe. Both lifetime and PEMD are found to correlate with changes in the particle morphology characteristic of partial ligand removal.

  4. Probing the exciton density of states in semiconductor nanocrystals using integrated photoluminescence spectroscopy

    Filonovich, S A; Vasilevskiy, M I; Rolo, A G; Gomes, M J M; Artemiev, M V; Talapin, D V; Rogach, A L

    2002-01-01

    We present the results of a comparative analysis of the absorption and photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra vs. integrated photoluminescence (IPL) measured as a function of the excitation wavelength for a number of samples containing II-VI semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) produced by different techniques. The structure of the absorption and PL spectra due to excitons confined in NCs and difficulties with the correct interpretation of the transmittance and PLE results are discussed. It is shown that, compared to the conventional PLE, the IPL intensity plotted against the excitation wavelength (IPLE spectra) reproduce better the structure of the absorption spectra. Therefore, IPLE spectroscopy can be successfully used for probing the quantized electron-hole (e-h) transitions in semiconductor nanocrystals. (author)

  5. Hyperspectral Probing of Exciton dynamics and Multiplication in PbSe Nanocrystals

    Gdor, I.; Sachs, H.; Roitblat, A.; Strasfeld, D.; Bawendi, M. G.; Ruhman, S.

    2013-03-01

    Height time hyperspectral near IR probing providing broad-band coverage is employed on PbSe nanocrystals, uncovering spectral evolution following high energy photo-excitation due to hot exciton relaxation and recombination. Separation of single, double and triple exciton state contributions to these spectra is demonstrated, and the mechanisms underlying the course of spectral evolution are investigated. In addition no sign of MEG was detected in this sample up to a photon energy 3.7 times that of the band gap.

  6. Hyperspectral Probing of Exciton dynamics and Multiplication in PbSe Nanocrystals

    Bawendi M.G.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Height time hyperspectral near IR probing providing broad-band coverage is employed on PbSe nanocrystals, uncovering spectral evolution following high energy photo-excitation due to hot exciton relaxation and recombination. Separation of single, double and triple exciton state contributions to these spectra is demonstrated, and the mechanisms underlying the course of spectral evolution are investigated. In addition no sign of MEG was detected in this sample up to a photon energy 3.7 times that of the band gap.

  7. Analytical capabilities of laser-probe mass spectrometry

    Kovalev, I.D.; Madsimov, G.A.; Suchkov, A.I.; Larin, N.V.

    1978-01-01

    The physical bases and quantitative analytical procedures of laser-probe mass spectrometry are considered in this review. A comparison is made of the capabilities of static and dynamic mass spectrometers. Techniques are studied for improving the analytical characteristics of laser-probe mass spectrometers. The advantages, for quantitative analysis, of the Q-switched mode over the normal pulse mode for lasers are: (a) the possibility of analysing metals, semiconductors and insulators without the use of standards; and (b) the possibility of layer-by-layer and local analysis. (Auth.)

  8. Y2O3: Eu,Zn nanocrystals as a fluorescent probe for the detection of biotin

    Ganjkhanlou, Y.; Hosseinnia, A.; Kazemzad, M.; Khanlarkhani, A.; Moghaddam, A.B.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the application of nanocrystals (NCs) of the type Y 2 O 3 : Eu,Zn as a probe for the fluorescent detection of biotin in aqueous solution. The NCs were dispersed in water in the presence of various surface modifiers including mercaptoethanol (ME), monoethanolamine and ethylene glycol. Both the absorbance of surfactant and the stability of the suspensions were investigated in order to optimize the experimental conditions. ME is found to be the most suitable surfactant for stabilization of the suspended NCs. Their photoluminescence intensity is found to be quenched by biotin. The Stern-Volmer constant for the quenching process is 7.6 x 10 3 M -1 . This NC probe can be applied to the detection of biotin in the 1-60 μM concentration range with detection limit of 1.89 μM. The possible mechanisms of quenching also are discussed. (author)

  9. Probing the formation of silicon nano-crystals (Si-ncs) using variable energy positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Knights, A. P.; Bradley, J. D. B.; Hulko, O.; Stevanovic, D. V.; Edwards, C. J.; Kallis, A.; Coleman, P. G.; Crowe, I. F.; Halsall, M. P.; Gwilliam, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    We describe preliminary results from studies of the formation of silicon nano-crystals (Si-ncs) embedded in stoichiometric, thermally grown SiO2 using Variable Energy Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (VEPAS). We show that the VEPAS technique is able to monitor the introduction of structural damage. In SiO2 through the high dose Si+ ion implantation required to introduce excess silicon as a precursor to Si-nc formation. VEPAS is also able to characterize the rate of the removal of this damage with high temperature annealing, showing strong correlation with photoluminescence. Finally, VEPAS is shown to be able to selectively probe the interface between Si-ncs and the host oxide. Introduction of hydrogen at these interfaces suppresses the trapping of positrons at the interfaces.

  10. Comparison of attraction capabilities associated with high-speed, dual-pneumatic vitrectomy probes.

    Dugel, Pravin U; Abulon, Dina J K; Dimalanta, Ramon

    2015-05-01

    To measure membrane attraction capabilities of enhanced 27-gauge, enhanced 25-gauge, and 23-gauge vitrectomy probes under various parameters. A membrane-on-cantilever apparatus was used to measure membrane attraction for enhanced 27-, enhanced 25-, and 23-gauge UltraVit probes (n = 6 for each). The following parameters were evaluated: effects of cut rates and duty cycles on membrane attraction distances, and flow rates and vacuum levels required to attract a membrane at a fixed distance. The enhanced 27-gauge probe had the shortest attraction distance across all cutting speeds and duty cycles. To attract a membrane at a fixed distance, increasing vacuum was necessary with higher cutting rates and smaller probe gauges but flow rate remained relatively constant. The biased open duty cycle was associated with a longer attraction distance than 50/50 or biased closed modes. The shorter membrane attraction distance of the enhanced 27-gauge probe versus 23-gauge and enhanced 25-gauge probes may permit greater membrane dissection precision while providing improved access to small tissue planes. Equivalent fluid flow capabilities of the 27-gauge probe compared with the 23-gauge and 25-gauge probes may provide efficient aspiration. Surgeon selection of duty cycle modes may improve intraoperative fluid control and expand the cutter utility as a multifunctional tool.

  11. Exploring exciton relaxation and multiexciton generation in PbSe nanocrystals using hyperspectral near-IR probing.

    Gdor, Itay; Sachs, Hanan; Roitblat, Avishy; Strasfeld, David B; Bawendi, Moungi G; Ruhman, Sanford

    2012-04-24

    Hyperspectral femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy is employed to record exciton relaxation and recombination in colloidal lead selenide (PbSe) nanocrystals in unprecedented detail. Results obtained with different pump wavelengths and fluences are scrutinized with regard to three issues: (1) early subpicosecond spectral features due to "hot" excitons are analyzed in terms of suggested underlying mechanisms; (2) global kinetic analysis facilitates separation of the transient difference spectra into single, double, and triple exciton state contributions, from which individual band assignments can be tested; and (3) the transient spectra are screened for signatures of multiexciton generation (MEG) by comparing experiments with excitation pulses both below and well above the theoretical threshold for multiplication. For the latter, a recently devised ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopic approach is employed. Scaling sample concentrations and pump pulse intensities inversely with the extinction coefficient at each excitation wavelength overcomes ambiguities due to direct multiphoton excitation, uncertainties of absolute absorption cross sections, and low signal levels. As observed in a recent application of this method to InAs core/shell/shell nanodots, no sign of MEG was detected in this sample up to photon energy 3.7 times the band gap. Accordingly, numerous reports of efficient MEG in other samples of PbSe suggest that the efficiency of this process varies from sample to sample and depends on factors yet to be determined.

  12. Evidence of localized amorphous silicon clustering from Raman depth-probing of silicon nanocrystals in fused silica

    Barba, D; Martin, F; Ross, G G

    2008-01-01

    Silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc) and amorphous silicon (α-Si) produced by silicon implantation in fused silica have been studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy. Information regarding the Raman signature of the α-Si phonon excitation was extracted from Raman depth-probing measurements using the phenomenological phonon confinement model. The spectral deconvolution of the Raman measurements recorded at different laser focusing depths takes into account both the Si-nc size variation and the Si-nc spatial distribution within the sample. The phonon peak associated with α-Si around 470 cm -1 is greatest for in-sample laser focusing, indicating that the formation of amorphous silicon is more important in the region containing a high concentration of silicon excess, where large Si-nc are located. As also observed for Si-nc systems prepared by SiO x layer deposition, this result demonstrates the presence of α-Si in high excess Si implanted Si-nc systems

  13. Cellulose nanocrystal submonolayers by spin coating

    Kontturi, E.J.; Johansson, L.S.; Kontturi, K.S.; Ahonen, P.; Thune, P.C.; Laine, J.

    2007-01-01

    Dilute concentrations of cellulose nanocrystal solutions were spin coated onto different substrates to investigate the effect of the substrate on the nanocrystal submonolayers. Three substrates were probed: silica, titania, and amorphous cellulose. According to atomic force microscopy (AFM) images,

  14. Probing surface states in PbS nanocrystal films using pentacene field effect transistors: controlling carrier concentration and charge transport in pentacene.

    Park, Byoungnam; Whitham, Kevin; Bian, Kaifu; Lim, Yee-Fun; Hanrath, Tobias

    2014-12-21

    We used a bilayer field effect transistor (FET) consisting of a thin PbS nanocrystals (NCs) film interfaced with vacuum-deposited pentacene to probe trap states in NCs. We interpret the observed threshold voltage shift in context of charge carrier trapping by PbS NCs and relate the magnitude of the threshold voltage shift to the number of trapped carriers. We explored a series of NC surface ligands to modify the interface between PbS NCs and pentacene and demonstrate the impact of interface chemistry on charge carrier density and the FET mobility in a pentacene FET.

  15. Proving the capabilities of the phased-array probe/ALOK inspection technique

    Bohn, H.; Kroening, M.; Rathgeb, W.; Gebhardt, W.; Kappes, W.; Barbian, O.A.

    1987-01-01

    The capability of the ALOK phased-probe-array inspection technique results from the simplicity of the testing system structure, the reflector detection and identification by means of transit time curves, and the analytical capacity of the system. Testing times are shortened, with the test results meeting the current standards, and further possibilities being given: Areas that could so far only be inspected with difficulty of not at all, can be examined, thanks to the compact equipment and without having to modify the system, very informative analysis measurements for interpreting indications can be made. Furthermore, it may be expected from the testing practice that descriptions of indications will become more reliable and reproducible, due to transit time curve identification. In addition to conventional criteria for reflector evaluation, the potential of transit time curve identification, and flaw boundary imaging of the reconstruction image can be utilized. (orig.)

  16. Superimposed noninterfering probes to extend the capabilities of phase Doppler anemometry.

    Onofri, Fabrice; Lenoble, Anne; Radev, Stefan

    2002-06-20

    We propose using multiple superimposed noninterfering probes (SNIPs) of the same wavelength but different beam angles to extend the capabilities of phase Doppler anemometry. When a particle is moving in a SNIP the Doppler signals that are produced exhibit multiple Doppler frequencies and phase shifts. The resolution of the measurements of particle size (i.e., by fringe spacing and Doppler frequency) increases with beam angle. Then, with the solution proposed, even with only two detectors several measurements of size can be obtained for the same particle with increasing resolution if we consider higher frequencies in the signal. Several optical solutions to produce SNIPs as well as a signal-processing algorithm to treat the multiple-frequency Doppler signals are proposed. Experimental validations of the sizing of spherical and cylindrical particles demonstrate the applicability of this technique for particle measurement. We believe that this new technique can be of great interest when high resolution of size, velocity, and even refractive index is required.

  17. The Role of Shape on Electronic Structure and Charge Transport in Faceted PbSe Nanocrystals

    Kaushik, Ananth P.; Lukose, Binit; Clancy, Paulette

    2014-01-01

    We have determined the effect of shape on the charge transport characteristics of nanocrystals. Our study looked at the explicit determination of the electronic properties of faceted nanocrystals that essentially probe the limit of current

  18. X-Ray Emission Spectrometer Design with Single-Shot Pump-Probe and Resonant Excitation Capabilities

    Spoth, Katherine; /SUNY, Buffalo /SLAC

    2012-08-28

    Core-level spectroscopy in the soft X-ray regime is a powerful tool for the study of chemical bonding processes. The ultrafast, ultrabright X-ray pulses generated by the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) allow these reactions to be studied in greater detail than ever before. In this study, we investigated a conceptual design of a spectrometer for the LCLS with imaging in the non-dispersive direction. This would allow single-shot collection of X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) measurements with varying laser pump X-ray probe delay or a variation of incoming X-ray energy over the illuminated area of the sample. Ray-tracing simulations were used to demonstrate how the components of the spectrometer affect its performance, allowing a determination of the optimal final design. These simulations showed that the spectrometer's non-dispersive focusing is extremely sensitive to the size of the sample footprint; the spectrometer is not able to image a footprint width larger than one millimeter with the required resolution. This is compatible with a single shot scheme that maps out the laser pump X-ray probe delay in the non-dispersive direction as well as resonant XES applications at normal incidence. However, the current capabilities of the Soft X-Ray (SXR) beamline at the LCLS do not produce the required energy range in a small enough sample footprint, hindering the single shot resonant XES application at SXR for chemical dynamics studies at surfaces. If an upgraded or future beamline at LCLS is developed with lower monochromator energy dispersion the width can be made small enough at the required energy range to be imaged by this spectrometer design.

  19. Second- and third-harmonic generation as a local probe for nanocrystal-doped polymer materials with a suppressed optical breakdown threshold

    Konorov, S. O.; Fedotov, A. B.; Ivanov, A. A.; Alfimov, M. V.; Zabotnov, S. V.; Naumov, A. N.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Podshivalov, A. A.; Petrov, A. N.; Fornarini, L.; Carpanese, M.; Ferrante, G.; Fantoni, R.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2003-09-01

    Second- and third-harmonic generation processes are shown to allow the detection of absorptive agglomerates of nanocrystals in transparent materials and the visualization of optical breakdown in nanocomposite materials. Correlations between laser-induced breakdown and the behavior of the second- and third-harmonic signals produced in SiC/PMMA nanocomposite films are studied. The potential of second- and third-harmonic generation for the on-line visualization of laser breakdown in nanocomposite polymer materials is revealed, with the ablative material removal being monitored by the decay of the second- and third-harmonic signals. The second and third harmonics generated around the optical breakdown threshold by 75-fs pulses of 1.25-μm Cr:forsterite laser radiation are respectively more than two and four orders of magnitude more intense than the second and third harmonics produced under identical conditions by 40-ps pulses of a Nd:YAG laser. The breakdown threshold for PMMA films doped with 10-20-nm SiC nanocrystals forming absorptive agglomerates are demonstrated to be more than an order of magnitude lower than the breakdown threshold for crystalline SiC and about an order of magnitude lower than that for nondoped PMMA films.

  20. Aneris: Devlopment of an intelligent oceanographic probe with high resolution autonomous sampling and col·lecting capabilities

    Cano, V.; Pujol, N.; Piera Fernández, Jaume; Torrecilla Ribalta, Elena; Aymerich, I.F.

    2010-01-01

    ANERIS is a multidisciplinary project focused on the design and development of a innovative sampling and collecting sonde. The probe design pretend to minimize actual sea water collecting devices limitations by providing autonomy and intelligence to the system. Peer Reviewed

  1. Probing the structure of CuInS{sub 2}-ZnS core-shell and similar nanocrystals by Raman spectroscopy

    Dzhagan, Volodymyr, E-mail: dzhagan@isp.kiev.ua [Semiconductor Physics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany); V. E. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductors Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv 03028 (Ukraine); Kempken, Björn [Energy and Semiconductor Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, 26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Valakh, Mykhailo [V. E. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductors Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv 03028 (Ukraine); Parisi, Jürgen; Kolny-Olesiak, Joanna [Energy and Semiconductor Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, 26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Zahn, Dietrich R.T. [Semiconductor Physics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    CuInS{sub 2}/ZnS core-shell and alloyed nanocrystals (NCs) are promising candidates for applications in biolabeling, photocatalysis, solar energy conversion, and light emitting diodes. The growth mechanism and subsequent internal structure of such heterogeneous NCs are therefore of crucial importance, as it strongly affects their optical and electronic properties. Here, we investigated using resonant Raman spectroscopy the structure of CuInS{sub 2}/ZnS and Cu-Zn-In-S/ZnS core-shell NCs, as well as the evolution of Cu{sub 2−x}S NCs into CuInS{sub 2}via the heterogeneous Cu{sub 2−x}S/CuInS{sub 2} phase. We demonstrate that the particular phases can be distinguished based on their characteristic Raman modes and tuning the exciting laser energy into resonance with the bandgap of the particular phase.

  2. Nanocrystal quantum dots

    Klimov, Victor I

    2010-01-01

    ""Soft"" Chemical Synthesis and Manipulation of Semiconductor Nanocrystals, J.A. Hollingsworth and V.I. Klimov Electronic Structure in Semiconductor Nanocrystals: Optical Experiment, D.J. NorrisFine Structure and Polarization Properties of Band-Edge Excitons in Semiconductor Nanocrystals, A.L. EfrosIntraband Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Colloidal Semiconductor Quantum Dots, P. Guyot-Sionnest, M. Shim, and C. WangMultiexciton Phenomena in Semiconductor Nanocrystals, V.I. KlimovOptical Dynamics in Single Semiconductor Quantum Do

  3. Fabrication and electronic transport studies of single nanocrystal systems

    Klein, David Louis [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-05-01

    Semiconductor and metallic nanocrystals exhibit interesting electronic transport behavior as a result of electrostatic and quantum mechanical confinement effects. These effects can be studied to learn about the nature of electronic states in these systems. This thesis describes several techniques for the electronic study of nanocrystals. The primary focus is the development of novel methods to attach leads to prefabricated nanocrystals. This is because, while nanocrystals can be readily synthesized from a variety of materials with excellent size control, means to make electrical contact to these nanocrystals are limited. The first approach that will be described uses scanning probe microscopy to first image and then electrically probe surfaces. It is found that electronic investigations of nanocrystals by this technique are complicated by tip-sample interactions and environmental factors such as salvation and capillary forces. Next, an atomic force microscope technique for the catalytic patterning of the surface of a self assembled monolayer is described. In principle, this nano-fabrication technique can be used to create electronic devices which are based upon complex arrangements of nanocrystals. Finally, the fabrication and electrical characterization of a nanocrystal-based single electron transistor is presented. This device is fabricated using a hybrid scheme which combines electron beam lithography and wet chemistry to bind single nanocrystals in tunneling contact between closely spaced metallic leads. In these devices, both Au and CdSe nanocrystals show Coulomb blockade effects with characteristic energies of several tens of meV. Additional structure is seen the transport behavior of CdSe nanocrystals as a result of its electronic structure.

  4. Nanocrystal Bioassembly: Asymmetry, Proximity, and Enzymatic Manipulation

    Claridge, Shelley A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Research at the interface between biomolecules and inorganic nanocrystals has resulted in a great number of new discoveries. In part this arises from the synergistic duality of the system: biomolecules may act as self-assembly agents for organizing inorganic nanocrystals into functional materials; alternatively, nanocrystals may act as microscopic or spectroscopic labels for elucidating the behavior of complex biomolecular systems. However, success in either of these functions relies heavily uponthe ability to control the conjugation and assembly processes.In the work presented here, we first design a branched DNA scaffold which allows hybridization of DNA-nanocrystal monoconjugates to form discrete assemblies. Importantly, the asymmetry of the branched scaffold allows the formation of asymmetric2assemblies of nanocrystals. In the context of a self-assembled device, this can be considered a step toward the ability to engineer functionally distinct inputs and outputs.Next we develop an anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography purification method which allows large gold nanocrystals attached to single strands of very short DNA to be purified. When two such complementary conjugates are hybridized, the large nanocrystals are brought into close proximity, allowing their plasmon resonances to couple. Such plasmon-coupled constructs are of interest both as optical interconnects for nanoscale devices and as `plasmon ruler? biomolecular probes.We then present an enzymatic ligation strategy for creating multi-nanoparticle building blocks for self-assembly. In constructing a nanoscale device, such a strategy would allow pre-assembly and purification of components; these constructs can also act as multi-label probes of single-stranded DNA conformational dynamics. Finally we demonstrate a simple proof-of-concept of a nanoparticle analog of the polymerase chain reaction.

  5. Developing New Nanoprobes from Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    Fu, Aihua [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots havegarnered the spotlight as an important new class of biological labelingtool. Withoptical properties superior to conventional organicfluorophores from many aspects, such as high photostability andmultiplexing capability, quantum dots have been applied in a variety ofadvanced imaging applications. This dissertation research goes along withlarge amount of research efforts in this field, while focusing on thedesign and development of new nanoprobes from semiconductor nanocrystalsthat are aimed for useful imaging or sensing applications not possiblewith quantum dots alone. Specifically speaking, two strategies have beenapplied. In one, we have taken advantage of the increasing capability ofmanipulating the shape of semiconductor nanocrystals by developingsemiconductor quantum rods as fluorescent biological labels. In theother, we have assembled quantum dots and gold nanocrystals into discretenanostructures using DNA. The background information and synthesis,surface manipulation, property characterization and applications of thesenew nanoprobes in a few biological experiments are detailed in thedissertation.

  6. Influence of multi-hit capability on quantitative measurement of NiPtSi thin film with laser-assisted atom probe tomography

    Kinno, T.; Akutsu, H.; Tomita, M.; Kawanaka, S.; Sonehara, T.; Hokazono, A.; Renaud, L.; Martin, I.; Benbalagh, R.; Sallé, B.; Takeno, S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Laser-assisted atom probe tomography was applied to NiPtSi films on Si substrates. ► Comparison of depth profiles of single-hit events and those of multi-hit events. ► ∼80% of Pt atoms were detected in multi-hit events. ► Multiple-ion detection is important for Laser-assisted atom probe tomography. - Abstract: Laser-assisted atom probe tomography (LA-APT) was applied to NiPtSi (0, 30, and 50% Pt contents) thin films on Si substrates. Consistent results with those of high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (HR-RBS) were obtained. Based on the obtained data sets, the composition profiles from only the signals of single-hit events, meaning detection of one ion by one laser pulse, were compiled. The profiles from only the signals of multi-hit events, meaning detection of multiple ions by one laser pulse, were also compiled. There were large discrepancies with respect to Ni and Pt concentrations among the compiled profiles and the original profiles including the signals of both types of detection events. Additionally, the profiles compiled from single-hit events showed that Si concentration in NiPtSi layer became smaller toward the surface, differing from the original profiles and the multi-hit profiles. These results suggest that capability of simultaneous multiple-ion detection is important for appropriate LA-APT analyses.

  7. X-ray and photoelectron spectroscopy of the structure, reactivity, and electronic structure of semiconductor nanocrystals

    Hamad, Kimberly Sue [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals are a system which has been the focus of interest due to their size dependent properties and their possible use in technological applications. Many chemical and physical properties vary systematically with the size of the nanocrystal and thus their study enables the investigation of scaling laws. Due to the increasing surface to volume ratio as size is decreased, the surfaces of nanocrystals are expected to have a large influence on their electronic, thermodynamic, and chemical behavior. In spite of their importance, nanocrystal surfaces are still relatively uncharacterized in terms of their structure, electronic properties, bonding, and reactivity. Investigation of nanocrystal surfaces is currently limited by what techniques to use, and which methods are suitable for nanocrystals is still being determined. This work presents experiments using x-ray and electronic spectroscopies to explore the structure, reactivity, and electronic properties of semiconductor (CdSe, InAs) nanocrystals and how they vary with size. Specifically, x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with multiple scattering simulations affords information about the structural disorder present at the surface of the nanocrystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) probe the electronic structure in terms of hole screening, and also give information about band lineups when the nanocrystal is placed in electric contact with a substrate. XPS of the core levels of the nanocrystal as a function of photo-oxidation time yields kinetic data on the oxidation reaction occurring at the surface of the nanocrystal.

  8. Controlled synthesis of bright and compatible lanthanide-doped upconverting nanocrystals

    Cohen, Bruce E.; Ostrowski, Alexis D.; Chan, Emory M.; Gargas, Daniel J.; Katz, Elan M.; Schuck, P. James; Milliron, Delia J.

    2017-01-31

    Certain nanocrystals possess exceptional optical properties that may make them valuable probes for biological imaging, but rendering these nanoparticles biocompatible requires that they be small enough not to perturb cellular systems. This invention describes a phosphorescent upconverting sub-10 nm nanoparticle comprising a lanthanide-doped hexagonal .beta.-phase NaYF.sub.4 nanocrystal and methods for making the same.

  9. Bi-photon imaging and diagnostics using ultra-small diagnostic probes engineered from semiconductor nanocrystals and single-domain antibodies

    Hafian, Hilal; Sukhanova, Alyona; Chames, Patrick; Baty, Daniel; Pluot, Michel; Cohen, Jacques H. M.; Nabiev, Igor R.; Millot, Jean-Marc

    2012-10-01

    Semiconductor fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) have just demonstrated their numerous advantages over organic dyes in bioimaging and diagnostics. One of characteristics of QDs is a very large cross section of their twophoton absorption. A common approach to biodetection by means of QDs is to use monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for targeting. Recently, we have engineered ultrasmall diagnostic nanoprobes (sdAb-QD) based on highly oriented conjugates of QDs with the single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) against cancer biomarkers. With a molecular weight of only 13 kDa (12-fold smaller than full-size mAbs) and extreme stability and capacity to refolding, sdAbs are the smallest functional Ab fragments capable of binding antigens with affinities comparable to those of conventional Abs. Ultrasmall diagnostic sdAb-QD nanoprobes were engineered through oriented conjugation of QDs with sdAbs. This study is the first to demonstrate the possibility of immunohistochemical imaging of colon carcinoma biomarkers with sdAb-QD conjugates by means of two-photon excitation. The optimal excitation conditions for imaging of the markers in clinical samples with sdAb-QD nanoprobes have been determined. The absence of sample autofluorescence significantly improves the sensitivity of biomarker detection with the use of the two-photon excitation diagnostic setup.

  10. Simultaneous control of nanocrystal size and nanocrystal ...

    applications such as a photo-sensor [11]. Thus, it is desirable to have, not only a control on the size of the nanocrystals, but also an independent tunability of the ... 1-thioglycerol) in 25 ml methanol under inert atmosphere. 10 ml of 0.2 M sodium sulfide solution is then added to the reaction mixture dropwise and the reaction.

  11. Design of a scanning probe microscope with advanced sample treatment capabilities: An atomic force microscope combined with a miniaturized inductively coupled plasma source

    Hund, Markus; Herold, Hans

    2007-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of an atomic force microscope (AFM) combined with a miniaturized inductively coupled plasma source working at a radio frequency of 27.12 MHz. State-of-the-art scanning probe microscopes (SPMs) have limited in situ sample treatment capabilities. Aggressive treatments such as plasma etching or harsh treatments such as etching in aggressive liquids typically require the removal of the sample from the microscope. Consequently, time consuming procedures are required if the same sample spot has to be imaged after successive processing steps. We have developed a first prototype of a SPM which features a quasi in situ sample treatment using a modified commercial atomic force microscope. A sample holder is positioned in a special reactor chamber; the AFM tip can be retracted by several millimeters so that the chamber can be closed for a treatment procedure. Most importantly, after the treatment, the tip is moved back to the sample with a lateral drift per process step in the 20 nm regime. The performance of the prototype is characterized by consecutive plasma etching of a nanostructured polymer film

  12. Nanocrystals Technology for Pharmaceutical Science.

    Cheng, Zhongyao; Lian, Yumei; Kamal, Zul; Ma, Xin; Chen, Jianjun; Zhou, Xinbo; Su, Jing; Qiu, Mingfeng

    2018-05-17

    Nanocrystals technology is a promising method for improving the dissolution rate and enhancing the bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. In recent years, it has been developing rapidly and applied to drug research and engineering. Nanocrystal drugs can be formulated into various dosage forms. This review mainly focused on the nanocrystals technology and its application in pharmaceutical science. Firstly, different preparation methods of nanocrystal technology and the characterization of nanocrystal drugs are briefly described. Secondly, the application of nanocrystals technology in pharmaceutical science is mainly discussed followed by the introduction of sustained release formulations. Then, the scaling up process, marketed nanocrystal drug products and regulatory aspects about nanodrugs are summarized. Finally, the specific challenges and opportunities of nanocrystals technology for pharmaceutical science are summarized and discussed. This review will provide a comprehensive guide for scientists and engineers in the field of pharmaceutical science and biochemical engineering. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. How Structure-Directing Agents Control Nanocrystal Shape: Polyvinylpyrrolidone-Mediated Growth of Ag Nanocubes.

    Qi, Xin; Balankura, Tonnam; Zhou, Ya; Fichthorn, Kristen A

    2015-11-11

    The importance of structure-directing agents (SDAs) in the shape-selective synthesis of colloidal nanostructures has been well documented. However, the mechanisms by which SDAs actuate shape control are poorly understood. In the polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-mediated growth of {100}-faceted Ag nanocrystals, this capability has been attributed to preferential binding of PVP to Ag(100). We use molecular dynamics simulations to probe the mechanisms by which Ag atoms add to Ag(100) and Ag(111) in ethylene glycol solution with PVP. We find that PVP induces kinetic Ag nanocrystal shapes by regulating the relative Ag fluxes to these facets. Stronger PVP binding to Ag(100) leads to a larger Ag flux to Ag(111) and cubic nanostructures through two mechanisms: enhanced Ag trapping by more extended PVP films on Ag(111) and a reduced free-energy barrier for Ag to cross lower-density films on Ag(111). These flux-regulating capabilities depend on PVP concentration and chain length, consistent with experiment.

  14. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    Gur, Ilan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation presents the results of a research agenda aimed at improving integration and stability in nanocrystal-based solar cells through advances in active materials and device architectures. The introduction of 3-dimensional nanocrystals illustrates the potential for improving transport and percolation in hybrid solar cells and enables novel fabrication methods for optimizing integration in these systems. Fabricating cells by sequential deposition allows for solution-based assembly of hybrid composites with controlled and well-characterized dispersion and electrode contact. Hyperbranched nanocrystals emerge as a nearly ideal building block for hybrid cells, allowing the controlled morphologies targeted by templated approaches to be achieved in an easily fabricated solution-cast device. In addition to offering practical benefits to device processing, these approaches offer fundamental insight into the operation of hybrid solar cells, shedding light on key phenomena such as the roles of electrode-contact and percolation behavior in these cells. Finally, all-inorganic nanocrystal solar cells are presented as a wholly new cell concept, illustrating that donor-acceptor charge transfer and directed carrier diffusion can be utilized in a system with no organic components, and that nanocrystals may act as building blocks for efficient, stable, and low-cost thin-film solar cells.

  15. Flame synthesis of zinc oxide nanocrystals

    Merchan-Merchan, Wilson, E-mail: wmerchan-merchan@ou.edu [School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Farahani, Moien Farmahini [School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report a single-step flame method for the synthesis of Zn oxide nanocrystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diverse flame positions lead to a variation of Zn oxide nanocrystal growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The synthesized crystals have polyhedral, pipet- and needle-like shape. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High length-to-diameter aspect-ratio crystals appear in a higher temperature flame. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal growth mechanism corresponds to vapor-to-solid conversion. - Abstract: Distinctive zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals were synthesized on the surface of Zn probes using a counter-flow flame medium formed by methane/acetylene and oxygen-enriched air streams. The source material, a zinc wire with a purity of {approx}99.99% and diameter of 1 mm, was introduced through a sleeve into the oxygen rich region of the flame. The position of the probe/sleeve was varied within the flame medium resulting in growth variation of ZnO nanocrystals on the surface of the probe. The shape and structural parameters of the grown crystals strongly depend on the flame position. Structural variations of the synthesized crystals include single-crystalline ZnO nanorods and microprisms (ZMPs) (the ZMPs have less than a few micrometers in length and several hundred nanometers in cross section) with a large number of facets and complex axial symmetry with a nanorod protruding from their tips. The protruding rods are less than 100 nm in diameter and lengths are less than 1 {mu}m. The protruding nanorods can be elongated several times by increasing the residence time of the probe/sleeve inside the oxygen-rich flame or by varying the flame position. At different flame heights, nanorods having higher length-to-diameter aspect-ratio can be synthesized. A lattice spacing of {approx}0.26 nm was measured for the synthesized nanorods, which can be closely correlated with the (0 0 2) interplanar spacing of hexagonal ZnO (Wurtzite) cells

  16. Sorting fluorescent nanocrystals with DNA

    Gerion, Daniele; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Williams, Shara C.; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2001-12-10

    Semiconductor nanocrystals with narrow and tunable fluorescence are covalently linked to oligonucleotides. These biocompounds retain the properties of both nanocrystals and DNA. Therefore, different sequences of DNA can be coded with nanocrystals and still preserve their ability to hybridize to their complements. We report the case where four different sequences of DNA are linked to four nanocrystal samples having different colors of emission in the range of 530-640 nm. When the DNA-nanocrystal conjugates are mixed together, it is possible to sort each type of nanoparticle using hybridization on a defined micrometer -size surface containing the complementary oligonucleotide. Detection of sorting requires only a single excitation source and an epifluorescence microscope. The possibility of directing fluorescent nanocrystals towards specific biological targets and detecting them, combined with their superior photo-stability compared to organic dyes, opens the way to improved biolabeling experiments, such as gene mapping on a nanometer scale or multicolor microarray analysis.

  17. Time-resolved energy transfer from single chloride-terminated nanocrystals to graphene

    Ajayi, O. A.; Wong, C. W.; Anderson, N. C.; Wolcott, A.; Owen, J. S.; Cotlet, M.; Petrone, N.; Hone, J.; Gu, T.; Gesuele, F.

    2014-01-01

    We examine the time-resolved resonance energy transfer of excitons from single n-butyl amine-bound, chloride-terminated nanocrystals to two-dimensional graphene through time-correlated single photon counting. The radiative biexponential lifetime kinetics and blinking statistics of the individual surface-modified nanocrystal elucidate the non-radiative decay channels. Blinking modification as well as a 4× reduction in spontaneous emission were observed with the short chloride and n-butylamine ligands, probing the energy transfer pathways for the development of graphene-nanocrystal nanophotonic devices

  18. The infra-red photoresponse of erbium-doped silicon nanocrystals

    Kenyon, A.J.; Bhamber, S.S.; Pitt, C.W.

    2003-01-01

    We have exploited the interaction between erbium ions and silicon nanoclusters to probe the photoresponse of erbium-doped silicon nanocrystals in the spectral region around 1.5 μm. We have produced an MOS device in which the oxide layer has been implanted with both erbium and silicon and annealed to produce silicon nanocrystals. Upon illumination with a 1480 nm laser diode, interaction between the nanocrystals and the rare-earth ions results in a modification of the conductivity of the oxide that enables a current to flow when a voltage is applied across the oxide layer

  19. Time-resolved energy transfer from single chloride-terminated nanocrystals to graphene

    Ajayi, O. A., E-mail: oaa2114@columbia.edu, E-mail: cww2104@columbia.edu; Wong, C. W., E-mail: oaa2114@columbia.edu, E-mail: cww2104@columbia.edu [Optical Nanostructures Laboratory, Center for Integrated Science and Engineering, Solid-State Science and Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Anderson, N. C.; Wolcott, A.; Owen, J. S. [Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Cotlet, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York, New York 11973 (United States); Petrone, N.; Hone, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Gu, T.; Gesuele, F. [Optical Nanostructures Laboratory, Center for Integrated Science and Engineering, Solid-State Science and Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2014-04-28

    We examine the time-resolved resonance energy transfer of excitons from single n-butyl amine-bound, chloride-terminated nanocrystals to two-dimensional graphene through time-correlated single photon counting. The radiative biexponential lifetime kinetics and blinking statistics of the individual surface-modified nanocrystal elucidate the non-radiative decay channels. Blinking modification as well as a 4× reduction in spontaneous emission were observed with the short chloride and n-butylamine ligands, probing the energy transfer pathways for the development of graphene-nanocrystal nanophotonic devices.

  20. Patterning nanocrystals using DNA

    Williams, Shara Carol [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    One of the goals of nanotechnology is to enable programmed self-assembly of patterns made of various materials with nanometer-sized control. This dissertation describes the results of experiments templating arrangements of gold and semiconductor nanocrystals using 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Previously, simple DNA-templated linear arrangements of two and three nanocrystals structures have been made.[1] Here, we have sought to assemble larger and more complex nanostructures. Gold-DNA conjugates with 50 to 100 bases self-assembled into planned arrangements using strands of DNA containing complementary base sequences. We used two methods to increase the complexity of the arrangements: using branched synthetic doublers within the DNA covalent backbone to create discrete nanocrystal groupings, and incorporating the nanocrystals into a previously developed DNA lattice structure [2][3] that self-assembles from tiles made of DNA double-crossover molecules to create ordered nanoparticle arrays. In the first project, the introduction of a covalently-branched synthetic doubler reagent into the backbone of DNA strands created a branched DNA ''trimer.'' This DNA trimer templated various structures that contained groupings of three and four gold nanoparticles, giving promising, but inconclusive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. Due to the presence of a variety of possible structures in the reaction mixtures, and due to the difficulty of isolating the desired structures, the TEM and gel electrophoresis results for larger structures having four particles, and for structures containing both 5 and 10 nm gold nanoparticles were inconclusive. Better results may come from using optical detection methods, or from improved sample preparation. In the second project, we worked toward making two-dimensional ordered arrays of nanocrystals. We replicated and improved upon previous results for making DNA lattices, increasing the size of the lattices

  1. Photoemission studies of semiconductor nanocrystals

    Hamad, K.S.; Roth, R.; Alivisatos, A.P.

    1997-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals have been the focus of much attention in the last ten years due predominantly to their size dependent optical properties. Namely, the band gap of nanocrystals exhibits a shift to higher energy with decreasing size due to quantum confinement effects. Research in this field has employed primarily optical techniques to study nanocrystals, and in this respect this system has been investigated extensively. In addition, one is able to synthesize monodisperse, crystalline particles of CdS, CdSe, Si, InP, InAs, as well as CdS/HgS/CdS and CdSe/CdS composites. However, optical spectroscopies have proven ambiguous in determining the degree to which electronic excitations are interior or surface admixtures or giving a complete picture of the density of states. Photoemission is a useful technique for understanding the electronic structure of nanocrystals and the effects of quantum confinement, chemical environments of the nanocrystals, and surface coverages. Of particular interest to the authors is the surface composition and structure of these particles, for they have found that much of the behavior of nanocrystals is governed by their surface. Previously, the authors had performed x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) on CdSe nanocrystals. XPS has proven to be a powerful tool in that it allows one to determine the composition of the nanocrystal surface

  2. Method of synthesizing pyrite nanocrystals

    Wadia, Cyrus; Wu, Yue

    2013-04-23

    A method of synthesizing pyrite nanocrystals is disclosed which in one embodiment includes forming a solution of iron (III) diethyl dithiophosphate and tetra-alkyl-ammonium halide in water. The solution is heated under pressure. Pyrite nanocrystal particles are then recovered from the solution.

  3. Nanocrystal/sol-gel nanocomposites

    Petruska, Melissa A [Los Alamos, NM; Klimov, Victor L [Los Alamos, NM

    2007-06-05

    The present invention is directed to solid composites including colloidal nanocrystals within a sol-gel host or matrix and to processes of forming such solid composites. The present invention is further directed to alcohol soluble colloidal nanocrystals useful in formation of sol-gel based solid composites.

  4. Seeded Growth Route to Noble Calcium Carbonate Nanocrystal.

    Aminul Islam

    Full Text Available A solution-phase route has been considered as the most promising route to synthesize noble nanostructures. A majority of their synthesis approaches of calcium carbonate (CaCO3 are based on either using fungi or the CO2 bubbling methods. Here, we approached the preparation of nano-precipitated calcium carbonate single crystal from salmacis sphaeroides in the presence of zwitterionic or cationic biosurfactants without external source of CO2. The calcium carbonate crystals were rhombohedron structure and regularly shaped with side dimension ranging from 33-41 nm. The high degree of morphological control of CaCO3 nanocrystals suggested that surfactants are capable of strongly interacting with the CaCO3 surface and control the nucleation and growth direction of calcium carbonate nanocrystals. Finally, the mechanism of formation of nanocrystals in light of proposed routes was also discussed.

  5. Uncovering the intrinsic size dependence of hydriding phase transformations in nanocrystals.

    Bardhan, Rizia; Hedges, Lester O; Pint, Cary L; Javey, Ali; Whitelam, Stephen; Urban, Jeffrey J

    2013-10-01

    A quantitative understanding of nanocrystal phase transformations would enable more efficient energy conversion and catalysis, but has been hindered by difficulties in directly monitoring well-characterized nanoscale systems in reactive environments. We present a new in situ luminescence-based probe enabling direct quantification of nanocrystal phase transformations, applied here to the hydriding transformation of palladium nanocrystals. Our approach reveals the intrinsic kinetics and thermodynamics of nanocrystal phase transformations, eliminating complications of substrate strain, ligand effects and external signal transducers. Clear size-dependent trends emerge in nanocrystals long accepted to be bulk-like in behaviour. Statistical mechanical simulations show these trends to be a consequence of nanoconfinement of a thermally driven, first-order phase transition: near the phase boundary, critical nuclei of the new phase are comparable in size to the nanocrystal itself. Transformation rates are then unavoidably governed by nanocrystal dimensions. Our results provide a general framework for understanding how nanoconfinement fundamentally impacts broad classes of thermally driven solid-state phase transformations relevant to hydrogen storage, catalysis, batteries and fuel cells.

  6. Biomolecular Assembly of Gold Nanocrystals

    Micheel, Christine Marya [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-05-20

    Over the past ten years, methods have been developed to construct discrete nanostructures using nanocrystals and biomolecules. While these frequently consist of gold nanocrystals and DNA, semiconductor nanocrystals as well as antibodies and enzymes have also been used. One example of discrete nanostructures is dimers of gold nanocrystals linked together with complementary DNA. This type of nanostructure is also known as a nanocrystal molecule. Discrete nanostructures of this kind have a number of potential applications, from highly parallel self-assembly of electronics components and rapid read-out of DNA computations to biological imaging and a variety of bioassays. My research focused in three main areas. The first area, the refinement of electrophoresis as a purification and characterization method, included application of agarose gel electrophoresis to the purification of discrete gold nanocrystal/DNA conjugates and nanocrystal molecules, as well as development of a more detailed understanding of the hydrodynamic behavior of these materials in gels. The second area, the development of methods for quantitative analysis of transmission electron microscope data, used computer programs written to find pair correlations as well as higher order correlations. With these programs, it is possible to reliably locate and measure nanocrystal molecules in TEM images. The final area of research explored the use of DNA ligase in the formation of nanocrystal molecules. Synthesis of dimers of gold particles linked with a single strand of DNA possible through the use of DNA ligase opens the possibility for amplification of nanostructures in a manner similar to polymerase chain reaction. These three areas are discussed in the context of the work in the Alivisatos group, as well as the field as a whole.

  7. One dimensional CuO nanocrystals synthesis by electrical explosion: A study on structural, optical and electronic properties

    Krishnan, Shutesh, E-mail: shutesh.k@onsemi.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); ON Semiconductor Package Innovation and Development Center, 70450 Seremban (Malaysia); Haseeb, A.S.M.A.; Johan, Mohd Rafie [Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • One-dimensional CuO nanoflakes were synthesized by novel wire explosion technique. • A physical synthesis method capable of producing high aspect ratio (1:16) nanocrystals. • Most energy efficient and eco-friendly synthesis of low-dimensional transition metal oxide nanocrystals. -- Abstract: One-dimensional (1D) copper oxide (CuO) nanocrystals were synthesized using a novel wire explosion in de-ionized (DI) water without any chemical additives. Highly crystalline 1D CuO nanocrystals with 1:16 aspect ratio were successfully synthesized using this technique. The chemical nature and physical structure of the nanocrystals were controlled by simply modulating the exploding medium temperature. The results showed that nanocrystals produced at explosion temperatures 65 °C and 95 °C are pure CuO with optical band-gap energy of 2.38 eV. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope analysis (HRTEM) indicates that the CuO nanocrystals are with growth in [1{sup ¯}11] and [1 1 1] directions. The epitaxial crystal growth kinetics of the 1D nanostructure by aggregation was discussed. The incorporation of microstructural features like edge dislocations and porosity in the growth mechanism was examined. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization indicates the formation of high purity CuO nanocrystals with valence state +2. This study provides an energy efficient and eco-friendly synthesis method of 1D transition metal oxide nanocrystals for electronic applications.

  8. One dimensional CuO nanocrystals synthesis by electrical explosion: A study on structural, optical and electronic properties

    Krishnan, Shutesh; Haseeb, A.S.M.A.; Johan, Mohd Rafie

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • One-dimensional CuO nanoflakes were synthesized by novel wire explosion technique. • A physical synthesis method capable of producing high aspect ratio (1:16) nanocrystals. • Most energy efficient and eco-friendly synthesis of low-dimensional transition metal oxide nanocrystals. -- Abstract: One-dimensional (1D) copper oxide (CuO) nanocrystals were synthesized using a novel wire explosion in de-ionized (DI) water without any chemical additives. Highly crystalline 1D CuO nanocrystals with 1:16 aspect ratio were successfully synthesized using this technique. The chemical nature and physical structure of the nanocrystals were controlled by simply modulating the exploding medium temperature. The results showed that nanocrystals produced at explosion temperatures 65 °C and 95 °C are pure CuO with optical band-gap energy of 2.38 eV. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope analysis (HRTEM) indicates that the CuO nanocrystals are with growth in [1 ¯ 11] and [1 1 1] directions. The epitaxial crystal growth kinetics of the 1D nanostructure by aggregation was discussed. The incorporation of microstructural features like edge dislocations and porosity in the growth mechanism was examined. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization indicates the formation of high purity CuO nanocrystals with valence state +2. This study provides an energy efficient and eco-friendly synthesis method of 1D transition metal oxide nanocrystals for electronic applications

  9. Synthesis and Doping of Silicon Nanocrystals for Versatile Nanocrystal Inks

    Kramer, Nicolaas Johannes

    The impact of nanotechnology on our society is getting larger every year. Electronics are becoming smaller and more powerful, the "Internet of Things" is all around us, and data generation is increasing exponentially. None of this would have been possible without the developments in nanotechnology. Crystalline semiconductor nanoparticles (nanocrystals) are one of the latest developments in the field of nanotechnology. This thesis addresses three important challenges for the transition of silicon nanocrystals from the lab bench to the marketplace: A better understanding of the nanocrystal synthesis was obtained, the electronic properties of the nanocrystals were characterized and tuned, and novel silicon nanocrystal inks were formed and applied using simple coating technologies. Plasma synthesis of nanocrystals has numerous advantages over traditional solution-based synthesis methods. While the formation of nanoparticles in low pressure nonthermal plasmas is well known, the heating mechanism leading to their crystallization is poorly understood. A combination of comprehensive plasma characterization with a nanoparticle heating model presented here reveals the underlying plasma physics leading to crystallization. The model predicts that the nanoparticles reach temperatures as high as 900 K in the plasma as a result of heating reactions on the nanoparticle surface. These temperatures are well above the gas temperature and sufficient for complete nanoparticle crystallization. Moving the field of plasma nanoparticle synthesis to atmospheric pressures is important for lowering its cost and making the process attractive for industrial applications. The heating and charging model for silicon nanoparticles was adapted in Chapter 3 to study plasmas maintained over a wide range of pressures (10 -- 105 Pa). The model considers three collisionality regimes and determines the dominant contribution of each regime under various plasma conditions. Strong nanoparticle cooling at

  10. Optimizing colloidal nanocrystals for applications

    Sytnyk, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the scientific literature colloidal nanocrystals are presented as promising materials for multiple applications, in areas covering optoelectronics, photovoltaics, spintronics, catalysis, and bio-medicine. On the marked are, however, only a very limited number of examples found, indeed implementing colloidal nanocrystals. Thus the scope of this thesis was to modify nanocrystals and to tune their properties to fulfill specific demands. While some modifications could be achieved by post synthetic treatments, one key problem of colloidal nanocrystals, hampering there widespread application is the toxicity of their constituents. To develop nanocrystals from non-toxic materials has been a major goal of this thesis as well. Roughly, the results in this thesis could be subdivided into three parts: (i) the development of ion exchange methods to tailor the properties of metallic and metal-oxide based nanocrystal heterostructures, (ii), the synthesis of semiconductor nanocrystals from non-toxic materials, and (iii) the characterization of the nanocrystals by measurements of their morphology, chemical composition, magnetic-, optical-, and electronic properties. In detail, the thesis is subdivided into an introductory chapter, 4 chapters reporting on scientific results, a chapter reporting the used methods, and the conclusions. The 4 chapters devoted to the scientific results correspond to manuscripts, which are either currently in preparation, or have been published in highly ranked scientific journals such as NanoLetters (chapter 2), ACS Nano (chapter 4), or JACS (chapter 5). Thus, these chapters provide also an extra introduction and conclusion section, as well as separate reference lists. Chapter 2 describes a cation exchange process which is used to tune and improve the magnetic properties of different iron-oxide based colloidal nanocrystal-heterostructures. The superparamagnetic blocking temperature, magnetic remanence, and coercivity is tuned by replacing Fe2+ by Co2

  11. Bacteria capable of degrading anthracene, phenanthrene, and fluoranthene as revealed by DNA based stable-isotope probing in a forest soil

    Song, Mengke [Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Jiang, Longfei [College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Zhang, Dayi [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Luo, Chunling, E-mail: clluo@gig.ac.cn [Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wang, Yan [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering (MOE), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Yu, Zhiqiang [Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Yin, Hua [College of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhang, Gan [Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2016-05-05

    Highlights: • Investigate PAHs degraders in forest carbon-rich soils via DNA-SIP. • Rhodanobacter is identified to metabolite anthracene for the first time. • The first fluoranthene degrader belongs to Acidobacteria. • Different functions of PAHs degraders in forest soils from contaminated soils. - Abstract: Information on microorganisms possessing the ability to metabolize different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in complex environments helps in understanding PAHs behavior in natural environment and developing bioremediation strategies. In the present study, stable-isotope probing (SIP) was applied to investigate degraders of PAHs in a forest soil with the addition of individually {sup 13}C-labeled phenanthrene, anthracene, and fluoranthene. Three distinct phylotypes were identified as the active phenanthrene-, anthracene- and fluoranthene-degrading bacteria. The putative phenanthrene degraders were classified as belonging to the genus Sphingomona. For anthracene, bacteria of the genus Rhodanobacter were the putative degraders, and in the microcosm amended with fluoranthene, the putative degraders were identified as belonging to the phylum Acidobacteria. Our results from DNA-SIP are the first to directly link Rhodanobacter- and Acidobacteria-related bacteria with anthracene and fluoranthene degradation, respectively. The results also illustrate the specificity and diversity of three- and four-ring PAHs degraders in forest soil, contributes to our understanding on natural PAHs biodegradation processes, and also proves the feasibility and practicality of DNA-based SIP for linking functions with identity especially uncultured microorganisms in complex microbial biota.

  12. Synthesis of Silicon Nanocrystals in Microplasma Reactor

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Kenji; Ogino, Tomohisa; Asahi, Daisuke; Okazaki, Ken

    Nanocrystalline silicon particles with a grain size of at least less than 10 nm are widely recognized as one of the key materials in optoelectronic devices, electrodes of lithium battery, bio-medical labels. There is also important character that silicon is safe material to the environment and easily gets involved in existing silicon technologies. To date, several synthesis methods such as sputtering, laser ablation, and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) based on low-pressure silane chemistry (SiH4) have been developed for precise control of size and density distributions of silicon nanocrystals. We explore the possibility of microplasma technologies for the efficient production of mono-dispersed nanocrystalline silicon particles in a micrometer-scale, continuous-flow plasma reactor operated at atmospheric pressure. Mixtures of argon, hydrogen, and silicon tetrachloride were activated using very high frequency (VHF = 144 MHz) power source in a capillary glass tube with a volume of less than 1 μ-liter. Fundamental plasma parameters of VHF capacitively coupled microplasma were characterized by optical emission spectroscopy, showing electron density of approximately 1015 cm-3 and rotational temperature of 1500 K, respectively. Such high-density non-thermal reactive plasma has a capability of decomposing silicon tetrachloride into atomic silicon to produce supersaturated atomic silicon vapor, followed by gas phase nucleation via three-body collision. The particle synthesis in high-density plasma media is beneficial for promoting nucleation process. In addition, further growth of silicon nuclei was able to be favorably terminated in a short-residence time reactor. Micro Raman scattering spectrum showed that as-deposited particles were mostly amorphous silicon with small fraction of silicon nanocrystals. Transmission electron micrograph confirmed individual silicon nanocrystals of 3-15 nm size. Although those particles were not mono-dispersed, they were

  13. Capability Paternalism

    Claassen, R.J.G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/269266224

    A capability approach prescribes paternalist government actions to the extent that it requires the promotion of specific functionings, instead of the corresponding capabilities. Capability theorists have argued that their theories do not have much of these paternalist implications, since promoting

  14. Nanocrystal thin film fabrication methods and apparatus

    Kagan, Cherie R.; Kim, David K.; Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Lai, Yuming

    2018-01-09

    Nanocrystal thin film devices and methods for fabricating nanocrystal thin film devices are disclosed. The nanocrystal thin films are diffused with a dopant such as Indium, Potassium, Tin, etc. to reduce surface states. The thin film devices may be exposed to air during a portion of the fabrication. This enables fabrication of nanocrystal-based devices using a wider range of techniques such as photolithography and photolithographic patterning in an air environment.

  15. The Role of Shape on Electronic Structure and Charge Transport in Faceted PbSe Nanocrystals

    Kaushik, Ananth P.

    2014-03-25

    We have determined the effect of shape on the charge transport characteristics of nanocrystals. Our study looked at the explicit determination of the electronic properties of faceted nanocrystals that essentially probe the limit of current computational reach, i.e., nanocrystals from 1.53 to 2.1 nm in diameter. These nanocrystals, which resemble PbSe systems, are either bare or covered in short ligands. They also differ in shape, octahedral vs cube-octahedral, and in superlattice symmetry (fcc vs bcc). We have provided insights on electron and hole coupling along different facets and overall charge mobility in bcc and fcc superlattices. We have determined that the relative areas of (100) to (111) facets, and facet atom types are important factors governing the optimization of charge transport. The calculated electronic density of states shows no role of -SCH3 - ligands on states near the band gap. Electron coupling between nanocrystals is significantly higher than that of hole coupling; thiol ligands lower the ratio between electron and hole couplings. Stronger coupling exists between smaller nanocrystals. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  16. Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Biological Imaging

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-06-28

    Conventional organic fluorophores suffer from poor photo stability, narrow absorption spectra and broad emission feature. Semiconductor nanocrystals, on the other hand, are highly photo-stable with broad absorption spectra and narrow size-tunable emission spectra. Recent advances in the synthesis of these materials have resulted in bright, sensitive, extremely photo-stable and biocompatible semiconductor fluorophores. Commercial availability facilitates their application in a variety of unprecedented biological experiments, including multiplexed cellular imaging, long-term in vitro and in vivo labeling, deep tissue structure mapping and single particle investigation of dynamic cellular processes. Semiconductor nanocrystals are one of the first examples of nanotechnology enabling a new class of biomedical applications.

  17. Electronic Structure of Hydrogenated and Surface-Modified GaAs Nanocrystals: Ab Initio Calculations

    Hamsa Naji Nasir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two methods are used to simulate electronic structure of gallium arsenide nanocrystals. The cluster full geometrical optimization procedure which is suitable for small nanocrystals and large unit cell that simulates specific parts of larger nanocrystals preferably core part as in the present work. Because of symmetry consideration, large unit cells can reach sizes that are beyond the capabilities of first method. The two methods use ab initio Hartree-Fock and density functional theory, respectively. The results show that both energy gap and lattice constant decrease in their value as the nanocrystals grow in size. The inclusion of surface part in the first method makes valence band width wider than in large unit cell method that simulates the core part only. This is attributed to the broken symmetry and surface passivating atoms that split surface degenerate states and adds new levels inside and around the valence band. Bond length and tetrahedral angle result from full geometrical optimization indicate good convergence to the ideal zincblende structure at the centre of hydrogenated nanocrystal. This convergence supports large unit cell methodology. Existence of oxygen atoms at nanocrystal surface melts down density of states and reduces energy gap.

  18. Brilliant molecular nanocrystals emerging from sol-gel thin films: towards a new generation of fluorescent biochips

    Dubuisson, E; Monnier, V; Sanz-Menez, N; Ibanez, A; Boury, B; Usson, Y; Pansu, R B

    2009-01-01

    To develop highly sensitive biosensors, we made directly available to biological aqueous solutions organic nanocrystals previously grown in the pores of sol-gel films. Through the controlled dissolution of the sol-gel surface, we obtained emerging nanocrystals that remained strongly anchored to the sol-gel coating for good mechanical stability of the final sensing device. We demonstrated that in the presence of a solution of DNA functionalized with a molecular probe, the nanocrystal fluorescence is strongly quenched by Foerster resonance energy transfer thus opening the way towards very sensitive fluorescent biosensors through biomolecules grafted onto fluorescent nanocrystals. Finally, this controlled dissolution, involving weak concentrated NaOH solution, is a generic process that can be used for the thinning of any kind of sol-gel layer.

  19. Volumetric flame synthesis of well-defined molybdenum oxide nanocrystals.

    Merchan-Merchan, Wilson; Saveliev, Alexei V; Desai, Milind

    2009-11-25

    Well-defined faceted inorganic Mo oxide nanocrystals are synthesized in the gas phase using a solid-fed-precursor flame synthesis method. The solid crystals have rectangular cross-section with characteristic size of 10-20 nm and with lengths ranging from 50 nm to a few hundred nanometres. A 1 mm diameter high purity Mo probe introduced in the oxygen-rich part of the flame serves as the material source. A combination of the strong temperature gradient and varying chemical species concentrations within the flame volume provides the ideal conditions for the rapid and direct formation of these unique nanocrystals. Oxidation and evaporation of MoO3 in the oxygen-rich zone are followed by reduction to MoO2 in the lower temperature, more fuel-rich zone. The MoO3 vapours formed are pushed in the direction of the gas flow and transformed into mature well-defined convex polyhedron nanocrystals bounded with six faces resembling rectangular parallelepipeds.

  20. Doping effect in Si nanocrystals

    Li, Dongke; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Pei; Jiang, Yicheng; Chen, Kunji

    2018-06-01

    Intentional doping in semiconductors is a fundamental issue since it can control the conduction type and ability as well as modify the optical and electronic properties. To realize effective doping is the basis for developing semiconductor devices. However, by reducing the size of a semiconductor, like Si, to the nanometer scale, the doping effects become complicated due to the coupling between the quantum confinement effect and the surfaces and/or interfaces effect. In particular, by introducing phosphorus or boron impurities as dopants into material containing Si nanocrystals with a dot size of less than 10 nm, it exhibits different behaviors and influences on the physical properties from its bulk counterpart. Understanding the doping effects in Si nanocrystals is currently a challenge in order to further improve the performance of the next generation of nano-electronic and photonic devices. In this review, we present an overview of the latest theoretical studies and experimental results on dopant distributions and their effects on the electronic and optical properties of Si nanocrystals. In particular, the advanced characterization techniques on dopant distribution, the carrier transport process as well as the linear and nonlinear optical properties of doped Si nanocrystals, are systematically summarized.

  1. "Nanocrystal bilayer for tandem catalysis"

    Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Huo, Ziyang; E.Habas, Susan E; Soejima, Tetsuro; Aliaga, Cesar E; Samorjai, Gabor A; Yang, Peidong

    2011-01-24

    Supported catalysts are widely used in industry and can be optimized by tuning the composition and interface of the metal nanoparticles and oxide supports. Rational design of metal-metal oxide interfaces in nanostructured catalysts is critical to achieve better reaction activities and selectivities. We introduce here a new class of nanocrystal tandem catalysts that have multiple metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. We utilized a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers of less than 10 nm on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO2-Pt and Pt-SiO2, can be used to catalyse two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO2-Pt interface catalysed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H2, which were subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalysed by the nearby Pt-SiO2 interface. Consequently, propanal was produced selectively from methanol and ethylene on the nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst. This new concept of nanocrystal tandem catalysis represents a powerful approach towards designing high-performance, multifunctional nanostructured catalysts

  2. Capability ethics

    Robeyns, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe capability approach is one of the most recent additions to the landscape of normative theories in ethics and political philosophy. Yet in its present stage of development, the capability approach is not a full-blown normative theory, in contrast to utilitarianism, deontological theories, virtue ethics, or pragmatism. As I will argue in this chapter, at present the core of the capability approach is an account of value, which together with some other (more minor) normative comm...

  3. Phase transitions and doping in semiconductor nanocrystals

    Sahu, Ayaskanta

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals are a promising technological material because their size-dependent optical and electronic properties can be exploited for a diverse range of applications such as light-emitting diodes, bio-labels, transistors, and solar cells. For many of these applications, electrical current needs to be transported through the devices. However, while their solution processability makes these colloidal nanocrystals attractive candidates for device applications, the bulky surfactants that render these nanocrystals dispersible in common solvents block electrical current. Thus, in order to realize the full potential of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals in the next-generation of solid-state devices, methods must be devised to make conductive films from these nanocrystals. One way to achieve this would be to add minute amounts of foreign impurity atoms (dopants) to increase their conductivity. Electronic doping in nanocrystals is still very much in its infancy with limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms that govern the doping process. This thesis introduces an innovative synthesis of doped nanocrystals and aims at expanding the fundamental understanding of charge transport in these doped nanocrystal films. The list of semiconductor nanocrystals that can be doped is large, and if one combines that with available dopants, an even larger set of materials with interesting properties and applications can be generated. In addition to doping, another promising route to increase conductivity in nanocrystal films is to use nanocrystals with high ionic conductivities. This thesis also examines this possibility by studying new phases of mixed ionic and electronic conductors at the nanoscale. Such a versatile approach may open new pathways for interesting fundamental research, and also lay the foundation for the creation of novel materials with important applications. In addition to their size-dependence, the intentional incorporation of

  4. Dynamic Capabilities

    Grünbaum, Niels Nolsøe; Stenger, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    The findings reveal a positive relationship between dynamic capabilities and innovation performance in the case enterprises, as we would expect. It was, however, not possible to establish a positive relationship between innovation performance and profitability. Nor was there any positive...... relationship between dynamic capabilities and profitability....

  5. Capability ethics

    I.A.M. Robeyns (Ingrid)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe capability approach is one of the most recent additions to the landscape of normative theories in ethics and political philosophy. Yet in its present stage of development, the capability approach is not a full-blown normative theory, in contrast to utilitarianism, deontological

  6. Soluble Supercapacitors: Large and Reversible Charge Storage in Colloidal Iron-Doped ZnO Nanocrystals.

    Brozek, Carl K; Zhou, Dongming; Liu, Hongbin; Li, Xiaosong; Kittilstved, Kevin R; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2018-05-09

    Colloidal ZnO semiconductor nanocrystals have previously been shown to accumulate multiple delocalized conduction-band electrons under chemical, electrochemical, or photochemical reducing conditions, leading to emergent semimetallic characteristics such as quantum plasmon resonances and raising prospects for application in multielectron redox transformations. Here, we demonstrate a dramatic enhancement in the capacitance of colloidal ZnO nanocrystals through aliovalent Fe 3+ -doping. Very high areal and volumetric capacitances (33 μF cm -2 , 233 F cm -3 ) are achieved in Zn 0.99 Fe 0.01 O nanocrystals that rival those of the best supercapacitors used in commercial energy-storage devices. The redox properties of these nanocrystals are probed by potentiometric titration and optical spectroscopy. These data indicate an equilibrium between electron localization by Fe 3+ dopants and electron delocalization within the ZnO conduction band, allowing facile reversible charge storage and removal. As "soluble supercapacitors", colloidal iron-doped ZnO nanocrystals constitute a promising class of solution-processable electronic materials with large charge-storage capacity attractive for future energy-storage applications.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of KTiOPO4 nanocrystals and their PMMA nanocomposites

    Galceran, M; Pujol, M C; Carvajal, J J; Diaz, F; Aguilo, M; Tkaczyk, S; Kityk, I V

    2009-01-01

    KTiOPO 4 (KTP) nanocrystals have been synthesized by the modified Pechini method using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and ethylene glycol (EG) as chelating and sterification agents, respectively. Orthorhombic KTP has been obtained by calcination at 1073 K for several hours. Differential thermal and thermogravimetric (DTA-TG) analyses have been used to study the optimized heat treatment used on the precursor powder to obtain KTP nanocrystals. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) studies on the thermally treated precursor powders indicated that nanocrystals began to crystallize at 923 K. Nanocrystals with a size dispersion distribution that fit to a lognormal function centered at 25 nm were observed by electronic microscopy. KTP nanocomposites were prepared by embedding nanocrystals in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The photoinduced second-order susceptibility parameter and the piezo-optical coefficient were measured for the KTP nanocomposites. The optimal conditions for the generation of the frequency-doubled second harmonic generation were recorded at 391 K, and at a fundamental laser wavelength of 1064 nm and under additional treatment by polarized UV light, provided the maximum value obtained of 3.23 pm V -1 . The piezo-optical coefficients were recorded at room temperature under photoinduced treatment by a UV laser beam; the maximum value achieved was 0.673 x 10 -14 m 2 N -1 at a pump-probe delaying time of 160 s.

  8. Synthesis, characterization and spectral temperature-dependence of thioglycerol-CdSe nanocrystals

    Ben Brahim, Nassim, E-mail: nassim.benbrahim.fsm@gmail.com [Laboratoire des Interfaces et Matériaux Avancés, Faculté des Sciences de Monastir, Boulevard de l’Environnement, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia); Poggi, Mélanie [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Haj Mohamed, Naim Bel; Ben Chaâbane, Rafik; Haouari, Mohamed [Laboratoire des Interfaces et Matériaux Avancés, Faculté des Sciences de Monastir, Boulevard de l’Environnement, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia); Negrerie, Michel, E-mail: michel.negrerie@polytechnique.fr [Laboratoire d' Optique et Biosciences, INSERM, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Ben Ouada, Hafedh [Laboratoire des Interfaces et Matériaux Avancés, Faculté des Sciences de Monastir, Boulevard de l’Environnement, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia)

    2016-09-15

    Water-soluble CdSe quantum dots (QDs) have been synthesized with thioglycerol as a stabilizer through a novel hydrothermal route. The obtained thioglycerol capped CdSe (TG-CdSe) nanocrystals were characterized regarding their morphology and structural, thermal and optical properties. The resulting nanocrystals were synthesized in the cubic structure with a near spherical shape, as confirmed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Combining transmission electron microscopy imaging and calculations using UV–visible absorption spectrum and X-ray diffraction pattern, the diameter of the synthesized nanocrystals was estimated to 2.26 nm. As confirmed by its Fourier transform IR spectrum, thioglycerol was successfully liganded on the surface of the resulting nanocrystals. Band structure parameters of the TG-CdSe nanoparticles were determined and quantum confinement effect was evidenced by optical absorption, fluorescence and Raman measurements. The thermal properties of the TG-CdSe were explored by thermal gravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The temperature dependence of both the absorption and fluorescence spectra in the physiological range makes the TG-CdSe nanocrystals sensitive temperature markers, a property that must be taken into account when developing any probing applications, especially for cellular imaging.

  9. Mobile Probing and Probes

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff Mathiasen, Anne-Gitte

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point...... to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  10. Mobile Probing and Probes

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff, Anne-Gitte

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  11. Synthesis and Manipulation of Semiconductor Nanocrystals inMicrofluidic Reactors

    Chan, Emory Ming-Yue [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Microfluidic reactors are investigated as a mechanism tocontrol the growth of semiconductor nanocrystals and characterize thestructural evolution of colloidal quantum dots. Due to their shortdiffusion lengths, low thermal masses, and predictable fluid dynamics,microfluidic devices can be used to quickly and reproducibly alterreaction conditions such as concentration, temperature, and reactiontime, while allowing for rapid reagent mixing and productcharacterization. These features are particularly useful for colloidalnanocrystal reactions, which scale poorly and are difficult to controland characterize in bulk fluids. To demonstrate the capabilities ofnanoparticle microreactors, a size series of spherical CdSe nanocrystalswas synthesized at high temperature in a continuous-flow, microfabricatedglass reactor. Nanocrystal diameters are reproducibly controlled bysystematically altering reaction parameters such as the temperature,concentration, and reaction time. Microreactors with finer control overtemperature and reagent mixing were designed to synthesize nanoparticlesof different shapes, such as rods, tetrapods, and hollow shells. The twomajor challenges observed with continuous flow reactors are thedeposition of particles on channel walls and the broad distribution ofresidence times that result from laminar flow. To alleviate theseproblems, I designed and fabricated liquid-liquid segmented flowmicroreactors in which the reaction precursors are encapsulated inflowing droplets suspended in an immiscible carrier fluid. The synthesisof CdSe nanocrystals in such microreactors exhibited reduced depositionand residence time distributions while enabling the rapid screening aseries of samples isolated in nL droplets. Microfluidic reactors werealso designed to modify the composition of existing nanocrystals andcharacterize the kinetics of such reactions. The millisecond kinetics ofthe CdSe-to-Ag2Se nanocrystal cation exchange reaction are measured insitu with micro

  12. Gossiping Capabilities

    Mogensen, Martin; Frey, Davide; Guerraoui, Rachid

    Gossip-based protocols are now acknowledged as a sound basis to implement collaborative high-bandwidth content dissemination: content location is disseminated through gossip, the actual contents being subsequently pulled. In this paper, we present HEAP, HEterogeneity Aware gossip Protocol, where...... nodes dynamically adjust their contribution to gossip dissemination according to their capabilities. Using a continuous, itself gossip-based, approximation of relative capabilities, HEAP dynamically leverages the most capable nodes by (a) increasing their fanouts (while decreasing by the same proportion...... declare a high capability in order to augment their perceived quality without contributing accordingly. We evaluate HEAP in the context of a video streaming application on a 236 PlanetLab nodes testbed. Our results shows that HEAP improves the quality of the streaming by 25% over a standard gossip...

  13. Effect of argon implantation on solid-state dewetting: control of size and surface density of silicon nanocrystals.

    Almadori, Y; Borowik, Ł; Chevalier, N; Barbé, J-C

    2017-01-27

    Thermally induced solid-state dewetting of ultra-thin films on insulators is a process of prime interest, since it is capable of easily forming nanocrystals. If no particular treatment is performed to the film prior to the solid-state dewetting, it is already known that the size, the shape and the density of nanocrystals is governed by the initial film thickness. In this paper, we report a novel approach to control the size and the surface density of silicon nanocrystals based on an argon-implantation preliminary surface treatment. Using 7.5 nm thin layers of silicon, we show that increasing the implantation dose tends to form smaller silicon nanocrystals with diameter and height lower than 50 nm and 30 nm, respectively. Concomitantly, the surface density is increased by a factor greater than 20, going from 5 μm -2 to values over 100 μm -2 .

  14. Large-scale, rapid synthesis and application in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of sub-micrometer polyhedral gold nanocrystals

    Guo Shaojun; Wang Yuling; Wang Erkang

    2007-01-01

    Macromolecule-protected sub-micrometer polyhedral gold nanocrystals have been facilely prepared by heating an aqueous solution containing poly (N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (PVP) and HAuCl 4 without adding other reducing agents. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX), ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectroscopy (UV-vis-NIR), and x-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to characterize the obtained polyhedral gold nanocrystals. It is found that the 10:1 molar ratio of PVP to gold is a key factor for obtaining quasi-monodisperse polyhedral gold nanocrystals. Furthermore, the application of polyhedral gold nanocrystals in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was investigated by using 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) as a probe molecule. The results indicated that the sub-micrometer polyhedral gold nanocrystals modified on the ITO substrate exhibited higher SERS activity compared to the traditional gold nanoparticle modified film. The enhancement factor (EF) on polyhedral gold nanocrystals was about six times larger than that obtained on aggregated gold nanoparticles (∼25 nm)

  15. Structure Map for Embedded Binary Alloy Nanocrystals

    Yuan, C.W.; Shin, S.J.; Liao, C.Y.; Guzman, J.; Stone, P.R.; Watanabe, M.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.; Chrzan, D.C.

    2008-09-20

    The equilibrium structure of embedded nanocrystals formed from strongly segregating binary-alloys is considered within a simple thermodynamic model. The model identifies two dimensionlessinterface energies that dictate the structure, and allows prediction of the stable structure for anychoice of these parameters. The resulting structure map includes three distinct nanocrystal mor-phologies: core/shell, lobe/lobe, and completely separated spheres.

  16. Hollow nanocrystals and method of making

    Alivisatos, A Paul [Oakland, CA; Yin, Yadong [Moreno Valley, CA; Erdonmez, Can Kerem [Berkeley, CA

    2011-07-05

    Described herein are hollow nanocrystals having various shapes that can be produced by a simple chemical process. The hollow nanocrystals described herein may have a shell as thin as 0.5 nm and outside diameters that can be controlled by the process of making.

  17. Synthesis, spectroscopy and simulation of doped nanocrystals

    Suyver, Jan Frederik

    2003-01-01

    This thesis deals with the properties of semiconductor nanocrystals (ZnS or ZnSe) in the size range (diameter) of 2 nm to 10 nm. The nanocrystals under investigation are doped with the transition metal ions manganese or copper. The goal is to study photoluminescence and electroluminescence from

  18. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    Weiss, Shimon [Pinole, CA; Schlamp, Michael C [Plainsboro, NJ; Alivisatos, A Paul [Oakland, CA

    2011-09-27

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit light of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  19. Symmetry breaking during seeded growth of nanocrystals.

    Xia, Xiaohu; Xia, Younan

    2012-11-14

    Currently, most of the reported noble-metal nanocrystals are limited to a high level of symmetry, as constrained by the inherent, face-centered cubic (fcc) lattice of these metals. In this paper, we report, for the first time, a facile and versatile approach (backed up by a clear mechanistic understanding) for breaking the symmetry of an fcc lattice and thus obtaining nanocrystals with highly unsymmetrical shapes. The key strategy is to induce and direct the growth of nanocrystal seeds into unsymmetrical modes by manipulating the reduction kinetics. With silver as an example, we demonstrated that the diversity of possible shapes taken by noble-metal nanocrystals could be greatly expanded by incorporating a series of new shapes drastically deviated from the fcc lattice. This work provides a new method to investigate shape-controlled synthesis of metal nanocrystal.

  20. Measuring the Valence of Nanocrystal Surfaces

    Owen, Jonathan Scharle [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2016-11-30

    The goal of this project is to understand and control the interplay between nanocrystal stoichiometry, surface ligand binding and exchange, and the optoelectronic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals in solution and in thin solid films. We pursued three research directions with this goal in mind: 1) We characterized nanocrystal stoichiometry and its influence on the binding of L-type and X-type ligands, including the thermodynamics of binding and the kinetics of ligand exchange. 2) We developed a quantitative understanding of the relationship between surface ligand passivation and photoluminescence quantum yield. 3) We developed methods to replace the organic ligands on the nanocrystal with halide ligands and controllably deposit these nanocrystals into thin films, where electrical measurements were used to investigate the electrical transport and internanocrystal electronic coupling.

  1. Quenching of photoluminescence of colloidal ZnO nanocrystals by nitronyl nitroxide radicals

    Stroyuk, Oleksandr L., E-mail: stroyuk@inphyschem-nas.kiev.ua [L.V. Pysarzhevsky Institute of Physical Chemistry of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 31 Nauky avenue, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Yakovenko, Anastasiya V.; Raevskaya, Oleksandra E. [L.V. Pysarzhevsky Institute of Physical Chemistry of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 31 Nauky avenue, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Plyusnin, Victor F. [Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    Quenching of the photoluminescence of colloidal zinc oxide nanocrystals by a series of stable nitronyl nitroxide radicals was studied by means of stationary and time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy. Among the studied radicals the most efficient quenchers of the ZnO luminescence are the carboxyl-substituted species. The meta-substituted radical was found to be a more active quencher, than para-substituted one due to a closer proximity of the radical center to the nanocrystals surface. The PL quenching has a complex dynamic/static character. The dynamic quenching arises from photocatalytic radical reduction by ZnO conduction band electrons, while the static quenching is caused by adsorption of the photoreduction products on the nanocrystal surface. The non-substituted and OH-substituted radicals are inferior to the products of their photoreduction in capability of adsorption of the ZnO surface, and the quenching is dominated by interactions between the nanocrystals and photoreduced hydroxylamines. In case of COOH-substituted radicals, however, the radicals compete with the photoreduction products for the surface sites of ZnO nanocrystals resulting in a dynamic character of photoluminescence quenching.

  2. Capability approach

    Jensen, Niels Rosendal; Kjeldsen, Christian Christrup

    Lærebogen er den første samlede danske præsentation af den af Amartya Sen og Martha Nussbaum udviklede Capability Approach. Bogen indeholder en præsentation og diskussion af Sen og Nussbaums teoretiske platform. I bogen indgår eksempler fra såvel uddannelse/uddannelsespolitik, pædagogik og omsorg....

  3. Ferromagnetism in Fe-doped ZnO Nanocrystals: Experimental and Theoretical investigations

    Karmakar, Debjani; Mandal, S. K.; Kadam, R. M.; Paulose, P. L.; Rajarajan, A. K.; Nath, T. K.; Das, A. K.; Dasgupta, I.; Das, G. P.

    2007-01-01

    Fe-doped ZnO nanocrystals are successfully synthesized and structurally characterized by using x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Magnetization measurements on the same system reveal a ferromagnetic to paramagnetic transition temperature > 450 K with a low-temperature transition from ferromagnetic to spin-glass state due to canting of the disordered surface spins in the nanoparticle system. Local magnetic probes like EPR and Mossbauer indicate the presence of Fe in both v...

  4. ENTREPRENEURIAL CAPABILITIES

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard; Nielsen, Thorkild

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyse entrepreneurship from an action research perspective. What is entrepreneurship about? Which are the fundamental capabilities and processes of entrepreneurship? To answer these questions the article includes a case study of a Danish entrepreneur and his networ....... Finally, the article discuss, how more long term action research methods could be integrated into the entrepreneurial processes and the possible impacts of such an implementation?...

  5. Grafted SiC nanocrystals

    Saini, Isha; Sharma, Annu; Dhiman, Rajnish

    2017-01-01

    ), raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. UV–Visible absorption spectroscopy was used to study optical properties such as optical energy gap (Eg), Urbach's energy (Eu), refractive index (n), real (ε1) and imaginary (ε2) parts of dielectric constant of PVA as well as PVA......Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) grafted SiC (PVA-g-SiC)/PVA nanocomposite was synthesized by incorporating PVA grafted silicon carbide (SiC) nanocrystals inside PVA matrix. In-depth structural characterization of resulting nanocomposite was carried out using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR...

  6. Automated microfluidic platform for systematic studies of colloidal perovskite nanocrystals: towards continuous nano-manufacturing.

    Epps, Robert W; Felton, Kobi C; Coley, Connor W; Abolhasani, Milad

    2017-11-21

    Colloidal organic/inorganic metal-halide perovskite nanocrystals have recently emerged as a potential low-cost replacement for the semiconductor materials in commercial photovoltaics and light emitting diodes. However, unlike III-V and IV-VI semiconductor nanocrystals, studies of colloidal perovskite nanocrystals have yet to develop a fundamental and comprehensive understanding of nucleation and growth kinetics. Here, we introduce a modular and automated microfluidic platform for the systematic studies of room-temperature synthesized cesium-lead halide perovskite nanocrystals. With abundant data collection across the entirety of four orders of magnitude reaction time span, we comprehensively characterize nanocrystal growth within a modular microfluidic reactor. The developed high-throughput screening platform features a custom-designed three-port flow cell with translational capability for in situ spectral characterization of the in-flow synthesized perovskite nanocrystals along a tubular microreactor with an adjustable length, ranging from 3 cm to 196 cm. The translational flow cell allows for sampling of twenty unique residence times at a single equilibrated flow rate. The developed technique requires an average total liquid consumption of 20 μL per spectra and as little as 2 μL at the time of sampling. It may continuously sample up to 30 000 unique spectra per day in both single and multi-phase flow formats. Using the developed plug-and-play microfluidic platform, we study the growth of cesium lead trihalide perovskite nanocrystals through in situ monitoring of their absorption and emission band-gaps at residence times ranging from 100 ms to 17 min. The automated microfluidic platform enables a systematic study of the effect of mixing enhancement on the quality of the synthesized nanocrystals through a direct comparison between single- and multi-phase flow systems at similar reaction time scales. The improved mixing characteristics of the multi-phase flow

  7. Development Considerations for Nanocrystal Drug Products.

    Chen, Mei-Ling; John, Mathew; Lee, Sau L; Tyner, Katherine M

    2017-05-01

    Nanocrystal technology has emerged as a valuable tool for facilitating the delivery of poorly water-soluble active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and enhancing API bioavailability. To date, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has received over 80 applications for drug products containing nanocrystals. These products can be delivered by different routes of administration and are used in a variety of therapeutic areas. To aid in identifying key developmental considerations for these products, a retrospective analysis was performed on the submissions received by the FDA to date. Over 60% of the submissions were for the oral route of administration. Based on the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS), most nanocrystal drugs submitted to the FDA are class II compounds that possess low aqueous solubility and high intestinal permeability. Impact of food on drug bioavailability was reduced for most nanocrystal formulations as compared with their micronized counterparts. For all routes of administration, dose proportionality was observed for some, but not all, nanocrystal products. Particular emphasis in the development of nanocrystal products was placed on the in-process tests and controls at critical manufacturing steps (such as milling process), mitigation and control of process-related impurities, and the stability of APIs or polymorphic form (s) during manufacturing and upon storage. This emphasis resulted in identifying challenges to the development of these products including accurate determination of particle size (distribution) of drug substance and/or nanocrystal colloidal dispersion, identification of polymorphic form (s), and establishment of drug substance/product specifications.

  8. Nanocrystal conversion chemistry: A unified and materials-general strategy for the template-based synthesis of nanocrystalline solids

    Vasquez, Yolanda; Henkes, Amanda E.; Chris Bauer, J.; Schaak, Raymond E.

    2008-01-01

    The concept of nanocrystal conversion chemistry, which involves the use of pre-formed nanoparticles as templates for chemical transformation into derivative solids, has emerged as a powerful approach for designing the synthesis of complex nanocrystalline solids. The general strategy exploits established synthetic capabilities in simple nanocrystal systems and uses these nanocrystals as templates that help to define the composition, crystal structure, and morphology of product nanocrystals. This article highlights key examples of 'conversion chemistry' approaches to the synthesis of nanocrystalline solids using a variety of techniques, including galvanic replacement, diffusion, oxidation, and ion exchange. The discussion is organized according to classes of solids, highlighting the diverse target systems that are accessible using similar chemical concepts: metals, oxides, chalcogenides, phosphides, alloys, intermetallic compounds, sulfides, and nitrides. - Graphical abstract: Nanocrystal conversion chemistry uses pre-formed nanoparticles as templates for chemical transformation into derivative solids, helping to define the composition, crystal structure, and morphology of product nanocrystals that have more complex features than their precursor templates. This article highlights the application of this concept to diverse classes of solids, including metals, oxides, chalcogenides, phosphides, alloys, intermetallics, sulfides, and nitrides

  9. Lanthanide-doped Na xScF 3+ x nanocrystals: Crystal structure evolution and multicolor tuning

    Teng, Xue

    2012-05-23

    Rare-earth-based nanomaterials have recently drawn considerable attention because of their unique energy upconversion (UC) capabilities. However, studies of Sc 3+-based nanomaterials are still absent. Herein we report the synthesis and fine control of Na xScF 3+x nanocrystals by tuning of the ratio of oleic acid (OA, polar surfactant) to 1-octadecene (OD, nonpolar solvent). When the OA:OD ratio was increased from low (3:17) to high (3:7), the nanocrystals changed from pure monoclinic phase (Na 3ScF 6) to pure hexagonal phase (NaScF 4) via a transition stage at an intermediate OA:OD ratio (3:9) where a mixture of nanocrystals in monoclinic and hexagonal phases was obtained and the coexistence of the two phases inside individual nanocrystals was also observed. More significantly, because of the small radius of Sc 3+, Na xScF 3+x:Yb/Er nanocrystals show different UC emission from that of NaYF 4:Yb/Er nanocrystals, which broadens the applications of rare-earth-based nanomaterials ranging from optical communications to disease diagnosis. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  10. Thorium/uranium mixed oxide nano-crystals: Synthesis, structural characterization and magnetic properties

    Hudry, Damien; Griveau, Jean-Christophe; Apostolidis, Christos; Colineau, Eric; Rasmussen, Gert; Walter, Olaf; Wang, Di; Venkata Sai Kiran Chakravadhaluna; Courtois, Eglantine; Kubel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    One of the primary aims of the actinide community within nano-science is to develop a good understanding similar to what is currently the case for stable elements. As a consequence, efficient, reliable and versatile synthesis techniques dedicated to the formation of new actinide-based nano-objects (e.g., nano-crystals) are necessary. Hence, a 'library' dedicated to the preparation of various actinide based nano-scale building blocks is currently being developed. Nano-scale building blocks with tunable sizes, shapes and compositions are of prime importance. So far, the non-aqueous synthesis method in highly coordinating organic media is the only approach which has demonstrated the capability to provide size and shape control of actinide-based nano-crystals (both for thorium and uranium, and recently extended to neptunium and plutonium). In this paper, we demonstrate that the non-aqueous approach is also well adapted to control the chemical composition of the nano-crystals obtained when mixing two different actinides. Indeed, the controlled hot co-injection of thorium acetylacetonate and uranyl acetate (together with additional capping agents) into benzyl ether can be used to synthesize thorium/uranium mixed oxide nano-crystals covering the full compositional spectrum. Additionally, we found that both size and shape are modified as a function of the thorium/uranium ratio. Finally, the magnetic properties of the different thorium/uranium mixed oxide nano-crystals were investigated. Contrary to several reports, we did not observe any ferromagnetic behavior. As a consequence, ferromagnetism cannot be described as a universal feature of nano-crystals of non-magnetic oxides as recently claimed in the literature. (authors)

  11. Charge transport in a CoPt3 nanocrystal microwire

    Beecher, P.; De Marzi, G.; Quinn, A.J.; Redmond, G.; Shevchenko, E.V.; Weller, H.

    2004-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of single CoPt 3 nanocrystal microwires formed by magnetic field-directed growth from colloidal solutions are presented. The wires comprise disordered assemblies of discrete nanocrystals, separated from each other by protective organic ligand shells. Electrical data indicate that the activated charge transport properties of the wires are determined by the nanocrystal charging energy, governed by the size and capacitance of the individual nanocrystals. Focused ion beam-assisted deposition of Pt metal at the wire-electrode junctions is employed to optimize the wire-electrode contacts, whilst maintaining the nanocrystal-dominated transport characteristics of these one-dimensional nanocrystal structures

  12. Composite material including nanocrystals and methods of making

    Bawendi, Moungi G.; Sundar, Vikram C.

    2010-04-06

    Temperature-sensing compositions can include an inorganic material, such as a semiconductor nanocrystal. The nanocrystal can be a dependable and accurate indicator of temperature. The intensity of emission of the nanocrystal varies with temperature and can be highly sensitive to surface temperature. The nanocrystals can be processed with a binder to form a matrix, which can be varied by altering the chemical nature of the surface of the nanocrystal. A nanocrystal with a compatibilizing outer layer can be incorporated into a coating formulation and retain its temperature sensitive emissive properties.

  13. High Temperature AL-Nanocrystal Alloy Synthesis

    Perepezko, J

    2001-01-01

    Aluminum-rich metallic glasses containing transition metals and rare earth elements have been found to yield finely mixed microstructures of Al nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous matrix and exhibit...

  14. Semiconductor-nanocrystal/conjugated polymer thin films

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Dittmer, Janke J.; Huynh, Wendy U.; Milliron, Delia

    2014-06-17

    The invention described herein provides for thin films and methods of making comprising inorganic semiconductor-nanocrystals dispersed in semiconducting-polymers in high loading amounts. The invention also describes photovoltaic devices incorporating the thin films.

  15. Photoluminescence of nanocrystals embedded in oxide matrices

    Estrada, C.; Gonzalez, J.A.; Kunold, A.; Reyes-Esqueda, J.A.; Pereyra, P.

    2006-12-01

    We used the theory of finite periodic systems to explain the photoluminescence spectra dependence on the average diameter of nanocrystals embedded in oxide matrices. Because of the broad matrix band gap, the photoluminescence response is basically determined by isolated nanocrystals and sequences of a few of them. With this model we were able to reproduce the shape and displacement of the experimentally observed photoluminescence spectra. (author)

  16. Charge transfer between acenes and PbS nanocrystals

    Dissanayake, D M N M [Solid State Electronics Laboratory, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2122 (United States); Hatton, R A [Department of Chemistry, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Lutz, T [Departments of Chemistry and Physics, Imperial College, London SW7 2AY (United Kingdom); Curry, R J; Silva, S R P [Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: ndissa@umich.edu

    2009-05-13

    Organic-inorganic hybrid heterojunctions have potential as the basis for future photovoltaic devices. Herein, we report the results of investigations exploring the possibility of using pentacene and tetracene as photoelectron donors in conjunction with PbS nanocrystals (PbS-NCs). Photoinduced charge transfer was probed using external quantum efficiency measurements on acene:PbS-NC hybrid photovoltaic devices in conjunction with photoluminescence studies of the corresponding bilayer films. It is shown that photoelectron transfer from pentacene to the PbS-NCs is inefficient as compared to that between tetracene and PbS-NCs. The latter case can be rationalized in terms of the energy level alignment at the heterojunction assuming a common vacuum level. However, in the case of pentacene:PbS-NC junctions an interfacial energy level shift must be considered in order to explain the observations.

  17. Applying analytical ultracentrifugation to nanocrystal suspensions

    Jamison, Jennifer A; Krueger, Karl M; Mayo, J T; Yavuz, Cafer T; Redden, Jacina J; Colvin, Vicki L, E-mail: colvin@rice.ed [Department of Chemistry, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-60, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2009-09-02

    While applied frequently in physical biochemistry to the study of protein complexes, the quantitative use of analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) for nanocrystal analysis is relatively rare. Its application in nanoscience is potentially very powerful as it provides a measure of nanocrystal density, size and structure directly in the solution phase. Towards that end, this paper examines the best practices for applying data collection and analysis methods for AUC, geared towards the study of biomolecules, to the unique problems of nanoparticle analysis. Using uniform nanocrystals of cadmium selenide, we compared several schemes for analyzing raw sedimentation data. Comparable values of the mean sedimentation coefficients (s-value) were found using several popular analytical approaches; however, the distribution in sample s-values is best captured using the van Holde-Weischt algorithm. Measured s-values could be reproducibly collected if sample temperature and concentration were controlled; under these circumstances, the variability for average sedimentation values was typically 5%. The full shape of the distribution in s-values, however, is not easily subjected to quantitative interpretation. Moreover, the selection of the appropriate sedimentation speed is crucial for AUC of nanocrystals as the density of inorganic nanocrystals is much larger than that of solvents. Quantitative analysis of sedimentation properties will allow for better agreement between experimental and theoretical models of nanocrystal solution behavior, as well as providing deeper insight into the hydrodynamic size and solution properties of nanomaterials.

  18. Bright trions in direct-bandgap silicon nanocrystals revealed bylow-temperature single-nanocrystal spectroscopy

    Kůsová, Kateřina; Pelant, Ivan; Valenta, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 4, Oct (2015), e336 ISSN 2047-7538 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA ČR GPP204/12/P235 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : silicon nanocrystals * single-nanocrystal spectroscopy * luminescing trions Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 13.600, year: 2015

  19. Solution synthesis of germanium nanocrystals

    Gerung, Henry [Albuquerque, NM; Boyle, Timothy J [Kensington, MD; Bunge, Scott D [Cuyahoga Falls, OH

    2009-09-22

    A method for providing a route for the synthesis of a Ge(0) nanometer-sized material from. A Ge(II) precursor is dissolved in a ligand heated to a temperature, generally between approximately 100.degree. C. and 400.degree. C., sufficient to thermally reduce the Ge(II) to Ge(0), where the ligand is a compound that can bond to the surface of the germanium nanomaterials to subsequently prevent agglomeration of the nanomaterials. The ligand encapsulates the surface of the Ge(0) material to prevent agglomeration. The resulting solution is cooled for handling, with the cooling characteristics useful in controlling the size and size distribution of the Ge(0) materials. The characteristics of the Ge(II) precursor determine whether the Ge(0) materials that result will be nanocrystals or nanowires.

  20. Polyimide Cellulose Nanocrystal Composite Aerogels

    Nguyen, Baochau N.; Meador, Mary Ann; Rowan, Stuart; Cudjoe, Elvis; Sandberg, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Polyimide (PI) aerogels are highly porous solids having low density, high porosity and low thermal conductivity with good mechanical properties. They are ideal for various applications including use in antenna and insulation such as inflatable decelerators used in entry, decent and landing operations. Recently, attention has been focused on stimuli responsive materials such as cellulose nano crystals (CNCs). CNCs are environmentally friendly, bio-renewable, commonly found in plants and the dermis of sea tunicates, and potentially low cost. This study is to examine the effects of CNC on the polyimide aerogels. The CNC used in this project are extracted from mantle of a sea creature called tunicates. A series of polyimide cellulose nanocrystal composite aerogels has been fabricated having 0-13 wt of CNC. Results will be discussed.

  1. 2009 Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures GRC

    Wang, Lai-Sheng [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2009-07-19

    For over thirty years, this Gordon Conference has been the premiere meeting for the field of cluster science, which studies the phenomena that arise when matter becomes small. During its history, participants have witnessed the discovery and development of many novel materials, including C60, carbon nanotubes, semiconductor and metal nanocrystals, and nanowires. In addition to addressing fundamental scientific questions related to these materials, the meeting has always included a discussion of their potential applications. Consequently, this conference has played a critical role in the birth and growth of nanoscience and engineering. The goal of the 2009 Gordon Conference is to continue the forward-looking tradition of this meeting and discuss the most recent advances in the field of clusters, nanocrystals, and nanostructures. As in past meetings, this will include new topics that broaden the field. In particular, a special emphasis will be placed on nanomaterials related to the efficient use, generation, or conversion of energy. For example, we anticipate presentations related to batteries, catalysts, photovoltaics, and thermoelectrics. In addition, we expect to address the controversy surrounding carrier multiplication with a session in which recent results addressing this phenomenon will be discussed and debated. The atmosphere of the conference, which emphasizes the presentation of unpublished results and lengthy discussion periods, ensures that attendees will enjoy a valuable and stimulating experience. Because only a limited number of participants are allowed to attend this conference, and oversubscription is anticipated, we encourage all interested researchers from academia, industry, and government institutions to apply as early as possible. An invitation is not required. We also encourage all attendees to submit their latest results for presentation at the poster sessions. We anticipate that several posters will be selected for 'hot topic' oral

  2. Assembling a Lasing Hybrid Material With Supramolecular Polymers and Nanocrystals

    Li, Leiming

    2003-01-01

    .... In the system containing ZnO nanocrystals as the inorganic component, both phases are oriented in the hybrid material forming an ultraviolet lasing medium with a lower threshold relative to pure ZnO nanocrystals.

  3. Surface treatment of nanocrystal quantum dots after film deposition

    Sykora, Milan; Koposov, Alexey; Fuke, Nobuhiro

    2015-02-03

    Provided are methods of surface treatment of nanocrystal quantum dots after film deposition so as to exchange the native ligands of the quantum dots for exchange ligands that result in improvement in charge extraction from the nanocrystals.

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Colloidal Metal and Photovoltaic Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    Abulikemu, Mutalifu

    2014-01-01

    -performing photovoltaic nanocrystals contain toxic elements, such as Pb, or scarce elements, such as In; thus, the production of solution-processable nanocrystals from earth-abundant materials using environmentally benign synthesis and processing methods has become a

  5. Near-infrared light emitting device using semiconductor nanocrystals

    Supran, Geoffrey J.S.; Song, Katherine W.; Hwang, Gyuweon; Correa, Raoul Emile; Shirasaki, Yasuhiro; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Bulovic, Vladimir; Scherer, Jennifer

    2018-04-03

    A near-infrared light emitting device can include semiconductor nanocrystals that emit at wavelengths beyond 1 .mu.m. The semiconductor nanocrystals can include a core and an overcoating on a surface of the core.

  6. Light Scattering Spectroscopies of Semiconductor Nanocrystals (Quantum Dots)

    Yu, Peter Y; Gardner, Grat; Nozaki, Shinji; Berbezier, Isabelle

    2006-01-01

    We review the study of nanocrystals or quantum dots using inelastic light scattering spectroscopies. In particular recent calculations of the phonon density of states and low frequency Raman spectra in Ge nanocrystals are presented for comparison with experimental results

  7. Conformational Control of Energy Transfer: A Mechanism for Biocompatible Nanocrystal-Based Sensors

    Kay, Euan R.; Lee, Jungmin; Nocera, Daniel; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2012-01-01

    Fold-up fluorophore: A new paradigm for designing self-referencing fluorescent nanosensors is demonstrated by interfacing a pH-triggered molecular conformational switch with quantum dots. Analytedependent, large-amplitude conformational motion controls the distance between the nanocrystal energy donor and an organic FRET acceptor. The result is a fluorescence signal capable of reporting pH values from individual endosomes in living cells.

  8. Binding SnO2 nanocrystals in nitrogen-doped graphene sheets as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

    Zhou, Xiaosi; Wan, Li-Jun; Guo, Yu-Guo

    2013-04-18

    Hybrid anode materials for Li-ion batteries are fabricated by binding SnO2 nanocrystals (NCs) in nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-RGO) sheets by means of an in situ hydrazine monohydrate vapor reduction method. The SnO2NCs in the obtained SnO2NC@N-RGO hybrid material exhibit exceptionally high specific capacity and high rate capability. Bonds formed between graphene and SnO2 nanocrystals limit the aggregation of in situ formed Sn nanoparticles, leading to a stable hybrid anode material with long cycle life. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Nonlinear optical effect and excited electron dynamics of semiconductor nanocrystals; Handotai nano kessh no hisenkei kogaku koka to reiki denshi dynamics

    Goto, T. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    1996-08-20

    Investigations were given on nanocrystals of CuCl and CdTe with regard to their nonlinear optical mechanism. The experiment used a femto-second pump probe spectroscope. The experiment on CuCl nanocrystals revealed the following facts: in the case where one photon is absorbed into one nanocrystal, cascade mitigation occurs to the pair of electrons and holes, and exciters; and in the case where two photons are absorbed into one nanocrystal, exciter molecules are made via the pair of electrons and holes and the exciters. Thus, it was found that the optical nonlinearity occurs when more than two photons are absorbed into one nanocrystal, and inter-exciter interactions and formation of the exciter molecules are the physical causes thereof. The experiment on CdTe nanocrystals indicated that electrons and holes produced by laser beam are distributed instantaneously between the size-quantized discrete levels, and that temperature in the electron system drops with lapse of time. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Cellulose nanocrystal: electronically conducting polymer nanocomposites for supercapacitors

    Liew, Soon Yee

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the use of cellulose nanocrystals for the fabrication of porous nanocomposites with electronic conducting polymers for electrochemical supercapacitor applications. The exceptional strength and negatively charged surface functionalities on cellulose nanocrystals are utilised in these nanocomposites. The negatively charged surface functionalities on cellulose nanocrystals allow their simultaneous incorporation into electropolymerised, positively charged conducting polymer ...

  11. PTFE-based microreactor system for the continuous synthesis of full-visible-spectrum emitting cesium lead halide perovskite nanocrystals

    Chengxi Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal perovskite nanocrystals comprised of all inorganic cesium lead halide (CsPbX3, X = Cl, Br, I or a mixture thereof have potential as optical gain materials due to their high luminescence efficiency. In this work, cesium lead halide nanocrystals are continuously synthesized via a microreactor system consisting of poly(tetrafluoroethylene (PTFE capillaries. The synthesized nanocrystals possess excellent optical properties, including a full width at half maximum of 19–35 nm, high fluorescence quantum yield of 47.8–90.55%, and photoluminescence emission in the range of 450–700 nm. For the same precursor concentrations, the photoluminescence emission peak generally increases with increasing reaction temperature, revealing a controllable temperature effect on the photoluminescence characteristics of the synthesized nanocrystals. For quantum dots synthesized with a Br/I ratio of 1:3, a slight blue shift was observed for reaction temperatures greater than 100 °C. This PTFE-based microreactor system provides the unique capability of continuously synthesizing high-quality perovskite nanocrystals that emit over the full visible spectrum with applications ranging from displays and optoelectronic devices.

  12. Direct femtosecond observation of charge carrier recombination in ternary semiconductor nanocrystals: The effect of composition and shelling

    Bose, Riya

    2015-02-12

    Heavy-metal free ternary semiconductor nanocrystals are emerging as key materials in photoactive applications. However, the relative abundance of intra-bandgap defect states and lack of understanding of their origins within this class of nanocrystals are major factors limiting their applicability. To remove these undesirable defect states which considerably shorten the lifetimes of photogenerated excited carriers, a detailed understanding about their origin and nature is required. In this report, we monitor the ultrafast charge carrier dynamics of CuInS2 (CIS), CuInSSe (CISSe), and CuInSe2 (CISe) nanocrystals, before and after ZnS shelling, using state-of-the-art time-resolved laser spectroscopy with broadband capabilities. The experimental results demonstrate the presence of both electron and hole trapping intra-bandgap states in the nanocrystals which can be removed significantly by ZnS shelling, and the carrier dynamics is slowed down. Another important observation remains the reduction of carrier lifetime in the presence of Se, and the shelling strategy is observed to be less effective at suppressing trap states. This study provides quantitative physical insights into the role of anion composition and shelling on the charge carrier dynamics in ternary CIS, CISSe, and CISe nanocrystals which are essential to improve their applicability for photovoltaics and optoelectronics.

  13. Hydrothermal synthesis of tungsten doped tin dioxide nanocrystals

    Zhou, Cailong; Li, Yufeng; Chen, Yiwen; Lin, Jing

    2018-01-01

    Tungsten doped tin dioxide (WTO) nanocrystals were synthesized through a one-step hydrothermal method. The structure, composition and morphology of WTO nanocrystals were characterized by x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra, zeta potential analysis and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Results show that the as-prepared WTO nanocrystals were rutile-type structure with the size near 13 nm. Compared with the undoped tin dioxide nanocrystals, the WTO nanocrystals possessed better dispersity in ethanol phase and formed transparent sol.

  14. Crystallization and Growth of Colloidal Nanocrystals

    Leite, Edson Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Since the size, shape, and microstructure of nanocrystalline materials strongly impact physical and chemical properties, the development of new synthetic routes to  nanocrystals with controlled composition and morphology is a key objective of the nanomaterials community. This objective is dependent on control of the nucleation and growth mechanisms that occur during the synthetic process, which in turn requires a fundamental understanding of both classical nucleation and growth and non-classical growth processes in nanostructured materials.  Recently, a novel growth process called Oriented Attachment (OA) was identified which appears to be a fundamental mechanism during the development of nanoscale  materials. OA is a special case of aggregation that provides an important route by which nanocrystals grow, defects are formed, and unique—often symmetry-defying—crystal morphologies can be produced. This growth mechanism involves reversible self-assembly of primary nanocrystals followed by reorientati...

  15. Shaping metal nanocrystals through epitaxial seeded growth

    Habas, Susan E.; Lee, Hyunjoo; Radmilovic, Velimir; Somorjai,Gabor A.; Yang, Peidong

    2008-02-17

    Morphological control of nanocrystals has becomeincreasingly important, as many of their physical and chemical propertiesare highly shape-dependent. Nanocrystal shape control for both single andmultiple material systems, however, remains fairly empirical andchallenging. New methods need to be explored for the rational syntheticdesign of heterostructures with controlled morphology. Overgrowth of adifferent material on well-faceted seeds, for example, allows for the useof the defined seed morphology to control nucleation and growth of thesecondary structure. Here, we have used highly faceted cubic Pt seeds todirect the epitaxial overgrowth of a secondary metal. We demonstrate thisconcept with lattice matched Pd to produce conformal shape-controlledcore-shell particles, and then extend it to lattice mismatched Au to giveanisotropic growth. Seeding with faceted nanocrystals may havesignificant potential towards the development of shape-controlledheterostructures with defined interfaces.

  16. The structure and morphology of semiconductor nanocrystals

    Kadavanich, Andreas V. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-11-01

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals were studied using High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). Organically capped nanocrystals were found to have faceted shapes consistent with Wulff polyhedra after the effects of capping ligands on surface energies were taken into account. The basic shape thus derived for wurtzite (WZ) structure CdSe nanocrystals capped by tri-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) was a truncated hexagonal prism, elongated alone the <001> axis with (100) and (002) facets. This structure has C{sub 3v} point group symmetry. The main defect in this structure is a stacking fault (a single layer of zinc blende type stacking), which does not significantly affect the shape (does not alter the point group).

  17. Strained interface defects in silicon nanocrystals

    Lee, Benjamin G.; Stradins, Paul [National Center for Photovoltaics, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Hiller, Daniel; Zacharias, Margit [IMTEK - Faculty of Engineering, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg (Germany); Luo, Jun-Wei; Beard, Matthew C. [Chemical and Materials Science, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Semonin, Octavi E. [Chemical and Materials Science, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2012-08-07

    The surface of silicon nanocrystals embedded in an oxide matrix can contain numerous interface defects. These defects strongly affect the nanocrystals' photoluminescence efficiency and optical absorption. Dangling-bond defects are nearly eliminated by H{sub 2} passivation, thus decreasing absorption below the quantum-confined bandgap and enhancing PL efficiency by an order of magnitude. However, there remain numerous other defects seen in absorption by photothermal deflection spectroscopy; these defects cause non-radiative recombination that limits the PL efficiency to <15%. Using atomistic pseudopotential simulations, we attribute these defects to two specific types of distorted bonds: Si-Si and bridging Si-O-Si bonds between two Si atoms at the nanocrystal surface. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Plasmonic Properties of Silicon Nanocrystals Doped with Boron and Phosphorus.

    Kramer, Nicolaas J; Schramke, Katelyn S; Kortshagen, Uwe R

    2015-08-12

    Degenerately doped silicon nanocrystals are appealing plasmonic materials due to silicon's low cost and low toxicity. While surface plasmonic resonances of boron-doped and phosphorus-doped silicon nanocrystals were recently observed, there currently is poor understanding of the effect of surface conditions on their plasmonic behavior. Here, we demonstrate that phosphorus-doped silicon nanocrystals exhibit a plasmon resonance immediately after their synthesis but may lose their plasmonic response with oxidation. In contrast, boron-doped nanocrystals initially do not exhibit plasmonic response but become plasmonically active through postsynthesis oxidation or annealing. We interpret these results in terms of substitutional doping being the dominant doping mechanism for phosphorus-doped silicon nanocrystals, with oxidation-induced defects trapping free electrons. The behavior of boron-doped silicon nanocrystals is more consistent with a strong contribution of surface doping. Importantly, boron-doped silicon nanocrystals exhibit air-stable plasmonic behavior over periods of more than a year.

  19. Luminescence in colloidal Mn2+-doped semiconductor nanocrystals

    Beaulac, Remi; Archer, Paul I.; Gamelin, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in nanocrystal doping chemistries have substantially broadened the variety of photophysical properties that can be observed in colloidal Mn 2+ -doped semiconductor nanocrystals. A brief overview is provided, focusing on Mn 2+ -doped II-VI semiconductor nanocrystals prepared by direct chemical synthesis and capped with coordinating surface ligands. These Mn 2+ -doped semiconductor nanocrystals are organized into three major groups according to the location of various Mn 2+ -related excited states relative to the energy gap of the host semiconductor nanocrystals. The positioning of these excited states gives rise to three distinct relaxation scenarios following photoexcitation. A brief outlook on future research directions is provided. - Graphical abstract: Mn 2+ -doped semiconductor nanocrystals are organized into three major groups according to the location of various Mn 2+ -related excited states relative to the energy gap of the host semiconductor nanocrystals. The positioning of these excited states gives rise to three distinct relaxation scenarios following photoexcitation

  20. Cloning nanocrystal morphology with soft templates

    Thapa, Dev Kumar; Pandey, Anshu

    2016-08-01

    In most template directed preparative methods, while the template decides the nanostructure morphology, the structure of the template itself is a non-general outcome of its peculiar chemistry. Here we demonstrate a template mediated synthesis that overcomes this deficiency. This synthesis involves overgrowth of silica template onto a sacrificial nanocrystal. Such templates are used to copy the morphologies of gold nanorods. After template overgrowth, gold is removed and silver is regrown in the template cavity to produce a single crystal silver nanorod. This technique allows for duplicating existing nanocrystals, while also providing a quantifiable breakdown of the structure - shape interdependence.

  1. Probe Storage

    Gemelli, Marcellino; Abelmann, Leon; Engelen, Johannes Bernardus Charles; Khatib, M.G.; Koelmans, W.W.; Zaboronski, Olog; Campardo, Giovanni; Tiziani, Federico; Laculo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of probe-based data storage research over the last three decades, encompassing all aspects of a probe recording system. Following the division found in all mechanically addressed storage systems, the different subsystems (media, read/write heads, positioning, data

  2. Cultural probes

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation.......The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation....

  3. Optical luminescence from alkyl-passivated Si nanocrystals under vacuum ultraviolet excitation: Origin and temperature dependence of the blue and orange emissions

    Chao, Y; Houlton, A; Horrocks, BR; Hunt, MRC; Poolton, NRJ; Yang, J; Šiller, L

    2006-01-01

    The origin and stability of luminescence are critical issues for Si nanocrystals which are intended for use as biological probes. The optical luminescence of alkyl-monolayer-passivated silicon nanocrystals was studied under excitation with vacuum ultraviolet photons (5.1–23 eV). Blue and orange emission bands were observed simultaneously, but the blue band only appeared at low temperatures (8.7 eV). At 8 K, the peak wavelengths of the emission bands were 430±2 nm (blue) and 600±2 nm (orange)....

  4. Enriching Silver Nanocrystals with a Second Noble Metal.

    Wu, Yiren; Sun, Xiaojun; Yang, Yin; Li, Jumei; Zhang, Yun; Qin, Dong

    2017-07-18

    Noble-metal nanocrystals have received considerable interests owing to their fascinating properties and promising applications in areas including plasmonics, catalysis, sensing, imaging, and medicine. As demonstrated by ample examples, the performance of nanocrystals in these and related applications can be augmented by switching from monometallic to bimetallic systems. The inclusion of a second metal can enhance the properties and greatly expand the application landscape by bringing in new capabilities. Seeded growth offers a powerful route to bimetallic nanocrystals. This approach is built upon the concept that preformed nanocrystals with uniform, well-controlled size, shape, and structure can serve as seeds to template and direct the deposition of metal atoms. Seeded growth is, however, limited by galvanic replacement when the deposited metal is less reactive than the seed. The involvement of galvanic replacement not only makes it difficult to control the outcome of seeded growth but also causes degradation to some properties. We have successfully addressed this issue by reducing the salt precursor(s) into atoms with essentially no galvanic replacement. In the absence of self-nucleation, the atoms are preferentially deposited onto the seeds to generate bimetallic nanocrystals with controlled structures. In this Account, we use Ag nanocubes as an example to demonstrate the fabrication of Ag@M and Ag@Ag-M (M = Au, Pd, or Pt) nanocubes with a core-frame or core-shell structure by controlling the deposition of M atoms. A typical synthesis involves the titration of M n+ (a precursor to M) ions into an aqueous suspension containing Ag nanocubes, ascorbic acid, and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) under ambient conditions. In one approach, aqueous sodium hydroxide is introduced to increase the initial pH of the reaction system. At pH = 11.9, ascorbic acid is dominated by ascorbate monoanion, a much stronger reductant, to suppress the galvanic replacement between M n+ and Ag. In

  5. Annealing effects on the photoresponse properties of CdSe nanocrystal thin films

    Lou Shiyun; Zhou Changhua; Wang Hongzhe; Shen Huaibin; Cheng Gang; Du Zuliang; Zhou, Shaomin; Li Linsong

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The as-prepared CdSe nanocrystal films were treated at 500 deg. C for 3 h under continuous N 2 . → Annealing process removed the organic capping completely and eliminated oxide on the CdSe surface. → Thermal annealing resulted the increase of the crystallite sizes and necking the NCs. → The photoresponse speed of the CdSe nanocrystal films was improved. - Abstract: The photoresponse properties of the as-prepared and annealed close-packed CdSe nanocrystal (NC) films were investigated under laser illumination by Kelvin probe force microscopy. The annealing process improved the photoresponse speed of the CdSe NC films. The work function of the annealed CdSe NC films changed more rapidly than that of the non-annealed film in air at room temperature. Combined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements and thermogravimetric analysis, the observed phenomena can be interpreted that annealing process removed the organic capping agents completely and eliminated oxide on the CdSe surface, which formed the tunnel barrier between NCs in the CdSe NC films. Consequently, it improved the separation rate of photoelectric charges and thus provided high speed photoresponse.

  6. Identification of nasopharyngeal carcinoma from photoluminescence spectra of 3C-SiC nanocrystals

    Wang, Li-Fen; Guo, Jun-Hong; Huang, Zhi-Chun; Gu, Jian-Sen; Feng, Li-Ren; Liu, Li-Zhe

    2017-09-01

    The identification of intracellular pH (pHi) during carcinogenesis progression plays a crucial role in the studies of biochemistry, cytology, and clinical medicine. In this work, 3C-SiC nanocrystals (NCs), which can effectively monitor the pH environment by using the linear relation between photoluminescence intensity and surface OH- and H+ concentration, are adapted as fluorescent probes for monitoring carcinogenesis progression of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Our results demonstrated that 3C-SiC NCs are compatible with living cells and have low cytotoxicity. The pHi measurements in different carcinogenesis environments indicate the validity and sensitivity of this technology in identifying nasopharyngeal carcinoma in application.

  7. Anode property of carbon coated LiFePO4 nanocrystals

    Ni, Jiangfeng; Jiang, Jiaxing; Savilov, S. V.; Aldoshin, S. M.

    2016-10-01

    Nanostructured LiFePO4 is appealing cathode material for rechargeable lithium batteries. Herein, however, we report the intriguing anode properties of carbon coated LiFePO4 nanocrystals. In the potential range of 0-3.0 V, the LiFePO4 nanocrystal electrodes afford high reversible capacity of 373 mAhg-1 at a current rate of 0.05 Ag-1 and retains 239 mAhg-1 at a much higher rate of 1.25 Ag-1. In addition, it is capable of sustaining 1000 cycles at 1.25 Ag-1 without any capacity fading. Such superior properties indicate that nanostructured LiFePO4 could also be promising anode for rechargeable battery applications.

  8. Prospects of Colloidal Copper Chalcogenide Nanocrystals

    van der Stam, W.; Berends, A.C.; de Mello-Donega, Celso

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few years, colloidal copper chalcogenide nanocrystals (NCs) have emerged as promising alternatives to conventional Cd and Pb chalcogenide NCs. Owing to their wide size, shape, and composition tunability, Cu chalcogenide NCs hold great promise for several applications, such as

  9. Hafnium carbide nanocrystal chains for field emitters

    Tian, Song; Li, Hejun; Zhang, Yulei; Ren, Jincui; Qiang, Xinfa; Zhang, Shouyang

    2014-01-01

    A hafnium carbide (HfC) nanostructure, i.e., HfC nanocrystal chain, was synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. X-ray diffractometer, field-emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer were employed to characterize the product. The synthesized one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures with many faceted octahedral nanocrystals possess diameters of tens of nanometers to 500 nm and lengths of a few microns. The chain-like structures possess a single crystalline structure and preferential growth direction along the [1 0 0] crystal orientation. The growth of the chains occurred through the vapor–liquid–solid process along with a negative-feedback mechanism. The field emission (FE) properties of the HfC nanocrystal chains as the cold cathode emitters were examined. The HfC nanocrystal chains display good FE properties with a low turn-on field of about 3.9 V μm −1 and a high field enhancement factor of 2157, implying potential applications in vacuum microelectronics.

  10. Atomic force microscopy characterization of cellulose nanocrystals

    Roya R. Lahiji; Xin Xu; Ronald Reifenberger; Arvind Raman; Alan Rudie; Robert J. Moon

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are gaining interest as a “green” nanomaterial with superior mechanical and chemical properties for high-performance nanocomposite materials; however, there is a lack of accurate material property characterization of individual CNCs. Here, a detailed study of the topography, elastic and adhesive properties of individual wood-derived CNCs...

  11. Biocompatibility of bio based calcium carbonate nanocrystals ...

    Background: Currently, there has been extensive research interest for inorganic nanocrystals such as calcium phosphate, iron oxide, silicone, carbon nanotube and layered double hydroxide as a drug delivery system especially in cancer therapy. However, toxicological screening of such particles is paramount importance ...

  12. Solvothermal synthesis and characterization of CZTS nanocrystals

    Dumasiya, Ajay; Shah, N. M.

    2017-05-01

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is a promising thin film absorber material for low cost solar cell applications. CZTS nanoparticle ink synthesized using solvothermal route is an attractive option to deposit absorber layer using screen printing or spin coating method in CZTS thin film solar cell. In this study we have synthesized CZTS nanocrystals using solvothermal method from aqueous solution of Copper nitrate [Cu(NO3)2], Zinc nitrate [Zn(NO3)2], tin chloride [SnCl4] and thiourea with varying concentration of Cu(NO3)2 (viz 0.82 mmol,1.4 mmol, 1.7 mmol) keeping concentrations of rest of solutions constant. As synthesized CZTS nanocrystals are characterized using Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-rays (EDAX) to verify stoichiometry of elements. Analysis of EDAX data suggests that CZTS nanocrystals having Copper nitrate [Cu (NO3)2] concentration of 1.4 m mole is near stoichiometric. X-ray diffraction analysis study of CZTS nanocrystals having Copper nitrate [Cu (NO3)2] concentration of 1.4 m mole reveals the preferred orientation of the grains in (112), (220) and (312) direction confirming Kesterite structure of CZTS.

  13. Thick-shell nanocrystal quantum dots

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A [Los Alamos, NM; Chen, Yongfen [Eugene, OR; Klimov, Victor I [Los Alamos, NM; Htoon, Han [Los Alamos, NM; Vela, Javier [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-05-03

    Colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots comprising an inner core having an average diameter of at least 1.5 nm and an outer shell, where said outer shell comprises multiple monolayers, wherein at least 30% of the quantum dots have an on-time fraction of 0.80 or greater under continuous excitation conditions for a period of time of at least 10 minutes.

  14. Biodegradation behaviors of cellulose nanocrystals -PVA nanocomposites

    Mahdi Rohani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this research, biodegradation behaviors of cellulose nanocrystals-poly vinyl alcohol nanocomposites were investigated. Nanocomposite films with different filler loading levels (3, 6, 9 and 12% by wt were developed by solvent casting method. The effect of cellulose nanocrystals on the biodegradation behaviors of nanocomposite films was studied. Water absorption and water solubility tests were performed by immersing specimens into distilled water. The characteristic parameter of diffusion coefficient and maximum moisture content were determined from the obtained water absorption curves. The water absorption behavior of the nanocomposites was found to follow a Fickian behavior. The maximum water absorption and diffusion coefficients were decreased by increasing the cellulose nanocrystals contents, however the water solubility decrease. The biodegradability of the films was investigated by immersing specimens into cellulase enzymatic solution as well as by burial in soil. The results showed that adding cellulose nanocrystals increase the weight loss of specimens in enzymatic solution but decrease it in soil media. The limited biodegradability of specimens in soil media attributed to development of strong interactions with solid substrates that inhibit the accessibility of functional groups. Specimens with the low degree of hydrolysis underwent extensive biodegradation in both enzymatic and soil media, whilst specimens with the high degree of hydrolysis showed recalcitrance to biodegradation under those conditions.

  15. Mechanistic Study of Monodisperse Iron Oxide Nanocrystals ...

    To gain better insight into the formation of iron oxide nanocrystals from the solution phase thermal decomposition of iron (III) oleate complex, different reaction conditions including time, heating ramp, as well as concentrations of iron oleate precursor and oleic acid ligand were systematically varied and the resulting ...

  16. Silicon nanocrystal films for electronic applications

    Lechner, Robert W.

    2009-02-06

    Whether nanoparticles of silicon are really suited for such applications, whether layers fabricated from this exhibit semiconducting properties, whether they can be doped, and whether for instance via the doping the conductivity can be tuned, was studied in the present thesis. Starting material for this were on the one hand spherical silicon nanocrystals with a sharp size distribution and mean diameters in the range from 4-50 nm. Furthermore silicon particle were available, which are with 50-500 nm distinctly larger and exhibit a broad distribution of the mean size and a polycrystalline fine structure with strongly bifurcated external morphology. The small conductivities and tje low mobility values of the charge carriers in the layers of silicon nanocrystals suggest to apply suited thermal after-treatment procedures. So was found that the aluminium-induced layer exchange (ALILE) also can be transferred to the porous layers of nanocrystals. With the deuteron passivation a method was available to change the charge-carrier concentration in the polycrystalline layers. Additionally to ALILE laser crystallization as alternative after-treatment procedure of the nanocrystal layers was studied.

  17. Biomimetic synthesis of noble metal nanocrystals

    Chiu, Chin-Yi

    At the nanometer scale, the physical and chemical properties of materials heavily depend on their sizes and shapes. This fact has triggered considerable efforts in developing controllable nanomaterial synthesis. The controlled growth of colloidal nanocrystal is a kinetic process, in which high-energy facets grow faster and then vanish, leading to a nanocrystal enclosed by low-energy facets. Identifying a surfactant that can selectively bind to a particular crystal facet and thus lower its surface energy, is critical and challenging in shape controlled synthesis of nanocrystals. Biomolecules exhibiting exquisite molecular recognition properties can be exploited to precisely engineer nanostructured materials. In the first part of my thesis, we employed the phage display technique to select a specific multifunctional peptide sequence which can bind on Pd surface and mediate Pd crystal nucleation and growth, achieving size controlled synthesis of Pd nanocrystals in aqueous solution. We further demonstrated a rational biomimetic approach to the predictable synthesis of nanocrystals enclosed by a particular facet in the case of Pt. Specifically, Pt {100} and Pt {111} facet-specific peptides were identified and used to synthesize Pt nanocubes and Pt nano-tetrahedrons, respectively. The mechanistic studies of Pt {111} facet-specific peptide had led us to study the facet-selective adsorption of aromatic molecules on noble metal surfaces. The discoveries had achieved the development of design strategies to select facet-selective molecules which can synthesize nanocrystals with expected shapes in both Pt and Pd system. At last, we exploited Pt facet-specific peptides and controlled the molecular interaction to produce one- and three- dimensional nanostructures composed of anisotropic nanoparticles in synthetic conditions without supramolecular pre-organization, demonstrating the full potential of biomolecules in mediating material formation process. My research on biomimetic

  18. Mobile probes

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Jørgensen, Anna Neustrup; Noesgaard, Signe Schack

    2016-01-01

    A project investigating the effectiveness of a collection of online resources for teachers' professional development used mobile probes as a data collection method. Teachers received questions and tasks on their mobile in a dialogic manner while in their everyday context as opposed...... to in an interview. This method provided valuable insight into the contextual use, i.e. how did the online resource transfer to the work practice. However, the research team also found that mobile probes may provide the scaffolding necessary for individual and peer learning at a very local (intra-school) community...... level. This paper is an initial investigation of how the mobile probes process proved to engage teachers in their efforts to improve teaching. It also highlights some of the barriers emerging when applying mobile probes as a scaffold for learning....

  19. Optical probe

    Denis, J.; Decaudin, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The probe includes optical means of refractive index n, refracting an incident light beam from a medium with a refractive index n1>n and reflecting an incident light beam from a medium with a refractive index n2 [fr

  20. Synthesis of nanocrystals and nanocrystal self-assembly

    Chen, Zhuoying

    Chapter 1. A general introduction is presented on nanomaterials and nanoscience. Nanoparticles are discussed with respect to their structure and properties. Ferroelectric materials and nanoparticles in particular are highlighted, especially in the case of the barium titanate, and their potential applications are discussed. Different nanocrystal synthetic techniques are discussed. Nanoparticle superlattices, the novel "meta-materials" built from self-assembly at the nanoscale, are introduced. The formation of nanoparticle superlattices and the importance and interest of synthesizing these nanostructures is discussed. Chapter 2. Advanced applications for high k dielectric and ferroelectric materials in the electronics industry continues to demand an understanding of the underlying physics in decreasing dimensions into the nanoscale. The first part of this chapter presents the synthesis, processing, and electrical characterization of nanostructured thin films (thickness ˜100 nm) of barium titanate BaTiO3 built from uniform nanoparticles (alcohols were used to study the effect of size and morphological control over the nanocrystals. Techniques including X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and high-resolution electron microscopy are used to examine crystallinity and morphology. Chapter 3. By investigating the self-assembly of cadmium selenide-gold (CdSe-Au) nanoparticle mixtures by transmission electron microscopy after solvent evaporation, the effect of solvents in the formation process of CdSe-Au binary nanoparticle superlattices (BNSLs) was studied. 1-dodecanethiol was found to be critical in generating conditions necessary for superlattice formation, prior to the other factors that likely determine structure, highlighting the dual role of this organic polar molecule as both ligand and high boiling point/crystallization solvent. The influence of thiol was investigated under various concentrations (and also

  1. Counting probe

    Matsumoto, Haruya; Kaya, Nobuyuki; Yuasa, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Tomoaki

    1976-01-01

    Electron counting method has been devised and experimented for the purpose of measuring electron temperature and density, the most fundamental quantities to represent plasma conditions. Electron counting is a method to count the electrons in plasma directly by equipping a probe with the secondary electron multiplier. It has three advantages of adjustable sensitivity, high sensitivity of the secondary electron multiplier, and directional property. Sensitivity adjustment is performed by changing the size of collecting hole (pin hole) on the incident front of the multiplier. The probe is usable as a direct reading thermometer of electron temperature because it requires to collect very small amount of electrons, thus it doesn't disturb the surrounding plasma, and the narrow sweep width of the probe voltage is enough. Therefore it can measure anisotropy more sensitively than a Langmuir probe, and it can be used for very low density plasma. Though many problems remain on anisotropy, computer simulation has been carried out. Also it is planned to provide a Helmholtz coil in the vacuum chamber to eliminate the effect of earth magnetic field. In practical experiments, the measurement with a Langmuir probe and an emission probe mounted to the movable structure, the comparison with the results obtained in reverse magnetic field by using a Helmholtz coil, and the measurement of ionic sound wave are scheduled. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  2. Highly aqueous soluble CaF2:Ce/Tb nanocrystals: effect of surface functionalization on structural, optical band gap, and photoluminescence properties.

    Ansari, Anees A; Parchur, Abdul K; Kumar, Brijesh; Rai, S B

    2016-12-01

    The design of nanostructured materials with highly stable water-dispersion and luminescence efficiency is an important concern in nanotechnology and nanomedicine. In this paper, we described the synthesis and distinct surface modification on the morphological structure and optical (optical absorption, band gap energy, excitation, emission, decay time, etc.) properties of highly crystalline water-dispersible CaF 2 :Ce/Tb nanocrystals (core-nanocrystals). The epitaxial growth of inert CaF 2 and silica shell, respectively, on their surface forming as CaF 2 :Ce/Tb@CaF 2 (core/shell) and CaF 2 :Ce/Tb@CaF 2 @SiO 2 (core/shell/SiO 2 ) nanoarchitecture. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope image shows that the nanocrystals were in irregular spherical phase, highly crystalline (~20 nm) with narrow size distribution. The core/shell nanocrystals confirm that the surface coating is responsible in the change of symmetrical nanostructure, which was determined from the band gap energy and luminescent properties. It was found that an inert inorganic shell formation effectively enhances the luminescence efficiency and silica shell makes the nanocrystals highly water-dispersible. In addition, Ce 3+ /Tb 3+ -co-doped CaF 2 nanocrystals show efficient energy transfer from Ce 3+ to Tb 3+ ion and strong green luminescence of Tb 3+ ion at 541 nm( 5 D 4 → 7 F 5 ). Luminescence decay curves of core and core/shell nanocrystals were fitted using mono and biexponential equations, and R 2 regression coefficient criteria were used to discriminate the goodness of the fitted model. The lifetime values for the core/shell nanocrystals are higher than core-nanocrystals. Considering the high stable water-dispersion and intensive luminescence emission in the visible region, these luminescent core/shell nanocrystals could be potential candidates for luminescent bio-imaging, optical bio-probe, displays, staining, and multianalyte optical sensing. A newly designed CaF 2 :Ce

  3. Structure and transformation of tactoids in cellulose nanocrystal suspensions

    Wang, Pei-Xi; Hamad, Wadood Y.; MacLachlan, Mark J.

    2016-05-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals obtained from natural sources are of great interest for many applications. In water, cellulose nanocrystals form a liquid crystalline phase whose hierarchical structure is retained in solid films after drying. Although tactoids, one of the most primitive components of liquid crystals, are thought to have a significant role in the evolution of this phase, they have evaded structural study of their internal organization. Here we report the capture of cellulose nanocrystal tactoids in a polymer matrix. This method allows us to visualize, for the first time, the arrangement of cellulose nanocrystals within individual tactoids by electron microscopy. Furthermore, we can follow the structural evolution of the liquid crystalline phase from tactoids to iridescent-layered films. Our insights into the early nucleation events of cellulose nanocrystals give important information about the growth of cholesteric liquid crystalline phases, especially for cellulose nanocrystals, and are crucial for preparing photonics-quality films.

  4. Organization of silicon nanocrystals by localized electrochemical etching

    Ayari-Kanoun, Asma; Drouin, Dominique; Beauvais, Jacques; Lysenko, Vladimir; Nychyporuk, Tetyana; Souifi, Abdelkader

    2009-01-01

    An approach to form a monolayer of organized silicon nanocrystals on a monocrystalline Si wafer is reported. Ordered arrays of nanoholes in a silicon nitride layer were obtained by combining electron beam lithography and plasma etching. Then, a short electrochemical etching current pulse led to formation of a single Si nanocrystal per each nanohole. As a result, high quality silicon nanocrystal arrays were formed with well controlled and reproducible morphologies. In future, this approach can be used to fabricate single electron devices.

  5. LHC Capabilities for Quarkonia

    Petrushanko, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    The measurement of the charmonium and bottomonium resonances in nucleus-nucleus collisions provides crucial information on high-density QCD matter. First, the suppression of quarkonia production is generally agreed to be one of the most direct probes of quark-gluon plasma formation. The observation of anomalous J/$\\psi$ suppression at the CERN-SPS and at RHIC is well established but the clarification of some important remaining questions requires equivalent studies of the $\\Upsilon$ family, only possible at the LHC energies. Second, the production of heavy-quarks proceeds mainly via gluon-gluon fusion processes and, as such, is sensitive to saturation of the gluon density at low-x in the nucleus. Measured departures from the expected vacuum quarkonia cross-sections in Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC will thus provide valuable information not only on the thermodynamical state of the produced partonic medium, but also on the initial-state modifications of the nuclear parton distribution functions. The capabilities ...

  6. DNA probes

    Castelino, J.

    1992-01-01

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with 32 P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism's genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens

  7. DNA probes

    Castelino, J

    1993-12-31

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with {sup 32}P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism`s genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens 10 figs, 2 tabs

  8. Microscopic theory of cation exchange in CdSe nanocrystals.

    Ott, Florian D; Spiegel, Leo L; Norris, David J; Erwin, Steven C

    2014-10-10

    Although poorly understood, cation-exchange reactions are increasingly used to dope or transform colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots). We use density-functional theory and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to develop a microscopic theory that explains structural, optical, and electronic changes observed experimentally in Ag-cation-exchanged CdSe nanocrystals. We find that Coulomb interactions, both between ionized impurities and with the polarized nanocrystal surface, play a key role in cation exchange. Our theory also resolves several experimental puzzles related to photoluminescence and electrical behavior in CdSe nanocrystals doped with Ag.

  9. Modeling and simulation of floating gate nanocrystal FET devices and circuits

    Hasaneen, El-Sayed A. M.

    The nonvolatile memory market has been growing very fast during the last decade, especially for mobile communication systems. The Semiconductor Industry Association International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors states that the difficult challenge for nonvolatile semiconductor memories is to achieve reliable, low power, low voltage performance and high-speed write/erase. This can be achieved by aggressive scaling of the nonvolatile memory cells. Unfortunately, scaling down of conventional nonvolatile memory will further degrade the retention time due to the charge loss between the floating gate and drain/source contacts and substrate which makes conventional nonvolatile memory unattractive. Using nanocrystals as charge storage sites reduces dramatically the charge leakage through oxide defects and drain/source contacts. Floating gate nanocrystal nonvolatile memory, FG-NCNVM, is a candidate for future memory because it is advantageous in terms of high-speed write/erase, small size, good scalability, low-voltage, low-power applications, and the capability to store multiple bits per cell. Many studies regarding FG-NCNVMs have been published. Most of them have dealt with fabrication improvements of the devices and device characterizations. Due to the promising FG-NCNVM applications in integrated circuits, there is a need for circuit a simulation model to simulate the electrical characteristics of the floating gate devices. In this thesis, a FG-NCNVM circuit simulation model has been proposed. It is based on the SPICE BSIM simulation model. This model simulates the cell behavior during normal operation. Model validation results have been presented. The SPICE model shows good agreement with experimental results. Current-voltage characteristics, transconductance and unity gain frequency (fT) have been studied showing the effect of the threshold voltage shift (DeltaVth) due to nanocrystal charge on the device characteristics. The threshold voltage shift due to

  10. Conductivity Probe

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air. The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air. The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  11. Sulfur nanocrystals anchored graphene composite with highly improved electrochemical performance for lithium-sulfur batteries

    Zhang, Jun; Dong, Zimin; Wang, Xiuli; Zhao, Xuyang; Tu, Jiangping; Su, Qingmei; Du, Gaohui

    2014-12-01

    Two kinds of graphene-sulfur composites with 50 wt% of sulfur are prepared using hydrothermal method and thermal mixing, respectively. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectra mapping show that sulfur nanocrystals with size of ∼5 nm dispersed on graphene sheets homogeneously for the sample prepared by hydrothermal method (NanoS@G). While for the thermal mixed graphene-sulfur composite (S-G mixture), sulfur shows larger and uneven size (50-200 nm). X-ray Photoelectron Spectra (XPS) reveals the strong chemical bonding between the sulfur nanocrystals and graphene. Comparing with the S-G mixture, the NanoS@G composite shows highly improved electrochemical performance as cathode for lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery. The NanoS@G composite delivers an initial capacity of 1400 mAh g-1 with the sulfur utilization of 83.7% at a current density of 335 mA g-1. The capacity keeps above 720 mAh g-1 over 100 cycles. The strong adherence of the sulfur nanocrystals on graphene immobilizes sulfur and polysulfides species and suppressed the "shuttle effect", resulting higher coulombic efficiency and better capacity retention. Electrochemical impedance also suggests that the strong bonding enabled rapid electronic/ionic transport and improved electrochemical kinetics, therefore good rate capability is obtained. These results demonstrate that the NanoS@G composite is a very promising candidate for high-performance Li-S batteries.

  12. Intracellular delivery of peptide nucleic acid and organic molecules using zeolite-L nanocrystals.

    Bertucci, Alessandro; Lülf, Henning; Septiadi, Dedy; Manicardi, Alex; Corradini, Roberto; De Cola, Luisa

    2014-11-01

    The design and synthesis of smart nanomaterials can provide interesting potential applications for biomedical purposes from bioimaging to drug delivery. Manufacturing multifunctional systems in a way to carry bioactive molecules, like peptide nucleic acids able to recognize specific targets in living cells, represents an achievement towards the development of highly selective tools for both diagnosis and therapeutics. This work describes a very first example of the use of zeolite nanocrystals as multifunctional nanocarriers to deliver simultaneously PNA and organic molecules into living cells. Zeolite-L nanocrystals are functionalized by covalently attaching the PNA probes onto the surface, while the channel system is filled with fluorescent guest molecules. The cellular uptake of the PNA/Zeolite-L hybrid material is then significantly increased by coating the whole system with a thin layer of biodegradable poly-L-lysine. The delivery of DAPI as a model drug molecule, inserted into the zeolite pores, is also demonstrated to occur in the cells, proving the multifunctional ability of the system. Using this zeolite nanosystem carrying PNA probes designed to target specific RNA sequences of interest in living cells could open new possibilities for theranostic and gene therapy applications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Cellulose nanocrystal properties and their applications

    mahdi jonoobi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this work is to provide an overview of recent research in the area of cellulose nonmaterials production from different sources. Due to their abundance, their renewability, high strength and stiffness, being eco-friendly, and low weight; numerous studies have been reported on the isolation of cellulose nanomaterials from different cellulosic sources and their use in high performance applications. This work covers an introduction into the nano cellulose definition as well as used methods for isolation of nanomaterials (nanocrystals from various sources. The rod-like cellulose nanocrystals (CNC can be isolated from sources like wood, plant fibers, agriculture and industrial bio residues, tunicates, and bacterial cellulose using acid hydrolysis process. Following this, the paper focused on characterization methods, materials properties and structure. The current review is a comprehensive literature regarding the nano cellulose isolation and demonstrates the potential of cellulose nanomaterials to be used in a wide range of high-tech applications.

  14. Tunable plasmonic lattices of silver nanocrystals

    Tao, Andrea; Sinsermsuksakul, Prasert; Yang, Peidong

    2008-02-18

    Silver nanocrystals are ideal building blocks for plasmonicmaterials that exhibit a wide range of unique and potentially usefuloptical phenomena. Individual nanocrystals display distinct opticalscattering spectra and can be assembled into hierarchical structures thatcouple strongly to external electromagnetic fields. This coupling, whichis mediated by surface plasmons, depends on their shape and arrangement.Here we demonstrate the bottom-up assembly of polyhedral silvernanocrystals into macroscopic two-dimensional superlattices using theLangmuir-Blodgett technique. Our ability to control interparticlespacing, density, and packing symmetry allows for tunability of theoptical response over the entire visible range. This assembly strategyoffers a new, practical approach to making novel plasmonic materials forapplication in spectroscopic sensors, sub-wavelength optics, andintegrated devices that utilize field enhancement effects.

  15. A simple and sensitive fluorescent probe for specific detection of ...

    Yan-Fei Kang

    A fluorescent probe, with simplicity of structure and convenience of synthesis, is capable of detecting ... Yan-Fei Kang et al. .... Pastore A, Federici G, Bertini E and Ptemonte F 2003 ... Urano Y 2010 New Strategies for Fluorescent Probe.

  16. Rights, goals, and capabilities

    van Hees, M.V.B.P.M

    This article analyses the relationship between rights and capabilities in order to get a better grasp of the kind of consequentialism that the capability theory represents. Capability rights have been defined as rights that have a capability as their object (rights to capabilities). Such a

  17. Microscopic and macroscopic characterization of the charging effects in SiC/Si nanocrystals/SiC sandwiched structures

    Xu, Jie; Xu, Jun; Wang, Yuefei; Cao, Yunqing; Li, Wei; Yu, Linwei; Chen, Kunji

    2014-01-01

    Microscopic charge injection into the SiC/Si nanocrystals/SiC sandwiched structures through a biased conductive AFM tip is subsequently characterized by both electrostatic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). The charge injection and retention characteristics are found to be affected by not only the band offset at the Si nanocrystals/SiC interface but also the doping type of the Si substrate. On the other hand, capacitance–voltage (C–V) measurements investigate the macroscopic charging effect of the sandwiched structures with a thicker SiC capping layer, where the charges are injected from the Si substrates. The calculated macroscopic charging density is 3–4 times that of the microscopic one, and the possible reason is the underestimation of the microscopic charging density caused by the averaging effect and detection delay in the KPFM measurements. (paper)

  18. Probe specificity

    Laget, J.M.

    1986-11-01

    Specificity and complementarity of hadron and electron probes must be systematically developed to answer three questions currently asked in intermediate energy nuclear physics: what is nucleus structure at short distances, what is nature of short range correlations, what is three body force nature [fr

  19. Visualization of nanocrystal breathing modes at extreme strains

    Szilagyi, Erzsi; Wittenberg, Joshua S.; Miller, Timothy A.; Lutker, Katie; Quirin, Florian; Lemke, Henrik; Zhu, Diling; Chollet, Matthieu; Robinson, Joseph; Wen, Haidan; Sokolowski-Tinten, Klaus; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

    2015-03-01

    Nanoscale dimensions in materials lead to unique electronic and structural properties with applications ranging from site-specific drug delivery to anodes for lithium-ion batteries. These functional properties often involve large-amplitude strains and structural modifications, and thus require an understanding of the dynamics of these processes. Here we use femtosecond X-ray scattering techniques to visualize, in real time and with atomic-scale resolution, light-induced anisotropic strains in nanocrystal spheres and rods. Strains at the percent level are observed in CdS and CdSe samples, associated with a rapid expansion followed by contraction along the nanosphere or nanorod radial direction driven by a transient carrier-induced stress. These morphological changes occur simultaneously with the first steps in the melting transition on hundreds of femtosecond timescales. This work represents the first direct real-time probe of the dynamics of these large-amplitude strains and shape changes in few-nanometre-scale particles.

  20. Extracting hot carriers from photoexcited semiconductor nanocrystals

    Zhu, Xiaoyang

    2014-12-10

    This research program addresses a fundamental question related to the use of nanomaterials in solar energy -- namely, whether semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) can help surpass the efficiency limits, the so-called “Shockley-Queisser” limit, in conventional solar cells. In these cells, absorption of photons with energies above the semiconductor bandgap generates “hot” charge carriers that quickly “cool” to the band edges before they can be utilized to do work; this sets the solar cell efficiency at a limit of ~31%. If instead, all of the energy of the hot carriers could be captured, solar-to-electric power conversion efficiencies could be increased, theoretically, to as high as 66%. A potential route to capture this energy is to utilize semiconductor nanocrystals. In these materials, the quasi-continuous conduction and valence bands of the bulk semiconductor become discretized due to confinement of the charge carriers. Consequently, the energy spacing between the electronic levels can be much larger than the highest phonon frequency of the lattice, creating a “phonon bottleneck” wherein hot-carrier relaxation is possible via slower multiphonon emission. For example, hot-electron lifetimes as long as ~1 ns have been observed in NCs grown by molecular beam epitaxy. In colloidal NCs, long lifetimes have been demonstrated through careful design of the nanocrystal interfaces. Due to their ability to slow electronic relaxation, semiconductor NCs can in principle enable extraction of hot carriers before they cool to the band edges, leading to more efficient solar cells.

  1. Structural phase transitions in niobium oxide nanocrystals

    Yuvakkumar, R.; Hong, Sun Ig

    2015-09-01

    Niobium oxide nanocrystals were successfully synthesized employing the green synthesis method. Phase formation, microstructure and compositional properties of 1, 4 and 7 days incubation treated samples after calcinations at 450 °C were examined using X-ray diffraction, Raman, photoluminescence (PL), infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectra and transmission electron microscopic characterizations. It was observed that phase formation of Nb2O5 nanocrystals was dependent upon the incubation period required to form stable metal oxides. The characteristic results clearly revealed that with increasing incubation and aging, the transformation of cubic, orthorhombic and monoclinic phases were observed. The uniform heating at room temperature (32 °C) and the ligation of niobium atoms due to higher phenolic constituents of utilized rambutan during aging processing plays a vital role in structural phase transitions in niobium oxide nanocrystals. The defects over a period of incubation and the intensities of the PL spectra changing over a period of aging were related to the amount of the defects induced by the phase transition.

  2. Spontaneous emission enhancement of colloidal perovskite nanocrystals

    Yang, Zhili; Waks, Edo

    Halide perovskite semiconductors have emerged as prominent photovoltaic materials since their high conversion efficiency and promising light emitting materials in optoelectronics. In particular, easy-to-fabricated colloidal perovskite nanocrystals based on CsPbX3 quantum dots has been intensively investigated recently. Their luminescent wavelength could be tuned precisely by their chemical composition and size of growth. This opens new applications including light-emitting diodes, optical amplifiers and lasing since their promising performance as emitters. However, this potentially high-efficient emitter and gain material has not been fully investigated and realized in integrated photonic structures. Here we demonstrate Purcell enhancement effect of CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocrystals by coupling to an optimized photonic crystal nanobeam cavity as a first crucial step towards realization of integrated on-chip coherent light source with low energy consumption. We show clearly highly-enhanced photoluminescent spectrum and an averaged Purcell enhancement factor of 2.9 is achieved when they are coupled to nanobeam photonic crystal cavities compared to the ones on unpatterned surface in our lifetime measurement. Our success in enhancement of emission from CsPbX3 perovskite nanocrystals paves the way towards the realization of efficient light sources for integrated optoelectronic devices with low energy consumption.

  3. Ultrahigh intercalation pseudocapacitance of mesoporous orthorhombic niobium pentoxide from a novel cellulose nanocrystal template

    Kong, Lingping; Zhang, Chuangfang; Wang, Jitong; Long, Donghui; Qiao, Wenming; Ling, Licheng

    2015-01-01

    A facile biotemplating method has been developed to prepare mesoporous orthorhombic nobium pentoxide (T-Nb 2 O 5 ) films with ultrahigh lithium ion (Li + ) intercalation pseudocapacitance. Nanorod-like cellulose nanocrystals (CNs) with 5–10 nm in width and 100–300 nm in length are produced by the hydrolysis of cotton, which can serve as a novel soft templating agent enabling the straightforward synthesis of mesoporous T-Nb 2 O 5 films. By varying the niobic-to-template ratio, it is possible to tune the surface area and crystallite dimension of the Nb 2 O 5 films. The obtained T-Nb 2 O 5 films show typical capacitive-dominated behaviour in the sweep rate range of 1–20 mV s −1 . It delivers an initial intercalation capacity of 644 C g −1 at a current density of 0.625 A g −1 , corresponding to x = 1.83 for Li x Nb 2 O 5 , and can still keep relatively stable capacity of 560 C g −1 after 300 cycles. Moreover, its excellent high-rate capability (450 C g −1 at 12.5 A g −1 ) and wider temperature adaptability present here suggests the promising of T-Nb 2 O 5 as high-energy pseudocapacitor electrode with superior intercalation capacitive behaviour. - Graphical abstract: We developed a facile and sustainable method to prepare T-Nb 2 O 5 nanocrystals using novel nanorod-like cellulose nanocrystals (CNs) as soft templates. The T-Nb 2 O 5 nanocrystals exhibited unprecedented Li + intercalation pseudocapacitance, excellent cycle performance and good high-and-low temperature tolerance performance.

  4. Colloidal Magnetic Heterostructured Nanocrystals with Asymmetric Topologies: Seeded-Growth Synthetic Routes and Formation Mechanisms

    Scarfiello, Riccardo; Nobile, Concetta; Cozzoli, P. Davide

    2016-12-01

    Colloidal inorganic nanocrystals, free-standing crystalline nanostructures generated and processed in solution phase, represent an important class of advanced nanoscale materials owing to the flexibility with which their physical-chemical properties can be controlled through synthetic tailoring of their compositional, structural and geometric features and the versatility with which they can be integrated in technological fields as diverse as optoelectronics, energy storage/ conversion/production, catalysis and biomedicine. In recent years, building upon mechanistic knowledge acquired on the thermodynamic and kinetic processes that underlie nanocrystal evolution in liquid media, synthetic nanochemistry research has made impressive advances, opening new possibilities for the design, creation and mastering of increasingly complex “colloidal molecules”, in which nanocrystal modules of different materials are clustered together via solid-state bonding interfaces into free-standing, easily processable multifunctional nanocomposite systems. This Review will provide a glimpse into this fast-growing research field by illustrating progress achieved in the wet-chemical development of last-generation breeds of all-inorganic heterostructured nanocrystals (HNCs) in asymmetric non-onionlike geometries, inorganic analogues of polyfunctional organic molecules, in which distinct nanoscale crystalline modules are interconnected in hetero-dimer, hetero-oligomer and anisotropic multidomain architectures via epitaxial heterointerfaces of limited extension. The focus will be on modular HNCs entailing at least one magnetic material component combined with semiconductors and/or metals, which hold potential for generating enhanced or unconventional magnetic properties, while offering diversified or even new chemical-physical properties and functional capabilities. The available toolkit of synthetic strategies, all based on the manipulation of seeded-growth techniques, will be described

  5. Colloidal Magnetic Heterostructured Nanocrystals with Asymmetric Topologies: Seeded-Growth Synthetic Routes and Formation Mechanisms

    Riccardo Scarfiello

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal inorganic nanocrystals, free-standing crystalline nanostructures generated and processed in solution phase, represent an important class of advanced nanoscale materials owing to the flexibility with which their physical–chemical properties can be controlled through synthetic tailoring of their compositional, structural and geometric features and the versatility with which they can be integrated in technological fields as diverse as optoelectronics, energy storage/ conversion/production, catalysis and biomedicine. In recent years, building upon mechanistic knowledge acquired on the thermodynamic and kinetic processes that underlie nanocrystal evolution in liquid media, synthetic nanochemistry research has made impressive advances, opening new possibilities for the design, creation and mastering of increasingly complex colloidal molecules, in which nanocrystal modules of different materials are clustered together via solid-state bonding interfaces into free-standing, easily processable multifunctional nanocomposite systems. This Review will provide a glimpse into this fast-growing research field by illustrating progress achieved in the wet-chemical development of last-generation breeds of all-inorganic heterostructured nanocrystals (HNCs in asymmetric non-onionlike geometries, inorganic analogues of polyfunctional organic molecules, in which distinct nanoscale crystalline modules are interconnected in hetero-dimer, hetero-oligomer and anisotropic multidomain architectures via epitaxial heterointerfaces of limited extension. The focus will be on modular HNCs entailing at least one magnetic material component combined with semiconductors and/or metals, which hold potential for generating enhanced or unconventional magnetic properties, while offering diversified or even new chemical-physical properties and functional capabilities. The available toolkit of synthetic strategies, all based on the manipulation of seeded-growth techniques

  6. Mobile Test Capabilities

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electrical Power Mobile Test capabilities are utilized to conduct electrical power quality testing on aircraft and helicopters. This capability allows that the...

  7. Extraordinary Interfacial Stitching between Single All-Inorganic Perovskite Nanocrystals

    Gomez, Leyre; Lin, Junhao; De Weerd, Chris; Poirier, Lucas; Boehme, Simon C.; Von Hauff, Elizabeth; Fujiwara, Yasufumi; Suenaga, Kazutomo; Gregorkiewicz, Tom

    2018-01-01

    All-inorganic cesium lead halide perovskite nanocrystals are extensively studied because of their outstanding optoelectronic properties. Being of a cubic shape and typically featuring a narrow size distribution, CsPbX3 (X = Cl, Br, and I) nanocrystals are the ideal starting material for the

  8. Synthesis and preservation of graphene-supported uranium dioxide nanocrystals

    Ma, Hanyu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Wang, Haitao [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, Texas Tech University, 911 Boston Ave., Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Burns, Peter C. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, 251 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); McNamara, Bruce K.; Buck, Edgar C. [Nuclear Chemistry & Engineering Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Na, Chongzheng, E-mail: chongzheng.na@gmail.com [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, Texas Tech University, 911 Boston Ave., Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Graphene-supported uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) nanocrystals are potentially important fuel materials. Here, we investigate the possibility of synthesizing graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals in polar ethylene glycol compounds by the polyol reduction of uranyl acetylacetone under boiling reflux, thereby enabling the use of an inexpensive graphene precursor graphene oxide into a one-pot process. We show that triethylene glycol is the most suitable solvent with an appropriate reduction potential for producing nanometer-sized UO{sub 2} crystals compared to monoethylene glycol, diethylene glycol, and polyethylene glycol. Graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals synthesized with triethylene glycol show evidence of heteroepitaxy, which can be beneficial for facilitating heat transfer in nuclear fuel particles. Furthermore, we show that graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals synthesized by polyol reduction can be readily stored in alcohols, impeding oxidation from the prevalent oxygen in air. Together, these methods provide a facile approach for preparing and storing graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals for further investigation and development under ambient conditions. - Highlights: • UO{sub 2} nanocrystals are synthesized using polyol reduction method. • Triethylene glycol is the best reducing agent for nano-sized UO{sub 2} crystals. • UO{sub 2} nanocrystals grow on graphene through heteroepitaxy. • Graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals can be stored in alcohols to prevent oxidation.

  9. Characterization of Ge-nanocrystal films with photoelectron spectroscopy

    Bostedt, C.; Buuren, T. van; Willey, T.M.; Nelson, A.J.; Franco, N.; Moeller, T.; Terminello, L.J.

    2003-01-01

    The Ge 3d core-levels of germanium nanocrystal films have been investigated by means of photoelectron spectroscopy. The experiments indicate bulk-like coordinated atoms in the nanocrystals and suggest structured disorder on the nanoparticle surface. The results underline the importance of the surface on the overall electronic structure of this class of nanostructured materials

  10. Group IV nanocrystals with ion-exchangeable surface ligands and methods of making the same

    Wheeler, Lance M.; Nichols, Asa W.; Chernomordik, Boris D.; Anderson, Nicholas C.; Beard, Matthew C.; Neale, Nathan R.

    2018-01-09

    Methods are described that include reacting a starting nanocrystal that includes a starting nanocrystal core and a covalently bound surface species to create an ion-exchangeable (IE) nanocrystal that includes a surface charge and a first ion-exchangeable (IE) surface ligand ionically bound to the surface charge, where the starting nanocrystal core includes a group IV element.

  11. L-serine capped ZnS:Mn nanocrystals for plant cell biological studies and as a growth enhancing agent for micropropagation of Bacopa monnieri Linn. (Brahmi:Scrophulariaceae)

    Augustine, M. Sajimol; Mathew, Lizzy; Alex, Roselin; Deepa, G. D.; Jayalekshmi, S.

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, the prospects of ZnS:Mn nanocrystals capped with L- serine, a bio-compatible amino acid, synthesized by wet chemical route, as efficient fluorescent probes for plant cell biological studies have been investigated. The present synthesis route using bio-compatible material is a low cost and easy to control method. The colloidal stability of the capped nano crystals is very good as they remain stable without settling down for long time. It is observed that L- serine significantly modifies the structural and optical characteristics of the ZnS:Mn nanocrystals and hence is suitable as a bio-compatible capping agent. The structural properties of L- serine capped nanocrystals were investigated by XRD technique. The size of the L- serine capped ZnS:Mn nanocrystals is found to be around 2 nm . The optical characterization of the nanocrystals was carried out on the basis of photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopic studies. The intense photoluminescence emission observed around 597nm for L-serine capped ZnS:Mn offers high prospects of applications in bio-imaging fields. The unique optical properties of nanoparticles make them appealing as in vivo and in vitro fluorophores in a variety of biological investigations. In the present study, L-serine capped ZnS:Mn nanocrystals were used as a staining dye in fluorescent microscope for observing cell division, cell structure etc. These nanocrystals were also incorporated into the culture media along with the normal auxin- cytokinin hormone combinations in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium for micropropagation of Bacopa monnieri Linn. (Brahmi:Scrophulariaceae), an Ayurvedic medicine. The results suggest that L-serine capped ZnS:Mn nanocrystals can act as efficient enhancers towards quick callusing and shoot proliferation.

  12. L-serine capped ZnS:Mn nanocrystals for plant cell biological studies and as a growth enhancing agent for micropropagation of Bacopa monnieri Linn. (Brahmi:Scrophulariaceae)

    Augustine, M. Sajimol; Mathew, Lizzy; Alex, Roselin; Deepa, G. D.; Jayalekshmi, S.

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, the prospects of ZnS:Mn nanocrystals capped with L- serine, a bio-compatible amino acid, synthesized by wet chemical route, as efficient fluorescent probes for plant cell biological studies have been investigated. The present synthesis route using bio-compatible material is a low cost and easy to control method. The colloidal stability of the capped nano crystals is very good as they remain stable without settling down for long time. It is observed that L- serine significantly modifies the structural and optical characteristics of the ZnS:Mn nanocrystals and hence is suitable as a bio-compatible capping agent. The structural properties of L- serine capped nanocrystals were investigated by XRD technique. The size of the L- serine capped ZnS:Mn nanocrystals is found to be around 2 nm . The optical characterization of the nanocrystals was carried out on the basis of photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopic studies. The intense photoluminescence emission observed around 597nm for L-serine capped ZnS:Mn offers high prospects of applications in bio-imaging fields. The unique optical properties of nanoparticles make them appealing as in vivo and in vitro fluorophores in a variety of biological investigations. In the present study, L-serine capped ZnS:Mn nanocrystals were used as a staining dye in fluorescent microscope for observing cell division, cell structure etc. These nanocrystals were also incorporated into the culture media along with the normal auxin- cytokinin hormone combinations in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium for micropropagation of Bacopa monnieri Linn. (Brahmi:Scrophulariaceae), an Ayurvedic medicine. The results suggest that L-serine capped ZnS:Mn nanocrystals can act as efficient enhancers towards quick callusing and shoot proliferation

  13. L-serine capped ZnS:Mn nanocrystals for plant cell biological studies and as a growth enhancing agent for micropropagation of Bacopa monnieri Linn. (Brahmi:Scrophulariaceae)

    Augustine, M. Sajimol, E-mail: sajimollazar@gmail.com [Department of Physics, St.Teresa' s College , Kochi-11, Kerala (India); Mathew, Lizzy [Department of Botany, St.Teresa' s College , Kochi-11, Kerala (India); Alex, Roselin [Department of Biotechnology, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi-22 (India); Deepa, G. D. [NCAAH, Cochin University of Science and Technology,Kochi-22, Kerala (India); Jayalekshmi, S., E-mail: jayalekshmi@cusat.ac.in [Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi-22 (India)

    2014-01-28

    In the present work, the prospects of ZnS:Mn nanocrystals capped with L- serine, a bio-compatible amino acid, synthesized by wet chemical route, as efficient fluorescent probes for plant cell biological studies have been investigated. The present synthesis route using bio-compatible material is a low cost and easy to control method. The colloidal stability of the capped nano crystals is very good as they remain stable without settling down for long time. It is observed that L- serine significantly modifies the structural and optical characteristics of the ZnS:Mn nanocrystals and hence is suitable as a bio-compatible capping agent. The structural properties of L- serine capped nanocrystals were investigated by XRD technique. The size of the L- serine capped ZnS:Mn nanocrystals is found to be around 2 nm . The optical characterization of the nanocrystals was carried out on the basis of photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopic studies. The intense photoluminescence emission observed around 597nm for L-serine capped ZnS:Mn offers high prospects of applications in bio-imaging fields. The unique optical properties of nanoparticles make them appealing as in vivo and in vitro fluorophores in a variety of biological investigations. In the present study, L-serine capped ZnS:Mn nanocrystals were used as a staining dye in fluorescent microscope for observing cell division, cell structure etc. These nanocrystals were also incorporated into the culture media along with the normal auxin- cytokinin hormone combinations in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium for micropropagation of Bacopa monnieri Linn. (Brahmi:Scrophulariaceae), an Ayurvedic medicine. The results suggest that L-serine capped ZnS:Mn nanocrystals can act as efficient enhancers towards quick callusing and shoot proliferation.

  14. Atomistic tight-binding computations of the structural and optical properties of CdTe/CdX (X=S and Se)/ZnS core/shell/shell nanocrystals

    Sukkabot, Worasak

    2018-05-01

    A study of CdTe/CdX (X=S and Se)/ZnS core/shell/shell nanocrystals is carried out using atomistic tight-binding theory and the configuration interaction method to provide information for applications in bioimaging, biolabeling, display devices and near-infrared electronic instruments. The calculations yield the dependences of the internal and external passivated shells on the natural behaviours of CdTe/CdX (X=S and Se)/ZnS core/shell/shell nanocrystals. The reduction of the optical band gaps is observed with increasing numbers of monolayers in the external ZnS shell due to quantum confinement. Interestingly, the optical band gaps of CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell nanocrystals are greater than those of CdTe/CdSe/ZnS core/shell/shell nanocrystals. In the presence of an external ZnS-coated shell, electron-hole wave function overlaps, oscillation strengths, ground-state exchange energies and Stokes shift are improved, whereas ground-state coulomb energies and fine-structure splitting are reduced. The oscillation strengths, Stokes shift and fine-structure splitting are reduced with the increase in external ZnS shell thickness. The oscillation strengths, Stokes shift and fine-structure splitting of CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell nanocrystals are larger than those of CdTe/CdSe/ZnS core/shell/shell nanocrystals. Reduction of the atomistic electron-hole interactions is observed with increasing external ZnS shell size. The strong electron-hole interactions are more probed in CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/shell/shell nanocrystals than in CdTe/CdSe/ZnS core/shell/shell nanocrystals.

  15. Fabrication of a novel nano-probe slide for near-field optical microscopy

    Yim, Sang-Youp; Jeang, Eun-Hee; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Park, Seung-Han; Cho, Kyu-Man

    2004-01-01

    A novel probe structure, which can act as a planar nano-probe slide for near-field microscopy, was proposed and fabricated. Sub-wavelength apertures on a Si substrate are successfully produced by means of standard photolithography techniques with properly selected masks. In particular, the anisotropic etching characteristics of Si substrate and the hardness of the Si 3 N 4 film are utilized. Probe-to-probe scanning of the fabricated near-field nano-probe slide shows sub-wavelength confinement of light and comparable throughput to the conventional optical fiber probe. We also show that the nano-probe slide can serve as a supporting base and a sub-wavelength aperture to obtain the near-field photoluminescence spectra of a limited number of CdSe nanocrystals.

  16. Photoluminescence from Si nanocrystals in silica: The effect of hydrogen

    Cheylan, S.; Elliman, R.G.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of H passivation on the PL emission of Si nanocrystals produced in silica by ion-implantion and annealing is shown to depend on the implant fluence. At low fluences, where the nanocrystals are small, passivation causes an enhancement of the emission intensity that is uniform over the full spectral range and therefore appears to be independent of nanocrystal size. For higher fluences, where the average size and size distribution of the nanocrystals are larger, the enhancement occurs preferentially at longer wavelengths, giving rise to a red-shift in the emission spectra. Both the enhancement and the red-shift increase monotonically with increasing fluence. These data are shown to be consistent with a model in which the probability to contain a non-radiative defect increases with nanocrystal size

  17. Isolating and moving single atoms using silicon nanocrystals

    Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2010-09-07

    A method is disclosed for isolating single atoms of an atomic species of interest by locating the atoms within silicon nanocrystals. This can be done by implanting, on the average, a single atom of the atomic species of interest into each nanocrystal, and then measuring an electrical charge distribution on the nanocrystals with scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) or electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) to identify and select those nanocrystals having exactly one atom of the atomic species of interest therein. The nanocrystals with the single atom of the atomic species of interest therein can be sorted and moved using an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. The method is useful for forming nanoscale electronic and optical devices including quantum computers and single-photon light sources.

  18. Facile synthesis of water-soluble curcumin nanocrystals

    Marković Zoran M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, facile synthesis of water soluble curcumin nanocrystals is reported. Solvent exchange method was applied to synthesize curcumin nanocrystals. Different techniques were used to characterize the structural and photophysical properties of curcumin nanocrystals. We found that nanocurcumin prepared by this method had good chemical and physical stability, could be stored in the powder form at room temperature, and was freely dispersible in water. It was established that the size of curcumin nanocrystals was varied in the range of 20-500 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and UV-Vis analyses showed the presence of tetrahydrofuran inside the curcumin nanocrystals. Also, it was found that nanocurcumin emitted photoluminescencewith yellow-green colour. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172003

  19. Plasmonic light-sensitive skins of nanocrystal monolayers

    Akhavan, Shahab; Gungor, Kivanc; Mutlugun, Evren; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2013-04-01

    We report plasmonically coupled light-sensitive skins of nanocrystal monolayers that exhibit sensitivity enhancement and spectral range extension with plasmonic nanostructures embedded in their photosensitive nanocrystal platforms. The deposited plasmonic silver nanoparticles of the device increase the optical absorption of a CdTe nanocrystal monolayer incorporated in the device. Controlled separation of these metallic nanoparticles in the vicinity of semiconductor nanocrystals enables optimization of the photovoltage buildup in the proposed nanostructure platform. The enhancement factor was found to depend on the excitation wavelength. We observed broadband sensitivity improvement (across 400-650 nm), with a 2.6-fold enhancement factor around the localized plasmon resonance peak. The simulation results were found to agree well with the experimental data. Such plasmonically enhanced nanocrystal skins hold great promise for large-area UV/visible sensing applications.

  20. Energy Transfer between Conjugated Colloidal Ga2O3 and CdSe/CdS Core/Shell Nanocrystals for White Light Emitting Applications

    Paul C. Stanish

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Developing solid state materials capable of generating homogeneous white light in an energy efficient and resource-sustainable way is central to the design of new and improved devices for various lighting applications. Most currently-used phosphors depend on strategically important rare earth elements, and rely on a multicomponent approach, which produces sub-optimal quality white light. Here, we report the design and preparation of a colloidal white-light emitting nanocrystal conjugate. This conjugate is obtained by linking colloidal Ga2O3 and II–VI nanocrystals in the solution phase with a short bifunctional organic molecule (thioglycolic acid. The two types of nanocrystals are electronically coupled by Förster resonance energy transfer owing to the short separation between Ga2O3 (energy donor and core/shell CdSe/CdS (energy acceptor nanocrystals, and the spectral overlap between the photoluminescence of the donor and the absorption of the acceptor. Using steady state and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopies, we quantified the contribution of the energy transfer to the photoluminescence spectral power distribution and the corresponding chromaticity of this nanocrystal conjugate. Quantitative understanding of this new system allows for tuning of the emission color and the design of quasi-single white light emitting inorganic phosphors without the use of rare-earth elements.

  1. Energy Transfer between Conjugated Colloidal Ga2O3 and CdSe/CdS Core/Shell Nanocrystals for White Light Emitting Applications

    Stanish, Paul C.; Radovanovic, Pavle V.

    2016-01-01

    Developing solid state materials capable of generating homogeneous white light in an energy efficient and resource-sustainable way is central to the design of new and improved devices for various lighting applications. Most currently-used phosphors depend on strategically important rare earth elements, and rely on a multicomponent approach, which produces sub-optimal quality white light. Here, we report the design and preparation of a colloidal white-light emitting nanocrystal conjugate. This conjugate is obtained by linking colloidal Ga2O3 and II–VI nanocrystals in the solution phase with a short bifunctional organic molecule (thioglycolic acid). The two types of nanocrystals are electronically coupled by Förster resonance energy transfer owing to the short separation between Ga2O3 (energy donor) and core/shell CdSe/CdS (energy acceptor) nanocrystals, and the spectral overlap between the photoluminescence of the donor and the absorption of the acceptor. Using steady state and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopies, we quantified the contribution of the energy transfer to the photoluminescence spectral power distribution and the corresponding chromaticity of this nanocrystal conjugate. Quantitative understanding of this new system allows for tuning of the emission color and the design of quasi-single white light emitting inorganic phosphors without the use of rare-earth elements. PMID:28344289

  2. Probing plasmonic nanostructures by photons and electrons

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Harald; Kneipp, Janina

    2015-01-01

    We discuss recent developments for studying plasmonic metal nanostructures. Exploiting photons and electrons opens up new capabilities to probe the complete plasmon spectrum including bright and dark modes and related local optical fields at subnanometer spatial resolution. This comprehensive cha...

  3. Z-Contrast STEM Imaging and EELS of CdSe Nanocrystals: Towards the Analysis of Individual Nanocrystal Surfaces

    Erwin, M.; Kadavanich, A.V.; Kippeny, T.; Pennycook, S.J.; Rosenthal, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    We have applied Atomic Number Contract Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (Z-Contrast STEM) and STEM/EELS (Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy) towards the study of colloidal CdSe semiconductor nanocrystals embedded in MEH-PPV polymer films. Unlike the case of conventional phase-contrast High Resolution TEM, Z-Contrast images are direct projections of the atomic structure. Hence they can be interpreted without the need for sophisticated image simulation and the image intensity is a direct measure of the thickness of a nanocrystal. Our thickness measurements are in agreement with the predicted faceted shape of these nanocrystals. Our unique 1.3A resolution STEM has successfully resolve3d the sublattice structure of these CdSe nanocrystals. In [010] projection (the polar axis in the image plane) we can distinguish Se atom columns from Cd columns. Consequently we can study the effects of lattice polarity on the nanocrystal morphology. Furthermore, since the STEM technique does not rely on diffraction, it is superbly suited to the study of non-periodic detail, such as the surface structure of the nanocrystals. EELS measurements on individual nanocrystals indicate a significant amount (equivalet to 0.5-1 surface monolayers) of oxygen on the nanocrystals, despite processing in an inert atmosphere. Spatially resolved measurements at 7A resolution suggest a surface oxide layer. However, the uncertainty in the measurement precludes definitive assignment at this time. The source of the oxygen is under investigation as well

  4. Capabilities for Strategic Adaptation

    Distel, Andreas Philipp

    This dissertation explores capabilities that enable firms to strategically adapt to environmental changes and preserve competitiveness over time – often referred to as dynamic capabilities. While dynamic capabilities being a popular research domain, too little is known about what these capabiliti...

  5. Dynamic capabilities, Marketing Capability and Organizational Performance

    Adriana Roseli Wünsch Takahashi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the study is to investigate the influence of dynamic capabilities on organizational performance and the role of marketing capabilities as a mediator in this relationship in the context of private HEIs in Brazil. As a research method we carried out a survey with 316 IES and data analysis was operationalized with the technique of structural equation modeling. The results indicate that the dynamic capabilities have influence on organizational performance only when mediated by marketing ability. The marketing capability has an important role in the survival, growth and renewal on educational services offerings for HEIs in private sector, and consequently in organizational performance. It is also demonstrated that mediated relationship is more intense for HEI with up to 3,000 students and other organizational profile variables such as amount of courses, the constitution, the type of institution and type of education do not significantly alter the results.

  6. Synthesis and Characterization of Colloidal Metal and Photovoltaic Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    Abulikemu, Mutalifu

    2014-11-05

    Metal and semiconducting nanocrystals have received a great deal of attention from fundamental scientists and application-oriented researchers due to their physical and chemical properties, which differ from those of bulk materials. Nanocrystals are essential building blocks in the development of nanostructured devices for energy conversion. Colloidal metals and metal chalcogenides have been developed for use as nanocrystal inks to produce efficient solar cells with lower costs. All high-performing photovoltaic nanocrystals contain toxic elements, such as Pb, or scarce elements, such as In; thus, the production of solution-processable nanocrystals from earth-abundant materials using environmentally benign synthesis and processing methods has become a major challenge for the inorganic semiconductor-based solar field. This dissertation, divided into two parts, addresses several aspects of these emerging challenges. The first portion of the thesis describes the synthesis and characterization of nanocrystals of antimony sulfide, which is composed of non-scarce and non-toxic elements, and examines their performance in photovoltaic devices. The effect of various synthetic parameters on the final morphology is explored. The structural, optical and morphological properties of the nanocrystals were investigated, and Sb2S3 nanocrystal-based solid-state semiconductor-sensitized solar cells were fabricated using different deposition processes. We achieved promising power conversion efficiencies of 1.48%. The second part of the thesis demonstrates a novel method for the in situ synthesis and patterning of nanocrystals via reactive inkjet printing. The use of low-cost manufacturing approaches for the synthesis of nanocrystals is critical for many applications, including photonics and electronics. In this work, a simple, low-cost method for the synthesis of nanocrystals with minimum size variation and waste using reactive inkjet printing is introduced. As a proof of concept, the

  7. Formation of noble metal nanocrystals in the presence of biomolecules

    Burt, Justin Lockheart

    One of the most promising, yet least studied routes for producing biocompatible nanostructures involves synthesis in the presence of biomolecules. I hypothesized that globular proteins could provide a suitable framework to regulate the formation of noble metal nanocrystals. As proof of concept, I designed two novel synthesis protocols utilizing bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein to regulate the formation of gold nanocrystals. In the first case, the standard protocol for polyol reduction was modified by replacing ethylene glycol with glycerin, replacing synthetic polymers with BSA as protecting agent, and decreasing the reaction temperature. In the second case, the Brust-Schiffrin two-phase reduction was modified by replacing alkylthiols with BSA as protecting agent, which facilitated a strictly aqueous phase synthesis. Due to superior product yield and rapid reduction at room temperature, the aqueous protocol became the foundation for subsequent studies. I extended this approach to produce well-dispersed ˜2nm silver, gold, and platinum nanocrystals. Having demonstrated the feasibility of BSA-functionalized nanocrystals, some potential uses were explored. BSA-functionalized silver nanocrystals were employed in a broader study on the interaction of silver nanocrystals with HIV. BSA-functionalized gold nanocrystals were utilized for in vivo dosage of a contrast enhancing agent to bacteria. BSA-functionalized platinum nanocrystals were studied as hydrogenation catalysts. Since many intriguing uses for protein-functionalized nanocrystals involve incorporation into biosystems, I sought to enhance biocompatibility by using ascorbic acid as reducing agent. Initial experiments revealed elongated and branched nanocrystals. Such structures were not observed in previous synthesis protocols with BSA, so I hypothesized ascorbic acid was driving their formation. To test my assertion, I reduced ionic gold in an aqueous solution of ascorbic acid, thereby discovering a new method

  8. One pot synthesis, growth mechanism and optical properties of Zn{sub 1-x}Cd{sub x}Se graded core/shell and alloy nanocrystals

    Sonawane, Kiran G. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Patil, K.R. [Centre for Materials Characterization, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411 008 (India); Mahamuni, Shailaja, E-mail: shailajamahamuni@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2013-03-15

    Comparatively higher photoluminescence yield along with robustness of core/shell semiconductor nanocrystals make them attractive candidates for studying intricate quantum size effects. Here, we report, one pot synthesis of Zn{sub 1-x}Cd{sub x}Se graded core/shell structures by exploiting change in the reactivity of precursors. Optical and structural measurements indicate formation of graded structure. Growth mechanism probed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy shows formation of graded core/shell structure, with CdSe rich core and ZnSe rich shell. Annealing these nanocrystals, in chemical bath, leads to diffusion of Cd from core to shell region. Formation of Zn{sub 1-x}Cd{sub x}Se alloy is also observed in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements, confirming the diffusion of Cd from core to shell region. Substantially high photoluminescence quantum efficiency of 60% with narrow line width of about 27 nm, was observed and is attributable to the reduced strain due to graded core/shell structure. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Graded CdSe/ZnSe core-shell nanocrystals are synthesized exploiting reactivity of precursors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Growth mechanism is probed using ICP-AES spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reduced strain leads to luminescence efficiency as high as 60%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alloy formation by annealing in chemical bath is probed using XPS.

  9. Semiconductor nanocrystals for novel optical applications

    Moon, Jong-Sik

    Inspired by the promise of enhanced spectral response, photorefractive polymeric composites photosensitized with semiconductor nanocrystals have emerged as an important class of materials. Here, we report on the photosensitization of photorefractive polymeric composites at visible wavelengths through the inclusion of narrow band-gap semiconductor nanocrystals composed of PbS. Through this approach, internal diffraction efficiencies in excess of 82%, two-beam-coupling gain coefficients in excess of 211 cm-1, and response times 34 ms have been observed, representing some of the best figures-of-merit reported on this class of materials. In addition to providing efficient photosensitization, however, extensive studies of these hybrid composites have indicated that the inclusion of nanocrystals also provides an enhancement in the charge-carrier mobility and subsequent reduction in the photorefractive response time. Through this approach with PbS as charge-carrier, unprecedented response times of 399 micros were observed, opening the door for video and other high-speed applications. It is further demonstrated that this improvement in response time occurs with little sacrifice in photorefractive efficiency and with internal diffraction efficiencies of 72% and two- beam-coupling gain coefficients of 500 cm-1 being measured. A thorough analysis of the experimental data is presented, supporting the hypothesized mechanism of the enhanced charge mobility without the accompaniment of superfluous traps. Finally, water soluble InP/ZnS and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots interacted with CPP and Herceptin to apply them as a bio-maker. Both of quantum dots showed the excellent potential for use in biomedical imaging and drug delivery applications. It is anticipated that these approaches can play a significant role in the eventual commercialization of these classes of materials.

  10. Silicon Nanocrystal Synthesis in Microplasma Reactor

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Kenji; Ogino, Tomohisa; Asahi, Daisuke; Okazaki, Ken

    Nanocrystalline silicon particles with grains smaller than 5 nm are widely recognized as a key material in optoelectronic devices, lithium battery electrodes, and bio-medical labels. Another important characteristic is that silicon is an environmentally safe material that is used in numerous silicon technologies. To date, several synthesis methods such as sputtering, laser ablation, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) based on low-pressure silane chemistry (SiH4) have been developed for precise control of size and density distributions of silicon nanocrystals. In this study, we explore the possibility of microplasma technologies for efficient production of mono-dispersed nanocrystalline silicon particles on a micrometer-scale, continuous-flow plasma reactor operated at atmospheric pressure. Mixtures of argon, hydrogen, and silicon tetrachloride were activated using a very-high-frequency (144 MHz) power source in a capillary glass tube with volume of less than 1 μl. Fundamental plasma parameters of the microplasma were characterized using optical emission spectroscopy, which respectively indicated electron density of 1015 cm-3, argon excitation temperature of 5000 K, and rotational temperature of 1500 K. Such high-density non-thermal reactive plasma can decompose silicon tetrachloride into atomic silicon to produce supersaturated silicon vapor, followed by gas-phase nucleation via three-body collision: particle synthesis in high-density plasma media is beneficial for promoting nucleation processes. In addition, further growth of silicon nuclei can be terminated in a short-residence-time reactor. Micro-Raman scattering spectra showed that as-deposited particles are mostly amorphous silicon with a small fraction of silicon nanocrystals. Transmission electron micrography confirmed individual 3-15 nm silicon nanocrystals. Although particles were not mono-dispersed, they were well separated and not coagulated.

  11. Solvothermal crystallization of nanocrystals of metal oxides

    Furukawa, S; Amino, H; Iwamoto, S; Inoue, M

    2008-01-01

    Solvothermal crystallization of the hydroxide gels obtained by hydrolysis of alkoxides (Zr, Ta, Nb, ln, Sn, Ti and Al) was examined. Nanocrystals having high surface areas (S BET > 170 m 2 g -1 ) were obtained except for the product derived from indium isopropoxide. The effect of water in organic solvent upon the crystallinity of the product was investigated. The increase in the activity of water by using high concentration of alkoxide or intentional addition of water to the solvothermal medium led to crystal growth of the products. In contrast, decrease in activity of water by adding ethylene glycol before solvothermal treatment caused a decrease in crystallinity of the product

  12. Structure and Magnetic Properties of Lanthanide Nanocrystals

    Dickerson, James Henry [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    We have had considerable success on this project, particularly in the understanding of the relationship between nanostructure and magnetic properties in lanthanide nanocrystals. We also have successfully facilitated the doctoral degrees of Dr. Suseela Somarajan, in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Dr. Melissa Harrison, in the Materials Science Program. The following passages summarize the various accomplishments that were featured in 9 publications that were generated based on support from this grant. We thank the Department of Energy for their generous support of our research efforts in this area of materials science, magnetism, and electron microscopy.

  13. Solvothermal crystallization of nanocrystals of metal oxides

    Furukawa, S.; Amino, H.; Iwamoto, S.; Inoue, M.

    2008-07-01

    Solvothermal crystallization of the hydroxide gels obtained by hydrolysis of alkoxides (Zr, Ta, Nb, ln, Sn, Ti and Al) was examined. Nanocrystals having high surface areas (SBET > 170 m2 g-1) were obtained except for the product derived from indium isopropoxide. The effect of water in organic solvent upon the crystallinity of the product was investigated. The increase in the activity of water by using high concentration of alkoxide or intentional addition of water to the solvothermal medium led to crystal growth of the products. In contrast, decrease in activity of water by adding ethylene glycol before solvothermal treatment caused a decrease in crystallinity of the product.

  14. Sensing the facet orientation in silver nano-plates using scanning Kelvin probe microscopy in air

    Abdellatif, M.H. [Department of Nanostructures, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, I-16163 Genova (Italy); Physics Department, National Research Center, Elbehoos st., 12622, Dokki, Giza (Egypt); Salerno, M., E-mail: marco.salerno@iit.it [Department of Nanophysics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, I-16163 Genova (Italy); Polovitsyn, Anatolii [Department of Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, I-16163 Genova (Italy); Dipartimentodi Fisica, Università di Genova, via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146 Genova (Italy); Marras, Sergio [Department of Nanochemistry, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, I-16163 Genova (Italy); De Angelis, Francesco [Department of Nanostructures, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego 30, I-16163 Genova (Italy)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • The surface potential of drop cast nanocrystals was measured by SKPM in ambient air. • The nanocrystal facet work function was derived by theory. • By comparing theory and experiment we distinguished the nanocrystal facets. • Nanocrystal facet control is of practical interest for optoelectronic devices. - Abstract: The work function of nano-materials is important for a full characterization of their electronic properties. Because the band alignment, band bending and electronic noise are very sensitive to work function fluctuations, the dependence of the work function of nano-scale crystals on facet orientation can be a critical issue in optimizing optoelectronic devices based on these materials. We used scanning Kelvin probe microscopy to assess the local work function on samples of silver nano-plates at sub-micrometric spatial resolution. With the appropriate choice of the substrate and based on statistical analysis, it was possible to distinguish the surface potential of the different facets of silver nano-plates even if the measurements were done in ambient conditions without the use of vacuum. A phenomenological model was used to calculate the differences of facet work function of the silver nano-plates and the corresponding shift in Fermi level. This theoretical prediction and the experimentally observed difference in surface potential on the silver nano-plates were in good agreement. Our results show the possibility to sense the nano-crystal facets by appropriate choice of the substrate in ambient conditions.

  15. Sensing the facet orientation in silver nano-plates using scanning Kelvin probe microscopy in air

    Abdellatif, M.H.; Salerno, M.; Polovitsyn, Anatolii; Marras, Sergio; De Angelis, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The surface potential of drop cast nanocrystals was measured by SKPM in ambient air. • The nanocrystal facet work function was derived by theory. • By comparing theory and experiment we distinguished the nanocrystal facets. • Nanocrystal facet control is of practical interest for optoelectronic devices. - Abstract: The work function of nano-materials is important for a full characterization of their electronic properties. Because the band alignment, band bending and electronic noise are very sensitive to work function fluctuations, the dependence of the work function of nano-scale crystals on facet orientation can be a critical issue in optimizing optoelectronic devices based on these materials. We used scanning Kelvin probe microscopy to assess the local work function on samples of silver nano-plates at sub-micrometric spatial resolution. With the appropriate choice of the substrate and based on statistical analysis, it was possible to distinguish the surface potential of the different facets of silver nano-plates even if the measurements were done in ambient conditions without the use of vacuum. A phenomenological model was used to calculate the differences of facet work function of the silver nano-plates and the corresponding shift in Fermi level. This theoretical prediction and the experimentally observed difference in surface potential on the silver nano-plates were in good agreement. Our results show the possibility to sense the nano-crystal facets by appropriate choice of the substrate in ambient conditions.

  16. Perovskite Nanocrystals as a Color Converter for Visible Light Communication

    Dursun, Ibrahim; Shen, Chao; Parida, Manas R.; Pan, Jun; Sarmah, Smritakshi P.; Priante, Davide; AlYami, Noktan; Liu, Jiakai; Saidaminov, Makhsud I.; Alias, Mohd Sharizal; Abdelhady, Ahmed L.; Ng, Tien Khee; Mohammed, Omar F.; Ooi, Boon S.; Bakr, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Visible light communication (VLC) is an emerging technology that uses light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or laser diodes for simultaneous illumination and data communication. This technology is envisioned to be a major part of the solution to the current bottlenecks in data and wireless communication. However, the conventional lighting phosphors that are typically integrated with LEDs have limited modulation bandwidth and thus cannot provide the bandwidth required to realize the potential of VLC. In this work, we present a promising light converter for VLC by designing solution-processed CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocrystals (NCs) with a conventional red phosphor. The fabricated CsPbBr3 NCs phosphor-based white light converter exhibits an unprecedented modulation bandwidth of 491 MHz, which is ~ 40 times greater than that of conventional phosphors, and the capability to transmit a high data rate of up to 2 Gbit/s. Moreover, this perovskite enhanced white light source combines ultrafast response characteristics with a high color rendering index of 89 and a low correlated color temperature of 3236 K, thereby enabling dual VLC and solid-state lighting functionalities.

  17. Isolation of thermally stable cellulose nanocrystals by phosphoric acid hydrolysis.

    Camarero Espinosa, Sandra; Kuhnt, Tobias; Foster, E Johan; Weder, Christoph

    2013-04-08

    On account of their intriguing mechanical properties, low cost, and renewable nature, high-aspect-ratio cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are an attractive component for many nanomaterials. Due to hydrogen bonding between their surface hydroxyl groups, unmodified CNCs (H-CNCs) aggregate easily and are often difficult to disperse. It is shown here that on account of ionic repulsion between charged surface groups, slightly phosphorylated CNCs (P-CNCs, average dimensions 31 ± 14 × 316 ± 127 nm, surface charge density = 10.8 ± 2.7 mmol/kg cellulose), prepared by controlled hydrolysis of cotton with phosphoric acid, are readily dispersible and form stable dispersions in polar solvents such as water, dimethyl sulfoxide, and dimethylformamide. Thermogravimetric analyses reveal that these P-CNCs exhibit a much higher thermal stability than partially sulfated CNCs (S-CNCs), which are frequently employed, but suffer from limited thermal stability. Nanocomposites of an ethylene oxide-epichlorohydrin copolymer and H-CNCs, S-CNCs, and P-CNCs were prepared, and their mechanical properties were studied by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis. The results show that P-CNCs offer a reinforcing capability that is comparable to that of H-CNCs or S-CNCs.

  18. Facile Synthesis of Monodisperse Gold Nanocrystals Using Virola oleifera

    Milaneze, Bárbara A.; Oliveira, Jairo P.; Augusto, Ingrid; Keijok, Wanderson J.; Côrrea, Andressa S.; Ferreira, Débora M.; Nunes, Otalíbio C.; Gonçalves, Rita de Cássia R.; Kitagawa, Rodrigo R.; Celante, Vinícius G.; da Silva, André Romero; Pereira, Ana Claudia H.; Endringer, Denise C.; Schuenck, Ricardo P.; Guimarães, Marco C. C.

    2016-10-01

    The development of new routes and strategies for nanotechnology applications that only employ green synthesis has inspired investigators to devise natural systems. Among these systems, the synthesis of gold nanoparticles using plant extracts has been actively developed as an alternative, efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally safe method for producing nanoparticles, and this approach is also suitable for large-scale synthesis. This study reports reproducible and completely natural gold nanocrystals that were synthesized using Virola oleifera extract. V. oleifera resin is rich in epicatechin, ferulic acid, gallic acid, and flavonoids (i.e., quercetin and eriodictyol). These gold nanoparticles play three roles. First, these nanoparticles exhibit remarkable stability based on their zeta potential. Second, these nanoparticles are functionalized with flavonoids, and third, an efficient, economical, and environmentally friendly mechanism can be employed to produce green nanoparticles with organic compounds on the surface. Our model is capable of reducing the resin of V. oleifera, which creates stability and opens a new avenue for biological applications. This method does not require painstaking conditions or hazardous agents and is a rapid, efficient, and green approach for the fabrication of monodisperse gold nanoparticles.

  19. Perovskite Nanocrystals as a Color Converter for Visible Light Communication

    Dursun, Ibrahim

    2016-05-31

    Visible light communication (VLC) is an emerging technology that uses light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or laser diodes for simultaneous illumination and data communication. This technology is envisioned to be a major part of the solution to the current bottlenecks in data and wireless communication. However, the conventional lighting phosphors that are typically integrated with LEDs have limited modulation bandwidth and thus cannot provide the bandwidth required to realize the potential of VLC. In this work, we present a promising light converter for VLC by designing solution-processed CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocrystals (NCs) with a conventional red phosphor. The fabricated CsPbBr3 NCs phosphor-based white light converter exhibits an unprecedented modulation bandwidth of 491 MHz, which is ~ 40 times greater than that of conventional phosphors, and the capability to transmit a high data rate of up to 2 Gbit/s. Moreover, this perovskite enhanced white light source combines ultrafast response characteristics with a high color rendering index of 89 and a low correlated color temperature of 3236 K, thereby enabling dual VLC and solid-state lighting functionalities.

  20. Charge transport in metal oxide nanocrystal-based materials

    Runnerstrom, Evan Lars

    There is probably no class of materials more varied, more widely used, or more ubiquitous than metal oxides. Depending on their composition, metal oxides can exhibit almost any number of properties. Of particular interest are the ways in which charge is transported in metal oxides: devices such as displays, touch screens, and smart windows rely on the ability of certain metal oxides to conduct electricity while maintaining visible transparency. Smart windows, fuel cells, and other electrochemical devices additionally rely on efficient transport of ionic charge in and around metal oxides. Colloidal synthesis has enabled metal oxide nanocrystals to emerge as a relatively new but highly tunable class of materials. Certain metal oxide nanocrystals, particularly highly doped metal oxides, have been enjoying rapid development in the last decade. As in myriad other materials systems, structure dictates the properties of metal oxide nanocrystals, but a full understanding of how nanocrystal synthesis, the processing of nanocrystal-based materials, and the structure of nanocrystals relate to the resulting properties of nanocrystal-based materials is still nascent. Gaining a fundamental understanding of and control over these structure-property relationships is crucial to developing a holistic understanding of metal oxide nanocrystals. The unique ability to tune metal oxide nanocrystals by changing composition through the introduction of dopants or by changing size and shape affords a way to study the interplay between structure, processing, and properties. This overall goal of this work is to chemically synthesize colloidal metal oxide nanocrystals, process them into useful materials, characterize charge transport in materials based on colloidal metal oxide nanocrystals, and develop ways to manipulate charge transport. In particular, this dissertation characterizes how the charge transport properties of metal oxide nanocrystal-based materials depend on their processing and

  1. Surface and Core Electronic Structure of Oxidized Silicon Nanocrystals

    Noor A. Nama

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio restricted Hartree-Fock method within the framework of large unit cell formalism is used to simulate silicon nanocrystals between 216 and 1000 atoms (1.6–2.65 nm in diameter that include Bravais and primitive cell multiples. The investigated properties include core and oxidized surface properties. Results revealed that electronic properties converge to some limit as the size of the nanocrystal increases. Increasing the size of the core of a nanocrystal resulted in an increase of the energy gap, valence band width, and cohesive energy. The lattice constant of the core and oxidized surface parts shows a decreasing trend as the nanocrystal increases in a size that converges to 5.28 Ǻ in a good agreement with the experiment. Surface and core convergence to the same lattice constant reflects good adherence of oxide layer at the surface. The core density of states shows highly degenerate states that split at the oxygenated (001-(1×1 surface due to symmetry breaking. The nanocrystal surface shows smaller gap and higher valence and conduction bands when compared to the core part, due to oxygen surface atoms and reduced structural symmetry. The smaller surface energy gap shows that energy gap of the nanocrystal is controlled by the surface part. Unlike the core part, the surface part shows a descending energy gap that proves its obedience to quantum confinement effects. Nanocrystal geometry proved to have some influence on all electronic properties including the energy gap.

  2. Interfacial interactions between calcined hydroxyapatite nanocrystals and substrates.

    Okada, Masahiro; Furukawa, Keiko; Serizawa, Takeshi; Yanagisawa, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Kawai, Tomoji; Furuzono, Tsutomu

    2009-06-02

    Interfacial interactions between calcined hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystals and surface-modified substrates were investigated by measuring adsorption behavior and adhesion strength with a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and a contact-mode atomic force microscope (AFM), respectively. The goal was to develop better control of HAp-nanocrystal coatings on biomedical materials. HAp nanocrystals with rodlike or spherical morphology were prepared by a wet chemical process followed by calcination at 800 degrees C with an antisintering agent to prevent the formation of sintered polycrystals. The substrate surface was modified by chemical reaction with a low-molecular-weight compound, or graft polymerization with a functional monomer. QCM measurement showed that the rodlike HAp nanocrystals adsorbed preferentially onto anionic COOH-modified substrates compared to cationic NH2- or hydrophobic CH3-modified substrates. On the other hand, the spherical nanocrystals adsorbed onto NH2- and COOH-modified substrates, which indicates that the surface properties of the HAp nanocrystals determined their adsorption behavior. The adhesion strength, which was estimated from the force required to move the nanocrystal in contact-mode AFM, on a COOH-grafted substrate prepared by graft polymerization was almost 9 times larger than that on a COOH-modified substrate prepared by chemical reaction with a low-molecular-weight compound, indicating that the long-chain polymer grafted on the substrate mitigated the surface roughness mismatch between the nanocrystal and the substrate. The adhesion strength of the nanocrystal bonded covalently by the coupling reaction to a Si(OCH3)-grafted substrate prepared by graft polymerization was approximately 1.5 times larger than that when adsorbed on the COOH-grafted substrate.

  3. Spectroscopic characterization of ligands on the surface of water dispersible NaGdF4:Ln3+ nanocrystals

    Cichos, J.; Karbowiak, M.

    2012-01-01

    For electronic or biomedical applications it is desirable to have ligand-free water-dispersible nanocrystals (NCs). The commonly used FTIR spectroscopy often provides a direct evidence for molecules on the surface. In some cases, however, the strong bands of solvent molecules may obscure the peaks of surface bounded ligands. We show that in this regard the emission spectroscopy may be used as a more reliable probing tool. The relevant information can be obtained from emission and excitation spectra, emission decay times as well as from analysis of relative efficiency of excitation energy transfer from Gd 3+ to Eu 3+ ions. Using these methods we tested samples obtained by various synthetic routes and indicated that only nitrosonium tetrafluoroborate (NOBF 4 ) removes successfully the organic ligands from the nanocrystals surface, yielding organic ligand-free NCs dispersible in aqueous solutions. The conclusions drawn from emission spectroscopy are useful for interpretation of results of FTIR, Raman and NMR studies. The detailed assignment of FTIR peaks for oleate-capped and oleate-free NCs is also provided. Finally, we point to the risk of drawing erroneous conclusions about colloidal stability of nanocrystals if refractive indexes of NCs and medium are similar.

  4. Spectroscopic characterization of ligands on the surface of water dispersible NaGdF4:Ln3+ nanocrystals

    Cichos, J.; Karbowiak, M.

    2012-05-01

    For electronic or biomedical applications it is desirable to have ligand-free water-dispersible nanocrystals (NCs). The commonly used FTIR spectroscopy often provides a direct evidence for molecules on the surface. In some cases, however, the strong bands of solvent molecules may obscure the peaks of surface bounded ligands. We show that in this regard the emission spectroscopy may be used as a more reliable probing tool. The relevant information can be obtained from emission and excitation spectra, emission decay times as well as from analysis of relative efficiency of excitation energy transfer from Gd3+ to Eu3+ ions. Using these methods we tested samples obtained by various synthetic routes and indicated that only nitrosonium tetrafluoroborate (NOBF4) removes successfully the organic ligands from the nanocrystals surface, yielding organic ligand-free NCs dispersible in aqueous solutions. The conclusions drawn from emission spectroscopy are useful for interpretation of results of FTIR, Raman and NMR studies. The detailed assignment of FTIR peaks for oleate-capped and oleate-free NCs is also provided. Finally, we point to the risk of drawing erroneous conclusions about colloidal stability of nanocrystals if refractive indexes of NCs and medium are similar.

  5. Architectural design of heterogeneous metallic nanocrystals--principles and processes.

    Yu, Yue; Zhang, Qingbo; Yao, Qiaofeng; Xie, Jianping; Lee, Jim Yang

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Heterogeneous metal nanocrystals (HMNCs) are a natural extension of simple metal nanocrystals (NCs), but as a research topic, they have been much less explored until recently. HMNCs are formed by integrating metal NCs of different compositions into a common entity, similar to the way atoms are bonded to form molecules. HMNCs can be built to exhibit an unprecedented architectural diversity and complexity by programming the arrangement of the NC building blocks ("unit NCs"). The architectural engineering of HMNCs involves the design and fabrication of the architecture-determining elements (ADEs), i.e., unit NCs with precise control of shape and size, and their relative positions in the design. Similar to molecular engineering, where structural diversity is used to create more property variations for application explorations, the architectural engineering of HMNCs can similarly increase the utility of metal NCs by offering a suite of properties to support multifunctionality in applications. The architectural engineering of HMNCs calls for processes and operations that can execute the design. Some enabling technologies already exist in the form of classical micro- and macroscale fabrication techniques, such as masking and etching. These processes, when used singly or in combination, are fully capable of fabricating nanoscopic objects. What is needed is a detailed understanding of the engineering control of ADEs and the translation of these principles into actual processes. For simplicity of execution, these processes should be integrated into a common reaction system and yet retain independence of control. The key to architectural diversity is therefore the independent controllability of each ADE in the design blueprint. The right chemical tools must be applied under the right circumstances in order to achieve the desired outcome. In this Account, after a short illustration of the infinite possibility of combining different ADEs to create HMNC design

  6. Self organized formation of Ge nanocrystals in multilayers

    Zschintzsch-Dias, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to create a process which allows the tailored growth of Ge nanocrystals for use in photovoltic applications. The multilayer systems used here provide a reliable method to control the Ge nanocrystal size after phase separation. In this thesis, the deposition of GeOx/SiO2 and Ge:SiOx~ 2/SiO2 multilayers via reactive dc magnetron sputtering and the self-ordered Ge nanocrystal formation within the GeOx and Ge:SiOx~ 2 sublayers during subsequent annealing is investigated...

  7. PPLA-cellulose nanocrystals nanocomposite prepared by in situ polymerization

    Paula, Everton L. de; Pereirea, Fabiano V.; Mano, Valdir

    2011-01-01

    This work reports the preparation and and characterization of a PLLA-cellulose nanocrystals nanocomposite obtained by in situ polymerization. The nanocomposite was prepared by ring opening polymerization of the lactide dimer in the presence of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and the as-obtained materials was characterized using FTIR, DSC, XRD and TGA measurements. The incorporation of cellulose nanocrystals in PLLA using this method improved the thermal stability and increased the crystallinity of PLLA. These results indicate that the incorporation of CNCs by in situ polymerization improve thermal properties and has potential to improve also mechanical properties of this biodegradable polymer. (author)

  8. Fine-tuning the Wall Thickness of Ordered Mesoporous Graphene by Exploiting Ligand Exchange of Colloidal Nanocrystals

    Han, Dandan; Yan, Yancui; Wei, Jishi; Wang, Biwei; Li, Tongtao; Guo, Guannan; Yang, Dong; Xie, Songhai; Dong, Angang

    2017-12-01

    Because of their unique physical properties, three-dimensional (3D) graphene has attracted enormous attention over the past years. However, it is still a challenge to precisely control the layer thickness of 3D graphene. Here, we report a novel strategy to rationally adjust the wall thickness of ordered mesoporous graphene (OMG). By taking advantage of ligand exchange capability of colloidal Fe3O4 nanocrystals, we are able to fine-tune the wall thickness of OMG from 2 to 6 layers of graphene by tailoring the hydrocarbon ligands attached to the nanocrystal surface. When evaluated as electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction upon S and N doping, the 4-layer OMG is found to show better catalytic performance compared with its 2- and 6-layer counterparts, which we attribute to the enhanced exposure of active sites resulting from its ultrathin wall thickness and high surface area.

  9. Probing lipid membrane electrostatics

    Yang, Yi

    The electrostatic properties of lipid bilayer membranes play a significant role in many biological processes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is highly sensitive to membrane surface potential in electrolyte solutions. With fully characterized probe tips, AFM can perform quantitative electrostatic analysis of lipid membranes. Electrostatic interactions between Silicon nitride probes and supported zwitterionic dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayer with a variable fraction of anionic dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS) were measured by AFM. Classical Gouy-Chapman theory was used to model the membrane electrostatics. The nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation was numerically solved with finite element method to provide the potential distribution around the AFM tips. Theoretical tip-sample electrostatic interactions were calculated with the surface integral of both Maxwell and osmotic stress tensors on tip surface. The measured forces were interpreted with theoretical forces and the resulting surface charge densities of the membrane surfaces were in quantitative agreement with the Gouy-Chapman-Stern model of membrane charge regulation. It was demonstrated that the AFM can quantitatively detect membrane surface potential at a separation of several screening lengths, and that the AFM probe only perturbs the membrane surface potential by external field created by the internai membrane dipole moment. The analysis yields a dipole moment of 1.5 Debye per lipid with a dipole potential of +275 mV for supported DOPC membranes. This new ability to quantitatively measure the membrane dipole density in a noninvasive manner will be useful in identifying the biological effects of the dipole potential. Finally, heterogeneous model membranes were studied with fluid electric force microscopy (FEFM). Electrostatic mapping was demonstrated with 50 nm resolution. The capabilities of quantitative electrostatic measurement and lateral charge density mapping make AFM a unique and powerful

  10. Hybrid nanocrystal/polymer solar cells based on tetrapod-shaped CdSexTe1-x nanocrystals

    Zhou Yi; Li Yunchao; Zhong Haizheng; Hou Jianhui; Ding Yuqin; Yang Chunhe; Li Yongfang

    2006-01-01

    A series of ternary tetrapodal nanocrystals of CdSe x Te 1-x with x = 0 (CdTe), 0.23, 0.53, 0.78, 1 (CdSe) were synthesized and used to fabricate hybrid nanocrystal/polymer solar cells. Herein, the nanocrystals acted as electron acceptors, and poly(2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene) (MEH-PPV) was used as an electron donor. It was found that the open circuit voltage (V oc ), short-circuit current (J sc ) and power conversion efficiency (η) of the devices all increased with increasing Se content in the CdSe x Te 1-x nanocrystals under identical experimental conditions. The solar cell based on the blend of tetrapodal CdSe nanocrystals and MEH-PPV (9:1 w/w) showed the highest power conversion efficiency of 1.13% under AM 1.5, 80 mW cm -2 , and the maximum incident photon to converted current efficiency (IPCE) of the device reached 47% at 510 nm. The influence of nanocrystal composition on the photovoltaic properties of the hybrid solar cells was explained by the difference of the band level positions between MEH-PPV and the nanocrystals

  11. Reusable hydroxyapatite nanocrystal sensors for protein adsorption

    Tagaya, Motohiro; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Chakarov, Dinko; Kasemo, Bengt; Tanaka, Junzo

    2010-01-01

    The repeatability of the adsorption and removal of fibrinogen and fetal bovine serum on hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystal sensors was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) monitoring technique. The HAp nanocrystals were coated on a gold-coated quartz sensor by electrophoretic deposition. Proteins adsorbed on the HAp sensors were removed by (i) ammonia/hydrogen peroxide mixture (APM), (ii) ultraviolet light (UV), (iii) UV/APM, (iv) APM/UV and (v) sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) treatments. FTIR spectra of the reused surfaces revealed that the APM and SDS treatments left peptide fragments or the proteins adsorbed on the surfaces, whereas the other methods successfully removed the proteins. The QCM-D measurements indicated that in the removal treatments, fibrinogen was slowly adsorbed in the first cycle because of the change in surface wettability revealed by contact angle measurements. The SDS treatment was not effective in removing proteins. The APM or UV treatment decreased the frequency shifts for the reused HAp sensors. The UV/APM treatment did not induce the frequency shifts but decreased the dissipation shifts. Therefore, we conclude that the APM/UV treatment is the most useful method for reproducing protein adsorption behavior on HAp sensors.

  12. Reusable hydroxyapatite nanocrystal sensors for protein adsorption

    Motohiro Tagaya, Toshiyuki Ikoma, Nobutaka Hanagata, Dinko Chakarov, Bengt Kasemo and Junzo Tanaka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The repeatability of the adsorption and removal of fibrinogen and fetal bovine serum on hydroxyapatite (HAp nanocrystal sensors was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D monitoring technique. The HAp nanocrystals were coated on a gold-coated quartz sensor by electrophoretic deposition. Proteins adsorbed on the HAp sensors were removed by (i ammonia/hydrogen peroxide mixture (APM, (ii ultraviolet light (UV, (iii UV/APM, (iv APM/UV and (v sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS treatments. FTIR spectra of the reused surfaces revealed that the APM and SDS treatments left peptide fragments or the proteins adsorbed on the surfaces, whereas the other methods successfully removed the proteins. The QCM-D measurements indicated that in the removal treatments, fibrinogen was slowly adsorbed in the first cycle because of the change in surface wettability revealed by contact angle measurements. The SDS treatment was not effective in removing proteins. The APM or UV treatment decreased the frequency shifts for the reused HAp sensors. The UV/APM treatment did not induce the frequency shifts but decreased the dissipation shifts. Therefore, we conclude that the APM/UV treatment is the most useful method for reproducing protein adsorption behavior on HAp sensors.

  13. The hydrodynamic size of polymer stabilized nanocrystals

    Krueger, Karl M; Al-Somali, Ali M; Mejia, Michelle; Colvin, Vicki L [Department of Chemistry, Rice University, MS-60 6100 Main Street, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2007-11-28

    For many emerging applications, nanocrystals are surface functionalized with polymers to control self-assembly, prevent aggregation, and promote incorporation into polymer matrices and biological systems. The hydrodynamic diameter of these nanoparticle-polymer complexes is a critical factor for many applications, and predicting this size is complicated by the fact that the structure of the grafted polymer at a nanocrystalline interface is not generally established. In this work we evaluate using size-exclusion chromatography the overall hydrodynamic diameter of nanocrystals (Au, CdSe, d<5 nm) surface coated with polystyrene of varying molecular weight. The polymer is tethered to the nanoparticles via a terminal thiol to provide strong attachment. Our data show that at full coverage the polymer assumes a brush conformation and is 44% longer than the unbound polymer in solution. The brush conformation is confirmed by comparison with models used to describe polymer brushes at flat interfaces. From this work, we suggest an empirical formula which predicts the hydrodynamic diameter of polymer coated nanoparticles based on the size of the nanoparticle core and the size of the randomly coiled unbound polymer in solution.

  14. Effects of small-angle mistilts on dopant visibility in ADF-STEM imaging of nanocrystals

    Held, Jacob T.; Duncan, Samuel; Mkhoyan, K. Andre, E-mail: mkhoyan@umn.edu

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • ADF-STEM is powerful technique for 3D location of substitutionally doped atoms. • The effects of specimen mistilt on ADF-STEM imaging of doped atoms are evaluated. • Visibility changes over 0–30 mrad mistilts are large enough to preclude 3D dopant location. • Dopant visibility is a strong function of specimen mistilt and cannot be ignored. - Abstract: Quantitative ADF-STEM imaging paired with image simulations has proven to be a powerful technique for determining the three dimensional location of substitutionally doped atoms in thin films. Expansion of this technique to lightly-doped nanocrystals requires an understanding of the influence of specimen mistilt on dopant visibility due to the difficulty of accurate orientation determination in such systems as well as crystal movement under the beam. In this study, the effects of specimen mistilt on ADF-STEM imaging are evaluated using germanium-doped silicon nanocrystals as model systems. It is shown that dopant visibility is a strong function of specimen mistilt, and the accuracy of specimen orientation is an important factor in the analysis of three-dimensional dopant location, but the sensitivity to mistilt can be weakened by increasing the STEM probe convergence angle and optimizing ADF detector inner angle.

  15. Synthesis of compositionally controllable Cu{sub 2}(Sn{sub 1−x}Ge{sub x})S{sub 3} nanocrystals with tunable band gaps

    Liang, Qingshuang, E-mail: lqs671@163.com [Jilin University, State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, College of Chemistry (China)

    2016-06-15

    In this work, we show that compositionally controlled Cu{sub 2}(Sn{sub 1–x}Ge{sub x})S{sub 3} nanocrystals can be successfully synthesized by the hot-injection method through careful tuning the Ge/(Sn+Ge) precursor ratio. The band gaps of the resultant nanocrystals are demonstrated to be linearly tuned from 1.45 to 2.33 eV by adjusting the composition parameter x of the Ge/(Sn+Ge) ratio from 0.0 to 1.0. The crystalline structures of the resultant NCs have been studied by the X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), select area electron diffraction (SAED), and Raman spectroscopy. A ligand exchange procedure is further performed to replace the native ligands on the surface of the NCs with sulfur ions. The photoresponsive behavior indicates the potential use of as-prepared Cu{sub 2}(Sn{sub 1–x}Ge{sub x})S{sub 3} nanocrystals in solar energy conversion systems. The synthesis of compositionally controlled Cu{sub 2}(Sn{sub 1–x}Ge{sub x})S{sub 3} nanocrystals reported herein provides a way for probing the effect of Ge inclusion in the Cu-Sn-S system thin films.

  16. Fluorescent cellulose nanocrystals via supramolecular assembly of terpyridine-modified cellulose nanocrystals and terpyridine-modified perylene

    Hassan, Mohammad L.; Moorefield, Charles M.; Elbatal, Hany S.; Newkome, George R.; Modarelli, David A.; Romano, Natalie C.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Surfaces of cellulose nanocrystals were modified with terpyridine ligands. ► Fluorescent nanocrystals could be obtained via self-assembly of terpyridine-modified perylene dye onto the terpyridine-modified cellulose nanocrystals. ► Further self-assembly of azide-functionalized terpyridine onto the fluorescent cellulose nanocrystals was possible to obtain nanocellulosic material with expected use in bioimaging. - Abstract: Due to their natural origin, biocompatibility, and non-toxicity, cellulose nanocrystals are promising candidates for applications in nanomedicine. Highly fluorescent nanocellulosic material was prepared via surface modification of cellulose nanocrystals with 2,2′:6′,2″-terpyridine side chains followed by supramolecular assembly of terpyridine-modified perylene dye onto the terpyridine-modified cellulose nanocrystals (CTP) via Ru III /Ru II reduction. The prepared terpyridine-modified cellulose-Ru II -terpyridine-modified perylene (CTP-Ru II -PeryTP) fluorescent nanocrystals were characterized using cross-polarized/magic angle spin 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (CP/MAS 13 C NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV–visible, and fluorescence spectroscopy. In addition, further self-assembly of terpyridine units with azide functional groups onto CTP-Ru II -PeryTP was possible via repeating the Ru III /Ru II reduction protocol to prepare supramolecular fluorescent nanocrystals with azide functionality (CTP-Ru II -PeryTP-Ru II -AZTP). The prepared derivative may have potential application in bio-imaging since the terminal azide groups can be easily reacted with antigens via “Click” chemistry reaction.

  17. Memory characteristics of an MOS capacitor structure with double-layer semiconductor and metal heterogeneous nanocrystals

    Ni Henan; Wu Liangcai; Song Zhitang; Hui Chun

    2009-01-01

    An MOS (metal oxide semiconductor) capacitor structure with double-layer heterogeneous nanocrystals consisting of semiconductor and metal embedded in a gate oxide for nonvolatile memory applications has been fabricated and characterized. By combining vacuum electron-beam co-evaporated Si nanocrystals and self-assembled Ni nanocrystals in a SiO 2 matrix, an MOS capacitor with double-layer heterogeneous nanocrystals can have larger charge storage capacity and improved retention characteristics compared to one with single-layer nanocrystals. The upper metal nanocrystals as an additional charge trap layer enable the direct tunneling mechanism to enhance the flat voltage shift and prolong the retention time. (semiconductor devices)

  18. Processing of ZnO nanocrystals by solochemical technique

    Gusatti, M.; Speckhahn, R.; Silva, L.A.; Rosario, J.A.; Lima, R.B.; Kuhnen, N.C.; Riella, H.G.; Campos, C.E.M.

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, we report the synthesis of high quality ZnO nanocrystals by solochemical technique. This synthetic strategy has been shown to have advantages over other methods of producing nanostructures in terms of low cost, efficiency, simplicity and uniformity of crystal structure. Zinc chloride solution at room temperature was mixed with sodium hydroxide solution at 50°C to produce ZnO nanocrystals. Transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the ZnO nanocrystals obtained. The structure of ZnO was refined by the Rietveld Method from X-ray diffraction data. These methods showed that the product consisted of pure ZnO nanocrystals and has, predominantly, a rod-like morphology. (author)

  19. Magneto-optical transitions in multilayer semiconductor nanocrystals

    Climente, J; Jaskolski, W; Aliaga, J I

    2003-01-01

    Absorption spectra of chemically synthesized uniform and multilayer semiconductor nanocrystals in a magnetic field are investigated theoretically. The nanocrystals are modelled by spherical barrier/well potentials. The electron states are calculated within the effective mass model. A four-band k centre dot p Hamiltonian, accounting for the valence subband mixing, is used to obtain the hole states. The magneto-optical transition spectrum depends strongly on the size and composition of the nanocrystals. In the case of small uniform quantum dots, only the linear Zeeman splitting of the electron and hole energy levels is observed even for very strong magnetic fields. In larger nanocrystals, the quadratic magnetic interaction turns out to be important and the transition spectrum becomes complicated. The most complicated influence of the magnetic field is found in quantum dot-quantum well systems in which the lowest electron and hole states are localized in a thin spherical layer. It is shown that transitions that ...

  20. Hydroxyapatite nanocrystals: Simple preparation, characterization and formation mechanism

    Mohandes, Fatemeh; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud; Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Fereshteh, Zeinab

    2014-01-01

    Crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanoparticles and nanorods have been successfully synthesized via a simple precipitation method. To control the shape and particle size of HAP nanocrystals, coordination ligands derived from 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde were first prepared, characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1 H-NMR) spectroscopies, and finally applied in the synthesis process of HAP. On the other hand, the HAP nanocrystals were also characterized by several techniques including powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). According to the FE-SEM and TEM micrographs, it was found that the morphology and crystallinity of the HAP powders depended on the coordination mode of the ligands. - Highlights: • HAP nanobundles and nanoparticles have been prepared by a precipitation method. • Morphologies of HAP nanocrystals were controlled by different coordination ligands. • The formation mechanism of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals was also considered

  1. Hydroxyapatite nanocrystals: Simple preparation, characterization and formation mechanism

    Mohandes, Fatemeh [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P. O. Box. 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salavati-Niasari, Masoud, E-mail: salavati@kashanu.ac.ir [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P. O. Box. 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, Kashan, P. O. Box 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fathi, Mohammadhossein [Biomaterials Research Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dental Materials Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fereshteh, Zeinab [Biomaterials Research Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-12-01

    Crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanoparticles and nanorods have been successfully synthesized via a simple precipitation method. To control the shape and particle size of HAP nanocrystals, coordination ligands derived from 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde were first prepared, characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H-NMR) spectroscopies, and finally applied in the synthesis process of HAP. On the other hand, the HAP nanocrystals were also characterized by several techniques including powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). According to the FE-SEM and TEM micrographs, it was found that the morphology and crystallinity of the HAP powders depended on the coordination mode of the ligands. - Highlights: • HAP nanobundles and nanoparticles have been prepared by a precipitation method. • Morphologies of HAP nanocrystals were controlled by different coordination ligands. • The formation mechanism of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals was also considered.

  2. Chemically Addressable Perovskite Nanocrystals for Light-Emitting Applications

    Sun, Haizhu; Yang, Zhenyu; Wei, Mingyang; Sun, Wei; Li, Xiyan; Ye, Shuyang; Zhao, Yongbiao; Tan, Hairen; Kynaston, Emily L.; Schon, Tyler B.; Yan, Han; Lu, Zheng-Hong; Ozin, Geoffrey A.; Sargent, Edward H.; Seferos, Dwight S.

    2017-01-01

    Whereas organic–inorganic hybrid perovskite nanocrystals (PNCs) have remarkable potential in the development of optoelectronic materials, their relatively poor chemical and colloidal stability undermines their performance in optoelectronic devices

  3. Pyridine-induced Dimensionality Change in Hybrid Perovskite Nanocrystals

    Ahmed, Ghada H.; Yin, Jun; Bose, Riya; Sinatra, Lutfan; Alarousu, Erkki; Yengel, Emre; AlYami, Noktan; Saidaminov, Makhsud I.; Zhang, Yuhai; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Bakr, Osman; Bredas, Jean-Luc; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2017-01-01

    of pyridine during the synthesis of methylammonium lead bromide (MAPbBr) perovskite nanocrystals can transform three-dimensional (3D) cubes into two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that pyridine preferentially

  4. Rapid thermal synthesis of GaN nanocrystals and nanodisks

    Sofer, Z.; Sedmidubský, D.; Huber, Š.; Šimek, P.; Šaněk, F.; Jankovský, O.; Gregorová, E.; Fiala, R.; Matějková, Stanislava; Mikulics, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2013), 1411/1-1411/7 ISSN 1388-0764 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : gallium nitride * thermal ammonolysis * nanodisks * nanocrystals Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.278, year: 2013

  5. A single molecule switch based on two Pd nanocrystals linked

    Conducting molecule; nanocrystals; scanning tunneling microscopy; negative differential resistance. Abstract. Tunneling spectroscopy measurements have been carried out on a single molecule device formed by two Pd ... Current Issue : Vol.

  6. Nonvolatile memory effect of tungsten nanocrystals under oxygen plasma treatments

    Chen, Shih-Cheng; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chen, Wei-Ren; Lo, Yuan-Chun; Wu, Kai-Ting; Sze, S.M.; Chen, Jason; Liao, I.H.; Yeh, Fon-Shan

    2010-01-01

    In this work, an oxygen plasma treatment was used to improve the memory effect of nonvolatile W nanocrystal memory, including memory window, retention and endurance. To investigate the role of the oxygen plasma treatment in charge storage characteristics, the X-ray photon-emission spectra (XPS) were performed to analyze the variation of chemical composition for W nanocrystal embedded oxide both with and without the oxygen plasma treatment. In addition, the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses were also used to identify the microstructure in the thin film and the size and density of W nanocrystals. The device with the oxygen plasma treatment shows a significant improvement of charge storage effect, because the oxygen plasma treatment enhanced the quality of silicon oxide surrounding the W nanocrystals. Therefore, the data retention and endurance characteristics were also improved by the passivation.

  7. Self-aggregation of magnetic semiconductor EuS nanocrystals

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Yasuchika; Kamikubo, Hironari; Kataoka, Mikio; Kawai, Tsuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Controlled formation of aggregates having organized structure of cube-shaped EuS nanocrystals is reported. The EuS aggregates in liquid media (methanol) were obtained by means of van der Waals interaction between EuS nanocrystals. The packing structure of the EuS aggregates is characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small angle X-ray scattering measurements (SAXS). TEM image indicates the EuS nanocrystals form self-aggregated 2D orthogonal lattice structure. The diffraction peak of (111) of SAXS profile shows that the cube-shaped EuS form 3D cubic superlattice. We successfully demonstrated that the aggregates of cube-shaped EuS nanocrystals formed cubic stacking structure.

  8. Surface structures for enhancement of quantum yield in broad spectrum emission nanocrystals

    Schreuder, Michael A.; McBride, James R.; Rosenthal, Sandra J.

    2014-07-22

    Disclosed are inorganic nanoparticles comprising a body comprising cadmium and/or zinc crystallized with selenium, sulfur, and/or tellurium; a multiplicity of phosphonic acid ligands comprising at least about 20% of the total surface ligand coverage; wherein the nanocrystal is capable of absorbing energy from a first electromagnetic region and capable of emitting light in a second electromagnetic region, wherein the maximum absorbance wavelength of the first electromagnetic region is different from the maximum emission wavelength of the second electromagnetic region, thereby providing a Stokes shift of at least about 20 nm, wherein the second electromagnetic region comprises an at least about 100 nm wide band of wavelengths, and wherein the nanoparticle exhibits has a quantum yield of at least about 10%. This abstract is intended as a scanning tool for purposes of searching in the particular art and is not intended to be limiting of the present invention.

  9. Formation of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals. The aspect of nucleation

    Kudera, S.

    2007-08-17

    The present work describes different techniques to control some major parameters of colloidal nanocrystals. The individual techniques rely on the manipulation of the nucleation event. The sensitive control of the nanocrystals' size and shape is discussed. Furthermore the formation of hybrid nanocrystals composed of different materials is presented. The synthesis technique for the production of the different samples involves organic solvents and surfactants and reactions at elevated temperatures. The presence of magic size clusters offers a possibility to control the size of the nanocrystals even at very small dimensions. The clusters produced comprise ca. 100 atoms. In the case of CdSe, nanocrystals of this size emit a blue fluorescence and therefore extend the routinely accessible spectrum for this material over the whole visible range. Samples fluorescing in the spectral range from green to red are produced with standard recipes. In this work a reaction scheme for magic size clusters is presented and a theoretical model to explain the particular behaviour of their growth dynamics is discussed. The samples are investigated by optical spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis. A method to form branched nanocrystals is discussed. The branching point is analysed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and proves for the occurrence of a multiple twinned structure are strengthened by simulation of the observed patterns. Two different techniques to generate nanocrystals of this type are presented. The first relies on a seeded growth approach in which the nucleation of the second material is allowed only on de ned sites of the seeds. The second technique uses the tips of pre-formed nano-dumbbells as sacrificial domains. The material on the tips is replaced by gold. Hybrid materials are formed by a seeded-growth mechanism. Pre-formed nanocrystals provide the nucleation sites for the second material. (orig.)

  10. Formation of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals. The aspect of nucleation

    Kudera, S

    2007-08-17

    The present work describes different techniques to control some major parameters of colloidal nanocrystals. The individual techniques rely on the manipulation of the nucleation event. The sensitive control of the nanocrystals' size and shape is discussed. Furthermore the formation of hybrid nanocrystals composed of different materials is presented. The synthesis technique for the production of the different samples involves organic solvents and surfactants and reactions at elevated temperatures. The presence of magic size clusters offers a possibility to control the size of the nanocrystals even at very small dimensions. The clusters produced comprise ca. 100 atoms. In the case of CdSe, nanocrystals of this size emit a blue fluorescence and therefore extend the routinely accessible spectrum for this material over the whole visible range. Samples fluorescing in the spectral range from green to red are produced with standard recipes. In this work a reaction scheme for magic size clusters is presented and a theoretical model to explain the particular behaviour of their growth dynamics is discussed. The samples are investigated by optical spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis. A method to form branched nanocrystals is discussed. The branching point is analysed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and proves for the occurrence of a multiple twinned structure are strengthened by simulation of the observed patterns. Two different techniques to generate nanocrystals of this type are presented. The first relies on a seeded growth approach in which the nucleation of the second material is allowed only on de ned sites of the seeds. The second technique uses the tips of pre-formed nano-dumbbells as sacrificial domains. The material on the tips is replaced by gold. Hybrid materials are formed by a seeded-growth mechanism. Pre-formed nanocrystals provide the nucleation sites for the second material. (orig.)

  11. Building Service Provider Capabilities

    Brandl, Kristin; Jaura, Manya; Ørberg Jensen, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study whether and how the interaction between clients and the service providers contributes to the development of capabilities in service provider firms. In situations where such a contribution occurs, we analyze how different types of activities in the production process...... process. We find that clients influence the development of human capital capabilities and management capabilities in reciprocally produced services. While in sequential produced services clients influence the development of organizational capital capabilities and management capital capabilities....... of the services, such as sequential or reciprocal task activities, influence the development of different types of capabilities. We study five cases of offshore-outsourced knowledge-intensive business services that are distinguished according to their reciprocal or sequential task activities in their production...

  12. Inhibition of palm oil oxidation by zeolite nanocrystals.

    Tan, Kok-Hou; Awala, Hussein; Mukti, Rino R; Wong, Ka-Lun; Rigaud, Baptiste; Ling, Tau Chuan; Aleksandrov, Hristiyan A; Koleva, Iskra Z; Vayssilov, Georgi N; Mintova, Svetlana; Ng, Eng-Poh

    2015-05-13

    The efficiency of zeolite X nanocrystals (FAU-type framework structure) containing different extra-framework cations (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+)) in slowing the thermal oxidation of palm oil is reported. The oxidation study of palm oil is conducted in the presence of zeolite nanocrystals (0.5 wt %) at 150 °C. Several characterization techniques such as visual analysis, colorimetry, rheometry, total acid number (TAN), FT-IR spectroscopy, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and Karl Fischer analyses are applied to follow the oxidative evolution of the oil. It was found that zeolite nanocrystals decelerate the oxidation of palm oil through stabilization of hydroperoxides, which are the primary oxidation product, and concurrently via adsorption of the secondary oxidation products (alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, and esters). In addition to the experimental results, periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to elucidate further the oxidation process of the palm oil in the presence of zeolite nanocrystals. The DFT calculations show that the metal complexes formed with peroxides are more stable than the complexes with alkenes with the same ions. The peroxides captured in the zeolite X nanocrystals consequently decelerate further oxidation toward formation of acids. Unlike the monovalent alkali metal cations in the zeolite X nanocrystals (K(+), Na(+), and Li(+)), Ca(2+) reduced the acidity of the oil by neutralizing the acidic carboxylate compounds to COO(-)(Ca(2+))1/2 species.

  13. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    Liu, Haitao

    2007-01-01

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis and application of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based on high temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has become one of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. This method is first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkers in 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and later extended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well as anisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod. This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystal synthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied by characterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and products and following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on these results, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction between the precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth of nanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theory calculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursor decomposition and monomer formation pathway. Based on the proposed reaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses water as a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSe and CdS nanorods

  14. Size- and shape-dependent surface thermodynamic properties of nanocrystals

    Fu, Qingshan; Xue, Yongqiang; Cui, Zixiang

    2018-05-01

    As the fundamental properties, the surface thermodynamic properties of nanocrystals play a key role in the physical and chemical changes. However, it remains ambiguous about the quantitative influence regularities of size and shape on the surface thermodynamic properties of nanocrystals. Thus by introducing interface variables into the Gibbs energy and combining Young-Laplace equation, relations between the surface thermodynamic properties (surface Gibbs energy, surface enthalpy, surface entropy, surface energy and surface heat capacity), respectively, and size of nanocrystals with different shapes were derived. Theoretical estimations of the orders of the surface thermodynamic properties of nanocrystals agree with available experimental values. Calculated results of the surface thermodynamic properties of Au, Bi and Al nanocrystals suggest that when r > 10 nm, the surface thermodynamic properties linearly vary with the reciprocal of particle size, and when r < 10 nm, the effect of particle size on the surface thermodynamic properties becomes greater and deviates from linear variation. For nanocrystals with identical equivalent diameter, the more the shape deviates from sphere, the larger the surface thermodynamic properties (absolute value) are.

  15. Cellulose nanocrystals from acacia bark-Influence of solvent extraction.

    Taflick, Ticiane; Schwendler, Luana A; Rosa, Simone M L; Bica, Clara I D; Nachtigall, Sônia M B

    2017-08-01

    The isolation of cellulose nanocrystals from different lignocellulosic materials has shown increased interest in academic and technological research. These materials have excellent mechanical properties and can be used as nanofillers for polymer composites as well as transparent films for various applications. In this work, cellulose isolation was performed following an environmental friendly procedure without chlorine. Cellulose nanocrystals were isolated from the exhausted acacia bark (after the industrial process of extracting tannin) with the objective of evaluating the effect of the solvent extraction steps on the characteristics of cellulose and cellulose nanocrystals. It was also assessed the effect of acid hydrolysis time on the thermal stability, morphology and size of the nanocrystals, through TGA, TEM and light scattering analyses. It was concluded that the extraction step with solvents was important in the isolation of cellulose, but irrelevant in the isolation of cellulose nanocrystals. Light scattering experiments indicated that 30min of hydrolysis was long enough for the isolation of cellulose nanocrystals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Gamma-ray imaging probes

    Wild, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    External nuclear medicine diagnostic imaging of early primary and metastatic lung cancer tumors is difficult due to the poor sensitivity and resolution of existing gamma cameras. Nonimaging counting detectors used for internal tumor detection give ambiguous results because distant background variations are difficult to discriminate from neighboring tumor sites. This suggests that an internal imaging nuclear medicine probe, particularly an esophageal probe, may be advantageously used to detect small tumors because of the ability to discriminate against background variations and the capability to get close to sites neighboring the esophagus. The design, theory of operation, preliminary bench tests, characterization of noise behavior and optimization of such an imaging probe is the central theme of this work

  17. Spaser as a biological probe

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Weingold, Robert; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nolan, Jacqueline; Harrington, Walter; Kuchyanov, Alexander S.; Parkhomenko, Roman G.; Watanabe, Fumiya; Nima, Zeid; Biris, Alexandru S.; Plekhanov, Alexander I.; Stockman, Mark I.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2017-06-01

    Understanding cell biology greatly benefits from the development of advanced diagnostic probes. Here we introduce a 22-nm spaser (plasmonic nanolaser) with the ability to serve as a super-bright, water-soluble, biocompatible probe capable of generating stimulated emission directly inside living cells and animal tissues. We have demonstrated a lasing regime associated with the formation of a dynamic vapour nanobubble around the spaser that leads to giant spasing with emission intensity and spectral width >100 times brighter and 30-fold narrower, respectively, than for quantum dots. The absorption losses in the spaser enhance its multifunctionality, allowing for nanobubble-amplified photothermal and photoacoustic imaging and therapy. Furthermore, the silica spaser surface has been covalently functionalized with folic acid for molecular targeting of cancer cells. All these properties make a nanobubble spaser a promising multimodal, super-contrast, ultrafast cellular probe with a single-pulse nanosecond excitation for a variety of in vitro and in vivo biomedical applications.

  18. Cellulose nanocrystals reinforced foamed nitrile rubber nanocomposites.

    Chen, Yukun; Zhang, Yuanbing; Xu, Chuanhui; Cao, Xiaodong

    2015-10-05

    Research on foamed nitrile rubber (NBR)/cellulose nanocrystals (CNs) nanocomposites is rarely found in the literatures. In this paper, CNs suspension and NBR latex was mixed to prepared the foamed NBR/CNs nanocomposites. We found that the CNs mainly located in the cell walls, effectively reinforcing the foamed NBR. The strong interaction between the CNs and NBR matrix restricted the mobility of NBR chains surrounding the CNs, hence increasing the crosslink density of the NBR matrix. CNs exhibited excellent reinforcement on the foamed NBR: a remarkable increase nearly 76% in the tensile strength of the foamed nanocomposites was achieved with a load of only 15 phr CNs. Enhanced mechanical properties make the foamed NBR/CNs nanocomposites a promising damping material for industrial applications with a potential to reduce the petroleum consumption. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Making sense of nanocrystal lattice fringes

    Fraundorf, P.; Qin Wentao; Moeck, Peter; Mandell, Eric

    2005-01-01

    The orientation dependence of thin-crystal lattice fringes can be gracefully quantified using fringe-visibility maps, a direct-space analog of Kikuchi maps [Nishikawa and Kikuchi, Nature (London) 121, 1019 (1928)]. As in navigation of reciprocal space with the aid of Kikuchi lines, fringe-visibility maps facilitate acquisition of crystallographic information from lattice images. In particular, these maps can help researchers to determine the three-dimensional lattice of individual nanocrystals, to 'fringe-fingerprint' collections of randomly oriented particles, and to measure local specimen thickness with only a modest tilt. Since the number of fringes in an image increases with maximum spatial-frequency squared, these strategies (with help from more precise goniometers) will be more useful as aberration correction moves resolutions into the subangstrom range

  20. Flexible and fragmentable tandem photosensitive nanocrystal skins

    Akhavan, S.; Uran, C.; Bozok, B.; Gungor, K.; Kelestemur, Y.; Lesnyak, V.; Gaponik, N.; Eychmüller, A.; Demir, H. V.

    2016-02-01

    We proposed and demonstrated the first account of large-area, semi-transparent, tandem photosensitive nanocrystal skins (PNSs) constructed on flexible substrates operating on the principle of photogenerated potential buildup, which avoid the need for applying an external bias and circumvent the current-matching limitation between junctions. We successfully fabricated and operated the tandem PNSs composed of single monolayers of colloidal water-soluble CdTe and CdHgTe nanocrystals (NCs) in adjacent junctions on a Kapton polymer tape. Owing to the usage of a single NC layer in each junction, noise generation was significantly reduced while keeping the resulting PNS films considerably transparent. In each junction, photogenerated excitons are dissociated at the interface of the semi-transparent Al electrode and the NC layer, with holes migrating to the contact electrode and electrons trapped in the NCs. As a result, the tandem PNSs lead to an open-circuit photovoltage buildup equal to the sum of those of the two single junctions, exhibiting a total voltage buildup of 128.4 mV at an excitation intensity of 75.8 μW cm-2 at 350 nm. Furthermore, we showed that these flexible PNSs could be bent over 3.5 mm radius of curvature and cut out in arbitrary shapes without damaging the operation of individual parts and without introducing any significant loss in the total sensitivity. These findings indicate that the NC skins are promising as building blocks to make low-cost, flexible, large-area UV/visible sensing platforms with highly efficient full-spectrum conversion.We proposed and demonstrated the first account of large-area, semi-transparent, tandem photosensitive nanocrystal skins (PNSs) constructed on flexible substrates operating on the principle of photogenerated potential buildup, which avoid the need for applying an external bias and circumvent the current-matching limitation between junctions. We successfully fabricated and operated the tandem PNSs composed of

  1. Scanning probe microscopy competency development

    Hawley, M.E.; Reagor, D.W.; Jia, Quan Xi [and others

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project collaborators developed an ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (UHV-STM) capability, integrated it with existing scanning probe microscopes, and developed new, advanced air-based scanning force techniques (SPMs). Programmatic, basic, and industrially related laboratory research requires the existence of SPMs, as well as expertise capable of providing local nano-scale information. The UHV-STM capability, equipped with load-lock system and several surface science techniques, will allow introduction, examination, and reaction of surfaces prepared under well-controlled vacuum conditions, including the examination of morphology and local bonding associated with the initial stages of film growth under controlled growth conditions. The resulting capabilities will enable the authors to respond to a variety of problems requiring local characterization of conducting and nonconducting surfaces in liquids, air, and UHV.

  2. Four-probe measurements with a three-probe scanning tunneling microscope

    Salomons, Mark; Martins, Bruno V. C.; Zikovsky, Janik; Wolkow, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    We present an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) three-probe scanning tunneling microscope in which each probe is capable of atomic resolution. A UHV JEOL scanning electron microscope aids in the placement of the probes on the sample. The machine also has a field ion microscope to clean, atomically image, and shape the probe tips. The machine uses bare conductive samples and tips with a homebuilt set of pliers for heating and loading. Automated feedback controlled tip-surface contacts allow for electrical stability and reproducibility while also greatly reducing tip and surface damage due to contact formation. The ability to register inter-tip position by imaging of a single surface feature by multiple tips is demonstrated. Four-probe material characterization is achieved by deploying two tips as fixed current probes and the third tip as a movable voltage probe

  3. Four-probe measurements with a three-probe scanning tunneling microscope

    Salomons, Mark [National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Martins, Bruno V. C.; Zikovsky, Janik; Wolkow, Robert A., E-mail: rwolkow@ualberta.ca [National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada)

    2014-04-15

    We present an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) three-probe scanning tunneling microscope in which each probe is capable of atomic resolution. A UHV JEOL scanning electron microscope aids in the placement of the probes on the sample. The machine also has a field ion microscope to clean, atomically image, and shape the probe tips. The machine uses bare conductive samples and tips with a homebuilt set of pliers for heating and loading. Automated feedback controlled tip-surface contacts allow for electrical stability and reproducibility while also greatly reducing tip and surface damage due to contact formation. The ability to register inter-tip position by imaging of a single surface feature by multiple tips is demonstrated. Four-probe material characterization is achieved by deploying two tips as fixed current probes and the third tip as a movable voltage probe.

  4. Four-probe measurements with a three-probe scanning tunneling microscope.

    Salomons, Mark; Martins, Bruno V C; Zikovsky, Janik; Wolkow, Robert A

    2014-04-01

    We present an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) three-probe scanning tunneling microscope in which each probe is capable of atomic resolution. A UHV JEOL scanning electron microscope aids in the placement of the probes on the sample. The machine also has a field ion microscope to clean, atomically image, and shape the probe tips. The machine uses bare conductive samples and tips with a homebuilt set of pliers for heating and loading. Automated feedback controlled tip-surface contacts allow for electrical stability and reproducibility while also greatly reducing tip and surface damage due to contact formation. The ability to register inter-tip position by imaging of a single surface feature by multiple tips is demonstrated. Four-probe material characterization is achieved by deploying two tips as fixed current probes and the third tip as a movable voltage probe.

  5. Photoluminescence behaviors of single CdSe/ZnS/TOPO nanocrystals: Adsorption effects of water molecules onto nanocrystal surfaces

    Oda, Masaru; Hasegawa, Atsushi; Iwami, Noriya; Nishiura, Ken; Ando, Naohisa; Nishiyama, Akira; Horiuchi, Hiromi; Tani, Toshiro

    2007-01-01

    We report here the distinctive modifications of photoluminescence (PL) behaviors in single CdSe/ZnS/TOPO nanocrystals depending on their environments. Long-time traces of PL intensity from single nanocrystals have been obtained in both vacuum and a wet nitrogen atmosphere. While all of the nanocrystals in both environments exhibit PL blinking behaviors, i.e. on-off intermittency of PL intensity, as usual, some of the nanocrystals in the wet nitrogen atmosphere show significant increase in duration time of on-events. As for the duration time of blinking off-events, it is for the moment associated with the occasional events of carrier capturing at trap sites on or near the nanocrystal surfaces. We propose a model in which adsorbed water molecules at the trap sites on the nanocrystal surfaces transform them under light irradiation, which eventually decreases the occurrence of the trapping events due to their inactivation. It in turn increases the PL on-times. In addition to the drastic modification of the blinking profile, we also found that in the PL time traces some kinds of undulated behaviors, i.e. continuous and rather low frequency fluctuation of PL intensity, appear during each on-event in vacuum while they disappear totally in the wet nitrogen atmosphere. These results are also described on the basis of the inactivation model of the trap sites introduced above

  6. Capability Handbook- offline metrology

    Islam, Aminul; Marhöfer, David Maximilian; Tosello, Guido

    This offline metrological capability handbook has been made in relation to HiMicro Task 3.3. The purpose of this document is to assess the metrological capability of the HiMicro partners and to gather the information of all available metrological instruments in the one single document. It provides...

  7. Dynamic Capabilities and Performance

    Wilden, Ralf; Gudergan, Siegfried P.; Nielsen, Bo Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    are contingent on the competitive intensity faced by firms. Our findings demonstrate the performance effects of internal alignment between organizational structure and dynamic capabilities, as well as the external fit of dynamic capabilities with competitive intensity. We outline the advantages of PLS...

  8. Developing Alliance Capabilities

    Heimeriks, Koen H.; Duysters, Geert; Vanhaverbeke, Wim

    This paper assesses the differential performance effects of learning mechanisms on the development of alliance capabilities. Prior research has suggested that different capability levels could be identified in which specific intra-firm learning mechanisms are used to enhance a firm's alliance...

  9. Telematics Options and Capabilities

    Hodge, Cabell [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-05

    This presentation describes the data tracking and analytical capabilities of telematics devices. Federal fleet managers can use the systems to keep their drivers safe, maintain a fuel efficient fleet, ease their reporting burden, and save money. The presentation includes an example of how much these capabilities can save fleets.

  10. State of the art of nanocrystals technology for delivery of poorly soluble drugs

    Zhou, Yuqi; Du, Juan; Wang, Lulu; Wang, Yancai, E-mail: wangyancai1999@163.com [Qilu University of Technology, School of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Engineering (China)

    2016-09-15

    Formulation of nanocrystals is a distinctive approach which can effectively improve the delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs, thus enticing the development of the nanocrystals technology. The characteristics of nanocrystals resulted in an exceptional drug delivery conductance, including saturation solubility, dissolution velocity, adhesiveness, and affinity. Nanocrystals were treated as versatile pharmaceuticals that could be delivered through almost all routes of administration. In the current review, oral, pulmonary, and intravenous routes of administration were presented. Also, the targeting of drug nanocrystals, as well as issues of efficacy and safety, were also discussed. Several methods were applied for nanocrystals production including top-down production strategy (media milling, high-pressure homogenization), bottom-up production strategy (antisolvent precipitation, supercritical fluid process, and precipitation by removal of solvent), and the combination approaches. Moreover, this review also described the evaluation and characterization of the drug nanocrystals and summarized the current commercial pharmaceutical products utilizing nanocrystals technology.

  11. Fundamental aspects of nucleation and growth in the solution-phase synthesis of germanium nanocrystals

    Codoluto, Stephen C.; Baumgardner, William J.; Hanrath, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Colloidal Ge nanocrystals (NCs) were synthesized via the solution phase reduction of germanium(ii) iodide. We report a systematic investigation of the nanocrystal nucleation and growth as a function of synthesis conditions including the nature

  12. Mechanical, barrier and morphological properties of starch nanocrystals-reinforced pea starch films.

    Li, Xiaojing; Qiu, Chao; Ji, Na; Sun, Cuixia; Xiong, Liu; Sun, Qingjie

    2015-05-05

    To characterize the pea starch films reinforced with waxy maize starch nanocrystals, the mechanical, water vapor barrier and morphological properties of the composite films were investigated. The addition of starch nanocrystals increased the tensile strength of the composite films, and the value of tensile strength of the composite films was highest when starch nanocrystals content was 5% (w/w). The moisture content (%), water vapor permeability, and water-vapor transmission rate of the composite films significantly decreased as starch nanocrystals content increased. When their starch nanocrystals content was 1-5%, the starch nanocrystals dispersed homogeneously in the composite films, resulting in a relatively smooth and compact film surface and better thermal stability. However, when starch nanocrystals content was more than 7%, the starch nanocrystals began to aggregate, which resulted in the surface of the composite films developing a longitudinal fibrous structure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Proximal Probes Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the...

  14. Probe Techniques. Introductory Remarks

    Emeleus, K. G. [School of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Queen' s University, Belfast (United Kingdom)

    1968-04-15

    In this brief introduction to the session on probes, the history of theii development is first touched on briefly. Reference is then made to the significance of the work to be described by Medicus, for conductivity and recombination calculations, and by Lam and Su, for a wide range of medium and higher pressure plasmas. Finally, a number of other probe topics are mentioned, including multiple probes; probes in electronegative plasmas; resonance probes; probes in noisy discharges; probes as oscillation detectors; use of probes where space-charge is not negligible. (author)

  15. Cellulose nanocrystals with tunable surface charge for nanomedicine

    Hosseinidoust, Zeinab; Alam, Md Nur; Sim, Goeun; Tufenkji, Nathalie; van de Ven, Theo G. M.

    2015-10-01

    Crystalline nanoparticles of cellulose exhibit attractive properties as nanoscale carriers for bioactive molecules in nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine. For applications in imaging and drug delivery, surface charge is one of the most important factors affecting the performance of nanocarriers. However, current methods of preparation offer little flexibility for controlling the surface charge of cellulose nanocrystals, leading to compromised colloidal stability under physiological conditions. We report a synthesis method that results in nanocrystals with remarkably high carboxyl content (6.6 mmol g-1) and offers continuous control over surface charge without any adjustment to the reaction conditions. Six fractions of nanocrystals with various surface carboxyl contents were synthesized from a single sample of softwood pulp with carboxyl contents varying from 6.6 to 1.7 mmol g-1 and were fully characterized. The proposed method resulted in highly stable colloidal nanocrystals that did not aggregate when exposed to high salt concentrations or serum-containing media. Interactions of these fractions with four different tissue cell lines were investigated over a wide range of concentrations (50-300 μg mL-1). Darkfield hyperspectral imaging and confocal microscopy confirmed the uptake of nanocrystals by selected cell lines without any evidence of membrane damage or change in cell density; however a charge-dependent decrease in mitochondrial activity was observed for charge contents higher than 3.9 mmol g-1. A high surface carboxyl content allowed for facile conjugation of fluorophores to the nanocrystals without compromising colloidal stability. The cellular uptake of fluoresceinamine-conjugated nanocrystals exhibited a time-dose dependent relationship and increased significantly with doubling of the surface charge.Crystalline nanoparticles of cellulose exhibit attractive properties as nanoscale carriers for bioactive molecules in nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine. For

  16. Protein Adsorption and Antibacterial Behavior for Hydroxyapatite Nanocrystals Prepared by Hydrothermal Method

    笠原, 英充; 小形, 信男; 荻原, 隆

    2005-01-01

    Homogeneous hydroxyapatite nanocrystals which have aspect ratio with more than four were synthesized by hydrothermal method. X-ray fluorescence analysis revealed that the Ca/P ratio of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals was maintaining start composition. The protein adsorption properties and bacteria-resistant of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals were investigated. The protein adsorption properties of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals were improvement after the hydrothermal treatment. Bacteria-resistant behavio...

  17. Aqueous dispersion of monodisperse magnetic iron oxide nanocrystals through phase transfer

    Yu, William W; Chang, Emmanuel; Sayes, Christie M; Drezek, Rebekah; Colvin, Vicki L

    2006-01-01

    A facile method was developed for completely transferring high quality monodisperse iron oxide nanocrystals from organic solvents to water. The as-prepared aqueous dispersions of iron oxide nanocrystals were extremely stable and could be functionalized for bioconjugation with biomolecules. These iron oxide nanocrystals showed negligible cytotoxicity to human breast cancer cells (SK-BR-3) and human dermal fibroblast cells. This method is general and versatile for many organic solvent-synthesized nanoparticles, including fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals

  18. The aggregation and characteristics of radiation-induced defects in lithium fluoride nanocrystals

    Voitovich, A. P.; Kalinov, V. S.; Korzhik, M. V.; Martynovich, E. F.; Runets, L. P.; Stupak, A. P.

    2013-02-01

    It has been established that diffusion activation energies for anion vacancies and centres ? in lithium fluoride nanocrystals are higher than those in bulk crystals. In nanocrystals, ? centres migrating in the range of the temperature close to room temperature is not observed and these centres remain stable. The ratio of centres ? and F 2 concentrations in nanocrystals is higher than in bulk crystals. A new type of colour centres, which is absent in bulk crystals, is discovered in nanocrystals.

  19. Preparation of NiFe binary alloy nanocrystals for nonvolatile memory applications

    2010-01-01

    In this work,an idea which applies binary alloy nanocrystal floating gate to nonvolatile memory application was introduced.The relationship between binary alloy’s work function and its composition was discussed theoretically.A nanocrystal floating gate structure with NiFe nanocrystals embedded in SiO2 dielectric layers was fabricated by magnetron sputtering.The micro-structure and composition deviation of the prepared NiFe nanocrystals were also investigated by TEM and EDS.

  20. Cellulose nanocrystal zero-valent iron nanocomposites for groundwater remediation†

    Bossa, Nathan; Carpenter, Alexis Wells; Kumar, Naresh; de Lannoy, Charles-François

    2018-01-01

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nano-ZVIs) have been widely studied for in situ remediation of groundwater and other environmental matrices. Nano-ZVI particle mobility and reactivity are still the main impediments in achieving efficient in situ groundwater remediation. Compared to the nano-ZVI “coating” strategy, nano-ZVI stabilization on supporting material allows direct contact with the contaminant, reduces the electron path from the nano-ZVI to the target contaminant and increases nano-ZVI reactivity. Herein, we report the synthesis of nano-ZVI stabilized by cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) rigid nanomaterials (CNC-nano-ZVI; Fe/CNC = 1 w/w) with two different CNC functional surfaces (–OH and –COOH) using a classic sodium borohydride synthesis pathway. The final nanocomposites were thoroughly characterized and the reactivity of CNC-nano-ZVIs was assessed by their methyl orange (MO) dye degradation potential. The mobility of nanocomposites was determined in (sand/glass bead) porous media by utilizing a series of flowthrough transport column experiments. The synthesized CNC-nano-ZVI provided a stable colloidal suspension and demonstrated high mobility in porous media with an attachment efficiency (α) value of less than 0.23. In addition, reactivity toward MO increased up to 25% compared to bare ZVI. The use of CNC as a delivery vehicle shows promising potential to further improve the capability and applicability of nano-ZVI for in situ groundwater remediation and can spur advancements in CNC-based nanocomposites for their application in environmental remediation. PMID:29725541

  1. Ultrahigh intercalation pseudocapacitance of mesoporous orthorhombic niobium pentoxide from a novel cellulose nanocrystal template

    Kong, Lingping; Zhang, Chuangfang; Wang, Jitong; Long, Donghui, E-mail: longdh@mail.ecust.edu.cn; Qiao, Wenming; Ling, Licheng

    2015-01-15

    A facile biotemplating method has been developed to prepare mesoporous orthorhombic nobium pentoxide (T-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}) films with ultrahigh lithium ion (Li{sup +}) intercalation pseudocapacitance. Nanorod-like cellulose nanocrystals (CNs) with 5–10 nm in width and 100–300 nm in length are produced by the hydrolysis of cotton, which can serve as a novel soft templating agent enabling the straightforward synthesis of mesoporous T-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} films. By varying the niobic-to-template ratio, it is possible to tune the surface area and crystallite dimension of the Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} films. The obtained T-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} films show typical capacitive-dominated behaviour in the sweep rate range of 1–20 mV s{sup −1}. It delivers an initial intercalation capacity of 644 C g{sup −1} at a current density of 0.625 A g{sup −1}, corresponding to x = 1.83 for Li{sub x}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and can still keep relatively stable capacity of 560 C g{sup −1} after 300 cycles. Moreover, its excellent high-rate capability (450 C g{sup −1} at 12.5 A g{sup −1}) and wider temperature adaptability present here suggests the promising of T-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} as high-energy pseudocapacitor electrode with superior intercalation capacitive behaviour. - Graphical abstract: We developed a facile and sustainable method to prepare T-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanocrystals using novel nanorod-like cellulose nanocrystals (CNs) as soft templates. The T-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanocrystals exhibited unprecedented Li{sup +} intercalation pseudocapacitance, excellent cycle performance and good high-and-low temperature tolerance performance.

  2. Controlled synthesis of novel octapod platinum nanocrystals under microwave irradiation

    Dai, Lei; Chi, Quan; Zhao, Yanxi; Liu, Hanfan; Zhou, Zhongqiang; Li, Jinlin; Huang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Under microwave irradiation, novel octapod Pt nanocrystals were synthesized by reducing H 2 PtCl 6 in TEG with PVP as a stabilizer. The as-prepared Pt nanocrystals displayed a unique octapod nanostructure with five little mastoids in each concave center. The use of KI was crucial to the formation of novel Pt octapods. Novel Octapod Platinum Nanocrystals. - Highlights: • A novel octapod Pt nanocrystals different from the common octapod were obtained. • The use of KI was crucial to the formation of the novel Pt octapods. • Microwave was readily employed in controlled synthesis of the novel Pt octapods. - Abstract: Microwave was employed in the shape-controlled synthesis of Pt nanoparticles. Novel octapod Pt nanocrystals enclosed with (1 1 1) facets were readily synthesized with H 2 PtCl 6 as a precursor, tetraethylene glycol (TEG) as both a solvent and a reducing agent, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a stabilizer in the presence of an appropriate amount of KI under microwave irradiation for 140 s. The as-prepared Pt nanocrystals displayed a unique octapod nanostructure with five little mastoids in each concave center and exhibited higher electrocatalytic activity than commercial Pt black in the electro-oxidations of methanol and formic acid. The results demonstrated that the use of KI was crucial to the formation of Pt octapods. KI determined the formation of the novel octapod Pt nanocrystals by tuning up the reduction kinetics and adsorbing on the surfaces of growing Pt nanoparticles. The optimum molar ratio of H 2 PtCl 6 /KI/PVP was 1/30/45

  3. Engineering Gold Nanorod-Based Plasmonic Nanocrystals for Optical Applications

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2015-09-01

    Plasmonic nanocrystals have a unique ability to support localized surface plasmon resonances and exhibit rich and intriguing optical properties. Engineering plasmonic nanocrystals can maximize their potentials for specific applications. In this dissertation, we developed three unprecedented Au nanorod-based plasmonic nanocrystals through rational design of the crystal shape and/or composition, and successfully demonstrated their applications in light condensation, photothermal conversion, and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The “Au nanorod-Au nanosphere dimer” nanocrystal was synthesized via the ligand-induced asymmetric growth of a Au nanosphere on a Au nanorod. This dimeric nanostructure features an extraordinary broadband optical absorption in the range of 400‒1400nm, and it proved to be an ideal black-body material for light condensation and an efficient solar-light harvester for photothermal conversion. The “Au nanorod (core) @ AuAg alloy (shell)” nanocrystal was built through the epitaxial growth of homogeneously alloyed AuAg shells on Au nanorods by precisely controlled synthesis. The resulting core-shell structured, bimetallic nanorods integrate the merits of the AuAg alloy with the advantages of anisotropic nanorods, exhibiting strong, stable and tunable surface plasmon resonances that are essential for SERS applications in a corrosive environment. The “high-index faceted Au nanorod (core) @ AuPd alloy (shell)” nanocrystal was produced via site-specific epitaxial growth of AuPd alloyed horns at the ends of Au nanorods. The AuPd alloyed horns are bound with high-index side facets, while the Au nanorod concentrates an intensive electric field at each end. This unique configuration unites highly active catalytic sites with strong SERS sites into a single entity and was demonstrated to be ideal for in situ monitoring of Pd-catalyzed reactions by SERS. The synthetic strategies developed here are promising towards the fabrication of

  4. Conjugation of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals with human immunoglobulin G for nanomedical applications.

    Iafisco, Michele; Varoni, Elena; Di Foggia, Michele; Pietronave, Stefano; Fini, Milena; Roveri, Norberto; Rimondini, Lia; Prat, Maria

    2012-02-01

    Inorganic nanosized drug carriers are a promising field in nanomedicine applied to cancer. Their conjugation with antibodies combines the properties of the nanoparticles themselves with the specific and selective recognition ability of the antibodies to antigens. Biomimetic carbonate-hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles were synthesized and fully characterized; human IgGs, used as model antibodies, were coupled to these nanocrystals. The maximum loading amount, the interaction modelling, the preferential orientation and the secondary structure modifications were evaluated using theoretical models (Langmuir, Freundlich and Langmuir-Freundlich) spectroscopic (UV-Vis, Raman), calorimetric (TGA), and immunochemical techniques (ELISA, Western Blot). HA nanoparticles of about 30 nm adsorbed human IgGs, in a dose-dependent, saturable and stable manner with micromolar affinity and adsorption capability around 2.3 mg/m(2). Adsorption isotherm could be described by Langmuir-Freundlich model, and was due to both energetically homogeneous and heterogeneous binding sites on HA surface, mainly of electrostatic nature. Binding did not induce secondary structure modification of IgGs. A preferential IgG end-on orientation with the involvement of IgG Fc moiety in the adsorption seems most probable due to the steric hindrance of their Fab domains. Biomimetic HA nanocrystals are suitable substrates to produce nanoparticles which can be functionalized with antibodies for efficient targeted drug delivery to tumours. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. FMEF/experimental capabilities

    Burgess, C.A.; Dronen, V.R.

    1981-01-01

    The Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF), under construction at the Hanford site north of Richland, Washington, will be one of the most modern facilities offering irradiated fuels and materials examination capabilities and fuel fabrication development technologies. Scheduled for completion in 1984, the FMEF will provide examination capability for fuel assemblies, fuel pins and test pins irradiated in the FFTF. Various functions of the FMEF are described, with emphasis on experimental data-gathering capabilities in the facility's Nondestructive and Destructive examination cell complex

  6. KSC Technical Capabilities Website

    Nufer, Brian; Bursian, Henry; Brown, Laurette L.

    2010-01-01

    This document is the website pages that review the technical capabilities that the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has for partnership opportunities. The purpose of this information is to make prospective customers aware of the capabilities and provide an opportunity to form relationships with the experts at KSC. The technical capabilities fall into these areas: (1) Ground Operations and Processing Services, (2) Design and Analysis Solutions, (3) Command and Control Systems / Services, (4) Materials and Processes, (5) Research and Technology Development and (6) Laboratories, Shops and Test Facilities.

  7. Depleted Nanocrystal-Oxide Heterojunctions for High-Sensitivity Infrared Detection

    2015-08-28

    Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: 4.3 Electronic Sensing - Depleted Nanocrystal- Oxide Heterojunctions for High...reviewed journals: Final Report: 4.3 Electronic Sensing - Depleted Nanocrystal- Oxide Heterojunctions for High-Sensitivity Infrared Detection Report Title...PERCENT_SUPPORTEDNAME FTE Equivalent: Total Number: 1 1 Final Progress Report Project title: Depleted Nanocrystal- Oxide Heterojunctions for High

  8. Infrared Emitting and Photoconducting Colloidal Silver Chalcogenide Nanocrystal Quantum Dots from a Silylamide-Promoted Synthesis

    Yarema, Maksym; Pichler, Stefan; Sytnyk, Mykhailo; Seyrkammer, Robert; Lechner, Rainer T.; Fritz-Popovski, Gerhard; Jarzab, Dorota; Szendrei, Krisztina; Resel, Roland; Korovyanko, Oleksandra; Loi, Maria Antonietta; Paris, Oskar; Hesser, Guenter; Heiss, Wolfgang; Hesser, Günter

    Here, we present a hot injection synthesis of colloidal Ag chalcogenide nanocrystals (Ag(2)Se, Ag(2)Te, and Ag(2)S) that resulted in exceptionally small nanocrystal sizes in the range between 2 and 4 nm. Ag chalcogenide nanocrystals exhibit band gap energies within the near-infrared spectral region,

  9. Resources, constraints and capabilities

    Dhondt, S.; Oeij, P.R.A.; Schröder, A.

    2018-01-01

    Human and financial resources as well as organisational capabilities are needed to overcome the manifold constraints social innovators are facing. To unlock the potential of social innovation for the whole society new (social) innovation friendly environments and new governance structures

  10. a Capability approach

    efforts towards gender equality in education as a means of achieving social justice. ... should mean that a lot of capability approach-oriented commentators are ... processes, their forms of exercising power, and their rules, unwritten cultures, ...

  11. Engineering Capabilities and Partnerships

    Poulos, Steve

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the engineering capabilities at Johnson Space Center, The presentation also reviews the partnerships that have resulted in successfully designed and developed projects that involved commercial and educational institutions.

  12. Brandishing Cyberattack Capabilities

    2013-01-01

    Advertising cyberwar capabilities may be helpful. It may back up a deterrence strategy. It might dissuade other states from conventional mischief or...to enable the attack.5 Many of the instruments of the attack remain with the target system, nestled in its log files, or even in the malware itself...debat- able. Even if demonstrated, what worked yesterday may not work today. But difficult does not mean impossible. Advertising cyberwar capabilities

  13. CASL Dakota Capabilities Summary

    Adams, Brian M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Simmons, Chris [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Williams, Brian J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-10

    The Dakota software project serves the mission of Sandia National Laboratories and supports a worldwide user community by delivering state-of-the-art research and robust, usable software for optimization and uncertainty quantification. These capabilities enable advanced exploration and riskinformed prediction with a wide range of computational science and engineering models. Dakota is the verification and validation (V&V) / uncertainty quantification (UQ) software delivery vehicle for CASL, allowing analysts across focus areas to apply these capabilities to myriad nuclear engineering analyses.

  14. Europium- and lithium-doped yttrium oxide nanocrystals that provide a linear emissive response with X-ray radiation exposure†

    Stanton, Ian N.; Belley, Matthew D.; Nguyen, Giao; Rodrigues, Anna; Li, Yifan; Kirsch, David G.; Yoshizumi, Terry T.

    2015-01-01

    Eu- and Li-doped yttrium oxide nanocrystals [Y2−xO3; Eux, Liy], in which Eu and Li dopant ion concentrations were systematically varied, were developed and characterized (TEM, XRD, Raman spectroscopic, UV-excited lifetime, and ICP-AES data) in order to define the most emissive compositions under specific X-ray excitation conditions. These optimized [Y2−xO3; Eux, Liy] compositions display scintillation responses that: (i) correlate linearly with incident radiation exposure at X-ray energies spanning from 40–220 kVp, and (ii) manifest no evidence of scintillation intensity saturation at the highest evaluated radiation exposures [up to 4 Roentgen per second]. For the most emissive nanoscale scintillator composition, [Y1.9O3; Eu0.1, Li0.16], excitation energies of 40, 120, and 220 kVp were chosen to probe the dependence of the integrated emission intensity upon X-ray exposure-rate in energy regimes having different mass-attenuation coefficients and where either the photoelectric or the Compton effect governs the scintillation mechanism. These experiments demonstrate for the first time for that for comparable radiation exposures, when the scintillation mechanism is governed by the photoelectric effect and a comparably larger mass-attenuation coefficient (120 kVp excitation), greater integrated emission intensities are recorded relative to excitation energies where the Compton effect regulates scintillation (220 kVp) in nanoscale [Y2−xO3; Eux] crystals. Nanoscale [Y1.9O3; Eu0.1, Li0.16] (70 ± 20 nm) was further exploited as a detector material in a prototype fiber-optic radiation sensor. The scintillation intensity from the [Y1.9O3; Eu0.1, Li0.16]-modified, 400 μm sized optical fiber tip, recorded using a CCD-photodetector and integrated over the 605–617 nm wavelength domain, was correlated with radiation exposure using a Precision XRAD 225Cx small-animal image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) system. For both 80 and 225 kVp energies, this radio transparent

  15. Hybrid Light-Emitting Diode Enhanced With Emissive Nanocrystals

    Kopylov, Oleksii

    This thesis investigates a new type of white light emitting hybrid diode, composed of a light emitting GaN/InGaN LED and a layer of semiconductor nanocrystals for color conversion. Unlike standard white LEDs, the device is configured to achieve high color conversion efficiency via non-radiative e......This thesis investigates a new type of white light emitting hybrid diode, composed of a light emitting GaN/InGaN LED and a layer of semiconductor nanocrystals for color conversion. Unlike standard white LEDs, the device is configured to achieve high color conversion efficiency via non...... of the hybrid diode fabrication including process techniques for GaN LED and incorporation of the nanocrystals are presented with the emphasis on the differences with standard LED processing. Results and analysis of optical and electrical characterization including photoluminescence (PL), micro-PL, time......-resolved PL and electroluminescence (EL) together with current-voltage characteristics are presented to evaluate the device performance. A clear evidence of non-radiative energy transfer was seen in the carrier dynamics of both the LED and the nanocrystals when the quantum well – nanocrystals separation...

  16. Preparation, characterization and catalytic effects of copper oxalate nanocrystals

    Singh, Gurdip; Kapoor, Inder Pal Singh; Dubey, Reena; Srivastava, Pratibha

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Prepared copper oxalate nanocrystals were characterized by FE-SEM and bright field TEM micrographs. Its catalytic activity was evaluated on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate using TG and TG-DSC techniques. Highlights: ► Preparation of nanocrystals (∼9.0 nm) of copper oxalate using Cu(NO 3 ) 2 ·2H 2 O, oxalic acid and acetone under thermal conditions. ► Method is simple and novel. ► Characterization using XRD, SEM, TEM, HRTEM and ED pattern. ► Catalytic activity of copper oxalate nanocrystals on AP thermal decomposition using thermal techniques (TG, TG-DSC and ignition delay). ► Kinetics of thermal decomposition of AP + CONs using isoconversional and model fitting kinetic approaches. - Abstract: Recent work has described the preparation and characterization of copper oxalate nanocrystals (CONs). It was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron diffraction pattern (ED). The catalytic activity of CONs on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) and composite solid propellants (CSPs) has been done by thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and ignition delay measurements. Burning rate of CSPs was also found to be enhanced in presence of copper oxalate nanocrystals. Kinetics of thermal decomposition of AP with and without CONs has also been investigated. The model free (isoconversional) and model-fitting kinetic approaches have been applied to data for isothermal TG decomposition.

  17. Stabilizing Agents for Drug Nanocrystals: Effect on Bioavailability

    Annika Tuomela

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Drug nanocrystals are a versatile option for drug delivery purposes, and while the number of poorly soluble drug materials is all the time increasing, more research in this area is performed. Drug nanocrystals have a simple structure—a solid drug core is surrounded by a layer of stabilizing agent. However, despite the considerably simple structure, the selection of an appropriate stabilizer for a certain drug can be challenging. Mostly, the stabilizer selection is based purely on the requirement of physical stability, e.g., maintaining the nanosized particle size as long as possible after the formation of drug nanocrystals. However, it is also worth taking into account that stabilizer can affect the bioavailability in the final formulation via interactions with cells and cell layers. In addition, formation of nanocrystals is only one process step, and for the final formulation, more excipients are often added to the composition. The role of the stabilizers in the final formulation can be more than only stabilizing the nanocrystal particle size. A good example is the stabilizer’s role as cryoprotectant during freeze drying. In this review, the stabilizing effect, role of stabilizers in final nanocrystalline formulations, challenges in reaching in vitro–in vivo correlation with nanocrystalline products, and stabilizers’ effect on higher bioavailability are discussed.

  18. Nuclear magnetic relaxation studies of semiconductor nanocrystals and solids

    Sachleben, Joseph Robert [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1993-09-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, small biomolecules, and 13C enriched solids were studied through the relaxation in NMR spectra. Surface structure of semiconductor nanocrystals (CdS) was deduced from high resolution 1H and 13C liquid state spectra of thiophenol ligands on the nanocrystal surfaces. The surface coverage by thiophenol was found to be low, being 5.6 and 26% for nanocrystal radii of 11.8 and 19.2 Å. Internal motion is estimated to be slow with a correlation time > 10-8 s-1. The surface thiophenol ligands react to form a dithiophenol when the nanocrystals were subjected to O2 and ultraviolet. A method for measuring 14N-1H J-couplings is demonstrated on pyridine and the peptide oxytocin; selective 2D T1 and T2 experiments are presented for measuring relaxation times in crowded spectra with overlapping peaks in 1D, but relaxation effects interfere. Possibility of carbon-carbon cross relaxation in 13C enriched solids is demonstrated by experiments on zinc acetate and L-alanine.

  19. Controlled synthesis of thorium and uranium oxide nano-crystals

    Hudry, Damien; Apostolidis, Christos; Walter, Olaf; Gouder, Thomas; Courtois, Eglantine; Kubel, Christian; Meyer, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Very little is known about the size and shape effects on the properties of actinide compounds. As a consequence, the controlled synthesis of well-defined actinide-based nano-crystals constitutes a fundamental step before studying their corresponding properties. In this paper, we report on the non-aqueous surfactant-assisted synthesis of thorium and uranium oxide nano-crystals. The final characteristics of thorium and uranium oxide nano-crystals can be easily tuned by controlling a few experimental parameters such as the nature of the actinide precursor and the composition of the organic system (e.g., the chemical nature of the surfactants and their relative concentrations). Additionally, the influence of these parameters on the outcome of the synthesis is highly dependent on the nature of the actinide element (thorium versus uranium). By using optimised experimental conditions, monodisperse isotropic uranium oxide nano-crystals with different sizes (4.5 and 10.7 nm) as well as branched nano-crystals (overall size ca. 5 nm), nano-dots (ca. 4 nm) and nano-rods (with ultra-small diameters of 1 nm) of thorium oxide were synthesised. (authors)

  20. Performance Parameters and Characterizations of Nanocrystals: A Brief Review

    Manasi M. Chogale

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Poor bioavailability of drugs associated with their poor solubility limits the clinical effectiveness of almost 40% of the newly discovered drug moieties. Low solubility, coupled with a high log p value, high melting point and high dose necessitates exploration of alternative formulation strategies for such drugs. One such novel approach is formulation of the drugs as “Nanocrystals”. Nanocrystals are primarily comprised of drug and surfactants/stabilizers and are manufactured by “top-down” or “bottom-up” methods. Nanocrystals aid the clinical efficacy of drugs by various means such as enhancement of bioavailability, lowering of dose requirement, and facilitating sustained release of the drug. This effect is dependent on the various characteristics of nanocrystals (particle size, saturation solubility, dissolution velocity, which have an impact on the improved performance of the nanocrystals. Various sophisticated techniques have been developed to evaluate these characteristics. This article describes in detail the various characterization techniques along with a brief review of the significance of the various parameters on the performance of nanocrystals.

  1. Space Logistics: Launch Capabilities

    Furnas, Randall B.

    1989-01-01

    The current maximum launch capability for the United States are shown. The predicted Earth-to-orbit requirements for the United States are presented. Contrasting the two indicates the strong National need for a major increase in Earth-to-orbit lift capability. Approximate weights for planned payloads are shown. NASA is studying the following options to meet the need for a new heavy-lift capability by mid to late 1990's: (1) Shuttle-C for near term (include growth versions); and (2) the Advanced Lauching System (ALS) for the long term. The current baseline two-engine Shuttle-C has a 15 x 82 ft payload bay and an expected lift capability of 82,000 lb to Low Earth Orbit. Several options are being considered which have expanded diameter payload bays. A three-engine Shuttle-C with an expected lift of 145,000 lb to LEO is being evaluated as well. The Advanced Launch System (ALS) is a potential joint development between the Air Force and NASA. This program is focused toward long-term launch requirements, specifically beyond the year 2000. The basic approach is to develop a family of vehicles with the same high reliability as the Shuttle system, yet offering a much greater lift capability at a greatly reduced cost (per pound of payload). The ALS unmanned family of vehicles will provide a low end lift capability equivalent to Titan IV, and a high end lift capability greater than the Soviet Energia if requirements for such a high-end vehicle are defined.In conclusion, the planning of the next generation space telescope should not be constrained to the current launch vehicles. New vehicle designs will be driven by the needs of anticipated heavy users.

  2. Increased electronic coupling in silicon nanocrystal networks doped with F4-TCNQ.

    Carvalho, Alexandra; Oberg, Sven; Rayson, Mark J; Briddon, Patrick R

    2013-02-01

    The modification of the electronic structure of silicon nanocrystals using an organic dopant, 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4-TCNQ), is investigated using first-principles calculations. It is shown that physisorbed F4-TCNQ molecules have the effect of oxidizing the nanocrystal, attracting the charge density towards the F4-TCNQ-nanocrystal interface, and decreasing the excitation energy of the system. In periodic F4-TCNQ/nanocrystal superlattices, F4-TCNQ is suggested to enhance exciton separation, and in the presence of free holes, to serve as a bridge for electron/hole transfer between adjacent nanocrystals.

  3. Properties of Nanocrystals-formulated Aluminosilicate Bricks

    Francesca Conciauro

    2015-10-01

    insulating and/or mechanical properties. The nanocrystals- modified refractories showed variations in properties, with respect to the untreated aluminosilicate reference in heat- insulating performances (thermal diffusivities were measured by the “hot disk” technique. In general, they also showed improvements in mechanical compression resist‐ ance for all of the samples at 2 wt. %. The best heat insula‐ tion was obtained with the addition of nano-aluminium hydroxide at 2 wt. %, while the highest mechanical compres‐ sion breaking resistance was found with nano-CaCO3 at 2 wt. %. These outcomes were investigated with complemen‐ tary techniques, like mercury porosimetry for porosity, and Archimedes methods to measure physical properties like the bulk and apparent densities, apparent porosities and water absorption. The results show that the nano-alumini‐ um hydroxide modified bricks were the most porous, which could explain the best heat-insulating performances. There is a less straightforward explanation for the mechanical resistance results, as they may have relations with the characteristics of the pores. Furthermore, the nanoparti‐ cles may have possible reactions with the matrix during the heat treatments.

  4. Modified cellulose nanocrystal for vitamin C delivery.

    Akhlaghi, Seyedeh Parinaz; Berry, Richard M; Tam, Kam Chiu

    2015-04-01

    Cellulose nanocrystal grafted with chitosan oligosaccharide (CNC-CSOS) was used to encapsulate vitamin C and prepare CNCS/VC complexes using tripolyphosphte via ionic complexation. The stability of vitamin C and the antioxidant activity of the CNCS/VC complexes were elucidated. The formation of the complex was confirmed using DSC and UV-vis spectrophotometry, and TEM was used to study the morphology of the complexes. The encapsulation efficiency of vitamin C at pH 3 and 5 was 71.6% ± 6.8 and 91.0 ± 1.0, respectively. Strong exothermic peaks observed in isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) studies at pH 5 could be attributed to additional electrostatic interactions between CNC-CSOS and vitamin C at pH 5. The in vitro release of vitamin C from CNCS/VC complexes showed a sustained release of up to 20 days. The vitamin C released from CNCS/VC complex displayed higher stability compared with the control vitamin C solution, and this was also confirmed from the ITC thermograms. CNC-CSOS possessed a higher scavenging activity and faster antioxidant activity compared with its precursors, i.e., oxidized CNC and CSOS and their physical mixtures. Complexing vitamin C into CNC-CSOS particles yielded a dynamic antioxidant agent, where the vitamin C is released over time and displayed sustained antioxidant properties. Therefore, CNCS/VC can potentially be used in cosmeceutical applications as topical formulations.

  5. PbSe Nanocrystal Excitonic Solar Cells

    Choi, Joshua J.

    2009-11-11

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of colloidal PbSe nanocrystal (NC)-based photovoltaic test structures that exhibit an excitonic solar cell mechanism. Charge extraction from the NC active layer is driven by a photoinduced chemical potential energy gradient at the nanostructured heterojunction. By minimizing perturbation to PbSe NC energy levels and thereby gaining insight into the "intrinsic" photovoltaic properties and charge transfer mechanism of PbSe NC, we show a direct correlation between interfacial energy level offsets and photovoltaic device performance. Size dependent PbSe NC energy levels were determined by cyclic voltammetry and optical spectroscopy and correlated to photovoltaic measurements. Photovoltaic test structures were fabricated from PbSe NC films sandwiched between layers of ZnO nanoparticles and PEDOT:PSS as electron and hole transporting elements, respectively. The device current-voltage characteristics suggest a charge separation mechanism that Is distinct from previously reported Schottky devices and consistent with signatures of excitonic solar cells. Remarkably, despite the limitation of planar junction structure, and without film thickness optimization, the best performing device shows a 1-sun power conversion efficiency of 3.4%, ranking among the highest performing NC-based solar cells reported to date. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  6. Campus Capability Plan

    Adams, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Arsenlis, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bailey, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bergman, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brase, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brenner, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Camara, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Carlton, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cheng, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chrzanowski, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Colson, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); East, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Farrell, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ferranti, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gursahani, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hansen, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Helms, L. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hernandez, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jeffries, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Larson, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lu, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNabb, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mercer, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Skeate, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sueksdorf, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zucca, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Le, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ancria, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Scott, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Leininger, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gagliardi, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gash, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bronson, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chung, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hobson, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meeker, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sanchez, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zagar, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Quivey, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sommer, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Atherton, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-06-06

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Campus Capability Plan for 2018-2028. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is one of three national laboratories that are part of the National Nuclear Security Administration. LLNL provides critical expertise to strengthen U.S. security through development and application of world-class science and technology that: Ensures the safety, reliability, and performance of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile; Promotes international nuclear safety and nonproliferation; Reduces global danger from weapons of mass destruction; Supports U.S. leadership in science and technology. Essential to the execution and continued advancement of these mission areas are responsive infrastructure capabilities. This report showcases each LLNL capability area and describes the mission, science, and technology efforts enabled by LLNL infrastructure, as well as future infrastructure plans.

  7. Technological Capability's Predictor Variables

    Fernanda Maciel Reichert

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the factors that influence in configuration of the technological capability of companies in sectors with medium-low technological intensity. To achieve the goal proposed in this article a survey was carried out. Based on the framework developed by Lall (1992 which classifies firms in basic, intermediate and advanced level of technological capability; it was found that the predominant technological capability is intermediate, with 83.7% of respondent companies (plastics companies in Brazil. It is believed that the main contribution of this study is the finding that the dependent variable named “Technological Capability” can be explained at a rate of 65% by six variables: development of new processes; selection of the best equipment supplier; sales of internally developed new technology to third parties; design and manufacture of equipment; study of the work methods and perform inventory control; and improvement of product quality.

  8. Predicting Nanocrystal Shape through Consideration of Surface-Ligand Interactions

    Bealing, Clive R.

    2012-03-27

    Density functional calculations for the binding energy of oleic acid-based ligands on Pb-rich {100} and {111} facets of PbSe nanocrystals determine the surface energies as a function of ligand coverage. Oleic acid is expected to bind to the nanocrystal surface in the form of lead oleate. The Wulff construction predicts the thermodynamic equilibrium shape of the PbSe nanocrystals. The equilibrium shape is a function of the ligand surface coverage, which can be controlled by changing the concentration of oleic acid during synthesis. The different binding energy of the ligand on the {100} and {111} facets results in different equilibrium ligand coverages on the facets, and a transition in the equilibrium shape from octahedral to cubic is predicted when increasing the ligand concentration during synthesis. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  9. Adsorption of vitamin E on mesoporous titania nanocrystals

    Shih, C.J.; Lin, C.T.; Wu, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Tri-block nonionic surfactant and titanium chloride were used as starting materials for the synthesis of mesoporous titania nanocrystallite powders. The main objective of the present study was to examine the synthesis of mesoporous titania nanocrystals and the adsorption of vitamin E on those nanocrystals using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms. When the calcination temperature was increased to 300 o C, the reflection peaks in the XRD pattern indicated the presence of an anatase phase. The crystallinity of the nanocrystallites increased from 80% to 98.6% with increasing calcination temperature from 465 o C to 500 o C. The N 2 adsorption data and XRD data taken after vitamin E adsorption revealed that the vitamin E molecules were adsorbed in the mesopores of the titania nanocrystals.

  10. Recent Developments in Shape-Controlled Synthesis of Silver Nanocrystals.

    Xia, Xiaohu; Zeng, Jie; Zhang, Qiang; Moran, Christine H; Xia, Younan

    2012-01-01

    This feature article introduces our recent work on understanding the roles played by citrate and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) as capping agents in seed-mediated syntheses of Ag nanocrystals with controlled shapes. We have demonstrated that citrate and PVP selectively bind to Ag(111) and Ag(100) surfaces, respectively, and thus favor the formation of Ag nanocrystals enclosed preferentially by {111} or {100} facets. In addition, we have quantified the coverage density of PVP adsorbed on the surface of Ag nanocubes. Based on the mechanistic understanding, a series of Ag nanocrystals with controlled shapes and sizes have been successfully synthesized by using different combinations of seeds and capping agents: single-crystal spherical/cubic seeds with citrate for cuboctahedrons and octahedrons or with PVP for cubes and bars; and plate-like seeds with citrate for enlarged thin plates or with PVP for thickened plates.

  11. Encapsulated Silicon Nanocrystals Formed in Silica by Ion Beam Synthesis

    Choi, Han Woo; Woo, Hyung Joo; Kim, Joon Kon; Kim, Gi Dong; Hong, Wan; Ji, Young Yong

    2004-01-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) emission of Si nanocrystals synthesized by 400 keV Si ion implanted in SiO 2 is studied as a function of ion dose and annealing time. The formation of nanocrystals at around 600 nm from the surface was confirmed by RBS and HRTEM, and the Si nanocrystals showed a wide and very intense PL emission at 700-900 nm. The intensity of this emission showed a typical behaviour with a fast transitory increase to reach a saturation with the annealing time, however, the red shift increased continuously because of the Ostwald ripening. The oversaturation of dose derived a decrease of PL intensity because of the diminishment of quantum confinement. A strong enhancement of PL intensity by H passivation was confirmed also, and the possible mechanism is discussed

  12. Properties of magnetically diluted nanocrystals prepared by mechanochemical route

    Balaz, P.; Skorvanek, I.; Fabian, M.; Kovac, J.; Steinbach, F.; Feldhoff, A.; Sepelak, V.; Jiang, J.; Satka, A.; Kovac, J.

    2010-01-01

    The bulk and surface properties of magnetically diluted Cd 0.6 Mn 0.4 S nanocrystals synthesized by solid state route in a planetary mill were studied. XRD, SEM, TEM (HRTEM), low-temperature N 2 sorption, nanoparticle size distribution as well as SQUID magnetometry methods have been applied. The measurements identified the aggregates of small nanocrystals, 5-10 nm in size. The homogeneity of produced particles with well developed specific surface area (15-66 m 2 g -1 ) was documented. The transition from the paramagnetic to the spin-glass-like phase has been observed below ∼40 K. The changes in the magnetic behaviour at low temperatures seem to be correlated with the formation of the new surface area as a consequence of milling. The magnetically diluted Cd 0.6 Mn 0.4 S nanocrystals are obtained in the simple synthesis step, making the process attractive for industrial applications.

  13. Light emission from silicon with tin-containing nanocrystals

    Søren Roesgaard

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Tin-containing nanocrystals, embedded in silicon, have been fabricated by growing an epitaxial layer of Si1−x−ySnxCy, where x = 1.6 % and y = 0.04 % on a silicon substrate, followed by annealing at various temperatures ranging from 650 ∘C to 900 ∘C. The nanocrystal density and average diameters are determined by scanning transmission-electron microscopy to ≈1017 cm−3 and ≈5 nm, respectively. Photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrates that the light emission is very pronounced for samples annealed at 725 ∘C, and Rutherford back-scattering spectrometry shows that the nanocrystals are predominantly in the diamond-structured phase at this particular annealing temperature. The origin of the light emission is discussed.

  14. Adsorption of vitamin E on mesoporous titania nanocrystals

    Shih, C.J., E-mail: cjshih@kmu.edu.tw [Department of Fragrance and Cosmetic Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Lin, C.T.; Wu, S.M. [School of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-15

    Tri-block nonionic surfactant and titanium chloride were used as starting materials for the synthesis of mesoporous titania nanocrystallite powders. The main objective of the present study was to examine the synthesis of mesoporous titania nanocrystals and the adsorption of vitamin E on those nanocrystals using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms. When the calcination temperature was increased to 300 {sup o}C, the reflection peaks in the XRD pattern indicated the presence of an anatase phase. The crystallinity of the nanocrystallites increased from 80% to 98.6% with increasing calcination temperature from 465 {sup o}C to 500 {sup o}C. The N{sub 2} adsorption data and XRD data taken after vitamin E adsorption revealed that the vitamin E molecules were adsorbed in the mesopores of the titania nanocrystals.

  15. Broadband enhancement of infrared absorption in microbolometers using Ag nanocrystals

    Hyun, Jerome K.; Ahn, Chi Won; Kim, Woo Choong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Hyun, Moon Seop; Kim, Hee Yeoun; Park, Jae Hong; Lee, Won-Oh

    2015-01-01

    High performance microbolometers are widely sought for thermal imaging applications. In order to increase the performance limits of microbolometers, the responsivity of the device to broadband infrared (IR) radiation needs to be improved. In this work, we report a simple, quick, and cost-effective approach to modestly enhance the broadband IR response of the device by evaporating Ag nanocrystals onto the light entrance surface of the device. When irradiated with IR light, strong fields are built up within the gaps between adjacent Ag nanocrystals. These fields resistively generate heat in the nanocrystals and underlying substrate, which is transduced into an electrical signal via a resistive sensing element in the device. Through this method, we are able to enhance the IR absorption over a broadband spectrum and improve the responsivity of the device by ∼11%

  16. Capabilities for innovation

    Nielsen, Peter; Nielsen, Rene Nesgaard; Bamberger, Simon Grandjean

    2012-01-01

    is a survey that collected information from 601 firms belonging to the private urban sector in Denmark. The survey was carried out in late 2010. Keywords: dynamic capabilities/innovation/globalization/employee/employer cooperation/Nordic model Acknowledgment: The GOPA study was financed by grant 20080053113......Technological developments combined with increasing levels of competition related to the ongoing globalization imply that firms find themselves in dynamic, changing environments that call for dynamic capabilities. This challenges the internal human and organizational resources of firms in general...

  17. Human push capability.

    Barnett, Ralph L; Liber, Theodore

    2006-02-22

    Use of unassisted human push capability arises from time to time in the areas of crowd and animal control, the security of locked doors, the integrity of railings, the removal of tree stumps and entrenched vehicles, the manoeuvering of furniture, and athletic pursuits such as US football or wrestling. Depending on the scenario, human push capability involves strength, weight, weight distribution, push angle, footwear/floor friction, and the friction between the upper body and the pushed object. Simple models are used to establish the relationships among these factors.

  18. The Capability Approach

    Robeyns, Ingrid

    2011-01-01

    textabstract In its most general description, the capability approach is a flexible and multi-purpose normative framework, rather than a precise theory of well-being, freedom or justice. At its core are two normative claims: first, the claim that the freedom to achieve well-being is of primary moral importance, and second, that freedom to achieve well-being is to be understood in terms of people’s capabilities, that is, their real opportunities to do and be what they have reason to value. Thi...

  19. Sandia QIS Capabilities.

    Muller, Richard P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a broad set of capabilities in quantum information science (QIS), including elements of quantum computing, quantum communications, and quantum sensing. The Sandia QIS program is built atop unique DOE investments at the laboratories, including the MESA microelectronics fabrication facility, the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) facilities (joint with LANL), the Ion Beam Laboratory, and ASC High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities. Sandia has invested $75 M of LDRD funding over 12 years to develop unique, differentiating capabilities that leverage these DOE infrastructure investments.

  20. Direction-specific van der Waals attraction between rutile TiO 2 nanocrystals

    Zhang, Xin; He, Yang; Sushko, Maria L.; Liu, Jia; Luo, Langli; De Yoreo, James J.; Mao, Scott X.; Wang, Chongmin; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2017-04-27

    Mutual lattice orientations dictate the types and magnitudes of forces between crystalline particles. When lattice polarizability is anisotropic, the van der Waals dispersion attraction can, in principle, contribute to this direction dependence. Here we report direct measurement of this attraction between rutile nanocrystals, as a function of their mutual orientation and surface hydration extent. At tens of nanometers of separation the attraction is weak and shows no dependence on azimuthal alignment nor surface hydration. At separations of approximately one hydration layer the attraction is strongly dependent on azimuthal alignment, and systematically decreases as intervening water density increases. Measured forces are in close agreement with predictions from Lifshitz theory, and show that dispersion forces are capable of generating a torque between particles interacting in solution and between grains in materials.

  1. Microfluidic Fabrication of Hydrocortisone Nanocrystals Coated with Polymeric Stabilisers

    David F. Odetade

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocortisone (HC nanocrystals intended for parenteral administration of HC were produced by anti-solvent crystallisation within coaxial assemblies of pulled borosilicate glass capillaries using either co-current flow of aqueous and organic phases or counter-current flow focusing. The organic phase was composed of 7 mg/mL of HC in a 60:40 (v/v mixture of ethanol and water and the anti-solvent was milli-Q water. The microfluidic mixers were fabricated with an orifice diameter of the inner capillary ranging from 50 µm to 400 µm and operated at the aqueous to organic phase flow rate ratio ranging from 5 to 25. The size of the nanocrystals decreased with increasing aqueous to organic flow rate ratio. The counter-current flow microfluidic mixers provided smaller nanocrystals than the co-current flow devices under the same conditions and for the same geometry, due to smaller diameter of the organic phase stream in the mixing zone. The Z-average particle size of the drug nanocrystals increased from 210–280 nm to 320–400 nm after coating the nanocrystals with 0.2 wt % aqueous solution of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC in a stirred vial. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD analyses carried out on the dried nanocrystals stabilized with HPMC, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP, and sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS were investigated and reported. The degree of crystallinity for the processed sample was lowest for the sample stabilised with HPMC and the highest for the raw HC powder.

  2. MEGACELL: A nanocrystal model construction software for HRTEM multislice simulation

    Stroppa, Daniel G.; Righetto, Ricardo D.; Montoro, Luciano A.; Ramirez, Antonio J.

    2011-01-01

    Image simulation has an invaluable importance for the accurate analysis of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM) results, especially due to its non-linear image formation mechanism. Because the as-obtained images cannot be interpreted in a straightforward fashion, the retrieval of both qualitative and quantitative information from HRTEM micrographs requires an iterative process including the simulation of a nanocrystal model and its comparison with experimental images. However most of the available image simulation software requires atom-by-atom coordinates as input for the calculations, which can be prohibitive for large finite crystals and/or low-symmetry systems and zone axis orientations. This paper presents an open source citation-ware tool named MEGACELL, which was developed to assist on the construction of nanocrystals models. It allows the user to build nanocrystals with virtually any convex polyhedral geometry and to retrieve its atomic positions either as a plain text file or as an output compatible with EMS (Electron Microscopy Software) input protocol. In addition to the description of this tool features, some construction examples and its application for scientific studies are presented. These studies show MEGACELL as a handy tool, which allows an easier construction of complex nanocrystal models and improves the quantitative information extraction from HRTEM images. -- Highlights: → A software to support the HRTEM image simulation of nanocrystals in actual size. → MEGACELL allows the construction of complex nanocrystals models for multislice image simulation. → Some examples of improved nanocrystalline system characterization are presented, including the analysis of 3D morphology and growth behavior.

  3. Passivation effects in B doped self-assembled Si nanocrystals

    Puthen Veettil, B.; Wu, Lingfeng; Jia, Xuguang; Lin, Ziyun; Zhang, Tian; Yang, Terry; Johnson, Craig; Conibeer, Gavin; Perez-Würfl, Ivan; McCamey, Dane

    2014-01-01

    Doping of semiconductor nanocrystals has enabled their widespread technological application in optoelectronics and micro/nano-electronics. In this work, boron-doped self-assembled silicon nanocrystal samples have been grown and characterised using Electron Spin Resonance and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The passivation effects of boron on the interface dangling bonds have been investigated. Addition of boron dopants is found to compensate the active dangling bonds at the interface, and this is confirmed by an increase in photoluminescence intensity. Further addition of dopants is found to reduce the photoluminescence intensity by decreasing the minority carrier lifetime as a result of the increased number of non-radiative processes

  4. Organic-Inorganic Composites of Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Efficient Excitonics.

    Guzelturk, Burak; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2015-06-18

    Nanocomposites of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals integrated into conjugated polymers are the key to soft-material hybrid optoelectronics, combining advantages of both plastics and particles. Synergic combination of the favorable properties in the hybrids of colloidal nanocrystals and conjugated polymers offers enhanced performance and new functionalities in light-generation and light-harvesting applications, where controlling and mastering the excitonic interactions at the nanoscale are essential. In this Perspective, we highlight and critically consider the excitonic interactions in the organic-inorganic nanocomposites to achieve highly efficient exciton transfer through rational design of the nanocomposites. The use of strong excitonic interactions in optoelectronic devices can trigger efficiency breakthroughs in hybrid optoelectronics.

  5. Acceptors in ZnO nanocrystals: A reinterpretation

    Gehlhoff, W.; Hoffmann, A.

    2012-12-01

    In a recent article, Teklemichael et al. reported on the identification of an uncompensated acceptor in ZnO nanocrystals using infrared spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in the dark and under illumination. Most of their conclusions, interpretations, and suggestions turned out to be erroneous. The observed EPR signals were interpreted to originate from axial and nonaxial VZn-H defects. We show that the given interpretation of the EPR results is based on misinterpretations of EPR spectra arising from defects in nanocrystals. The explanation of the infrared absorption lines is in conflict with recent results of valence band ordering and valence band splitting.

  6. Processing of Polymer Nanocomposites Reinforced with Polysaccharide Nanocrystals

    Alain Dufresne

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous suspensions of polysaccharide (cellulose, chitin or starch nanocrystals can be prepared by acid hydrolysis of biomass. The main problem with their practical use is related to the homogeneous dispersion of these nanoparticles within a polymeric matrix. Water is the preferred processing medium. A new and interesting way for the processing of polysaccharide nanocrystals-based nanocomposites is their transformation into a co-continuous material through long chain surface chemical modification. It involves the surface chemical modification of the nanoparticles based on the use of grafting agents bearing a reactive end group and a long compatibilizing tail.

  7. Coulomb gap triptych in a periodic array of metal nanocrystals.

    Chen, Tianran; Skinner, Brian; Shklovskii, B I

    2012-09-21

    The Coulomb gap in the single-particle density of states (DOS) is a universal consequence of electron-electron interaction in disordered systems with localized electron states. Here we show that in arrays of monodisperse metallic nanocrystals, there is not one but three identical adjacent Coulomb gaps, which together form a structure that we call a "Coulomb gap triptych." We calculate the DOS and the conductivity in two- and three-dimensional arrays using a computer simulation. Unlike in the conventional Coulomb glass models, in nanocrystal arrays the DOS has a fixed width in the limit of large disorder. The Coulomb gap triptych can be studied via tunneling experiments.

  8. Photogenerated Exciton Dissociation in Highly Coupled Lead Salt Nanocrystal Assemblies

    Choi, Joshua J.; Luria, Justin; Hyun, Byung-Ryool; Bartnik, Adam C.; Sun, Liangfeng; Lim, Yee-Fun; Marohn, John A.; Wise, Frank W.; Hanrath, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Internanocrystal coupling induced excitons dissociation in lead salt nanocrystal assemblies is investigated. By combining transient photoluminescence spectroscopy, grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering, and time-resolved electric force microscopy, we show that excitons can dissociate, without the aid of an external bias or chemical potential gradient, via tunneling through a potential barrier when the coupling energy is comparable to the exciton binding energy. Our results have important implications for the design of nanocrystal-based optoelectronic devices. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  9. Preparation of ZnO nanocrystals via ultrasonic irradiation

    Qian, D.; Jiang, Jianzhong; Hansen, P. L.

    2003-01-01

    A simple and rapid process has been developed for the preparation of nanometer-sized ZnO crystals via ultrasonic irradiation, by which pure ZnO nanocrystals with an average size of 6 nm and narrow size distribution can be synthesized in a short time and without using any solvents for the precipit......A simple and rapid process has been developed for the preparation of nanometer-sized ZnO crystals via ultrasonic irradiation, by which pure ZnO nanocrystals with an average size of 6 nm and narrow size distribution can be synthesized in a short time and without using any solvents...

  10. Photoluminescence of hydrophilic silicon nanocrystals in aqueous solutions

    Prtljaga, Nikola; D'Amato, Elvira; Pitanti, Alessandro; Guider, Romain; Froner, Elena; Larcheri, Silvia; Scarpa, Marina; Pavesi, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    Stable aqueous solutions of undecylenic-acid-grafted silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc) were prepared. The time evolution of the photoluminescence properties of these hydrophilic silicon nanocrystals has been followed on different timescales (hours and days). On a short timescale (hours), Si-nc tend to agglomerate while the PL lineshape and intensity are stable. Agglomeration can be reduced by using suitable surfactants. On a long timescale (days), oxidation of Si-nc occurs even in the presence of surfactants. These two observations render Si-nc very useful as a labeling agent for biosensing.

  11. Photoluminescence of hydrophilic silicon nanocrystals in aqueous solutions

    Prtljaga, Nikola; D'Amato, Elvira; Pitanti, Alessandro; Guider, Romain; Froner, Elena; Larcheri, Silvia; Scarpa, Marina; Pavesi, Lorenzo

    2011-05-01

    Stable aqueous solutions of undecylenic-acid-grafted silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc) were prepared. The time evolution of the photoluminescence properties of these hydrophilic silicon nanocrystals has been followed on different timescales (hours and days). On a short timescale (hours), Si-nc tend to agglomerate while the PL lineshape and intensity are stable. Agglomeration can be reduced by using suitable surfactants. On a long timescale (days), oxidation of Si-nc occurs even in the presence of surfactants. These two observations render Si-nc very useful as a labeling agent for biosensing.

  12. Photoluminescence of hydrophilic silicon nanocrystals in aqueous solutions

    Prtljaga, Nikola; D' Amato, Elvira; Pitanti, Alessandro; Guider, Romain; Froner, Elena; Larcheri, Silvia; Scarpa, Marina; Pavesi, Lorenzo, E-mail: nikolap@science.unitn.it [Department of Physics, University of Trento, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy)

    2011-05-27

    Stable aqueous solutions of undecylenic-acid-grafted silicon nanocrystals (Si-nc) were prepared. The time evolution of the photoluminescence properties of these hydrophilic silicon nanocrystals has been followed on different timescales (hours and days). On a short timescale (hours), Si-nc tend to agglomerate while the PL lineshape and intensity are stable. Agglomeration can be reduced by using suitable surfactants. On a long timescale (days), oxidation of Si-nc occurs even in the presence of surfactants. These two observations render Si-nc very useful as a labeling agent for biosensing.

  13. Fundamental absorption edge of NiO nanocrystals

    Sokolov, V.I., E-mail: visokolov@imp.uran.ru [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch of RAS, S. Kovalevskaya Street 18, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Druzhinin, A.V. [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch of RAS, S. Kovalevskaya Street 18, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kim, G.A. [Institute of Organic Synthesis Ural Branch of RAS, S. Kovalevskaya Street 20, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Gruzdev, N.B.; Yermakov, A.Ye.; Uimin, M.A.; Byzov, I.V.; Shchegoleva, N.N.; Vykhodets, V.B.; Kurennykh, T.E. [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch of RAS, S. Kovalevskaya Street 18, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-01

    NiO nanocrystals with the average size of 5, 10 and 25 nm were synthesized by gas-condensation method. The well-defined increase of the optical density D near the fundamental absorption edge of NiO nanocrystals in the range of 3.5–4.0 eV observed after the annealing in air is caused by the oxygen content growth. It is the direct experimental evidence of the fact that p—d charge transfer transitions form the fundamental absorption edge.

  14. Fundamental absorption edge of NiO nanocrystals

    Sokolov, V.I.; Druzhinin, A.V.; Kim, G.A.; Gruzdev, N.B.; Yermakov, A.Ye.; Uimin, M.A.; Byzov, I.V.; Shchegoleva, N.N.; Vykhodets, V.B.; Kurennykh, T.E.

    2013-01-01

    NiO nanocrystals with the average size of 5, 10 and 25 nm were synthesized by gas-condensation method. The well-defined increase of the optical density D near the fundamental absorption edge of NiO nanocrystals in the range of 3.5–4.0 eV observed after the annealing in air is caused by the oxygen content growth. It is the direct experimental evidence of the fact that p—d charge transfer transitions form the fundamental absorption edge

  15. Elucidating the Potential Biological Impact of Cellulose Nanocrystals

    Sandra Camarero-Espinosa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose nanocrystals exhibit an interesting combination of mechanical properties and physical characteristics, which make them potentially useful for a wide range of consumer applications. However, as the usage of these bio-based nanofibers increases, a greater understanding of human exposure addressing their potential health issues should be gained. The aim of this perspective is to highlight how knowledge obtained from studying the biological impact of other nanomaterials can provide a basis for future research strategies to deduce the possible human health risks posed by cellulose nanocrystals.

  16. Photogenerated Exciton Dissociation in Highly Coupled Lead Salt Nanocrystal Assemblies

    Choi, Joshua J.

    2010-05-12

    Internanocrystal coupling induced excitons dissociation in lead salt nanocrystal assemblies is investigated. By combining transient photoluminescence spectroscopy, grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering, and time-resolved electric force microscopy, we show that excitons can dissociate, without the aid of an external bias or chemical potential gradient, via tunneling through a potential barrier when the coupling energy is comparable to the exciton binding energy. Our results have important implications for the design of nanocrystal-based optoelectronic devices. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  17. ISOPHOT - Capabilities and performance

    Lemke, D.; Klaas, U.; Abolins, J.

    1996-01-01

    ISOPHOT covers the largest wavelength range on ISO from 2.5 to 240 mu m. Its scientific capabilities include multi filter and multi-aperture photometry, polarimetry, imaging and spectrophotometry. All modes can optionally include a focal plane chopper. The backbone of the photometric calibration...

  18. Capabilities for Intercultural Dialogue

    Crosbie, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    The capabilities approach offers a valuable analytical lens for exploring the challenge and complexity of intercultural dialogue in contemporary settings. The central tenets of the approach, developed by Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum, involve a set of humanistic goals including the recognition that development is a process whereby people's…

  19. Capabilities and Special Needs

    Kjeldsen, Christian Christrup

    into international consideration in relation to the implementation of the UN convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. As for the theoretical basis, the research makes use of the sociological open-ended and relational concepts of Pierre Bourdieu and the normative yardstick of the Capability Approach...

  20. Metrology Measurement Capabilities

    Dr. Glen E. Gronniger

    2007-10-02

    This document contains descriptions of Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each measurement capability. Metrology provides NIST traceable precision measurements or equipment calibration for a wide variety of parameters, ranges, and state-of-the-art uncertainties. Metrology laboratories conform to the requirements of the Department of Energy Development and Production Manual Chapter 13.2, ANSI/ISO/IEC ANSI/ISO/IEC 17025:2005, and ANSI/NCSL Z540-1. FM&T Metrology laboratories are accredited by NVLAP for the parameters, ranges, and uncertainties listed in the specific scope of accreditation under NVLAP Lab code 200108-0. See the Internet at http://ts.nist.gov/Standards/scopes/2001080.pdf. These parameters are summarized. The Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major fields of measurement: (1) Mechanical; (2) Environmental, Gas, Liquid; (3) Electrical (DC, AC, RF/Microwave); and (4) Optical and Radiation. Metrology Engineering provides the expertise to develop measurement capabilities for virtually any type of measurement in the fields listed above. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of our suppliers and internal calibration organizations. Evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys.

  1. The Capability Approach

    I.A.M. Robeyns (Ingrid)

    2011-01-01

    textabstract In its most general description, the capability approach is a flexible and multi-purpose normative framework, rather than a precise theory of well-being, freedom or justice. At its core are two normative claims: first, the claim that the freedom to achieve well-being is of primary

  2. Sensor Alerting Capability

    Henriksson, Jakob; Bermudez, Luis; Satapathy, Goutam

    2013-04-01

    There is a large amount of sensor data generated today by various sensors, from in-situ buoys to mobile underwater gliders. Providing sensor data to the users through standardized services, language and data model is the promise of OGC's Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) initiative. As the amount of data grows it is becoming difficult for data providers, planners and managers to ensure reliability of data and services and to monitor critical data changes. Intelligent Automation Inc. (IAI) is developing a net-centric alerting capability to address these issues. The capability is built on Sensor Observation Services (SOSs), which is used to collect and monitor sensor data. The alerts can be configured at the service level and at the sensor data level. For example it can alert for irregular data delivery events or a geo-temporal statistic of sensor data crossing a preset threshold. The capability provides multiple delivery mechanisms and protocols, including traditional techniques such as email and RSS. With this capability decision makers can monitor their assets and data streams, correct failures or be alerted about a coming phenomena.

  3. Free radical scavenging properties of some wine probes

    Stasko, A.; Liptakova, M.; Malik, F.

    1999-01-01

    There are preliminary results of investigation of scavenging properties of 8 probes of Slovak wines (consisting of one reference, 3 probes of white wine and 4 probes of red wine). According to the literature so far, wine probes contain paramagnetic species (Mn 2+ , characterised with sextet spectrum, and a singlet line around g=2,00). In our probes we observed Mn 2+ signals, but no significant evidence for a single line of free radical was found. We can conclude that Mn 2+ content in the red wines is generally higher than in the white ones. Further, we investigated the scavenging activities of the probes adding solution of dinitropicryl hydrazyl (DPPH-stable radical) to them. Their ability to terminate free radicals resulted in the decrease of the final DPPH concentrations in the probes. The red wines have significantly higher capability to scavenge free radicals than the probes of white wines. (authors)

  4. Mobile Game Probes

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja

    2006-01-01

    This paper will examine how probes can be useful for game designers in the preliminary phases of a design process. The work is based upon a case study concerning pervasive mobile phone games where Mobile Game Probes have emerged from the project. The new probes are aimed towards a specific target...... group and the goal is to specify the probes so they will cover the most relevant areas for our project. The Mobile Game Probes generated many interesting results and new issues occurred, since the probes came to be dynamic and favorable for the process in new ways....

  5. Capitalizing on capabilities.

    Ulrich, Dave; Smallwood, Norm

    2004-06-01

    By making the most of organizational capabilities--employees' collective skills and fields of expertise--you can dramatically improve your company's market value. Although there is no magic list of proficiencies that every organization needs in order to succeed, the authors identify 11 intangible assets that well-managed companies tend to have: talent, speed, shared mind-set and coherent brand identity, accountability, collaboration, learning, leadership, customer connectivity, strategic unity, innovation, and efficiency. Such companies typically excel in only three of these capabilities while maintaining industry parity in the other areas. Organizations that fall below the norm in any of the 11 are likely candidates for dysfunction and competitive disadvantage. So you can determine how your company fares in these categories (or others, if the generic list doesn't suit your needs), the authors explain how to conduct a "capabilities audit," describing in particular the experiences and findings of two companies that recently performed such audits. In addition to highlighting which intangible assets are most important given the organization's history and strategy, this exercise will gauge how well your company delivers on its capabilities and will guide you in developing an action plan for improvement. A capabilities audit can work for an entire organization, a business unit, or a region--indeed, for any part of a company that has a strategy to generate financial or customer-related results. It enables executives to assess overall company strengths and weaknesses, senior leaders to define strategy, midlevel managers to execute strategy, and frontline leaders to achieve tactical results. In short, it helps turn intangible assets into concrete strengths.

  6. Structural Characterization of Bimetallic Nanocrystal Electrocatalysts

    Cullen, David A [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Late transition metal nanocrystals find applications in heterogeneous catalysis such as plasmon-enhanced catalysis and as electrode materials for fuel cells, a zero-emission and sustainable energy technology. Their commercial viability for automotive transportation has steadily increased in recent years, almost exclusively due to the discovery of more efficient bimetallic nanocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the cathode. Despite improvements to catalyst design, achieving high activity while maintaining durability is essential to further enhance their performance for this and other important applications in catalysis. Electronic effects arising from the generation of metal-metal interfaces, from plasmonic metals, and from lattice distortions, can vastly improve sorption properties at catalytic surfaces, while increasing durability.[1] Multimetallic lattice-strained nanoparticles are thus an interesting opportunity for fundamental research.[2,3] A colloidal synthesis approach is demonstrated to produce AuPd alloy and Pd@Au core-shell nanoicosahedra as catalysts for electro-oxidations. The nanoparticles are characterized using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (ac-STEM) and large solid angle energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) on an FEI Talos 4-detector STEM/EDS system. Figure 1 shows bright-field (BF) and high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) ac-STEM images of the alloy and core-shell nanoicosahedra together with EDS line-scans and elemental maps. These structures are unique in that the presence of twin boundaries, alloying, and core-shell morphology could create highly strained surfaces and interfaces. The shell thickness of the core-shell structures observed in HAADF-STEM images is tuned by adjusting the ratio between metal precursors (Figure 2a-f) to produce shells ranging from a few to several monolayers. Specific activity was measured in ethanol electro-oxidation to examine the effect of shell thickness on

  7. Atomic-scale modeling of cellulose nanocrystals

    Wu, Xiawa

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), the most abundant nanomaterials in nature, are recognized as one of the most promising candidates to meet the growing demand of green, bio-degradable and sustainable nanomaterials for future applications. CNCs draw significant interest due to their high axial elasticity and low density-elasticity ratio, both of which are extensively researched over the years. In spite of the great potential of CNCs as functional nanoparticles for nanocomposite materials, a fundamental understanding of CNC properties and their role in composite property enhancement is not available. In this work, CNCs are studied using molecular dynamics simulation method to predict their material' behaviors in the nanoscale. (a) Mechanical properties include tensile deformation in the elastic and plastic regions using molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics and nanoindentation methods. This allows comparisons between the methods and closer connectivity to experimental measurement techniques. The elastic moduli in the axial and transverse directions are obtained and the results are found to be in good agreement with previous research. The ultimate properties in plastic deformation are reported for the first time and failure mechanism are analyzed in details. (b) The thermal expansion of CNC crystals and films are studied. It is proposed that CNC film thermal expansion is due primarily to single crystal expansion and CNC-CNC interfacial motion. The relative contributions of inter- and intra-crystal responses to heating are explored. (c) Friction at cellulose-CNCs and diamond-CNCs interfaces is studied. The effects of sliding velocity, normal load, and relative angle between sliding surfaces are predicted. The Cellulose-CNC model is analyzed in terms of hydrogen bonding effect, and the diamond-CNC model compliments some of the discussion of the previous model. In summary, CNC's material properties and molecular models are both studied in this research, contributing to

  8. Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability

    Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1983-02-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project is a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored real-time emergency response service available for use by both federal and state agencies in case of a potential or actual atmospheric release of nuclear material. The project, initiated in 1972, is currently evolving from the research and development phase to full operation. Plans are underway to expand the existing capability to continuous operation by 1984 and to establish a National ARAC Center (NARAC) by 1988. This report describes the ARAC system, its utilization during the past two years, and plans for its expansion during the next five to six years. An integral part of this expansion is due to a very important and crucial effort sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency to extend the ARAC service to approximately 45 Department of Defense (DOD) sites throughout the continental US over the next three years

  9. Surface structure of alpha-Fe sub 2 O sub 3 nanocrystal observed by O K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Zhang, J; Ibrahim, K; Abbas, M I; Ju, X

    2003-01-01

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra is used as a probe of surface structure of alpha-Fe sub 2 O sub 3 nanocrystal, prepared by sol-gel method. We present O K-edge XANES of alpha-Fe sub 2 O sub 3 in nanocrystal and bulk by total electron yield at the photoemission station of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The spectrum of alpha-Fe sub 2 O sub 3 shows a splitting of the pre-edge structure, which is interpreted as two subsets of Fe 3d t sub 2 sub g and e sub g orbitals in oxygen octahedral (O sub h) crystal field, and is also sensitive to long-range order effects. However, no distinguishable splitting of the pre-edge peak of nanocrystal alpha-Fe sub 2 O sub 3 is observed. This suggests that there exists the distorted octahedral coordination around Fe sites and also the long-range disorder due to the surface as compared with bulk alpha-Fe sub 2 O sub 3.

  10. Group Capability Model

    Olejarski, Michael; Appleton, Amy; Deltorchio, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The Group Capability Model (GCM) is a software tool that allows an organization, from first line management to senior executive, to monitor and track the health (capability) of various groups in performing their contractual obligations. GCM calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI) by comparing actual head counts, certifications, and/or skills within a group. The model can also be used to simulate the effects of employee usage, training, and attrition on the GCI. A universal tool and common method was required due to the high risk of losing skills necessary to complete the Space Shuttle Program and meet the needs of the Constellation Program. During this transition from one space vehicle to another, the uncertainty among the critical skilled workforce is high and attrition has the potential to be unmanageable. GCM allows managers to establish requirements for their group in the form of head counts, certification requirements, or skills requirements. GCM then calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI), where a score of 1 indicates that the group is at the appropriate level; anything less than 1 indicates a potential for improvement. This shows the health of a group, both currently and over time. GCM accepts as input head count, certification needs, critical needs, competency needs, and competency critical needs. In addition, team members are categorized by years of experience, percentage of contribution, ex-members and their skills, availability, function, and in-work requirements. Outputs are several reports, including actual vs. required head count, actual vs. required certificates, CGI change over time (by month), and more. The program stores historical data for summary and historical reporting, which is done via an Excel spreadsheet that is color-coded to show health statistics at a glance. GCM has provided the Shuttle Ground Processing team with a quantifiable, repeatable approach to assessing and managing the skills in their organization. They now have a common

  11. Expeditionary Rubber Removal Capability

    2006-12-31

    the modified spray unit or system with equivalent capabilities. 24 25 9.8. A pressure sensor or caster wheels should be incorporated into the...DISCUSSION 18 8.0 CONCLUSIONS 23 9.0 RECOMMENDATIONS 24 APPENDIX A – DETAILED LIST OF EQUIPMENT AND MODIFICATIONS 26 APPENDIX B – LIST OF SOURCES FOR...tall Weight – 4820 lb (No Attachments) Top Speed – 18 mph High Flow Hydraulics (Optional) – 26 gpm Steering – All Wheel Steering Cargo Max Load

  12. Atmospheric release advisory capability

    Sullivan, T.J.

    1981-01-01

    The ARAC system (Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability) is described. The system is a collection of people, computers, computer models, topographic data and meteorological input data that together permits a calculation of, in a quasi-predictive sense, where effluent from an accident will migrate through the atmosphere, where it will be deposited on the ground, and what instantaneous and integrated dose an exposed individual would receive

  13. Europium- and lithium-doped yttrium oxide nanocrystals that provide a linear emissive response with X-ray radiation exposure

    Stanton, Ian N.; Belley, Matthew D.; Nguyen, Giao; Rodrigues, Anna; Li, Yifan; Kirsch, David G.; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Therien, Michael J.

    2014-04-01

    scintillation intensities that tracked linearly with total radiation exposure, highlighting its capability to provide alternately accurate dosimetry measurements for both diagnostic imaging (80 kVp) and radiation therapy treatment (225 kVp).Eu- and Li-doped yttrium oxide nanocrystals [Y2-xO3 Eux, Liy], in which Eu and Li dopant ion concentrations were systematically varied, were developed and characterized (TEM, XRD, Raman spectroscopic, UV-excited lifetime, and ICP-AES data) in order to define the most emissive compositions under specific X-ray excitation conditions. These optimized [Y2-xO3 Eux, Liy] compositions display scintillation responses that: (i) correlate linearly with incident radiation exposure at X-ray energies spanning from 40-220 kVp, and (ii) manifest no evidence of scintillation intensity saturation at the highest evaluated radiation exposures [up to 4 Roentgen per second]. For the most emissive nanoscale scintillator composition, [Y1.9O3; Eu0.1, Li0.16], excitation energies of 40, 120, and 220 kVp were chosen to probe the dependence of the integrated emission intensity upon X-ray exposure-rate in energy regimes having different mass-attenuation coefficients and where either the photoelectric or the Compton effect governs the scintillation mechanism. These experiments demonstrate for the first time for that for comparable radiation exposures, when the scintillation mechanism is governed by the photoelectric effect and a comparably larger mass-attenuation coefficient (120 kVp excitation), greater integrated emission intensities are recorded relative to excitation energies where the Compton effect regulates scintillation (220 kVp) in nanoscale [Y2-xO3 Eux] crystals. Nanoscale [Y1.9O3; Eu0.1, Li0.16] (70 +/- 20 nm) was further exploited as a detector material in a prototype fiber-optic radiation sensor. The scintillation intensity from the [Y1.9O3; Eu0.1, Li0.16]-modified, 400 μm sized optical fiber tip, recorded using a CCD-photodetector and integrated over the

  14. Shared probe design and existing microarray reanalysis using PICKY

    Chou Hui-Hsien

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large genomes contain families of highly similar genes that cannot be individually identified by microarray probes. This limitation is due to thermodynamic restrictions and cannot be resolved by any computational method. Since gene annotations are updated more frequently than microarrays, another common issue facing microarray users is that existing microarrays must be routinely reanalyzed to determine probes that are still useful with respect to the updated annotations. Results PICKY 2.0 can design shared probes for sets of genes that cannot be individually identified using unique probes. PICKY 2.0 uses novel algorithms to track sharable regions among genes and to strictly distinguish them from other highly similar but nontarget regions during thermodynamic comparisons. Therefore, PICKY does not sacrifice the quality of shared probes when choosing them. The latest PICKY 2.1 includes the new capability to reanalyze existing microarray probes against updated gene sets to determine probes that are still valid to use. In addition, more precise nonlinear salt effect estimates and other improvements are added, making PICKY 2.1 more versatile to microarray users. Conclusions Shared probes allow expressed gene family members to be detected; this capability is generally more desirable than not knowing anything about these genes. Shared probes also enable the design of cross-genome microarrays, which facilitate multiple species identification in environmental samples. The new nonlinear salt effect calculation significantly increases the precision of probes at a lower buffer salt concentration, and the probe reanalysis function improves existing microarray result interpretations.

  15. Charge transport in silicon nanocrystal superlattices in the terahertz regime

    Němec, Hynek; Zajac, Vít; Kužel, Petr; Malý, P.; Gutsch, S.; Hiller, D.; Zacharias, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 19 (2015), "195443-1"-"195443-10" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-12386S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : silicon nanocrystals * charge transport * terahertz spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  16. A fractal model for intergranular fractures in nanocrystals

    Lung, C.W.; Xiong, L.Y.; Zhou, X.Z.

    1993-09-01

    A fractal model for intergranular fractures in nanocrystals is proposed to explain the dependence of fracture toughness with grain size in this range of scale. Based on positron annihilation and internal friction experimental results, we point out that the assumption of a constant grain boundary thickness in previous models is too simplified to be true. (author). 7 refs, 6 figs

  17. Exciton Recombination in Formamidinium Lead Triiodide : Nanocrystals versus Thin Films

    Fang, Hong-Hua; Protesescu, Loredana; Balazs, Daniel M.; Adjokatse, Sampson; Kovalenko, Maksym V.; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2017-01-01

    The optical properties of the newly developed near-infrared emitting formamidinium lead triiodide (FAPbI(3)) nanocrystals (NCs) and their polycrystalline thin film counterpart are comparatively investigated by means of steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence. The excitonic emission is

  18. Fabrication and evaluation of smart nanocrystals of artemisinin for ...

    Background: Nanocrystals have the potential to substantially increase dissolution rate, solubility with subsequent enhanced bioavailability via the oral route of a range of poor water soluble drugs. Regardless of other issues, scale up of the batch size is the main issue associated with bottom up approach. Material and ...

  19. Luminescence in Mn-doped CdS nanocrystals

    Wintec

    and the Mn d levels occur at two different energies, allowed us to study the PL lifetime decay behaviour of both kinds of .... seen from the XRD analysis, the size of the nanocrystals .... levels couple to the CdS electronic states and the excited.

  20. Environmental friendly InP/ZnS nanocrystals

    Coşkun, Yasemin

    2012-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, 2012. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2012. Includes bibliographical references leaves 80-89. Semiconductor nanocrystals are nanometer scale fluorescent crystallites with tunable optical properties, which can be controlled by the material composition and particle size. They can be prepared using various synthesis techniques and find applications in many different areas ranging from...

  1. The relationship between cellulose nanocrystal dispersion and strength

    Yizheng Cao; Pablo Zavattieri; Jeffrey Youngblood; Robert Moon; Jason Weiss

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the agglomeration of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and uses ultrasonication to disperse CNCs in cement pastes in an attempt to improve strength. Rheological measurements show that when the concentration of CNCs exceeds 1.35% by volume in deionized water, agglomerates start to develop. This experimental finding is comparable to the value obtained from...

  2. A simple synthesis and characterization of CuS nanocrystals

    Unknown

    Water-soluble CuS nanocrystals and nanorods were prepared by reacting copper acetate with thioacetamide in ... potential applications in solar cells, IR detectors and lubri- cation (Mane ... ted a solventless synthesis of Cu2S nanorods, by heating copper thiolate .... 2004 Nanoparticles: Building blocks for nano- technology ...

  3. Photoluminescence studies of Li-doped Si nanocrystals

    Klimešová, Eva; Vacík, Jiří; Holý, V.; Pelant, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 14 (2013), s. 1-7 ISSN 1847-9804 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : Si nanocrystals * photoluminescence * doping * Li-ion batteries Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.949, year: 2013

  4. Extraction and characterisation of cellulose nanocrystals from pineapple peel

    Ana Raquel Madureira

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The potential of pineapple peel as a source of cellulose nanocrystals was evaluated. Peels skin from fresh-cut fruit was used as raw material. These residues were purified to remove pigments, lipids and hemicellulose, and a bleaching process for delignification was carried out for 4-6 h. All resulting products were characterised for their lignin, hemicellulose, cellulose and ash contents using standard techniques. Dry matter at the end was low (ca. 50% compared with the raw material (ca. 90%. The process applied resulted in ca. 20% (m/m of purified cellulose (ca. 80% purity, with ineligible levels of lignin and hemicellulose present, especially when using 6h of bleaching. The purified cellulose was subject to acid hydrolysis for nanocrystal extraction with two testing times, 30 and 60 minutes. These cellulose nanocrystals had small sizes (< 1000 nm, with high variability and negative zeta potential values. The time of extraction did not affect the nanocrystals’ chemical and physical properties. The use of 6 h of bleaching treatment during purification was shown to be more effective than 4 h. Pineapple peel was demonstrated to be a good source of cellulose for the production of cellulose nanocrystals.

  5. Introducing cellulose nanocrystals in sheet molding compounds (SMC)

    Amir Asadi; Mark Miller; Sanzida Sultana; Robert J. Moon; Kyriaki Kalaitzidou

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of short glass fiber/epoxy composites containing cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) made using sheet molding compound (SMC) manufacturing method as well as the rheological and thermomechanical properties of the CNC-epoxy composites were investigated as a function of the CNC content. CNC up to 1.4 wt% were dispersed in the epoxy to produce the resin...

  6. Morphology-controlled Pd nanocrystals as catalysts in tandem ...

    MIRIAM NAVLANI-GARCÍA

    2017-09-22

    Sep 22, 2017 ... aDivision of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, .... 5. 0.390. 0.680. 5.0. –. Note: S, M and L are referred to small, medium and large average nanocrystals size. [a] Considering the molecular weight (MW ) of one ... In this case, 10 mg of catalyst and 5 mL.

  7. Silicon nanocrystals in silica – Novel active waveguides for nanophotonics

    Janda, P.; Valenta, J.; Ostatnický, T.; Skopalová, Eva; Pelant, Ivan; Elliman, R. G.; Tomasiunas, R.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 121, - (2006), s. 267-273 ISSN 0022-2313 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010316; GA ČR GP202/01/D030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : nanocrystal * waveguide * silicon * photonics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.441, year: 2006

  8. Predicting Nanocrystal Shape through Consideration of Surface-Ligand Interactions

    Bealing, Clive R.; Baumgardner, William J.; Choi, Joshua J.; Hanrath, Tobias; Hennig, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Density functional calculations for the binding energy of oleic acid-based ligands on Pb-rich {100} and {111} facets of PbSe nanocrystals determine the surface energies as a function of ligand coverage. Oleic acid is expected to bind

  9. Design and characterization of cellulose nanocrystal-enhanced epoxy hardeners

    Shane X. Peng; Robert J. Moon; Jeffrey P. Youngblood

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are renewable, sustainable, and abundant nanomaterial widely used as reinforcing fillers in the field of polymer nanocomposites. In this study, two-part epoxy systems with CNC-enhanced hardeners were fabricated. Three types of hardeners, Jeffamine D400 (JD400), diethylenetriamine (DETA), and (±)-trans-1,2- diaminocyclohexane (DACH), were...

  10. Atomistic Simulation of Frictional Sliding Between Cellulose Iß Nanocrystals

    Xiawa Wu; Robert J. Moon; Ashlie Martini

    2013-01-01

    Sliding friction between cellulose Iß nanocrystals is studied using molecular dynamics simulation. The effects of sliding velocity, normal load, and relative angle between sliding surface are predicted, and the results analyzed in terms of the number of hydrogen bonds within and between the cellulose chains. We find that although the observed friction trends can be...

  11. Comparison of Cellulose Supramolecular Structures Between Nanocrystals of Different Origins

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Richard S. Reiner; Christopher G. Hunt; Jeffery Catchmark; E. Johan Foster; Akira Isogai

    2015-01-01

    In this study, morphologies and supramolecular structures of CNCs from wood-pulp, cotton, bacteria, tunicate, and cladophora were investigated. TEM was used to study the morphological aspects of the nanocrystals whereas Raman spectroscopy provided information on the cellulose molecular structure and its organization within a CNC. Dimensional differences between the...

  12. Strong Carrier-Phonon Coupling in Lead Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals

    Iaru, Claudiu M; Geuchies, Jaco J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370526090; Koenraad, Paul M; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniël|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829137; Silov, Andrei Yu

    2017-01-01

    We highlight the importance of carrier-phonon coupling in inorganic lead halide perovskite nanocrystals. The low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectrum of CsPbBr3 has been investigated under a nonresonant and a nonstandard, quasi-resonant excitation scheme, and phonon replicas of the main PL

  13. Synthesis and photovoltaic application of coper (I) sulfide nanocrystals

    Wu, Yue; Wadia, Cyrus; Ma, Wanli; Sadtler, Bryce; Alivisatos, A.Paul

    2008-06-24

    We present the rational synthesis of colloidal copper(I) sulfide nanocrystals and demonstrate their application as an active light absorbing component in combination with CdS nanorods to make a solution-processed solar cell with 1.6percent power conversion efficiency on both conventional glass substrates and flexible plastic substrates with stability over a 4 month testing period.

  14. Low temperature synthesis of carbon encapsulated Fe7S8 nanocrystals as high performance anode for lithium-ion batteries

    Liu, Boyang; Zhang, Fuhua; Wu, Qianlin; Wang, Junhua; Li, Wenge; Dong, Lihua; Yin, Yansheng

    2015-01-01

    A novel method is developed for low temperature synthesis of carbon encapsulated spherical Fe 7 S 8 nanocrystals with core–shell structure (Fe 7 S 8 @C) by the reaction of ferrocene with ammonium persulphate. The phase structure, morphology, specific surface area and composition of the nanocomposite are systematically characterized. It is found that the Fe 7 S 8 nanocrystals with a weight percent of 33.5% have a median size of 25.2 nm. The Fe 7 S 8 @C electrodes retain a reversible capacity of 815 and 539 mAh g −1 after 50 cycles at a current density of 200 and 2284 mA g −1 , respectively. The high capacity, good cycling behavior and rate capability of Fe 7 S 8 @C electrodes are attributed to the good protection and electrical conductivity of carbon shell. - Highlights: • Large scale and low temperature synthesis of Fe 7 S 8 @C with core–shell structure. • The Fe 7 S 8 @C electrodes retain a capacity of 815 mAh g −1 after 50 cycles at 200 mA g −1 . • The Fe 7 S 8 @C electrodes show good cycling behavior and rate capability

  15. Steerable Doppler transducer probes

    Fidel, H.F.; Greenwood, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    An ultrasonic diagnostic probe is described which is capable of performing ultrasonic imaging and Doppler measurement consisting of: a hollow case having an acoustic window which passes ultrasonic energy and including chamber means for containing fluid located within the hollow case and adjacent to a portion of the acoustic window; imaging transducer means, located in the hollow case and outside the fluid chamber means, and oriented to direct ultrasonic energy through the acoustic window toward an area which is to be imaged; Doppler transducer means, located in the hollow case within the fluid chamber means, and movably oriented to direct Doppler signals through the acoustic window toward the imaged area; means located within the fluid chamber means and externally controlled for controllably moving the Doppler transducer means to select one of a plurality of axes in the imaged area along which the Doppler signals are to be directed; and means, located external to the fluid chamber means and responsive to the means for moving, for providing an indication signal for identifying the selected axis

  16. Synthesis of silicon nanocrystals in silane plasmas for nanoelectronics and large area electronic devices

    Roca i Cabarrocas, P; Nguyen-Tran, Th; Djeridane, Y; Abramov, A; Johnson, E; Patriarche, G

    2007-01-01

    The synthesis of silicon nanocrystals in standard radio-frequency glow discharge systems is studied with respect to two main objectives: (i) the production of devices based on quantum size effects associated with the small dimensions of silicon nanocrystals and (ii) the synthesis of polymorphous and polycrystalline silicon films in which silicon nanocrystals are the elementary building blocks. In particular we discuss results on the mechanisms of nanocrystal formation and their transport towards the substrate. We found that silicon nanocrystals can contribute to a significant fraction of deposition (50-70%) and that they can be positively charged. This has a strong influence on their deposition because positively charged nanocrystals will be accelerated towards the substrate with energy of the order of the plasma potential. However, the important parameter with respect to the deposition of charged nanocrystals is not the accelerating voltage but the energy per atom and thus a doubling of the diameter will result in a decrease in the energy per atom by a factor of 8. To leverage this geometrical advantage we propose the use of more electronegative gases, which may have a strong effect on the size and charge distribution of the nanocrystals. This is illustrated in the case of deposition from silicon tetrafluoride plasmas in which we observe low-frequency plasma fluctuations, associated with successive generations of nanocrystals. The contribution of larger nanocrystals to deposition results in a lower energy per deposited atom and thus polycrystalline films

  17. Building Structural Complexity in Semiconductor Nanocrystals through Chemical Transformations

    Sadtler, Bryce F [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Methods are presented for synthesizing nanocrystal heterostructures comprised of two semiconductor materials epitaxially attached within individual nanostructures. The chemical transformation of cation exchange, where the cations within the lattice of an ionic nanocrystal are replaced with a different metal ion species, is used to alter the chemical composition at specific regions ofa nanocrystal. Partial cation exchange was performed in cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanorods of well-defined size and shape to examine the spatial organization of materials within the resulting nanocrystal heterostructures. The selectivity for cation exchange to take place at different facets of the nanocrystal plays an important role in determining the resulting morphology of the binary heterostructure. The exchange of copper (I) (Cu+) cations in CdS nanorods occurs preferentially at the ends of the nanorods. Theoretical modeling of epitaxial attachments between different facets of CdS and Cu2S indicate that the selectivity for cation exchange at the ends of the nanorods is a result of the low formation energy of the interfaces produced. During silver (I) (Ag+) cation exchange in CdS nanorods, non-selective nucleation of silver sulfide (Ag2S), followed by partial phase segregation leads to significant changes in the spatial arrangement of CdS and Ag2S regions at the exchange reaction proceeds through the nanocrystal. A well-ordered striped pattern of alternating CdS and Ag2S segments is found at intermediate fractions of exchange. The forces mediating this spontaneous process are a combination of Ostwald ripening to reduce the interfacial area along with a strain-induced repulsive interaction between Ag2S segments. To elucidate why Cu+ and Ag+ cation exchange with CdS nanorods produce different morphologies, models for epitaxial attachments between various facets of CdS with Cu2S or

  18. InP/ZnS Nanocrystals as Fluorescent Probes for the Detection of ATP

    Massadeh, Salam; Nann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a study on fluorescence adenosine triphosphate (ATP) detection by InP/ZnS quantum dots (QDs). We present a spectroscopic analysis displaying the effect of enzymatic reactions of glucose oxidase (GOX) and hexokinase (HEX) on the InP/ZnS quantum dots at physiological pH. The InP/ZnS quantum dots act as glucose sensors in the presence of GOX, Glu and ATP, and their luminescence quenches during the release of hydrogen peroxide from the reaction. However, in the presence of...

  19. Glutathione-capped CdTe nanocrystals as probe for the determination of fenbendazole

    Li, Qin; Tan, Xuanping; Li, Jin; Pan, Li; Liu, Xiaorong

    2015-04-01

    Water-soluble glutathione (GSH)-capped CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized. In pH 7.1 PBS buffer solution, the interaction between GSH-capped CdTe QDs and fenbendazole (FBZ) was investigated by spectroscopic methods, including fluorescence spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, and resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) spectroscopy. In GSH-capped CdTe QDs solution, the addition of FBZ results in the fluorescence quenching and RRS enhancement of GSH-capped CdTe QDs. And the quenching intensity (enhanced RRS intensity) was proportional to the concentration of FBZ in a certain range. Investigation of the interaction mechanism, proved that the fluorescence quenching and RRS enhancement of GSH-capped CdTe QDs by FBZ is the result of electrostatic attraction. Based on the quenching of fluorescence (enhancement of RRS) of GSH-capped CdTe QDs by FBZ, a novel, simple, rapid and specific method for FBZ determination was proposed. The detection limit for FBZ was 42 ng mL-1 (3.4 ng mL-1) and the quantitative determination range was 0-2.8 μg mL-1 with a correlation of 0.9985 (0.9979). The method has been applied to detect FBZ in real simples and with satisfactory results.

  20. The evolution of alliance capabilities

    Heimeriks, K.H.; Duysters, G.M.; Vanhaverbeke, W.P.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper assesses the effectiveness and differential performance effects of learning mechanisms on the evolution of alliance capabilities. Relying on the concept of capability lifecycles, prior research has suggested that different capability levels could be identified in which different

  1. Scanning Probe Microscopy at 650 °C in Air

    Hansen, Karin Vels; Jacobsen, Torben; Nørgaard, Anne-Mette

    2009-01-01

    The controlled atmosphere high temperature scanning probe microscope was designed to study the electrical properties of surfaces at elevated temperatures by using the probe as an electrode. The capability of a simultaneous acquisition of topographical and electrical data for the same surface area...

  2. Probe-diverse ptychography

    Peterson, I., E-mail: isaac.russellpeterson@rmit.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-ray Science, the University of Melbourne, School of Physics, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Harder, R. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Robinson, I.K. [Research Complex at Harwell, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    We propose an extension of ptychography where the target sample is scanned separately through several probes with distinct amplitude and phase profiles and a diffraction image is recorded for each probe and each sample translation. The resulting probe-diverse dataset is used to iteratively retrieve high-resolution images of the sample and all probes simultaneously. The method is shown to yield significant improvement in the reconstructed sample image compared to the image obtained using the standard single-probe ptychographic phase-retrieval scheme.

  3. Building Server Capabilities

    Adeyemi, Oluseyi

    2013-01-01

    Many western companies have moved part of their operations to China in order to take advantage of cheap resources and/or to gain access to a high potential market. Depending on motive, offshore facilities usually start either as “sales-only” of products exported by headquarters or “production......-only”, exporting parts and components back to headquarter for sales in the home country. In the course of time, the role of offshore subsidiaries in a company’s operations network tends to change and, with that, the capabilities, of the subsidiaries. Focusing on Danish subsidiaries in China, the objective...

  4. Building server capabilities

    Adeyemi, Oluseyi

    Many western companies have moved part of their operations to China in order to take advantage of cheap resources and/or to gain access to a high potential market. Depending on motive, offshore facilities usually start either as “sales-only” of products exported by headquarters or “production......-only”, exporting parts and components back to headquarter for sales in the home country. In the course of time, the role of offshore subsidiaries in a company’s operations network tends to change and, with that, the capabilities, of the subsidiaries. Focusing on Danish subsidiaries in China, the objective...

  5. Traversing probe system

    Mashburn, D.N.; Stevens, R.H.; Woodall, H.C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention comprises a rotatable annular probe-positioner which carries at least one radially disposed sensing probe, such as a Pitot tube having a right-angled tip. The positioner can be coaxially and rotatably mounted within a compressor casing or the like and then actuated to orient the sensing probe as required to make measurements at selected stations in the annulus between the positioner and compressor casing. The positioner can be actuated to (a) selectively move the probe along its own axis, (b) adjust the yaw angle of the right-angled probe tip, and (c) revolve the probe about the axis common to the positioner and casing. A cam plate engages a cam-follower portion of the probe and normally rotates with the positioner. The positioner includes a first-motor-driven ring gear which effects slidable movement of the probe by rotating the positioner at a time when an external pneumatic cylinder is actuated to engage the cam plate and hold it stationary. When the pneumatic cylinder is not actuated, this ring gear can be driven to revolve the positioner and thus the probe to a desired circumferential location about the above-mentioned common axis. A second motor-driven ring gear included in the positioner can be driven to rotate the probe about its axis, thus adjusting the yaw angle of the probe tip. The positioner can be used in highly corrosive atmosphere, such as gaseous uranium hexafluoride. 10 claims, 6 figures

  6. Traversing probe system

    Mashburn, Douglas N.; Stevens, Richard H.; Woodall, Harold C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention comprises a rotatable annular probe-positioner which carries at least one radially disposed sensing probe, such as a Pitot tube having a right-angled tip. The positioner can be coaxially and rotatably mounted within a compressor casing or the like and then actuated to orient the sensing probe as required to make measurements at selected stations in the annulus between the positioner and compressor casing. The positioner can be actuated to (a) selectively move the probe along its own axis, (b) adjust the yaw angle of the right-angled probe tip, and (c) revolve the probe about the axis common to the positioner and casing. A cam plate engages a cam-follower portion of the probe and normally rotates with the positioner. The positioner includes a first-motor-driven ring gear which effects slidable movement of the probe by rotating the positioner at a time when an external pneumatic cylinder is actuated to engage the cam plate and hold it stationary. When the pneumatic cylinder is not actuated, this ring gear can be driven to revolve the positioner and thus the probe to a desired circumferential location about the above-mentioned common axis. A second motor-driven ring gear included in the positioner can be driven to rotate the probe about its axis, thus adjusting the yaw angle of the probe tip. The positioner can be used in highly corrosive atmosphere, such as gaseous uranium hexafluoride.

  7. Electrical resistivity probes

    Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Solbau, Ray D.

    2003-10-21

    A miniaturized electrical resistivity (ER) probe based on a known current-voltage (I-V) electrode structure, the Wenner array, is designed for local (point) measurement. A pair of voltage measuring electrodes are positioned between a pair of current carrying electrodes. The electrodes are typically about 1 cm long, separated by 1 cm, so the probe is only about 1 inch long. The electrodes are mounted to a rigid tube with electrical wires in the tube and a sand bag may be placed around the electrodes to protect the electrodes. The probes can be positioned in a borehole or on the surface. The electrodes make contact with the surrounding medium. In a dual mode system, individual probes of a plurality of spaced probes can be used to measure local resistance, i.e. point measurements, but the system can select different probes to make interval measurements between probes and between boreholes.

  8. Laboratory microfusion capability study

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate the issues involved in developing a Laboratory Microfusion Capability (LMC) which is the major objective of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program within the purview of the Department of Energy's Defense Programs. The study was initiated to support a number of DOE management needs: to provide insight for the evolution of the ICF program; to afford guidance to the ICF laboratories in planning their research and development programs; to inform Congress and others of the details and implications of the LMC; to identify criteria for selection of a concept for the Laboratory Microfusion Facility and to develop a coordinated plan for the realization of an LMC. As originally proposed, the LMC study was divided into two phases. The first phase identifies the purpose and potential utility of the LMC, the regime of its performance parameters, driver independent design issues and requirements, its development goals and requirements, and associated technical, management, staffing, environmental, and other developmental and operational issues. The second phase addresses driver-dependent issues such as specific design, range of performance capabilities, and cost. The study includes four driver options; the neodymium-glass solid state laser, the krypton fluoride excimer gas laser, the light-ion accelerator, and the heavy-ion induction linear accelerator. The results of the Phase II study are described in the present report

  9. Semiconductor nanocrystals formed in SiO2 by ion implantation

    Zhu, J.G.; White, C.W.; Budai, J.D.; Withrow, S.P.; Chen, Y.

    1994-11-01

    Nanocrystals of group IV (Si, Ge and SiGe), III-V (GaAs), and II-VI (CdSe) semiconductor materials have been fabricated inside SiO 2 by ion implantation and subsequent thermal annealing. The microstructure of these nanocrystalline semiconductor materials has been studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The nanocrystals form in near-spherical shape with random crystal orientations in amorphous SiO 2 . Extensive studies on the nanocrystal size distributions have been carried out for the Ge nanocrystals by changing the implantation doses and the annealing temperatures. Remarkable roughening of the nanocrystals occurs when the annealing temperature is raised over the melting temperature of the implanted semiconductor material. Strong red photoluminescence peaked around 1.67 eV has been achieved in samples with Si nanocrystals in SiO 2

  10. Pulsed ion-beam induced nucleation and growth of Ge nanocrystals on SiO2

    Stepina, N. P.; Dvurechenskii, A. V.; Armbrister, V. A.; Kesler, V. G.; Novikov, P. L.; Gutakovskii, A. K.; Kirienko, V. V.; Smagina, Zh. V.; Groetzschel, R.

    2007-01-01

    Pulsed low-energy (200 eV) ion-beam induced nucleation during Ge deposition on thin SiO 2 film was used to form dense homogeneous arrays of Ge nanocrystals. The ion-beam action is shown to stimulate the nucleation of Ge nanocrystals when being applied after thin Ge layer deposition. Temperature and flux variation was used to optimize the nanocrystal size and array density required for memory device. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation shows that ion impacts open an additional channel of atom displacement from a nanocrystal onto SiO 2 surface. This results both in a decrease in the average nanocrystal size and in an increase in nanocrystal density

  11. Multicolour synthesis in lanthanide-doped nanocrystals through cation exchange in water

    Han, Sanyang

    2016-10-04

    Meeting the high demand for lanthanide-doped luminescent nanocrystals across a broad range of fields hinges upon the development of a robust synthetic protocol that provides rapid, just-in-time nanocrystal preparation. However, to date, almost all lanthanide-doped luminescent nanomaterials have relied on direct synthesis requiring stringent controls over crystal nucleation and growth at elevated temperatures. Here we demonstrate the use of a cation exchange strategy for expeditiously accessing large classes of such nanocrystals. By combining the process of cation exchange with energy migration, the luminescence properties of the nanocrystals can be easily tuned while preserving the size, morphology and crystal phase of the initial nanocrystal template. This post-synthesis strategy enables us to achieve upconversion luminescence in Ce3+ and Mn2+-activated hexagonal-phased nanocrystals, opening a gateway towards applications ranging from chemical sensing to anti-counterfeiting.

  12. Structural and thermal characterization of polyvinylalcohol grafted SiC nanocrystals

    Saini, Isha; Sharma, Annu; Dhiman, Rajnish

    2017-01-01

    introduced in the characteristic TO and LO mode of vibration of SiC nanocrystals after grafting procedure.XRD analysis confirmed that the grafting procedure did not alter the crystalline geometry of SiC nanocrystals. TEM and SEM images further support the FTIR and Raman spectroscopic results and confirm...... of semiconducting SiC nanocrystals using a novel method. FTIR spectroscopy reveals the introduction of new peaks corresponding to various functional groups of PVA alongwith the presence of characteristic Si-C vibrational peak in the spectra of grafted SiC nanocrystals. Raman spectra depict the presence of changes...... the presence of PVA layer around SiC nanocrystals. Thermal degradation behavior of PVA-g-SiC nanocrystals has been studied using TGA analysis....

  13. Nanocrystals for enhancement of oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs

    Varaporn Buraphacheep Junyaprasert

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystals, a carrier-free colloidal delivery system in nano-sized range, is an interesting approach for poorly soluble drugs. Nanocrystals provide special features including enhancement of saturation solubility, dissolution velocity and adhesiveness to surface/cell membranes. Several strategies are applied for nanocrystals production including precipitation, milling, high pressure homogenization and combination methods such as NanoEdge™, SmartCrystal and Precipitation-lyophilization-homogenization (PLH technology. For oral administration, many publications reported useful advantages of nanocrystals to improve in vivo performances i.e. pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety and targeted delivery which were discussed in this review. Additionally, transformation of nanocrystals to final formulations and future trends of nanocrystals were also described.

  14. Colloidal infrared reflective and transparent conductive aluminum-doped zinc oxide nanocrystals

    Buonsanti, Raffaella; Milliron, Delia J

    2015-02-24

    The present invention provides a method of preparing aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) nanocrystals. In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) injecting a precursor mixture of a zinc precursor, an aluminum precursor, an amine, and a fatty acid in a solution of a vicinal diol in a non-coordinating solvent, thereby resulting in a reaction mixture, (2) precipitating the nanocrystals from the reaction mixture, thereby resulting in a final precipitate, and (3) dissolving the final precipitate in an apolar solvent. The present invention also provides a dispersion. In an exemplary embodiment, the dispersion includes (1) nanocrystals that are well separated from each other, where the nanocrystals are coated with surfactants and (2) an apolar solvent where the nanocrystals are suspended in the apolar solvent. The present invention also provides a film. In an exemplary embodiment, the film includes (1) a substrate and (2) nanocrystals that are evenly distributed on the substrate.

  15. Synthesis of highly faceted multiply twinned gold nanocrystals stabilized by polyoxometalates

    Yuan Junhua; Chen Yuanxian; Han Dongxue; Zhang Yuanjian; Shen Yanfei; Wang Zhijuan; Niu Li

    2006-01-01

    A novel and facile chemical synthesis of highly faceted multiply twinned gold nanocrystals is reported. The gold nanocrystals are hexagonal in transmission electron microscopy and icosahedral in scanning electron microscopy. Phosphotungstic acid (PTA), which was previously reduced, serves as a reductant and stabilizer for the synthesis of gold nanocrystals. The PTA-gold nanocomposites are quite stable in aqueous solutions, and electrochemically active towards the hydrogen evolution reaction

  16. Preparation of ZnS semiconductor nanocrystals using pulsed laser ablation in aqueous surfactant solutions

    Choi, S-H; Sasaki, T; Shimizu, Y; Yoon, J-W; Nichols, W T; Sung, Y-E; Koshizaki, N

    2007-01-01

    Cubic ZnS semiconductor nanocrystals with the size of 2 to 5 nm were prepared by pulsed laser ablation in aqueous surfactant solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide without any further treatments. The obtained suspensions of the nanocrystals have broad photoluminescence emission from 375 to 600 nm. The abundance and emission intensity of the nanocrystals depend on the concentration of the surfactant in solution

  17. High-purity Cu nanocrystal synthesis by a dynamic decomposition method

    Jian, Xian; Cao, Yu; Chen, Guozhang; Wang, Chao; Tang, Hui; Yin, Liangjun; Luan, Chunhong; Liang, Yinglin; Jiang, Jing; Wu, Sixin; Zeng, Qing; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Chengui

    2014-01-01

    Cu nanocrystals are applied extensively in several fields, particularly in the microelectron, sensor, and catalysis. The catalytic behavior of Cu nanocrystals depends mainly on the structure and particle size. In this work, formation of high-purity Cu nanocrystals is studied using a common chemical vapor deposition precursor of cupric tartrate. This process is investigated through a combined experimental and computational approach. The decomposition kinetics is researched via differential sca...

  18. Aqueous synthesis and characterization of bovine hemoglobin-conjugated cadmium sulfide nanocrystals

    Yang, Guangrui [Institute of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, North China University of Water Conservancy and Electric Power, Zhengzhou 450011 (China); Qin, Dezhi, E-mail: dezhiqin@163.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Pingdingshan University, Pingdingshan 467000 (China); Du, Xian; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Ganqing; Zhang, Qiuxia; Wu, Jiulin [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Pingdingshan University, Pingdingshan 467000 (China)

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • CdS nanocrystals were synthesized by biomimetic method in bovine hemoglobin (BHb) solution. • The study of the interaction between Cd{sup 2+}/CdS and BHb. • The optical properties of BHb-conjugated CdS nanocrystals. • The synthesis process of BHb-conjugated CdS nanocrystals is facile, effective and environment friendly. • The change of secondary structure of BHb after binding to CdS nanocrystals. - Abstract: Cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanocrystals with average diameter about 5.5 nm were synthesized in aqueous solution of bovine hemoglobin (BHb) via simple biomimetic method. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) characterizations were used to determine the structure and morphology of CdS nanocrystals. It was revealed that amount of BHb, chelating of Cd{sup 2+} to BHb and reaction temperature were key factors in controlling shape and dispersion of CdS nanocrystals. The binding sites of BHb to CdS nanocrystals and the change of secondary structure of protein have been identified by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. It was found that conjugating of BHb with Cd{sup 2+} and CdS could protect nanocrystals from agglomerating. Moreover, the thermostability of BHb enhanced after conjugating with CdS nanocrystals. The interaction mechanism of BHb with Cd{sup 2+}/CdS was also proposed. The quantum-confined effect of CdS nanocrystals was confirmed by ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) spectrum. The nanocrystals exhibited a well-defined photoluminescence (PL) emission feature at about 510 nm with narrow full width at half maximum (FWHM)

  19. Insights into the microstructural and physical properties of colloidal Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals

    Xie, Ruishi, E-mail: rxie@foxmail.com [Analytical and Testing Center, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Li, Yuanli [Department of Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Jiang, Linhai; Zhang, Xingquan [Analytical and Testing Center, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • We present a facile and environmentally friendly protocol to fabricate Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals. • The microstructural and physical properties of Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals were systematically investigated. • The current synthesis is dramatically simple and highly reproducible, it will facilitate the commercial scale synthesis of highly luminescent water-soluble nanocrystals with surface functionality in the near future. - Abstract: Here, we present a facile and environmentally friendly synthetic protocol to fabricate highly luminescent and water-soluble Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals in aqueous solution at low temperature. The microstructure and various physical properties (e.g., crystal structure, interplanar spacing, lattice parameter, crystalline size, lattice microstrain, intrinsic stress, X-ray density, specific surface area, dislocation density, porosity, agglomeration number) of the Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals were systematically investigated using X-ray diffraction. The particle size and morphology of the Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals were determined by transmission electron microscopy. The optical properties (e.g., absorption and photoluminescence) of the fabricated nanocrystals were explored using ultraviolet–visible absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopies, respectively. The surface functionalization of the Fe:ZnSe nanocrystals by mercaptoacetic acid ligand was evidenced by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. To confirm the elementary composition of the obtained nanocrystals, Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was performed. To further shed light upon elemental distribution of the resulting nanocrystals, elemental mapping measurements were conducted. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms were also elucidated. As a consequence, the current investigation not only provides a deep insight into exploring the physical properties of doped nanocrystals, but also demonstrates a useful synthetic strategy for producing water-soluble and highly fluorescent doped

  20. Confocal microscopy and spectroscopy of nanocrystals on a high-Q microsphere resonator

    Goetzinger, S; Menezes, L de S; Benson, O; Talapin, D V; Gaponik, N; Weller, H; Rogach, A L; Sandoghdar, V

    2004-01-01

    We report on experiments where we used a home-made confocal microscope to excite single nanocrystals on a high-Q microsphere resonator. In that way spectra of an individual quantum emitter could be recorded. The Q factor of the microspheres coated with nanocrystals was still up to 10 9 . We also demonstrate the use of a prism coupler as a well-defined output port to collect the fluorescence of an ensemble of nanocrystals coupled to whispering-gallery modes

  1. Optical properties and ensemble characteristics of size purified Silicon nanocrystals

    Miller, Joseph Bradley

    Nanotechnology is at the forefront of current scientific research and nanocrystals are being hailed as the 'artificial' atoms of the 21st century. Semiconducting silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) are prime candidates for potential commercial applications because of silicon's already ubiquitous presence in the semiconductor industry, nontoxicity and abundance in nature. For realization of these potential applications, the properties and behavior of SiNCs need to be understood and enhanced. In this report, some of the main SiNC synthesis schemes are discussed, including those we are currently experimenting with to create our own SiNCs and the one utilized to create the SiNCs used in this study. The underlying physics that governs the unique behavior of SiNCs is then presented. The properties of the as-produced SiNCs are determined to depend strongly on surface passivation and environment. Size purification, an important aspect of nanomaterial utilization, was successfully performed on our SiNCs though density gradient ultracentrifugation. We demonstrate that the size-purified fractions exhibit an enhanced ability for colloidal self-assembly, with better aligned nanocrystal energy levels which promotes greater photostability in close-packed films and produces a slight increase in photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield. The qualities displayed by the fractions are exploited to form SiNC clusters that exhibit photostable PL. An analysis of SiNC cluster (from individual nanocrystals to collections of more than one thousand) blinking and PL shows an improvement in their PL emitting 'on' times. Pure SiNC films and SiNC-polymer nanocomposites are created and the dependence of their PL on temperature is measured. For such nanocomposites, the coupling between the 'coffee-ring' effect and liquid-liquid phase separation is also examined for ternary mixtures of solvent, polymer and semiconducting nanocrystal. We discover that with the right SiNC-polymer concentration and polymer

  2. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of CdSe nanocrystals covalently bound to GaAs

    Walzer, K.; Marx, E.; Greenham, N.C.

    2003-01-01

    We present scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) measurements of CdSe nanocrystals covalently attached to doped GaAs substrates using monolayers of 1,6-hexanedithiol. STM measurements showed the formation of stable, densely packed, homogeneous monolayers...... of nanocrystals. STS measurements showed rectifying behaviour, with high currents at the opposite sample bias to that previously observed for CdSe nanocrystals adsorbed on Si substrates. We explain the rectifying behaviour by considering the interaction between the electronic states of the nanocrystals...

  3. Structure/Processing Relationships of Highly Ordered Lead Salt Nanocrystal Superlattices

    Hanrath, Tobias; Choi, Joshua J.; Smilgies, Detlef-M.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the influence of processing conditions, nanocrystal/substrate interactions and solvent evaporation rate on the ordering of strongly interacting nanocrystals by synergistically combining electron microscopy and synchrotron-based small-angle X-ray scattering analysis. Spin-cast PbSe nanocrystal films exhibited submicrometer-sized supracrystals with face-centered cubic symmetry and (001)s planes aligned parallel to the substrate. The ordering of drop-cast lead salt nanocrystal films was sensitive to the nature of the substrate and solvent evaporation dynamics. Nanocrystal films drop-cast on rough indium tin oxide substrates were polycrystalline with small grain size and low degree of orientation with respect to the substrate, whereas films drop-cast on flat Si substrates formed highly ordered face-centered cubic supracrystals with close-packed (111)s planes parallel to the substrate. The spatial coherence of nanocrystal films drop-cast in the presence of saturated solvent vapor was significantly improved compared to films drop-cast in a dry environment. Solvent vapor annealing was demonstrated as a postdeposition technique to modify the ordering of nanocrystals in the thin film. Octane vapor significantly improved the long-range order and degree of orientation of initially disordered or polycrystalline nanocrystal assemblies. Exposure to 1,2-ethanedithiol vapor caused partial displacement of surface bound oleic acid ligands and drastically degraded the degree of order in the nanocrystal assembly. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  4. Micromagnetic study of single-domain FePt nanocrystals overcoated with silica

    Hyun, Changbae; Lee, Doh C; Korgel, Brian A; Lozanne, Alex de

    2007-01-01

    Chemically-synthesized FePt nanocrystals must be annealed at a high temperature (>550 deg. C) to induce the hard ferromagnetic L 1 0 phase. Unfortunately, the organic stabilizer covering these nanocrystals degrades at these temperatures and the nanocrystals sinter, resulting in the loss of control over nanocrystal size and separation in the film. We have developed a silica overcoating strategy to prevent nanocrystal sintering. In this study, 6 nm diameter FePt nanocrystals were coated with 17 nm thick shells of silica using an inverse micelle process. Magnetization measurements of the annealed FePt-SiO 2 nanocrystals indicate ferromagnetism with a high coercivity at room temperature. Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) results show that the film composed of nanocrystals behaves as a dipole after magnetization by an 8 T external field. The individual nanocrystals are modelled as single-domain particles with random crystallographic orientations. We propose that the interparticle magnetic dipole interaction is weaker than the magnetocrystalline energy in the remanent state, leading to an unusual material with no magnetic anisotropy and no domains. Films of these nanoparticles are promising candidates for magnetic media with a data storage density of ∼Tb/in 2

  5. Photoresponse of hybrids made of carbon nanotubes and CdTe nanocrystals

    Zebli, Bernd; Vieyra, Hugo A.; Kotthaus, Joerg P. [Department fuer Physik and Center for NanoScience (CeNS), Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, 80539 Munich (Germany); Carmeli, Itai [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Hartschuh, Achim [Department fuer Chemie, Physikalische Chemie, Butenandtstr. 5-13 E, 81377 Munich (Germany); Holleitner, Alexander W. [Walter-Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 3, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    We observe that the photoresponse of single-walled carbon nanotubes can be adjusted by the absorption characteristics of colloidal CdTe nanocrystals, which are bound to the side-walls of the carbon nanotubes via molecular recognition. To this end, the hybrid systems are characterized using charge transport measurements under resonant optical excitation of the carbon nanotubes and nanocrystals, respectively. We investigate the photoresponse of both ensembles of hybrid systems and single carbon-nanotube-nanocrystal-hybrids. The data suggest a bolometrically induced increase of the current in the carbon nanotubes, which is due to photon absorption in the nanocrystals.

  6. Flexible and low-voltage integrated circuits constructed from high-performance nanocrystal transistors.

    Kim, David K; Lai, Yuming; Diroll, Benjamin T; Murray, Christopher B; Kagan, Cherie R

    2012-01-01

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals are emerging as a new class of solution-processable materials for low-cost, flexible, thin-film electronics. Although these colloidal inks have been shown to form single, thin-film field-effect transistors with impressive characteristics, the use of multiple high-performance nanocrystal field-effect transistors in large-area integrated circuits has not been shown. This is needed to understand and demonstrate the applicability of these discrete nanocrystal field-effect transistors for advanced electronic technologies. Here we report solution-deposited nanocrystal integrated circuits, showing nanocrystal integrated circuit inverters, amplifiers and ring oscillators, constructed from high-performance, low-voltage, low-hysteresis CdSe nanocrystal field-effect transistors with electron mobilities of up to 22 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), current modulation >10(6) and subthreshold swing of 0.28 V dec(-1). We fabricated the nanocrystal field-effect transistors and nanocrystal integrated circuits from colloidal inks on flexible plastic substrates and scaled the devices to operate at low voltages. We demonstrate that colloidal nanocrystal field-effect transistors can be used as building blocks to construct complex integrated circuits, promising a viable material for low-cost, flexible, large-area electronics.

  7. Stability studies of CdSe nanocrystals in an aqueous environment

    Xi, Lifei; Lek, Jun Yan; Liang, Yen Nan

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, CdSe nanocrystal dissolution in an aqueous solution was studied. It was found that light is a key factor affecting the dissolution of nanocrystals. In the presence of light, the electrons generated from CdSe nanocrystals reduce water to hydrogen and hydroxide ions (OH − ) while photo......-generated holes oxidize CdSe to Cd2 + and elemental Se. The dissolution was accelerated in an acidic medium while moderate alkalinity (pH = 10.3) can slow down the dissolution possibly due to precipitation of nanocrystals. This study has strong implications for the use of these crystals in aqueous environments...

  8. Infrared emitting and photoconducting colloidal silver chalcogenide nanocrystal quantum dots from a silylamide-promoted synthesis.

    Yarema, Maksym; Pichler, Stefan; Sytnyk, Mykhailo; Seyrkammer, Robert; Lechner, Rainer T; Fritz-Popovski, Gerhard; Jarzab, Dorota; Szendrei, Krisztina; Resel, Roland; Korovyanko, Oleksandra; Loi, Maria Antonietta; Paris, Oskar; Hesser, Günter; Heiss, Wolfgang

    2011-05-24

    Here, we present a hot injection synthesis of colloidal Ag chalcogenide nanocrystals (Ag(2)Se, Ag(2)Te, and Ag(2)S) that resulted in exceptionally small nanocrystal sizes in the range between 2 and 4 nm. Ag chalcogenide nanocrystals exhibit band gap energies within the near-infrared spectral region, making these materials promising as environmentally benign alternatives to established infrared active nanocrystals containing toxic metals such as Hg, Cd, and Pb. We present Ag(2)Se nanocrystals in detail, giving size-tunable luminescence with quantum yields above 1.7%. The luminescence, with a decay time on the order of 130 ns, was shown to improve due to the growth of a monolayer thick ZnSe shell. Photoconductivity with a quantum efficiency of 27% was achieved by blending the Ag(2)Se nanocrystals with a soluble fullerene derivative. The co-injection of lithium silylamide was found to be crucial to the synthesis of Ag chalcogenide nanocrystals, which drastically increased their nucleation rate even at relatively low growth temperatures. Because the same observation was made for the nucleation of Cd chalcogenide nanocrystals, we conclude that the addition of lithium silylamide might generally promote wet-chemical synthesis of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals, including in as-yet unexplored materials.

  9. Improved oral bioavailability for lutein by nanocrystal technology: formulation development, in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    Chang, Daoxiao; Ma, Yanni; Cao, Guoyu; Wang, Jianhuan; Zhang, Xia; Feng, Jun; Wang, Wenping

    2018-08-01

    Lutein is a kind of natural carotenoids possessing many pharmacological effects. The application of lutein was limited mainly due to its low oral bioavailability caused by poor aqueous solubility. Nanocrystal formulation of lutein was developed to improve the oral bioavailability in this study. The nanosuspension was prepared by the anti-solvent precipitation-ultrasonication method and optimized by Box-Behnken design, followed by freeze-drying to obtain lutein nanocrystals. The nanocrystals were characterized on their physical properties, in vitro dissolution and in vivo absorption performance. Lutein nanocrystals showed as tiny spheres with an average particle size of 110.7 nm. The result of diffractograms indicated that the percent crystallinity of lutein was 89.4% in coarse powder and then declined in nanocrystal formulation. The saturated solubility of lutein in water increased from 7.3 μg/ml for coarse powder up to 215.7 μg/ml for lutein nanocrystals. The dissolution rate of lutein nanocrystals was significantly higher than that of coarse powder or the physical mixture. The C max and AUC 0-24 h of lutein nanocrystals after oral administration in rats was 3.24 and 2.28 times higher than those of lutein suspension, respectively. These results indicated that the nanocrystal formulation could significantly enhance the dissolution and absorption of lutein and might be a promising approach for improving its oral bioavailability.

  10. Structure/Processing Relationships of Highly Ordered Lead Salt Nanocrystal Superlattices

    Hanrath, Tobias

    2009-10-27

    We investigated the influence of processing conditions, nanocrystal/substrate interactions and solvent evaporation rate on the ordering of strongly interacting nanocrystals by synergistically combining electron microscopy and synchrotron-based small-angle X-ray scattering analysis. Spin-cast PbSe nanocrystal films exhibited submicrometer-sized supracrystals with face-centered cubic symmetry and (001)s planes aligned parallel to the substrate. The ordering of drop-cast lead salt nanocrystal films was sensitive to the nature of the substrate and solvent evaporation dynamics. Nanocrystal films drop-cast on rough indium tin oxide substrates were polycrystalline with small grain size and low degree of orientation with respect to the substrate, whereas films drop-cast on flat Si substrates formed highly ordered face-centered cubic supracrystals with close-packed (111)s planes parallel to the substrate. The spatial coherence of nanocrystal films drop-cast in the presence of saturated solvent vapor was significantly improved compared to films drop-cast in a dry environment. Solvent vapor annealing was demonstrated as a postdeposition technique to modify the ordering of nanocrystals in the thin film. Octane vapor significantly improved the long-range order and degree of orientation of initially disordered or polycrystalline nanocrystal assemblies. Exposure to 1,2-ethanedithiol vapor caused partial displacement of surface bound oleic acid ligands and drastically degraded the degree of order in the nanocrystal assembly. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  11. Facile synthesis of ultrafine Co3O4 nanocrystals embedded carbon matrices with specific skeletal structures as efficient non-enzymatic glucose sensors

    Li, Mian; Han, Ce; Zhang, Yufan; Bo, Xiangjie; Guo, Liping

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel hyperfine Co 3 O 4 nanocrystals decorated porous carbon matrixes. • Facile synthesis without use of any harmful dispersing reagents or surfactants. • High dispersion degree of Co 3 O 4 nanocrystals and excellent e − transport rates. • A large current sensitivity of 955.9 μA cm −2 mM −1 toward glucose. • Excellent anti-interference and stability for glucose detection. - Abstract: A facile, effective, and environmentally friendly method has been adopted for the first time to prepare tiny Co 3 O 4 nanocrystals embedded carbon matrices without using surfactants, harmful organic reagents or extreme conditions. Structural characterizations reveal that the size-controlled Co 3 O 4 nanocrystals are uniformly dispersed on carbon matrices. Electrochemical measurements reveal that Co 3 O 4 -ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) can more efficiently catalyze glucose oxidation and acquire better detection parameters compared with those for the Co 3 O 4 -macroporous carbon, Co 3 O 4 -reduced graphene oxide, and free Co 3 O 4 nanoparticles (NPs) (such as: the large sensitivity (2597.5 μA cm −2 mM −1 between 0 and 0.8 mM and 955.9 μA cm −2 mM −1 between 0.9 and 7.0 mM), fast response time, wide linear range, good stability, and surpassingly selective capability to electroactive molecules or Cl − ). Such excellent performances are attributed to the synergistic effect of the following three factors: (1) the high catalytic sites provided by the uniformly dispersed and size-controlled Co 3 O 4 nanocrystals embedded on OMC; (2) the excellent reactant transport efficiency caused by the abundant mesoporous structures of OMC matrix: (3) the improved electron transport in high electron transfer rate (confinement of the Co 3 O 4 NPs in nanoscale spaces ensured intimate contact between Co 3 O 4 nanocrystals and the conducting OMC matrix). The superior catalytic activity and selectivity make Co 3 O 4 -OMC very promising for application in direct

  12. Facile synthesis of ultrafine Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocrystals embedded carbon matrices with specific skeletal structures as efficient non-enzymatic glucose sensors

    Li, Mian; Han, Ce; Zhang, Yufan; Bo, Xiangjie, E-mail: baoxj133@nenu.edu.cn; Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp078@nenu.edu.cn

    2015-02-25

    Highlights: • Novel hyperfine Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocrystals decorated porous carbon matrixes. • Facile synthesis without use of any harmful dispersing reagents or surfactants. • High dispersion degree of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocrystals and excellent e{sup −} transport rates. • A large current sensitivity of 955.9 μA cm{sup −2} mM{sup −1} toward glucose. • Excellent anti-interference and stability for glucose detection. - Abstract: A facile, effective, and environmentally friendly method has been adopted for the first time to prepare tiny Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocrystals embedded carbon matrices without using surfactants, harmful organic reagents or extreme conditions. Structural characterizations reveal that the size-controlled Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocrystals are uniformly dispersed on carbon matrices. Electrochemical measurements reveal that Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}-ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) can more efficiently catalyze glucose oxidation and acquire better detection parameters compared with those for the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}-macroporous carbon, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}-reduced graphene oxide, and free Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs) (such as: the large sensitivity (2597.5 μA cm{sup −2} mM{sup −1} between 0 and 0.8 mM and 955.9 μA cm{sup −2} mM{sup −1} between 0.9 and 7.0 mM), fast response time, wide linear range, good stability, and surpassingly selective capability to electroactive molecules or Cl{sup −}). Such excellent performances are attributed to the synergistic effect of the following three factors: (1) the high catalytic sites provided by the uniformly dispersed and size-controlled Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocrystals embedded on OMC; (2) the excellent reactant transport efficiency caused by the abundant mesoporous structures of OMC matrix: (3) the improved electron transport in high electron transfer rate (confinement of the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs in nanoscale spaces ensured intimate contact between Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocrystals and the

  13. High index surfaces of Au-nanocrystals supported on one-dimensional MoO3-nanorod as a bi-functional electrocatalyst for ethanol oxidation and oxygen reduction

    Karuppasamy, L.; Chen, C.Y.; Anandan, S.; Wu, J.J.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •Synthesis of a new class of Au nanocrystals enclosed with high index surface supported on MoO 3 nanorods by ultrasonic probe method. •The role of supporting materials reduces the loading of Au and acts as a co-catalyst. •The as prepared electrocatalyst exhibits enhanced catalytic activity and stability towards both EOR and ORR. -- Abstract: The design of highly active electrocatalyst for ethanol electrooxidation (EOR) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is of great significance for the improvement of efficient direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs). Therefore, creating high index facets nanocrystals with abundant catalytic active sites of stepped atoms is an effective way to enhance the electrocatalytic performance. In this article, we prepared the high index surface structures of Au nanocrystals supported on one-dimensional (1-D) MoO 3 nanorods by using two steps ultrasonic probe irradiation method. The size and physical properties of as electrocatalysts were studied by using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD) instrumentation. Besides, the catalytic activity of as Au-MoO 3 electrocatalyst was determined by using cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometric (CA), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), CO-stripping, and linear sweep voltammetry-rotating disk electrode (LSV-RDE). As a consequence, the Au-MoO 3 nanocomposites has been considered as an effective electrocatalyst for both ethanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reaction.

  14. Integrated microfluidic probe station.

    Perrault, C M; Qasaimeh, M A; Brastaviceanu, T; Anderson, K; Kabakibo, Y; Juncker, D

    2010-11-01

    The microfluidic probe (MFP) consists of a flat, blunt tip with two apertures for the injection and reaspiration of a microjet into a solution--thus hydrodynamically confining the microjet--and is operated atop an inverted microscope that enables live imaging. By scanning across a surface, the microjet can be used for surface processing with the capability of both depositing and removing material; as it operates under immersed conditions, sensitive biological materials and living cells can be processed. During scanning, the MFP is kept immobile and centered over the objective of the inverted microscope, a few micrometers above a substrate that is displaced by moving the microscope stage and that is flushed continuously with the microjet. For consistent and reproducible surface processing, the gap between the MFP and the substrate, the MFP's alignment, the scanning speed, the injection and aspiration flow rates, and the image capture need all to be controlled and synchronized. Here, we present an automated MFP station that integrates all of these functionalities and automates the key operational parameters. A custom software program is used to control an independent motorized Z stage for adjusting the gap, a motorized microscope stage for scanning the substrate, up to 16 syringe pumps for injecting and aspirating fluids, and an inverted fluorescence microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device camera. The parallelism between the MFP and the substrate is adjusted using manual goniometer at the beginning of the experiment. The alignment of the injection and aspiration apertures along the scanning axis is performed using a newly designed MFP screw holder. We illustrate the integrated MFP station by the programmed, automated patterning of fluorescently labeled biotin on a streptavidin-coated surface.

  15. Aircraft Capability Management

    Mumaw, Randy; Feary, Mike

    2018-01-01

    This presentation presents an overview of work performed at NASA Ames Research Center in 2017. The work concerns the analysis of current aircraft system management displays, and the initial development of an interface for providing information about aircraft system status. The new interface proposes a shift away from current aircraft system alerting interfaces that report the status of physical components, and towards displaying the implications of degradations on mission capability. The proposed interface describes these component failures in terms of operational consequences of aircraft system degradations. The research activity was an effort to examine the utility of different representations of complex systems and operating environments to support real-time decision making of off-nominal situations. A specific focus was to develop representations that provide better integrated information to allow pilots to more easily reason about the operational consequences of the off-nominal situations. The work is also seen as a pathway to autonomy, as information is integrated and understood in a form that automated responses could be developed for the off-nominal situations in the future.

  16. Production capability and supply

    Klemenic, J.

    1977-01-01

    The strong market for uranium of recent years is about to usher in a new era in domestic uranium production. The spot market price of uranium has remained relatively stable at a little over $40/lb for more than 18 months. Many of the recent contracts for delivery in the early 1980s are calling for prices in the range of $40 to $65 per lb in year-of-delivery dollars. Low-grade, high-cost projects, such as uranium recovery from mill tailings and the reopening of ''mined-out'' ore bodies, have already been initiated. New underground mines to produce at greater depths, and new surface mines to recover lower grade ores, are being developed or seriously planned. In keeping with this movement to recover uranium from low-grade ore and other high cost materials, the Grand Junction Office has examined, for the first time, the production capability of the domestic industry assuming a $30/lb (or less) ''forward cost'' resource base. As in the past, keep in mind that the market price needed to stimulate full production of a given resource base may be significantly higher than the estimated forward cost of producing that resource. Results of the $30/lb study are presented

  17. Mobile systems capability plan

    1996-09-01

    This plan was prepared to initiate contracting for and deployment of these mobile system services. 102,000 cubic meters of retrievable, contact-handled TRU waste are stored at many sites around the country. Also, an estimated 38,000 cubic meters of TRU waste will be generated in the course of waste inventory workoff and continuing DOE operations. All the defense TRU waste is destined for disposal in WIPP near Carlsbad NM. To ship TRU waste there, sites must first certify that the waste meets WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The waste must be characterized, and if not acceptable, subjected to additional processing, including repackaging. Most sites plan to use existing fixed facilities or open new ones between FY1997-2006 to perform these functions; small-quantity sites lack this capability. An alternative to fixed facilities is the use of mobile systems mounted in trailers or skids, and transported to sites. Mobile systems will be used for all characterization and certification at small sites; large sites can also use them. The Carlsbad Area Office plans to pursue a strategy of privatization of mobile system services, since this offers a number of advantages. To indicate the possible magnitude of the costs of deploying mobile systems, preliminary estimates of equipment, maintenance, and operating costs over a 10-year period were prepared and options for purchase, lease, and privatization through fixed-price contracts considered

  18. Strength capability while kneeling.

    Haslegrave, C M; Tracy, M F; Corlett, E N

    1997-12-01

    Work sometimes has to be carried out kneeling, particularly where jobs are performed in confined spaces as is common for miners, aircraft baggage handlers and maintenance workers. In order to assess the risks in performing forceful tasks under such conditions, data is needed on strength capabilities of kneeling subjects. A study was undertaken to measure isometric strength in single-handed exertions for male subjects and to investigate the effects on this of task layout factors (direction of force exertion, reach distance, height of the workpiece and orientation relative to the subject's sagittal plane). The data has been tabulated to show the degree to which strength may be reduced in different situations and analysis of the task factors showed their influence to be complex with direction of exertion and reach distance having the greatest effect. The results also suggest that exertions are weaker when subjects are kneeling on two knees than when kneeling on one knee, although this needs to be confirmed by direct experimental comparison.

  19. White Emitting ZnS Nanocrystals: Synthesis and Spectrum Characterization

    Qing-Song, Huang; Dong-Qing, Dong; Jian-Ping, Xu; Xiao-Song, Zhang; Hong-Min, Zhang; Lan, Li

    2010-01-01

    Spherical organic-bonded ZnS nanocrystals with 4.0±0.2 nm in diameter are synthesized by a liquid-solid-solution method. The photoluminescence spectrum of sample ([S 2− ]/[Zn 2+ ] = 1.0) shows a strong white emission with a peak at 490 nm and ∼ 170 nm full widths at half maximum. By Gauss fitting, the white emission is attributed to the overlap of a blue emission and a green-yellow emission, originating from electronic transitions from internal S 2− vacancies level to valence band and to the internal Zn 2+ vacancy level, respectively. After sealingZnS nanocrystals onto InGaN chips, the device shows CIE coordinates of (0.29,0.30), which indicates their potential applications for white light emitting diodes

  20. Pyridine-induced Dimensionality Change in Hybrid Perovskite Nanocrystals

    Ahmed, Ghada H.

    2017-05-02

    Engineering the surface energy through careful manipulation of the surface chemistry is a convenient approach to control quantum confinement and structure dimensionality during nanocrystal growth. Here, we demonstrate that the introduction of pyridine during the synthesis of methylammonium lead bromide (MAPbBr) perovskite nanocrystals can transform three-dimensional (3D) cubes into two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that pyridine preferentially binds to Pb atoms terminating the surface, driving the selective 2D growth of the nanostructures. These 2D nanostructures exhibit strong quantum confinement effects, high photoluminescence quantum yields in the visible spectral range, and efficient charge transfer to molecular acceptors. These qualities indicate the suitability of the synthesized 2D nanostructures for a wide range of optoelectronic applications.

  1. Photoluminescent silicon nanocrystals with chlorosilane surfaces - synthesis and reactivity

    Höhlein, Ignaz M. D.; Kehrle, Julian; Purkait, Tapas K.; Veinot, Jonathan G. C.; Rieger, Bernhard

    2014-12-01

    We present a new efficient two-step method to covalently functionalize hydride terminated silicon nanocrystals with nucleophiles. First a reactive chlorosilane layer was formed via diazonium salt initiated hydrosilylation of chlorodimethyl(vinyl)silane which was then reacted with alcohols, silanols and organolithium reagents. With organolithium compounds a side reaction is observed in which a direct functionalization of the silicon surface takes place.We present a new efficient two-step method to covalently functionalize hydride terminated silicon nanocrystals with nucleophiles. First a reactive chlorosilane layer was formed via diazonium salt initiated hydrosilylation of chlorodimethyl(vinyl)silane which was then reacted with alcohols, silanols and organolithium reagents. With organolithium compounds a side reaction is observed in which a direct functionalization of the silicon surface takes place. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental procedures and additional NMR, PL, EDX, DLS and TEM data. See DOI: 10.1039/C4NR05888G

  2. Development of the metrology and imaging of cellulose nanocrystals

    Postek, Michael T; Vladár, András; Dagata, John; Farkas, Natalia; Ming, Bin; Wagner, Ryan; Raman, Arvind; Moon, Robert J; Sabo, Ronald; Wegner, Theodore H; Beecher, James

    2011-01-01

    The development of metrology for nanoparticles is a significant challenge. Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are one group of nanoparticles that have high potential economic value but present substantial challenges to the development of the measurement science. Even the largest trees owe their strength to this newly appreciated class of nanomaterials. Cellulose is the world's most abundant natural, renewable, biodegradable polymer. Cellulose occurs as whisker-like microfibrils that are biosynthesized and deposited in plant material in a continuous fashion. The nanocrystals are isolated by hydrolyzing away the amorphous segments leaving the acid resistant crystalline fragments. Therefore, the basic raw material for new nanomaterial products already abounds in nature and is available to be utilized in an array of future materials. However, commercialization requires the development of efficient manufacturing processes and nanometrology to monitor quality. This paper discusses some of the instrumentation, metrology and standards issues associated with the ramping up for production and use of CNCs

  3. Development of the metrology and imaging of cellulose nanocrystals

    Postek, Michael T.; Vladár, András; Dagata, John; Farkas, Natalia; Ming, Bin; Wagner, Ryan; Raman, Arvind; Moon, Robert J.; Sabo, Ronald; Wegner, Theodore H.; Beecher, James

    2011-02-01

    The development of metrology for nanoparticles is a significant challenge. Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are one group of nanoparticles that have high potential economic value but present substantial challenges to the development of the measurement science. Even the largest trees owe their strength to this newly appreciated class of nanomaterials. Cellulose is the world's most abundant natural, renewable, biodegradable polymer. Cellulose occurs as whisker-like microfibrils that are biosynthesized and deposited in plant material in a continuous fashion. The nanocrystals are isolated by hydrolyzing away the amorphous segments leaving the acid resistant crystalline fragments. Therefore, the basic raw material for new nanomaterial products already abounds in nature and is available to be utilized in an array of future materials. However, commercialization requires the development of efficient manufacturing processes and nanometrology to monitor quality. This paper discusses some of the instrumentation, metrology and standards issues associated with the ramping up for production and use of CNCs.

  4. Nanocrystal synthesis and thin film formation for earth abundant photovoltaics

    Carter, Nathaniel J.

    Providing access to on-demand energy at the global scale is a grand challenge of our time. The fabrication of solar cells from nanocrystal inks comprising earth abundant elements represents a scalable and sustainable photovoltaic technology with the potential to meet the global demand for electricity. Solar cells with Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe) absorber layers are of particular interest due to the high absorption coefficient of CZTSSe, its band gap in the ideal range for efficient photovoltaic power conversion, and the relative abundance of its constituent elements in the earth's crust. Despite the promise of this material system, CZTSSe solar cell efficiencies reported throughout literature have failed to exceed 12.6%, principally due to the low open-circuit voltage (VOC) achieved in these devices compared to the absorber band gap. The work presented herein primarily aims to address the low VOC problem. First, the fundamental cause for such low VOC's is investigated. Interparticle compositional inhomogeneities identified in the synthesized CZTS nanocrystals and their effect on the absorber layer formation and device performance are characterized. Real-time energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXRD) elucidates the role of these inhomogeneities in the mechanism by which a film of CZTS nanocrystals converts into a dense absorber layer comprising micron-sized CZTSSe grains upon annealing in a selenium atmosphere (selenization). Additionally, a direct correlation between the nanocrystal inhomogeneities and the VOC in completed devices is observed. Detailed characterization of CZTSSe solar cells identifies electrical potential fluctuations in the CZTSSe absorber - due to spatial composition variations not unlike those observed in the nanocrystals - as a primary V OC inhibitor. Additional causes for low VOC's in CZTSSe solar cells proposed in the literature involve recombination at the interface between the CZTSSe absorber and: (1) the n-type, CdS buffer layer, or (2) the

  5. Quantum confinement effects on superconducting properties of Lead nanocrystals

    Aubin, Herve; Moreira, Helena; Mahler, Benoit; Dubertret, Benoit

    2008-03-01

    We developed a new chemical synthesis method for producing large quantities of monodispersed lead (Pb) nanocrystals. They are obtained from the alcohol reduction of a mixture of two lead carboxylates with alkyl chains of different lengths, dissolved in a high temperature solvent. The nanocrystals obtained are protected from oxydation and aggregation by long chain fatty acids and their diameter can be tuned to reach values as low as 10 nm. Our results suggest that monodispersed particules are obtained when nucleation and growth occur at distincts temperatures, possibly as a consequence of different reactivities of the two lead carboxylates used in the solution. Owing to the large quantities of monodispersed particles produced, thermodynamics studies as function of particles diameter become possible. In particular, we will present a study of the effect of quantum confinement on superconducting properties of these Pb particles through SQUID magnetometry measurements.

  6. GaAs nanocrystals: Structure and vibrational properties

    Nayak, J.; Sahu, S.N.; Nozaki, S.

    2006-01-01

    GaAs nanocrystals were grown on indium tin oxide substrate by an electrodeposition technique. Atomic force microscopic measurement indicates an increase in the size of the nanocrystal with decrease in the electrolysis current density accompanied by the change in the shape of the crystallite. Transmission electron microscopic measurements identify the crystallite sizes to be in the range of 10-15 nm and the crystal structure to be orthorhombic. On account of the quantum size effect, the first optical transition was blue shifted with respect to the band gap of the bulk GaAs and the excitonic peak appeared prominent. A localized phonon mode ascribed to certain point defect occurred in the room temperature micro-Raman spectrum

  7. Highly phosphorescent hollow fibers inner-coated with tungstate nanocrystals

    Ng, Pui Fai; Bai, Gongxun; Si, Liping; Lee, Ka I.; Hao, Jianhua; Xin, John H.; Fei, Bin

    2017-12-01

    In order to develop luminescent microtubes from natural fibers, a facile biomimetic mineralization method was designed to introduce the CaWO4-based nanocrystals into kapok lumens. The structure, composition, and luminescence properties of resultant fibers were investigated with microscopes, x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, and fluorescence spectrometry. The yield of tungstate crystals inside kapok was significantly promoted with a process at high temperature and pressure—the hydrothermal treatment. The tungstate crystals grown on the inner wall of kapok fibers showed the same crystal structure with those naked powders, but smaller in crystal size. The resultant fiber assemblies demonstrated reduced phosphorescence intensity in comparison to the naked tungstate powders. However, the fibers gave more stable luminescence than the naked powders in wet condition. This approach explored the possibility of decorating natural fibers with high load of nanocrystals, hinting potential applications in anti-counterfeit labels, security textiles, and even flexible and soft optical devices.

  8. Synthesis of Pd-Au bimetallic nanocrystals via controlled overgrowth.

    Lim, Byungkwon; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Yu, Taekyung; Wang, Jinguo; Kim, Moon J; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Rycenga, Matthew; Xia, Younan

    2010-03-03

    This paper describes the synthesis of Pd-Au bimetallic nanocrystals with controlled morphologies via a one-step seeded-growth method. Two different reducing agents, namely, L-ascorbic acid and citric acid, were utilized for the reduction of HAuCl(4) in an aqueous solution to control the overgrowth of Au on cubic Pd seeds. When L-ascorbic acid was used as the reducing agent, conformal overgrowth of Au on the Pd nanocubes led to the formation of Pd-Au nanocrystals with a core-shell structure. On the contrary, localized overgrowth of Au was observed when citric acid was used as the reducing agent, producing Pd-Au bimetallic dimers. Through this morphological control, we were able to tune the localized surface plasmon resonance peaks of Pd-Au bimetallic nanostructures in the visible region.

  9. Licuri fibers characterization after treatment to produce cellulose nanocrystals

    Castro, E.G.; Oliveira, J.C.; Miranda, C.S.; Jose, N.M.

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals have been widely studied in the materials area due to their high aspect ratio, which is directly related to a good performance as mechanical reinforcement. Obtaining this nanocrystals from commercial bleached pulps, as eucalyptus, or microcrystalline cellulose is well studied. Trying to find new extraction sources, exploring better the huge variety of Brazil’s natural fibers and giving the opportunity of development to small communities, the present work verifies the influence of two bleaching methodologies, sodium hypochlorite or hydrogen peroxide, on licuri fibers. Previous washing and mercerization steps were performed before bleaching. The product of each step was analysed by: DSC, TGA, XRD, SEM and FTIR. The yield of each step was also calculated. (author)

  10. Hydroxyapatite nanocrystals: simple preparation, characterization and formation mechanism.

    Mohandes, Fatemeh; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud; Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Fereshteh, Zeinab

    2014-12-01

    Crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanoparticles and nanorods have been successfully synthesized via a simple precipitation method. To control the shape and particle size of HAP nanocrystals, coordination ligands derived from 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde were first prepared, characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR) spectroscopies, and finally applied in the synthesis process of HAP. On the other hand, the HAP nanocrystals were also characterized by several techniques including powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). According to the FE-SEM and TEM micrographs, it was found that the morphology and crystallinity of the HAP powders depended on the coordination mode of the ligands. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals from cattle bones

    Patel, Sangeeta; Wei, Shanghai; Han, Jie; Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    In this present study, hydroxyapatite which was obtained from cattle bones has been heat treated at temperature 400 °C and 600 °C. The microstructure after the treatment has been studied in detail using Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction techniques. The TEM results indicate that natural bone consists of collagen and hydroxyapatite nano-crystals which are needle shaped. The heat treatment influences the crystallinity and growth of these hydroxyapatite nano-crystals known as ‘crystal maturation’ or ‘crystal ageing’. - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite is obtained from cattle bones. • Material has been characterised using XRD and TEM. • Crystal growth and orientation has been studied in detail.

  12. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals from cattle bones

    Patel, Sangeeta, E-mail: spt658@aucklanduni.ac.nz [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, 20 Symonds Street, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand); Wei, Shanghai [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, 20 Symonds Street, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand); Han, Jie [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 205 North Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL (United States); Gao, Wei [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, 20 Symonds Street, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand)

    2015-11-15

    In this present study, hydroxyapatite which was obtained from cattle bones has been heat treated at temperature 400 °C and 600 °C. The microstructure after the treatment has been studied in detail using Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction techniques. The TEM results indicate that natural bone consists of collagen and hydroxyapatite nano-crystals which are needle shaped. The heat treatment influences the crystallinity and growth of these hydroxyapatite nano-crystals known as ‘crystal maturation’ or ‘crystal ageing’. - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite is obtained from cattle bones. • Material has been characterised using XRD and TEM. • Crystal growth and orientation has been studied in detail.

  13. TiO2 Nanoparticles as a Soft X-ray Molecular Probe

    Larabell, Carolyn; Ashcroft, Jared M.; Gu, Weiwei; Zhang, Tierui; Hughes, Steven M.; Hartman, Keith B.; Hofmann, Cristina; Kanaras, Antonios G.; Kilcoyne, David A.; Le Gros, Mark; Yin, Yadong; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2007-06-30

    With the emergence of soft x-ray techniques for imaging cells, there is a pressing need to develop protein localization probes that can be unambiguously identified within the region of x-ray spectrum used for imaging. TiO2 nanocrystal colloids, which have a strong absorption cross-section within the "water-window" region of x-rays, areideally suited as soft x-ray microscopy probes. To demonstrate their efficacy, TiO2-streptavidin nanoconjugates were prepared and subsequently labeled microtubules polymerized from biotinylated tubulin. The microtubules were imaged using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM), and the TiO2 nanoparticle tags were specifically identified using x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). These experiments demonstrate that TiO2 nanoparticles are potential probes for protein localization analyses using soft x-ray microscopy.

  14. Cellulose nanocrystals the next big nano-thing?

    Postek, Michael T.; Vladar, Andras; Dagata, John; Farkas, Natalia; Ming, Bin; Sabo, Ronald; Wegner, Theodore H.; Beecher, James

    2008-08-01

    Biomass surrounds us from the smallest alga to the largest redwood tree. Even the largest trees owe their strength to a newly-appreciated class of nanomaterials known as cellulose nanocrystals (CNC). Cellulose, the world's most abundant natural, renewable, biodegradable polymer, occurs as whisker like microfibrils that are biosynthesized and deposited in plant material in a continuous fashion. Therefore, the basic raw materials for a future of new nanomaterials breakthroughs already abound in the environment and are available to be utilized in an array of future materials once the manufacturing processes and nanometrology are fully developed. This presentation will discuss some of the instrumentation, metrology and standards issues associated with nanomanufacturing of cellulose nanocrystals. The use of lignocellulosic fibers derived from sustainable, annually renewable resources as a reinforcing phase in polymeric matrix composites provides positive environmental benefits with respect to ultimate disposability and raw material use. Today we lack the essential metrology infrastructure that would enable the manufacture of nanotechnology-based products based on CNCs (or other new nanomaterial) to significantly impact the U.S. economy. The basic processes common to manufacturing - qualification of raw materials, continuous synthesis methods, process monitoring and control, in-line and off-line characterization of product for quality control purposes, validation by standard reference materials - are not generally in place for nanotechnology based products, and thus are barriers to innovation. One advantage presented by the study of CNCs is that, unlike other nanomaterials, at least, cellulose nanocrystal manufacturing is already a sustainable and viable bulk process. Literally tons of cellulose nanocrystals can be generated each day, producing other viable byproducts such as glucose (for alternative fuel) and gypsum (for buildings).There is an immediate need for the

  15. Solution-Processed Nanocrystal Quantum Dot Tandem Solar Cells

    Choi, Joshua J.; Wenger, Whitney N.; Hoffman, Rachel S.; Lim, Yee-Fun; Luria, Justin; Jasieniak, Jacek; Marohn, John A.; Hanrath, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Solution-processed tandem solar cells created from nanocrystal quantum dots with size-tuned energy levels are demonstrated. Prototype devices featuring interconnected quantum dot layers of cascaded energy gaps exhibit IR sensitivity and an open circuit voltage, V oc, approaching 1 V. The tandem solar cell performance depends critically on the optical and electrical properties of the interlayer. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Formation of drug nanocrystals under nanoconfinement afforded by liposomes

    Cipolla, D.; Wu, H.; Salentinig, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Nanocrystals of drug substances have important therapeutic applications, but their preparation is often difficult due to size control in bottom up approaches, or energetic milling and surface activation in top down processing. In this study, confinement within liposome nanocompartments is demonst...... physical means (e.g., freeze/thaw) is an attractive possibility, especially in highly regulated industries such as pharmaceuticals where qualitative and quantitative changes of composition would require extensive safety evaluations....

  17. Switching-on quantum size effects in silicon nanocrystals.

    Sun, Wei; Qian, Chenxi; Wang, Liwei; Wei, Muan; Mastronardi, Melanie L; Casillas, Gilberto; Breu, Josef; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2015-01-27

    The size-dependence of the absolute luminescence quantum yield of size-separated silicon nanocrystals reveals a "volcano" behavior, which switches on around 5 nm, peaks at near 3.7-3.9 nm, and decreases thereafter. These three regions respectively define: i) the transition from bulk to strongly quantum confined emissive silicon, ii) increasing confinement enhancing radiative recombination, and iii) increasing contributions favoring non-radiative recombination. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Comparison of silicon nanocrystals prepared by two fundamentally different methods

    Cibulka, Ondřej; Vorkotter, C.; Purkrt, Adam; Holovský, Jakub; Benedikt, J.; Herynková, Kateřina

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, Oct (2016), s. 1-7, č. článku 445. ISSN 1556-276X Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) DAAD-16-18 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : silicon nanocrystals * electrochemical etching * low-pressure plasma * photoluminescence * size distribution * surface passivation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.833, year: 2016

  19. Quantum behavior of terahertz photoconductivity in silicon nanocrystals networks

    Pushkarev, Vladimir; Ostatnický, T.; Němec, Hynek; Chlouba, T.; Trojánek, F.; Malý, P.; Zacharias, M.; Gutsch, S.; Hiller, D.; Kužel, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 12 (2017), s. 1-9, č. článku 125424. ISSN 2469-9950 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-03662S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 607521 - NOTEDEV Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : terahertz spectroscopy * charge transport * silicon nanocrystals * linear response theory Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.836, year: 2016

  20. Direct bandgap silicon: tensile-strained silicon nanocrystals

    Kůsová, Kateřina; Hapala, Prokop; Valenta, J.; Jelínek, Pavel; Cibulka, Ondřej; Ondič, Lukáš; Pelant, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2 (2014), "1300042-1"-"1300042-9" ISSN 2196-7350 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA ČR GPP204/12/P235; GA ČR GAP204/10/0952 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : silicon nanocrystals * badstructure * light emission * direct bandgap * surface capping Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  1. Solution-Processed Nanocrystal Quantum Dot Tandem Solar Cells

    Choi, Joshua J.

    2011-06-03

    Solution-processed tandem solar cells created from nanocrystal quantum dots with size-tuned energy levels are demonstrated. Prototype devices featuring interconnected quantum dot layers of cascaded energy gaps exhibit IR sensitivity and an open circuit voltage, V oc, approaching 1 V. The tandem solar cell performance depends critically on the optical and electrical properties of the interlayer. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Novel use of silicon nanocrystals and nanodiamonds in biology

    Fučíková, A.; Valenta, J.; Pelant, Ivan; Březina, Vítězslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 6 (2009), s. 704-708 ISSN 0366-6352 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC510; GA ČR GA202/07/0818 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521; CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : silicon nanocrystals * nanodiamonds * biocompatibilty * quantum dot Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.791, year: 2009

  3. Electron diffraction, elemental and image analysis of nanocrystals

    Šlouf, Miroslav; Pavlova, Ewa; Hromádková, Jiřina; Králová, Daniela; Tyrpekl, Václav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 16, 2a (2009), s. 33-34 ISSN 1211-5894. [Struktura - Colloquium of Czech and Slovak Crystallographic Association. Hluboká nad Vltavou, 22.06.2009-25.06.2009] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200520704; GA ČR GA203/07/0717 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : TEM * electron diffraction * nanocrystals Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  4. A radiation-tolerant, low-power non-volatile memory based on silicon nanocrystal quantum dots

    Bell, L. D.; Boer, E.; Ostraat, M.; Brongersma, M. L.; Flagan, R. C.; Atwater, H. A.; De Blauwe, J.; Green, M. L.

    2001-01-01

    Nanocrystal nonvolatile floating-gate memories are a good candidate for space applications - initial results suggest they are fast, more reliable and consume less power than conventional floating gate memories. In the nanocrystal based NVM device, charge is not stored on a continuous polysilicon layer (so-called floating gate), but instead on a layer of discrete nanocrystals. Charge injection and storage in dense arrays of silicon nanocrystals in SiO_2 is a critical aspect of the performance ...

  5. Trapping time of excitons in Si nanocrystals embedded in a SiO2 matrix

    de Jong, E. M. L. D.; de Boer, W. D. A. M.; Yassievich, I. N.; Gregorkiewicz, T.

    2017-05-01

    Silicon (Si) nanocrystals (NCs) are of great interest for many applications, ranging from photovoltaics to optoelectonics. The photoluminescence quantum yield of Si NCs dispersed in SiO2 is limited, suggesting the existence of very efficient processes of nonradiative recombination, among which the formation of a self-trapped exciton state on the surface of the NC. In order to improve the external quantum efficiency of these systems, the carrier relaxation and recombination need to be understood more thoroughly. For that purpose, we perform transient-induced absorption spectroscopy on Si NCs embedded in a SiO2 matrix over a broad probe range for NCs of average sizes from 2.5 to 5.5 nm. The self-trapping of free excitons on surface-related states is experimentally and theoretically discussed and found to be dependent on the NC size. These results offer more insight into the self-trapped exciton state and are important to increase the optical performance of Si NCs.

  6. Bi-continuous Multi-component Nanocrystal Superlattices for Solar Energy Conversion

    Kagan, Cherie [University of Pennsylvania; Murray, Christopher [University of Pennsylvania; Kikkawa, James [University of Pennsylvania; Engheta, Nader [University of Pennsylvania

    2017-06-14

    Our SISGR program studied an emerging class of nanomaterials wherein different combinations of semiconductor or semiconductor and plasmonic nanocrystals (NCs) are self-assembled into three-dimensional multi-component superlattices. The NC assemblies were designed to form bicontinuous semiconductor NC sublattices with type-II energy offsets to drive charge separation onto electron and hole transporting sublattices for collection and introduce plasmonic NCs to increase solar absorption and charge separation. Our group is expert in synthesizing and assembling an extraordinary variety of artificial systems by tailoring the NC building blocks and the superlattice unit cell geometry. Under this DOE BES Materials Chemistry program, we introduced chemical methods to control inter-particle distance and to dope NC assemblies, which enabled our demonstration of strong electronic communication between NCs and the use of NC thin films as electronic materials. We synthesized, assembled and structurally, spectroscopically, and electrically probed NC superlattices to understand and manipulate the flow of energy and charge toward discovering the design rules and optimizing these complex architectures to create materials that efficiently convert solar radiation into electricity.

  7. X-Ray Absorption Studies of Vanadium-Containing Metal Oxide Nanocrystals

    Hohn, Keith, L.

    2006-01-09

    Metal oxide nanocrystals offer significant potential for use as catalysts or catalyst supports due to their high surface areas and unique chemical properties that result from the high number of exposed corners and edges. However, little is known about the catalytic activity of these materials, especially as oxidation catalysts. This research focused on the preparation, characterization and use of vanadium-containing nanocrystals as selective oxidation catalysts. Three vanadium-containing nanocrystals were prepared using a modified sol-gel procedure: V/MgO, V/SiO2, and vanadium phosphate (VPO). These represent active oxidation catalysts for a number of industrially relevant reactions. The catalysts were characterized by x-ray diffraction and Raman, UV-VIS, infrared and x-ray absorption spectroscopies with the goal of determining the primary structural and chemical differences between nanocrystals and microcrystals. The catalytic activity of these catalysts was also studied in oxidative dehydrogenation of butane and methanol oxidation to formaldehyde. V/MgO nanocrystals were investigated for activity in oxidative dehydrogenation of butane and compared to conventional V/MgO catalysts. Characterization of V/MgO catalysts using Raman spectroscopy and x-ray absorption spectroscopy showed that both types of catalysts contained magnesium orthovanadate at vanadium loadings below 15 weight%, but above that loading, magnesium pyrovanadate may have been present. In general, MgO nanocrystals had roughly half the crystal size and double the surface area of the conventional MgO. In oxidative dehydrogenation of butane, nanocrystalline V/MgO gave higher selectivity to butene than conventional V/MgO at the same conversion. This difference was attributed to differences in vanadium domain size resulting from the higher surface areas of the nanocrystalline support, since characterization suggested that similar vanadium phases were present on both types of catalysts. Experiments in

  8. Microstructure, thermal properties and crystallinity of amadumbe starch nanocrystals.

    Mukurumbira, Agnes; Mariano, Marcos; Dufresne, Alain; Mellem, John J; Amonsou, Eric O

    2017-09-01

    Amadumbe (Colocasia esculenta), commonly known as taro is a tropical tuber that produces starch-rich underground corms. In this study, the physicochemical properties of starch nanocrystals (SNC) prepared by acid hydrolysis of amadumbe starches were investigated. Two varieties of amadumbe corms were used for starch extraction. Amadumbe starches produced substantially high yield (25%) of SNC's. These nanocrystals appeared as aggregated and individual particles and possessed square-like platelet morphology with size: 50-100nm. FTIR revealed high peak intensities corresponding to OH stretch, CH stretch and H 2 O bending vibrations for SNCs compared to their native starch counterparts. Both the native starch and SNC exhibited the A-type crystalline pattern. However, amadumbe SNCs showed higher degree of crystallinity and slightly reduced melting temperatures than their native starches. Amadumbe SNCs presented similar thermal decomposition property as their native starches. Amadumbe starch nanocrystals may have potential application in biocomposite films due to their square-like platelet morphology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Plasmon-induced carrier polarization in semiconductor nanocrystals

    Yin, Penghui; Tan, Yi; Fang, Hanbing; Hegde, Manu; Radovanovic, Pavle V.

    2018-06-01

    Spintronics1 and valleytronics2 are emerging quantum electronic technologies that rely on using electron spin and multiple extrema of the band structure (valleys), respectively, as additional degrees of freedom. There are also collective properties of electrons in semiconductor nanostructures that potentially could be exploited in multifunctional quantum devices. Specifically, plasmonic semiconductor nanocrystals3-10 offer an opportunity for interface-free coupling between a plasmon and an exciton. However, plasmon-exciton coupling in single-phase semiconductor nanocrystals remains challenging because confined plasmon oscillations are generally not resonant with excitonic transitions. Here, we demonstrate a robust electron polarization in degenerately doped In2O3 nanocrystals, enabled by non-resonant coupling of cyclotron magnetoplasmonic modes11 with the exciton at the Fermi level. Using magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy, we show that intrinsic plasmon-exciton coupling allows for the indirect excitation of the magnetoplasmonic modes, and subsequent Zeeman splitting of the excitonic states. Splitting of the band states and selective carrier polarization can be manipulated further by spin-orbit coupling. Our results effectively open up the field of plasmontronics, which involves the phenomena that arise from intrinsic plasmon-exciton and plasmon-spin interactions. Furthermore, the dynamic control of carrier polarization is readily achieved at room temperature, which allows us to harness the magnetoplasmonic mode as a new degree of freedom in practical photonic, optoelectronic and quantum-information processing devices.

  10. Spectral diffusion of quasi localized excitons in single silicon nanocrystals

    Martin, Joerg; Cichos, Frank [Centre for nanostructured Materials and Analytics, Institute of Physics, Chemnitz University of Technology, Reichenhainer Street 70, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Borczyskowski, Christian von, E-mail: Borczyskowski@physik.tu-chemnitz.de [Centre for nanostructured Materials and Analytics, Institute of Physics, Chemnitz University of Technology, Reichenhainer Street 70, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    Evolution in time of photoluminescence spectra of SiO{sub x} capped single silicon nanocrystals has been investigated by means of confocal optical spectroscopy at room temperature. Large spectral jumps between subsequent spectra of up to 40 meV have been detected leading to noticeable line broadening and variation in the electron-phonon coupling. Further, a correlation between emission energy and emission intensity has been found and discussed in terms of an intrinsic Stark effect. Anti-correlated variations of the electron-phonon coupling to Si and SiO{sub 2} phonons as a function of photoluminescence energy indicate that the nearly localized excition is to some extent coupled to phonons in the shell covering the silicon nanocrystal. However, coupling is reduced upon increasing Stark effect, while at the same time coupling to phonons of the Si core increases. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single silicon nanocrystals are detected via confocal microscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoluminescence energies fluctuate strongly in time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spectral fluctuation is described in the form of spectral diffusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic processes are strongly controlled by electron-phonon coupling.

  11. Advanced Branching Control and Characterization of Inorganic Semiconducting Nanocrystals

    Hughes, Steven Michael [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The ability to finely tune the size and shape of inorganic semiconducting nanocrystals is an area of great interest, as the more control one has, the more applications will be possible for their use. The first two basic shapes develped in nanocrystals were the sphere and the anistropic nanorod. the II_VI materials being used such as Cadmium Selenide (CdSe) and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), exhibit polytypism, which allows them to form in either the hexagonally packed wurtzite or cubically packed zinc blende crystalline phase. The nanorods are wurtzite with the length of the rod growing along the c-axis. As this grows, stacking faults may form, which are layers of zinc blende in the otherwise wurtzite crystal. Using this polytypism, though, the first generation of branched crystals were developed in the form of the CdTe tetrapod. This is a nanocrystal that nucleates in the zincblend form, creating a tetrahedral core, on which four wurtzite arms are grown. This structure opened up the possibility of even more complex shapes and applications. This disseration investigates the advancement of branching control and further understanding the materials polytypism in the form of the stacking faults in nanorods.

  12. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    Liu, Haitao [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-05-17

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience andnanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis andapplication of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based onhigh temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has becomeone of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidalnanocrystals. This methodis first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkersin 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and laterextended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well asanisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod.This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystalsynthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied bycharacterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and productsand following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on theseresults, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction betweenthe precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth ofnanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theorycalculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursordecomposition and monomerformation pathway. Based on the proposedreaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses wateras a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSeand CdS nanorods.

  13. Adsorption and spectroscopic characterization of lactoferrin on hydroxyapatite nanocrystals.

    Iafisco, Michele; Di Foggia, Michele; Bonora, Sergio; Prat, Maria; Roveri, Norberto

    2011-01-28

    Lactoferrin (LF), a well-characterized protein of blood plasma and milk with antioxidant, cariostatic, anticarcinogenic and anti-inflammatory properties, has been adsorbed onto biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HA) nanocrystals at two different pH values (7.4 and 9.0). The interaction was herein investigated by spectroscopic, thermal and microscopic techniques. The positive electrostatic surface potential of LF at pH 7.4 allows a strong surface interaction with the slightly negative HA nanocrystals and avoids the protein-protein interaction, leading to the formation of a coating protein monolayer. In contrast, at pH 9.0 the surface potential of LF is a mix of negative and positive zones favouring the protein-protein interaction and reducing the interaction with HA nanocrystals; as a result a double layer of coating protein was formed. These experimental findings are supported by the good fittings of the adsorption isotherms by different theoretical models according to Langmuir, Freundlich and Langmuir-Freundlich models. The nanosized HA does not appreciably affect the conformation of the adsorbed protein. In fact, using FT-Raman and FT-IR, we found that after adsorption the protein was only slightly unfolded with a small fraction of the α-helix structure being converted into turn, while the β-sheet content remained almost unchanged. The bioactive surface of HA functionalized with LF could be utilized to improve the material performance towards the biological environment for biomedical applications.

  14. Zero-reabsorption doped-nanocrystal luminescent solar concentrators.

    Erickson, Christian S; Bradshaw, Liam R; McDowall, Stephen; Gilbertson, John D; Gamelin, Daniel R; Patrick, David L

    2014-04-22

    Optical concentration can lower the cost of solar energy conversion by reducing photovoltaic cell area and increasing photovoltaic efficiency. Luminescent solar concentrators offer an attractive approach to combined spectral and spatial concentration of both specular and diffuse light without tracking, but they have been plagued by luminophore self-absorption losses when employed on practical size scales. Here, we introduce doped semiconductor nanocrystals as a new class of phosphors for use in luminescent solar concentrators. In proof-of-concept experiments, visibly transparent, ultraviolet-selective luminescent solar concentrators have been prepared using colloidal Mn(2+)-doped ZnSe nanocrystals that show no luminescence reabsorption. Optical quantum efficiencies of 37% are measured, yielding a maximum projected energy concentration of ∼6× and flux gain for a-Si photovoltaics of 15.6 in the large-area limit, for the first time bounded not by luminophore self-absorption but by the transparency of the waveguide itself. Future directions in the use of colloidal doped nanocrystals as robust, processable spectrum-shifting phosphors for luminescent solar concentration on the large scales required for practical application of this technology are discussed.

  15. Engineering Plasmonic Nanocrystal Coupling through Template-Assisted Self-Assembly

    Greybush, Nicholas J.

    The construction of materials from nanocrystal building blocks represents a powerful new paradigm for materials design. Just as nature's materials orchestrate intricate combinations of atoms from the library of the periodic table, nanocrystal "metamaterials" integrate individual nanocrystals into larger architectures with emergent collective properties. The individual nanocrystal "meta-atoms" that make up these materials are themselves each a nanoscale atomic system with tailorable size, shape, and elemental composition, enabling the creation of hierarchical materials with predesigned structure at multiple length scales. However, an improved fundamental understanding of the interactions among individual nanocrystals is needed in order to translate this structural control into enhanced functionality. The ability to form precise arrangements of nanocrystals and measure their collective properties is therefore essential for the continued development of nanocrystal metamaterials. In this dissertation, we utilize template-assisted self-assembly and spatially-resolved spectroscopy to form and characterize individual nanocrystal oligomers. At the intersection of "top-down" and "bottom-up" nanoscale patterning schemes, template-assisted self-assembly combines the design freedom of lithography with the chemical control of colloidal synthesis to achieve unique nanocrystal configurations. Here, we employ shape-selective templates to assemble new plasmonic structures, including heterodimers of Au nanorods and upconversion phosphors, a series of hexagonally-packed Au nanocrystal oligomers, and triangular formations of Au nanorods. Through experimental analysis and numerical simulation, we elucidate the means through which inter-nanocrystal coupling imparts collective optical properties to the plasmonic assemblies. Our self-assembly and measurement strategy offers a versatile platform for exploring optical interactions in a wide range of material systems and application areas.

  16. Probe tests microweld strength

    1965-01-01

    Probe is developed to test strength of soldered, brazed or microwelded joints. It consists of a spring which may be adjusted to the desired test pressure by means of a threaded probe head, and an indicator lamp. Device may be used for electronic equipment testing.

  17. Sandia Laboratories technical capabilities. Auxiliary capabilities: environmental health information science

    1975-09-01

    Sandia Laboratories is an engineering laboratory in which research, development, testing, and evaluation capabilities are integrated by program management for the generation of advanced designs. In fulfilling its primary responsibility to ERDA, Sandia Laboratories has acquired extensive research and development capabilities. The purpose of this series of documents is to catalog the many technical capabilities of the Laboratories. After the listing of capabilities, supporting information is provided in the form of highlights, which show applications. This document deals with auxiliary capabilities, in particular, environmental health and information science. (11 figures, 1 table) (RWR)

  18. Connecting the dots : shedding light on the self-assembly of semiconductor nanocrystals with synchrotron X-ray scattering techniques

    Geuchies, J.J.

    2017-01-01

    We studied the formation of two-dimensional crystals from nanocrystals using X-ray scattering techniques. Inside these nanocrystals, with sizes between 5-10 nm, the atoms are ordered in an atomic lattice. We use the nanocrystals as building blocks to create larger lattices in two dimensions. By

  19. Surface interaction forces of cellulose nanocrystals grafted with thermoresponsive polymer brushes.

    Zoppe, Justin O; Osterberg, Monika; Venditti, Richard A; Laine, Janne; Rojas, Orlando J

    2011-07-11

    The colloidal stability and thermoresponsive behavior of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) brushes grafted from cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) of varying graft densities and molecular weights was investigated. Indication of the grafted polymer brushes was obtained after AFM imaging of CNCs adsorbed on silica. Also, aggregation of the nanoparticles carrying grafts of high degree of polymerization was observed. The responsiveness of grafted CNCs in aqueous dispersions and as an ultrathin film was evaluated by using light scattering, viscosimetry, and colloidal probe microscopy (CPM). Light transmittance measurements showed temperature-dependent aggregation originating from the different graft densities and molecular weights. The lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of grafted poly(NiPAAm) brushes was found to decrease with the ionic strength, as is the case for free poly(NiPAAm) in aqueous solution. Thermal responsive behavior of grafted CNCs in aqueous dispersions was observed by a sharp increase in dispersion viscosity as the temperature approached the LCST. CPM in liquid media for asymmetric systems consisting of ultrathin films of CNCs and a colloidal silica probe showed the distinctive effects of the grafted polymer brushes on interaction and adhesive forces. The origin of such forces was found to be mainly electrostatic and steric in the case of bare and grafted CNCs, respectively. A decrease in the onset of attractive and adhesion forces of grafted CNCs films were observed with the ionic strength of the aqueous solution. The decreased mobility of polymer brushes upon partial collapse and decreased availability of hydrogen bonding sites with higher electrolyte concentration were hypothesized as the main reasons for the less prominent polymer bridging between interacting surfaces.

  20. Sandia Laboratories technical capabilities: testing

    Lundergan, C.D.

    1975-12-01

    The testing capabilities at Sandia Laboratories are characterized. Selected applications of these capabilities are presented to illustrate the extent to which they can be applied in research and development programs

  1. Sandia Laboratories technical capabilities: electronics

    Lundergan, C.D.

    1975-12-01

    This report characterizes the electronics capabilities at Sandia Laboratories. Selected applications of these capabilities are presented to illustrate the extent to which they can be applied in research and development programs

  2. Structural Capability of an Organization toward Innovation Capability

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Momeni, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    The scholars in the field of strategic management have developed two major approaches for attainment of competitive advantage: an approach based on environmental opportunities, and another one based on internal capabilities of an organization. Some investigations in the last two decades have...... indicated that the advantages relying on the internal capabilities of organizations may determine the competitive position of organizations better than environmental opportunities do. Characteristics of firms shows that one of the most internal capabilities that lead the organizations to the strongest...... competitive advantage in the organizations is the innovation capability. The innovation capability is associated with other organizational capabilities, and many organizations have focused on the need to identify innovation capabilities.This research focuses on recognition of the structural aspect...

  3. Probes for edge plasma studies of TFTR (invited)

    Manos, D.M.; Budny, R.V.; Kilpatrick, S.; Stangeby, P.; Zweben, S.

    1986-01-01

    Tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) probes are designed to study the interaction of the plasma with material surfaces such as the wall and limiters, and to study the transport of particles and energy between the core and edge. Present probe heads have evolved from prototypes in Princeton large torus (PLT), poloidal divertor experiment (PDX) [Princeton BETA experiment (PBX)], and the initial phase of TFTR operation. The newest heads are capable of making several simultaneous measurements and include Langmuir probes, heat flux probes, magnetic coils, rotating calorimeter fast ion probes, and sample exposure specimens. This paper describes these probe heads and presents some of the data they and their prototypes have acquired. The paper emphasizes measurement of transient plasma effects such as fast ion loss during auxiliary heating, the evolution of the edge plasma during heating, compression, and free expansion, and fluctuations in the edge plasma

  4. The Capability to Hold Property

    Claassen, Rutger

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the question of whether a capability theory of justice (such as that of Martha Nussbaum) should accept a basic “capability to hold property.” Answering this question is vital for bridging the gap between abstract capability theories of justice and their institutional

  5. Phase diagrams of ferroelectric nanocrystals strained by an elastic matrix

    Nikitchenko, A. I.; Azovtsev, A. V.; Pertsev, N. A.

    2018-01-01

    Ferroelectric crystallites embedded into a dielectric matrix experience temperature-dependent elastic strains caused by differences in the thermal expansion of the crystallites and the matrix. Owing to the electrostriction, these lattice strains may affect polarization states of ferroelectric inclusions significantly, making them different from those of a stress-free bulk crystal. Here, using a nonlinear thermodynamic theory, we study the mechanical effect of elastic matrix on the phase states of embedded single-domain ferroelectric nanocrystals. Their equilibrium polarization states are determined by minimizing a special thermodynamic potential that describes the energetics of an ellipsoidal ferroelectric inclusion surrounded by a linear elastic medium. To demonstrate the stability ranges of such states for a given material combination, we construct a phase diagram, where the inclusion’s shape anisotropy and temperature are used as two parameters. The ‘shape-temperature’ phase diagrams are calculated numerically for PbTiO3 and BaTiO3 nanocrystals embedded into representative dielectric matrices generating tensile (silica glass) or compressive (potassium silicate glass) thermal stresses inside ferroelectric inclusions. The developed phase maps demonstrate that the joint effect of thermal stresses and matrix-induced elastic clamping of ferroelectric inclusions gives rise to several important features in the polarization behavior of PbTiO3 and BaTiO3 nanocrystals. In particular, the Curie temperature displays a nonmonotonic variation with the ellipsoid’s aspect ratio, being minimal for spherical inclusions. Furthermore, the diagrams show that the polarization orientation with respect to the ellipsoid’s symmetry axis is controlled by the shape anisotropy and the sign of thermal stresses. Under certain conditions, the mechanical inclusion-matrix interaction qualitatively alters the evolution of ferroelectric states on cooling, inducing a structural transition

  6. Storage of optical excitations in colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals

    Kraus, Robert

    2009-01-01

    In the present theis it is described, how colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals can be used under influence of an electric field to store optical excitation energy at room temperature, to alter, and to supply controlledly. For this the photoluminescence emission of an ensemble of heterogeneous nanocrystals was manipulated and spectroscopically studied. The applied od-shaped particles consist of a spherical core of CdSe, on which an elongated shell of CdS is monocrystallinely be grown. The electron is in such an asymmetric geometry delocalized over the hole nanorod, whereas the hole because of the high potential barrier remains bound in the CdSe core. The wave-function overlap of the charge carriers can therefore be influenced both by the length of the nanorod and by an external electric field. In the regime of prompt fluorescence the manipulation of the charge-carrier separation by an electric field led to a suppression of the radiative recombination. As consequence a fluorescence suppression of about 40% could be observed. After the removal of the electric field the separation was reduced and the stored energy is in an fluorescence increasement directedly liberated again. The strength of the storage efficiency lies with the strength of the electric field in a linear connection. Furthermore in this time range a quantum-confined Stark effect of upt o 14 meV could be detected at room temperature, although the effect is complicated by the different orientations and sizes of the nanorods in the ensemble. Hereby it is of advance to can adress with the applied detection technique a subensemble of nanocrystals. Furthermore a significant storage of the ensmble emission by up to 100 μs conditioned by the electric electric fieldcould be demonstrated, which exceeds the fluorescence lifetime of these particles by the 10 5 fold. As also could be shown by experiments on CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals surface states play a relevent role for the emission dynamics of nanocrystals. The

  7. Octacosanol educes physico-chemical attributes, release and bioavailability as modified nanocrystals.

    Sen Gupta, Surashree; Ghosh, Mahua

    2017-10-01

    Octacosanol is a lesser known nutraceutical with the potential for treatment of several inflammatory diseases, high cholesterol, Parkinson's symptoms and tumour growth along with the capacity to improve athletic performance. But its lipophilicity and large structure inhibits extended solubility in water resulting in poor absorption and a low bioavailability. In the present work, sodium salt of octacosyl sulfate was synthesized. It displayed improved water solubility. Its nanocrystals, synthesized by means of nanoprecipitation technique, enhanced diffusion velocity, antioxidant capacity, shelf-life, penetrability and bioavailability. Particle size of the nanocrystals ranged between 197 and 220nm. Both modified octacosanol and its nanocrystals displayed maximum lipid peroxidation activities at a concentration 1000ppm, but nanocrystals demonstrated higher prevention. From freeze-thaw cycles it was evident that normal octacosanol crystals were far more prone to temperature variations than the nanocrystals. A pronounced increase in release/diffusion rate and bioavailability was observed for the nanocrystals of the modified octacosanol. In vitro release kinetics, bioavailability and bioequivalence were studied. Relative bioavailability for gastric passage and pancreatic passage of nanocrystals was 2.58 times and 1.81 times that of normal crystals respectively. Furthermore the nanocrystals displayed a superior in vitro release rate, while following a non-Fickian mode. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Synthesis of Semiconductor Nanocrystals, Focusing on Nontoxic and Earth-Abundant Materials

    Reiss, Peter; Carrière, Marie; Lincheneau, Christophe; Vaure, Louis; Tamang, Sudarsan

    2016-01-01

    We review the synthesis of semiconductor nanocrystals/colloidal quantum dots in organic solvents with special emphasis on earth-abundant and toxic heavy metal free compounds. Following the Introduction, section 2 defines the terms related to the toxicity of nanocrystals and gives a comprehensive

  9. Inorganic nanocrystals as contrast agents in MRI:synthesis, coating and introducing multifunctionality

    Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2013-01-01

    Inorganic nanocrystals have myriad applications in medicine, which includes their use as drug or gene delivery complexes, therapeutic hyperthermia agents, in diagnostic systems and as contrast agents in a wide range of medical imaging techniques. For MRI, nanocrystals can produce contrast themselves, of which iron oxides have been most extensively explored, or be given a coating that generates MR contrast, for example gold nanoparticles coated with gadolinium chelates. These MR-active nanocrystals can be used in imaging of the vasculature, liver and other organs, as well as molecular imaging, cell tracking and theranostics. Due to these exciting applications, synthesizing and rendering these nanocrystals water-soluble and biocompatible is therefore highly desirable. We will discuss aqueous phase and organic phase methods for synthesizing inorganic nanocrystals such as gold, iron oxides and quantum dots. The pros and cons of the various methods will be highlighted. We explore various methods for making nanocrystals biocompatible, i.e. directly synthesizing nanocrystals coated with biocompatible coatings, ligand substitution, amphiphile coating and embedding in carrier matrices that can be made biocompatible. Various examples will be highlighted and their applications explained. These examples signify that synthesizing biocompatible nanocrystals with controlled properties has been achieved by numerous research groups and can be applied for a wide range of applications. Therefore we expect to see reports of preclinical applications of ever more complex MRI-active nanoparticles and their wider exploitation, as well as in novel clinical settings. PMID:23303729

  10. Assembly of Ge nanocrystals on SiO2 via a stress-induced dewetting process

    Sutter, E; Sutter, P

    2006-01-01

    We use epitaxial Ge islands on silicon-on-insulator (001) to initiate and drive the dewetting of the ultrathin ( 2 layer and transforms the Ge islands into oxide-supported, electrically isolated, Ge-rich nanocrystals. We investigate the process of dewetting and demonstrate that it can be used for the controlled assembly of nanocrystals-from isolated single ones to dense arrays

  11. Reversible modulation of CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocrystal/gold nanoparticle heterostructures.

    Chen, Shanshan; Lyu, Danya; Ling, Tao; Guo, Weiwei

    2018-04-19

    A facile strategy is illustrated to reversibly modulate CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocrystal/Au nanoparticle heterostructures with the reversible formation and fragmentation of gold nanoparticles anchored to the corners and surface of CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocrystals. The modulation process was performed under ambient conditions and could be conducted for cycles.

  12. Changes of the absorption cross section of Si nanocrystals with temperature and distance

    Greben, M.; Khoroshyy, Petro; Gutsch, S.; Hiller, D.; Zacharias, M.; Valenta, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, Nov 6 (2017), s. 2315-2323 ISSN 2190-4286 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : absorption cross section * average lifetime * nanocrystal distance * photoluminescence decay * silicon nanocrystals Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 3.127, year: 2016 https://www.beilstein-journals.org/bjnano/articles/8/231

  13. Origin of low quantum efficiency of photoluminescence of InP/ZnS nanocrystals

    Shirazi, Roza; Kovacs, Andras; Corell, Dennis Dan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we study the origin of a strong wavelength dependence of the quantum efficiency of InP/ZnS nanocrystals. We find that while the average size of the nanocrystals increased by 50%, resulting in longer emission wavelength, the quantum efficiency drops more than one order of magnitude...

  14. Origin of low quantum efficiency of photoluminescence of InP/ZnS nanocrystals

    Shirazi, Roza, E-mail: rozas@fotonik.dtu.dk [Department of Photonics Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Oersted Plads 343, 2800 Kgs Lyngby (Denmark); Kovacs, Andras [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Peter Grunberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Julich, 52425 Julich (Germany); Dan Corell, Dennis [Department of Photonics Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Riso, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Gritti, Claudia [Department of Photonics Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Oersted Plads 343, 2800 Kgs Lyngby (Denmark); Thorseth, Anders; Dam-Hansen, Carsten; Michael Petersen, Paul [Department of Photonics Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Riso, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Kardynal, Beata [Department of Photonics Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Oersted Plads 343, 2800 Kgs Lyngby (Denmark); PGI-9, Forschungszentrum Julich, JARA FIT, 52425 Julich (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    In this paper, we study the origin of a strong wavelength dependence of the quantum efficiency of InP/ZnS nanocrystals. We find that while the average size of the nanocrystals increased by 50%, resulting in longer emission wavelength, the quantum efficiency drops more than one order of magnitude compared to the quantum efficiency of the small nanocrystals. By correlating this result with the time-resolved photoluminescence we find that the reduced photoluminescence efficiency is caused by a fast growing fraction of non-emissive nanocrystals while the quality of the nanocrystals that emit light is similar for all samples. Transmission electron microscopy reveals the polycrystalline nature of many of the large nanocrystals, pointing to the grain boundaries as one possible site for the photoluminescence quenching defects. -- Highlights: • We investigate drop of quantum efficiency of InP/ZnS nanocrystals emitting at longer wavelengths. • We correlate quantum efficiency measurements with time-resolved carrier dynamics. • We find that only a small fraction of larger nanocrystals is optically active.

  15. Mega-electron-volt ion beam induced anisotropic plasmon resonance of silver nanocrystals in glass

    Penninkhof, JJ; Polman, A; Sweatlock, LA; Maier, SA; Atwater, HA; Vredenberg, AM; Kooi, BJ; Sweatlock, Luke A.; Maier, Stefan A.

    2003-01-01

    30 MeV Si ion beam irradiation of silica glass containing Ag nanocrystals causes alignment of Ag nanocrystals in arrays along the ion tracks. Optical transmission measurements show a large splitting of the surface plasmon resonance bands for polarizations longitudinal and transversal to the arrays.

  16. Origin of low quantum efficiency of photoluminescence of InP/ZnS nanocrystals

    Shirazi, Roza; Kovacs, Andras; Dan Corell, Dennis; Gritti, Claudia; Thorseth, Anders; Dam-Hansen, Carsten; Michael Petersen, Paul; Kardynal, Beata

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study the origin of a strong wavelength dependence of the quantum efficiency of InP/ZnS nanocrystals. We find that while the average size of the nanocrystals increased by 50%, resulting in longer emission wavelength, the quantum efficiency drops more than one order of magnitude compared to the quantum efficiency of the small nanocrystals. By correlating this result with the time-resolved photoluminescence we find that the reduced photoluminescence efficiency is caused by a fast growing fraction of non-emissive nanocrystals while the quality of the nanocrystals that emit light is similar for all samples. Transmission electron microscopy reveals the polycrystalline nature of many of the large nanocrystals, pointing to the grain boundaries as one possible site for the photoluminescence quenching defects. -- Highlights: • We investigate drop of quantum efficiency of InP/ZnS nanocrystals emitting at longer wavelengths. • We correlate quantum efficiency measurements with time-resolved carrier dynamics. • We find that only a small fraction of larger nanocrystals is optically active

  17. Potentiometric Titrations for Measuring the Capacitance of Colloidal Photodoped ZnO Nanocrystals.

    Brozek, Carl K; Hartstein, Kimberly H; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2016-08-24

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals offer a unique opportunity to bridge molecular and bulk semiconductor redox phenomena. Here, potentiometric titration is demonstrated as a method for quantifying the Fermi levels and charging potentials of free-standing colloidal n-type ZnO nanocrystals possessing between 0 and 20 conduction-band electrons per nanocrystal, corresponding to carrier densities between 0 and 1.2 × 10(20) cm(-3). Potentiometric titration of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals has not been described previously, and little precedent exists for analogous potentiometric titration of any soluble reductants involving so many electrons. Linear changes in Fermi level vs charge-carrier density are observed for each ensemble of nanocrystals, with slopes that depend on the nanocrystal size. Analysis indicates that the ensemble nanocrystal capacitance is governed by classical surface electrical double layers, showing no evidence of quantum contributions. Systematic shifts in the Fermi level are also observed with specific changes in the identity of the charge-compensating countercation. As a simple and contactless alternative to more common thin-film-based voltammetric techniques, potentiometric titration offers a powerful new approach for quantifying the redox properties of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals.

  18. A single molecule switch based on two Pd nanocrystals linked by a ...

    in this single molecule system. 2. Experimental ... (b) Histogram showing size distribution of the nanocrystal in (a). (c) Micro- graph taken ... applied on one of the nanocrystals using the STM tip, a voltage drop is expected along the molecular ...

  19. Self-Assembled Monolayers of CdSe Nanocrystals on Doped GaAs Substrates

    Marx, E.; Ginger, D.S.; Walzer, Karsten

    2002-01-01

    This letter reports the self-assembly and analysis of CdSe nanocrystal monolayers on both p- and a-doped GaAs substrates. The self-assembly was performed using a 1,6-hexanedithiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM) to link CdSe nanocrystals to GaAs substrates. Attenuated total reflection Fourier tran...

  20. Capability-based computer systems

    Levy, Henry M

    2014-01-01

    Capability-Based Computer Systems focuses on computer programs and their capabilities. The text first elaborates capability- and object-based system concepts, including capability-based systems, object-based approach, and summary. The book then describes early descriptor architectures and explains the Burroughs B5000, Rice University Computer, and Basic Language Machine. The text also focuses on early capability architectures. Dennis and Van Horn's Supervisor; CAL-TSS System; MIT PDP-1 Timesharing System; and Chicago Magic Number Machine are discussed. The book then describes Plessey System 25

  1. Transforming organizational capabilities in strategizing

    Jørgensen, Claus; Friis, Ole Uhrskov; Koch, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Offshored and networked enterprises are becoming an important if not leading organizational form and this development seriously challenges their organizational capabilities. More specifically, over the last years, SMEs have commenced entering these kinds of arrangements. As the organizational...... capabilities of SMEs are limited at the outset, even more emphasis is needed regarding the issues of developing relevant organizational capabilities. This paper aims at investigating how capabilities evolve during an offshoring process of more than 5 years in two Danish SMEs, i.e. not only short- but long......-term evolvements within the companies. We develop our framework of understanding organizational capabilities drawing on dynamic capability, relational capability and strategy as practice concepts, appreciating the performative aspects of developing new routines. Our two cases are taken from one author’s Ph...

  2. Utilizing boron nitride sheets as thin supports for high resolution imaging of nanocrystals

    Wu, Yimin A; Kirkland, Angus I; Schaeffel, Franziska; Porfyrakis, Kyriakos; Young, Neil P; Briggs, G Andrew D; Warner, Jamie H, E-mail: Jamie.warner@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-13

    We demonstrate the use of thin BN sheets as supports for imaging nanocrystals using low voltage (80 kV) aberration-corrected high resolution transmission electron microscopy. This provides an alternative to the previously utilized 2D crystal supports of graphene and graphene oxide. A simple chemical exfoliation method is applied to get few layer boron nitride (BN) sheets with micrometer-sized dimensions. This generic approach of using BN sheets as supports is shown by depositing Mn doped ZnSe nanocrystals directly onto the BN sheets and resolving the atomic structure from both the ZnSe nanocrystals and the BN support. Phase contrast images reveal moire patterns of interference between the beams diffracted by the nanocrystals and the BN substrate that are used to determine the relative orientation of the nanocrystals with respect to the BN sheets and interference lattice planes. Double diffraction is observed and has been analyzed.

  3. Synthesis and spectroscopic properties of silica-dye-semiconductor nanocrystal hybrid particles.

    Ren, Ting; Erker, Wolfgang; Basché, Thomas; Schärtl, Wolfgang

    2010-12-07

    We prepared silica-dye-nanocrystal hybrid particles and studied the energy transfer from semiconductor nanocrystals (= donor) to organic dye molecules (= acceptor). Multishell CdSe/CdS/ZnS semiconductor nanocrystals were adsorbed onto monodisperse Stöber silica particles with an outer silica shell of thickness 2-23 nm containing organic dye molecules (Texas Red). The thickness of this dye layer has a strong effect on the energy transfer efficiency, which is explained by the increase in the number of dye molecules homogeneously distributed within the silica shell, in combination with an enhanced surface adsorption of nanocrystals with increasing dye amount. Our conclusions were underlined by comparison of the experimental results with numerically calculated FRET efficiencies and by control experiments confirming attractive interaction between the nanocrystals and Texas Red freely dissolved in solution.

  4. Growth kinetics of tin oxide nanocrystals in colloidal suspensions under hydrothermal conditions

    Lee, Eduardo J.H.; Ribeiro, Caue; Longo, Elson; Leite, Edson R.

    2006-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions of tin oxide nanocrystals were synthesized at room temperature by the hydrolysis reaction of tin chloride (II), in an ethanolic solution. The coarsening kinetics of such nanocrystals was studied by submitting the as-prepared suspensions to hydrothermal treatments at temperatures of 100, 150 and 200 deg. C for periods between 60 and 12,000 min. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to characterize the samples (i.e. distribution of nanocrystal size, average particle radius and morphology). The results show that the usual Ostwald ripening coarsening mechanism does not fit well the experimental data, which is an indicative that this process is not significant for SnO 2 nanocrystals, in the studied experimental conditions. The morphology evolution of the nanocrystals upon hydrothermal treatment indicates that growth by oriented attachment (OA) should be significant. A kinetic model that describes OA growth is successfully applied to fit the data

  5. Utilizing boron nitride sheets as thin supports for high resolution imaging of nanocrystals

    Wu, Yimin A; Kirkland, Angus I; Schaeffel, Franziska; Porfyrakis, Kyriakos; Young, Neil P; Briggs, G Andrew D; Warner, Jamie H

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of thin BN sheets as supports for imaging nanocrystals using low voltage (80 kV) aberration-corrected high resolution transmission electron microscopy. This provides an alternative to the previously utilized 2D crystal supports of graphene and graphene oxide. A simple chemical exfoliation method is applied to get few layer boron nitride (BN) sheets with micrometer-sized dimensions. This generic approach of using BN sheets as supports is shown by depositing Mn doped ZnSe nanocrystals directly onto the BN sheets and resolving the atomic structure from both the ZnSe nanocrystals and the BN support. Phase contrast images reveal moire patterns of interference between the beams diffracted by the nanocrystals and the BN substrate that are used to determine the relative orientation of the nanocrystals with respect to the BN sheets and interference lattice planes. Double diffraction is observed and has been analyzed.

  6. Controllable synthesis of nickel bicarbonate nanocrystals with high homogeneity for a high-performance supercapacitor

    Gu, Jianmin; Liu, Xin; Wang, Zhuang; Bian, Zhenpan; Jin, Cuihong; Sun, Xiao; Yin, Baipeng; Wu, Tianhui; Wang, Lin; Tang, Shoufeng; Wang, Hongchao; Gao, Faming

    2017-08-01

    The electrochemical performance of supercapacitors might be associated with the homogeneous structure of the electrode materials. However, the relationship between the degree of uniformity for the electrode materials and the electrochemical performance of the supercapacitor is not clear. Herein, we synthesize two types of nickel bicarbonate nanocrystals with different degrees of uniformity to investigate this relationship. As the electroactive material, the nickel bicarbonate nanocrystals with a homogeneous structure could provide a larger space and offer more exposed atoms for the electrochemical reaction than the nanocrystals with a heterogeneous structure. The homogeneous nickel bicarbonate nanocrystals exhibit better electrochemical performance and show excellent specific capacitance (1596 F g-1 at 2 A g-1 and 1260 F g-1 at 30 A g-1), which is approximately twice that of the heterogeneous nickel bicarbonate nanocrystals. The cycling stability for the homogeneity (˜80%) is higher than the inhomogeneity (˜61%) at a high current density of 5 A g-1.

  7. From Artificial Atoms to Nanocrystal Molecules: Preparation and Properties of More Complex Nanostructures

    Choi, Charina L; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2009-10-20

    Quantum dots, which have found widespread use in fields such as biomedicine, photovoltaics, and electronics, are often called artificial atoms due to their size-dependent physical properties. Here this analogy is extended to consider artificial nanocrystal molecules, formed from well-defined groupings of plasmonically or electronically coupled single nanocrystals. Just as a hydrogen molecule has properties distinct from two uncoupled hydrogen atoms, a key feature of nanocrystal molecules is that they exhibit properties altered from those of the component nanoparticles due to coupling. The nature of the coupling between nanocrystal atoms and its response to vibrations and deformations of the nanocrystal molecule bonds are of particular interest. We discuss synthetic approaches, predicted and observed physical properties, and prospects and challenges toward this new class of materials.

  8. Fabrication of multilayered Ge nanocrystals embedded in SiOxGeNy films

    Gao Fei; Green, Martin A.; Conibeer, Gavin; Cho, Eun-Chel; Huang Yidan; Perez-Wurfl, Ivan; Flynn, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Multilayered Ge nanocrystals embedded in SiO x GeN y films have been fabricated on Si substrate by a (Ge + SiO 2 )/SiO x GeN y superlattice approach, using a rf magnetron sputtering technique with a Ge + SiO 2 composite target and subsequent thermal annealing in N 2 ambient at 750 deg. C for 30 min. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement indicated the formation of Ge nanocrystals with an average size estimated to be 5.4 nm. Raman scattering spectra showed a peak of the Ge-Ge vibrational mode downward shifted to 299.4 cm -1 , which was caused by quantum confinement of phonons in the Ge nanocrystals. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that Ge nanocrystals were confined in (Ge + SiO 2 ) layers. This superlattice approach significantly improved both the size uniformity of Ge nanocrystals and their uniformity of spacing on the 'Z' growth direction

  9. Gamma-Ray Imaging Probes.

    Wild, Walter James

    1988-12-01

    External nuclear medicine diagnostic imaging of early primary and metastatic lung cancer tumors is difficult due to the poor sensitivity and resolution of existing gamma cameras. Nonimaging counting detectors used for internal tumor detection give ambiguous results because distant background variations are difficult to discriminate from neighboring tumor sites. This suggests that an internal imaging nuclear medicine probe, particularly an esophageal probe, may be advantageously used to detect small tumors because of the ability to discriminate against background variations and the capability to get close to sites neighboring the esophagus. The design, theory of operation, preliminary bench tests, characterization of noise behavior and optimization of such an imaging probe is the central theme of this work. The central concept lies in the representation of the aperture shell by a sequence of binary digits. This, coupled with the mode of operation which is data encoding within an axial slice of space, leads to the fundamental imaging equation in which the coding operation is conveniently described by a circulant matrix operator. The coding/decoding process is a classic coded-aperture problem, and various estimators to achieve decoding are discussed. Some estimators require a priori information about the object (or object class) being imaged; the only unbiased estimator that does not impose this requirement is the simple inverse-matrix operator. The effects of noise on the estimate (or reconstruction) is discussed for general noise models and various codes/decoding operators. The choice of an optimal aperture for detector count times of clinical relevance is examined using a statistical class-separability formalism.

  10. InAs nanocrystals on SiO2/Si by molecular beam epitaxy for memory applications

    Hocevar, Moiera; Regreny, Philippe; Descamps, Armel; Albertini, David; Saint-Girons, Guillaume; Souifi, Abdelkader; Gendry, Michel; Patriarche, Gilles

    2007-01-01

    We studied a memory structure based on InAs nanocrystals grown by molecular beam epitaxy directly on thermal SiO 2 on silicon. Both nanocrystal diameter and density can be controlled by growth parameters. Transmission electron microscopy analysis shows high crystallinity and low size dispersion. In an electrical test structure with a 3.5 nm tunnel oxide, we observed that 80% of the initial injected electrons remain stored in the InAs nanocrystals after 3 months and that the retention time for electrons in InAs nanocrystals is four orders of magnitude higher than in silicon nanocrystals

  11. Impact of Personnel Capabilities on Organizational Innovation Capability

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Momeni, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    in this rapidly changing world. This research focuses on definition of the personnel aspect of innovation capability, and proposes a conceptual model based on the scientific articles of academic literature on organisations innovation capability. This paper includes an expert based validation in three rounds...... of the Delphi method. And for the purpose of a better appreciation of the relationship dominating the factors of the model, it has distributed the questionnaire to Iranian companies in the Food industry. This research proposed a direct relationship between Innovation Capability and the Personnel Capability...

  12. Experimental modeling of eddy current inspection capabilities

    Junker, W.R.; Clark, W.G.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter examines the experimental modeling of eddy current inspection capabilities based upon the use of liquid mercury samples designed to represent metal components containing discontinuities. A brief summary of past work with mercury modeling and a detailed discussion of recent experiments designed to further evaluate the technique are presented. The main disadvantages of the mercury modeling concept are that mercury is toxic and must be handled carefully, liquid mercury can only be used to represent nonferromagnetic materials, and wetting and meniscus problems can distort the effective size of artificial discontinuities. Artificial discontinuities placed in a liquid mercury sample can be used to represent discontinuities in solid metallic structures. Discontinuity size and type cannot be characterized from phase angle and signal amplitude data developed with a surface scanning, pancake-type eddy current probe. It is concluded that the mercury model approach can greatly enhance the overall understanding and applicability of eddy current inspection techniques

  13. Towards a National Space Weather Predictive Capability

    Fox, N. J.; Ryschkewitsch, M. G.; Merkin, V. G.; Stephens, G. K.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Barnes, R. J.; Anderson, B. J.; Paxton, L. J.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Kelly, M. A.; Berger, T. E.; Bonadonna, L. C. M. F.; Hesse, M.; Sharma, S.

    2015-12-01

    National needs in the area of space weather informational and predictive tools are growing rapidly. Adverse conditions in the space environment can cause disruption of satellite operations, communications, navigation, and electric power distribution grids, leading to a variety of socio-economic losses and impacts on our security. Future space exploration and most modern human endeavors will require major advances in physical understanding and improved transition of space research to operations. At present, only a small fraction of the latest research and development results from NASA, NOAA, NSF and DoD investments are being used to improve space weather forecasting and to develop operational tools. The power of modern research and space weather model development needs to be better utilized to enable comprehensive, timely, and accurate operational space weather tools. The mere production of space weather information is not sufficient to address the needs of those who are affected by space weather. A coordinated effort is required to support research-to-applications transition efforts and to develop the tools required those who rely on this information. In this presentation we will review the space weather system developed for the Van Allen Probes mission, together with other datasets, tools and models that have resulted from research by scientists at JHU/APL. We will look at how these, and results from future missions such as Solar Probe Plus, could be applied to support space weather applications in coordination with other community assets and capabilities.

  14. Hard probes 2006 Asilomar

    2006-01-01

    "The second international conference on hard and electromagnetic probes of high-energy nuclear collisions was held June 9 to 16, 2006 at the Asilomar Conference grounds in Pacific Grove, California" (photo and 1/2 page)

  15. Neutrons as a probe

    Iizumi, Masashi

    1993-01-01

    As an introduction to the symposium a brief overview will be given about the features of neutrons as a probe. First it will be pointed out that the utilization of neutrons as a probe for investigating the structural and dynamical properties of condensed matters is a benign gift eventuated from the release of atomic energy initiated by Enrico Fermi exactly half century ago. Features of neutrons as a probe are discussed in accordance with the four basic physical properties of neutrons as an elementary particle; (1) no electric charge (the interaction with matter is nuclear), (2) the mass of neutron is 1 amu, (3) spin is 1/2 and (4) neutrons have magnetic dipole moment. Overview will be given on the uniqueness of neutrons as a probe and on the variety in the way they are used in the wide research area from the pure science to the industrial applications. (author)

  16. Fine-Tuning the Wall Thickness of Ordered Mesoporous Graphene by Exploiting Ligand Exchange of Colloidal Nanocrystals

    Dandan Han

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Because of their unique physical properties, three-dimensional (3D graphene has attracted enormous attention over the past years. However, it is still a challenge to precisely control the layer thickness of 3D graphene. Here, we report a novel strategy to rationally adjust the wall thickness of ordered mesoporous graphene (OMG. By taking advantage of ligand exchange capability of colloidal Fe3O4 nanocrystals, we are able to fine-tune the wall thickness of OMG from 2 to 6 layers of graphene. When evaluated as electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction upon S and N doping, the 4-layer OMG is found to show better catalytic performance compared with their 2- and 6-layer counterparts, which we attribute to the enhanced exposure of active sites arising from the thin wall thickness and high surface area.

  17. Adjustable Pitot Probe

    Ashby, George C., Jr.; Robbins, W. Eugene; Horsley, Lewis A.

    1991-01-01

    Probe readily positionable in core of uniform flow in hypersonic wind tunnel. Formed of pair of mating cylindrical housings: transducer housing and pitot-tube housing. Pitot tube supported by adjustable wedge fairing attached to top of pitot-tube housing with semicircular foot. Probe adjusted both radially and circumferentially. In addition, pressure-sensing transducer cooled internally by water or other cooling fluid passing through annulus of cooling system.

  18. People Capability Maturity Model. SM.

    1995-09-01

    tailored so it consumes less time and resources than a traditional software process assessment or CMU/SEI-95-MM-02 People Capability Maturity Model...improved reputation or customer loyalty. CMU/SEI-95-MM-02 People Capability Maturity Model ■ L5-17 Coaching Level 5: Optimizing Activity 1...Maturity Model CMU/SEI-95-MM-62 Carnegie-Mellon University Software Engineering Institute DTIC ELECTE OCT 2 7 1995 People Capability Maturity

  19. Dual-probe near-field fiber head with gap servo control for data storage applications.

    Fang, Jen-Yu; Tien, Chung-Hao; Shieh, Han-Ping D

    2007-10-29

    We present a novel fiber-based near-field optical head consisting of a straw-shaped writing probe and a flat gap sensing probe. The straw-shaped probe with a C-aperture on the end face exhibits enhanced transmission by a factor of 3 orders of magnitude over a conventional fiber probe due to a hybrid effect that excites both propagation modes and surface plasmon waves. In the gap sensing probe, the spacing between the probe and the disk surface functions as an external cavity. The high sensitivity of the output power to the change in the gap width is used as a feedback control signal. We characterize and design the straw-shaped writing probe and the flat gap sensing probe. The dual-probe system is installed on a conventional biaxial actuator to demonstrate the capability of flying over a disk surface with nanometer position precision.

  20. New self-assembled nanocrystal micelles for biolabels and biosensors.

    Tallant, David Robert; Wilson, Michael C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Leve, Erik W. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Fan, Hongyou; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Gabaldon, John (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Scullin, Chessa (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-12-01

    The ability of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) to display multiple (size-specific) colors simultaneously during a single, long term excitation holds great promise for their use in fluorescent bio-imaging. The main challenges of using nanocrystals as biolabels are achieving biocompatibility, low non-specific adsorption, and no aggregation. In addition, functional groups that can be used to further couple and conjugate with biospecies (proteins, DNAs, antibodies, etc.) are required. In this project, we invented a new route to the synthesis of water-soluble and biocompatible NCs. Our approach is to encapsulate as-synthesized, monosized, hydrophobic NCs within the hydrophobic cores of micelles composed of a mixture of surfactants and phospholipids containing head groups functionalized with polyethylene glycol (-PEG), -COOH, and NH{sub 2} groups. PEG provided biocompatibility and the other groups were used for further biofunctionalization. The resulting water-soluble metal and semiconductor NC-micelles preserve the optical properties of the original hydrophobic NCs. Semiconductor NCs emit the same color; they exhibit equal photoluminescence (PL) intensity under long-time laser irradiation (one week) ; and they exhibit the same PL lifetime (30-ns). The results from transmission electron microscopy and confocal fluorescent imaging indicate that water-soluble semiconductor NC-micelles are biocompatible and exhibit no aggregation in cells. We have extended the surfactant/lipid encapsulation techniques to synthesize water-soluble magnetic NC-micelles. Transmission electron microscopy results suggest that water-soluble magnetic NC-micelles exhibit no aggregation. The resulting NC-micelles preserve the magnetic properties of the original hydrophobic magnetic NCs. Viability studies conducted using yeast cells suggest that the magnetic nanocrystal-micelles are biocompatible. We have demonstrated, for the first time, that using external oscillating magnetic fields to manipulate

  1. Effects of Cu content on the photoelectrochemistry of Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystal thin films

    Khoshmashrab, Saghar; Turnbull, Matthew J.; Vaccarello, Daniel; Nie, Yuting; Martin, Spencer; Love, David A.; Lau, Po K.; Sun, Xuhui; Ding, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Two compositions of CZTS were synthesized, one yielding Cu-poor and the other Cu-stoichiometric nanocrystals (NCs). • Physical and electronic properties of both films were probed using various analytical techniques. • Films comprised of Cu-poor CZTS showed tighter packing with less defects compared to those of stoichiometric-Cu. • Photoelectrochemical measurements exhibited increased photoconversion and increased photostability of the Cu-poor films. • Intensity modulated photocurrent spectroscopy showed that the Cu-deficient NCs had half the recombination rate as that of stoichiometric-Cu films. - Abstract: Cu 2 ZnSnS 4 (CZTS) nanocrystals (NCs) were prepared via a one-pot solvothermal method. Given that the composition affects the electronic properties of this p-type semiconductor, two compositional ratios were chosen from 10 designed and synthesized analogues, one yielding Cu-poor and the other Cu-stoichiometric CZTS. NCs in which the Cu concentration was slightly below stoichiometric yielded more uniform films with greater photovoltaic performance. The lower Cu content also lead to slightly better crystallinity within the film, as demonstrated by XRD, Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Chronophotoelectrochemical measurements indicated that both types of NC films displayed good stability; however, with a decrease in potential, an increase in resistance for the Cu-stoichiometric film was observed. As determined by intensity modulated photocurrent spectroscopy, the product separation rate of the photoinduced holes and electrons in the Cu-poor films were more than 3 times that of the Cu-stoichiometric, confirming that the lower Cu content led to an improved photoperformance

  2. Surface structure, optoelectronic properties and charge transport in ZnO nanocrystal/MDMO-PPV multilayer films.

    Lian, Qing; Chen, Mu; Mokhtar, Muhamad Z; Wu, Shanglin; Zhu, Mingning; Whittaker, Eric; O'Brien, Paul; Saunders, Brian R

    2018-05-07

    Blends of semiconducting nanocrystals and conjugated polymers continue to attract major research interest because of their potential applications in optoelectronic devices, such as solar cells, photodetectors and light-emitting diodes. In this study we investigate the surface structure, morphological and optoelectronic properties of multilayer films constructed from ZnO nanocrystals (NCs) and poly[2-methoxy-5-(3',7'-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MDMO-PPV). The effects of layer number and ZnO concentration (C ZnO ) used on the multilayer film properties are investigated. An optimised solvent blend enabled well-controlled layers to be sequentially spin coated and the construction of multilayer films containing six ZnO NC (Z) and MDMO-PPV (M) layers (denoted as (ZM) 6 ). Contact angle data showed a strong dependence on C ZnO and indicated distinct differences in the coverage of MDMO-PPV by the ZnO NCs. UV-visible spectroscopy showed that the MDMO-PPV absorption increased linearly with the number of layers in the films and demonstrates highly tuneable light absorption. Photoluminescence spectra showed reversible quenching as well as a surprising red-shift of the MDMO-PPV emission peak. Solar cells were constructed to probe vertical photo-generated charge transport. The measurements showed that (ZM) 6 devices prepared using C ZnO = 14.0 mg mL -1 had a remarkably high open circuit voltage of ∼800 mV. The device power conversion efficiency was similar to that of a control bilayer device prepared using a much thicker MDMO-PPV layer. The results of this study provide insight into the structure-optoelectronic property relationships of new semiconducting multilayer films which should also apply to other semiconducting NC/polymer combinations.

  3. Four-point probe measurements using current probes with voltage feedback to measure electric potentials

    Lüpke, Felix; Cuma, David; Korte, Stefan; Cherepanov, Vasily; Voigtländer, Bert

    2018-02-01

    We present a four-point probe resistance measurement technique which uses four equivalent current measuring units, resulting in minimal hardware requirements and corresponding sources of noise. Local sample potentials are measured by a software feedback loop which adjusts the corresponding tip voltage such that no current flows to the sample. The resulting tip voltage is then equivalent to the sample potential at the tip position. We implement this measurement method into a multi-tip scanning tunneling microscope setup such that potentials can also be measured in tunneling contact, allowing in principle truly non-invasive four-probe measurements. The resulting measurement capabilities are demonstrated for \

  4. Femtosecond luminescence spectroscopy of core states in silicon nanocrystals

    Žídek, K.; Trojánek, F.; Malý, P.; Ondič, Lukáš; Pelant, Ivan; Dohnalová, Kateřina; Šiller, L.; Little, R.; Horrocks, B.R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 24 (2010), s. 25241-25249 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400100701; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA101120804; GA MŠk LC510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : silicon nanocrystals * ultrafast spectroscopy * photoluminescence spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.749, year: 2010 http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-18-24-25241

  5. Photoluminescence properties of Co-doped ZnO nanocrystals

    Lommens, P.; Smet, P.F.; De Mello Donega, C.

    2006-01-01

    We performed photoluminescence experiments on colloidal, Co -doped ZnO nanocrystals in order to study the electronic properties of Co in a ZnO host. Room temperature measurements showed, next to the ZnO exciton and trap emission, an additional emission related to the Co dopant. The spectral...... position and width of this emission does not depend on particle size or Co concentration. At 8 K, a series of ZnO bulk phonon replicas appear on the Co-emission band. We conclude that Co ions are strongly localized in the ZnO host, making the formation of a Co d-band unlikely. Magnetic measurements...

  6. Fabrication and characterization of cellulose nanocrystal based transparent electroactive polyurethane

    Ko, Hyun-U.; Kim, Hyun Chan; Kim, Jung Woong; Zhai, Lindong; Jayaramudu, Tippabattini; Kim, Jaehwan

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) based transparent and electroactive polyurethane (CPPU), suitable for actively tunable optical lens. CNC is used for high dielectric filler to improve electromechanical behavior of CPPU. For high transparency and homogeneous distribution of CNC in polyurethane, CNC-poly[di(ethylene glycol) adipate] is used to play a role of polyol and isocyanate salt. The fabricated CPPU exhibits high transparency (>90%) and 10% of electromechanical strain under 3 V μm-1 electric field. Mechanical, dielectric properties as well as physical and chemical characteristics are investigated to prove the electromechanical behavior of CPPU.

  7. Genesis, challenges and opportunities for colloidal lead halide perovskite nanocrystals

    Akkerman, Quinten A.; Rainò, Gabriele; Kovalenko, Maksym V.; Manna, Liberato

    2018-05-01

    Lead halide perovskites (LHPs) in the form of nanometre-sized colloidal crystals, or nanocrystals (NCs), have attracted the attention of diverse materials scientists due to their unique optical versatility, high photoluminescence quantum yields and facile synthesis. LHP NCs have a `soft' and predominantly ionic lattice, and their optical and electronic properties are highly tolerant to structural defects and surface states. Therefore, they cannot be approached with the same experimental mindset and theoretical framework as conventional semiconductor NCs. In this Review, we discuss LHP NCs historical and current research pursuits, challenges in applications, and the related present and future mitigation strategies explored.

  8. Flexible, High-Speed CdSe Nanocrystal Integrated Circuits.

    Stinner, F Scott; Lai, Yuming; Straus, Daniel B; Diroll, Benjamin T; Kim, David K; Murray, Christopher B; Kagan, Cherie R

    2015-10-14

    We report large-area, flexible, high-speed analog and digital colloidal CdSe nanocrystal integrated circuits operating at low voltages. Using photolithography and a newly developed process to fabricate vertical interconnect access holes, we scale down device dimensions, reducing parasitic capacitances and increasing the frequency of circuit operation, and scale up device fabrication over 4 in. flexible substrates. We demonstrate amplifiers with ∼7 kHz bandwidth, ring oscillators with <10 μs stage delays, and NAND and NOR logic gates.

  9. Confined Growth of ZIF-8 Nanocrystals with Tunable Structural Colors

    Chang, Bingdong; Yang, Yuanqing; Jansen, Henri

    2018-01-01

    Zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIF-8) have promising applications as sensors or catalysts due to their highly porous crystalline structures. While most of the previous studies are based on ZIF-8 crystals either in isolated particles in aqueous environments or in a compact colloidal form, here...... down to ≈100 nm. A wide range of structural colors generated by the ZIF-8 nanocrystals is also observed, which can be attributed to the size-dependent resonant scattering as verified by finite-difference time-domain simulations and classical Mie theory. The scalable fabrication of wafer-based ZIF-8...

  10. Photoelectric work function studies of carbonaceous films containing Ni nanocrystals

    Czerwosz, E.; Dluzewski, P.; Kutner, T.; Stacewicz, T.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of photoelectric work function measurements for carbonaceous films containing Ni nanocrystals. The investigated films were obtained by thermal vacuum deposition method. The structure of films was studied by electron diffraction, transmission microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Film structure depends on Ni contents in the film volume. Work function determined from photoelectric measurements for all investigated films are similar and lie in the range of 2.65-2.93 eV. The decrease of work function value with the cleaning of the film's surface with UV pulsed laser beam was observed

  11. Dry gel conversion synthesis of SAPO-34 nanocrystals

    Hirota, Yuichiro; Murata, Kenji; Tanaka, Shunsuke; Nishiyama, Norikazu; Egashira, Yasuyuki; Ueyama, Korekazu

    2010-01-01

    SAPO-34 nanocrystals were synthesized by a dry gel conversion method using tetraethylammonium hydroxide as a structure-directing agent. The crystal growth of SAPO-34 was studied by X-ray diffraction and field-emission scanning electron microscopy. After 3 h, 45-nm SAPO-34 crystals with an amorphous phase were observed. The crystal size increased to 70 nm after 6 h, but did not increase greatly thereafter. The average crystal size of the final product was 75 nm. The nucleation density for SAPO-34 crystals in dry gel conversion appeared to be much higher than that under hydrothermal conditions, resulting in the formation of small crystals.

  12. The size effects upon shock plastic compression of nanocrystals

    Malygin, G. A.; Klyavin, O. V.

    2017-10-01

    For the first time a theoretical analysis of scale effects upon the shock plastic compression of nanocrystals is implemented in the context of a dislocation kinetic approach based on the equations and relationships of dislocation kinetics. The yield point of crystals τy is established as a quantitative function of their cross-section size D and the rate of shock deformation as τy ɛ2/3 D. This dependence is valid in the case of elastic stress relaxation on account of emission of dislocations from single-pole Frank-Read sources near the crystal surface.

  13. Chemically Designed Metallic/Insulating Hybrid Nanostructures with Silver Nanocrystals for Highly Sensitive Wearable Pressure Sensors.

    Kim, Haneun; Lee, Seung-Wook; Joh, Hyungmok; Seong, Mingi; Lee, Woo Seok; Kang, Min Su; Pyo, Jun Beom; Oh, Soong Ju

    2018-01-10

    With the increase in interest in wearable tactile pressure sensors for e-skin, researches to make nanostructures to achieve high sensitivity have been actively conducted. However, limitations such as complex fabrication processes using expensive equipment still exist. Herein, simple lithography-free techniques to develop pyramid-like metal/insulator hybrid nanostructures utilizing nanocrystals (NCs) are demonstrated. Ligand-exchanged and unexchanged silver NC thin films are used as metallic and insulating components, respectively. The interfaces of each NC layer are chemically engineered to create discontinuous insulating layers, i.e., spacers for improved sensitivity, and eventually to realize fully solution-processed pressure sensors. Device performance analysis with structural, chemical, and electronic characterization and conductive atomic force microscopy study reveals that hybrid nanostructure based pressure sensor shows an enhanced sensitivity of higher than 500 kPa -1 , reliability, and low power consumption with a wide range of pressure sensing. Nano-/micro-hierarchical structures are also designed by combining hybrid nanostructures with conventional microstructures, exhibiting further enhanced sensing range and achieving a record sensitivity of 2.72 × 10 4 kPa -1 . Finally, all-solution-processed pressure sensor arrays with high pixel density, capable of detecting delicate signals with high spatial selectivity much better than the human tactile threshold, are introduced.

  14. A transparent flexible z-axis sensitive multi-touch panel based on colloidal ITO nanocrystals.

    Sangeetha, N M; Gauvin, M; Decorde, N; Delpech, F; Fazzini, P F; Viallet, B; Viau, G; Grisolia, J; Ressier, L

    2015-08-07

    Bottom-up fabrication of a flexible multi-touch panel prototype based on transparent colloidal indium tin oxide (ITO) nanocrystal (NC) films is presented. A series of 7% Sn(4+) doped ITO NCs protected by oleate, octanoate and butanoate ligands are synthesized and characterized by a battery of techniques including, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, (1)H, (13)C and (119)Sn nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and the related diffusion ordered spectroscopy. Electrical resistivities of transparent films of these NCs assembled on flexible polyethylene terephthalate substrates by convective self-assembly from their suspension in toluene decrease with the ligand length, from 220 × 10(3) for oleate ITO to 13 × 10(3)Ω cm for butanoate ITO NC films. A highly transparent, flexible touch panel based on a matrix of strain gauges derived from the least resistive film of 17 nm butanoate ITO NCs sensitively detects the lateral position (x, y) of the touch as well as its intensity over the z-axis. Being compatible with a stylus or bare/gloved finger, a larger version of this module may be readily implemented in upcoming flexible screens, enabling navigation capabilities over all three axes, a feature highly desired by the display industry.

  15. Real-space Mapping of Surface Trap States in CIGSe Nanocrystals using 4D Electron Microscopy

    Bose, Riya

    2016-05-26

    Surface trap states in semiconductor copper indium gallium selenide nanocrystals (NCs) which serve as undesirable channels for non-radiative carrier recombination, remain a great challenge impeding the development of solar and optoelectronics devices based on these NCs. In order to design efficient passivation techniques to minimize these trap states, a precise knowledge about the charge carrier dynamics on the NCs surface is essential. However, selective mapping of surface traps requires capabilities beyond the reach of conventional laser spectroscopy and static electron microscopy; it can only be accessed by using a one-of-a-kind, second-generation four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscope (4D S-UEM) with sub-picosecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolutions. Here, we precisely map the surface charge carrier dynamics of copper indium gallium selenide NCs before and after surface passivation in real space and time using S-UEM. The time-resolved snapshots clearly demonstrate that the density of the trap states is significantly reduced after zinc sulfide (ZnS) shelling. Furthermore, removal of trap states and elongation of carrier lifetime are confirmed by the increased photocurrent of the self-biased photodetector fabricated using the shelled NCs.

  16. Physicochemical characterization of cellulose nanocrystal and nanoporous self-assembled CNC membrane derived from Ceiba pentandra.

    Mohamed, Mohamad Azuwa; W Salleh, W N; Jaafar, Juhana; Ismail, A F; Abd Mutalib, Muhazri; Mohamad, Abu Bakar; M Zain, M F; Awang, Nor Asikin; Mohd Hir, Zul Adlan

    2017-02-10

    This research involves the rare utilisation of the kapok fibre (Ceiba pentandra) as a raw material for the fabrication of cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) and self-assembled CNC membranes. The isolation of CNC from Ceiba pentandra began with the extraction of cellulose via the chemical alkali extraction by using 5wt% NaOH, followed by the typical acidified bleaching method and, finally, the CNC production through acid hydrolysis with 60wt% H 2 SO 4 at the optimum time of 60min. The prepared CNC was then employed for the preparation of self-assembled membrane through the water suspension casting evaporation technique. The obtained CNC membrane was characterised in terms of its composition, crystallinity, thermal stability, as well as, structural and morphological features with the use of several techniques including FTIR, XRD, AFM, TEM, FESEM, and TGA. The FESEM and AFM analyses had illustrated the achievement of a self-assembled CNC membrane with a smooth surface and a well-distributed nano-porous structure, with the porosity of 52.82±7.79%. In addition, the findings proved that the self-assembled CNC membrane displayed good adsorption capability indicated by the recorded efficiency of 79% and 85% for 10mg/L and 5mg/L of methylene blue in an aqueous solution, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Real-space Mapping of Surface Trap States in CIGSe Nanocrystals using 4D Electron Microscopy

    Bose, Riya; Bera, Ashok; Parida, Manas R.; Adhikari, Aniruddha; Shaheen, Basamat; Alarousu, Erkki; Sun, Jingya; Wu, Tao; Bakr, Osman; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2016-01-01

    Surface trap states in semiconductor copper indium gallium selenide nanocrystals (NCs) which serve as undesirable channels for non-radiative carrier recombination, remain a great challenge impeding the development of solar and optoelectronics devices based on these NCs. In order to design efficient passivation techniques to minimize these trap states, a precise knowledge about the charge carrier dynamics on the NCs surface is essential. However, selective mapping of surface traps requires capabilities beyond the reach of conventional laser spectroscopy and static electron microscopy; it can only be accessed by using a one-of-a-kind, second-generation four-dimensional scanning ultrafast electron microscope (4D S-UEM) with sub-picosecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolutions. Here, we precisely map the surface charge carrier dynamics of copper indium gallium selenide NCs before and after surface passivation in real space and time using S-UEM. The time-resolved snapshots clearly demonstrate that the density of the trap states is significantly reduced after zinc sulfide (ZnS) shelling. Furthermore, removal of trap states and elongation of carrier lifetime are confirmed by the increased photocurrent of the self-biased photodetector fabricated using the shelled NCs.

  18. Engineering Interfacial Charge Transfer in CsPbBr3 Perovskite Nanocrystals by Heterovalent Doping.

    Begum, Raihana; Parida, Manas R; Abdelhady, Ahmed L; Murali, Banavoth; Alyami, Noktan M; Ahmed, Ghada H; Hedhili, Mohamed Nejib; Bakr, Osman M; Mohammed, Omar F

    2017-01-18

    Since compelling device efficiencies of perovskite solar cells have been achieved, investigative efforts have turned to understand other key challenges in these systems, such as engineering interfacial energy-level alignment and charge transfer (CT). However, these types of studies on perovskite thin-film devices are impeded by the morphological and compositional heterogeneity of the films and their ill-defined surfaces. Here, we use well-defined ligand-protected perovskite nanocrystals (NCs) as model systems to elucidate the role of heterovalent doping on charge-carrier dynamics and energy level alignment at the interface of perovskite NCs with molecular acceptors. More specifically, we develop an in situ doping approach for colloidal CsPbBr 3 perovskite NCs with heterovalent Bi 3+ ions by hot injection to precisely tune their band structure and excited-state dynamics. This synthetic method allowed us to map the impact of doping on CT from the NCs to different molecular acceptors. Using time-resolved spectroscopy with broadband capability, we clearly demonstrate that CT at the interface of NCs can be tuned and promoted by metal ion doping. We found that doping increases the energy difference between states of the molecular acceptor and the donor moieties, subsequently facilitating the interfacial CT process. This work highlights the key variable components not only for promoting interfacial CT in perovskites, but also for establishing a higher degree of precision and control over the surface and the interface of perovskite molecular acceptors.

  19. Superparamagnetic nickel colloidal nanocrystal clusters with antibacterial activity and bacteria binding ability

    Peng, Bo; Zhang, Xinglin; Aarts, Dirk G. A. L.; Dullens, Roel P. A.

    2018-06-01

    Recent progress in synthetic nanotechnology and the ancient use of metals in food preservation and the antibacterial treatment of wounds have prompted the development of nanometallic materials for antimicrobial applications1-4. However, the materials designed so far do not simultaneously display antimicrobial activity and the capability of binding and capturing bacteria and spores. Here, we develop a one-step pyrolysis procedure to synthesize monodisperse superparamagnetic nickel colloidal nanocrystal clusters (SNCNCs), which show both antibacterial activity and the ability to bind Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria, as well as bacterial spores. The SNCNCs are formed from a rapid burst of nickel nanoparticles, which self-assemble slowly into clusters. The clusters can magnetically extract 99.99% of bacteria and spores and provide a promising approach for the removal of microbes, including hard-to-treat microorganisms. We believe that our work illustrates the exciting opportunities that nanotechnology offers for alternative antimicrobial strategies and other applications in microbiology.

  20. Engineering Interfacial Charge Transfer in CsPbBr3 Perovskite Nanocrystals by Heterovalent Doping

    Begum, Raihana

    2016-12-17

    Since compelling device efficiencies of perovskite solar cells have been achieved, investigative efforts have turned to understand other key challenges in these systems, such as engineering interfacial energy-level alignment and charge transfer (CT). However, these types of studies on perovskite thin-film devices are impeded by the morphological and compositional heterogeneity of the films and their ill-defined surfaces. Here, we use well-defined ligand-protected perovskite nanocrystals (NCs) as model systems to elucidate the role of heterovalent doping on charge-carrier dynamics and energy level alignment at the interface of perovskite NCs with molecular acceptors. More specifically, we develop an in situ doping approach for colloidal CsPbBr3 perovskite NCs with heterovalent Bi3+ ions by hot injection to precisely tune their band structure and excited-state dynamics. This synthetic method allowed us to map the impact of doping on CT from the NCs to different molecular acceptors. Using time-resolved spectroscopy with broadband capability, we clearly demonstrate that CT at the interface of NCs can be tuned and promoted by metal ion doping. We found that doping increases the energy difference between states of the molecular acceptor and the donor moieties, subsequently facilitating the interfacial CT process. This work highlights the key variable components not only for promoting interfacial CT in perovskites, but also for establishing a higher degree of precision and control over the surface and the interface of perovskite molecular acceptors.