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Sample records for nano-structured ferritic alloys

  1. Lower Length Scale Characterization and Validation of Formation and Stability of Helium Bubbles in Nano-structured Ferritic Alloys under Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Huijuan [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Yun, Di [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hoelzer, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC)

    2018-01-30

    In order to extend the operating license of current light water reactors (LWRs) in the United States and other countries to as many as 80 years or longer, it is demanding to identify potential materials for many of the internal structural components and fasteners. We proposed that 14YWT iron alloy can be adopted in such applications with its excellent material properties, such as high-temperature strength, low creep rate, and high irradiation resistance. Application with 14YWT would improve the void/helium swelling characteristics of the LWR fuels, extend the burn-up limits with the tolerant temperature up to 800oC and reduce the hydrogen production. One key feature of 14YWT material property enhancement is the ultrafine high density of 2-4nm Y-Ti-O enriched nanoclusters (NCs) within the 14YWT iron matrix. The NCs can effectively pin the ultra-fine grain boundaries and dislocations, which significantly enhance mechanical properties of the alloy. Moreover, these nanoclusters remain stable with no coarsening after a large dose of ion irradiation. After ion irradiation, the helium bubbles are observed extremely uniform in size (1nm) and quite homogeneously distributed within the 14YWT matrix, which indicates that the microstructure of 14YWT remains remarkably tolerance to radiation damage. However, there is a lack of understanding of 14YWT both theoretically and experimentally in order to understand the mechanism behind the material property enhancement and to further develop and design a new generation of advanced structural material for current LWR applications and future fusion applications.

  2. Low activation ferritic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  3. High strength ferritic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A high strength ferritic steel is specified in which the major alloying elements are chromium and molybdenum, with smaller quantities of niobium, vanadium, silicon, manganese and carbon. The maximum swelling is specified for various irradiation conditions. Rupture strength is also specified. (U.K.)

  4. Processing of a novel nano-structured ferritic steel via spark plasma sintering and investigation of its mechanical and microstructural characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasebani, Somayeh; Charit, Indrajit; Wu, Yaqiao; Burns, Jatuporn; Allahar, Kerry N.; Butt, Darryl P.; Cole, James I.

    2015-01-01

    Nano-structured ferritic steels (NFSs) with 12-14 wt% Cr have attracted widespread interest for potential high temperature structural and fuel cladding applications in advanced nuclear reactors. They have excellent high temperature mechanical properties and high resistance to radiation-induced damage. The properties of the NFSs depend on the composition that mainly consists of Cr, Ti, W or Mo, and Y 2 O 3 as alloying constituents. In this study, a novel nano-structured ferritic steel (Fe-14Cr-1Ti-0.3Mo-0.5La 2 O 3 , wt%) termed as 14LMT was developed via high energy ball milling and spark plasma sintering. Vickers microhardness values were measured. Microstructural studies of the developed NFSs were performed by EBSD and TEM, which revealed a bimodal grain size distribution. A significant number density of nano-precipitates was observed in the microstructure. The diameter of the precipitates varied between 2-70 nm and the morphology from the spherical to faceted shape. The Cr-La-Ti-O-enriched nano-clusters were identified by APT studies. (authors)

  5. Oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbroeck, P. van.

    1976-10-01

    The publication gives the available data on the DTO2 dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloy developed at C.E.N./S.C.K. Mol, Belgium. DTO2 is a Fe-Cr-Mo ferritic alloy, strengthened by addition of titanium oxide and of titanium leading to the formation of Chi phase. It was developed for use as canning material for fast breeder reactors. (author)

  6. Titanium oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrix, W.; Vandermeulen, W.

    1980-04-01

    The available data on the DT02 and DT3911 ferritic dispersion strengthened alloys, developed at SCK/CEN, Mol, Belgium, are presented. Both alloys consist of Fe - 13% Cr - 1.5% Mo to which 2% TiO 2 and about 3.5% Ti are added (wt.%). Their main use is for the fabrication of fast breeder reactor cladding tubes but their application as turbine blade material is also envisaged for cases where high damping is important. (auth.)

  7. Plasticity of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakine, C.; Prioul, C.; Alamo, A.; Francois, D.

    1993-01-01

    Two 13%Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic alloys, DT and DY, exhibiting different oxide particle size distribution and a χ phase precipitation were studied. Their tensile properties have been tested from 20 to 700 C. Experimental observations during room temperature tensile tests performed in a scanning electronic microscope have shown that the main damage mechanism consists in microcracking of the χ phase precipitates on grain boundaries. These alloys are high tensile and creep resistant between 500 and 700 C. Their strongly stress-sensitive creep behaviour can be described by usual creep laws and incorporating a threshold stress below which the creep rate is negligible. (orig.)

  8. Characterization of precipitates in nano structured 14% Cr ODS alloys for fusion application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, P.; Klimenkov, M.; Lindau, R.; Möslang, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We examine Ti influence on microstructure and mechanical properties of ODS steels. ► Ti addition leads to bimodal grain size distribution. ► The formation of Ti oxide and Y–Ti–O particles is observed in Ti-containing steels. ► The best nanoparticle refinement and tensile strength are obtained with 0.3% Ti. ► Ti exhibits adverse effect on the Charpy impact property. - Abstract: Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) reduced activation ferritic (RAF) steels, have been considered as promising materials for application in fusion power reactors up to about 750 °C. Four ODS RAF steels, with compositions of Fe–13.5Cr–2W–(0–0.2–0.3–0.4)Ti–0.3Y 2 O 3 (in wt.%) were produced by powder metallurgy technique. For the different Ti-contents, the correlation between microstructure and mechanical properties was analyzed by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with energy- dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX) and electron energy loss spectrometer (EELS). A bimodal grain size distribution was observed in all as-hipped Ti-containing ODS alloys. These alloys consisted of coarse grains typical ranging from 1 μm to 8 μm and fine grains well below 1 μm in diameter. The addition of Ti resulted in the formation of spherical Ti oxides rather than Cr oxides owing to the stronger affinity of Ti. The influence of Ti on particle size refinement was striking and the optimum effect was obtained when adding 0.3% Ti. Generally the hardness increased consistently with increasing in Ti content. The ODS alloying with 0.3% Ti exhibit the highest strength due to the optimum refinement of mean ODS particle size.

  9. Positron annihilation characterization of nanostructured ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alinger, M.J.; Glade, S.C.; Wirth, B.D.; Odette, G.R.; Toyama, T.; Nagai, Y.; Hasegawa, M.

    2009-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) were produced by mechanically alloying Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti and 0.25Y 2 O 3 (wt%) powders followed by hot isostatic pressing consolidation at 850, 1000 and 1150 deg. C. Positron annihilation lifetime and orbital momentum spectroscopy measurements are in qualitative agreement with small angle neutron scattering, transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography observations, indicating that up to 50% of the annihilations occur at high densities of Y-Ti-O enriched nm-scale features (NFs). Some annihilations may also occur in small cavities. In Y-free control alloys, that do not contain NFs, positrons primarily annihilate in the Fe-Cr matrix and at features such as dislocations, while a small fraction annihilate in large cavities or Ar bubbles.

  10. Fabrication of the micro/nano-structure superhydrophobic surface on aluminum alloy by sulfuric acid anodizing and polypropylene coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ruomei; Liang, Shuquan; Liu, Jun; Pan, Anqiang; Yu, Y; Tang, Yan

    2013-03-01

    The preparation of the superhydrophobic surface on aluminum alloy by anodizing and polypropylene (PP) coating was reported. Both the different anodizing process and different PP coatings of aluminum alloy were investigated. The effects of different anodizing conditions, such as electrolyte concentration, anodization time and current on the superhydrophobic surface were discussed. By PP coating after anodizing, a good superhydrophobic surface was facilely fabricated. The optimum conditions for anodizing were determined by orthogonal experiments. After the aluminium-alloy was grinded with 600# sandpaper, pretreated by 73 g/L hydrochloric acid solution at 1 min, when the concentration of sulfuric acid was 180 g/L, the concentration of oxalic acid was 5 g/L, the concentration of potassium dichromate was 10 g/L, the concentration of chloride sodium was 50 g/L and 63 g/L of glycerol, anodization time was 20 min, and anodization current was 1.2 A/dm2, anodization temperature was 30-35 degrees C, the best micro-nanostructure aluminum alloy films was obtained. On the other hand, the PP with different concentrations was used to the PP with different concentrations was used to coat the aluminum alloy surface after anodizing. The results showed that the best superhydrophobicity was achieved by coating PP, and the duration of the superhydrophobic surface was improved by modifying the coat the aluminum alloy surface after anodizing. The results showed that the best superhydrophobicity was surface with high concentration PP. The morphologies of micro/nano-structure superhydrophobic surface were further confirmed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The material of PP with the low surface free energy combined with the micro/nano-structures of the surface resulted in the superhydrophobicity of the aluminum alloy surface.

  11. Structural and magnetic Properties of TbZn-substituted calcium barium M-type nano-structured hexa-ferrites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Hasan M. [Department of Physics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800 (Pakistan); Department of Electronics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Islam, M.U., E-mail: dr.misbahulislam@bzu.edu.pk [Department of Physics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800 (Pakistan); Xu, Yongbing [Department of Electronics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Nanjing–York International Centre of Spintronics and Nano-Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Asif Iqbal, M. [Department of Physics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800 (Pakistan); National University of Science and Technology, College of E and ME, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ali, Irshad [Department of Physics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800 (Pakistan)

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • Tb–Zn substituted Ca{sub 0.5}Ba{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 19} samples exhibit single magnetoplumbite phase. • Lattice parameters a and c have increasing values. • Coercivity can be tuned at lower substitution level • Crystallites size was found in the range 18–25 nm by TEM and by Scherrer formula. • These hexa-ferrites are suitable for microwave devices and magnetic recording media. -- Abstract: Effect of TbZn substitution on the structural and magnetic properties of Ca{sub 0.5}Ba{sub 0.5−x}Tb{sub x}Zn{sub y}Fe{sub 12−y}O{sub 19}, (x = 0.00–0.10; y = 0.00–1.00) ferrites prepared by sol–gel auto combustion is reported. The synthesized samples were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Vibrating Sample magnetometery. The X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed single phase M-type hexa-ferrite structure. The lattice parameters were found to increase as TbZn contents increases, which is attributed to the ionic sizes of the implicated cations. The TbZn seems to be completely soluble in the lattice. The results of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy shows that the grain size decreases with increase of TbZn substitution. The coercivity values (1277–2025 Oe) of all samples lies in the range of M-type hexa-ferrite and indicate that an increase of anisotropy was achieved by substitution of TbZn, while the size of nanoparticles was drastically reduced between 18 and 25 nm. The increased anisotropy and fine particle size are useful for many applications, such as improving signal noise ratio of recording devices.

  12. Cold compaction behavior of nano-structured Nd–Fe–B alloy powders prepared by different processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiaoya; Hu, Lianxi; Wang, Erde

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Relative density enhancement and nanocrystallization of Nd 2 Fe 14 B phase are two major effective means to improve magnetic properties. Since the matrix Nd 2 Fe 14 B phase in the starting Nd–Fe–B alloy can be disproportionated into a nano-structured mixture of NdH 2.7 , Fe 2 B, and α-Fe phases during mechanical milling in hydrogen. It is thus important to study the densification behavior of nanocrystalline powders to evaluate and predict the cold compactibility of powders. By comparison with the as milled as well as melt-spun Nd 16 Fe 76 B 8 alloy powders, we find that the as-disproportionated Nd 16 Fe 76 B 8 alloy powder exhibits the best cold compactibility. As evident from the illustration presented below, compaction parameters (representing the powder compactibility) have been determined by fitting density–pressure data with double logarithm compaction equation. Densification mechanisms involved during cold compaction process are clarified in our work by referring to microstructure observation of samples prepared by various methods. As a result, highly densified green magnet compact can be obtained by cold pressing of as-disproportionated NdFeB alloy powders. Highlights: ► Nano-structured disproportionated Nd–Fe–B alloy powders by mechanical milling in hydrogen. ► Highly densified green magnet compact by cold pressing of as-disproportionated Nd–Fe–B alloy powders. ► Density–pressure data fitted well by an empirical powder compaction model. ► As-disproportionated powder showed better compactibility than as milled and melt-spun counterparts. ► The effects of physical properties on powder compactibility and densification mechanisms are clarified. - Abstract: The compaction behavior of nano-structured Nd 16 Fe 76 B 8 (atomic ratio) alloy powders, which were prepared by three different processing routes including melt spinning, mechanical milling in argon, and mechanically activated disproportionation by milling in

  13. Cold compaction behavior of nano-structured Nd-Fe-B alloy powders prepared by different processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaoya [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Hu, Lianxi, E-mail: hulx@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Erde [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2013-02-25

    Graphical abstract: Relative density enhancement and nanocrystallization of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase are two major effective means to improve magnetic properties. Since the matrix Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase in the starting Nd-Fe-B alloy can be disproportionated into a nano-structured mixture of NdH{sub 2.7}, Fe{sub 2}B, and {alpha}-Fe phases during mechanical milling in hydrogen. It is thus important to study the densification behavior of nanocrystalline powders to evaluate and predict the cold compactibility of powders. By comparison with the as milled as well as melt-spun Nd{sub 16}Fe{sub 76}B{sub 8} alloy powders, we find that the as-disproportionated Nd{sub 16}Fe{sub 76}B{sub 8} alloy powder exhibits the best cold compactibility. As evident from the illustration presented below, compaction parameters (representing the powder compactibility) have been determined by fitting density-pressure data with double logarithm compaction equation. Densification mechanisms involved during cold compaction process are clarified in our work by referring to microstructure observation of samples prepared by various methods. As a result, highly densified green magnet compact can be obtained by cold pressing of as-disproportionated NdFeB alloy powders. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nano-structured disproportionated Nd-Fe-B alloy powders by mechanical milling in hydrogen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highly densified green magnet compact by cold pressing of as-disproportionated Nd-Fe-B alloy powders. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Density-pressure data fitted well by an empirical powder compaction model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As-disproportionated powder showed better compactibility than as milled and melt-spun counterparts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of physical properties on powder compactibility and densification mechanisms are clarified. - Abstract: The compaction behavior of nano-structured Nd{sub 16}Fe{sub 76}B{sub 8} (atomic ratio) alloy

  14. Effect of alloying element partitioning on ferrite hardening in a low alloy ferrite-martensite dual phase steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahimian, A., E-mail: ebrahimiana@yahoo.com; Ghasemi Banadkouki, S.S.

    2016-11-20

    In this paper, the effect of carbon and other alloying elements partitioning on ferrite hardening behavior were studied in details using a low alloy AISI4340 ferrite-martensite dual phase (DP) steel. To do so, various re-austenitised samples at 860 °C for 60 min were isothermally heated at 650 °C from 3 to 60 min and then water–quenched to obtain the final ferrite-martensite DP microstructures containing different ferrite and martensite volume fractions. Light and electron microscopic observations were supplemented with electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and nanoindentation tests to explore the localized compositional and hardening variations within ferrite grains in DP samples. The experimental results showed that the ferrite hardness was varied with progress of austenite to ferrite phase transformation in DP samples. In the case of a particular ferrite grain in a particular DP sample, despite a homogeneous distribution of carbon concentration, the ferrite hardness was significantly increased by increasing distance from the central location toward the interfacial α/γ areas. Beside a considerable influence of martensitic phase transformation on adjacent ferrite hardness, these results were rationalized in part to the significant level of Cr and Mo pile-up at α/γ interfaces leading to higher solid solution hardening effect of these regions. The reduction of potential energy developed by attractive interaction between C-Cr and C-Mo couples toward the carbon enriched prior austenite areas were the dominating driving force for pile-up segregation.

  15. Microstructural examination of commercial ferritic alloys at 299 DPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1995-11-01

    Microstructures and density change measurements are reported for Martensitic commercial steels HT-9 and Modified 9Cr-lMo (T9) and oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloys MA956 and NU957 following irradiation in the FFTF/MOTA at 420 degrees C to 200 DPA. Swelling as determined by density change remains below 2% for all conditions. Microstructures are found to be stable except in recrystallized grains of MA957, which are fabrication artifacts, with only minor swelling in the Martensitic steels and α' precipitation in alloys with 12% or more chromium. These results further demonstrate the high swelling resistance and microstructural stability of the ferritic alloy class

  16. Effect of Ca substitution on some physical properties of nano-structured and bulk Ni-ferrite samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assar, S. T.; Abosheiasha, H. F.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles of Ni1-xCaxFe2O4 (x=0.0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06 and 0.10) were prepared by citrate precursor method. A part of these samples was sintered at 600 °C for 2 h in order to keep the particles within the nano-size while the other part was sintered at 1000 °C to let the particles to grow to the bulk size. The effect of Ca2+ ion substitution in nickel ferrite on some structural, magnetic, electrical and thermal properties was investigated. All samples were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). A two probe method was used to measure the dc electrical conductivity whereas the photoacoustic (PA) technique was used to determine the thermal diffusivity of the samples. To interpret different experimental results for nano and bulk samples some cation distributions were assumed based on the VSM and XRD data. These suggested cation distributions give logical explanations for other experimental results such as the observed values of the absorption bands in FTIR spectra and the dc conductivity results. Finally, in the thermal measurements it was found that increasing the Ca2+ ion content causes a decrease in the thermal diffusivity of both nano and bulk samples. The explanation of this behavior is ascribed to the phonon-phonon scattering.

  17. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T; Asta, Mark D; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E; Liaw, Peter K

    2015-11-09

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.

  18. High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Zirconium Alloy with Nano structured Oxide Layer in Air Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y. J.; Kim, J. W.; Park, J. W.; Cho, S. O.

    2016-01-01

    If the temperature of the cladding materials increases above 1000 .deg. C, which can be caused by a loss of coolant accident (LOCA), Zr becomes an auto-oxidation catalyst and hence produces a huge amount of hydrogen gas from water. Therefore, many investigations are being carried out to prevent (or reduce) the hydrogen production from Zr-based cladding materials in the nuclear reactors. Our team has developed an anodization technique by which nanostructured oxide can be formed on various flat metallic elements such as Al, Ti, and Zr-based alloy. Anodization is a simple electrochemical technique and requires only a power supply and an electrolyte. In this study, Zr-based alloys with nanostructured oxide layers were oxidized by using Thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) and compared with the pristine one. It reveals that the nanostructured oxide layer can prevent oxidation of substrate metal in air. Oxidation behavior of the pristine Zr-Nb-Sn alloy and the Zr-Nb-Sn alloy with nanostructured oxide layer evaluated by measuring weight gain (TGA). In comparison with the pristine Zr-Nb-Sn alloy, weight gain of the Zr-Nb-Sn alloy with nanostructured oxide layer is lower than 10% even for 12 hours oxidation in air.

  19. Radiation induced phosphorus segregation in austenitic and ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brimhall, J.L.; Baer, D.R.; Jones, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation induced surface segregation (RIS) of phosphorus in stainless steel attained a maximum at a dose of 0.8 dpa then decreased continually with dose. This decrease in the surface segregation of phosphorus at high dose levels has been attributed to removal of the phosphorus layer by ion sputtering. Phosphorus is not replenished since essentially all of the phosphorus within the irradiation zone has been segregated to the surface. Sputter removal can explain the previously reported absence of phosphorus segregation in ferritic alloys irradiated at high dosessup(1,2) (>1 dpa) since irradiation of ferritic alloys to low doses has shown measurable RIS. This sputtering phenomenon places an inherent limitation to the heavy ion irradiation technique for the study of surface segregation of impurity elements. The magnitude of the segregation in ferritics is still much less than in stainless steel which can be related to the low damage accumulation in these alloys. (orig.)

  20. Design and screening of nanoprecipitates-strengthened advanced ferritic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yang, Ying [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chen, Tianyi [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sridharan, K. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); He, Li [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-12-30

    Advanced nuclear reactors as well as the life extension of light water reactors require advanced alloys capable of satisfactory operation up to neutron damage levels approaching 200 displacements per atom (dpa). Extensive studies, including fundamental theories, have demonstrated the superior resistance to radiation-induced swelling in ferritic steels, primarily inherited from their body-centered cubic (bcc) structure. This study aims at developing nanoprecipitates strengthened advanced ferritic alloys for advanced nuclear reactor applications. To be more specific, this study aims at enhancing the amorphization ability of some precipitates, such as Laves phase and other types of intermetallic phases, through smart alloying strategy, and thereby promote the crystalline®amorphous transformation of these precipitates under irradiation.

  1. Path E alloys: ferritic material development for magnetic fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, J.J.

    1980-09-01

    The application of ferritic materials in irradiation environments has received greatly expanded attention in the last few years, both internationally and in the United States. Ferritic materials are found to be resistant to irradiation damage and have in many cases superior properties to those of AISI 316. It has been shown that for magnetic fusion energy applications the low thermal expansion behavior of the ferritic alloy class will result in lower thermal stresses during reactor operation, leading to significantly longer ETF operating lifetimes. The Magnetic Fusion Energy Program therefore now includes a ferritic alloy option for alloy selection and this option has been designated Path E

  2. Micro/nano structured coatings of light alloys by cold spray for surface protection and repair of high value-added components: State of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedoya, J.; Cinca, N.; Guilemany, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    The Cold Gas Spray - CGS technique has greatly attracted the attention of the researchers in the last decade due to advantages compared to other conventional thermal spray processes. It presents outstanding characteristics such as high density coatings and absence of thermal degradation (oxidation or phase transformation). In addition, CGS is an efficient and green technology. This paper presents a bibliographic review related to micro/nano structured aluminium-based coatings of by CGS on light alloy substrates. It provides an overview of the feasibility of using the Cold Gas Spray as a technique for the protection, recovery and repair of high value-added components, especially those made of light alloys (aluminium and magnesium base) which, by their low density and mechanical properties, are widely used in several industrial sectors such as transport, aerospace and power generation. (Author)

  3. Fracture toughness of ferritic alloys irradiated at FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.

    1986-05-01

    Ferritic compact tension specimens loaded in the Material Open Test Assembly (MOTA) for irradiation during FFTF Cycle 4 were tested at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 428/degree/C. The electrical potential single specimen method was used to measure the fracture toughness of the specimens. Results showed that the fracture toughness of both HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo decreases with increasing test temperature and that the toughness of HT-9 was about 30% higher than that of 9Cr-1Mo. In addition, increasing irradiation temperature resulted in an increase in tearing modulus for both alloys. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  4. Development of New Heats of Advanced Ferritic/Martensitic Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloy, Stuart Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pestovich, Kimberly Shay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Anderoglu, Osman [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Aydogan, Eda [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-23

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program is investigating methods of transmuting minor actinides in various fuel cycle options. To achieve this goal, new fuels and cladding materials must be developed and tested to high burnup levels (e.g. >20%) requiring cladding to withstand very high doses (greater than 200 dpa) while in contact with the coolant and the fuel. To develop and qualify materials to a total fluence greater than 200 dpa requires development of advanced alloys and irradiations in fast reactors to test these alloys. Recent results from testing numerous ferritic/martensitic steels at low temperatures suggest that improvements in low temperature radiation tolerance can be achieved through carefully controlling the nitrogen content in these alloys. Thus, four new heats of HT-9 were produced with controlled nitrogen content: two by Metalwerks and two by Sophisticated Alloys. Initial results on these new alloys are presented including microstructural analysis and hardness testing. Future testing will include irradiation testing with ions and in reactor.

  5. Field emission properties of nano-structured cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) synthesized by low-temperature chemical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, S. M.; Suryawanshi, S. R.; More, M. A.; Sen, Debasis; Kolekar, Y. D.; Ramana, C. V.

    2018-06-01

    We report on the field-emission properties of structure-morphology controlled nano-CoFe2O4 (CFO) synthesized via a simple and low-temperature chemical method. Structural analyses indicate that the spongy-CFO (approximately, 2.96 nm) is nano-structured, spherical, uniformly-distributed, cubic-structured and porous. Field emission studies reveal that CFO exhibit low turn-on field (4.27 V/μm) and high emission current-density (775 μA/cm2) at a lower applied electric field of 6.80 V/μm. In addition, extremely good emission current stability is obtained at a pre-set value of 1 μA and high emission spot-density over large area (2 × 2 cm2) suggesting the applicability of these materials for practical applications in vacuum micro-/nano-electronics.

  6. Effects of neutron irradiation on microstructure in experimental and commercial ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Thomas, L.E.

    1983-05-01

    A series of microstructural studies have been undertaken on fast-reactor-irradiated specimens of experimental ferritic alloys and ferritic/martensitic commercial alloys covering a broad range of compositions and starting microstructures. It is found that voids do indeed form in ferritic alloys and that dislocation loops and tangles are created during irradiation at temperatures below 500 0 C. Swelling rates as high as 0.25% per 10 22 n/cm 2 have been measured. However, the major effect of irradiation is precipitation and precipitation can suppress void swelling completely and/or be responsible for degradation of mechanical properties

  7. Fatigue and fracture behavior of low alloy ferritic forged steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, V.; Sharma, A.K.; Muktibodh, U.C.; Borwankar, Neeraj; Singh, D.K.; Srinivasan, K.N.; Kulkarni, R.G.

    2016-01-01

    Low alloy ferritic steels are widely used in nuclear industry for the construction of pressure vessels. Pressure vessel forged low alloy steels 20MnMoNi55 (modified) have been developed indigenously. Experiments have been carried out to study the Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) and fracture behavior of these forged steels. Fully reversed strain controlled LCF testing at room temperature and at 350 °C has been carried out at a constant strain rate, and for different axial strain amplitude levels. LCF material behavior has been studied from cyclic stress-strain responses and the strain-life relationships. Fracture behavior of the steel has been studied based on tests carried out for crack growth rate and fracture toughness (J-R curve). Further, responses of fatigue crack growth rate tests have been compared with the rate evaluated from fatigue precracking carried out for fracture toughness (J-R) tests. Fractography of the samples have been carried out to reveal dominant damage mechanisms in crack propagation and fracture. The fatigue and fracture properties of indigenously developed low alloy steel 20MnMoNi55 (modified) steels are comparable with similar class of steels. (author)

  8. Dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy for use in liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, J.J.

    1978-01-01

    A dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloy is provided which has high-temperature strength and is readily fabricable at ambient temperatures, and which is useful as structural elements of liquid-metal fast breeder reactors. 4 tables

  9. Effect of zinc substitution on the structural, electrical and magnetic properties of nano-structured Ni0.5Co0.5Fe2O4 ferrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, K. Vijaya; Sailaja, B.; Jalaiah, K.; Shibeshi, Paulos Taddesse; Ravi, M.

    2018-04-01

    A series of Ni0.5Co0.5-xZnxFe2O4 (x = 0, 0.02, 0.04 and 0.06) nanoferrites were synthesized by sol-gel method using citric acid as chelating reagent. The synthesized ferrite systems are characterized by XRD, SEM, FTIR, ESR and dielectric techniques. The formation of cubic spinel phase belonging to space group Fd3m is identified from the X-ray diffraction patterns. SEM showed the particles are in spherical shape with an average grain size 5-10 nm. FTIR spectra portrait the fundamental absorption bands in the range 400-600 cm-1 relating to octahedral and tetrahedral sites. Dielectric properties are investigated over the frequency range of 20 Hz to 1 MHz at room temperature. A difference in dielectric constant (εr) and dissipation factor (tanδ) of the ferrites has been observed. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss tangent decreases exponentially with increase in frequency. The obtained results are good agreeing with the reported values.

  10. A novel sandwich Fe-Mn damping alloy with ferrite shell prepared by vacuum annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Bingnan; Peng, Huabei; Wen, Yuhua

    2018-04-01

    To improve the corrosion resistance of high strength Fe-Mn damping alloys, we fabricated a novel sandwich Fe-17.5Mn damping alloy with Mn-depleted ferrite shell by vacuum annealing at 1100 °C. The formation behavior of the ferrite shell obeys the parabolic law for the vacuum annealed Fe-17.5Mn alloy at 1100 °C. The sandwich Fe-17.5Mn alloy with ferrite shell exhibits not only better corrosion resistance but also higher damping capacity than the conventional annealed Fe-17.5Mn alloy under argon atmosphere. The existence of only ferrite shell on the surface accounts for the better corrosion in the sandwich Fe-17.5Mn alloy. The better damping capacity in the sandwich Fe-17.5Mn alloy is owed to more stacking faults inside both ɛ martensite and γ austenite induced by the stress from ferrite shell. Vacuum annealing is a new way to improve the corrosion resistance and damping capacity of Fe-Mn damping alloys.

  11. Alloys influence in ferritic steels with hydrogen attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moro, L; Rey Saravia, D; Lombardich, J; Saggio, M; Juan, A; Blanco, J

    2003-01-01

    Materials exposed to a corrosive environment and high temperatures, are associated with a decrease of their mechanical properties and embitterment.At room temperatures atomic hydrogen diffuses easily through metals structure, it accumulates in lattice defects forming molecular hydrogen and generating cracking due to internal stresses.Under high temperatures the phenomenon is more complex.The steels in these conditions present different structures of precipitates, that the change under creep conditions period.In this work it is determined the influence of Cr and V alloys, the changes of ferritic steel resistance in a corrosive environment and high temperatures.1.25 Cr 1 Mo 0.25 V and 2.25Cr 1 Mo under different loads and temperatures previously attacked by hydrogen environment.The hydrogen is induced by the electrolytic technique, optimizing the choice of temperatures, current density, electrolyte, etc. In order to control an adequate cathode charge, a follow up procedure is carried out by electronic barrier microscopy.After the attack, the material is settled at room temperatures for certain period of time, to allow the hydrogen to leave and evaluate the residual damage.Creep by torsion assays, under constant load and temperature is used as an experimental technique.With the outcome data curves are drawn in order to study the secondary creep rate, with the applied load and temperature, determining the value of stress exponent n and the activation energy Q.Comparing to equal assays to the same ferritic steels but non attacked by hydrogen, these values allows the prediction of microstructure changes present during these tests

  12. Effects of consolidation temperature, strength and microstructure on fracture toughness of nanostructured ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao, P.; Odette, G.R.; Yamamoto, T.; Alinger, M.; Hoelzer, D.; Gragg, D.

    2007-01-01

    Fully consolidated nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) were prepared by attritor milling pre-alloyed Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti and 0.3 wt% Y 2 O 3 powders, followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) at 1000 o C or 1150 o C at 200 MPa for 4 h. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed similar bimodal distributions of fine and coarse ferrite grains in both cases. However, as expected, the alloy microhardness decreased with increasing in HIPing temperature. Three point bend tests on single edge notched specimens, with a nominal root radius ρ = 0.15 mm, were used to measure the notch fracture toughness, K ρ , as a function of test temperature. The K ρ curves were found to be similar for both processing conditions. It appears that the coarser ferrite grains control cleavage fracture, in a way that is independent of alloy strength and HIPing temperature

  13. Radiation induced nano structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibragimova, E.M.; Kalanov, M.U.; Khakimov, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Nanometer-size silicon clusters have been attracting much attention due to their technological importance, in particular, as promising building blocks for nano electronic and nano photonic systems. Particularly, silicon wires are of great of interest since they have potential for use in one-dimensional quantum wire high-speed field effect transistors and light-emitting devices with extremely low power consumption. Carbon and metal nano structures are studied very intensely due to wide possible applications. Radiation material sciences have been dealing with sub-micron objects for a long time. Under interaction of high energy particles and ionizing radiation with solids by elastic and inelastic mechanisms, at first point defects are created, then they form clusters, column defects, disordered regions (amorphous colloids) and finally precipitates of another crystal phase in the matrix. Such irradiation induced evolution of structure defects and phase transformations was observed by X-diffraction techniques in dielectric crystals of quartz and corundum, which exist in and crystal modifications. If there is no polymorphism, like in alkali halide crystals, then due to radiolysis halogen atoms are evaporated from the surface that results in non-stoichiometry or accumulated in the pores formed by metal vacancies in the sub-surface layer. Nano-pores are created by intensive high energy particles irradiation at first chaotically and then they are ordered and in part filled by inert gas. It is well-known mechanism of radiation induced swelling and embrittlement of metals and alloys, which is undesirable for construction materials for nuclear reactors. Possible solution of this problem may come from nano-structured materials, where there is neither swelling nor embrittlement at gas absorption due to very low density of the structure, while strength keeps high. This review considers experimental observations of radiation induced nano-inclusions in insulating

  14. Synergistic alloying effect on microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of Cu precipitation-strengthened ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Y.R.; Li, Y.P.; Hirata, A.; Zhang, Y.; Fujita, T.; Furuhara, T.; Liu, C.T.; Chiba, A.; Chen, M.W.

    2013-01-01

    We report the influence of alloying elements (Ni, Al and Mn) on the microstructural evolution of Cu-rich nanoprecipitates and the mechanical properties of Fe–Cu-based ferritic alloys. It was found that individual additions of Ni and Al do not give rise to an obvious strengthening effect, compared with the binary Fe–Cu parent alloy, although Ni segregates at the precipitate/matrix interface and Al partitions into Cu-rich precipitates. In contrast, the co-addition of Ni and Al results in the formation of core–shell nanoprecipitates with a Cu-rich core and a B2 Ni–Al shell, leading to a dramatic improvement in strength. The coarsening rate of the core–shell precipitates is about two orders of magnitude lower than that of monolithic Cu-rich precipitates in the binary and ternary Fe–Cu alloys. Reinforcement of the B2 Ni–Al shells by Mn partitioning further improves the strength of the precipitation-strengthened alloys by forming ultrastable and high number density core–shell nanoprecipitates

  15. Nano-structureal and nano-chemical analysis of Ni-based alloy/low alloy steel dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Shin, Sang Hun; Kim, Jong Jin; Jung, Ju Ang; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2012-01-01

    The dissimilar metal joints welded between Ni-based alloy, Alloy 690 and low alloy steel, A533 Gr. B with Alloy 152 filler metal were characterized by using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, secondary ion mass spectrometry and 3-dimensional atom probe tomography. It was found that in the weld root region, the weld was divided into several regions including unmixed zone in Ni-base alloy, fusion boundary, and heat-affected zone in the low alloy steel. The result of nanostructural and nanochemical analyses in this study showed the non-homogeneous distribution of elements with higher Fe but lower Mn, Ni and Cr in A533 Gr. B compared with Alloy 152, and the precipitation of carbides near the fusion boundary.

  16. Nano-structureal and nano-chemical analysis of Ni-based alloy/low alloy steel dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Shin, Sang Hun; Kim, Jong Jin; Jung, Ju Ang; Kim, Ji Hyun [Interdisciplinary School of Green Energy, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    The dissimilar metal joints welded between Ni-based alloy, Alloy 690 and low alloy steel, A533 Gr. B with Alloy 152 filler metal were characterized by using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, secondary ion mass spectrometry and 3-dimensional atom probe tomography. It was found that in the weld root region, the weld was divided into several regions including unmixed zone in Ni-base alloy, fusion boundary, and heat-affected zone in the low alloy steel. The result of nanostructural and nanochemical analyses in this study showed the non-homogeneous distribution of elements with higher Fe but lower Mn, Ni and Cr in A533 Gr. B compared with Alloy 152, and the precipitation of carbides near the fusion boundary.

  17. Effects of irradiation on ferritic alloys and implications for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1986-07-01

    This paper reviews the ADIP irradiation effects data base on ferritic (martensitic) alloys to provide reactor teams with an understanding of how such alloys will behave for fusion reactor first wall applications. Irradiation affects dimensional stability, strength and toughness. Dimensional stability is altered by precipitation and void swelling. Swelling as high as 25% may occur in some ferritic alloys at 500 dpa. Irradiation alters strength both during and following irradiation. Irradiation at low temperatures leads to hardening whereas at higher temperatures and high exposures, precipitate coarsening can result in softening. Toughness can also be adversely affected by irradiation. Failure can occur in ferritic in a brittle manner and irradiation induced hardening causes brittle failure at higher temperatures. Even at high test temperatures, toughness is reduced due to reduced failure initiation stresses. 39 refs

  18. Oxidation Kinetics of Ferritic Alloys in High-Temperature Steam Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Stephen S.; White, Josh; Hosemann, Peter; Nelson, Andrew

    2018-02-01

    High-temperature isothermal steam oxidation kinetic parameters of several ferritic alloys were determined by thermogravimetric analysis. The oxidation kinetic constant ( k) was measured as a function of temperature from 900°C to 1200°C. The results show a marked increase in oxidation resistance compared to reference Zircaloy-2, with kinetic constants 3-5 orders of magnitude lower across the experimental temperature range. The results of this investigation supplement previous findings on the properties of ferritic alloys for use as candidate cladding materials and extend kinetic parameter measurements to high-temperature steam environments suitable for assessing accident tolerance for light water reactor applications.

  19. A comparative assessment of the fracture toughness behavior of ferritic-martensitic steels and nanostructured ferritic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Thak Sang, E-mail: thaksang.byun@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Hoelzer, David T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Kim, Jeoung Han [Hanbat National University, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of); Maloy, Stuart A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2017-02-15

    The Fe-Cr alloys with ultrafine microstructures are primary candidate materials for advanced nuclear reactor components because of their excellent high temperature strength and high resistance to radiation-induced damage such as embrittlement and swelling. Mainly two types of Fe-Cr alloys have been developed for the high temperature reactor applications: the quenched and tempered ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels hardened primarily by ultrafine laths and carbonitrides and the powder metallurgy-based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) by nanograin structure and nanoclusters. This study aims at elucidating the differences and similarities in the temperature and strength dependences of fracture toughness in the Fe-Cr alloys to provide a comparative assessment of their high-temperature structural performance. The K{sub JQ} versus yield stress plots confirmed that the fracture toughness was inversely proportional to yield strength. It was found, however, that the toughness data for some NFAs were outside the band of the integrated dataset at given strength level, which indicates either a significant improvement or deterioration in mechanical properties due to fundamental changes in deformation and fracture mechanisms. When compared to the behavior of NFAs, the FM steels have shown much less strength dependence and formed narrow fracture toughness data bands at a significantly lower strength region. It appeared that at high temperatures ≥600 °C the NFAs cannot retain the nanostructure advantage of high strength and high toughness either by high-temperature embrittlement or by excessive loss of strength. Irradiation studies have revealed, however, that the NFAs have much stronger radiation resistance than tempered martensitic steels, such as lower radiation-induced swelling, finer helium bubble formation, lower irradiation creep rate and reduced low temperature embrittlement.

  20. A comparison study of polymer/cobalt ferrite nano-composites synthesized by mechanical alloying route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Rashidi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effect of different biopolymers such as polyethylene glycol (PEG and polyvinylalcohol (PVA on synthesis and characterization of polymer/cobalt ferrite (CF nano-composites bymechanical alloying method has been systematically investigated. The structural, morphological andmagnetic properties changes during mechanical milling were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD,Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, fieldemission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, and vibrating sample magnetometer techniques(VSM, respectively. The polymeric cobalt ferrite nano-composites were obtained by employing atwo-step procedure: the cobalt ferrite of 20 nm mean particle size was first synthesized by mechanicalalloying route and then was embedded in PEG or PVA biopolymer matrix by milling process. Theresults revealed that PEG melted due to the local temperature raise during milling. Despite thisphenomenon, cobalt ferrite nano-particles were entirely embedded in PEG matrix. It seems, PAV is anappropriate candidate for producing nano-composite samples due to its high melting point. InPVA/CF nano-composites, the mean crystallite size and milling induced strain decreased to 13 nm and0.48, respectively. Moreover, milling process resulted in well distribution of CF in PVA matrix eventhough the mean particle size of cobalt ferrite has not been significantly affecetd. FTIR resultconfirmed the attachment of PVA to the surface of nano-particles. Magnetic properties evaluationshowed that saturation magnetization and coercivity values decreased in nano-composite samplecomparing the pure cobalt ferrite.

  1. Stress corrosion cracking studies on ferritic low alloy pressure vessel steel - water chemistry and modelling aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipping, P.; Ineichen, U.; Cripps, R.

    1994-01-01

    The susceptibility of low alloy ferritic pressure vessel steels (A533-B type) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) degradation has been examined using various BWR type coolant chemistries. Fatigue pre-cracked wedge-loaded double cantilever beams and also constantly loaded 25 mm thick compact tension specimens have shown classical SCC attack. The influence of parameters such as dissolved oxygen content, water impurity level and conductivity, material chemical composition (sulphur content) and stress intensity level are discussed. The relevance of SCC as a life-limiting degradation mechanism for low alloy ferritic nuclear power plant PV steel is examined. Some parameters, thought to be relevant for modelling SCC processes in low alloy steels in simulated BWR-type coolant, are discussed. 8 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  2. The creep properties of a low alloy ferritic steel containing an intermetallic precipitate dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batte, A.D.; Murphy, M.C.; Edmonds, D.V.

    1976-01-01

    A good combination of creep rupture ductility and strength together with excellent long term thermal stability, has been obtained from a dispersion of intermetallic Laves phase precipitate in a non-transforming ferritic low alloy steel. The steel is without many of the problems currently associated with the heat affected zone microstructures of low alloy transformable ferritic steels, and can be used as a weld metal. Following suitable development to optimize the composition and heat treatment, such alloys may provide a useful range of weldable creep resistant steels for steam turbine and other high temperature applications. They would offer the unique possibility of easily achievable microstructural uniformity, giving good long term strength and ductility across the entire welded joint

  3. The Effect of H and He on Irradiation Performance of Fe and Ferritic Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubbins, James F.

    2010-01-01

    This research program was designed to look at basic radiation damage and effects and mechanical properties in Fe and ferritic alloys. The program scope included a number of materials ranging from pure single crystal Fe to more complex Fe-Cr-C alloys. The range of materials was designed to examine materials response and performance on ideal/model systems and gradually move to more complex systems. The experimental program was coordinated with a modeling effort. The use of pure and model alloys also facilitated the ability to develop and employ atomistic-scale modeling techniques to understand the inherent physics underlying materials performance.

  4. Computational Design of Creep-Resistant Alloys and Experimental Validation in Ferritic Superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liaw, Peter

    2014-12-31

    A new class of ferritic superalloys containing B2-type zones inside parent L21-type precipitates in a disordered solid-solution matrix, also known as a hierarchical-precipitate strengthened ferritic alloy (HPSFA), has been developed for high-temperature structural applications in fossil-energy power plants. These alloys were designed by the addition of the Ti element into a previously-studied NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy (denoted as FBB8 in this study). In the present research, systematic investigations, including advanced experimental techniques, first-principles calculations, and numerical simulations, have been integrated and conducted to characterize the complex microstructures and excellent creep resistance of HPSFAs. The experimental techniques include transmission-electron microscopy, scanningtransmission- electron microscopy, neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography, which provide detailed microstructural information of HPSFAs. Systematic tension/compression creep tests revealed that HPSFAs exhibit the superior creep resistance, compared with the FBB8 and conventional ferritic steels (i.e., the creep rates of HPSFAs are about 4 orders of magnitude slower than the FBB8 and conventional ferritic steels.) First-principles calculations include interfacial free energies, anti-phase boundary (APB) free energies, elastic constants, and impurity diffusivities in Fe. Combined with kinetic Monte- Carlo simulations of interdiffusion coefficients, and the integration of computational thermodynamics and kinetics, these calculations provide great understanding of thermodynamic and mechanical properties of HPSFAs. In addition to the systematic experimental approach and first-principles calculations, a series of numerical tools and algorithms, which assist in the optimization of creep properties of ferritic superalloys, are utilized and developed. These numerical simulation results are compared with the available experimental data and previous first

  5. The role of processing route on the microstructure of 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazumder, B., E-mail: mazumderb@ornl.gov [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Parish, C.M.; Bei, H. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Miller, M.K. [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys have outstanding high temperature creep properties and enhanced tolerance to radiation damage over conventional ferritic alloys. To achieve these properties, NFAs are fabricated by mechanical alloying of metallic and yttria powders. Atom probe tomography has demonstrated that milling times of at least 40 h are required to produce a uniform distribution of solutes in the flakes. After milling and hot extrusion, the microstructure consists of α-Fe, high number densities of Ti–Y–O-vacancy-enriched nanoclusters, and coarse Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Ti(O,C,N) precipitates on the grain boundaries. In contrast, the as-cast condition consists of α-Fe with 50–100 μm irregularly-shaped Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} pyrochlore precipitates with smaller embedded precipitates with the Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (yttrium–aluminum garnet) crystal structure indicating that this traditional processing route is not a viable approach to achieve the desired microstructure. The nano-hardnesses were also substantially different, i.e., 4 and 8 GPa for the as-cast and as-extruded conditions, respectively. These variances can be explained by the microstructural differences and the effects of the high vacancy content introduced by mechanical alloying, and the strong binding energy of vacancies with O, Ti, and Y atoms that retard diffusion. - Highlights: • Mechanical alloying produces nanostructured ferritic alloy with excellent properties. • Short milling time wastes solutes in low number densities of coarse precipitates. • Milling for 40 h yields UFG alloy with optimum distribution of ultrafine precipitates. • Longer milling times increase cost and increases impurities from attritor mill. • Casting produces undesirable course grain microstructure of α-Fe, YAG and pyrochlore.

  6. Helium sequestration at nanoparticle-matrix interfaces in helium + heavy ion irradiated nanostructured ferritic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parish, C.M., E-mail: parishcm@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Unocic, K.A.; Tan, L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Kondo, S. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto, 611-0011 (Japan); Snead, L.L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hoelzer, D.T.; Katoh, Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2017-01-15

    We irradiated four ferritic alloys with energetic Fe and He ions: one castable nanostructured alloy (CNA) containing Ti-W-Ta-carbides, and three nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). The NFAs were: 9Cr containing Y-Ti-O nanoclusters, and two Fe-12Cr-5Al NFAs containing Y-Zr-O or Y-Hf-O clusters. All four were subjected to simultaneous dual-beam Fe + He ion implantation (650 °C, ∼50 dpa, ∼15 appm He/dpa), simulating fusion-reactor conditions. Examination using scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) revealed high-number-density helium bubbles of ∼8 nm, ∼10{sup 21} m{sup −3} (CNA), and of ∼3 nm, 10{sup 23} m{sup −3} (NFAs). STEM combined with multivariate statistical analysis data mining suggests that the precipitate-matrix interfaces in all alloys survived ∼50 dpa at 650 °C and serve as effective helium trapping sites. All alloys appear viable structural material candidates for fusion or advanced fission energy systems. Among these developmental alloys the NFAs appear to sequester the helium into smaller bubbles and away from the grain boundaries more effectively than the early-generation CNA.

  7. Corrosion studies on Cu-Ni alloys and ferritic steel in salt water for desalination service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibad, P.R.; Balachandra, J.

    1975-01-01

    Corrosion studies on In 838 and In 848 alloys in 3% NaCl solution, synthetic sea water and in 3% NaCl at pH3 and pH10 indicate that the latter alloy is more corrosion resistant than the former at room (28 0 C), and boiling temperature (101 0 C) and at 125 0 C. Ferritic steel is unaffected in boiling synthetic sea water. In boiling 3% NaCl solution at pH3 and pH10, (the pH values adjusted at room temperature) increase in the rate of corrosion of ferritic steel compared to that at room temperature has been observed. A fair correlation between polarization characteristics and dissolution rates in these solutions is seen for all these materials. (author)

  8. Impurity content of reduced-activation ferritic steels and a vanadium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Bloom, E.E.

    1997-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to analyze a reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel and a vanadium alloy for low-level impurities that would compromise the reduced-activation characteristics of these materials. The ferritic steel was from the 5-ton IEA heat of modified F82H, and the vanadium alloy was from a 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti. To compare techniques for analysis of low concentrations of impurities, the vanadium alloy was also examined by glow discharge mass spectrometry. Two other reduced-activation steels and two commercial ferritic steels were also analyzed to determine the difference in the level of the detrimental impurities in the IEA heat and steels for which no extra effort was made to restrict some of the tramp impurities. Silver, cobalt, molybdenum, and niobium proved to be the tramp impurities of most importance. The levels observed in these two materials produced with present technology exceeded the limits for low activation for either shallow land burial or recycling. The chemical analyses provide a benchmark for the improvement in production technology required to achieve reduced activation; they also provide a set of concentrations for calculating decay characteristics for reduced-activation materials. The results indicate the progress that has been made and give an indication of what must still be done before the reduced-activation criteria can be achieved

  9. Effects of irradiation on low-activation ferritic alloys to 45 dpa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Hamilton, M.L.

    1986-06-01

    Nine low activation ferritic alloys covering the range 2 to 12Cr with alloying additions of tungsten and/or vanadium have been irradiated to intermediate fluences of 30 to 45 dpa and tensile tested or examined by transmission electron microscopy in order to determine the effect of increasing neutron dose on properties and microstructure. Changes in properties and microstructure are for the most part completed within 10 dpa but swelling and dislocation evolution continue with increasing dose at 420/degree/C and subgrain coarsening occurs at 600/degree/C. 9 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Effect of Mechanical Alloying Atmospheres and Oxygen Concentration on Mechanical Properties of ODS Ferritic Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Choi, Byoungkwon; Han, Changhee; Kim, Kibaik; Kang, Sukhoon; Chun, Youngbum; Kim, Taekyu

    2013-01-01

    Finely dispersed nano-oxide particles with a high number density in the homogeneous grain matrix are essential to achieve superior mechanical properties at high temperatures, and these unique microstructures can be obtained through the mechanical alloying (MA) and hot consolidation process. The microstructure and mechanical property of ODS steel significantly depends on its powder property and the purity after the MA process. These contents should be carefully controlled to improve the mechanical property at elevated temperature. In particular, appropriate the control of oxygen concentration improves the mechanical property of ODS steel at high temperature. An effective method is to control the mechanical alloying atmosphere by high purity inert gas. In the present study, the effects of mechanical alloying atmospheres and oxygen concentration on the mechanical property of ODS steel were investigated. ODS ferritic alloys were fabricated in various atmospheres, and the HIP process was used to investigate the effects of MA atmospheres and oxygen concentration on the microstructure and mechanical property. ODS ferritic alloys milled in an Ar-H 2 mixture, and He is effective to reduce the excess oxygen concentration. The YH 2 addition made an extremely reduced oxygen concentration by the internal oxygen reduction reaction and resulted in a homogeneous microstructure and superior creep strength

  11. The electrolytic plating of compositionally modulated alloys and laminated metal nano-structures based on an automated computer-controlled dual-bath system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NabiRahni, D.M.A.; Tang, Peter Torben; Leisner, Peter

    1996-01-01

    -controlled plating system for producing large-scale CMA coatings and laminated nano-structures of metals. Electroplating bath constituent concentrations, pH, temperature, mode of agitation, etc, as well as galvanostatic modes, e.g. direct current (d.c.) versus pulsed and/or pulse reversal currents, were optimized......). Effort was also expended in the generation of CMA structures from single electroplating baths where the two metals of interest were present. The characterization results, as elucidated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic absorption spectroscopy and x-ray fluorescence and diffraction methods...

  12. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of MA957: implications to the development of nanocomposited ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alinger, M.J.; Odette, G.R.; Lucas, G.E.

    2002-01-01

    A study to explore approaches to optimizing nanocomposited ferritic alloys was carried out on dispersion strengthened mechanically alloyed (MA) MA957, in the form of extruded bar stock. Previous studies had indicated that this alloy manifested superior high temperature strength and radiation stability, but was extremely brittle in notch impact tests. Thus our objective was to develop a combination of tensile, fracture toughness and microstructural data to clarify the basis for this brittle behavior. To this end, tensile properties and fracture toughness were characterized as a function of temperature in various orientations relative to the grain and inclusion structures. This database along with extensive fractography suggests that brittleness is due to the presence of a large volume fraction of impurity alumina stringers. In orientations where the effects of the stringers are reduced, much higher toughness was observed. These results provide a path for alloy development approach to achieve high strength and toughness

  13. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of MA957: implications to the development of nanocomposited ferritic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alinger, M. J.; Odette, G. R.; Lucas, G. E.

    2002-12-01

    A study to explore approaches to optimizing nanocomposited ferritic alloys was carried out on dispersion strengthened mechanically alloyed (MA) MA957, in the form of extruded bar stock. Previous studies had indicated that this alloy manifested superior high temperature strength and radiation stability, but was extremely brittle in notch impact tests. Thus our objective was to develop a combination of tensile, fracture toughness and microstructural data to clarify the basis for this brittle behavior. To this end, tensile properties and fracture toughness were characterized as a function of temperature in various orientations relative to the grain and inclusion structures. This database along with extensive fractography suggests that brittleness is due to the presence of a large volume fraction of impurity alumina stringers. In orientations where the effects of the stringers are reduced, much higher toughness was observed. These results provide a path for alloy development approach to achieve high strength and toughness.

  14. Ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened alloys by spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allahar, Kerry N., E-mail: KerryAllahar@boisestate.edu [Materials and Science Engineering Department, Boise State University, 1910 University Blvd., Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd., Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Burns, Jatuporn [Materials and Science Engineering Department, Boise State University, 1910 University Blvd., Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd., Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Jaques, Brian [Materials and Science Engineering Department, Boise State University, 1910 University Blvd., Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Wu, Y.Q. [Materials and Science Engineering Department, Boise State University, 1910 University Blvd., Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd., Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Charit, Indrajit [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Idaho, McClure Hall Room 405D, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Cole, James [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Butt, Darryl P. [Materials and Science Engineering Department, Boise State University, 1910 University Blvd., Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd., Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Spark plasma sintering (SPS) was used to consolidate a Fe–16Cr–3Al (wt.%) powder that was mechanically alloyed with Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Ti powders to produce 0.5 Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 0.5 Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}–1Ti powders. The effects of mechanical alloying and sintering conditions on the microstructure, relative density and hardness of the sintered oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are presented. Scanning electron microscopy indicated a mixed fine-grain and coarse-grain microstructure that was attributed to recrystallization and grain growth during sintering. Analysis of the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT) data identified Y–O and Y–O–Ti nanoclusters. Elemental ratios of these nanoclusters were consistent with that observed in hot-extruded ODS alloys. The influence of Ti was to refine the grains as well as the nanoclusters with there being greater number density and smaller sizes of the Y–O–Ti nanoclusters as compared to the Y–O nanoclusters. This resulted in the Ti-containing samples being harder than the Ti-free alloys. The hardness of the alloys with the Y–O–Ti nanoclusters was insensitive to sintering time while smaller hardness values were associated with longer sintering times for the alloys with the Y–O nanoclusters. Pressures greater than 80 MPa are recommended for improved densification as higher sintering temperatures and longer sintering times at 80 MPa did not improve the relative density beyond 97.5%.

  15. Development of new ferritic alloys reinforced by nano titanium nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathon, M.H.; Perrut, M.; Poirier, L.; Ratti, M.; Hervé, N.; Carlan, Y. de

    2015-01-01

    Nano-reinforced steels are considered for future nuclear reactors or for application at high temperature like the heat exchangers tubes or plates. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys are the most known of the nano-reinforced alloys. They exhibit high creep strength as well as high resistance to radiation damage. This article deals with the development of new nano reinforced alloys called Nitride Dispersed Strengthened (NDS). Those are also considered for nuclear applications and could exhibit higher ductility with a simplest fabrication way. Two main fabrication routes were studied: the co-milling of Fe–18Cr1W0.008N and TiH 2 powders and the plasma nitration at low temperature of a Fe–18Cr1W0.8Ti powder. The materials were studied mainly by Small Angle Neutron Scattering. The feasibility of the reinforcement by nano-nitride particles is demonstrated. The final size of the nitrides can be similar (few nanometers) to the nano-oxides observed in ODS alloys. The mechanical properties of the new NDS show an amazing ductility at high temperature for a nano-reinforced alloy

  16. Development of new ferritic alloys reinforced by nano titanium nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathon, M.H., E-mail: marie-helene.mathon@cea.fr [Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, CEA-CNRS, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Perrut, M., E-mail: mikael.perrut@onera.fr [Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, CEA-CNRS, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Poirier, L., E-mail: poirier@nitruvid.com [Bodycote France and Belgium, 9 r Jean Poulmarch, 95100 Argenteuil (France); Ratti, M., E-mail: mathieu.ratti@snecma.fr [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées, F91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hervé, N., E-mail: nicolas.herve@cea.fr [CEA, DRT, LITEN, F38054 Grenoble (France); Carlan, Y. de, E-mail: yann.decarlan@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées, F91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-01-15

    Nano-reinforced steels are considered for future nuclear reactors or for application at high temperature like the heat exchangers tubes or plates. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys are the most known of the nano-reinforced alloys. They exhibit high creep strength as well as high resistance to radiation damage. This article deals with the development of new nano reinforced alloys called Nitride Dispersed Strengthened (NDS). Those are also considered for nuclear applications and could exhibit higher ductility with a simplest fabrication way. Two main fabrication routes were studied: the co-milling of Fe–18Cr1W0.008N and TiH{sub 2} powders and the plasma nitration at low temperature of a Fe–18Cr1W0.8Ti powder. The materials were studied mainly by Small Angle Neutron Scattering. The feasibility of the reinforcement by nano-nitride particles is demonstrated. The final size of the nitrides can be similar (few nanometers) to the nano-oxides observed in ODS alloys. The mechanical properties of the new NDS show an amazing ductility at high temperature for a nano-reinforced alloy.

  17. Detection and quantification of solute clusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.K., E-mail: millermk@ornl.gov [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6139 (United States); Reinhard, D., E-mail: David.Reinhard@ametek.com [CAMECA Instruments, Inc., 5500 Nobel Drive, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Larson, D.J., E-mail: David.Larson@ametek.com [CAMECA Instruments, Inc., 5500 Nobel Drive, Madison, WI 53711 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Simulated APT data indicate that solute clusters can be resolved at 80% detection efficiency. • Solute clusters containing 2–9 atoms were detected in a prototype ∼80% detection efficiency LEAP. • High densities, 1.8 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −3}, of solute clusters were detected in as-milled flakes of 14YWT. • Lower densities, 1.2 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −3}, were detected in the stir zone of a FSW. • Vacancies stabilize the clusters, which retard diffusion and confers excellent stability. - Abstract: A series of simulated atom probe datasets were examined with a friends-of-friends method to establish the detection efficiency required to resolve solute clusters in the ferrite phase of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy. The size and number densities of solute clusters in the ferrite of the as-milled mechanically-alloyed condition and the stir zone of a friction stir weld were estimated with a prototype high-detection-efficiency (∼80%) local electrode atom probe. High number densities, 1.8 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −3} and 1.2 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −3}, respectively of solute clusters containing between 2 and 9 solute atoms of Ti, Y and O and were detected for these two conditions. These results support first principle calculations that predicted that vacancies stabilize these Ti–Y–O– clusters, which retard diffusion and contribute to the excellent high temperature stability of the microstructure and radiation tolerance of nanostructured ferritic alloys.

  18. Postirradiation deformation behavior in ferritic Fe-Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.; Gardner, P.L.

    1992-06-01

    It has been demonstrated that fast-neutron irradiation produces significant hardening in simple Fe-(3-18)Cr binary alloys irradiated to about 35 dpa in the temperature range 365 to 420 degrees C, whereas irradiation at 574 degrees C produces hardening only for 15% or more chromium. The irradiation-induced changes in tensile properties are discussed in terms of changes in the power law work-hardening exponent. The work-hardening exponent of the lower chromium alloys decreased significantly after low-temperature irradiation (≤ 420 degrees C) but increased after irradiation at 574 degrees C. The higher chromium alloys failed either in cleavage or in a mixed ductile/brittle fashion. Deformation microstructures are presented to support the tensile behavior

  19. Strain hardening of cold-rolled lean-alloyed metastable ferritic-austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papula, Suvi [Aalto University School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 14200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Anttila, Severi [Centre for Advanced Steels Research, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 4200, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Talonen, Juho [Outokumpu Oyj, P.O. Box 245, FI-00181 Helsinki (Finland); Sarikka, Teemu; Virkkunen, Iikka; Hänninen, Hannu [Aalto University School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, P.O. Box 14200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2016-11-20

    Mechanical properties and strain hardening of two pilot-scale lean-alloyed ferritic-austenitic stainless steels having metastable austenite phase, present at 0.50 and 0.30 volume fractions, have been studied by means of tensile testing and nanoindentation. These ferritic-austenitic stainless steels have high strain-hardening capacity, due to the metastable austenite phase, which leads to an improved uniform elongation and higher tensile strength in comparison with most commercial lean duplex stainless steels. According to the results, even as low as 0.30 volume fraction of austenite seems efficient for achieving nearly 40% elongation. The austenite phase is initially the harder phase, and exhibits more strain hardening than the ferrite phase. The rate of strain hardening and the evolution of the martensite phase were found to depend on the loading direction: both are higher when strained in the rolling direction as compared to the transverse direction. Based on the mechanical testing, characterization of the microstructure by optical/electron microscopy, magnetic balance measurements and EBSD texture analysis, this anisotropy in mechanical properties of the cold-rolled metastable ferritic-austenitic stainless steels can be explained by the elongated dual-phase microstructure, fiber reinforcement effect of the harder austenite phase and the presence and interplay of rolling textures in the two phases.

  20. The microstructure and mechanical properties of Al-containing 9Cr ODS ferritic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guangming [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Zhou, Zhangjian, E-mail: zhouzhj@mater.ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Mo, Kun [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Wang, Pinghuai [Fusion Reactor & Materials Division, Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Miao, Yinbin [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Li, Shaofu; Wang, Man [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Xiang [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Gong, Mengqiang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Almer, Jonathan [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Stubbins, James F. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States)

    2015-11-05

    In this study, a 9Cr oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy with additional corrosion resistant element Al was fabricated by mechanical alloying (MA) and hot pressing (HP) to explore the impact of Al on the microstructure and mechanical property of a 9Cr ODS alloy. It is found that the Al completely dissolved into the Fe–Cr matrix after milling for 30 h. The minor phases in the Al-containing 9Cr ODS ferritic alloy were investigated by a high-energy X-ray, and were identified to be orthorhombic-YAlO{sub 3} (YAP), bcc-Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YAG), monoclinic-Al{sub 2}Y{sub 4}O{sub 9} (YAM), and hexagonal-YAlO{sub 3} (YAH). These phases were further confirmed by selected area diffraction pattern (SADP), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). In addition, their volume fractions were also calculated from the integrated intensities. According to the analysis of the particles and their formation sequences, the larger particles (greater than 100 nm) are identified as mainly YAG and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles, while the particles with small size (less than 30 nm) are likely primarily YAM, YAH, and YAP particles. The yielding strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) at RT are 563 MPa and 744 MPa, respectively, while the YS and UTS at 700 °C are 245 MPa and 276 MPa, respectively. Although the addition Al in ODS alloys decreases the strength at RT, the values at high temperature are similar to those obtained for 9Cr ODS alloys strengthened by fine Y–Ti–O particles. - Graphical abstract: Synchrotron X-ray diffraction line profile of the 9CrAl ODS alloy; (Ferrite matrix phases, along with minor phases, orthorhombic YAlO{sub 3} (yttrium aluminum perovskite, YAP), bcc Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (yttrium aluminum garnet, YAG), monoclinic Al{sub 2}Y{sub 4}O{sub 9} (yttrium aluminum monoclinic, YAM), and hexagonal YAlO{sub 3} (yttium aluminum hexagonal, YAH) were recognized.). - Highlights: • The

  1. Ion-induced swelling of ODS ferritic alloy MA957 tubing to 500 dpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toloczko, M.B., E-mail: mychailo.toloczko@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Garner, F.A. [Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Voyevodin, V.N.; Bryk, V.V.; Borodin, O.V.; Mel’nychenko, V.V.; Kalchenko, A.S. [Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2014-10-15

    In order to study the potential swelling behavior of the ODS ferritic alloy MA957 at very high dpa levels, specimens were prepared from pressurized tubes that were unirradiated archives of tubes previously irradiated in FFTF to doses as high as 110 dpa. These unirradiated specimens were irradiated with 1.8 MeV Cr{sup +} ions to doses ranging from 100 to 500 dpa and examined by transmission electron microscopy. No co-injection of helium or hydrogen was employed. It was shown that compared to several tempered ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated in the same facility, these tubes were rather resistant to void swelling, reaching a maximum value of only 4.5% at 500 dpa and 450 °C. In this fine-grained material, the distribution of swelling was strongly influenced by the presence of void denuded zones along the grain boundaries.

  2. Charpy impact test results of four low activation ferritic alloys irradiated at 370{degrees}C to 15 DPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Miniature CVN specimens of four low activation ferritic alloys have been impact tested following irradiation at 370{degrees}C to 15 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of control specimens indicates that degradation in the impact behavior occurs in each of these four alloys. The 9Cr-2W alloy referred to as GA3X and the similar alloy F82H with 7.8Cr-2W appear most promising for further consideration as candidate structural materials in fusion energy system applications. These two alloys exhibit a small DBTT shift to higher temperatures but show increased absorbed energy on the upper shelf.

  3. Microstructural evolution of ferritic steel powder during mechanical alloying with iron oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Yuren; Liu, Yong; Liu, Donghua; Tang, Bei [Central South Univ., State Key Lab. of Powder Metallurgy, Changsha (China); Liu, C.T. [The Hong Kong Polytechnic Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong (China)

    2011-02-15

    Mechanical alloying of mixed powders is of great importance for preparing oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels. In this study, the microstructural evolution of ferritic steel powder mixed with TiH{sub x}, YH{sub 2} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the process of mechanical alloying is systematically investigated by using X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and microhardness tests. It is found that titanium, yttrium hydrides and iron oxide are completely dissolved during milling, and homogeneous element distribution can be achieved after milling for 12 h. The disintegration of the composite powder particles occurs at 24 h and reaches the balance of welding and fracturing after 36 h. The oxygen content increases sharply with the disintegration of powder particles due to the absorption of oxygen at the solid/gas interface from the milling atmosphere, which is the main source of extra oxygen in the milled powder. Grain refinement down to nanometer level occurs due to the severe plastic deformation of particles; however, the grain size does not change much with further disintegration of particles. The hardness increases with milling time and then becomes stable during further milling. The study indicates that the addition of iron oxide and hydrides may be more beneficial for the dispersion and homogenization of chemical compositions in the powder mixture, thus shortening the mechanical alloying process. (orig.)

  4. Microstructural examination of several commercial ferritic alloys irradiated to high fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    Microstructural observations are reported for a series of five commercial ferritic alloys, 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo, H-11, EM-12, 416, and 430F, covering the composition range 2.25 to 17% chromium, following EBR-II irradiation over the temperature range 400 to 650 0 C and to a maximum fluence of 17.6 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV). These materials were confirmed to be low void swelling with maximum swelling of 0.63% measured in EM-12 following irradiation at 400 0 C to 14.0 x 10 22 n/cm 2 . A wide range of precipitation response was found both as a function of alloy and irradiation temperature. Precipitates observed included M 6 C, Mo 2 C, Chi, Laves, M 23 C 6 , α' and a low temperature phase as yet unidentified. It is predicted, based on these results, that the major impact of irradiation on the ferritic alloy class will be changes in postirradiation mechanical properties due to precipitation

  5. Microstructural examination of several commercial ferritic alloys irradiated to high fluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, D. S.

    Microstructural observations are reported for a series of five commercial ferritic alloys, 2 {1}/{4}Cr-1Mo , H-11, EM-12, 416, and 430F, covering the composition range 2.25 to 17% chromium, following EBR-II irradiation over the temperature range 400 to 650°C and to a maximum fluence of 1.76 × 10 23 n/cm 2 (E >0.1 MeV). These materials were confirmed to be low void swelling with maximum swelling of 0.63% measured in EM-12 following irradiation at 400°C to 1.40 × 10 23 n/cm 2. A wide range of precipitation response was found both as a function of alloy and irradiation temperature. Precipitates observed included M 6C, Mo 2C, Chi, Laves, M 23C 6, α' and a low temperature phase as yet unidentified. It is predicted, based on these results, that the major impact of irradiation on the ferritic alloy class will be changes in postirradiation mechanical properties due to precipitation.

  6. The structural changes of Y2O3 in ferritic ODS alloys during milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilger, I.; Tegel, M.; Gorley, M.J.; Grant, P.S.; Weißgärber, T.; Kieback, B.

    2014-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels are usually fabricated via mechanical alloying and subsequent consolidation via hot extrusion or hot isostatic pressing. During the individual process steps, a complex evolution of the nanoparticle structure is taking place. Powders with different Y 2 O 3 contents were milled and examined by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atom probe tomography (APT). It has been observed that the Y 2 O 3 is fragmented and becomes partially amorphous upon milling due to the grain refinement of Y 2 O 3 during the milling process. There was no compelling evidence for Y 2 O 3 dissociation and dissolution into the steel matrix

  7. Some microstructural characterisations in a friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legendre, F.; Poissonnet, S.; Bonnaillie, P.; Boulanger, L.; Forest, L.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study is to characterize microstructure of a friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened alloy. The welded material is constituted by two sheets of an yttria-dispersion-strengthened PM 2000 ferritic steel. Different areas of the friction stir welded product were analyzed using field emission gun secondary electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) and electron microprobe whereas nanoindentation was used to evaluate mechanical properties. The observed microstructural evolution, including distribution of the yttria dispersoids, after friction stir welding process is discussed and a correlation between the microstructure and the results of nanoindentation tests is established.

  8. Radiation damage simulation studies of selected austenitic and ferritic/martensitic alloys for fusion reactor structural applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazey, D.J.; Walters, G.P.; Buckley, S.N.; Bullough, R.; Hanks, W.; Bolster, D.E.J.; Sowden, B.C.; Lurcook, D.; Murphy, S.M.

    1985-03-01

    Results are given of an investigation of the radiation damage stability of selected austenitic and ferritic alloys following ion bombardment in the Harwell VEC to simulate fusion-reactor exposures up to 110 dpa at temperatures from 425 deg to 625 deg C. Gas production rates appropriate to CTR conditions were simulated using a mixed beam of (4 MeV He + 2 MeV H 2 ) in the ratio 1:4 He:H. A beam of 46 MeV Ni or 20 MeV Cr ions was used in sequence with the mixed gas beam to provide a gas/damage ratio of 13 appm He/dpa at a damage rate of approx. 1 dpa/hr. The materials were investigated using TEM and comprised three austenitic alloys: European reference 316L, 316-Ti, 316-Nb; four high-nickel alloys: Fe/25 Ni/8Cr, Inconel 625, Inconel 706 and Nimonic PE16, and four ferritic/martensitic alloys: FV 448, FV 607, CRM 12 and FI. Some data were obtained for a non-magnetic structural alloy Nonmagne-30. The swelling behaviour is reported. The overall results of the study indicate that on a comparative basis the ferritic alloys are the most swelling-resistant, whilst the high-nickel alloys have an acceptable low swelling response up to 110 dpa. The 316 alloys tested have shown an unfavourable swelling response. (author)

  9. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated at {approximately}400{degrees}C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Eiholzer, C.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400{degrees}C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400{degrees}C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 x 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.

  10. The role of minor alloying elements on the stability and dispersion of yttria nanoclusters in nanostructured ferritic alloys: An ab initio study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murali, D.; Panigrahi, B.K.; Valsakumar, M.C.; Chandra, Sharat; Sundar, C.S.; Raj, Baldev

    2010-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys derive their strength from the dispersion of oxide nanoclusters in the ferritic matrix. We have explored the relative role of minor alloying elements like Ti and Zr on the stability of nanoclusters of vacancy-Y-Ti-O by density functional theory calculations and shown that the binding energy of these clusters increases when we replace Ti with Zr. This could imply faster nucleation of the nanoclusters which, in turn, may lead to finer dispersion of nanoclusters resulting in improved performance of ferritic alloys. Further, we show a core/shell structure for these nanoclusters in which the core is enriched in Y, O, Ti while the shell is enriched in Cr.

  11. Editorial Emerging Multifunctional Nano structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, H.; Lu, Y.; Ramanath, G.; Pomposo, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    The interest in emerging nano structures is growing exponentially since they are promising building blocks for advanced multifunctional nano composites. In recent years, an evolution from the controlled synthesis of individual monodisperse nanoparticles to the tailored preparation of hybrid spherical and also unsymmetrical multiparticle nano structures is clearly observed. As a matter of fact, the field of nano structures built around a nano species such as inside, outside, and next to a nanoparticle is becoming a new evolving area of research and development with potential applications in improved drug delivery systems, innovative magnetic devices, biosensors, and highly efficient catalysts, among several others Emerging nano structures with improved magnetic, conducting and smart characteristics are currently based on the design, synthesis, characterization and modeling of multifunctional nano object-based materials. In fact, core-shell nanoparticles and other related complex nano architectures covering a broad spectrum of materials (from metal and metal oxide to fused carbon, synthetic polymer, and bio polymer structures) to nano structure morphologies (spherical, cylindrical, star-like, etc.) are becoming the main building blocks for next generation of drug delivery systems, advanced sensors and biosensors, or improved nano composites. The five papers presented in this special issue examine the preparation and characterization of emerging multifunctional materials, covering from hybrid asymmetric structures to engineering nano composites.

  12. Optimization of mechanical alloying parameters in 12YWT ferritic steel nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmanifard, R., E-mail: rahmanifrd@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Advanced Materials Group, School of Materials Research, NSTRC, P.O. Box 31585-4395 Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farhangi, H. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Novinrooz, A.J. [Advanced Materials Group, School of Materials Research, NSTRC, P.O. Box 31585-4395 Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Detailed studies of microstructural properties of ODS steels. {yields} Investigation of effects of different mechanical alloying parameters such as milling time; milling speed; ball-to-powder weight ratio and ball diameter on the microstructural characteristics. {yields} Interpretation of the experimental data using theoretical model by X-ray diffraction line profile analysis. - Abstract: The effects of different mechanical alloying parameters on the microstructural characteristics and morphology of ODS-ferritic steel nanocomposite powders were investigated. The steady state between the welding and fracturing of the particles was obtained within about 30 h using 8 mm ball diameter and 420 rpm milling speed with the ball-to-powder weight ratio of 10:1. However, for perfect dissolution of the used alloying elements, the mechanical alloying process must be continued up to 80 h of milling. Evaluation of the microstructural characteristics calculated by X-ray diffraction profile analysis revealed that although the average crystallite size reduced more sharply at the initial milling stages under the above conditions, with further milling, it eventually reached nearly the same value in all specimens. The distribution changes of crystallite size also showed a similar behavior of crystallite size. Among the investigated mechanical alloying parameters, milling speed had a considerable effect on the dislocation density so that it was reduced by about one order of magnitude when the milling speed decreased from 420 to 300 rpm.

  13. TEM examination of microstructural evolution during processing of 14CrYWTi nanostructured ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, H.; Alinger, M.J.; Odette, G.R.; Yamamoto, T.

    2004-01-01

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study was carried out on the co-evolution of the coarser-scale microstructural features in mechanically alloyed (MA) powders and hot isostatic press (HIP) consolidated Fe-14Cr-3W-0 and 0.4Ti-0.25Y 2 O 3 nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). The pancake shaped nanoscale grains in the as-MA powders are textured and elongated parallel to the particle surface. Powder annealing results in re-crystallization at 850 deg. C and grain growth at 1150 deg. C. The grains also recrystallize and may grow in the alloys HIPed at 850 deg. C, but appear to retain a polygonized sub-grain structure. The grains are larger and more distinct in the alloys HIPed at 1000 and 1150 deg. C. However, annealing resulted in bi-modal grain size distribution. Finer grains retained a significant dislocation density and populations of small precipitates with crystal structures distinct form the matrix. The grains and precipitates were much larger in alloys without Ti

  14. The effect of fusion-relevant helium levels on the mechanical properties of isotopically tailored ferritic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hankin, G.L. [Loughborough Univ. (United Kingdom); Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The yield and maximum strengths of an irradiated series of isotopically tailored ferritic alloys were evaluated using the shear punch test. The composition of three of the alloys was Fe-12Cr-1.5Ni. Different balances of nickel isotopes were used in each alloy in order to produce different helium levels. A fourth alloy, which contained no nickel, was also irradiated. The addition of nickel at any isotopic balance to the Fe-12Cr base alloy significantly increased the shear yield and maximum strengths of the alloys, and as expected, the strength of the alloys decreased with increasing irradiation temperature. Helium itself, up to 75 appm over 7 dpa appears to have little effect on the mechanical properties of the alloys.

  15. Nanocluster irradiation evolution in Fe-9%Cr ODS and ferritic-martensitic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, M. J.; Wharry, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the influence of dose rate and cascade morphology on nanocluster evolution in a model Fe-9%Cr oxide dispersion strengthened steel and the commercial ferritic/martensitic (F/M) alloys HCM12A and HT9. We present a large, systematic data set spanning the three alloys, three irradiating particle types, four orders of magnitude in dose rate, and doses ranging 1-100 displacements per atom over 400-500 °C. Nanoclusters are characterized using atom probe tomography. ODS oxide nanoclusters experience partial dissolution after irradiation due to inverse Ostwald ripening, while F/M nanoclusters undergo Ostwald ripening. Damage cascade morphology is indicative of nanocluster number density evolution. Finally, the effects of dose rate on nanocluster morphology provide evidence for a temperature dilation theory, which purports that a negative temperature shift is necessary for higher dose rate irradiations to emulate nanocluster evolution in lower dose rate irradiations.

  16. Structural and chemical evolution in neutron irradiated and helium-injected ferritic ODS PM2000 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hee Joon [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Edwards, Dan J., E-mail: dan.edwards@pnnl.gov [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Kurtz, Richard J. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Yamamoto, Takuya; Wu, Yuan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Odette, G. Robert [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2017-02-15

    An investigation of the influence of helium on damage evolution under neutron irradiation of an 11 at% Al, 19 at% Cr ODS ferritic PM2000 alloy was carried out in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) using a novel in situ helium injection (ISHI) technique. Helium was injected into adjacent TEM discs from thermal neutron {sup 58}Ni(n{sub th},γ) {sup 59}Ni(n{sub th},α) reactions in a thin NiAl layer. The PM2000 undergoes concurrent displacement damage from the high-energy neutrons. The ISHI technique allows direct comparisons of regions with and without high concentrations of helium since only the side coated with the NiAl experiences helium injection. The corresponding microstructural and microchemical evolutions were characterized using both conventional and scanning transmission electron microscopy techniques. The evolutions observed include formation of dislocation loops and associated helium bubbles, precipitation of a variety of phases, amorphization of the Al{sub 2}YO{sub 3} oxides (which also variously contained internal voids), and several manifestations of solute segregation. Notably, high concentrations of helium had a significant effect on many of these diverse phenomena. These results on PM2000 are compared and contrasted to the evolution of so-called nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA).

  17. Oxide nanoparticles in an Al-alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened steel: crystallographic structure and interface with ferrite matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Pantleon, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Oxide nanoparticles are quintessential for ensuring the extraordinary properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels. In this study, the crystallographic structure of oxide nanoparticles, and their interface with the ferritic steel matrix in an Al-alloyed ODS steel, i.e. PM2000, were...

  18. The consequences of helium production on microstructural development in isotopically tailored ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    A series of alloys have been made adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation by a two step nuclear reaction in a mixed spectrum reactor. The alloys use a base composition of Fe-12Cr with an addition of 1.5% nickel, either in the form of 60 Ni which produces no helium, 59 Ni which produces helium at a rate of about 10 appm He/dpa, or natural nickel ( Nat Ni) which provides an intermediate level of helium due to delayed development of 59 Ni. Specimens were irradiated in the HFIR at Oak Ridge, TN to ∼7 dpa at 300 and 400 degrees C. Microstructural examinations indicated that nickel additions promote precipitation in all alloys, but the effect appears to be much stronger at 400 degrees C than at 300 degrees C. There is sufficient dose by 7 dpa (and with 2 appm He) to initiate void swelling in ferritic/martensitic alloys. Little difference was found between response from 59 Ni and Nat Ni. Also, helium bubble development for high helium generation conditions appeared to be very different at 300 and 400 degrees C. At 300 degrees C, it appeared that high densities of bubbles formed whereas at 400 degrees C, bubbles could not be identified, possibly because of the complexity of the microstructure, but more likely because helium accumulated at precipitate interfaces

  19. The consequences of helium production on microstructural development in isotopically tailored ferritic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    A series of alloys have been made adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation by a two step nuclear reaction in a mixed spectrum reactor. The alloys use a base composition of Fe-12Cr with an addition of 1.5% nickel, either in the form of {sup 60}Ni which produces no helium, {sup 59}Ni which produces helium at a rate of about 10 appm He/dpa, or natural nickel ({sup Nat}Ni) which provides an intermediate level of helium due to delayed development of {sup 59}Ni. Specimens were irradiated in the HFIR at Oak Ridge, TN to {approx}7 dpa at 300 and 400{degrees}C. Microstructural examinations indicated that nickel additions promote precipitation in all alloys, but the effect appears to be much stronger at 400{degrees}C than at 300{degrees}C. There is sufficient dose by 7 dpa (and with 2 appm He) to initiate void swelling in ferritic/martensitic alloys. Little difference was found between response from {sup 59}Ni and {sup Nat}Ni. Also, helium bubble development for high helium generation conditions appeared to be very different at 300 and 400{degrees}C. At 300{degrees}C, it appeared that high densities of bubbles formed whereas at 400{degrees}C, bubbles could not be identified, possibly because of the complexity of the microstructure, but more likely because helium accumulated at precipitate interfaces.

  20. Study of behaviour during a quench treatment of ferrite delta of binary and pseudo-binary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champin, B.

    1970-01-01

    Focusing of Fe-Cr and Fe-Mo alloys (and extending results to different binary alloys like Fe-W, Fe-Al and Fe-Si, and even to some ternary systems such as Fe-Cr-Ni and Fe-Mo-Ni), and after having recalled some previous results and presented experimental materials and processes, this research thesis describes the behaviour of the considered alloys, reports a detailed study of Fe-Mo alloys (influence of carbon content), a bibliographical study of the gamma-to-delta transformation, the study of hybrid alloys (behaviour, partial transformations, diffusion), the study of other types of alloys (hyper-quench of delta ferrite of Fe-Mo alloys, adsorption and diffusion). It discusses the case of two-phase structures, and the mechanism and kinetics of the delta-to-gamma transformation

  1. Radiation damage simulation studies in the Harwell VEC of selected austenitic and ferritic alloys for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazey, D J; Walters, G P; Buckley, S N; Hanks, W; Bolster, D E.J.; Murphy, S M

    1988-07-01

    Three austenitic (316 L, 316-Ti, 316-Nb); four high-nickel (IN 625, IN 706, PE 16, Fe-25Ni-8Cr) and four ferritic (CRM 12, FV 448, FV 607, FI) alloys have been irradiated with 46 MeV Ni or 20 MeV Cr ions in the Harwell VEC to simulated fusion-reactor doses up to 110 dpa (proportional to 10 MW-yr m/sup -2/) at temperatures from 425 to 625/sup 0/C. Gas production rates appropriate to fusion were obtained from a mixed beam of He+H/sub 2/ in the ratio 1:4 He:H with gas/dpa ratios of 13 appm He/dpa and 52 appm H/dpa. The 316 alloys showed irradiation-induced precipitation and swelling as high as 40% in ST 316-Ti after 110 dpa at 625/sup 0/C. Low swelling (e.g. <2% at 110 dpa) was observed in the high-nickel alloys. The ferritic/martensitic alloys showed negligible swelling (e.g. <0.2% in FV 607 after 100 dpa at 475/sup 0/C). The results demonstrate the high swelling behaviour of 316 alloys and the better swelling resistance of high-nickel and ferritic alloys under simulated fusion conditions.

  2. The potential for using high chromium ferritic alloys for hydroprocessing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antalffy, Leslie P.; Chaku, Pran N.; Canonico, Domenic A.; Pfeifer, Jeff A.; Alcorn, Douglas G.

    2002-01-01

    This paper outlines the development of hydroprocessing reactors and the parallel development of applicable steels for their high temperature and high pressure process environments. Trends in the development of newer processes for severe hydroprocessing applications have been increasing in operating hydrogen partial pressures and operating temperatures that require the development of new alloys to meet these more severe process environments. The paper outlines the properties of conventional hydroprocessing reactor materials and discusses the advantages of the advanced high chromium ferritic steel alloy Grade 91 (9Cr-1Mo-V) for high temperature hydroprocessing applications. Additionally, the alloys permitted for ASME Section I and Section VIII Division I construction, Grade 92 (Code Case 2179), and what will probably be called Grade 122 (Code Case 2180) are briefly introduced as possible future choices for hydroprocessing reactor construction. These three alloys contain 9-12% Cr and have time independent allowable stress values above 566 deg. C. These high, time independent, strength values provide materials that will in some cases permit extending hydroprocessing temperature limits by 112 deg. C. The paper provides room temperature and elevated temperature mechanical and toughness properties for the low chrome and Grade 91 materials and discusses the effects of hydrogen attack, and hydrogen and isothermal embrittlement. Fabrication aspects, including forming and welding are addressed. The paper discusses the environmental resistance of these alloys and investigates the possibility of utilizing excess wall metal thickness in these materials in less severe applications in lieu of the deposition of a higher chromium alloy weld overlay to overcome the corrosive effects of the process environment

  3. Ferritic Alloys as Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Material for Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebak, Raul B.

    2014-01-01

    provide hermetic seal. The replacement of a zirconium alloy using a ferritic material containing chromium and aluminum appears to be the most near term implementation for accident tolerant nuclear fuels.

  4. Ferritic Alloys as Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Material for Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, Raul B. [General Electric Global Research, Schnectady, NY (United States)

    2014-09-30

    provide hermetic seal. The replacement of a zirconium alloy using a ferritic material containing chromium and aluminum appears to be the most near term implementation for accident tolerant nuclear fuels.

  5. Comparison of ferritic and austenitic plasma nitriding and nitrocarburizing behavior of AISI 4140 low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fattah, M.; Mahboubi, F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper compares the ferritic and austenitic plasma nitriding and nitrocarburizing behavior of AISI 4140 low alloy steel carried out to improve the surface corrosion resistance. The gas composition for plasma nitriding was 85% N 2 -15% H 2 and that for plasma nitrocarburizing was 85% N 2 -12% H 2 -3% CO 2 . Both treatments were performed for 5 h, for different process temperatures of 570 and 620 o C for ferritic and austenitic plasma treatment, respectively. Optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and potentiodynamic polarization technique in 3.5% NaCl solution, were used to study the treated surfaces. The results of X-ray analysis revealed that with increasing the treatment temperature from 570 to 620 o C for both treatments, the amount of ε phase decreased and γ' phase increased. Nitrocarburizing treatment resulted in formation of a more amount of ε phase with respect to nitriding treatment. However, the highest amount of ε phase was observed in the ferritic nitrocarburized sample at 570 o C. The sample nitrided at 620 o C exhibited the thickest layer. The potentiodynamic polarization results revealed that after plasma nitriding and nitrocarburizing at 570 o C, corrosion potential increased with respect to the untreated sample due to the noble nitride and carbonitride phases formed on the surface. After increasing the treatment temperature from 570 to 620 o C, corrosion potential decreased due to the less ε phase development in the compound layer and more porous compound layer formed at 620 o C with respect to the treated samples at 570 o C.

  6. Effect of mechanical alloying atmosphere on the microstructure and Charpy impact properties of an ODS ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oksiuta, Z.; Baluc, N.

    2009-01-01

    Two types of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels, with the composition of Fe-14Cr-2W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2 O 3 (in weight percent), have been produced by mechanically alloying elemental powders of Fe, Cr, W, and Ti with Y 2 O 3 particles either in argon atmosphere or in hydrogen atmosphere, degassing at various temperatures, and compacting the mechanically alloyed powders by hot isostatic pressing. It was found in particular that mechanical alloying in hydrogen yields a significant reduction in oxygen content in the materials, a lower dislocation density, and a strong improvement in the fast fracture properties of the ODS ferritic steels, as measured by Charpy impact tests.

  7. High Temperature Deformation Mechanism in Hierarchical and Single Precipitate Strengthened Ferritic Alloys by In Situ Neutron Diffraction Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Clausen, Bjørn; Zhang, Shu Yan; Gao, Yanfei; Liaw, Peter K

    2017-04-07

    The ferritic Fe-Cr-Ni-Al-Ti alloys strengthened by hierarchical-Ni 2 TiAl/NiAl or single-Ni 2 TiAl precipitates have been developed and received great attentions due to their superior creep resistance, as compared to conventional ferritic steels. Although the significant improvement of the creep resistance is achieved in the hierarchical-precipitate-strengthened ferritic alloy, the in-depth understanding of its high-temperature deformation mechanisms is essential to further optimize the microstructure and mechanical properties, and advance the development of the creep resistant materials. In the present study, in-situ neutron diffraction has been used to investigate the evolution of elastic strain of constitutive phases and their interactions, such as load-transfer/load-relaxation behavior between the precipitate and matrix, during tensile deformation and stress relaxation at 973 K, which provide the key features in understanding the governing deformation mechanisms. Crystal-plasticity finite-element simulations were employed to qualitatively compare the experimental evolution of the elastic strain during tensile deformation at 973 K. It was found that the coherent elastic strain field in the matrix, created by the lattice misfit between the matrix and precipitate phases for the hierarchical-precipitate-strengthened ferritic alloy, is effective in reducing the diffusional relaxation along the interface between the precipitate and matrix phases, which leads to the strong load-transfer capability from the matrix to precipitate.

  8. Previsions of the microstructural evolution of ferritic alloys under irradiation by numerical atomic scale simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngayam Happy, R.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we have improved a diffusion model for point defects (vacancies and self-interstitials) by introducing hetero-interstitials. The model has been used to simulate by Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) the formation of solute rich clusters that are observed experimentally in irradiated ferritic model alloys of type Fe - CuMnNiSiP - C.Electronic structure calculations have been used to characterize the interactions between self-interstitials and all solute atoms, and also carbon. P interacts with vacancies and strongly with self-interstitials. Mn also interacts with self-interstitials to form mixed dumbbells. C, with occupies octahedral sites, interacts strongly with vacancies and less with self-interstitials. Binding and migration energies, as well as others atomic scale properties, obtained by ab initio calculations, have been used as parameters for the KMC code. Firstly, these parameters have been optimized over isochronal annealing experiments, in the literature, of binary alloys that have been electron-irradiated. Isochronal annealing simulations, by reproducing experimental results, have allowed us to link each mechanism to a single evolution of the resistivity during annealing. Moreover, solubility limits of all the elements have been determined by Metropolis Monte Carlo. Secondly, we have simulated the evolution at 300 C of the microstructure under irradiation of different alloys of increasing complexity: pure Fe, binary alloys, ternaries, quaternaries, and finally complex alloys which compositions are close to those of pressure vessel steels. The results show that the model globally reproduces all the experimental tendencies, what has led us to propose mechanisms to explain the behaviours observed. (author)

  9. Role of grain boundary engineering in the SCC behavior of ferritic-martensitic alloy HT-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, G.; Ampornrat, P.; Ren, X.; Sridharan, K.; Allen, T.R.; Was, G.S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper focuses on the role of grain boundary engineering (GBE) in stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of ferritic-martensitic (F-M) alloy HT-9 in supercritical water (SCW) at 400 deg. C and 500 deg. C. Constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests were conducted on HT-9 in as-received (AR) and coincident site lattice enhanced (CSLE) condition. Both unirradiated and irradiated specimens (irradiated with 2 MeV protons at 400 deg. C and 500 deg. C to a dose of 7 dpa) were tested. Ferritic-martensitic steel HT-9 exhibited intergranular stress corrosion cracking when subjected to CERT tests in an environment of supercritical water at 400 deg. C and 500 deg. C and also in an inert environment of argon at 500 deg. C. CSL-enhancement reduces grain boundary carbide coarsening and cracking susceptibility in both the unirradiated and irradiated condition. Irradiation enhanced coarsening of grain boundary carbides and cracking susceptibility of HT-9 for both the AR and CSLE conditions. Intergranular (IG) cracking of HT-9 results likely from fracture of IG carbides and seems consistent with the mechanism that coarser carbides worsen cracking susceptibility. Oxidation in combination with wedging stresses is the likely cause of the observed environmental enhancement of high temperature IG cracking in HT-9

  10. Electrochemical and passive behaviour of tin alloyed ferritic stainless steel in concrete environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Li, Baosong; Ying, Guobing

    2018-05-01

    In the present work, the electrochemical behavior and semiconducting properties of a tin alloyed ferritic stainless steel in simulated concrete solution in presence of NaCl were estimated by conventional electrochemical methods such as potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and capacitance measurement (Mott-Schottky approach). The surface passive film was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results revealed a good agreement between pitting corrosion, electrochemical behaviour, and electronic properties. The p and n-type bilayer structure passive film were observed. The increase of Sn4+ oxide species in the passive film shows no beneficial effects on the pitting corrosion. In addition, the dehydration of the passive film was further discussed.

  11. Radiation-induced segregation and phase stability in ferritic-martensitic alloy T 91

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wharry, Janelle P.; Jiao Zhijie; Shankar, Vani [University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2104 (United States); Busby, Jeremy T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Was, Gary S., E-mail: gsw@umich.edu [University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2104 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Radiation-induced segregation in ferritic-martensitic alloy T 91 was studied to understand the behavior of solutes as a function of dose and temperature. Irradiations were conducted using 2 MeV protons to doses of 1, 3, 7 and 10 dpa at 400 deg. C. Radiation-induced segregation at prior austenite grain boundaries was measured, and various features of the irradiated microstructure were characterized, including grain boundary carbide coverage, the dislocation microstructure, radiation-induced precipitation and irradiation hardening. Results showed that Cr, Ni and Si segregate to prior austenite grain boundaries at low dose, but segregation ceases and redistribution occurs above 3 dpa. Grain boundary carbide coverage mirrors radiation-induced segregation. Irradiation induces formation of Ni-Si-Mn and Cu-rich precipitates that account for the majority of irradiation hardening. Radiation-induced segregation behavior is likely linked to the evolution of the precipitate and dislocation microstructures.

  12. Carburization of austenitic and ferritic alloys in hydrocarbon environments at high temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serna, A.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The technical and industrial aspects of high temperature corrosion of materials exposed to a variety of aggressive environments have significant importance. These environments include combustion product gases and hydrocarbon gases with low oxygen potentials and high carbon potentials. In the refinery and petrochemical industries, austenitic and ferritic alloys are usually used for tubes in fired furnaces. The temperature range for exposure of austenitic alloys is 800-1100 °C, and for ferritic alloys 500-700 °C, with carbon activities ac > 1 in many cases. In both applications, the carburization process involves carbon (coke deposition on the inner diameter, carbon absorption at the metal surface, diffusion of carbon inside the alloy, and precipitation and transformation of carbides to a depth increasing with service. The overall kinetics of the internal carburization are approximately parabolic, controlled by carbon diffusion and carbide precipitation. Ferritic alloys exhibit gross but uniform carburization while non-uniform intragranular and grain-boundary carburization is observed in austenitic alloys.

    La corrosión a alta temperatura, tal como la carburación de materiales expuestos a una amplia variedad de ambientes agresivos, tiene especial importancia desde el punto de vista técnico e industrial. Estos ambientes incluyen productos de combustión, gases e hidrocarburos con bajo potencial de oxígeno y alto potencial de carbono. En las industrias de refinación y petroquímica, las aleaciones austeníticas y ferríticas se utilizan en tuberías de hornos. El rango de temperatura de exposición para aleaciones austeníticas está entre 800-1.100°C y para aleaciones ferríticas está entre 500-700°C, con actividades de carbono ac>1 en algunos casos. En tuberías con ambas aleaciones, el proceso de carburación incluye deposición de carbón (coque en el diámetro interno, absorción de carbono en la superficie

  13. EBSD as a tool to identify and quantify bainite and ferrite in low-alloyed Al-TRIP steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaefferer, S; Romano, P; Friedel, F

    2008-06-01

    Bainite is thought to play an important role for the chemical and mechanical stabilization of metastable austenite in low-alloyed TRIP steels. Therefore, in order to understand and improve the material properties, it is important to locate and quantify the bainitic phase. To this aim, electron backscatter diffraction-based orientation microscopy has been employed. The main difficulty herewith is to distinguish bainitic ferrite from ferrite because both have bcc crystal structure. The most important difference between them is the occurrence of transformation induced geometrically necessary dislocations in the bainitic phase. To determine the areas with larger geometrically necessary dislocation density, the following orientation microscopy maps were explored: pattern quality maps, grain reference orientation deviation maps and kernel average misorientation maps. We show that only the latter allow a reliable separation of the bainitic and ferritic phase. The kernel average misorientation threshold value that separates both constituents is determined by an algorithm that searches for the smoothness of the boundaries between them.

  14. Statistical study to determine the effect of carbon, silicon, nickel and other alloying elements on the mechanical properties of as-cast ferritic ductile irons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacaze, J.; Sertucha, J.; Larranaga, P.; Suarez, R.

    2016-01-01

    There is a great interest in fully ferritic ductile irons due to their structural homogeneity, remarkable ductility and good response when machining. On the other hand the wide variety of raw materials available in foundry plants becomes a problem when controlling the chemical composition of the manufactured alloys. The present work shows a statistical study about the effect of different C, Si, Ni contents and other minor elements on structural and mechanical properties of a group of ferritic ductile iron alloys. A set of equations are finally presented to predict room temperature mechanical properties of ferritic ductile irons by means of their chemical composition and pearlite content. (Author)

  15. Statistical study to determine the effect of carbon, silicon, nickel and other alloying elements on the mechanical properties of as-cast ferritic ductile irons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacaze, J.; Sertucha, J.; Larranaga, P.; Suarez, R.

    2016-10-01

    There is a great interest in fully ferritic ductile irons due to their structural homogeneity, remarkable ductility and good response when machining. On the other hand the wide variety of raw materials available in foundry plants becomes a problem when controlling the chemical composition of the manufactured alloys. The present work shows a statistical study about the effect of different C, Si, Ni contents and other minor elements on structural and mechanical properties of a group of ferritic ductile iron alloys. A set of equations are finally presented to predict room temperature mechanical properties of ferritic ductile irons by means of their chemical composition and pearlite content. (Author)

  16. Microstructure and Mechanical Property of ODS Ferritic Steels Using Commercial Alloy Powders for High Temperature Service Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Choi, Byoung-Kwon; Kang, Suk Hoon; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS) is one of the promising ways to improve the mechanical property at high temperatures. This is mainly attributed to uniformly distributed nano-oxide particle with a high density, which is extremely stable at the high temperature and acts as effective obstacles when the dislocations are moving. In this study, as a preliminary examination to develop the advanced structural materials for high temperature service applications, ODS ferritic steels were fabricated using commercial alloy powders and their microstructural and mechanical properties were investigated. In this study, ODS ferritic steels were fabricated using commercial stainless steel 430L powder and their microstructures and mechanical properties were investigated. Morphology of micro-grains and oxide particles were significantly changed by the addition of minor alloying elements such as Ti, Zr, and Hf. The ODS ferritic steel with Zr and Hf additions showed ultra-fine grains with fine complex oxide particles. The oxide particles were uniformly located in grains and on the grain boundaries. This led to higher hardness than ODS ferritic steel with Ti addition.

  17. TEM characterization of irradiated microstructure of Fe-9%Cr ODS and ferritic-martensitic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, M. J.; Wharry, J. P.

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of irradiation dose and dose rate on defect cluster (i.e. dislocation loops and voids) evolution in a model Fe-9%Cr oxide dispersion strengthened steel and commercial ferritic-martensitic steels HCM12A and HT9. Complimentary irradiations using Fe2+ ions, protons, or neutrons to doses ranging from 1 to 100 displacements per atom (dpa) at 500 °C are conducted on each alloy. The irradiated microstructures are characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Dislocation loops exhibit limited growth after 1 dpa upon Fe2+ and proton irradiation, while any voids observed are small and sparse. The average size and number density of loops are statistically invariant between Fe2+, proton, and neutron irradiated specimens at otherwise fixed irradiation conditions of ∼3 dpa, 500 °C. Therefore, we conclude that higher dose rate charged particle irradiations can reproduce the neutron irradiated loop microstructure with temperature shift governed by the invariance theory; this temperature shift is ∼0 °C for the high sink strength alloys studied herein.

  18. Behavior of the elements in the mechanically alloyed and cast ferritic steels and a type 316 stainless steel in a flowing sodium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, T.; Mutoh, I.

    1988-01-01

    Sodium corrosion behavior of a mechanically alloyed ferritic steel, dispersion-strengthened with addition of Y 2 0 3 and Ti, two kinds of melted/cast ferritic steels and a Type 316 stainless steel was examined by using a non-isothermal sodium loop system, constructed of another Type 316 stainless steel, with a direct resistance electrical heater. The sodium conditions were 675 0 C, 4.0 m/s in velocity and 1-2 ppm oxygen concentration and a cumulative exposure time of the specimens was about 3000 h. The absorption of Ni and selective dissolution of Cr played an important role in the corrosion of the mechanically alloyed ferritic steel as in the case of the cast ferritic steels. However, the region of Ni absorption and Cr diminution was deeper than that of the cast ferritic steels. Peculiar finding for the mechanically alloyed ferritic steel was the corroded surface with irregularly shaped protuberance, that might be related with formation of sodium titanate, and the absorption of carbon and nitrogen to form carbide and nitride of titanium. It seems that these facts resulted in the irregular weight loss of the specimens, which depended on the downstream position and the cumulative exposure time. However, the tensile properties of the mechanically alloyed ferritic steel did not noticeably change by the sodium exposure

  19. Process development for 9Cr nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA) with high fracture toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Hoelzer, David T.; Lee, Yong Bok; Kang, Suk Hoon; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2014-01-01

    This article is to summarize the process development and key characterization results for the newly-developed Fe–9Cr based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) with high fracture toughness. One of the major drawbacks from pursuing ultra-high strength in the past development of NFAs is poor fracture toughness at high temperatures although a high fracture toughness is essential to prevent cracking during manufacturing and to mitigate or delay irradiation-induced embrittlement in irradiation environments. A study on fracture mechanism using the NFA 14YWT found that the low-energy grain boundary decohesion in fracture process at a high temperature (>200 °C) resulted in low fracture toughness. Lately, efforts have been devoted to explore an integrated process to enhance grain bonding. Two base materials were produced through mechanical milling and hot extrusion and designated as 9YWTV-PM1 and 9YWTV-PM2. Isothermal annealing (IA) and controlled rolling (CR) treatments in two phase region were used to enhance diffusion across the interfaces and boundaries. The PM2 alloy after CR treatments showed high fracture toughness (K JQ ) at represented temperatures: 240–280 MPa √m at room temperature and 160–220 MPa √m at 500 °C, which indicates that the goal of 100 MPa √m over possible nuclear application temperature range has been well achieved. Furthermore, it is also confirmed by comparison that the CR treatments on 9YWTV-PM2 result in high fracture toughness similar to or higher than those of the conventional ferritic–martensitic steels such as HT9 and NF616

  20. Oxide nanoparticles in an Al-alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened steel: crystallographic structure and interface with ferrite matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Pantleon, Wolfgang

    2017-07-01

    Oxide nanoparticles are quintessential for ensuring the extraordinary properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels. In this study, the crystallographic structure of oxide nanoparticles, and their interface with the ferritic steel matrix in an Al-alloyed ODS steel, i.e. PM2000, were systematically investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The majority of oxide nanoparticles were identified to be orthorhombic YAlO3. During hot consolidation and extrusion, they develop a coherent interface and a near cuboid-on-cube orientation relationship with the ferrite matrix in the material. After annealing at 1200 °C for 1 h, however, the orientation relationship between the oxide nanoparticles and the matrix becomes arbitrary, and their interface mostly incoherent. Annealing at 1300 °C leads to considerable coarsening of oxide nanoparticles, and a new orientation relationship of pseudo-cube-on-cube between oxide nanoparticles and ferrite matrix develops. The reason for the developing interfaces and orientation relationships between oxide nanoparticles and ferrite matrix under different conditions is discussed.

  1. Interdiffusion behavior of Al-rich oxidation resistant coatings on ferritic-martensitic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velraj, S.; Zhang, Y.; Hawkins, E.W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN 38505-0001 (United States); Pint, B.A. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6156 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Interdiffusion of thin Al-rich coatings synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and pack cementation on 9Cr ferritic-martensitic alloys was investigated in the temperature range of 650-700 C. The compositional changes after long-term exposures in laboratory air and air + 10 vol% H{sub 2}O were examined experimentally. Interdiffusion was modeled by a modified coating oxidation and substrate interdiffusion model (COSIM) program. The modification enabled the program to directly input the concentration profiles of the as-deposited coating determined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Reasonable agreement was achieved between the simulated and experimental Al profiles after exposures. The model was also applied to predict coating lifetime at 650-700 C based on a minimum Al content (C{sub b}) required at the coating surface to re-form protective oxide scale. In addition to a C{sub b} value established from the failure of a thin CVD coating at 700 C, values reported for slurry aluminide coatings were also included in lifetime predictions. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Tensile deformation and fracture properties of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, M.E., E-mail: alam@engineering.ucsb.edu [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Pal, S.; Fields, K. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Maloy, S.A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hoelzer, D.T. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Odette, G.R. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    A new larger heat of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA), FCRD NFA-1, was synthesized by ball milling FeO and argon atomized Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti-0.2Y (wt%) powders, followed by hot extrusion, annealing and cross rolling to produce an ≈10 mm-thick plate. NFA-1 contains a bimodal size distribution of pancake-shaped, mostly very fine scale, grains. The as-processed plate also contains a large population of microcracks running parallel to its broad surfaces. The small grains and large concentration of Y–Ti–O nano-oxides (NOs) result in high strength up to 800 °C. The uniform and total elongations range from ≈1–8%, and ≈10–24%, respectively. The strength decreases more rapidly above ≈400 °C and deformation transitions to largely viscoplastic creep by ≈600 °C. While the local fracture mechanism is generally ductile-dimple microvoid nucleation, growth and coalescence, perhaps the most notable feature of tensile deformation behavior of NFA-1 is the occurrence of periodic delamination, manifested as fissures on the fracture surfaces.

  3. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazumder, B.; Yu, X.; Edmondson, P.D.; Parish, C.M.; Miller, M.K.; Meyer, H.M.; Feng, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygen-enriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the size of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.

  4. Effects of alloying elements on sticking occurring during hot rolling of ferritic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Dae Jin; Kim, Yong Jin; Lee, Yong Deuk; Lee, Sung Hak; Lee, Jong Seog

    2008-01-01

    In this study, effects of alloying elements on the sticking occurring during hot rolling of five kinds of ferritic STS430J1L stainless steels were investigated by analyzing high-temperature hardness and oxidation behavior of the rolled steels. Hot-rolling simulation tests were conducted by a high-temperature wear tester which could simulate actual hot rolling. The simulation test results revealed that the sticking process proceeded with three stages, i.e., nucleation, growth, and saturation. Since the hardness continuously decreased as the test temperature increased, whereas the formation of Fe-Cr oxides in the rolled steel surface region increased, the sticking of five stainless steels was evaluated by considering both the high-temperature hardness and oxidation effects. The addition of Zr, Cu, or Si had a beneficial effect on the sticking resistance, while the Ni addition did not show any difference in the sticking. Particularly in the case of the Si addition, Si oxides formed first in the initial stage of high-temperature oxidation, worked as initiation sites for Fe-Cr oxides, accelerated the formation of Fe-Cr oxides, and thus raised the sticking resistance by about 10 times in comparison with the steel without Si content

  5. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazumder, B., E-mail: mazumderb@ornl.gov [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Yu, X.; Edmondson, P.D.; Parish, C.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Miller, M.K. [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Meyer, H.M.; Feng, Z. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygen-enriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the size of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.

  6. Diffusion Couple Alloying of Refractory Metals in Austenitic and Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    stainless steel and ferritic/ martensitic steel can vary from structural and support components in the reactor core to reactor fuel...of ferritic/ martensitic steels compared to type 316 stainless steel after irradiation in Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at 420 ºC to ~80dpa (From...ferritic martensitic steel at Sandia National Laboratories. The 316 stainless steel had a certified composition of:

  7. Further Charpy impact test results of low activation ferritic alloys, irradiated at 430{degrees}C to 67 dpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Miniature CVN specimens of four ferritic alloys, GA3X, F82H, GA4X and HT9, have been impact tested following irradiation at 430{degrees}C to 67 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of the previously tested lower dose irradiation condition indicates that the GA3X and F82H alloys, two primary candidate low activation alloys, exhibit virtually identical behavior following irradiation at 430{degrees}C to {approximately}67 dpa and at 370{degrees}C to {approximately}15 dpa. Very little shift is observed in either DBTT or USE relative to the unirradiated condition. The shifts in DBTT and USE observed in both GA4X and HT9 were smaller after irradiation at 430{degrees}C to {approximately}67 dpa than after irradiation at 370{degrees}C to {approximately}15 dpa.

  8. Further Charpy impact test results of low activation ferritic alloys, irradiated at 430 degrees C to 67 dpa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1997-01-01

    Miniature CVN specimens of four ferritic alloys, GA3X, F82H, GA4X and HT9, have been impact tested following irradiation at 430 degrees C to 67 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of the previously tested lower dose irradiation condition indicates that the GA3X and F82H alloys, two primary candidate low activation alloys, exhibit virtually identical behavior following irradiation at 430 degrees C to ∼67 dpa and at 370 degrees C to ∼15 dpa. Very little shift is observed in either DBTT or USE relative to the unirradiated condition. The shifts in DBTT and USE observed in both GA4X and HT9 were smaller after irradiation at 430 degrees C to ∼67 dpa than after irradiation at 370 degrees C to ∼15 dpa

  9. Multi-scale modeling of interaction between vacancies and alloying elements in ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barouh, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    This PhD thesis is devoted to the study of interaction between vacancies and alloying elements in Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels, which are promising candidate materials for future nuclear reactors. This work is based on multi-scale modeling of a simplified system composed by oxygen, yttrium and titanium atoms and vacancies in an α-iron lattice. We particularly focused on the role of vacancies which are created in excess during the fabrication of these steels. The stability and mobility of vacancy-solute clusters have been examined using ab initio calculations for oxygen, on one hand, which has been systematically compared to carbon and nitrogen, interstitial solutes frequently present in iron-based materials, and, on the other hand, for substitutional solutes: titanium and yttrium. The three interstitial solutes show very similar energetic and kinetic behaviors. The impact of small mobile vacancy-solute clusters has been verified using a cluster dynamics model based on our ab initio results. It has been thus demonstrated that with over-saturation of vacancies, diffusion of interstitial solutes may be accelerated, while substitutional solutes do not become necessarily faster. These conclusions are consistent with existing experimental observations. All these results have been then used to complete our understanding of nano-clusters formation mechanisms. It appeared that the relative mobility of yttrium and titanium, as well as the number of potential nuclei to form nanoparticles strongly depend on the total vacancy concentration in the system. (author) [fr

  10. Oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloys. 14/20% chromium: effects of processing on deformation texture, recrystallization and tensile properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regle, H.

    1994-01-01

    The ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened alloys are promising candidates for high temperature application materials, in particular for long life core components of advanced nuclear reactors. The aim of this work is to control the microstructure, in order to optimise the mechanical properties. The two ferritic alloys examined here, MA956 and MA957, are obtained by Mechanical Alloying techniques. They are characterised by quite anisotropic microstructure and mechanical properties. We have investigated the influence of hot and cold working processes (hot extrusion, swaging and cold-drawing) and recrystallization heat treatments on deformation textures, microstructures and tensile properties. The aim was to control the size of the grains and their anisotropic shape, using recrystallization heat treatments. After consolidation and hot extrusion, as-received materials present a extremely fine microstructure with elongated grains and a very strong (110) deformation texture with single-crystal character. At that stage of processing, recrystallization temperature are very high (1450 degrees C for MA957 alloy and 1350 degrees C for MA956 alloy) and materials develop millimetric recrystallized grains. Additional hot extrusion induce a fibre texture. Cold-drawing maintains a fibre texture, but the intensity decreases with increasing cold-work level. For both materials, the decrease of texture intensities correspond to a decrease of the recrystallization temperatures (from 1350 degrees C for a low cold-work level to 750 degrees C for 60 % cold-deformation, case of MA956 alloy) and a refinement of the grain size (from a millimetric size to less than an hundred of micrometer). Swaging develop a cyclic component where the intensity increases with increasing deformation in this case, the recrystallization temperature remains always very high and the millimetric grain size is slightly modified, even though cold-work level increases. Technologically, cold-drawing is the only way

  11. Influence of displacement damage on deuterium and helium retention in austenitic and ferritic-martensitic alloys considered for ADS service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyevodin, V.N.; Karpov, S.A.; Kopanets, I.E.; Ruzhytskyi, V.V. [National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology” Kharkov, 1, Akademicheskaya St., Kharkov, 61108 (Ukraine); Tolstolutskaya, G.D., E-mail: g.d.t@kipt.kharkov.ua [National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology” Kharkov, 1, Akademicheskaya St., Kharkov, 61108 (Ukraine); Garner, F.A. [Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The behavior of ion-implanted hydrogen (deuterium) and helium in austenitic 18Cr10NiTi stainless steel, EI-852 ferritic steel and ferritic/martensitic steel EP-450 and their interaction with displacement damage were investigated. Energetic argon irradiation was used to produce displacement damage and bubble formation to simulate nuclear power environments. The influence of damage morphology and the features of radiation-induced defects on deuterium and helium trapping in structural alloys was studied using ion implantation, the nuclear reaction D({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He, thermal desorption spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. It was found in the case of helium irradiation that various kinds of helium-radiation defect complexes are formed in the implanted layer that lead to a more complicated spectra of thermal desorption. Additional small changes in the helium spectra after irradiation with argon ions to a dose of ≤25 dpa show that the binding energy of helium with these traps is weakly dependent on the displacement damage. It was established that retention of deuterium in ferritic and ferritic-martensitic alloys is three times less than in austenitic steel at damage of ∼1 dpa. The retention of deuterium in steels is strongly enhanced by presence of radiation damages created by argon ion irradiation, with a shift in the hydrogen release temperature interval of 200 K to higher temperature. At elevated temperatures of irradiation the efficiency of deuterium trapping is reduced by two orders of magnitude.

  12. Gas atomized precursor alloy powder for oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieken, Joel [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-12-13

    Gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was employed as a simplified method for producing precursor powders for oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic stainless steels (e.g., Fe-Cr-Y-(Ti,Hf)-O), departing from the conventional mechanical alloying (MA) process. During GARS processing a reactive atomization gas (i.e., Ar-O2) was used to oxidize the powder surfaces during primary break-up and rapid solidification of the molten alloy. This resulted in envelopment of the powders by an ultra-thin (t < 150 nm) metastable Cr-enriched oxide layer that was used as a vehicle for solid-state transport of O into the consolidated microstructure. In an attempt to better understand the kinetics of this GARS reaction, theoretical cooling curves for the atomized droplets were calculated and used to establish an oxidation model for this process. Subsequent elevated temperature heat treatments, which were derived from Rhines pack measurements using an internal oxidation model, were used to promote thermodynamically driven O exchange reactions between trapped films of the initial Cr-enriched surface oxide and internal Y-enriched intermetallic precipitates. This novel microstructural evolution process resulted in the successful formation of nano-metric Y-enriched dispersoids, as confirmed using high energy X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), equivalent to conventional ODS alloys from MA powders. The thermal stability of these Y-enriched dispersoids was evaluated using high temperature (1200°C) annealing treatments ranging from 2.5 to 1,000 hrs of exposure. In a further departure from current ODS practice, replacing Ti with additions of Hf appeared to improve the Y-enriched dispersoid thermal stability by means of crystal structure modification. Additionally, the spatial distribution of the dispersoids was found to depend strongly on the original rapidly solidified microstructure. To exploit this, ODS microstructures were engineered from

  13. Thermal stability of nano structured iron powder as a function of amount and nature of reinforcement (Nb or NbC); Estudio de la estabilidad termica de polvo de hierro nanoestructurado en funcion del tipo de refuerzo (Nb, NbC) y de su contenido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes-Pacheco, L.; Campos, M.; Torralba, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    In structural steels, an effective strategy to succeed in increasing both strength and toughness is the grain refining, like in microalloyed steels. To delay or even inhibit the grain growth there are two basic mechanisms: particle pinning and solute drag. The effect of the presence of small particles of NbC to inhibit the austenitic grain growth is well known. However, it is not so clear which mechanism will be more effective to delay ferritic grain growth. In order to confirm it, nano structured iron powders reinforced with Nb and NbC have been prepared by mechanical alloying. The main objective of this work is, therefore, to study the thermal stability of the nano structured powder as a function of the reinforce type (elemental Nb or NbC) and its content. (Author) 19 refs.

  14. OKMC study of the effect of grain boundaries in martensitic Fe-Cr-C alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiapetto, M.; Becquart, C.S.; Malerba, L.

    2015-01-01

    Fe-Cr-C alloys with chromium concentrations in the range from about 2 wt % to 12 wt % form ferritic-martensitic structures by rapid cooling from the austenite state already in the presence of relatively low carbon concentrations. In this process it is possible to obtain different ratios of ferrite and martensite, as well as formation of carbides, by varying the thermal treatment. The presence of ferrite or martensite might have an influence on the nano-structural evolution under irradiation of these alloys. Here, considering a tempered martensite reference alloy with 9% Cr, we make use of an already validated object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) model in order to study the possible effect of the formation of martensite laths on the material nano-structural evolution under neutron irradiation, assuming that the relevant boundaries act as sinks for radiation defects. The results show that the reduction of the grain size (including in this definition the average size of prior austenite grains, blocks and laths) does not play any relevant role until sizes of the order of about 0.5 μm are reached: for smaller grains the number of defects being absorbed by the boundaries becomes dominant. However, this threshold is lower than the experimentally observed martensite lath dimensions, thereby suggesting that what makes the difference in martensitic Fe-Cr-C alloys with respect to ferrite concerning events and mechanisms taking place during irradiation are not the lath boundaries as sinks. Differences between the nano-structural evolution in ferrite and martensite should therefore be ascribed to other factors. This document is composed of an article and the presentation slides. (authors)

  15. Evaluation of mechanically alloyed Cu-based powders as filler alloy for brazing tungsten to a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, J. de, E-mail: javier.deprado@urjc.es; Sánchez, M.; Ureña, A.

    2017-07-15

    80Cu-20Ti powders were evaluated for their use as filler alloy for high temperature brazing of tungsten to a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (Eurofer), and its application for the first wall of the DEMO fusion reactor. The use of alloyed powders has not been widely considered for brazing purposes and could improve the operational brazeability of the studied system due to its narrower melting range, determined by DTA analysis, which enhances the spreading capabilities of the filler. Ti contained in the filler composition acts as an activator element, reacting and forming several interfacial layers at the Eurofer-braze, which enhances the wettability properties and chemical interaction at the brazing interface. Brazing thermal cycle also activated the diffusion phenomena, which mainly affected to the Eurofer alloying elements causing in it a softening band of approximately 400 μm of thickness. However, this softening effect did not degrade the shear strength of the brazed joints (94 ± 23 MPa), because failure during testing was always located at the tungsten-braze interface. - Highlights: •W-Eurofer brazed joints, manufactured using Cu-based mechanically alloyed powders as filler is proposed. •The benefits derivate from the alloyed composition could improve the operational brazeability of the studied system. •Tested pre-alloyed fillers have a more homogeneous melting stage which enhances its spreading and flowing capabilities. •This behaviour could lead to work with higher heating rates and lower brazing temperatures.

  16. Micro/nano structured coatings of light alloys by cold spray for surface protection and repair of high value-added components: State of the art; Recubrimientos micro/nanoestructurados de aleaciones ligeras mediante proyeccion fria para la proteccion y reparacion de componentes de elevado valor anadido: Estado del arte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedoya, J.; Cinca, N.; Guilemany, J. M.

    2013-09-01

    The Cold Gas Spray - CGS technique has greatly attracted the attention of the researchers in the last decade due to advantages compared to other conventional thermal spray processes. It presents outstanding characteristics such as high density coatings and absence of thermal degradation (oxidation or phase transformation). In addition, CGS is an efficient and green technology. This paper presents a bibliographic review related to micro/nano structured aluminium-based coatings of by CGS on light alloy substrates. It provides an overview of the feasibility of using the Cold Gas Spray as a technique for the protection, recovery and repair of high value-added components, especially those made of light alloys (aluminium and magnesium base) which, by their low density and mechanical properties, are widely used in several industrial sectors such as transport, aerospace and power generation. (Author)

  17. Fe-Cr-V ternary alloy-based ferritic steels for high- and low-temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieth, M.; Materna-Morris, E.; Dudarev, S.L.; Boutard, J.-L.; Keppler, H.; Mayor, J.

    2009-01-01

    The phase stability of alloys and steels developed for application in nuclear fission and fusion technology is one of the decisive factors determining the potential range of operating temperatures and radiation conditions that the core elements of a power plant can tolerate. In the case of ferritic and ferritic-martensitic steels, the choice of the chemical composition is dictated by the phase diagram for binary FeCr alloys where in the 0-9% range of Cr composition the alloy remains in the solid solution phase at and below the room temperature. For Cr concentrations exceeding 9% the steels operating at relatively low temperatures are therefore expected to exhibit the formation of α' Cr-rich precipitates. These precipitates form obstacles for the propagation of dislocations, impeding plastic deformation and embrittling the material. This sets the low temperature limit for the use of of high (14% to 20%) Cr steels, which for the 20% Cr steels is at approximately 600 deg. C. On the other hand, steels containing 12% or less Cr cannot be used at temperatures exceeding ∼600 deg. C due to the occurrence of the α-γ transition (912 deg. C in pure iron and 830 deg. C in 7% Cr alloy), which weakens the steel in the high temperature limit. In this study, we investigate the physical properties of a concentrated ternary alloy system that attracted relatively little attention so far. The phase diagram of ternary Fe-Cr-V alloy shows no phase boundaries within a certain broad range of Cr and V concentrations. This makes the alloy sufficiently resistant to corrosion and suggests that steels and dispersion strengthened materials based on this alloy composition may have better strength and stability at high temperatures. Experimental heats were produced on a laboratory scale by arc melting the material components to pellets, then by melting the pellets in an induction furnace and casting the melt into copper moulds. The compositions in weight percent (iron base) are 10Cr5V, 10Cr

  18. Editorial Nano structures for Medicine and Pharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing-Jie, L.; Kumar, A.; Donglu, S.; Daxiang, C.

    2012-01-01

    The rapid developments in nano structured materials and nano technology will have profound impact in many areas of biomedical applications including delivery of drugs and biomolecules, tissue engineering, detection of bio markers, cancer diagnosis, cancer therapy, and imaging. This field is expanding quickly, and a lot of work is ongoing in the design, characterization, synthesis, and application of materials, for controlling shape and size at nanometer scale to develop highly advanced materials for biomedical application and even to design better pharmaceutical products. In recent years, novel nano structure with multi functionalities has been focused on the use of nano structures toward solving problems of biology and medicine. The main scope of this special issue is to demonstrate the latest achievement of nano technology and its application in nano medicine particularly in new approaches for drug delivery such as targeted drug delivery system, nano structure for drug storage, nano materials for tissue engineering, medical diagnosis and treatment, and generation of new kinds of materials from biological sources. Therefore, many critical issues in nano structured materials, particularly their applications in biomedicine, must be addressed before clinical applications. This special issue devotes several review and research articles encompassing various aspects of nano materials for medicine and pharmaceuticals.

  19. Evaluation of mechanical properties in stainless alloy ferritic with 5 % molybdenum; Avaliacao das propriedades mecanicas em ligas inoxidaveis ferriticas com 5% de molibdenio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima Filho, V.X.; Gomes, F.H.F.; Guimaraes, R.F.; Saboia, F.H.C.; Abreu, H.F.G. de [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Ceara (IFCE). Campus Maracanau, CE (Brazil)], e-mail: venceslau@ifce.edu.br

    2010-07-01

    The deterioration of equipment in the oil industry is caused by high aggressiveness in processing the same. One solution to this problem would increase the content of molybdenum (Mo) alloys, since this improves the corrosion resistance. As the increase of Mo content causes changes in mechanical properties, we sought to evaluate the mechanical properties of alloys with 5% Mo and different levels of chromium (Cr). Were performed metallography and hardness measurement of the alloys in the annealed condition. Subsequent tests were performed tensile and Charpy-V, both at room temperature. The results showed that 2% difference in the content of Cr did not significantly alter the mechanical properties of alloys. The alloys studied had higher values in measured properties when compared to commercial ferritic alloys with similar percentages of Cr. The high content of Mo resulted in a brittle at room temperature but ductile at temperatures above 70 degree C. (author)

  20. Nano structures for Medical Diagnostics Md

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellah, M.; Iqbal, S.M.; Bellah, M.; Iqbal, S.M.; Christensen, S.M.; Iqbal, S.M.; Iqbal, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Nano technology is the art of manipulating materials on atomic or molecular scales especially to build nano scale structures and devices. The field is expanding quickly, and a lot of work is ongoing in the design, characterization, synthesis, and application of materials, structures, devices, and systems by controlling shape and size at nanometer scale. In the last few years, much work has been focused on the use of nano structures toward problems of biology and medicine. In this paper, we focus on the application of various nano structures and nano devices in clinical diagnostics and detection of important biological molecules. The discussion starts by introducing some basic techniques of micro-/nano scale fabrication that have enabled reproducible production of nano structures. The prospects, benefits, and limitations of using these novel techniques in the fields of bio detection and medical diagnostics are then discussed. Finally, the challenges of mass production and acceptance of nano technology by the medical community are considered.

  1. Atom probe study of the microstructural evolution induced by irradiation in Fe-Cu ferritic alloys and pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pareige, P.

    1996-04-01

    Pressure vessel steels used in pressurized water reactors are low alloyed ferritic steels. They may be prone to hardening and embrittlement under neutron irradiation. The changes in mechanical properties are generally supposed to result from the formation of point defects, dislocation loops, voids and/or copper rich clusters. However, the real nature of the irradiation induced-damage in these steels has not been clearly identified yet. In order to improve our vision of this damage, we have characterized the microstructure of several steels and model alloys irradiated with electrons and neutrons. The study was performed with conventional and tomographic atom probes. The well known importance of the effects of copper upon pressure vessel steel embrittlement has led us to study Fe-Cu binary alloys. We have considered chemical aging as well as aging under electron and neutron irradiations. The resulting effects depend on whether electron or neutron irradiations ar used for thus. We carried out both kinds of irradiation concurrently so as to compare their effects. We have more particularly considered alloys with a low copper supersaturation representative of that met with the French vessel alloys (0.1% Cu). Then, we have examined steels used on French nuclear reactor pressure vessels. To characterize the microstructure of CHOOZ A steel and its evolution when exposed to neutrons, we have studied samples from the reactor surveillance program. The results achieved, especially the characterization of neutron-induced defects have been compared with those for another steel from the surveillance program of Dampierre 2. All the experiment results obtained on model and industrial steels have allowed us to consider an explanation of the way how the defects appear and grow, and to propose reasons for their influence upon steel embrittlement. (author). 3 appends

  2. Plasticity of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloys; Plasticite des alliages ferritiques renforces par dispersion d`oxydes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakine, C

    1994-07-05

    The object of this work is to study the plasticity mechanisms of two oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloys, DT and DY. Microstructural characterisation has been performed on DT and DY alloys by optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. These materials, strengthened by an oxide dispersion, contain an intermetallic {chi} phase precipitated on grain boundaries. The {chi} phase, stable up to 900 deg, can be dissolved into the matrix by heat treatment beyond 1 000 deg. Between 20 and 700 deg, according to tensile tests, the DY alloy which is strengthened by a fine dispersion of yttria particles is more resistant and less ductile than DT alloy, strengthened by titanium oxides. Tensile tests performed at room temperature, in the chamber of a SEM, have shown that micro-cracking of the {chi} phase coincides with the first stage of the macroscopic yielding. The cavities initiated by the {chi} phase micro-cracking induce a ductile fracture of the matrix. A dynamic strain ageing mechanism has been observed around 400 deg, which is attributed to the Mo contribution. Between 20 and 700 deg, comparison of tensile properties of alloys with or without {chi} phase has shown that the intermetallic phase has a detrimental effect on the ductility, but has no influence on the mechanical strength. Creep tests have been performed between 500 and 700 deg. Thermally activated plasticity mechanisms are observed in this temperature range. The {chi} phase, which is always micro-cracked after tensile testing, is not damaged after creep testing below a critical stress. This behaviour is explained by the influence of strain rate through the competition between strain hardening and relaxation of the matrix. (author).

  3. Overload effects on a ferritic-baintic steel and a cast aluminium alloy: two very different behaviours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saintier, N. [Arts et Metiers Paris Tech, I2M, UMR CNRS, Universite Bordeaux 1, Talene Cedex (France); El Dsoki, C.; Kaufmann, H.; Sonsino, C.M. [Fraunhofer-Institute for Structural Durability and System Reliability LBF, Darmstadt (Germany); Dumas, C. [RENAULT, Technocentre, Guyancourt Cedex (France); Voellmecke, F.J. [BORBET GmbH, Hallenberg-Hesborn (Germany); Palin-Luc, T.; Bidonard, H.

    2011-10-15

    Load controlled fatigue tests were performed up to 10{sup 7} cycles on flat notched specimens (K{sub t} = 2.5) under constant amplitude and variable amplitude loadings with and without periodical overloads. Two materials are studied: a ferritic-bainitic steel (HE400M steel) and a cast aluminium alloy (AlSi7Mg0.3). These materials have a very different cyclic behaviour: the steel exhibits cyclic strain softening whereas the Al alloy shows cyclic strain hardening. The fatigue tests show that, for the steel, periodical overload applications reduce significantly the fatigue life for fully reversed load ratio (R{sub {sigma}} = -1), while they have no influence under pulsating loading (R{sub {sigma}} = 0). For the Al alloy overloads have an effect (fatigue life decreasing) only for variable amplitude loadings. The detrimental effect of overloads on the steel is due to ratcheting at the notch root which evolution is overload's dependent. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Influence of scandium addition on the high-temperature grain size stabilization of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) ferritic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lulu, E-mail: lli18@ncsu.edu; Xu, Weizong; Saber, Mostafa; Zhu, Yuntian; Koch, Carl C.; Scattergood, Ronald O.

    2015-06-11

    The influence of 1–4 at% Sc addition on the thermal stability of mechanically alloyed ODS ferritic alloy was studied in this work. Sc addition was found to significantly stabilize grain size and microhardness at high temperatures. Grain sizes of samples with 1 and 4 at% Sc was found maintained in the nanoscale range at temperatures up to 1000 °C with hardness maintained at 5.6 and 6.7 GPa, respectively. The detailed microstructure was also investigated from EDS elemental mapping, where nanofeatures [ScTiO] were observed, while nanosized [YTiO] particles were rarely seen. This is probably due to the concentration difference between Sc and Y, leading to the formation of [ScTiO] favoring that of [YTiO]. Precipitation was considered as the major source for the observed high temperature stabilization. In addition, 14YT–Sc alloys without large second phases such as Ti-oxide can exhibit better performance compared to conventional ODS materials.

  5. Hydrogen-Induced Delayed Cracking in TRIP-Aided Lean-Alloyed Ferritic-Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi Papula

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Susceptibility of three lean-alloyed ferritic-austenitic stainless steels to hydrogen-induced delayed cracking was examined, concentrating on internal hydrogen contained in the materials after production operations. The aim was to study the role of strain-induced austenite to martensite transformation in the delayed cracking susceptibility. According to the conducted deep drawing tests and constant load tensile testing, the studied materials seem not to be particularly susceptible to delayed cracking. Delayed cracks were only occasionally initiated in two of the materials at high local stress levels. However, if a delayed crack initiated in a highly stressed location, strain-induced martensite transformation decreased the crack arrest tendency of the austenite phase in a duplex microstructure. According to electron microscopy examination and electron backscattering diffraction analysis, the fracture mode was predominantly cleavage, and cracks propagated along the body-centered cubic (BCC phases ferrite and α’-martensite. The BCC crystal structure enables fast diffusion of hydrogen to the crack tip area. No delayed cracking was observed in the stainless steel that had high austenite stability. Thus, it can be concluded that the presence of α’-martensite increases the hydrogen-induced cracking susceptibility.

  6. The influence of fabrication procedure on the void swelling of an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy in a HVEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snykers, M.; Biermans, F.; Cornelis, J.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of changes in the fabrication procedure of ferritic alloys with compositions Fe-13Cr-Ti-Mo-TiO 2 on the swelling behaviour are investigated. The fabrication procedures are: casting, powder metallurgy; milling in air and powder metallurgy; milling in argon. No difference is found for the results obtained for the materials fabricated by casting and by powder metallurgy; milling in air. Slightly different results are obtained for the material fabricated by powder metallurgy; milling in argon. This material contains argon in solution in the matrix, which causes a small shift of the peak swelling temperature and of the peak swelling helium concentration for tests carried out at 450 0 C. The overall swelling of this material is the lowest due to the small grain size and to the high density of inclusions. (orig.)

  7. Evaluation of mechanically alloyed Cu-based powders as filler alloy for brazing tungsten to a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Prado, J.; Sánchez, M.; Ureña, A.

    2017-07-01

    80Cu-20Ti powders were evaluated for their use as filler alloy for high temperature brazing of tungsten to a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (Eurofer), and its application for the first wall of the DEMO fusion reactor. The use of alloyed powders has not been widely considered for brazing purposes and could improve the operational brazeability of the studied system due to its narrower melting range, determined by DTA analysis, which enhances the spreading capabilities of the filler. Ti contained in the filler composition acts as an activator element, reacting and forming several interfacial layers at the Eurofer-braze, which enhances the wettability properties and chemical interaction at the brazing interface. Brazing thermal cycle also activated the diffusion phenomena, which mainly affected to the Eurofer alloying elements causing in it a softening band of approximately 400 μm of thickness. However, this softening effect did not degrade the shear strength of the brazed joints (94 ± 23 MPa), because failure during testing was always located at the tungsten-braze interface.

  8. Hierarchical periodic micro/nano-structures on nitinol and their influence on oriented endothelialization and anti-thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Kosuke; Shinonaga, Togo; Ebe, Noriko; Horiuchi, Naohiro; Nakamura, Miho; Tsutsumi, Yusuke; Hanawa, Takao; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Nagai, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    The applications of hierarchical micro/nano-structures, which possess properties of two-scale roughness, have been studied in various fields. In this study, hierarchical periodic micro/nano-structures were fabricated on nitinol, an equiatomic Ni–Ti alloy, using a femtosecond laser for the surface modification of intravascular stents. By controlling the laser fluence, two types of surfaces were developed: periodic nano- and micro/nano-structures. Evaluation of water contact angles indicated that the nano-surface was hydrophilic and the micro/nano-surface was hydrophobic. Endothelial cells aligned along the nano-structures on both surfaces, whereas platelets failed to adhere to the micro/nano-surface. Decorrelation between the responses of the two cell types and the results of water contact angle analysis were a result of the pinning effect. This is the first study to show the applicability of hierarchical periodic micro/nano-structures for surface modification of nitinol. - Highlights: • Hierarchical micro/nano-structures were created on nitinol using a femtosecond laser. • The nano-surface was hydrophilic and the micro/nano-surface was hydrophobic. • Endothelial cells aligned along the nano-structures • Platelets failed to adhere to the micro/nano-surface

  9. Hierarchical periodic micro/nano-structures on nitinol and their influence on oriented endothelialization and anti-thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozaki, Kosuke [Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan); Shinonaga, Togo [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Ebe, Noriko; Horiuchi, Naohiro; Nakamura, Miho; Tsutsumi, Yusuke; Hanawa, Takao [Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan); Tsukamoto, Masahiro [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Yamashita, Kimihiro [Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan); Nagai, Akiko, E-mail: nag-bcr@tmd.ac.jp [Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan)

    2015-12-01

    The applications of hierarchical micro/nano-structures, which possess properties of two-scale roughness, have been studied in various fields. In this study, hierarchical periodic micro/nano-structures were fabricated on nitinol, an equiatomic Ni–Ti alloy, using a femtosecond laser for the surface modification of intravascular stents. By controlling the laser fluence, two types of surfaces were developed: periodic nano- and micro/nano-structures. Evaluation of water contact angles indicated that the nano-surface was hydrophilic and the micro/nano-surface was hydrophobic. Endothelial cells aligned along the nano-structures on both surfaces, whereas platelets failed to adhere to the micro/nano-surface. Decorrelation between the responses of the two cell types and the results of water contact angle analysis were a result of the pinning effect. This is the first study to show the applicability of hierarchical periodic micro/nano-structures for surface modification of nitinol. - Highlights: • Hierarchical micro/nano-structures were created on nitinol using a femtosecond laser. • The nano-surface was hydrophilic and the micro/nano-surface was hydrophobic. • Endothelial cells aligned along the nano-structures • Platelets failed to adhere to the micro/nano-surface.

  10. Optimized Compositional Design and Processing-Fabrication Paths for Larger Heats of Nanostructured Ferritic Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odette, G. Robert [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2017-02-06

    The objective of this work was to characterize the alloy 14YWT-PM2, which is an extruded and cross-rolled precursor alloy to a large heat of 14YWT being produced using an alternative processing path that incorporates Y during gas atomization process.

  11. Si-Ge Nano-Structured with Tungsten Silicide Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Jon; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynys, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Traditional silicon germanium high temperature thermoelectrics have potential for improvements in figure of merit via nano-structuring with a silicide phase. A second phase of nano-sized silicides can theoretically reduce the lattice component of thermal conductivity without significantly reducing the electrical conductivity. However, experimentally achieving such improvements in line with the theory is complicated by factors such as control of silicide size during sintering, dopant segregation, matrix homogeneity, and sintering kinetics. Samples are prepared using powder metallurgy techniques; including mechanochemical alloying via ball milling and spark plasma sintering for densification. In addition to microstructural development, thermal stability of thermoelectric transport properties are reported, as well as couple and device level characterization.

  12. Past research and fabrication conducted at SCK•CEN on ferritic ODS alloys used as cladding for FBR's fuel pins

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bremaecker, Anne

    2012-09-01

    In the 1960s in the frame of the sodium-cooled fast breeders, SCK•CEN decided to develop claddings made with ferritic stainless materials because of their specific properties, namely a higher thermal conductivity, a lower thermal expansion, a lower tendency to He-embrittlement, and a lower swelling than the austenitic stainless steels. To enhance their lower creep resistance at 650-700 °C arose the idea to strengthen the microstructure by oxide dispersions. This was the starting point of an ambitious programme where both the matrix and the dispersions were optimized. A purely ferritic 13 wt% Cr matrix was selected and its mechanical strength was improved through addition of ferritizing elements. Results of tensile and stress-rupture tests showed that Ti and Mo were the most beneficial elements, partly because of the chi-phase precipitation. In 1973 the optimized matrix composition was Fe-13Cr-3.5Ti-2Mo. To reach creep properties similar to those of AISI 316, different dispersions and methods were tested: internal oxidation (that was not conclusive), and the direct mixing of metallic and oxide powders (Al2O3, MgO, ZrO2, TiO2, ZrSiO4) followed by pressing, sintering, and extrusion. The compression and extrusion parameters were determined: extrusion as hollow at 1050 °C, solution annealing at 1050 °C/15 min, cleaning, cold drawing to the final dimensions with intermediate annealings at 1050 °C, final annealing at 1050 °C, straightening and final aging at 800 °C. The choice of titania and yttria powders and their concentrations were finalized on the basis of their out-of-pile and in-pile creep and tensile strength. As soon as a resistance butt welding machine was developed and installed in a glove-box, fuel segments with PuO2 were loaded in the Belgian MTR BR2. The fabrication parameters were continuously optimized: milling and beating, lubrication, cold drawing (partial and final reduction rates, temperature, duration, atmosphere and furnace). Specific non

  13. Lifetime of Nano-Structured Black Silicon for Photovoltaic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present recent results of lifetime optimization for nano-structured black silicon and its photovoltaic applications. Black silicon nano-structures provide significant reduction of silicon surface reflection due to highly corrugated nanostructures with excellent light trapping pro......, respectively. This is promising for use of black silicon RIE nano-structuring in a solar cell process flow......In this work, we present recent results of lifetime optimization for nano-structured black silicon and its photovoltaic applications. Black silicon nano-structures provide significant reduction of silicon surface reflection due to highly corrugated nanostructures with excellent light trapping...

  14. Radiation-induced strengthening and absorption of dislocation loops in ferritic Fe–Cr alloys: the role of Cr segregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terentyev, D; Bakaev, A

    2013-01-01

    The understanding of radiation-induced strengthening in ferritic FeCr-based steels remains an essential issue in the assessment of materials for fusion and fission reactors. Both early and recent experimental works on Fe–Cr alloys reveal Cr segregation on radiation-induced nanostructural features (mainly dislocation loops), whose impact on the modification of the mechanical response of the material might be key for explaining quantitatively the radiation-induced strengthening in these alloys. In this work, we use molecular dynamics to study systematically the interaction of dislocations with 1/2〈111〉 and 〈100〉 loops in all possible orientations, both enriched by Cr atoms and undecorated, for different temperatures, loop sizes and dislocation velocities. The configurations of the enriched loops have been obtained using a non-rigid lattice Monte Carlo method. The study reveals that Cr segregation influences the interaction mechanisms with both 1/2〈111〉 and 〈100〉 loops. The overall effect of Cr enrichment is to penalize the mobility of intrinsically glissile 1/2〈111〉 loops, modifying the reaction mechanisms as a result. The following three most important effects associated with Cr enrichment have been revealed: (i) absence of dynamic drag; (ii) suppression of complete absorption; (iii) enhanced strength of small dislocation loops (2 nm and smaller). Overall the effect of the Cr enrichment is therefore to increase the unpinning stress, so experimentally ‘invisible’ nanostructural features may also contribute to radiation-induced strengthening. The reasons for the modification of the mechanisms are explained and the impact of the loading conditions is discussed. (paper)

  15. Charpy impact test results of ferritic alloys at a fluence of 6 x 1022n/cm2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    Charpy impact tests on specimens in the AD-2 reconstitution experiment were completed. One hundred ten specimens made of HT-9 base metal, 9Cr-1Mo base metal and 9Cr-1Mo weldment at various heat treatment conditions were tested in temperature range from -73 0 C to 260 0 C. The specimens were irradiated from 390 0 C to 550 0 C and the fluence of the specimens reached 6 x 10 22 n/cm 2 . This is the first time that the transition behavior of ferritic alloys at high fluence was obtained. This is also the first time that comprehensive results on the irradiated 9Cr-1Mo weldment are available. The test results show a small additional shift in transition temperature for HT-9 base metal irradiated at 390 0 C and 450 0 C as the fluence was raised to 6 x 10 22 n/cm 2 . At higher irradiation temperatures, however, the shift in transition temperature is less conclusive. Further reduction in USE was observed at higher fluence for all the irradiation temperatures. There is no apparent fluence effect for 9Cr-1Mo base metal at all the irradiation temperatures studied. Contrary to the previous finding on HT-9 base metal and weldment, the 9Cr-1Mo weldment shows a higher transition temperature ( + 60 0 C) and a higher USE ( + 100%) as compared to the 9Cr-1MO base metal for the same irradiation conditions. 6 references, 7 figures, 7 tables

  16. Development of High-Temperature Ferritic Alloys and Performance Prediction Methods for Advanced Fission Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. RObert Odette; Takuya Yamamoto

    2009-08-14

    Reports the results of a comprehensive development and analysis of a database on irradiation hardening and embrittlement of tempered martensitic steels (TMS). Alloy specific quantitative semi-empirical models were derived for the dpa dose, irradiation temperature (ti) and test (Tt) temperature of yield stress hardening (or softening) .

  17. Characterization of nano structured metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin A, M.; Gutierrez W, C.; Cruz C, R.; Angeles C, C.

    1997-01-01

    Nowadays the search of new materials with specific optical properties has carried out to realize a series of experiments through the polymer synthesis [(C 3 N 3 ) 2 (NH) 3 ] n doped with gold metallic nanoparticles. The thermal stability of a polymer is due to the presence of tyazine rings contained in the structure. The samples were characterized by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-ray diffraction by the Powder method, Ft-infrared and its thermal properties by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetry (TGA). One of the purposes of this work is to obtain nano structured materials over a polymeric matrix. (Author)

  18. Comparison of Ductile-to-Brittle Transition Behavior in Two Similar Ferritic Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Jesus; Rementeria, Rosalia; Aranda, Maria; Capdevila, Carlos; Gonzalez-Carrasco, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    The ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT) behavior of two similar Fe-Cr-Al oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) stainless steels was analyzed following the Cottrell–Petch model. Both alloys were manufactured by mechanical alloying (MA) but by different forming routes. One was manufactured as hot rolled tube, and the other in the form of hot extruded bar. The two hot forming routes considered do not significantly influence the microstructure, but cause differences in the texture and the distribution of oxide particles. These have little influence on tensile properties; however, the DBT temperature and the upper shelf energy (USE) are significantly affected because of delamination orientation with regard to the notch plane. Whereas in hot rolled material the delaminations are parallel to the rolling surface, in the hot extruded material, they are randomly oriented because the material is transversally isotropic. PMID:28773764

  19. Comparison of Ductile-to-Brittle Transition Behavior in Two Similar Ferritic Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Jesus; Rementeria, Rosalia; Aranda, Maria; Capdevila, Carlos; Gonzalez-Carrasco, Jose Luis

    2016-07-29

    The ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT) behavior of two similar Fe-Cr-Al oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) stainless steels was analyzed following the Cottrell-Petch model. Both alloys were manufactured by mechanical alloying (MA) but by different forming routes. One was manufactured as hot rolled tube, and the other in the form of hot extruded bar. The two hot forming routes considered do not significantly influence the microstructure, but cause differences in the texture and the distribution of oxide particles. These have little influence on tensile properties; however, the DBT temperature and the upper shelf energy (USE) are significantly affected because of delamination orientation with regard to the notch plane. Whereas in hot rolled material the delaminations are parallel to the rolling surface, in the hot extruded material, they are randomly oriented because the material is transversally isotropic.

  20. Numerical atomic scale simulations of the microstructural evolution of ferritic alloys under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, E.

    2006-12-01

    In this work, we have developed a model of point defect (vacancies and interstitials) diffusion whose aim is to simulate by kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) the formation of solute rich clusters observed experimentally in irradiated FeCuNiMnSi model alloys and in pressure vessel steels. Electronic structure calculations have been used to characterize the interactions between point defects and the different solute atoms. Each of these solute atoms establishes an attractive bond with the vacancy. As for Mn, which is the element which has the weakest bond with the vacancy, it establishes more favourable bonds with interstitials. Binding energies, migration energies as well as other atomic scale properties, determined by ab initio calculations, have led to a parameter set for the KMC code. Firstly, these parameters have been optimised on thermal ageing experiments realised on the FeCu binary alloy and on complex alloys, described in the literature. The vacancy diffusion thermal annealing simulations show that when a vacancy is available, all the solutes migrate and form clusters, in agreement with the observed experimental tendencies. Secondly, to simulate the microstructural evolution under irradiation, we have introduced interstitials in the KMC code. Their presence leads to a more efficient transport of Mn. The first simulations of electron and neutron irradiations show that the model results are globally qualitatively coherent with the experimentally observed tendencies. (author)

  1. Strengthening of the RAFMS RUSFER-EK181 through nano structuring surface layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panin, A.; Melnikova, E.A. [Tomsk State Univ., lnstitute of Strength Physics and Materials Science, SB, RAS (Russian Federation); Chernov, V.M. [Bochvar Institute of Inorganic Materials, Moscow (Russian Federation); Leontieva-Smirnova, M.V. [A.A. Bochvar Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Surface nano-structuring increases yield point and strength of the reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel (RAFMS ) RUSREF - EK181. Ultrasonic impact treatment was used to produce a nano-structure within the surface layers of the specimens. Using scanning tunnelling microscope reveals a new mechanism of mesoscale-level plastic deformation of nano-structured surface layers of the RAFMS RUSREF - EK181 as doubled spirals of localised-plastic deformation meso-bands. A linear dependence of their sizes on thickness of strengthened layer was obtained. The effect of localised deformation meso-bands on macro-mechanical properties of a material was demonstrated. A certain combination of thermal and mechanical treatment as well as optimum proportion of nano-structured surface layer thickness to thickness of a whole specimen are necessary to achieve maximum strength values. Tests performed at high temperatures in the range from 20 to 700 deg. C shows efficiency of the surface hardening of the RAFMS RUSREF - EK181. The effect of nano-structured surface layer on the character of plastic deformation and mechanical properties of the RAFMS RUSREF - EK181 was considered in the framework of a multilevel model in which loss of shear stability and generation of structural defects occur self-consistently at various scale levels such as nano-, micro-, meso-, and macro-Chessboard like distribution of stresses and misfit deformations was theoretical and experimentally shown to appear at the 'nano-structured surface layer - bulk of material' interface. Zones of compressive normal stresses alternates with zones of tensile normal stresses as on a chessboard. Plastic shear can generate only within local zones of tensile normal stresses. Critical meso-volume of non-equilibrium states required for local structure-phase transformation can be formed within these zones. Whereas within the zones of compressive normal stresses acting from both

  2. Advanced vectorial simulation of VCSELs with nano structures invited paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    The single-mode properties and design issues of three vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) structures incorporating nano structures are rigorously investigated. Nano structuring enables to deliver selective pumping or loss to the fundamental mode as well as stabilizing the output...... polarization state. Comparison of three vectorial simulation methods reveals that the modal expansion method is suitable for treating the nano structured VCSEL designs....

  3. Comparison of fracture behavior for low-swelling ferritic and austenitic alloys irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to 180 DPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.

    1992-02-01

    Fracture toughness testing was conducted to investigate the radiation embrittlement of high-nickel superalloys, modified austenitic steels and ferritic steels. These materials have been experimentally proven to possess excellent resistance to void swelling after high neutron exposures. In addition to swelling resistance, post-irradiation fracture resistance is another important criterion for reactor material selection. By means of fracture mechanics techniques the fracture behavior of those highly irradiated alloys was characterized in terms of irradiation and test conditions. Precipitation-strengthened alloys failed by channel fracture with very low postirradiation ductility. The fracture toughness of titanium-modified austenitic stainless steel D9 deteriorates with increasing fluence to about 100 displacement per atom (dpa), the fluence level at which brittle fracture appears to occur. Ferritic steels such as HT9 are the most promising candidate materials for fast and fusion reactor applications. The upper-shelf fracture toughness of alloy HT9 remained adequate after irradiation to 180 dpa although its ductile- brittle transition temperature (DBTT) shift by low temperature irradiation rendered the material susceptible to brittle fracture at room temperature. Understanding the fracture characteristics under various irradiation and test conditions helps reduce the potential for brittle fracture by permitting appropriate measure to be taken

  4. Effects of alloying and processing modifications on precipitation and strength in 9%Cr ferritic/martensitic steels for fast reactor cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippey, Kristin E.

    P92 was modified with respect to alloying and processing in the attempt to enhance high-temperature microstructural stability and mechanical properties. Alloying effects were modeled in ThermoCalcRTM and analyzed with reference to literature. ThermoCalcRTM modeling was conducted to design two low-carbon P92-like low-carbon alloys with austenite stabilized by alternative alloying; full conversion to austenite allows for a fully martensitic structure. Goals included avoidance of Z-phase, decrease of M23C6 phase fraction and maintained or increased MX phase fraction. Fine carbonitride precipitation was optimized by selecting alloying compositions such that all V and Nb could be solutionized at temperatures outside the delta-ferrite phase field. A low-carbon alloy (LC) and a low-carbon-zero-niobium alloy (0Nb) were identified and fabricated. This low-carbon approach stems from the increased creep resistance reported in several low-carbon alloys, presumably from reduced M23C6 precipitation and maintained MX precipitation [1], although these low-carbon alloys also contained additional tungsten (W) and cobalt (Co) compared to the base P92 alloy. The synergistic effect of Co and W on the microstructure and mechanical properties are difficult to deconvolute. Higher solutionizing temperatures allow more V and Nb into solution and increase prior austenite grain size; however, at sufficiently high temperatures delta-ferrite forms. Optimal solutionizing temperatures to maximize V and Nb in solution, while avoiding the onset of the delta ferrite phase field, were analyzed in ThermoCalcRTM. Optical microscopy showed ThermoCalc RTM predicted higher delta-ferrite onset temperatures of 20 °C in P92 alloys to nearly 50 °C in the designed alloys of the critical temperature. Identifying the balance where maximum fine precipitation is achieved and delta-ferrite avoided is a key factor in the design of an acceptable P92-like alloy for Generation IV reactor cladding. Processing was

  5. Irradiation-Induced Solute Clustering in a Low Nickel FeMnNi Ferritic Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meslin, E.; Barbu, A.; Radiguet, B.; Pareige, P.; Toffolon, C.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is required to be able to operate safely a nuclear power plant or to extend its lifetime. The mechanical properties degradation is partly due to the clustering of solute under irradiation. To gain knowledge about the clustering process, a Fe-1.1 Mn-0.7 Ni (at.%) alloy was irradiated in a test reactor at two fluxes of 0.15 and 9 *10 17 n E≥1MeV . m -2 .s -1 and at increasing doses from 0.18 to 1.3 *10 24 n E≥1MeV ) . m -2 at 300 degrees C. Atom probe tomography (APT) experiments revealed that the irradiation promotes the formation in the α iron matrix of Mn/Mn and/or Ni/Ni pair correlations at low dose and Mn-Ni enriched clusters at high dose. These clusters dissolve partially after a thermal treatment at 400 degrees C. Based on a comparison with thermodynamic calculations, we show that the solute clustering under irradiation can just result from an induced mechanism. (authors)

  6. Synthesis of nano structures for use as toxic gas adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velazquez P, S.; Pacheco S, J.; Estrada M, N.; Vasquez N, C.; Garcia R, M.; Garduno A, M.; Torres R, C.; Garcia G, J.; Pacheco P, M.; Valdivia B, R.; Ramos F, F.; Cruz A, A.; Duran G, M.; Hidalgo P, M.

    2008-01-01

    The work described here is the study of adsorption of nitrogen oxides by carbon nano structures and its implementation in a plasma reactor used to treat toxic gases. By placing a bed of carbon nano structures to the plasma reactor outlet obtained and increase in the efficiency of degradation. (Author)

  7. Compatibility of graphite with a martensitic-ferritic steel, an austenitic stainless steel and a Ni-base alloy up to 1250 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, P.

    1994-08-01

    To study the chemical interactions between graphite and a martensitic-ferritic steel (1.4914), an austenitic stainless steel (1.4919; AISI 316), and a Ni-base alloy (Hastelloy X) isothermal reaction experiments were performed in the temperature range between 900 and 1250 C. At higher temperatures a rapid and complete liquefaction of the components occurred as a result of eutectic interactions. The chemical interactions are diffusion-controlled processes and can be described by parabolic rate laws. The reaction behavior of the two steels is very similar. The chemical interactions of the steels with graphite are much faster above 1100 C than those for the Ni-base alloy. Below 1000 C the effect is opposite. (orig.) [de

  8. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of the nanostructured oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiselt, Ch.Ch.; Klimenkov, M.; Lindau, R.; Moeslang, A.; Odette, G.R.; Yamamoto, T.; Gragg, D.

    2011-01-01

    The realization of fusion power as an attractive energy source requires advanced structural materials that can cope with ultra-severe thermo-mechanical loads and high neutron fluxes experienced by fusion power plant components, such as the first wall, divertor and blanket structures. Towards this end, two variants of a 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2 O 3 reduced activation ferritic (RAF-) ODS steel were produced by ball milling phase blended Fe-13Cr-1W, 0.3Y 2 0 3 and 0.3Ti powders in both argon and hydrogen atmospheres. The milled powders were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The as-HIPed alloys were then hot rolled into 6 mm plates. Microstructural, tensile and fracture toughness characterization of the hot rolled alloys are summarized here and compared to results previously reported for the as-HIPed condition.

  9. TEM and HRTEM study of oxide particles in an Al-alloyed high-Cr oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel with Hf addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dou, Peng, E-mail: doup@tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kimura, Akihiko, E-mail: kimura@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kasada, Ryuta, E-mail: r-kasada@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Okuda, Takanari, E-mail: okuda.takanari@kki.kobelco.com [Kobelco Research Institute, 1-5-5 Takatsukadai, Nishi-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 651-2271 (Japan); Inoue, Masaki, E-mail: inoue.masaki@jaea.go.jp [Advanced Nuclear System R& D Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita, O-arai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Ukai, Shigeharu, E-mail: s-ukai@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13, W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Ohnuki, Somei, E-mail: ohnuki@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13, W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Fujisawa, Toshiharu, E-mail: fujisawa@esi.nagoya-u.ac.jp [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Furo, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Abe, Fujio, E-mail: ABE.Fujio@nims.go.jp [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Jiang, Shan, E-mail: js93518@gmail.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Yang, Zhigang, E-mail: zgyang@tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials (MOE), School of Materials Sciences and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2017-03-15

    The nanoparticles in an Al-alloyed high-Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with Hf addition, i.e., SOC-16 (Fe-15Cr-2W-0.1Ti-4Al-0.62Hf-0.35Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}), have been examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Relative to an Al-alloyed high-Cr ODS ferritic steel without Hf addition, i.e., SOC-9 (Fe-15.5Cr-2W-0.1Ti-4Al-0.35Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}), the dispersion morphology and coherency of the oxide nanoparticles in SOC-16 were significantly improved. Almost all the small nanoparticles (diameter <10 nm) in SOC-16 were found to be consistent with cubic Y{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} oxides with the anion-deficient fluorite structure and coherent with the bcc steel matrix. The larger particles (diameter >10 nm) were also mainly identified as cubic Y{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} oxides with the anion-deficient fluorite structure. The results presented here are compared with those of SOC-9 with a brief discussion of the underlying mechanisms of the unusual thermal and irradiation stabilities of the oxides as well as the superior strength, excellent irradiation tolerance and extraordinary corrosion resistance of SOC-16.

  10. TEM and HRTEM study of oxide particles in an Al-alloyed high-Cr oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel with Hf addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou, Peng; Kimura, Akihiko; Kasada, Ryuta; Okuda, Takanari; Inoue, Masaki; Ukai, Shigeharu; Ohnuki, Somei; Fujisawa, Toshiharu; Abe, Fujio; Jiang, Shan; Yang, Zhigang

    2017-01-01

    The nanoparticles in an Al-alloyed high-Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with Hf addition, i.e., SOC-16 (Fe-15Cr-2W-0.1Ti-4Al-0.62Hf-0.35Y 2 O 3 ), have been examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Relative to an Al-alloyed high-Cr ODS ferritic steel without Hf addition, i.e., SOC-9 (Fe-15.5Cr-2W-0.1Ti-4Al-0.35Y 2 O 3 ), the dispersion morphology and coherency of the oxide nanoparticles in SOC-16 were significantly improved. Almost all the small nanoparticles (diameter <10 nm) in SOC-16 were found to be consistent with cubic Y 2 Hf 2 O 7 oxides with the anion-deficient fluorite structure and coherent with the bcc steel matrix. The larger particles (diameter >10 nm) were also mainly identified as cubic Y 2 Hf 2 O 7 oxides with the anion-deficient fluorite structure. The results presented here are compared with those of SOC-9 with a brief discussion of the underlying mechanisms of the unusual thermal and irradiation stabilities of the oxides as well as the superior strength, excellent irradiation tolerance and extraordinary corrosion resistance of SOC-16.

  11. Functionally Graded Materials using Plasma Spray with Nano Structured Ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sioh, E L; Tok, A I Y

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, nano structured FGM was fabricated using DC plasma spray technique. Nano structured and micro structured powder were used as the feeding powder with steel substrate. The spray parameters was optimized and characterisation of nano-ceramic FGM and micro-ceramic FGM were done using bending test and micro-hardness test. Experimental results have shown that the nano-structured FGM exhibit 20% improvement flexure strength and 10% in hardness. A comparison was made between sintered micro ceramic tile and nano ceramic FGM using simple drop test method.

  12. HIGH TEMPERATURE BRAZING ALLOY FOR JOINT Fe-Cr-Al MATERIALS AND AUSTENITIC AND FERRITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cost, R.C.

    1958-07-15

    A new high temperature brazing alloy is described that is particularly suitable for brazing iron-chromiumaluminum alloys. It consists of approximately 20% Cr, 6% Al, 10% Si, and from 1.5 to 5% phosphorus, the balance being iron.

  13. Fabrication of nano-structured UO2 fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jae Ho; Kang, Ki Won; Rhee, Young Woo; Kim, Dong Joo; Kim, Jong Heon; Kim, Keon Sik; Song, Kun Woo

    2007-01-01

    Nano-structured materials have received much attention for their possibility for various functional materials. Ceramics with a nano-structured grain have some special properties such as super plasticity and a low sintering temperature. To reduce the fuel cycle costs and the total mass of spent LWR fuels, it is necessary to extend the fuel discharged burn-up. In order to increase the fuel burn-up, it is important to understand the fuel property of a highly irradiated fuel pellet. Especially, research has focused on the formation of a porous and small grained microstructure in the rim area of the fuel, called High Burn-up Structure (HBS). The average grain size of HBS is about 300nm. This paper deals with the feasibility study on the fabrication of nano-structured UO 2 pellets. The nano sized UO 2 particles are prepared by a combined process of a oxidation-reducing and a mechanical milling of UO 2 powder. Nano-structured UO 2 pellets (∼300nm) with a density of ∼93%TD can be obtained by sintering nano-sized UO 2 compacts. The SEM study reveals that the microstructure of the fabricated nano-structure UO 2 pellet is similar to that of HBS. Therefore, this bulk nano-structured UO 2 pellet can be used as a reference pellet for a measurement of the physical properties of HBS

  14. TEM Study of the Orientation Relationship Between Cementite and Ferrite in a Bainitic Low Carbon High Strength Low Alloy Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Illescas Fernandez, Silvia; Brown, A.P.; He, K.; Fernández, Javier; Guilemany Casadamon, Josep Maria

    2005-01-01

    Two different bainitic structures are observed in a steel depending on the sample heat treatment. The different types of bainitic structures exhibit different orientation relationships between cementite and the ferrite matrix. Upper bainite presents a Pitsch orientation relationship and lower bainite presents a Bagaryatski orientation relationship. Different heat treatments of low carbon HSLA steel samples have been studied using TEM in order to find the orientation relationshi...

  15. Establishing a Scientific Basis for Optimizing Compositions, Process Paths and Fabrication Methods for Nanostructured Ferritic Alloys for Use in Advanced Fission Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odette, G Robert; Cunningham, Nicholas J., Wu, Yuan; Etienne, Auriane; Stergar, Erich; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2012-02-21

    The broad objective of this NEUP was to further develop a class of 12-15Cr ferritic alloys that are dispersion strengthened and made radiation tolerant by an ultrahigh density of Y-Ti-O nanofeatures (NFs) in the size range of less than 5 nm. We call these potentially transformable materials nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). NFAs are typically processed by ball milling pre-alloyed rapidly solidified powders and yttria (Y2O3) powders. Proper milling effectively dissolves the Ti, Y and O solutes that precipitate as NFs during hot consolidation. The tasks in the present study included examining alternative processing paths, characterizing and optimizing the NFs and investigating solid state joining. Alternative processing paths involved rapid solidification by gas atomization of Fe, 14% Cr, 3% W, and 0.4% Ti powders that are also pre-alloyed with 0.2% Y (14YWT), where the compositions are in wt.%. The focus is on exploring the possibility of minimizing, or even eliminating, the milling time, as well as producing alloys with more homogeneous distributions of NFs and a more uniform, fine grain size. Three atomization environments were explored: Ar, Ar plus O (Ar/O) and He. The characterization of powders and alloys occurred through each processing step: powder production by gas atomization; powder milling; and powder annealing or hot consolidation by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) or hot extrusion. The characterization studies of the materials described here include various combinations of: a) bulk chemistry; b) electron probe microanalysis (EPMA); c) atom probe tomography (APT); d) small angle neutron scattering (SANS); e) various types of scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM); and f) microhardness testing. The bulk chemistry measurements show that preliminary batches of gas-atomized powders could be produced within specified composition ranges. However, EPMA and TEM showed that the Y is heterogeneously distributed and phase separated, but

  16. Characterization of low alloy ferritic steel–Ni base alloy dissimilar metal weld interface by SPM techniques, SEM/EDS, TEM/EDS and SVET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Siyan; Ding, Jie; Ming, Hongliang; Zhang, Zhiming; Wang, Jianqiu, E-mail: wangjianqiu@imr.ac.cn

    2015-02-15

    The interface region of welded A508–Alloy 52 M is characterized by scanning probe microscope (SPM) techniques, scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM)/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and scanning vibrate electrode technique (SVET). The regions along the welded A508–Alloy 52 M interface can be categorized into two types according to their different microstructures. In the type-I interface region, A508 and Alloy 52 M are separated by the fusion boundary, while in the type-II interface region, A508 and Alloy 52 M are separated by a martensite zone. A508, martensite zone and grain boundaries in Alloy 52 M are ferromagnetic while the Alloy 52 M matrix is paramagnetic. The Volta potentials measured by scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM) of A508, martensite zone and Alloy 52 M follow the order: V{sub 52} {sub M} > V{sub A508} > V{sub martensite}. The corrosion behavior of A508–Alloy 52 M interface region is galvanic corrosion, in which Alloy 52 M is cathode while A508 is anode. The martensite dissolves faster than Alloy 52 M, but slower than A508 in the test solution. - Highlights: • The A508–Alloy 52 M interface regions can be categorized into two types. • The chromium depleted region is observed along the Alloy 52 M grain boundary. • The Alloy 52 M grain boundaries which are close to the interface are ferromagnetic. • Martensite zone has lower Volta potential but higher corrosion resistance than A508.

  17. Delta ferrite in the weld metal of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sam, Shiju, E-mail: shiju@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 428 (India); Das, C.R.; Ramasubbu, V.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Jayakumar, T. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Rajendra Kumar, E. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 428 (India)

    2014-12-15

    Formation of delta(δ)-ferrite in the weld metal, during autogenous bead-on-plate welding of Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, has been studied. Composition of the alloy is such that delta-ferrite is not expected in the alloy; but examination of the weld metal revealed presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal. Volume fraction of delta-ferrite is found to be higher in the weld interface than in the rest of the fusion zone. Decrease in the volume fraction of delta-ferrite, with an increase in preheat temperature or with an increase in heat input, is observed. Results indicate that the cooling rate experienced during welding affects the volume fraction of delta-ferrite retained in the weld metal and variation in the delta-ferrite content with cooling rate is explained with variation in the time that the weld metal spends in various temperature regimes in which delta-ferrite is stable for the alloy during its cooling from the liquid metal to the ambient temperature. This manuscript will discuss the effect of welding parameters on formation of delta-ferrite and its retention in the weld metal of RAFM steel.

  18. Influence of Mn-Co Spinel Coating on Oxidation Behavior of Ferritic SS Alloys for SOFC Interconnect Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venkatachalam, Vinothini; Molin, Sebastian; Kiebach, Wolff-Ragnar

    2014-01-01

    Chromia forming ferritic stainless steels (SS) are being considered for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell interconnect applications. However, protective coatings are in general needed to avoid chromium volatilization and poisoning of cathodes from chromium species. Mn-Co spinel is one...... of the promising candidates to prevent chromium outward diffusion, improve oxidation resistance and ensure high electrical conductivity over the lifetime of interconnects. In the present study, uniform and well adherent Mn-Co spinel coatings were produced on Crofer 22APU using electrophoretic deposition (EPD...

  19. Metal Oxide Nano structures: Synthesis, Properties, and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, L. H.; Patil, D. S.; Yang, J.; Xiao, J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, nano structured materials have attracted wide attention due to their fascinating optical and electrical properties, which make these materials potentially suitable for applications in electronics, optics, photonics, and sensors. Some metal oxides show a wide variety of morphologies such as nano wires, nano rods, nano tubes, nano rings, and nano belts. Synthesis and investigation of these metal-oxide nano structures are beneficial not only for understanding the fundamental phenomena in low dimensional systems, but also for developing new-generation nano devices with high performance.

  20. Tolerance Verification of Micro and Nano Structures on Polycarbonate Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasparin, Stefania; Tosello, Guido; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2010-01-01

    Micro and nano structures are an increasing challenge in terms of tolerance verification and process quality control: smaller dimensions led to a smaller tolerance zone to be evaluated. This paper focuses on the verification of CD, DVD and HD-DVD nanoscale features. CD tolerance features are defi......Micro and nano structures are an increasing challenge in terms of tolerance verification and process quality control: smaller dimensions led to a smaller tolerance zone to be evaluated. This paper focuses on the verification of CD, DVD and HD-DVD nanoscale features. CD tolerance features...

  1. Characterization of TiN, TiC and Ti(C,N) in titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels focusing on the significance of different particle morphologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelic, S.K., E-mail: susanne.michelic@unileoben.ac.at [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Loder, D. [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Reip, T.; Ardehali Barani, A. [Outokumpu Nirosta GmbH, Essener Straße 244, 44793 Bochum (Germany); Bernhard, C. [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2015-02-15

    Titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels are a competitive option to classical austenitic stainless steels owing to their similar corrosion resistance. The addition of titanium significantly influences their final steel cleanliness. The present contribution focuses on the detailed metallographic characterization of titanium nitrides, titanium carbides and titanium carbonitrides with regard to their size, morphology and composition. The methods used are manual and automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy as well as optical microscopy. Additional thermodynamic calculations are performed to explain the precipitation procedure of the analyzed titanium nitrides. The analyses showed that homogeneous nucleation is decisive at an early process stage after the addition of titanium. Heterogeneous nucleation gets crucial with ongoing process time and essentially influences the final inclusion size of titanium nitrides. A detailed investigation of the nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation with automated Scanning Electron Microscopy proved to be difficult due to their small size. Manual Scanning Electron Microscopy and optical microscopy have to be applied. Furthermore, it was found that during solidification an additional layer around an existing titanium nitride can be formed which changes the final inclusion morphology significantly. These layers are also characterized in detail. Based on these different inclusion morphologies, in combination with thermodynamic results, tendencies regarding the formation and modification time of titanium containing inclusions in ferritic chromium steels are derived. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The formation and modification of TiN in the steel 1.4520 was examined. • Heterogeneous nucleation essentially influences the final steel cleanliness. • In most cases heterogeneous nuclei in TiN inclusions are magnesium based. • Particle morphology provides important information

  2. Past research and fabrication conducted at SCK-CEN on ferritic ODS alloys used as cladding for FBR's fuel pins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bremaecker, Anne, E-mail: adbremae@sckcen.be [Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie-Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire (SCK-CEN), NMS, Mol (Belgium)

    2012-09-15

    In the 1960s in the frame of the sodium-cooled fast breeders, SCK-CEN decided to develop claddings made with ferritic stainless materials because of their specific properties, namely a higher thermal conductivity, a lower thermal expansion, a lower tendency to He-embrittlement, and a lower swelling than the austenitic stainless steels. To enhance their lower creep resistance at 650-700 Degree-Sign C arose the idea to strengthen the microstructure by oxide dispersions. This was the starting point of an ambitious programme where both the matrix and the dispersions were optimized. A purely ferritic 13 wt% Cr matrix was selected and its mechanical strength was improved through addition of ferritizing elements. Results of tensile and stress-rupture tests showed that Ti and Mo were the most beneficial elements, partly because of the chi-phase precipitation. In 1973 the optimized matrix composition was Fe-13Cr-3.5Ti-2Mo. To reach creep properties similar to those of AISI 316, different dispersions and methods were tested: internal oxidation (that was not conclusive), and the direct mixing of metallic and oxide powders (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, ZrO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, ZrSiO{sub 4}) followed by pressing, sintering, and extrusion. The compression and extrusion parameters were determined: extrusion as hollow at 1050 Degree-Sign C, solution annealing at 1050 Degree-Sign C/15 min, cleaning, cold drawing to the final dimensions with intermediate annealings at 1050 Degree-Sign C, final annealing at 1050 Degree-Sign C, straightening and final aging at 800 Degree-Sign C. The choice of titania and yttria powders and their concentrations were finalized on the basis of their out-of-pile and in-pile creep and tensile strength. As soon as a resistance butt welding machine was developed and installed in a glove-box, fuel segments with PuO{sub 2} were loaded in Belgian MTR BR2. The fabrication parameters were continuously optimized: milling and beating, lubrication, cold drawing (partial

  3. Synthesis and characterization of hybrid micro/nano-structured NiTi surfaces by a combination of etching and anodizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Z.; Fratila-Apachitei, L. E.; Apachitei, I.; Duszczyk, J.

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to generate hybrid micro/nano-structures on biomedical nickel-titanium alloy (NiTi). To achieve this, NiTi surfaces were firstly electrochemically etched and then anodized in fluoride-containing electrolyte. With the etching process, the NiTi surface was micro-roughened through the formation of micropits uniformly distributed over the entire surface. Following the subsequent anodizing process, self-organized nanotube structures enriched in TiO2 could be superimposed on the etched surface under specific conditions. Furthermore, the anodizing treatment significantly reduced water contact angles and increased the surface free energy compared to the surfaces prior to anodizing. The results of this study show for the first time that it is possible to create hybrid micro/nano-structures on biomedical NiTi alloys by combining electrochemical etching and anodizing under controlled conditions. These novel structures are expected to significantly enhance the surface biofunctionality of the material when compared to conventional implant devices with either micro- or nano-structured surfaces.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of hybrid micro/nano-structured NiTi surfaces by a combination of etching and anodizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huan, Z; Fratila-Apachitei, L E; Apachitei, I; Duszczyk, J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to generate hybrid micro/nano-structures on biomedical nickel–titanium alloy (NiTi). To achieve this, NiTi surfaces were firstly electrochemically etched and then anodized in fluoride-containing electrolyte. With the etching process, the NiTi surface was micro-roughened through the formation of micropits uniformly distributed over the entire surface. Following the subsequent anodizing process, self-organized nanotube structures enriched in TiO 2 could be superimposed on the etched surface under specific conditions. Furthermore, the anodizing treatment significantly reduced water contact angles and increased the surface free energy compared to the surfaces prior to anodizing. The results of this study show for the first time that it is possible to create hybrid micro/nano-structures on biomedical NiTi alloys by combining electrochemical etching and anodizing under controlled conditions. These novel structures are expected to significantly enhance the surface biofunctionality of the material when compared to conventional implant devices with either micro- or nano-structured surfaces. (paper)

  5. Synthesis and characterization of hybrid micro/nano-structured NiTi surfaces by a combination of etching and anodizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Z; Fratila-Apachitei, L E; Apachitei, I; Duszczyk, J

    2014-02-07

    The purpose of this study was to generate hybrid micro/nano-structures on biomedical nickel-titanium alloy (NiTi). To achieve this, NiTi surfaces were firstly electrochemically etched and then anodized in fluoride-containing electrolyte. With the etching process, the NiTi surface was micro-roughened through the formation of micropits uniformly distributed over the entire surface. Following the subsequent anodizing process, self-organized nanotube structures enriched in TiO2 could be superimposed on the etched surface under specific conditions. Furthermore, the anodizing treatment significantly reduced water contact angles and increased the surface free energy compared to the surfaces prior to anodizing. The results of this study show for the first time that it is possible to create hybrid micro/nano-structures on biomedical NiTi alloys by combining electrochemical etching and anodizing under controlled conditions. These novel structures are expected to significantly enhance the surface biofunctionality of the material when compared to conventional implant devices with either micro- or nano-structured surfaces.

  6. Engineering Nano-Structured Multiferroic Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Pui Lam

    Multiferroics exhibit remarkable tunabilities in their ferromagnetic, ferroelectric and magnetoelectric properties that provide the potential in enabling the control of magnetizations by electric field for the next generation non-volatile memories, antennas and motors. In recent research and developments in integrating single-phase ferroelectric and ferromagnetic materials, multiferroic composite demonstrated a promising magnetoelectric (ME) coupling for future applications. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique, on the other hand, allows fabrications of complex multiferroic nanostructures to investigate interfacial coupling between the two materials. In this work, radical-enhanced ALD of cobalt ferrite (CFO) and thermal ALD of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) were combined in fabricating complex multiferroic architectures in investigating the effect of nanostructuring and magnetic shape anisotropy on improving ME coupling. In particular, 1D CFO nanotubes and nanowires; 0D-3D CFO/PZT mesoporous composite; and 1D-1D CFO/PZT core-shell nanowire composite were studied. The potential implementation of nanostructured multiferroic composites into functioning devices was assessed by quantifying the converse ME coupling coefficient. The synthesis of 1D CFO nanostructures was realized by ALD of CFO in anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes. This work provided a simple and inexpensive route to create parallel and high aspect ratio ( 55) magnetic nanostructures. The change in magnetic easy axis of (partially filled) CFO nanotubes from perpendicular to parallel in (fully-filled) nanowires indicated the significance of the geometric factor in controlling magnetizations and ME coupling. The 0D-3D CFO/PZT mesoporous composite demonstrated the optimizations of the strain transfer could be achieved by precise thickness control. 100 nm of mesoporous PZT was synthesized on Pt/TiOx/SiO2/Si using amphiphilic diblock copolymers as a porous ferroelectric template (10 nm pore diameter) for

  7. Compliance variations in the fatigue thresold regime of a low alloy ferritic steel under closure-free testing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidya, W.V.

    1991-01-01

    Compliance variations in the threshold regime of a high strength ferritic steel tested under closure-free conditions at room temperature and in air are reported. In contrast to the Paris regime, and irrespective of whether the data during load shedding, at threshold or after postthreshold load increase are considered, it is found that comparatively compliance varies inconsistently in the threshold regime. Therefore, a 1:1 correlation between the averaged optical crack length and that inferred from compliance was not observed. This discrepancy is analyzed. The variations in compliance are utilized to infer the crack front behavior, and the results are discussed in terms of the microstructural impedance. (orig.) With 22 figs., 2 appendices [de

  8. Development and characterization of nano structured hard coatings for high performance tools by using PVD technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irfan, M.; Alam, S.; Hassan, Z.; Iftikhar, F.; Khadim, S.

    2006-01-01

    No doubt hard coatings nave major applications in high performance cutting tools in order to improve tribological and mechanical properties of these tools since last years. The actual top development in this regard is the development of PVD based AlTiN coatings and their supplementation with nano. layers. In present these nano coatings are replaced by nano composites along with an additional development of Multilayer Nano structured coatings. This PVD based nano structured coating development optimized by process parameters, crystalline structure and deposition in multilayer. These coating are definitely produced by combination of ARC and Sputtering with filtration of arc droplets. It is studied that the properties like oxidation resistance, wear resistance and resistance against chemical reaction may be obtained by alloying additions of different elements. This paper presents different development stages and Process parameters for- producing high performance Nanostructure coatings and including adhesion test by using Kalomax system for determination of adhesion strength of these coatings and coating thickness measurements by using image analyzer system. Results and conclusions are showing the optimum values for better coatings for different applications. (author)

  9. Effect of aluminizing of Cr-containing ferritic alloys on the seal strength of a novel high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell sealing glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    A novel high-temperature alkaline earth silicate sealing glass was developed for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass was used to join two metallic coupons of Cr-containing ferritic stainless steel for seal strength evaluation. In previous work, SrCrO 4 was found to form along the glass/steel interface, which led to severe strength degradation. In the present study, aluminization of the steel surface was investigated as a remedy to minimize or prevent the strontium chromate formation. Three different processes for aluminization were evaluated with Crofer22APU stainless steel: pack cementation, vapor-phase deposition, and aerosol spraying. It was found that pack cementation resulted in a rough surface with occasional cracks in the Al-diffused region. Vapor-phase deposition yielded a smoother surface, but the resulting high Al content increased the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), resulting in the failure of joined coupons. Aerosol spraying of an Al-containing salt resulted in the formation of a thin aluminum oxide layer without any surface damage. The room temperature seal strength was evaluated in the as-fired state and in environmentally aged conditions. In contrast to earlier results with uncoated Crofer22APU, the aluminized samples showed no strength degradation even for samples aged in air. Interfacial and chemical compatibility was also investigated. The results showed aluminization to be a viable candidate approach to minimize undesirable chromate formation between alkaline earth silicate sealing glass and Cr-containing interconnect alloys for SOFC applications.

  10. Preparation and characterization of CBN ternary compounds with nano-structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Y.H.; Yang, S.; Xiong, C.S.; Pi, H.L.; Zhang, J.; Ren, Z.M.; Mai, Y.T.; Xu, W.; Dai, G.H.; Song, S.J.; Xiong, J.; Zhang, L.; Xia, Z.C.; Yuan, S.L.

    2006-01-01

    CBN ternary compounds with nano-structure have been prepared directly by a mechanical alloying technique at room temperature. The characteristic and formation mechanism of CBN are discussed. The nano-sheets and nano-layered rods of CBN are observed according to the morphology of scanning electron microscopy. It is substantiated that the microstructure of CBN was closely related to the ball milling time and the ball milling condition according to the results of X-ray diffraction of CBN with different ball milling time. After ball milling for 60 and 90 h, some new diffraction peaks are observed, which implies that some unknown microstructure and phase separation are induced in the reactive ball milling of CBN. The results of XRD are in accordance with that of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of CBN before ball milling and after ball milling for 90 h

  11. Size effect of primary Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions on the characteristics of the nanostructured ferritic ODS alloys: Comparing as-milled and as-milled/annealed alloys using S/TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saber, Mostafa, E-mail: msaber@ncsu.edu; Xu, Weizong; Li, Lulu; Zhu, Yuntian; Koch, Carl C.; Scattergood, Ronald O.

    2014-09-15

    The need for providing S/TEM evidence to clarify the mechanisms of nano-scale precipitate formation was the motivation of this investigation. In this study, an Fe–14Cr–0.4Ti alloy was ball-milled with different amounts of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} content up to 10 wt.%, and then annealed at temperatures up to 1100 °C. Micron-size Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles were substituted for the nano-size counterpart to elucidate the mechanism of oxide precipitate formation. The S/TEM studies revealed that the microstructure of the alloy with 10 wt.% yttria contained amorphous undissolved Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} after ball milling, while a small part of the initial oxide particles were dissolved into the solid solution. Consequently, when the amount of yttria was reduced to 1 wt.%, the amorphous phase of the yttria vanished and the whole content of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} was dissolved into the BCC solid solution. Defect analysis of precipitates on the annealed samples via S/TEM and micro-hardness studies revealed that the use of micron-size primary oxide particles can produce nano-size precipitates, stable up to temperatures as high as 1100 °C, and uniformly distributed throughout the microstructure. This study indicates that the use of high energy ball milling along with micron-size primary oxide particles can lead to nanostructured ferritic ODS alloys without the use of nano-size primary oxide additions.

  12. Modeling the long-term evolution of the primary damage in ferritic alloys using coarse-grained methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becquart, C.S.; Barbu, A.; Bocquet, J.L.; Caturla, M.J.; Domain, C.; Fu, C.-C.; Golubov, S.I.; Hou, M.; Malerba, L.; Ortiz, C.J.; Souidi, A.; Stoller, R.E.

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the long-term evolution of the microstructure after introduction of primary damage is an essential ingredient in understanding mechanical property changes that occur during irradiation. Within the European integrated project 'PERFECT,' different techniques have been developed or improved to model microstructure evolution of Fe alloys under irradiation. This review paper aims to present the current state of the art of these techniques, as developed in the project, as well as the main results obtained.

  13. Nano-structured polymer composites and process for preparing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillmyer, Marc; Chen, Liang

    2013-04-16

    A process for preparing a polymer composite that includes reacting (a) a multi-functional monomer and (b) a block copolymer comprising (i) a first block and (ii) a second block that includes a functional group capable of reacting with the multi-functional monomer, to form a crosslinked, nano-structured, bi-continuous composite. The composite includes a continuous matrix phase and a second continuous phase comprising the first block of the block copolymer.

  14. Template-assisted growth of nano structured functional materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, K.K.; Nur Ubaidah Saidin; Khuan, N.I.; Suhaila Hani Ilias; Foo, C.T.

    2012-01-01

    Template-assisted growth is an important nano electrochemical deposition technique for synthesizing one-dimensional (1-D) nano structures with uniformly well-controlled shapes and sizes. A good template with well-defined dimensions is imperative for realizing this task. Porous anodic alumina (PAA) has been a favorable candidate for this purpose as it can be tailor-made with precise pore geometries, such as pore length and diameter as well as inter-pore distances, via the anodization of pure aluminium. This paper reports the fabrication of PAA templates and electrochemical synthesis of functional nano structures in the form of nano wires using PAA templates as scaffolds. Axial heterostructure and homogeneous nano wires formed by engineering materials configuration via composition and/ or layer thickness variations were fabricated for different functionalities. X-ray diffraction and imaging techniques were used to alucidate the microstructures, morphologies and chemical compositions of the nano wires produced. Due to their large surface area-to-volume ratios, and therefore high sensitivities, these functional nano structures have useful applications as critical components in nano sensor devices and various areas of nano technology. Potential applications include as hydrogen gas sensors in nuclear power plant for monitoring structural integrity of reactor components and containment building, as well as environmental monitoring of air pollution and leakages of toxic gases and chemicals. (Author)

  15. Pulsed Laser Interactions with Silicon Nano structures in Emitter Formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huat, V.L.C.; Leong, C.S.; Kamaruzzaman Sopian, Saleem Hussain Zaidi

    2015-01-01

    Silicon wafer thinning is now approaching fundamental limits for wafer thickness owing to thermal expansion mismatch between Al and Si, reduced yields in wet-chemical processing as a result of fragility, and reduced optical absorption. An alternate manufacturing approach is needed to eliminate current manufacturing issues. In recent years, pulsed lasers have become readily available and costs have been significantly reduced. Pulsed laser interactions with silicon, in terms of micromachining, diffusions, and edge isolation, are well known, and have become industrial manufacturing tools. In this paper, pulsed laser interactions with silicon nano structures were identified as the most desirable solution for the fundamental limitations discussed above. Silicon nano structures have the capability for extremely high absorption that significantly reduces requirements for laser power, as well as thermal shock to the thinner wafer. Laser-assisted crystallization, in the presence of doping materials, leads to nano structure profiles that are highly desirable for sunlight absorption. The objective of this paper is the replacement of high temperature POCl_3 diffusion by laser-assisted phosphorus layers. With these improvements, complete low-temperature processing of thinner wafers was achievable with 3.7 % efficiency. Two-dimensional laser scanning was proved to be able to form uniformly annealed surfaces with higher fill factor and open-circuit voltage. (author)

  16. Evaluation of ferritic alloy Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo after neutron irradiation: Microstructural development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1986-10-01

    As part of a program to provide a data base on the bainitic alloy Fe-2-1/4-1Mo for fusion energy applications, microstructural examinations are reported for nine specimen conditions for 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel which had been irradiated by fast neutrons over the temperature range 390 to 510 0 C. Void swelling is found following irradiation at 400 0 C to 480 0 C. Concurrently dislocation structure and precipitation developed. Peak void swelling, void density, dislocation density and precipitate number density formed at the lowest temperature, approximately 400 0 C, whereas mean void size, and mean precipitate size increased with increasing irradiation temperature. The examination results are used to provide interpretation of in-reactor creep, density change and post irradiation tensile behavior

  17. From Nano Structure to Systems: Fabrication and Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uda Hashim

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the interest in nano technology research has been grown rapidly. With the latest technology, it is possible to arrange atoms into structures that are only a few nanometers in size. Dimension for nano structure is between 0.1 and 100nm where the actual size of 1nm is equal to 10-9 m or just about a few atoms thick. In other word, a nano structure is an object which it size is about four atom diameters or 1/50000 of a human hair. Due to the connecting of a patterned silicon substrate with biomolecules and the small size and large surface-to-volume ratio, it opens much new possibility for assembling nano structures.The ultimate goal is to fabricate devices that have every atom in the right place. Such technology would give the opportunity to minimize the size of a device and to reduce the material, energy and time necessary to perform its task. Potential applications include electrical circuits, mechanical devices and medical instruments. There are two most important nano structures that are extensively studied and researched in various organizations which are nano wire and nano gap. Nano wires is a new class of nano structure that have attracted attention and great research interest in the last few years because of their potential applications in nano technology such as nano electronic, nano mechanical and biomedical engineering. Fabrication of Nano wires is one of the great challenges today. Conventional lithography methods are not capable to produce Nano wires and even with advance nano lithography sizes below 100 nm may not easily be achieved. Nano wire can be produced in two approaches, which are top down and bottom-up method. Very small nano wires which can be produced by using top-down nano fabrication methods are Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) based Electron Beam Lithography (EBL) method, and Spacer Patterning Lithography (SPL) method. The top-down nano fabrication method based on EBL was the design of the Nano wires Pattern Design (NPD). The

  18. Electrochemically synthesized Si nano wire arrays and thermoelectric nano structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khuan, N.I.; Ying, K.K.; Nur Ubaidah Saidin; Foo, C.T.

    2012-01-01

    Thermoelectric nano structures hold great promise for capturing and directly converting into electricity some vast amount of low-grade waste heats now being lost to the environment (for example from nuclear power plant, fossil fuel burning, automotive and household appliances). In this study, large-area vertically-aligned silicon nano wire (SiNW) arrays were synthesized in an aqueous solution containing AgNO 3 and HF on p-type Si (100) substrate by self-selective electroless etching process. The etching conditions were systematically varied in order to achieve different stages of nano wire formation. Diameters of the SiNWs obtained varied from approximately 50 to 200 nm and their lengths ranged from several to a few tens of μm. Te/ Bi 2 Te 3 -Si thermoelectric core-shell nano structures were subsequently obtained via galvanic displacement of SiNWs in acidic HF electrolytes containing HTeO 2 + and Bi 3+ / HTeO 2 + ions. The reactions were basically a nano-electrochemical process due to the difference in redox potentials between the materials. the surface-modified SiNWs of core-shell structures had roughened surface morphologies and therefore, higher surface-t-bulk ratios compared to unmodified SiNWs. They have potential applications in sensors, photovoltaic and thermoelectric nano devices. Growth study on the SiNWs and core-shell nano structures produced is presented using various microscopy, diffraction and probe-based techniques for microstructural, morphological and chemical characterizations. (Author)

  19. Influence of Zr and nano-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions on thermal stability and improved hardness in mechanically alloyed Fe base ferritic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotan, Hasan, E-mail: hkotan@konya.edu.tr [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Necmettin Erbakan University, Dere Aşıklar Mah. Demet Sokak, Meram, Konya 42140 (Turkey); Darling, Kris A. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, RDRL-WMM-F, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 (United States); Scattergood, Ronald O.; Koch, Carl C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, NC State University, 911 Partners Way, Room 3078, Raleigh, NC 27695-7907 (United States)

    2014-12-05

    The motivation of this work was driven to improve the thermal stability in systems where polymorphic transformations can result in an additional driving force, upsetting the expected thermodynamic stability. In this study, Fe{sub 92}Ni{sub 8} alloys with Zr and nano-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions were produced by ball milling and then annealed at high temperatures. Emphasis was placed on understanding the effects of dispersed nano-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle additions and their effect on microstructural stability at and above the bcc-to-fcc transformation occurring at 700 °C in Fe–Ni systems. Results reveal that microstructural stability and hardness can be promoted by a combination of Zr and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions, that being mostly effective for stability before and after phase transition, respectively. The mechanical strength of these alloys is achieved by a unique microstructure comprised a ultra-fine grain Fe base matrix, which contains dispersions of both nano-scale in-situ formed Zr base intermetallics and ex-situ added Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} secondary oxide phases. Both of these were found to be essential for a combination of high thermal stability and high mechanical strength properties. - Highlights: • Polymorphic transformations can limit the processing of nanostructured powders. • It causes a rapid grain growth and impairs the improved mechanical properties. • We aim to improve the hardness and thermal stability above the phase transformation. • Thermal stability is achieved by a combination of Zr and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions. • Hardness is promoted by in-situ formed and ex-situ added secondary nano phases.

  20. Nanomanufacturing : nano-structured materials made layer-by-layer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, James V.; Cheng, Shengfeng; Grest, Gary Stephen; Tjiptowidjojo, Kristianto (University of New Mexico); Reedy, Earl David, Jr.; Fan, Hongyou; Schunk, Peter Randall; Chandross, Michael Evan; Roberts, Scott A.

    2011-10-01

    Large-scale, high-throughput production of nano-structured materials (i.e. nanomanufacturing) is a strategic area in manufacturing, with markets projected to exceed $1T by 2015. Nanomanufacturing is still in its infancy; process/product developments are costly and only touch on potential opportunities enabled by growing nanoscience discoveries. The greatest promise for high-volume manufacturing lies in age-old coating and imprinting operations. For materials with tailored nm-scale structure, imprinting/embossing must be achieved at high speeds (roll-to-roll) and/or over large areas (batch operation) with feature sizes less than 100 nm. Dispersion coatings with nanoparticles can also tailor structure through self- or directed-assembly. Layering films structured with these processes have tremendous potential for efficient manufacturing of microelectronics, photovoltaics and other topical nano-structured devices. This project is designed to perform the requisite R and D to bring Sandia's technology base in computational mechanics to bear on this scale-up problem. Project focus is enforced by addressing a promising imprinting process currently being commercialized.

  1. Ferritic steels for French LMFBR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, M.; Mathieu, B.; Petrequin, P.

    1983-06-01

    Austenitic stainless steels have been widely used in many components of the French LMFBR. Up to now, ferritic steels have not been considered for these components, mainly due to their relatively low creep properties. Some ferritic steels are usable when the maximum temperatures in service do not exceed about 530 0 C. It is the case of the steam generators of the Phenix plant, where the exchange tubes of the evaporator are made of 2,25% Cr-1% Mo steel, stabilized or not by addition of niobium. These ferritic alloys have worked successfully since the first steam production in October 1973. For the SuperPhenix power plant, an ''all austenitic stainless alloy'' apparatus has been chosen. However, for the future, ferritic alloys offer potential for use as alternative materials in the evaporators: low alloys steels type 2,25% Cr-1% Mo (exchange tubes, tube-sheets, shells), or at higher chromium content type 9% Cr-2% Mo NbV (exchange tubes) or 12M Cr-1% Mo-V (tube-sheets). Most of these steels have already an industrial background, and are widely used in similar applications. The various potential applications of these steels are reviewed with regards to the French LMFBR steam generators, indicating that some points need an effort of clarification, for instance the properties of the heterogeneous ferritic/austenitic weldments

  2. Ferrite re-crystallization kinetics on a C-Mn steel and on two micro alloyed steels after dual-phase strain; Cinetica de recristalizacao da ferrita em um aco C-Mn e dois acos microligados apos deformacao na regiao bifasica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simieli, Eider A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas (IPT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1991-12-31

    Ferrite recrystallization was investigated in two micro alloyed steels deformed in the inter critical range. A reference steel was also used, which had a composition of 0,06% C and 1,31% Mn. (author). 15 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Alloy Design and Development of Cast Cr-W-V Ferritic Steels for Improved High-Temperature Strength for Power Generation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R L; Maziasz, P J; Vitek, J M; Evans, N D; Hashimoto, N

    2006-09-23

    Economic and environmental concerns demand that the power-generation industry seek increased efficiency for gas turbines. Higher efficiency requires higher operating temperatures, with the objective temperature for the hottest sections of new systems {approx} 593 C, and increasing to {approx} 650 C. Because of their good thermal properties, Cr-Mo-V cast ferritic steels are currently used for components such as rotors, casings, pipes, etc., but new steels are required for the new operating conditions. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed new wrought Cr-W-V steels with 3-9% Cr, 2-3% W, 0.25% V (compositions are in wt.%), and minor amounts of additional elements. These steels have the strength and toughness required for turbine applications. Since cast alloys are expected to behave differently from wrought material, work was pursued to develop new cast steels based on the ORNL wrought compositions. Nine casting test blocks with 3, 9, and 11% Cr were obtained. Eight were Cr-W-V-Ta-type steels based on the ORNL wrought steels; the ninth was COST CB2, a 9Cr-Mo-Co-V-Nb cast steel, which was the most promising cast steel developed in a European alloy-development program. The COST CB2 was used as a control to which the new compositions were compared, and this also provided a comparison between Cr-W-V-Ta and Cr-Mo-V-Nb compositions. Heat treatment studies were carried out on the nine castings to determine normalizing-and-tempering treatments. Microstructures were characterized by both optical and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Tensile, impact, and creep tests were conducted. Test results on the first nine cast steel compositions indicated that properties of the 9Cr-Mo-Co-V-Nb composition of COST CB2 were better than those of the 3Cr-, 9Cr-, and 11Cr-W-V-Ta steels. Analysis of the results of this first iteration using computational thermodynamics raised the question of the effectiveness in cast steels of the Cr-W-V-Ta combination versus the Cr

  4. Si/ZnO NANO STRUCTURED HETEROJUNCTIONS BY APCVD METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Maleki

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, polycrystalline pure zinc oxide nano structured thin films were deposited on two kinds of single crystal and polycrystalline of p and n type Si in three different substrate temperatures of 300, 400 and 500◦C by low cost APCVD method. Structural, electrical and optical properties of these thin films were characterized by X ray diffraction, two point probe method and UV visible spectrophotometer respectively. IV measurements of these heterojunctions showed that turn on voltage and series resistance will increase with increasing substrate temperature in polycrystalline Si, while in single crystal Si, turn on voltage will decrease. Although they are acceptable diodes, their efficiency as a heterojunction solar cell are so low

  5. π -Plasmon model for carbon nano structures: Application to porphyrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Dao Thu; Anh, Chu Thuy; Nga, Do Thi; Thanh, Le Minh; Van, Tran Thi Thanh; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    2016-01-01

    In traditional concept, the optical properties of semiconductors and semimetals near their fundamental optical band gaps are attributed to single excitations (such electron-hole pairs, excitons...). In our earlier article, we proposed the collective mechanism of π -plasmons for optical properties of low dimensional carbon nano structures. A simple way to calculate the peak positions of UV-vis absorption spectra was pointed out and gave a good agreement with experimental data. In this work we analyze different schemas to calculate the UV-vis absorption peaks. A new parameter k which characterizes the dependence of schema on geometry and number of carbon sites is defined. As an example, the case of porphyrin was investigated. (paper)

  6. Microstructure characterization and magnetic properties of nano structured materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, X.C.

    2000-01-01

    The present thesis deals with the unique microstructural properties and their novel magnetic properties of core-shell Ni-Ce nano composite particles, carbon encapsulated Fe, Co, and Ni nanoparticles and the nano crystallization behavior of typical ferromagnetic Fe 78 Si 9 B 13 ribbons. These properties have intensively been investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (Sem), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (Eds.); selected area electron diffraction pattern (SAED), Ft-IR, differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). In addition, magnetic moments measurements at different temperatures and applied fields have been performed by transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy, superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer (SQUID), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The present studies may provide the insights for the better understanding of the correlation between the unique microstructure and novel magnetic properties for several magnetic nano structured materials. (Author)

  7. Exposure of tungsten nano-structure to TEXTOR edge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Y.; Miyata, K.; Ohtsuka, Y.; Lee, H.T.; Fukumoto, M.; Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J.W.; Kreter, A.; Litnovsky, A.; Philipps, V.; Schweer, B.; Sergienko, G.; Hirai, T.; Taguchi, A.; Torikai, Y.; Sugiyama, K.; Tanabe, T.; Kajita, S.; Ohno, N.

    2011-01-01

    W nano-structures (fuzz), produced in the linear high plasma device, NAGDIS, were exposed to TEXTOR edge plasmas (ohmic He/D mixed plasma and pure D plasma) to study formation, erosion and C deposition on W fuzz in tokamak plasmas for the first time. Fuzz layers were either completely eroded or covered by C deposit. There was no clear indication of W fuzz growth under the present conditions. There was no significant difference of C deposition between 'thick' fuzz (500-600 nm in thickness) and 'thin' fuzz (300-400 nm) in the He/D plasma. On the W fuzz surface, C deposition was enhanced probably due to reduction of effective sputtering yield and effective reflection coefficient of carbon ions, similar to roughness effects. Formation and erosion of W fuzz in tokamak devices and role of impurities are discussed.

  8. Elastic nano-structure of diamond-like carbon (DLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogiso, Hisato; Yoshida, Mikiko; Nakano, Shizuka; Yasui, Haruyuki; Awazu, Kaoru

    2006-01-01

    This research discusses the elastic nano-structure of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films. Two DLC film samples deposited by plasma based ion implantation (PBII) were prepared. The plasma generated by microwave (MW) was applied to one sample and the plasma by radio frequency (RF) to the other sample. The samples were evaluated for the elastic property image with nanometer resolution using scanning probe microscopy (SPM). The film surface deposited by RF-PBII was very flat and homogeneous in elastic property. In contrast, the film surface by MW-PBII was more uneven than that by RF-PBII and both the locally hard and the locally soft regions were found at the film surface. The size of the structure in elastic property is several tens nanometer. We conclude that the film probably contains nano-scale diamond phase

  9. Elastic nano-structure of diamond-like carbon (DLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogiso, Hisato [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-2-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8564 (Japan); Yoshida, Mikiko [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-2-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8564 (Japan); Nakano, Shizuka [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-2-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8564 (Japan); Yasui, Haruyuki [Industrial Research Institute of Ishikawa (IRII), Ro-1, Tomizu-machi, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-0233 (Japan); Awazu, Kaoru [Industrial Research Institute of Ishikawa (IRII), Ro-1, Tomizu-machi, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-0233 (Japan)

    2006-01-15

    This research discusses the elastic nano-structure of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films. Two DLC film samples deposited by plasma based ion implantation (PBII) were prepared. The plasma generated by microwave (MW) was applied to one sample and the plasma by radio frequency (RF) to the other sample. The samples were evaluated for the elastic property image with nanometer resolution using scanning probe microscopy (SPM). The film surface deposited by RF-PBII was very flat and homogeneous in elastic property. In contrast, the film surface by MW-PBII was more uneven than that by RF-PBII and both the locally hard and the locally soft regions were found at the film surface. The size of the structure in elastic property is several tens nanometer. We conclude that the film probably contains nano-scale diamond phase.

  10. Microstructure characterization and magnetic properties of nano structured materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, X.C

    2000-07-01

    The present thesis deals with the unique microstructural properties and their novel magnetic properties of core-shell Ni-Ce nano composite particles, carbon encapsulated Fe, Co, and Ni nanoparticles and the nano crystallization behavior of typical ferromagnetic Fe{sub 78}Si{sub 9}B{sub 13} ribbons. These properties have intensively been investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (Sem), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy [eds.]; selected area electron diffraction pattern (SAED), Ft-IR, differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). In addition, magnetic moments measurements at different temperatures and applied fields have been performed by transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy, superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer (SQUID), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The present studies may provide the insights for the better understanding of the correlation between the unique microstructure and novel magnetic properties for several magnetic nano structured materials. (Author)

  11. The study of Widmanstätten ferrite in Fe–C alloys by a phase field model coupled with anisotropic elasticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Li [China State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Shen, Yao, E-mail: yaoshen@sjtu.edu.cn [China State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wan, Haibo [China State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Shanghai Power Equipment Research Institute, Shanghai 200240 (China); Xiong, Xiaochuan [General Motors Global Research & Development, China Science Laboratory, Shanghai 201206 (China); Zhang, Lanting [China State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-11-25

    A phase field model accounting for anisotropic elastic energy has been formulated to investigate the morphology and growth kinetics of a Widmanstätten microstructure during the isothermal austenite to ferrite transformation in binary Fe–C. Physically realistic parameters are employed, for which the thermodynamic functions and the diffusional mobilities are from the literatures that were assessed via the Calphad technique and from experimental results respectively. The simulation results suggest that the anisotropy of elastic energy, resulting from the lattice distortion between the ferrite precipitate and the austenite matrix in the phase transformation, is sufficient to generate a plate-like Widmanstätten structure. The growth of the ferrite precipitate follows completely different dynamic laws in different directions, i.e., parabolic thickening in the direction of the plate thickness and linear lengthening in the direction toward the plate tip. The chief reason for the former is that the moving of the plate broad sides may be regarded as a migration of straight interfaces in the diffusion-controlled phase transformation; the latter is because that the plate tip can maintain a constant radius of curvature during the phase transition after a transient initial stage. Furthermore, the aspect ratio and the lengthening rate of the Widmanstätten ferrite plate simulated by our analyses are in good agreement with the experimental observations. - Highlights: • A model assuming elastic anisotropy for the growth of ferrites is formulated. • The elastic anisotropy is sufficient to generate acicular Widmanstätten ferrites. • The direction of the plate thickness features a parabolic thickening. • The direction of the plate tip characterizes a linear lengthening. • The calculated aspect ratio and growth rate are in good agreement with experiments.

  12. Aluminum Templates of Different Sizes with Micro-, Nano- and Micro/Nano-Structures for Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Liang Yen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the results of cell cultures on aluminum (Al templates with flat-structures, micro-structures, nano-structures and micro/nano-structures. An Al template with flat-structure was obtained by electrolytic polishing; an Al template with micro-structure was obtained by micro-powder blasting; an Al template with nano-structure was obtained by aluminum anodization; and an Al template with micro/nano-structure was obtained by micro-powder blasting and then anodization. Osteoblast-like cells were cultured on aluminum templates with various structures. The microculture tetrazolium test assay was utilized to assess the adhesion, elongation, and proliferation behaviors of cultured osteoblast-like cells on aluminum templates with flat-structures, micro-structures, nano-structures, and micro/nano-structures. The results showed that the surface characterization of micro/nano-structure of aluminum templates had superhydrophilic property, and these also revealed that an aluminum template with micro/nano-structure could provide the most suitable growth situation for cell culture.

  13. Surface Nano Structures Manufacture Using Batch Chemical Processing Methods for Tooling Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; Calaon, Matteo; Gavillet, J.

    2011-01-01

    The patterning of large surface areas with nano structures by using chemical batch processes to avoid using highenergy intensive nano machining processes was investigated. The capability of different surface treatment methods of creating micro and nano structured adaptable mould inserts for subse...

  14. The effect of cooling rate and austenite grain size on the austenite to ferrite transformation temperature and different ferrite morphologies in microalloyed steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmailian, M.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of different austenite grain size and different cooling rates on the austenite to ferrite transformation temperature and different ferrite morphologies in one Nb-microalloyed high strength low alloy steel has been investigated. Three different austenite grain sizes were selected and cooled at two different cooling rates for obtaining austenite to ferrite transformation temperature. Moreover, samples with specific austenite grain size have been quenched, partially, for investigation on the microstructural evolution. In order to assess the influence of austenite grain size on the ferrite transformation temperature, a temperature differences method is established and found to be a good way for detection of austenite to ferrite, pearlite and sometimes other ferrite morphologies transformation temperatures. The results obtained in this way show that increasing of austenite grain size and cooling rate has a significant influence on decreasing of the ferrite transformation temperature. Micrographs of different ferrite morphologies show that at high temperatures, where diffusion rates are higher, grain boundary ferrite nucleates. As the temperature is lowered and the driving force for ferrite formation increases, intragranular sites inside the austenite grains become operative as nucleation sites and suppress the grain boundary ferrite growth. The results indicate that increasing the austenite grain size increases the rate and volume fraction of intragranular ferrite in two different cooling rates. Moreover, by increasing of cooling rate, the austenite to ferrite transformation temperature decreases and volume fraction of intragranular ferrite increases.

  15. Controlled Synthesis of Manganese Dioxide Nano structures via a Facile Hydrothermal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, R.S.C.; Chin, S.F.; Ye, Ch. Ling

    2012-01-01

    Manganese dioxide nano structures with controllable morphological structures and crystalline phases were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal route at low temperatures without using any templates or surfactants. Both the aging duration and aging temperatures were the main synthesis parameters used to influence and control the rate of morphological and structural evolution of MnO 2 nano structures. MnO 2 nano structures comprise of spherical nano particulate agglomerates and highly amorphous in nature were formed at lower temperature and/or short aging duration. In contrast, MnO 2 nano structures of sea-urchin-like and nano rods-like morphologies and nanocrystalline in nature were prepared at the combined higher aging temperatures and longer aging durations. These nano structures underwent notable phase transformation from d-MnO 2 to a-MnO 2 upon prolonged hydrothermal aging duration and exhibited accelerated rate of phase transformation at higher aging temperature.

  16. Stiff, light, strong and ductile: nano-structured High Modulus Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, H; Baron, C; Szczepaniak, A; Uhlenwinkel, V; Raabe, D

    2017-06-05

    Structural material development for lightweight applications aims at improving the key parameters strength, stiffness and ductility at low density, but these properties are typically mutually exclusive. Here we present how we overcome this trade-off with a new class of nano-structured steel - TiB 2 composites synthesised in-situ via bulk metallurgical spray-forming. Owing to the nano-sized dispersion of the TiB 2 particles of extreme stiffness and low density - obtained by the in-situ formation with rapid solidification kinetics - the new material has the mechanical performance of advanced high strength steels, and a 25% higher stiffness/density ratio than any of the currently used high strength steels, aluminium, magnesium and titanium alloys. This renders this High Modulus Steel the first density-reduced, high stiffness, high strength and yet ductile material which can be produced on an industrial scale. Also ideally suited for 3D printing technology, this material addresses all key requirements for high performance and cost effective lightweight design.

  17. Recent developments of nano-structured materials as the catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, SungYeon; Kim, HuiJung; Chung, Yong-Ho

    2018-04-01

    Developments of high efficient materials for electrocatalyst are significant topics of numerous researches since a few decades. Recent global interests related with energy conversion and storage lead to the expansion of efforts to find cost-effective catalysts that can substitute conventional catalytic materials. Especially, in the field of fuel cell, novel materials for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) have been noticed to overcome disadvantages of conventional platinum-based catalysts. Various approaching methods have been attempted to achieve low cost and high electrochemical activity comparable with Pt-based catalysts, including reducing Pt consumption by the formation of hybrid materials, Pt-based alloys, and not-Pt metal or carbon based materials. To enhance catalytic performance and stability, numerous methods such as structural modifications and complex formations with other functional materials are proposed, and they are basically based on well-defined and well-ordered catalytic active sites by exquisite control at nanoscale. In this review, we highlight the development of nano-structured catalytic materials for ORR based on recent findings, and discuss about an outlook for the direction of future researches.

  18. Assessment of the integrity of ferritic-austenitic dissimilar weld joints of different grades of Cr-Mo ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K.S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, Sunil; Mathew, M.D. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Metallurgy and Materials Group

    2010-07-01

    Integrity of the 2.25 Cr-1Mo / Alloy 800, 9Cr-1Mo / Alloy 800 and 9Cr-1Mo-VNb / Alloy 800 ferritic-austenitic dissimilar joints, fusion welded employing Inconel 182 electrode, has been assessed under creep conditions at 823 K. The dissimilar weld joints displayed lower creep rupture strength than their respective ferritic steel base metals. The strength reduction was more for 2.25Cr-1Mo steel joint and least for 9Cr-1Mo steel joint. The failure location in the joints was found to shift from the ferritic steel base metal to the intercritical region of heat-affected zone (HAZ) in ferritic steel (type IV cracking) with decrease in stress. At still lower stresses the failure occurred at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface. Localized creep deformation and cavitation in the soft intercritical HAZ induced type IV failure whereas creep cavitation at the weld interface particles induced ferritic / austenitic interface cracking due to high creep strength mismatch across it. Micromechanisms of type IV failure and interface cracking in the ferritic / austenitic joints and different susceptibility to failure for different grades of ferritic steels are discussed based on microstructural investigation, mechanical testing and finite element analysis. (Note from indexer: paper contains many typographical errors.)

  19. Nano structured materials studied by coherent X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulden, Johannes

    2013-03-01

    Structure determination with X-rays in crystallography is a rapidly evolving field. Crystallographic methods for structure determination are based on the assumptions about the crystallinity of the sample. It is vital to understand the structure of possible defects in the crystal, because they can influence the structure determination. All conventional methods to characterize defects require a modelling through simulated data. No direct methods exist to image the core of defects in crystals. Here a new method is proposed, which will enable to visualize the individual scatterers around and at defects in crystals. The method is based on coherent X-ray scattering. X-rays are perfectly suited since they can penetrate thick samples and buried structures can be investigated Recent developments increased the coherent flux of X-Ray sources such as synchrotrons by orders of magnitude. As a result, the use of the coherent properties of X-rays is emerging as a new aspect of X-ray science. New upcoming and operating X-ray laser sources will accelerate this trend. One new method which has the capacity to recover structural information from the coherently scattered photons is Coherent X-ray Diffraction Imaging (CXDI). The main focus of this thesis is the investigation of the structure and the dynamics of colloidal crystals. Colloidal crystals can be used as a model for atomic crystals in order to understand the growth and defect structure. Despite the large interest in these structures, many details are still unknown.Therefore, it is vital to develop new approaches to measure the core of defects in colloidal crystals. After an introduction into the basics of the field of coherent X-ray scattering, this thesis introduces a novel method, Small Angle Bragg Coherent Diffractive Imaging, (SAB-CDI). This new measurement technique which besides the relevance to colloidal crystals can be applied to a large variety of nano structured materials. To verify the experimental possibilities the

  20. Nano structured materials studied by coherent X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulden, Johannes

    2013-03-15

    Structure determination with X-rays in crystallography is a rapidly evolving field. Crystallographic methods for structure determination are based on the assumptions about the crystallinity of the sample. It is vital to understand the structure of possible defects in the crystal, because they can influence the structure determination. All conventional methods to characterize defects require a modelling through simulated data. No direct methods exist to image the core of defects in crystals. Here a new method is proposed, which will enable to visualize the individual scatterers around and at defects in crystals. The method is based on coherent X-ray scattering. X-rays are perfectly suited since they can penetrate thick samples and buried structures can be investigated Recent developments increased the coherent flux of X-Ray sources such as synchrotrons by orders of magnitude. As a result, the use of the coherent properties of X-rays is emerging as a new aspect of X-ray science. New upcoming and operating X-ray laser sources will accelerate this trend. One new method which has the capacity to recover structural information from the coherently scattered photons is Coherent X-ray Diffraction Imaging (CXDI). The main focus of this thesis is the investigation of the structure and the dynamics of colloidal crystals. Colloidal crystals can be used as a model for atomic crystals in order to understand the growth and defect structure. Despite the large interest in these structures, many details are still unknown.Therefore, it is vital to develop new approaches to measure the core of defects in colloidal crystals. After an introduction into the basics of the field of coherent X-ray scattering, this thesis introduces a novel method, Small Angle Bragg Coherent Diffractive Imaging, (SAB-CDI). This new measurement technique which besides the relevance to colloidal crystals can be applied to a large variety of nano structured materials. To verify the experimental possibilities the

  1. Characteristics of mechanical alloying of Zn-Al-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Y.H.; Hong Kong Polytechnic; Perez Hernandez, A.; Lee, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    Three pure elemental powder mixtures of Zn-22%Al-18%Cu, Zn-5%Al-11%Cu, and Zn-27%Al-3%Cu (in wt.%) were mechanically alloyed by steel-ball milling processing. The mechanical alloying characteristics were investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. It was explored that mechanical alloying started with the formation of phases from pure elemental powders, and this was followed by mechanical milling-induced phase transformation. During mechanical alloying, phases stable at the higher temperatures formed at the near room temperature of milling. Nano-structure Zn-Al-based alloys were produced by mechanical alloying. (orig.)

  2. Nano structures of amorphous silicon: localization and energy gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Nourbakhsh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Renewable energy research has created a push for new materials; one of the most attractive material in this field is quantum confined hybrid silicon nano-structures (nc-Si:H embedded in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H. The essential step for this investigation is studying a-Si and its ability to produce quantum confinement (QC in nc-Si: H. Increasing the gap of a-Si system causes solar cell efficiency to increase. By computational calculations based on Density Functional Theory (DFT, we calculated a special localization factor, [G Allan et al., Phys. Rev. B 57 (1997 6933.], for the states close to HOMO and LUMO in a-Si, and found most weak-bond Si atoms. By removing these silicon atoms and passivating the system with hydrogen, we were able to increase the gap in the a-Si system. As more than 8% hydrogenate was not experimentally available, we removed about 2% of the most localized Si atoms in the almost tetrahedral a-Si system. After removing localized Si atoms in the system with 1000 Si atoms, and adding 8% H, the gap increased about 0.24 eV. Variation of the gap as a function of hydrogen percentage was in good agreement with the Tight –Binding results, but about 2 times more than its experimental value. This might come from the fact that in the experimental conditions, it does not have the chance to remove the most localized states. However, by improving the experimental conditions and technology, this value can be improved.

  3. Synthesis of Carbon nano structures by plasma discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez L, M.L.

    2007-01-01

    Due to the great quantity of applications of the carbon nano structures (NEC) in diverse areas like: synthesis of super-resistant materials, hydrogen storage, nano sensors generation and nano catalysts, it has seen the necessity to generate new processes of synthesis of this materials as well as to already improve those existent. The present work has as objective to optimize the NEC synthesis process by means of the electric arc method which uses alternating current to high frequencies (HF), obtaining relatively clean products; that is to say, it hardly presents amorphous material neither sludges. They stand out the obtaining of carbon nano fibers (NFC) by means of a luminescent-arch discharge, in a gas mixture of He-CH 4 with 34% at. Ni/10.32% at.Y like catalyst; at a frequency of 42 kHz and low power (300 W). This method benefits the amass of the particles in both electrodes due to the high frequencies. The time of duration of the process oscillates between 5 and 20 minutes. The obtained product was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (MEB), transmission electron microscopy (MET) to determine the NEC type obtained and by X-ray diffraction analysis and Raman spectroscopy for determining the purity of the samples. The NFC is relatively free of amorphous coal. The surface and structural analysis indicates that the fibers have a half diameter of 80 nm. It is also made, a study by optical emission spectroscopy of plasma using the Swan band for determining the temperature. (Author)

  4. Ferrites and ceramic composites

    CERN Document Server

    Jotania, Rajshree B

    2013-01-01

    The Ferrite term is used to refer to all magnetic oxides containing iron as major metallic component. Ferrites are very attractive materials because they simultaneously show high resistivity and high saturation magnetization, and attract now considerable attention, because of the interesting physics involved. Typical ferrite material possesses excellent chemical stability, high corrosion resistivity, magneto-crystalline anisotropy, magneto-striction, and magneto-optical properties. Ferrites belong to the group of ferrimagnetic oxides, and include rare-earth garnets and ortho-ferrites. Several

  5. One-Dimensional SnO2 Nano structures: Synthesis and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, J.; Shen, H.; Mathur, S.; Pan, J.

    2012-01-01

    Nano scale semiconducting materials such as quantum dots (0-dimensional) and one-dimensional (1D) structures, like nano wires, nano belts, and nano tubes, have gained tremendous attention within the past decade. Among the variety of 1D nano structures, tin oxide (SnO 2 ) semiconducting nano structures are particularly interesting because of their promising applications in optoelectronic and electronic devices due to both good conductivity and transparence in the visible region. This article provides a comprehensive review of the recent research activities that focus on the rational synthesis and unique applications of 1D SnO 2 nano structures and their optical and electrical properties. We begin with the rational design and synthesis of 1D SnO 2 nano structures, such as nano tubes, nano wires, nano belts, and some heterogeneous nano structures, and then highlight a range of applications (e.g., gas sensor, lithium-ion batteries, and nano photonics) associated with them. Finally, the review is concluded with some perspectives with respect to future research on 1D SnO 2 nano structures

  6. Reduction reactions applied for synthesizing different nano-structured materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albuquerque Brocchi, Eduardo de; Correia de Siqueira, Rogério Navarro [Department of Materials Engineering, PUC-Rio, Rua Marquês de São Vicente, 225, Gávea, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Motta, Marcelo Senna [Basck Ltd. (United Kingdom); Moura, Francisco José, E-mail: moura@puc-rio.br [Department of Materials Engineering, PUC-Rio, Rua Marquês de São Vicente, 225, Gávea, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Solórzano-Naranjo, Ivan Guillermo [Department of Materials Engineering, PUC-Rio, Rua Marquês de São Vicente, 225, Gávea, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    Different materials have been synthesized by alternative routes: nitrates thermal decomposition to prepare oxide or co-formed oxides and reduction by hydrogen or graphite to obtain mixed oxides, composites or alloys. These chemical-based synthesis routes are described and thermodynamics studies and kinetics data are presented to support its feasibility. In addition, selective reduction reactions have been applied to successfully produce metal/ceramic composites, and alloys. Structural characterization has been carried out by X-ray Diffraction and, more extensively, Transmission Electron Microscopy operating in conventional diffraction contrast (CTEM) and high-resolution mode (HRTEM), indicated the possibility of obtaining oxide and alloy crystals of sizes ranging between 20 and 40 nm. - Highlights: • The viability in obtaining Ni–Co, Cu–Al, Mn–Al co-formed nano oxides was evaluated. • Partial and complete H{sub 2} reduction were used to produce alloy, composite and Spinel. • XRD, TEM and HREM techniques were used to characterize the obtained nanostructures.

  7. Electrochemical synthesis, structure and phase composition of nano structured amorphous thin layers of NiW and Ni-Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitina, I.; Lubane, M.; Belmane, V.; Rubene, V.; Krumina, A.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Nano structured Ni-W thin layers containing W 6-37 wt.% were electrodeposited on a copper substratum. The W content in the layer changes, and it is determined by the electrolyte pH in the range 8.0-9.6 and the cathode current density in the range 1.0-10.0 A/dm 2 . The atomic composition and thermal stability of structure of the electrodeposited thin layers depend for the most part on the conditions of the electrodeposition and less on the W content in the layer. Cracking of the Ni-W layers electrodeposited at the electrolyte pH 8.5 and containing 34-37 wt.% W and 8.5 wt.% W was observed. The cracking increases at heating at 400 deg C for 50 h. On the contrary, no cracking of the Ni-W layer electrodeposited at the electrolyte pH 9.0 and containing 25 wt.% W was observed. The atomic composition of the layer remains practically unchanged at heating at 400 deg C for 50 h. The layer binds oxygen up to 7 wt.%. According to X-ray diffraction, in spite of the W content 35-37 wt.% in the layer, nano structured layers rather than amorphous layers were obtained which at heating at 400 deg C depending on the W content crystallises as Ni or intermetallic compounds Ni x W y if the W content is approx. 25 wt.%. Amorphous Ni-Mo alloys containing 35-52 wt.% Mo was electrodeposited on copper substratum at the cathode current densities of 0.5-1.5 A/dm2 and the electrolyte pH 6.8-8.6. Formation of thin layer (∼1-2μm) of X-ray amorphous Ni-Mo alloy, the Mo content, the characteristics of structure depend on the electrodeposition process, the electrolyte pH, and the cathode current density. The Ni-Mo layer deposited at the electrolyte pH above 8.6 and below average 6.8 had a nanocrystalline structure rather than characteristics of amorphous structure. Ni- W and Ni-Mo alloys were electrodeposited from citrate electrolyte not containing ammonium ions

  8. From zinc selenate to zinc selenide nano structures synthesized by reduction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutagalung, S.D.; Eng, S.T.; Ahmad, Z.A.; Ishak Mat; Yussof Wahab

    2009-01-01

    One-dimensional nano structure materials are very attractive because of their electronic and optical properties depending on their size. It is well known that properties of material can be tuned by reducing size to nano scale because at the small sizes, that they behave differently with its bulk materials and the band gap will control by the size. The tunability of the band gap makes nano structured materials useful for many applications. As one of the wide band gaps semiconductor compounds, zinc selenide (ZnSe) nano structures (nanoparticles, nano wires, nano rods) have received much attention for the application in optoelectronic devices, such as blue laser diode, light emitting diodes, solar cells and IR optical windows. In this study, ZnSe nano structures have been synthesized by reduction process of zinc selenate using hydrazine hydrate (N 2 H 4 .2H 2 O). The reductive agent of hydrazine hydrate was added to the starting materials of zinc selenate were heat treated at 500 degree Celsius for 1 hour under argon flow to form one-dimensional nano structures. The SEM and TEM images show the formation of nano composite-like structure, which some small nano bar and nano pellets stick to the rod. The x-ray diffraction and elemental composition analysis confirm the formation of mixture zinc oxide and zinc selenide phases. (author)

  9. CHARACTERIZING AND MODELING FERRITE-CORE PROBES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbagh, Harold A.; Murphy, R. Kim; Sabbagh, Elias H.; Aldrin, John C.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we accurately and carefully characterize a ferrite-core probe that is widely used for aircraft inspections. The characterization starts with the development of a model that can be executed using the proprietary volume-integral code, VIC-3D(c), and then the model is fitted to measured multifrequency impedance data taken with the probe in freespace and over samples of a titanium alloy and aluminum. Excellent results are achieved, and will be discussed.

  10. Thermoluminescence properties of micro and nano structure hydroxyapatite after gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafaei, Mostafa; Ziaie, Farhood; Hajiloo, Nahid [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Application Research School

    2016-12-15

    The goal of this study is to compare the thermoluminescence properties of nano and micro structure hydroxyapatite. Nano structure hydroxyapatite was synthesized via hydrolysis method, while the micro structure one was from Merck Company. X-ray diffraction and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to determine the crystal structure and chemical composition of the hydroxyapatite samples. Particles sizes of each sample were estimated using Scherer equation and transmission electron microscopy system. Thermoluminescence properties of the samples were investigated under gamma irradiation. The glow curves of micro and nano structure samples show a peak at 150 C and 200 C, respectively. Thermoluminescence responses of both the samples were linear in the range of 25 - 1 000 Gy where, nano structure sample show a greater slope and stronger linearity in comparison to the micro sample. The results show that the thermoluminescence response of micro sample faded rapidly in comparison to the nano sample due to the existence of the peak at higher temperature.

  11. Synthesis and applications of one-dimensional nano-structured polyaniline: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Donghua; Wang Yangyong

    2006-01-01

    This paper summarizes and reviews the various synthesizing approaches of one-dimensional nano-structured polyaniline (PANI) and several potential applications of the nanomaterial. The synthesizing approaches can be generally categorized into template synthesis and non-template synthesis according to whether template(s), hard (physical template) or soft (chemical template), is (are) used or not. However, though the various approaches established, preparation of one-dimensional nano-structured PANI with controllable morphologies and sizes, especially well oriented arrays on a large scale is still a major challenge. Furthermore, the formation mechanisms of the nanostructures are still unclear. On the other hand, one-dimensional nano-structured PANI exhibits high surface area, high conductivity, as well as controllable chemical/physical properties and good environmental stability, rendering the nanomaterial promising candidate for application ranging from sensors, energy storage and flash welding to digital nonvolatile memory

  12. Formation of Lanthanum Hydroxide nano structures: Effect of NaOH and KOH solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazloumi, M.; Zanganeh, S.; Kajbafvala, A.; Shayegh, M. R.; Sadrnezhaad, S. K.

    2008-01-01

    Lanthanum hydroxide (La(OH) 3 ) nano structures, including elliptical nanoparticles, octahedral rods and irregular nanoparticles were prepared chemically in NaOH and KOH solutions with 10 M concentration. The obtained powders were characterized with x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and differential thermal analysis. Crystallinities, morphologies and thermal behavior of the obtained nano structure powders were investigated under the influence of above mentioned solvents. The effect of chemical's temperature was also determined in one of the solvents (i.e. NaOH). The formation of growth in nano structure mechanism under the influence of alkali solutions (i.e., KOH and NaOH) have been discussed considerably in this paper

  13. Magnetic layering transitions in a polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer nano-structure: Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziti, S.; Aouini, S.; Labrim, H.; Bahmad, L.

    2017-02-01

    We study the magnetic layering transitions in a polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer nano-structure, under the effect of an external magnetic field. We examine the magnetic properties, of this model of the spin S=1 Ising ferromagnetic in real nanostructure used in several scientific domains. For T=0, we give and discuss the ground state phase diagrams. At non null temperatures, we applied the Monte Carlo simulations giving important results summarized in the form of the phase diagrams. We also analyzed the effect of varying the external magnetic field, and found the layering transitions in the polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer nano-structure.

  14. Formation mechanism of solute clusters under neutron irradiation in ferritic model alloys and in a reactor pressure vessel steel: clusters of defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meslin-Chiffon, E.

    2007-11-01

    The embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under irradiation is partly due to the formation of point defects (PD) and solute clusters. The aim of this work was to gain more insight into the formation mechanisms of solute clusters in low copper ([Cu] = 0.1 wt%) FeCu and FeCuMnNi model alloys, in a copper free FeMnNi model alloy and in a low copper French RPV steel (16MND5). These materials were neutron-irradiated around 300 C in a test reactor. Solute clusters were characterized by tomographic atom probe whereas PD clusters were simulated with a rate theory numerical code calibrated under cascade damage conditions using transmission electron microscopy analysis. The confrontation between experiments and simulation reveals that a heterogeneous irradiation-induced solute precipitation/segregation probably occurs on PD clusters. (author)

  15. XXIst Century Ferrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazaleyrat, F; Zehani, K; Pasko, A; Loyau, V; LoBue, M

    2012-01-01

    Ferrites have always been a subject of great interest from point of view of magnetic application, since the fist compass to present date. In contrast, the scientific interest for iron based magnetic oxides decreased after Oersted discovery as they where replaced by coil as magnetizing sources. Neel discovery of ferrimagnetism boosted again interest and leads to strong developments during two decades before being of less interest. Recently, the evolution of power electronics toward higher frequency, the down sizing of ceramics microstructure to nanometer scale, the increasing price of rare-earth elements and the development of magnetocaloric materials put light again on ferrites. A review on three ferrite families is given herein: harder nanostructured Ba 2+ Fe 12 O 19 magnet processed by spark plasma sintering, magnetocaloric effect associated to the spin transition reorientation of W-ferrite and low temperature spark plasma sintered Ni-Zn-Cu ferrites for high frequency power applications.

  16. Oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloys. 14/20% chromium: effects of processing on deformation texture, recrystallization and tensile properties; Alliages ferritiques 14/20% de chrome renforces par dispersion d`oxydes. Effets des procedes de mise en forme sur les textures de deformation, la recristallisation et les proprietes de traction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regle, H

    1994-12-31

    The ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened alloys are promising candidates for high temperature application materials, in particular for long life core components of advanced nuclear reactors. The aim of this work is to control the microstructure, in order to optimise the mechanical properties. The two ferritic alloys examined here, MA956 and MA957, are obtained by Mechanical Alloying techniques. They are characterised by quite anisotropic microstructure and mechanical properties. We have investigated the influence of hot and cold working processes (hot extrusion, swaging and cold-drawing) and recrystallization heat treatments on deformation textures, microstructures and tensile properties. The aim was to control the size of the grains and their anisotropic shape, using recrystallization heat treatments. After consolidation and hot extrusion, as-received materials present a extremely fine microstructure with elongated grains and a very strong (110) deformation texture with single-crystal character. At that stage of processing, recrystallization temperature are very high (1450 degrees C for MA957 alloy and 1350 degrees C for MA956 alloy) and materials develop millimetric recrystallized grains. Additional hot extrusion induce a fibre texture. Cold-drawing maintains a fibre texture, but the intensity decreases with increasing cold-work level. For both materials, the decrease of texture intensities correspond to a decrease of the recrystallization temperatures (from 1350 degrees C for a low cold-work level to 750 degrees C for 60 % cold-deformation, case of MA956 alloy) and a refinement of the grain size (from a millimetric size to less than an hundred of micrometer). Swaging develop a cyclic component where the intensity increases with increasing deformation in this case, the recrystallization temperature remains always very high and the millimetric grain size is slightly modified, even though cold-work level increases. (Abstract Truncated)

  17. Localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking behavior of austenitic stainless steel weldments containing retained ferrite. Annual progress report, June 1, 1978--March 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, W.F.; Duquette, D.J.

    1979-03-01

    Localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking experiments have been performed on single phase 304 stainless steel alloys and autogeneous weldments containing retained delta ferrite as a second phase. The results of the pitting experiments show that the pressure of delta ferrite decreases localized corrosion resistance with pits initiating preferentially at delta ferrite--gamma austenite interphase boundaries. This increased susceptibility is reversible with elevated temperature heat treatments which revert the metastable ferrite phase to the equilibrium austenite phase

  18. Development of nano-structured silicon carbide ceramics: from synthesis of the powder to sintered ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reau, A.

    2008-12-01

    The materials used inside future nuclear reactors will be subjected to very high temperature and neutrons flux. Silicon carbide, in the form of SiC f /SiC nano-structured composite is potentially interesting for this type of application. It is again necessary to verify the contribution of nano-structure on the behaviour of this material under irradiation. To verify the feasibility and determine the properties of the matrix, it was envisaged to produce it by powder metallurgy from SiC nanoparticles. The objective is to obtain a fully dense nano-structured SiC ceramic without additives. For that, a parametric study of the phases of synthesis and agglomeration was carried out, the objective of which is to determine the active mechanisms and the influence of the key parameters. Thus, studying the nano-powder synthesis by laser pyrolysis allowed to produce, with high production rates, homogeneous batches of SiC nanoparticles whose size can be adjusted between 15 and 90 nm. These powders have been densified by an innovating method: Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). The study and the optimization of the key parameters allowed the densification of silicon carbide ceramic without sintering aids while preserving the nano-structure of material. The thermal and mechanical properties of final materials were studied in order to determine the influence of the microstructure on their properties. (author)

  19. Outlook for NanoInside Theme "3D nano-structuring and metrology"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruit, P.; Kroon, M.G.M. de; Maas, D.J.; Baumer, S.M.B.; Spruit, W.E.T.

    2017-01-01

    Het vakgebied van 3D nano-structurering en metrologie ontwikkelt zich razendsnel, zowel in Nederland als in de rest van de wereld. Het niveau van de Nederlandse betrokken onderzoekers, kennisinstituten en bedrijven is van wereldklasse. Veel Nederlandse academische groepen, kennisinstituten en

  20. Key Techniques on Preparing High Aspect Ratio Micro and Nano Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jian, Zhao; Lianhe, Dong; Xiaoli, Zhu

    2016-01-01

    effectively. The mechanism of action between NaCl and HSQ was analyzed. The collapse and adhesion of resist structure due to the effect of gas-liquid interfacial capillary surface tension were suppressed by the CO2 supercritical drying method. Large-area dense nano-structures with the aspect ratio of 12...

  1. D. C. plasma-sprayed coatings of nano-structured alumina-titania-silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Xianliang

    2002-01-01

    nano-crystalline powders of ω(Al 2 O 3 ) = 95%, ω(TiO 2 ) = 3%, and ω(SiO 2 ) = 2%, were reprocessed into agglomerated particles for plasma spraying, by using consecutive steps of ball milling, slurry forming, spray drying, and heat treatment. D.C. plasma was used to spray the agglomerated nano-crystalline powders, and resultant coatings were deposited on the substrate of stainless steel. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the morphology of the agglomerated powders and the cross section of the alumina-titania-silica coatings. Experimental results show that the agglomerated nano-crystalline particles are spherical, with a size from (10-90) μm. The flow ability of the nano-crystalline powders is greatly improved after the reprocessing. The coatings deposited by the plasma spraying are mainly of nano-structure. Unlike conventional plasma-sprayed coatings, no laminar layer could be found in the nano-structured coatings. Although the nano-structured coatings have a lower microhardness than conventional microstructured coatings, the toughness of the nano-structured ceramic coatings is significantly improved

  2. Fabrication of 3D nano-structures using reverse imprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kang-Soo; Hong, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Kang-In; Cho, Joong-Yeon; Choi, Kyung-woo; Lee, Heon

    2013-02-01

    In spite of the fact that the fabrication process of three-dimensional nano-structures is complicated and expensive, it can be applied to a range of devices to increase their efficiency and sensitivity. Simple and inexpensive fabrication of three-dimensional nano-structures is necessary. In this study, reverse imprint lithography (RIL) with UV-curable benzylmethacrylate, methacryloxypropyl terminated poly-dimethylsiloxane (M-PDMS) resin and ZnO-nano-particle-dispersed resin was used to fabricate three-dimensional nano-structures. UV-curable resins were placed between a silicon stamp and a PVA transfer template, followed by a UV curing process. Then, the silicon stamp was detached and a 2D pattern layer was transferred to the substrate using diluted UV-curable glue. Consequently, three-dimensional nano-structures were formed by stacking the two-dimensional nano-patterned layers. RIL was applied to a light-emitting diode (LED) to evaluate the optical effects of a nano-patterned layer. As a result, the light extraction of the patterned LED was increased by about 12% compared to an unpatterned LED.

  3. Fabrication of 3D nano-structures using reverse imprint lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Kang-Soo; Cho, Joong-Yeon; Lee, Heon; Hong, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Kang-In; Choi, Kyung-woo

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the fact that the fabrication process of three-dimensional nano-structures is complicated and expensive, it can be applied to a range of devices to increase their efficiency and sensitivity. Simple and inexpensive fabrication of three-dimensional nano-structures is necessary. In this study, reverse imprint lithography (RIL) with UV-curable benzylmethacrylate, methacryloxypropyl terminated poly-dimethylsiloxane (M-PDMS) resin and ZnO-nano-particle-dispersed resin was used to fabricate three-dimensional nano-structures. UV-curable resins were placed between a silicon stamp and a PVA transfer template, followed by a UV curing process. Then, the silicon stamp was detached and a 2D pattern layer was transferred to the substrate using diluted UV-curable glue. Consequently, three-dimensional nano-structures were formed by stacking the two-dimensional nano-patterned layers. RIL was applied to a light-emitting diode (LED) to evaluate the optical effects of a nano-patterned layer. As a result, the light extraction of the patterned LED was increased by about 12% compared to an unpatterned LED. (paper)

  4. White emission from nano-structured top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes based on a blue emitting layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, Woo Jin; Park, Jung Jin; Park, O Ok; Im, Sang Hyuk; Chin, Byung Doo

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrated that white emission can be obtained from nano-structured top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (TEOLEDs) based on a blue emitting layer (EML). The nano-structured TEOLEDs were fabricated on nano-patterned substrates, in which both optical micro-cavity and scattering effects occur simultaneously. Due to the combination of these two effects, the electroluminescence spectra of the nano-structured device with a blue EML exhibited not only blue but also yellow colours, which corresponded to the intrinsic emission of the EML and the resonant emission of the micro-cavity effect. Consequently, it was possible to produce white emission from nano-structured TEOLEDs without employing a multimode micro-cavity. The intrinsic emission wavelength can be varied by altering the dopant used for the EML. Furthermore, the emissive characteristics turned out to be strongly dependent on the nano-pattern sizes of the nano-structured devices. (paper)

  5. Alloy development for cladding and duct applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straalsund, J.L.; Johnson, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    Three general classes of materials under development for cladding and ducts are listed. Solid solution strengthened, or austenitic, alloys are Type 316 stainless steel and D9. Precipitation hardened (also austenitic) alloys consist of D21, D66 and D68. These alloys are similar to such commercial alloys as M-813, Inconel 706, Inconel 718 and Nimonic PE-16. The third general class of alloys is composed of ferritic alloys, with current emphasis being placed on HT-9, a tempered martensitic alloy, and D67, a delta-ferritic steel. The program is comprised of three parallel paths. The current reference, or first generation alloy, is 20% cold worked Type 316 stainless steel. Second generation alloys for near-term applications include D9 and HT-9. Third generation materials consist of the precipitation strengthened steels and ferritic alloys, and are being considered for implementation at a later time than the first and second generation alloys. The development of second and third generation materials was initiated in 1974 with the selection of 35 alloys. This program has proceeded to today where there are six advanced alloys being evaluated. These alloys are the developmental alloys D9, D21, D57, D66 and D68, together with the commerical alloy, HT-9. The status of development of these alloys is summarized

  6. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-04-01

    Progress is reported in eight sections: analysis and evaluation studies, test matrices and test methods development, Path A Alloy Development (austenitic stainless steels), Path C Alloy Development (Ti and V alloys), Path D Alloy Development (Fe alloys), Path E Alloy Development (ferritic steels), irradiation experiments and materials inventory, and materials compatibility and hydrogen permeation studies. (DLC)

  7. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    Progress is reported in eight sections: analysis and evaluation studies, test matrices and test methods development, Path A Alloy Development (austenitic stainless steels), Path C Alloy Development (Ti and V alloys), Path D Alloy Development (Fe alloys), Path E Alloy Development (ferritic steels), irradiation experiments and materials inventory, and materials compatibility and hydrogen permeation studies

  8. Direct writing of large-area micro/nano-structural arrays on single crystalline germanium substrates using femtosecond lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Wang, Jun

    2017-06-01

    A direct writing technique for fabricating micro/nano-structural arrays without using a multi-scanning process, multi-beam interference, or any assisted microlens arrays is reported. Various sub-wavelength micro/nano-structural arrays have been directly written on single crystalline germanium substrate surfaces using femtosecond laser pulses. The evolution of the multiscale surface morphology from periodic micro/nano-structures to V-shaped microgrooves has been achieved, and the relationship between array characteristics and laser polarization directions has been discussed. The self-organization model agrees well with the experimental results in this study.

  9. Studies on Thermal Decomposition of Aluminium Sulfate to Produce Alumina Nano Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jafar-Tafreshi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum sulfate nano structures have been prepared by solution combustion synthesis using aluminum nitrate nonahydrate (Al(NO33.9H2O and ammonium sulfate ((NH42SO4. The resultant aluminum sulfate nano structures were calcined at different temperatures to study thermal  decomposition of aluminum sulfate. The crystallinity and phase of  the as-synthesized and calcined samples were characterized by both X- ray diffraction and FTIR measurements. These two analyses determined the temperature at which the aluminum sulfate is converted to γ-alumina nano particles. The specific surface area and pore size distribution for  γ-alumina nano particles were determined by BET measurement. TEM measurement confirmed the size of the particles obtained by XRD and BET analyses.

  10. Comparison of 3 methods on fabricating micro- /nano- structured surface on 3D mold cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yang; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Bissacco, Giuliano

    2015-01-01

    The methods to manufacture micro- or nano- structures on surfaces have been an area of intense investigation. Demands are shown for technologies for surface structuring on real 3D parts in many fields. However, most technologies for the fabrication of micro-structured functional surfaces are still...... limited to flat or simple shaped geometries. In this paper, 3 approaches for fabricating micro and nano- structured surfaces on a mold cavity for injection moulding are investigated and compared. The first approach is to use pre-fabricated plate with micro-structured surface as an insert for the mold......, in this way micro holes (Ø4 μm) was obtained. The second approach is to produce the cavity part using anodizing process chain, and in this way sub-micro structures can be obtained all over the cavity surface. The third approach is to machine the surface inside the cavity directly by femtosecond laser combined...

  11. On the shear strength of tungsten nano-structures with embedded helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, R.D.; Krasheninnikov, S.I.

    2013-01-01

    Modification of plastic properties of tungsten nano-structures under shear stress load due to embedded helium atoms is studied using molecular dynamics modelling. The modelling demonstrates that the yield strength of tungsten nano-structures reduces significantly with increasing embedded helium concentration. At high helium concentrations (>10 at%), the yield strength decreases to values characteristic to the pressure in helium nano-bubbles, which are formed in tungsten under such conditions and thought to be responsible for the formation of nano-fuzz on tungsten surfaces irradiated with helium plasma. It is also shown that tungsten plastic flow strongly facilitates coagulation of helium clusters to larger bubbles. The temperature dependencies of the yield strength are obtained. (letter)

  12. Removal of Cadmium from Aqueous Solution by Nano Structured γ-Alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hassan Zavar Mousavi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the use of nano structured γ-alumina as a new and convince adsorbent for removal of cadmium ions from aqueous solution was investigated. The equilibrium adsorption level was determined as a function of the solution pH, temperature, contact time, initial adsorbate concentration and adsorbent doses. Adsorption isotherms of Cd(II on adsorbents were determined and correlated with common isotherm equations such as Langmuir, Freundlich and Tempkin models. The isotherm data fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm. The maximum adsorption capacity for Cd(II on nano structured γ-alumina was 76.92 mg g-1. The adsorption kinetics was investigated and the best fit was achieved by a second-order equation. The thermodynamic parameters such as free energy (ΔG0, enthalpy (ΔH0 and entropy changes (ΔS0 for the adsorption of Cd(II were computed to predict the nature of adsorption process.

  13. Adherence of human oral keratinocytes and gingival fibroblasts to nano-structured titanium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorkhan, Marjan; Yücel-Lindberg, Tülay; Hall, Jan; Svensäter, Gunnel; Davies, Julia R

    2014-06-21

    A key element for long-term success of dental implants is integration of the implant surface with the surrounding host tissues. Modification of titanium implant surfaces can enhance osteoblast activity but their effects on soft-tissue cells are unclear. Adherence of human keratinocytes and gingival fibroblasts to control commercially pure titanium (CpTi) and two surfaces prepared by anodic oxidation was therefore investigated. Since implant abutments are exposed to a bacteria-rich environment in vivo, the effect of oral bacteria on keratinocyte adhesion was also evaluated. The surfaces were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The number of adhered cells and binding strength, as well as vitality of fibroblasts and keratinocytes were evaluated using confocal scanning laser microscopy after staining with Live/Dead Baclight. To evaluate the effect of bacteria on adherence and vitality, keratinocytes were co-cultured with a four-species streptococcal consortium. SEM analysis showed the two anodically oxidized surfaces to be nano-structured with differing degrees of pore-density. Over 24 hours, both fibroblasts and keratinocytes adhered well to the nano-structured surfaces, although to a somewhat lesser degree than to CpTi (range 42-89% of the levels on CpTi). The strength of keratinocyte adhesion was greater than that of the fibroblasts but no differences in adhesion strength could be observed between the two nano-structured surfaces and the CpTi. The consortium of commensal streptococci markedly reduced keratinocyte adherence on all the surfaces as well as compromising membrane integrity of the adhered cells. Both the vitality and level of adherence of soft-tissue cells to the nano-structured surfaces was similar to that on CpTi. Co-culture with streptococci reduced the number of keratinocytes on all the surfaces to approximately the same level and caused cell damage, suggesting that commensal bacteria could affect adherence of soft-tissue cells to

  14. Preparation of BiOBr thin films with micro-nano-structure and their photocatalytic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Rui [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Fan, Caimei, E-mail: fancm@163.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Zhang, Xiaochao, E-mail: zhang13598124761@163.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Wang, Yawen; Wang, Yunfang [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Zhang, Hui [Particle Technology Research Centre, Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    A series of micro-nano-structure BiOBr thin films were prepared at a low temperature by the alcoholysis-coating method using BiBr{sub 3} as precursor. The as-prepared films were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area. The obtained results indicated that micro-nano-structure tetragonal BiOBr films with different intensity ratios of (110) to (102) characteristic peaks could be synthesized through controlling the reaction temperature and the calcination temperatures. Furthermore, the photocatalytic activities of BiOBr thin films with different preparation conditions have been evaluated by the degradation of methyl orange (MO) under UV light irradiation, suggesting that the photocatalytic activity should be closely related to the solvent, the alcoholysis reaction temperature, and the calcining temperature. The best photocatalytic degradation efficiency of MO for BiOBr thin films reaches 98.5% under 2.5 h UV irradiation. The BiOBr thin films display excellent stability and their photocatalytic activity still remains above 90% after being used five times. The main reasons for the higher photocatalytic activity of micro-nano-structure BiOBr microspheres have been investigated. In addition, the possible formation mechanism of BiOBr thin films with micro-nano-structure and excellent photocatalytic activity was proposed and discussed. - Highlights: • The BiOBr film was prepared at low temperature via alcoholysis-coating method. • The optimum process conditions of preparing BiOBr film were discussed. • As-prepared BiOBr films were composed of micro-nano flake structures. • The BiOBr films demonstrated excellent photocatalytic activity. • The formation mechanism of BiOBr films with high activity was proposed.

  15. Micro/Nano Structural Tantalum Coating for Enhanced Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ding Ding; Youtao Xie; Kai Li; Liping Huang; Xuebin Zheng

    2018-01-01

    Recently, tantalum has been attracting much attention for its anticorrosion resistance and biocompatibility, and it has been widely used in surface modification for implant applications. To improve its osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs), a micro/nano structure has been fabricated on the tantalum coating surface through the combination of anodic oxidation and plasma spraying method. The morphology, composition, and microstructure of the modified coating were co...

  16. Fabrication and condensation characteristics of metallic superhydrophobic surface with hierarchical micro-nano structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Fuqiang; Wu, Xiaomin

    2016-05-01

    Metallic superhydrophobic surfaces have various applications in aerospace, refrigeration and other engineering fields due to their excellent water repellent characteristics. This study considers a simple but widely applicable fabrication method using a two simultaneous chemical reactions method to prepare the acid-salt mixed solutions to process the metal surfaces with surface deposition and surface etching to construct hierarchical micro-nano structures on the surface and then modify the surface with low surface-energy materials. Al-based and Cu-based superhydrophobic surfaces were fabricated using this method. The Al-based superhydrophobic surface had a water contact angle of 164° with hierarchical micro-nano structures similar to the lotus leaves. The Cu-based surface had a water contact angle of 157° with moss-like hierarchical micro-nano structures. Droplet condensation experiments were also performed on these two superhydrophobic surfaces to investigate their condensation characteristics. The results show that the Al-based superhydrophobic surface has lower droplet density, higher droplet jumping probability, slower droplet growth rate and lower surface coverage due to the more structured hierarchical structures.

  17. Friction-induced nano-structural evolution of graphene as a lubrication additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jun; Mao, Junyuan; Li, Yingru; He, Yongyong; Luo, Jianbin

    2018-03-01

    Graphene has attracted enormous attention in the field of lubrication based on its excellent physical and chemical properties. Although many studies have obtained thermally or chemically- exfoliated graphene and investigated their wide and important application, few studies have reported their physical nano-structural evolution under friction. In this study, we investigated the lubrication properties of graphene additives with different layer numbers and interlayer spacing by exfoliating. The additives with a higher degrees of exfoliation changed to ordering under friction, and had better lubrication properties, while that with a lower degrees exhibited obvious structural defects and high friction. Therefore, the original degrees of exfoliation plays a key role in the structural evolution of graphene and superior lubrication can be achieved through the physical nano-structure changing to ordering, even graphitization. Furthermore, the ordered tribofilm on the frictional interfaces was parallel to the sliding direction, meaning the highly exfoliated graphene indeed reaching slippage between its layers, which wasn't experimentally discovered in previous studies. This work provides a new understanding of the relationship between friction-induced nano-structural evolution and lubrication properties of graphene as a lubrication additive, and has great potential for the structural design of graphene as a lubrication additive.

  18. Density functional theory for field emission from carbon nano-structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhibing, E-mail: stslzb@mail.sysu.edu.cn

    2015-12-15

    Electron field emission is understood as a quantum mechanical many-body problem in which an electronic quasi-particle of the emitter is converted into an electron in vacuum. Fundamental concepts of field emission, such as the field enhancement factor, work-function, edge barrier and emission current density, will be investigated, using carbon nanotubes and graphene as examples. A multi-scale algorithm basing on density functional theory is introduced. We will argue that such a first principle approach is necessary and appropriate for field emission of nano-structures, not only for a more accurate quantitative description, but, more importantly, for deeper insight into field emission. - Highlights: • Applications of DFT to electron field emission of nano-structures are reviewed. • Fundamental concepts of field emission are re-visited with emphasis on the many-body effects. • New insights to field emission of nano-structures are obtained by multi-scale DFT calculations. • It is shown that the exchange–correlation effect on the emission barrier is significant. • Spontaneous symmetry breaking in field emission of CNT has been predicted.

  19. D. C. plasma-sprayed coatings of nano-structured alumina-titania-silica

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang Xian Liang

    2002-01-01

    nano-crystalline powders of omega(Al sub 2 O sub 3) = 95%, omega(TiO sub 2) = 3%, and omega(SiO sub 2) = 2%, were reprocessed into agglomerated particles for plasma spraying, by using consecutive steps of ball milling, slurry forming, spray drying, and heat treatment. D.C. plasma was used to spray the agglomerated nano-crystalline powders, and resultant coatings were deposited on the substrate of stainless steel. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the morphology of the agglomerated powders and the cross section of the alumina-titania-silica coatings. Experimental results show that the agglomerated nano-crystalline particles are spherical, with a size from (10-90) mu m. The flow ability of the nano-crystalline powders is greatly improved after the reprocessing. The coatings deposited by the plasma spraying are mainly of nano-structure. Unlike conventional plasma-sprayed coatings, no laminar layer could be found in the nano-structured coatings. Although the nano-structured coatings have a lo...

  20. Intragranular ferrite morphologies in medium carbon vanadium-microalloyed steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadel A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine TTT diagram of medium carbon V-N micro-alloyed steel with emphasis on the development of intragranular ferrite morphologies. The isothermal treatment was carried out at 350, 400, 450, 500, 550 and 600°C. These treatments were interrupted at different times in order to analyze the evolution of the microstructure. Metallographic evaluation was done using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results show that at high temperatures (≥ 500°C polygonal intragranulary nucleated ferrite idiomorphs, combined with grain boundary ferrite and pearlite were produced and followed by an incomplete transformation phenomenon. At intermediate temperatures (450, 500°C an interloced acicular ferrite (AF microstructure is produced, and at low temperatures (400, 350°C the sheave of parallel acicular ferrite plates, similar to bainitic sheaves but intragranularly nucleated were observed. In addition to sheaf type acicular ferrite, the grain boundary nucleated bainitic sheaves are observed. [Projekat Ministartsva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI174004

  1. Ferrite materials for memory applications

    CERN Document Server

    Saravanan, R

    2017-01-01

    The book discusses the synthesis and characterization of various ferrite materials used for memory applications. The distinct feature of the book is the construction of charge density of ferrites by deploying the maximum entropy method (MEM). This charge density gives the distribution of charges in the ferrite unit cell, which is analyzed for charge related properties.

  2. CASS Ferrite and Grain Structure Relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruud, Clayton O. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meyer, Ryan M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Diaz, Aaron A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, Michael T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-07-13

    This document summarizes the results of research conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine whether, based on experimental measurements, a correlation existed between grain structure in cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) piping and ferrite content of the casting alloy. The motivation for this research lies in the fact that ultrasonic testing (UT) is strongly influenced by CASS grain structure; knowledge of this grain structure may help improve the ability to interpret UT responses, thereby improving the overall reliability of UT inspections of CASS components.

  3. Evaluation of welds on a ferritic-austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleva, J.; Johansson, B.

    1984-01-01

    Five different welding methods for the ferritic-austenitic steel 22Cr6Ni3MoN have been evaluated on mill welded heavy wall pipes. The corrosion resistance of the weld joints has been tested both in standard tests and in special environments, related to certain oil and gas wells. The tests were conclusive in that a welding procedure with the addition of sufficient amounts of filler metal should be employed. TIG welds without or with marginal filler addition showed poor resistance to pitting, and to boiling nitric acid. Contents of main alloying elements in ferrite and austenite phases have been measured and causes of corrosion attack in welds are discussed

  4. Propeller-Shaped ZnO Nano structures Obtained by Chemical Vapor Deposition: Photoluminescence and Photo catalytic Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.L.; Zhu, H.W.; Li, P.G.; Tang, W.H.

    2012-01-01

    Propeller-shaped and flower-shaped ZnO nano structures on Si substrates were prepared by a one-step chemical vapor deposition technique. The propeller-shaped ZnO nano structure consists of a set of axial nano rod (50 nm in tip, 80 nm in root and 1μm in length), surrounded by radial-oriented nano ribbons (20-30 nm in thickness and 1.5μm in length). The morphology of flower-shaped ZnO nano structure is similar to that of propeller-shaped ZnO, except the shape of leaves. These nano rods leaves (30?nm in diameter and 1-1.5μm in length) are aligned in a radial way and pointed toward a common center. The flower-shaped ZnO nano structures show sharper and stronger UV emission at 378 nm than the propeller-shaped ZnO, indicating a better crystal quality and fewer structural defects in flower-shaped ZnO. In comparison with flower-shaped ZnO nano structures, the propeller-shaped ZnO nano structures exhibited a higher photo catalytic property for the photo catalytic degradation of Rhodamine B under UV-light illumination.

  5. Methods of acicular ferrite forming in the weld bead metal (Brief analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Володимир Олександрович Лебедєв

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A brief analysis of the methods of acicular ferrite formation as the most preferable structural component in the weld metal has been presented. The term «acicular ferrite» is meant as a structure that forms during pearlite and martensite transformation and austenite decomposition. Acicular ferrite is a packet structure consisting of battens of bainitic ferrite, there being no cementite particles inside these battens at all. The chemical elements most effectively influencing on the formation of acicular ferrite have been considered and their combined effect as well. It has been shown in particular, that the most effective chemical element in terms of impact toughness and cost relation is manganese. Besides, the results of multipass surfacing with impulse and constant feed of low-alloy steel wire electrode have been considered. According to these results acicular ferrite forms in both cases. However, at impulse feed of the electrode wire high mechanical properties of surfacing layer were got in the first passes, the form of the acicular ferrite crystallite has been improved and volume shares of polygonal and lamellar ferrite have been reduced. An assumption has been made, according to which acicular ferrite in the surfacing layer may be obtained through superposition of mechanical low-frequency oscillation on the welding torch or on the welding pool instead of periodic thermal effect due to electrode wire periodic feed

  6. Fabrication of high-aspect-ratio nano structures using a nano x-ray shadow mask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Chul; Lee, Seung S

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method for the fabrication of high-aspect-ratio nano structures (HAR-nano structures) using a nano x-ray shadow mask and deep x-ray lithography (DXRL). The nano x-ray shadow mask is fabricated by depositing an x-ray absorber layer (Au, 3 µm) onto the back side of a nano shadow mask. The nano shadow mask is produced with nano-sized apertures whose dimensions are reduced to several tens of nanometers by the accumulation of low-stress silicon nitride (Si x N y ) using the LPCVD process on the shadow mask. A shadow mask containing apertures with a size of 1 µm is fabricated on a bulk micromachined Si x N y membrane. The thickness of an absorber layer must be in the range of several tens of micrometers in order to obtain a contrast of more than 100 for the conventional DXRL process at the Pohang Light Source (PLS). However, a 3 µm thick absorber layer can provide a sufficient contrast if the modified DXRL of the central beam-stop method is used, which blocks high-energy x-rays. A nano shadow mask with 30 nm sized apertures is fabricated and a nano x-ray shadow mask with 250 nm sized apertures is fabricated by depositing a 3 µm thick absorber layer on a nano shadow mask with 500 nm sized apertures. HAR-nano structures (circles with a diameter of 420 nm and lines with a width of 274 nm) with aspect ratios of over 10:1 on a 3.2 µm SU-8 are successfully fabricated by using the nano x-ray shadow mask and the central beam-stop method

  7. Nano-structured Cu(In,Al)Se{sub 2} near-infrared photodetectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Ruo-Ping [Institute of Microelectronics and Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Perng, Dung-Ching, E-mail: dcperng@ee.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Microelectronics and Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-01

    We have demonstrated nano-structured Cu(In,Al)Se{sub 2} (CIAS) near-infrared (NIR) photodetectors (PDs). The CIAS NIR PDs were fabricated on ZnO nanowires (NWs)/ZnO/Mo/ITO (indium tin oxide) glass substrate. CIAS film acted as a sensing layer and sparse ZnSe NWs, which were converted from ZnO NWs after selenization process, were embedded in the CIAS film to improve the amplification performance of the NIR PDs. X-ray diffraction patterns show that the CIAS film is a single phased polycrystalline film. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the morphology of the CIAS film and the growth of NWs. Two detection schemes, plain Al–CIAS–Al metal–semiconductor–metal structure and vertical structure with CIAS/ZnSe NWs annular p–n junctions, were studied. The nano-structured NIR PDs demonstrate two orders of magnitude for the annular p–n junction and one order of magnitude for the MSM structure in photocurrent amplification. The responsivities of the PDs using both sensing structures have the same cut-off frequency near 790 nm. - Highlights: ► We demonstrate nano-structured Cu(In,Al)Se{sub 2} near-infrared photodetectors. ► Photodetectors were fabricated on ZnO nanowires/ZnO/Mo/ITO glass substrate. ► Two detection schemes studied: a plain MSM structure and a vertical structure. ► Photocurrent amplification for the vertical structure is two orders of magnitude. ► Photocurrent amplification for the MSM structure is one order of magnitude.

  8. Small angle neutron and x-ray scattering studies of self-assembled nano structured materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Min

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Small angle neutron and x-ray scattering are very powerful techniques to investigate nano structured materials. In this presentation, examples of nano structured materials investigated by neutron and x-ray scattering will be presented. Part I: The unique anisotropic physical properties of columnar discotic liquid crystals (DLCs) have attracted considerable interest for their potential applications as electronic devices. For many practical applications, however, it is crucial to obtain uniaxially oriented and highly ordered columnar superstructures of DLC molecules covering macroscopic area. Here, we present a simple and straight-forward approach to fabricate uniaxially oriented and highly ordered columnar superstructures of cobalt octa(n-decylthio) porphyrazine (CoS 1 0), a discotic supra-molecule, in bulk and on substrates [1] over a macroscopic length scale, utilizing an applied magnetic field and the interaction of CoS 1 0 with an OTS-functionalized substrate. The details of the oriented and ordered columnar nano-structures are investigated by SANS and GISAXS. Part II: Self-assembly of one-dimensional (1D) nanoparticles with metallic or semiconducting properties into highly ordered superstructures using various interactions has been of great interest as a route towards materials with new functionalities. Here, we report a new phase diagram of negatively charged 1D nanoparticle (cROD) and cationic liposome (CL) complexes in water which exhibit three different highly ordered phases [2]. Small angle neutron and x-ray scattering measurements show that the cROD-CL complexes exhibit three different highly ordered phases, intercalated lamellar, doubly intercalated lamellar and centered rectangular phases, depending on particle curvature and electrostatic interactions. The new phase diagram can be used to understand and design new highly ordered self-assemblies of 1D nanoparticles in soft matter which provide new functionalities. (author)

  9. Synthesis and study of nano-structured cellulose acetate based materials for energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, F.

    2006-12-01

    Nano-structured materials have unique properties (high exchange areas, containment effect) because of their very low characteristic dimensions. The elaboration way set up in this PhD work consists in applying the classical processes for the preparation of aerogel-like materials (combining sol-gel synthesis and CO 2 supercritical extraction) to cellulosic polymers. This work is divided in four parts: a literature review, the presentation and the study of the chemical synthesis that leads to cellulose acetate-based aerogel, the characterizations (chemical, structural and thermal) of the elaborated nano-materials, and finally the study of the first carbons that were obtained after pyrolysis of the organic matrix. The formulations and the sol-gel protocol lead to chemical gels by crosslinking cellulose acetate using a poly-functional iso-cyanate. The dry materials obtained after solvent extraction with supercritical CO 2 are nano-structured and mainly meso-porous. Correlations between chemical synthesis parameters (reagent concentrations, crosslinking rate and degree of polymerisation) and porous properties (density, porosity, pore size distribution) were highlighted thanks to structural characterizations. An ultra-porous reference aerogel, with a density equals to 0,245 g.cm -3 together with a meso-porous volume of 3,40 cm 3 .g -1 was elaborated. Once in granular shape, this material has a thermal conductivity of 0,029 W.m -1 .K -1 . In addition, carbon materials produced after pyrolysis of the organic matrix and after grinding are nano-structured and nano-porous, even if important structural modifications have occurred during the carbonization process. The elaborated materials are evaluated for applications in relation with energy such as thermal insulation (organic aerogels) but also for energy conversion and storage through electrochemical way (carbon aerogels). (author)

  10. Formation of surface nano-structures by plasma expansion induced by highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moslem, W. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said (Egypt); Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt (BUE), El-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt) and International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); El-Said, A. S. [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Nuclear and Radiation Physics Laboratory, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, 35516 Mansoura (Egypt) and Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Bautzner Landstr. 128, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Slow highly charged ions (HCIs) create surface nano-structures (nano-hillocks) on the quartz surface. The formation of hillocks was only possible by surpassing a potential energy threshold. By using the plasma expansion approach with suitable hydrodynamic equations, the creation mechanism of the nano-hillocks induced by HCIs is explained. Numerical analysis reveal that within the nanoscale created plasma region, the increase of the temperature causes an increase of the self-similar solution validity domain, and consequently the surface nano-hillocks become taller. Furthermore, the presence of the negative (positive) nano-dust particles would lead to increase (decrease) the nano-hillocks height.

  11. Induction Heating System Applied to Injection Moulding of Micro and Nano Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menotti, Stefano

    The present Ph.D. thesis contains a study concerning induction heating system applied to injection moulding of micro and nano structures. The overall process chain was considered and investigated during the project including part design, simulation, conventional and non-conventional tooling...... part. In fact one of the main problems in micro injection moulding is the premature freezing of the polymer flow inside the cavity and often is not possible to obtain a full replica of the nano/micro structures embed on the surfaces. Some other defects that can be avoided with the use of an additional...

  12. Characterization of nano structured metallic materials; Caracterizacion de materiales metalicos nanoestructurados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin A, M.; Gutierrez W, C.; Cruz C, R.; Angeles C, C. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    Nowadays the search of new materials with specific optical properties has carried out to realize a series of experiments through the polymer synthesis [(C{sub 3}N{sub 3}){sub 2} (NH){sub 3}]{sub n} doped with gold metallic nanoparticles. The thermal stability of a polymer is due to the presence of tyazine rings contained in the structure. The samples were characterized by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-ray diffraction by the Powder method, Ft-infrared and its thermal properties by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetry (TGA). One of the purposes of this work is to obtain nano structured materials over a polymeric matrix. (Author)

  13. Regularities of ferritic-pearlitic structure formation during subcooled austenite decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shkatov, V.V.; Frantsenyuk, L.I.; Bogomolov, I.V.

    1997-01-01

    Relationships of ferrite-pearlite structure parameters to austenite grain size and cooling conditions during γ -> α transformation are studied for steel 3 sp. A mathematical description has been proposed for grain evolution in carbon and low alloy steel cooling after hot rolling. It is shown that ferrite grain size can be controlled by changing temperature range of water spraying when the temperatures of rolling completion and strip coiling are the same

  14. The effects of laser welding parameters on the microstructure of ferritic and duplex stainless steels welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekkarinen, J.; Kujanpää, V.

    This study is focused to determine empirically, which microstructural changes occur in ferritic and duplex stainless steels when heat input is controlled by welding parameters. Test welds were done autogenously bead-on-plate without shielding gas using 5 kW fiber laser. For comparison, some gas tungsten arc welds were made. Used test material were 1.4016 (AISI 430) and 1.4003 (low-carbon ferritic) type steels in ferritic steels group and 1.4162 (low-alloyed duplex, LDX2101) and 1.4462 (AISI 2205) type steels in duplex steels group. Microstructural changes in welds were identified and examined using optical metallographic methods.

  15. Atom probe study of the microstructural evolution induced by irradiation in Fe-Cu ferritic alloys and pressure vessel steels; Etude a la sonde atomique de l`evolution microstructurale sous irradiation d`alliages ferritiques Fe-Cu et d`aciers de cuve REP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pareige, P

    1996-04-01

    Pressure vessel steels used in pressurized water reactors are low alloyed ferritic steels. They may be prone to hardening and embrittlement under neutron irradiation. The changes in mechanical properties are generally supposed to result from the formation of point defects, dislocation loops, voids and/or copper rich clusters. However, the real nature of the irradiation induced-damage in these steels has not been clearly identified yet. In order to improve our vision of this damage, we have characterized the microstructure of several steels and model alloys irradiated with electrons and neutrons. The study was performed with conventional and tomographic atom probes. The well known importance of the effects of copper upon pressure vessel steel embrittlement has led us to study Fe-Cu binary alloys. We have considered chemical aging as well as aging under electron and neutron irradiations. The resulting effects depend on whether electron or neutron irradiations ar used for thus. We carried out both kinds of irradiation concurrently so as to compare their effects. We have more particularly considered alloys with a low copper supersaturation representative of that met with the French vessel alloys (0.1% Cu). Then, we have examined steels used on French nuclear reactor pressure vessels. To characterize the microstructure of CHOOZ A steel and its evolution when exposed to neutrons, we have studied samples from the reactor surveillance program. The results achieved, especially the characterization of neutron-induced defects have been compared with those for another steel from the surveillance program of Dampierre 2. All the experiment results obtained on model and industrial steels have allowed us to consider an explanation of the way how the defects appear and grow, and to propose reasons for their influence upon steel embrittlement. (author). 3 appends.

  16. Heating temperature effect on ferritic grain size of rotor steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheremnykh, V.G.; Derevyankin, E.V.; Sakulin, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    The heating temperature effect on ferritic grain size of two steels 13Kh1M1FA and 25Kh1M1FA is evaluated. It is shown that exposure time increase at heating temperatures below 1000 deg C up to 10h changes but slightly the size of the Cr-Mo-V ferritic grain of rotor steel cooled with 25 deg C/h rate. Heating up to 1000 deg C and above leads to substantial ferritic grain growth. The kinetics of ferritic grain growth is determined by the behaviour of phases controlling the austenitic grain growth, such as carbonitrides VCsub(0.14)Nsub(0.78) in 13Kh1M1FA steel and VCsub(0.18)Nsub(0.72) in 25Kh1M1FA steel. Reduction of carbon and alloying elements content in steel composition observed at the liquation over rotor length leads to a certain decrease of ferritic grain resistance to super heating

  17. Micro/Nano Structural Tantalum Coating for Enhanced Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ding; Xie, Youtao; Li, Kai; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin

    2018-04-03

    Recently, tantalum has been attracting much attention for its anticorrosion resistance and biocompatibility, and it has been widely used in surface modification for implant applications. To improve its osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs), a micro/nano structure has been fabricated on the tantalum coating surface through the combination of anodic oxidation and plasma spraying method. The morphology, composition, and microstructure of the modified coating were comprehensively studied by employing scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effects of hierarchical structures as well as micro-porous structure of tantalum coating on the behavior for human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs) were evaluated and compared at both cellular and molecular levels in vitro. The experimental results show that a hierarchical micro/nano structure with Ta₂O₅ nanotubes spread onto a micro-scale tantalum coating has been fabricated successfully, which is confirmed to promote cell adhesion and spreading. Besides, the hierarchical micro/nano tantalum coating can provide 1.5~2.1 times improvement in gene expression, compared with the micro-porous tantalum coating. It demonstrates that it can effectively enhance the proliferation and differentiation of hBMSCs in vitro.

  18. Micro/Nano Structural Tantalum Coating for Enhanced Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Ding

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, tantalum has been attracting much attention for its anticorrosion resistance and biocompatibility, and it has been widely used in surface modification for implant applications. To improve its osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs, a micro/nano structure has been fabricated on the tantalum coating surface through the combination of anodic oxidation and plasma spraying method. The morphology, composition, and microstructure of the modified coating were comprehensively studied by employing scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The effects of hierarchical structures as well as micro-porous structure of tantalum coating on the behavior for human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs were evaluated and compared at both cellular and molecular levels in vitro. The experimental results show that a hierarchical micro/nano structure with Ta2O5 nanotubes spread onto a micro-scale tantalum coating has been fabricated successfully, which is confirmed to promote cell adhesion and spreading. Besides, the hierarchical micro/nano tantalum coating can provide 1.5~2.1 times improvement in gene expression, compared with the micro-porous tantalum coating. It demonstrates that it can effectively enhance the proliferation and differentiation of hBMSCs in vitro.

  19. An effective medium model versus a network model for nano-structured solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minnaert, B.; Grasso, C.; Burgelman, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, two methods are compared to model the I-V curves of nano-structured solar cells. These cells consist of an interpenetrating network of an n-type transparent semiconductor oxide (e.g. TiO 2 ) and a p-type semiconductor absorber (e.g. CdTe, CuInS 2 ), deposited on TCO covered glass. The methods are also applicable when a dye and an electrolyte replace the p-semiconductor, and even to organic bulk heterojunction cells. A network model (NM) with resistors and diodes has been published by us before. Another method which has been proposed in the literature is an effective medium model (EMM). In this model, the whole p-n nano-structure is represented by one single effective semiconductor layer, which then is fed into a standard solar cell device simulator, e.g. SCAPS. In this work, it is shown that the NM and the EMM can describe the same physical structure, when they are set up properly. As an illustration, some problems are described both by EMM and NM, and the results are compared. The EMM in this work confirms the results obtained earlier with a simplified NM (constant R n , R p ): when illuminating the n-side, the structure is tolerant to R n but not to R p ; the interpenetrating geometry is disadvantageous for V oc . (authors)

  20. Eu"2"+ doped TiO_2 nano structures synthesized by HYSYCVD for thermoluminescence dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez A, J. A.; Leal C, A. L.; Melendrez A, R.; Barboza F, M.

    2016-10-01

    Titania (TiO_2) has attracted interest owing his potential applications as dosimetry material given his excellent optical, electrical and thermal properties and the ability to shape his structure make TiO_2 suitable for research and dosimetry applications. In this work, a systematic study to know the magnitude of processing parameters influence on thermoluminescent properties of undoped (TiO_2) and doped (TiO_2:Eu"2"+) nano materials obtained by hybrid precursor systems chemical vapor deposition (HYSYCVD) technique is presented. Synthesis of one dimension nano structures of TiO_2:Eu"2"+ was carried out using K_2TiF_6 and EuCl_2 as dopant at 0.5, 1, 2.5 and 5 wt %. The nano structures samples were irradiated with β-ray in a doses range of 0.083-3000 Gy. All thermoluminescence (Tl) glow curves showed 3 broad Tl peaks around 373, 473 and 573 K, and a dosimetric linear behavior from 0.083 to 300 Gy. The Tl has a good reproducibility, with deviations of around 5%, making these TiO_2:Eu"2"+ nano materials suitable for dosimetric applications. (Author)

  1. Self-organized nano-structuring of CoO islands on Fe(001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, A.; Picone, A.; Giannotti, D.; Riva, M.; Bussetti, G.; Berti, G.; Calloni, A.; Finazzi, M.; Ciccacci, F.; Duò, L.

    2016-01-01

    The realization of nanometer-scale structures through bottom-up strategies can be accomplished by exploiting a buried network of dislocations. We show that, by following appropriate growth steps in ultra-high vacuum molecular beam epitaxy, it is possible to grow nano-structured films of CoO coupled to Fe(001) substrates, with tunable sizes (both the lateral size and the maximum height scale linearly with coverage). The growth mode is discussed in terms of the evolution of surface morphology and chemical interactions as a function of the CoO thickness. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements reveal that square mounds of CoO with lateral dimensions of less than 25 nm and heights below 10 atomic layers are obtained by growing few-nanometers-thick CoO films on a pre-oxidized Fe(001) surface covered by an ultra-thin Co buffer layer. In the early stages of growth, a network of misfit dislocations develops, which works as a template for the CoO nano-structuring. From a chemical point of view, at variance with typical CoO/Fe interfaces, neither Fe segregation at the surface nor Fe oxidation at the buried interface are observed, as seen by Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy, respectively.

  2. Characterization of Ge Nano structures Embedded Inside Porous Silicon for Photonics Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahim, A.F.A.; Hashim, M.R.; Rahim, A.F.A.; Ali, N.K.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we prepared germanium nano structures by means of filling the material inside porous silicon (PS) using conventional and cost effective technique, thermal evaporator. The PS acts as patterned substrate. It was prepared by anodization of silicon wafer in ethanoic hydrofluoric acid (HF). A Ge layer was then deposited onto the PS by thermal evaporation. This was followed by deposition of Si layer by thermal evaporation and anneal at 650 degree Celsius for 30 min. The process was completed by Ni metal deposition using thermal evaporator followed by metal annealing of 400 degree Celsius for 10 min to form metal semiconductor metal (MSM) photodetector. Structural analysis of the samples was performed using energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy (RS). EDX spectrum suggests the presence of Ge inside the pores structure. Raman spectrum showed that good crystalline structure of Ge can be produced inside silicon pores with a phase with the diamond structure by (111), (220) and (400) reflections. Finally current-voltage (I-V) measurement of the MSM photodetector was carried out and showed lower dark currents compared to that of Si control device. Interestingly the device showed enhanced current gain compared to Si device which can be associated with the presence of Ge nano structures in the porous silicon. (author)

  3. Ultrasound-assisted synthesis of nano-structured Zinc(II)-based metal-organic frameworks as precursors for the synthesis of ZnO nano-structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigdeli, Fahime; Ghasempour, Hosein; Azhdari Tehrani, Alireza; Morsali, Ali; Hosseini-Monfared, Hassan

    2017-07-01

    A 3D, porous Zn(II)-based metal-organic framework {[Zn 2 (oba) 2 (4-bpmn)]·(DMF) 1.5 } n (TMU-21), (4-bpmn=N,N'-Bis-pyridin-4-ylmethylene-naphtalene-1,5-diamine, H 2 oba=4,4'-oxybis(benzoic acid)) with nano-rods morphology under ultrasonic irradiation at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure was prepared and characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Sonication time and concentration of initial reagents effects on the size and morphology of nano-structured MOFs were studied. Also {[Zn 2 (oba) 2 (4-bpmn)] (TMU-21) and {[Zn 2 (oba) 2 (4-bpmb)] (TMU-6), 4-bpmb=N,N'-(1,4-phenylene)bis(1-(pyridin-4-yl)methanimine) were easily prepared by mechanochemical synthesis. Nanostructures of Zinc(II) oxide were obtained by calcination of these compounds and their de-solvated analogue as activated MOFs, at 550°C under air atmosphere. As a result of that, different Nanostructures of Zinc(II) oxide were obtained. The ZnO nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and FT-IR spectroscopy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Progress in development of iron base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zackay, V.V.; Parker, E.R.

    1980-01-01

    The ways of development of new iron base high-strength alloys are considered. Perspectiveness of ferritic steel strengthening with intermetallides (TaFe 2 , for instance) is shown. Favourable combination of plasticity, strength and fracture toughness in nickel-free iron-manganese alloys (16-20%) is also pointed out. A strength level of alloyed maraging steels can be achieved by changes in chemical composition and by proper heat treatments of low- and medium-alloyed steels

  5. Contributions from research on irradiated ferritic/martensitic steels to materials science and engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, D. S.

    1990-05-01

    Ferritic and martensitic steels are finding increased application for structural components in several reactor systems. Low-alloy steels have long been used for pressure vessels in light water fission reactors. Martensitic stainless steels are finding increasing usage in liquid metal fast breeder reactors and are being considered for fusion reactor applications when such systems become commercially viable. Recent efforts have evaluated the applicability of oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic steels. Experiments on the effect of irradiation on these steels provide several examples where contributions are being made to materials science and engineering. Examples are given demonstrating improvements in basic understanding, small specimen test procedure development, and alloy development.

  6. Structural coloration of metallic surfaces with micro/nano-structures induced by elliptical vibration texturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Pan, Yayue; Guo, Ping

    2017-04-01

    Creating orderly periodic micro/nano-structures on metallic surfaces, or structural coloration, for control of surface apparent color and optical reflectivity has been an exciting research topic over the years. The direct applications of structural coloration include color marking, display devices, and invisibility cloak. This paper presents an efficient method to colorize metallic surfaces with periodic micro/nano-gratings using elliptical vibration texturing. When the tool vibration is coupled with a constant cutting velocity, controlled periodic ripples can be generated due to the overlapping tool trajectory. These periodic ripples with a wavelength near visible spectrum can act as micro-gratings to introduce iridescent colors. The proposed technique also provides a flexible method for color marking of metallic surfaces with arbitrary patterns and images by precise control of the spacing distance and orientation of induced micro/nano-ripples. Theoretical analysis and experimental results are given to demonstrate structural coloration of metals by a direct mechanical machining technique.

  7. Preparation and Characterization of Nano-structured Ceramic Powders Synthesized by Emulsion Combustion Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takatori, Kazumasa; Tani, Takao; Watanabe, Naoyoshi; Kamiya, Nobuo

    1999-01-01

    The emulsion combustion method (ECM), a novel powder production process, was originally developed to synthesize nano-structured metal-oxide powders. Metal ions in the aqueous droplets were rapidly oxidized by the combustion of the surrounding flammable liquid. The ECM achieved a small reaction field and a short reaction period to fabricate the submicron-sized hollow ceramic particles with extremely thin wall and chemically homogeneous ceramic powder. Alumina, zirconia, zirconia-ceria solid solutions and barium titanate were synthesized by the ECM process. Alumina and zirconia powders were characterized to be metastable in crystalline phase and hollow structure. The wall thickness of alumina was about 10 nm. The zirconia-ceria powders were found to be single-phase solid solutions for a wide composition range. These powders were characterized as equiaxed-shape, submicron-sized chemically homogeneous materials. The powder formation mechanism was investigated through the synthesis of barium titanate powder with different metal sources

  8. Preparation of biomimetic nano-structured films with multi-scale roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelemin, A.; Nikitin, D.; Choukourov, A.; Kylián, O.; Kousal, J.; Khalakhan, I.; Melnichuk, I.; Slavínská, D.; Biederman, H.

    2016-06-01

    Biomimetic nano-structured films are valuable materials in various applications. In this study we introduce a fully vacuum-based approach for fabrication of such films. The method combines deposition of nanoparticles (NPs) by gas aggregation source and deposition of overcoat thin film that fixes the nanoparticles on a surface. This leads to the formation of nanorough surfaces which, depending on the chemical nature of the overcoat, may range from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic. In addition, it is shown that by proper adjustment of the amount of NPs it is possible to tailor adhesive force on superhydrophobic surfaces. Finally, the possibility to produce NPs in a wide range of their size (45-240 nm in this study) makes it possible to produce surfaces not only with single scale roughness, but also with bi-modal or even multi-modal character. Such surfaces were found to be superhydrophobic with negligible water contact angle hysteresis and hence truly slippery.

  9. Density functional theory for field emission from carbon nano-structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhibing

    2015-12-01

    Electron field emission is understood as a quantum mechanical many-body problem in which an electronic quasi-particle of the emitter is converted into an electron in vacuum. Fundamental concepts of field emission, such as the field enhancement factor, work-function, edge barrier and emission current density, will be investigated, using carbon nanotubes and graphene as examples. A multi-scale algorithm basing on density functional theory is introduced. We will argue that such a first principle approach is necessary and appropriate for field emission of nano-structures, not only for a more accurate quantitative description, but, more importantly, for deeper insight into field emission. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A study on hydrogen storage through adsorption in nano-structured carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langohr, D.

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this work is to build and calibrate an experimental set-up for the testing of the materials, to produce some carbon materials in large amounts and characterise them, and finally, to test these materials in their ability to store hydrogen. This will help in establishing a link between the hydrogen storage capacities of the carbons and their nano-structure. The script is divided into four chapters. The first chapter will deal with the literature review on the thematic of hydrogen storage through adsorption in the carbon materials, while the second chapter will present the experimental set-up elaborated in the laboratory. The third chapter explains the processes used to produce the two families of carbon materials and finally, the last chapter presents the structural characterisation of the samples as well as the experimental results of hydrogen storage on the materials elaborated. (author)

  11. Nano-structured noble metal catalysts based on hexametallate architecture for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Todd H.

    2015-09-15

    Nano-structured noble metal catalysts based on hexametallate lattices, of a spinel block type, and which are resistant to carbon deposition and metal sulfide formation are provided. The catalysts are designed for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels to synthesis gas. The hexametallate lattices are doped with noble metals (Au, Pt, Rh, Ru) which are atomically dispersed as isolated sites throughout the lattice and take the place of hexametallate metal ions such as Cr, Ga, In, and/or Nb. Mirror cations in the crystal lattice are selected from alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, and the lanthanide metals, so as to reduce the acidity of the catalyst crystal lattice and enhance the desorption of carbon deposit forming moieties such as aromatics. The catalysts can be used at temperatures as high as 1000.degree. C. and pressures up to 30 atmospheres. A method for producing these catalysts and applications of their use also is provided.

  12. Tailoring the strain in Si nano-structures for defect-free epitaxial Ge over growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaumseil, P; Yamamoto, Y; Schubert, M A; Capellini, G; Skibitzki, O; Zoellner, M H; Schroeder, T

    2015-09-04

    We investigate the structural properties and strain state of Ge nano-structures selectively grown on Si pillars of about 60 nm diameter with different SiGe buffer layers. A matrix of TEOS SiO2 surrounding the Si nano-pillars causes a tensile strain in the top part at the growth temperature of the buffer that reduces the misfit and supports defect-free initial growth. Elastic relaxation plays the dominant role in the further increase of the buffer thickness and subsequent Ge deposition. This method leads to Ge nanostructures on Si that are free from misfit dislocations and other structural defects, which is not the case for direct Ge deposition on these pillar structures. The Ge content of the SiGe buffer is thereby not a critical parameter; it may vary over a relatively wide range.

  13. Nano-structuring of solid surface by extreme ultraviolet Ar8+ laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koláček, Karel; Štraus, Jaroslav; Schmidt, Jiří; Frolov, Oleksandr; Prukner, Václav; Shukurov, A.; Holý, V.; Sobota, Jaroslav; Fořt, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 1 (2012), s. 57-63 ISSN 0263-0346. [International Conference on the Frontiers of Plasma Physics and Technology/5./. Singapore , 18.04.2011-22.04.2011] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08024; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA AV ČR KAN300100702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : Ablation by EUV radiation * application of Ar8+ laser * nano-patterning by EUV radiation * , nano-structuring by EUV radiation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers (UPT-D) Impact factor: 2.016, year: 2012

  14. Vortex configuration and vortex-vortex interaction in nano-structured superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Masaru; Niwa, Yuhei; Suematsu, Hisataka; Ishida, Takekazu

    2012-01-01

    We study the vortex structures and quasi-particle structures in nano-structured superconductors. We used the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation and the finite element method and obtained stable magnetic flux structures and the quasi-particle states. We found the vortex configurations are affected by the interference of the quasi-particle bound states around the vortices. In order to clarify the interference between the quasi-particle wave-functions around two vortices we have developed a numerical method using the elliptic coordinates and the Mathieu functions. We apply this method to two singly quantized vortex state in a conventional s-wave superconductor and a pair of half-quantum vortices in a chiral p-wave superconductor.

  15. The nano-structured battery plays extra time; La batterie nanostructuree joue les prolongations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deroin, Ph.

    2005-06-01

    The Bell Labs of Lucent Technologies and the laboratories of mPhase company (Connecticut, USA) have developed a new architecture of battery cell based on nano-structured material which should lead to a 15 to 20 years lifetime without any significant discharge. In this structure, the electrolyte (zinc and ammonium chlorides) and the electrodes (Zn, MnO{sub 2}) are not in contact as long as the battery is not activated. A fluorocarbon hydrophobic coating (the 'nano-metric grass') ensures the separation between electrolyte and electrodes. This hydrophobic effect can be instantaneously cancelled by an electric pulse which provokes an electro-wetting effect allowing the migration of the electrolyte towards the electrodes. Short paper. (J.S.)

  16. Nano-Structures for Optics and Photonics: Optical Strategies for Enhancing

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, John; Silvestri, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    The contributions in this volume were presented at a NATO Advanced Study Institute held in Erice, Italy, 4-19 July 2013. Many aspects of important research into nanophotonics, plasmonics, semiconductor materials and devices, instrumentation for bio sensing to name just a few, are covered in depth in this volume.  The growing connection between optics and electronics, due to the increasing important role plaid by semiconductor materials and devices, find their expression in the term photonics, which also reflects the importance of the photon aspect of light in the description of the performance of several optical systems. Nano-structures have unique capabilities that allow the enhanced performance of processes of interest in optical and photonic devices. In particular these structures permit the nanoscale manipulation of photons, electrons and atoms; they represent a very hot topic of research and are relevant to many devices and applications. The various subjects bridge over the disciplines of physics, biolo...

  17. Quantum confinement effect in cheese like silicon nano structure fabricated by metal induced etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, Shailendra K., E-mail: phd1211512@iiti.ac.in; Sahu, Gayatri; Sagdeo, Pankaj R.; Kumar, Rajesh [Material Research Laboratory, Discipline of Physics & MSEG, Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Madhya Pradesh-452017 (India)

    2015-08-28

    Quantum confinement effect has been studied in cheese like silicon nano-structures (Ch-SiNS) fabricated by metal induced chemical etching using different etching times. Scanning electron microscopy is used for the morphological study of these Ch-SiNS. A visible photoluminescence (PL) emission is observed from the samples under UV excitation at room temperature due to quantum confinement effect. The average size of Silicon Nanostructures (SiNS) present in the samples has been estimated by bond polarizability model using Raman Spectroscopy from the red-shift observed from SiNSs as compared to its bulk counterpart. The sizes of SiNS present in the samples decreases as etching time increase from 45 to 75 mintunes.

  18. Preparation of biomimetic nano-structured films with multi-scale roughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelemin, A; Nikitin, D; Choukourov, A; Kylián, O; Kousal, J; Khalakhan, I; Melnichuk, I; Slavínská, D; Biederman, H

    2016-01-01

    Biomimetic nano-structured films are valuable materials in various applications. In this study we introduce a fully vacuum-based approach for fabrication of such films. The method combines deposition of nanoparticles (NPs) by gas aggregation source and deposition of overcoat thin film that fixes the nanoparticles on a surface. This leads to the formation of nanorough surfaces which, depending on the chemical nature of the overcoat, may range from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic. In addition, it is shown that by proper adjustment of the amount of NPs it is possible to tailor adhesive force on superhydrophobic surfaces. Finally, the possibility to produce NPs in a wide range of their size (45–240 nm in this study) makes it possible to produce surfaces not only with single scale roughness, but also with bi-modal or even multi-modal character. Such surfaces were found to be superhydrophobic with negligible water contact angle hysteresis and hence truly slippery. (paper)

  19. Nano-structured micropatterns by combination of block copolymer self-assembly and UV photolithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorzolnik, B; Mela, P; Moeller, M

    2006-01-01

    A procedure for the fabrication of nano-structured micropatterns by direct UV photo-patterning of a monolayer of a self-assembled block copolymer/transition metal hybrid structure is described. The method exploits the selective photochemical modification of a self-assembled monolayer of hexagonally ordered block copolymer micelles loaded with a metal precursor salt. Solvent development of the monolayer after irradiation results in the desired pattern of micelles on the surface. Subsequent plasma treatment of the pattern leaves ordered metal nanodots. The presented technique is a simple and low-cost combination of 'top-down' and 'bottom-up' approaches that allows decoration of large areas with periodic and aperiodic patterns of nano-objects, with good control over two different length scales: nano- and micrometres

  20. Microstructural characterization of ODS ferritic steels at different processing stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, E., E-mail: egil@ceit.es; Ordás, N.; García-Rosales, C.; Iturriza, I., E-mail: iiturriza@ceit.es

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • ODS ferritic stainless steel produced by new route without mechanical alloying. • Fully dense ferritic stainless steels containing Y and Ti were obtained by HIPping. • Y and Ti-rich precipitates prevent grain growth during heat treatment up to 1320 °C. • HIPping at 1220 °C dissolves the metastable oxides on PPBs. - Abstract: Nanostructured Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Reduced Activation Ferritic Stainless Steels (ODS RAF) are promising structural materials for fusion reactors, due to their ultrafine microstructure and the presence of a dispersion of Y–Ti–O nanoclusters that provide excellent creep strength at high temperatures (up to 750 °C). The traditional powder metallurgical route to produce these steels is based on Gas Atomization (GA) + Mechanical Alloying (MA) + HIP + ThermoMechanical Treatments (TMTs). Recently, alternative methods have arisen to avoid the MA step. In line with this new approach, ferritic stainless steel powders were produced by gas atomization and HIPped, after adjusting their oxygen, Y and Ti contents to form Y–Ti–O nanoclusters during subsequent heat treatments. The microstructure of as-HIPped steels mainly consists of ferrite grains, Y–Ti precipitates, carbides and oxides on Prior Particle Boundaries (PPBs). Post-HIP heat treatments performed at high temperatures (1270 and 1300 °C) evaluated the feasibility of achieving a complete dissolution of the oxides on PPBs and a precipitation of ultrafine Ti- and Y-rich oxides in the Fe14Cr2W matrix. FEG-SEM with extensive EDS analysis was used to characterize the microstructure of the atomized powders and the ODS-RAF specimens after HIP consolidation and post-HIP heat treatments. A deeper characterization of atomized powder was carried out by TEM.

  1. Synthesis of nano-structured materials by laser-ablation and their application to sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, T.; Suehiro, J.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the synthesis of nano-structured materials of ZnO and Pd by laser ablation and their applications to sensors. The synthesis of ZnO nano-wires was performed by nano-particle assisted deposition (NPAD) where nano-crystals were grown with nano-particles generated by laser-ablating a ZnO sintered target in an Ar background gas. The synthesized ZnO nano-wires were characterized with a scanning electron microscopy and the photoluminescent characteristics were examined under an excitation with the third harmonics of a Nd:YAG laser. The nano-wires with a diameter in the range from 50 to 150 nm and a length of up to 5 μm were taken out of the substrate by laser blow-off technique and/or sonication. It was confirmed that the nano-wires showed the stimulated emission under optical pumping, indicating a high quality of the crystalinity. Pd nano-particles were generated by laser-ablating a Pd plate in pure water. The transmission electron microscope observation revealed that Pd nano-particles with a diameter in the range from 3 nm to several tens of nanometers were produced. Using these nano-structured materials, we successfully fabricated sensors by the dielectrophoresis techniques. In the case of the ultraviolet photosensor, a detection sensitivity of 10 nW/cm 2 was achieved and in the case of hydrogen sensing, the response time of less than 10 s has been demonstrated with Pd nano-particles

  2. Nano-structured Ni(II)-curcumin modified glassy carbon electrode for electrocatalytic oxidation of fructose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elahi, M. Yousef; Mousavi, M.F.; Ghasemi, S.

    2008-01-01

    A nano-structured Ni(II)-curcumin (curcumin: 1,7-bis[4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl]-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione) film is electrodeposited on a glassy carbon electrode in alkaline solution. The morphology of polyNi(II)-curcumin (NC) was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM results show NC has a nano-globular structure in the range 20-50 nm. Using cyclic voltammetry, linear sweep voltammetry, chronoamperometry, steady-state polarization measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) showed that the nano-structure NC film acts as an efficient material for the electrocatalytic oxidation of fructose. According to the voltammetric studies, the increase in the anodic peak current and subsequent decrease in the corresponding cathodic current, fructose was oxidized on the electrode surface via an electrocatalytic mechanism. The EIS results show that the charge-transfer resistance has as a function of fructose concentration, time interval and applied potential. The increase in the fructose concentration and time interval in fructose solution results in enhanced charge transfer resistance in Nyquist plots. The EIS results indicate that fructose electrooxidation at various potentials shows different impedance behaviors. At lower potentials, a semicircle is observed in the first quadrant of impedance plot. With further increase of the potential, a transition of the semicircle from the first to the second quadrant occurs. Also, the results obtained show that the rate of fructose electrooxidation depends on concentration of OH - . Electron transfer coefficient, diffusion coefficient and rate constant of the electrocatalytic oxidation reaction are obtained. The modified electrode was used as a sensor for determination of fructose with a good dynamic range and a low detection limit

  3. Self-organized nano-structuring of CoO islands on Fe(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, A.; Picone, A.; Giannotti, D.; Riva, M.; Bussetti, G.; Berti, G.; Calloni, A.; Finazzi, M.; Ciccacci, F.; Duò, L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • CoO grown on the Co(001)-p(1 × 1)O surface of a 5 ML thick Co layer on Fe(001). • The growth process does not induce Fe cation migration and/or oxidation. • A misfit dislocation network develops in the very early stages of CoO growth. • Such a network acts as a template for a three-dimensional CoO nanostructuration. • The dimensions of CoO wedding-cake square mounds scale linearly with thickness. - Abstract: The realization of nanometer-scale structures through bottom-up strategies can be accomplished by exploiting a buried network of dislocations. We show that, by following appropriate growth steps in ultra-high vacuum molecular beam epitaxy, it is possible to grow nano-structured films of CoO coupled to Fe(001) substrates, with tunable sizes (both the lateral size and the maximum height scale linearly with coverage). The growth mode is discussed in terms of the evolution of surface morphology and chemical interactions as a function of the CoO thickness. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements reveal that square mounds of CoO with lateral dimensions of less than 25 nm and heights below 10 atomic layers are obtained by growing few-nanometers-thick CoO films on a pre-oxidized Fe(001) surface covered by an ultra-thin Co buffer layer. In the early stages of growth, a network of misfit dislocations develops, which works as a template for the CoO nano-structuring. From a chemical point of view, at variance with typical CoO/Fe interfaces, neither Fe segregation at the surface nor Fe oxidation at the buried interface are observed, as seen by Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy, respectively.

  4. Synthesis, characterization and nano-structuration of poly-thiophene derivatives for organic photovoltaic solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berson, S.

    2007-10-01

    This work is devoted to the synthesis of poly-thiophene derivatives with low bandgap and preserving high oxidation potential. Disubstituted thiophenes and 'Donor-Acceptor' bi-thiophenes were synthesized and then polymerized. The side chains of these polymers, donor or acceptor, were modified in order to tune the properties of material as well from the optical point of view as electrochemical. These polymers were also tested in blend with PCBM in bulk-heterojunction photovoltaic cells. Voc delivered by the devices showed a linear dependence according to the potential of oxidation of the polymers. Copolymers containing cyano-thiophene and alkyl- or alkoxy-thiophene showed values of 0.8 V. However, in spite of power conversion efficiency of 1 %, these performances remain lower than the one obtained with the P3HT. Optimizations in terms of morphology are certainly necessary. Indeed, the morphology of the active layer plays a key role in obtaining high power conversion efficiency. An original technique of nano-structuration of the polymer on a nano-metric scale was developed during this work, leading to the development of fibrillar P3HT. These nano-structures, presenting an important degree of order, are formed spontaneously in solution. Their rate compared to amorphous material is perfectly controllable and adjustable in solution and in solid state. Measurements of mobilities show a strong improvement of the transport of load within these fibrillar layers compared to a traditional film of P3HT obtained without annealing. Power conversion efficiencies of 3.6% on glass and 3.3 % on plastic were reached without annealing. (author)

  5. Synthesis, characterization and nano-structuration of poly-thiophene derivatives for organic photovoltaic solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berson, S.

    2007-10-01

    This work is devoted to the synthesis of poly-thiophene derivatives with low bandgap and preserving high oxidation potential. Di-substituted thiophenes and 'Donor-Acceptor' bi-thiophenes were synthesized and then polymerized. The side chains of these polymers, donor or acceptor, were modified in order to tune the properties of material as well from the optical point of view as electrochemical. These polymers were also tested in blend with PCBM in bulk-heterojunction photovoltaic cells. Voc delivered by the devices showed a linear dependence according to the potential of oxidation of the polymers. Copolymers containing cyano-thiophene and alkyl- or alkoxy-thiophene showed values of 0.8 V. However, in spite of power conversion efficiency of 1 %, these performances remain lower than the one obtained with the P3HT. Optimizations in terms of morphology are certainly necessary. Indeed, the morphology of the active layer plays a key role in obtaining high power conversion efficiency. An original technique of nano-structuration of the polymer on a nano-metric scale was developed during this work, leading to the development of fibrillary P3HT. These nano-structures, presenting an important degree of order, are formed spontaneously in solution. Their rate compared to amorphous material is perfectly controllable and adjustable in solution and in solid state. Measurements of mobilities show a strong improvement of the transport of load within these fibrillary layers compared to a traditional film of P3HT obtained without annealing. Power conversion efficiencies of 3.6 % on glass and 3.3 % on plastic were reached without annealing. (author)

  6. C-Curves for Lengthening of Widmanstätten and Bainitic Ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jiaqing; Leach, Lindsay; Hillert, Mats; Borgenstam, Annika

    2017-09-01

    Widmanstätten ferrite and bainitic ferrite are both acicular and their lengthening rate in binary Fe-C alloys and low-alloyed steels under isothermal conditions is studied by searching the literature and through new measurements. As a function of temperature, the lengthening rate can be represented by a common curve for both kinds of acicular ferrite in contrast to the separate C-curves often presented in time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagrams. The curves for Fe-C alloys with low carbon content show no obvious decrease in rate at low temperatures down to 623 K (350 °C). For alloys with higher carbon content, the expected decrease of rate as a function of temperature below a nose was observed. An attempt to explain the absence of a nose for low carbon contents by an increasing deviation from local equilibrium at high growth rates is presented. This explanation is based on a simple kinetic model, which predicts that the growth rates for Fe-C alloys with less than 0.3 mass pct carbon are high enough at low temperatures to make the carbon pileup, in front of the advancing tip of a ferrite plate, shrink below atomic dimensions, starting at about 600 K (323 °C).

  7. Development of high performance ODS alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Lin [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Gao, Fei [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Garner, Frank [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2018-01-29

    This project aims to capitalize on insights developed from recent high-dose self-ion irradiation experiments in order to develop and test the next generation of optimized ODS alloys needed to meet the nuclear community's need for high strength, radiation-tolerant cladding and core components, especially with enhanced resistance to void swelling. Two of these insights are that ferrite grains swell earlier than tempered martensite grains, and oxide dispersions currently produced only in ferrite grains require a high level of uniformity and stability to be successful. An additional insight is that ODS particle stability is dependent on as-yet unidentified compositional combinations of dispersoid and alloy matrix, such as dispersoids are stable in MA957 to doses greater than 200 dpa but dissolve in MA956 at doses less than 200 dpa. These findings focus attention on candidate next-generation alloys which address these concerns. Collaboration with two Japanese groups provides this project with two sets of first-round candidate alloys that have already undergone extensive development and testing for unirradiated properties, but have not yet been evaluated for their irradiation performance. The first set of candidate alloys are dual phase (ferrite + martensite) ODS alloys with oxide particles uniformly distributed in both ferrite and martensite phases. The second set of candidate alloys are ODS alloys containing non-standard dispersoid compositions with controllable oxide particle sizes, phases and interfaces.

  8. A correlative approach to segmenting phases and ferrite morphologies in transformation-induced plasticity steel using electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazder, Azdiar A., E-mail: azdiar@uow.edu.au [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Al-Harbi, Fayez; Spanke, Hendrik Th. [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Mitchell, David R.G. [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Pereloma, Elena V. [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    Using a combination of electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data, a segmentation procedure was developed to comprehensively distinguish austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite, ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths in a thermo-mechanically processed low-Si, high-Al transformation-induced plasticity steel. The efficacy of the ferrite morphologies segmentation procedure was verified by transmission electron microscopy. The variation in carbon content between the ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths was explained on the basis of carbon partitioning during their growth. - Highlights: • Multi-condition segmentation of austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite and ferrite in bainite. • Ferrites in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite segmented by variation in relative carbon counts. • Carbon partitioning during growth explains variation in carbon content of ferrites in bainites. • Developed EBSD image processing tools can be applied to the microstructures of a variety of alloys. • EBSD-based segmentation procedure verified by correlative TEM results.

  9. Formation of oxides particles in ferritic steel by using gas-atomized powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yong; Fang Jinghua; Liu Donghua; Lu Zhi; Liu Feng; Chen Shiqi; Liu, C.T.

    2010-01-01

    Oxides dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel was prepared by using gas-atomized pre-alloyed powder, without the conventional mechanical alloying process. By adjusting the volume content of O 2 in the gas atmosphere Ar, the O level in the ferritic powder can be well controlled. The O dissolves uniformly in the ferritic powder, and a very thin layer of oxides forms on the powder surface. After hot deformation, the primary particle boundaries, which retain after sintering, can be disintegrated and near fully dense materials can be obtained. The oxide layer on the powder surface has a significant effect on the microstructural evolution. It may prevent the diffusion in between the primary particles during sintering, and may dissolve and/or induce the nucleation of new oxides in the ferritic matrix during recrystallization. Two kinds of oxide particles are found in the ferritic steel: large (∼100 nm) Ti-rich and fine (10-20 nm) Y-Ti-rich oxides. The hardness of the ferritic steel increases with increasing annealing temperatures, however, decreases at 1400 deg. C, due to the coarsening of precipitates and the recrystallization microstructure.

  10. Simple Magnetic Device Indicates Thickness Of Alloy 903

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Pin Jeng; Rodriguez, Sergio; Bright, Mark L.

    1995-01-01

    Handheld device called "ferrite indicator" orginally designed for use in determining ferrite content of specimen of steel. Placed in contact with specimen and functions by indicating whether magnet attracted more strongly to specimen or to calibrated reference sample. Relative strength of attraction shows whether alloy overlay thinner than allowable.

  11. Creep lifetime assessements of ferritic pipeline welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainsworth, R.A.; Goodall, I.W.; Miller, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    The low alloy ferritic steam pipework in Advanced Gas Cooled reactor (AGR) power stations operates at temperatures in the creep range. An inspection strategy for continued operation of the pipework has been developed based on estimation of the creep rupture life of pipework weldments and fracture mechanics for demonstrating acceptance of defects. This strategy is described in outline. The estimation of creep rupture life is described in more detail. Validation for the approach is illustrated by comparison with pressure vessel tests and with metallographic examination of components removed from service. The fracture mechanics methods are also described. It is shown that the amount of creep crack growth is dependent on the life fraction at which the assessment is made; crack growth being rapid as the creep rupture life is approached. (author). 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  12. Polarization and fluence effects in femtosecond laser induced micro/nano structures on stainless steel with antireflection property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Caizhen; Ye, Yayun; Jia, Baoshen; Li, Yuan; Ding, Renjie; Jiang, Yong; Wang, Yuxin; Yuan, Xiaodong

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, micro/nano structures on stainless steel were prepared in single spot irradiation mode and scan mode by using femtosecond laser technique. The influence of polarization and fluence on the formation of micro/nano structures were explored. Surface morphology, microstructure, roughness and composition of prepared samples were characterized. The antireflection property and wettability of laser treated samples were also tested and compared with that of original stainless steel.Results showed that the laser-induced spot consists of two distinct regions due to the Gaussian beam profile: a core region of moth-eye-like structure and a peripheral region of nanoparticles-covered laser-induced periodic surface structure (NC-LIPSS). The proportion of the core region and dimension of micro/nano structure increase with increasing laser fluence. Polarization can be used to tune the direction of NC-LIPSS. Atomic ratios of Cr and Mn increase and atomic ratio of Ni decreases after laser irradiation. Oxygen is not detected on laser irradiated samples, indicating that oxidation reactions are not significant during the interaction process between femtosecond laser and 304 stainless steel. These are good for the application of stainless steel as its physical properties would not change or even enhanced. The overlaps between two laser scan lines significantly influence the surface roughness and should be controlled carefully during the preparation process. The laser irradiated surface has a better antireflection property in comparison with that of original stainless steel, which may due to the scattering and absorption of micro/nano structures. Contact angle of micro/nano structured stainless steel decreases with the increase of laser fluence. The hydrophilic property can be explained by Wenzel's model. The interference between the surface plasmon wave and the incident light wave leads to the formation of NC-LIPSS.

  13. Pool boiling of water on nano-structured micro wires at sub-atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Mahendra; Khandekar, Sameer; Pratap, Dheeraj; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2016-09-01

    Past decades have seen active research in enhancement of boiling heat transfer by surface modifications. Favorable surface modifications are expected to enhance boiling efficiency. Several interrelated mechanisms such as capillarity, surface energy alteration, wettability, cavity geometry, wetting transitions, geometrical features of surface morphology, etc., are responsible for change in the boiling behavior of modified surfaces. Not much work is available on pool boiling at low pressures on microscale/nanoscale geometries; low pressure boiling is attractive in many applications wherein low operating temperatures are desired for a particular working fluid. In this background, an experimental setup was designed and developed to investigate the pool boiling performance of water on (a) plain aluminum micro wire (99.999 % pure) and, (b) nano-porous alumina structured aluminum micro wire, both having diameter of 250 µm, under sub-atmospheric pressure. Nano-structuring on the plain wire surface was achieved via anodization. Two samples, A and B of anodized wires, differing by the degree of anodization were tested. The heater length scale (wire diameter) was much smaller than the capillary length scale. Pool boiling characteristics of water were investigated at three different sub-atmospheric pressures of 73, 123 and 199 mbar (corresponding to T sat = 40, 50 and 60 °C). First, the boiling characteristics of plain wire were measured. It was noticed that at sub-atmospheric pressures, boiling heat transfer performance for plain wire was quite low due to the increased bubble sizes and low nucleation site density. Subsequently, boiling performance of nano-structured wires (both Sample A and Sample B) was compared with plain wire and it was noted that boiling heat transfer for the former was considerably enhanced as compared to the plain wire. This enhancement is attributed to increased nucleation site density, change in wettability and possibly due to enhanced pore scale

  14. Investigation of nano-structured Zirconium oxide film on Ti6Al4V substrate to improve tribological properties prepared by PIII&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, Sehrish [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Ahmad, R., E-mail: ahriaz@gcu.edu.pk [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics (CASP), Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Ayub, R. [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics (CASP), Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Ikhlaq, Uzma [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Jin, Weihong; Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • ZrO{sub 2} film was deposited on Ti6Al4V alloy using the plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition at various bias voltage. • The deposited film was characterized by XPS, AFM, Ellipometry, Nano-indentation and Pin-on disk machine. • A dense zirconium oxide film with the maximum thickness 108 nm was formed at maximum applied voltage. • The hardness and wear resistance of film is much higher as compared to the substrate. - Abstract: Plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII&D) is the most attractive and efficient technique used in the medical field to tailor materials for biomedical applications. In the present study zirconium oxide nano-structured thin films were deposited on surface of Ti6Al4V alloy for bias voltages of 15, 20 and 25 kV. The chemical composition, surface roughness and thickness of deposited films were characterized by the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscope (AFM) and ellipsometry respectively. The XPS results confirm the formation of a dense zirconium oxide film of the treated specimens. AFM results exhibit a smooth film with maximum roughness of about 8.4 nm is formed. The thickness of the film is increased with the increase in bias voltages and is maximum at 25 kV. The effect of bias voltages on wear characteristics was further investigated by pin-on-disk test. It is observed that the friction coefficient is reduced, whereas wear resistance is enhanced and it is found to be maximum at 25 kV compared to the other bias voltages. Nanohardness is improved up to twice compared to untreated specimen at the maximum bias voltage. Therefore, it is concluded that deposition of zirconium oxide using the PIII&D is produced a dense layer on the substrate surface, which can be used as a promising candidate for the improved tribological properties of Ti6Al4V.

  15. The fabrication and hydrophobic property of micro-nano patterned surface on magnesium alloy using combined sparking sculpture and etching route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yunfeng; Wang, Yaming; Liu, Hao; Liu, Yan; Guo, Lixin; Jia, Dechang; Ouyang, Jiahu; Zhou, Yu

    2016-12-01

    Magnesium alloy with micro-nano structure roughness surface, can serve as the loading reservoirs of medicine capsule and industrial lubricating oil, or mimic 'lotus leaf' hydrophobic surface, having the potential applications in medical implants, automobile, aerospace and electronic products, etc. Herein, we propose a novel strategy to design a micro-nano structure roughness surface on magnesium alloy using combined microarc sparking sculpture and etching in CrO3 aqueous solution. A hydrophobic surface (as an applied example) was further fabricated by chemical decorating on the obtained patterned magnesium alloy surface to enhance the corrosion resistance. The results show that the combined micro-nano structure of 7-9 μm diameter big pores insetting with nano-scale fine pores was duplicated after etched the sparking sculptured 'over growth' oxide regions towards the magnesium substrate. The micro-nano structure surface was chemically decorated using AgNO3 and stearic acid, which enables the contact angle increased from 60° to 146.8°. The increasing contact angle is mainly attributed to the micro-nano structure and the chemical composition. The hydrophobic surface of magnesium alloy improved the corrosion potential from -1.521 V of the bare magnesium to -1.274 V. Generally, the sparking sculpture and then etching route demonstrates a low-cost, high-efficacy method to fabricate a micro-nano structure hydrophobic surface on magnesium alloy. Furthermore, our research on the creating of micro-nano structure roughness surface and the hydrophobic treatment can be easily extended to the other metal materials.

  16. The Origin of Acicular Ferrite in Gas Metal Arc and Submerged ARC Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Ratio vs Acicular Ferrite 45 Figure 2.10 Crack Propagati6n Schematic . . ........... 46 Figure 2.11 CCT Diagram ... .......... ............ 47 Figure 3.1...10𔃾 TIME (S) Figure 2. 11 Continuous cooling transformation ( CCT ) diagram showing the effects of alloying elements, inclusion formers and cooling rate

  17. High purity ferritic Cr-Mo stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoth, J.

    1977-01-01

    In five years, E-BRITE 26-1 ferritic stainless steel has won an important place in the spectrum of materials suitable for use in chemical process equipment. It provides, in stainless steel, performance-capability characteristics comparable to more expensive alloys. It has demonstrated cost-effectiveness in equipment used for caustic, nitric-urea, organic chemicals, pulping liquors, refinery streams, and elsewhere. User confidence in the reliability and integrity of Grade XM 27 has increased to the point where large critical systems are now routinely specified in the alloy. The market acceptance of this material has attracted attempts to produce substitute versions of the alloy. Imitation, should be viewed with caution. Stabilized 26-IS must be examined over a lengthy period of time to determine if its own corrosion resistance, ductility, fabricability and reproducibility properties could ever be likened to those of E-BRITE 26-1. (orig.) [de

  18. Nano-structured silica coated mesoporous carbon micro-granules for potential application in water filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Avik; Sen, D.; Mazumder, S.; Ghosh, A. K.

    2017-05-01

    A novel nano-composite spherical micro-granule has been synthesized using a facile technique of solvent evaporation induced assembly of nanoparticles for potential application in water filtration. The spherical micro-granule is comprised of nano-structured shell of hydrophilic silica encapsulating a hydrophobic mesoporous carbon at the core. Hierarchical structure of such core-shell micro-granules has been rigorously characterized using small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering techniques and complemented with scanning electron microscopy. The hydrophilic silica envelope around the carbon core helps in incorporation of such granules into the hydrophilic polymeric ultra-filtration membrane. The interstitial micro-pores present in the silica shell can serve as water transport channels and the mesoporus carbon core enhances the separation performance due its well adsorption characteristics. It has been found that the incorporation of such granules inside the ultra-filtration membrane indeed enhances the water permeability as well as the separation performance in a significant way.

  19. Development of a hard nano-structured multi-component ceramic coating by laser cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masanta, Manoj; Ganesh, P.; Kaul, Rakesh; Nath, A.K.; Roy Choudhury, A.

    2009-01-01

    The present paper reports laser-assisted synthesis of a multi-component ceramic composite coating consisting of aluminum oxide, titanium di-boride and titanium carbide (Al 2 O 3 -TiB 2 -TiC). A pre-placed powder mixture of aluminum (Al), titanium oxide (TiO 2 ) and boron carbide (B 4 C) was made to undergo self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) by laser triggering. Laser subsequently effected cladding of the products of SHS on the substrate. The effect of laser scanning speed on the hardness, microstructure and phase composition of the composite coating was investigated. The coating exhibited an increase in hardness and a decrease in grain size with increase in laser scanning speed. A maximum micro-hardness of 2500 HV 0.025 was obtained. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of the top surface of the coating revealed the presence of aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ), titanium di-boride (TiB 2 ) and titanium carbide (TiC) along with some non-stoichiometric products of the Ti-Al-B-C-O system. Field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) analysis revealed some nano-structured TiB 2 and Al 2 O 3 , which are discussed in detail.

  20. Annealing temperature dependent reversible wettability switching of micro/nano structured ZnO superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velayi, Elmira; Norouzbeigi, Reza

    2018-05-01

    Superhydrophobic ZnO surfaces with reversibly tunable wettability were fabricated on stainless steel meshes via a facile chemical bath deposition method just by regulating the micro/nano structured ZnO needles without using chemical post modifications. The obtained surfaces can be easily and reversibly switched between superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic/underwater superoleophobic characteristics by altering the annealing temperatures. As-prepared sample exhibited long-term superhydrophobic properties with a water contact angle (WCA) of 163.8° ± 1.8° and contact angle hysteresis (CAH) of 1.1° ± 0.8°. The SEM, XRD, XPS and Raman analyses were employed to characterize the morphological features and surface chemistry of the prepared samples. SEM images showed the formation of ZnO micro/nanoneedles with a diameter of ∼90 nm on the substrate. The superhydrophobic ZnO surface was switched to highly hydrophilic and underwater superoleophobic properties with an oil contact angle (OCA) of about 172.5° after being annealed at 400 °C in air for 30 min and restored to superhydrophobic state again by altering the annealing temperature to 150 °C. Mechanical durability of the ZnO superhydrophobic surface was tested by an abrasion test. Results confirmed that the prepared surface exhibited an excellent robustness after 20 abrasion cycles under the pressure of 4.7 kPa.

  1. Fabrication of superhydrophobic polyurethane/organoclay nano-structured composites from cyclomethicone-in-water emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, I.S.; Steele, A.; Martorana, P.J.; Loth, E.

    2010-01-01

    Nano-structured polyurethane/organoclay composite films were fabricated by dispersing moisture-curable polyurethanes and fatty amine/amino-silane surface modified montmorillonite clay (organoclay) in cyclomethicone-in-water emulsions. Cyclomethicone Pickering emulsions were made by emulsifying decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D 5 ), dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D 6 ) and aminofunctional siloxane polymers with water using montmorillonite particles as emulsion stabilizers. Polyurethane and organoclay dispersed emulsions were spray coated on aluminum surfaces. Upon thermosetting, water repellent self-cleaning coatings were obtained with measured static water contact angles exceeding 155 o and low contact angle hysteresis ( o ). Electron microscopy images of the coating surfaces revealed formation of self-similar hierarchical micro- and nano-scale surface structures. The surface morphology and the coating adhesion strength to aluminum substrates were found to be sensitive to the relative amounts of dispersed polyurethane and organoclay in the emulsions. The degree of superhydrophobicity was analyzed using static water contact angles as well as contact angle hysteresis measurements. Due to biocompatibility of cyclomethicones and polyurethane, developed coatings can be considered for specific bio-medical applications.

  2. Fabrication of superhydrophobic polyurethane/organoclay nano-structured composites from cyclomethicone-in-water emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayer, I.S., E-mail: ibayer1@illinois.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Steele, A.; Martorana, P.J. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Loth, E. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Virginia, VA 22904 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Nano-structured polyurethane/organoclay composite films were fabricated by dispersing moisture-curable polyurethanes and fatty amine/amino-silane surface modified montmorillonite clay (organoclay) in cyclomethicone-in-water emulsions. Cyclomethicone Pickering emulsions were made by emulsifying decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D{sub 5}), dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D{sub 6}) and aminofunctional siloxane polymers with water using montmorillonite particles as emulsion stabilizers. Polyurethane and organoclay dispersed emulsions were spray coated on aluminum surfaces. Upon thermosetting, water repellent self-cleaning coatings were obtained with measured static water contact angles exceeding 155{sup o} and low contact angle hysteresis (<8{sup o}). Electron microscopy images of the coating surfaces revealed formation of self-similar hierarchical micro- and nano-scale surface structures. The surface morphology and the coating adhesion strength to aluminum substrates were found to be sensitive to the relative amounts of dispersed polyurethane and organoclay in the emulsions. The degree of superhydrophobicity was analyzed using static water contact angles as well as contact angle hysteresis measurements. Due to biocompatibility of cyclomethicones and polyurethane, developed coatings can be considered for specific bio-medical applications.

  3. Optimization of process parameters for spark plasma sintering of nano structured SAF 2205 composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Ranti Oke

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This research optimized spark plasma sintering (SPS process parameters in terms of sintering temperature, holding time and heating rate for the development of a nano-structured duplex stainless steel (SAF 2205 grade reinforced with titanium nitride (TiN. The mixed powders were sintered using an automated spark plasma sintering machine (model HHPD-25, FCT GmbH, Germany. Characterization was performed using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Density and hardness of the composites were investigated. The XRD result showed the formation of FeN0.068. SEM/EDS revealed the presence of nano ranged particles of TiN segregated at the grain boundaries of the duplex matrix. A decrease in hardness and densification was observed when sintering temperature and heating rate were 1200 °C and 150 °C/min respectively. The optimum properties were obtained in composites sintered at 1150 °C for 15 min and 100 °C/min. The composite grades irrespective of the process parameters exhibited similar shrinkage behavior, which is characterized by three distinctive peaks, which is an indication of good densification phenomena. Keywords: Spark plasma sintering, Duplex stainless steel (SAF 2205, Titanium nitride (TiN, Microstructure, Density, Hardness

  4. Natural nano-structures on insects - possible functions of ordered arrays characterized by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, G.S.; Watson, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Naturally occurring nano-structures is a much-neglected, but potentially rich, source of products that meet specifications imposed by natural selection. While the pharmaceutical industry has long recognized the value of natural compounds, the emerging industries based on nanotechnology have so far made little use of 'free' technology that has been 'invented' over evolutionary time-scales and driven by the imperatives of species survival. Ordered hexagonal packed array structures on cicada (e.g., Pflatoda claripennis) and termite (e.g., family Rhinotermitidae) wings have been investigated in this study. The spacings range from 200 to 1000 nm. The structures tend to have a rounded shape at the apex and protrude some 150-350 nm out from the surface plane. Wing structures with spacings at the lower end of the range are most likely optimized to serve as an anti-reflective coating (natural 'stealth technology') but may also act as a self-cleaning coating (the Lotus effect). Structures with spacings at the upper end of the range may provide mechanical strength to prevent load failure under flight and/or aid in the aerodynamic efficiency of the insect. This study demonstrates the multi-purpose design of natural structures

  5. Development of a hard nano-structured multi-component ceramic coating by laser cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masanta, Manoj [Department of Mechanical Engineering, IIT Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India); Ganesh, P.; Kaul, Rakesh [Laser Material Processing Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore (India); Nath, A.K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, IIT Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India); Roy Choudhury, A., E-mail: roychoudhuryasimava@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, IIT Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India)

    2009-05-20

    The present paper reports laser-assisted synthesis of a multi-component ceramic composite coating consisting of aluminum oxide, titanium di-boride and titanium carbide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiB{sub 2}-TiC). A pre-placed powder mixture of aluminum (Al), titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) and boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) was made to undergo self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) by laser triggering. Laser subsequently effected cladding of the products of SHS on the substrate. The effect of laser scanning speed on the hardness, microstructure and phase composition of the composite coating was investigated. The coating exhibited an increase in hardness and a decrease in grain size with increase in laser scanning speed. A maximum micro-hardness of 2500 HV{sub 0.025} was obtained. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of the top surface of the coating revealed the presence of aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), titanium di-boride (TiB{sub 2}) and titanium carbide (TiC) along with some non-stoichiometric products of the Ti-Al-B-C-O system. Field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) analysis revealed some nano-structured TiB{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which are discussed in detail.

  6. Correlation between reflectance and photoluminescent properties of al-rich ZnO nano-structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Firoz; Baek, Seong-Ho; Ahmad, Nafis; Lee, Gun Hee; Seo, Tae Hoon; Suh, Eun-kyung; Kim, Jae Hyun

    2015-05-01

    Al rich zinc oxide nano-structured films were synthesized using spin coating sol-gel technique. The films were annealed in oxygen ambient in the temperature range of 200-700 °C. The structural, optical, and photoluminescence (PL) properties of the films were studied at various annealing temperatures using X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, photoluminescence emission spectra measurement, and Raman and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The optical band gap was found to decrease with the increase of the annealing temperature following the Gauss Amp function due to the confinement of the exciton. The PL peak intensity in the near band region (INBE) was found to increase with the increase of the annealing temperature up to 600 °C, then to decrease fast to a lower value for the annealing temperature of 700 °C due to crystalline quality. The Raman peak of E2 (low) was red shifted from 118 cm-1 to 126 cm-1 with the increase of the annealing temperature. The intensity of the second order phonon (TA+LO) at 674 cm-1 was found to decrease with the increase of the annealing temperature. The normalized values of the reflectance and the PL intensity in the NBE region were highest for the annealing temperature of 600 °C. A special correlation was found between the reflectance at λ = 1000 nm and the normalized PL intensity in the green region due to scattering due to presence of grains.

  7. Bright-field Nanoscopy: Visualizing Nano-structures with Localized Optical Contrast Using a Conventional Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suran, Swathi; Bharadwaj, Krishna; Raghavan, Srinivasan; Varma, Manoj M

    2016-04-26

    Most methods for optical visualization beyond the diffraction limit rely on fluorescence emission by molecular tags. Here, we report a method for visualization of nanostructures down to a few nanometers using a conventional bright-field microscope without requiring additional molecular tags such as fluorophores. The technique, Bright-field Nanoscopy, is based on the strong thickness dependent color of ultra-thin germanium on an optically thick gold film. We demonstrate the visualization of grain boundaries in chemical vapour deposited single layer graphene and the detection of single 40 nm Ag nanoparticles. We estimate a size detection limit of about 2 nm using this technique. In addition to visualizing nano-structures, this technique can be used to probe fluid phenomena at the nanoscale, such as transport through 2D membranes. We estimated the water transport rate through a 1 nm thick polymer film using this technique, as an illustration. Further, the technique can also be extended to study the transport of specific ions in the solution. It is anticipated that this technique will find use in applications ranging from single-nanoparticles resolved sensing to studying nanoscale fluid-solid interface phenomena.

  8. Effects of confinement in meso-porous silica and carbon nano-structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, V.

    2006-07-01

    Physico-chemical properties of materials can be strongly modified by confinement because of the quantum effects that appear at such small length scales and also because of the effects of the confinement itself. The aim of this thesis is to show that both the nature of the confining material and the size of the pores and cavities have a strong impact on the confined material. We first show the effect of the pore size of the host meso-porous silica on the temperature of the solid-solid phase transition of silver selenide, a semiconducting material with enhanced magnetoresistive properties under non-stoichiometric conditions. Narrowing the pores from 20 nm to 2 nm raises the phase transition temperature from 139 C to 146 C. This result can be explained by considering the interaction between the confining and confined materials as a driving force. The effects of confinement are also studied in the case of hydrogen and deuterium inside cavities of organized carbon nano-structures. The effects that appear in the adsorption/desorption cycles are much stronger with carbon nano-horns as the host material than with C60 pea-pods and single-walled carbon nano-tubes. (author)

  9. Gaussian process based intelligent sampling for measuring nano-structure surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L. J.; Ren, M. J.; Yin, Y. H.

    2016-09-01

    Nanotechnology is the science and engineering that manipulate matters at nano scale, which can be used to create many new materials and devices with a vast range of applications. As the nanotech product increasingly enters the commercial marketplace, nanometrology becomes a stringent and enabling technology for the manipulation and the quality control of the nanotechnology. However, many measuring instruments, for instance scanning probe microscopy, are limited to relatively small area of hundreds of micrometers with very low efficiency. Therefore some intelligent sampling strategies should be required to improve the scanning efficiency for measuring large area. This paper presents a Gaussian process based intelligent sampling method to address this problem. The method makes use of Gaussian process based Bayesian regression as a mathematical foundation to represent the surface geometry, and the posterior estimation of Gaussian process is computed by combining the prior probability distribution with the maximum likelihood function. Then each sampling point is adaptively selected by determining the position which is the most likely outside of the required tolerance zone among the candidates and then inserted to update the model iteratively. Both simulationson the nominal surface and manufactured surface have been conducted on nano-structure surfaces to verify the validity of the proposed method. The results imply that the proposed method significantly improves the measurement efficiency in measuring large area structured surfaces.

  10. Nano-structural characteristics and optical properties of silver chiral nano-flower sculptured thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savaloni, Hadi; Haydari-Nasab, Fatemh; Malmir, Mariam

    2011-01-01

    Silver chiral nano-flowers with 3-, 4- and 5-fold symmetry were produced using oblique angle deposition method in conjunction with the rotation of sample holder with different speeds at different sectors of each revolution corresponding to symmetry order of the acquired nano-flower. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), were employed to obtain morphology and nano-structure of the films. Optical characteristics of silver chiral nano-flower thin films were obtained using single beam spectrophotometer with both s- and p-polarization incident light at 30 o and 70 o incidence angles and at different azimuthal angles (φ). Optical spectra showed both TM (TDM (transverse dipole mode) and TQM (transverse quadruple mode)) and LM (longitudinal mode) Plasmon resonance peaks. For 3- and 4-fold symmetry chiral nano-flowers the s-polarization extinction spectra obtained at different azimuthal angles did not show significant change in the Plasmon peak position while 5-fold symmetry chiral nano-flower showed a completely different behavior, which may be the result of increased surface anisotropy, so when the φ angle is changed the s-polarization response from the surface can change more significantly than that for lower symmetries. In general, for 3-, 4- and 5-fold symmetry chiral nano-flowers a sharp peak at lower wavelengths ( o incidence angle.

  11. Simulation and Measurement of Neuroelectrodes' Characteristics with Integrated High Aspect Ratio Nano Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Nick

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Improving the interface between electrodes and neurons has been the focus of research for the last decade. Neuroelectrodes should show small geometrical surface area and low impedance for measuring and high charge injection capacities for stimulation. Increasing the electrochemically active surface area by using nanoporous electrode material or by integrating nanostructures onto planar electrodes is a common approach to improve this interface. In this paper a simulation approach for neuro electrodes' characteristics with integrated high aspect ratio nano structures based on a point-contact-model is presented. The results are compared with experimental findings conducted with real nanostructured microelectrodes. In particular, effects of carbon nanotubes and gold nanowires integrated onto microelectrodes are described. Simulated and measured impedance properties are presented and its effects onto the transfer function between the neural membrane potential and the amplifier output signal are studied based on the point-contact-model. Simulations show, in good agreement with experimental results, that electrode impedances can be dramatically reduced by the integration of high aspect ratio nanostructures such as gold nanowires and carbon nanotubes. This lowers thermal noise and improves the signal-to-noise ratio for measuring electrodes. It also may increase the adhesion of cells to the substrate and thus increase measurable signal amplitudes.

  12. Development of ferritic steels for reduced activation: the US program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Gelles, D.S.; Lechtenberg, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Cr-Mo ferritic (martensitic) steels are candidates for the structural components of fusion reactors. Irradiation of such steels in a fusion environment produces long-lived radioactive isotopes, which lead to difficult radioactive waste disposal problems once the structure is removed from service. Such problems could be reduced by using steels that contain only elements that produce radioactive isotopes that decay to low levels in a reasonable time (tens of years instead of hundreds or thousands of years). The US Department of Energy has a program to develop steels to meet the criteria for shallow land burial as opposed to deep geologic storage. A review of the alloy development programs indicates that ferritic steels that meet these criteria can be developed

  13. Corrosion of ferrous alloys in eutectic lead-lithium environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Smith, D.L.

    1983-09-01

    Corrosion data have been obtained on austenitic prime candidate alloy (PCA) and Type 316 stainless steel and ferritic HT-9 and Fe-9Cr-1Mo steels in a flowing Pb-17 at. % Li environment at 727 and 700 K (454 and 427 0 C). The results indicate that the dissolution rates for both austenitic and ferritic steels in Pb-17Li are an order of magnitude greater than in flowing lithium. The influence of time, temperature, and alloy composition on the corrosion behavior in Pb-17Li is similar to that in lithium. The weight losses for the austenitic steels are an order of magnitude greater than for the ferritic steels. The rate of weight loss for the ferritic steels is constant, whereas the dissolution rates for the austenitic steels decrease with time. After exposure to Pb-17Li, the austenitic steels develop a very weak and porous ferrite layer which easily spalls from the specimen surface

  14. Synthesis of Nano-Structured La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3 Perovskite by Co-Precipitation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Mostafavi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nano-structured lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite, La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3 (LSCF, was successfully synthesized via co-precipitation method using metal nitrates as starting materials. Effects of precipitating agent and calcination temperature on the phase composition and morphology of synthesized powders were systematically studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, respectively. XRD analysis revealed that a single phase La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3 perovskite was obtained in the processed sample using ammonium carbonate as precipitating agent with a NH4+/NO3-molar ratio of 2 after calcination at 1000C for 1 h. The phase composition of products was also affected by changing pH values. Moreover, using sodium hydroxide as a precipitant resulted in a mixture of La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3 and cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4 phases. Careless washing of the precursors can also led to the formation of mixed phase after calcination of final powders. Mean crystallite size of the obtained powders was not noticeably affected by varying calcination temperature from 900 to 1050C and remained almost the same at 10 nm, however increasing calcination temperature to 1100C resulted in sharp structural coarsening. FESEM studies demonstrate that relatively uniform particles with mean particle size of 90 nm were obtained in the sample processed with a NH4+/NO3- molar ratio of 2 after calcination at 1000C for 1 h.

  15. Electrochemical hydrogen property improved in nano-structured perovskite oxide LaFeO3 for Ni/MH battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Deng, Gang; Chen, Zhiqian; Chen, Yungui; Cheng, Nanpu

    2013-02-01

    Perovskite oxide LaFeO3, as a novel candidate for the electrode of Ni/MH battery, holds high specific capacity and good cyclical durability at elevated temperatures. However, the poor electrochemical kinetics is a bottleneck for the application of this type of material. By use of nano-structured materials, there are greatly enhanced values of exchange current density I0 and hydrogen diffusion coefficient D, which resulted in an improvement of electrochemical kinetics, a much higher specific capacity and excellent stability during cycling for nano-structured LaFeO3. In theory, there is a significant possibility of further advancing the hydrogen reaction kinetics of perovskite type oxides for Ni/MH battery.

  16. Dwell-time effect on the synthesis of a nano-structured material in water by using Ni wire explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Gyu Sub; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Cho, Yong Sub; Paek, Kwang Hyun; Joo, Won Tae

    2014-01-01

    Nickel nano-structured materials are synthesized by using a wire explosion in water. Based on an analysis of each step of the wire explosion, we propose insufficient energy deposition before a plasma restrike as the cause for the inclusion of coarse particles in the wire-explosion product. We confirmed that more energy, in excess of 30%, could be deposited by increasing the dwell time, which resulted from a compression of vapor by the surrounding water and from suppression of plasma restrikes. Because of an increased energy loss into the surrounding water, the specific energy increased by two-fold compared to a gas atmosphere. The synthesized nano-structured nickel showed a uniform particle size of 20 nm with a few coarse particles that were mainly metallic nickel with a little oxide and hydroxide phases. The possibility for large-volume production through a continuous explosion of 300 shots was confirmed.

  17. Determination of reactive oxygen species from ZnO micro-nano structures with shape-dependent photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Weiwei; Zhao, Hongxiao; Jia, Huimin [Key Laboratory of Micro-Nano Materials for Energy Storage and Conversion of Henan Province, Institute of Surface Micro and Nano Materials, Xuchang University, Henan 461000 (China); Yin, Jun-Jie [Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, College Park, MD 20740 (United States); Zheng, Zhi, E-mail: zhengzhi99999@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Micro-Nano Materials for Energy Storage and Conversion of Henan Province, Institute of Surface Micro and Nano Materials, Xuchang University, Henan 461000 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: ZnO micro/nano structures with shape dependent photocatalytic activity were prepared by hydrothermal reaction. The generations of hydroxyl radical, superoxide and singlet oxygen from irradiated ZnO were identified precisely by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The type of reactive oxygen species was determined by band gap structure of ZnO. - Highlights: • ZnO micro/nano structures with different morphologies were prepared by solvothermal reaction. • Multi-pod like ZnO structures exhibited superior photocatalytic activity. • The generations of hydroxyl radical, superoxide and singlet oxygen from irradiated ZnO were characterized precisely by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. • The type of reactive oxygen species was determined by band gap structure of ZnO. - Abstract: ZnO micro/nano structures with different morphologies have been prepared by the changing solvents used during their synthesis by solvothermal reaction. Three typical shapes of ZnO structures including hexagonal, bell bottom like and multi-pod formed and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Multi pod like ZnO structures exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity toward degradation of methyl orange. Using electron spin resonance spectroscopy coupled with spin trapping techniques, we demonstrate an effective way to identify precisely the generation of hydroxyl radicals, superoxide and singlet oxygen from the irradiated ZnO multi pod structures. The type of reactive oxygen species formed was predictable from the band gap structure of ZnO. These results indicate that the shape of micro-nano structures significantly affects the photocatalytic activity of ZnO, and demonstrate the value of electron spin resonance spectroscopy for characterizing the type of reactive oxygen species formed during photoexcitation of semiconductors.

  18. Manufacturing Steps for Commercial Production of Nano-Structure Capacitors Final Report CRADA No. TC02159.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbee, T. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schena, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-29

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and TroyCap LLC, to develop manufacturing steps for commercial production of nano-structure capacitors. The technical objective of this project was to demonstrate high deposition rates of selected dielectric materials which are 2 to 5 times larger than typical using current technology.

  19. Determination of reactive oxygen species from ZnO micro-nano structures with shape-dependent photocatalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Weiwei; Zhao, Hongxiao; Jia, Huimin; Yin, Jun-Jie; Zheng, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: ZnO micro/nano structures with shape dependent photocatalytic activity were prepared by hydrothermal reaction. The generations of hydroxyl radical, superoxide and singlet oxygen from irradiated ZnO were identified precisely by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The type of reactive oxygen species was determined by band gap structure of ZnO. - Highlights: • ZnO micro/nano structures with different morphologies were prepared by solvothermal reaction. • Multi-pod like ZnO structures exhibited superior photocatalytic activity. • The generations of hydroxyl radical, superoxide and singlet oxygen from irradiated ZnO were characterized precisely by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. • The type of reactive oxygen species was determined by band gap structure of ZnO. - Abstract: ZnO micro/nano structures with different morphologies have been prepared by the changing solvents used during their synthesis by solvothermal reaction. Three typical shapes of ZnO structures including hexagonal, bell bottom like and multi-pod formed and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Multi pod like ZnO structures exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity toward degradation of methyl orange. Using electron spin resonance spectroscopy coupled with spin trapping techniques, we demonstrate an effective way to identify precisely the generation of hydroxyl radicals, superoxide and singlet oxygen from the irradiated ZnO multi pod structures. The type of reactive oxygen species formed was predictable from the band gap structure of ZnO. These results indicate that the shape of micro-nano structures significantly affects the photocatalytic activity of ZnO, and demonstrate the value of electron spin resonance spectroscopy for characterizing the type of reactive oxygen species formed during photoexcitation of semiconductors

  20. Virus-resembling nano-structures for near infrared fluorescence imaging of ovarian cancer HER2 receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Yadir A.; Bahmani, Baharak; Singh, Sheela P.; Vullev, Valentine I.; Kundra, Vikas; Anvari, Bahman

    2015-10-01

    Ovarian cancer remains the dominant cause of death due to malignancies of the female reproductive system. The capability to identify and remove all tumors during intraoperative procedures may ultimately reduce cancer recurrence, and lead to increased patient survival. The objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of an optical nano-structured system for targeted near infrared (NIR) imaging of ovarian cancer cells that over-express the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), an important biomarker associated with ovarian cancer. The nano-structured system is comprised of genome-depleted plant-infecting brome mosaic virus doped with NIR chromophore, indocyanine green, and functionalized at the surface by covalent attachment of monoclonal antibodies against the HER2 receptor. We use absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering to characterize the physical properties of the constructs. Using fluorescence imaging and flow cytometry, we demonstrate the effectiveness of these nano-structures for targeted NIR imaging of HER2 receptors in vitro. These functionalized nano-materials may provide a platform for NIR imaging of ovarian cancer.

  1. Virus-resembling nano-structures for near infrared fluorescence imaging of ovarian cancer HER2 receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero, Yadir A; Bahmani, Baharak; Vullev, Valentine I; Anvari, Bahman; Singh, Sheela P; Kundra, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer remains the dominant cause of death due to malignancies of the female reproductive system. The capability to identify and remove all tumors during intraoperative procedures may ultimately reduce cancer recurrence, and lead to increased patient survival. The objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of an optical nano-structured system for targeted near infrared (NIR) imaging of ovarian cancer cells that over-express the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), an important biomarker associated with ovarian cancer. The nano-structured system is comprised of genome-depleted plant-infecting brome mosaic virus doped with NIR chromophore, indocyanine green, and functionalized at the surface by covalent attachment of monoclonal antibodies against the HER2 receptor. We use absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering to characterize the physical properties of the constructs. Using fluorescence imaging and flow cytometry, we demonstrate the effectiveness of these nano-structures for targeted NIR imaging of HER2 receptors in vitro. These functionalized nano-materials may provide a platform for NIR imaging of ovarian cancer. (paper)

  2. Multiwavelength anomalous diffraction and diffraction anomalous fine structure to study composition and strain of semiconductor nano structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favre-Nicolin, V.; Proietti, M.G.; Leclere, C.; Renevier, H.; Katcho, N.A.; Richard, M.I.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to illustrate the use of Multi-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Diffraction Anomalous Fine Structure (DAFS) spectroscopy for the study of structural properties of semiconductor nano-structures. We give a brief introduction on the basic principles of these techniques providing a detailed bibliography. Then we focus on the data reduction and analysis and we give specific examples of their application on three different kinds of semiconductor nano-structures: Ge/Si nano-islands, AlN capped GaN/AlN Quantum Dots and AlGaN/AlN Nano-wires. We show that the combination of MAD and DAFS is a very powerful tool to solve the structural problem of these materials of high technological impact. In particular, the effects of composition and strain on diffraction are disentangled and composition can be determined in a reliable way, even at the interface between nano-structure and substrate. We show the great possibilities of this method and give the reader the basic tools to undertake its use. (authors)

  3. Crystallization of -type hexagonal ferrites from mechanically

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Crystallization of -type hexagonal ferrites from mechanically activated mixtures of barium carbonate and goethite ... Abstract. -type hexagonal ferrite precursor was prepared by a soft mechanochemical ... Bulletin of Materials Science | News.

  4. Chip-package nano-structured copper and nickel interconnections with metallic and polymeric bonding interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Ankur

    developed to address the IC packaging requirements beyond the ITRS projections and to introduce innovative design and fabrication concepts that will further advance the performance of the chip, the package, and the system board. The nano-structured interconnect technology simultaneously packages all the ICs intact in wafer form with quantum jump in the number of interconnections with the lowest electrical parasitics. The intrinsic properties of nano materials also enable several orders of magnitude higher interconnect densities with the best mechanical properties for the highest reliability and yet provide higher current and heat transfer densities. Nano-structured interconnects provides the ability to assemble the packaged parts on the system board without the use of underfill materials and to enable advanced analog/digital testing, reliability testing, and burn-in at wafer level. This thesis investigates the electrical and mechanical performance of nanostructured interconnections through modeling and test vehicle fabrication. The analytical models evaluate the performance improvements over solder and compliant interconnections. Test vehicles with nano-interconnections were fabricated using low cost electro-deposition techniques and assembled with various bonding interfaces. Interconnections were fabricated at 200 micron pitch to compare with the existing solder joints and at 50 micron pitch to demonstrate fabrication processes at fine pitches. Experimental and modeling results show that the proposed nano-interconnections could enhance the reliability and potentially meet all the system performance requirements for the emerging micro/nano-systems.

  5. Osteogenic activity of titanium surfaces with hierarchical micro/nano-structures obtained by hydrofluoric acid treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang J

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Jianfei Liang,1,* Shanshan Xu,1,* Mingming Shen,2,* Bingkun Cheng,3 Yongfeng Li,4 Xiangwei Liu,1 Dongze Qin,1 Anuj Bellare,5 Liang Kong1 1State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Disease & Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Stomatology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, 2Department of Stomatology, Xinhua Hospital of Beijing, Beijing, 3Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Stomatology, The Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, 4Department of Stomatology, Chinese PLA 532 Hospital, Huangshan, People’s Republic of China; 5Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: An easier method for constructing the hierarchical micro-/nano-structures on the surface of dental implants in the clinic is needed. In this study, three different titanium surfaces with microscale grooves (width 0.5–1, 1–1.5, and 1.5–2 µm and nanoscale nanoparticles (diameter 20–30, 30–50, and 50–100 nm, respectively were obtained by treatment with different concentrations of hydrofluoric acid (HF and at different etching times (1%, 3 min; 0.5%, 12 min; and 1.5%, 12 min, respectively; denoted as groups HF1, HF2, and HF3. The biological response to the three different titanium surfaces was evaluated by in vitro human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (hBMMSC experiments and in vivo animal experiments. The results showed that cell adhesion, proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineralization of hBMMSCs were increased in the HF3 group. After the different surface implants were inserted into the distal femurs of 40 rats, the bone–implant contact in groups HF1, HF2, and HF3 was 33.17%±2.2%, 33.82%±3.42%, and 41.04%±3.08%, respectively. Moreover, the maximal pullout

  6. Characterizing the nano-structure and defect structure of nano-scaled non-ferrous structural alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghamarian, Iman, E-mail: imanghamarian@yahoo.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Samimi, Peyman; Liu, Yue [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Center for Advanced Non-Ferrous Structural Alloys, an NSF-I/UCRC between the University of North Texas (Denton, TX, 76203) and the Colorado School of Mines (Golden, CO, 80401) (United States); Poorganji, Behrang; Vasudevan, Vijay K. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Collins, Peter C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Center for Advanced Non-Ferrous Structural Alloys, an NSF-I/UCRC between the University of North Texas (Denton, TX, 76203) and the Colorado School of Mines (Golden, CO, 80401) (United States)

    2016-03-15

    The presence and interaction of nanotwins, geometrically necessary dislocations, and grain boundaries play a key role in the mechanical properties of nanostructured crystalline materials. Therefore, it is vital to determine the orientation, width and distance of nanotwins, the angle and axis of grain boundary misorientations as well as the type and the distributions of dislocations in an automatic and statistically meaningful fashion in a relatively large area. In this paper, such details are provided using a transmission electron microscope-based orientation microscopy technique called ASTAR™/precession electron diffraction. The remarkable spatial resolution of this technique (~ 2 nm) enables highly detailed characterization of nanotwins, grain boundaries and the configuration of dislocations. This orientation microscopy technique provides the raw data required for the determination of these parameters. The procedures to post-process the ASTAR™/PED datasets in order to obtain the important (and currently largely hidden) details of nanotwins as well as quantifications of dislocation density distributions are described in this study. - Highlights: • EBSD cannot characterize defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries and nanotwins in severely deformed metals. • TEM based orientation microscopy technique called ASTAR™/PED was used to resolve the problem. • Locations and orientations of nanotwins, dislocation density distribution and grain boundary characters can be resolved. • This work provides the bases for further studies on the interactions between dislocations, grain boundaries and nanotwins. • The computation part is explained sufficiently which helps the readers to post process their own data.

  7. Self-organised nano-structuring of thin oxide-films under swift heavy ion bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolse, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    Surface instabilities and the resulting self-organisation processes play an important role in nano-technology since they allow for large-array nano-structuring. We have recently found that the occurrence of such instabilities in thin film systems can be triggered by energetic ion bombardment and the subsequent self-assembly of the surface can be nicely controlled by fine-tuning of the irradiation conditions. The role of the ion in such processes is of double nature: If the instability is latently present already in the virgin sample, but self-assembly cannot take place because of kinetic barriers, the ion impact may just supply the necessary atomic mobility. On the other hand, the surface may become instable due to the ion beam induced material modifications and further irradiation then results in its reorganisation. In the present paper, we will review recently observed nano-scale self-organisation processes in thin oxide-films induced by the irradiation with swift heavy ions (SHI) at some MeV/amu energies. The first example is about SHI induced dewetting, which is driven by capillary forces already present in the as-deposited samples. The achieved dewetting pattern show an amazing similarity to those observed for liquid polymer films on Si, although in the present case the samples were kept at 80 K and hence have never reached their melting point. The second example is about self-organised lamellae formation driven by planar stresses, which are induced by SHI bombardment under grazing incidence and result in a surface instability and anisotropic plastic deformation (hammering effect). Taking advantage of these effects and modifying the irradiation procedure, we were able to generate more complex structures like NiO-'nano-towers' of 2 μm height and 200 nm in diameter

  8. Ion Beam Etching: Replication of Micro Nano-structured 3D Stencil Masks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Patrick; Guibert, Edouard; Mikhailov, Serguei; Bruegger, Juergen; Villanueva, Guillermo

    2009-01-01

    Ion beam LIGA allows the etching of 3D nano-structures by direct writing with a nano-sized beam. However, this is a relatively time consuming process. We propose here another approach for etching structures on large surfaces and faster, compared to the direct writing process. This approach consists of replicating 3D structured masks, by scanning an unfocused ion beam. A polymer substrate is placed behind the mask, as in UV photolithography. But the main advantage is that the 3D structure of the mask can be replicated into the polymer. For that purpose, the masks (developped at LMIS1, EPFL) are made of a silicon nitride membrane 100 nm thick, on which 3D gold structures up to 200 nm thick, are deposited. The 3D Au structures are made with the nanostencil method, based on successive gold deposition. The IMA institute, from HE-Arc, owns a High Voltage Engineering 1.7 MV Tandetron with both solid and gaseous negative ion sources, able to generate ions from almost every chemical element in a broad range of energies comprised between 400 keV and 6.8 MeV. The beam composition and energy are chosen in such a way, that ions lose a significant fraction of their energy when passing through the thickest regions of the mask. Ions passing through thinner regions of the mask loose a smaller fraction of their energy and etch the polymer with larger thicknesses, allowing a replication of the mask into the polymer. For our trials, we have used a carbon beam with an energy of 500 keV. The beam was focussed to a diameter of 5 mm with solid slits, in order to avoid border effects and thus ensure a homogeneous dose distribution on the beam diameter. The feasibility of this technique has been demonstrated, allowing industrial applications for micro-mould fabrication, micro-fluidics and micro-optics.

  9. Nano-structural characteristics and optical properties of silver chiral nano-flower sculptured thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savaloni, Hadi, E-mail: savaloni@khayam.ut.ac.ir [Department of Physics, University of Tehran, North-Kargar Street, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Haydari-Nasab, Fatemh; Malmir, Mariam [Department of Physics, University of Tehran, North-Kargar Street, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Silver chiral nano-flowers with 3-, 4- and 5-fold symmetry were produced using oblique angle deposition method in conjunction with the rotation of sample holder with different speeds at different sectors of each revolution corresponding to symmetry order of the acquired nano-flower. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), were employed to obtain morphology and nano-structure of the films. Optical characteristics of silver chiral nano-flower thin films were obtained using single beam spectrophotometer with both s- and p-polarization incident light at 30{sup o} and 70{sup o} incidence angles and at different azimuthal angles ({phi}). Optical spectra showed both TM (TDM (transverse dipole mode) and TQM (transverse quadruple mode)) and LM (longitudinal mode) Plasmon resonance peaks. For 3- and 4-fold symmetry chiral nano-flowers the s-polarization extinction spectra obtained at different azimuthal angles did not show significant change in the Plasmon peak position while 5-fold symmetry chiral nano-flower showed a completely different behavior, which may be the result of increased surface anisotropy, so when the {phi} angle is changed the s-polarization response from the surface can change more significantly than that for lower symmetries. In general, for 3-, 4- and 5-fold symmetry chiral nano-flowers a sharp peak at lower wavelengths (<450 nm) is observed in the s-polarization spectra, while in addition to this peak a broad peak at longer wavelengths (i.e., LM) observed in the p-polarization spectra, which is more dominant for 70{sup o} incidence angle.

  10. Characterization for rbs of Titanium Oxide thin films grown by Dip Coating in a coloidal suspension of nano structured Titanium Oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrero, E.; Vigil, E.; Zumeta, I.

    1999-01-01

    The depth of Titanium Oxide thin films grown by Dip Coating in a coloidal suspension of nano structured Titanium Oxide was characterized using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry. Film depths are compared in function of bath and suspension parameters

  11. Optimization and testing results of Zr-bearing ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yang, Ying [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tyburska-Puschel, Beata [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Sridharan, K. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The mission of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program is to develop crosscutting technologies for nuclear energy applications. Advanced structural materials with superior performance at elevated temperatures are always desired for nuclear reactors, which can improve reactor economics, safety margins, and design flexibility. They benefit not only new reactors, including advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast reactors such as sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) that is primarily designed for management of high-level wastes, but also life extension of the existing fleet when component exchange is needed. Developing and utilizing the modern materials science tools (experimental, theoretical, and computational tools) is an important path to more efficient alloy development and process optimization. Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels are important structural materials for nuclear reactors due to their advantages over other applicable materials like austenitic stainless steels, notably their resistance to void swelling, low thermal expansion coefficients, and higher thermal conductivity. However, traditional FM steels exhibit a noticeable yield strength reduction at elevated temperatures above ~500°C, which limits their applications in advanced nuclear reactors which target operating temperatures at 650°C or higher. Although oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels have shown excellent high-temperature performance, their extremely high cost, limited size and fabricability of products, as well as the great difficulty with welding and joining, have limited or precluded their commercial applications. Zirconium has shown many benefits to Fe-base alloys such as grain refinement, improved phase stability, and reduced radiation-induced segregation. The ultimate goal of this project is, with the aid of computational modeling tools, to accelerate the development of a new generation of Zr-bearing ferritic alloys to be fabricated using conventional

  12. The influence of Cr content on the mechanical properties of ODS ferritic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaofu; Zhou, Zhangjian; Jang, Jinsung; Wang, Man; Hu, Helong; Sun, Hongying; Zou, Lei; Zhang, Guangming; Zhang, Liwei

    2014-12-01

    The present investigation aimed at researching the mechanical properties of the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels with different Cr content, which were fabricated through a consolidation of mechanical alloyed (MA) powders of 0.35 wt.% nano Y2O3 dispersed Fe-12.0Cr-0.5Ti-1.0W (alloy A), Fe-16.0Cr-0.5Ti-1.0W (alloy B), and Fe-18.0Cr-0.5Ti-1.0W (alloy C) alloys (all in wt.%) by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) with 100 MPa pressure at 1150 °C for 3 h. The mechanical properties, including the tensile strength, hardness, and impact fracture toughness were tested by universal testers, while Young's modulus was determined by ultrasonic wave non-destructive tester. It was found that the relationship between Cr content and the strength of ODS ferritic steels was not a proportional relationship. However, too high a Cr content will cause the precipitation of Cr-enriched segregation phase, which is detrimental to the ductility of ODS ferritic steels.

  13. Calcium-assisted reduction of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for nanostructured iron cobalt with enhanced magnetic performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, B.; Andrew, J. S.; Arnold, D. P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the potential of a calcium-assisted reduction process for synthesizing fine-grain (~100 nm) metal alloys from metal oxide nanoparticles. To demonstrate the process, an iron cobalt alloy (Fe_6_6Co_3_4) is obtained by hydrogen annealing 7-nm cobalt ferrite (CoFe_2O_4) nanoparticles in the presence of calcium granules. The calcium serves as a strong reducing agent, promoting the phase transition from cobalt ferrite to a metallic iron cobalt alloy, while maintaining high crystallinity. Magnetic measurements demonstrate the annealing temperature is the dominant factor of tuning the grain size and magnetic properties. Annealing at 700 °C for 1 h maximizes the magnetic saturation, up to 2.4 T (235 emu/g), which matches that of bulk iron cobalt.

  14. Calcium-assisted reduction of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for nanostructured iron cobalt with enhanced magnetic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, B. [University of Florida, Interdisciplinary Microsystems Group, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (United States); Andrew, J. S. [University of Florida, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (United States); Arnold, D. P., E-mail: darnold@ufl.edu [University of Florida, Interdisciplinary Microsystems Group, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (United States)

    2017-03-15

    This paper demonstrates the potential of a calcium-assisted reduction process for synthesizing fine-grain (~100 nm) metal alloys from metal oxide nanoparticles. To demonstrate the process, an iron cobalt alloy (Fe{sub 66}Co{sub 34}) is obtained by hydrogen annealing 7-nm cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles in the presence of calcium granules. The calcium serves as a strong reducing agent, promoting the phase transition from cobalt ferrite to a metallic iron cobalt alloy, while maintaining high crystallinity. Magnetic measurements demonstrate the annealing temperature is the dominant factor of tuning the grain size and magnetic properties. Annealing at 700 °C for 1 h maximizes the magnetic saturation, up to 2.4 T (235 emu/g), which matches that of bulk iron cobalt.

  15. Microwave dielectric properties of nanostructured nickel ferrite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Abstract. Nickel ferrite is one of the important ferrites used in microwave devices. In the present work, we have synthesized nanoparticles of nickel ferrite using chemical precipitation technique. The crystal structure and grain size of the particles are studied using XRD. The microwave dielectric properties of nanostructured.

  16. Use of microstructure control to toughen ferritic steels for cryogenic use. I. Fe--Ni steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syn, C.K.; Jin, S.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1976-12-01

    Alternation of austenitization and austenite + ferrite two-phase decomposition treatment in a cyclic thermal treatment allows the achievement of ultra-fine grain size in steels containing 8-12% Ni. The grain refinement leads to a substantial improvement in cryogenic mechanical properties. The ductile-brittle transition temperature of a ferritic Fe-12Ni-0.25Ti alloy was suppressed to below liquid helium temperature by this grain refinement procedure; the transition temperature of commercial ''9Ni'' cryogenic steel was similarly reduced by combining the grain refinement with a final temper which introduces a small admixture of retained austenite

  17. Some initial considerations on the suitability of Ferritic/ martensitic stainless steels as first wall and blanket materials in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterworth, G.J.

    1982-01-01

    The constitution of stainless iron alloys and the characteristic properties of alloys in the main ferritic, martensitic and austenitic groups are discussed. A comparison of published data on the mechanical, thermal and irradiation properties of typical austenitic and martensitic/ferritic steels shows that alloys in the latter groups have certain advantages for fusion applications. The ferromagnetism exhibited by martensitic and ferritic alloys has, however, been identified as a potentially serious obstacle to their utilisation in magnetic confinement devices. The paper describes measurements performed in other laboratories on the magnetic properties of two representative martensitic alloys 12Cr-1Mo and 9Cr-2Mo. These observations show that a modest bias magnetic field of magnitude 1 - 2 tesla induces a state of magnetic saturation in these materials. They would thus behave as essentially paramagnetic materials having a relative permeability close to unity when saturated by the toroidal field of a tokamak reactor. The results of computations by the General Atomic research group to assess the implications of such magnetic behaviour on reactor design and operation are presented. The results so far indicate that the ferromagnetism of martensitic/ferritic steels would not represent a major obstacle to their utilisation as first wall or blanket materials. (author)

  18. Role of motive forces for the spin torque transfer for nano-structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Stewart

    2009-03-01

    Despite an announced imminent commercial realization of spin transfer random access memory (SPRAM) the current theory evolved from that of Slonczewski [1,2] does not conserve energy. Barnes and Maekawa [3] have shown, in order correct this defect, forces which originate from the spin rather than the charge of an electron must be accounted for, this leading to the concept of spin-motive-forces (smf) which must appear in Faraday's law and which significantly modifies the theory for spin-valves and domain wall devices [4]. A multi-channel theory in which these smf's redirect the spin currents will be described. In nano-structures it is now well known that the Kondo effect is reflected by conductance peaks. In essence, the spin degrees of freedom are used to enhance conduction. In a system with nano-magnets and a Coulomb blockade [5] the similar spin channels can be the only means of effective conduction. This results in a smf which lasts for minutes and an enormous magneto-resistance [5]. This implies the possibility of ``single electron memory'' in which the magnetic state is switched by a single electron. [4pt] [1] J. C. Slonczewski, Current-Driven Excitation of Magnetic Multilayers J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 159, L1 (1996). [0pt] [2] Y. Tserkovnyak, A. Brataas, G. E. W. Bauer, and B. I. Halperin, Nonlocal magnetization dynamics in ferromagnetic heterostructures, Rev. Mod. Phys. 77, 1375 (2005). [0pt] [3] S. E. Barnes and S. Maekawa, Generalization of Faraday's Law to Include Nonconservative Spin Forces Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 246601 (2007); S. E. Barnes and S. Maekawa, Currents induced by domain wall motion in thin ferromagnetic wires. arXiv:cond-mat/ 0410021v1 (2004). [0pt] [4] S. E., Barnes, Spin motive forces, measurement, and spin-valves. J. Magn. Magn. Mat. 310, 2035-2037 (2007); S. E. Barnes, J. Ieda. J and S. Maekawa, Magnetic memory and current amplification devices using moving domain walls. Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 122507 (2006). [0pt] [5] Pham-Nam Hai, Byung-Ho Yu

  19. Micro-, to nano-structural relationships in natural serpentines, derived from cationic substitutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, M.; Farges, F.; Andreani, M.; Ulrich, M.; Marcaillou, C.; Mathon, O.

    2014-12-01

    The understanding of the crystal chemistry of serpentine minerals (incl. antigorite, lizardite and chrysotile) is fundamental since serpentinization processes concern very large scientific domains: e.g., natural abiotic hydrogen production (Marcaillou et al., 2011), origins of life (Russell et al., 2010), fluid properties and mobility of metals in subduction zones (Kelley and Cottrell, 2009). This study aims at characterizing relations between the micro-, and nano-structures of the most abundant serpentine polytypes in the oceanic crust. Serpentine theoretical formula is Mg3Si2O5(OH)4 but several natural substitutions are possible and the formula may be written such as: (Mg,Fe2+,Fe3+,Al)3(Si,Al,Fe3+)2O5(OH)4; showing that Fe and Al may play an important role in the crystallization of serpentines. Preliminary crystal chemistry studies, suggest that, 1) the Al content alone cannot be directly correlated to serpentine polytypes (Andreani et al., 2008), 2) the amounts of tetrahedral iron can be significant in the presence of ferric iron (Marcaillou et al., 2011). Because magnetite is usually associated to serpentine, the Fe-speciation characterization of serpentine is delicate. Here, we provide the study of 33 magnetite-free serpentines containing various amounts of Fe and Al. The samples were characterized by SEM, Raman, XRF, as well as XANES, pre-edge, and EXAFS spectroscopy at the Fe K-edge. XANES experimental data were crosschecked and interpreted thanks to ab initio calculations and EXAFS shell-fitting. Also, preliminary 27Al-RMN data is presented. Results suggest relationships between the type and amount of substitution of trivalent cations in minerals, and the microstructures observed. Chrysotile incorporates less trivalent cations than other varieties, which tends to preserve the so-called misfit between the TO layers, and therefore the tubular structure of the mineral. Lizardites mainly involve Fe/Al Tschermak-type substitutions, while M-site vacancy charge

  20. Categorization of nano-structured titanium dioxide according to physicochemical characteristics and pulmonary toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Hashizume

    Full Text Available A potentially useful means of predicting the pulmonary risk posed by new forms of nano-structured titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2 is to use the associations between the physicochemical properties and pulmonary toxicity of characterized forms of TiO2. In the present study, we conducted intratracheal administration studies in rats to clarify the associations between the physicochemical characteristics of seven characterized forms of TiO2 and their acute or subacute pulmonary inflammatory toxicity. Examination of the associations between the physicochemical characteristics of the TiO2 and the pulmonary inflammatory responses they induced revealed (1 that differences in the crystallinity or shape of the TiO2 particles were not associated with the acute pulmonary inflammatory response; (2 that particle size was associated with the acute pulmonary inflammatory response; and (3 that TiO2 particles coated with Al(OH3 induced a greater pulmonary inflammatory response than did non-coated particles. We separated the seven TiO2 into two groups: a group containing the six TiO2 with no surface coating and a group containing the one TiO2 with a surface coating. Intratracheal administration to rats of TiO2 from the first group (i.e., non-coated TiO2 induced only acute pulmonary inflammatory responses, and within this group, the acute pulmonary inflammatory response was equivalent when the particle size was the same, regardless of crystallinity or shape. In contrast, intratracheal administration to rats of the TiO2 from the second group (i.e., the coated TiO2 induced a more severe, subacute pulmonary inflammatory response compared with that produced by the non-coated TiO2. Since alteration of the pulmonary inflammatory response by surface treatment may depend on the coating material used, the pulmonary toxicities of coated TiO2 need to be further evaluated. Overall, the present results demonstrate that physicochemical properties may be useful for predicting the

  1. Development of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) Ferritic Steel Through Powder Forging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Prakash, Ujjwal; Dabhade, Vikram V.; Laha, K.; Sakthivel, T.

    2017-04-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels are candidates for cladding tubes in fast breeder nuclear reactors. In this study, an 18%Cr ODS ferritic steel was prepared through powder forging route. Elemental powders with a nominal composition of Fe-18Cr-2 W-0.2Ti (composition in wt.%) with 0 and 0.35% yttria were prepared by mechanical alloying in a Simoloyer attritor under argon atmosphere. The alloyed powders were heated in a mild steel can to 1473 K under flowing hydrogen atmosphere. The can was then hot forged. Steps of sealing, degassing and evacuation are eliminated by using powder forging. Heating ODS powder in hydrogen atmosphere ensures good bonding between alloy powders. A dense ODS alloy with an attractive combination of strength and ductility was obtained after re-forging. On testing at 973 K, a loss in ductility was observed in yttria-containing alloy. The strength and ductility increased with increase in strain rate at 973 K. Reasons for this are discussed. The ODS alloy exhibited a recrystallized microstructure which is difficult to achieve by extrusion. No prior particle boundaries were observed after forging. The forged compacts exhibited isotropic mechanical properties. It is suggested that powder forging may offer several advantages over the traditional extrusion/HIP routes for fabrication of ODS alloys.

  2. First-principles study on influence of molybdenum on acicular ferrite formation on TiC particles in microallyed steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Guomin; Li, Changsheng; Cheng, Xiaonong; Zhao, Xinluo; Feng, Quan; Li, Zhijie; Li, Dongyang; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, influences of molybdenum on acicular ferrite formation on precipitated TiC particles are investigated from thermodynamic and kinetic respects. In thermodynamics, Segregation of Mo towards austenite/TiC interface releases the interfacial energy and induces phase transformation from austenite to acicular ferrite on the precipitated TiC particles. The Phase transformation can be achieved by displacive deformation along uniaxial Bain path. In addition, the segregation of Mo atom will also lead to the enhanced stability of ferrite in comparison with austenite no matter at low temperature or at high temperature. In kinetics, the Mo solute in acicular ferrite can effectively suppress the diffusion of carbon atoms, which ensures that orientation relationship between acicular ferrite and austenitized matrix can be satisfied during the diffusionless phase transformation. In contrast to ineffectiveness of TiC particles, the alloying Mo element can facilitate the formation of acicular ferrite on precipitated TiC particles, which is attributed to the above thermodynamic and kinetic reasons. Furthermore, Interfacial toughness and ductility of as-formed acicular ferrite/TiC interface can be improved simultaneously by segregation of Mo atom.

  3. Irradiation creep in ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandermeulen, W.; Bremaecker, A. de; Burbure, S. de; Huet, J.J.; Asbroeck, P. van

    Pressurized and non-pressurized capsules of several ferritic steels have been irradiated in Rapsodie between 400 and 500 0 C up to 3.7 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E>0.1 MeV). Results of the diameter measurements are presented and show that the total in-pile deformation is lower than for austenitic steels

  4. Effect of neutron irradiation on vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braski, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron-irradiated vanadium alloys were evaluated for their susceptibility to irradiation hardening, helium embrittlement, swelling, and residual radioactivity, and the results were compared with those for the austenitic and ferritic stainless steels. The VANSTAR-7 and V-15Cr-5Ti alloys showed the greatest hardening between 400 and 600 0 C while V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti had lower values that were comparable to those of ferritic steels. The V-15Cr-5Ti and VANSTAR-7 alloys were susceptible to helium embrittlement caused by the combination of weakened grain boundaries and irradiation-hardened grain matrices. Specimen fractures were entirely intergranular in the most severe instances of embrittlement. The V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti alloys were more resistant to helium embrittlement. Except for VANSTAR-7 irradiated to 40 dpa at 520 0 C, all of the vanadium alloys exhibited low swelling that was similar to the ferritic steels. Swelling was greater in specimens that were preimplanted with helium using the tritium trick. The vanadium alloys clearly exhibit lower residual radioactivity after irradiation than the ferrous alloys

  5. Effect of neutron irradiation on vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braski, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron-irradiated vanadium alloys were evaluated for their susceptibility to irradiation hardening, helium embrittlement, swelling, and residual radioactivity, and the results were compared with those for the austenitic and ferritic stainless steels. The VANSTAR-7 and V-15Cr-5Ti alloys showed the greatest hardening between 400 and 600/sup 0/C while V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti had lower values that were comparable to those of ferritic steels. The V-15Cr-5Ti and VANSTAR-7 alloys were susceptible to helium embrittlement caused by the combination of weakened grain boundaries and irradiation-hardened grain matrices. Specimen fractures were entirely intergranular in the most severe instances of embrittlement. The V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti alloys were more resistant to helium embrittlement. Except for VANSTAR-7 irradiated to 40 dpa at 520/sup 0/C, all of the vanadium alloys exhibited low swelling that was similar to the ferritic steels. Swelling was greater in specimens that were preimplanted with helium using the tritium trick. The vanadium alloys clearly exhibit lower residual radioactivity after irradiation than the ferrous alloys.

  6. Review of creep resistant alloys for power plant applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nagode

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A paper describes the most popular alloys for power plant application as well as the most promising alloys for future application in that technology. The components in power plants operate in severe conditions (high temperatures and pressures and they are expected reliable service for 30 years and more. The correct choice of the material is, thus, of a very importance. The paper describes the development as well as advantages and disadvantages of convenient ferritic/martensitic steels, ferritic/bainitic steels, austenitic stainless steels and the new alloys for the application at temperatures of 650°C and more.

  7. Passivation behavior of a ferritic stainless steel in concentrated alkaline solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Fattah-alhosseini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The passivation behavior of AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel was investigated in concentrated alkaline solutions in relation to several test parameters, using electrochemical techniques. Increasing solution pH (varying from 11.5 to 14.0 leads to an increase in the corrosion rate of the alloy. Mott–Schottky analysis revealed that passive films formed on AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel behave as n-type semiconductor and the donor densities increased with pH. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS results showed that the reciprocal capacitance of the passive film is directly proportional to its thickness, which decreases with pH increase. The results revealed that for this ferritic stainless steel in concentrated alkaline solutions, decreasing the solution pH offers better conditions for forming passive films with higher protection behavior, due to the growth of a much thicker and less defective film.

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Ferritic Steel via a Sol-Gel Route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Qinxing; Zhang Tao; Wang Xianping; Fang Qianfeng; Hu Jing; Liu Changsong

    2012-01-01

    Nanocrystalline oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel powders with nominal composition of Fe-14Cr-3W-0.3Ti-0.4Y 2 O 3 are synthesized using sol-gel method and hydrogen reduction. At low reduction temperature the impurity phase of CrO is detected. At higher reduction temperature the impurity phase is Cr 2 O 3 which eventually disappears with increasing reduction time. A pure ODS ferritic steel phase is obtained after reducing the sol-gel resultant products at 1200°C for 3 h. The HRTEM and EDS mapping indicate that the Y 2 O 3 particles with a size of about 15 nm are homogenously dispersed in the alloy matrix. The bulk ODS ferritic steel samples prepared from such powders exhibit good mechanical performance with an ultimate tensile stress of 960 MPa.

  9. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened 9Cr ferritic-martensitic steel clad tube for fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laha, K.; Saroja, S.; Mathew, M.D.; Jayakumar, T.; Vijay, R.; Venugopal Reddy, A.; Lakshminarayana, B.; Kapoor, Komal; Jha, S.K.; Tonpe, S.S.

    2012-01-01

    One of the key issues in the economical operation of FBR is to achieve high burn-up of fuel (200-250 GWd/t) which considerably reduces the fuel cycle cost. This imposes stringent requirements of void swelling resistance upto 200 dpa for the core structural materials. Presently used alloy 09 (a modified austenitic stainless steel, 15Cr-15Ni-Ti) for PFBR has void swelling limit less than 150 dpa. Because of the inherent void swelling resistance, 9-12Cr steels ferritic/martensitic steels are qualified for irradiation upto 200 dpa but their low creep strength at temperatures above 600 deg C restricts their application as a clad material. Oxide dispersion strengthening is found to be promising means of extending the creep resistance of ferritic/martensitic steels beyond 650 deg C without sacrificing the inherent advantages of high thermal conductivity and low swelling of ferritic steels

  10. Design and construction of UVSOR-BL4A2 beam line for nano-structure processing

    CERN Document Server

    Takezoe, N; Tanaka, T; Kurosawa, K; Nonogaki, Y; Noda, H; Mekaru, H; Urisu, T

    2001-01-01

    We have designed and constructed a new beam line BL4A2 at UVSOR mainly for nano-structure fabrication based on synchrotron radiation stimulated surface photochemical reactions. In order to obtain high-photon flux, we use white ray beam focused with only one mirror. The beam line is connected with ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope for in-situ atomic scale observations, low energy electron diffraction and Auger electron spectroscope for surface crystal structure characterization, and photo-stimulated surface reaction chamber. In order to monitor the optical properties with atomic scale, a near field optical microscope is planned to be installed.

  11. Nano-structured Fabry–Pérot resonators in neutron optics and tunneling of neutron wave-particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maaza, M.; Hamidi, D.

    2012-01-01

    Correlated to the quantum mechanics wave-particle duality, the optical analogy between electromagnetic waves and cold neutrons manifests itself through several interference phenomena particularly the so called Frustrated Total Reflection i.e., the tunneling process in Fabry–Pérot nano-structured cavities. Prominent resonant situations offered by this configuration allow the attainment of numerous fundamental investigations and surface-interface studies as well as to devise new kinds of neutron optics devices. This review contribution reports such possibilities in addition to the recently observed peculiar Goos–Hänchen longitudinal shift of neutron wave-particles which was predicted by Sir Isaac Newton as early as 1730.

  12. Time-domain simulations for metallic nano-structures - a Krylov-subspace approach beyond the limitations of FDTD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, Michael [Institut fuer Theoretische Festkoerperphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe School of Optics and Photonics (KSOP), Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Niegemann, Jens; Tkeshelashvili, Lasha; Busch, Kurt [Institut fuer Theoretische Festkoerperphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); DFG Forschungszentrum Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe School of Optics and Photonics (KSOP), Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Numerical simulations of metallic nano-structures are crucial for the efficient design of plasmonic devices. Conventional time-domain solvers such as FDTD introduce large numerical errors especially at metallic surfaces. Our approach combines a discontinuous Galerkin method on an adaptive mesh for the spatial discretisation with a Krylov-subspace technique for the time-stepping procedure. Thus, the higher-order accuracy in both time and space is supported by unconditional stability. As illustrative examples, we compare numerical results obtained with our method against analytical reference solutions and results from FDTD calculations.

  13. Influence of beryllium ceramics nano-structuring by iron atoms on increase of their stability to ionizing radiations effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, A.I.; Bitenbaev, M.I

    2007-01-01

    In the work a new results on beryllium ceramics nano-structuring effect by iron oxide atoms on radiation defects quantum yield value G in these materials and defects depth constants in ionizing radiation fields k are presented. Experimental data under dependence of G and k values from concentration of iron atoms in beryllium ceramic matrix are presented. It is shown, that structure modification of beryllium ceramics by feedings on the iron base leads to sharp decrease (almost in 30 times) of radiation defects quantum yield value, i.e. to increase of these ceramics stability enhancement to ionizing radiation effect

  14. Design and construction of UVSOR-BL4A2 beam line for nano-structure processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takezoe, N.; Yanagida, H.; Tanaka, T.; Kurosawa, K.; Nonogaki, Y.; Noda, H.; Mekaru, H.; Urisu, T.

    2001-01-01

    We have designed and constructed a new beam line BL4A2 at UVSOR mainly for nano-structure fabrication based on synchrotron radiation stimulated surface photochemical reactions. In order to obtain high-photon flux, we use white ray beam focused with only one mirror. The beam line is connected with ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope for in-situ atomic scale observations, low energy electron diffraction and Auger electron spectroscope for surface crystal structure characterization, and photo-stimulated surface reaction chamber. In order to monitor the optical properties with atomic scale, a near field optical microscope is planned to be installed

  15. Computational design and performance prediction of creep-resistant ferritic superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liaw, Peter K. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wang, Shao-Yu [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Dunand, David C. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Ghosh, Gautum [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Song, Gian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rawlings, Michael [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Baik, Sung Il [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2017-12-04

    Ferritic superalloys containing the B2 phase with the parent L21 phase precipitates in a disordered solid-solution matrix, also known as a hierarchical-precipitate-strengthened ferritic alloy (HPSFA), had been developed for high-temperature structural applications in fossil-energy power plants. These alloys were designed by adding Ti into a previously-studied NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy (denoted as FBB8 in this study). Following with the concept of HPSFAs, in the present research, a systematic investigation on adding other elements, such as Hf and Zr, and optimizing the Ti content within the alloy system, has been conducted, in order to further improve the creep resistance of the model alloys. Studies include advanced experimental techniques, first-principles calculations on thermodynamic and mechanical properties, and numerical simulations on precipitation hardening, have been integrated and conducted to characterize the complex microstructures and excellent creep resistance of alloys. The experimental techniques include transmission-electron microscopy (TEM), scanning-electron microscopy (SEM), neutron diffraction (ND), and atom-probe tomography (APT), which provide the detailed microstructural information of the model alloys. Systematic tension/compression creep tests have also been conducted in order to verify the creep resistance of the potential alloy compositions. The results show that when replacing Ti with Hf and Zr, it does not form the L21 phase. Instead, the hexagonal Laves phase forms and distributes majorly along the grain boundary, or large segregation within grains. Since the Laves phase does not form parent to the B2-phase precipitates, it cannot bring the strengthening effect of HPSFAs. As a result, the FBB8 + 2 wt. % Hf and FBB8 + 2 wt. % Zr alloys have similar mechanical properties to the original FBB8. The FBB8 + Ti series alloys had also been studied, from the creep tests and microstructural characterizations, the FBB8 + 3.5 wt.% Ti

  16. The effect of solution pH on the electrochemical performance of nanocrystalline metal ferrites MFe2O4 (M=Cu, Zn, and Ni) thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, E. M.; Rashad, M. M.; Khalil, H. F. Y.; Ibrahim, I. A.; Hussein, M. R.; El-Sabbah, M. M. B.

    2016-04-01

    Nanocrystalline metal ferrite MFe2O4 (M=Cu, Zn, and Ni) thin films have been synthesized via electrodeposition-anodization process. Electrodeposited (M)Fe2 alloys were obtained from aqueous sulfate bath. The formed alloys were electrochemically oxidized (anodized) in aqueous (1 M KOH) solution, at room temperature, to the corresponding hydroxides. The parameters controlling the current efficiency of the electrodeposition of (M)Fe2 alloys such as the bath composition and the current density were studied and optimized. The anodized (M)Fe2 alloy films were annealed in air at 400 °C for 2 h. The results revealed the formation of three ferrite thin films were formed. The crystallite sizes of the produced films were in the range between 45 and 60 nm. The microstructure of the formed film was ferrite type dependent. The corrosion behavior of ferrite thin films in different pH solutions was investigated using open circuit potential (OCP) and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The open circuit potential indicates that the initial potential E im of ZnFe2O4 thin films remained constant for a short time, then sharply increased in the less negative direction in acidic and alkaline medium compared with Ni and Cu ferrite films. The values of the corrosion current density I corr were higher for the ZnFe2O4 films at pH values of 1 and 12 compared with that of NiFe2O4 and CuFe2O4 which were higher only at pH value 1. The corrosion rate was very low for the three ferrite films when immersion in the neutral medium. The surface morphology recommended that Ni and Cu ferrite films were safely used in neutral and alkaline medium, whereas Zn ferrite film was only used in neutral atmospheres.

  17. First Principles Investigations of Technologically and Environmentally Important Nano-structured Materials and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sujata

    In the course of my PhD I have worked on a broad range of problems using simulations from first principles: from catalysis and chemical reactions at surfaces and on nanostructures, characterization of carbon-based systems and devices, and surface and interface physics. My research activities focused on the application of ab-initio electronic structure techniques to the theoretical study of important aspects of the physics and chemistry of materials for energy and environmental applications and nano-electronic devices. A common theme of my research is the computational study of chemical reactions of environmentally important molecules (CO, CO2) using high performance simulations. In particular, my principal aim was to design novel nano-structured functional catalytic surfaces and interfaces for environmentally relevant remediation and recycling reactions, with particular attention to the management of carbon dioxide. We have studied the carbon-mediated partial sequestration and selective oxidation of carbon monoxide (CO), both in the presence and absence of hydrogen, on graphitic edges. Using first-principles calculations we have studied several reactions of CO with carbon nanostructures, where the active sites can be regenerated by the deposition of carbon decomposed from the reactant (CO) to make the reactions self-sustained. Using statistical mechanics, we have also studied the conditions under which the conversion of CO to graphene and carbon dioxide is thermodynamically favorable, both in the presence and in the absence of hydrogen. These results are a first step toward the development of processes for the carbon-mediated partial sequestration and selective oxidation of CO in a hydrogen atmosphere. We have elucidated the atomic scale mechanisms of activation and reduction of carbon dioxide on specifically designed catalytic surfaces via the rational manipulation of the surface properties that can be achieved by combining transition metal thin films on oxide

  18. Observation of self-assembled periodic nano-structures induced by femtosecond laser in both ablation and deposition regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mingzhen; Zhang, Haitao; Her, Tsing-Hua

    2008-02-01

    We observed the spontaneous formation of periodic nano-structures in both femtosecond laser ablation and deposition. The former involved 400-nm femtosecond pulses from a 250-KHz regenerated amplified mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser and periodic nanocracks and the nano-structure are in the form of periodic nanocracks in the substrate, the latter applied an 80-MHz mode-locked Ti:sapphire oscillator with pulse energy less than half nanojoule in a laser-induced chemical vapor deposition configuration and tungsten nanogratings grow heterogeneously on top of the substrates. These two observed periodic nanostructures have opposite orientations respecting to laser polarization: the periodic nanocracks are perpendicular to, whereas the deposited tungsten nanogratings are parallel to laser polarization direction. By translating the substrate respecting to the laser focus, both the periodic nanocrack and tungsten nanograting extend to the whole scanning range. The deposited tungsten nanogratings possess excellent uniformity on both the grating period and tooth length. Both the attributes can be tuned precisely by controlling the laser power and scanning speed. Furthermore, we discovered that the teeth of transverse tungsten nanogratings are self aligned along their axial direction during multiple scanning with appropriate offset between scans. We demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating large-area one-dimensional grating by exploiting such unique property. These distinct phenomena of nanocracks and tungsten nanogratings indicate different responsible mechanisms.

  19. Eu{sup 2+} doped TiO{sub 2} nano structures synthesized by HYSYCVD for thermoluminescence dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez A, J. A. [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Fisica, Apdo. Postal 5-088, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Leal C, A. L.; Melendrez A, R.; Barboza F, M., E-mail: alanix89@gmail.com [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Apdo. Postal 5-088, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2016-10-15

    Titania (TiO{sub 2}) has attracted interest owing his potential applications as dosimetry material given his excellent optical, electrical and thermal properties and the ability to shape his structure make TiO{sub 2} suitable for research and dosimetry applications. In this work, a systematic study to know the magnitude of processing parameters influence on thermoluminescent properties of undoped (TiO{sub 2}) and doped (TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sup 2+}) nano materials obtained by hybrid precursor systems chemical vapor deposition (HYSYCVD) technique is presented. Synthesis of one dimension nano structures of TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sup 2+} was carried out using K{sub 2}TiF{sub 6} and EuCl{sub 2} as dopant at 0.5, 1, 2.5 and 5 wt %. The nano structures samples were irradiated with β-ray in a doses range of 0.083-3000 Gy. All thermoluminescence (Tl) glow curves showed 3 broad Tl peaks around 373, 473 and 573 K, and a dosimetric linear behavior from 0.083 to 300 Gy. The Tl has a good reproducibility, with deviations of around 5%, making these TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sup 2+} nano materials suitable for dosimetric applications. (Author)

  20. Synthesis and application of multiple rods gold-zinc oxide nano structures in the photo catalytic degradation of methyl orange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arab Chamjangali, M.; Bagherian, G.; Bahramian, B.; Fahimi Rad, B.

    2015-01-01

    Zinc oxide and gold-zinc oxide (Au-Zn O) nano structures with multiple rods (multi pods) morphology were successfully prepared. Au-Zn O nano structures were synthesized via a simple precipitation route method in the presence of oligo aniline-coated gold nanoparticles. The Au-Zn O catalyst obtained was applied for the degradation of methyl orange in an aqueous solution under UV irradiation Effects of the operational parameters such as the solution p H, amount of photocatalyst, and dye concentration on the photo catalytic degradation and decolorisation of methyl orange were studied. Detailed studies including kinetic study and regeneration of catalyst were carried out on the optimal conditions for the photodegradation of methyl orange by Au-Zn O multi pods in aqueous solution. Effect of foreign species on the photodegradation of methyl orange was also studied. An enhancement of the photo catalytic activities for photodegradation of methyl orange was observed when the gold nanoparticles were loaded on the zinc oxide multi pods. The proposed catalyst was applied for the degradation of methyl orange in synthetic wastewater samples with satisfactory results.

  1. Nano-Structural Investigation on Cellulose Highly Dissolved in Ionic Liquid: A Small Angle X-ray Scattering Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takatsugu Endo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated nano-structural changes of cellulose dissolved in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate—an ionic liquid (IL—using a small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS technique over the entire concentration range (0–100 mol %. Fibril structures of cellulose disappeared at 40 mol % of cellulose, which is a significantly higher concentration than the maximum concentration of dissolution (24–28 mol % previously determined in this IL. This behavior is explained by the presence of the anion bridging, whereby an anion prefers to interact with multiple OH groups of different cellulose molecules at high concentrations, discovered in our recent work. Furthermore, we observed the emergence of two aggregated nano-structures in the concentration range of 30–80 mol %. The diameter of one structure was 12–20 nm, dependent on concentration, which is ascribed to cellulose chain entanglement. In contrast, the other with 4.1 nm diameter exhibited concentration independence and is reminiscent of a cellulose microfibril, reflecting the occurrence of nanofibrillation. These results contribute to an understanding of the dissolution mechanism of cellulose in ILs. Finally, we unexpectedly proposed a novel cellulose/IL composite: the cellulose/IL mixtures of 30–50 mol % that possess liquid crystallinity are sufficiently hard to be moldable.

  2. Nano structure Formations and Improvement in Corrosion Resistance of Steels by Means of Pulsed Electron Beam Surface Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, K.M.; Zou, J.X.; Zou, J.X.; Grosdidier, T.; Zou, J.X.; Grosdidier, T.; Grosdidier, T.

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion of steels has long been the topic for materials scientists. It is established that surface treatment is an efficient way to improve the corrosion resistance of steels without changing the bulk properties and with low costs. In the present paper, different kinds of surface treatment techniques for steels are briefly reviewed. In particular, the surface modification involving nano structure formations of steels by using a low energy high pulsed electron beam (LEHCPEB) treatment is lightened in the case of an AISI 316L stainless steel and D2 steel. The overall results demonstrate the high potential of the LEHCPEB technique for improving the corrosion performance of steels The corrosion of steels has long been the topic for materials scientists. It is established that surface treatment is an efficient way to improve the corrosion resistance of steels without changing the bulk properties and with low costs. In the present paper, different kinds of surface treatment techniques for steels are briefly reviewed. In particular, the surface modification involving nano structure formations of steels by using a low energy high pulsed electron beam (LEHCPEB) treatment is lightened in the case of an AISI 316L stainless steel and D2 steel. The overall results demonstrate the high potential of the LEHCPEB technique for improving the corrosion performance of steels

  3. Interfacial Interactions and Nano structure Changes in DPPG/HD Monolayer at the Air/Water Interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, H.; Zhang, P.; Sun, R.; Hao, Ch.; Wang, J.; Zhu, H.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, P.; Li, Sh.

    2015-01-01

    Lung surfactant (LS) plays a crucial role in regulating surface tension during normal respiration cycles by decreasing the work associated with lung expansion and therefore decreases the metabolic energy consumed. Monolayer surfactant films composed of a mixture of phospholipids and spreading additives are of optional utility for applications in lung surfactant-based therapies. A simple, minimal model of such a lung surfactant system, composed of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phosphor-rac-(1-glycerol)] (DPPG) and hexadecanol (HD), was prepared, and the surface pressure-area π-A) isotherms and nano structure characteristics of the binary mixture were investigated at the air/water interface using a combination of Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Based on the regular solution theory, the miscibility and stability of the two components in the monolayer were analyzed in terms of compression modulusC_s"-1) , excess Gibbs free energy (δG"π_exc) , activity coefficients (γ), and interaction parameterζ. The results of this paper provide valuable insight into basic thermodynamics and nano structure of mixed DPPG/HD monolayers; it is helpful to understand the thermodynamic behavior of HD as spreading additive in LS monolayer with a view toward characterizing potential improvements to LS performance brought about by addition of HD to lung phospholipids

  4. Review of Recent Progress of Plasmonic Materials and Nano-Structures for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan X. Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS has demonstrated single-molecule sensitivity and is becoming intensively investigated due to its significant potential in chemical and biomedical applications. SERS sensing is highly dependent on the substrate, where excitation of the localized surface plasmons (LSPs enhances the Raman scattering signals of proximate analyte molecules. This paper reviews research progress of SERS substrates based on both plasmonic materials and nano-photonic structures. We first discuss basic plasmonic materials, such as metallic nanoparticles and nano-rods prepared by conventional bottom-up chemical synthesis processes. Then, we review rationally-designed plasmonic nano-structures created by top-down approaches or fine-controlled synthesis with high-density hot-spots to provide large SERS enhancement factors (EFs. Finally, we discuss the research progress of hybrid SERS substrates through the integration of plasmonic nano-structures with other nano-photonic devices, such as photonic crystals, bio-enabled nanomaterials, guided-wave systems, micro-fluidics and graphene.

  5. Effects of nano-structured photonic crystals on light extraction enhancement of nitride light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, G.M.; Yen, C.C.; Chien, H.W.; Lu, H.C.; Chang, T.W.; Nee, T.E.

    2011-01-01

    The light extraction efficiency of an InGaN/GaN light-emitting diode (LED) can be enhanced by incorporating nano-structured photonic crystals inside the LED structure. We employed plane wave expansion (PWE) method and finite difference time domain (FDTD) method to reveal the optical confinement effects with the relevant parameters. The results showed that band-gap modulation could increase the efficiency for light extraction at the lattice constant of 200 nm and depth of 200 nm for the 468-nm LED. Focused ion beam (FIB) using Ga created the desired nano-structured patterns. The LED device micro-PL (photoluminescence) results have demonstrated that the triangular photonic crystal arrays could increase the peak illumination intensity by 58%. The peak wavelength remained unchanged. The integrated area under the illumination peak was increased by 75%. As the patterned area ratio was increased to 85%, the peak intensity enhancement was further improved to 91%, and the integrated area was achieved at 106%.

  6. Structural characterization of ferrite nanoparticles and composite materials using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, A.S.; Macedo, W.A.A.; Plivelic, T.; Torriani, I.L.; Jimenez, J.A.L.; Saitovich, E.B.

    2001-01-01

    During the last decade nanocrystalline magnetic materials have been widely studied due to the multiple technological applications. Amongst the magnetic materials of major technological interest are the soft magnetic ferrites and the granular solids formed by ferrites dispersed in non-magnetic matrices. It is a well known fact that the magnetic properties of these materials, such as coercivity, magnetic saturation and magnetization, depend on the shape, size and size distribution of the nanoparticles. For this reason, the general purpose of this work was to obtain structural information on ferrite nanoparticles (NiFe 2 O 4 and NiZnFe 2 O 4 ) and granular solids obtained by dispersion of these particles in non magnetic matrices, like SiO 2 and SnO 2 . The ferrite samples were prepared by co-precipitation and heat treated between 300 and 600 deg. C at the Applied Physics Laboratory of tile CDTN. The granular solids, with 30% in volume concentration of ferrite, were obtained by mechanical alloying with milling times (t m ) varying between 1.25 and 10 h, at the CBPF

  7. Conversion of MX Nitrides to Modified Z-Phase in 9-12%Cr Ferritic Steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cipolla, Leonardo

    for Z-phase formation was highlighted during the studies. Several 9-12%Cr commercial steels with prolonged high-temperature exposures have been investigated, too. The same mechanism of Z-phase formation observed in 12%Cr model alloys was identified in industrial 9-12%Cr steels after thousands of hours......The 9-12%Cr ferritic steels are extensively used in modern steam power plants at service temperature up to 620°C. Currently the best perform ing ferritic creep resistance steel is the ASTM Grade 92, whose high temperature strength has recently been assessed by European Creep Collaborative Committee...... in 2005 as 600°C/113MPa/10 5h. All previous attempts made in the last twenty years to develop ferritic steels for 650°C applications have failed due to the incapacity to combine the superior oxidation resistance, given by 12%Cr content, with excellent creep resistance of high-alloyed ferritic steels...

  8. High impact strength polymers having novel nano-structures produced via reactive extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortorella, Nathan Fraser

    A major focus of scientists and engineers over the last century has been to increase the impact strength and therefore reduce the brittleness of materials. By altering and adding energy absorption mechanisms, brittle failure can be averted. Isotactic polypropylene (PP) is the focus of this dissertation because it is an extremely low cost, high volume, versatile plastic but behaves in a brittle manner at or below room temperature or in a notched state. Early work on impact modification of polypropylene focused on blending energy-absorbing low density elastomers and rubbers. These binary blends all had a common problem---an increase in impact strength was paralleled by a significant decrease in both elastic modulus and yield stress. Reactive extrusion processing has allowed the in-situ compatibilization of isotactic polypropylene and metallocene-catalyzed ethylene-octene copolymers (EOCs). This process involves combining both the comonomer and vector fluid approaches to grafting polyolefins. Styrene monomer and a multifunctional acrylate monomer undergo peroxide-induced copolymerization and grafting in the presence of both PP and EOC. This results in a phase separated alloy with an impact strength over 13 times that of pure polypropylene and double that of the physical blend. There is also a significant improvement in stress-strain performance when comparing the alloys to physical blend counterparts. Many researchers have categorized the necessary components to toughening polypropylene as pertaining to the amorphous phase. The alloys described in this dissertation meet the criteria put forth by these researchers, namely low density, crystallinity, and modulus of the elastomer phase, sub-micron particle diameter, close inter-particle distance, and a high degree of entanglements of both the PP matrix phase and EOC minor phase. But many people neglect to study the crystalline state of impact modified PP in conjunction with the amorphous phase. This work shows that the

  9. Radiation Stability of Nanoclusters in Nano-structured Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certain, Alicia G.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana; Shutthanandan, V.; Allen, T. R.

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are considered candidates for nuclear fission and fusion applications at high temperature and dose. The complex oxide nanoclusters in these alloys provide high-temperature strength and are expected to afford better radiation resistance. Proton, heavy ion, and neutron irradiations have been performed to evaluate cluster stability in 14YWT and 9CrODS steel under a range of irradiation conditions. Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography were used in this work to analyze the evolution of the oxide population.

  10. Ferrite measurements for SNS accelerating cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendall, R.G.; Church, R.A.

    1979-03-01

    The RF system for the SNS has six double accelerating cavities each containing seventy ferrite toroids. Difficulties experienced in obtaining toroids to the required specifications are discussed and the two toroid test cavity built to test those supplied is described. Ferrite measurements are reported which were undertaken to measure; (a) μQf as a function of frequency and RF field level and (b) bias current as a function of frequency for different ranges of ferrite permeability μ. (U.K.)

  11. Solubility limit and precipitation kinetics of iron-phosphide in ferritic iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shigeru

    1992-01-01

    The solubility limit of iron-phosphide in ferritic iron was examined with electrical resistivity measurements by using the relationship between resistivity and the amount of dissolved phosphorous. The temperature dependence of the solubility obtained was in good agreement with previous results. The kinetics of precipitation of the phosphide from a supersaturated Fe-3.75 at.% P alloy was also investigated with changes of the resistivity by isochronal and isothermal annealing. The activation energy for the precipitation process of the phosphide was about 2.6 eV. Diffusivities of phosphorus were estimated from the annealing behaviour and the morphology of the precipitates, which were comparable to those obtained with the tracer method previously. This suggests that the precipitation process of phosphide is rate controlled by diffusion of phosphorus in ferritic iron-phosphorus alloys. (orig.) [de

  12. Hydrogen-assisted fatigue crack growth in ferritic steels – a fractographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Di

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue crack growth (FCG behavior of a Fe-3wt.%Si ferritic alloy under different environmental conditions using in-situ electrochemical (cathodic hydrogen (H charging has been investigated. Three frequencies have been applied. Results clearly show that the FCG rate increased by a factor spanning from 20 to 1000 times, depending on the loading frequencies, when compared to the reference test in air. Lower frequency leads to higher FCG rate. A comprehensive fractographic analysis was carried out: the area fraction of different fracture surface features was measured and taken into statistical analysis. Based on these investigations, the possible mechanisms of H-enhanced FCG are discussed. Similar tests in high-pressure H gas from other studies were also compared and discussed. These results give a preliminary understanding of H effect in fatigue crack propagation procedure in ferritic alloys.

  13. Epitaxial Garnets and Hexagonal Ferrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-20

    guide growth of the epitaxial YIG films. Aluminum or gallium substitu- tions for iron were used in combination with lanthanum substitutions for yttrium... gallate spinel sub- strates. There was no difficulty with nucleation in the melt and film quality appeared to be similar to that observed previously...hexagonal ferrites. We succeeded in growing the M-type lead hexaferrite (magnetoplumbite) on gallate spinel substrates. We found that the PbO-based

  14. Preparation of micro/nano-structure superhydrophobic film on aluminum plates using galvanic corrosion method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ruomei; Chao, Guang Hua; Jiang, Haiyun; Pan, Anqiang; Chen, Hong; Yuan, Zhiqing; Liu, Qilong

    2013-10-01

    A simple and novel approach has been developed to obtain a microporous film with compound nanoparticles on the surface of aluminum alloy substrate using the galvanic corrosion method. The wettability of the surface changes from hydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity after chemical modification with stearic acid (SA). The water contact angle (WCA) and sliding angle (WSA) of superhydrophobic aluminum alloy surface (SAAS) are 154 degrees and 9 degrees, respectively. The roughness of the aluminum substrate increases after the oxidation reaction. The porous aluminum matrix surface is covered with irregularly shaped holes with a mean radius of about 15 microm, similar to the surface papillae of natural Lotus leaf, with villus-like nanoparticles array on pore surfaces. The superhydrophobic property is attributed to this special surface morphology and low surface energy SA. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) pattern and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) spectrum indicate that Al2O3, Al(OH)3 and AIO(OH) has been formed on the surface of aluminum substrate after the oxidation reaction. The Raman spectra indicate that C-H bond from SA and the Al-O are formed on the SAAS. The as-formed SAAS has good stability.

  15. Ferrite-guided cyclotron-resonance maser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerby, Eli; Kesar, A.; Aharony, A.; Breitmeier, G.

    2002-01-01

    The concept of a cyclotron-resonance maser (CRM) with a ferrite loading incorporated in its waveguide is proposed. The CRM interaction occurs between the rotating electron beam and the em wave propagating along a longitudinally magnetized ferrite medium. The ferrite anisotropic permeability resembles the CRM susceptibility in many aspects, and particularly in their similar response to the axial magnetic field (the ferrite susceptibility can be regarded as a passive analog of the active CRM interaction). The ferrite loading slows down the phase velocity of the em wave and thus the axial (Weibel) mechanism of the CRM interaction dominates. The ferrite loading enables also a mechanism of spectral tunability for CRM's. The ferrite loading is proposed, therefore, as a useful ingredient for high-power CRM devices. A linear model of the combined ferrite-guided CRM interaction reveals its useful features. Future schemes may also incorporate ferrite sections functioning as isolators, gyrators, or phase shifters within the CRM device itself for selective suppression of backward waves and spurious oscillations, and for gain and efficiency enhancement

  16. Contribution to the metallurgy of welding processes in stainless ferritic-austenitic (duplex) steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perteneder, E.; Toesch, J.; Rabensteiner, G.

    1989-01-01

    Duplex steels have a ferritic austenitic structure. Therefore, to obtain a successful welding, special metallurgical regulations must be observed. The effect of energy per unit length and plate thickness onto the heat influence zone in case of manual arc welding is examined. Practice-oriented instructions for the welding technique to be applied are deduced from the results. Finally, the effect of the alloy composition onto the welding capacity of duplex steels is examined. (orig.) [de

  17. Some considerations on the toughness properties of ferritic stainless steels - A brief review

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Zwieten, ACTM

    1993-02-01

    Full Text Available . H. Bulloch* Head Office, Electricity Supply Board, Lower Fitzwilliam Street, Dublin 2, Republic of Ireland (Received 14 February 1992; accepted 25 February 1992) A BS TRA C T The present paper has attempted... of molybdenum, niobium or titanium. Recently, very low (C + N) content have been specified; the super-ferritic steels. The higher alloy compositions can also include up to 4% Ni, provided this does not alter their fully...

  18. Corrosion of Ferritic-Martensitic steels in high temperature water: A literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F.

    2001-01-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steel in high temperature water as reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) including stress corrosion cracking (SCC), corrosion fatigue and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS). Are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. (Author)

  19. The impact of structural relaxation on spin polarization and magnetization reversal of individual nano structures studied by spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Dirk; Phark, Soo-Hyon; Corbetta, Marco; Fischer, Jeison A; Oka, Hirofumi; Kirschner, Jürgen

    2014-10-01

    The application of low temperature spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy in magnetic fields for the quantitative characterization of spin polarization, magnetization reversal and magnetic anisotropy of individual nano structures is reviewed. We find that structural relaxation, spin polarization and magnetic anisotropy vary on the nm scale near the border of a bilayer Co island on Cu(1 1 1). This relaxation is lifted by perimetric decoration with Fe. We discuss the role of spatial variations of the spin-dependent electronic properties within and at the edge of a single nano structure for its magnetic properties.

  20. Dilution and Ferrite Number Prediction in Pulsed Current Cladding of Super-Duplex Stainless Steel Using RSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Raeissi, Keyvan

    2013-12-01

    Super-duplex stainless steels have an excellent combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance at relatively low temperatures and can be used as a coating to improve the corrosion and wear resistance of low carbon and low alloy steels. Such coatings can be produced using weld cladding. In this study, pulsed current gas tungsten arc cladding process was utilized to deposit super-duplex stainless steel on high strength low alloy steel substrates. In such claddings, it is essential to understand how the dilution affects the composition and ferrite number of super-duplex stainless steel layer in order to be able to estimate its corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In the current study, the effect of pulsed current gas tungsten arc cladding process parameters on the dilution and ferrite number of super-duplex stainless steel clad layer was investigated by applying response surface methodology. The validity of the proposed models was investigated by using quadratic regression models and analysis of variance. The results showed an inverse relationship between dilution and ferrite number. They also showed that increasing the heat input decreases the ferrite number. The proposed mathematical models are useful for predicting and controlling the ferrite number within an acceptable range for super-duplex stainless steel cladding.

  1. Modification of implant material surface properties by means of oxide nano-structured coatings deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safonov, Vladimir; Zykova, Anna; Smolik, Jerzy; Rogowska, Renata; Lukyanchenko, Vladimir; Kolesnikov, Dmitrii

    2014-08-01

    The deposition of functional coatings on the metal surface of artificial joints is an effective way of enhancing joint tribological characteristics. It is well-known that nanostructured oxide coatings have specific properties advantageous for future implant applications. In the present study, we measured the high hardness parameters, the adhesion strength and the low friction coefficient of the oxide magnetron sputtered coatings. The corrosion test results show that the oxide coating deposition had improved the corrosion resistance by a factor of ten for both stainless steel and titanium alloy substrates. Moreover, the hydrophilic nature of coated surfaces in comparison with the metal ones was investigated in the tensiometric tests. The surfaces with nanostructured oxide coatings demonstrated improved biocompatibility for in vitro and in vivo tests, attributed to the high dielectric constants and the high values of the surface free energy parameters.

  2. Ultrahigh Charpy impact toughness (~450J) achieved in high strength ferrite/martensite laminated steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenquan; Zhang, Mingda; Huang, Chongxiang; Xiao, Shuyang; Dong, Han; Weng, Yuqing

    2017-02-01

    Strength and toughness are a couple of paradox as similar as strength-ductility trade-off in homogenous materials, body-centered-cubic steels in particular. Here we report a simple way to get ultrahigh toughness without sacrificing strength. By simple alloying design and hot rolling the 5Mn3Al steels in ferrite/austenite dual phase temperature region, we obtain a series of ferrite/martensite laminated steels that show up-to 400-450J Charpy V-notch impact energy combined with a tensile strength as high as 1.0-1.2 GPa at room temperature, which is nearly 3-5 times higher than that of conventional low alloy steels at similar strength level. This remarkably enhanced toughness is mainly attributed to the delamination between ferrite and martensite lamellae. The current finding gives us a promising way to produce high strength steel with ultrahigh impact toughness by simple alloying design and hot rolling in industry.

  3. Tensile properties and deformation mechanisms of a 14Cr ODS ferritic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steckmeyer, A., E-mail: antonin.steckmeyer@cea.f [Service de Recherches Metallurgiques Appliquees, CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Praud, M.; Fournier, B.; Malaplate, J.; Garnier, J.; Bechade, J.L.; Tournie, I.; Tancray, A.; Bougault, A. [Service de Recherches Metallurgiques Appliquees, CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bonnaillie, P. [Service de Recherche en Metallurgie Physique, CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2010-10-15

    The search for a new cladding material is part of the research studies carried out at CEA to develop a sodium-cooled fast reactor meeting the expectations of the Generation IV International Forum. In this study, the tensile properties of a ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened steel produced by hot extrusion at CEA have been evaluated. They prove the studied alloy to be as resistant as and more ductile than the other nano-reinforced alloys of literature. The effects of the strain rate and temperature on the total plastic strain of the material remind of diffusion phenomena. Intergranular damage and intergranular decohesion are clearly highlighted.

  4. Effect of acicular ferrite formation on grain refinement in the coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, X.L.; Wei, R.; Wu, K.M.

    2010-01-01

    The microstructure of acicular ferrite and its formation for the grain refinement of coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone of high strength low-alloy bainite steels were studied using three-dimensional reconstruction technique. Crystallographic grain size was analyzed by means of electron backscatter diffraction. It was revealed that the microstructure in the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone consisted of predominantly bainite packets and a small proportion of acicular ferrite. Acicular ferrite was of lath or plate-like rather than needle or rod-like morphology. Tempering of the coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone showed that the acicular ferrite was more stable than the bainite, indicating that the acicular ferrite was formed prior to bainite. The acicular ferrite laths or plates divided the prior austenite grains into smaller and separate regions, and confining the bainite transformed at lower temperatures in the smaller regions and hence leading to the grain refinement in the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone.

  5. Effect of acicular ferrite formation on grain refinement in the coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, X.L.; Wei, R. [Institute of Advanced Steels and Welding Technology, Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory for Systems Science on Metallurgical Processing, Key Laboratory for Ferrous Metallurgy and Resources Utilization of Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Wu, K.M., E-mail: wukaiming@wust.edu.cn [Institute of Advanced Steels and Welding Technology, Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory for Systems Science on Metallurgical Processing, Key Laboratory for Ferrous Metallurgy and Resources Utilization of Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China)

    2010-07-15

    The microstructure of acicular ferrite and its formation for the grain refinement of coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone of high strength low-alloy bainite steels were studied using three-dimensional reconstruction technique. Crystallographic grain size was analyzed by means of electron backscatter diffraction. It was revealed that the microstructure in the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone consisted of predominantly bainite packets and a small proportion of acicular ferrite. Acicular ferrite was of lath or plate-like rather than needle or rod-like morphology. Tempering of the coarse-grained region of heat-affected zone showed that the acicular ferrite was more stable than the bainite, indicating that the acicular ferrite was formed prior to bainite. The acicular ferrite laths or plates divided the prior austenite grains into smaller and separate regions, and confining the bainite transformed at lower temperatures in the smaller regions and hence leading to the grain refinement in the coarse-grained region of the heat-affected zone.

  6. The fabrication and hydrophobic property of micro-nano patterned surface on magnesium alloy using combined sparking sculpture and etching route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yunfeng [Institute for Advanced Ceramics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Yaming, E-mail: wangyaming@hit.edu.cn [Institute for Advanced Ceramics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu, Hao [Institute for Advanced Ceramics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu, Yan [Key Laboratory of Bionic Engineering (Ministry of Education), Jilin University, Changchun 130022 (China); Guo, Lixin; Jia, Dechang; Ouyang, Jiahu; Zhou, Yu [Institute for Advanced Ceramics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A hydrophobic micro-nano roughness surface on magnesium was fabricated. • Micro-nano structure derives from duplicating ‘over growth’ regions by MAO. • 7–9 μm micro-scale big pores insetting with nano-scale fine pores were fabricated. • Hydrophobicity of micro-nano surface was improved by chemical decoration and stearic treatment. - Abstract: Magnesium alloy with micro-nano structure roughness surface, can serve as the loading reservoirs of medicine capsule and industrial lubricating oil, or mimic ‘lotus leaf’ hydrophobic surface, having the potential applications in medical implants, automobile, aerospace and electronic products, etc. Herein, we propose a novel strategy to design a micro-nano structure roughness surface on magnesium alloy using combined microarc sparking sculpture and etching in CrO{sub 3} aqueous solution. A hydrophobic surface (as an applied example) was further fabricated by chemical decorating on the obtained patterned magnesium alloy surface to enhance the corrosion resistance. The results show that the combined micro-nano structure of 7–9 μm diameter big pores insetting with nano-scale fine pores was duplicated after etched the sparking sculptured ‘over growth’ oxide regions towards the magnesium substrate. The micro-nano structure surface was chemically decorated using AgNO{sub 3} and stearic acid, which enables the contact angle increased from 60° to 146.8°. The increasing contact angle is mainly attributed to the micro-nano structure and the chemical composition. The hydrophobic surface of magnesium alloy improved the corrosion potential from −1.521 V of the bare magnesium to −1.274 V. Generally, the sparking sculpture and then etching route demonstrates a low-cost, high-efficacy method to fabricate a micro-nano structure hydrophobic surface on magnesium alloy. Furthermore, our research on the creating of micro-nano structure roughness surface and the hydrophobic treatment can be easily

  7. The fabrication and hydrophobic property of micro-nano patterned surface on magnesium alloy using combined sparking sculpture and etching route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yunfeng; Wang, Yaming; Liu, Hao; Liu, Yan; Guo, Lixin; Jia, Dechang; Ouyang, Jiahu; Zhou, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A hydrophobic micro-nano roughness surface on magnesium was fabricated. • Micro-nano structure derives from duplicating ‘over growth’ regions by MAO. • 7–9 μm micro-scale big pores insetting with nano-scale fine pores were fabricated. • Hydrophobicity of micro-nano surface was improved by chemical decoration and stearic treatment. - Abstract: Magnesium alloy with micro-nano structure roughness surface, can serve as the loading reservoirs of medicine capsule and industrial lubricating oil, or mimic ‘lotus leaf’ hydrophobic surface, having the potential applications in medical implants, automobile, aerospace and electronic products, etc. Herein, we propose a novel strategy to design a micro-nano structure roughness surface on magnesium alloy using combined microarc sparking sculpture and etching in CrO_3 aqueous solution. A hydrophobic surface (as an applied example) was further fabricated by chemical decorating on the obtained patterned magnesium alloy surface to enhance the corrosion resistance. The results show that the combined micro-nano structure of 7–9 μm diameter big pores insetting with nano-scale fine pores was duplicated after etched the sparking sculptured ‘over growth’ oxide regions towards the magnesium substrate. The micro-nano structure surface was chemically decorated using AgNO_3 and stearic acid, which enables the contact angle increased from 60° to 146.8°. The increasing contact angle is mainly attributed to the micro-nano structure and the chemical composition. The hydrophobic surface of magnesium alloy improved the corrosion potential from −1.521 V of the bare magnesium to −1.274 V. Generally, the sparking sculpture and then etching route demonstrates a low-cost, high-efficacy method to fabricate a micro-nano structure hydrophobic surface on magnesium alloy. Furthermore, our research on the creating of micro-nano structure roughness surface and the hydrophobic treatment can be easily extended to the

  8. Vanadium-base alloys for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Loomis, B.A.; Diercks, D.R.

    1984-10-01

    Vanadium-base alloys offer potentially significant advantages over other candidate alloys as a structural material for fusion reactor first wall/blanket applications. Although the data base is more limited than that for the other leading candidate structural materials, viz., austenitic and ferritic steels, vanadium-base alloys exhibit several properties that make them particularly attractive for the fusion reactor environment. This paper presents a review of the structural material requirements, a summary of the materials data base for selected vanadium-base alloys, and a comparison of projected performance characteristics compared to other candidate alloys. Also, critical research and development (R and D) needs are defined

  9. Vanadium-base alloys for fusion reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.L.; Loomis, B.A.; Diercks, D.R.

    1984-10-01

    Vanadium-base alloys offer potentially significant advantages over other candidate alloys as a structural material for fusion reactor first wall/blanket applications. Although the data base is more limited than that for the other leading candidate structural materials, viz., austenitic and ferritic steels, vanadium-base alloys exhibit several properties that make them particularly attractive for the fusion reactor environment. This paper presents a review of the structural material requirements, a summary of the materials data base for selected vanadium-base alloys, and a comparison of projected performance characteristics compared to other candidate alloys. Also, critical research and development (R and D) needs are defined.

  10. The preparation, cytocompatibility and antimicrobial property of micro/nano structural titanium loading alginate and antimicrobial peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiyuan; Zhong, Mou; Sun, Yuhua; Chen, Junhong; Feng, Bo

    2018-03-01

    Titanium with hybrid microporous/nanotubes (TMNT) structure on its surface was fabricated by acid etching and subsequently anodization at different voltages. Bovine lactoferricin, a kind of antimicrobial peptide, and sodium alginate (NaAlg) were loaded onto titanium surface through layer by layer assembly. The drug release, cytocompatibility and antimicrobial property against S.aureus and E.coil were studied by release experiment, osteoblast and bacterial cultures. Results indicated that samples with nanotubes of bigger diameter carried more drugs and had better biocompatibility, and drug-loaded samples acquired better biocompatibility compared with drug-free samples. Furthermore, the drug-loaded samples exhibited good initial antimicrobial property, but weak long-term antimicrobial property. Therefore, drug-loaded titanium with micro/nano structure, especially, of big diameter nanotubes, could be a promise material for medical implants, such as internal/external fixation devices.

  11. X-ray free electron laser and its application to 3-dimensional imaging of non-crystalline nano-structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2007-01-01

    The Laser in the X-ray region has been anticipated to be realized as a light source to probe the nano-world. Free electron lasers using high energy electron accelerators have been promising the candidates. The finding of the principle of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) resolved the technological difficulties accompanying the X-ray free electron laser, and the construction of large scale SASE facilities started in western countries. In Japan the construction of an SASE facility started in 2006 to be completed in 2010 at the site of the large synchrotron radiation facility, SPring-8 positioned as a 'critical technology of national importance' by the Japanese government. The principle of the X-ray free electron laser is explained and the outline of the Japanese facility construction plan is presented. Also the application of the X-ray laser to the imaging of non-crystalline nano-structure is introduced. (K.Yoshida)

  12. Fabrication of Hierarchically Micro- and Nano-structured Mold Surfaces Using Laser Ablation for Mass Production of Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Jiwhan; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Na, Suckjoo; Lim, Hyuneui; Jung, Dae-Hwan

    2010-10-01

    Many studies have examined the formation of surfaces with mixed patterns of micro- and nano-sized lotus leaves that have hydrophobic properties. In this study, micro- and nano-shapes such as lotus leaves were fabricated on a metal mold surface using laser ablation and ripple formation. A microstructure on the mold surface was replicated onto poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) using the polymer casting method to manufacture low-cost hydrophobic surfaces. A PDMS surface with micro- and nano-structures that were the inverse image of a lotus leaf showed hydrophobic characteristics (water contact angle: 157°). From these results, we deduced that portions of the microstructures were wet and that air gaps existed between the microstructures and the water drops. In this paper we suggest the possibility of the mass production of hydrophobic plastic surfaces and the development of a methodology for the hydrophobic texturing of various polymer surfaces, using the polymer casting method with laser-processed molds.

  13. Development of ODS ferritic-martensitic steels for application to high temperature and irradiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambard, V.

    2000-01-01

    Iron oxide dispersion strengthened alloys are candidate for nuclear fuel cladding. Therefore, it is crucial to control their microstructure in order to optimise their mechanical properties at temperatures up to 700 deg C. The industrial candidates, ODS ferritic alloys, present an anisotropic microstructure which induces a weakening of mechanical properties in transversal direction as well as the precipitation of brittle phases under thermal aging and irradiation. For this purpose, we tried to develop a material with isotropic properties. We studied several 9Cr-1Mo ferritic/martensitic alloys, strengthened or not by oxide dispersion. The mechanical alloying was performed by attribution and powders were consolidated by hot extrusion. In this work, different metallurgical characterisation techniques and modelling were used to optimise a new martensitic ODS alloy. Microstructural and chemical characterization of matrix has been done. The effect of austenitizing and isochronal tempering treatments on microstructure and hardness has been studied. Oxide distribution, size and chemical composition have been studied before and after high temperature thermal treatment. The study of phase transformation upon heating has permitted the extrapolation to the equilibrium temperature formation of austenite. Phase transformation diagrams upon cooling have been determined and the transformation kinetics have been linked to austenite grain size by a simple relation. Fine grain size is unfavourable for the targeted application, so a particular thermal treatment inducing a coarser grain structure has been developed. Finally, tensile properties have been determined for the different microstructures. (author)

  14. Swelling in several commercial alloys irradiated to very high neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Pintler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Swelling values have been obtained from a set of commercial alloys irradiated in EBR-II to a peak fluence of 2.5 x 10 23 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) or approx. 125 dpa covering the range 400 to 650 0 C. The alloys can be ranked for swelling resistance from highest to lowest as follows: the martensitic and ferritic alloys, the niobium based alloys, the precipitation strengthened iron and nickel based alloys, the molybdenum alloys and the austenitic alloys

  15. Pit initiation resistance of ferritic stainless steels in chloride environments from 800 to 2600C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cieslak, W.R.; Duquette, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    The pitting resistance of high-purity ferritic stainless steels has been studied by potentiodynamic anodic polarization, mechanical film-rupture (scratch) testing, and microstructural examination. The purpose has been to determine the ability of the Fe-Cr-Mo alloys to resist pit initiation at temperatures up to 260 0 C in chloride environments. At temperatures exceeding about 200 0 C, Cr is shown to become much more effective than Mo to enhance alloy pitting resistance. In fact, at 260 0 C, 2% Mo does not noticeably affect the pitting resistance of 18% Cr or 28% Cr steels. Also, 5% Mo is more effective for the lower Cr than for the higher Cr alloy, unlike lower temperatures, at which the effect of the two elements is greater than additive. Preferential localized attack at microstructural features, e.g. inclusions, is not observed under any of the experimental conditions, rather the pit-initiation resistance is controlled solely by alloy composition

  16. Application of thermoelectricity to NDE of thermally aged cast duplex stainless steels and neutron irradiated ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coste, J.F.; Leborgne, J.M.; Massoud, J.P.; Grisot, O.; Miloudi, S.

    1997-10-01

    The thermoelectric power (TEP) of an alloy depends mainly on its temperature, its chemical composition and its atomic arrangement. The TEP measurement technique is used in order to study and follow two degradation phenomena affecting some components of the primary loop of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). The first degradation phenomenon is the thermal aging of cast duplex stainless steel components. The de-mixing of the ferritic Fe-Cr-Ni slid solution is responsible for the decreasing of the mechanical characteristics. Laboratory studies have shown the sensitivity of TEP to the de-mixing phenomenon. TEP increases linearly with the ferrite content and with and Arrhenius-type aging parameter depending on time, temperature and activation energy. TEP is also correlated to mechanic characteristics. The second degradation phenomenon is the aging of ferritic steels due to neutron irradiation at about 290 deg C. In this case, the degradation mechanism is the formation of clusters of solute atoms and/or copper rich precipitates that causes the hardening of the material. As a first approach, a study of binary Fe-Cu alloys irradiated by electrons at 288 deg C has revealed the possibility of following the copper depletion of the ferritic matrix. Moreover, the recovery of the mechanical properties of the alloy by annealing can be monitored. Finally, a correlation between Vickers hardness and TEP has been established. (author)

  17. Swelling of Fe-Mn and Fe-Cr-Mn alloys at high neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Brager, H.R.

    1986-06-01

    Swelling data on neutron-irradiated simple Fe-Cr-Mn and Fe-Mn alloys, as well as commercial Fe-Cr-Mn base alloys are now becoming available at exposure levels approaching 50 dpa. The swelling rate decreases from the ∼1%/dpa found at lower exposures, probably due to the extensive formation of ferritic phases. As expected, commercial alloys swell less than the simple alloys

  18. Microwave Measurements of Ferrite Polymer Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastislav Dosoudil

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the microwave measurements performed on the nickel-zinc sintered ferrite with the chemical formula Ni0.3Zn0.7Fe2O4 produced by the ceramic technique and composite materials based on this ferrite and a non-magnetic polymer (polyvinyl chloride matrix. The prepared composite samples had the same particle size distribution 0-250um but different ferrite particle concentrations between 23 vol% and 80 vol%. The apparatus for measurement of the signal proportional to the absolute value of scattering parameter S11 (reflexion coefficient is described and the dependence of measured reflected signal on a bias magnetic field has been studied. By means of experiments, the resonances to be connected with the geometry of microwave experimental set-up were distinguished from ferromagnetic resonance arising in ferrite particles of composite structure. The role of local interaction fields of ferrite particles in composite material has been discussed.

  19. Material science and manufacturing of heat-resistant reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioltukhovskiy, A.G.; Blokhin, A.I.; Budylkin, N.I.; Chernov, V.M.; Leont'eva-Smirnova, M.V.; Mironova, E.G.; Medvedeva, E.A.; Solonin, M.I.; Porollo, S.I.; Zavyalsky, L.P.

    2000-01-01

    A number of issues regarding the development and use of 10-12% Cr reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels (RAFMS) for fusion are considered. These include: (1) problems of manufacturing and modifying their composition and metallurgical condition; (2) the influence on properties of their composition, purity, δ-ferrite concentration and cooling rates in the final stages of manufacturing; and (3) the effects of neutron irradiation at 320-650 deg. C up to 108 dpa on their mechanical properties. In addition, neutron activation and nuclear accumulation of elements in RAFMS with different initial concentrations of alloying and impurity elements for typical fusion reactor (DEMO) irradiation regimes have been calculated

  20. Properties of welded joints in laser welding of aeronautic aluminum-lithium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malikov, A. G.; Orishich, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    The work presents the experimental investigation of the laser welding of the aluminum-lithium alloys (system Al-Mg-Li) and aluminum alloy (system Al-Cu-Li) doped with Sc. The influence of the nano-structuring of the surface layer welded joint by the cold plastic deformation method on the strength properties of the welded joint is determined. It is founded that, regarding the deformation degree over the thickness, the varying value of the welded joint strength is different for these aluminum alloys.

  1. Nano-Structured Bio-Inorganic Hybrid Material for High Performing Oxygen Reduction Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rongzhong; Tran, Dat T; McClure, Joshua P; Chu, Deryn

    2015-08-26

    In this study, we demonstrate a non-Pt nanostructured bioinorganic hybrid (BIH) catalyst for catalytic oxygen reduction in alkaline media. This catalyst was synthesized through biomaterial hemin, nanostructured Ag-Co alloy, and graphene nano platelets (GNP) by heat-treatment and ultrasonically processing. This hybrid catalyst has the advantages of the combined features of these bio and inorganic materials. A 10-fold improvement in catalytic activity (at 0.8 V vs RHE) is achieved in comparison of pure Ag nanoparticles (20-40 nm). The hybrid catalyst reaches 80% activity (at 0.8 V vs RHE) of the state-of-the-art catalyst (containing 40% Pt and 60% active carbon). Comparable catalytic stability for the hybrid catalyst with the Pt catalyst is observed by chronoamperometric experiment. The hybrid catalyst catalyzes 4-electron oxygen reduction to produce water with fast kinetic rate. The rate constant obtained from the hybrid catalyst (at 0.6 V vs RHE) is 4 times higher than that of pure Ag/GNP catalyst. A catalytic model is proposed to explain the oxygen reduction reaction at the BIH catalyst.

  2. Improved cladding nano-structured materials with self-repairing capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popa-Simil, L.

    2012-01-01

    When designing nuclear reactors or the materials that go into them, one of the key challenges is finding materials that can withstand an outrageously extreme environment. In addition to constant bombardment by radiation, reactor materials may be subjected to extremes in temperature, physical stress, and corrosive conditions. A limitation in fuel burnup is and usage of the nuclear fuel material is related to the structural material radiation damage, that makes the fuel be removed with low-burnup and immobilized in the waste storage pools. The advanced burnup brings cladding material embitterment due to radiation damage effects corroborated with corrosion effects makes the fuel pellet life shorter. The novel nano-clustered structured sintered material may mitigate simultaneously the radiation damage and corrosion effects driving to more robust structural materials that may make the nuclear reactor safer and more reliable. The development of nano-clustered sinter alloys provides new avenues for further examination of the role of grain boundaries and engineered material interfaces in self-healing of radiation-induced defects driving to the design of highly radiation-tolerant materials for the next generation of nuclear energy applications. (authors)

  3. Structure and radiation induced swelling of steels and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parshin, A.M.

    1983-01-01

    Regularities of vacancy void formation and radiation induced swelling of austenitic chromium-nickel steels and alloyse ferritic steels as well as titanium α-alloys under radiation by light and heavy ions and neutrons are considered. Possible methods for preparation of alloys with increased resistance to radiation swelling are described. Accounting for investigations into ferritic steels and α-alloys of titanium the basic way of weakening vacancy smelling is development of continuous homogeneous decomposition of solid solution using alloying with vividly expressed incubation period at a certain volumetric dilatation as well as decompositions of the type of ordering, K-state, lamination of solid solutions, etc. Additional alloying of solid solutions is also shown to be necessary for increasing recrystallization temperature of cold-deformed steel

  4. Development of ferritic steels for fusion reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Corwin, W.R.

    1988-08-01

    Chromium-molybdenum ferritic (martensitic) steels are leading candidates for the structural components for future fusion reactors. However, irradiation of such steels in a fusion environment will produce long-lived radioactive isotopes that will lead to difficult waste-disposal problems. Such problems could be reduced by replacing the elements in the steels (i.e., Mo, Nb, Ni, N, and Cu) that lead to long-lived radioactive isotopes. We have proposed the development of ferritic steels analogous to conventional Cr-Mo steels, which contain molybdenum and niobium. It is proposed that molybdenum be replaced by tungsten and niobium be replaced by tantalum. Eight experimental steels were produced. Chromium concentrations of 2.25, 5, 9, and 12% were used (all concentrations are in wt %). Steels with these chromium compositions, each containing 2% W and 0.25% V, were produced. To determine the effect of tungsten and vanadium, 2.25 Cr steels were produced with 2% W and no vanadium and with 0.25% V and O and 1% W. A 9Cr steel containing 2% W, 0.25 V, and 0.07% Ta was also studied. For all alloys, carbon was maintained at 0.1%. Tempering studies on the normalized steels indicated that the tempering behavior of the new Cr-W steels was similar to that of the analogous Cr-Mo steels. Microscopy studies indicated that 2% tungsten was required in the 2.25 Cr steels to produce 100% bainite in 15.9-mm-thick plate during normalization. The 5Cr and 9Cr steels were 100% martensite, but the 12 Cr steel contained about 75% martensite with the balance delta-ferrite. 33 refs., 35 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Development of ferritic steels for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Corwin, W.R.

    1988-08-01

    Chromium-molybdenum ferritic (martensitic) steels are leading candidates for the structural components for future fusion reactors. However, irradiation of such steels in a fusion environment will produce long-lived radioactive isotopes that will lead to difficult waste-disposal problems. Such problems could be reduced by replacing the elements in the steels (i.e., Mo, Nb, Ni, N, and Cu) that lead to long-lived radioactive isotopes. We have proposed the development of ferritic steels analogous to conventional Cr-Mo steels, which contain molybdenum and niobium. It is proposed that molybdenum be replaced by tungsten and niobium be replaced by tantalum. Eight experimental steels were produced. Chromium concentrations of 2.25, 5, 9, and 12% were used (all concentrations are in wt %). Steels with these chromium compositions, each containing 2% W and 0.25% V, were produced. To determine the effect of tungsten and vanadium, 2.25 Cr steels were produced with 2% W and no vanadium and with 0.25% V and O and 1% W. A 9Cr steel containing 2% W, 0.25 V, and 0.07% Ta was also studied. For all alloys, carbon was maintained at 0.1%. Tempering studies on the normalized steels indicated that the tempering behavior of the new Cr-W steels was similar to that of the analogous Cr-Mo steels. Microscopy studies indicated that 2% tungsten was required in the 2.25 Cr steels to produce 100% bainite in 15.9-mm-thick plate during normalization. The 5Cr and 9Cr steels were 100% martensite, but the 12 Cr steel contained about 75% martensite with the balance delta-ferrite. 33 refs., 35 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Kinetics of niobium carbide precipitation in ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gendt, D.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a NbC precipitation modelling in ferrite. This theoretical study is motivated by the fact it considers a ternary system and focus on the concurrence of two different diffusion mechanisms. An experimental study with TEP, SANS and Vickers micro-hardening measurements allows a description of the NbC precipitation kinetics. The mean radius of the precipitates is characterized by TEM observations. To focus on the nucleation stage, we use the Tomographic Atom Probe that analyses, at an atomistic scale, the position of the solute atoms in the matrix. A first model based on the classical nucleation theory and the diffusion-limited growth describes the precipitation of spherical precipitates. To solve the set of equations, we use a numerical algorithm that furnishes an evaluation of the precipitated fraction, the mean radius and the whole size distribution of the particles. The parameters that are the interface energy, the solubility product and the diffusion coefficients are fitted with the data available in the literature and our experimental results. It allows a satisfactory agreement as regards to the simplicity of the model. Monte Carlo simulations are used to describe the evolution of a ternary alloy Fe-Nb-C on a cubic centred rigid lattice with vacancy and interstitial mechanisms. This is realized with an atomistic description of the atoms jumps and their related frequencies. The model parameters are fitted with phase diagrams and diffusion coefficients. For the sake of simplicity, we consider that the precipitation of NbC is totally coherent and we neglect any elastic strain effect. We can observe different kinetic paths: for low supersaturations, we find an expected precipitation of NbC but for higher supersaturations, the very fast diffusivity of carbon atoms conducts to the nucleation of iron carbide particles. We establish that the occurrence of this second phenomenon depends on the vacancy arrival kinetics and can be related

  7. Thin slab processing of acicular ferrite steels with high toughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reip, Carl-Peter; Hennig, Wolfgang; Hagmann, Rolf [SMS Demag Aktiengesellschaft, Duesseldorf (Germany); Sabrudin, Bin Mohamad Suren; Susanta, Ghosh; Lee, Weng Lan [Megasteel Sdn Bhd, Banting (Malaysia)

    2005-07-01

    Near-net-shape casting processes today represent an important option in steelmaking. High productivity and low production cost as well as the variety of steel grades that can be produced plus an excellent product quality are key factors for the acceptance of such processes in markets all over the world. Today's research focuses on the production of pipe steel with special requirements in terms of toughness at low temperatures. The subject article describes the production of hot strip made from acicular ferritic / bainitic steel grades using the CSP thin-slab technology. In addition, the resulting strength and toughness levels as a function of the alloying concepts are discussed. Optimal control of the CSP process allows the production of higher-strength hot-rolled steel grades with a fine-grain acicular-ferritic/bainitic microstructure. Hot strip produced in this way is characterized by a high toughness at low temperatures. In a drop weight tear test, transition temperatures of up to -50 deg C can be achieved with a shear-fracture share of 85%. (author)

  8. Microstructure and mechanical properties of unirradiated low activation ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, C.Y.; Lechtenberg, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Transmission electron micrographs of normalized and tempered 9Cr-2.5W-0.3V-0.15C low activation ferritic steel showed tempered lath-type martensite with precipitation of rod and plate-like carbides at lath and grain boundaries. X-ray diffraction analysis of the extracted replicas revealed nearly 100% M 23 C 6 carbides (a=1.064 nm), with no indication of Fe 2 W-type Laves phase even after thermal aging at 600 0 C/1000 h. Thermal aging increased the number density of rod-like M 23 C 6 along prior austenite grain boundaries and martensite lath boundaries. The elevated-temperature tensile strengths of this steel are about 10% higher than the average strengths of commercial heats of 9Cr-1Mo and modified 9Cr-1Mo steels up to 650 0 C, with equivalent uniform elongation and ∝50% decrease in total elongation. The DBTT was determined to be -25 0 C which is similar to other 9Cr-1Mo steels. Fractographic examination of tensile tested specimens shows a mixed mode of equiaxed and elongated dimples at test temperatures above 400 0 C. Modification of the Ga3X alloy composition for opimization of materials properties is discussed. However, the proposed low activation ferritic steel shows the promise of improved mechanical properties over 9Cr-1Mo steels. (orig.)

  9. Investigation of hydrogen assisted cracking in acicular ferrite using site-specific micro-fracture tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costin, Walter L. [School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Lavigne, Olivier, E-mail: Olivier.lavigne@adelaide.edu.au [School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Kotousov, Andrei; Ghomashchi, Reza [School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Linton, Valerie [Energy Pipelines Cooperative Research Centre, Faculty of Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2016-01-10

    Hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC) is a common type of failure mechanism that can affect a wide range of metals and alloys. Experimental studies of HAC are cumbersome due to various intrinsic and extrinsic parameters and factors (associated with stress, hydrogen and the materials microstructure) contributing to the hydrogen crack kinetics. The microstructure of many materials consists of diverse constituents with characteristic features and mechanical properties which only occur in very small material volumes. The only way to differentiate the effect of these individual constituents on the hydrogen crack kinetics is to miniaturise the testing procedures. In this paper we present a new experimental approach to investigate hydrogen assisted crack growth in a microstructural constituent, i.e. acicular ferrite. For this purpose, sharply notched micro-cantilevers were fabricated with a Focus Ion Beam within this selected microscopic region. Acicular ferrite can be found in many ferrous alloys including ferritic weld metal and has specific features that control its intrinsic susceptibility to HAC. These features were characterised via Electron Backscatter Diffraction and the specimens were subsequently loaded under uncharged and hydrogen charged conditions with a nano-indenter. The outcomes of the testing, demonstrated that the threshold stress intensity factor, K{sub th}, to initiate crack propagation in acicular ferrite ranges between 1.56 MPa m{sup 1/2} and 4.36 MPa m{sup 1/2}. This range is significantly below the values of K{sub th} reported for various ferrous alloys in standard macro-tests. This finding indicates that the mechanisms and resistance to HAC at micro-scale could be very different than at the macro-scale as not all fracture toughening mechanisms may be activated at this scale level.

  10. SPEED DEPENDENCE OF ACOUSTIC VIBRATION PROPAGATION FROM THE FERRITIC GRAIN SIZE IN LOW-CARBON STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Vakulenko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. It is determining the nature of the ferrite grain size influence of low-carbon alloy steel on the speed propagation of acoustic vibrations. Methodology. The material for the research served a steel sheet of thickness 1.4 mm. Steel type H18T1 had a content of chemical elements within grade composition: 0, 12 % C, 17, 5 % Cr, 1 % Mn, 1, 1 % Ni, 0, 85 % Si, 0, 9 % Ti. The specified steel belongs to the semiferritic class of the accepted classification. The structural state of the metal for the study was obtained by cold plastic deformation by rolling at a reduction in the size range of 20-30 % and subsequent recrystallization annealing at 740 – 750 ° C. Different degrees of cold plastic deformation was obtained by pre-selection of the initial strip thickness so that after a desired amount of rolling reduction receives the same final thickness. The microstructure was observed under a light microscope, the ferrite grain size was determined using a quantitative metallographic technique. The using of X-ray structural analysis techniques allowed determining the level of second-order distortion of the crystal latitude of the ferrite. The speed propagation of acoustic vibrations was measured using a special device such as an ISP-12 with a working frequency of pulses 1.024 kHz. As the characteristic of strength used the hardness was evaluated by the Brinell’s method. Findings. With increasing of ferrite grain size the hardness of the steel is reduced. In the case of constant structural state of metal, reducing the size of the ferrite grains is accompanied by a natural increasing of the phase distortion. The dependence of the speed propagation of acoustic vibrations up and down the rolling direction of the ferrite grain size remained unchanged and reports directly proportional correlation. Originality. On the basis of studies to determine the direct impact of the proportional nature of the ferrite grain size on the rate of propagation of sound

  11. Manufacturing a durable superhydrophobic polypropylene coating on aluminum alloy substrate by adding nano-titania nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haiyun; Wu, Ruomei; Hu, Zhongliang; Yuan, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xuehui; Liu, Qilong

    2014-07-01

    A superhydrophobic polypropylene (PP) coating on the surface of aluminum alloy coupons is unstable because of the existence of metastable state in curing process. Nano-titania particles were added into PP solution to form hierarchical micro- and nano-structures of PP coatings on the surface of aluminum alloy coupons. The morphology of the coatings was observed with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and the corresponding structure and components were investigated with Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD), respectively. The results indicated that nano-TiO2 particles are the main nucleation cores in the curing of the coatings; PP in solution is enclosed in these cores and crystallizes gradually. The coatings can preserve the stable micro- and nano-structure on six months due to the nucleation action of nano-TiO2 particles, and its durable water contact angle (WCA) is about 164 +/- 1.5 degrees.

  12. Growth modes of individual ferrite grains in the austenite to ferrite transformation of low carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.Z.; Xiao, N.M.; Lan, Y.J.; Zheng, C.W.; Li, Y.Y.

    2007-01-01

    The mesoscale deterministic cellular automaton (CA) method and probabilistic Q-state Potts-based Monte Carlo (MC) model have been adopted to investigate independently the individual growth behavior of ferrite grain during the austenite (γ)-ferrite (α) transformation. In these models, the γ-α phase transformation and ferrite grain coarsening induced by α/α grain boundary migration could be simulated simultaneously. The simulations demonstrated that both the hard impingement (ferrite grain coarsening) and the soft impingement (overlapping carbon concentration field) have a great influence on the individual ferrite growth behavior. Generally, ferrite grains displayed six modes of growth behavior: parabolic growth, delayed nucleation and growth, temporary shrinkage, partial shrinkage, complete shrinkage and accelerated growth in the transformation. Some modes have been observed before by the synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiment. The mesoscopic simulation provides an alternative tool for investigating both the individual grain growth behavior and the overall transformation behavior simultaneously during transformation

  13. Tem study of thermal ageing of ferrite in cast duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nenonen, P.; Massoud, J.P.; Timofeev, B.T.

    2002-01-01

    The changes in the microstructure and composition of ferrite in two types of cast duplex stainless steels and in an austenitic-ferritic weld metal after long term thermal ageing has been studied using analytical transmission electron microscope (FEGTEM). A cast test steel containing Mo was investigated first as a reference material in three different conditions: as solution annealed, aged at 300 C and aged at 400 C. This investigation was carried out to gain experience of how EDS (X-ray analyser) analyser and TEM (transmission electron microscope) can be used to study elemental inhomogeneity, which is usually investigated with an atom probe (APFIM). The two other materials, an austenitic-ferritic weld metal and a cast duplex Ti-stabilised stainless steel used for long time at NPP operation temperature were investigated using the experience obtained with the test steel. The results showed that analytical TEM can be used to investigate elemental inhomogeneity of ferrite, but there are several important things to be taken into account when the spectra for this purpose are collected. These things are, such as the thickness of the specimen, probe size, contamination rate, 'elemental background' of the spectrum and possible enrichment of certain alloying elements in the surface oxide layer of the TEM-specimens. If minor elements are also analysed, it may increase the scattering of the results. (authors)

  14. Corrosion of austenitic and ferritic-martensitic steels exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, L.; Anderson, M.; Taylor, D.; Allen, T.R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Oxidation is the primary corrosion phenomenon for the steels exposed to S-CO 2 . → The austenitic steels showed significantly better corrosion resistance than the ferritic-martensitic steels. → Alloying elements (e.g., Mo and Al) showed distinct effects on oxidation behavior. - Abstract: Supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO 2 ) is a potential coolant for advanced nuclear reactors. The corrosion behavior of austenitic steels (alloys 800H and AL-6XN) and ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels (F91 and HCM12A) exposed to S-CO 2 at 650 deg. C and 20.7 MPa is presented in this work. Oxidation was identified as the primary corrosion phenomenon. Alloy 800H had oxidation resistance superior to AL-6XN. The FM steels were less corrosion resistant than the austenitic steels, which developed thick oxide scales that tended to exfoliate. Detailed microstructure characterization suggests the effect of alloying elements such as Al, Mo, Cr, and Ni on the oxidation of the steels.

  15. Microstructure feature of friction stir butt-welded ferritic ductile iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Hung-Tu; Wang, Chaur-Jeng; Cheng, Chin-Pao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Defect-free ferritic ductile iron joints is fabricated by FSW. • The welding nugget is composed of graphite, martensite, and recrystallized ferrite. • The graphite displays a striped pattern in the surface and advancing side. • The ferritic matrix transforms into martensite structure during welding. • High degree of plastic deformation is found on the advancing side. - Abstract: This study conducted friction stir welding (FSW) by using the butt welding process to join ferritic ductile iron plates and investigated the variations of microsturcture in the joined region formed after welding. No defects appeared in the resulting experimental weld, which was formed using a 3-mm thick ductile iron plate and tungsten carbide alloy stir rod to conduct FSW at a rotational speed of 982 rpm and traveling speed of 72 mm/min. The welding region was composed of deformed graphite, martensite phase, and dynamically recrystallized ferrite structures. In the surface region and on the advancing side (AS), the graphite displayed a striped configuration and the ferritic matrix transformed into martensite. On the retreating side (RS), the graphite surrounded by martensite remained as individual granules and the matrix primarily comprised dynamically recrystallized ferrite. After welding, diffusion increased the carbon content of the austenite around the deformed graphite nodules, which transformed into martensite during the subsequent cooling process. A micro Vickers hardness test showed that the maximum hardness value of the martensite structures in the weld was approximately 800 HV. An analysis using an electron probe X-ray microanalyzer (EPMA) indicated that its carbon content was approximately 0.7–1.4%. The peak temperature on the RS, 8 mm from the center of the weld, measured 630 °C by the thermocouple. Overall, increased severity of plastic deformation and process temperature near the upper stir zone (SZ) resulted in distinct phase transformation

  16. Effect of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and multiple injections on diesel soot nano-structure and reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohani, Behzad; Bae, Choongsik

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • EGR reduced the nano-structural order, regardless of injection strategy. • EGR reduces both VOF and reactivity, regardless of injection strategy. • Longer dwell time between pilot and main injection increases VOF and reactivity. • With EGR, VOF and reactivity are both reduced and un-affected by injection strategy. • VOF-reactivity correlation (without causality) suggests role of surface roughness. - Abstract: The physio-chemical characteristics of soot particles are of importance with regard to performance of diesel after-treatment systems. In this study, the soot particles generated in a single-cylinder heavy-duty diesel engine are examined in terms of nanostructure, oxidative reactivity and volatile organic fraction (VOF), using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman micro-spectroscopy, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Five different injection strategies including single injection and multiple injections with various pilot injection amounts and dwell times were tested with and without exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), while combustion phasing, engine speed, and fuel injection quantity was matched for all cases. Results indicate that for the soot produced under EGR condition, nano-structural order (indicated by crystallite size obtained from XRD and AD1/AG resulted from the Raman Analysis) can explain the soot reactivity. However, in the absence of EGR, the reactivity trend cannot be explained by the structural order. It is discussed that a possible reason can be a higher level of in-cylinder oxidation in non-EGR cases (indicated by higher level of surface functional groups) which roughens the soot surface, and enhances the oxidation by increasing the specific soot surface area. It is also found that in the absence of EGR, different injection strategies impact the soot reactivity and VOF content, which can be explained mainly through the level of charge premixed-ness and the in

  17. Irradiation performance of 9--12 Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steels and their potential for in-core application in LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1993-08-01

    Ferritic-martensitic stainless steels exhibit radiation stability and stress corrosion resistance that make them attractive replacement materials for austenitic stainless steels for in-core applications. Recent radiation studies have demonstrated that 9% Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steel had less than a 30C shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) following irradiation at 365C to a dose of 14 dpa. These steels also exhibit very low swelling rates, a result of the microstructural stability of these alloys during radiation. The 9 to 12% Cr alloys to also exhibit excellent corrosion and stress corrosion resistance in out-of-core applications. Demonstration of the applicability of ferritic/martensitic stainless steels for in-core LWR application will require verification of the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior, measurement of DBTT following irradiation at 288C, and corrosion rates measurements for in-core water chemistry

  18. Technical Letter Report on the Cracking of Irradiated Cast Stainless Steels with Low Ferrite Content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Alexandreanu, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Crack growth rate and fracture toughness J-R curve tests were performed on CF-3 and CF-8 cast austenite stainless steels (CASS) with 13-14% of ferrite. The tests were conducted at ~320°C in either high-purity water with low dissolved oxygen or in simulated PWR water. The cyclic crack growth rates of CF-8 were higher than that of CF-3, and the differences between the aged and unaged specimens were small. No elevated SCC susceptibility was observed among these samples, and the SCC CGRs of these materials were comparable to those of CASS alloys with >23% ferrite. The fracture toughness values of unirradiated CF-3 were similar between unaged and aged specimens, and neutron irradiation decreased the fracture toughness significantly. The fracture toughness of CF-8 was reduced after thermal aging, and declined further after irradiation. It appears that while lowering ferrite content may help reduce the tendency of thermal aging embrittlement, it is not very effective to mitigate irradiation-induced embrittlement. Under a combined condition of thermal aging and irradiation, neutron irradiation plays a dominant role in causing embrittlement in CASS alloys.

  19. Creep strength and rupture ductility of creep strength enhanced ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushima, Hideaki; Sawada, Kota; Kimura, Kazuhiro [National Inst. for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    Creep strength and rupture ductility of Creep Strength Enhanced Ferritic (CSEF) steels were investigated from a viewpoint of stress dependence in comparison with conventional low alloy ferritic creep resistant steels. Inflection of stress vs. time to rupture curve was observed at 50% of 0.2% offset yield stress for both CSEF and conventional ferritic steels. Creep rupture ductility tends to decrease with increase in creep exposure time, however, those of conventional low alloy steels indicate increase in the long-term. Creep rupture ductility of the ASME Grades 92 and 122 steels indicates drastic decrease with decrease in stress at 50% of 0.2% offset yield stress. Stress dependence of creep rupture ductility of the ASME Grades 92 and 122 steels is well described by stress ratio to 0.2% offset yield stress, regardless of temperature. Drop of creep rupture ductility is caused by inhomogeneous recovery at the vicinity of prior austenite grain boundary, and remarkable drop of creep rupture ductility of CSEF steels should be derived from those stabilized microstructure. (orig.)

  20. Experience with the procurement of ferrite and temperature compensator for permanent magnets for accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, W.B.; Brown, B.C.; Volk, J.

    1997-07-01

    The use of permanent magnets for transporting the 8 GeV proton beam from the Fermilab Booster to the new Fermilab Main Injector accelerator has been implemented and the magnets for a new 8 GeV ring to be installed in the Main Injector tunnel for increasing the luminosity of pbar/p collisions in the Tevatron are about to start being produced. Strontium oxide ferrite was selected for the magnets due to it's low cost and satisfactory magnetic properties for the 1.5 kilogauss fields required in the 2-inch gap magnets. Fermilab has received 96,000 pounds of ferrite and by working with the Vendor (HITACHI, Edmore, MI) improved uniformity of Residual Induction (Br) has reached 3905 gauss ± 0.65%. Further details are given in the paper. Overcoming the magnetic field variation when the temperature of the magnets changes is accomplished by incorporation of approximately 30% nickel steel alloy. The ferrite changes approximately -0.2% per degree C, which is compensated for by the 13% by the volume of compensator alloy incorporated in the magnet. Fourteen thousand (14,000) pounds of this material has been received and in order to obtain sufficient uniformity the authors mixed equal amounts from each batch into each magnet. Results of this process are given in the paper

  1. Preliminary evaluation of microstructure and mechanical properties on low activation ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, C.Y.; Lechtenberg, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    Radioactive waste disposal has become a primary concern for the selection of materials for the structural components for fusion reactors. One way to minimize this potential environmental problem is to use structural materials in which the induced radioactivity decays quickly to levels that allow for near-surface disposal under 10CFR61 rules. The primary objective of this work is to develop low activation ferritic steels that exhibit mechanical and physical properties approximately equivalent to the HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo steels, but which only contain elements that would permit near-surface disposal under 10CFR61 after exposure to fusion neutrons. A preliminary evaluation of the microstructure and mechanical properties of a 9Cr-2.5W-0.3V-0.15C (GA3X) low activation ferritic steel has been performed. An optimum heat treatment condition has been defined for GA3X steel. The properties and microstructure of the quenched and tempered specimens were characterized via hardness measurement and optical metallographic observation. The hot-microhardness and ductility parameter measurements were used to estimate the tensile properties at elevated temperatures. The estimated tensile strengths of GA3X steel at elevated temperatures are comparable to both 9Cr-1Mo and the modified 9Cr-1Mo steels. These preliminary results are encouraging in that they suggest that suitable low activation alloys can be successfully produced in this ferritic alloy class

  2. Design of Radiation-Tolerant Structural Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, T.R.; Was, G.S.; Bruemmer, S.M.; Gan, J.; Ukai, S.

    2005-12-28

    The objective of this program is to improve the radiation tolerance of both austenitic and ferritic-martensitic (F-M) alloys projected for use in Generation IV systems. The expected materials limitations of Generation IV components include: creep strength, dimensional stability, and corrosion/stress corrosion compatibility. The material design strategies to be tested fall into three main categories: (1) engineering grain boundaries; (2) alloying, by adding oversized elements to the matrix; and (3) microstructural/nanostructural design, such as adding matrix precipitates. These three design strategies were tested across both austenitic and ferritic-martensitic alloy classes

  3. Optimization of production and properties of the nanoscaled ferritic ODS-alloy 13Cr-1W-0,3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-0,3TiH{sub 2} and characterization of structure and property correlations; Eigenschaftsoptimierung der nanoskaligen ferritischen ODS-Legierung 13Cr-1W-0,3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-0,3TiH{sub 2}, metallkundliche Charakterisierung und Bestimmung von Struktur-Eigenschaftskorrelationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eiselt, Charles Christopher

    2010-01-15

    Fusion power reactors next to renewable energy sources shall form an important basis for a future energy scenario avoiding damaging emissions due to the lack of fossil primary energy carriers. An efficient operation of such reactors necessitate temperatures >700 C, which require new kinds of structural materials. Today only reduced activated oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS-) materials based on iron, which have high strengths at elevated temperatures, offer the possibility to meet those criterias, which are developed in internationally coordinated programs. Therefore a nearly industrial production process based on the powdermetallurgical route is iteratively and systematically optimized to produce the ferritic ODS-alloy 13Cr-1W-0,3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-0,3TiH{sub 2}. Through TEM elemental analyses of mechanically alloyed steel powder it is confirmed, that the additives Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiH{sub 2} dissolve completely in the powder and form the ODS-particles during the HIP-cycle. Detailed studies of powder contamination during mechanical alloying reveal correlations between the contamination behaviour of certain elements and the milling parameters. A specially designed procedure of powder encapsulation and sealing leads to a successful powder compaction to the ODS-material 13Cr-1W-0,3Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-0,3TiH{sub 2}. Detailed TEM studies show a bimodal grain size distribution within the material at first. The alloy's recrystallization behaviour is the main reason for this phenomenon and is therefore discussed in detail. A high dispersion of ODS-particles as the decisive material's component with particle sizes von 3-5nm within grains and 12-36nm at the grain boundaries is successfully reached and verified by numerous TEM-Elemental Mappings. By applying hot rolling as an additional step during production a more even grain structure by equally maintaining the fine nanoskaled particle dispersion is set up. The microstructure is highly stable, since no grain- or

  4. Pseudocapacitive properties of nano-structured anhydrous ruthenium oxide thin film prepared by electrostatic spray deposition and electrochemical lithiation/delithiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.H.; Kim, J.Y.; Kim, K.B. [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Nano-structured anhydrous ruthenium oxide (RuO{sub 2}) thin films were prepared using an electrostatic spray deposition (ESD) technique followed by electrochemical lithiation and delithiation. During the electrochemical lithiation process, RuO{sub 2} decomposed to nano-structured metallic ruthenium Ru with the concomitant formation of Li{sub 2}O. Nano-structured RuO{sub 2} was formed upon subsequent electrochemical extraction of Li from the Ru/Li{sub 2}O nanocomposite. Electrochemical lithiation/deliathiation at different charge/discharge rates (C-rate) was used to control the nano-structure of the anhydrous RuO{sub 2}. Electrochemical lithiation/delithiation of the RuO{sub 2} thin film electrode at different C-rates was closely related to the specific capacitance and high rate capability of the nano-structured anhydrous RuO{sub 2} thin film. Nano-structured RuO{sub 2} thin films prepared by electrochemical lithiation and delithiation at 2C rate showed the highest specific capacitance of 653 F g{sup -1} at 20 mV s{sup -1}, which is more than two times higher than the specific capacitance of 269 F g{sup -1} for the as-prepared RuO{sub 2}. In addition, it showed 14% loss in specific capacitance from 653 F g{sup -1} at 20 mV s{sup -1} to 559 F g{sup -1} at 200 mV s{sup -1}, indicating significant improvement in the high rate capability compared to the 26% loss of specific capacitance of the as-prepared RuO{sub 2} electrode from 269 F g{sup -1} at 20 mV s{sup -1} to 198 F g{sup -1} at 200 mV s{sup -1} for the same change in scan rate. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. Ferrite HOM Absorber for the RHIC ERL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn,H.; Choi, E.M.; Hammons, L.

    2008-10-01

    A superconducting Energy Recovery Linac is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory to serve as test bed for RHIC upgrades. The damping of higher-order modes in the superconducting five-cell cavity for the Energy-Recovery linac at RHIC is performed exclusively by two ferrite absorbers. The ferrite properties have been measured in ferrite-loaded pill box cavities resulting in the permeability values given by a first-order Debye model for the tiled absorber structure and an equivalent permeability value for computer simulations with solid ring dampers. Measured and simulated results for the higher-order modes in the prototype copper cavity are discussed. First room-temperature measurements of the finished niobium cavity are presented which confirm the effective damping of higher-order modes in the ERL. by the ferrite absorbers.

  6. Focused Application Software for Ferrite Patch Antennas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trott, Keith

    1999-01-01

    ... (brick and tetrahedral elements) are combined by MRC via a graphical user interface (GUI) into a user friendly code capable of modeling conformal antennas with ferrite sub and superstrates recessed in planar surfaces.

  7. Micro and nano-structured green gallium indium nitride/gallium nitride light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Christoph J. M.

    towards smaller values was observed when the stripe width was reduced from 1 μm to 50 nm. At the same time a strong fourfold enhancement of the light emission from the patterned region over the unpatterned area was observed. Micro-patterned LEDs showed non-linear scaling of the light output power, and an enhancement of 39 % was achieved for structures with an area fill ratio of 0.5 over an LED with square mesa. Growth of cubic GaN and cubic GaInN/GaN LEDs was shown by M-OVPE in Vshaped grooves formed by the {111} planes of etched silicon. SEM images of the GaN layer in small ( 0.5 μm) regions show a contrast change where the phase boundary between cubic and wurtzite GaN is expected to occur. The growth parameter space is explored for optimal conditions while minimizing the alloying problem for GaN growth on Si. The cubic GaN phase is confirmed by electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) in the V-groove center, whereas wurtzite GaN is found near the groove edges. Luminescence of undoped GaN and GaInN/GaN multi-quantum well structures was studied by cathodoluminescence (CL). The undoped cubic GaN structure showed strong band-edge luminescence at 385 nm (3.22 eV) at 78 K, whereas for the MQW device strong emission at 498 nm is observed, even at room temperature. Full cubic LED structures were grown, and wavelength-stable electroluminescence at 489 nm was demonstrated. LEDs with integrated light extraction structures are grown on free-standing GaN substrates with different off-cut angles. The devices with different off-cut show pronounced features at the top surface that also penetrate the active region. For a 2.24° off-cut, these features resemble fish scales, where the feature sizes are in the μm-range. The 2.24° off-cut LED shows a 3.6-fold increased light output power compared to a LED on virtually on-axis substrate with 0.06° off-cut. The enhancement found in the fish scale LEDs is attributed to increased light scattering, effectively reducing the fraction of

  8. The con focal laser scanning microscope: a powerful tool for the investigation of micro devices and nano structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montereali, R.M.; Baldacchini, G.; Bonfigli, F.; Vincenti, M.A.; Almaviva, S.

    2008-01-01

    In the last years the Con focal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM), a versatile and powerful optical instrument, gained a strong increase of interest in the scientific community, not only for biological applications, but also for the characterization of materials, microstructures and devices. The conditions that favoured its wide diffusion are surely the large availability of laser sources and powerful computer-imaging and data-processing systems at relatively low cost; however, the main reason that contributed to its popularity is the ability to obtain tri dimensional reconstruction of a great variety of biological and non-biological samples with sub micrometric resolution. In this report we show the main properties and characteristics of the Con focal Microscope Nikon Eclipse 80-i C1, which has operated sinc more than two years in the Solid State Laser and Spectroscopy Laboratory of the ENEA Research Center in Frascati. Some of the results obtained in the characterization of luminescent micro and nano structures based on lithium fluoride color centers will be presented [it

  9. Hierarchical Micro/Nano Structures by Combined Self-Organized Dewetting and Photopatterning of Photoresist Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachan, Priyanka; Kulkarni, Manish; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2015-11-17

    Photoresists are the materials of choice for micro/nanopatterning and device fabrication but are rarely used as a self-assembly material. We report for the first time a novel interplay of self-assembly and photolithography for fabrication of hierarchical and ordered micro/nano structures. We create self-organized structures by the intensified dewetting of unstable thin (∼10 nm to 1 μm) photoresist films by annealing them in an optimal solvent and nonsolvent liquid mixture that allows spontaneous dewetting to form micro/nano smooth dome-like structures. The density, size (∼100 nm to millimeters), and curvature/contact angle of the dome/droplet structures are controlled by the film thickness, composition of the dewetting liquid, and time of annealing. Ordered dewetted structures are obtained simply by creating spatial variation of viscosity by ultraviolet exposure or by photopatterning before dewetting. Further, the structures thus fabricated are readily photopatterned again on the finer length scales after dewetting. We illustrate the approach by fabricating several three-dimensional structures of varying complexity with secondary and tertiary features.

  10. Development of a Quartz Crystal Microbalance Sensor Modified by Nano-Structured Polyaniline for Detecting the Plasticizer in Gaseous State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui XU

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM modified by a film of nano-structured polyaniline (nano-PANI is developed as a gas sensor for detecting the presence of the plasticizer, such as dibutyl phthalate (DBP in the ambient. Nano-PANI is prepared using a non-template method and the films are deposited using physical coating method. Scanning electron microscopy is used to characterize the nano-PANI film. The sensor response towards DBP is tested in a sealed gas chamber. The QCM resonant frequency shift is measured due to the absorption of DBP with different concentration ranging from 0.04 to 1.2 ppm. The experiment results show that the variation of the frequency is a linear function of DBP concentration and the sensitivity up to 54 Hz/ppm could be achieved by using the researched nano-PANI on QCM. To investigate the selectivity, the potential interfering analytes such as acetone, ethanol, acetaldehyde and formaldehyde are tested. And the mechanism hypothesis of the nano-PANI sensitive to the plasticizer is analyzed.

  11. Determination of standard molar enthalpies of formation of SrMoO4 micro/nano structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Yunxiao; Fan, Gaochao; Huang, Zaiyin; Sun, Jilong; Wang, Lude; Wang, Tenghui; Chen, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of thermochemical cycle between the nano and bulk reaction systems. Highlights: ► A thermochemical cycle was designed. ► Relationship of standard molar enthalpies of formation between micro/nano and bulk SrMoO 4 was gained. ► Microcalorimetry was used as a supplementary technology. ► Standard molar enthalpies of formation of the synthesized micro/nano SrMoO 4 were obtained. ► This novel approach can be used to other micro/nano materials. - Abstract: SrMoO 4 micro/nano structures were prepared by a simple reverse microemulsion method and were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). In order to associate standard molar enthalpies of formation of nano SrMoO 4 with bulk SrMoO 4 , the relationship of them was obtained through designing a thermochemical cycle according to thermodynamic potential function method. Combined with microcalorimetry, the standard molar enthalpies of formation of the synthesized micro/nano SrMoO 4 at 298.15 K were gained in this paper. And the variation of standard molar enthalpies of formation of micro/nano SrMoO 4 with different morphologies and sizes was discussed.

  12. Synthesis of carbide fuels from nano-structured precursors: impact on carbo-reduction and physico-chemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saravia, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The classical way classically used for manufacturing carbide fuels consists of carbo-reducing at high temperature (1600 C) and under primary vacuum a mixture of AnO 2 and graphite powders. These conditions are disadvantageous for the synthesis of mixed (U,Pu)C carbides on account of plutonium volatilization. Therefore, one of the main aims of these studies is to decrease the carbo-reduction temperature. The experiments focused mainly on the lowering of the uranium oxide temperature. This result has been obtained with the use of uranium oxide and carbon nano-structured precursors. To achieve this goal colloidal suspensions of uranium oxide have been prepared and stabilized by cellulosic ethers. Cellulosic ethers are both stabiliser for uranium oxide nanoparticles and carbon source for carbo-reduction. It has been shown that these precursors are more efficient for carbo-reduction than the standard precursors: a reduction of 300 C of carbo-reduction temperature has been obtained. The impact of these precursors on carbo-reduction and on physico-chemical properties as well as the structural and microstructural characterizations of the obtained carbides have been carried out. (author) [fr

  13. Superficial characterization and nano structural of nano multilayers Cr/Cr N obtained by UBM with different unbalance grades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piratoba, U.; Arenas A, J.; Olaya, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Coatings of 25 bilayers of Cr/Cr N, with total thickness between 1.32 and 1.67 microns, were deposited by reactive sputtering on silicon and H13 steel, in argon and argon with nitrogen atmospheres. A power of 160 watts, flows of argon and nitrogen of 9 and 3 sc cm respectively, and an axial unbalanced magnetron, whose coefficient of geometrical unbalance K G was varied between 0.85 and 1.37. Of these coatings, micrographs of surface and cross section scanning electron microscopy were obtained, was make a micro structural characterization with X-ray diffraction, a nano structural characterization by transmission electron microscopy, and surface characterization by atomic force microscopy in tapping mode: analysis showed uniform surface coating with globular and pyramidal formations, which contain some granular inclusions and microscopic craters. With the increase in the unbalance of the magnetic field, the grain size, the roughness and the speed of the coatings growth were increased. (Author)

  14. Facile fabrication of nano-structured silica hybrid film with superhydrophobicity by one-step VAFS approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yi; Yue, Renliang; Liu, Gang; Yang, Jie; Ni, Yong; Wu, Xiaofeng; Chen, Yunfa

    2013-01-01

    Here we report a novel one-step vapor-fed aerosol flame synthesis (VAFS) method to attain silica hybrid film with superhydrophobicity on normal glass and other engineering material substrates using hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) as precursor. The deposited nano-structured silica films represent excellent superhydrophobicity with contact angle larger than 150° and sliding angle below 5°, without any surface modification or other post treatments. SEM photographs proved that flame-made SiO2 nanoparticles formed dual-scale surface roughness on the substrates. It was confirmed by FTIR and XPS that the in situ formed organic fragments on the particle surface as species like (CH3)xSiO2-x/2 (x = 1, 2, 3) which progressively lowered the surface energy of fabricated films. Thus, these combined dual-scale roughness and lowered surface energy cooperatively produced superhydrophobic films. IR camera had been used to monitor the real-time flame temperature. It is found that the inert dilution gas inflow played a critical role in attaining superhydrophobicity due to its cooling and anti-oxidation effect. This method is facile and scalable for diverse substrates, without any requirement of complex equipments and multiple processing steps. It may contribute to the industrial fabrication of superhydrophobic films.

  15. High-speed infrared thermography for the measurement of microscopic boiling parameters on micro- and nano-structured surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Youngjae; Kim, Hyungdae; Kim, Hyungmo; Kim, Joonwon

    2014-01-01

    Micro- and nano-scale structures on boiling surfaces can enhance nucleate boiling heat transfer coefficient (HTC) and critical heat flux (CHF). A few studies were conducted to explain the enhancements of HTC and CHF using the microscopic boiling parameters. Quantitative measurements of microscopic boiling parameters are needed to understand the physical mechanism of the boiling heat transfer augmentation on structured surfaces. However, there is no existing experimental techniques to conveniently measure the boiling parameters on the structured surfaces because of the small (nano-structured surfaces. The visualization results are analyzed to obtain the microscopic boiling parameters. Finally, quantitative microscopic boiling parameters are used to interpret the enhancement of HTC and CHF. In this study, liquid-vapor phase distributions of each surface were clearly visualized by IR thermography during the nucleate boiling phenomena. From the visualization results, following microscopic boiling parameters were quantitatively measured by image processing. - Number density of dry patch, NDP IR thermography technique was demonstrated by nucleate pool boiling experiments with M- and N surfaces. The enhancement of HTC and CHF could be explained by microscopic boiling parameters

  16. Micromagnetic simulations of spinel ferrite particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, Christine C.; Gama, Adriana M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of simulations of the magnetization field ac response (at 2-12 GHz) of various submicron ferrite particles (cylindrical dots). The ferrites in the present simulations have the spinel structure, expressed here by M 1 - n Zn n Fe 2 O 4 (where M stands for a divalent metal), and the parameters chosen were the following: (a) for n=0: M={Fe, Mn, Co, Ni, Mg, Cu }; (b) for n=0.1: M = {Fe, Mg} (mixed ferrites). These runs represent full 3D micromagnetic (one-particle) ferrite simulations. We find evidences of confined spin waves in all simulations, as well as a complex behavior nearby the main resonance peak in the case of the M = {Mg, Cu} ferrites. A comparison of the n=0 and n=0.1 cases for fixed M reveals a significant change in the spectra in M = Mg ferrites, but only a minor change in the M=Fe case. An additional larger scale simulation of a 3 by 3 particle array was performed using similar conditions of the Fe 3 O 4 (magnetite; n=0, M = Fe) one-particle simulation. We find that the main resonance peak of the Fe 3 O 4 one-particle simulation is disfigured in the corresponding 3 by 3 particle simulation, indicating the extent to which dipolar interactions are able to affect the main resonance peak in that magnetic compound.

  17. Microstructural investigations of fast reactor irradiated austenitic and ferritic-martensitic stainless steel fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agueev, V.S.; Medvedeva, E.A.; Mitrofanova, N.M.; Romanueev, V.V.; Tselishev, A.V.

    1992-01-01

    Electron microscopy has been used to characterize the microstructural changes induced in advanced fast reactor fuel claddings fabricated from Cr16Ni15Mo3NbB and Cr16Ni15Mo2Mn2TiVB austenitic stainless steels in the cold worked condition and Cr13Mo2NbVB ferritic -martensitic steel following irradiation in the BOR-60, BN-350 and BN-600 fast reactors. The data are compared with the results obtained from a typical austenitic commercial cladding material, Cr16Ni15Mo3Nb, in the cold worked condition. The results reveal a beneficial effect of boron and other alloying elements in reducing void swelling in 16Cr-15Ni type austenitic steels. The high resistance of ferritic-martensitic steels to void swelling has been confirmed in the Cr13Mo2NbVB steel. (author)

  18. Corrosion resistance improvement of ferritic steels through hydrogen additions to the BWR coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, B.M.; Jewett, C.W.; Pickett, A.E.; Indig, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    Motivated by the success of oxygen suppression for mitigation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in weld sensitized austenitic materials used in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs), oxygen suppression, through hydrogen additions to the feedwater was investigated to determine its affect on the corrosion resistance of ferritic and martensitic BWR structural materials. The results of these investigations are presented in this paper, where particular emphasis is placed on the corrosion performance of BWR pressure vessel low alloy steels, carbon steel piping materials and martensitic pump materials. It is important to note that the corrosion resistance of these materials in the BWR environment is excellent. Consequently this investigation was also motivated to determine whether there were any detrimental effects of hydrogen additions, as well as to identify any additional margin in ferritic/martensitic materials corrosion performance

  19. Strength of "Light" Ferritic and Austenitic Steels Based on the Fe - Mn - Al - C System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaputkina, L. M.; Svyazhin, A. G.; Smarygina, I. V.; Kindop, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    The phase composition, the hardness, the mechanical properties at room temperature, and the resistance to hot (950 - 1000°C) and warm (550°C) deformation are studied for cast deformable "light" ferritic and austenitic steels of the Fe - (12 - 25)% Mn - (0 - 15)% Al - (0 - 2)% C system alloyed additionally with about 5% Ni. The high-aluminum high-manganese low-carbon and carbonless ferritic steels at a temperature of about 0.5 T melt have a specific strength close to that of the austenitic steels and may be used as weldable scale-resistant and wear-resistant materials. The high-carbon Fe - (20 - 24)% Mn - (5 - 9)% Al - 5% Ni - 1.5% C austenitic steels may be applied as light high-strength materials operating at cryogenic temperatures after a solution treatment and as scale- and heat-resistant materials in an aged condition.

  20. Development and Application of High-Cr Ferritic Stainless Steels as Building Exterior Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeong H.; Lee, Yong H.; Lee, Yong D.

    2008-01-01

    Stainless Steels have been widely used as a building exterior materials in Asian countries for the last decade. It is required for the materials in this field to have an aesthetic appearance,a relatively high strength, and an excellent corrosion resistance. Other metallic materials such as copper, aluminum, and carbon steels have been also used as the exterior materials. Considering the cost of maintenance, stainless steel, having the outstanding corrosion resistance, is replacing other materials in the several parts in the building exteriors. Ferritic stainless steel has been applied as the roofing materials because its thermal expansion is much smaller than that of austenitic stainless steel. Therefore, it is suitable for the large-scale construction such as airport terminal, convention center, and football stadium. To improve the corrosion resistance of the ferritic stainless steels, the modification of alloy composition has been studied to develop new grade materials and the progress in the surface technology has been introduced. Corrosion properties, of these materials were evaluated in the laboratory and in the field for longer than two years. High-Cr ferritic stainless steel showed excellent corrosion resistance to the atmospheric environments. In the region close to the sea, the corrosion resistance of high-Cr ferritic stainless steel was much superior to that of other materials, which may prove this steel to be the appropriate materials for the construction around seashore. In some of the large constructions around seashore in South Korea, high-Cr ferritic stainless steels have been used as the building exterior materials for six years

  1. Development and Application of High-Cr Ferritic Stainless Steels as Building Exterior Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeong H.; Lee, Yong H.; Lee, Yong D. [POSCO Technical Reseaarch Lab., Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Stainless Steels have been widely used as a building exterior materials in Asian countries for the last decade. It is required for the materials in this field to have an aesthetic appearance,a relatively high strength, and an excellent corrosion resistance. Other metallic materials such as copper, aluminum, and carbon steels have been also used as the exterior materials. Considering the cost of maintenance, stainless steel, having the outstanding corrosion resistance, is replacing other materials in the several parts in the building exteriors. Ferritic stainless steel has been applied as the roofing materials because its thermal expansion is much smaller than that of austenitic stainless steel. Therefore, it is suitable for the large-scale construction such as airport terminal, convention center, and football stadium. To improve the corrosion resistance of the ferritic stainless steels, the modification of alloy composition has been studied to develop new grade materials and the progress in the surface technology has been introduced. Corrosion properties, of these materials were evaluated in the laboratory and in the field for longer than two years. High-Cr ferritic stainless steel showed excellent corrosion resistance to the atmospheric environments. In the region close to the sea, the corrosion resistance of high-Cr ferritic stainless steel was much superior to that of other materials, which may prove this steel to be the appropriate materials for the construction around seashore. In some of the large constructions around seashore in South Korea, high-Cr ferritic stainless steels have been used as the building exterior materials for six years.

  2. Modelling study on the three-dimensional neutron depolarisation response of the evolving ferrite particle size distribution during the austenite-ferrite phase transformation in steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, H.; van der Zwaag, S.; van Dijk, N. H.

    2018-07-01

    The magnetic configuration of a ferromagnetic system with mono-disperse and poly-disperse distribution of magnetic particles with inter-particle interactions has been computed. The analysis is general in nature and applies to all systems containing magnetically interacting particles in a non-magnetic matrix, but has been applied to steel microstructures, consisting of a paramagnetic austenite phase and a ferromagnetic ferrite phase, as formed during the austenite-to-ferrite phase transformation in low-alloyed steels. The characteristics of the computational microstructures are linked to the correlation function and determinant of depolarisation matrix, which can be experimentally obtained in three-dimensional neutron depolarisation (3DND). By tuning the parameters in the model used to generate the microstructure, we studied the effect of the (magnetic) particle size distribution on the 3DND parameters. It is found that the magnetic particle size derived from 3DND data matches the microstructural grain size over a wide range of volume fractions and grain size distributions. A relationship between the correlation function and the relative width of the particle size distribution was proposed to accurately account for the width of the size distribution. This evaluation shows that 3DND experiments can provide unique in situ information on the austenite-to-ferrite phase transformation in steels.

  3. 6. international conference on Nano-technology in Carbon: from synthesis to applications of nano-structured carbon and related materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This is the sixth international conference sponsored this year by the French Carbon Group (GFEC), the European Research Group on Nano-tubes GDRE 'Nano-E', in collaboration with the British Carbon Group and the 'Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel' (local organizer). The aim of this conference is to promote carbon science in the nano-scale as, for example, nano-structured carbons, nano-tubes, nano-wires, fullerenes, etc. This conference is designed to introduce those with an interest in materials to current research in nano-technology and to bring together research scientists working in various disciplines in the broad area of nano-structured carbons, nano-tubes and fullerene-related nano-structures. Elemental carbon is the simplest exemplar of this nano-technology based on covalent bonding, however other systems (for example containing hetero-atoms) are becoming important from a research point of view, and provide alternative nano-materials with unique properties opening a broad field of applications. Nano-technology requires an understanding of these materials on a structural and textural point of view and this will be the central theme. This year the conference will feature sessions on: S1. Control and synthesis of nano-materials 1.1 Nano-structured carbons: pyrolysis of polymers, activation, templates,... 1.2 Nano-tubes: Catalytic method, HiPCO, graphite vaporization, electrolysis,... 1.3 Fullerenes S2. Chemistry of carbon nano-materials 2.1 Purification of carbon nano-tubes 2.2 Functionalization - Self-assembling S3. Structural characterization S4. Theory and modelling S5. Relationship between structure and properties S6. Applications Water and air purification, Gas and energy storage, Composite materials, Field emission, Nano-electronics, Biotechnology,... S7. Environmental impact. Only one paper concerning carbon under irradiation has been added to the INIS database. (authors)

  4. Fracture toughness testing on ferritic alloys using the electropotential technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.; Wire, G.L.

    1981-01-01

    Fracture toughness measurements as done conventionally require large specimens (5 x 5 x 2.5 cm) which would be prohibitively expensive to irradiate over the fluence and temperature ranges required for first wall design. To overcome this difficulty a single specimen technique for J intergral fracture toughness measurements on miniature specimens (1.6 cm OD x 0.25 cm thick) was developed. Comparisons with specimens three times as thick show that the derived J/sub 1c/ is constant, validating the specimen for first wall applications. The electropotential technique was used to obtain continuous crack extension measurements, allowing a ductile fracture resistence curve to be constructed from a single specimen. The irradiation test volume required for fracture toughness measurements using both miniature specimens and single specimen J measurements was reduced a factor of 320, making it possible to perform a systematic exploration of irradiation temperature and dose variables as required for qualification of HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo base metal and welds for first wall application. Fracture toughness test results for HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo from 25 to 539 0 C are presented to illustrate the single specimen technique

  5. Synthesis of uniform nano-structured lead oxide by sonochemical method and its application as cathode and anode of lead-acid batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karami, Hassan; Karimi, Mohammad Ali; Haghdar, Saeed

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a research aimed at investigating the synthesis of nano-structured lead oxide through reaction of lead nitrate solution and sodium carbonate solution by the sonochemical method. At the first, lead carbonate was obtained in a synthesized solution and then, after filtration, it was calcinated at the temperature of 320 deg. C so that nano-structured lead oxide can be produced. The effects of different parameters on particle size and morphology of final lead oxide powder were optimized by a 'one at a time' method. The prepared lead oxide powder was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Under optimum conditions, uniformed and homogeneous nano-structured lead oxide powder with more spongy morphology and particle size of 20-40 nm was obtained. The synthesized lead oxide, as anode and cathode of lead-acid batteries, showed an excellent discharge capacity (140 mA h/g)

  6. Effects of atomic-level nano-structured hydroxyapatite on adsorption of bone morphogenetic protein-7 and its derived peptide by computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qun; Wang, Menghao; Lu, Xiong; Wang, Kefeng; Fang, Liming; Ren, Fuzeng; Lu, Guoming

    2017-11-09

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is the principal inorganic component of bones and teeth and has been widely used as a bone repair material because of its good biocompatibility and bioactivity. Understanding the interactions between proteins and HA is crucial for designing biomaterials for bone regeneration. In this study, we evaluated the effects of atomic-level nano-structured HA (110) surfaces on the adsorption of bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) and its derived peptide (KQLNALSVLYFDD) using molecular dynamics and density functional theory methods. The results indicated that the atomic-level morphology of HA significantly affected the interaction strength between proteins and HA substrates. The interactions of BMP-7 and its derived peptide with nano-concave and nano-pillar HA surfaces were stronger than those with flat or nano-groove HA surfaces. The results also revealed that if the groove size of nano-structured HA surfaces matched that of residues in the protein or peptide, these residues were likely to spread into the grooves of the nano-groove, nano-concave, and nano-pillar HA, further strengthening the interactions. These results are helpful in better understanding the adsorption behaviors of proteins onto nano-structured HA surfaces, and provide theoretical guidance for designing novel bioceramic materials for bone regeneration and tissue engineering.

  7. Morphology and nano-structure analysis of soot particles sampled from high pressure diesel jet flames under diesel-like conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao; Li, Tie; Wang, Yifeng; He, Pengfei

    2018-04-01

    Soot particles emitted from diesel engines have a significant impact on the atmospheric environment. Detailed understanding of soot formation and oxidation processes is helpful for reducing the pollution of soot particles, which requires information such as the size and nano-structure parameters of the soot primary particles sampled in a high-temperature and high-pressure diesel jet flame. Based on the thermophoretic principle, a novel sampling probe minimally disturbing the diesel jet flame in a constant volume combustion vessel is developed for analysing soot particles. The injected quantity of diesel fuel is less than 10 mg, and the soot particles sampled by carriers with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) grid and lacey TEM grid can be used to analyse the morphologies of soot aggregates and the nano-structure of the soot primary particles, respectively. When the quantity of diesel fuel is more than 10 mg, in order to avoid burning-off of the carriers in higher temperature and pressure conditions, single-crystal silicon chips are employed. Ultrasonic oscillations and alcohol extraction are then implemented to obtain high quality soot samples for observation using a high-resolution transmission electron microscope. An in-house Matlab-based code is developed to extract the nano-structure parameters of the soot particles. A complete sampling and analysis procedure of the soot particles is provided to study the formation and oxidation mechanism of soot.

  8. Oxidation Behavior of Some Cr Ferritic Steels for High Temperature Fuel Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, H.E.

    2012-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of three high Cr ferritic steels designated 1Al, RA and 5Al with different levels of Al, Si, Mn and Hf has been investigated in the present work. These steels have been developed as candidates for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) interconnect. Specimens of these alloys have been subjected to isothermal as well as cyclic oxidation in air. Isothermal oxidation tests are conducted in the temperature range 800 - 1000 degree C for time periods up to 1000 h. cyclic oxidation tests were carried out at 800 and 1000 degree C for twenty 25 - h cycles giving a total cyclic exposure time of 500 h. The growth rate of the oxide scales was found to follow a parabolic law over a certain oxidation period which changed with alloy composition and oxidation temperature. The value of the parabolic rate constant increased with increasing oxidation temperature. At 800 and 900 degree C alloy 1Al exhibited higher oxidation resistance compared to the other two alloys. Alloy RA showed spalling behavior when oxidized at 900 degree C and the extent of spalling increased with increasing the oxidation temperature to 1000 degree C. Alloy 5Al oxidized at 1000 degree C showed the highest oxidation resistance among the investigated alloys. Alloy 1Al and RA showed similar scale morphology and composition. X- ray diffraction analysis revealed that the scales developed on these alloys consist of Cr 2 O 3 with an outer layer of MnCr 2 O 4 and a minor amount of FeCr 2 O 4 spinels. Alloy 5Al developed scale consisting of γ- Al 2 O 3 at 800 degree C and γ and α- Al 2 O 3 at 900 degree C. Oxidation of alloy 5Al at 1000 degree C led to formation of a scale consisting mainly of the protective phase α Al 2 O 3 . The presence of 0.84 wt% Al and 0.95 wt % Si in alloy 1Al enhanced its oxidation resistance compared to alloy RA which contains only 0.29 wt% Si and is Al - free. This enhancement was attributed to formation of internal oxidation zone in alloy 1Al just beneath the oxide / alloy

  9. The Cracking Mechanism of Ferritic-Austenitic Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stradomski G.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the high-alloy, ferritic - austenitic (duplex stainless steels high tendency to cracking, mainly hot-is induced by micro segregation processes and change of crystallization mechanism in its final stage. The article is a continuation of the problems presented in earlier papers [1 - 4]. In the range of high temperature cracking appear one mechanism a decohesion - intergranular however, depending on the chemical composition of the steel, various structural factors decide of the occurrence of hot cracking. The low-carbon and low-alloy cast steel casting hot cracking cause are type II sulphide, in high carbon tool cast steel secondary cementite mesh and / or ledeburite segregated at the grain solidified grains boundaries, in the case of Hadfield steel phosphorus - carbide eutectic, which carrier is iron-manganese and low solubility of phosphorus in high manganese matrix. In duplex cast steel the additional factor increasing the risk of cracking it is very “rich” chemical composition and related with it processes of precipitation of many secondary phases.

  10. Effect of alloy content on microstructure and microchemistry of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study on the microstructural evolution in 9Cr reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels during short term thermal exposures. Since the microstructure is strongly influenced by the alloying additions, mainly W, Ta and C contents, the effect of varying W and Ta contents on ...

  11. New Stainless Steel Alloys for Low Temperature Surface Hardening?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present contribution showcases the possibility for developing new surface hardenable stainless steels containing strong nitride/carbide forming elements (SNCFE). Nitriding of the commercial alloys, austenitic A286, and ferritic AISI 409 illustrates the beneficial effect of having SNCFE presen...

  12. Characterization of Austempered Ferritic Ductile Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakre, Vinayak S.; Peshwe, D. R.; Pathak, S. U.; Likhite, A. A.

    2018-04-01

    The ductile iron (DI) has graphite nodules enclose in ferrite envelop in pearlitic matrix. The pearlitic matrix in DI was converted to ferritic matrix through heat treatment. This heat treatment includes austenitization of DI at 900°C for 1h, followed by furnace cooling to 750°C & hold for 1h, then again furnace cooling to 690°C hold for 2h, then samples were allowed to cool in furnace. The new heat treated DI has graphite nodules in ferritic matrix and called as ferritic ductile iron (FDI). Both DIs were austenitized at 900°C for 1h and then quenched into salt bath at 325°C. The samples were soaked in salt bath for 60, 120, 180, 240 and 300 min followed by air cooling. The austempered samples were characterized with help of optical microscopy, SEM and X-ray diffraction analysis. Austempering of ferritic ductile iron resulted in finer ausferrite matrix as compared to ADI. Area fraction of graphite, ferrite and austenite were determining using AXIOVISION-SE64 software. Area fraction of graphite was more in FDI than that of as cast DI. The area fraction of graphite remains unaffected due to austempering heat treatment. Ausferritic matrix coarsened (feathered) with increasing in austempering time for both DI and FDI. Bulk hardness test was carried on Rockwell Hardness Tester with load of 150 kgf and diamond indenter. Hardness obtained in as cast DI is 28 HRC which decreased to 6 HRC in FDI due conversion of pearlitic matrix to ferritic matrix. Hardness is improved by austempering process.

  13. Nano-structure and optical properties (plasmonic) of graded helical square tower-like (terraced) Mn sculptured thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savaloni, Hadi, E-mail: savaloni@khayam.ut.ac.ir [Department of Physics, University of Tehran, North-Kargar Street, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fakharpour, Mahsa [Department of Physics, Islamic Azad University, Science and Research Branch, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Siabi-Garjan, Araz [Department of Advanced Technologies, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Namin, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Materials Engineering and Nanotechnology, Sabalan University of Advanced Technologies (SUAT), Namin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Placido, Frank [SUPA and Institute of Thin Films, Sensors and Imaging, University of The West of Scotland, High Street, Paisley (United Kingdom); Babaei, Ferydon [Department of Physics, University of Qom, Qom (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-01-30

    Highlights: • Graded helical square tower-like terraced sculptured Mn thin films are produced with different number of arms. • XRD, AFM, FESEM and optical analyses as well as theoretical calculations are carried out. • Intensity of Plasmon peaks depend on the polarization, the incident angle, and the distance from the shadowing block. • The presence of defects in these sculptured structures can be predicted by theoretical investigation. • Experimental and theoretical investigations show consistent results. - Abstract: Graded helical square tower-like terraced sculptured Mn thin films (GHSTTS) are produced in three stages with different number of arms using oblique angle deposition together with rotation of substrate holder about its surface normal, plus a shadowing block fixed at the centre of the substrate holder. The structural characterization of the produced samples was obtained using field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM). Results showed a structural gradient with distance from the edge of the shadowing block, which in turn is responsible for the decrease in the volume of void fraction and increase of grain size. Plasmon absorption peaks observed in the optical analysis of these nano-structures showed that their wavelength region and intensity depend on the polarization and the incident angle of light, as well as the distance from the edge of the shadowing block. According to our model and discrete dipole approximation (DDA) calculations, when the number of parallel nano-rods of different lengths and radii are increased the peak in the spectrum shifts to shorter wavelengths (blue shift). Also when the diameters of the nano-rods increases (a situation that occurs with increasing film thickness) the results is again a blue shift in the spectrum. The presence of defects in these sculptured structures caused by the shadowing effect is predicted by the theoretical DDA investigation of their optical spectra

  14. Identification and design of novel polymer-based mechanical transducers: A nano-structural model for thin film indentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villanueva, Joshua; Huang, Qian; Sirbuly, Donald J., E-mail: dsirbuly@ucsd.edu [Department of NanoEngineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2014-09-14

    Mechanical characterization is important for understanding small-scale systems and developing devices, particularly at the interface of biology, medicine, and nanotechnology. Yet, monitoring sub-surface forces is challenging with current technologies like atomic force microscopes (AFMs) or optical tweezers due to their probe sizes and sophisticated feedback mechanisms. An alternative transducer design relying on the indentation mechanics of a compressible thin polymer would be an ideal system for more compact and versatile probes, facilitating measurements in situ or in vivo. However, application-specific tuning of a polymer's mechanical properties can be burdensome via experimental optimization. Therefore, efficient transducer design requires a fundamental understanding of how synthetic parameters such as the molecular weight and grafting density influence the bulk material properties that determine the force response. In this work, we apply molecular-level polymer scaling laws to a first order elastic foundation model, relating the conformational state of individual polymer chains to the macroscopic compression of thin film systems. A parameter sweep analysis was conducted to observe predicted model trends under various system conditions and to understand how nano-structural elements influence the material stiffness. We validate the model by comparing predicted force profiles to experimental AFM curves for a real polymer system and show that it has reasonable predictive power for initial estimates of the force response, displaying excellent agreement with experimental force curves. We also present an analysis of the force sensitivity of an example transducer system to demonstrate identification of synthetic protocols based on desired mechanical properties. These results highlight the usefulness of this simple model as an aid for the design of a new class of compact and tunable nanomechanical force transducers.

  15. Photoinduced molecular migration process in polymer matrices: application to the realization of optically organized nano-structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, Ch.

    2003-06-01

    This work deals with the study of a new all optical structuration process of azo-polymer films. We show that the irradiation with normal incidence of an azo-polymer film by a uniform laser beam which wavelength is in the absorption band of the azo-molecules, can lead to the formation of a quasi hexagonal surface relief grating at the surface of a polymer film. After a brief review of different methods of micro and nano-structuration as well as the properties of azo-polymer films in the case of the surface relief gratings formation, we study in the first part of this manuscript the influence of several experimental parameters on the spontaneous optically controlled formation of these photoinduced structures, among them the light polarization direction and the irradiation power. The different results obtained in our case are then compared with different photo-assisted structuration processes already proposed and whose physical origins are clearly established, in order to determine the key parameters governing the formation of these hexagonal structures as well as their origins. In the second part, a synthesis of the different experiments performed in order to evaluate the validity of effects so called 'optical feedback effect' observed in liquid crystal light valve systems is performed. The interpretation of the photoinduced hexagonal structuration process appears to be difficult: it is not excluded that an optical feedback phenomenon could be at the origin of the structuration process, but at the present, according to the different experiments performed, a new and original phenomenon of structuration adapted to azo-polymers films cannot be excluded in order to fully explain the different results obtained. (author)

  16. Establishing the interfacial nano-structure and elemental composition of homeopathic medicines based on inorganic salts: a scientific approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temgire, Mayur Kiran; Suresh, Akkihebbal Krishnamurthy; Kane, Shantaram Govind; Bellare, Jayesh Ramesh

    2016-05-01

    Extremely dilute systems arise in homeopathy, which uses dilution factors 10(60), 10(400) and also higher. These amounts to potencies of 30c, 200c or more, those are far beyond Avogadro's number. There is extreme skepticism among scientists about the possibility of presence of starting materials due to these high dilutions. This has led modern scientists to believe homeopathy may be at its best a placebo effect. However, our recent studies on 30c and 200c metal based homeopathic medicines clearly revealed the presence of nanoparticles of starting metals, which were found to be retained due to the manufacturing processes involved, as published earlier.(9,10) Here, we use HR-TEM and STEM techniques to study medicines arising from inorganic salts as starting materials. We show that the inorganic starting materials are present as nano-scale particles in the medicines even at 1 M potency (having a large dilution factor of 10(2000)). Thus this study has extended our physicochemical studies of metal based medicines to inorganic based medicines, and also to higher dilution. Further, we show that the particles develop a coat of silica: these particles were seen embedded in a meso-microporous silicate layer through interfacial encapsulation. Similar silicate coatings were also seen in metal based medicines. Thus, metal and inorganic salt based homeopathic medicines retain the starting material as nanoparticles encapsulated within a silicate coating. On the basis of these studies, we propose a universal microstructural hypothesis that all types of homeopathic medicines consist of silicate coated nano-structures dispersed in the solvent. Copyright © 2015 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nano-Structured Magnesium Oxide Coated Iron Ore: Its Application to the Remediation of Wastewater Containing Lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajah, Ranjini; Jang, Min; Pichiah, Saravanan; Cho, Jongman; Snyder, Shane A

    2015-12-01

    Magnetically separable nano-structured magnesium oxide coated iron ore (IO(MgO)) was prepared using environmentally benign chemicals, such as iron ore (IO), magnesium(II) nitrate hexahydrate [Mg(NO3)2 x 6H2O] and urea; via an easy and fast preparation method. The lO(MgO) was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and alternating gradient magnetometer (AGM) analyses. The isotherm and kinetic studies indicated that lO(MgO) has a comparably higher Langmuir constant (K(L), 1.69 L mg(-1)) and maximum sorption capacity (33.9 mg g(-1)) for lead (Pb) than other inorganic media. Based on MgO amount, the removal capacity of Pb by IO(MgO) was 2,724 mg Pb (g MgO)(-1), which was higher than that (1,980 mg g(-1)) for flowerlike magnesium oxide nanostructures reported by Cao et al. The kinetics, FE-SEM, elemental mapping and XRD results revealed that the substitution followed by precipitation was identified as the mechanism of Pb removal and plumbophyllite (Pb2Si4O10 x H2O) was the precipitated phase of Pb. A leaching test revealed that IOMgO) had negligible concentrations of leached Fe at pH 4-9. Since the base material, IO, is cheap and easily available, lO(MgO) could be produced in massive amounts and used for remediation of wastewater containing heavy metals, applying simple and fast magnetic separation.

  18. Identification and design of novel polymer-based mechanical transducers: A nano-structural model for thin film indentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva, Joshua; Huang, Qian; Sirbuly, Donald J.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical characterization is important for understanding small-scale systems and developing devices, particularly at the interface of biology, medicine, and nanotechnology. Yet, monitoring sub-surface forces is challenging with current technologies like atomic force microscopes (AFMs) or optical tweezers due to their probe sizes and sophisticated feedback mechanisms. An alternative transducer design relying on the indentation mechanics of a compressible thin polymer would be an ideal system for more compact and versatile probes, facilitating measurements in situ or in vivo. However, application-specific tuning of a polymer's mechanical properties can be burdensome via experimental optimization. Therefore, efficient transducer design requires a fundamental understanding of how synthetic parameters such as the molecular weight and grafting density influence the bulk material properties that determine the force response. In this work, we apply molecular-level polymer scaling laws to a first order elastic foundation model, relating the conformational state of individual polymer chains to the macroscopic compression of thin film systems. A parameter sweep analysis was conducted to observe predicted model trends under various system conditions and to understand how nano-structural elements influence the material stiffness. We validate the model by comparing predicted force profiles to experimental AFM curves for a real polymer system and show that it has reasonable predictive power for initial estimates of the force response, displaying excellent agreement with experimental force curves. We also present an analysis of the force sensitivity of an example transducer system to demonstrate identification of synthetic protocols based on desired mechanical properties. These results highlight the usefulness of this simple model as an aid for the design of a new class of compact and tunable nanomechanical force transducers.

  19. Synthesis of Carbon nano structures by plasma discharge; Sintesis de nanoestructuras de carbono por descarga de plasmaa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez L, M L

    2007-07-01

    Due to the great quantity of applications of the carbon nano structures (NEC) in diverse areas like: synthesis of super-resistant materials, hydrogen storage, nano sensors generation and nano catalysts, it has seen the necessity to generate new processes of synthesis of this materials as well as to already improve those existent. The present work has as objective to optimize the NEC synthesis process by means of the electric arc method which uses alternating current to high frequencies (HF), obtaining relatively clean products; that is to say, it hardly presents amorphous material neither sludges. They stand out the obtaining of carbon nano fibers (NFC) by means of a luminescent-arch discharge, in a gas mixture of He-CH{sub 4} with 34% at. Ni/10.32% at.Y like catalyst; at a frequency of 42 kHz and low power (300 W). This method benefits the amass of the particles in both electrodes due to the high frequencies. The time of duration of the process oscillates between 5 and 20 minutes. The obtained product was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (MEB), transmission electron microscopy (MET) to determine the NEC type obtained and by X-ray diffraction analysis and Raman spectroscopy for determining the purity of the samples. The NFC is relatively free of amorphous coal. The surface and structural analysis indicates that the fibers have a half diameter of 80 nm. It is also made, a study by optical emission spectroscopy of plasma using the Swan band for determining the temperature. (Author)

  20. Dielectric properties of Al-substituted Co ferrite nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    The particle size, D, decreases with increase in Al-content. The lattice parameter, a ... a significant saving in time and energy consumption over the traditional methods. ... electrical, and magnetic properties of spinel ferrites. Cobalt ferrite based ...

  1. Cr-W-V bainitic/ferritic steel with improved strength and toughness and method of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1994-03-08

    This work describes a high strength, high toughness bainitic/ferritic steel alloy comprising about 2.75% to 4.0% chromium, about 2.0% to 3.5% tungsten, about 0.10% to 0.30% vanadium, and about 0.1% to 0.15% carbon with the balance iron, wherein the percentages are by total weight of the composition, wherein the alloy having been heated to an austenitizing temperature and then cooled at a rate sufficient to produce carbide-free acicular bainite. 15 figures.

  2. High-strength laser welding of aluminum-lithium scandium-doped alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malikov, A. G.; Ivanova, M. Yu.

    2016-11-01

    The work presents the experimental investigation of laser welding of an aluminum alloy (system Al-Mg-Li) and aluminum alloy (system Al-Cu-Li) doped with Sc. The influence of nano-structuring of the surface layer welded joint by cold plastic deformation on the strength properties of the welded joint is determined. It is founded that, regarding the deformation degree over the thickness, the varying value of the welded joint strength is different for these aluminum alloys. The strength of the plastically deformed welded joint, aluminum alloys of the Al-Mg-Li and Al-Cu-Li systems reached 0.95 and 0.6 of the base alloy strength, respectively.

  3. Effect of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties of ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kass, S.B.; Murty, K.L.

    1995-01-01

    Effect of neutron radiation exposure was investigated in various ferritic steels with the main emphasis being the effects of thermal neutrons on radiation hardening. Pure iron of varied grain sizes was also used for characterizing the grain size effects on the source hardening before and after neutron irradiation. While many steels are considered in the overall study, the results on 1020, A516 and A588 steels are emphasized. Radiation hardening due to fast neutrons was seen to be sensitive to the composition of the steels with A354 being the least resistant and A490 the least sensitive. Majority of the radiation hardening stems from friction hardening, and source hardening term decreased with exposure to neutron radiation apparently due to the interaction of interstitial impurities with radiation produced defects. Inclusion of thermal neutrons along with fast resulted in further decrease in the source hardening with a slight increase in the friction hardening which revealed a critical grain size below which exposure to total (fast and thermal) neutron spectrum resulted in a slight reduction in the yield stress compared to the exposure to only fast neutrons. This is the first time such a grain size effect is reported and this is shown to be consistent with known radiation effects on friction and source hardening terms along with the observation that low energy neutrons have a nonnegligible effect on the mechanical properties of steels. In ferritic steels, however, despite their small grain size, exposure to total neutron spectrum yielded higher strengths than exposure to only fast neutrons. This behavior is consistent with the fact that the source hardening is small in these alloys and radiation effect is due only to friction stress

  4. Precipitates and boundaries interaction in ferritic ODS steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sallez, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.sallez@simap.grenoble-inp.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, SIMAP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Hatzoglou, Constantinos [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, Université et INSA de Rouen, UMR CNRS 6634, Normandie Université (France); Delabrouille, Fredéric [EDF–EDF R& D, Les Renardières, 77818 Moret-sur-Loing (France); Sornin, Denis; Chaffron, Laurent [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliqué, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Blat-Yrieix, Martine [EDF–EDF R& D, Les Renardières, 77818 Moret-sur-Loing (France); Radiguet, Bertrand; Pareige, Philippe [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, Université et INSA de Rouen, UMR CNRS 6634, Normandie Université (France); Donnadieu, Patricia; Bréchet, Yves [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, SIMAP, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2016-04-15

    In the course of a recrystallization study of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels during extrusion, particular interest was paid to the (GB) Grain Boundaries interaction with precipitates. Complementary and corresponding characterization experiments using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Atom Probe Tomography (APT) have been carried out on a voluntarily interrupted extrusion or extruded samples. Microscopic observations of Precipitate Free Zones (PFZ) and precipitates alignments suggest precipitate interaction with migrating GB involving dissolution and Oswald ripening of the precipitates. This is consistent with the local chemical information gathered by EDX and APT. This original mechanism for ODS steels is similar to what had been proposed in the late 80s for similar observation made on Ti alloys reinforced by nanosized yttrium oxides: An interaction mechanism between grain boundaries and precipitates involving a diffusion controlled process of precipitates dissolution at grain boundaries. It is believed that this mechanism can be of primary importance to explain the mechanical behaviour of such steels. - Highlights: • To study the microstructural evolution of a ferritic ODS steel during its extrusion, observations have been carried on samples resulting from a voluntarily interrupted extrusion and extruded materials. • A highly heterogeneous precipitate population have been observed. Nanosized coherent precipitates (2–5 nm) on both sides of the grain boundaries despite grain boundary migration after precipitation due to further thermo-mechanical processing as well as coarse precipitates (10–40 nm) alignments are observed on the grain boundaries and within the grains, parallel to the grain boundaries. • Asymmetrical PFZs can be observed around precipitates alignments and grain boundaries. Using TEM with EDX and APT we have been able to ensure that the PFZs are chemically depleted.

  5. Low activation vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witzenburg, W. van.

    1991-01-01

    The properties and general characteristics of vanadium-base alloys are reviewed in terms of the materials requirements for fusion reactor first wall and blanket structures. In this review attention is focussed on radiation response including induced radioactivity, mechanical properties, compatibility with potential coolants, physical and thermal properties, fabricability and resources. Where possible, properties are compared to those of other leading candidate structural materials, e.g. austenitic and ferritic/martensitic steels. Vanadium alloys appear to offer advantages in the areas of long-term activation, mechanical properties at temperatures above 600 deg C, radiation resistance and thermo-hydraulic design, due to superior physical and thermal properties. They also have a potential for higher temperature operation in liquid lithium systems. Disadvantages are associated with their ability to retain high concentrations of hydrogen isotopes, higher cost, more difficult fabrication and welding. A particular concern regarding use of vanadium alloys relates their reactivity with non-metallic elements, such as oxygen and nitrogen. (author). 33 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  6. Behaviour of AISI-SAE 8615 steel in ferritic nitrocarburizing using urea-metanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrena, M.I.; Castro, A.

    1998-01-01

    The present work shows the behaviour of low carbon alloyed steels as AISI-SAE 8615, after a ferritic nitrocarburizing process. Nitrocarburizing takes place at 570 degree centigree for 3 h in an atmosphere by combustion of methanol and urea under different flow rates. Metallographic studies were performed by optical microscopy. Harness profiles were measured and carbon percentages were also analyzed by emission spectrometry in order to determine the extension of the nitrocarburizing process. Optimal flow conditions have been found. The influence of the flow rate on the nitrocarburizing layer thickness has been also studied. (Author) 12 refs

  7. In-situ formation of complex oxide precipitates during processing of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayasankar, K.; Pandey, Abhishek; Mishra, B.K.; Das, Siddhartha

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Use of dual drive planetary ball mill for Bench scale (>1 kg) production. • X-ray diffraction and TEM were used to study transformations during sintering. • HIPped and rolled samples with nearly 99% density successfully produced. - Abstract: In fusion and fission reactor material development, ODS alloys are the most suitable candidate materials due to its high temperature creep properties and irradiation resistance properties. This paper describes the preparation of oxide dispersion strengthened alloy powder in large quantity (>1 kg batch) in dual drive planetary ball mill using pre-alloyed ferrtic steel powder with nano sized Y_2O_3. The consolidation of the powders was carried out in hot isostatic press (HIP) followed by hot rolling. 99% of the theoretical density was achieved by this method. The vickers hardness values of pressed and rolled samples were in the range of 380 ± 2HV and 719 ± 2HV, respectively. Samples were further investigated using X-ray diffraction particle size analyzer and electron microscope. Initial increase in particle size with milling was observed showing flattening of the particle. It was found that 5 h of milling time is sufficient to reduce the particle size to achieve the desired size. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of milled ODS steel powder revealed a uniform distribution of combustion synthesized nano-Y_2O_3 in ferritic steel matrix after a milling time of 5 h. Preliminary results demonstrated suitability of dual drive planetary ball mill for mass production of alloy within a short time due to various kinds of forces acting at a time during milling process. Fine monoclinic Y_2Si_2O_7 precipitates were also observed in the steel. This study explains the particle characteristics of nano Y_2O_3 dispersed ODS powder and formation of nano clusters in ODS ferritic alloy.

  8. Ferritic/martensitic steels: Promises and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Ehrlich, K.; Abe, F.

    1992-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels are candidate structural materials for fusion reactors because of their higher swelling resistance, higher thermal conductivity, lower thermal expansion, and better liquid-metal compatibility than austenitic steels. Irradiation effects will ultimately determine the applicability of these steels, and the effects of irradiation on microstructure and swelling, and on the tensile, fatigue, and impact properties of the ferritic/martensitic steels are discussed. Most irradiation studies have been carried out in fast reactors, where little transmutation helium forms. Helium has been shown to enhance swelling and affect tensile and fracture behavior, making helium a critical issue, since high helium concentrations will be generated in conjunction with displacement damage in a fusion reactor. These issues are reviewed to evaluate the status of ferritic/martensitic steels and to assess the research required to insure that such steels are viable candidates for fusion applications

  9. Ferrite LTCC based phased array antennas

    KAUST Repository

    Ghaffar, Farhan A.

    2016-11-02

    Two phased array antennas realized in multilayer ferrite LTCC technology are presented in this paper. The use of embedded bias windings in these designs allows the negation of external magnets which are conventionally employed with bulk ferrite medium. This reduces the required magnetostatic field strength by 90% as compared to the traditional designs. The phase shifters are implemented using the SIW technology. One of the designs is operated in the half mode waveguide topology while the other design is based on standard full mode waveguide operation. The two phase shifter designs are integrated with two element patch antenna array and slotted SIW array respectively. The array designs demonstrate a beam steering of 30° and ±19° respectively for a current excitation of 200 mA. The designs, due to their small factor can be easily integrated in modern communication systems which is not possible in the case of bulk ferrite based designs.

  10. Corrosion behavior of austenitic and ferritic/martensitic steels in oxygen-saturated liquid Pb-Bi eutectic at 450circC and 550circC

    OpenAIRE

    倉田 有司; 二川 正敏; 斎藤 滋

    2005-01-01

    Static corrosion tests of various austenitic and ferritic/martensitic steels were conducted in oxygen-saturated liquid Pb-Bi at 450circC and 550circC for 3000h to study the effects of temperature and alloying elements on corrosion behavior. Oxidation, grain boundary corrosion, dissolution and penetration were observed. The corrosion depth decreases at 450circC with increasing Cr content in steels regardless of ferritic/martensitic or austenitic steels. Appreciable dissolution of Ni and Cr doe...

  11. Integrity assessment of the ferritic / austenitic dissimilar weld joint between intermediate heat exchanger and steam generator in fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, T.; Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, S.; Kumar, J. G.; Mathew, M. D. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam- 603 102 (India)

    2012-07-01

    Integrity of the modified 9Cr-1Mo / alloy 800 dissimilar joint welded with Inconel 182 electrodes has been assessed under creep condition based on the detailed analysis of microstructure and stress distribution across the joint by finite element analysis. A hardness peak at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface and a hardness trough at the inter-critical heat affected zone (HAZ) in ferritic base metal developed. Un-tempered martensite was found at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface to impart high hardness in it; whereas annealing of martensitic structure of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel by inter-critical heating during welding thermal cycle resulted in hardness tough in the inter-critical HAZ. Creep tests were carried out on the joint and ferritic steel base metal at 823 K over a stress range of 160-320 MPa. The joint possessed lower creep rupture strength than its ferritic steel base metal. Failure of the joint at relatively lower stresses occurred at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface; whereas it occurred at inter-critical region of HAZ at moderate stresses. Cavity nucleation associated with the weld interface particles led to premature failure of the joint. Finite element analysis of stress distribution across the weld joint considering the micro-mechanical strength inhomogeneity across it revealed higher von-Mises and principal stresses at the weld interface. These stresses induced preferential creep cavitation at the weld interface. Role of precipitate in enhancing creep cavitation at the weld interface has been elucidated based on the FE analysis of stress distribution across it. (authors)

  12. Recrystallization induced plasticity in austenite and ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Mingxin; Pineau, André; Bouaziz, Olivier; Vu, Trong-Dai

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Plasticity can be induced by recrystallization in austenite and ferrite. ► Strain rate is proportional to recrystallization kinetics. ► Overall atomic flux selects a preferential direction may be the origin. - Abstract: New experimental evidences are provided to demonstrate that plastic strain can be induced by recrystallization in austenite and ferrite under an applied stress much smaller than their yield stresses. Such Recrystallization Induced Plasticity (RIP) phenomenon occurs because the overall atomic flux during recrystallization follows a preferential direction imposed by the applied stress.

  13. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  14. Continuous cooling transformations and microstructures in a low-carbon, high-strength low-alloy plate steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, S. W.; Vin, D. J., Col; Krauss, G.

    1990-06-01

    A continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagram was determined for a high-strength low-alloy plate steel containing (in weight percent) 0.06 C, 1.45 Mn, 1.25 Cu, 0.97 Ni, 0.72 Cr, and 0.42 Mo. Dilatometric measurements were supplemented by microhardness testing, light microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The CCT diagram showed significant suppression of polygonal ferrite formation and a prominent transformation region, normally attributed to bainite formation, at temperatures intermediate to those of polygonal ferrite and martensite formation. In the intermediate region, ferrite formation in groups of similarly oriented crystals about 1 μm in size and containing a high density of dislocations dominated the transformation of austenite during continuous cooling. The ferrite grains assumed two morphologies, elongated or acicular and equiaxed or granular, leading to the terms “acicular ferrite” and “granular ferrite,” respectively, to describe these structures. Austenite regions, some transformed to martensite, were enriched in carbon and retained at interfaces between ferrite grains. Coarse interfacial ledges and the nonacicular morphology of the granular ferrite grains provided evidence for a phase transformation mechanism involving reconstructive diffusion of substitutional atoms. At slow cooling rates, polygonal ferrite and Widmanstätten ferrite formed. These latter structures contained low dislocation densities and e-copper precipitates formed by an interphase transformation mechanism.

  15. Simulation of non-linear coaxial line using ferrite beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, S.; Matsumoto, H.; Tachi, K.; Takano, S.; Irisawa, J.

    2002-01-01

    A ferrite sharpener is a non-linear coaxial line using ferrite beads, which produces high-voltage, high-dV/dt pulses. We have been examining the characteristics of ferrite sharpeners experimentally, varying various parameters. Also we have made the simulation of the ferrite sharpener and compared the predictions with the experimental results in detail to analyze the characteristics of the sharpener. In this report, calculating the magnetization M of the ferrite bead, we divide the bead into n sections radially instead of adopting M at the average radius in the previous report. (author)

  16. Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Zr Alloys for High Burnup and Generation IV Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Y. H.; Park, S. Y.; Lee, M. H.; Choi, B. K.; Baek, J. H.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, H. G.; Jung, Y. H.; Bang, B. G.

    2006-08-01

    The systematic study was performed to develop the advanced corrosion-resistant Zr alloys for high burnup and Gen IV application. The corrosion behavior was significantly changed with the alloy composition and the corrosion environment. In general, the model alloys with a higher alloying elements showed a higher corrosion resistance. Among the model alloys tested in this study, Zr-10Cr-0.2Fe showed the best corrosion resistance regardless of the corrosion condition. The oxide on the higher corrosion-resistant alloy such as Zr-1.0Cr-0.2Fe consisted of mainly columnar grains, and it have a higher tetragonal phase stability. In comparison with other alloys being considered for the SCWR, the Zr alloys showed a lower corrosion rate than ferritic-martensitic steels. The results of this study imply that, at least from a corrosion standpoint, Zr alloys deserve consideration as potential cladding or structural materials in supercritical water cooled reactors

  17. The analysis of bainitic ferrite microstructure in microalloyed plate steels through quantitative characterization of intervariant boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Singon, E-mail: sikang@mines.edu [Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research Center, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Speer, John G.; Regier, Ryan W. [Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research Center, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Nako, Hidenori [Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research Center, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Materials Research Laboratory, Kobe Steel Ltd., Kobe, Hyogo 651-2271 (Japan); Kennett, Shane C. [Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research Center, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Exponent Failure Analysis Associates, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Findley, Kip O. [Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research Center, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2016-07-04

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements were performed to investigate the bainitic ferrite microstructure in low-carbon, microalloyed steels with varying C and Mn contents. Fully austenitized samples were isothermally heat treated at temperatures ranging from 450 to 550 °C to form bainitic ferrite. The bainitic ferrite microstructures and boundary characteristics obtained from the EBSD measurements were analyzed based on an inferred Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S) orientation relationship. The heat treated samples exhibit a microstructure composed of laths and the lath aspect ratio tends to increase at lower isothermal heat treatment temperatures. High fractions of boundary misorientation angles below 5° are observed, which are due to lath boundaries in the microstructure. Additionally, misorientations of approximately 7°, 53° and 60° are observed, which are related to the sub-block, packet, and block boundaries, respectively. With decreasing isothermal heat treatment temperature, there is an increase of block boundaries; these boundaries are intervariant boundaries between different blocks within a packet, most of which have the misorientation angle of 60°. The specimens with a higher carbon level contained increased length of block boundaries, whereas the addition of Mn moderated the dependence of block boundary length on the heat treatment temperature within the experimental temperature range. Meanwhile, the length of intervariant boundaries of both packet and sub-block character did not vary much with heat treatment temperature and alloy composition.

  18. Irradiation response of delta ferrite in as-cast and thermally aged cast stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhangbo; Lo, Wei-Yang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Program, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Chen, Yiren [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Pakarinen, Janne [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Wu, Yaqiao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, Boise, ID 83715 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Allen, Todd [Engineering Physics Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Yang, Yong, E-mail: yongyang@ufl.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Program, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    To enable the life extension of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) beyond 60 years, it is critical to gain adequate knowledge for making conclusive predictions to assure the integrity of duplex stainless steel reactor components, e.g. primary pressure boundary and reactor vessel internal. Microstructural changes in the ferrite of thermally aged, neutron irradiated only, and neutron irradiated after being thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) were investigated using atom probe tomography. The thermal aging was performed at 400 °C for 10,000 h and the irradiation was conducted in the Halden reactor at ∼315 °C to 0.08 dpa (5.6 × 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}, E > 1 MeV). Low dose neutron irradiation at a dose rate of 5 × 10{sup −9} dpa/s was found to induce spinodal decomposition in the ferrite of as-cast microstructure, and further to enhance the spinodal decomposition in the thermally aged cast alloys. Regarding the G-phase precipitates, the neutron irradiation dramatically increases the precipitate size, and alters the composition of the precipitates with increased, Mn, Ni, Si and Mo and reduced Fe and Cr contents. The results have shown that low dose neutron irradiation can further accelerate the degradation of ferrite in a duplex stainless steel at the LWR relevant condition.

  19. Effect of composition and cold work on the ferrite transformation in feroplug materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, J.K.L.; Wong, K.W.; Shek, C.H.; Duggan, B.J.

    1993-01-01

    Feroplug is a newly developed temperature indicator suitable for use in the remaining life assessment of high temperature components in power generating plants. The device has been patented in the US on March 17, 1992 under patent number 5,096,304, by the British Technology Group. The Feroplug uses the phase transformation characteristics of duplex stainless steels for temperature measurement. Duplex stainless steels contain ferrite and austenite. Upon exposure to elevated temperatures, the ferrite transforms into austenite, carbides and intermetallic phases. The transformation can be easily monitored by magnetic measurements using a device called the Feritscope. A number of specially designed duplex stainless steels have been produced and the effects of silicon, carbon, and prior cold work on the phase transformation in these alloys. The ferrite transformation was found to be accelerated by prior cold work and by the addition of silicon. The effect of carbon was complicated. Increase in carbon content resulted in a slight increase in the rate of transformation at the early stage, but at the later stage of the transformation the effect of higher carbon content was to reduce the rate of transformation

  20. Mitigation of sensitisation effects in unstabilised 12%Cr ferritic stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warmelo, Martin van; Nolan, David; Norrish, John

    2007-01-01

    Sensitisation in the heat-affected zones of ferritic stainless steel welds is typically prevented by stabilisation of the parent material with titanium or niobium, and suitable design of the overall composition to produce a suitably high ferrite factor. However, such alloy modification has proven to be economically unviable for thick gauge (>10 mm) plate products and therefore unstabilised 12%Cr (3CR12) material is still currently being used for heavy gauge structural applications in many parts of the world. The aim of the current work was to review the mechanisms responsible for sensitisation in these unstabilised ferritic stainless steels, and to characterise the sensitisation effects arising from multipass welding procedures. The objective was to determine the influence of welding parameters, and thereby to recommend mitigating strategies. Two particular sensitisation modes were found to occur in the current work, although only one was predominant and considered problematic from a practical perspective. It was found that with proper positioning of weld capping runs and control of weld overlap, it is possible to ensure that sensitising isotherms remain buried beneath the parent surface, and so reduce harmful corrosion effects

  1. The relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties of ferritic chromium steel weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayr, Peter; Cerjak, Horst [Graz Univ. of Technology (Austria); Toda, Yoshiaki; Hara, Toru; Abe, Fujio [National Institute for Materials Science (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Welding as the major joining and repair technology for steels in thermal power plants has a significant influence on the steels microstructure and, therefore, on its properties. Heat-resistant martensitic 9-12% chromium steels show an affinity to the retention of delta ferrite in the heat-affected zone of their weldments. This is related to their high level of ferrite stabilizing alloying elements such as Cr, W or Mo. Retained delta ferrite in martensitic steel grades has a significant negative influence on creep strength, fatigue strength, toughness and oxidation resistance. In the long-term range of creep exposure, many weldments of martensitic heatresistant steels fail by Type IV cracking in the fine-grained region of the heat-affected zone. In this work, the formation of the heat-affected zone microstructures in martensitic chromium steels is studied by in-situ X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation, optical microscopy as well as most advanced electron microscopical methods. The observed microstructure is directly linked to the mechanical properties, i.e. ductility, toughness and creep strength. Characteristic failure modes are discussed in detail. (orig.)

  2. Irradiation response of delta ferrite in as-cast and thermally aged cast stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhangbo; Lo, Wei-Yang; Chen, Yiren; Pakarinen, Janne; Wu, Yaqiao; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    To enable the life extension of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) beyond 60 years, it is critical to gain adequate knowledge for making conclusive predictions to assure the integrity of duplex stainless steel reactor components, e.g. primary pressure boundary and reactor vessel internal. Microstructural changes in the ferrite of thermally aged, neutron irradiated only, and neutron irradiated after being thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) were investigated using atom probe tomography. The thermal aging was performed at 400 °C for 10,000 h and the irradiation was conducted in the Halden reactor at ∼315 °C to 0.08 dpa (5.6 × 10"1"9 n/cm"2, E > 1 MeV). Low dose neutron irradiation at a dose rate of 5 × 10"−"9 dpa/s was found to induce spinodal decomposition in the ferrite of as-cast microstructure, and further to enhance the spinodal decomposition in the thermally aged cast alloys. Regarding the G-phase precipitates, the neutron irradiation dramatically increases the precipitate size, and alters the composition of the precipitates with increased, Mn, Ni, Si and Mo and reduced Fe and Cr contents. The results have shown that low dose neutron irradiation can further accelerate the degradation of ferrite in a duplex stainless steel at the LWR relevant condition.

  3. Elevated-Temperature Ferritic and Martensitic Steels and Their Application to Future Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, RL

    2005-01-31

    In the 1970s, high-chromium (9-12% Cr) ferritic/martensitic steels became candidates for elevated-temperature applications in the core of fast reactors. Steels developed for conventional power plants, such as Sandvik HT9, a nominally Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.25V-0.2C steel (composition in wt %), were considered in the United States, Europe, and Japan. Now, a new generation of fission reactors is in the planning stage, and ferritic, bainitic, and martensitic steels are again candidates for in-core and out-of-core applications. Since the 1970s, advances have been made in developing steels with 2-12% Cr for conventional power plants that are significant improvements over steels originally considered. This paper will review the development of the new steels to illustrate the advantages they offer for the new reactor concepts. Elevated-temperature mechanical properties will be emphasized. Effects of alloying additions on long-time thermal exposure with and without stress (creep) will be examined. Information on neutron radiation effects will be discussed as it applies to ferritic and martensitic steels.

  4. Co-Assembled Supported Catalysts: Synthesis of Nano-Structured Supported Catalysts with Hierarchic Pores through Combined Flow and Radiation Induced Co-Assembled Nano-Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galip Akay

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel generic method of silica supported catalyst system generation from a fluid state is presented. The technique is based on the combined flow and radiation (such as microwave, thermal or UV induced co-assembly of the support and catalyst precursors forming nano-reactors, followed by catalyst precursor decomposition. The transformation from the precursor to supported catalyst oxide state can be controlled from a few seconds to several minutes. The resulting nano-structured micro-porous silica supported catalyst system has a surface area approaching 300 m2/g and X-ray Diffraction (XRD-based catalyst size controlled in the range of 1–10 nm in which the catalyst structure appears as lamellar sheets sandwiched between the catalyst support. These catalyst characteristics are dependent primarily on the processing history as well as the catalyst (Fe, Co and Ni studied when the catalyst/support molar ratio is typically 0.1–2. In addition, Ca, Mn and Cu were used as co-catalysts with Fe and Co in the evaluation of the mechanism of catalyst generation. Based on extensive XRD, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM studies, the micro- and nano-structure of the catalyst system were evaluated. It was found that the catalyst and silica support form extensive 0.6–2 nm thick lamellar sheets of 10–100 nm planar dimensions. In these lamellae, the alternate silica support and catalyst layer appear in the form of a bar-code structure. When these lamellae structures pack, they form the walls of a micro-porous catalyst system which typically has a density of 0.2 g/cm3. A tentative mechanism of catalyst nano-structure formation is provided based on the rheology and fluid mechanics of the catalyst/support precursor fluid as well as co-assembly nano-reactor formation during processing. In order to achieve these structures and characteristics, catalyst support must be in the form of silane coated silica nano

  5. Toughness testing and high-temperature oxidation evaluations of advanced alloys for core internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Chen, Xiang [ORNL

    2016-09-16

    Alloy X-750 was procured from Carpenter Technology and Bodycote in this year. An appropriate TMT was developed on Alloy 439 to obtain materials with refined grain size for property screening tests. Charpy V-notch impact tests were completed for the three ferritic steels Grade 92, Alloy 439, and 14YWT. Fracture toughness tests at elevated temperatures were completed for 14YWT. The tests will be completed for the other alloys in next fiscal year. Steam oxidation tests of the three ferritic steels, 316L, and Zr–2.5Nb have been completed. The steam tests of the Ni-based superalloys and the other austenitic stainless steels will be continued and finished in next fiscal year. Performance ranking in terms of steam oxidation resistance and impact/fracture toughness of the alloys will be deduced.

  6. Fabrication of Al2O3 Nano-Structure Functional Film on a Cellulose Insulation Polymer Surface and Its Space Charge Suppression Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Hao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose insulation polymer (paper/pressboard has been widely used in high voltage direct current (HVDC transformers. One of the most challenging issues in the insulation material used for HVDC equipment is the space charge accumulation. Effective ways to suppress the space charge injection/accumulation in insulation material is currently a popular research topic. In this study, an aluminium oxide functional film was deposited on a cellulose insulation pressboard surface using reactive radio frequency (RF magnetron sputtering. The sputtered thin film was characterized by the scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM/EDS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The influence of the deposited functional film on the dielectric properties and the space charge injection/accumulation behaviour was investigated. A preliminary exploration of the space charge suppression effect is discussed. SEM/EDS, XPS, and XRD results show that the nano-structured Al2O3 film with amorphous phase was successfully fabricated onto the fibre surface. The cellulose insulation pressboard surface sputtered by Al2O3 film has lower permittivity, conductivity, and dissipation factor values in the lower frequency (<103 Hz region. The oil-impregnated sputtered pressboard presents an apparent space-charge suppression effect. Compared with the pressboard sputtered with Al2O3 film for 90 min, the pressboard sputtered with Al2O3 film for 60 min had a better space charge suppression effect. Ultra-small Al2O3 particles (<10 nm grew on the surface of the larger nanoparticles. The nano-structured Al2O3 film sputtered on the fibre surface could act as a functional barrier layer for suppression of the charge injection and accumulation. This study offers a new perspective in favour of the application of insulation pressboard with a nano-structured function surface against space charge injection/accumulation in HVDC equipment.

  7. Accelerated development of Zr-containing new generation ferritic steels for advanced nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yang, Ying [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sridharan, K. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The mission of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program is to develop crosscutting technologies for nuclear energy applications. Advanced structural materials with superior performance at elevated temperatures are always desired for nuclear reactors, which can improve reactor economics, safety margins, and design flexibility. They benefit not only new reactors, including advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast reactors such as the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) that is primarily designed for management of high-level wastes, but also life extension of the existing fleet when component exchange is needed. Developing and utilizing the modern materials science tools (experimental, theoretical, and computational tools) is an important path to more efficient alloy development and process optimization. The ultimate goal of this project is, with the aid of computational modeling tools, to accelerate the development of Zr-bearing ferritic alloys that can be fabricated using conventional steelmaking methods. The new alloys are expected to have superior high-temperature creep performance and excellent radiation resistance as compared to Grade 91. The designed alloys were fabricated using arc-melting and drop-casting, followed by hot rolling and conventional heat treatments. Comprehensive experimental studies have been conducted on the developed alloys to evaluate their hardness, tensile properties, creep resistance, Charpy impact toughness, and aging resistance, as well as resistance to proton and heavy ion (Fe2+) irradiation.

  8. Oxide-Free Bonding of III-V-Based Material on Silicon and Nano-Structuration of the Hybrid Waveguide for Advanced Optical Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Pantzas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Oxide-free bonding of III-V-based materials for integrated optics is demonstrated on both planar Silicon (Si surfaces and nanostructured ones, using Silicon on Isolator (SOI or Si substrates. The hybrid interface is characterized electrically and mechanically. A hybrid InP-on-SOI waveguide, including a bi-periodic nano structuration of the silicon guiding layer is demonstrated to provide wavelength selective transmission. Such an oxide-free interface associated with the nanostructured design of the guiding geometry has great potential for both electrical and optical operation of improved hybrid devices.

  9. Nickel-zinc ferrite/permalloy (Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4/Ni-Fe soft magnetic nanocomposites fabricated by electro-infiltration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Wen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetically soft NiZn ferrite (Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticles are embedded within a permalloy (Ni-Fe matrix via an electro-infiltration process as thin films intended for use as on-chip inductor cores in the MHz frequency regime. A layer of NiZn ferrite nanoparticles is first deposited, and then permalloy is electroplated through the voids to encapsulate the particles and form three-dimensional ferrite/alloy nanocomposites. The composites are estimated to contain 37% ferrite by volume and exhibit a relative permeability of ∼320, a saturation of ∼1.15 T, and an operational bandwidth of 93 MHz. Compared to a permalloy thin film of similar thickness, the nanocomposite exhibits 39% higher electrical resistivity and 50% higher bandwidth.

  10. Magnetic properties of nanostructured spinel ferrites and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    exchange interaction strength because of an increase in the magnetic ion concentration in the A-site on milling, ... By using a copper wheel, rotating with the ... Zn ferrite with a small applied field of 4 mT for two different grain sizes. The Néel ... By varying the concentration of the oxidant (KNO3) or ferric ions, we could achieve.

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    prepared material. It was observed that surface modification such as with silica coating on the cobalt ferrite will have significant effect on the structural and magnetic properties. It is also observed that, silica coated nanoparticles could be used in biomedical applications (Hong et al., 2013). In this work we have chosen sol-gel ...

  12. Structural properties of Cd–Co ferrites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    36, No. 5, October 2013, pp. 919–922. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Structural properties of Cd–Co ferrites. S P DALAWAIa,∗. , T J SHINDEb, A B GADKARIc and P N VASAMBEKARa. aDepartment of Electronics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416 004, India. bDepartment of Physics, KRP Kanya Mahavidyalaya, Islampur ...

  13. Neutron diffraction in a frustrated ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirebeau, I.; Iancu, G.; Gavoille, G.; Hubsch, J.

    1994-01-01

    The competitio