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Sample records for n-terminal insertion sequence

  1. Critical structural and functional roles for the N-terminal insertion sequence in surfactant protein B analogs.

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    Frans J Walther

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactant protein B (SP-B; 79 residues belongs to the saposin protein superfamily, and plays functional roles in lung surfactant. The disulfide cross-linked, N- and C-terminal domains of SP-B have been theoretically predicted to fold as charged, amphipathic helices, suggesting their participation in surfactant activities. Earlier structural studies with Mini-B, a disulfide-linked construct based on the N- and C-terminal regions of SP-B (i.e., approximately residues 8-25 and 63-78, confirmed that these neighboring domains are helical; moreover, Mini-B retains critical in vitro and in vivo surfactant functions of the native protein. Here, we perform similar analyses on a Super Mini-B construct that has native SP-B residues (1-7 attached to the N-terminus of Mini-B, to test whether the N-terminal sequence is also involved in surfactant activity.FTIR spectra of Mini-B and Super Mini-B in either lipids or lipid-mimics indicated that these peptides share similar conformations, with primary alpha-helix and secondary beta-sheet and loop-turns. Gel electrophoresis demonstrated that Super Mini-B was dimeric in SDS detergent-polyacrylamide, while Mini-B was monomeric. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR, predictive aggregation algorithms, and molecular dynamics (MD and docking simulations further suggested a preliminary model for dimeric Super Mini-B, in which monomers self-associate to form a dimer peptide with a "saposin-like" fold. Similar to native SP-B, both Mini-B and Super Mini-B exhibit in vitro activity with spread films showing near-zero minimum surface tension during cycling using captive bubble surfactometry. In vivo, Super Mini-B demonstrates oxygenation and dynamic compliance that are greater than Mini-B and compare favorably to full-length SP-B.Super Mini-B shows enhanced surfactant activity, probably due to the self-assembly of monomer peptide into dimer Super Mini-B that mimics the functions and putative structure of native SP-B.

  2. Cell type-specific termination of transcription by transposable element sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Andrew B; Jordan, I King

    2012-09-30

    Transposable elements (TEs) encode sequences necessary for their own transposition, including signals required for the termination of transcription. TE sequences within the introns of human genes show an antisense orientation bias, which has been proposed to reflect selection against TE sequences in the sense orientation owing to their ability to terminate the transcription of host gene transcripts. While there is evidence in support of this model for some elements, the extent to which TE sequences actually terminate transcription of human gene across the genome remains an open question. Using high-throughput sequencing data, we have characterized over 9,000 distinct TE-derived sequences that provide transcription termination sites for 5,747 human genes across eight different cell types. Rarefaction curve analysis suggests that there may be twice as many TE-derived termination sites (TE-TTS) genome-wide among all human cell types. The local chromatin environment for these TE-TTS is similar to that seen for 3' UTR canonical TTS and distinct from the chromatin environment of other intragenic TE sequences. However, those TE-TTS located within the introns of human genes were found to be far more cell type-specific than the canonical TTS. TE-TTS were much more likely to be found in the sense orientation than other intragenic TE sequences of the same TE family and TE-TTS in the sense orientation terminate transcription more efficiently than those found in the antisense orientation. Alu sequences were found to provide a large number of relatively weak TTS, whereas LTR elements provided a smaller number of much stronger TTS. TE sequences provide numerous termination sites to human genes, and TE-derived TTS are particularly cell type-specific. Thus, TE sequences provide a powerful mechanism for the diversification of transcriptional profiles between cell types and among evolutionary lineages, since most TE-TTS are evolutionarily young. The extent of transcription

  3. Acquisition of a novel eleven amino acid insertion directly N-terminal to a tetrabasic cleavage site confers intracellular cleavage of an H7N7 influenza virus hemagglutinin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Brian S.; Sun, Xiangjie; Chung, Changik; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2012-01-01

    A critical feature of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (H5N1 and H7N7) is the efficient intracellular cleavage of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein. H7N7 viruses also exist in equine species, and a unique feature of the equine H7N7 HA is the presence of an eleven amino acid insertion directly N-terminal to a tetrabasic cleavage site. Here, we show that three histidine residues within the unique insertion of the equine H7N7 HA are essential for intracellular cleavage. An asparagine residue within the insertion-derived glycosylation site was also found to be essential for intracellular cleavage. The presence of the histidine residues also appear to be involved in triggering fusion, since mutation of the histidine residues resulted in a destabilizing effect. Importantly, the addition of a tetrabasic site and the eleven amino acid insertion conferred efficient intracellular cleavage to the HA of an H7N3 low pathogenicity avian influenza virus. Our studies show that acquisition of the eleven amino acid insertion offers an alternative mechanism for intracellular cleavage of influenza HA.

  4. Acquisition of a novel eleven amino acid insertion directly N-terminal to a tetrabasic cleavage site confers intracellular cleavage of an H7N7 influenza virus hemagglutinin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, Brian S.; Sun, Xiangjie; Chung, Changik [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca NY 14853 (United States); New York Center of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester NY 14627 (United States); Whittaker, Gary R., E-mail: grw7@cornell.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca NY 14853 (United States); New York Center of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester NY 14627 (United States)

    2012-12-05

    A critical feature of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (H5N1 and H7N7) is the efficient intracellular cleavage of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein. H7N7 viruses also exist in equine species, and a unique feature of the equine H7N7 HA is the presence of an eleven amino acid insertion directly N-terminal to a tetrabasic cleavage site. Here, we show that three histidine residues within the unique insertion of the equine H7N7 HA are essential for intracellular cleavage. An asparagine residue within the insertion-derived glycosylation site was also found to be essential for intracellular cleavage. The presence of the histidine residues also appear to be involved in triggering fusion, since mutation of the histidine residues resulted in a destabilizing effect. Importantly, the addition of a tetrabasic site and the eleven amino acid insertion conferred efficient intracellular cleavage to the HA of an H7N3 low pathogenicity avian influenza virus. Our studies show that acquisition of the eleven amino acid insertion offers an alternative mechanism for intracellular cleavage of influenza HA.

  5. Cell type-specific termination of transcription by transposable element sequences

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    Conley Andrew B

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transposable elements (TEs encode sequences necessary for their own transposition, including signals required for the termination of transcription. TE sequences within the introns of human genes show an antisense orientation bias, which has been proposed to reflect selection against TE sequences in the sense orientation owing to their ability to terminate the transcription of host gene transcripts. While there is evidence in support of this model for some elements, the extent to which TE sequences actually terminate transcription of human gene across the genome remains an open question. Results Using high-throughput sequencing data, we have characterized over 9,000 distinct TE-derived sequences that provide transcription termination sites for 5,747 human genes across eight different cell types. Rarefaction curve analysis suggests that there may be twice as many TE-derived termination sites (TE-TTS genome-wide among all human cell types. The local chromatin environment for these TE-TTS is similar to that seen for 3′ UTR canonical TTS and distinct from the chromatin environment of other intragenic TE sequences. However, those TE-TTS located within the introns of human genes were found to be far more cell type-specific than the canonical TTS. TE-TTS were much more likely to be found in the sense orientation than other intragenic TE sequences of the same TE family and TE-TTS in the sense orientation terminate transcription more efficiently than those found in the antisense orientation. Alu sequences were found to provide a large number of relatively weak TTS, whereas LTR elements provided a smaller number of much stronger TTS. Conclusions TE sequences provide numerous termination sites to human genes, and TE-derived TTS are particularly cell type-specific. Thus, TE sequences provide a powerful mechanism for the diversification of transcriptional profiles between cell types and among evolutionary lineages, since most TE-TTS are

  6. Templated sequence insertion polymorphisms in the human genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozawa, Masahiro; Aplan, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Templated Sequence Insertion Polymorphism (TSIP) is a recently described form of polymorphism recognized in the human genome, in which a sequence that is templated from a distant genomic region is inserted into the genome, seemingly at random. TSIPs can be grouped into two classes based on nucleotide sequence features at the insertion junctions; Class 1 TSIPs show features of insertions that are mediated via the LINE-1 ORF2 protein, including 1) target-site duplication (TSD), 2) polyadenylation 10-30 nucleotides downstream of a “cryptic” polyadenylation signal, and 3) preference for insertion at a 5’-TTTT/A-3’ sequence. In contrast, class 2 TSIPs show features consistent with repair of a DNA double-strand break via insertion of a DNA “patch” that is derived from a distant genomic region. Survey of a large number of normal human volunteers demonstrates that most individuals have 25-30 TSIPs, and that these TSIPs track with specific geographic regions. Similar to other forms of human polymorphism, we suspect that these TSIPs may be important for the generation of human diversity and genetic diseases.

  7. Identification of succinimide sites in proteins by N-terminal sequence analysis after alkaline hydroxylamine cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, M. Y.; Harris, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    Under favorable conditions, Asp or Asn residues can undergo rearrangement to a succinimide (cyclic imide), which may also serve as an intermediate for deamidation and/or isoaspartate formation. Direct identification of such succinimides by peptide mapping is hampered by their lability at neutral and alkaline pH. We determined that incubation in 2 M hydroxylamine, 0.2 M Tris buffer, pH 9, for 2 h at 45 degrees C will specifically cleave on the C-terminal side of succinimides without cleavage at Asn-Gly bonds; yields are typically approximately 50%. N-terminal sequence analysis can then be used to identify an internal sequence generated by cleavage of the succinimide, hence identifying the succinimide site. PMID:8142891

  8. Isolation and N-terminal sequencing of a novel cadmium-binding protein from Boletus edulis

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    Collin-Hansen, C.; Andersen, R. A.; Steinnes, E.

    2003-05-01

    A Cd-binding protein was isolated from the popular edible mushroom Boletus edulis, which is a hyperaccumulator of both Cd and Hg. Wild-growing samples of B. edulis were collected from soils rich in Cd. Cd radiotracer was added to the crude protein preparation obtained from ethanol precipitation of heat-treated cytosol. Proteins were then further separated in two consecutive steps; gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. In both steps the Cd radiotracer profile showed only one distinct peak, which corresponded well with the profiles of endogenous Cd obtained by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Concentrations of the essential elements Cu and Zn were low in the protein fractions high in Cd. N-terminal sequencing performed on the Cd-binding protein fractions revealed a protein with a novel amino acid sequence, which contained aromatic amino acids as well as proline. Both the N-terminal sequencing and spectrofluorimetric analysis with EDTA and ABD-F (4-aminosulfonyl-7-fluoro-2, 1, 3-benzoxadiazole) failed to detect cysteine in the Cd-binding fractions. These findings conclude that the novel protein does not belong to the metallothionein family. The results suggest a role for the protein in Cd transport and storage, and they are of importance in view of toxicology and food chemistry, but also for environmental protection.

  9. Protection against β-amyloid neurotoxicity by a non-toxic endogenous N-terminal β-amyloid fragment and its active hexapeptide core sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Kelly H; Alfulaij, Naghum; Arora, Komal; Taketa, Ruth; Sherrin, Tessi; Todorovic, Cedomir; Lawrence, James L M; Yoshikawa, Gene T; Ng, Ho-Leung; Hruby, Victor J; Nichols, Robert A

    2018-01-01

    High levels (μM) of beta amyloid (Aβ) oligomers are known to trigger neurotoxic effects, leading to synaptic impairment, behavioral deficits, and apoptotic cell death. The hydrophobic C-terminal domain of Aβ, together with sequences critical for oligomer formation, is essential for this neurotoxicity. However, Aβ at low levels (pM-nM) has been shown to function as a positive neuromodulator and this activity resides in the hydrophilic N-terminal domain of Aβ. An N-terminal Aβ fragment (1-15/16), found in cerebrospinal fluid, was also shown to be a highly active neuromodulator and to reverse Aβ-induced impairments of long-term potentiation. Here, we show the impact of this N-terminal Aβ fragment and a shorter hexapeptide core sequence in the Aβ fragment (Aβcore: 10-15) to protect or reverse Aβ-induced neuronal toxicity, fear memory deficits and apoptotic death. The neuroprotective effects of the N-terminal Aβ fragment and Aβcore on Aβ-induced changes in mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, and apoptotic neuronal death were demonstrated via mitochondrial membrane potential, live reactive oxygen species, DNA fragmentation and cell survival assays using a model neuroblastoma cell line (differentiated NG108-15) and mouse hippocampal neuron cultures. The protective action of the N-terminal Aβ fragment and Aβcore against spatial memory processing deficits in amyloid precursor protein/PSEN1 (5XFAD) mice was demonstrated in contextual fear conditioning. Stabilized derivatives of the N-terminal Aβcore were also shown to be fully protective against Aβ-triggered oxidative stress. Together, these findings indicate an endogenous neuroprotective role for the N-terminal Aβ fragment, while active stabilized N-terminal Aβcore derivatives offer the potential for therapeutic application. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  10. Accessibility of the Shine-Dalgarno sequence dictates N-terminal codon bias in E. coli

    OpenAIRE

    Shakhnovich, Eugene; Zhang, Wenli; Yan, Jin; Adkar, Bharat; Jacobs, William; Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Adkar, Bharat

    2018-01-01

    Despite considerable efforts, no physical mechanism has been shown to explain N-terminal codon bias in prokaryotic genomes. Using a systematic study of synonymous substitutions in two endogenous E. coli genes, we show that interactions between the coding region and the upstream Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence modulate the efficiency of translation initiation, affecting both intracellular mRNA and protein levels due to the inherent coupling of transcription and translation in E. coli. We further ...

  11. Interaction of the N-terminal segment of pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C with interfacial phospholipid films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plasencia, Inés; Keough, Kevin M W; Perez-Gil, Jesus

    2005-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C is a 35-residue polypeptide composed of a hydrophobic transmembrane alpha-helix and a polycationic, palmitoylated-cysteine containing N-terminal segment. This segment is likely the only structural motif the protein projects out of the bilayer in which SP-C is ins......Pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C is a 35-residue polypeptide composed of a hydrophobic transmembrane alpha-helix and a polycationic, palmitoylated-cysteine containing N-terminal segment. This segment is likely the only structural motif the protein projects out of the bilayer in which SP...... or anionic phospholipid monolayers. The peptide expands the pi-A compression isotherms of interfacial phospholipid/peptide films, and perturbs the lipid packing of phospholipid films during compression-driven liquid-expanded to liquid-condensed lateral transitions, as observed by epifluorescence microscopy....... These results demonstrate that the sequence of the SP-C N-terminal region has intrinsic ability to interact with, insert into, and perturb the structure of zwitterionic and anionic phospholipid films, even in the absence of the palmitic chains attached to this segment in the native protein. This effect has been...

  12. N-terminal amino acid sequence of Bacillus licheniformis alpha-amylase: comparison with Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Bacillus subtilis Enzymes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhn, H; Fietzek, P P; Lampen, J O

    1982-01-01

    The thermostable, liquefying alpha-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis was immunologically cross-reactive with the thermolabile, liquefying alpha-amylase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. Their N-terminal amino acid sequences showed extensive homology with each other, but not with the saccharifying alpha-amylases of Bacillus subtilis.

  13. Heads or tails: L1 insertion-associated 5' homopolymeric sequences

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    Meyer Thomas J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background L1s are one of the most successful autonomous mobile elements in primate genomes. These elements comprise as much as 17% of primate genomes with the majority of insertions occurring via target primed reverse transcription (TPRT. Twin priming, a variant of TPRT, can result in unusual DNA sequence architecture. These insertions appear to be inverted, truncated L1s flanked by target site duplications. Results We report on loci with sequence architecture consistent with variants of the twin priming mechanism and introduce dual priming, a mechanism that could generate similar sequence characteristics. These insertions take the form of truncated L1s with hallmarks of classical TPRT insertions but having a poly(T simple repeat at the 5' end of the insertion. We identified loci using computational analyses of the human, chimpanzee, orangutan, rhesus macaque and marmoset genomes. Insertion site characteristics for all putative loci were experimentally verified. Conclusions The 39 loci that passed our computational and experimental screens probably represent inversion-deletion events which resulted in a 5' inverted poly(A tail. Based on our observations of these loci and their local sequence properties, we conclude that they most probably represent twin priming events with unusually short non-inverted portions. We postulate that dual priming could, theoretically, produce the same patterns. The resulting homopolymeric stretches associated with these insertion events may promote genomic instability and create potential target sites for future retrotransposition events.

  14. Characterization of GM events by insert knowledge adapted re-sequencing approaches.

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    Yang, Litao; Wang, Congmao; Holst-Jensen, Arne; Morisset, Dany; Lin, Yongjun; Zhang, Dabing

    2013-10-03

    Detection methods and data from molecular characterization of genetically modified (GM) events are needed by stakeholders of public risk assessors and regulators. Generally, the molecular characteristics of GM events are incomprehensively revealed by current approaches and biased towards detecting transformation vector derived sequences. GM events are classified based on available knowledge of the sequences of vectors and inserts (insert knowledge). Herein we present three insert knowledge-adapted approaches for characterization GM events (TT51-1 and T1c-19 rice as examples) based on paired-end re-sequencing with the advantages of comprehensiveness, accuracy, and automation. The comprehensive molecular characteristics of two rice events were revealed with additional unintended insertions comparing with the results from PCR and Southern blotting. Comprehensive transgene characterization of TT51-1 and T1c-19 is shown to be independent of a priori knowledge of the insert and vector sequences employing the developed approaches. This provides an opportunity to identify and characterize also unknown GM events.

  15. Characterization of GM events by insert knowledge adapted re-sequencing approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Litao; Wang, Congmao; Holst-Jensen, Arne; Morisset, Dany; Lin, Yongjun; Zhang, Dabing

    2013-01-01

    Detection methods and data from molecular characterization of genetically modified (GM) events are needed by stakeholders of public risk assessors and regulators. Generally, the molecular characteristics of GM events are incomprehensively revealed by current approaches and biased towards detecting transformation vector derived sequences. GM events are classified based on available knowledge of the sequences of vectors and inserts (insert knowledge). Herein we present three insert knowledge-ad...

  16. SEQUENCING OF FLAX LIS-1 INSERTION SITE IN THE ALBIDUM GENOTYPE

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    Jana Žiarovská

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a methodology of identifying the insertion site of LIS-1-1 (Linum Insertion Sequence 1 element in flax Albidum variety when growing under the in vitro combined with environmental stress conditions. Abiotic stress was induced by a reduced nutrient content in a growth medium. The LIS-1 insertion site amplification was reaLIS-1ed using the forward LIS-L: 5'-GGG CAG TTT AAC TGT AAC GAA - 3 'and revers LIS-R: 5'-GCT TGG ATT TAG ACT TGG CAA C - 3' primers by PCR. PCR product was sequenced by direct sequencing method to proove the nucleotide sequence for matching with database LIS-1 sequence. A comparison has been matched with the sequence of the amplified segment in the database for all nucleotides except the 11-position in the 5'-3 ' direction, where instead of the three adenine pair is a couple in the Albidum variety. Changes caused by mobile elements or insertion sequences result in common flax in variability that can be used for the purposes of development of effective marker identification or environment based markers development.

  17. Identifying transposon insertions and their effects from RNA-sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Julian R; Kas, Sjors M; Schut, Eva; Adams, David J; Koudijs, Marco J; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Jonkers, Jos

    2017-07-07

    Insertional mutagenesis using engineered transposons is a potent forward genetic screening technique used to identify cancer genes in mouse model systems. In the analysis of these screens, transposon insertion sites are typically identified by targeted DNA-sequencing and subsequently assigned to predicted target genes using heuristics. As such, these approaches provide no direct evidence that insertions actually affect their predicted targets or how transcripts of these genes are affected. To address this, we developed IM-Fusion, an approach that identifies insertion sites from gene-transposon fusions in standard single- and paired-end RNA-sequencing data. We demonstrate IM-Fusion on two separate transposon screens of 123 mammary tumors and 20 B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, respectively. We show that IM-Fusion accurately identifies transposon insertions and their true target genes. Furthermore, by combining the identified insertion sites with expression quantification, we show that we can determine the effect of a transposon insertion on its target gene(s) and prioritize insertions that have a significant effect on expression. We expect that IM-Fusion will significantly enhance the accuracy of cancer gene discovery in forward genetic screens and provide initial insight into the biological effects of insertions on candidate cancer genes. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Allexiviruses may have acquired inserted sequences between the CP and CRP genes to change the translation reinitiation strategy of CRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Naoto; Shimura, Hanako; Masuta, Chikara

    2018-06-01

    Allexiviruses are economically important garlic viruses that are involved in garlic mosaic diseases. In this study, we characterized the allexivirus cysteine-rich protein (CRP) gene located just downstream of the coat protein (CP) gene in the viral genome. We determined the nucleotide sequences of the CP and CRP genes from numerous allexivirus isolates and performed a phylogenetic analysis. According to the resulting phylogenetic tree, we found that allexiviruses were clearly divided into two major groups (group I and group II) based on the sequences of the CP and CRP genes. In addition, the allexiviruses in group II had distinct sequences just before the CRP gene, while group I isolates did not. The inserted sequence between the CP and CRP genes was partially complementary to garlic 18S rRNA. Using a potato virus X vector, we showed that the CRPs affected viral accumulation and symptom induction in Nicotiana benthamiana, suggesting that the allexivirus CRP is a pathogenicity determinant. We assume that the inserted sequences before the CRP gene may have been generated during viral evolution to alter the termination-reinitiation mechanism for coupled translation of CP and CRP.

  19. Identification of genomic insertion and flanking sequence of G2-EPSPS and GAT transgenes in soybean using whole genome sequencing method

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    Bingfu Guo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Molecular characterization of sequences flanking exogenous fragment insertions is essential for safety assessment and labeling of genetically modified organisms (GMO. In this study, the T-DNA insertion sites and flanking sequences were identified in two newly developed transgenic glyphosate-tolerant soybeans GE-J16 and ZH10-6 based on whole genome sequencing (WGS method. About 21 Gb sequence data (~21× coverage for each line was generated on Illumina HiSeq 2500 platform. The junction reads mapped to boundary of T-DNA and flanking sequences in these two events were identified by comparing all sequencing reads with soybean reference genome and sequence of transgenic vector. The putative insertion loci and flanking sequences were further confirmed by PCR amplification, Sanger sequencing, and co-segregation analysis. All these analyses supported that exogenous T-DNA fragments were integrated in positions of Chr19: 50543767-50543792 and Chr17: 7980527-7980541 in these two transgenic lines. Identification of the genomic insertion site of the G2-EPSPS and GAT transgenes will facilitate the use of their glyphosate-tolerant traits in soybean breeding program. These results also demonstrated that WGS is a cost-effective and rapid method of identifying sites of T-DNA insertions and flanking sequences in soybean.

  20. Antral content, secretion and peripheral metabolism of N-terminal progastrin fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter; Hansen, Carsten Palnaes; Rehfeld, Jens F

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In addition to the acid-stimulatory gastrins, progastrin also release N-terminal fragments. In order to examine the cellular content, secretion and peripheral metabolism of these fragments, we developed an immunoassay specific for the N-terminal sequence of human progastrin. RESULTS......-terminal progastrin fragments. The basal concentration of N-terminal fragments in normal human plasma was almost 30-fold higher than that of the amidated, acid-stimulatory gastrins (286 pmol/l versus 9.8 pmol/l, n=26, P...-35 in circulation was 30 min, and a pig model revealed the kidneys and the vasculature to the head as the primary sites of degradation. CONCLUSION: The cellular and circulatory concentration profiles of N-terminal progastrin fragments differ markedly from those of the acid-stimulatory gastrins. The high basal...

  1. Identification of a novel calcium binding motif based on the detection of sequence insertions in the animal peroxidase domain of bacterial proteins.

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    Santamaría-Hernando, Saray; Krell, Tino; Ramos-González, María-Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Proteins of the animal heme peroxidase (ANP) superfamily differ greatly in size since they have either one or two catalytic domains that match profile PS50292. The orf PP_2561 of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 that we have called PepA encodes a two-domain ANP. The alignment of these domains with those of PepA homologues revealed a variable number of insertions with the consensus G-x-D-G-x-x-[GN]-[TN]-x-D-D. This motif has also been detected in the structure of pseudopilin (pdb 3G20), where it was found to be involved in Ca(2+) coordination although a sequence analysis did not reveal the presence of any known calcium binding motifs in this protein. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that a peptide containing this consensus motif bound specifically calcium ions with affinities ranging between 33-79 µM depending on the pH. Microcalorimetric titrations of the purified N-terminal ANP-like domain of PepA revealed Ca(2+) binding with a K(D) of 12 µM and stoichiometry of 1.25 calcium ions per protein monomer. This domain exhibited peroxidase activity after its reconstitution with heme. These data led to the definition of a novel calcium binding motif that we have termed PERCAL and which was abundantly present in animal peroxidase-like domains of bacterial proteins. Bacterial heme peroxidases thus possess two different types of calcium binding motifs, namely PERCAL and the related hemolysin type calcium binding motif, with the latter being located outside the catalytic domains and in their C-terminal end. A phylogenetic tree of ANP-like catalytic domains of bacterial proteins with PERCAL motifs, including single domain peroxidases, was divided into two major clusters, representing domains with and without PERCAL motif containing insertions. We have verified that the recently reported classification of bacterial heme peroxidases in two families (cd09819 and cd09821) is unrelated to these insertions. Sequences matching PERCAL were detected in all kingdoms of life.

  2. Identification of a novel calcium binding motif based on the detection of sequence insertions in the animal peroxidase domain of bacterial proteins.

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    Saray Santamaría-Hernando

    Full Text Available Proteins of the animal heme peroxidase (ANP superfamily differ greatly in size since they have either one or two catalytic domains that match profile PS50292. The orf PP_2561 of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 that we have called PepA encodes a two-domain ANP. The alignment of these domains with those of PepA homologues revealed a variable number of insertions with the consensus G-x-D-G-x-x-[GN]-[TN]-x-D-D. This motif has also been detected in the structure of pseudopilin (pdb 3G20, where it was found to be involved in Ca(2+ coordination although a sequence analysis did not reveal the presence of any known calcium binding motifs in this protein. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that a peptide containing this consensus motif bound specifically calcium ions with affinities ranging between 33-79 µM depending on the pH. Microcalorimetric titrations of the purified N-terminal ANP-like domain of PepA revealed Ca(2+ binding with a K(D of 12 µM and stoichiometry of 1.25 calcium ions per protein monomer. This domain exhibited peroxidase activity after its reconstitution with heme. These data led to the definition of a novel calcium binding motif that we have termed PERCAL and which was abundantly present in animal peroxidase-like domains of bacterial proteins. Bacterial heme peroxidases thus possess two different types of calcium binding motifs, namely PERCAL and the related hemolysin type calcium binding motif, with the latter being located outside the catalytic domains and in their C-terminal end. A phylogenetic tree of ANP-like catalytic domains of bacterial proteins with PERCAL motifs, including single domain peroxidases, was divided into two major clusters, representing domains with and without PERCAL motif containing insertions. We have verified that the recently reported classification of bacterial heme peroxidases in two families (cd09819 and cd09821 is unrelated to these insertions. Sequences matching PERCAL were detected in all kingdoms of

  3. N-Terminal Domains in Two-Domain Proteins Are Biased to Be Shorter and Predicted to Fold Faster Than Their C-Terminal Counterparts

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    Etai Jacob

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Computational analysis of proteomes in all kingdoms of life reveals a strong tendency for N-terminal domains in two-domain proteins to have shorter sequences than their neighboring C-terminal domains. Given that folding rates are affected by chain length, we asked whether the tendency for N-terminal domains to be shorter than their neighboring C-terminal domains reflects selection for faster-folding N-terminal domains. Calculations of absolute contact order, another predictor of folding rate, provide additional evidence that N-terminal domains tend to fold faster than their neighboring C-terminal domains. A possible explanation for this bias, which is more pronounced in prokaryotes than in eukaryotes, is that faster folding of N-terminal domains reduces the risk for protein aggregation during folding by preventing formation of nonnative interdomain interactions. This explanation is supported by our finding that two-domain proteins with a shorter N-terminal domain are much more abundant than those with a shorter C-terminal domain.

  4. Identification of evolutionarily conserved non-AUG-initiated N-terminal extensions in human coding sequences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ivanov, Ivaylo P

    2011-05-01

    In eukaryotes, it is generally assumed that translation initiation occurs at the AUG codon closest to the messenger RNA 5\\' cap. However, in certain cases, initiation can occur at codons differing from AUG by a single nucleotide, especially the codons CUG, UUG, GUG, ACG, AUA and AUU. While non-AUG initiation has been experimentally verified for a handful of human genes, the full extent to which this phenomenon is utilized--both for increased coding capacity and potentially also for novel regulatory mechanisms--remains unclear. To address this issue, and hence to improve the quality of existing coding sequence annotations, we developed a methodology based on phylogenetic analysis of predicted 5\\' untranslated regions from orthologous genes. We use evolutionary signatures of protein-coding sequences as an indicator of translation initiation upstream of annotated coding sequences. Our search identified novel conserved potential non-AUG-initiated N-terminal extensions in 42 human genes including VANGL2, FGFR1, KCNN4, TRPV6, HDGF, CITED2, EIF4G3 and NTF3, and also affirmed the conservation of known non-AUG-initiated extensions in 17 other genes. In several instances, we have been able to obtain independent experimental evidence of the expression of non-AUG-initiated products from the previously published literature and ribosome profiling data.

  5. Efficient DNA fingerprinting based on the targeted sequencing of active retrotransposon insertion sites using a bench-top high-throughput sequencing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monden, Yuki; Yamamoto, Ayaka; Shindo, Akiko; Tahara, Makoto

    2014-10-01

    In many crop species, DNA fingerprinting is required for the precise identification of cultivars to protect the rights of breeders. Many families of retrotransposons have multiple copies throughout the eukaryotic genome and their integrated copies are inherited genetically. Thus, their insertion polymorphisms among cultivars are useful for DNA fingerprinting. In this study, we conducted a DNA fingerprinting based on the insertion polymorphisms of active retrotransposon families (Rtsp-1 and LIb) in sweet potato. Using 38 cultivars, we identified 2,024 insertion sites in the two families with an Illumina MiSeq sequencing platform. Of these insertion sites, 91.4% appeared to be polymorphic among the cultivars and 376 cultivar-specific insertion sites were identified, which were converted directly into cultivar-specific sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using these insertion sites, which corresponded well with known pedigree information, thereby indicating their suitability for genetic diversity studies. Thus, the genome-wide comparative analysis of active retrotransposon insertion sites using the bench-top MiSeq sequencing platform is highly effective for DNA fingerprinting without any requirement for whole genome sequence information. This approach may facilitate the development of practical polymerase chain reaction-based cultivar diagnostic system and could also be applied to the determination of genetic relationships. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  6. The N-terminal of a heparin-binding sperm membrane mitogen possess lectin-like sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mor, Visesato; Chatterjee, Tapati

    2007-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans like heparin and heparin sulfate in follicular fluid induce changes in the intracellular environment during the spermatozoal functional maturation. We previously reported the isolation, purification and partial characterization of a heparin binding sperm membrane protein (HBSM). In the present study, the amino acids analysis provided evidence of a single sequence, which suggest the homogeneity of the purified HBSM. Fourteen amino acids- 1 A D T I V A V E L D T Y P N 14 -correspond to the amino terminal sequence of Concanavalin A (Con A) and contain 45.2% carbohydrate by weight. HBSM possess mitogenic property on lymphocytes with comparable magnitude to the well-known mitogen; Con A, inducing 83% radiolabel thymidine incorporation in growing lymphocytes. Unlike Con A, there was no agglutination of cell by HBSM upto 5 ng/ml concentration. Interestingly, we found that heparin and chondroitin sulfate-conjugated HBSM inhibit the proliferative activity. Similar effect was also found with an in-house isolate sulfated glycans; G-I (28% sulfate). In contrast, there was no inhibition by the desulfated form; G-ID. Altogether, our data suggest that the mechanism of cell proliferative pathway may be different for HBSM and Con A

  7. Combinatorial events of insertion sequences and ICE in Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toleman, Mark A; Walsh, Timothy R

    2011-09-01

    The emergence of antibiotic and antimicrobial resistance in Gram-negative bacteria is incremental and linked to genetic elements that function in a so-called 'one-ended transposition' manner, including ISEcp1, ISCR elements and Tn3-like transposons. The power of these elements lies in their inability to consistently recognize one of their own terminal sequences, while recognizing more genetically distant surrogate sequences. This has the effect of mobilizing the DNA sequence found adjacent to their initial location. In general, resistance in Gram-negatives is closely linked to a few one-off events. These include the capture of the class 1 integron by a Tn5090-like transposon; the formation of the 3' conserved segment (3'-CS); and the fusion of the ISCR1 element to the 3'-CS. The structures formed by these rare events have been massively amplified and disseminated in Gram-negative bacteria, but hitherto, are rarely found in Gram-positives. Such events dominate current resistance gene acquisition and are instrumental in the construction of large resistance gene islands on chromosomes and plasmids. Similar combinatorial events appear to have occurred between conjugative plasmids and phages constructing hybrid elements called integrative and conjugative elements or conjugative transposons. These elements are beginning to be closely linked to some of the more powerful resistance mechanisms such as the extended spectrum β-lactamases, metallo- and AmpC type β-lactamases. Antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria is dominated by unusual combinatorial mistakes of Insertion sequences and gene fusions which have been selected and amplified by antibiotic pressure enabling the formation of extended resistance islands. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Isolation and sequence analysis of a cDNA clone encoding the fifth complement component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundwall, Åke B; Wetsel, Rick A; Kristensen, Torsten

    1985-01-01

    DNA clone of 1.85 kilobase pairs was isolated. Hybridization of the mixed-sequence probe to the complementary strand of the plasmid insert and sequence analysis by the dideoxy method predicted the expected protein sequence of C5a (positions 1-12), amino-terminal to the anticipated priming site. The sequence......, subcloned into M13 mp8, and sequenced at random by the dideoxy technique, thereby generating a contiguous sequence of 1703 base pairs. This clone contained coding sequence for the C-terminal 262 amino acid residues of the beta-chain, the entire C5a fragment, and the N-terminal 98 residues of the alpha......'-chain. The 3' end of the clone had a polyadenylated tail preceded by a polyadenylation recognition site, a 3'-untranslated region, and base pairs homologous to the human Alu concensus sequence. Comparison of the derived partial human C5 protein sequence with that previously determined for murine C3 and human...

  9. Identification, isolation, and N-terminal sequencing of style glycoproteins associated with self-incompatibility in Nicotiana alata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnen, W; Batterham, M P; Clarke, A E; Moritz, R L; Simpson, R J

    1989-05-01

    S-Gene-associated glycoproteins (S-glycoproteins) from styles of Nicotiana alata, identified by non-equilibrium two-dimensional electrophoresis, were purified by cation exchange fast protein liquid chromatography with yields of 0.5 to 8 micrograms of protein per style, depending on the S-genotype of the plant. The method relies on the highly basic nature of the S-glycoproteins. The elution profiles of the different S-glycoproteins from the fast protein liquid chromatography column were characteristic of each S-glycoprotein, and could be used to establish the S-genotype of plants in outbreeding populations. In all cases, the S-genotype predicted from the style protein profile corresponded to that predicted from DNA gel blot analysis using S-allele-specific DNA probes and to that established by conventional breeding tests. Amino-terminal sequences of five purified S-glycoproteins showed a high degree of homology with the previously published sequences of N. alata and Lycopersicon esculentum S-glycoproteins.

  10. Is the C-terminal insertional signal in Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane proteins species-specific or not?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paramasivam Nagarajan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Gram-negative bacteria, the outer membrane is composed of an asymmetric lipid bilayer of phopspholipids and lipopolysaccharides, and the transmembrane proteins that reside in this membrane are almost exclusively β-barrel proteins. These proteins are inserted into the membrane by a highly conserved and essential machinery, the BAM complex. It recognizes its substrates, unfolded outer membrane proteins (OMPs, through a C-terminal motif that has been speculated to be species-specific, based on theoretical and experimental results from only two species, Escherichia coli and Neisseria meningitidis, where it was shown on the basis of individual sequences and motifs that OMPs from the one cannot easily be over expressed in the other, unless the C-terminal motif was adapted. In order to determine whether this species specificity is a general phenomenon, we undertook a large-scale bioinformatics study on all predicted OMPs from 437 fully sequenced proteobacterial strains. Results We were able to verify the incompatibility reported between Escherichia coli and Neisseria meningitidis, using clustering techniques based on the pairwise Hellinger distance between sequence spaces for the C-terminal motifs of individual organisms. We noticed that the amino acid position reported to be responsible for this incompatibility between Escherichia coli and Neisseria meningitidis does not play a major role for determining species specificity of OMP recognition by the BAM complex. Instead, we found that the signal is more diffuse, and that for most organism pairs, the difference between the signals is hard to detect. Notable exceptions are the Neisseriales, and Helicobacter spp. For both of these organism groups, we describe the specific sequence requirements that are at the basis of the observed difference. Conclusions Based on the finding that the differences between the recognition motifs of almost all organisms are small, we assume that

  11. Time-Resolved Transposon Insertion Sequencing Reveals Genome-Wide Fitness Dynamics during Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guanhua; Billings, Gabriel; Hubbard, Troy P; Park, Joseph S; Yin Leung, Ka; Liu, Qin; Davis, Brigid M; Zhang, Yuanxing; Wang, Qiyao; Waldor, Matthew K

    2017-10-03

    Transposon insertion sequencing (TIS) is a powerful high-throughput genetic technique that is transforming functional genomics in prokaryotes, because it enables genome-wide mapping of the determinants of fitness. However, current approaches for analyzing TIS data assume that selective pressures are constant over time and thus do not yield information regarding changes in the genetic requirements for growth in dynamic environments (e.g., during infection). Here, we describe structured analysis of TIS data collected as a time series, termed pattern analysis of conditional essentiality (PACE). From a temporal series of TIS data, PACE derives a quantitative assessment of each mutant's fitness over the course of an experiment and identifies mutants with related fitness profiles. In so doing, PACE circumvents major limitations of existing methodologies, specifically the need for artificial effect size thresholds and enumeration of bacterial population expansion. We used PACE to analyze TIS samples of Edwardsiella piscicida (a fish pathogen) collected over a 2-week infection period from a natural host (the flatfish turbot). PACE uncovered more genes that affect E. piscicida 's fitness in vivo than were detected using a cutoff at a terminal sampling point, and it identified subpopulations of mutants with distinct fitness profiles, one of which informed the design of new live vaccine candidates. Overall, PACE enables efficient mining of time series TIS data and enhances the power and sensitivity of TIS-based analyses. IMPORTANCE Transposon insertion sequencing (TIS) enables genome-wide mapping of the genetic determinants of fitness, typically based on observations at a single sampling point. Here, we move beyond analysis of endpoint TIS data to create a framework for analysis of time series TIS data, termed pattern analysis of conditional essentiality (PACE). We applied PACE to identify genes that contribute to colonization of a natural host by the fish pathogen

  12. Neurospora tryptophan synthase: N-terminal analysis and the sequence of the pyridoxal phosphate active site peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, M.L.; Hsu, P.Y.; DeMoss, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Tryptophan synthase (TS), which catalyzes the final step of tryptophan biosynthesis, is a multifunctional protein requiring pyridoxal phosphate (B6P) for two of its three distinct enzyme activities. TS from Neurospora has a blocked N-terminal, is a homodimer of 150 KDa and binds one mole of B6P per mole of subunit. The authors shown the N-terminal residue to be acyl-serine. The B6P-active site of holoenzyme was labelled by reduction of the B6P-Schiff base with [ 3 H]-NaBH 4 , and resulted in a proportionate loss of activity in the two B6P-requiring reactions. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of CNBr-generated peptides showed the labelled, active site peptide to be 6 KDa. The sequence of this peptide, purified to apparent homogeneity by a combination of C-18 reversed phase and TSK gel filtration HPLC is: gly-arg-pro-gly-gln-leu-his-lys-ala-glu-arg-leu-thr-glu-tyr-ala-gly-gly-ala-gln-ile-xxx-leu-lys-arg-glu-asp-leu-asn-his-xxx-gly-xxx-his-/sub ***/-ile-asn-asn-ala-leu. Although four residues (xxx, /sub ***/) are unidentified, this peptide is minimally 78% homologous with the corresponding peptide from yeast TS, in which residue (/sub ***/) is the lysine that binds B6P

  13. A bioinformatics approach for identifying transgene insertion sites using whole genome sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Doori; Park, Su-Hyun; Ban, Yong Wook; Kim, Youn Shic; Park, Kyoung-Cheul; Kim, Nam-Soo; Kim, Ju-Kon; Choi, Ik-Young

    2017-08-15

    Genetically modified crops (GM crops) have been developed to improve the agricultural traits of modern crop cultivars. Safety assessments of GM crops are of paramount importance in research at developmental stages and before releasing transgenic plants into the marketplace. Sequencing technology is developing rapidly, with higher output and labor efficiencies, and will eventually replace existing methods for the molecular characterization of genetically modified organisms. To detect the transgenic insertion locations in the three GM rice gnomes, Illumina sequencing reads are mapped and classified to the rice genome and plasmid sequence. The both mapped reads are classified to characterize the junction site between plant and transgene sequence by sequence alignment. Herein, we present a next generation sequencing (NGS)-based molecular characterization method, using transgenic rice plants SNU-Bt9-5, SNU-Bt9-30, and SNU-Bt9-109. Specifically, using bioinformatics tools, we detected the precise insertion locations and copy numbers of transfer DNA, genetic rearrangements, and the absence of backbone sequences, which were equivalent to results obtained from Southern blot analyses. NGS methods have been suggested as an effective means of characterizing and detecting transgenic insertion locations in genomes. Our results demonstrate the use of a combination of NGS technology and bioinformatics approaches that offers cost- and time-effective methods for assessing the safety of transgenic plants.

  14. Nature of unstable insertional mutations and reversions at the cut locus of Drosophila melanogaster: Molecular mechanism for transpositional memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizrokhi, L.Yu.; Georgieva, S.G.; Obolenkova, L.A.; Priimyagi, A.F.; Gerasimova, T.I.; Il'in, Yu.V.

    1988-01-01

    A segment of the cut locus containing an mdg4 insertion as a result of ct MR and ct MRp10 mutations was cloned. Clones were obtained for the phenotypically different ct MR2 and ct MRpN10 mutants and for stable and unstable revertants. All mutations studied are associated with mdg4 insertion at an identical nucleotide sequence of the cut locus, the same site at which mdg4 is inserted at the ct 6 allele. The ct MRpN line differs from ct MR2 in that the mobile element jockey (3 kbp) is inserted in mdg4. Jockey is represented by about 1,000 copies per genome; it is homogeneous and lacks long terminal repeats (LTRs). In stable ct + reversions, mdg4 is completely excised. In unstable ct + reversions, in which there is a high degree of reverse directed transposition of mdg4 to the cut locus, an LTR of mdg4 is preserved at the site of the mutation. It is a sequence along which new copies of mdg4 or jockey-containing mdg4 are inserted into the genome. The authors discuss a molecular mechanism for transpositional memory involving homologous recombination of the remnant LTR and circular extrachromosomal copies of mdg4

  15. A Novel Insertion Variant of CRYGD Is Associated with Congenital Nuclear Cataract in a Chinese Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiaotong; Wang, Lianqing; Song, Zixun; Xiao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    To investigate a novel insertion variant of CRYGD identified in a Chinese family with nuclear congenital cataract. A Chinese family with congenital nuclear cataract was recruited for the mutational screening of candidate genes by direct sequencing. Recombinant N-terminal Myc tagged wildtype or mutant CRYGD was expressed in HEK293T cells. The expression pattern, protein solubility and subcellular distribution were analyzed by western blotting and immunofluorescence. A novel insertion variant, c.451_452insGACT, in CRYGD was identified in the patients. It causes a frameshift and a premature termination of the polypeptide to become Y151*. A significantly reduced solubility was observed for this mutant. Unlike wildtype CRYGD, which existed mainly in the cytoplasm, Y151* was mis-located in the nucleus. We have identified a novel mutation, c.451_452insGACT, in CRYGD, which is associated with nuclear cataract. This is the first insertion mutation of CRYGD found to cause autosomal dominant congenital cataract. The mutant protein, with loss of solubility and localization to the nucleus, is hypothesized to be the major cause of cataract in these patients.

  16. Cyclization of the N-Terminal X-Asn-Gly Motif during Sample Preparation for Bottom-Up Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xumin; Højrup, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We, herein, report a novel -17 Da peptide modification corresponding to an N-terminal cyclization of peptides possessing the N-terminal motif of X-Asn-Gly. The cyclization occurs spontaneously during sample preparation for bottom-up proteomics studies. Distinct from the two well-known N-terminal ......We, herein, report a novel -17 Da peptide modification corresponding to an N-terminal cyclization of peptides possessing the N-terminal motif of X-Asn-Gly. The cyclization occurs spontaneously during sample preparation for bottom-up proteomics studies. Distinct from the two well-known N......-terminal cyclizations, cyclization of N-terminal glutamine and S-carbamoylmethylcysteine, it is dependent on pH instead of [NH(4)(+)]. The data set from our recent study on large-scale N(α)-modified peptides revealed a sequence requirement for the cyclization event similar to the well-known deamidation of Asn to iso...

  17. A high-throughput splinkerette-PCR method for the isolation and sequencing of retroviral insertion sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uren, Anthony G; Mikkers, Harald; Kool, Jaap

    2009-01-01

    sites has been a major limitation to performing screens on this scale. Here we present a method for the high-throughput isolation of insertion sites using a highly efficient splinkerette-PCR method coupled with capillary or 454 sequencing. This protocol includes a description of the procedure for DNA......Insertional mutagens such as viruses and transposons are a useful tool for performing forward genetic screens in mice to discover cancer genes. These screens are most effective when performed using hundreds of mice; however, until recently, the cost-effective isolation and sequencing of insertion...

  18. Insights into N-calls of mitochondrial DNA sequencing using MitoChip v2.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blakely Emma L

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Developments in DNA resequencing microarrays include mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA sequencing and mutation detection. Failure by the microarray to identify a base, compared to the reference sequence, is designated an 'N-call.' This study re-examined the N-call distribution of mtDNA samples sequenced by the Affymetrix MitoChip v.2.0, based on the hypothesis that N-calls may represent insertions or deletions (indels in mtDNA. Findings We analysed 16 patient mtDNA samples using MitoChip. N-calls by the proprietary GSEQ software were significantly reduced when either of the freeware on-line algorithms ResqMi or sPROFILER was utilized. With sPROFILER, this decrease in N-calls had no effect on the homoplasmic or heteroplasmic mutation levels compared to GSEQ software, but ResqMi produced a significant change in mutation load, as well as producing longer N-cell stretches. For these reasons, further analysis using ResqMi was not attempted. Conventional DNA sequencing of the longer N-calls stretches from sPROFILER revealed 7 insertions and 12 point mutations. Moreover, analysis of single-base N-calls of one mtDNA sample found 3 other point mutations. Conclusions Our study is the first to analyse N-calls produced from GSEQ software for the MitoChipv2.0. By narrowing the focus to longer stretches of N-calls revealed by sPROFILER, conventional sequencing was able to identify unique insertions and point mutations. Shorter N-calls also harboured point mutations, but the absence of deletions among N-calls suggests that probe confirmation affects binding and thus N-calling. This study supports the contention that the GSEQ is more capable of assigning bases when used in conjunction with sPROFILER.

  19. Insertion sequences enrichment in extreme Red sea brine pool vent

    KAUST Repository

    Elbehery, Ali H. A.

    2016-12-03

    Mobile genetic elements are major agents of genome diversification and evolution. Limited studies addressed their characteristics, including abundance, and role in extreme habitats. One of the rare natural habitats exposed to multiple-extreme conditions, including high temperature, salinity and concentration of heavy metals, are the Red Sea brine pools. We assessed the abundance and distribution of different mobile genetic elements in four Red Sea brine pools including the world’s largest known multiple-extreme deep-sea environment, the Red Sea Atlantis II Deep. We report a gradient in the abundance of mobile genetic elements, dramatically increasing in the harshest environment of the pool. Additionally, we identified a strong association between the abundance of insertion sequences and extreme conditions, being highest in the harshest and deepest layer of the Red Sea Atlantis II Deep. Our comparative analyses of mobile genetic elements in secluded, extreme and relatively non-extreme environments, suggest that insertion sequences predominantly contribute to polyextremophiles genome plasticity.

  20. Sequencing Lys-N Proteolytic Peptides by ESI and MALDI Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, Mathieu; Cantel, Sonia; Verdié, Pascal; Martinez, Jean; Enjalbal, Christine

    2011-02-01

    In this study, we explored the MS/MS behavior of various synthetic peptides that possess a lysine residue at the N-terminal position. These peptides were designed to mimic peptides produced upon proteolysis by the Lys-N enzyme, a metalloendopeptidase issued from a Japanese fungus Grifola frondosa that was recently investigated in proteomic studies as an alternative to trypsin digestion, as a specific cleavage at the amide X-Lys chain is obtained that provides N-terminal lysine peptide fragments. In contrast to tryptic peptides exhibiting a lysine or arginine residue solely at the C-terminal position, and are thus devoid of such basic amino acids within the sequence, these Lys-N proteolytic peptides can contain the highly basic arginine residue anywhere within the peptide chain. The fragmentation patterns of such sequences with the ESI-QqTOF and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometers commonly used in proteomic bottom-up experiments were investigated.

  1. Ulysses: accurate detection of low-frequency structural variations in large insert-size sequencing libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet-Markowska, Alexandre; Richard, Hugues; Fischer, Gilles; Lafontaine, Ingrid

    2015-03-15

    The detection of structural variations (SVs) in short-range Paired-End (PE) libraries remains challenging because SV breakpoints can involve large dispersed repeated sequences, or carry inherent complexity, hardly resolvable with classical PE sequencing data. In contrast, large insert-size sequencing libraries (Mate-Pair libraries) provide higher physical coverage of the genome and give access to repeat-containing regions. They can thus theoretically overcome previous limitations as they are becoming routinely accessible. Nevertheless, broad insert size distributions and high rates of chimerical sequences are usually associated to this type of libraries, which makes the accurate annotation of SV challenging. Here, we present Ulysses, a tool that achieves drastically higher detection accuracy than existing tools, both on simulated and real mate-pair sequencing datasets from the 1000 Human Genome project. Ulysses achieves high specificity over the complete spectrum of variants by assessing, in a principled manner, the statistical significance of each possible variant (duplications, deletions, translocations, insertions and inversions) against an explicit model for the generation of experimental noise. This statistical model proves particularly useful for the detection of low frequency variants. SV detection performed on a large insert Mate-Pair library from a breast cancer sample revealed a high level of somatic duplications in the tumor and, to a lesser extent, in the blood sample as well. Altogether, these results show that Ulysses is a valuable tool for the characterization of somatic mosaicism in human tissues and in cancer genomes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Karect: accurate correction of substitution, insertion and deletion errors for next-generation sequencing data

    KAUST Repository

    Allam, Amin

    2015-07-14

    Motivation: Next-generation sequencing generates large amounts of data affected by errors in the form of substitutions, insertions or deletions of bases. Error correction based on the high-coverage information, typically improves de novo assembly. Most existing tools can correct substitution errors only; some support insertions and deletions, but accuracy in many cases is low. Results: We present Karect, a novel error correction technique based on multiple alignment. Our approach supports substitution, insertion and deletion errors. It can handle non-uniform coverage as well as moderately covered areas of the sequenced genome. Experiments with data from Illumina, 454 FLX and Ion Torrent sequencing machines demonstrate that Karect is more accurate than previous methods, both in terms of correcting individual-bases errors (up to 10% increase in accuracy gain) and post de novo assembly quality (up to 10% increase in NGA50). We also introduce an improved framework for evaluating the quality of error correction.

  3. Regulation of presynaptic Ca2+, synaptic plasticity and contextual fear conditioning by a N-terminal β-amyloid fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, James L M; Tong, Mei; Alfulaij, Naghum; Sherrin, Tessi; Contarino, Mark; White, Michael M; Bellinger, Frederick P; Todorovic, Cedomir; Nichols, Robert A

    2014-10-22

    Soluble β-amyloid has been shown to regulate presynaptic Ca(2+) and synaptic plasticity. In particular, picomolar β-amyloid was found to have an agonist-like action on presynaptic nicotinic receptors and to augment long-term potentiation (LTP) in a manner dependent upon nicotinic receptors. Here, we report that a functional N-terminal domain exists within β-amyloid for its agonist-like activity. This sequence corresponds to a N-terminal fragment generated by the combined action of α- and β-secretases, and resident carboxypeptidase. The N-terminal β-amyloid fragment is present in the brains and CSF of healthy adults as well as in Alzheimer's patients. Unlike full-length β-amyloid, the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment is monomeric and nontoxic. In Ca(2+) imaging studies using a model reconstituted rodent neuroblastoma cell line and isolated mouse nerve terminals, the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment proved to be highly potent and more effective than full-length β-amyloid in its agonist-like action on nicotinic receptors. In addition, the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment augmented theta burst-induced post-tetanic potentiation and LTP in mouse hippocampal slices. The N-terminal fragment also rescued LTP inhibited by elevated levels of full-length β-amyloid. Contextual fear conditioning was also strongly augmented following bilateral injection of N-terminal β-amyloid fragment into the dorsal hippocampi of intact mice. The fragment-induced augmentation of fear conditioning was attenuated by coadministration of nicotinic antagonist. The activity of the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment appears to reside largely in a sequence surrounding a putative metal binding site, YEVHHQ. These findings suggest that the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment may serve as a potent and effective endogenous neuromodulator. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3414210-09$15.00/0.

  4. Directed evolution of the TALE N-terminal domain for recognition of all 5' bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Brian M; Mercer, Andrew C; Barbas, Carlos F

    2013-11-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins can be designed to bind virtually any DNA sequence. General guidelines for design of TALE DNA-binding domains suggest that the 5'-most base of the DNA sequence bound by the TALE (the N0 base) should be a thymine. We quantified the N0 requirement by analysis of the activities of TALE transcription factors (TALE-TF), TALE recombinases (TALE-R) and TALE nucleases (TALENs) with each DNA base at this position. In the absence of a 5' T, we observed decreases in TALE activity up to >1000-fold in TALE-TF activity, up to 100-fold in TALE-R activity and up to 10-fold reduction in TALEN activity compared with target sequences containing a 5' T. To develop TALE architectures that recognize all possible N0 bases, we used structure-guided library design coupled with TALE-R activity selections to evolve novel TALE N-terminal domains to accommodate any N0 base. A G-selective domain and broadly reactive domains were isolated and characterized. The engineered TALE domains selected in the TALE-R format demonstrated modularity and were active in TALE-TF and TALEN architectures. Evolved N-terminal domains provide effective and unconstrained TALE-based targeting of any DNA sequence as TALE binding proteins and designer enzymes.

  5. Membrane-bound human orphan cytochrome P450 2U1: Sequence singularities, construction of a full 3D model, and substrate docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducassou, Lionel; Dhers, Laura; Jonasson, Gabriella; Pietrancosta, Nicolas; Boucher, Jean-Luc; Mansuy, Daniel; André, François

    2017-09-01

    Human cytochrome P450 2U1 (CYP2U1) is an orphan CYP that exhibits several distinctive characteristics among the 57 human CYPs with a highly conserved sequence in almost all living organisms. We compared its protein sequence with those of the 57 human CYPs and constructed a 3D structure of a full-length CYP2U1 model bound to a POPC membrane. We also performed docking experiments of arachidonic acid (AA) and N-arachidonoylserotonin (AS) in this model. The protein sequence of CYP2U1 displayed two unique characteristics when compared to those of the human CYPs, the presence of a longer N-terminal region upstream of the putative trans-membrane helix (TMH) containing 8 proline residues, and of an insert of about 20 amino acids containing 5 arginine residues between helices A' and A. Its N-terminal part upstream of TMH involved an additional short terminal helix, in a manner similar to what was reported in the crystal structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CYP51. Our model also showed a specific interaction between the charged residues of insert AA' and phosphate groups of lipid polar heads, suggesting a possible role of this insert in substrate recruitment. Docking of AA and AS in this model showed these substrates in channel 2ac, with the terminal alkyl chain of AA or the indole ring of AS close to the heme, in agreement with the reported CYP2U1-catalyzed AA and AS hydroxylation regioselectivities. This model should be useful to find new endogenous or exogenous CYP2U1 substrates and to interpret the regioselectivity of their hydroxylation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  6. Nickel Ligation of the N-Terminal Amine of HypA Is Required for Urease Maturation in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Heidi Q; Johnson, Ryan C; Merrell, D Scott; Maroney, Michael J

    2017-02-28

    The human pathogen Helicobacter pylori requires nickel for colonization of the acidic environment of the stomach. HypA, a Ni metallochaperone that is typically associated with hydrogenase maturation, is also required for urease maturation and acid survival of H. pylori. There are two proposed Ni site structures for HypA; one is a paramagnetic six-coordinate site characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in unmodified HypA, while another is a diamagnetic four-coordinate planar site characterized by solution nuclear magnetic resonance in an N-terminally modified HypA construct. To determine the role of the N-terminal amine in Ni binding of HypA, an N-terminal extension variant, L2*-HypA, in which a leucine residue was inserted into the second position of the amino acid sequence in the proposed Ni-binding motif, was characterized in vitro and in vivo. Structural characterization of the Ni site using XAS showed a coordination change from six-coordinate in wild-type HypA (WT-HypA) to five-coordinate pyramidal in L2*-HypA, which was accompanied by the loss of two N/O donor protein ligands and the addition of an exogenous bromide ligand from the buffer. The magnetic properties of the Ni sites in WT-HypA compared to those of the Ni sites in L2*-HypA confirmed that a spin-state change from high to low spin accompanied this change in structure. The L2*-HypA H. pylori strain was shown to be acid sensitive and deficient in urease activity in vivo. In vitro characterization showed that L2*-HypA did not disrupt the HypA-UreE interaction that is essential for urease maturation but was at least 20-fold weaker in Ni binding than WT-HypA. Characterization of the L2*-HypA variant clearly demonstrates that the N-terminal amine of HypA is involved in proper Ni coordination and is necessary for urease activity and acid survival.

  7. N-terminal Proteomics Assisted Profiling of the Unexplored Translation Initiation Landscape in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Patrick; Ndah, Elvis; Jonckheere, Veronique; Stael, Simon; Sticker, Adriaan; Martens, Lennart; Van Breusegem, Frank; Gevaert, Kris; Van Damme, Petra

    2017-06-01

    Proteogenomics is an emerging research field yet lacking a uniform method of analysis. Proteogenomic studies in which N-terminal proteomics and ribosome profiling are combined, suggest that a high number of protein start sites are currently missing in genome annotations. We constructed a proteogenomic pipeline specific for the analysis of N-terminal proteomics data, with the aim of discovering novel translational start sites outside annotated protein coding regions. In summary, unidentified MS/MS spectra were matched to a specific N-terminal peptide library encompassing protein N termini encoded in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. After a stringent false discovery rate filtering, 117 protein N termini compliant with N-terminal methionine excision specificity and indicative of translation initiation were found. These include N-terminal protein extensions and translation from transposable elements and pseudogenes. Gene prediction provided supporting protein-coding models for approximately half of the protein N termini. Besides the prediction of functional domains (partially) contained within the newly predicted ORFs, further supporting evidence of translation was found in the recently released Araport11 genome re-annotation of Arabidopsis and computational translations of sequences stored in public repositories. Most interestingly, complementary evidence by ribosome profiling was found for 23 protein N termini. Finally, by analyzing protein N-terminal peptides, an in silico analysis demonstrates the applicability of our N-terminal proteogenomics strategy in revealing protein-coding potential in species with well- and poorly-annotated genomes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. The catalytic chain of human complement subcomponent C1r. Purification and N-terminal amino acid sequences of the major cyanogen bromide-cleavage fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlaud, G J; Gagnon, J; Porter, R R

    1982-01-01

    1. The a- and b-chains of reduced and alkylated human complement subcomponent C1r were separated by high-pressure gel-permeation chromatography and isolated in good yield and in pure form. 2. CNBr cleavage of C1r b-chain yielded eight major peptides, which were purified by gel filtration and high-pressure reversed-phase chromatography. As determined from the sum of their amino acid compositions, these peptides accounted for a minimum molecular weight of 28 000, close to the value 29 100 calculated from the whole b-chain. 3. N-Terminal sequence determinations of C1r b-chain and its CNBr-cleavage peptides allowed the identification of about two-thirds of the amino acids of C1r b-chain. From our results, and on the basis of homology with other serine proteinases, an alignment of the eight CNBr-cleavage peptides from C1r b-chain is proposed. 4. The residues forming the 'charge-relay' system of the active site of serine proteinases (His-57, Asp-102 and Ser-195 in the chymotrypsinogen numbering) are found in the corresponding regions of C1r b-chain, and the amino acid sequence around these residues has been determined. 5. The N-terminal sequence of C1r b-chain has been extended to residue 60 and reveals that C1r b-chain lacks the 'histidine loop', a disulphide bond that is present in all other known serine proteinases.

  9. Exponential Megapriming PCR (EMP) Cloning—Seamless DNA Insertion into Any Target Plasmid without Sequence Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Alexander; Andersen, Kasper R.; Schwartz, Thomas U.

    2012-01-01

    We present a fast, reliable and inexpensive restriction-free cloning method for seamless DNA insertion into any plasmid without sequence limitation. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP) cloning requires two consecutive PCR steps and can be carried out in one day. We show that EMP cloning has a higher efficiency than restriction-free (RF) cloning, especially for long inserts above 2.5 kb. EMP further enables simultaneous cloning of multiple inserts. PMID:23300917

  10. Nucleotide sequence of a cDNA coding for the amino-terminal region of human prepro. alpha. 1(III) collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toman, P D; Ricca, G A [Rorer Biotechnology, Inc., Springfield, VA (USA); de Crombrugghe, B [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA)

    1988-07-25

    Type III Collagen is synthesized in a variety of tissues as a precursor macromolecule containing a leader sequence, a N-propeptide, a N-telopeptide, the triple helical region, a C-telopeptide, and C-propeptide. To further characterize the human type III collagen precursor, a human placental cDNA library was constructed in gt11 using an oligonucleotide derived from a partial cDNA sequence corresponding to the carboxy-terminal part of the 1(III) collagen. A cDNA was identified which contains the leader sequence, the N-propeptide and N-telopeptide regions. The DNA sequence of these regions are presented here. The triple helical, C-telopeptide and C-propeptide amino acid sequence for human type III collagen has been determined previously. A comparison of the human amino acid sequence with mouse, chicken, and calf sequence shows 81%, 81%, and 92% similarity, respectively. At the DNA level, the sequence similarity between human and mouse or chicken type III collagen sequences in this area is 82% and 77%, respectively.

  11. Evolutionary analysis of a novel zinc ribbon in the N-terminal region of threonine synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurmeet; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2017-10-18

    Threonine synthase (TS) catalyzes the terminal reaction in the biosynthetic pathway of threonine and requires pyridoxal phosphate as a cofactor. TSs share a common catalytic domain with other fold type II PALP dependent enzymes. TSs are broadly grouped into two classes based on their sequence, quaternary structure, and enzyme regulation. We report the presence of a novel zinc ribbon domain in the N-terminal region preceding the catalytic core in TS. The zinc ribbon domain is present in TSs belonging to both classes. Our sequence analysis reveals that archaeal TSs possess all zinc chelating residues to bind a metal ion that are lacking in the structurally characterized homologs. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that TSs with an N-terminal zinc ribbon likely represents the ancestral state of the enzyme while TSs without a zinc ribbon must have diverged later in specific lineages. The zinc ribbon and its N- and C-terminal extensions are important for enzyme stability, activity and regulation. It is likely that the zinc ribbon domain is involved in higher order oligomerization or mediating interactions with other biomolecules leading to formation of larger metabolic complexes.

  12. Structure of the N-terminal region of Haemophilus Influenzae HI0017: Implications for function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Liping; Mack, Jamey; Hajduk, Phil; Fesik, Stephen W.

    2001-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a gram-negative pathogen that causes infections ranging from asymptomatic colonization of the human upper respiratory tract to serious invasive diseases such as meningitis. Although the genome of Haemophilus influenzae has been completely sequenced, the structure and function of many of these proteins are unknown. HI0017 is one of these uncharacterized proteins. Here we describe the three-dimensional solution structure of the N-terminal portion of HI0017 as determined by NMR spectroscopy. The structure consists of a five-stranded antiparallel β-sheet and two short α-helices. It is similar to the C-terminal domain of Diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR). The C-terminal portion of HI0017 has an amino acid sequence that closely resembles pyruvate formate-lyase - an enzyme that converts pyruvate and CoA into acetyl-CoA and formate by a radical mechanism. Based on structural and sequence comparisons, we propose that the C-terminus of HI0017 functions as an enzyme with a glycyl radical mechanism, while the N-terminus participates in protein/protein interactions involving an activase (iron-sulfur protein) and/or the substrate

  13. Structure of the N-terminal region of Haemophilus Influenzae HI0017: Implications for function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Liping; Mack, Jamey; Hajduk, Phil; Fesik, Stephen W. [Abbott Laboratories, Pharmaceutical Discovery Division, D46Y, AP10/LL (United States)

    2001-06-15

    Haemophilus influenzae is a gram-negative pathogen that causes infections ranging from asymptomatic colonization of the human upper respiratory tract to serious invasive diseases such as meningitis. Although the genome of Haemophilus influenzae has been completely sequenced, the structure and function of many of these proteins are unknown. HI0017 is one of these uncharacterized proteins. Here we describe the three-dimensional solution structure of the N-terminal portion of HI0017 as determined by NMR spectroscopy. The structure consists of a five-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet and two short {alpha}-helices. It is similar to the C-terminal domain of Diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR). The C-terminal portion of HI0017 has an amino acid sequence that closely resembles pyruvate formate-lyase - an enzyme that converts pyruvate and CoA into acetyl-CoA and formate by a radical mechanism. Based on structural and sequence comparisons, we propose that the C-terminus of HI0017 functions as an enzyme with a glycyl radical mechanism, while the N-terminus participates in protein/protein interactions involving an activase (iron-sulfur protein) and/or the substrate.

  14. Barley polyamine oxidase: Characterisation and analysis of the cofactor and the N-terminal amino acid sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radova, A.; Sebela, M.; Galuszka, P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the first purification method developed for the isolation of an homogeneous polyamine oxidase (PAO) from etiolated barley seedlings. The crude enzyme preparation was obtained after initial precipitation of the extract with protamine sulphate and ammonium sulphate. The enzyme...... was further confirmed by measuring the fluorescence spectra, Barley PAO is an acidic protein (pI 5.4) containing 3% of neutral sugars: its molecular mass determined by SDS-PAGE was 56 kDa, whilst gel permeation chromatography revealed the higher value of 76 kDa. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of barley...... PAO shows a high degree of similarity to that of maize PAO and to several other flavoprotein oxidases. The polyamines spermine and spermidine were the only two substrates of the enzyme with K-m values 4 x 10(-5) and 3 x 10(-5) M and pH optima of 5.0 and 6.0, respectively. Barley polyamine oxidase...

  15. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP cloning--seamless DNA insertion into any target plasmid without sequence constraints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Ulrich

    Full Text Available We present a fast, reliable and inexpensive restriction-free cloning method for seamless DNA insertion into any plasmid without sequence limitation. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP cloning requires two consecutive PCR steps and can be carried out in one day. We show that EMP cloning has a higher efficiency than restriction-free (RF cloning, especially for long inserts above 2.5 kb. EMP further enables simultaneous cloning of multiple inserts.

  16. Locus-specific detection of HLA-DQ and -DR antigens by antibodies against synthetic N-terminal octapeptides of the beta chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deufel, T; Grove, A; Kofod, Hans

    1985-01-01

    Antibodies against synthetic peptides representing the class-II antigen HLA-DR and -DQ beta chain N-terminal sequences were prepared in rabbits. The two octapeptides only share two amino acids and enzyme-linked immuno-assays showed the antisera only to bind to its own antigen. Both peptide antisera...... chains of HLA-DR and -DQ have been prepared by the preparation by the production of antibodies against the N-terminal sequences of each polypeptide....

  17. Characterization of full-length sequenced cDNA inserts (FLIcs) from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, Rune; Lunner, Sigbjørn; Høyheim, Bjørn

    2009-01-01

    Background Sequencing of the Atlantic salmon genome is now being planned by an international research consortium. Full-length sequenced inserts from cDNAs (FLIcs) are an important tool for correct annotation and clustering of the genomic sequence in any species. The large amount of highly similar duplicate sequences caused by the relatively recent genome duplication in the salmonid ancestor represents a particular challenge for the genome project. FLIcs will therefore be an extremely useful resource for the Atlantic salmon sequencing project. In addition to be helpful in order to distinguish between duplicate genome regions and in determining correct gene structures, FLIcs are an important resource for functional genomic studies and for investigation of regulatory elements controlling gene expression. In contrast to the large number of ESTs available, including the ESTs from 23 developmental and tissue specific cDNA libraries contributed by the Salmon Genome Project (SGP), the number of sequences where the full-length of the cDNA insert has been determined has been small. Results High quality full-length insert sequences from 560 pre-smolt white muscle tissue specific cDNAs were generated, accession numbers [GenBank: BT043497 - BT044056]. Five hundred and ten (91%) of the transcripts were annotated using Gene Ontology (GO) terms and 440 of the FLIcs are likely to contain a complete coding sequence (cCDS). The sequence information was used to identify putative paralogs, characterize salmon Kozak motifs, polyadenylation signal variation and to identify motifs likely to be involved in the regulation of particular genes. Finally, conserved 7-mers in the 3'UTRs were identified, of which some were identical to miRNA target sequences. Conclusion This paper describes the first Atlantic salmon FLIcs from a tissue and developmental stage specific cDNA library. We have demonstrated that many FLIcs contained a complete coding sequence (cCDS). This suggests that the remaining c

  18. Characterization of full-length sequenced cDNA inserts (FLIcs from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lunner Sigbjørn

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequencing of the Atlantic salmon genome is now being planned by an international research consortium. Full-length sequenced inserts from cDNAs (FLIcs are an important tool for correct annotation and clustering of the genomic sequence in any species. The large amount of highly similar duplicate sequences caused by the relatively recent genome duplication in the salmonid ancestor represents a particular challenge for the genome project. FLIcs will therefore be an extremely useful resource for the Atlantic salmon sequencing project. In addition to be helpful in order to distinguish between duplicate genome regions and in determining correct gene structures, FLIcs are an important resource for functional genomic studies and for investigation of regulatory elements controlling gene expression. In contrast to the large number of ESTs available, including the ESTs from 23 developmental and tissue specific cDNA libraries contributed by the Salmon Genome Project (SGP, the number of sequences where the full-length of the cDNA insert has been determined has been small. Results High quality full-length insert sequences from 560 pre-smolt white muscle tissue specific cDNAs were generated, accession numbers [GenBank: BT043497 - BT044056]. Five hundred and ten (91% of the transcripts were annotated using Gene Ontology (GO terms and 440 of the FLIcs are likely to contain a complete coding sequence (cCDS. The sequence information was used to identify putative paralogs, characterize salmon Kozak motifs, polyadenylation signal variation and to identify motifs likely to be involved in the regulation of particular genes. Finally, conserved 7-mers in the 3'UTRs were identified, of which some were identical to miRNA target sequences. Conclusion This paper describes the first Atlantic salmon FLIcs from a tissue and developmental stage specific cDNA library. We have demonstrated that many FLIcs contained a complete coding sequence (cCDS. This

  19. N-terminal domains of human DNA polymerase lambda promote primer realignment during translesion DNA synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, David J.; Dayeh, Daniel M.; Fredrickson, Saul W.; Suo, Zucai

    2014-01-01

    The X-family DNA polymerases λ (Polλ) and β (Polβ) possess similar 5′-2-deoxyribose-5-phosphatelyase (dRPase) and polymerase domains. Besides these domains, Polλ also possesses a BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) domain and a proline-rich domain at its N terminus. However, it is unclear how these non-enzymatic domains contribute to the unique biological functions of Polλ. Here, we used primer extension assays and a newly developed high-throughput short oligonucleotide sequencing assay (HT-SOSA) to compare the efficiency of lesion bypass and fidelity of human Polβ, Polλ and two N-terminal deletion constructs of Polλ during the bypass of either an abasic site or a 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) lesion. We demonstrate that the BRCT domain of Polλ enhances the efficiency of abasic site bypass by approximately 1.6-fold. In contrast, deletion of the N-terminal domains of Polλ did not affect the efficiency of 8-oxodG bypass relative to nucleotide incorporations opposite undamaged dG. HT-SOSA analysis demonstrated that Polλ and Polβ preferentially generated −1 or −2 frameshift mutations when bypassing an abasic site and the single or double base deletion frequency was highly sequence dependent. Interestingly, the BRCT and proline-rich domains of Polλ cooperatively promoted the generation of −2 frameshift mutations when the abasic site was situated within a sequence context that was susceptible to homology-driven primer realignment. Furthermore, both N-terminal domains of Polλ increased the generation of −1 frameshift mutations during 8-oxodG bypass and influenced the frequency of substitution mutations produced by Polλ opposite the 8-oxodG lesion. Overall, our data support a model wherein the BRCT and proline-rich domains of Polλ act cooperatively to promote primer/template realignment between DNA strands of limited sequence homology. This function of the N-terminal domains may facilitate the role of Polλ as a gap-filling polymerase

  20. Structure of genes and an insertion element in the methane producing archaebacterium Methanobrevibacter smithii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, P T; Reeve, J N

    1985-01-01

    DNA fragments cloned from the methanogenic archaebacterium Methanobrevibacter smithii which complement mutations in the purE and proC genes of E. coli have been sequenced. Sequence analyses, transposon mutagenesis and expression in E. coli minicells indicate that purE and proC complementations result from the synthesis of M. smithii polypeptides with molecular weights of 36,697 and 27,836 respectively. The encoding genes appear to be located in operons. The M. smithii genome contains 69% A/T basepairs (bp) which is reflected in unusual codon usages and intergenic regions containing approximately 85% A/T bp. An insertion element, designated ISM1, was found within the cloned M. smithii DNA located adjacent to the proC complementing region. ISM1 is 1381 bp in length, has 29 bp terminal inverted repeat sequences and contains one major ORF encoded in 87% of the ISM1 sequence. ISM1 is mobile, present in approximately 10 copies per genome and integration duplicates 8 bp at the site of insertion. The duplicated sequences show homology with sequences within the 29 bp terminal repeat sequence of ISM1. Comparison of our data with sequences from halophilic archaebacteria suggests that 5'GAANTTTCA and 5'TTTTAATATAAA may be consensus promoter sequences for archaebacteria. These sequences closely resemble the consensus sequences which precede Drosophila heat-shock genes (Pelham 1982; Davidson et al. 1983). Methanogens appear to employ the eubacterial system of mRNA: 16SrRNA hybridization to ensure initiation of translation; the consensus ribosome binding sequence is 5'AGGTGA.

  1. N-terminal region of gelsolin induces apoptosis of activated hepatic stellate cells by a caspase-dependent mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budhaditya Mazumdar

    Full Text Available Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs are the major source for alteration of extracellular matrix in fibrosis and cirrhosis. Conditioned medium (CM collected from immortalized human hepatocytes (IHH have earlier been shown to be responsible for apoptosis of HSCs. In this study, we have shown that antibodies raised against a peptide derived from a linear B-cell epitope in the N-terminal region of gelsolin identified a gelsolin fragment in IHH CM. Analysis of activated stellate cell death by CM collected from Huh7 cells transfected with plasmids encoding gelsolin deletion mutants suggested that the N-terminal half of gelsolin contained sequences which were responsible for stellate cell death. Further analysis determined that this activity was restricted to a region encompassing amino acids 1-70 in the gelsolin sequence; antibody directed to an epitope within this region was able to neutralize stellate cell death. Gelsolin modulation of cell death using this fragment involved upregulation of TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2, and involved caspase 3 activation by extrinsic pathway. The apoptotic activity of N-terminal gelsolin fragments was restricted to activated but not quiescent stellate cells indicating its potential application in therapeutic use as an anti-fibrotic agent. Gelsolin fragments encompassing N-terminal regions in polypeptides of different molecular sizes were detected by N-terminal peptide specific antiserum in IHH CM immunoprecipitated with chronically HCV infected patient sera, suggesting the presence of autoantibodies generated against N-terminal gelsolin fragments in patients with chronic liver disease.

  2. Sequence and structural analysis of the chitinase insertion domain reveals two conserved motifs involved in chitin-binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitinases are prevalent in life and are found in species including archaea, bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals. They break down chitin, which is the second most abundant carbohydrate in nature after cellulose. Hence, they are important for maintaining a balance between carbon and nitrogen trapped as insoluble chitin in biomass. Chitinases are classified into two families, 18 and 19 glycoside hydrolases. In addition to a catalytic domain, which is a triosephosphate isomerase barrel, many family 18 chitinases contain another module, i.e., chitinase insertion domain. While numerous studies focus on the biological role of the catalytic domain in chitinase activity, the function of the chitinase insertion domain is not completely understood. Bioinformatics offers an important avenue in which to facilitate understanding the role of residues within the chitinase insertion domain in chitinase function.Twenty-seven chitinase insertion domain sequences, which include four experimentally determined structures and span five kingdoms, were aligned and analyzed using a modified sequence entropy parameter. Thirty-two positions with conserved residues were identified. The role of these conserved residues was explored by conducting a structural analysis of a number of holo-enzymes. Hydrogen bonding and van der Waals calculations revealed a distinct subset of four conserved residues constituting two sequence motifs that interact with oligosaccharides. The other conserved residues may be key to the structure, folding, and stability of this domain.Sequence and structural studies of the chitinase insertion domains conducted within the framework of evolution identified four conserved residues which clearly interact with the substrates. Furthermore, evolutionary studies propose a link between the appearance of the chitinase insertion domain and the function of family 18 chitinases in the subfamily A.

  3. Directed evolution of the TALE N-terminal domain for recognition of all 5′ bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Brian M.; Mercer, Andrew C.; Barbas, Carlos F.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins can be designed to bind virtually any DNA sequence. General guidelines for design of TALE DNA-binding domains suggest that the 5′-most base of the DNA sequence bound by the TALE (the N0 base) should be a thymine. We quantified the N0 requirement by analysis of the activities of TALE transcription factors (TALE-TF), TALE recombinases (TALE-R) and TALE nucleases (TALENs) with each DNA base at this position. In the absence of a 5′ T, we observed decreases in TALE activity up to >1000-fold in TALE-TF activity, up to 100-fold in TALE-R activity and up to 10-fold reduction in TALEN activity compared with target sequences containing a 5′ T. To develop TALE architectures that recognize all possible N0 bases, we used structure-guided library design coupled with TALE-R activity selections to evolve novel TALE N-terminal domains to accommodate any N0 base. A G-selective domain and broadly reactive domains were isolated and characterized. The engineered TALE domains selected in the TALE-R format demonstrated modularity and were active in TALE-TF and TALEN architectures. Evolved N-terminal domains provide effective and unconstrained TALE-based targeting of any DNA sequence as TALE binding proteins and designer enzymes. PMID:23980031

  4. Nickel Ligation of the N-Terminal Amine of HypA Is Required for Urease Maturation in Helicobacter pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Heidi Q. [Department; Johnson, Ryan C. [Microbiology; Merrell, D. Scott [Microbiology; Maroney, Michael J. [Department

    2017-02-17

    The human pathogen Helicobacter pylori requires nickel for colonization of the acidic environment of the stomach. HypA, a Ni metallochaperone that is typically associated with hydrogenase maturation, is also required for urease maturation and acid survival of H. pylori. There are two proposed Ni site structures for HypA; one is a paramagnetic six-coordinate site characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in unmodified HypA, while another is a diamagnetic four-coordinate planar site characterized by solution nuclear magnetic resonance in an N-terminally modified HypA construct. To determine the role of the N-terminal amine in Ni binding of HypA, an N-terminal extension variant, L2*-HypA, in which a leucine residue was inserted into the second position of the amino acid sequence in the proposed Ni-binding motif, was characterized in vitro and in vivo. Structural characterization of the Ni site using XAS showed a coordination change from six-coordinate in wild-type HypA (WT-HypA) to five-coordinate pyramidal in L2*-HypA, which was accompanied by the loss of two N/O donor protein ligands and the addition of an exogenous bromide ligand from the buffer. The magnetic properties of the Ni sites in WT-HypA compared to those of the Ni sites in L2*-HypA confirmed that a spin-state change from high to low spin accompanied this change in structure. The L2*-HypA H. pylori strain was shown to be acid sensitive and deficient in urease activity in vivo. In vitro characterization showed that L2*-HypA did not disrupt the HypA–UreE interaction that is essential for urease maturation but was at least 20-fold weaker in Ni binding than WT-HypA. Characterization of the L2*-HypA variant clearly demonstrates that the N-terminal amine of HypA is involved in proper Ni coordination and is necessary for urease activity and acid survival.

  5. The EspF N-Terminal of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL933w Imparts Stronger Toxicity Effects on HT-29 Cells than the C-Terminal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangyu; Du, Yanli; Hua, Ying; Fu, Muqing; Niu, Cong; Zhang, Bao; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Qiwei; Wan, Chengsong

    2017-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 EspF is an important multifunctional protein that destroys the tight junctions of intestinal epithelial cells and promotes host cell apoptosis. However, its molecular mechanism remains elusive. We knocked out the espF sequence (747 bp, Δ espF ), N-terminal sequence (219 bp, Δ espF N ), and C-terminal sequence (528 bp, Δ espF C ) separately using the pKD46-mediated λ Red homologous recombination system. Then, we built the corresponding complementation strains, namely, Δ espF/pespF , Δ espF N /pespF N , and Δ espF C /pespF C by overlap PCR, which were used in infecting HT-29 cells and BALB/C mice. The level of reactive oxygen species, cell apoptosis, mitochondrial trans-membrane potential, inflammatory factors, transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), and animal mortality were evaluated by DCFH-DA, double staining of Annexin V-FITC/PI, JC-1 staining, ELISA kit, and a mouse assay. The wild-type (WT), Δ espF , Δ espF/pespF , Δ espF C , Δ espF C /pespF C , Δ espF N , and Δ espF N /pespF N groups exhibited apoptotic rates of 68.3, 27.9, 64.9, 65.7, 73.4, 41.3, and 35.3% respectively, and mean TNF-α expression levels of 428 pg/mL, 342, 466, 446, 381, 383, and 374 pg/mL, respectively. In addition, the apoptotic rates and TNF-α levels of the WT, Δ espF/pespF , and Δ espF C were significantly higher than that of Δ espF , Δ espF N , Δ espF C /pespF C , and Δ espF N /pespF N group ( p < 0.05). The N-terminal of EspF resulted in an increase in the number of apoptotic cells, TNF-α secretion, ROS generation, mitochondria apoptosis, and pathogenicity in BalB/c mice. In conclusion, the N-terminal domain of the Enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 EspF more strongly promotes apoptosis and inflammation than the C-terminal domain.

  6. The first N-terminal unprotected (Gly-Aib)n peptide: H-Gly-Aib-Gly-Aib-OtBu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessmann, Renate; Brückner, Hans; Petratos, Kyriacos

    2015-12-01

    Glycine (Gly) is incorporated in roughly half of all known peptaibiotic (nonribosomally biosynthesized antibiotic peptides of fungal origin) sequences and is the residue with the greatest conformational flexibility. The conformational space of Aib (α-aminoisobutyric acid) is severely restricted by the second methyl group attached to the Cα atom. Most of the crystal structures containing Aib are N-terminal protected. Deprotection of the N- or C-terminus of peptides may alter the hydrogen-bonding scheme and/or the structure and may facilitate crystallization. The structure reported here for glycyl-α-aminoisobutyrylglycyl-α-aminoisobutyric acid tert-butyl ester, C16H30N4O5, describes the first N-terminal-unprotected (Gly-Aib)n peptide. The achiral peptide could form an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the C=O group of Gly1 and the N-H group of Aib4. This hydrogen bond is found in all tetrapeptides and N-terminal-protected tripeptides containing Aib, apart from one exception. In the present work, this hydrogen bond is not observed (N...O = 5.88 Å). Instead, every molecule is hydrogen bonded to six other symmetry-related molecules with a total of eight hydrogen bonds per molecule. The backbone conformation starts in the right-handed helical region (and the left-handed helical region for the inverted molecule) and reverses the screw sense in the last two residues.

  7. 3' terminal diversity of MRP RNA and other human noncoding RNAs revealed by deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Katherine C; Cech, Thomas R

    2013-09-21

    Post-transcriptional 3' end processing is a key component of RNA regulation. The abundant and essential RNA subunit of RNase MRP has been proposed to function in three distinct cellular compartments and therefore may utilize this mode of regulation. Here we employ 3' RACE coupled with high-throughput sequencing to characterize the 3' terminal sequences of human MRP RNA and other noncoding RNAs that form RNP complexes. The 3' terminal sequence of MRP RNA from HEK293T cells has a distinctive distribution of genomically encoded termini (including an assortment of U residues) with a portion of these selectively tagged by oligo(A) tails. This profile contrasts with the relatively homogenous 3' terminus of an in vitro transcribed MRP RNA control and the differing 3' terminal profiles of U3 snoRNA, RNase P RNA, and telomerase RNA (hTR). 3' RACE coupled with deep sequencing provides a valuable framework for the functional characterization of 3' terminal sequences of noncoding RNAs.

  8. The proviral genome of radiation leukemia virus: Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence of its long terminal repeat and integration in lymphoma cell DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janowski, M.; Merregaert, J.; Boniver, J.; Maisin, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The proviral genome of a thymotropic and leukemogenic C57BL/Ka mouse retrovirus, RadLV/VL/sub 3/(T+L+), was cloned as a biologically active PstI insert in the bacterial plasmid pBR322. Its restriction map was compared to those, already known, of two nonthymotropic and nonleukemogenic viruses of the same mouse strain, the ecotropic BL/Ka(B) and the xenotropic constituent of the radiation leukemia virus complex (RadLV). Differences were observed in the pol gene and in the env gene. Moreover, the nucleotide sequence of the RadLV/VL/sub 3/(T+L+) long terminal repeat revealed the existence of two copies of a 42 bp long sequence, separated by 11 nucleotides and of which BL/Ka(B) possesses only one copy

  9. A novel tandem reporter quantifies RNA polymerase II termination in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayan Banerjee

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Making the correct choice between transcription elongation and transcription termination is essential to the function of RNA polymerase II, and fundamental to gene expression. This choice can be influenced by factors modifying the transcription complex, factors modifying chromatin, or signals mediated by the template or transcript. To aid in the study of transcription elongation and termination we have developed a transcription elongation reporter system that consists of tandem luciferase reporters flanking a test sequence of interest. The ratio of expression from the reporters provides a measure of the relative rates of successful elongation through the intervening sequence.Size matched fragments containing the polyadenylation signal of the human beta-actin gene (ACTB and the human beta-globin gene (HBB were evaluated for transcription termination using this new ratiometric tandem reporter assay. Constructs bearing just 200 base pairs on either side of the consensus poly(A addition site terminated 98% and 86% of transcription for ACTB and HBB sequences, respectively. The nearly 10-fold difference in read-through transcription between the two short poly(A regions was eclipsed when additional downstream poly(A sequence was included for each gene. Both poly(A regions proved very effective at termination when 1100 base pairs were included, stopping 99.6% of transcription. To determine if part of the increased termination was simply due to the increased template length, we inserted several kilobases of heterologous coding sequence downstream of each poly(A region test fragment. Unexpectedly, the additional length reduced the effectiveness of termination of HBB sequences 2-fold and of ACTB sequences 3- to 5-fold.The tandem construct provides a sensitive measure of transcription termination in human cells. Decreased Xrn2 or Senataxin levels produced only a modest release from termination. Our data support overlap in allosteric and torpedo mechanisms

  10. Amino-terminal sequence of glycoprotein D of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenberg, R.J.; Long, D.; Hogue-Angeletti, R.; Cohen, G.H.

    1984-01-01

    Glycoprotein D (gD) of herpes simplex virus is a structural component of the virion envelope which stimulates production of high titers of herpes simplex virus type-common neutralizing antibody. The authors caried out automated N-terminal amino acid sequencing studies on radiolabeled preparations of gD-1 (gD of herpes simplex virus type 1) and gD-2 (gD of herpes simplex virus type 2). Although some differences were noted, particularly in the methionine and alanine profiles for gD-1 and gD-2, the amino acid sequence of a number of the first 30 residues of the amino terminus of gD-1 and gD-2 appears to be quite similar. For both proteins, the first residue is a lysine. When we compared out sequence data for gD-1 with those predicted by nucleic acid sequencing, the two sequences could be aligned (with one exception) starting at residue 26 (lysine) of the predicted sequence. Thus, the first 25 amino acids of the predicted sequence are absent from the polypeptides isolated from infected cells

  11. Genomic clones of bovine parvovirus: Construction and effect of deletions and terminal sequence inversions on infectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shull, B.C.; Chen, K.C.; Lederman, M.; Stout, E.R.; Bates, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Genomic clones of the autonomous parvovirus bovine parvovirus (BPV) were constructed by blunt-end ligation of reannealed virion plus and minus DNA strands into the plasmid pUC8. These clones were stable during propagation in Escherichia coli JM107. All clones tested were found to be infectious by the criteria of plaque titer and progressive cytophathic effect after transfection into bovine fetal lung cells. Sequencing of the recombinant plasmids demonstrated that all of the BPV inserts had left-end (3')-terminal deletions of up to 34 bases. Defective genomes could also be detected in the progeny DNA even though the infection was initiated with homogeneous, cloned DNA. Full-length genomic clones with 3' flip and 3' flop conformations were constructed and were found to have equal infectivity. Expression of capsid proteins from tranfected genomes was demonstrated by hemagglutination, indirect immunofluorescence, and immunoprecipitation of [ 35 S]methionine-labeled cell lysates. Use of appropriate antiserum for immunoprecipitation showed the synthesis of BPV capsid and noncapsid proteins after transfection. Independently, a series of genomic clones with increasingly larger 3'-terminal deletions was prepared from separately subcloned 3'-terminal fragments. Transfection of these clones into bovine fetal lung cells revealed that deletions of up to 34 bases at the 3' end lowered but did not abolish infectivity, while deletions of greater than 52 bases were lethal. End-label analysis showed that the 34-base deletion was repaired to wild-type length in the progeny virus

  12. TAPDANCE: An automated tool to identify and annotate transposon insertion CISs and associations between CISs from next generation sequence data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarver Aaron L

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next generation sequencing approaches applied to the analyses of transposon insertion junction fragments generated in high throughput forward genetic screens has created the need for clear informatics and statistical approaches to deal with the massive amount of data currently being generated. Previous approaches utilized to 1 map junction fragments within the genome and 2 identify Common Insertion Sites (CISs within the genome are not practical due to the volume of data generated by current sequencing technologies. Previous approaches applied to this problem also required significant manual annotation. Results We describe Transposon Annotation Poisson Distribution Association Network Connectivity Environment (TAPDANCE software, which automates the identification of CISs within transposon junction fragment insertion data. Starting with barcoded sequence data, the software identifies and trims sequences and maps putative genomic sequence to a reference genome using the bowtie short read mapper. Poisson distribution statistics are then applied to assess and rank genomic regions showing significant enrichment for transposon insertion. Novel methods of counting insertions are used to ensure that the results presented have the expected characteristics of informative CISs. A persistent mySQL database is generated and utilized to keep track of sequences, mappings and common insertion sites. Additionally, associations between phenotypes and CISs are also identified using Fisher’s exact test with multiple testing correction. In a case study using previously published data we show that the TAPDANCE software identifies CISs as previously described, prioritizes them based on p-value, allows holistic visualization of the data within genome browser software and identifies relationships present in the structure of the data. Conclusions The TAPDANCE process is fully automated, performs similarly to previous labor intensive approaches

  13. Complete amino acid sequence of human intestinal aminopeptidase N as deduced from cloned cDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowell, G M; Kønigshøfer, E; Danielsen, E M

    1988-01-01

    The complete primary structure (967 amino acids) of an intestinal human aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2) was deduced from the sequence of a cDNA clone. Aminopeptidase N is anchored to the microvillar membrane via an uncleaved signal for membrane insertion. A domain constituting amino acid 250...

  14. Peptides derived from human galectin-3 N-terminal tail interact with its carbohydrate recognition domain in a phosphorylation-dependent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berbís, M. Álvaro [Chemical and Physical Biology Department, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain); André, Sabine [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians University, 80539 Munich (Germany); Cañada, F. Javier [Chemical and Physical Biology Department, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pipkorn, Rüdiger [Central Peptide Synthesis Unit, German Cancer Research Center, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ippel, Hans [Department of Biochemistry, CARIM, University of Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Mayo, Kevin H. [Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Kübler, Dieter [Biomolecular Interactions, German Cancer Research Center, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Gabius, Hans-Joachim [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians University, 80539 Munich (Germany); Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús, E-mail: jjbarbero@cib.csic.es [Chemical and Physical Biology Department, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Galectin-3 is composed of a carbohydrate recognition domain and an N-terminal tail. •Synthetic peptides derived from the tail are shown to interact with the CRD. •This interaction is modulated by Ser- and Tyr-phosphorylation of the peptides. -- Abstract: Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a multi-functional effector protein that functions in the cytoplasm and the nucleus, as well as extracellularly following non-classical secretion. Structurally, Gal-3 is unique among galectins with its carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) attached to a rather long N-terminal tail composed mostly of collagen-like repeats (nine in the human protein) and terminating in a short non-collagenous terminal peptide sequence unique in this lectin family and not yet fully explored. Although several Ser and Tyr sites within the N-terminal tail can be phosphorylated, the physiological significance of this post-translational modification remains unclear. Here, we used a series of synthetic (phospho)peptides derived from the tail to assess phosphorylation-mediated interactions with {sup 15}N-labeled Gal-3 CRD. HSQC-derived chemical shift perturbations revealed selective interactions at the backface of the CRD that were attenuated by phosphorylation of Tyr 107 and Tyr 118, while phosphorylation of Ser 6 and Ser 12 was essential. Controls with sequence scrambling underscored inherent specificity. Our studies shed light on how phosphorylation of the N-terminal tail may impact on Gal-3 function and prompt further studies using phosphorylated full-length protein.

  15. Peptides derived from human galectin-3 N-terminal tail interact with its carbohydrate recognition domain in a phosphorylation-dependent manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berbís, M. Álvaro; André, Sabine; Cañada, F. Javier; Pipkorn, Rüdiger; Ippel, Hans; Mayo, Kevin H.; Kübler, Dieter; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Galectin-3 is composed of a carbohydrate recognition domain and an N-terminal tail. •Synthetic peptides derived from the tail are shown to interact with the CRD. •This interaction is modulated by Ser- and Tyr-phosphorylation of the peptides. -- Abstract: Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a multi-functional effector protein that functions in the cytoplasm and the nucleus, as well as extracellularly following non-classical secretion. Structurally, Gal-3 is unique among galectins with its carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) attached to a rather long N-terminal tail composed mostly of collagen-like repeats (nine in the human protein) and terminating in a short non-collagenous terminal peptide sequence unique in this lectin family and not yet fully explored. Although several Ser and Tyr sites within the N-terminal tail can be phosphorylated, the physiological significance of this post-translational modification remains unclear. Here, we used a series of synthetic (phospho)peptides derived from the tail to assess phosphorylation-mediated interactions with 15 N-labeled Gal-3 CRD. HSQC-derived chemical shift perturbations revealed selective interactions at the backface of the CRD that were attenuated by phosphorylation of Tyr 107 and Tyr 118, while phosphorylation of Ser 6 and Ser 12 was essential. Controls with sequence scrambling underscored inherent specificity. Our studies shed light on how phosphorylation of the N-terminal tail may impact on Gal-3 function and prompt further studies using phosphorylated full-length protein

  16. Genetic variation in N- and C-terminal regions of bovine DNAJA1 heat shock protein gene in African, Asian and American cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Oyeyemi O.; Peters, Sunday O.; De Donato, Marcos; Mujibi, F. Denis; Khan, Waqas A.; Hussain, Tanveer; Babar, Masroor E.; Imumorin, Ikhide G.; Thomas, Bolaji N.

    2018-01-01

    DNAJA1 or heat shock protein 40 (Hsp40) is associated with heat adaptation in various organisms. We amplified and sequenced a total of 1,142 bp of bovine Hsp40 gene representing the critical N-terminal (NTR) and C-terminal (CTR) regions in representative samples of African, Asian and American cattle breeds. Eleven and 9 different haplotypes were observed in the NTR in Asian and African breeds respectively while in American Brangus, only two mutations were observed resulting in two haplotypes. The CTR appears to be highly conserved between cattle and yak. In-silico functional analysis with PANTHER predicted putative deleterious functional impact of c.161 T>A; p. V54Q while alignment of bovine and human NTR-J domains revealed that p.Q19H, p.E20Q and p. E21X mutations occurred in helix 2 and p.V54Q missense mutation occurred in helix 3 respectively. The 124 bp insertion found in the yak DNAJA1 ortholog may have significant functional relevance warranting further investigation. Our results suggest that these genetic differences may be concomitant with population genetic history and possible functional consequences for climate adaptation in bovidae. PMID:29290829

  17. 3′ terminal diversity of MRP RNA and other human noncoding RNAs revealed by deep sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Post-transcriptional 3′ end processing is a key component of RNA regulation. The abundant and essential RNA subunit of RNase MRP has been proposed to function in three distinct cellular compartments and therefore may utilize this mode of regulation. Here we employ 3′ RACE coupled with high-throughput sequencing to characterize the 3′ terminal sequences of human MRP RNA and other noncoding RNAs that form RNP complexes. Results The 3′ terminal sequence of MRP RNA from HEK293T cells has a distinctive distribution of genomically encoded termini (including an assortment of U residues) with a portion of these selectively tagged by oligo(A) tails. This profile contrasts with the relatively homogenous 3′ terminus of an in vitro transcribed MRP RNA control and the differing 3′ terminal profiles of U3 snoRNA, RNase P RNA, and telomerase RNA (hTR). Conclusions 3′ RACE coupled with deep sequencing provides a valuable framework for the functional characterization of 3′ terminal sequences of noncoding RNAs. PMID:24053768

  18. New OprM structure highlighting the nature of the N-terminal anchor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eMONLEZUN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Among the different mechanisms used by bacteria to resist antibiotics, active efflux plays a major role. In gram-negative bacteria, active efflux is carried out by tripartite efflux pumps that form a macromolecular assembly spanning both membranes of the cellular wall. At the outer membrane level, a well-conserved Outer Membrane Factor (OMF protein acts as an exit duct, but its sequence varies greatly among different species. The OMFs share a similar tri-dimensional structure that includes a beta-barrel pore domain that stabilizes the channel within the membrane. In addition, OMFs are often subjected to different N-terminal post-translational modifications, such as an acylation with a lipid. The role of additional N-terminal anchors is all the more intriguing since it is not always required among the OMFs family. Understanding this optional post-translational modification could open new research lines in the field of antibiotics resistance. In E. coli, it has been shown that CusC is modified with a tri-acylated lipid, whereas TolC does not show any. In the case of OprM from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the N-terminal modification remains a matter of debate, therefore, we used several approaches to investigate this issue. As definitive evidence, we present a new X ray structure at 3.8Å resolution that was solved in a new space group, making it possible to model the N-terminal residue as a palmitylated cysteine.

  19. Time-Resolved Transposon Insertion Sequencing Reveals Genome-Wide Fitness Dynamics during Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanhua Yang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Transposon insertion sequencing (TIS is a powerful high-throughput genetic technique that is transforming functional genomics in prokaryotes, because it enables genome-wide mapping of the determinants of fitness. However, current approaches for analyzing TIS data assume that selective pressures are constant over time and thus do not yield information regarding changes in the genetic requirements for growth in dynamic environments (e.g., during infection. Here, we describe structured analysis of TIS data collected as a time series, termed pattern analysis of conditional essentiality (PACE. From a temporal series of TIS data, PACE derives a quantitative assessment of each mutant’s fitness over the course of an experiment and identifies mutants with related fitness profiles. In so doing, PACE circumvents major limitations of existing methodologies, specifically the need for artificial effect size thresholds and enumeration of bacterial population expansion. We used PACE to analyze TIS samples of Edwardsiella piscicida (a fish pathogen collected over a 2-week infection period from a natural host (the flatfish turbot. PACE uncovered more genes that affect E. piscicida’s fitness in vivo than were detected using a cutoff at a terminal sampling point, and it identified subpopulations of mutants with distinct fitness profiles, one of which informed the design of new live vaccine candidates. Overall, PACE enables efficient mining of time series TIS data and enhances the power and sensitivity of TIS-based analyses.

  20. The N-terminal region of the dopamine D2 receptor, a rhodopsin-like GPCR, regulates correct integration into the plasma membrane and endocytic routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, DI; Min, C; Jung, KS; Cheong, SY; Zheng, M; Cheong, SJ; Oak, MH; Cheong, JH; Lee, BK; Kim, KM

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Functional roles of the N-terminal region of rhodopsin-like GPCR family remain unclear. Using dopamine D2 and D3 receptors as a model system, we probed the roles of the N-terminal region in the signalling, intracellular trafficking of receptor proteins, and explored the critical factors that determine the functionality of the N-terminal region. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The N-terminal region of the D2 receptor was gradually shortened or switched with that of the D3 receptor or a non-specific sequence (FLAG), or potential N-terminal glycosylation sites were mutated. Effects of these manipulations on surface expression, internalization, post-endocytic behaviours and signalling were determined. KEY RESULTS Shortening the N-terminal region of the D2 receptor enhanced receptor internalization and impaired surface expression and signalling; ligand binding, desensitization and down-regulation were not affected but their association with a particular microdomain, caveolae, was disrupted. Replacement of critical residues within the N-terminal region with the FLAG epitope failed to restore surface expression but partially restored the altered internalization and signalling. When the N-terminal regions were switched between D2 and D3 receptors, cell surface expression pattern of each receptor was switched. Mutations of potential N-terminal glycosylation sites inhibited surface expression but enhanced internalization of D2 receptors. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Shortening of N-terminus or mutation of glycosylation sites located within the N-terminus enhanced receptor internalization but impaired the surface expression of D2 receptors. The N-terminal region of the D2 receptor, in a sequence-specific manner, controls the receptor's conformation and integration into the plasma membrane, which determine its subcellular localization, intracellular trafficking and signalling properties. PMID:22117524

  1. Insertion-Sequence-Mediated Mutations Isolated During Adaptation to Growth and Starvation in Lactococcus lactis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, de J.A.G.M.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Hoekstra, R.F.; Vos, de W.M.

    2004-01-01

    We studied the activity of three multicopy insertion sequence (IS) elements in 12 populations of Lactococcus lactis IL1403 that evolved in the laboratory for 1000 generations under various environmental conditions (growth or starvation and shaken or stationary). Using RFLP analysis of single-clone

  2. The human receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator. NH2-terminal amino acid sequence and glycosylation variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Rønne, E; Ploug, M

    1990-01-01

    -PA. The purified protein shows a single 55-60 kDa band after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining. It is a heavily glycosylated protein, the deglycosylated polypeptide chain comprising only 35 kDa. The glycosylated protein contains N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and sialic acid......, but no N-acetyl-D-galactosamine. Glycosylation is responsible for substantial heterogeneity in the receptor on phorbol ester-stimulated U937 cells, and also for molecular weight variations among various cell lines. The amino acid composition and the NH2-terminal amino acid sequence are reported...

  3. Untangling spider silk evolution with spidroin terminal domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garb Jessica E

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spidroins are a unique family of large, structural proteins that make up the bulk of spider silk fibers. Due to the highly variable nature of their repetitive sequences, spidroin evolutionary relationships have principally been determined from their non-repetitive carboxy (C-terminal domains, though they offer limited character data. The few known spidroin amino (N-terminal domains have been difficult to obtain, but potentially contain critical phylogenetic information for reconstructing the diversification of spider silks. Here we used silk gland expression data (ESTs from highly divergent species to evaluate the functional significance and phylogenetic utility of spidroin N-terminal domains. Results We report 11 additional spidroin N-termini found by sequencing ~1,900 silk gland cDNAs from nine spider species that shared a common ancestor > 240 million years ago. In contrast to their hyper-variable repetitive regions, spidroin N-terminal domains have retained striking similarities in sequence identity, predicted secondary structure, and hydrophobicity. Through separate and combined phylogenetic analyses of N-terminal domains and their corresponding C-termini, we find that combined analysis produces the most resolved trees and that N-termini contribute more support and less conflict than the C-termini. These analyses show that paralogs largely group by silk gland type, except for the major ampullate spidroins. Moreover, spidroin structural motifs associated with superior tensile strength arose early in the history of this gene family, whereas a motif conferring greater extensibility convergently evolved in two distantly related paralogs. Conclusions A non-repetitive N-terminal domain appears to be a universal attribute of spidroin proteins, likely retained from the origin of spider silk production. Since this time, spidroin N-termini have maintained several features, consistent with this domain playing a key role in silk

  4. Structural plasticity of the N-terminal capping helix of the TPR domain of kinesin light chain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Quyen Nguyen

    Full Text Available Kinesin1 plays a major role in neuronal transport by recruiting many different cargos through its kinesin light chain (KLC. Various structurally unrelated cargos interact with the conserved tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR domain of KLC. The N-terminal capping helix of the TPR domain exhibits an atypical sequence and structural features that may contribute to the versatility of the TPR domain to bind different cargos. We determined crystal structures of the TPR domain of both KLC1 and KLC2 encompassing the N-terminal capping helix and show that this helix exhibits two distinct and defined orientations relative to the rest of the TPR domain. Such a difference in orientation gives rise, at the N-terminal part of the groove, to the formation of one hydrophobic pocket, as well as to electrostatic variations at the groove surface. We present a comprehensive structural analysis of available KLC1/2-TPR domain structures that highlights that ligand binding into the groove can be specific of one or the other N-terminal capping helix orientations. Further, structural analysis reveals that the N-terminal capping helix is always involved in crystal packing contacts, especially in a TPR1:TPR1' contact which highlights its propensity to be a protein-protein interaction site. Together, these results underline that the structural plasticity of the N-terminal capping helix might represent a structural determinant for TPR domain structural versatility in cargo binding.

  5. The history and advances of reversible terminators used in new generations of sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Dong, Mengxing; Ge, Meng; Zhu, Lingxiang; Ren, Lufeng; Liu, Guocheng; Mu, Rong

    2013-02-01

    DNA sequencing using reversible terminators, as one sequencing by synthesis strategy, has garnered a great deal of interest due to its popular application in the second-generation high-throughput DNA sequencing technology. In this review, we provided its history of development, classification, and working mechanism of this technology. We also outlined the screening strategies for DNA polymerases to accommodate the reversible terminators as substrates during polymerization; particularly, we introduced the "REAP" method developed by us. At the end of this review, we discussed current limitations of this approach and provided potential solutions to extend its application. Copyright © 2013. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. A prawn core histone 4: derivation of N- and C-terminal peptides and their antimicrobial properties, molecular characterization and mRNA transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasia, Mukesh Kumar; Palanisamy, Rajesh; Bhatt, Prasanth; Kumaresan, Venkatesh; Gnanam, Annie J; Pasupuleti, Mukesh; Kasi, Marimuthu; Harikrishnan, Ramaswamy; Arockiaraj, Jesu

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the complete molecular characterization including bioinformatics characterization, gene expression, synthesis of N and C terminal peptides and their antimicrobial activity of the core histone 4 (H4) from freshwater giant prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (Mr). A cDNA encoding MrH4 was identified from the constructed cDNA library of M. rosenbergii during screening and the sequence was obtained using internal sequencing primers. The MrH4 coding region possesses a polypeptide of 103 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 11kDa and an isoelectric point of 11.5. The bioinformatics analysis showed that the MrH4 polypeptide contains a H4 signature at (15)GAKRH(19). Multiple sequence alignment of MrH4 showed that the N-terminal (21-42) and C-terminal (87-101) antimicrobial peptide regions and the pentapeptide or H4 signature (15-19) are highly conserved including in humans. The phylogenetic tree formed two separate clades of vertebrate and invertebrate H4, wherein MrH4 was located within the arthropod monophyletic clade of invertebrate H4 groups. Three-dimensional model of MrH4 was established using I-TASSER program and the model was validated using Ramachandran plot analysis. Schiffer-Edmundson helical wheel modeling was used to predict the helix propensity of N (21-42) and C (87-101) terminal derived Mr peptides. The highest gene expression was observed in gills and is induced by viral [white spot syndrome baculovirus (WSBV) and M. rosenbergii nodovirus (MrNV)] and bacterial (Aeromonas hydrophila and Vibrio harveyi) infections. The N and C terminal peptides were synthesized and their antimicrobial and hemolytic properties were examined. Both peptides showed activity against the tested Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria; however, the highest activity was noticed against Gram negative bacteria. Among the two peptides used in this study, C-terminal peptide yielded better results than the N-terminal peptide. Therefore, C terminal

  7. N-terminal nesprin-2 variants regulate β-catenin signalling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qiuping; Minaisah, Rose-Marie; Ferraro, Elisa; Li, Chen; Porter, Lauren J.; Zhou, Can; Gao, Fang; Zhang, Junyi; Rajgor, Dipen; Autore, Flavia; Shanahan, Catherine M.; Warren, Derek T., E-mail: derek.warren@kcl.ac.uk

    2016-07-15

    The spatial compartmentalisation of biochemical signalling pathways is essential for cell function. Nesprins are a multi-isomeric family of proteins that have emerged as signalling scaffolds, herein, we investigate the localisation and function of novel nesprin-2 N-terminal variants. We show that these nesprin-2 variants display cell specific distribution and reside in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that nesprin-2 N-terminal variants colocalised with β-catenin at cell-cell junctions in U2OS cells. Calcium switch assays demonstrated that nesprin-2 and β-catenin are lost from cell-cell junctions in low calcium conditions whereas emerin localisation at the NE remained unaltered, furthermore, an N-terminal fragment of nesprin-2 was sufficient for cell-cell junction localisation and interacted with β-catenin. Disruption of these N-terminal nesprin-2 variants, using siRNA depletion resulted in loss of β-catenin from cell-cell junctions, nuclear accumulation of active β-catenin and augmented β-catenin transcriptional activity. Importantly, we show that U2OS cells lack nesprin-2 giant, suggesting that the N-terminal nesprin-2 variants regulate β-catenin signalling independently of the NE. Together, these data identify N-terminal nesprin-2 variants as novel regulators of β-catenin signalling that tether β-catenin to cell-cell contacts to inhibit β-catenin transcriptional activity. - Highlights: • N-terminal nesprin-2 variants display cell specific expression patterns. • N-terminal spectrin repeats of nesprin-2 interact with β-catenin. • N-terminal nesprin-2 variants scaffold β-catenin at cell-cell junctions.. • Nesprin-2 variants play multiple roles in β-catenin signalling.

  8. Ant System-Corner Insertion Sequence: An Efficient VLSI Hard Module Placer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HOO, C.-S.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Placement is important in VLSI physical design as it determines the time-to-market and chip's reliability. In this paper, a new floorplan representation which couples with Ant System, namely Corner Insertion Sequence (CIS is proposed. Though CIS's search complexity is smaller than the state-of-the-art representation Corner Sequence (CS, CIS adopts a preset boundary on the placement and hence, leading to search bound similar to CS. This enables the previous unutilized corner edges to become viable. Also, the redundancy of CS representation is eliminated in CIS leads to a lower search complexity of CIS. Experimental results on Microelectronics Center of North Carolina (MCNC hard block benchmark circuits show that the proposed algorithm performs comparably in terms of area yet at least two times faster than CS.

  9. Identifying and quantifying proteolytic events and the natural N terminome by terminal amine isotopic labeling of substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleifeld, Oded; Doucet, Alain; Prudova, Anna; auf dem Keller, Ulrich; Gioia, Magda; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Overall, Christopher M

    2011-09-22

    Analysis of the sequence and nature of protein N termini has many applications. Defining the termini of proteins for proteome annotation in the Human Proteome Project is of increasing importance. Terminomics analysis of protease cleavage sites in degradomics for substrate discovery is a key new application. Here we describe the step-by-step procedures for performing terminal amine isotopic labeling of substrates (TAILS), a 2- to 3-d (depending on method of labeling) high-throughput method to identify and distinguish protease-generated neo-N termini from mature protein N termini with all natural modifications with high confidence. TAILS uses negative selection to enrich for all N-terminal peptides and uses primary amine labeling-based quantification as the discriminating factor. Labeling is versatile and suited to many applications, including biochemical and cell culture analyses in vitro; in vivo analyses using tissue samples from animal and human sources can also be readily performed. At the protein level, N-terminal and lysine amines are blocked by dimethylation (formaldehyde/sodium cyanoborohydride) and isotopically labeled by incorporating heavy and light dimethylation reagents or stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture labels. Alternatively, easy multiplex sample analysis can be achieved using amine blocking and labeling with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification, also known as iTRAQ. After tryptic digestion, N-terminal peptide separation is achieved using a high-molecular-weight dendritic polyglycerol aldehyde polymer that binds internal tryptic and C-terminal peptides that now have N-terminal alpha amines. The unbound naturally blocked (acetylation, cyclization, methylation and so on) or labeled mature N-terminal and neo-N-terminal peptides are recovered by ultrafiltration and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Hierarchical substrate winnowing discriminates substrates from the background proteolysis products and

  10. Plastome Sequencing of Ten Nonmodel Crop Species Uncovers a Large Insertion of Mitochondrial DNA in Cashew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabah, Samar O; Lee, Chaehee; Hajrah, Nahid H; Makki, Rania M; Alharby, Hesham F; Alhebshi, Alawiah M; Sabir, Jamal S M; Jansen, Robert K; Ruhlman, Tracey A

    2017-11-01

    In plant evolution, intracellular gene transfer (IGT) is a prevalent, ongoing process. While nuclear and mitochondrial genomes are known to integrate foreign DNA via IGT and horizontal gene transfer (HGT), plastid genomes (plastomes) have resisted foreign DNA incorporation and only recently has IGT been uncovered in the plastomes of a few land plants. In this study, we completed plastome sequences for l0 crop species and describe a number of structural features including variation in gene and intron content, inversions, and expansion and contraction of the inverted repeat (IR). We identified a putative in cinnamon ( J. Presl) and other sequenced Lauraceae and an apparent functional transfer of to the nucleus of quinoa ( Willd.). In the orchard tree cashew ( L.), we report the insertion of an ∼6.7-kb fragment of mitochondrial DNA into the plastome IR. BLASTn analyses returned high identity hits to mitogenome sequences including an intact open reading frame. Using three plastome markers for five species of , we generated a phylogeny to investigate the distribution and timing of the insertion. Four species share the insertion, suggesting that this event occurred <20 million yr ago in a single clade in the genus. Our study extends the observation of mitochondrial to plastome IGT to include long-lived tree species. While previous studies have suggested possible mechanisms facilitating IGT to the plastome, more examples of this phenomenon, along with more complete mitogenome sequences, will be required before a common, or variable, mechanism can be elucidated. Copyright © 2017 Crop Science Society of America.

  11. The EspF N-Terminal of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL933w Imparts Stronger Toxicity Effects on HT-29 Cells than the C-Terminal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyu Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC O157:H7 EspF is an important multifunctional protein that destroys the tight junctions of intestinal epithelial cells and promotes host cell apoptosis. However, its molecular mechanism remains elusive. We knocked out the espF sequence (747 bp, ΔespF, N-terminal sequence (219 bp, ΔespFN, and C-terminal sequence (528 bp, ΔespFC separately using the pKD46-mediated λ Red homologous recombination system. Then, we built the corresponding complementation strains, namely, ΔespF/pespF, ΔespFN/pespFN, and ΔespFC/pespFC by overlap PCR, which were used in infecting HT-29 cells and BALB/C mice. The level of reactive oxygen species, cell apoptosis, mitochondrial trans-membrane potential, inflammatory factors, transepithelial electrical resistance (TER, and animal mortality were evaluated by DCFH-DA, double staining of Annexin V-FITC/PI, JC-1 staining, ELISA kit, and a mouse assay. The wild-type (WT, ΔespF, ΔespF/pespF, ΔespFC, ΔespFC/pespFC, ΔespFN, and ΔespFN/pespFN groups exhibited apoptotic rates of 68.3, 27.9, 64.9, 65.7, 73.4, 41.3, and 35.3% respectively, and mean TNF-α expression levels of 428 pg/mL, 342, 466, 446, 381, 383, and 374 pg/mL, respectively. In addition, the apoptotic rates and TNF-α levels of the WT, ΔespF/pespF, and ΔespFC were significantly higher than that of ΔespF, ΔespFN, ΔespFC/pespFC, and ΔespFN/pespFN group (p < 0.05. The N-terminal of EspF resulted in an increase in the number of apoptotic cells, TNF-α secretion, ROS generation, mitochondria apoptosis, and pathogenicity in BalB/c mice. In conclusion, the N-terminal domain of the Enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 EspF more strongly promotes apoptosis and inflammation than the C-terminal domain.

  12. The N-terminal region of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A signals to nuclear localization of the protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parreiras-e-Silva, Lucas T.; Gomes, Marcelo D.; Oliveira, Eduardo B.; Costa-Neto, Claudio M.

    2007-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) is a ubiquitous protein of eukaryotic and archaeal organisms which undergoes hypusination, a unique post-translational modification. We have generated a polyclonal antibody against murine eIF5A, which in immunocytochemical assays in B16-F10 cells revealed that the endogenous protein is preferentially localized to the nuclear region. We therefore analyzed possible structural features present in eIF5A proteins that could be responsible for that characteristic. Multiple sequence alignment analysis of eIF5A proteins from different eukaryotic and archaeal organisms showed that the former sequences have an extended N-terminal segment. We have then performed in silico prediction analyses and constructed different truncated forms of murine eIF5A to verify any possible role that the N-terminal extension might have in determining the subcellular localization of the eIF5A in eukaryotic organisms. Our results indicate that the N-terminal extension of the eukaryotic eIF5A contributes in signaling this protein to nuclear localization, despite of bearing no structural similarity with classical nuclear localization signals

  13. Characterization of the N-terminal segment used by the barley yellow dwarf virus movement protein to promote interaction with the nuclear membrane of host plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, Sarah Rachel; Harris, Frederick; Brandenburg, Klaus; Phoenix, David Andrew

    2007-11-01

    The barley yellow dwarf virus movement protein (BYDV-MP) requires its N-terminal sequence to promote the transport of viral RNA into the nuclear compartment of host plant cells. Here, graphical analysis predicts that this sequence would form a membrane interactive amphiphilic alpha-helix. Confirming this prediction, NT1, a peptide homologue of the BYDV-MP N-terminal sequence, was found to be alpha-helical (65%) in the presence of vesicles mimics of the nuclear membrane. The peptide increased the fluidity of these nuclear membrane mimics (rise in wavenumber of circa 0.5-1.0 cm(-1)) and induced surface pressure changes of 2 mN m(-1) in lipid monolayers with corresponding compositions. Taken with isotherm analysis these results suggest that BYDV-MP forms an N-terminal amphiphilic alpha-helix, which partitions into the nuclear membrane primarily through thermodynamically stable associations with the membrane lipid headgroup region. We speculate that these associations may play a role in targeting of the nuclear membrane by BYDM-MP.

  14. Influence of AlGaN/GaN superlattice inserted structure on the performance of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.-L.; Tsai, M.-C.; Gong, J.-R.; Liao, W.-T.; Lin, P.-Y.; Yen, K.-Y.; Chang, C.-C.; Lin, H.-Y.; Hwang, S.-K.

    2007-01-01

    Investigations were conducted to explore the effect of Al 0.3 Ga 0.7 N/GaN short-period superlattice (SPSL)-inserted structures in the GaN under layer on the performance of In 0.2 Ga 0.8 N/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs). The Al 0.3 Ga 0.7 N/GaN SPSL-inserted LEDs were found to exhibit improved materials and device characteristics including decrements in ideality factor and reverse leakage current. The results of etch pit counts reveal that SPSL-induced threading dislocation density reduction in the SPSL-inserted In 0.2 Ga 0.8 N/GaN MQW LED structures enables the improved LED performance

  15. Towards the N-terminal acetylome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xumin; Højrup, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Protein N-terminal acetylation (N(α)-acetylation) is observed widely from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. It gains increased importance in biological field, due to its multiple roles in many aspects of the protein life, such as assembly, stability, activity, and location. Today, mass spectrometry (MS...

  16. Localization of Daucus carota NMCP1 to the nuclear periphery: the role of the N-terminal region and an NLS-linked sequence motif, RYNLRR, in the tail domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta eKimura

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent ultrastructural studies revealed that a structure similar to the vertebrate nuclear lamina exists in the nuclei of higher plants. However, plant genomes lack genes for lamins and intermediate-type filament proteins, and this suggests that plant-specific nuclear coiled-coil proteins make up the lamina-like structure in plants. NMCP1 is a protein, first identified in Daucus carota cells, that localizes exclusively to the nuclear periphery in interphase cells. It has a tripartite structure comprised of head, rod, and tail domains, and includes putative nuclear localization signal (NLS motifs. We identified the functional NLS of DcNMCP1 (carrot NMCP1 and determined the protein regions required for localizing to the nuclear periphery using EGFP-fused constructs transiently expressed in Apium graveolens epidermal cells. Transcription was driven under a CaMV35S promoter, and the genes were introduced into the epidermal cells by a DNA-coated microprojectile delivery system. Of the NLS motifs, KRRRK and RRHK in the tail domain were highly functional for nuclear localization. Addition of the N-terminal 141 amino acids from DcNMCP1 shifted the localization of a region including these NLSs from the entire nucleus to the nuclear periphery. Using this same construct, the replacement of amino acids in RRHK or its preceding sequence, YNL, with alanine residues abolished localization to the nuclear periphery, while replacement of KRRRK did not affect localization. The sequence R/Q/HYNLRR/H, including YNL and the first part of the sequence of RRHK, is evolutionarily conserved in a subclass of NMCP1 sequences from many plant species. These results show that NMCP1 localizes to the nuclear periphery by a combined action of a sequence composed of R/Q/HYNLRR/H, NLS, and the N-terminal region including the head and a portion of the rod domain, suggesting that more than one binding site is implicated in localization of NMCP1.

  17. Dimeric structure of the N-terminal domain of PriB protein from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis solved ab initio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebschner, Dorothee [National Cancer Institute, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Brzezinski, Krzysztof [National Cancer Institute, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); University of Bialystok, 15-399 Bialystok (Poland); Dauter, Miroslawa [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Dauter, Zbigniew, E-mail: dauter@anl.gov [National Cancer Institute, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Nowak, Marta; Kur, Józef; Olszewski, Marcin, E-mail: dauter@anl.gov [Gdansk University of Technology, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); National Cancer Institute, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The N-terminal domain of the PriB protein from the thermophilic bacterium T. tengcongensis (TtePriB) was expressed and its crystal structure has been solved at the atomic resolution of 1.09 Å by direct methods. PriB is one of the components of the bacterial primosome, which catalyzes the reactivation of stalled replication forks at sites of DNA damage. The N-terminal domain of the PriB protein from the thermophilic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (TtePriB) was expressed and its crystal structure was solved at the atomic resolution of 1.09 Å by direct methods. The protein chain, which encompasses the first 104 residues of the full 220-residue protein, adopts the characteristic oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) structure consisting of a five-stranded β-barrel filled with hydrophobic residues and equipped with four loops extending from the barrel. In the crystal two protomers dimerize, forming a six-stranded antiparallel β-sheet. The structure of the N-terminal OB domain of T. tengcongensis shows significant differences compared with mesophile PriBs. While in all other known structures of PriB a dimer is formed by two identical OB domains in separate chains, TtePriB contains two consecutive OB domains in one chain. However, sequence comparison of both the N-terminal and the C-terminal domains of TtePriB suggests that they have analogous structures and that the natural protein possesses a structure similar to a dimer of two N-terminal domains.

  18. Carbamylation of N-terminal proline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olajuyigbe, Folasade M; Demitri, Nicola; Ajele, Joshua O; Maurizio, Elisa; Randaccio, Lucio; Geremia, Silvano

    2010-09-09

    Protein carbamylation is of great concern both in vivo and in vitro. Here, we report the first structural characterization of a protein carbamylated at the N-terminal proline. The unexpected carbamylation of the α-amino group of the least reactive codified amino acid has been detected in high-resolution electron density maps of a new crystal form of the HIV-1 protease/saquinavir complex. The carbamyl group is found coplanar to the proline ring with a trans conformation. The reaction of N-terminal with cyanate ion derived from the chaotropic agent urea was confirmed by mass spectra analysis on protease single crystals. Implications of carbamylation process in vitro and in vivo are discussed.

  19. Chimeric polyomavirus-derived virus-like particles: the immunogenicity of an inserted peptide applied without adjuvant to mice depends on its insertion site and its flanking linker sequence

    OpenAIRE

    Lawatscheck, R.; Aleksaite, E.; Schenk, J.A.; Micheel, B.; Jandrig, B.; Holland, G.; Sasnauskas, K.; Gedvilaite, A.; Ulrich, R.G.

    2007-01-01

    We inserted the sequence of the carcinoembryonic antigen-derived T cell epitope CAP-1-6D (CEA) into different positions of the hamster polyomavirus major capsid protein VP1. Independently from additional flanking linkers, yeast-expressed VP1 proteins harboring the CEA insertion between VP1 amino acid residues 80 and 89 (site 1) or 288 and 295 (site 4) or simultaneously at both positions assembled to chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs). BALB/c mice immunized with adjuvant-free VLPs developed ...

  20. The scorpion toxin Bot IX is a potent member of the α-like family and has a unique N-terminal sequence extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Salvatierra, Juan; Bosmans, Frank; Bougis, Pierre E

    2016-09-01

    We report the detailed chemical, immunological and pharmacological characterization of the α-toxin Bot IX from the Moroccan scorpion Buthus occitanus tunetanus venom. Bot IX, which consists of 70 amino acids, is a highly atypical toxin. It carries a unique N-terminal sequence extension and is highly lethal in mice. Voltage clamp recordings on oocytes expressing rat Nav1.2 or insect BgNav1 reveal that, similar to other α-like toxins, Bot IX inhibits fast inactivation of both variants. Moreover, Bot IX belongs to the same structural/immunological group as the α-like toxin Bot I. Remarkably, radioiodinated Bot IX competes efficiently with the classical α-toxin AaH II from Androctonus australis, and displays one of the highest affinities for Nav channels. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  1. Functional interaction between the N- and C-terminal domains of murine leukemia virus surface envelope protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, C.-W.; Roth, Monica J.

    2003-01-01

    A series of murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) with chimeric envelope proteins (Env) was generated to map functional interactions between the N- and the C-terminal domains of surface proteins (SU). All these chimeras have the 4070A amphotropic receptor-binding region flanked by various lengths of Moloney ecotropic N- and C-terminal Env. A charged residue, E49 (E16 on the mature protein), was identified at the N-terminals of Moloney MuLV SU that is important for the interaction with the C-terminal domain of the SU. The region that interacts with E49 was localized between junction 4 (R265 of M-MuLV Env) and junction 6 (L374 of M-MuLV Env) of SU. Sequencing the viable chimeric Env virus populations identified residues within the SU protein that improved the replication kinetics of the input chimeric Env viruses. Mutations in the C-domain of SU (G387E/R, L435I, L442P) were found to improve chimera IV4, which displayed a delayed onset of replication. The replication of AE6, containing a chimeric junction in the SU C-terminus, was improved by mutations in the N-domain (N40H, E80K), the proline-rich region (Q252R), or the transmembrane protein (L538N). Altogether, these observations provide insights into the structural elements required for Env function

  2. Specificity of N-terminal methionyl peptidase: analysis by site-directed mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasper, T.J.; Boissel, J.P.; Bunn, H.F.

    1987-01-01

    The start site of eukaryotic translation is normally an AUG codon. The corresponding N-terminal methionine is most often removed when the nascent chain reaches about 30 residues. Data from a survey of 1764 eukaryotic protein sequences suggest that the residue adjacent to the initiator Met determines Met cleavage. In order to investigate the mechanism of this reaction, the authors have prepared oligonucleotide-directed mutants of human β-globin from gapped heteroduplexes of a T3/T7 plasmid containing a globin cDNA clone. To date, the authors have produced mutants encoding for 15 of 19 possible amino acid replacements at position 1 in the β-globin chain. These mutants have been confirmed by dideoxy sequencing, transcribed in vitro, and translated in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate in the presence of 35 S-methionine. Labeled translation products were then isolated by cation exchange HPLC, and tryptic peptides were analyzed by RP-HPLC. Thus far, this structural analysis has shown that for β-1 Val, Ala, and Ser, the initiator Met is cleaved, whereas for β-1 Lys, Met, Glu, Trp, Asn, Tyr, and Glu, initiator Met is retained. For β-1 Leu initiator Met is cleaved with a frequency of about 50%. These results are consistent with the data obtained from the previous survey. The expression of site-directed mutants in a cell-free system can also be used to investigate other N-terminal processing events, such as acetylation and myristylation

  3. Molecular cloning and complete nucleotide sequence of a human ventricular myosin light chain 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, E; Shi, Q W; Floroff, M; Mickle, D A.G.; Wu, T W; Olley, P M; Jackowski, G

    1988-03-25

    Human ventricular plasmid library was constructed. The library was screened with the oligonucleotide probe (17-mer) corresponding to a conserve region of myosin light chain 1 near the carboxy terminal. Full length cDNA recombinant plasmid containing 1100 bp insert was isolated. RNA blot hybridization with this insert detected a message of approximately 1500 bp corresponding to the size of VLCl and mRNA. Complete nucleotide sequence of the coding region was determined in M13 subclones using dideoxy chain termination method. With the isolation of this clone (pCD HLVCl), the publication of the complete nucleotide sequence of HVLCl and the predicted secondary structure of this protein will aid in understanding of the biochemistry of myosin and its function in contraction, the evolution of myosin light genes and the genetic, developmental and physiological regulation of myosin genes.

  4. Adenovirus fibre shaft sequences fold into the native triple beta-spiral fold when N-terminally fused to the bacteriophage T4 fibritin foldon trimerisation motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolopoulou, Katerina; Teixeira, Susana; Belrhali, Hassan; Forsyth, V Trevor; Mitraki, Anna; van Raaij, Mark J

    2004-09-03

    Adenovirus fibres are trimeric proteins that consist of a globular C-terminal domain, a central fibrous shaft and an N-terminal part that attaches to the viral capsid. In the presence of the globular C-terminal domain, which is necessary for correct trimerisation, the shaft segment adopts a triple beta-spiral conformation. We have replaced the head of the fibre by the trimerisation domain of the bacteriophage T4 fibritin, the foldon. Two different fusion constructs were made and crystallised, one with an eight amino acid residue linker and one with a linker of only two residues. X-ray crystallographic studies of both fusion proteins shows that residues 319-391 of the adenovirus type 2 fibre shaft fold into a triple beta-spiral fold indistinguishable from the native structure, although this is now resolved at a higher resolution of 1.9 A. The foldon residues 458-483 also adopt their natural structure. The intervening linkers are not well ordered in the crystal structures. This work shows that the shaft sequences retain their capacity to fold into their native beta-spiral fibrous fold when fused to a foreign C-terminal trimerisation motif. It provides a structural basis to artificially trimerise longer adenovirus shaft segments and segments from other trimeric beta-structured fibre proteins. Such artificial fibrous constructs, amenable to crystallisation and solution studies, can offer tractable model systems for the study of beta-fibrous structure. They can also prove useful for gene therapy and fibre engineering applications.

  5. Complete nucleotide sequence of CTX-M-15-plasmids from clinical Escherichia coli isolates: insertional events of transposons and insertion sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemieke Smet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CTX-M-producing Escherichia coli strains are regarded as major global pathogens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The nucleotide sequence of three plasmids (pEC_B24: 73801-bp; pEC_L8: 118525-bp and pEC_L46: 144871-bp from Escherichia coli isolates obtained from patients with urinary tract infections and one plasmid (pEC_Bactec: 92970-bp from an Escherichia coli strain isolated from the joint of a horse with arthritis were determined. Plasmid pEC_Bactec belongs to the IncI1 group and carries two resistance genes: bla(TEM-1 and bla(CTX-M-15. It shares more than 90% homology with a previously published bla(CTX-M-plasmid from E. coli of human origin. Plasmid pEC_B24 belongs to the IncFII group whereas plasmids pEC_L8 and pEC_L46 represent a fusion of two replicons of type FII and FIA. On the pEC_B24 backbone, two resistance genes, bla(TEM-1 and bla(CTX-M-15, were found. Six resistance genes, bla(TEM-1, bla(CTX-M-15, bla(OXA-1, aac6'-lb-cr, tetA and catB4, were detected on the pEC_L8 backbone. The same antimicrobial drug resistance genes, with the exception of tetA, were also identified on the pEC_L46 backbone. Genome analysis of all 4 plasmids studied provides evidence of a seemingly frequent transposition event of the bla(CTX-M-15-ISEcp1 element. This element seems to have a preferred insertion site at the tnpA gene of a bla(TEM-carrying Tn3-like transposon, the latter itself being inserted by a transposition event. The IS26-composite transposon, which contains the bla(OXA-1, aac6'-lb-cr and catB4 genes, was inserted into plasmids pEC_L8 and pEC_L46 by homologous recombination rather than a transposition event. Results obtained for pEC_L46 indicated that IS26 also plays an important role in structural rearrangements of the plasmid backbone and seems to facilitate the mobilisation of fragments from other plasmids. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, these data suggests that IS26 together with ISEcp1 could play a critical role in the evolution of

  6. Automation of C-terminal sequence analysis of 2D-PAGE separated proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.P. Moerman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental assignment of the protein termini remains essential to define the functional protein structure. Here, we report on the improvement of a proteomic C-terminal sequence analysis method. The approach aims to discriminate the C-terminal peptide in a CNBr-digest where Met-Xxx peptide bonds are cleaved in internal peptides ending at a homoserine lactone (hsl-derivative. pH-dependent partial opening of the lactone ring results in the formation of doublets for all internal peptides. C-terminal peptides are distinguished as singlet peaks by MALDI-TOF MS and MS/MS is then used for their identification. We present a fully automated protocol established on a robotic liquid-handling station.

  7. Intrinsic structural differences in the N-terminal segment of pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C from different species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plasencia, I; Rivas, L; Casals, C

    2001-01-01

    Predictive studies suggest that the known sequences of the N-terminal segment of surfactant protein SP-C from animal species have an intrinsic tendency to form beta-turns, but there are important differences on the probable location of these motifs in different SP-C species. Our hypothesis...

  8. Calcium Occupancy of N-terminal Sites within Calmodulin Induces Inhibition of the Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boschek, Curt B; Jones, Terry E; Squier, Thomas C; Bigelow, Diana J

    2007-08-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) regulates calcium release from intracellular stores in skeletal muscle through its association with the ryanodine receptor (RyR1) calcium release channel, where CaM association enhances channel opening at resting calcium levels and its closing at micromolar calcium levels associated with muscle contraction. A high-affinity CaM-binding sequence (RyRp) has been identified in RyR1, which corresponds to a 30-residue sequence (i.e., K3614 – N3643) located within the central portion of the primary sequence. However, it is currently unclear whether the identified CaM-binding sequence a) senses calcium over the physiological range of calcium-concentrations associated with RyR1 regulation or b) plays a structural role unrelated to the calcium-dependent modulation of RyR1 function. Therefore, we have measured the calcium-dependent activation of the individual domains of CaM in association with RyRp and their relationship to the CaM-dependent regulation of RyR1. These measurements utilize an engineered CaM, permitting the site-specific incorporation of N-(1-pyrene) maleimide at either T34C (PyN-CaM) or T110C (PyC-CaM) in the N- and C-domains, respectively. Consistent with prior measurements, we observe a high-affinity association between both apo- and calcium-activated CaM and RyRp. Upon association with RyRp, fluorescence changes in PyN-CaM or PyC-CaM permit the measurement of the calcium-activation of these individual domains. Fluorescence changes upon calcium-activation of PyC-CaM in association with RyRp are indicative of high-affinity calcium-dependent activation of the C-terminal domain of CaM bound to RyRp at resting calcium levels and the activation of the N-terminal domain at levels of calcium associated cellular activation. In comparison, occupancy of calcium-binding sites in the N-domain of CaM mirrors the calcium-dependence of RyR1 inhibition observed at activating calcium levels, where [Ca]1/2 = 4.3 0.4 μM, suggesting a direct regulation of Ry

  9. NetAcet: prediction of N-terminal acetylation sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiemer, Lars; Bendtsen, Jannick Dyrløv; Blom, Nikolaj

    2005-01-01

    Summary: We present here a neural network based method for prediction of N-terminal acetylation-by far the most abundant post-translational modification in eukaryotes. The method was developed on a yeast dataset for N-acetyltransferase A (NatA) acetylation, which is the type of N-acetylation for ......Summary: We present here a neural network based method for prediction of N-terminal acetylation-by far the most abundant post-translational modification in eukaryotes. The method was developed on a yeast dataset for N-acetyltransferase A (NatA) acetylation, which is the type of N...

  10. Segment-specific terminal sequences of Bunyamwera bunyavirus regulate genome replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, John N.; Elliott, Richard M.; Dunn, Ewan F.; Wertz, Gail W.

    2003-01-01

    Bunyamwera virus (BUNV) is the prototype of both the Orthobunyavirus genus and the Bunyaviridae family of segmented negative sense RNA viruses. The tripartite BUNV genome consists of small (S), medium (M), and large (L) segments that are transcribed to give a single mRNA and replicated to generate an antigenome that is the template for synthesis of further genomic RNA strands. We modified an existing cDNA-derived RNA synthesis system to allow identification of BUNV RNA replication and transcription products by direct metabolic labeling. Direct RNA analysis allowed us to distinguish between template activities that affected either RNA replication or mRNA transcription, an ability that was not possible using previous reporter gene expression assays. We generated genome analogs containing the entire nontranslated terminal sequences of the S, M, and L BUNV segments surrounding a common sequence. Analysis of RNAs synthesized from these templates revealed that the relative abilities of BUNV segments to perform RNA replication was M > L > S. Exchange of segment-specific terminal nucleotides identified a 12-nt region located within both the 3' and 5' termini of the M segment that correlated with its high replication ability

  11. Insertion sequence typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: characterization of a widespread subtype with a single copy of IS6110.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomukong, N G; Tang, T H; al-Maamary, S; Ibrahim, W A; Ramayah, S; Yates, M; Zainuddin, Z F; Dale, J W

    1994-12-01

    DNA fingerprinting with the insertion sequence IS6110 (also known as IS986) has become established as a major tool for investigating the spread of tuberculosis. Most strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis have multiple copies of IS6110, but a small minority carry a single copy only. We have examined selected strains from Malaysia, Tanzania and Oman, in comparison with M. bovis isolates and BCG strains carrying one or two copies of IS6110. The insertion sequence appears to be present in the same position in all these strains, which suggests that in these organisms the element is defective in transposition and that the loss of transposability may have occurred at an early stage in the evolution of the M. tuberculosis complex.

  12. A novel calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase (ACA2) from Arabidopsis with an N-terminal autoinhibitory domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, J. F.; Hong, B.; Hwang, I.; Guo, H. Q.; Stoddard, R.; Huang, J. F.; Palmgren, M. G.; Sze, H.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    To study transporters involved in regulating intracellular Ca2+, we isolated a full-length cDNA encoding a Ca2+-ATPase from a model plant, Arabidopsis, and named it ACA2 (Arabidopsis Ca2+-ATPase, isoform 2). ACA2p is most similar to a "plasma membrane-type" Ca2+-ATPase, but is smaller (110 kDa), contains a unique N-terminal domain, and is missing a long C-terminal calmodulin-binding regulatory domain. In addition, ACA2p is localized to an endomembrane system and not the plasma membrane, as shown by aqueous-two phase fractionation of microsomal membranes. ACA2p was expressed in yeast as both a full-length protein (ACA2-1p) and an N-terminal truncation mutant (ACA2-2p; Delta residues 2-80). Only the truncation mutant restored the growth on Ca2+-depleted medium of a yeast mutant defective in both endogenous Ca2+ pumps, PMR1 and PMC1. Although basal Ca2+-ATPase activity of the full-length protein was low, it was stimulated 5-fold by calmodulin (50% activation around 30 nM). In contrast, the truncated pump was fully active and insensitive to calmodulin. A calmodulin-binding sequence was identified within the first 36 residues of the N-terminal domain, as shown by calmodulin gel overlays on fusion proteins. Thus, ACA2 encodes a novel calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase distinguished by a unique N-terminal regulatory domain and a non-plasma membrane localization.

  13. Insertion of Contemporary and Modern Physics in classroom: a teaching learning sequence on radioactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre dos Santos Batista

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available After more than two decades of justifications on the insertion of Modern and Contemporary Physics in the high school Education, the current challenge regards to how this content can be inserted in the classroom in an interesting and innovative way. Recent research reveals that despite a significant accumulation of recent academic research, whose purpose is to assist teachers pedagogically, few are grounded and proposed theoretically seeking to investigate how this integration happens. In this sense, we present a teaching-learning sequence on the topic of radioactivity, forged in the theoretical and methodological assumptions of Design-Based Research and a Teaching-Learning Sequence that, when implemented in public schools in the south of Bahia, produced the relevant knowledge to be shared with the community on teaching physics. Forged in our assumptions, the proposal allows teachers and researchers to understand questions about how, when and why, in fact, the inclusion of Modern and Contemporary Physics can occur in a non-traditional way. Therefore, the importance of this proposal is revealed to the high school of physics as it translates its ability to transform the theoretical demands on the curriculum and methodological innovation in the practical interventions in the classroom. We add that the availability of the necessary sources to find lesson plans, quizzes, texts, videos of teaching-learning sequence, shows the contribution of this work for teachers and researchers, in particular, to improve the scientific learning of students in the Basic Education.

  14. A search for RNA insertions and NS3 gene duplication in the genome of cytopathic isolates of bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.L. Quadros

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Calves born persistently infected with non-cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (ncpBVDV frequently develop a fatal gastroenteric illness called mucosal disease. Both the original virus (ncpBVDV and an antigenically identical but cytopathic virus (cpBVDV can be isolated from animals affected by mucosal disease. Cytopathic BVDVs originate from their ncp counterparts by diverse genetic mechanisms, all leading to the expression of the non-structural polypeptide NS3 as a discrete protein. In contrast, ncpBVDVs express only the large precursor polypeptide, NS2-3, which contains the NS3 sequence within its carboxy-terminal half. We report here the investigation of the mechanism leading to NS3 expression in 41 cpBVDV isolates. An RT-PCR strategy was employed to detect RNA insertions within the NS2-3 gene and/or duplication of the NS3 gene, two common mechanisms of NS3 expression. RT-PCR amplification revealed insertions in the NS2-3 gene of three cp isolates, with the inserts being similar in size to that present in the cpBVDV NADL strain. Sequencing of one such insert revealed a 296-nucleotide sequence with a central core of 270 nucleotides coding for an amino acid sequence highly homologous (98% to the NADL insert, a sequence corresponding to part of the cellular J-Domain gene. One cpBVDV isolate contained a duplication of the NS3 gene downstream from the original locus. In contrast, no detectable NS2-3 insertions or NS3 gene duplications were observed in the genome of 37 cp isolates. These results demonstrate that processing of NS2-3 without bulk mRNA insertions or NS3 gene duplications seems to be a frequent mechanism leading to NS3 expression and BVDV cytopathology.

  15. Molecular cloning and biologically active production of IpaD N-terminal region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesaraki, Mahdi; Saadati, Mojtaba; Honari, Hossein; Olad, Gholamreza; Heiat, Mohammad; Malaei, Fatemeh; Ranjbar, Reza

    2013-07-01

    Shigella is known as pathogenic intestinal bacteria in high dispersion and pathogenic bacteria due to invasive plasmid antigen (Ipa). So far, a number of Ipa proteins have been studied to introduce a new candidate vaccine. Here, for the first time, we examined whether the N-terminal region of IpaD(72-162) could be a proper candidate for Shigella vaccine. Initially, the DNA sequence coding N-terminal region was isolated by PCR from Shigella dysenteriae type I and cloned into pET-28a expression vector. Then, the heterologous protein was expressed, optimized and purified by affinity Ni-NTA column. Western blot analysis using, His-tag and IpaD(72-162) polyclonal antibodies, confirmed the purity and specificity of the recombinant protein, respectively. Subsequently, the high immunogenicity of the antigen was shown by ELISA. The results of the sereny test in Guinea pigs showed that IpaD(72-162) provides a protective system against Shigella flexneri 5a and S. dysenteriae type I. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Increasing genomic diversity and evidence of constrained lifestyle evolution due to insertion sequences in Aeromonas salmonicida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Antony T; Trudel, Mélanie V; Freschi, Luca; Nagar, Vandan; Gagné-Thivierge, Cynthia; Levesque, Roger C; Charette, Steve J

    2016-01-12

    Aeromonads make up a group of Gram-negative bacteria that includes human and fish pathogens. The Aeromonas salmonicida species has the peculiarity of including five known subspecies. However, few studies of the genomes of A. salmonicida subspecies have been reported to date. We sequenced the genomes of additional A. salmonicida isolates, including three from India, using next-generation sequencing in order to gain a better understanding of the genomic and phylogenetic links between A. salmonicida subspecies. Their relative phylogenetic positions were confirmed by a core genome phylogeny based on 1645 gene sequences. The Indian isolates, which formed a sub-group together with A. salmonicida subsp. pectinolytica, were able to grow at either at 18 °C and 37 °C, unlike the A. salmonicida psychrophilic isolates that did not grow at 37 °C. Amino acid frequencies, GC content, tRNA composition, loss and gain of genes during evolution, pseudogenes as well as genes under positive selection and the mobilome were studied to explain this intraspecies dichotomy. Insertion sequences appeared to be an important driving force that locked the psychrophilic strains into their particular lifestyle in order to conserve their genomic integrity. This observation, based on comparative genomics, is in agreement with previous results showing that insertion sequence mobility induced by heat in A. salmonicida subspecies causes genomic plasticity, resulting in a deleterious effect on the virulence of the bacterium. We provide a proof-of-concept that selfish DNAs play a major role in the evolution of bacterial species by modeling genomes.

  17. Capillary electrophoresis of Big-Dye terminator sequencing reactions for human mtDNA Control Region haplotyping in the identification of human remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesino, Marta; Prieto, Lourdes

    2012-01-01

    Cycle sequencing reaction with Big-Dye terminators provides the methodology to analyze mtDNA Control Region amplicons by means of capillary electrophoresis. DNA sequencing with ddNTPs or terminators was developed by (1). The progressive automation of the method by combining the use of fluorescent-dye terminators with cycle sequencing has made it possible to increase the sensibility and efficiency of the method and hence has allowed its introduction into the forensic field. PCR-generated mitochondrial DNA products are the templates for sequencing reactions. Different set of primers can be used to generate amplicons with different sizes according to the quality and quantity of the DNA extract providing sequence data for different ranges inside the Control Region.

  18. Role of N-terminal 28-amino-acid region of Rhizopus oryzae lipase in directing proteins to secretory pathway of Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Shinji; Tamalampudi, Sriappareddy; Shindo, Naoki; Numata, Takao; Yamaji, Hideki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2008-07-01

    To develop a new approach for improving heterologous protein production in Aspergillus oryzae, we focused on the functional role of the N-terminal region of Rhizopus oryzae lipase (ROL). Several N-terminal deletion variants of ROL were expressed in A. oryzae. Interestingly, a segment of 28 amino acids from the C-terminal region of the propeptide (N28) was found to be critical for secretion of ROL into the culture medium. To further investigate the role of N28, the ROL secretory process was visualized in vivo using ROL-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins. In cells producing ROL with N28, fluorescence observations showed that the fusion proteins are transported through endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi, and cell wall, which is one of the typical secretory processes in a eukaryotic cell. Because the expression of the mature ROL-GFP fusion protein induced fluorescence accumulation without its translocation into the ER, N28 is considered to play a crucial role in protein transport. When N28 was inserted between the secretion signal and GFP, fluorescence observations showed that GFP, which is originally a cytoplasmic protein, was efficiently translocated into the ER of A. oryzae, resulting in an enhanced secretion of mature GFP after proteolytic cleavage of N28. These findings suggest that N28 facilitates protein translocation into ER and can be a promising candidate for improving heterologous protein production in A. oryzae.

  19. Heparan sulfate regulates fibrillin-1 N- and C-terminal interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cain, Stuart A; Baldwin, Andrew K; Mahalingam, Yashithra

    2008-01-01

    Fibrillin-1 N- and C-terminal heparin binding sites have been characterized. An unprocessed monomeric N-terminal fragment (PF1) induced a very high heparin binding response, indicating heparin-mediated multimerization. Using PF1 deletion and short fragments, a heparin binding site was localized w......-terminal interactions with heparin/heparan sulfate directly influence cell behavior, whereas C-terminal interactions with heparin/heparan sulfate regulate elastin deposition. These data highlight how heparin/heparan sulfate controls fibrillin-1 interactions....

  20. Synergy between the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis HupB is essential for high-affinity binding, DNA supercoiling and inhibition of RecA-promoted strand exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharadamma, N; Khan, Krishnendu; Kumar, Sandeep; Patil, K Neelakanteshwar; Hasnain, Seyed E; Muniyappa, K

    2011-09-01

    The occurrence of DNA architectural proteins containing two functional domains derived from two different architectural proteins is an interesting emerging research theme in the field of nucleoid structure and function. Mycobacterium tuberculosis HupB, unlike Escherichia coli HU, is a two-domain protein that, in the N-terminal region, shows broad sequence homology with bacterial HU. The long C-terminal extension, on the other hand, contains seven PAKK/KAAK motifs, which are characteristic of the histone H1/H5 family of proteins. In this article, we describe several aspects of HupB function, in comparison with its truncated derivatives lacking either the C-terminus or N-terminus. We found that HupB binds a variety of DNA repair and replication intermediates with K(d) values in the nanomolar range. By contrast, the N-terminal fragment of M. tuberculosis HupB (HupB(MtbN)) showed diminished DNA-binding activity, with K(d) values in the micromolar range, and the C-terminal domain was completely devoid of DNA-binding activity. Unlike HupB(MtbN) , HupB was able to constrain DNA in negative supercoils and introduce negative superhelical turns into relaxed DNA. Similarly, HupB exerted a robust inhibitory effect on DNA strand exchange promoted by cognate and noncognate RecA proteins, whereas HupB(MtbN), even at a 50-fold molar excess, had no inhibitory effect. Considered together, these results suggest that synergy between the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of HupB is essential for its DNA-binding ability, and to modulate the topological features of DNA, which has implications for processes such as DNA compaction, gene regulation, homologous recombination, and DNA repair. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  1. Wear evaluation of WC inserts coated with TiN/TiAlN multinanolayers

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno, L. H.; Ciacedo, J. C.; Martinez, F.; Bejarano, G.; Battaille, T. S.; Prieto, P.

    2010-01-01

    TiN/TiAlN multilayers were deposited by radio frequency, r.f., reactive magnetron sputtering by using titanium and aluminum targets with 10 cm diameter and 99.99% purity in an argon/nitrogen atmosphere, applying a substrate temperature of 300 ºC. WC inserts were used as substrates to improve the mechanical and tribological properties of TiN/TiAlN multilayered coatings compared to other types of coatings like TiAlN monolayers and to manage greater efficiency of these coatings in different indu...

  2. Designing a Long Acting Erythropoietin by Fusing Three Carboxyl-Terminal Peptides of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin β Subunit to the N-Terminal and C-Terminal Coding Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuad Fares

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A new analog of EPO was designed by fusing one and two CTPs to the N-terminal and C-terminal ends of EPO (EPO-(CTP3, respectively. This analog was expressed and secreted efficiently in CHO cells. The in vitro test shows that the activity of EPO-(CTP3 in TFI-1 cell proliferation assay is similar to that of EPO-WT and commercial rHEPO. However, in vivo studies indicated that treatment once a week with EPO-(CTP3 (15 μg/kg dramatically increased (~8 folds haematocrit as it was compared to rHuEPO. Moreover, it was found that EPO-(CTP3 is more effective than rHuEPO and Aranesp in increasing reticulocyte number in mice blood. The detected circulatory half-lives of rHuEPO, Aranesp, and EPO-(CTP3 following IV injection of 20 IU were 4.4, 10.8, and 13.1 h, respectively. These data established the rational for using this chimera as a long-acting EPO analog in clinics. The therapeutic efficacy of EPO-CTP analog needs to be established in higher animals and in human clinical trials.

  3. Reactivity insertion accident analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, J.M.L.; Nakata, H.; Yorihaz, H.

    1990-04-01

    The correct prediction of postulated accidents is the fundamental requirement for the reactor licensing procedures. Accident sequences and severity of their consequences depend upon the analysis which rely on analytical tools which must be validated against known experimental results. Present work presents a systematic approach to analyse and estimate the reactivity insertion accident sequences. The methodology is based on the CINETHICA code which solves the point-kinetics/thermohydraulic coupled equations with weighted temperature feedback. Comparison against SPERT experimental results shows good agreement for the step insertion accidents. (author) [pt

  4. Characterization of cDNA for human tripeptidyl peptidase II: The N-terminal part of the enzyme is similar to subtilisin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomkinson, B.; Jonsson, A-K

    1991-01-01

    Tripeptidyl peptidase II is a high molecular weight serine exopeptidase, which has been purified from rat liver and human erythrocytes. Four clones, representing 4453 bp, or 90% of the mRNA of the human enzyme, have been isolated from two different cDNA libraries. One clone, designated A2, was obtained after screening a human B-lymphocyte cDNA library with a degenerated oligonucleotide mixture. The B-lymphocyte cDNA library, obtained from human fibroblasts, were rescreened with a 147 bp fragment from the 5' part of the A2 clone, whereby three different overlapping cDNA clones could be isolated. The deduced amino acid sequence, 1196 amino acid residues, corresponding to the longest open rading frame of the assembled nucleotide sequence, was compared to sequences of current databases. This revealed a 56% similarity between the bacterial enzyme subtilisin and the N-terminal part of tripeptidyl peptidase II. The enzyme was found to be represented by two different mRNAs of 4.2 and 5.0 kilobases, respectively, which probably result from the utilziation of two different polyadenylation sites. Futhermore, cDNA corresponding to both the N-terminal and C-terminal part of tripeptidyl peptidase II hybridized with genomic DNA from mouse, horse, calf, and hen, even under fairly high stringency conditions, indicating that tripeptidyl peptidase II is highly conserved

  5. The C-Terminal RpoN Domain of sigma54 Forms an unpredictedHelix-Turn-Helix Motif Similar to domains of sigma70

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doucleff, Michaeleen; Malak, Lawrence T.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Wemmer, David E.

    2005-11-01

    The ''{delta}'' subunit of prokaryotic RNA-polymerase allows gene-specific transcription initiation. Two {sigma} families have been identified, {sigma}{sup 70} and {sigma}{sup 54}, which use distinct mechanisms to initiate transcription and share no detectable sequence homology. Although the {sigma}{sup 70}-type factors have been well characterized structurally by x-ray crystallography, no high-resolution structural information is available for the {sigma}{sup 54}-type factors. Here we present the NMR derived structure of the C-terminal domain of {sigma}{sup 54} from Aquifex aeolicus. This domain (Thr323 to Gly389), which contains the highly conserved RpoN box sequence, consists of a poorly structured N-terminal tail followed by a three-helix bundle, which is surprisingly similar to domains of the {sigma}{sup 70}-type proteins. Residues of the RpoN box, which have previously been shown to be critical for DNA binding, form the second helix of an unpredicted helix-turn-helix motif. This structure's homology with other DNA binding proteins, combined with previous biochemical data, suggest how the C-terminal domain of {sigma}{sup 54} binds to DNA.

  6. Linear and exponential TAIL-PCR: a method for efficient and quick amplification of flanking sequences adjacent to Tn5 transposon insertion sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xianbo; Lin, Xinjian; Chen, Jichen

    2017-11-02

    Current genome walking methods are very time consuming, and many produce non-specific amplification products. To amplify the flanking sequences that are adjacent to Tn5 transposon insertion sites in Serratia marcescens FZSF02, we developed a genome walking method based on TAIL-PCR. This PCR method added a 20-cycle linear amplification step before the exponential amplification step to increase the concentration of the target sequences. Products of the linear amplification and the exponential amplification were diluted 100-fold to decrease the concentration of the templates that cause non-specific amplification. Fast DNA polymerase with a high extension speed was used in this method, and an amplification program was used to rapidly amplify long specific sequences. With this linear and exponential TAIL-PCR (LETAIL-PCR), we successfully obtained products larger than 2 kb from Tn5 transposon insertion mutant strains within 3 h. This method can be widely used in genome walking studies to amplify unknown sequences that are adjacent to known sequences.

  7. CRISPR/Cas9 cleavages in budding yeast reveal templated insertions and strand-specific insertion/deletion profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Brenda R; Kaplan, Adam C; Bae, Ji Eun; Ferrazzoli, Alexander E; Kuo, James; Anand, Ranjith P; Waterman, David P; Haber, James E

    2018-02-27

    Harnessing CRISPR-Cas9 technology provides an unprecedented ability to modify genomic loci via DNA double-strand break (DSB) induction and repair. We analyzed nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair induced by Cas9 in budding yeast and found that the orientation of binding of Cas9 and its guide RNA (gRNA) profoundly influences the pattern of insertion/deletions (indels) at the site of cleavage. A common indel created by Cas9 is a 1-bp (+1) insertion that appears to result from Cas9 creating a 1-nt 5' overhang that is filled in by a DNA polymerase and ligated. The origin of +1 insertions was investigated by using two gRNAs with PAM sequences located on opposite DNA strands but designed to cleave the same sequence. These templated +1 insertions are dependent on the X-family DNA polymerase, Pol4. Deleting Pol4 also eliminated +2 and +3 insertions, which are biased toward homonucleotide insertions. Using inverted PAM sequences, we also found significant differences in overall NHEJ efficiency and repair profiles, suggesting that the binding of the Cas9:gRNA complex influences subsequent NHEJ processing. As with events induced by the site-specific HO endonuclease, CRISPR-Cas9-mediated NHEJ repair depends on the Ku heterodimer and DNA ligase 4. Cas9 events are highly dependent on the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex, independent of Mre11's nuclease activity. Inspection of the outcomes of a large number of Cas9 cleavage events in mammalian cells reveals a similar templated origin of +1 insertions in human cells, but also a significant frequency of similarly templated +2 insertions.

  8. Formation of large viroplasms and virulence of Cauliflower mosaic virus in turnip plants depend on the N-terminal EKI sequence of viral protein TAV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angèle Geldreich

    Full Text Available Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV TAV protein (TransActivator/Viroplasmin plays a pivotal role during the infection cycle since it activates translation reinitiation of viral polycistronic RNAs and suppresses RNA silencing. It is also the major component of cytoplasmic electron-dense inclusion bodies (EDIBs called viroplasms that are particularly evident in cells infected by the virulent CaMV Cabb B-JI isolate. These EDIBs are considered as virion factories, vehicles for CaMV intracellular movement and reservoirs for CaMV transmission by aphids. In this study, focused on different TAV mutants in vivo, we demonstrate that three physically separated domains collectively participate to the formation of large EDIBs: the N-terminal EKI motif, a sequence of the MAV domain involved in translation reinitiation and a C-terminal region encompassing the zinc finger. Surprisingly, EKI mutant TAVm3, corresponding to a substitution of the EKI motif at amino acids 11-13 by three alanines (AAA, which completely abolished the formation of large viroplasms, was not lethal for CaMV but highly reduced its virulence without affecting the rate of systemic infection. Expression of TAVm3 in a viral context led to formation of small irregularly shaped inclusion bodies, mild symptoms and low levels of viral DNA and particles accumulation, despite the production of significant amounts of mature capsid proteins. Unexpectedly, for CaMV-TAVm3 the formation of viral P2-containing electron-light inclusion body (ELIB, which is essential for CaMV aphid transmission, was also altered, thus suggesting an indirect role of the EKI tripeptide in CaMV plant-to-plant propagation. This important functional contribution of the EKI motif in CaMV biology can explain the strict conservation of this motif in the TAV sequences of all CaMV isolates.

  9. The N-Terminal of Aquareovirus NS80 Is Required for Interacting with Viral Proteins and Viral Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available Reovirus replication and assembly occurs within viral inclusion bodies that formed in specific intracellular compartments of cytoplasm in infected cells. Previous study indicated that aquareovirus NS80 is able to form inclusion bodies, and also can retain viral proteins within its inclusions. To better understand how NS80 performed in viral replication and assembly, the functional regions of NS80 associated with other viral proteins in aquareovirus replication were investigated in this study. Deletion mutational analysis and rotavirus NSP5-based protein association platform were used to detect association regions. Immunofluorescence images indicated that different N-terminal regions of NS80 could associate with viral proteins VP1, VP4, VP6 and NS38. Further co-immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed the interaction between VP1, VP4, VP6 or NS38 with different regions covering the N-terminal amino acid (aa, 1-471 of NS80, respectively. Moreover, removal of NS80 N-terminal sequences required for interaction with proteins VP1, VP4, VP6 or NS38 not only prevented the capacity of NS80 to support viral replication in NS80 shRNA-based replication complementation assays, but also inhibited the expression of aquareovirus proteins, suggesting that N-terminal regions of NS80 are necessary for viral replication. These results provided a foundational basis for further understanding the role of NS80 in viral replication and assembly during aquareovirus infection.

  10. Improving the secretion of a methyl parathion hydrolase in Pichia pastoris by modifying its N-terminal sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wang

    Full Text Available Pichia pastoris is commonly used to express and secrete target proteins, although not all recombinant proteins can be successfully produced. In this study, we used methyl parathion hydrolase (MPH from Ochrobactrum sp. M231 as a model to study the importance of the N-terminus of the protein for its secretion. While MPH can be efficiently expressed intracellularly in P. pastoris, it is not secreted into the extracellular environment. Three MPH mutants (N66-MPH, D10-MPH, and N9-MPH were constructed through modification of its N-terminus, and the secretion of each by P. pastoris was improved when compared to wild-type MPH. The level of secreted D10-MPH was increased to 0.21 U/mL, while that of N9-MPH was enhanced to 0.16 U/mL. Although N66-MPH was not enzymatically active, it was secreted efficiently, and was identified by SDS-PAGE. These results demonstrate that the secretion of heterologous proteins in P. pastoris may be improved by modifying their N-terminal structures.

  11. Insertion sequence ISRP10 inactivation of the oprD gene in imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qinghui; Ba, Zhaofen; Wu, Guoying; Wang, Wei; Lin, Shuxiang; Yang, Hongjiang

    2016-05-01

    Carbapenem resistance mechanisms were investigated in 32 imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates recovered from hospitalised children. Sequence analysis revealed that 31 of the isolates had an insertion sequence element ISRP10 disrupting the porin gene oprD, demonstrating that ISRP10 inactivation of oprD conferred imipenem resistance in the majority of the isolates. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was used to discriminate the isolates. In total, 11 sequence types (STs) were identified including 3 novel STs, and 68.3% (28/41) of the tested strains were characterised as clone ST253. In combination with random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis, the imipenem-resistant isolates displayed a relatively high degree of genetic variability and were unlikely associated with nosocomial infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  12. Nucleotide sequences of two cellulase genes from alkalophilic Bacillus sp. strain N-4 and their strong homology.

    OpenAIRE

    Fukumori, F; Sashihara, N; Kudo, T; Horikoshi, K

    1986-01-01

    Two genes for cellulases of alkalophilic Bacillus sp. strain N-4 (ATCC 21833) have been sequenced. From the DNA sequences the cellulases encoded in the plasmids pNK1 and pNK2 consist of 488 and 409 amino acids, respectively. The DNA and protein sequences of the pNK1-encoded cellulase are related to those of the pNK2-encoded cellulase. The pNK2-encoded cellulase lacks the direct repeat sequence of a stretch of 60 amino acids near the C-terminal end of the pNK1-encoded cellulase. The duplicatio...

  13. Codon cassette mutagenesis: a general method to insert or replace individual codons by using universal mutagenic cassettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegler-Ebo, D M; Docktor, C M; DiMaio, D

    1994-05-11

    We describe codon cassette mutagenesis, a simple method of mutagenesis that uses universal mutagenic cassettes to deposit single codons at specific sites in double-stranded DNA. A target molecule is first constructed that contains a blunt, double-strand break at the site targeted for mutagenesis. A double-stranded mutagenic codon cassette is then inserted at the target site. Each mutagenic codon cassette contains a three base pair direct terminal repeat and two head-to-head recognition sequences for the restriction endonuclease Sapl, an enzyme that cleaves outside of its recognition sequence. The intermediate molecule containing the mutagenic cassette is then digested with Sapl, thereby removing most of the mutagenic cassette, leaving only a three base cohesive overhang that is ligated to generate the final insertion or substitution mutation. A general method for constructing blunt-end target molecules suitable for this approach is also described. Because the mutagenic cassette is excised during this procedure and alters the target only by introducing the desired mutation, the same cassette can be used to introduce a particular codon at all target sites. Each cassette can deposit two different codons, depending on the orientation in which it is inserted into the target molecule. Therefore, a series of eleven cassettes is sufficient to insert all possible amino acids at any constructed target site. Thus codon cassettes are 'off-the-shelf' reagents, and this methodology should be a particularly useful and inexpensive approach for subjecting multiple different positions in a protein sequence to saturation mutagenesis.

  14. Cast iron cutting with nano TiN and multilayer TiN-CrN coated inserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perucca, M.; Durante, S.; Semmler, U.; Rüger, C.; Fuentes, G. G.; Almandoz, E.

    2012-09-01

    During the past decade great success has been achieved in the development of duplex and multilayer multi-functional surface systems. Among these surface systems outstanding properties have nanoscale multilayer coatings. Within the framework of the M3-2S project funded in the 7th European Framework Programme, several nanoscale multilayer coatings have been developed and investigated for experimental and industrial validation. This paper shows the performance of TiN and TiN/CrN nanoscale multilayer coatings on WC cutting inserts when machining GJL250 cast iron. The thin films have been deposited by cathodic arc evaporation in an industrial PVD system. The multilayer deposition characteristic and its properties are shown. The inserts have been investigated in systematic cutting experiments of cast iron bars on a turning machine specifically equipped for force measurements, accompanied by wear determination. Furthermore, equivalent experiments have been carried out on an industrial turning unit. Industrial validation criteria have been applied to assess the comparative performance of the coatings. The choice of the material and the machined parts is driven by an interest in automotive applications. The industrial tests show the need to further optimise the multi-scale modelling approach in order to reduce the lead time of the coating development as well as to improve simulation reliability.

  15. Cast iron cutting with nano TiN and multilayer TiN-CrN coated inserts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perucca, M; Durante, S; Semmler, U; Rüger, C; Fuentes, G G; Almandoz, E

    2012-01-01

    During the past decade great success has been achieved in the development of duplex and multilayer multi-functional surface systems. Among these surface systems outstanding properties have nanoscale multilayer coatings. Within the framework of the M3-2S project funded in the 7th European Framework Programme, several nanoscale multilayer coatings have been developed and investigated for experimental and industrial validation. This paper shows the performance of TiN and TiN/CrN nanoscale multilayer coatings on WC cutting inserts when machining GJL250 cast iron. The thin films have been deposited by cathodic arc evaporation in an industrial PVD system. The multilayer deposition characteristic and its properties are shown. The inserts have been investigated in systematic cutting experiments of cast iron bars on a turning machine specifically equipped for force measurements, accompanied by wear determination. Furthermore, equivalent experiments have been carried out on an industrial turning unit. Industrial validation criteria have been applied to assess the comparative performance of the coatings. The choice of the material and the machined parts is driven by an interest in automotive applications. The industrial tests show the need to further optimise the multi-scale modelling approach in order to reduce the lead time of the coating development as well as to improve simulation reliability.

  16. Detection of reverse transcriptase termination sites using cDNA ligation and massive parallel sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielpinski, Lukasz J; Boyd, Mette; Sandelin, Albin

    2013-01-01

    Detection of reverse transcriptase termination sites is important in many different applications, such as structural probing of RNAs, rapid amplification of cDNA 5' ends (5' RACE), cap analysis of gene expression, and detection of RNA modifications and protein-RNA cross-links. The throughput...... of these methods can be increased by applying massive parallel sequencing technologies.Here, we describe a versatile method for detection of reverse transcriptase termination sites based on ligation of an adapter to the 3' end of cDNA with bacteriophage TS2126 RNA ligase (CircLigase™). In the following PCR...

  17. Novel Insights into Structure-Activity Relationships of N-Terminally Modified PACE4 Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowska, Anna; Couture, Frédéric; Levesque, Christine; Ly, Kévin; Beauchemin, Sophie; Desjardins, Roxane; Neugebauer, Witold; Dory, Yves L; Day, Robert

    2016-02-04

    PACE4 plays important roles in prostate cancer cell proliferation. The inhibition of this enzyme has been shown to slow prostate cancer progression and is emerging as a promising therapeutic strategy. In previous work, we developed a highly potent and selective PACE4 inhibitor, the multi-Leu (ML) peptide, an octapeptide with the sequence Ac-LLLLRVKR-NH2 . Here, with the objective of developing a useful compound for in vivo administration, we investigate the effect of N-terminal modifications. The inhibitory activity, toxicity, stability, and cell penetration properties of the resulting analogues were studied and compared to the unmodified inhibitor. Our results show that the incorporation of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety leads to a loss of antiproliferative activity, whereas the attachment of a lipid chain preserves or improves it. However, the lipidated peptides are significantly more toxic when compared with their unmodified counterparts. Therefore, the best results were achieved not by the N-terminal extension but by the protection of both ends with the d-Leu residue and 4-amidinobenzylamide, which yielded the most stable inhibitor, with an excellent activity and toxicity profile. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Coupling of terminal alkynes and isonitriles by organo-actinide complexes: Scope and mechanistic insights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnea, E.; Andrea, T.; Eisen, M. S.; Berthet, J.C.; Ephritikhine, M.

    2008-01-01

    The coupling reaction of terminal alkynes with several isonitriles, catalyzed by the neutral organo-actinide complexes Cp * 2 AnMe 2 (Cp * = C 5 Me 5 , An = Th, U) or the cationic complex [(Et 2 N) 3 U][BPh 4 ], yielded substituted α, β-acetylenic aldimines, in good to excellent yields. The reaction proceeded via a 1,1-insertion of the isonitrile carbon into a metal-acetylide bond, followed by a protonolysis by the acidic proton of the terminal alkyne. Additional insertion products were obtained by altering the catalyst and the reactant ratios. A plausible mechanism for the catalytic reaction is also presented, based on kinetics measurements and thermodynamic studies of the coupling reaction with Cp * 2 ThMe 2 or [(Et 2 N) 3 U][BPh 4 ] as catalysts. The reaction is first-order in catalyst and isonitrile and zero-order in alkyne. (authors)

  19. An N-terminal peptide extension results in efficient expression, but not secretion, of a synthetic horseradish peroxidase gene in transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Mihaly; Burbridge, Emma; Brock, Ian W; Heggie, Laura; Dix, Philip J; Kavanagh, Tony A

    2004-03-01

    Native horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) peroxidase, HRP (EC 1.11.1.7), isoenzyme C is synthesized with N-terminal and C-terminal peptide extensions, believed to be associated with protein targeting. This study aimed to explore the specific functions of these extensions, and to generate transgenic plants with expression patterns suitable for exploring the role of peroxidase in plant development and defence. Transgenic Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) plants expressing different versions of a synthetic horseradish peroxidase, HRP, isoenzyme C gene were constructed. The gene was engineered to include additional sequences coding for either the natural N-terminal or the C-terminal extension or both. These constructs were placed under the control of a constitutive promoter (CaMV-35S) or the tobacco RUBISCO-SSU light inducible promoter (SSU) and introduced into tobacco using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. To study the effects of the N- and C-terminal extensions, the localization of recombinant peroxidase was determined using biochemical and molecular techniques. Transgenic tobacco plants can exhibit a ten-fold increase in peroxidase activity compared with wild-type tobacco levels, and the majority of this activity is located in the symplast. The N-terminal extension is essential for the production of high levels of recombinant protein, while the C-terminal extension has little effect. Differences in levels of enzyme activity and recombinant protein are reflected in transcript levels. There is no evidence to support either preferential secretion or vacuolar targeting of recombinant peroxidase in this heterologous expression system. This leads us to question the postulated targeting roles of these peptide extensions. The N-terminal extension is essential for high level expression and appears to influence transcript stability or translational efficiency. Plants have been generated with greatly elevated cytosolic peroxidase activity, and smaller increases in apoplastic

  20. A 19-nucleotide insertion in the leader sequence of avian leukosis virus subgroup J contributes to its replication in vitro but is not related to its pathogenicity in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Ji

    Full Text Available Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J was first isolated from meat-type chickens that had developed myeloid leukosis and since 2008, ALV-J infections in chickens have become widespread in China. A comparison of the sequence of ALV-J epidemic isolates with HPRS-103, the ALV-J prototype virus, revealed several distinct features, one of which is a 19-nucleotide (nt insertion in the leader sequence. To determine the role of the 19-nt insertion in ALV-J pathogenicity, a pair of viruses were constructed and rescued. The first virus was an ALV-J Chinese isolate (designated rSD1009 containing the 19-nt insertion in its leader sequence. The second virus was a clone, in which the leader sequence had a deleted 19-nt sequence (designated rSD1009△19. Compared with rSD1009△19, rSD1009 displayed a moderate growth advantage in vitro. However, no differences were demonstrated in either viral replication or oncogenicity between the two rescued viruses in chickens. These results indicated that the 19-nt insertion contributed to ALV-J replication in vitro but was not related to its pathogenicity in vivo.

  1. Dual N- and C-terminal helices are required for endoplasmic reticulum and lipid droplet association of alcohol acetyltransferases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyun-Liang Lin

    Full Text Available In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae two alcohol acetyltransferases (AATases, Atf1 and Atf2, condense short chain alcohols with acetyl-CoA to produce volatile acetate esters. Such esters are, in large part, responsible for the distinctive flavors and aromas of fermented beverages including beer, wine, and sake. Atf1 and Atf2 localize to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and Atf1 is known to localize to lipid droplets (LDs. The mechanism and function of these localizations are unknown. Here, we investigate potential mechanisms of Atf1 and Atf2 membrane association. Segments of the N- and C-terminal domains of Atf1 (residues 24-41 and 508-525, respectively are predicted to be amphipathic helices. Truncations of these helices revealed that the terminal domains are essential for ER and LD association. Moreover, mutations of the basic or hydrophobic residues in the N-terminal helix and hydrophobic residues in the C-terminal helix disrupted ER association and subsequent sorting from the ER to LDs. Similar amphipathic helices are found at both ends of Atf2, enabling ER and LD association. As was the case with Atf1, mutations to the N- and C-terminal helices of Atf2 prevented membrane association. Sequence comparison of the AATases from Saccharomyces, non-Saccharomyces yeast (K. lactis and P. anomala and fruits species (C. melo and S. lycopersicum showed that only AATases from Saccharomyces evolved terminal amphipathic helices. Heterologous expression of these orthologs in S. cerevisiae revealed that the absence of terminal amphipathic helices eliminates LD association. Combined, the results of this study suggest a common mechanism of membrane association for AATases via dual N- and C-terminal amphipathic helices.

  2. Proposal and achievement of novel structure InN/GaN multiple quantum wells consisting of 1 ML and fractional monolayer InN wells inserted in GaN matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, A.; Che, S. B.; Yamaguchi, W.; Saito, H.; Wang, X. Q.; Ishitani, Y.; Hwang, E. S.

    2007-01-01

    The authors propose and demonstrate the fabrication of InN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) consisting of 1 ML and fractional monolayer InN well insertion in GaN matrix under In-polarity growth regime. Since the critical thickness of InN epitaxy on GaN is about 1 ML and the growth temperature for 1 ML InN insertion can be remarkably higher, the proposed MQW structure can avoid/reduce generation of misfit dislocation, resulting in higher quality MQW-structure nature in principle than former InN-based MQWs. The proposed InN/GaN MQWs are potentially applicable to room temperature operating excitonic devices working in short-wavelength visible colors

  3. A Bac Library and Paired-PCR Approach to Mapping and Completing the Genome Sequence of Sulfolobus Solfataricus P2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    She, Qunxin; Confalonieri, F.; Zivanovic, Y.

    2000-01-01

    The original strategy used in the Sulfolobus solfatnricus genome project was to sequence non overlapping, or minimally overlapping, cosmid or lambda inserts without constructing a physical map. However, after only about two thirds of the genome sequence was completed, this approach became counter......-productive because there was a high sequence bias in the cosmid and lambda libraries. Therefore, a new approach was devised for linking the sequenced regions which may be generally applicable. BAC libraries were constructed and terminal sequences of the clones were determined and used for both end mapping and PCR...

  4. Novel insertion mutation in a non-Jewish Caucasian type 1 Gaucher disease patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choy, F.Y.M.; Humphries, M.L. [Univ. of Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Ferreira, P. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)

    1997-01-20

    Gaucher disease is the most prevalent lysosomal storage disorder. It is autosomal recessive, resulting in lysosomal glucocerebrosidase deficiency. Three clinical forms of Gaucher disease have been described: type 1 (nonneuronopathic), type 2 (acute neuronopathic), and type 3 (subacute neuronopathic). We performed PCR-thermal cycle sequence analysis of glucocerebrosidase genomic DNA and identified a novel mutation in a non-Jewish type 1 Gaucher disease patient. It is a C insertion in exon 3 at cDNA nucleotide position 122 and genomic nucleotide position 1626. This mutation causes a frameshift and, subsequently, four of the five codons immediately downstream of the insertion were changed while the sixth was converted to a stop codon, resulting in premature termination of protein translation. The 122CC insertion abolishes a Cac81 restriction endonuclease cleavage site, allowing a convenient and reliable method for detection using RFLP analysis of PCR-amplified glucocerebrosidase genomic DNA. The mutation in the other Gaucher allele was found to be an A{r_arrow}G substitution at glucocerebrosidase cDNA nucleotide position 1226 that so far has only been reported among type 1 Gaucher disease patients. Since mutation 122CC causes a frameshift and early termination of protein translation, it most likely results in a meaningless transcript and subsequently no residual glucocerebrosidase enzyme activity. We speculate that mutation 122CC may result in a worse prognosis than mutations associated with partial activity. When present in the homozygous form, it could be a lethal allele similar to what has been postulated for the other known insertion mutation, 84GG. Our patient, who is a compound heterozygote 122CC/1226G, has moderately severe type 1 Gaucher disease. Her clinical response to Ceredase{reg_sign} therapy that began 31 months ago has been favorable, though incomplete. 30 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide as a cardiac biomarker in Japanese hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Minako; Doi, Shigehiro; Nakashima, Ayumu; Naito, Takayuki; Masaki, Takao

    2018-03-01

    This study examined the clinical significance of N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide level as a cardiac marker in Japanese hemodialysis patients. This was a multicenter cross-sectional study involving 1428 Japanese hemodialysis patients. Ultrasonic cardiography data at post-hemodialysis were obtained from 395 patients. We examined whether serum N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide levels were associated with cardiac parameters and assessed cut-off values and investigated factors associated with a reduced ratio of N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide levels pre- and post-hemodialysis. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that pre- and post-hemodialysis N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide levels were associated with left ventricular hypertrophy on electrocardiogram (odds ratio: 3.10; p N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide levels were also significantly associated with ejection fraction on urine chorionic gonadotrophin (ultrasonic cardiography; odds ratio: 35.83; p N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide reduction ratio during a hemodialysis session correlated with Kt/V, membrane area, membrane type, modality, body weight gain ratio, treatment time, and ultrafiltration rate with multiple linear regression ( R: 0.53; p N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide are associated with the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy in this population. The post-hemodialysis N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide level is a useful marker for systolic dysfunction.

  6. Resolution of a protein sequence ambiguity by X-ray crystallographic and mass spectrometric methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, L.J.; Lattman, E.E.; Wolkow, C.; Woods, A.; Chevrier, M.; Cotter, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    Ambiguities in amino acid sequences are a potential problem in X-ray crystallographic studies of proteins. Amino acid side chains often cannot be reliably identified from the electron density. Many protein crystal structures that are now being solved are simple variants of a known wild-type structure. Thus, cloning artifacts or other untoward events can readily lead to cases in which the proposed sequence is not correct. An example is presented showing that mass spectrometry provides an excellent tool for analyzing suspected errors. The X-ray crystal structure of an insertion mutant of Staphylococcal nuclease has been solved to 1.67 A resolution and refined to a crystallographic R value of 0.170. A single residue has been inserted in the C-terminal α helix. The inserted amino acid was believed to be an alanine residue, but the final electron density maps strongly indicated that a glycine had been inserted instead. To confirm the observations from the X-ray data, matrix-assisted laser desorption mass spectrometry was employed to verify the glycine insertion. This mass spectrometric technique has sufficient mass accuracy to detect the methyl group that distinguishes glycine from alanine and can be extended to the more common situation in which crystallographic measurements suggest a problem with the sequence, but cannot pinpoint its location or nature. (orig.)

  7. Resolution of a protein sequence ambiguity by X-ray crystallographic and mass spectrometric methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keefe, L.J.; Lattman, E.E. (Dept. of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry, Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Wolkow, C.; Woods, A.; Chevrier, M.; Cotter, R.J. (Middle Atlantic Mass Spectrometry Lab., Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1992-04-01

    Ambiguities in amino acid sequences are a potential problem in X-ray crystallographic studies of proteins. Amino acid side chains often cannot be reliably identified from the electron density. Many protein crystal structures that are now being solved are simple variants of a known wild-type structure. Thus, cloning artifacts or other untoward events can readily lead to cases in which the proposed sequence is not correct. An example is presented showing that mass spectrometry provides an excellent tool for analyzing suspected errors. The X-ray crystal structure of an insertion mutant of Staphylococcal nuclease has been solved to 1.67 A resolution and refined to a crystallographic R value of 0.170. A single residue has been inserted in the C-terminal {alpha} helix. The inserted amino acid was believed to be an alanine residue, but the final electron density maps strongly indicated that a glycine had been inserted instead. To confirm the observations from the X-ray data, matrix-assisted laser desorption mass spectrometry was employed to verify the glycine insertion. This mass spectrometric technique has sufficient mass accuracy to detect the methyl group that distinguishes glycine from alanine and can be extended to the more common situation in which crystallographic measurements suggest a problem with the sequence, but cannot pinpoint its location or nature. (orig.).

  8. Insertion sequences as variability generators in the Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and M. synoviae genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elgion Lúcio Silva Loreto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the sequenced genomes of three strains of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and one strain of M. synoviae, and have found three and two different transposable element families, respectively in each species. In M. hyopneumoniae, the Insertion Sequences of the IS4 family is represented by ISMHp1, a putatively active element. The IS3 family is represented by several degenerated sequences. A third element called tMH was found, which shows some characteristics reminiscent of retrotransposons. In M. synoviae, three different possibly active IS4 elements are present (ISMHp1-like; ISMs1 and IS1634-like elements. The IS30 family is represented by the degenerated IS1630-like element. The IS1634-like element is shown to be involved in chromosomal rearrangements and horizontal gene transfer (HGT. The ISMHp1-like element is shown to relate to the HGT of a 25-kb region from M. gallisepticum to M. synoviae. The fractions of these genomes that correspond to mobile elements varied from 1.35 to 3.13% in M. hyopneumonia strains and was 2.08% in M. synoviae. Although these species possess reduced genomes, they maintain mobile elements, perhaps as a mechanism for genetic variability production.

  9. An amino-terminal segment of hantavirus nucleocapsid protein presented on hepatitis B virus core particles induces a strong and highly cross-reactive antibody response in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geldmacher, Astrid; Skrastina, Dace; Petrovskis, Ivars; Borisova, Galina; Berriman, John A.; Roseman, Alan M.; Crowther, R. Anthony; Fischer, Jan; Musema, Shamil; Gelderblom, Hans R.; Lundkvist, Aake; Renhofa, Regina; Ose, Velta; Krueger, Detlev H.; Pumpens, Paul; Ulrich, Rainer

    2004-01-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated that hepatitis B virus (HBV) core particles tolerate the insertion of the amino-terminal 120 amino acids (aa) of the Puumala hantavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein. Here, we demonstrate that the insertion of 120 amino-terminal aa of N proteins from highly virulent Dobrava and Hantaan hantaviruses allows the formation of chimeric core particles. These particles expose the inserted foreign protein segments, at least in part, on their surface. Analysis by electron cryomicroscopy of chimeric particles harbouring the Puumala virus (PUUV) N segment revealed 90% T = 3 and 10% T = 4 shells. A map computed from T = 3 shells shows additional density splaying out from the tips of the spikes producing the effect of an extra shell of density at an outer radius compared with wild-type shells. The inserted Puumala virus N protein segment is flexibly linked to the core spikes and only partially icosahedrally ordered. Immunisation of mice of two different haplotypes (BALB/c and C57BL/6) with chimeric core particles induces a high-titered and highly cross-reactive N-specific antibody response in both mice strains

  10. Intrinsic terminators in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Tiago Ebert; Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Schrank, Irene Silveira

    2015-04-08

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, an important pathogen of swine, exhibits a low guanine and cytosine (GC) content genome. M. hyopneumoniae genome is organised in long transcriptional units and promoter sequences have been mapped upstream of all transcription units. These analysis provided insights into the gene organisation and transcription initiation at the genome scale. However, the presence of transcriptional terminator sequences in the M. hyopneumoniae genome is poorly understood. In silico analyses demonstrated the presence of putative terminators in 82% of the 33 monocistronic units (mCs) and in 74% of the 116 polycistronic units (pCs) considering different classes of terminators. The functional activity of 23 intrinsic terminators was confirmed by RT-PCR and qPCR. Analysis of all terminators found by three software algorithms, combined with experimental results, allowed us to propose a pattern of RNA hairpin formation during the termination process and to predict the location of terminators in the M. hyopneumoniae genome sequence. The stem-loop structures of intrinsic terminators of mycoplasma diverge from the pattern of terminators found in other bacteria due the low content of guanine and cytosine. In M. hyopneumoniae, transcription can end after a transcriptional unit and before its terminator sequence and can also continue past the terminator sequence with RNA polymerases gradually releasing the RNA.

  11. Powdery mildew fungal effector candidates share N-terminal Y/F/WxC-motif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmersen Jeppe

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Powdery mildew and rust fungi are widespread, serious pathogens that depend on developing haustoria in the living plant cells. Haustoria are separated from the host cytoplasm by a plant cell-derived extrahaustorial membrane. They secrete effector proteins, some of which are subsequently transferred across this membrane to the plant cell to suppress defense. Results In a cDNA library from barley epidermis containing powdery mildew haustoria, two-thirds of the sequenced ESTs were fungal and represented ~3,000 genes. Many of the most highly expressed genes encoded small proteins with N-terminal signal peptides. While these proteins are novel and poorly related, they do share a three-amino acid motif, which we named "Y/F/WxC", in the N-terminal of the mature proteins. The first amino acid of this motif is aromatic: tyrosine, phenylalanine or tryptophan, and the last is always cysteine. In total, we identified 107 such proteins, for which the ESTs represent 19% of the fungal clones in our library, suggesting fundamental roles in haustoria function. While overall sequence similarity between the powdery mildew Y/F/WxC-proteins is low, they do have a highly similar exon-intron structure, suggesting they have a common origin. Interestingly, searches of public fungal genome and EST databases revealed that haustoria-producing rust fungi also encode large numbers of novel, short proteins with signal peptides and the Y/F/WxC-motif. No significant numbers of such proteins were identified from genome and EST sequences from either fungi which do not produce haustoria or from haustoria-producing Oomycetes. Conclusion In total, we identified 107, 178 and 57 such Y/F/WxC-proteins from the barley powdery mildew, the wheat stem rust and the wheat leaf rust fungi, respectively. All together, our findings suggest the Y/F/WxC-proteins to be a new class of effectors from haustoria-producing pathogenic fungi.

  12. 48 CFR 52.249-6 - Termination (Cost-Reimbursement).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-Reimbursement). 52.249-6 Section 52.249-6 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION....249-6 Termination (Cost-Reimbursement). As prescribed in 49.503(a)(1), insert the following clause: Termination (Cost-Reimbursement) (MAY 2004) (a) The Government may terminate performance of work under this...

  13. IS30-related transposon mediated insertional inactivation of bile salt hydrolase (bsh1) gene of Lactobacillus plantarum strain Lp20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Grover, Sunita; Kaushik, Jai K; Batish, Virender Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is a flexible and versatile microorganism that inhabits a variety of niches, and its genome may express up to four bsh genes to maximize its survival in the mammalian gut. However, the ecological significance of multiple bsh genes in L. plantarum is still not clearly understood. Hence, this study demonstrated the disruption of bile salt hydrolase (bsh1) gene due to the insertion of a transposable element in L. plantarum Lp20 - a wild strain of human fecal origin. Surprisingly, L. plantarum strain Lp20 produced a ∼2.0 kb bsh1 amplicon against the normal size (∼1.0 kb) bsh1 amplicon of Bsh(+)L. plantarum Lp21. Strain Lp20 exhibited minimal Bsh activity in spite of having intact bsh2, bsh3 and bsh4 genes in its genome and hence had a Bsh(-) phenotype. Cloning and sequence characterization of Lp20 bsh1 gene predicted four individual open reading frames (ORFs) within this region. BLAST analysis of ORF1 and ORF2 revealed significant sequence similarity to the L. plantarum bsh1 gene while ORF3 and ORF4 showed high sequence homology to IS30-family transposases. Since, IS30-related transposon element was inserted within Lp20 bsh1 gene in reverse orientation (3'-5'), it introduced several stop codons and disrupted the protein reading frames of both Bsh1 and transposase. Inverted terminal repeats (GGCAGATTG) of transposon, mediated its insertion at 255-263 nt and 1301-1309 nt positions of Lp20 bsh1 gene. In conclusion, insertion of IS30 related-transposon within the bsh1 gene sequence of L. plantarum strain Lp20 demolished the integrity and functionality of Bsh1 enzyme. Additionally, this transposon DNA sequence remains active among various Lactobacillus spp. and hence harbors the potential to be explored in the development of efficient insertion mutagenesis system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Depletion of the human N-terminal acetyltransferase hNaa30 disrupts Golgi integrity and ARFRP1 localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starheim, Kristian K; Kalvik, Thomas V; Bjørkøy, Geir; Arnesen, Thomas

    2017-04-30

    The organization of the Golgi apparatus (GA) is tightly regulated. Golgi stack scattering is observed in cellular processes such as apoptosis and mitosis, and has also been associated with disruption of cellular lipid metabolism and neurodegenerative diseases. Our studies show that depletion of the human N-α-acetyltransferase 30 (hNaa30) induces fragmentation of the Golgi stack in HeLa and CAL-62 cell lines. The GA associated GTPase ADP ribosylation factor related protein 1 (ARFRP1) was previously shown to require N-terminal acetylation for membrane association and based on its N-terminal sequence, it is likely to be a substrate of hNaa30. ARFRP1 is involved in endosome-to- trans -Golgi network (TGN) traffic. We observed that ARFRP1 shifted from a predominantly cis -Golgi and TGN localization to localizing both Golgi and non-Golgi vesicular structures in hNaa30-depleted cells. However, we did not observe loss of membrane association of ARFRP1. We conclude that hNaa30 depletion induces Golgi scattering and induces aberrant ARFRP1 Golgi localization. © 2017 The Author(s).

  15. Sorting genomes by reciprocal translocations, insertions, and deletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xingqin; Li, Guojun; Li, Shuguang; Xu, Ying

    2010-01-01

    The problem of sorting by reciprocal translocations (abbreviated as SBT) arises from the field of comparative genomics, which is to find a shortest sequence of reciprocal translocations that transforms one genome Pi into another genome Gamma, with the restriction that Pi and Gamma contain the same genes. SBT has been proved to be polynomial-time solvable, and several polynomial algorithms have been developed. In this paper, we show how to extend Bergeron's SBT algorithm to include insertions and deletions, allowing to compare genomes containing different genes. In particular, if the gene set of Pi is a subset (or superset, respectively) of the gene set of Gamma, we present an approximation algorithm for transforming Pi into Gamma by reciprocal translocations and deletions (insertions, respectively), providing a sorting sequence with length at most OPT + 2, where OPT is the minimum number of translocations and deletions (insertions, respectively) needed to transform Pi into Gamma; if Pi and Gamma have different genes but not containing each other, we give a heuristic to transform Pi into Gamma by a shortest sequence of reciprocal translocations, insertions, and deletions, with bounds for the length of the sorting sequence it outputs. At a conceptual level, there is some similarity between our algorithm and the algorithm developed by El Mabrouk which is used to sort two chromosomes with different gene contents by reversals, insertions, and deletions.

  16. Using PATIMDB to create bacterial transposon insertion mutant libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbach, Jonathan M; Wei, Tao; Liberati, Nicole; Grenfell-Lee, Daniel; Villanueva, Jacinto; Wu, Gang; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2009-04-01

    PATIMDB is a software package for facilitating the generation of transposon mutant insertion libraries. The software has two main functions: process tracking and automated sequence analysis. The process tracking function specifically includes recording the status and fates of multiwell plates and samples in various stages of library construction. Automated sequence analysis refers specifically to the pipeline of sequence analysis starting with ABI files from a sequencing facility and ending with insertion location identifications. The protocols in this unit describe installation and use of PATIMDB software.

  17. The Cu(II) affinity of the N-terminus of human copper transporter CTR1: Comparison of human and mouse sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossak, Karolina; Drew, Simon C; Stefaniak, Ewelina; Płonka, Dawid; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Bal, Wojciech

    2018-05-01

    Copper Transporter 1 (CTR1) is a homotrimeric membrane protein providing the main route of copper transport into eukaryotic cells from the extracellular milieu. Its N-terminal extracellular domain, rich in His and Met residues, is considered responsible for directing copper into the transmembrane channel. Most of vertebrate CTR1 proteins contain the His residue in position three from N-terminus, creating a well-known Amino Terminal Cu(II)- and Ni(II)-Binding (ATCUN) site. CTR1 from humans, primates and many other species contains the Met-Asp-His (MDH) sequence, while some rodents including mouse have the Met-Asn-His (MNH) N-terminal sequence. CTR1 is thought to collect Cu(II) ions from blood copper transport proteins, including albumin, but previous reports indicated that the affinity of N-terminal peptide/domain of CTR1 is significantly lower than that of albumin, casting serious doubt on this aspect of CTR1 function. Using potentiometry and spectroscopic techniques we demonstrated that MDH-amide, a tripeptide model of human CTR1 N-terminus, binds Cu(II) with K of 1.3 × 10 13  M -1 at pH 7.4, ~13 times stronger than Human Serum Albumin (HSA), and MNH-amide is even stronger, K of 3.2 × 10 14  M -1 at pH 7.4. These results indicate that the N-terminus of CTR1 may serve as intermediate binding site during Cu(II) transfer from blood copper carriers to the transporter. MDH-amide, but not MNH-amide also forms a low abundance complex with non-ATCUN coordination involving the Met amine, His imidazole and Asp carboxylate. This species might assist Cu(II) relay down the peptide chain or its reduction to Cu(I), both steps necessary for the CTR1 function. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cloning and sequence analysis of cDNA coding for rat nucleolar protein C23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghaffari, S.H.; Olson, M.O.J.

    1986-01-01

    Using synthetic oligonucleotides as primers and probes, the authors have isolated and sequenced cDNA clones encoding protein C23, a putative nucleolus organizer protein. Poly(A + ) RNA was isolated from rat Novikoff hepatoma cells and enriched in C23 mRNA by sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation. Two deoxyoligonuleotides, a 48- and a 27-mer, were synthesized on the basis of amino acid sequence from the C-terminal half of protein C23 and cDNA sequence data from CHO cell protein. The 48-mer was used a primer for synthesis of cDNA which was then inserted into plasmid pUC9. Transformed bacterial colonies were screened by hybridization with 32 P labeled 27-mer. Two clones among 5000 gave a strong positive signal. Plasmid DNAs from these clones were purified and characterized by blotting and nucleotide sequence analysis. The length of C23 mRNA was estimated to be 3200 bases in a northern blot analysis. The sequence of a 267 b.p. insert shows high homology with the CHO cDNA with only 9 nucleotide differences and an identical amino acid sequence. These studies indicate that this region of the protein is highly conserved

  19. Blocking an N-terminal acetylation–dependent protein interaction inhibits an E3 ligase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Daniel C.; Hammill, Jared T.; Min, Jaeki; Rhee, David Y.; Connelly, Michele; Sviderskiy, Vladislav O.; Bhasin, Deepak; Chen, Yizhe; Ong, Su-Sien; Chai, Sergio C.; Goktug, Asli N.; Huang, Guochang; Monda, Julie K.; Low, Jonathan; Kim, Ho Shin; Paulo, Joao A.; Cannon, Joe R.; Shelat, Anang A.; Chen, Taosheng; Kelsall, Ian R.; Alpi, Arno F.; Pagala, Vishwajeeth; Wang, Xusheng; Peng, Junmin; Singh , Bhuvanesh; Harper, J. Wade; Schulman, Brenda A.; Guy, R. Kip (MSKCC); (Dundee); (SJCH); (Harvard-Med); (MXPL)

    2017-06-05

    N-terminal acetylation is an abundant modification influencing protein functions. Because ~80% of mammalian cytosolic proteins are N-terminally acetylated, this modification is potentially an untapped target for chemical control of their functions. Structural studies have revealed that, like lysine acetylation, N-terminal acetylation converts a positively charged amine into a hydrophobic handle that mediates protein interactions; hence, this modification may be a druggable target. We report the development of chemical probes targeting the N-terminal acetylation–dependent interaction between an E2 conjugating enzyme (UBE2M or UBC12) and DCN1 (DCUN1D1), a subunit of a multiprotein E3 ligase for the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8. The inhibitors are highly selective with respect to other protein acetyl-amide–binding sites, inhibit NEDD8 ligation in vitro and in cells, and suppress anchorage-independent growth of a cell line with DCN1 amplification. Overall, our data demonstrate that N-terminal acetyl-dependent protein interactions are druggable targets and provide insights into targeting multiprotein E2–E3 ligases.

  20. Enhanced production of recombinant proteins with Corynebacterium glutamicum by deletion of insertion sequences (IS elements).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Woong; Yim, Sung Sun; Kim, Min Jeong; Jeong, Ki Jun

    2015-12-29

    In most bacteria, various jumping genetic elements including insertion sequences elements (IS elements) cause a variety of genetic rearrangements resulting in harmful effects such as genome and recombinant plasmid instability. The genetic stability of a plasmid in a host is critical for high-level production of recombinant proteins, and in this regard, the development of an IS element-free strain could be a useful strategy for the enhanced production of recombinant proteins. Corynebacterium glutamicum, which is a workhorse in the industrial-scale production of various biomolecules including recombinant proteins, also has several IS elements, and it is necessary to identify the critical IS elements and to develop IS element deleted strain. From the cultivation of C. glutamicum harboring a plasmid for green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene expression, non-fluorescent clones were isolated by FACS (fluorescent activated cell sorting). All the isolated clones had insertions of IS elements in the GFP coding region, and two major IS elements (ISCg1 and ISCg2 families) were identified. By co-cultivating cells harboring either the isolated IS element-inserted plasmid or intact plasmid, it was clearly confirmed that cells harboring the IS element-inserted plasmids became dominant during the cultivation due to their growth advantage over cells containing intact plasmids, which can cause a significant reduction in recombinant protein production during cultivation. To minimize the harmful effects of IS elements on the expression of heterologous genes in C. glutamicum, two IS element free C. glutamicum strains were developed in which each major IS element was deleted, and enhanced productivity in the engineered C. glutamicum strain was successfully demonstrated with three models: GFP, poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB)] and γ-aminobutyrate (GABA). Our findings clearly indicate that the hopping of IS elements could be detrimental to the production of recombinant proteins in C

  1. The metalloid arsenite induces nuclear export of Id3 possibly via binding to the N-terminal cysteine residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurooka, Hisanori; Sugai, Manabu; Mori, Kentaro; Yokota, Yoshifumi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Sodium arsenite induces cytoplasmic accumulation of Id3. •Arsenite binds to closely spaced N-terminal cysteine residues of Id3. •N-terminal cysteines are essential for arsenite-induced nuclear export of Id3. •Nuclear export of Id3 counteracts its transcriptional repression activity. -- Abstract: Ids are versatile transcriptional repressors that regulate cell proliferation and differentiation, and appropriate subcellular localization of the Id proteins is important for their functions. We previously identified distinct functional nuclear export signals (NESs) in Id1 and Id2, but no active NES has been reported in Id3. In this study, we found that treatment with the stress-inducing metalloid arsenite led to the accumulation of GFP-tagged Id3 in the cytoplasm. Cytoplasmic accumulation was impaired by a mutation in the Id3 NES-like sequence resembling the Id1 NES, located at the end of the HLH domain. It was also blocked by co-treatment with the CRM1-specific nuclear export inhibitor leptomycin B (LMB), but not with the inhibitors for mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Importantly, we showed that the closely spaced N-terminal cysteine residues of Id3 interacted with the arsenic derivative phenylarsine oxide (PAO) and were essential for the arsenite-induced cytoplasmic accumulation, suggesting that arsenite induces the CRM1-dependent nuclear export of Id3 via binding to the N-terminal cysteines. Finally, we demonstrated that Id3 significantly repressed arsenite-stimulated transcription of the immediate-early gene Egr-1 and that this repression activity was inversely correlated with the arsenite-induced nuclear export. Our results imply that Id3 may be involved in the biological action of arsenite

  2. N-terminal peptides from unprocessed prion proteins enter cells by macropinocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magzoub, Mazin; Sandgren, Staffan; Lundberg, Pontus; Oglecka, Kamila; Lilja, Johanna; Wittrup, Anders; Goeran Eriksson, L.E.; Langel, Ulo; Belting, Mattias; Graeslund, Astrid

    2006-01-01

    A peptide derived from the N-terminus of the unprocessed bovine prion protein (bPrPp), incorporating the hydrophobic signal sequence (residues 1-24) and a basic domain (KKRPKP, residues 25-30), internalizes into mammalian cells, even when coupled to a sizeable cargo, and therefore functions as a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP). Confocal microscopy and co-localization studies indicate that the internalization of bPrPp is mainly through macropinocytosis, a fluid-phase endocytosis process, initiated by binding to cell-surface proteoglycans. Electron microscopy studies show internalized bPrPp-DNA-gold complexes residing in endosomal vesicles. bPrPp induces expression of a complexed luciferase-encoding DNA plasmid, demonstrating the peptide's ability to transport the cargo across the endosomal membrane and into the cytosol and nucleus. The novel CPP activity of the unprocessed N-terminal domain of PrP could be important for the retrotranslocation of partly processed PrP and for PrP trafficking inside or between cells, with implications for the infectivity associated with prion diseases

  3. C-terminal sequences of hsp70 and hsp90 as non-specific anchors for tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Andrew J; Russell, Lance C; Chinkers, Michael

    2009-10-12

    Steroid-hormone-receptor maturation is a multi-step process that involves several TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) proteins that bind to the maturation complex via the C-termini of hsp70 (heat-shock protein 70) and hsp90 (heat-shock protein 90). We produced a random T7 peptide library to investigate the roles played by the C-termini of the two heat-shock proteins in the TPR-hsp interactions. Surprisingly, phages with the MEEVD sequence, found at the C-terminus of hsp90, were not recovered from our biopanning experiments. However, two groups of phages were isolated that bound relatively tightly to HsPP5 (Homo sapiens protein phosphatase 5) TPR. Multiple copies of phages with a C-terminal sequence of LFG were isolated. These phages bound specifically to the TPR domain of HsPP5, although mutation studies produced no evidence that they bound to the domain's hsp90-binding groove. However, the most abundant family obtained in the initial screen had an aspartate residue at the C-terminus. Two members of this family with a C-terminal sequence of VD appeared to bind with approximately the same affinity as the hsp90 C-12 control. A second generation pseudo-random phage library produced a large number of phages with an LD C-terminus. These sequences acted as hsp70 analogues and had relatively low affinities for hsp90-specific TPR domains. Unfortunately, we failed to identify residues near hsp90's C-terminus that impart binding specificity to individual hsp90-TPR interactions. The results suggest that the C-terminal sequences of hsp70 and hsp90 act primarily as non-specific anchors for TPR proteins.

  4. Electronic structures of the F-terminated AlN nanoribbons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using the first-principles calculations, electronic properties for the F-terminated AlN nanoribbons with both zigzag and armchair edges are studied. The results show that both the zigzag and armchair AlN nanoribbons are semiconducting and nonmagnetic, and the indirect band gap of the zigzag AlN nanoribbons and the ...

  5. The Herpes Simplex Virus Protein pUL31 Escorts Nucleocapsids to Sites of Nuclear Egress, a Process Coordinated by Its N-Terminal Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Funk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Progeny capsids of herpesviruses leave the nucleus by budding through the nuclear envelope. Two viral proteins, the membrane protein pUL34 and the nucleo-phosphoprotein pUL31 form the nuclear egress complex that is required for capsid egress out of the nucleus. All pUL31 orthologs are composed of a diverse N-terminal domain with 1 to 3 basic patches and a conserved C-terminal domain. To decipher the functions of the N-terminal domain, we have generated several Herpes simplex virus mutants and show here that the N-terminal domain of pUL31 is essential with basic patches being critical for viral propagation. pUL31 and pUL34 entered the nucleus independently of each other via separate routes and the N-terminal domain of pUL31 was required to prevent their premature interaction in the cytoplasm. Unexpectedly, a classical bipartite nuclear localization signal embedded in this domain was not required for nuclear import of pUL31. In the nucleus, pUL31 associated with the nuclear envelope and newly formed capsids. Viral mutants lacking the N-terminal domain or with its basic patches neutralized still associated with nucleocapsids but were unable to translocate them to the nuclear envelope. Replacing the authentic basic patches with a novel artificial one resulted in HSV1(17+Lox-UL31-hbpmp1mp2, that was viable but delayed in nuclear egress and compromised in viral production. Thus, while the C-terminal domain of pUL31 is sufficient for the interaction with nucleocapsids, the N-terminal domain was essential for capsid translocation to sites of nuclear egress and a coordinated interaction with pUL34. Our data indicate an orchestrated sequence of events with pUL31 binding to nucleocapsids and escorting them to the inner nuclear envelope. We propose a common mechanism for herpesviral nuclear egress: pUL31 is required for intranuclear translocation of nucleocapsids and subsequent interaction with pUL34 thereby coupling capsid maturation with primary

  6. A Comparative study of early postpartum IUCD insertion to interval IUCD insertion at Tertiary Care Centre

    OpenAIRE

    Roopal, Dr.; Bisht, Vandana

    2018-01-01

    Background: A Comparative study of early postpartum IUCD insertion to interval IUCD insertion at Tertiary Care Centre.Methods: This prospective study was conducted among 100 women at tertiary care centre, Haldwani, Nainital. Patients were divided in to two groups. Group A (n=50)-post placental insertion within 10 minutes of delivery of placenta. Group B (n=50)-Interval insertion after 6 weeks of delivery. Both groups were compared in terms of pain abdomen, bleeding, missing thread, expulsion,...

  7. Features of the Env leader protein and the N-terminal Gag domain of feline foamy virus important for virus morphogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geiselhart, Verena; Schwantes, Astrid; Bastone, Patrizia; Frech, Matthias; Loechelt, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that foamy virus (FV) particle budding, especially the involvement of the viral Env glycoprotein, is different from that of other (ortho) retroviruses: the N-terminal Env leader protein Elp is a constituent of released FV particles. A defined sequence in Elp required for particle budding binds to the MA domain of Gag. To extend these findings, we show that feline FV Elp is a membrane-anchored protein with the N-terminus located inside the particle. Thus, the internal/cytoplasmic domain of Elp has the correct topology for interacting with Gag during budding. In addition to Elp, an Elp-related protein of about 9 kDa was shown to be virion associated and is probably generated by cellular signal peptidases. Besides the function of Elp binding, the N-terminal domain of Gag was shown to be required for proper localization of feline FV Gag to the cytoplasm and the perinuclear/nuclear region

  8. Impact of Insertion Sequences and Recombination on the Population Structure of Staphylococcus haemolyticus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ons Bouchami

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus haemolyticus is one of the most common pathogens associated with medical-device related infections, but its molecular epidemiology is poorly explored. In the current study, we aimed to better understand the genetic mechanisms contributing to S. haemolyticus diversity in the hospital environment and their impact on the population structure and clinical relevant phenotypic traits. The analysis of a representative S. haemolyticus collection by multilocus sequence typing (MLST has identified a single highly prevalent and diverse genetic lineage of nosocomial S. haemolyticus clonal complex (CC 29 accounting for 91% of the collection of isolates disseminated worldwide. The examination of the sequence changes at MLST loci during clonal diversification showed that recombination had a higher impact than mutation in shaping the S. haemolyticus population. Also, we ascertained that another mechanism contributing significantly to clonal diversification and adaptation was mediated by insertion sequence (IS elements. We found that all nosocomial S. haemolyticus, belonging to different STs, were rich in IS1272 copies, as determined by Southern hybridization of macrorestriction patterns. In particular, we observed that the chromosome of a S. haemolyticus strain within CC29 was highly unstable during serial growth in vitro which paralleled with IS1272 transposition events and changes in clinically relevant phenotypic traits namely, mannitol fermentation, susceptibility to beta-lactams, biofilm formation and hemolysis. Our results suggest that recombination and IS transposition might be a strategy of adaptation, evolution and pathogenicity of the major S. haemolyticus prevalent lineage in the hospital environment.

  9. Diversity of the marine picocyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus assessed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms of 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer sequences Diversidad de las picocianobacterias marinas Prochlorococcus y Synechococcus por medio de polimorfismos de longitud de fragmentos de restricción terminal en secuencias del espaciador transcrito interno del ARNr 16S - 23S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PARIS LAVIN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the appropriateness of the use of internal transcribed spacer (ITS sequences for the study of population genetics of marine cyanobacteria, we amplified and cloned the 16S rRNA gene plus the 16S-23S ITS regions of six strains of Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus. We analyzed them by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms (T-RFLP. When using the standard application of these techniques, we obtained more than one band or terminal restriction fragment (T-RF per strain or cloned sequence. Reports in literature have suggested that these anomalies can result from the formation of secondary structures. Secondary structures of the ITS sequences of Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus strains were computationally modelled at the different temperatures that were used during the polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Modelling results predicted the existence of hairpin loops that would still be present at the extensión temperature; it is likely that these loops produced incomplete and single stranded PCR products. We modified the standard T-RFLP procedure by adding the labelled ITS primer in the last two cycles of the PCR reaction; this resulted, in most cases, in only one T-RF per ribotype. Application of this technique to a natural picoplankton community in marine waters off northern Chile, showed that it was possible to identify the presence, and determine the relative abundance, of several phylogenetic lineages within the genera Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus inhabiting the euphotic zone. Phylogenetic analysis of ITS sequences obtained by cloning and sequencing DNA from the same sample confirmed the presence of the different genotypes. With the proposed modification, T-RFLP profiles should therefore be suitable for studying the diversity of natural populations of cyanobacteria, and should become an important tool to study the factors influencing the genetic structure and

  10. P22 Arc repressor: enhanced expression of unstable mutants by addition of polar C-terminal sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Milla, M. E.; Brown, B. M.; Sauer, R. T.

    1993-01-01

    Many mutant variants of the P22 Arc repressor are subject to intracellular proteolysis in Escherichia coli, which precludes their expression at levels sufficient for purification and subsequent biochemical characterization. Here we examine the effects of several different C-terminal extension sequences on the expression and activity of a set of Arc mutants. We show that two tail sequences, KNQHE (st5) and H6KNQHE (st11), increase the expression levels of most mutants from 10- to 20-fold and, ...

  11. N-terminal modifications of cellular proteins: The enzymes involved, their substrate specificities and biological effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varland, Sylvia; Osberg, Camilla; Arnesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of eukaryotic proteins are N-terminally modified by one or more processing enzymes. Enzymes acting on the very first amino acid of a polypeptide include different peptidases, transferases, and ligases. Methionine aminopeptidases excise the initiator methionine leaving the nascent polypeptide with a newly exposed amino acid that may be further modified. N-terminal acetyl-, methyl-, myristoyl-, and palmitoyltransferases may attach an acetyl, methyl, myristoyl, or palmitoyl group, respectively, to the α-amino group of the target protein N-terminus. With the action of ubiquitin ligases, one or several ubiquitin molecules are transferred, and hence, constitute the N-terminal modification. Modifications at protein N-termini represent an important contribution to proteomic diversity and complexity, and are essential for protein regulation and cellular signaling. Consequently, dysregulation of the N-terminal modifying enzymes is implicated in human diseases. We here review the different protein N-terminal modifications occurring co- or post-translationally with emphasis on the responsible enzymes and their substrate specificities. PMID:25914051

  12. Utilization of next generation sequencing for analyzing transgenic insertions in plum

    Science.gov (United States)

    When utilizing transgenic plants, it is useful to know how many copies of the genes were inserted and the locations of these insertions in the genome. This information can provide important insights for the interpretation of transgene expression and the resulting phenotype. Traditionally, these qu...

  13. Intrafamiliar clinical variability of circumferential skin creases Kunze type caused by a novel heterozygous mutation of N-terminal TUBB gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentici, M L; Terracciano, A; Bellacchio, E; Capolino, R; Novelli, A; Digilio, M C; Dallapiccola, B

    2018-02-10

    Circumferential skin creases Kunze type (CSC-KT; OMIM 156610, 616734) is a rare disorder characterized by folding of excess skin, which leads to ringed creases, known as Michelin Tire Baby Syndrome (MTBS). CSC-KT patients also exhibit facial dysmorphism, growth retardation, intellectual disability (ID) and multiple congenital malformations. Recently, 2 heterozygous mutations in TUBB gene and 4 mutations (both homozygous and heterozygous) in MAPRE2 gene were identified in 3 and 4 CSC-KT patients, respectively. In the 3 TUBB gene-related CSC-KT patients, all mutations fall in the N-terminal gene domain and were de novo. Mutations in the C-terminal of TUBB gene have been associated to microcephaly and structural brain malformation, in the absence of CSC-KT features. We report a 9-year-old boy with a diagnosis of CSC-KT based on MTBS, facial dysmorphism, microcephaly, severe ID, cortical atrophy and corpus callosum hypoplasia. Sanger sequencing identified a novel heterozygous c.218T>C (p.Met73Thr) mutation in the N-terminal of TUBB gene, that was inherited from the mother affected by isolated MTBS. This is the first report of inherited TUBB gene-related CSC-KT resulting from a novel heterozygous mutation in the N-terminal domain. Present data support the role of TUBB mutations in CSC-KT and definitely includes CSC-KT syndrome within the tubulinopathies. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. A Convenient Approach to Synthesizing Peptide C-Terminal N-Alkyl Amides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wei-Jie; Yakovleva, Tatyana; Aldrich, Jane V.

    2014-01-01

    Peptide C-terminal N-alkyl amides have gained more attention over the past decade due to their biological properties, including improved pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles. However, the synthesis of this type of peptide on solid phase by current available methods can be challenging. Here we report a convenient method to synthesize peptide C-terminal N-alkyl amides using the well-known Fukuyama N-alkylation reaction on a standard resin commonly used for the synthesis of peptide C-terminal primary amides, the PAL-PEG-PS (Peptide Amide Linker-polyethylene glycol-polystyrene) resin. The alkylation and oNBS deprotection were conducted under basic conditions and were therefore compatible with this acid labile resin. The alkylation reaction was very efficient on this resin with a number of different alkyl iodides or bromides, and the synthesis of model enkephalin N-alkyl amide analogs using this method gave consistently high yields and purities, demonstrating the applicability of this methodology. The synthesis of N-alkyl amides was more difficult on a Rink amide resin, especially the coupling of the first amino acid to the N-alkyl amine, resulting in lower yields for loading the first amino acid onto the resin. This method can be widely applied in the synthesis of peptide N-alkyl amides. PMID:22252422

  15. Localization of the N-terminal domain of cauliflower mosaic virus coat protein precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champagne, Julie; Benhamou, Nicole; Leclerc, Denis

    2004-01-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) open reading frame (ORF) IV encodes a coat protein precursor (pre-CP) harboring an N-terminal extension that is cleaved off by the CaMV-encoded protease. In transfected cells, pre-CP is present in the cytoplasm, while the processed form (p44) of CP is targeted to the nucleus, suggesting that the N-terminal extension might be involved in keeping the pre-CP in the cytoplasm for viral assembly. This study reports for the first time the intracellular localization of the N-terminal extension during CaMV infection in Brassica rapa. Immunogold-labeling electron microscopy using polyclonal antibodies directed to the N-terminal extension of the pre-CP revealed that this region is closely associated with viral particles present in small aggregates, which we called small bodies, adjacent to the main inclusion bodies typical of CaMV infection. Based on these results, we propose a model for viral assembly of CaMV

  16. Motif decomposition of the phosphotyrosine proteome reveals a new N-terminal binding motif for SHIP2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Martin Lee; Hanke, S.; Hinsby, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    set of 481 unique phosphotyrosine (Tyr(P)) peptides by sequence similarity to known ligands of the Src homology 2 (SH2) and the phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains. From 20 clusters we extracted 16 known and four new interaction motifs. Using quantitative mass spectrometry we pulled down Tyr......(P)-specific binding partners for peptides corresponding to the extracted motifs. We confirmed numerous previously known interaction motifs and found 15 new interactions mediated by phosphosites not previously known to bind SH2 or PTB. Remarkably, a novel hydrophobic N-terminal motif ((L/V/I)(L/V/I)pY) was identified...

  17. The N-terminal domain determines the affinity and specificity of H1 binding to chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Öberg, Christine; Belikov, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► wt Human histone H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of N-terminal domain, ΔN-hH1.4, were compared. ► Both histones bind to chromatin, however, ΔN-hH1.4 displays lower binding affinity. ► Interaction of ΔN-hH1.4 with chromatin includes a significant unspecific component. ► N-terminal domain is a determinant of specificity of histone H1 binding to chromatin. -- Abstract: Linker histone H1, one of the most abundant nuclear proteins in multicellular eukaryotes, is a key component of the chromatin structure mainly due to its role in the formation and maintenance of the 30 nm chromatin fiber. It has a three-domain structure; a central globular domain flanked by a short N-terminal domain and a long, highly basic C-terminal domain. Previous studies have shown that the binding abilities of H1 are at large determined by the properties of the C-terminal domain; much less attention has been paid to role of the N-terminal domain. We have previously shown that H1 can be reconstituted via cytoplasmic mRNA injection in Xenopus oocytes, cells that lack somatic H1. The heterologously expressed H1 proteins are incorporated into in vivo assembled chromatin at specific sites and the binding event is monitored as an increase in nucleosomal repeat length (NRL). Using this setup we have here compared the binding properties of wt-H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of its N-terminal domain (ΔN-hH1.4). The ΔN-hH1.4 displays a drastically lower affinity for chromatin binding as compared to the wild type hH1.4. Our data also indicates that ΔN-hH1.4 is more prone to unspecific chromatin binding than the wild type. We conclude that the N-terminal domain of H1 is an important determinant of affinity and specificity of H1-chromatin interactions.

  18. Evidence for Amino Acid Snorkeling from a High-Resolution, In Vivo Analysis of Fis1 Tail-Anchor Insertion at the Mitochondrial Outer Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Abdurrahman; Akdoğan, Emel; Dunn, Cory D

    2017-02-01

    Proteins localized to mitochondria by a carboxyl-terminal tail anchor (TA) play roles in apoptosis, mitochondrial dynamics, and mitochondrial protein import. To reveal characteristics of TAs that may be important for mitochondrial targeting, we focused our attention upon the TA of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fis1 protein. Specifically, we generated a library of Fis1p TA variants fused to the Gal4 transcription factor, then, using next-generation sequencing, revealed which Fis1p TA mutations inhibited membrane insertion and allowed Gal4p activity in the nucleus. Prompted by our global analysis, we subsequently analyzed the ability of individual Fis1p TA mutants to localize to mitochondria. Our findings suggest that the membrane-associated domain of the Fis1p TA may be bipartite in nature, and we encountered evidence that the positively charged patch at the carboxyl terminus of Fis1p is required for both membrane insertion and organelle specificity. Furthermore, lengthening or shortening of the Fis1p TA by up to three amino acids did not inhibit mitochondrial targeting, arguing against a model in which TA length directs insertion of TAs to distinct organelles. Most importantly, positively charged residues were more acceptable at several positions within the membrane-associated domain of the Fis1p TA than negatively charged residues. These findings, emerging from the first high-resolution analysis of an organelle targeting sequence by deep mutational scanning, provide strong, in vivo evidence that lysine and arginine can "snorkel," or become stably incorporated within a lipid bilayer by placing terminal charges of their side chains at the membrane interface. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  19. Assessment of Insert Sizes and Adapter Content in Fastq Data from NexteraXT Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Susan Turner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Illumina NexteraXT transposon protocol is a cost effective way to generate paired end libraries. However the resulting insert size is highly sensitive to the concentration of DNA used, and the variation of insert sizes is often large. One consequence of this is some fragments may have an insert shorter than the length of a single read, particularly where the library is designed to produce overlapping paired end reads in order to produce longer continuous sequences. Such small insert sizes mean fewer longer reads, and also result in the presence of adapter at the end of the read. Here is presented a protocol to use publicly available tools to identify read pairs with small insert sizes and so likely to contain adapter, to check the sequence of the adapter, and remove adapter sequence from the reads. This protocol does not require a reference genome or prior knowledge of the sequence to be trimmed. Whilst the presence of fragments with small insert sizes may be a particular problem for NexteraXT libraries, the principle can be applied to any Illumina dataset in which the presence of such small inserts is suspected.

  20. Multi-species sequence comparison reveals dynamic evolution of the elastin gene that has involved purifying selection and lineage-specific insertions/deletions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green Eric D

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The elastin gene (ELN is implicated as a factor in both supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS and Williams Beuren Syndrome (WBS, two diseases involving pronounced complications in mental or physical development. Although the complete spectrum of functional roles of the processed gene product remains to be established, these roles are inferred to be analogous in human and mouse. This view is supported by genomic sequence comparison, in which there are no large-scale differences in the ~1.8 Mb sequence block encompassing the common region deleted in WBS, with the exception of an overall reversed physical orientation between human and mouse. Results Conserved synteny around ELN does not translate to a high level of conservation in the gene itself. In fact, ELN orthologs in mammals show more sequence divergence than expected for a gene with a critical role in development. The pattern of divergence is non-conventional due to an unusually high ratio of gaps to substitutions. Specifically, multi-sequence alignments of eight mammalian sequences reveal numerous non-aligning regions caused by species-specific insertions and deletions, in spite of the fact that the vast majority of aligning sites appear to be conserved and undergoing purifying selection. Conclusions The pattern of lineage-specific, in-frame insertions/deletions in the coding exons of ELN orthologous genes is unusual and has led to unique features of the gene in each lineage. These differences may indicate that the gene has a slightly different functional mechanism in mammalian lineages, or that the corresponding regions are functionally inert. Identified regions that undergo purifying selection reflect a functional importance associated with evolutionary pressure to retain those features.

  1. The influence of the N-terminal region of antimicrobial peptide pleurocidin on fungal apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyemin; Lee, Dong Gun

    2013-10-28

    In our previous study, the 25-mer antimicrobial peptide pleurocidin (Ple) had been thought to induce apoptosis in Candida albicans. This study demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was a major cause of Ple-induced apoptosis. Four truncated analogs were synthesized to understand the functional roles in the N- and C-terminal regions of Ple on the apoptosis. Ple, Ple (4-25), Ple (1-22), and Ple (1-19) produced ROS, including hydroxyl radicals, on the order of [Ple > Ple (1-22) > Ple (4-25) > Ple (1-19)], whereas Ple (7-25) did not induce any ROS production. The results suggested that the N-terminal deletion affected the ROS-inducing activities much more than that of the C-terminal deletion, and net hydrophobicity [Ple > Ple (1-22) > Ple (4-25) > Ple (1-19) > Ple (7-25)] was related to ROS generation rather than other primary factors like net charge. Hence, we focused on the N-terminal-truncated peptides, Ple (4-25) and Ple (7-25), and examined other apoptotic features, including mitochondrial membrane depolarization, caspase activation, phosphatidylserine externalization, and DNA and nuclear fragmentation. The results also confirmed the disappearance of apoptotic activity of Ple (7-25) by the truncation of the N-terminal region (1-6) and the specific activity patterns between Ple and analogs. In conclusion, the N-terminal region of Ple played an important role in apoptosis.

  2. Tor forms a dimer through an N-terminal helical solenoid with a complex topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baretić, Domagoj; Berndt, Alex; Ohashi, Yohei; Johnson, Christopher M.; Williams, Roger L.

    2016-04-01

    The target of rapamycin (Tor) is a Ser/Thr protein kinase that regulates a range of anabolic and catabolic processes. Tor is present in two complexes, TORC1 and TORC2, in which the Tor-Lst8 heterodimer forms a common sub-complex. We have determined the cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structure of Tor bound to Lst8. Two Tor-Lst8 heterodimers assemble further into a dyad-symmetry dimer mediated by Tor-Tor interactions. The first 1,300 residues of Tor form a HEAT repeat-containing α-solenoid with four distinct segments: a highly curved 800-residue N-terminal 'spiral', followed by a 400-residue low-curvature 'bridge' and an extended `railing' running along the bridge leading to the 'cap' that links to FAT region. This complex topology was verified by domain insertions and offers a new interpretation of the mTORC1 structure. The spiral of one TOR interacts with the bridge of another, which together form a joint platform for the Regulatory Associated Protein of TOR (RAPTOR) regulatory subunit.

  3. Mammalian prions: tolerance to sequence changes-how far?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamat, Muhammad Khalid; Munoz-Montesino, Carola; Moudjou, Mohammed; Rezaei, Human; Laude, Hubert; Béringue, Vincent; Dron, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Upon prion infection, abnormal prion protein (PrP (Sc) ) self-perpetuate by conformational conversion of α-helix-rich PrP (C) into β sheet enriched form, leading to formation and deposition of PrP (Sc) aggregates in affected brains. However the process remains poorly understood at the molecular level and the regions of PrP critical for conversion are still debated. Minimal amino acid substitutions can impair prion replication at many places in PrP. Conversely, we recently showed that bona fide prions could be generated after introduction of eight and up to 16 additional amino acids in the H2-H3 inter-helix loop of PrP. Prion replication also accommodated the insertions of an octapeptide at different places in the last turns of H2. This reverse genetic approach reveals an unexpected tolerance of prions to substantial sequence changes in the protease-resistant part which is associated with infectivity. It also demonstrates that conversion does not require the presence of a specific sequence in the middle of the H2-H3 area. We discuss the implications of our findings according to different structural models proposed for PrP (Sc) and questioned the postulated existence of an N- or C-terminal prion domain in the protease-resistant region.

  4. A LINE-1 Insertion in DLX6 Is Responsible for Cleft Palate and Mandibular Abnormalities in a Canine Model of Pierre Robin Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Zena T.; Leslie, Elizabeth J.; Arzi, Boaz; Jayashankar, Kartika; Karmi, Nili; Jia, Zhonglin; Rowland, Douglas J.; Young, Amy; Safra, Noa; Sliskovic, Saundra; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Wade, Claire M.; Bannasch, Danika L.

    2014-01-01

    Cleft palate (CP) is one of the most commonly occurring craniofacial birth defects in humans. In order to study cleft palate in a naturally occurring model system, we utilized the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever (NSDTR) dog breed. Micro-computed tomography analysis of CP NSDTR craniofacial structures revealed that these dogs exhibit defects similar to those observed in a recognizable subgroup of humans with CP: Pierre Robin Sequence (PRS). We refer to this phenotype in NSDTRs as CP1. Individuals with PRS have a triad of birth defects: shortened mandible, posteriorly placed tongue, and cleft palate. A genome-wide association study in 14 CP NSDTRs and 72 unaffected NSDTRs identified a significantly associated region on canine chromosome 14 (24.2 Mb–29.3 Mb; praw = 4.64×10−15). Sequencing of two regional candidate homeobox genes in NSDTRs, distal-less homeobox 5 (DLX5) and distal-less homeobox 6 (DLX6), identified a 2.1 kb LINE-1 insertion within DLX6 in CP1 NSDTRs. The LINE-1 insertion is predicted to insert a premature stop codon within the homeodomain of DLX6. This prompted the sequencing of DLX5 and DLX6 in a human cohort with CP, where a missense mutation within the highly conserved DLX5 homeobox of a patient with PRS was identified. This suggests the involvement of DLX5 in the development of PRS. These results demonstrate the power of the canine animal model as a genetically tractable approach to understanding naturally occurring craniofacial birth defects in humans. PMID:24699068

  5. The N-terminal sequence of ribosomal protein L10 from the archaebacterium Halobacterium marismortui and its relationship to eubacterial protein L6 and other ribosomal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijk, J; van den Broek, R; Nasiulas, G; Beck, A; Reinhardt, R; Wittmann-Liebold, B

    1987-08-01

    The amino-terminal sequence of ribosomal protein L10 from Halobacterium marismortui has been determined up to residue 54, using both a liquid- and a gas-phase sequenator. The two sequences are in good agreement. The protein is clearly homologous to protein HcuL10 from the related strain Halobacterium cutirubrum. Furthermore, a weaker but distinct homology to ribosomal protein L6 from Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus can be detected. In addition to 7 identical amino acids in the first 36 residues in all four sequences a number of conservative replacements occurs, of mainly hydrophobic amino acids. In this common region the pattern of conserved amino acids suggests the presence of a beta-alpha fold as it occurs in ribosomal proteins L12 and L30. Furthermore, several potential cases of homology to other ribosomal components of the three ur-kingdoms have been found.

  6. Purification, properties, and N-terminal amino acid sequence of homogeneous Escherichia coli 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate CoA ligase, a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, J J; Dekker, E E

    1987-10-25

    Starting with 100 g (wet weight) of a mutant of Escherichia coli K-12 forced to grow on L-threonine as sole carbon source, we developed a 6-step procedure that provides 30-40 mg of homogeneous 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate CoA ligase (also called aminoacetone synthetase or synthase). This ligase, which catalyzes the cleavage/condensation reaction between 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate (the presumed product of the L-threonine dehydrogenase-catalyzed reaction) and glycine + acetyl-CoA, has an apparent molecular weight approximately equal to 85,000 and consists of two identical (or nearly identical) subunits with Mr = 42,000. Computer analysis of amino acid composition data, which gives the best fit nearest integer ratio for each residue, indicates a total of 387 amino acids/subunit with a calculated Mr = 42,093. Stepwise Edman degradation provided the N-terminal sequence of the first 21 amino acids. It is a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzyme since (a) several carbonyl reagents caused greater than 90% loss of activity, (b) dialysis against buffer containing hydroxylamine resulted in 89% loss of activity coincident with an 86% decrease in absorptivity at 428 nm, (c) incubation of the apoenzyme with 20 microM pyridoxal phosphate showed a parallel recovery (greater than 90%) of activity and 428-nm absorptivity, and (d) reduction of the holoenzyme with NaBH4 resulted in complete inactivation, disappearance of a new absorption maximum at 333 nm. Strict specificity for glycine is shown but acetyl-CoA (100%), n-propionyl-CoA (127%), or n-butyryl-CoA (16%) is utilized in the condensation reaction. Apparent Km values for acetyl-CoA, n-propionyl-CoA, and glycine are 59 microM, 80 microM, and 12 mM, respectively; the pH optimum = 7.5. Added divalent metal ions or sulfhydryl compounds inhibited catalysis of the condensation reaction.

  7. Evaluation of the Terminal Sequencing and Spacing System for Performance Based Navigation Arrivals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thipphavong, Jane; Jung, Jaewoo; Swenson, Harry N.; Martin, Lynne; Lin, Melody; Nguyen, Jimmy

    2013-01-01

    NASA has developed the Terminal Sequencing and Spacing (TSS) system, a suite of advanced arrival management technologies combining timebased scheduling and controller precision spacing tools. TSS is a ground-based controller automation tool that facilitates sequencing and merging arrivals that have both current standard ATC routes and terminal Performance-Based Navigation (PBN) routes, especially during highly congested demand periods. In collaboration with the FAA and MITRE's Center for Advanced Aviation System Development (CAASD), TSS system performance was evaluated in human-in-the-loop (HITL) simulations with currently active controllers as participants. Traffic scenarios had mixed Area Navigation (RNAV) and Required Navigation Performance (RNP) equipage, where the more advanced RNP-equipped aircraft had preferential treatment with a shorter approach option. Simulation results indicate the TSS system achieved benefits by enabling PBN, while maintaining high throughput rates-10% above baseline demand levels. Flight path predictability improved, where path deviation was reduced by 2 NM on average and variance in the downwind leg length was 75% less. Arrivals flew more fuel-efficient descents for longer, spending an average of 39 seconds less in step-down level altitude segments. Self-reported controller workload was reduced, with statistically significant differences at the p less than 0.01 level. The RNP-equipped arrivals were also able to more frequently capitalize on the benefits of being "Best-Equipped, Best- Served" (BEBS), where less vectoring was needed and nearly all RNP approaches were conducted without interruption.

  8. Proteolytic cleavage orchestrates cofactor insertion and protein assembly in [NiFe]-hydrogenase biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senger, Moritz; Stripp, Sven T; Soboh, Basem

    2017-07-14

    Metalloenzymes catalyze complex and essential processes, such as photosynthesis, respiration, and nitrogen fixation. For example, bacteria and archaea use [NiFe]-hydrogenases to catalyze the uptake and release of molecular hydrogen (H 2 ). [NiFe]-hydrogenases are redox enzymes composed of a large subunit that harbors a NiFe(CN) 2 CO metallo-center and a small subunit with three iron-sulfur clusters. The large subunit is synthesized with a C-terminal extension, cleaved off by a specific endopeptidase during maturation. The exact role of the C-terminal extension has remained elusive; however, cleavage takes place exclusively after assembly of the [NiFe]-cofactor and before large and small subunits form the catalytically active heterodimer. To unravel the functional role of the C-terminal extension, we used an enzymatic in vitro maturation assay that allows synthesizing functional [NiFe]-hydrogenase-2 of Escherichia coli from purified components. The maturation process included formation and insertion of the NiFe(CN) 2 CO cofactor into the large subunit, endoproteolytic cleavage of the C-terminal extension, and dimerization with the small subunit. Biochemical and spectroscopic analysis indicated that the C-terminal extension of the large subunit is essential for recognition by the maturation machinery. Only upon completion of cofactor insertion was removal of the C-terminal extension observed. Our results indicate that endoproteolytic cleavage is a central checkpoint in the maturation process. Here, cleavage temporally orchestrates cofactor insertion and protein assembly and ensures that only cofactor-containing protein can continue along the assembly line toward functional [NiFe]-hydrogenase. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Morpholino spin-labeling for base-pair sequencing of a 3'-terminal RNA stem by proton homonuclear Overhauser enhancements: yeast ribosomal 5S RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.M.; Marshall, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    Base-pair sequences for 5S and 5.8S RNAs are not readily extracted from proton homonuclear nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) connectivity experiments alone, due to extensive peak overlap in the downfield (11-15 ppm) proton NMR spectrum. In this paper, we introduce a new method for base-pair proton peak assignment for ribosomal RNAs, based upon the distance-dependent broadening of the resonances of base-pair protons spatially proximal to a paramagnetic group. Introduction of a nitroxide spin-label covalently attached to the 3'-terminal ribose provides an unequivocal starting point for base-pair hydrogen-bond proton NMR assignment. Subsequent NOE connectivities then establish the base-pair sequence for the terminal stem of a 5S RNA. Periodate oxidation of yeast 5S RNA, followed by reaction with 4-amino-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-1-oxy (TEMPO-NH2) and sodium borohydride reduction, produces yeast 5S RNA specifically labeled with a paramagnetic nitroxide group at the 3'-terminal ribose. Comparison of the 500-MHz 1H NMR spectra of native and 3'-terminal spin-labeled yeast 5S RNA serves to identify the terminal base pair (G1 . C120) and its adjacent base pair (G2 . U119) on the basis of their proximity to the 3'-terminal spin-label. From that starting point, we have then identified (G . C, A . U, or G . U) and sequenced eight of the nine base pairs in the terminal helix via primary and secondary NOE's

  10. The diagnostic value of plasma N-terminal connective tissue growth factor levels in children with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Song, Xueqing; Xia, Jiyi; Li, Jing; Jia, Peng; Chen, Pengyuan; Zhao, Jian; Liu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of plasma N-terminal connective tissue growth factor in children with heart failure. Methods and results Plasma N-terminal connective tissue growth factor was determined in 61 children, including 41 children with heart failure, 20 children without heart failure, and 30 healthy volunteers. The correlations between plasma N-terminal connective tissue growth factor levels and clinical parameters were investigated. Moreover, the diagnostic value of N-terminal connective tissue growth factor levels was evaluated. Compared with healthy volunteers and children without heart failure, plasma N-terminal connective tissue growth factor levels were significantly elevated in those with heart failure (p0.05), but it obviously improved the ability of diagnosing heart failure in children, as demonstrated by the integrated discrimination improvement (6.2%, p=0.013) and net re-classification improvement (13.2%, p=0.017) indices. Plasma N-terminal connective tissue growth factor is a promising diagnostic biomarker for heart failure in children.

  11. A simple, flexible and efficient PCR-fusion/Gateway cloning procedure for gene fusion, site-directed mutagenesis, short sequence insertion and domain deletions and swaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etchells J Peter

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The progress and completion of various plant genome sequencing projects has paved the way for diverse functional genomic studies that involve cloning, modification and subsequent expression of target genes. This requires flexible and efficient procedures for generating binary vectors containing: gene fusions, variants from site-directed mutagenesis, addition of protein tags together with domain swaps and deletions. Furthermore, efficient cloning procedures, ideally high throughput, are essential for pyramiding of multiple gene constructs. Results Here, we present a simple, flexible and efficient PCR-fusion/Gateway cloning procedure for construction of binary vectors for a range of gene fusions or variants with single or multiple nucleotide substitutions, short sequence insertions, domain deletions and swaps. Results from selected applications of the procedure which include ORF fusion, introduction of Cys>Ser mutations, insertion of StrepII tag sequence and domain swaps for Arabidopsis secondary cell wall AtCesA genes are demonstrated. Conclusion The PCR-fusion/Gateway cloning procedure described provides an elegant, simple and efficient solution for a wide range of diverse and complicated cloning tasks. Through streamlined cloning of sets of gene fusions and modification variants into binary vectors for systematic functional studies of gene families, our method allows for efficient utilization of the growing sequence and expression data.

  12. Matrix isolation infrared spectra of O2 and N2 insertion reactions with atomic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, R.D.; Toth, L.M.; Yustein, J.T.; Andrews, L.

    1993-01-01

    Laser ablation of refractory metals can be an effective source of vapor for matrix isolation IR studies. This combination of techniques was used for the first time to study the mechanisms of U vapor reactions with atmospheric components. U atoms and O 2 were codeposited with excess Ar at 12 K. The dominant codeposition products were UO 2 and UO 3 . In contrast, the UO yield was always small because UO 2 is formed by an insertion mechanism. This mechanism was verified in the 16 O 2 / 18 O 2 experiments which failed to produce 16 OU 18 O. The effects of UV photolysis and matrix annealings were also examined. The U atoms and O 2 reaction requires little or no activation energy since UO 2 was formed from cold reagents. New charge-transfer species, (UO 2+ 2 )(O 2- 2 ) and (UO + 2 )(O - 2 ), and a weak complex, UO 3 --O 2 , were primarily produced under conditions which favored further O 2 reactions. Similar U atom and N 2 experiments produced only linear NUN which is also produced by an insertion mechanism. This U reaction represents the first time that atom was observed breaking and inserting into the triple bond of N 2 . Photolysis dramatically increased the NUN yield by 3-fold. Matrix annealings produced weak UN 2 --N 2 and UN 2 --2N 2 complexes

  13. Matrix isolation infrared spectra of O2 and N2 insertion reactions with atomic uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Rodney D.; Toth, L. Mac; Yustein, Jason T.; Andrews, Lester

    1993-10-01

    Laser ablation of refractory metals can be an effective source of vapor for matrix isolation IR studies. This combination of techniques was used for the first time to study the mechanisms of U vapor reactions with atmospheric components. U atoms and O2 were codeposited with excess Ar at 12 K. The dominant codeposition products were UO2 and UO3. In contrast, the UO yield was always small because UO2 is formed by an insertion mechanism. This mechanism was verified in the 16O2/18O2 experiments which failed to produce 16OU18O. The effects of UV photolysis and matrix annealings were also examined. The U atoms and O2 reaction requires little or no activation energy since UO2 was formed from cold reagents. New charge-transfer species, (UO2+2)(O2-2) and (UO+2)(O-2), and a weak complex, UO3-O2, were primarily produced under conditions which favored further O2 reactions. Similar U atom and N2 experiments produced only linear NUN which is also produced by an insertion mechanism. This U reaction represents the first time that atom was observed breaking and inserting into the triple bond of N2. Photolysis dramatically increased the NUN yield by 3-fold. Matrix annealings produced weak UN2-N2 and UN2-2N2 complexes.

  14. Improvements in DC Current-Ioltage (I-V) Characteristics of n-GaN Schottky Diode using Metal Overlap Edge Termination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munir, T.; Aziz, A. A.; Abdullah, M. J.; Ain, M. F.

    2010-01-01

    Practical design of GaN Schottky diodes incorporating a field plate necessitates an understanding of how the addition of such plate affects the diode performance. In this paper, we investigated the effects on DC current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of n-GaN schottky diode by incorporating metal overlap edge termination. The thickness of the oxide film varies from 0.001 to 1 micron. Two-dimensional Atlas/Blaze simulations revealed that severe electric field crowding across the metal semiconductor contact will cause reliability concern and limit device breakdown voltage. DC current-voltage (I-V) measurements indicate that the forward currents are higher for thinner oxide film schottky diodes with metal overlap edge termination than those of unterminated schottky diodes. The forward current increased due to formation of an accumulation layer underneath the oxide layer. Extending the field plate to beyond periphery regions of schottky contact does not result in any significant increase in forward current. The new techniques of ramp oxide metal overlap edge termination have been implemented to increase the forward current of n-GaN schottky diode. In reverse bias, breakdown voltage increased with edge termination oxide up to a certain limit of oxide thickness.

  15. Human MLH1 suppresses the insertion of telomeric sequences at intra-chromosomal sites in telomerase-expressing cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Pingping; Chastain, Megan; Zou, Ying; Her, Chengtao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aberrant formation of interstitial telomeric sequences (ITSs) promotes genome instabilities. However, it is unclear how aberrant ITS formation is suppressed in human cells. Here, we report that MLH1, a key protein involved in mismatch repair (MMR), suppresses telomeric sequence insertion (TSI) at intra-chromosomal regions. The frequency of TSI can be elevated by double-strand break (DSB) inducer and abolished by ATM/ATR inhibition. Suppression of TSI requires MLH1 recruitment to DSBs, indicating that MLH1's role in DSB response/repair is important for suppressing TSI. Moreover, TSI requires telomerase activity but is independent of the functional status of p53 and Rb. Lastly, we show that TSI is associated with chromosome instabilities including chromosome loss, micronuclei formation and chromosome breakage that are further elevated by replication stress. Our studies uncover a novel link between MLH1, telomerase, telomere and genome stability. PMID:28180301

  16. N-terminally truncated POM121C inhibits HIV-1 replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Saito

    Full Text Available Recent studies have identified host cell factors that regulate early stages of HIV-1 infection including viral cDNA synthesis and orientation of the HIV-1 capsid (CA core toward the nuclear envelope, but it remains unclear how viral DNA is imported through the nuclear pore and guided to the host chromosomal DNA. Here, we demonstrate that N-terminally truncated POM121C, a component of the nuclear pore complex, blocks HIV-1 infection. This truncated protein is predominantly localized in the cytoplasm, does not bind to CA, does not affect viral cDNA synthesis, reduces the formation of 2-LTR and diminished the amount of integrated proviral DNA. Studies with an HIV-1-murine leukemia virus (MLV chimeric virus carrying the MLV-derived Gag revealed that Gag is a determinant of this inhibition. Intriguingly, mutational studies have revealed that the blockade by N-terminally-truncated POM121C is closely linked to its binding to importin-β/karyopherin subunit beta 1 (KPNB1. These results indicate that N-terminally-truncated POM121C inhibits HIV-1 infection after completion of reverse transcription and before integration, and suggest an important role for KPNB1 in HIV-1 replication.

  17. Human-specific HERV-K insertion causes genomic variations in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonseok Shin

    Full Text Available Human endogenous retroviruses (HERV sequences account for about 8% of the human genome. Through comparative genomics and literature mining, we identified a total of 29 human-specific HERV-K insertions. We characterized them focusing on their structure and flanking sequence. The results showed that four of the human-specific HERV-K insertions deleted human genomic sequences via non-classical insertion mechanisms. Interestingly, two of the human-specific HERV-K insertion loci contained two HERV-K internals and three LTR elements, a pattern which could be explained by LTR-LTR ectopic recombination or template switching. In addition, we conducted a polymorphic test and observed that twelve out of the 29 elements are polymorphic in the human population. In conclusion, human-specific HERV-K elements have inserted into human genome since the divergence of human and chimpanzee, causing human genomic changes. Thus, we believe that human-specific HERV-K activity has contributed to the genomic divergence between humans and chimpanzees, as well as within the human population.

  18. Involvement of the N-terminal part of cyclophilin B in the interaction with specific Jurkat T-cell binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariller, C; Haendler, B; Allain, F; Denys, A; Spik, G

    1996-07-15

    Cyclophilin B (CyPB) is secreted in biological fluids such as blood or milk and binds to a specific receptor present on the human lymphoblastic cell line Jurkat and on human peripheral blood lymphocytes. This study was intended to specify the areas of CyPB that are involved in the interaction with the receptor. A synthetic peptide corresponding to the first 24 N-terminal amino acid residues of CyPB was shown to specifically recognize the receptor. Moreover, modification of Arg18 of CyPB by p-hydroxyphenlglyoxal led to a dramatic loss of affinity for the receptor. However, when this residue was replaced by an alanine residue using site-directed mutagenesis, no modification of the binding properties was found, suggesting that Arg18 is not directly involved but is sufficiently close to the interaction site to interfere with the binding when modified. Competitive binding experiments using a chimaeric protein made up of the 24 N-terminal amino acid residues of CyPB fused to the cyclophilin A core sequence confirmed the involvement of this region of CyPB in receptor binding.

  19. Highly potent antimicrobial peptides from N-terminal membrane-binding region of E. coli MreB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Karabi; Sravani, Yalavarthi Durga; Ramakrishnan, Vibin; Chaudhary, Nitin

    2017-02-23

    Microbial pathogenesis is a serious health concern. The threat escalates as the existing conventional antimicrobials are losing their efficacy against the evolving pathogens. Peptides hold promise to be developed into next-generation antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides adopt amphipathic structures that could selectively bind to and disrupt the microbial membranes. Interaction of proteins with membranes is central to all living systems and we reasoned that the membrane-binding domains in microbial proteins could be developed into efficient antimicrobials. This is an interesting approach as self-like sequences could elude the microbial strategies of degrading the antimicrobial peptides, one of the mechanisms of showing resistance to antimicrobials. We selected the 9-residue-long membrane-binding region of E. coli MreB protein. The 9-residue peptide (C-terminal amide) and its N-terminal acetylated analog displayed broad-spectrum activity, killing Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and fungi. Extension with a tryptophan residue at the N-terminus drastically improved the activity of the peptides with lethal concentrations ≤10 μM against all the organisms tested. The tryptophan-extended peptides caused complete killing of C. albicans as well as gentamicin and methicillin resistant S. aureus at 5 μM concentration. Lipid-binding studies and electron microscopic analyses of the peptide-treated microbes suggest membrane disruption as the mechanism of killing.

  20. N-terminal arginines modulate plasma-membrane localization of Kv7.1/KCNE1 channel complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenawit Girmatsion

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The slow delayed rectifier current (I(Ks is important for cardiac action potential termination. The underlying channel is composed of Kv7.1 α-subunits and KCNE1 β-subunits. While most evidence suggests a role of KCNE1 transmembrane domain and C-terminus for the interaction, the N-terminal KCNE1 polymorphism 38G is associated with reduced I(Ks and atrial fibrillation (a human arrhythmia. Structure-function relationship of the KCNE1 N-terminus for I(Ks modulation is poorly understood and was subject of this study. METHODS: We studied N-terminal KCNE1 constructs disrupting structurally important positively charged amino-acids (arginines at positions 32, 33, 36 as well as KCNE1 constructs that modify position 38 including an N-terminal truncation mutation. Experimental procedures included molecular cloning, patch-clamp recording, protein biochemistry, real-time-PCR and confocal microscopy. RESULTS: All KCNE1 constructs physically interacted with Kv7.1. I(Ks resulting from co-expression of Kv7.1 with non-atrial fibrillation '38S' was greater than with any other construct. Ionic currents resulting from co-transfection of a KCNE1 mutant with arginine substitutions ('38G-3xA' were comparable to currents evoked from cells transfected with an N-terminally truncated KCNE1-construct ('Δ1-38'. Western-blots from plasma-membrane preparations and confocal images consistently showed a greater amount of Kv7.1 protein at the plasma-membrane in cells co-transfected with the non-atrial fibrillation KCNE1-38S than with any other construct. CONCLUSIONS: The results of our study indicate that N-terminal arginines in positions 32, 33, 36 of KCNE1 are important for reconstitution of I(Ks. Furthermore, our results hint towards a role of these N-terminal amino-acids in membrane representation of the delayed rectifier channel complex.

  1. Insertion profiles of 4 headless compression screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Adam; Harvey, Edward J; Lefebvre, Louis-Philippe; Barthelat, Francois; Rabiei, Reza; Martineau, Paul A

    2013-09-01

    In practice, the surgeon must rely on screw position (insertion depth) and tactile feedback from the screwdriver (insertion torque) to gauge compression. In this study, we identified the relationship between interfragmentary compression and these 2 factors. The Acutrak Standard, Acutrak Mini, Synthes 3.0, and Herbert-Whipple implants were tested using a polyurethane foam scaphoid model. A specialized testing jig simultaneously measured compression force, insertion torque, and insertion depth at half-screw-turn intervals until failure occurred. The peak compression occurs at an insertion depth of -3.1 mm, -2.8 mm, 0.9 mm, and 1.5 mm for the Acutrak Mini, Acutrak Standard, Herbert-Whipple, and Synthes screws respectively (insertion depth is positive when the screw is proud above the bone and negative when buried). The compression and insertion torque at a depth of -2 mm were found to be 113 ± 18 N and 0.348 ± 0.052 Nm for the Acutrak Standard, 104 ± 15 N and 0.175 ± 0.008 Nm for the Acutrak Mini, 78 ± 9 N and 0.245 ± 0.006 Nm for the Herbert-Whipple, and 67 ± 2N, 0.233 ± 0.010 Nm for the Synthes headless compression screws. All 4 screws generated a sizable amount of compression (> 60 N) over a wide range of insertion depths. The compression at the commonly recommended insertion depth of -2 mm was not significantly different between screws; thus, implant selection should not be based on compression profile alone. Conically shaped screws (Acutrak) generated their peak compression when they were fully buried in the foam whereas the shanked screws (Synthes and Herbert-Whipple) reached peak compression before they were fully inserted. Because insertion torque correlated poorly with compression, surgeons should avoid using tactile judgment of torque as a proxy for compression. Knowledge of the insertion profile may improve our understanding of the implants, provide a better basis for comparing screws, and enable the surgeon to optimize compression. Copyright

  2. Sequence of the amino-terminal region of rat liver ribosomal proteins S4, S6, S8, L6, L7a, L18, L27, L30, L37, L37a, and L39.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann-Liebold, B; Geissler, A W; Lin, A; Wool, I G

    1979-01-01

    The sequence of the amino-terminal region of eleven rat liver ribosomal proteins--S4, S6, S8, L6, L7a, L18, L27, L30, L37a, and L39--was determined. The analysis confirmed the homogeneity of the proteins and suggests that they are unique, since no extensive common sequences were found. The N-terminal regions of the rat liver proteins were compared with amino acid sequences in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in Escherichia coli ribosomal proteins. It seems likely that the proteins L37 from rat liver and Y55 from yeast ribosomes are homologous. It is possible that rat liver L7a or L37a or both are related to S cerevisiae Y44, although the similar sequences are at the amino-terminus of the rat liver proteins and in an internal region of Y44. A number of similarities in the sequences of rat liver and E coli ribosomal proteins have been found; however, it is not yet possible to say whether they connote a common ancestry.

  3. Amino acid sequences and structures of chicken and turkey beta 2-microglobulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welinder, K G; Jespersen, H M; Walther-Rasmussen, J

    1991-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequences of chicken and turkey beta 2-microglobulins have been determined by analyses of tryptic, V8-proteolytic and cyanogen bromide fragments, and by N-terminal sequencing. Mass spectrometric analysis of chicken beta 2-microglobulin supports the sequence-derived Mr of 11...

  4. RelocaTE2: a high resolution transposable element insertion site mapping tool for population resequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinfeng Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Transposable element (TE polymorphisms are important components of population genetic variation. The functional impacts of TEs in gene regulation and generating genetic diversity have been observed in multiple species, but the frequency and magnitude of TE variation is under appreciated. Inexpensive and deep sequencing technology has made it affordable to apply population genetic methods to whole genomes with methods that identify single nucleotide and insertion/deletion polymorphisms. However, identifying TE polymorphisms, particularly transposition events or non-reference insertion sites can be challenging due to the repetitive nature of these sequences, which hamper both the sensitivity and specificity of analysis tools. Methods We have developed the tool RelocaTE2 for identification of TE insertion sites at high sensitivity and specificity. RelocaTE2 searches for known TE sequences in whole genome sequencing reads from second generation sequencing platforms such as Illumina. These sequence reads are used as seeds to pinpoint chromosome locations where TEs have transposed. RelocaTE2 detects target site duplication (TSD of TE insertions allowing it to report TE polymorphism loci with single base pair precision. Results and Discussion The performance of RelocaTE2 is evaluated using both simulated and real sequence data. RelocaTE2 demonstrate high level of sensitivity and specificity, particularly when the sequence coverage is not shallow. In comparison to other tools tested, RelocaTE2 achieves the best balance between sensitivity and specificity. In particular, RelocaTE2 performs best in prediction of TSDs for TE insertions. Even in highly repetitive regions, such as those tested on rice chromosome 4, RelocaTE2 is able to report up to 95% of simulated TE insertions with less than 0.1% false positive rate using 10-fold genome coverage resequencing data. RelocaTE2 provides a robust solution to identify TE insertion sites and can be

  5. Three-dimensional structure of N-terminal domain of DnaB helicase and helicase-primase interactions in Helicobacter pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Kashav

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Replication initiation is a crucial step in genome duplication and homohexameric DnaB helicase plays a central role in the replication initiation process by unwinding the duplex DNA and interacting with several other proteins during the process of replication. N-terminal domain of DnaB is critical for helicase activity and for DnaG primase interactions. We present here the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD of H. pylori DnaB (HpDnaB helicase at 2.2 A resolution and compare the structural differences among helicases and correlate with the functional differences. The structural details of NTD suggest that the linker region between NTD and C-terminal helicase domain plays a vital role in accurate assembly of NTD dimers. The sequence analysis of the linker regions from several helicases reveals that they should form four helix bundles. We also report the characterization of H. pylori DnaG primase and study the helicase-primase interactions, where HpDnaG primase stimulates DNA unwinding activity of HpDnaB suggesting presence of helicase-primase cohort at the replication fork. The protein-protein interaction study of C-terminal domain of primase and different deletion constructs of helicase suggests that linker is essential for proper conformation of NTD to interact strongly with HpDnaG. The surface charge distribution on the primase binding surface of NTDs of various helicases suggests that DnaB-DnaG interaction and stability of the complex is most probably charge dependent. Structure of the linker and helicase-primase interactions indicate that HpDnaB differs greatly from E.coli DnaB despite both belong to gram negative bacteria.

  6. The N-terminal cleavage of chondromodulin-I in growth-plate cartilage at the hypertrophic and calcified zones during bone development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigenori Miura

    Full Text Available Chondromodulin-I (ChM-I is a 20-25 kDa anti-angiogenic glycoprotein in cartilage matrix. In the present study, we identified a novel 14-kDa species of ChM-I by immunoblotting, and purified it by immunoprecipitation with a newly raised monoclonal antibody against ChM-I. The N-terminal amino acid sequencing indicated that it was an N-terminal truncated form of ChM-I generated by the proteolytic cleavage at Asp37-Asp38. This 14-kDa ChM-I was shown by the modified Boyden chamber assay to have very little inhibitory activity on the VEGF-A-induced migration of vascular endothelial cells in contrast to the intact 20-25 kDa form of ChM-I (ID50 = 8 nM. Immunohistochemistry suggested that 20-25 kDa ChM-I was exclusively localized in the avascular zones, i.e. the resting, proliferating, and prehypertrophic zones, of the cartilaginous molds of developing long bone, whereas the 14-kDa form of ChM-I was found in hypertrophic and calcified zones. Immunoblotting demonstrated that mature growth-plate chondrocytes isolated from rat costal cartilage actively secrete ChM-I almost exclusively as the intact 20-25 kDa form into the medium in primary culture. Taken together, our results suggest that intact 20-25 kDa ChM-I is stored as a component of extracellular matrix in the avascular cartilage zones, but it is inactivated by a single N-terminal proteolytic cleavage in the hypertrophic zone of growth-plate cartilage.

  7. Complete genome sequence and architecture of crucian carp Carassius auratus herpesvirus (CaHV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiao-Tao; Chen, Zhong-Yuan; Deng, Yuan-Sheng; Gui, Jian-Fang; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2016-12-01

    Crucian carp Carassius auratus herpesvirus (CaHV) was isolated from diseased crucian carp with acute gill hemorrhages and high mortality. The CaHV genome was sequenced and analyzed. The data showed that it consists of 275,348 bp and contains 150 predicted ORFs. The architecture of the CaHV genome differs from those of four cyprinid herpesviruses (CyHV1, CyHV2, SY-C1, CyHV3), with insertions, deletions and the absence of a terminal direct repeat. Phylogenetic analysis of the DNA polymerase sequences of 17 strains of Herpesvirales members, and the concatenated 12 core ORFs from 10 strains of alloherpesviruses showed that CaHV clustered together with members of the genus Cyprinivirus, family Alloherpesviridae.

  8. Amino-terminal domain of the v-fms oncogene product includes a functional signal peptide that directs synthesis of a transforming glycoprotein in the absence of feline leukemia virus gag sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, E.F.; Roussel, M.F.; Hampe, A.; Walker, M.H.; Fried, V.A.; Look, A.T.; Rettenmier, C.W.; Sherr, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 5' segment of the human genomic c-fms proto-oncogene suggested that recombination between feline leukemia virus and feline c-fms sequences might have occurred in a region encoding the 5' untranslated portion of c-fms mRNA. The polyprotein precursor gP180/sup gag-fms/ encoded by the McDonough strain of feline sarcoma virus was therefore predicted to contain 34 v-fms-coded amino acids derived from sequences of the c-fms gene that are not ordinarily translated from the proto-oncogene mRNA. The (gP180/sup gag-fms/) polyprotein was cotranslationally cleaved near the gag-fms junction to remove its gag gene-coded portion. Determination of the amino-terminal sequence of the resulting v-fms-coded glycoprotein, gp120/sup v-fms/, showed that the site of proteolysis corresponded to a predicted signal peptidase cleavage site within the c-fms gene product. Together, these analyses suggested that the linked gag sequences may not be necessary for expression of a biologically active v-fms gene product. The gag-fms sequences of feline sarcoma virus strain McDonough and the v-fms sequences alone were inserted into a murine retroviral vector containing a neomycin resistance gene. The authors conclude that a cryptic hydrophobic signal peptide sequence in v-fms was unmasked by gag deletion, thereby allowing the correct orientation and transport of the v-fms was unmasked by gag deletion, thereby allowing the correct orientation and transport of the v-fms gene product within membranous organelles. It seems likely that the proteolytic cleavage of gP180/gag-fms/ is mediated by signal peptidase and that the amino termini of gp140/sup v-fms/ and the c-fms gene product are identical

  9. Amino-terminal domain of the v-fms oncogene product includes a functional signal peptide that directs synthesis of a transforming glycoprotein in the absence of feline leukemia virus gag sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, E.F.; Roussel, M.F.; Hampe, A.; Walker, M.H.; Fried, V.A.; Look, A.T.; Rettenmier, C.W.; Sherr, C.J.

    1986-08-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 5' segment of the human genomic c-fms proto-oncogene suggested that recombination between feline leukemia virus and feline c-fms sequences might have occurred in a region encoding the 5' untranslated portion of c-fms mRNA. The polyprotein precursor gP180/sup gag-fms/ encoded by the McDonough strain of feline sarcoma virus was therefore predicted to contain 34 v-fms-coded amino acids derived from sequences of the c-fms gene that are not ordinarily translated from the proto-oncogene mRNA. The (gP180/sup gag-fms/) polyprotein was cotranslationally cleaved near the gag-fms junction to remove its gag gene-coded portion. Determination of the amino-terminal sequence of the resulting v-fms-coded glycoprotein, gp120/sup v-fms/, showed that the site of proteolysis corresponded to a predicted signal peptidase cleavage site within the c-fms gene product. Together, these analyses suggested that the linked gag sequences may not be necessary for expression of a biologically active v-fms gene product. The gag-fms sequences of feline sarcoma virus strain McDonough and the v-fms sequences alone were inserted into a murine retroviral vector containing a neomycin resistance gene. The authors conclude that a cryptic hydrophobic signal peptide sequence in v-fms was unmasked by gag deletion, thereby allowing the correct orientation and transport of the v-fms was unmasked by gag deletion, thereby allowing the correct orientation and transport of the v-fms gene product within membranous organelles. It seems likely that the proteolytic cleavage of gP180/gag-fms/ is mediated by signal peptidase and that the amino termini of gp140/sup v-fms/ and the c-fms gene product are identical.

  10. Improving N-terminal protein annotation of Plasmodium species based on signal peptide prediction of orthologous proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neto Armando

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal peptide is one of the most important motifs involved in protein trafficking and it ultimately influences protein function. Considering the expected functional conservation among orthologs it was hypothesized that divergence in signal peptides within orthologous groups is mainly due to N-terminal protein sequence misannotation. Thus, discrepancies in signal peptide prediction of orthologous proteins were used to identify misannotated proteins in five Plasmodium species. Methods Signal peptide (SignalP and orthology (OrthoMCL were combined in an innovative strategy to identify orthologous groups showing discrepancies in signal peptide prediction among their protein members (Mixed groups. In a comparative analysis, multiple alignments for each of these groups and gene models were visually inspected in search of misannotated proteins and, whenever possible, alternative gene models were proposed. Thresholds for signal peptide prediction parameters were also modified to reduce their impact as a possible source of discrepancy among orthologs. Validation of new gene models was based on RT-PCR (few examples or on experimental evidence already published (ApiLoc. Results The rate of misannotated proteins was significantly higher in Mixed groups than in Positive or Negative groups, corroborating the proposed hypothesis. A total of 478 proteins were reannotated and change of signal peptide prediction from negative to positive was the most common. Reannotations triggered the conversion of almost 50% of all Mixed groups, which were further reduced by optimization of signal peptide prediction parameters. Conclusions The methodological novelty proposed here combining orthology and signal peptide prediction proved to be an effective strategy for the identification of proteins showing wrongly N-terminal annotated sequences, and it might have an important impact in the available data for genome-wide searching of potential vaccine and drug

  11. Binding of the N-Terminal Domain of the Lactococcal Bacteriophage TP901-1 CI Repressor to Its Target DNA: A Crystallography, Small Angle Scattering, and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Kristian Erik Høpfner; Rasmussen, Kim K.; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing

    2013-01-01

    In most temperate bacteriophages, regulation of the choice of lysogenic or lytic life cycle is controlled by a CI repressor protein. Inhibition of transcription is dependent on a helix–turn–helix motif, often located in the N-terminal domain (NTD), which binds to specific DNA sequences (operator ...

  12. A C-terminal PDZ domain-binding sequence is required for striatal distribution of the dopamine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rickhag, Karl Mattias; Hansen, Freja Herborg; Sørensen, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    believed to bind synaptic scaffolding proteins, but its functional significance is uncertain. Here we demonstrate that two different dopamine transporter knock-in mice with disrupted PDZ-binding motifs (dopamine transporter-AAA and dopamine transporter+Ala) are characterized by dramatic loss of dopamine......The dopamine transporter mediates reuptake of dopamine from the synaptic cleft. The cellular mechanisms controlling dopamine transporter levels in striatal nerve terminals remain poorly understood. The dopamine transporters contain a C-terminal PDZ (PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1) domain-binding sequence...... transporter expression in the striatum, causing hyperlocomotion and attenuated response to amphetamine. In cultured dopaminergic neurons and striatal slices from dopamine transporter-AAA mice, we find markedly reduced dopamine transporter surface levels and evidence for enhanced constitutive internalization...

  13. A YEAST SPECIFIC INSERTION AMIDST OBG FOLD IS CRITICAL FOR THE MITOCHONDRIAL FUNCTION OF Mtg2p IN SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upasana Mehra

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein expression in mitochondria is carried out by ribosomes that are distinct from their cytosolic counterpart. Mitochondrial ribosomes are made of individual proteins having distinct lineages: those with clear bacterial orthologues, those conserved in eukaryotes only and proteins that are species specific. MTG2 is the mitochondrial member of the universally conserved Obg family of GTPases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae which associates with and regulates mitochondrial large ribosomal subunit assembly. In this study we demonstrate that MTG2, in addition to the universally conserved OBG and GTPase domains, has an essential yeast specific insertion domain positioned within the N terminal OBG fold. Cells expressing mtg2∆201-294, deleted for the insertion domain are not able to support cellular respiration. In addition, we show that large stretches of amino acids can be inserted into MTG2 at the end of the yeast specific insertion domain and the OBG fold without perturbing its cellular functions, consistent with the insertion domain folding into a species specific protein binding platform.

  14. Targeted gene insertion for molecular medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Katrin; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán

    2008-11-01

    Genomic insertion of a functional gene together with suitable transcriptional regulatory elements is often required for long-term therapeutical benefit in gene therapy for several genetic diseases. A variety of integrating vectors for gene delivery exist. Some of them exhibit random genomic integration, whereas others have integration preferences based on attributes of the targeted site, such as primary DNA sequence and physical structure of the DNA, or through tethering to certain DNA sequences by host-encoded cellular factors. Uncontrolled genomic insertion bears the risk of the transgene being silenced due to chromosomal position effects, and can lead to genotoxic effects due to mutagenesis of cellular genes. None of the vector systems currently used in either preclinical experiments or clinical trials displays sufficient preferences for target DNA sequences that would ensure appropriate and reliable expression of the transgene and simultaneously prevent hazardous side effects. We review in this paper the advantages and disadvantages of both viral and non-viral gene delivery technologies, discuss mechanisms of target site selection of integrating genetic elements (viruses and transposons), and suggest distinct molecular strategies for targeted gene delivery.

  15. Distinctive functions of Syk N-terminal and C-terminal SH2 domains in the signaling cascade elicited by oxidative stress in B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, J; Takano, T; Hermann, P; Gao, S; Han, W; Noda, C; Yanagi, S; Yamamura, H

    2000-05-01

    Syk plays a crucial role in the transduction of oxidative stress signaling. In this paper, we investigated the roles of Src homology 2 (SH2) domains of Syk in oxidative stress signaling, using Syk-negative DT40 cells expressing the N- or C-terminal SH2 domain mutant [mSH2(N) or mSH2(C)] of Syk. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk in cells expressing mSH2(N) Syk after H(2)O(2) treatment was higher than that in cells expressing wild-type Syk or mSH2(C) Syk. The tyrosine phosphorylation of wild-type Syk and mSH2(C) Syk, but not that of mSH2(N), was sensitive to PP2, a specific inhibitor of Src-family protein-tyrosine kinase. In oxidative stress, the C-terminal SH2 domain of Syk was demonstrated to be required for induction of tyrosine phosphorylation of cellular proteins, phospholipase C (PLC)-gamma2 phosphorylation, inositol 1,4, 5-triphosphate (IP(3)) generation, Ca(2)(+) release from intracellular stores, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation. In contrast, in mSH2(N) Syk-expressing cells, tyrosine phosphorylation of intracellular proteins including PLC-gamma2 was markedly induced in oxidative stress. The enhanced phosphorylation of mSH2(N) Syk and PLC-gamma2, however, did not link to Ca(2)(+) mobilization from intracellular pools and IP(3) generation. Thus, the N- and C-terminal SH2 domains of Syk possess distinctive functions in oxidative stress signaling.

  16. Site directed spin labeling studies of Escherichia coli dihydroorotate dehydrogenase N-terminal extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couto, Sheila G. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Sao-carlense 400, C.P. 369, 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Grupo de Biofisica e Fisica Aplicada a Medicina, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Goias, Campus Samambaia, C.P. 131, 74001-970, Goiania, GO (Brazil); Cristina Nonato, M. [Laboratorio de Cristalografia de Proteinas, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. do Cafe S/N, 14040-903, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Costa-Filho, Antonio J., E-mail: ajcosta@ffclrp.usp.br [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Sao-carlense 400, C.P. 369, 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EcDHODH is a membrane-associated enzyme and a promising target for drug design. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enzyme's N-terminal extension is responsible for membrane association. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-terminal works as a molecular lid regulating access to the protein interior. -- Abstract: Dihydroorotate dehydrogenases (DHODHs) are enzymes that catalyze the fourth step of the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. In this reaction, DHODH converts dihydroorotate to orotate, using a flavine mononucleotide as a cofactor. Since the synthesis of nucleotides has different pathways in mammals as compared to parasites, DHODH has gained much attention as a promising target for drug design. Escherichia coli DHODH (EcDHODH) is a family 2 DHODH that interacts with cell membranes in order to promote catalysis. The membrane association is supposedly made via an extension found in the enzyme's N-terminal. In the present work, we used site directed spin labeling (SDSL) to specifically place a magnetic probe at positions 2, 5, 19, and 21 within the N-terminal and thus monitor, by using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), dynamics and structural changes in this region in the presence of a membrane model system. Overall, our ESR spectra show that the N-terminal indeed binds to membranes and that it experiences a somewhat high flexibility that could be related to the role of this region as a molecular lid controlling the entrance of the enzyme's active site and thus allowing the enzyme to give access to quinones that are dispersed in the membrane and that are necessary for the catalysis.

  17. The Nucleoid Binding Protein H-NS Biases Genome-Wide Transposon Insertion Landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kimura

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Transposon insertion sequencing (TIS; also known as TnSeq is a potent approach commonly used to comprehensively define the genetic loci that contribute to bacterial fitness in diverse environments. A key presumption underlying analyses of TIS datasets is that loci with a low frequency of transposon insertions contribute to fitness. However, it is not known whether factors such as nucleoid binding proteins can alter the frequency of transposon insertion and thus whether TIS output may systematically reflect factors that are independent of the role of the loci in fitness. Here, we investigated whether the histone-like nucleoid structuring (H-NS protein, which preferentially associates with AT-rich sequences, modulates the frequency of Mariner transposon insertion in the Vibrio cholerae genome, using comparative analysis of TIS results from wild-type (wt and Δhns V. cholerae strains. These analyses were overlaid on gene classification based on GC content as well as on extant genome-wide identification of H-NS binding loci. Our analyses revealed a significant dearth of insertions within AT-rich loci in wt V. cholerae that was not apparent in the Δhns insertion library. Additionally, we observed a striking correlation between genetic loci that are overrepresented in the Δhns insertion library relative to their insertion frequency in wt V. cholerae and loci previously found to physically interact with H-NS. Collectively, our findings reveal that factors other than genetic fitness can systematically modulate the frequency of transposon insertions in TIS studies and add a cautionary note to interpretation of TIS data, particularly for AT-rich sequences.

  18. Disruption of a Transcriptional Repressor by an Insertion Sequence Element Integration Leads to Activation of a Novel Silent Cellobiose Transporter in Lactococcus lactis MG1363.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solopova, Ana; Kok, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2017-12-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains typically carry many dairy niche-specific adaptations. During adaptation to the milk environment these former plant strains have acquired various pseudogenes and insertion sequence elements indicative of ongoing genome decay and frequent transposition events in their genomes. Here we describe the reactivation of a silenced plant sugar utilization cluster in an L. lactis MG1363 derivative lacking the two main cellobiose transporters, PtcBA-CelB and PtcBAC, upon applying selection pressure to utilize cellobiose. A disruption of the transcriptional repressor gene llmg_1239 by an insertion sequence (IS) element allows expression of the otherwise silent novel cellobiose transporter Llmg_1244 and leads to growth of mutant strains on cellobiose. Llmg_1239 was labeled CclR, for c ellobiose cl uster r epressor. IMPORTANCE Insertion sequences (ISs) play an important role in the evolution of lactococci and other bacteria. They facilitate DNA rearrangements and are responsible for creation of new genetic variants with selective advantages under certain environmental conditions. L. lactis MG1363 possesses 71 copies in a total of 11 different types of IS elements. This study describes yet another example of an IS-mediated adaptive evolution. An integration of IS 981 or IS 905 into a gene coding for a transcriptional repressor led to activation of the repressed gene cluster coding for a plant sugar utilization pathway. The expression of the gene cluster allowed assembly of a novel cellobiose-specific transporter and led to cell growth on cellobiose. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Structure of N-Terminal Sequence Asp-Ala-Glu-Phe-Arg-His-Asp-Ser of Aβ-Peptide with Phospholipase A2 from Venom of Andaman Cobra Sub-Species Naja naja sagittifera at 2.0 Å Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeenat Mirza

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is one of the most significant social and health burdens of the present century. Plaques formed by extracellular deposits of amyloid β (Aβ are the prime player of AD’s neuropathology. Studies have implicated the varied role of phospholipase A2 (PLA2 in brain where it contributes to neuronal growth and inflammatory response. Overall contour and chemical nature of the substrate-binding channel in the low molecular weight PLA2s are similar. This study involves the reductionist fragment-based approach to understand the structure adopted by N-terminal fragment of Alzheimer’s Aβ peptide in its complex with PLA2. In the current communication, we report the structure determined by X-ray crystallography of N-terminal sequence Asp-Ala-Glu-Phe-Arg-His-Asp-Ser (DAEFRHDS of Aβ-peptide with a Group I PLA2 purified from venom of Andaman Cobra sub-species Naja naja sagittifera at 2.0 Å resolution (Protein Data Bank (PDB Code: 3JQ5. This is probably the first attempt to structurally establish interaction between amyloid-β peptide fragment and hydrophobic substrate binding site of PLA2 involving H bond and van der Waals interactions. We speculate that higher affinity between Aβ and PLA2 has the therapeutic potential of decreasing the Aβ–Aβ interaction, thereby reducing the amyloid aggregation and plaque formation in AD.

  20. Tipo de arcada y plano terminal molar de la dentición temporal y su correlación con las clases de maloclusión de la dentición permanente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Pascual Serna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo fue establecer la correlación del tipo de arcada y plano terminal molar de la dentición temporal con las clases de maloclusión de Angle en niños de 5 años de edad que acuden al Hospital Nacional “Daniel Alcides Carrión”de Cerro de Pasco, 2010 - 2011. La investigación se desarrolló bajo un diseño descriptivo longitudinal prospectivo. La muestra estuvo conformada por 40 niños escogidos por muestreo no probabilístico. Se realizó inicialmente la evaluación clínica del tipo de arcada y plano terminal molar de la dentición temporal y posteriormente al erupcionar las primeras molares permanentes se verificó la correlación con las clases de maloclusión de Angle, el tratamiento estadístico de la hipótesis fue con la Chi Cuadrada. Entre los resultados podemos mencionar que existe diferencia estadística significativa para asumir que el tipo de plano terminal molar y tipo de arcada de la dentición temporal se correlaciona con las clases de maloclusión de Angle, teniendo en consideración que la X2c=12,724>X2t = 9,488(4gl-95 %, rechazándose la Ho. En conclusión, el tipo de plano terminal molar recto y el tipo de arcada abierta de la dentición temporal se relaciona con mayor frecuencia con la normoclusión y la Clase I de maloclusión. Mientras que el tipo de plano terminal molar escalón mesial y el tipo de arcada cerrada de la dentición temporal se relaciona con la Clase III de maloclusión.

  1. Insertion compounds of transition-metal and uranium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chippindale, A.M.; Dickens, P.G.; Powell, A.V.

    1991-01-01

    Several transition-metal and actinide oxides, in which the metal occurs in a high oxidation state, have open covalent structures and are capable of incorporating alkali and other electropositive metals under mild conditions to form insertion compounds A x MO n . These are solids which have several features in common: Over a range of compositions, A x MO n exists as one or more stable or metastable phases in which the structure of the parent oxide MO n is largely retained and the insertion element A is accommodated interstitially. Insertion is accompanied by a redox process A=A i . + e - M in which M is reduced and the electronic properties of the parent oxide change to those typical of a mixed-valence compound. The insertion process xA + MO n = A x MO n can be reversed, at least to some extent, by chemical or electrochemical reaction, with retention of structure (topotactic reaction). This review concentrates on methods of synthesis, characterisation, crystal structure and thermochemistry of these insertion compounds. It updates and extends previous work. (author)

  2. Acetylation within the N- and C-Terminal Domains of Src Regulates Distinct Roles of STAT3-Mediated Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Lihan; Lee, Hank W; Ayrapetov, Marina K; Zhao, Ting C; Hao, Yimei; Gao, Jinsong; Yang, Chunzhang; Mehta, Gautam U; Zhuang, Zhengping; Zhang, Xiaoren; Hu, Guohong; Chin, Y Eugene

    2018-06-01

    Posttranslational modifications of mammalian c-Src N-terminal and C-terminal domains regulate distinct functions. Myristoylation of G 2 controls its cell membrane association and phosphorylation of Y419/Y527 controls its activation or inactivation, respectively. We provide evidence that Src-cell membrane association-dissociation and catalytic activation-inactivation are both regulated by acetylation. In EGF-treated cells, CREB binding protein (CBP) acetylates an N-terminal lysine cluster (K5, K7, and K9) of c-Src to promote dissociation from the cell membrane. CBP also acetylates the C-terminal K401, K423, and K427 of c-Src to activate intrinsic kinase activity for STAT3 recruitment and activation. N-terminal domain phosphorylation (Y14, Y45, and Y68) of STAT3 by c-Src activates transcriptionally active dimers of STAT3. Moreover, acetyl-Src translocates into nuclei, where it forms the Src-STAT3 enhanceosome for gene regulation and cancer cell proliferation. Thus, c-Src acetylation in the N-terminal and C-terminal domains play distinct roles in Src activity and regulation. Significance: CBP-mediated acetylation of lysine clusters in both the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of c-Src provides additional levels of control over STAT3 transcriptional activity. Cancer Res; 78(11); 2825-38. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Differential isotope dansylation labeling combined with liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for quantification of intact and N-terminal truncated proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Yanan; Li, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •LC–MS was developed for quantifying protein mixtures containing both intact and N-terminal truncated proteins. • 12 C 2 -Dansylation of the N-terminal amino acid of proteins was done first, followed by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. •The released 12 C 2 -dansyl labeled N-terminal amino acid was quantified using 13 C 2 -dansyl labeled amino acid standards. •The method provided accurate and precise results for quantifying intact and N-terminal truncated proteins within 8 h. -- Abstract: The N-terminal amino acids of proteins are important structure units for maintaining the biological function, localization, and interaction networks of proteins. Under different biological conditions, one or several N-terminal amino acids could be cleaved from an intact protein due to processes, such as proteolysis, resulting in the change of protein properties. Thus, the ability to quantify the N-terminal truncated forms of proteins is of great importance, particularly in the area of development and production of protein-based drugs where the relative quantity of the intact protein and its truncated form needs to be monitored. In this work, we describe a rapid method for absolute quantification of protein mixtures containing intact and N-terminal truncated proteins. This method is based on dansylation labeling of the N-terminal amino acids of proteins, followed by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis of the proteins into amino acids. It is shown that dansyl labeled amino acids are stable in acidic conditions and can be quantified by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC–MS) with the use of isotope analog standards

  4. Insertion of a solo LTR retrotransposon associates with spur mutations in 'Red Delicious' apple (Malus × domestica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mengxue; Sun, Qibao; Zhou, Junyong; Qiu, Huarong; Guo, Jing; Lu, Lijuan; Mu, Wenlei; Sun, Jun

    2017-09-01

    Insertion of a solo LTR, which possesses strong bidirectional, stem-specific promoter activities, is associated with the evolution of a dwarfing apple spur mutation. Spur mutations in apple scions revolutionized global apple production. Since long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons are tightly related to natural mutations, inter-retrotransposon-amplified polymorphism technique and genome walking were used to find sequences in the apple genome based on these LTRs. In 'Red Delicious' spur mutants, a novel, 2190-bp insertion was identified as a spur-specific, solo LTR (sLTR) located at the 1038th nucleotide of another sLTR, which was 1536 bp in length. This insertion-within-an-insertion was localized within a preexisting Gypsy-50 retrotransposon at position 3,762,767 on chromosome 4. The analysis of transcriptional activity of the two sLTRs (the 2190- and 1536-bp inserts) indicated that the 2190-bp sLTR is a promoter, capable of bidirectional transcription. GUS expression in the 2190-bp-sense and 2190-bp-antisense transgenic lines was prominent in stems. In contrast, no promoter activity from either the sense or the antisense strand of the 1536-bp sLTR was detected. From ~150 kb of DNA on each side of the 2190 bp, sLTR insertion site, corresponding to 300 kb of the 'Golden Delicious' genome, 23 genes were predicted. Ten genes had predicted functions that could affect shoot development. This first report, of a sLTR insertion associated with the evolution of apple spur mutation, will facilitate apple breeding, cloning of spur-related genes, and discovery of mechanisms behind dwarf habit.

  5. Central limit theorems for sequences with m(n)-dependent main part

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuis, G.

    1992-01-01

    Let (Xi(n); n ϵ N, 1⩽i⩽h(n)) be a double sequence of random variables with h(n)→∞ as n→∞. Suppose that the sequence can be split into two parts: an m(n)-dependent sequence (Xi,m(n); n ϵ N, 1⩽i⩽h(n)) of main terms and a sequence (Xi,m(n); n ϵ N, 1⩽i⩽h(n)) of residual terms. Here (m(n)) may be

  6. Bromine isotopic signature facilitates de novo sequencing of peptides in free-radical-initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS) mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jungjoo; Kwon, Hyuksu; Jang, Inae; Jeon, Aeran; Moon, Jingyu; Lee, Sun Young; Kang, Dukjin; Han, Sang Yun; Moon, Bongjin; Oh, Han Bin

    2015-02-01

    We recently showed that free-radical-initiated peptide sequencing mass spectrometry (FRIPS MS) assisted by the remarkable thermochemical stability of (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidin-1-yl)oxyl (TEMPO) is another attractive radical-driven peptide fragmentation MS tool. Facile homolytic cleavage of the bond between the benzylic carbon and the oxygen of the TEMPO moiety in o-TEMPO-Bz-C(O)-peptide and the high reactivity of the benzylic radical species generated in •Bz-C(O)-peptide are key elements leading to extensive radical-driven peptide backbone fragmentation. In the present study, we demonstrate that the incorporation of bromine into the benzene ring, i.e. o-TEMPO-Bz(Br)-C(O)-peptide, allows unambiguous distinction of the N-terminal peptide fragments from the C-terminal fragments through the unique bromine doublet isotopic signature. Furthermore, bromine substitution does not alter the overall radical-driven peptide backbone dissociation pathways of o-TEMPO-Bz-C(O)-peptide. From a practical perspective, the presence of the bromine isotopic signature in the N-terminal peptide fragments in TEMPO-assisted FRIPS MS represents a useful and cost-effective opportunity for de novo peptide sequencing. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Binding of the GTPase Sar1 to a Lipid Membrane Monolayer: Insertion and Orientation Studied by Infrared Reflection–Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Schwieger

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Membrane-interacting proteins are polyphilic polymers that engage in dynamic protein–protein and protein–lipid interactions while undergoing changes in conformation, orientation and binding interfaces. Predicting the sites of interactions between such polypeptides and phospholipid membranes is still a challenge. One example is the small eukaryotic GTPase Sar1, which functions in phospholipid bilayer remodeling and vesicle formation as part of the multimeric coat protein complex (COPII. The membrane interaction of Sar1 is strongly dependent on its N-terminal 23 amino acids. By monolayer adsorption experiments and infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS, we elucidate the role of lipids in inducing the amphipathicity of this N-terminal stretch, which inserts into the monolayer as an amphipathic helix (AH. The AH inserting angle is determined and is consistent with the philicities and spatial distribution of the amino acid monomers. Using an advanced method of IRRAS data evaluation, the orientation of Sar1 with respect to the lipid layer prior to the recruitment of further COPII proteins is determined. The result indicates that only a slight reorientation of the membrane-bound Sar1 is needed to allow coat assembly. The time-course of the IRRAS analysis corroborates a role of slow GTP hydrolysis in Sar1 desorption from the membrane.

  8. Diagnostic Usefulness of N-terminal Pro-brain Natriuretic Peptide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP) is useful in the diagnosis and management of adult patients with heart failure. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to determine the usefulness of NT-proBNP in diagnosing congestive heart failure (CHF) in children and its correlation with left ...

  9. Human TRPA1 is intrinsically cold- and chemosensitive with and without its N-terminal ankyrin repeat domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moparthi, Lavanya; Survery, Sabeen; Kreir, Mohamed; Simonsen, Charlotte; Kjellbom, Per; Högestätt, Edward D; Johanson, Urban; Zygmunt, Peter M

    2014-11-25

    We have purified and reconstituted human transient receptor potential (TRP) subtype A1 (hTRPA1) into lipid bilayers and recorded single-channel currents to understand its inherent thermo- and chemosensory properties as well as the role of the ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) of the N terminus in channel behavior. We report that hTRPA1 with and without its N-terminal ARD (Δ1-688 hTRPA1) is intrinsically cold-sensitive, and thus, cold-sensing properties of hTRPA1 reside outside the N-terminal ARD. We show activation of hTRPA1 by the thiol oxidant 2-((biotinoyl)amino)ethyl methanethiosulfonate (MTSEA-biotin) and that electrophilic compounds activate hTRPA1 in the presence and absence of the N-terminal ARD. The nonelectrophilic compounds menthol and the cannabinoid Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabiorcol (C16) directly activate hTRPA1 at different sites independent of the N-terminal ARD. The TRPA1 antagonist HC030031 inhibited cold and chemical activation of hTRPA1 and Δ1-688 hTRPA1, supporting a direct interaction with hTRPA1 outside the N-terminal ARD. These findings show that hTRPA1 is an intrinsically cold- and chemosensitive ion channel. Thus, second messengers, including Ca(2+), or accessory proteins are not needed for hTRPA1 responses to cold or chemical activators. We suggest that conformational changes outside the N-terminal ARD by cold, electrophiles, and nonelectrophiles are important in hTRPA1 channel gating and that targeting chemical interaction sites outside the N-terminal ARD provides possibilities to fine tune TRPA1-based drug therapies (e.g., for treatment of pain associated with cold hypersensitivity and cardiovascular disease).

  10. Vegetation response to the "African Humid Period" termination in Central Cameroon (7° N – new pollen insight from Lake Mbalang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Servant

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A new pollen sequence from the Lake Mbalang (7°19´ N, 13°44´ E, 1110 m a.s.l. located on the eastern Adamawa plateau, in Central Cameroon, is presented in this paper to analyze the Holocene African Humid Period (AHP termination and related vegetation changes at 7° N in tropical Africa, completing an important transect for exploring shifts in the northern margin of the African Monsoon. This sequence, spanning the last 7000 cal yr BP, shows that the vegetation response to this transitional climatic period was marked by significant successional changes within the broad context of long-term aridification. Semi-deciduous/sub-montane forest retreat in this area is initially registered as early as ca. 6100 cal yr BP and modern savannah was definitely established at ca. 3000 cal yr BP and stabilized at ca. 2400 cal yr BP; but a slight forest regeneration episode is observed between ca. 5200 and ca. 4200 cal yr BP. In this area with modern high rainfall, increasing in the length of the dry season during the AHP termination linked to a contraction of the northern margin of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ from ca. 6100 cal yr BP onward, probably associated with decreasing in cloud cover and/or fog frequency, has primarily controlled vegetation dynamics and above all the disappearance of the forested environment on the Adamawa plateau. Compared to previous studies undertaken in northern tropical and Central Africa, this work clearly shows that the response of vegetation to transitional periods between climatic extremes such as the AHP termination might be different in timing, mode and amplitude according to the regional climate of the study sites, but also according to the stability of vegetation before and during these climatic transitions.

  11. Analysis of proteolytic processes and enzymatic activities in the generation of huntingtin n-terminal fragments in an HEK293 cell model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T N Tebbenkamp

    Full Text Available N-terminal fragments of mutant huntingtin (htt that terminate between residues 90-115, termed cleavage product A or 1 (cp-A/1, form intracellular and intranuclear inclusion bodies in the brains of patients with Huntington's disease (HD. These fragments appear to be proteolytic products of the full-length protein. Here, we use an HEK293 cell culture model to investigate huntingtin proteolytic processing; previous studies of these cells have demonstrated cleavage of htt to cp-A/1 like htt fragments.Recombinant N-terminal htt fragments, terminating at residue 171 (also referred to as cp-B/2 like, were efficiently cleaved to produce cp-A/1 whereas fragments representing endogenous caspase, calpain, and metalloproteinase cleavage products, terminating between residues 400-600, were inefficiently cleaved. Using cysteine-labeling techniques and antibody binding mapping, we localized the C-terminus of the cp-A/1 fragments produced by HEK293 cells to sequences minimally limited by cysteine 105 and an antibody epitope composed of residues 115-124. A combination of genetic and pharmacologic approaches to inhibit potential proteases, including γ-secretase and calpain, proved ineffective in preventing production of cp-A/1.Our findings indicate that HEK293 cells express a protease that is capable of efficiently cleaving cp-B/2 like fragments of htt with normal or expanded glutamine repeats. For reasons that remain unclear, this protease cleaves longer htt fragments, with normal or expanded glutamine expansions, much less efficiently. The protease in HEK293 cells that is capable of generating a cp-A/1 like htt fragment may be a novel protease with a high preference for a cp-B/2-like htt fragment as substrate.

  12. KV4.3 N-terminal deletion mutant Δ2–39

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovind, Laura J; Skerritt, Matthew R

    2011-01-01

    Gating transitions in the KV4.3 N-terminal deletion mutant Δ2–39 were characterized in the absence and presence of KChIP2b. We particularly focused on gating characteristics of macroscopic (open state) versus closed state inactivation (CSI) and recovery. In the absence of KChIP2b Δ2–39 did not significantly alter the steady-state activation “a4” relationship or general CSI characteristics, but it did slow the kinetics of deactivation, macroscopic inactivation and macroscopic recovery. Recovery kinetics (for both WT KV4.3 and Δ2–39) were complicated and displayed sigmoidicity, a process which was enhanced by Δ2–39. Deletion of the proximal N-terminal domain therefore appeared to specifically slow mechanisms involved in regulating gating transitions occurring after the channel open state(s) had been reached. In the presence of KChIP2b Δ2–39 recovery kinetics (from both macroscopic and CSI) were accelerated, with an apparent reduction in initial sigmoidicity. Hyperpolarizing shifts in both “a4” and isochronal inactivation “i” were also produced. KChIP2b-mediated remodeling of KV4.3 gating transitions was therefore not obligatorily dependent upon an intact N-terminus. To account for these effects we propose that KChIP2 regulatory domains exist in KV4.3 α subunit regions outside of the proximal N-terminal. In addition to regulating macroscopic inactivation, we also propose that the KV4.3 N-terminus may act as a novel regulator of deactivation-recovery coupling. PMID:21057209

  13. c-jun-N-Terminal Kinase (JNK) for the Treatment of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0431 TITLE: “c-jun-N-Terminal Kinase (JNK) for the Treatment of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis ” PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE “c-jun-N-Terminal Kinase (JNK) for the Treatment of Amyotrophic Lateral Scelerosis” 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER... Lateral   Sclerosis ”   Final  Report:  Project  Period  Sept  2012-­‐Dec  2014     Personnel  List:     Feng,  Yangbo

  14. Identification of a Major Dimorphic Region in the Functionally Critical N-Terminal ID1 Domain of VAR2CSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doritchamou, Justin; Sabbagh, Audrey; Jespersen, Jakob S

    2015-01-01

    The VAR2CSA protein of Plasmodium falciparum is transported to and expressed on the infected erythrocyte surface where it plays a key role in placental malaria (PM). It is the current leading candidate for a vaccine to prevent PM. However, the antigenic polymorphism integral to VAR2CSA poses...... a challenge for vaccine development. Based on detailed analysis of polymorphisms in the sequence of its ligand-binding N-terminal region, currently the main focus for vaccine development, we assessed var2csa from parasite isolates infecting pregnant women. The results reveal for the first time the presence...

  15. Low operation voltage of GaN-based LEDs with Al-doped ZnO upper contact directly on p-type GaN without insert layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P. H.; Chen, Yu An; Chang, L. C.; Lai, W. C.; Kuo, Cheng Huang

    2015-07-01

    Al-doped ZnO (AZO) film was evaporated on double-side polished sapphire, p-GaN layers, n+-InGaN-GaN short-period superlattice (SPS) structures, and GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) by e-beam. The AZO film on the p-GaN layer after thermal annealing exhibited an extremely high transparency (98% at 450 nm) and a small specific contact resistance of 2.19 × 10-2 Ω cm2, which was almost the same as that of as-deposited AZO on n+-SPS structure. With 20 mA injection current, the forward voltages were 3.30 and 3.27 V, whereas the output powers were 4.32 and 4.07 mW for the LED with AZO on insert n+-SPS upper contact and the LED with AZO on p-GaN upper contact (without insert layer), respectively. The small specific contact resistance and low operation voltage of LED with AZO on p-GaN upper contact was achieved by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) process.

  16. C-terminal low-complexity sequence repeats of Mycobacterium smegmatis Ku modulate DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Ambuj K; Grove, Anne

    2013-01-24

    Ku protein is an integral component of the NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining) pathway of DSB (double-strand break) repair. Both eukaryotic and prokaryotic Ku homologues have been characterized and shown to bind DNA ends. A unique feature of Mycobacterium smegmatis Ku is its basic C-terminal tail that contains several lysine-rich low-complexity PAKKA repeats that are absent from homologues encoded by obligate parasitic mycobacteria. Such PAKKA repeats are also characteristic of mycobacterial Hlp (histone-like protein) for which they have been shown to confer the ability to appose DNA ends. Unexpectedly, removal of the lysine-rich extension enhances DNA-binding affinity, but an interaction between DNA and the PAKKA repeats is indicated by the observation that only full-length Ku forms multiple complexes with a short stem-loop-containing DNA previously designed to accommodate only one Ku dimer. The C-terminal extension promotes DNA end-joining by T4 DNA ligase, suggesting that the PAKKA repeats also contribute to efficient end-joining. We suggest that low-complexity lysine-rich sequences have evolved repeatedly to modulate the function of unrelated DNA-binding proteins.

  17. Differential isotope dansylation labeling combined with liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for quantification of intact and N-terminal truncated proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yanan; Li, Liang, E-mail: Liang.Li@ualberta.ca

    2013-08-20

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •LC–MS was developed for quantifying protein mixtures containing both intact and N-terminal truncated proteins. •{sup 12}C{sub 2}-Dansylation of the N-terminal amino acid of proteins was done first, followed by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. •The released {sup 12}C{sub 2}-dansyl labeled N-terminal amino acid was quantified using {sup 13}C{sub 2}-dansyl labeled amino acid standards. •The method provided accurate and precise results for quantifying intact and N-terminal truncated proteins within 8 h. -- Abstract: The N-terminal amino acids of proteins are important structure units for maintaining the biological function, localization, and interaction networks of proteins. Under different biological conditions, one or several N-terminal amino acids could be cleaved from an intact protein due to processes, such as proteolysis, resulting in the change of protein properties. Thus, the ability to quantify the N-terminal truncated forms of proteins is of great importance, particularly in the area of development and production of protein-based drugs where the relative quantity of the intact protein and its truncated form needs to be monitored. In this work, we describe a rapid method for absolute quantification of protein mixtures containing intact and N-terminal truncated proteins. This method is based on dansylation labeling of the N-terminal amino acids of proteins, followed by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis of the proteins into amino acids. It is shown that dansyl labeled amino acids are stable in acidic conditions and can be quantified by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC–MS) with the use of isotope analog standards.

  18. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the N-terminal domain of nsp2 from avian infectious bronchitis virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Anqi; Wei, Lei; Zhao, Weiran; Xu, Yuanyuan; Rao, Zihe

    2009-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of nsp2 from avian infectious bronchitis virus has been purified and crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution. Avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is a prototype of the group III coronaviruses and encodes 15 nonstructural proteins which make up the transcription/replication machinery. The nsp2 protein from IBV has a unique and novel sequence and has no experimentally confirmed function in replication, whereas it has been proposed to be crucial for early viral infection and may inhibit the early host immune response. The gene that encodes a double-mutant IBV nsp2 N-terminal domain (residues 9–393 of the polyprotein, with mutations Q132L and L270F) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and the protein was subjected to crystallization trials. The crystals diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and belonged to space group P6 2 or P6 4 , with unit-cell parameters a = b = 114.2, c = 61.0 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. Each asymmetric unit contained one molecule

  19. Highly enantioselective catalytic cross-dehydrogenative coupling of N-carbamoyl tetrahydroisoquinolines and terminal alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shutao; Li, Chengkun; Floreancig, Paul E; Lou, Hongxiang; Liu, Lei

    2015-04-03

    The first catalytic asymmetric cross-dehydrogenative coupling of cyclic carbamates and terminal alkynes has been established. The reaction features high enantiocontrol and excellent functional group tolerance and displays a wide range of structurally and electronically diverse carbamates as well as terminal alkynes. N-Acyl hemiaminals were identified as the reactive intermediates through preliminary control experiments. Employing readily removable carbamates as substrates rather than traditionally adopted N-aryl amines allows applications in complex molecule synthesis and therefore advances the C-H functionalization strategy to a synthetically useful level.

  20. Characterization of a digestive carboxypeptidase from the insect pest corn earworm (Helicoverpa armigera) with novel specificity towards C-terminal glutamate residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bown, David P; Gatehouse, John A

    2004-05-01

    Carboxypeptidases were purified from guts of larvae of corn earworm (Helicoverpa armigera), a lepidopteran crop pest, by affinity chromatography on immobilized potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor, and characterized by N-terminal sequencing. A larval gut cDNA library was screened using probes based on these protein sequences. cDNA HaCA42 encoded a carboxypeptidase with sequence similarity to enzymes of clan MC [Barrett, A. J., Rawlings, N. D. & Woessner, J. F. (1998) Handbook of Proteolytic Enzymes. Academic Press, London.], but with a novel predicted specificity towards C-terminal acidic residues. This carboxypeptidase was expressed as a recombinant proprotein in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The expressed protein could be activated by treatment with bovine trypsin; degradation of bound pro-region, rather than cleavage of pro-region from mature protein, was the rate-limiting step in activation. Activated HaCA42 carboxypeptidase hydrolysed a synthetic substrate for glutamate carboxypeptidases (FAEE, C-terminal Glu), but did not hydrolyse substrates for carboxypeptidase A or B (FAPP or FAAK, C-terminal Phe or Lys) or methotrexate, cleaved by clan MH glutamate carboxypeptidases. The enzyme was highly specific for C-terminal glutamate in peptide substrates, with slow hydrolysis of C-terminal aspartate also observed. Glutamate carboxypeptidase activity was present in larval gut extract from H. armigera. The HaCA42 protein is the first glutamate-specific metallocarboxypeptidase from clan MC to be identified and characterized. The genome of Drosophila melanogaster contains genes encoding enzymes with similar sequences and predicted specificity, and a cDNA encoding a similar enzyme has been isolated from gut tissue in tsetse fly. We suggest that digestive carboxypeptidases with sequence similarity to the classical mammalian enzymes, but with specificity towards C-terminal glutamate, are widely distributed in insects.

  1. Structure of the human histone chaperone FACT Spt16 N-terminal domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcianò, G.; Huang, D. T., E-mail: d.huang@beatson.gla.ac.uk [Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Glasgow G61 1BD, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-22

    The Spt16–SSRP1 heterodimer is a histone chaperone that plays an important role in regulating chromatin assembly. Here, a crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human Spt16 is presented and it is shown that this domain may contribute to histone binding. The histone chaperone FACT plays an important role in facilitating nucleosome assembly and disassembly during transcription. FACT is a heterodimeric complex consisting of Spt16 and SSRP1. The N-terminal domain of Spt16 resembles an inactive aminopeptidase. How this domain contributes to the histone chaperone activity of FACT remains elusive. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of human Spt16 is reported at a resolution of 1.84 Å. The structure adopts an aminopeptidase-like fold similar to those of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe Spt16 NTDs. Isothermal titration calorimetry analyses show that human Spt16 NTD binds histones H3/H4 with low-micromolar affinity, suggesting that Spt16 NTD may contribute to histone binding in the FACT complex. Surface-residue conservation and electrostatic analysis reveal a conserved acidic patch that may be involved in histone binding.

  2. Structure of the human histone chaperone FACT Spt16 N-terminal domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcianò, G.; Huang, D. T.

    2016-01-01

    The Spt16–SSRP1 heterodimer is a histone chaperone that plays an important role in regulating chromatin assembly. Here, a crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human Spt16 is presented and it is shown that this domain may contribute to histone binding. The histone chaperone FACT plays an important role in facilitating nucleosome assembly and disassembly during transcription. FACT is a heterodimeric complex consisting of Spt16 and SSRP1. The N-terminal domain of Spt16 resembles an inactive aminopeptidase. How this domain contributes to the histone chaperone activity of FACT remains elusive. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of human Spt16 is reported at a resolution of 1.84 Å. The structure adopts an aminopeptidase-like fold similar to those of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe Spt16 NTDs. Isothermal titration calorimetry analyses show that human Spt16 NTD binds histones H3/H4 with low-micromolar affinity, suggesting that Spt16 NTD may contribute to histone binding in the FACT complex. Surface-residue conservation and electrostatic analysis reveal a conserved acidic patch that may be involved in histone binding

  3. Installation of the LHC experimental insertions

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolome-Jimenez, S

    2004-01-01

    The installation of the LHC experimental insertions, and particularly the installation of the low-beta quadrupoles, raises many technical challenges due to the stringent alignment specifications and to the difficulty of access in very confined areas. The compact layout with many lattice elements, vacuum components, beam control instrumentation and the presence of shielding does not allow for any improvisation in the installation procedure. This paper reviews all the constraints that need to be taken into account when installing the experimental insertions. It describes the chronological sequence of installation and discusses the technical solutions that have been adopted.

  4. INSTALLATION OF THE LHC EXPERIMENTAL INSERTIONS

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolome-Jimenez, S

    2004-01-01

    The installation of the LHC experimental insertions, and particularly the installation of the Low-Beta quadrupoles, raises many technical challenges due to the stringent alignment specifications and to the difficulty of access in very confined areas. The compact layout with many lattice elements, vacuum components, beam control instrumentation and the presence of shielding does not allow for any improvisation in the installation procedure. This paper reviews all the constraints that need to be taken into account when installing the experimental insertions. It describes the chronological sequence of installation and discusses the technical solutions that have been adopted.

  5. Implication of the oligomeric state of the N-terminal PTX3 domain in cumulus matrix assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ievoli, Elena; Lindstedt, Ragnar; Inforzato, Antonio; Camaioni, Antonella; Palone, Francesca; Day, Anthony J; Mantovani, Alberto; Salvatori, Giovanni; Salustri, Antonietta

    2011-06-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) plays a key role in the formation of the hyaluronan-rich matrix of the cumulus oophorus surrounding ovulated eggs that is required for successful fertilization and female fertility. PTX3 is a multimeric protein consisting of eight identical protomers held together by a combination of non-covalent interactions and disulfide bonds. Recent findings suggest that the oligomeric status of PTX3 is important for stabilizing the cumulus matrix. Because the role of PTX3 in the cumulus resides in the unique N-terminal sequence of the protomer, we investigated further this issue by testing the ability of distinct Cys/Ser mutants of recombinant N-terminal region of PTX3 (N(_)PTX3) with different oligomeric arrangement to promote in vitro normal expansion in cumuli from Ptx3-null mice. Here we report that the dimer of the N(_)PTX3 is unable to rescue cumulus matrix organization, and that the tetrameric assembly of the protein is the minimal oligomeric state required for accomplishing this function. We have previously demonstrated that PTX3 binds to HCs of IαI and TSG-6, which are essential for cumulus matrix formation and able to interact with hyaluronan. Interestingly, here we show by solid-phase binding experiments that the dimer of the N(_)PTX3 retains the ability to bind to both IαI and TSG-6, suggesting that the octameric structure of PTX3 provides multiple binding sites for each of these ligands. These findings support the hypothesis that PTX3 contributes to cumulus matrix organization by cross-linking HA polymers through interactions with multiple HCs of IαI and/or TSG-6. The N-terminal PTX3 tetrameric oligomerization was recently reported to be also required for recognition and inhibition of FGF2. Given that this growth factor has been detected in the mammalian preovulatory follicle, we wondered whether FGF2 negatively influences cumulus expansion and PTX3 may also serve in vivo to antagonize its activity. We found that a molar excess of FGF2, above

  6. RNA2 of grapevine fanleaf virus: sequence analysis and coat protein cistron location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serghini, M A; Fuchs, M; Pinck, M; Reinbolt, J; Walter, B; Pinck, L

    1990-07-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the genomic RNA2 (3774 nucleotides) of grapevine fanleaf virus strain F13 was determined from overlapping cDNA clones and its genetic organization was deduced. Two rapid and efficient methods were used for cDNA cloning of the 5' region of RNA2. The complete sequence contained only one long open reading frame of 3555 nucleotides (1184 codons, 131K product). The analysis of the N-terminal sequence of purified coat protein (CP) and identification of its C-terminal residue have allowed the CP cistron to be precisely positioned within the polyprotein. The CP produced by proteolytic cleavage at the Arg/Gly site between residues 680 and 681 contains 504 amino acids (Mr 56019) and has hydrophobic properties. The Arg/Gly cleavage site deduced by N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis is the first for a nepovirus coat protein and for plant viruses expressing their genomic RNAs by polyprotein synthesis. Comparison of GFLV RNA2 with M RNA of cowpea mosaic comovirus and with RNA2 of two closely related nepoviruses, tomato black ring virus and Hungarian grapevine chrome mosaic virus, showed strong similarities among the 3' non-coding regions but less similarity among the 5' end non-coding sequences than reported among other nepovirus RNAs.

  7. Novel insertion mutation of ABCB1 gene in an ivermectin-sensitive Border Collie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jae-Ik; Son, Hyoung-Won; Park, Seung-Cheol; Na, Ki-Jeong

    2010-12-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is encoded by the ABCB1 gene and acts as an efflux pump for xenobiotics. In the Border Collie, a nonsense mutation caused by a 4-base pair deletion in the ABCB1 gene is associated with a premature stop to P-gp synthesis. In this study, we examined the full-length coding sequence of the ABCB1 gene in an ivermectin-sensitive Border Collie that lacked the aforementioned deletion mutation. The sequence was compared to the corresponding sequences of a wild-type Beagle and seven ivermectin-tolerant family members of the Border Collie. When compared to the wild-type Beagle sequence, that of the ivermectin-sensitive Border Collie was found to have one insertion mutation and eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the coding sequence of the ABCB1 gene. While the eight SNPs were also found in the family members' sequences, the insertion mutation was found only in the ivermectin-sensitive dog. These results suggest the possibility that the SNPs are species-specific features of the ABCB1 gene in Border Collies, and that the insertion mutation may be related to ivermectin intolerance.

  8. Occurrence of C-Terminal Residue Exclusion in Peptide Fragmentation by ESI and MALDI Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, Mathieu; Cantel, Sonia; Martinez, Jean; Enjalbal, Christine

    2012-02-01

    the high mass range of the MS/MS spectra. The mass difference between this signal and the protonated molecular ion corresponds to the mass of the C-terminal residue. It allowed a straightforward identification of the amino acid positioned at this extremity. It must be emphasized that a neutral residue loss can be misattributed to the formation of a ym-1 ion, i.e., to the loss of the N-terminal residue following the a1-ym-1 fragmentation channel. Extreme caution must be adopted when reading the direct sequence ion on the positive ion MS/MS spectra of singly charged peptides not to mix up the attribution of the N- and C-terminal amino acids. Although such peculiar fragmentation behavior is of obvious interest for de novo peptide sequencing, it can also be exploited in proteomics, especially for studies involving digestion protocols carried out with proteolytic enzymes other than trypsin (Lys-N, Glu-C, and Asp-N) that produce arginine-containing peptides.

  9. Investigating the DNA-binding ability of GATA-1-N-terminal zinc finger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, R.; Newton, A.; Crossley, M.; Mackay, J.

    2001-01-01

    Erythroid transcription factor GATA-1 interacts with both DNA and other proteins through its zinc finger domains (ZnFs). While it has been known for me time that the C-terminal ZnF binds DNA at GATA sites, only recently has it been observed that the N-terminal finger (NF) is capable of interacting with GATC sites. Further, a number of naturally occurring mutations in NF (V205M, G208S, R216Q, D218G) that lead to anaemia and thrombocytopenia have been identified. We are interested in characterising the NF-DNA interaction and determining the effects of mutation upon this interaction. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we have observed an interaction between recombinant NF and a 16-mer DNA duplex containing a core GATC sequence. This result forms the basis from which residues in NF involved in DNA binding can be identified, and work is being carried out to improve the quality of the NMR data with the aim of determining the solution structure of the NF-DNA complex. The DNA-binding affinity of both wild-type and mutant NFs mentioned above is also being investigated using isothermal titration calorimetry. These data suggest that the strength of the interaction between NF and the 16-mer DNA duplex is in the sub-micromolar range, and comparisons between the DNA-binding affinities of the NF mutants are being made. Together, these studies will help us to understand how GATA-1 acts as a transcriptional regulator and how mutations in NF domain of GATA-1 may lead to blood disorders

  10. The Contributions of the Amino and Carboxy Terminal Domains of Flightin to the Biomechanical Properties of Drosophila Flight Muscle Thick Filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasek, Nathan S; Nyland, Lori R; Vigoreaux, Jim O

    2016-04-27

    Flightin is a myosin binding protein present in Pancrustacea. In Drosophila, flightin is expressed in the indirect flight muscles (IFM), where it is required for the flexural rigidity, structural integrity, and length determination of thick filaments. Comparison of flightin sequences from multiple Drosophila species revealed a tripartite organization indicative of three functional domains subject to different evolutionary constraints. We use atomic force microscopy to investigate the functional roles of the N-terminal domain and the C-terminal domain that show different patterns of sequence conservation. Thick filaments containing a C-terminal domain truncated flightin (fln(ΔC44)) are significantly shorter (2.68 ± 0.06 μm; p thick filaments containing a full length flightin (fln⁺; 3.21 ± 0.05 μm) and thick filaments containing an N-terminal domain truncated flightin (fln(ΔN62); 3.21 ± 0.06 μm). Persistence length was significantly reduced in fln(ΔN62) (418 ± 72 μm; p thick filament bending propensity. Our results indicate that the flightin amino and carboxy terminal domains make distinct contributions to thick filament biomechanics. We propose these distinct roles arise from the interplay between natural selection and sexual selection given IFM's dual role in flight and courtship behaviors.

  11. Au-Catalyzed Synthesis of 2-Alkylindoles from N-Arylhydroxylamines and Terminal Alkynes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanzhao; Ye, Longwu

    2012-01-01

    The first gold-catalyzed addition of N-arylhydroxylamines to aliphatic terminal alkynes is developed to access O-alkenyl-N-arylhydroxylamines, which undergo facile in situ sequential 3,3-rearrangements and cyclodehydrations to afford 2-alkylindoles with regiospecificity and under exceptionally mild reaction conditions. PMID:21637891

  12. Controlled carrier screening in p-n NiO/GaN piezoelectric generators by an Al2O3 insertion layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johar, Muhammad Ali; Jeong, Dae Kyung; Afifi Hassan, Mostafa; Kang, Jin-Ho; Ha, Jun-Seok; Key Lee, June; Ryu, Sang-Wan

    2017-12-01

    The performance of a piezoelectric generator (PG) depends significantly on the internal screening process inside the device. As piezoelectric charges appear on both ends of the piezoelectric crystal, internal screening starts to decrease the piezoelectric bias. Therefore, the piezoelectric energy generated by external stress is not fully utilized by external circuit, which is the most challenging aspect of high-efficiency PGs. In this work, the internal screening effect of a NiO/GaN p-n PG was analyzed and controlled with an Al2O3 insertion layer. Internal screening in the p-n diode PG was categorized into free-carrier screening in neutral regions and junction screening due to charge drift across the junction. It was observed that junction screening could be significantly suppressed by inserting an Al2O3 layer and that effect was dominant in a leaky diode PG. With this implementation, the piezoelectric bias of the NiO/GaN PG was improved by a factor of ~100 for high-leakage diodes and a factor of ~1.6 for low-leakage diodes. Consequently, NiO/Al2O3/GaN PGs under a stress of 5 MPa provided a piezoelectric bias of 12.1 V and a current density of 2.25 µA cm-2. The incorporation of a highly resistive Al2O3 layer between p-NiO and n-GaN layers in NiO/GaN heterojunctions provides an efficient means of improving the piezoelectric performance by controlling the internal screening of the piezoelectric field.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the N-terminal domain of human thioredoxin-interacting protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polekhina, Galina; Ascher, David Benjamin; Kok, Shie Foong; Waltham, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of thioredoxin-interacting protein has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belonged to a monoclinic space group and diffracted to 3 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. Thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) is a negative regulator of thioredoxin and its roles in the pathologies of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases have marked it out as a potential drug target. Expression of TXNIP is robustly induced under various stress conditions such as high glucose, heat shock, UV, H 2 O 2 and mechanical stress amongst others. Elevated levels of TXNIP result in the sequestration and inactivation of thioredoxin, leading to cellular oxidative stress. For some time, this was the only known function of TXNIP; however, more recently the protein has been shown to play a role in regulation of glucose uptake and activation of the inflammasome. Based on the primary sequence, TXNIP is remotely related to β-arrestins, which include the visual arrestins. TXNIP has thus been classified as a member of the α-arrestin family, which to date includes five other members. None of the other α-arrestins are known to interact with thioredoxin, although curiously one has been implicated in glucose uptake. In order to gain insight into the structure–function relationships of the α-arrestin protein family, and particularly that of TXNIP, the N-terminal domain of TXNIP has been crystallized. The crystals belonged to a monoclinic space group and diffracted to 3 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation

  14. Accurate quantification of mouse mitochondrial DNA without co-amplification of nuclear mitochondrial insertion sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Afshan N; Czajka, Anna; Cunningham, Phil

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria contain an extra-nuclear genome in the form of mitochondrial DNA (MtDNA), damage to which can lead to inflammation and bioenergetic deficit. Changes in MtDNA levels are increasingly used as a biomarker of mitochondrial dysfunction. We previously reported that in humans, fragments in the nuclear genome known as nuclear mitochondrial insertion sequences (NumtS) affect accurate quantification of MtDNA. In the current paper our aim was to determine whether mouse NumtS affect the quantification of MtDNA and to establish a method designed to avoid this. The existence of NumtS in the mouse genome was confirmed using blast N, unique MtDNA regions were identified using FASTA, and MtDNA primers which do not co-amplify NumtS were designed and tested. MtDNA copy numbers were determined in a range of mouse tissues as the ratio of the mitochondrial and nuclear genome using real time qPCR and absolute quantification. Approximately 95% of mouse MtDNA was duplicated in the nuclear genome as NumtS which were located in 15 out of 21 chromosomes. A unique region was identified and primers flanking this region were used. MtDNA levels differed significantly in mouse tissues being the highest in the heart, with levels in descending order (highest to lowest) in kidney, liver, blood, brain, islets and lung. The presence of NumtS in the nuclear genome of mouse could lead to erroneous data when studying MtDNA content or mutation. The unique primers described here will allow accurate quantification of MtDNA content in mouse models without co-amplification of NumtS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular characterization of the 30-AA N-terminal mineral interaction domain of the biomineralization protein AP7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Il Won; Morse, Daniel E; Evans, John Spencer

    2004-12-21

    The AP7 protein is one of several mollusk shell proteins which are responsible for aragonite polymorph formation and stabilization within the nacre layer of the Pacific red abalone, H. rufescens. Previously, we demonstrated that the 30-AA N-terminal domain of AP7, denoted as AP7-1, exists as an unfolded sequence and possesses the capability of inhibiting calcium carbonate crystal growth in vitro via growth step frustration or interruption. However, very little is known with regard to the interactive capabilities of this sequence with Ca(II) and with calcium carbonates. Using multidisciplinary techniques, we determine that the AP7-1 polypeptide interacts with Ca(II) ions at the -DD- sequence clusters, yet retains its unfolded, conformationally labile structure in the presence of Ca(II) ions. Further, NMR experiments reveal that the extended structured sequence blocks, -GNGM-, -SVRTQG-, and -ISYL, exhibit motional, chemical exchange, and/or backbone geometry perturbations in response to Ca(II) interactions with AP7-1. Solid-state NMR magic angle spinning studies verify that during the course of in vitro calcium carbonate crystal growth, AP7-1 becomes bound to calcite fragments and cannot be entirely displaced from the mineral fragments using competitive Ca(II) washing. Finally, using a scrambled sequence version of the AP7-1 polypeptide, we observe that sequence scrambling does not adversely affect the crystal growth inhibitory activity of AP7-1, suggesting that the amino acid composition of AP7-1 may be more critical to growth step inhibition than the linear ordering of amino acids.

  16. Distal insertions of the semimembranosus tendon: MR imaging with anatomic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeseneer, Michel de [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Department of Radiology, Jette, Brussels (Belgium); Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Experimental Anatomy, Brussels (Belgium); Shahabpour, Maryam; Milants, Annemieke; Ridder, Filip de; Mey, Johan de [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Department of Radiology, Jette, Brussels (Belgium); Lenchik, Leon [Wake Forest University, Department of Radiology, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Cattrysse, Erik [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Experimental Anatomy, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-06-15

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the distal insertions of the semimembranosus tendon with MR imaging, correlated with findings in cadavers. Four fresh cadaveric specimens were studied with 3-T MR imaging. Sequences included proton density (PD) sequences (TE, 13; TR, 4957; FOV, 170 x 170; matrix, 424 x 413; NA, 2; slice thickness, 2.5 mm) in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes and 3D fast field echo (FFE) sequences (TR 9.4; TE 6.9; FOV, 159 x 105; matrix, 200 x 211; NA, 2; slice thickness, 0.57 mm). One specimen was dissected and three specimens were sectioned with a bandsaw in the axial, coronal, and sagittal plane. The sections were photographed and correlated with MR images. To standardize the analysis, the semimembranosus muscle and tendon were assessed at seven levels for the axial sections, and at three levels for the coronal and sagittal sections. Anatomic dissection revealed six insertions of the distal semimembranosus tendon: direct arm, anterior arm, posterior oblique ligament extension, oblique popliteal ligament extension, distal tibial expansion (popliteus aponeurosis), and meniscal arm. Axial MR images showed five of six insertions: direct arm, anterior arm, oblique popliteal ligament extension, posterior oblique ligament extension, and distal tibial expansion. Sagittal MR images showed four of six insertions: direct arm, anterior arm, oblique popliteal ligament arm, and distal tibial expansion. Sagittal MR images were ideal for showing the direct arm insertion, but were less optimal than the axial images for showing the other insertions. The anterior arm was seen but volume averaging was present with the gracilis tendon. Coronal MR images optimally revealed the anterior arm, although magic angle artifact was present at its posterior aspect. The common semimembranosus tendon and meniscal arm were also well depicted. The division in anterior arm, direct arm, and oblique popliteal ligament arm was poorly seen on coronal images due to

  17. Nucleotide sequence of cloned cDNA for human sphingolipid activator protein 1 precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewji, N.N.; Wenger, D.A.; O'Brien, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Two cDNA clones encoding prepro-sphingolipid activator protein 1 (SAP-1) were isolated from a λ gt11 human hepatoma expression library using polyclonal antibodies. These had inserts of ≅ 2 kilobases (λ-S-1.2 and λ-S-1.3) and both were both homologous with a previously isolated clone (λ-S-1.1) for mature SAP-1. The authors report here the nucleotide sequence of the longer two EcoRI fragments of S-1.2 and S-1.3 that were not the same and the derived amino acid sequences of mature SAP-1 and its prepro form. The open reading frame encodes 19 amino acids, which are colinear with the amino-terminal sequence of mature SAP-1, and extends far beyond the predicted carboxyl terminus of mature SAP-1, indicating extensive carboxyl-terminal processing. The nucleotide sequence of cDNA encoding prepro-SAP-1 includes 1449 bases from the assigned initiation codon ATG at base-pair 472 to the stop codon TGA at base-pair 1921. The first 23 amino acids coded after the initiation ATG are characteristic of a signal peptide. The calculated molecular mass for a polypeptide encoded by 1449 bases is ≅ 53 kDa, in keeping with the reported value for pro-SAP-1. The data indicate that after removal of the signal peptide mature SAP-1 is generated by removing an additional 7 amino acids from the amino terminus and ≅ 373 amino acids from the carboxyl terminus. One potential glycosylation site was previously found in mature SAP-1. Three additional potential glycosylation sites are present in the processed carboxyl-terminal polypeptide, which they designate as P-2

  18. Patterns of transposable element expression and insertion in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan A Clayton

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Human transposable element (TE activity in somatic tissues causes mutations that can contribute to tumorigenesis. Indeed, TE insertion mutations have been implicated in the etiology of a number of different cancer types. Nevertheless, the full extent of somatic TE activity, along with its relationship to tumorigenesis, have yet to be fully explored. Recent developments in bioinformatics software make it possible to analyze TE expression levels and TE insertional activity directly from transcriptome (RNA-seq and whole genome (DNA-seq next-generation sequence data. We applied these new sequence analysis techniques to matched normal and primary tumor patient samples from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA in order to analyze the patterns of TE expression and insertion for three cancer types: breast invasive carcinoma, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and lung adenocarcinoma. Our analysis focused on the three most abundant families of active human TEs: Alu, SVA and L1. We found evidence for high levels of somatic TE activity for these three families in normal and cancer samples across diverse tissue types. Abundant transcripts for all three TE families were detected in both normal and cancer tissues along with an average of ~80 unique TE insertions per individual patient/tissue. We observed an increase in L1 transcript expression and L1 insertional activity in primary tumor samples for all three cancer types. Tumor-specific TE insertions are enriched for private mutations, consistent with a potentially causal role in tumorigenesis. We used genome feature analysis to investigate two specific cases of putative cancer-causing TE mutations in further detail. An Alu insertion in an upstream enhancer of the CBL tumor suppressor gene is associated with down-regulation of the gene in a single breast cancer patient, and an L1 insertion in the first exon of the BAALC gene also disrupts its expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Our results are

  19. Normally-off AlGaN/GaN-based MOS-HEMT with self-terminating TMAH wet recess etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Dong-Hyeok; Jo, Young-Woo; Won, Chul-Ho; Lee, Jun-Hyeok; Seo, Jae Hwa; Lee, Sang-Heung; Lim, Jong-Won; Kim, Ji Heon; Kang, In Man; Cristoloveanu, Sorin; Lee, Jung-Hee

    2018-03-01

    Normally-off AlGaN/GaN-based MOS-HEMT has been fabricated by utilizing damage-free self-terminating tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) recess etching. The device exhibited a threshold voltage of +2.0 V with good uniformity, extremely small hysteresis of ∼20 mV, and maximum drain current of 210 mA/mm. The device also exhibited excellent off-state performances, such as breakdown voltage of ∼800 V with off-state leakage current as low as ∼10-12 A and high on/off current ratio (Ion/Ioff) of 1010. These excellent device performances are believed to be due to the high quality recessed surface, provided by the simple self-terminating TMAH etching.

  20. Investigation of the N-terminal coding region of MUC7 alterations in dentistry students with and without caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koç Öztürk L

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human low-molecular weight salivary mucin (MUC7 is a small, secreted glycoprotein coded by MUC7. In the oral cavity, they inhibit the colonization of oral bacteria, including cariogenic ones, by masking their surface adhesions, thus helping saliva to avoid dental caries. The N-terminal domain is important for low-molecular weight (MG2 mucins to contact with oral microorganisms. In this study, we aimed to identify the N-terminal coding region of the MUC7 gene between individuals with and without caries. Forty-four healthy dental students were enrolled in this study; 24 of them were classified to have caries [decayed, missing, filled-teeth (DMFT = 5.6] according to the World Health Organization (WHO criteria, and 20 of them were caries-free (DMFT = 0. Simplified oral hygiene index (OHI-S and gingival index (GI were used to determine the oral hygiene and gingival conditions. Total protein levels and salivary total protein levels and salivary buffer capacity (SBC were determined by Lowry and Ericsson methods. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood cells of all the participants and genotyping was carried out by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR-sequencing method. No statistical differences were found between two groups in the terms of salivary parameters, oral hygiene and gingival conditions. We detected one common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP that leads to a change of asparagine to lysine at codon 80. This substitution was found in 29.0 and 40.0%, respectively, of the groups with and without caries. No other sequence variations were detected. The SNP found in this study may be a specific polymorphism affecting the Turkish population. Further studies with extended numbers are necessary in order to clarify this finding.

  1. The membranotropic activity of N-terminal peptides from the pore ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The membranotropic activity of N-terminal peptides from the pore-forming proteins sticholysin I and II is modulated by hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions ... Center for Protein Studies, Biology Faculty, University of Havana, Havana, Cuba; Department of Applied Physics, Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São ...

  2. Arene-Inserted Extended Germa[n]pericyclynes: Synthesis, Structure, and Phosphorescence Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Hiroki; Mori, Junta; Ito, Shunichiro; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Morimoto, Tsumoru; Tanaka, Kazuo; Chujo, Yoshiki; Kakiuchi, Kiyomi

    2017-07-26

    This report describes the synthesis and characterization of arene-inserted extended (ArEx) germa[n]pericyclynes composed of germanium and 1,4-diethynylbenzene units. These novel cyclic germanium-π unit materials were synthesized with diethynylbenzene and germanium dichloride. X-ray crystallographic analysis revealed their structures, and the planar conformation of ArEx germa[4]pericyclyne along with the regular aromatic rings. UV/Vis absorption spectra and fluorescence emission spectra showed considerably unique and highly improved character compared to previously reported germa[n]pericyclynes. Even in the absence of transition metal components, phosphorescence emissions were observed, and the emission lifetimes were dramatically improved. ArEx germa[n]pericyclynes showed high photoluminescence quantum yields, whereas low photoluminescence quantum yields were observed for acyclic compounds. Density functional theory calculations show delocalized orbitals between skipped alkyne units through a germanium tether, and an increase in the HOMO energy level, leading to a small HOMO-LUMO energy gap. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Hydroxyl Radical-Mediated Novel Modification of Peptides: N-Terminal Cyclization through the Formation of α-Ketoamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seon Hwa; Kyung, Hyunsook; Yokota, Ryo; Goto, Takaaki; Oe, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-20

    The hydroxyl radical-mediated oxidation of peptides and proteins constitutes a large group of post-translational modifications that can result in structural and functional changes. These oxidations can lead to hydroxylation, sulfoxidation, or carbonylation of certain amino acid residues and cleavage of peptide bonds. In addition, hydroxyl radicals can convert the N-terminus of peptides to an α-ketoamide via abstraction of the N-terminal α-hydrogen and hydrolysis of the ketimine intermediate. In the present study, we identified N-terminal cyclization as a novel modification mediated by a hydroxyl radical. The reaction of angiotensin (Ang) II (DRVYIHPF) and the hydroxyl radical generated by the Cu(II)/ascorbic acid (AA) system or UV/hydrogen peroxide system produced N-terminal cyclized-Ang II (Ang C) and pyruvamide-Ang II (Ang P, CH3COCONH-RVYIHPF). The structure of Ang C was confirmed by mass spectrometry and comparison to an authentic standard. The subsequent incubation of isolated Ang P in the presence of Cu(II)/AA revealed that Ang P was the direct precursor of Ang C. The proposed mechanism involves the formation of a nitrogen-centered (aminyl) radical, which cyclizes to form a five-membered ring containing the alkoxy radical. The subsequent β-scission reaction of the alkoxyl radical results in the cleavage of the terminal CH3CO group. The initial aminyl radical can be stabilized by chelation to the Cu(II) ions. The affinity of Ang C toward the Ang II type 1 receptor was significantly lower than that of Ang II or Ang P. Ang C was not further metabolized by aminopeptidase A, which converts Ang II to Ang III. Hydroxyl radical-mediated N-terminal cyclization was also observed in other Ang peptides containing N-terminal alanine, arginine, valine, and amyloid β 1-11 (DAEFRHDSGYE).

  4. 'Boomerang'-like insertion of a fusogenic peptide in a lipid membrane revealed by solid-state 19F NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonin, Sergii; Dürr, Ulrich H N; Glaser, Ralf W; Ulrich, Anne S

    2004-02-01

    Solid state (19)F NMR revealed the conformation and alignment of the fusogenic peptide sequence B18 from the sea urchin fertilization protein bindin embedded in flat phospholipid bilayers. Single (19)F labels were introduced into nine distinct positions along the wild-type sequence by substituting each hydrophobic amino acid, one by one, with L-4-fluorophenylglycine. Their anisotropic chemical shifts were measured in uniaxially oriented membrane samples and used as orientational constraints to model the peptide structure in the membrane-bound state. Previous (1)H NMR studies of B18 in 30% TFE and in detergent micelles had shown that the peptide structure consists of two alpha-helical segments that are connected by a flexible hinge. This helix-break-helix motif was confirmed here by the solid-state (19)F NMR data, while no other secondary structure (beta-sheet, 3(10)-helix) was compatible with the set of orientational constraints. For both alpha-helical segments we found that the helical conformation extends all the way to the respective N- and C-termini of the peptide. Analysis of the corresponding tilt and azimuthal rotation angles showed that the N-terminal helix of B18 is immersed obliquely into the bilayer (at a tilt angle tau approximately 54 degrees), whereas the C-terminus is peripherally aligned (tau approximately 91 degrees). The azimuthal orientation of the two segments is consistent with the amphiphilic distribution of side-chains. The observed 'boomerang'-like mode of insertion into the membrane may thus explain how peptide binding leads to lipid dehydration and acyl chain perturbation as a prerequisite for bilayer fusion to occur. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Roles of N- and C-terminal domains in the ligand-binding properties of cytoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanai, Shumpei; Tsujino, Hirofumi; Yamashita, Taku; Torii, Ryo; Sawai, Hitomi; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Oohora, Koji; Hayashi, Takashi; Uno, Tadayuki

    2018-02-01

    Cytoglobin (Cygb) is a member of the hexacoordinated globin protein family and is expressed ubiquitously in rat and human tissues. Although Cygb is reportedly upregulated under hypoxic conditions both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting a physiological function to protect cells under hypoxic/ischemic conditions by scavenging reactive oxygen species or by signal transduction, the mechanisms associated with this function have not been fully elucidated. Recent studies comparing Cygbs among several species suggest that mammalian Cygbs show a distinctly longer C-terminal domain potentially involved in unique physiological functions. In this study, we prepared human Cygb mutants (ΔC, ΔN, and ΔNC) with either one or both terminal domains truncated and investigated the enzymatic functions and structural features by spectroscopic methods. Evaluation of the superoxide-scavenging activity between Cygb variants showed that the ΔC and ΔNC mutants exhibited slightly higher activity involving superoxide scavenging as compared with wild-type Cygb. Subsequent experiments involving ligand titration, flash photolysis, and resonance Raman spectroscopic studies suggested that the truncation of the C- and N-terminal domains resulted in less effective to dissociation constants and binding rates for carbon monoxide, respectively. Furthermore, structural stability was assessed by guanidine hydrochloride and revealed that the C-terminal domain might play a vital role in improving structure, whereas the N-terminal domain did not exert a similar effect. These findings indicated that long terminal domains could be important not only in regulating enzymatic activity but also for structural stability, and that the domains might be relevant to other hypothesized physiological functions for Cygb. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cloning of a cDNA encoding the human cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate-specific receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohlmann, R.; Nagel, G.; Schmidt, B.

    1987-01-01

    Complementary DNA clones for the human cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate-specific receptor have been isolated from a human placenta library in λgt11. The nucleotide sequence of the 2463-base-pair cDNA insert includes a 145-base-pair 5' untranslated region, an open reading frame of 831 base pairs corresponding to 277 amino acids, and a 1487-base-pair 3' untranslated region. The deduced amino acid sequence is colinear with that determined by amino acid sequencing of the N-terminus peptide (41 residues) and nine tryptic peptides (93 additional residues). The receptor is synthesized as a precursor with a signal peptide of 20 amino acids. The hydrophobicity profile of the receptor indicates a single membrane-spanning domain, which separates an N-terminal region containing five potential N-glycosylation sites from a C-terminal region lacking N-glycosylation sites. Thus the N-terminal (M/sub r/ = 18,299) and C-terminal (M/sub r/ ≤ 7648) segments of the mature receptor are assumed to be exposed to the extracytosolic and cytosolic sides of the membrane, respectively. Analysis of a panel of somatic cell (mouse-human) hybrids shows that the gene for the receptor is located on human chromosome 12

  7. Human tissue factor: cDNA sequence and chromosome localization of the gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarpati, E.M.; Wen, D.; Broze, G.J. Jr.; Miletich, J.P.; Flandermeyer, R.R.; Siegel, N.R.; Sadler, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    A human placenta cDNA library in λgt11 was screened for the expression of tissue factor antigens with rabbit polyclonal anti-human tissue factor immunoglobulin G. Among 4 million recombinant clones screened, one positive, λHTF8, expressed a protein that shared epitopes with authentic human brain tissue factor. The 1.1-kilobase cDNA insert of λHTF8 encoded a peptide that contained the amino-terminal protein sequence of human brain tissue factor. Northern blotting identified a major mRNA species of 2.2 kilobases and a minor species of ∼ 3.2 kilobases in poly(A) + RNA of placenta. Only 2.2-kilobase mRNA was detected in human brain and in the human monocytic U937 cell line. In U937 cells, the quantity of tissue factor mRNA was increased several fold by exposure of the cells to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Additional cDNA clones were selected by hybridization with the cDNA insert of λHTF8. These overlapping isolates span 2177 base pairs of the tissue factor cDNA sequence that includes a 5'-noncoding region of 75 base pairs, an open reading frame of 885 base pairs, a stop codon, a 3'-noncoding region of 1141 base pairs, and a poly(a) tail. The open reading frame encodes a 33-kilodalton protein of 295 amino acids. The predicted sequence includes a signal peptide of 32 or 34 amino acids, a probable extracellular factor VII binding domain of 217 or 219 amino acids, a transmembrane segment of 23 acids, and a cytoplasmic tail of 21 amino acids. There are three potential glycosylation sites with the sequence Asn-X-Thr/Ser. The 3'-noncoding region contains an inverted Alu family repetitive sequence. The tissue factor gene was localized to chromosome 1 by hybridization of the cDNA insert of λHTF8 to flow-sorted human chromosomes

  8. BIM-Mediated Membrane Insertion of the BAK Pore Domain Is an Essential Requirement for Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Weber

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available BAK activation represents a key step during apoptosis, but how it converts into a mitochondria-permeabilizing pore remains unclear. By further delineating the structural rearrangements involved, we reveal that BAK activation progresses through a series of independent steps: BH3-domain exposure, N-terminal change, oligomerization, and membrane insertion. Employing a “BCL-XL-addiction” model, we show that neutralization of BCL-XL by the BH3 mimetic ABT-737 resulted in death only when cells were reconstituted with BCL-XL:BAK, but not BCL-2/ BCL-XL:BIM complexes. Although this resembles the indirect model, release of BAK from BCL-XL did not result in spontaneous adoption of the pore conformation. Commitment to apoptosis required association of the direct activator BIM with oligomeric BAK promoting its conversion to a membrane-inserted pore. The sequential nature of this cascade provides multiple opportunities for other BCL-2 proteins to interfere with or promote BAK activation and unites aspects of the indirect and direct activation models.

  9. Sequence analysis of PROTEOLYSIS 6 from Solanum lycopersicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslan, Nur Farhana; Chew, Bee Lyn; Goh, Hoe-Han; Isa, Nurulhikma Md

    2018-04-01

    The N-end rule pathway is a protein degradation pathway that relates the protein half-life with the identity of its N-terminal residues. A destabilizing N-terminal residues is created by enzymatic reaction or chemical modifications. This destabilized substrate will be recognized by PROTEOLYSIS 6 (PRT6) protein, which encodes an E3 ligase enzyme and resulted in substrate degradation by proteasome. PRT6 has been studied in Arabidopsis thaliana and barley but not yet been studied in fleshy fruit plants. Hence, this study was carried out in tomato that is known as the model for fleshy fruit plants. BLASTX analysis identified that Solyc09g010830 which encodes for a PRT6 gene in tomato based on its sequence similarity with PRT6 in A. thaliana. In silico gene expression analysis shows that PRT6 gene was highly expressed in tomato fruits breaker +5. Co-expression analysis shows that PRT6 may not only involved in abiotic stresses but also in biotic stresses. The objective is to analyze the sequence and characterize PRT6 gene in tomato.

  10. Short- and long-term evolutionary dynamics of bacterial insertion sequences: insights from Wolbachia endosymbionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerveau, Nicolas; Leclercq, Sébastien; Leroy, Elodie; Bouchon, Didier; Cordaux, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Transposable elements (TE) are one of the major driving forces of genome evolution, raising the question of the long-term dynamics underlying their evolutionary success. Long-term TE evolution can readily be reconstructed in eukaryotes, thanks to many degraded copies constituting genomic fossil records of past TE proliferations. By contrast, bacterial genomes usually experience high sequence turnover and short TE retention times, thereby obscuring ancient TE evolutionary patterns. We found that Wolbachia bacterial genomes contain 52-171 insertion sequence (IS) TEs. IS account for 11% of Wolbachia wRi, which is one of the highest IS genomic coverage reported in prokaryotes to date. We show that many IS groups are currently expanding in various Wolbachia genomes and that IS horizontal transfers are frequent among strains, which can explain the apparent synchronicity of these IS proliferations. Remarkably, >70% of Wolbachia IS are nonfunctional. They constitute an unusual bacterial IS genomic fossil record providing direct empirical evidence for a long-term IS evolutionary dynamics following successive periods of intense transpositional activity. Our results show that comprehensive IS annotations have the potential to provide new insights into prokaryote TE evolution and, more generally, prokaryote genome evolution. Indeed, the identification of an important IS genomic fossil record in Wolbachia demonstrates that IS elements are not always of recent origin, contrary to the conventional view of TE evolution in prokaryote genomes. Our results also raise the question whether the abundance of IS fossils is specific to Wolbachia or it may be a general, albeit overlooked, feature of prokaryote genomes.

  11. Crystallization of Galectin-8 Linker Reveals Intricate Relationship between the N-terminal Tail and the Linker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong Si

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Galectin-8 (Gal-8 plays a significant role in normal immunological function as well as in cancer. This lectin contains two carbohydrate recognition domains (CRD connected by a peptide linker. The N-terminal CRD determines ligand binding specificity, whereas the linker has been proposed to regulate overall Gal-8 function, including multimerization and biological activity. Here, we crystallized the Gal-8 N-terminal CRD with the peptide linker using a crystallization condition that contains Ni2+. The Ni2+ ion was found to be complexed between two CRDs via crystal packing contacts. The coordination between Ni2+ and Asp25 plays an indirect role in determining the structure of β-strand F0 and in influencing the linker conformation which could not be defined due to its dynamic nature. The linker was also shortened in situ and crystallized under a different condition, leading to a higher resolution structure refined to 1.08 Å. This crystal structure allowed definition of a short portion of the linker interacting with the Gal-8 N-terminal tail via ionic interactions and hydrogen bonds. Observation of two Gal-8 N-terminal CRD structures implies that the N-terminal tail and the linker may influence each other’s conformation. In addition, under specific crystallization conditions, glycerol could replace lactose and was observed at the carbohydrate binding site. However, glycerol did not show inhibition activity in hemagglutination assay.

  12. Three duplication events and variable molecular evolution ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Some large insertion fragments of NbeGGPS1 and NbeGGPS3 were deleted for more visibility. Three conserved motifs were located in the middle region of proteins and were conservative in all 25 sequences. Four positive selection sites were detected in N-terminal region of proteins that are labelled as red arrows.

  13. Recomendación para la Atención Ético-Médica del Paciente Terminal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Sánchez Torres

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available

    (Aprobada en Sesión del 18 de abril de 2002

    Pautas para el Manejo Ético-Médico del Paciente en Estado Terminal.

    En la actualidad, los avances tecnológicos en el campo de las Ciencias Médicas han hecho posible prolongar la vida de pacientes que en otras circunstancias estarían condenados a fallecer a corto plazo como consecuencia de una enfermedad o de una agresión traumática. La existencia de las llamadas Unidades de Cuidados Intensivos (UCI ha sido un factor preponderante para ello. Se trata de espacios asistenciales destinados a manejar “agresivamente” los estados considerados como “críticos“, utilizando aparatos y procedimientos de avanzada, a unos costos económicos altos, con frecuencia superiores a las posibilidades pecuniarias de muchos de los pacientes.

    Frente al valor de la vida -de la vida útil y de calidad, por supuesto-, cualquier gasto que signifique su conservación se convierte en una buena inversión. Tal principio justifica la existencia de las UCI.

    Sin embargo, no es raro que en las UCI sean aceptados y manejados por tiempo largo pacientes cuya recuperación no es posible, pese a la variada y sofisticada tecnología con que se cuenta. Se trata de individuos catalogados como “en estado terminal“, para significar con ello que su enfermedad es ineluctablemente mortal, vale decir, que la Medicina ya ha sido derrotada.

    Teniendo en cuenta lo anterior, el manejo agresivo y costoso de dichos enfermos es a todas luces injustificado, lo cual configura la llamada “distanasia” o “encarnizamiento terapéutico”, criticable desde el punto de vista científico y, con más razón, desde el punto de vista ético.

    Por no ser subsidiario de los beneficios de la medicina agresiva o intensiva, el enfermo en estado terminal se constituye en un paciente muy especial.

    Por una parte, habiendo sido desahuciado médicamente, algunos consideran que las

  14. The N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 is essential and sufficient for its caveolae-association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Zhuang [State Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Laboratory of System Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Zou, Xinle [State Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Wang, Hongzhong; Lei, Jigang; Wu, Yuan [State Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Laboratory of System Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Liao, Kan, E-mail: kliao@sibs.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Laboratory of System Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China)

    2015-01-16

    Highlight: • The N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 determines caveolar association. • Different cellular localization of PTRF/cavin-1 influences its serine 389 and 391 phosphorylation state. • PTRF/cavin-1 regulates cell motility via its caveolar association. - Abstract: PTRF/cavin-1 is a protein of two lives. Its reported functions in ribosomal RNA synthesis and in caveolae formation happen in two different cellular locations: nucleus vs. plasma membrane. Here, we identified that the N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 was essential for the protein to be associated with caveolae in plasma membrane. It could counteract the effect of nuclear localization sequence in the molecule (AA 235–251). Deletion of this leucine-zipper motif from PTRF/cavin-1 caused the mutant to be exclusively localized in nuclei. The fusion of this leucine-zipper motif with histone 2A, which is a nuclear protein, could induce the fusion protein to be exported from nucleus. Cell migration was greatly inhibited in PTRF/cavin-1{sup −/−} mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). The inhibited cell motility could only be rescued by exogenous cavin-1 but not the leucine-zipper motif deleted cavin-1 mutant. Plasma membrane dynamics is an important factor in cell motility control. Our results suggested that the membrane dynamics in cell migration is affected by caveolae associated PTRF/cavin-1.

  15. The N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 is essential and sufficient for its caveolae-association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Zhuang; Zou, Xinle; Wang, Hongzhong; Lei, Jigang; Wu, Yuan; Liao, Kan

    2015-01-01

    Highlight: • The N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 determines caveolar association. • Different cellular localization of PTRF/cavin-1 influences its serine 389 and 391 phosphorylation state. • PTRF/cavin-1 regulates cell motility via its caveolar association. - Abstract: PTRF/cavin-1 is a protein of two lives. Its reported functions in ribosomal RNA synthesis and in caveolae formation happen in two different cellular locations: nucleus vs. plasma membrane. Here, we identified that the N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 was essential for the protein to be associated with caveolae in plasma membrane. It could counteract the effect of nuclear localization sequence in the molecule (AA 235–251). Deletion of this leucine-zipper motif from PTRF/cavin-1 caused the mutant to be exclusively localized in nuclei. The fusion of this leucine-zipper motif with histone 2A, which is a nuclear protein, could induce the fusion protein to be exported from nucleus. Cell migration was greatly inhibited in PTRF/cavin-1 −/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). The inhibited cell motility could only be rescued by exogenous cavin-1 but not the leucine-zipper motif deleted cavin-1 mutant. Plasma membrane dynamics is an important factor in cell motility control. Our results suggested that the membrane dynamics in cell migration is affected by caveolae associated PTRF/cavin-1

  16. Aspects of insertion in random trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagchi, Arunabha; Reingold, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    A method formulated by Yao and used by Brown has yielded bounds on the fraction of nodes with specified properties in trees bult by a sequence of random internal nodes in a random tree built by binary search and insertion, and show that in such a tree about bounds better than those now known. We

  17. Copper(II) Binding Sites in N-Terminally Acetylated α-Synuclein: A Theoretical Rationalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramis, Rafael; Ortega-Castro, Joaquín; Vilanova, Bartolomé; Adrover, Miquel; Frau, Juan

    2017-08-03

    The interactions between N-terminally acetylated α-synuclein and Cu(II) at several binding sites have been studied with DFT calculations, specifically with the M06 hybrid functional and the ωB97X-D DFT-D functional. In previous experimental studies, Cu(II) was shown to bind several α-synuclein residues, including Met1-Asp2 and His50, forming square planar coordination complexes. Also, it was determined that a low-affinity binding site exists in the C-terminal domain, centered on Asp121. However, in the N-terminally acetylated protein, present in vivo, the Met1 site is blocked. In this work, we simplify the representation of the protein by modeling each experimentally found binding site as a complex between an N-terminally acetylated α-synuclein dipeptide (or several independent residues) and a Cu(II) cation, and compare the results with a number of additional, structurally analogous sites not experimentally found. This way of representing the binding sites, although extremely simple, allows us to reproduce experimental results and to provide a theoretical rationale to explain the preference of Cu(II) for certain sites, as well as explicit geometrical structures for the complexes formed. These results are important to understand the interactions between α-synuclein and Cu(II), one of the factors inducing structural changes in the protein and leading to aggregated forms of it which may play a role in neurodegeneration.

  18. La eficiencia terminal en la Educación Superior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. C. Victor Millo Carmenate

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Se procesan los resultados de promoción de los estudian­tes de la carrera de Ingeniería Mecánica disponibles en la Secretaría General de la Facultad de Ingeniería de la Universidad de Cienfuegos entre los años 2008 al 2015 y se encuestan 35 de los 75 que abandonaron sus estudios de­finitivamente en este mismo período, con el objetivo de co­nocer desde la perspectivas de los estudiantes causas del comportamiento de varios indicadores de eficiencia e iden­tificar los factores que afectan la eficiencia terminal, para lo cual se hizo uso de métodos estadísticos y cualitativos de análisis. Se realiza una propuesta de acciones a considerar para la mejora de los indicadores de eficiencia terminal.

  19. Quantifying the Number of Independent Organelle DNA Insertions in Genome Evolution and Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazkani-Covo, Einat; Martin, William F

    2017-05-01

    Fragments of organelle genomes are often found as insertions in nuclear DNA. These fragments of mitochondrial DNA (numts) and plastid DNA (nupts) are ubiquitous components of eukaryotic genomes. They are, however, often edited out during the genome assembly process, leading to systematic underestimation of their frequency. Numts and nupts, once inserted, can become further fragmented through subsequent insertion of mobile elements or other recombinational events that disrupt the continuity of the inserted sequence relative to the genuine organelle DNA copy. Because numts and nupts are typically identified through sequence comparison tools such as BLAST, disruption of insertions into smaller fragments can lead to systematic overestimation of numt and nupt frequencies. Accurate identification of numts and nupts is important, however, both for better understanding of their role during evolution, and for monitoring their increasingly evident role in human disease. Human populations are polymorphic for 141 numt loci, five numts are causal to genetic disease, and cancer genomic studies are revealing an abundance of numts associated with tumor progression. Here, we report investigation of salient parameters involved in obtaining accurate estimates of numt and nupt numbers in genome sequence data. Numts and nupts from 44 sequenced eukaryotic genomes reveal lineage-specific differences in the number, relative age and frequency of insertional events as well as lineage-specific dynamics of their postinsertional fragmentation. Our findings outline the main technical parameters influencing accurate identification and frequency estimation of numts in genomic studies pertinent to both evolution and human health. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  20. cDNA cloning, sequence analysis, and chromosomal localization of the gene for human carnitine palmitoyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finocchiaro, G.; Taroni, F.; Martin, A.L.; Colombo, I.; Tarelli, G.T.; DiDonato, S.; Rocchi, M.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have cloned and sequenced a cDNA encoding human liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase an inner mitochondrial membrane enzyme that plays a major role in the fatty acid oxidation pathway. Mixed oligonucleotide primers whose sequences were deduced from one tryptic peptide obtained from purified CPTase were used in a polymerase chain reaction, allowing the amplification of a 0.12-kilobase fragment of human genomic DNA encoding such a peptide. A 60-base-pair (bp) oligonucleotide synthesized on the basis of the sequence from this fragment was used for the screening of a cDNA library from human liver and hybridized to a cDNA insert of 2255 bp. This cDNA contains an open reading frame of 1974 bp that encodes a protein of 658 amino acid residues including 25 residues of an NH 2 -terminal leader peptide. The assignment of this open reading frame to human liver CPTase is confirmed by matches to seven different amino acid sequences of tryptic peptides derived from pure human CPTase and by the 82.2% homology with the amino acid sequence of rat CPTase. The NH 2 -terminal region of CPTase contains a leucine-proline motif that is shared by carnitine acetyl- and octanoyltransferases and by choline acetyltransferase. The gene encoding CPTase was assigned to human chromosome 1, region 1q12-1pter, by hybridization of CPTase cDNA with a DNA panel of 19 human-hanster somatic cell hybrids

  1. 48 CFR 52.249-2 - Termination for Convenience of the Government (Fixed-Price).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Convenience of the Government (Fixed-Price). 52.249-2 Section 52.249-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.249-2 Termination for Convenience of the Government (Fixed-Price). As prescribed in 49.502(b)(1)(i), insert the following clause: Termination for Convenience of the Government...

  2. A non-catalytic N-terminal domain negatively influences the nucleotide exchange activity of translation elongation factor 1Bα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosiuk, Tetiana V; Shalak, Vyacheslav F; Szczepanowski, Roman H; Negrutskii, Boris S; El'skaya, Anna V

    2016-02-01

    Eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1Bα (eEF1Bα) is a functional homolog of the bacterial factor EF-Ts, and is a component of the macromolecular eEF1B complex. eEF1Bα functions as a catalyst of guanine nucleotide exchange on translation elongation factor 1A (eEF1A). The C-terminal domain of eEF1Bα is necessary and sufficient for its catalytic activity, whereas the N-terminal domain interacts with eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1Bγ (eEF1Bγ) to form a tight complex. However, eEF1Bγ has been shown to enhance the catalytic activity of eEF1Bα attributed to the C-terminal domain of eEF1Bα. This suggests that the N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα may in some way influence the guanine nucleotide exchange process. We have shown that full-length recombinant eEF1Bα and its truncated forms are non-globular proteins with elongated shapes. Truncation of the N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα, which is dispensable for catalytic activity, resulted in acceleration of the rate of guanine nucleotide exchange on eEF1A compared to full-length eEF1Bα. A similar effect on the catalytic activity of eEF1Bα was observed after its interaction with eEF1Bγ. We suggest that the non-catalytic N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα may interfere with eEF1A binding to the C-terminal catalytic domain, resulting in a decrease in the overall rate of the guanine nucleotide exchange reaction. Formation of a tight complex between the eEF1Bγ and eEF1Bα N-terminal domains abolishes this inhibitory effect. © 2015 FEBS.

  3. 48 CFR 49.603-3 - Cost-reimbursement contracts-complete termination, if settlement includes cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cost-reimbursement... Termination Forms and Formats 49.603-3 Cost-reimbursement contracts—complete termination, if settlement includes cost. [Insert the following in Block 14 of SF 30 for settlement of cost-reimbursement contracts...

  4. Ribonucleocapsid Formation of SARS-COV Through Molecular Action of the N-Terminal Domain of N Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saikatendu, K.S.; Joseph, J.S.; Subramanian, V.; Neuman, B.W.; Buchmeier, M.J.; Stevens, R.C.; Kuhn, P.; /Scripps Res. Inst.

    2007-07-12

    Conserved amongst all coronaviruses are four structural proteins, the matrix (M), small envelope (E) and spike (S) that are embedded in the viral membrane and the nucleocapsid phosphoprotein (N), which exists in a ribonucleoprotein complex in their lumen. The N terminal domain of coronaviral N proteins (N-NTD) provides a scaffold for RNA binding while the C-terminal domain (N-CTD) mainly acts as oligomerization modules during assembly. The C-terminus of N protein anchors it to the viral membrane by associating with M protein. We characterized the structures of N-NTD from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in two crystal forms, at 1.17A (monoclinic) and 1.85 A (cubic) respectively, solved by molecular replacement using the homologous avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) structure. Flexible loops in the solution structure of SARS-CoV N-NTD are now shown to be well ordered around the beta-sheet core. The functionally important positively charged beta-hairpin protrudes out of the core and is oriented similar to that in the IBV N-NTD and is involved in crystal packing in the monoclinic form. In the cubic form, the monomers form trimeric units that stack in a helical array. Comparison of crystal packing of SARS-CoV and IBV N-NTDs suggest a common mode of RNA recognition, but probably associate differently in vivo during the formation of the ribonucleoprotein complex. Electrostatic potential distribution on the surface of homology models of related coronaviral N-NTDs hints that they employ different modes of both RNA recognition as well as oligomeric assembly, perhaps explaining why their nucleocapsids have different morphologies.

  5. The hydrophobic core of twin-arginine signal sequences orchestrates specific binding to Tat-pathway related chaperones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitha Shanmugham

    Full Text Available Redox enzyme maturation proteins (REMPs bind pre-proteins destined for translocation across the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane via the twin-arginine translocation system and enable the enzymatic incorporation of complex cofactors. Most REMPs recognize one specific pre-protein. The recognition site usually resides in the N-terminal signal sequence. REMP binding protects signal peptides against degradation by proteases. REMPs are also believed to prevent binding of immature pre-proteins to the translocon. The main aim of this work was to better understand the interaction between REMPs and substrate signal sequences. Two REMPs were investigated: DmsD (specific for dimethylsulfoxide reductase, DmsA and TorD (specific for trimethylamine N-oxide reductase, TorA. Green fluorescent protein (GFP was genetically fused behind the signal sequences of TorA and DmsA. This ensures native behavior of the respective signal sequence and excludes any effects mediated by the mature domain of the pre-protein. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that these chimeric pre-proteins specifically bind to the cognate REMP. Furthermore, the region of the signal sequence that is responsible for specific binding to the corresponding REMP was identified by creating region-swapped chimeric signal sequences, containing parts of both the TorA and DmsA signal sequences. Surprisingly, specificity is not encoded in the highly variable positively charged N-terminal region of the signal sequence, but in the more similar hydrophobic C-terminal parts. Interestingly, binding of DmsD to its model substrate reduced membrane binding of the pre-protein. This property could link REMP-signal peptide binding to its reported proofreading function.

  6. Gestión centralizada de la iluminación en Terminal 1 del aeropuerto Barcelona-El Prat

    OpenAIRE

    Borraz Rocafull, Óscar

    2017-01-01

    Este trabajo consiste en el estudio de una gestión centralizada de iluminación en la Terminal T1 del Aeropuerto de Barcelona-El Prat. Se dan a conocer los sistemas y subsistemas del control de iluminación, con base KNX-EIB (sistema estándar de interconexión de dispositivos) y su central de gestión. También se explican los fallos encontrados al finalizar la obra de construcción de la T1 (terminada en 2009) o los sucedidos durante su operatividad. Así como mejoras para su func...

  7. Engineering cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) for resistance to cotton leaf curl disease using viral truncated AC1 DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, Jamil A; Zafar, Yusuf; Arshad, Muhammad; Mansoor, Shahid; Asad, Shaheen

    2011-04-01

    Several important biological processes are performed by distinct functional domains found on replication-associated protein (Rep) encoded by AC1 of geminiviruses. Two truncated forms of replicase (tAC1) gene, capable of expressing only the N-terminal 669 bp (5'AC1) and C-terminal 783 bp (3'AC1) nucleotides cloned under transcriptional control of the CaMV35S were introduced into cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) using LBA4404 strain of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to make use of an interference strategy for impairing cotton leaf curl virus (CLCuV) infection in transgenic cotton. Compared with nontransformed control, we observed that transgenic cotton plants overexpressing either N-terminal (5'AC1) or C-terminal (3'AC1) sequences confer resistance to CLCuV by inhibiting replication of viral genomic and β satellite DNA components. Molecular analysis by Northern blot hybridization revealed high transgene expression in early and late growth stages associated with inhibition of CLCuV replication. Of the eight T(1) transgenic lines tested, six had delayed and minor symptoms as compared to nontransformed control lines which developed disease symptoms after 2-3 weeks of whitefly-mediated viral delivery. Virus biological assay and growth of T(2) plants proved that transgenic cotton plants overexpressing 5'- and 3'AC1 displayed high resistance level up to 72, 81%, respectively, as compared to non-transformed control plants following inoculation with viruliferous whiteflies giving significantly high cotton seed yield. Progeny analysis of these plants by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern blotting and virus biological assay showed stable transgene, integration, inheritance and cotton leaf curl disease (CLCuD) resistance in two of the eight transgenic lines having single or two transgene insertions. Transgenic cotton expressing partial AC1 gene of CLCuV can be used as virus resistance source in cotton breeding programs aiming to improve virus resistance in cotton crop.

  8. N-terminally truncated forms of human cathepsin F accumulate in aggresome-like inclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerič, Barbara; Dolenc, Iztok; Mihelič, Marko; Klarić, Martina; Zavašnik-Bergant, Tina; Gunčar, Gregor; Turk, Boris; Turk, Vito; Stoka, Veronika

    2013-10-01

    The contribution of individual cysteine cathepsins as positive mediators of programmed cell death is dependent on several factors, such as the type of stimuli, intensity and duration of the stimulus, and cell type involved. Of the eleven human cysteine cathepsins, cathepsin F is the only cathepsin that exhibits an extended N-terminal proregion, which contains a cystatin-like domain. We predicted that the wild-type human cathepsin F contains three natively disordered regions within the enzyme's propeptide and various amino acid stretches with high fibrillation propensity. Wild-type human cathepsin F and its N-terminally truncated forms, Ala(20)-Asp(484) (Δ(19)CatF), Pro(126)-Asp(484) (Δ(125)CatF), and Met(147)-Asp(484) (Δ(146)CatF) were cloned into the pcDNA3 vector and overexpressed in HEK 293T cells. Wild-type human cathepsin F displayed a clear vesicular labeling and colocalized with the LAMP2 protein, a lysosomal marker. However, all three N-terminally truncated forms of human cathepsin F were recovered as insoluble proteins, suggesting that the deletion of at least the signal peptides (Δ(19)CatF), results in protein aggregation. Noteworthy, they concentrated large perinuclear-juxtanuclear aggregates that accumulated within aggresome-like inclusions. These inclusions showed p62-positive immunoreactivity and were colocalized with the autophagy marker LC3B, but not with the LAMP2 protein. In addition, an approximately 2-3 fold increase in DEVDase activity was not sufficient to induce apoptotic cell death. These results suggested the clearance of the N-terminally truncated forms of human cathepsin F via the autophagy pathway, underlying its protective and prosurvival mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. N-terminal pro-C-type natriuretic peptide in serum associated with bone destruction in patients with multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mylin, Anne K; Goetze, Jens P; Heickendorff, Lene

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To examine whether N-terminal proCNP concentrations in serum is associated with bone destruction in patients with multiple myeloma. MATERIALS & METHODS: N-terminal proCNP and biochemical bone markers were measured in 153 patients. Radiographic bone disease and skeletal-related events were...

  10. 5'-Terminal AUGs in Escherichia coli mRNAs with Shine-Dalgarno Sequences: Identification and Analysis of Their Roles in Non-Canonical Translation Initiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather J Beck

    Full Text Available Analysis of the Escherichia coli transcriptome identified a unique subset of messenger RNAs (mRNAs that contain a conventional untranslated leader and Shine-Dalgarno (SD sequence upstream of the gene's start codon while also containing an AUG triplet at the mRNA's 5'- terminus (5'-uAUG. Fusion of the coding sequence specified by the 5'-terminal putative AUG start codon to a lacZ reporter gene, as well as primer extension inhibition assays, reveal that the majority of the 5'-terminal upstream open reading frames (5'-uORFs tested support some level of lacZ translation, indicating that these mRNAs can function both as leaderless and canonical SD-leadered mRNAs. Although some of the uORFs were expressed at low levels, others were expressed at levels close to that of the respective downstream genes and as high as the naturally leaderless cI mRNA of bacteriophage λ. These 5'-terminal uORFs potentially encode peptides of varying lengths, but their functions, if any, are unknown. In an effort to determine whether expression from the 5'-terminal uORFs impact expression of the immediately downstream cistron, we examined expression from the downstream coding sequence after mutations were introduced that inhibit efficient 5'-uORF translation. These mutations were found to affect expression from the downstream cistrons to varying degrees, suggesting that some 5'-uORFs may play roles in downstream regulation. Since the 5'-uAUGs found on these conventionally leadered mRNAs can function to bind ribosomes and initiate translation, this indicates that canonical mRNAs containing 5'-uAUGs should be examined for their potential to function also as leaderless mRNAs.

  11. Disruption of tetR type regulator adeN by mobile genetic element confers elevated virulence in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranathan, Rajagopalan; Pagal, Sudhakar; Sawant, Ajit R; Tomar, Archana; Madhangi, M; Sah, Suresh; Satti, Annapurna; Arunkumar, K P; Prashanth, K

    2017-10-03

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important human pathogen and considered as a major threat due to its extreme drug resistance. In this study, the genome of a hyper-virulent MDR strain PKAB07 of A. baumannii isolated from an Indian patient was sequenced and analyzed to understand its mechanisms of virulence, resistance and evolution. Comparative genome analysis of PKAB07 revealed virulence and resistance related genes scattered throughout the genome, instead of being organized as an island, indicating the highly mosaic nature of the genome. Many intermittent horizontal gene transfer events, insertion sequence (IS) element insertions identified were augmenting resistance machinery and elevating the SNP densities in A. baumannii eventually aiding in their swift evolution. ISAba1, the most widely distributed insertion sequence in A. baumannii was found in multiple sites in PKAB07. Out of many ISAba1 insertions, we identified novel insertions in 9 different genes wherein insertional inactivation of adeN (tetR type regulator) was significant. To assess the significance of this disruption in A. baumannii, adeN mutant and complement strains were constructed in A. baumannii ATCC 17978 strain and studied. Biofilm levels were abrogated in the adeN knockout when compared with the wild type and complemented strain of adeN knockout. Virulence of the adeN knockout mutant strain was observed to be high, which was validated by in vitro experiments and Galleria mellonella infection model. The overexpression of adeJ, a major component of AdeIJK efflux pump observed in adeN knockout strain could be the possible reason for the elevated virulence in adeN mutant and PKB07 strain. Knocking out of adeN in ATCC strain led to increased resistance and virulence at par with the PKAB07. Disruption of tetR type regulator adeN by ISAba1 consequently has led to elevated virulence in this pathogen.

  12. A novel and facile decay path of Criegee intermediates by intramolecular insertion reactions via roaming transition states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Trong-Nghia; Putikam, Raghunath; Lin, M. C.

    2015-01-01

    We have discovered a new and highly competitive product channel in the unimolecular decay process for small Criegee intermediates, CH 2 OO and anti/syn-CH 3 C(H)OO, occurring by intramolecular insertion reactions via a roaming-like transition state (TS) based on quantum-chemical calculations. Our results show that in the decomposition of CH 2 OO and anti-CH 3 C(H)OO, the predominant paths directly produce cis-HC(O)OH and syn-CH 3 C(O)OH acids with >110 kcal/mol exothermicities via loose roaming-like insertion TSs involving the terminal O atom and the neighboring C–H bonds. For syn-CH 3 C(H)OO, the major decomposition channel occurs by abstraction of a H atom from the CH 3 group by the terminal O atom producing CH 2 C(H)O–OH. At 298 K, the intramolecular insertion process in CH 2 OO was found to be 600 times faster than the commonly assumed ring-closing reaction

  13. Quantification of Tissue Trauma following Insulin Pen Needle Insertions in Skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Casper Bo; Larsen, Rasmus; Vestergaard, Jacob Schack

    Objective: Within the field of pen needle development, most research on needle design revolves around mechanical tensile testing and patient statements. Only little has been published on the actual biological skin response to needle insertions. The objective of this study was to develop a computa......Objective: Within the field of pen needle development, most research on needle design revolves around mechanical tensile testing and patient statements. Only little has been published on the actual biological skin response to needle insertions. The objective of this study was to develop...... a computational method to quantify tissue trauma based on skin bleeding and immune response. Method: Two common sized pen needles of 28G (0.36mm) and 32G (0.23mm) were inserted into skin of sedated LYD pigs prior to termination. Four pigs were included and a total of 32 randomized needle insertions were conducted...... diameter. Conclusion: A computational and quantitative method has been developed to assess tissue trauma following insulin pen needle insertions. Application of the method is tested by conduction of a needle diameter study. The obtained quantitative measures of tissue trauma correlate positively to needle...

  14. Concepts for stereoselective acrylate insertion

    KAUST Repository

    Neuwald, Boris

    2013-01-23

    Various phosphinesulfonato ligands and the corresponding palladium complexes [{((PaO)PdMeCl)-μ-M}n] ([{( X1-Cl)-μ-M}n], (PaO) = κ2- P,O-Ar2PC6H4SO2O) with symmetric (Ar = 2-MeOC6H4, 2-CF3C6H4, 2,6-(MeO)2C6H3, 2,6-(iPrO)2C 6H3, 2-(2′,6′-(MeO)2C 6H3)C6H4) and asymmetric substituted phosphorus atoms (Ar1 = 2,6-(MeO)2C6H 3, Ar2 = 2′-(2,6-(MeO)2C 6H3)C6H4; Ar1 = 2,6-(MeO)2C6H3, Ar2 = 2-cHexOC 6H4) were synthesized. Analyses of molecular motions and dynamics by variable temperature NMR studies and line shape analysis were performed for the free ligands and the complexes. The highest barriers of ΔGa = 44-64 kJ/mol were assigned to an aryl rotation process, and the flexibility of the ligand framework was found to be a key obstacle to a more effective stereocontrol. An increase of steric bulk at the aryl substituents raises the motional barriers but diminishes insertion rates and regioselectivity. The stereoselectivity of the first and the second methyl acrylate (MA) insertion into the Pd-Me bond of in situ generated complexes X1 was investigated by NMR and DFT methods. The substitution pattern of the ligand clearly affects the first MA insertion, resulting in a stereoselectivity of up to 6:1 for complexes with an asymmetric substituted phosphorus. In the consecutive insertion, the stereoselectivity is diminished in all cases. DFT analysis of the corresponding insertion transition states revealed that a selectivity for the first insertion with asymmetric (P aO) complexes is diminished in the consecutive insertions due to uncooperatively working enantiomorphic and chain end stereocontrol. From these observations, further concepts are developed. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  15. Stability assessment on a library scale: a rapid method for the evaluation of the commutability and insertion of residues in C-terminal loops of the CH3 domains of IgG1-Fc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenhindl, Christoph; Traxlmayr, Michael W; Wozniak-Knopp, Gordana; Jones, Phil C; Stadlmayr, Gerhard; Rüker, Florian; Obinger, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Antigen-binding Fc fragments (Fcab) are generated by engineering the C-terminal loop regions in the CH3 domain of human immunoglobulin G class 1-crystallizable fragment (IgG1-Fc). For an optimum library design with high percentage of well-folded clones for efficient binder selection, information about the correlation between primary structure and stability is needed. Here, we present a rapid method that allows determination of the overall stability of whole libraries of IgG1-Fc on the surface of yeast by flow cytometry. Libraries of IgG1-Fc mutants with distinct regions in AB-, CD- and EF-loops of the CH3 domains randomized or carrying therein insertions of five additional residues were constructed, incubated at increasing temperatures and probed for residual binding of generic Fc ligands. Calculated temperatures of half-maximal irreversible denaturation of the libraries gave a clear hierarchy of tolerance to randomization of distinct loop positions. Experimental data were evaluated by a computational approach and are discussed with respect to the structure of IgG1-Fc and variation in sequence and length of these loops in homologous Fc proteins. Generally, the described method allows for quick assessment of the effects of randomization of distinct regions on the foldability and stability of a yeast-displayed protein library.

  16. Structure of N-Terminal Domain of NPC1 Reveals Distinct Subdomains for Binding and Transfer of Cholesterol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyock Joo; Abi-Mosleh, Lina; Wang, Michael L.; Deisenhofer, Johann; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Brown, Michael S.; Infante, Rodney E.; (UTSMC)

    2010-09-21

    LDL delivers cholesterol to lysosomes by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Exit of cholesterol from lysosomes requires two proteins, membrane-bound Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) and soluble NPC2. NPC2 binds cholesterol with its isooctyl side chain buried and its 3{beta}-hydroxyl exposed. Here, we describe high-resolution structures of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of NPC1 and complexes with cholesterol and 25-hydroxycholesterol. NPC1(NTD) binds cholesterol in an orientation opposite to NPC2: 3{beta}-hydroxyl buried and isooctyl side chain exposed. Cholesterol transfer from NPC2 to NPC1(NTD) requires reorientation of a helical subdomain in NPC1(NTD), enlarging the opening for cholesterol entry. NPC1 with point mutations in this subdomain (distinct from the binding subdomain) cannot accept cholesterol from NPC2 and cannot restore cholesterol exit from lysosomes in NPC1-deficient cells. We propose a working model wherein after lysosomal hydrolysis of LDL-cholesteryl esters, cholesterol binds NPC2, which transfers it to NPC1(NTD), reversing its orientation and allowing insertion of its isooctyl side chain into the outer lysosomal membranes.

  17. MiMIC: a highly versatile transposon insertion resource for engineering Drosophila melanogaster genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venken, Koen J. T.; Schulze, Karen L.; Haelterman, Nele A.; Pan, Hongling; He, Yuchun; Evans-Holm, Martha; Carlson, Joseph W.; Levis, Robert W.; Spradling, Allan C.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the versatility of a collection of insertions of the transposon Minos mediated integration cassette (MiMIC), in Drosophila melanogaster. MiMIC contains a gene-trap cassette and the yellow+ marker flanked by two inverted bacteriophage ΦC31 attP sites. MiMIC integrates almost at random in the genome to create sites for DNA manipulation. The attP sites allow the replacement of the intervening sequence of the transposon with any other sequence through recombinase mediated cassette exchange (RMCE). We can revert insertions that function as gene traps and cause mutant phenotypes to wild type by RMCE and modify insertions to control GAL4 or QF overexpression systems or perform lineage analysis using the Flp system. Insertions within coding introns can be exchanged with protein-tag cassettes to create fusion proteins to follow protein expression and perform biochemical experiments. The applications of MiMIC vastly extend the Drosophila melanogaster toolkit. PMID:21985007

  18. High-throughput sequencing of Campylobacter jejuni insertion mutant libraries reveals mapA as a fitness factor for chicken colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeremiah G; Livny, Jonathan; Dirita, Victor J

    2014-06-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of gastrointestinal infections worldwide, due primarily to its ability to asymptomatically colonize the gastrointestinal tracts of agriculturally relevant animals, including chickens. Infection often occurs following consumption of meat that was contaminated by C. jejuni during harvest. Because of this, much interest lies in understanding the mechanisms that allow C. jejuni to colonize the chicken gastrointestinal tract. To address this, we generated a C. jejuni transposon mutant library that is amenable to insertion sequencing and introduced this mutant pool into day-of-hatch chicks. Following deep sequencing of C. jejuni mutants in the cecal outputs, several novel factors required for efficient colonization of the chicken gastrointestinal tract were identified, including the predicted outer membrane protein MapA. A mutant strain lacking mapA was constructed and found to be significantly reduced for chicken colonization in both competitive infections and monoinfections. Further, we found that mapA is required for in vitro competition with wild-type C. jejuni but is dispensable for growth in monoculture.

  19. Structural Basis for Toughness and Flexibility in the C-terminal Passenger Domain of an Acinetobacter Trimeric Autotransporter Adhesin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koiwai, Kotaro; Hartmann, Marcus D.; Linke, Dirk; Lupas, Andrei N.; Hori, Katsutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs) on the cell surface of Gram-negative pathogens mediate bacterial adhesion to host cells and extracellular matrix proteins. However, AtaA, a TAA in the nonpathogenic Acinetobacter sp. strain Tol 5, shows nonspecific high adhesiveness to abiotic material surfaces as well as to biotic surfaces. It consists of a passenger domain secreted by the C-terminal transmembrane anchor domain (TM), and the passenger domain contains an N-terminal head, N-terminal stalk, C-terminal head (Chead), and C-terminal stalk (Cstalk). The Chead-Cstalk-TM fragment, which is conserved in many Acinetobacter TAAs, has by itself the head-stalk-anchor architecture of a complete TAA. Here, we show the crystal structure of the Chead-Cstalk fragment, AtaA_C-terminal passenger domain (CPSD), providing the first view of several conserved TAA domains. The YadA-like head (Ylhead) of the fragment is capped by a unique structure (headCap), composed of three β-hairpins and a connector motif; it also contains a head insert motif (HIM1) before its last inner β-strand. The headCap, Ylhead, and HIM1 integrally form a stable Chead structure. Some of the major domains of the CPSD fragment are inherently flexible and provide bending sites for the fiber between segments whose toughness is ensured by topological chain exchange and hydrophobic core formation inside the trimer. Thus, although adherence assays using in-frame deletion mutants revealed that the characteristic adhesive sites of AtaA reside in its N-terminal part, the flexibility and toughness of the CPSD part provide the resilience that enables the adhesive properties of the full-length fiber across a wide range of conditions. PMID:26698633

  20. Insertion of liquid crystal molecules into hydrocarbon monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, Piotr, E-mail: ppopov@kent.edu; Mann, Elizabeth K. [Department of Physics, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242 (United States); Lacks, Daniel J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Jákli, Antal [Liquid Crystal Institute, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242-0001 (United States)

    2014-08-07

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to investigate the molecular mechanisms of vertical surface alignment of liquid crystals. We study the insertion of nCB (4-Cyano-4{sup ′}-n-biphenyl) molecules with n = 0,…,6 into a bent-core liquid crystal monolayer that was recently found to provide good vertical alignment for liquid crystals. The results suggest a complex-free energy landscape for the liquid crystal within the layer. The preferred insertion direction of the nCB molecules (core or tail first) varies with n, which can be explained by entropic considerations. The role of the dipole moments was found to be negligible. As vertical alignment is the leading form of present day liquid crystal displays (LCD), these results will help guide improvement of the LCD technology, as well as lend insight into the more general problem of insertion of biological and other molecules into lipid and surfactant layers.

  1. Reversible alkyne insertion in the benzannulation reaction of Fischer carbene complexes with alkynes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, M.L.; Bos, M.E.; Wulff, W.D. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The benzannulation reaction of Fischer carbene complexes with alkynes to give phenols is highly regioselective with terminal alkynes, and reasonably regioselective with internal alkynes. This has been attributed to steric factors in intermediates, where one form is favored due to close contact between the R substituent and a cis-CO ligand. Whether alkyne insertion is kinetically or thermodynamically controlled has not been determined. The authors now have evidence from regioselectivity studies that alkyne insertion into the metal-carbon bond is reversible. Implications of these results and further mechanistic considerations will be presented.

  2. Genomic rearrangements by LINE-1 insertion-mediated deletion in the human and chimpanzee lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyudong; Sen, Shurjo K; Wang, Jianxin; Callinan, Pauline A; Lee, Jungnam; Cordaux, Richard; Liang, Ping; Batzer, Mark A

    2005-01-01

    Long INterspersed Elements (LINE-1s or L1s) are abundant non-LTR retrotransposons in mammalian genomes that are capable of insertional mutagenesis. They have been associated with target site deletions upon insertion in cell culture studies of retrotransposition. Here, we report 50 deletion events in the human and chimpanzee genomes directly linked to the insertion of L1 elements, resulting in the loss of approximately 18 kb of sequence from the human genome and approximately 15 kb from the chimpanzee genome. Our data suggest that during the primate radiation, L1 insertions may have deleted up to 7.5 Mb of target genomic sequences. While the results of our in vivo analysis differ from those of previous cell culture assays of L1 insertion-mediated deletions in terms of the size and rate of sequence deletion, evolutionary factors can reconcile the differences. We report a pattern of genomic deletion sizes similar to those created during the retrotransposition of Alu elements. Our study provides support for the existence of different mechanisms for small and large L1-mediated deletions, and we present a model for the correlation of L1 element size and the corresponding deletion size. In addition, we show that internal rearrangements can modify L1 structure during retrotransposition events associated with large deletions.

  3. An evaluation of Comparative Genome Sequencing (CGS by comparing two previously-sequenced bacterial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herring Christopher D

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the development of new technology, it has recently become practical to resequence the genome of a bacterium after experimental manipulation. It is critical though to know the accuracy of the technique used, and to establish confidence that all of the mutations were detected. Results In order to evaluate the accuracy of genome resequencing using the microarray-based Comparative Genome Sequencing service provided by Nimblegen Systems Inc., we resequenced the E. coli strain W3110 Kohara using MG1655 as a reference, both of which have been completely sequenced using traditional sequencing methods. CGS detected 7 of 8 small sequence differences, one large deletion, and 9 of 12 IS element insertions present in W3110, but did not detect a large chromosomal inversion. In addition, we confirmed that CGS also detected 2 SNPs, one deletion and 7 IS element insertions that are not present in the genome sequence, which we attribute to changes that occurred after the creation of the W3110 lambda clone library. The false positive rate for SNPs was one per 244 Kb of genome sequence. Conclusion CGS is an effective way to detect multiple mutations present in one bacterium relative to another, and while highly cost-effective, is prone to certain errors. Mutations occurring in repeated sequences or in sequences with a high degree of secondary structure may go undetected. It is also critical to follow up on regions of interest in which SNPs were not called because they often indicate deletions or IS element insertions.

  4. Anatomic relationship of the proximal nail matrix to the extensor hallucis longus tendon insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo López, P; Becerro de Bengoa Vallejo, R; López López, D; Prados Frutos, J C; Alfonso Murillo González, J; Losa Iglesias, M E

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to delineate the relationship of the terminal extensor hallucis longus tendon insertion to the proximal limit of the nail matrix of the great toe. Fifty fresh-frozen human cadaver great toes with no evidence of trauma (average age, 62.5 years; 29 males and 21 females) were used for this study. Under 25X magnification, the proximal limit of the nail matrix and the terminal bony insertion of the extensor hallucis longus tendons were identified. The distance from the terminal tendon insertion to the nail matrix was ascertained using precision calipers, an optical microscope, and autocad(®) software for windows. Twenty-five great toes were placed in a neutral formalin solution and further analysed by histological longitudinal-sections. The specimens were stained with haematoxylin and eosin and examined microscopically to determine the presence of the extensor hallucis longus tendon along the dorsal aspect of the distal phalanx of each great toe. The main result we found in great toes was that the extensor tendon is between the matrix and the phalanx and extends dorsally to the distal aspect of the distal phalanx in all, 100%, specimens. The nail matrix of the great toe is not attached to the periosteum of the dorsal aspect of the base of the distal phalanx as is the case for fingers, because the extensor hallucis tendon is plantar or directly underneath the nail matrix and the tendon is dorsal to the bone. We have found that the extensor tendon is between the matrix and the phalanx and extends dorsally to the distal aspect of the distal phalanx. The nail matrix of the great toe is not attached to the periosteum of the dorsal aspect of the base of distal phalanx as is the case in fingers, because the extensor hallucis tendon is plantar or directly underneath the nail matrix and the tendon is dorsal to the bone. Our anatomic study demonstrates that the proximal limit of the matrix and nail bed of the human great toe are dorsal and

  5. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of hamster CENP-A cDNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdivia Manuel M

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The centromere is a specialized locus that mediates chromosome movement during mitosis and meiosis. This chromosomal domain comprises a uniquely packaged form of heterochromatin that acts as a nucleus for the assembly of the kinetochore a trilaminar proteinaceous structure on the surface of each chromatid at the primary constriction. Kinetochores mediate interactions with the spindle fibers of the mitotic apparatus. Centromere protein A (CENP-A is a histone H3-like protein specifically located to the inner plate of kinetochore at active centromeres. CENP-A works as a component of specialized nucleosomes at centromeres bound to arrays of repeat satellite DNA. Results We have cloned the hamster homologue of human and mouse CENP-A. The cDNA isolated was found to contain an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide consisting of 129 amino acid residues with a C-terminal histone fold domain highly homologous to those of CENP-A and H3 sequences previously released. However, significant sequence divergence was found at the N-terminal region of hamster CENP-A that is five and eleven residues shorter than those of mouse and human respectively. Further, a human serine 7 residue, a target site for Aurora B kinase phosphorylation involved in the mechanism of cytokinesis, was not found in the hamster protein. A human autoepitope at the N-terminal region of CENP-A described in autoinmune diseases is not conserved in the hamster protein. Conclusions We have cloned the hamster cDNA for the centromeric protein CENP-A. Significant differences on protein sequence were found at the N-terminal tail of hamster CENP-A in comparison with that of human and mouse. Our results show a high degree of evolutionary divergence of kinetochore CENP-A proteins in mammals. This is related to the high diverse nucleotide repeat sequences found at the centromere DNA among species and support a current centromere model for kinetochore function and structural

  6. A Conserved Acidic Motif in the N-Terminal Domain of Nitrate Reductase Is Necessary for the Inactivation of the Enzyme in the Dark by Phosphorylation and 14-3-3 Binding1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigaglio, Emmanuelle; Durand, Nathalie; Meyer, Christian

    1999-01-01

    It has previously been shown that the N-terminal domain of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) nitrate reductase (NR) is involved in the inactivation of the enzyme by phosphorylation, which occurs in the dark (L. Nussaume, M. Vincentz, C. Meyer, J.P. Boutin, and M. Caboche [1995] Plant Cell 7: 611–621). The activity of a mutant NR protein lacking this N-terminal domain was no longer regulated by light-dark transitions. In this study smaller deletions were performed in the N-terminal domain of tobacco NR that removed protein motifs conserved among higher plant NRs. The resulting truncated NR-coding sequences were then fused to the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA promoter and introduced in NR-deficient mutants of the closely related species Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. We found that the deletion of a conserved stretch of acidic residues led to an active NR protein that was more thermosensitive than the wild-type enzyme, but it was relatively insensitive to the inactivation by phosphorylation in the dark. Therefore, the removal of this acidic stretch seems to have the same effects on NR activation state as the deletion of the N-terminal domain. A hypothetical explanation for these observations is that a specific factor that impedes inactivation remains bound to the truncated enzyme. A synthetic peptide derived from this acidic protein motif was also found to be a good substrate for casein kinase II. PMID:9880364

  7. Synthesis of phenanthrenes through copper-catalyzed cross-coupling of N-tosylhydrazones with terminal alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad Lokman; Ye, Fei; Liu, Zhenxing; Xia, Ying; Shi, Yi; Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Jianbo

    2014-09-19

    A novel protocol for the synthesis of phenanthrenes through the copper-catalyzed reaction of aromatic tosylhydrazones with terminal alkynes is explored. The reaction proceeds via the formation of an allene intermediate and subsequent six-π-electron cyclization-isomerization, affording phenanthrene derivatives in good yields. The transformation can be performed in two ways: (1) with N-tosylhydrazones derived from [1,1'-biphenyl]-2-carbaldehydes and terminal alkynes as the starting materials and (2) with N-tosylhydrazones derived from aromatic aldehydes and 2-alkynyl biphenyls as the starting materials. This new phenanthrene synthesis uses readily available starting materials and a cheap copper catalyst and has a wide range of functional group compatibility.

  8. Automated cleaning and pre-processing of immunoglobulin gene sequences from high-throughput sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miri eMichaeli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available High throughput sequencing (HTS yields tens of thousands to millions of sequences that require a large amount of pre-processing work to clean various artifacts. Such cleaning cannot be performed manually. Existing programs are not suitable for immunoglobulin (Ig genes, which are variable and often highly mutated. This paper describes Ig-HTS-Cleaner (Ig High Throughput Sequencing Cleaner, a program containing a simple cleaning procedure that successfully deals with pre-processing of Ig sequences derived from HTS, and Ig-Indel-Identifier (Ig Insertion – Deletion Identifier, a program for identifying legitimate and artifact insertions and/or deletions (indels. Our programs were designed for analyzing Ig gene sequences obtained by 454 sequencing, but they are applicable to all types of sequences and sequencing platforms. Ig-HTS-Cleaner and Ig-Indel-Identifier have been implemented in Java and saved as executable JAR files, supported on Linux and MS Windows. No special requirements are needed in order to run the programs, except for correctly constructing the input files as explained in the text. The programs' performance has been tested and validated on real and simulated data sets.

  9. CSReport: A New Computational Tool Designed for Automatic Analysis of Class Switch Recombination Junctions Sequenced by High-Throughput Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, François; Boutouil, Hend; Dalloul, Iman; Dalloul, Zeinab; Cook-Moreau, Jeanne; Aldigier, Jean-Claude; Carrion, Claire; Herve, Bastien; Scaon, Erwan; Cogné, Michel; Péron, Sophie

    2017-05-15

    B cells ensure humoral immune responses due to the production of Ag-specific memory B cells and Ab-secreting plasma cells. In secondary lymphoid organs, Ag-driven B cell activation induces terminal maturation and Ig isotype class switch (class switch recombination [CSR]). CSR creates a virtually unique IgH locus in every B cell clone by intrachromosomal recombination between two switch (S) regions upstream of each C region gene. Amount and structural features of CSR junctions reveal valuable information about the CSR mechanism, and analysis of CSR junctions is useful in basic and clinical research studies of B cell functions. To provide an automated tool able to analyze large data sets of CSR junction sequences produced by high-throughput sequencing (HTS), we designed CSReport, a software program dedicated to support analysis of CSR recombination junctions sequenced with a HTS-based protocol (Ion Torrent technology). CSReport was assessed using simulated data sets of CSR junctions and then used for analysis of Sμ-Sα and Sμ-Sγ1 junctions from CH12F3 cells and primary murine B cells, respectively. CSReport identifies junction segment breakpoints on reference sequences and junction structure (blunt-ended junctions or junctions with insertions or microhomology). Besides the ability to analyze unprecedentedly large libraries of junction sequences, CSReport will provide a unified framework for CSR junction studies. Our results show that CSReport is an accurate tool for analysis of sequences from our HTS-based protocol for CSR junctions, thereby facilitating and accelerating their study. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. X-ray crystal structure of the N-terminal region of Moloney murine leukemia virus integrase and its implications for viral DNA recognition: N-Terminal Region of M-MuLV Integrase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Rongjin [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Aiyer, Sriram [Department of Pharmacology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Cote, Marie L. [Department of Biochemistry, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, UMDNJ, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Xiao, Rong [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Jiang, Mei [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Acton, Thomas B. [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Roth, Monica J. [Department of Pharmacology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Montelione, Gaetano T. [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Biochemistry, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, UMDNJ, Piscataway New Jersey 08854

    2017-02-03

    The retroviral integrase (IN) carries out the integration of a dsDNA copy of the viral genome into the host DNA, an essential step for viral replication. All IN proteins have three general domains, the N-terminal domain (NTD), the catalytic core domain, and the C-terminal domain. The NTD includes an HHCC zinc finger-like motif, which is conserved in all retroviral IN proteins. Two crystal structures of Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) IN N-terminal region (NTR) constructs that both include an N-terminal extension domain (NED, residues 1–44) and an HHCC zinc-finger NTD (residues 45–105), in two crystal forms are reported. The structures of IN NTR constructs encoding residues 1–105 (NTR1–105) and 8–105 (NTR8–105) were determined at 2.7 and 2.15 Å resolution, respectively and belong to different space groups. While both crystal forms have similar protomer structures, NTR1–105 packs as a dimer and NTR8–105 packs as a tetramer in the asymmetric unit. The structure of the NED consists of three anti-parallel β-strands and an α-helix, similar to the NED of prototype foamy virus (PFV) IN. These three β-strands form an extended β-sheet with another β-strand in the HHCC Zn2+ binding domain, which is a unique structural feature for the M-MuLV IN. The HHCC Zn2+ binding domain structure is similar to that in HIV and PFV INs, with variations within the loop regions. Differences between the PFV and MLV IN NEDs localize at regions identified to interact with the PFV LTR and are compared with established biochemical and virological data for M-MuLV. Proteins 2017; 85:647–656.

  11. Comparing insertion libraries in two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains to assess gene essentiality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberati, Nicole T; Urbach, Jonathan M; Thurber, Tara K; Wu, Gang; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2008-01-01

    Putative essential genes can be identified by comparing orthologs not disrupted in multiple near-saturated transposon insertion mutation libraries in related strains of the same bacterial species. Methods for identifying all orthologs between two bacterial strains and putative essential orthologs are described. In addition, protocols detailing near-saturation transposon insertion mutagenesis of bacteria are presented, including (1) conjugation-mediated mutagenesis, (2) automated colony picking and liquid handling of mutant cultures, and (3) arbitrary polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of genomic DNA adjacent to transposon insertion sites.

  12. Mining olive genome through library sequencing and bioinformatics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As one of the initial steps of olive (Olea europaea L.) genome analysis, a small insert genomic DNA library was constructed (digesting olive genomic DNA with SmaI and cloning the digestion products into pUC19 vector) and randomly picked 83 colonies were sequenced. Analysis of the insert sequences revealed 12 clones ...

  13. Detection of prosecretory mitogen lacritin in nonprimate tears primarily as a C-terminal-like fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurie, Diane E; Splan, Rebecca K; Green, Kari; Still, Katherine M; McKown, Robert L; Laurie, Gordon W

    2012-09-12

    Lacritin is a human tear glycoprotein that promotes basal tear protein secretion in cultured rat lacrimal acinar cells and proliferation of subconfluent human corneal epithelial cells. When topically added to rabbit eyes, lacritin promotes basal tearing. Despite these activities on several species, lacritin's presence in nonprimate tears or other tissues has not been explored. Here we probed for lacritin in normal horse tears. Sequences were collected from the Ensembl genomic alignment of human LACRT gene with high-quality draft horse genome (EquCab2.0) and analyzed. Normal horse tears were collected and assayed by Western blotting, ELISA, and mass spectrometry. Newly generated rabbit antibodies, respectively, against N- and C-terminal regions of human lacritin were employed. Identity was 75% and 45%, respectively, at nucleotide and protein levels. Structural features were conserved, including a C-terminal amphipathic α-helix. Anti-C-terminal antibodies strongly detected a ∼13 kDa band in horse tears that was validated by mass spectrometry. In human tears, the same antibody detected uncleaved lacritin (∼24 kDa) strongly and C-terminal fragments of ∼13 and ∼11 kDa weakly. Anti-N-terminal antibodies were slightly reactive with a ∼24 kDa horse antigen and showed no reaction with the anti-C-terminal-reactive ∼13 kDa species. Similar respective levels of horse C-terminal versus N-terminal immunoreactivity were apparent by ELISA. Lacritin is present in horse tears, largely as a C-terminal fragment homologous to the mitogenic and bactericidal region in human lacritin, suggesting potential benefit in corneal wound repair.

  14. Human adenovirus serotype 12 virion precursors pMu and pVI are cleaved at amino-terminal and carboxy-terminal sites that conform to the adenovirus 2 endoproteinase cleavage consensus sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freimuth, P; Anderson, C W

    1993-03-01

    The sequence of a 1158-base pair fragment of the human adenovirus serotype 12 (Ad12) genome was determined. This segment encodes the precursors for virion components Mu and VI. Both Ad12 precursors contain two sequences that conform to a consensus sequence motif for cleavage by the endoproteinase of adenovirus 2 (Ad2). Analysis of the amino terminus of VI and of the peptide fragments found in Ad12 virions demonstrated that these sites are cleaved during Ad12 maturation. This observation suggests that the recognition motif for adenovirus endoproteinases is highly conserved among human serotypes. The adenovirus 2 endoproteinase polypeptide requires additional co-factors for activity (C. W. Anderson, Protein Expression Purif., 1993, 4, 8-15). Synthetic Ad12 or Ad2 pVI carboxy-terminal peptides each permitted efficient cleavage of an artificial endoproteinase substrate by recombinant Ad2 endoproteinase polypeptide.

  15. Creation and structure determination of an artificial protein with three complete sequence repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Motoyasu, E-mail: adachi.motoyasu@jaea.go.jp; Shimizu, Rumi; Kuroki, Ryota [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakatashirane 2-4, Nakagun Tokaimura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Blaber, Michael [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakatashirane 2-4, Nakagun Tokaimura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4300 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    An artificial protein with three complete sequence repeats was created and the structure was determined by X-ray crystallography. The structure showed threefold symmetry even though there is an amino- and carboxy-terminal. The artificial protein with threefold symmetry may be useful as a scaffold to capture small materials with C3 symmetry. Symfoil-4P is a de novo protein exhibiting the threefold symmetrical β-trefoil fold designed based on the human acidic fibroblast growth factor. First three asparagine–glycine sequences of Symfoil-4P are replaced with glutamine–glycine (Symfoil-QG) or serine–glycine (Symfoil-SG) sequences protecting from deamidation, and His-Symfoil-II was prepared by introducing a protease digestion site into Symfoil-QG so that Symfoil-II has three complete repeats after removal of the N-terminal histidine tag. The Symfoil-QG and SG and His-Symfoil-II proteins were expressed in Eschericha coli as soluble protein, and purified by nickel affinity chromatography. Symfoil-II was further purified by anion-exchange chromatography after removing the HisTag by proteolysis. Both Symfoil-QG and Symfoil-II were crystallized in 0.1 M Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.0) containing 1.8 M ammonium sulfate as precipitant at 293 K; several crystal forms were observed for Symfoil-QG and II. The maximum diffraction of Symfoil-QG and II crystals were 1.5 and 1.1 Å resolution, respectively. The Symfoil-II without histidine tag diffracted better than Symfoil-QG with N-terminal histidine tag. Although the crystal packing of Symfoil-II is slightly different from Symfoil-QG and other crystals of Symfoil derivatives having the N-terminal histidine tag, the refined crystal structure of Symfoil-II showed pseudo-threefold symmetry as expected from other Symfoils. Since the removal of the unstructured N-terminal histidine tag did not affect the threefold structure of Symfoil, the improvement of diffraction quality of Symfoil-II may be caused by molecular characteristics of

  16. Machinability and scratch wear resistance of carbon-coated WC inserts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazhanivel, B., E-mail: palcecri@yahoo.co.in; Kumar, T. Prem; Sozhan, G.

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Cemented WC inserts were coated with carbon by CVD. • The deposits were either loosely held MWCNTs or adherent carbides. • Co-efficient of friction (ramp load; 1–13 N); 0.2 and 0.1 μ, respectively, for the uncoated and carbide-coated inserts. • The carbide-coated insert exhibited better machinability and surface finish than a commercial TiCN-coated insert. - Abstract: In this work, cemented tungsten carbide (WC) inserts were coated with nanocarbons/carbides by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and their machinability and scratch wear resistance were investigated. The hardness and surface conditions of the WC substrate were studied before and after coating. The CVD-generated nanocarbons on the insert surfaces were examined by SEM, FE-SEM and TEM. The electron microscopic images revealed that the carbons generated were multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) or carbides depending on the experimental conditions. In both the cases, the cutting edges of the inserts had dense deposits. Scratch wear test with the coated inserts showed that the co-efficient of friction was 0.1 μ as against 0.2 μ for the uncoated inserts under a ramp load of 1–13 N. The machinability characteristics of commercially available TiCN-coated inserts and the carbon-coated WC inserts were compared by using a CNC machine and a Rapid I vision inspection system. It was found that the carbide-coated inserts exhibited machinability with better surface finish comparable to that of the TiCN-coated inserts while the MWCNT-coated inserts showed inferior adhesion properties.

  17. The N-terminal tail of hERG contains an amphipathic α-helix that regulates channel deactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Ann Ng

    Full Text Available The cytoplasmic N-terminal domain of the human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG K+ channel is critical for the slow deactivation kinetics of the channel. However, the mechanism(s by which the N-terminal domain regulates deactivation remains to be determined. Here we show that the solution NMR structure of the N-terminal 135 residues of hERG contains a previously described Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS domain (residues 26-135 as well as an amphipathic α-helix (residues 13-23 and an initial unstructured segment (residues 2-9. Deletion of residues 2-25, only the unstructured segment (residues 2-9 or replacement of the α-helix with a flexible linker all result in enhanced rates of deactivation. Thus, both the initial flexible segment and the α-helix are required but neither is sufficient to confer slow deactivation kinetics. Alanine scanning mutagenesis identified R5 and G6 in the initial flexible segment as critical for slow deactivation. Alanine mutants in the helical region had less dramatic phenotypes. We propose that the PAS domain is bound close to the central core of the channel and that the N-terminal α-helix ensures that the flexible tail is correctly orientated for interaction with the activation gating machinery to stabilize the open state of the channel.

  18. N-terminal truncation enables crystallization of the receptor-binding domain of the FedF bacterial adhesin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Kerpel, Maia; Van Molle, Inge [Department of Ultrastructure, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Brys, Lea [Department of Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Wyns, Lode; De Greve, Henri; Bouckaert, Julie, E-mail: bouckaej@vub.ac.be [Department of Ultrastructure, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology (VIB), Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2006-12-01

    The N-terminal receptor-binding domain of the FedF adhesin from enterotoxigenic E. coli has been crystallized. This required the deletion of its first 14 residues, which are also cleaved off naturally. FedF is the two-domain tip adhesin of F18 fimbriae from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. Bacterial adherence, mediated by the N-terminal receptor-binding domain of FedF to carbohydrate receptors on intestinal microvilli, causes diarrhoea and oedema disease in newly weaned piglets and induces the secretion of Shiga toxins. A truncate containing only the receptor-binding domain of FedF was found to be further cleaved at its N-terminus. Reconstruction of this N-terminal truncate rendered FedF amenable to crystallization, resulting in crystals with space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and unit-cell parameters a = 36.20, b = 74.64, c = 99.03 Å that diffracted to beyond 2 Å resolution. The binding specificity of FedF was screened for on a glycan array, exposing 264 glycoconjugates, to identify specific receptors for cocrystallization with FedF.

  19. Nuclear Trafficking of the Rabies Virus Interferon Antagonist P-Protein Is Regulated by an Importin-Binding Nuclear Localization Sequence in the C-Terminal Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin L Rowe

    Full Text Available Rabies virus P-protein is expressed as five isoforms (P1-P5 which undergo nucleocytoplasmic trafficking important to roles in immune evasion. Although nuclear import of P3 is known to be mediated by an importin (IMP-recognised nuclear localization sequence in the N-terminal region (N-NLS, the mechanisms underlying nuclear import of other P isoforms in which the N-NLS is inactive or has been deleted have remained unresolved. Based on the previous observation that mutation of basic residues K214/R260 of the P-protein C-terminal domain (P-CTD can result in nuclear exclusion of P3, we used live cell imaging, protein interaction analysis and in vitro nuclear transport assays to examine in detail the nuclear trafficking properties of this domain. We find that the effect of mutation of K214/R260 on P3 is largely dependent on nuclear export, suggesting that nuclear exclusion of mutated P3 involves the P-CTD-localized nuclear export sequence (C-NES. However, assays using cells in which nuclear export is pharmacologically inhibited indicate that these mutations significantly inhibit P3 nuclear accumulation and, importantly, prevent nuclear accumulation of P1, suggestive of effects on NLS-mediated import activity in these isoforms. Consistent with this, molecular binding and transport assays indicate that the P-CTD mediates IMPα2/IMPβ1-dependent nuclear import by conferring direct binding to the IMPα2/IMPβ1 heterodimer, as well as to a truncated form of IMPα2 lacking the IMPβ-binding autoinhibitory domain (ΔIBB-IMPα2, and IMPβ1 alone. These properties are all dependent on K214 and R260. This provides the first evidence that P-CTD contains a genuine IMP-binding NLS, and establishes the mechanism by which P-protein isoforms other than P3 can be imported to the nucleus. These data underpin a refined model for P-protein trafficking that involves the concerted action of multiple NESs and IMP-binding NLSs, and highlight the intricate regulation of P

  20. Efficient DNA Fingerprinting Based on the Targeted Sequencing of Active Retrotransposon Insertion Sites Using a Bench-Top High-Throughput Sequencing Platform

    OpenAIRE

    Monden, Yuki; Yamamoto, Ayaka; Shindo, Akiko; Tahara, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    In many crop species, DNA fingerprinting is required for the precise identification of cultivars to protect the rights of breeders. Many families of retrotransposons have multiple copies throughout the eukaryotic genome and their integrated copies are inherited genetically. Thus, their insertion polymorphisms among cultivars are useful for DNA fingerprinting. In this study, we conducted a DNA fingerprinting based on the insertion polymorphisms of active retrotransposon families (Rtsp-1 and LI...

  1. Active role of a human genomic insert in replication of a yeast artificial chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Brabant, A J; Fangman, W L; Brewer, B J

    1999-06-01

    Yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) are a common tool for cloning eukaryotic DNA. The manner by which large pieces of foreign DNA are assimilated by yeast cells into a functional chromosome is poorly understood, as is the reason why some of them are stably maintained and some are not. We examined the replication of a stable YAC containing a 240-kb insert of DNA from the human T-cell receptor beta locus. The human insert contains multiple sites that serve as origins of replication. The activity of these origins appears to require the yeast ARS consensus sequence and, as with yeast origins, additional flanking sequences. In addition, the origins in the human insert exhibit a spacing, a range of activation efficiencies, and a variation in times of activation during S phase similar to those found for normal yeast chromosomes. We propose that an appropriate combination of replication origin density, activation times, and initiation efficiencies is necessary for the successful maintenance of YAC inserts.

  2. Effect of a flow-corrective insert on the flow pattern in a pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yu; Gui, Nan; Yang, Xingtuan [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Tu, Jiyuan [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); School of Aerospace, Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne 3083, VIC (Australia); Jiang, Shengyao, E-mail: shengyaojiang@sina.com [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Effect of an insert on improving flow uniformity and eliminating stagnant zone is studied. • Three values concerned with the stagnant zone, radial uniformity and flow sequence are used. • Outlet diameter is a critical parameter that determines balancing mechanism of the insert. • Height/location is varied to let the insert work in unbalanced region and avoid adverse effect. - Abstract: A flow-corrective insert is adopted in the pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) to improve flow performance of the pebble flow for the first time. 3D discrete element method (DEM) modeling is employed to study this slow and dense granular flow. It is verified that locating a properly designed insert in the bed can help transform unsatisfactory flow field to the preferred flow pattern for pebble bed reactors. Three characteristic values on the stagnant zone, radial uniformity and flow sequence of pebble flow are defined to evaluate uniformity of the overall flow field quantitatively. The results demonstrate that the pebble bed equipped with an insert performs better than normal beds from all these three aspects. Moreover, based on numerical experiments, several universal tips for insert design on height, location and outlet diameter are suggested.

  3. 48 CFR 49.603-5 - Cost-reimbursement contracts-partial termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cost-reimbursement....603-5 Cost-reimbursement contracts—partial termination. [Insert the following in Block 14 of SF 30, Amendment of Solicitation/Modification of Contract, for settlement agreements for cost-reimbursement...

  4. Polymorphism Sequence - JSNP | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us JSNP Polymorphism Sequence Data detail Data name Polymorphism Sequence DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nb...dc00114-001 Description of data contents Information on polymorphisms (SNPs and insertions/deletions) and th...se Name database name JSNP_SNP: single nucleotide polymorphism JSNP_InsDel_IND: insertion/deletion JSNP_InsD...ved allele observed 3' Flanking Sequence 3' flanking sequence Offset in Flanking Sequence position of the polymorphism...uence Accession No. accession No. of the sequence for polymorphism screening Offset in Record position of the polymorphism

  5. Survey of transposable elements in sugarcane expressed sequence tags (ESTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi Magdalena

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST project has produced a large number of cDNA sequences from several plant tissues submitted or not to different conditions of stress. In this paper we report the result of a search for transposable elements (TEs revealing a surprising amount of expressed TEs homologues. Of the 260,781 sequences grouped in 81,223 fragment assembly program (Phrap clusters, a total of 276 clones showed homology to previously reported TEs using a stringent cut-off value of e-50 or better. Homologous clones to Copia/Ty1 and Gypsy/Ty3 groups of long terminal repeat (LTR retrotransposons were found but no non-LTR retroelements were identified. All major transposon families were represented in sugarcane including Activator (Ac, Mutator (MuDR, Suppressor-mutator (En/Spm and Mariner. In order to compare the TE diversity in grasses genomes, we carried out a search for TEs described in sugarcane related species O.sativa, Z. mays and S. bicolor. We also present preliminary results showing the potential use of TEs insertion pattern polymorphism as molecular markers for cultivar identification.

  6. Repeated extragenic sequences in prokaryotic genomes: a proposal for the origin and dynamics of the RUP element in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oggioni, M R; Claverys, J P

    1999-10-01

    A survey of all Streptococcus pneumoniae GenBank/EMBL DNA sequence entries and of the public domain sequence (representing more than 90% of the genome) of an S. pneumoniae type 4 strain allowed identification of 108 copies of a 107-bp-long highly repeated intergenic element called RUP (for repeat unit of pneumococcus). Several features of the element, revealed in this study, led to the proposal that RUP is an insertion sequence (IS)-derivative that could still be mobile. Among these features are: (1) a highly significant homology between the terminal inverted repeats (IRs) of RUPs and of IS630-Spn1, a new putative IS of S. pneumoniae; and (2) insertion at a TA dinucleotide, a characteristic target of several members of the IS630 family. Trans-mobilization of RUP is therefore proposed to be mediated by the transposase of IS630-Spn1. To account for the observation that RUPs are distributed among four subtypes which exhibit different degrees of sequence homogeneity, a scenario is invoked based on successive stages of RUP mobility and non-mobility, depending on whether an active transposase is present or absent. In the latter situation, an active transposase could be reintroduced into the species through natural transformation. Examination of sequences flanking RUP revealed a preferential association with ISs. It also provided evidence that RUPs promote sequence rearrangements, thereby contributing to genome flexibility. The possibility that RUP preferentially targets transforming DNA of foreign origin and subsequently favours disruption/rearrangement of exogenous sequences is discussed.

  7. Termination unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traeholt, Chresten; Willen, Dag; Roden, Mark; Tolbert, Jerry C.; Lindsay, David; Fisher, Paul W.; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann

    2016-05-03

    Cable end section comprises end-parts of N electrical phases/neutral, and a thermally-insulation envelope comprising cooling fluid. The end-parts each comprises a conductor and are arranged with phase 1 innermost, N outermost surrounded by the neutral, electrical insulation being between phases and N and neutral. The end-parts comprise contacting surfaces located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section. A termination unit has an insulating envelope connected to a cryostat, special parts at both ends comprising an adapter piece at the cable interface and a closing end-piece terminating the envelope in the end-section. The special parts houses an inlet and/or outlet for cooling fluid. The space between an inner wall of the envelope and a central opening of the cable is filled with cooling fluid. The special part at the end connecting to the cryostat houses an inlet or outlet, splitting cooling flow into cable annular flow and termination annular flow.

  8. A novel and facile decay path of Criegee intermediates by intramolecular insertion reactions via roaming transition states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Trong-Nghia [Department of Applied Chemistry and Institute of Molecular Science, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Department of Physical Chemistry, Hanoi University of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Putikam, Raghunath; Lin, M. C., E-mail: chemmcl@emory.edu [Department of Applied Chemistry and Institute of Molecular Science, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China)

    2015-03-28

    We have discovered a new and highly competitive product channel in the unimolecular decay process for small Criegee intermediates, CH{sub 2}OO and anti/syn-CH{sub 3}C(H)OO, occurring by intramolecular insertion reactions via a roaming-like transition state (TS) based on quantum-chemical calculations. Our results show that in the decomposition of CH{sub 2}OO and anti-CH{sub 3}C(H)OO, the predominant paths directly produce cis-HC(O)OH and syn-CH{sub 3}C(O)OH acids with >110 kcal/mol exothermicities via loose roaming-like insertion TSs involving the terminal O atom and the neighboring C–H bonds. For syn-CH{sub 3}C(H)OO, the major decomposition channel occurs by abstraction of a H atom from the CH{sub 3} group by the terminal O atom producing CH{sub 2}C(H)O–OH. At 298 K, the intramolecular insertion process in CH{sub 2}OO was found to be 600 times faster than the commonly assumed ring-closing reaction.

  9. Structure of a tropomyosin N-terminal fragment at 0.98 Å resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshcheryakov, Vladimir A.; Krieger, Inna; Kostyukova, Alla S.; Samatey, Fadel A.

    2011-01-01

    The crystal structure of the N-terminal fragment of the short nonmuscle α-tropomyosin has been determined at a resolution of 0.98 Å. Tropomyosin (TM) is an elongated two-chain protein that binds along actin filaments. Important binding sites are localized in the N-terminus of tropomyosin. The structure of the N-terminus of the long muscle α-TM has been solved by both NMR and X-ray crystallography. Only the NMR structure of the N-terminus of the short nonmuscle α-TM is available. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminus of the short nonmuscle α-TM (αTm1bZip) at a resolution of 0.98 Å is reported, which was solved from crystals belonging to space group P3 1 with unit-cell parameters a = b = 33.00, c = 52.03 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. The first five N-terminal residues are flexible and residues 6–35 form an α-helical coiled coil. The overall fold and the secondary structure of the crystal structure of αTM1bZip are highly similar to the NMR structure and the atomic coordinates of the corresponding C α atoms between the two structures superimpose with a root-mean-square deviation of 0.60 Å. The crystal structure validates the NMR structure, with the positions of the side chains being determined precisely in our structure

  10. Structure of a tropomyosin N-terminal fragment at 0.98 Å resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meshcheryakov, Vladimir A. [Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Okinawa (Japan); Krieger, Inna [Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas (United States); Kostyukova, Alla S. [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, New Jersey (United States); Samatey, Fadel A., E-mail: f.a.samatey@oist.jp [Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Okinawa (Japan)

    2011-09-01

    The crystal structure of the N-terminal fragment of the short nonmuscle α-tropomyosin has been determined at a resolution of 0.98 Å. Tropomyosin (TM) is an elongated two-chain protein that binds along actin filaments. Important binding sites are localized in the N-terminus of tropomyosin. The structure of the N-terminus of the long muscle α-TM has been solved by both NMR and X-ray crystallography. Only the NMR structure of the N-terminus of the short nonmuscle α-TM is available. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminus of the short nonmuscle α-TM (αTm1bZip) at a resolution of 0.98 Å is reported, which was solved from crystals belonging to space group P3{sub 1} with unit-cell parameters a = b = 33.00, c = 52.03 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. The first five N-terminal residues are flexible and residues 6–35 form an α-helical coiled coil. The overall fold and the secondary structure of the crystal structure of αTM1bZip are highly similar to the NMR structure and the atomic coordinates of the corresponding C{sup α} atoms between the two structures superimpose with a root-mean-square deviation of 0.60 Å. The crystal structure validates the NMR structure, with the positions of the side chains being determined precisely in our structure.

  11. The Lysine Residues within the Human Ribosomal Protein S17 Sequence Naturally Inserted into the Viral Nonstructural Protein of a Unique Strain of Hepatitis E Virus Are Important for Enhanced Virus Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Scott P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an important but extremely understudied human pathogen. Due largely to the lack of an efficient cell culture system for HEV, the molecular mechanisms of HEV replication and pathogenesis are poorly understood. Recently, a unique genotype 3 strain of HEV recovered from a chronically infected patient was adapted for growth in HepG2C3A human hepatoma cells. The adaptation of the Kernow C-1 P6 HEV to propagate in HepG2C3A cells selected for a rare virus recombinant that contains an insertion of a 171-nucleotide sequence encoding amino acids 21 to 76 of the human ribosomal protein S17 (RPS17) within the hypervariable region (HVR) of the HEV ORF1 protein. When the RPS17 insertion was placed into a strain of genotype 1 HEV which infects only humans, it expanded the host range of the virus, allowing it to infect cell lines from multiple animal species, including cow, dog, cat, chicken, and hamster. In this study, we utilized forward and reverse genetics to attempt to define which aspects of the RPS17 insertion allow for the ability of the Kernow C-1 P6 HEV to adapt in cell culture and allow for expanded host tropism. We demonstrate that the RPS17 sequence insertion in HEV bestows novel nuclear/nucleolar trafficking capabilities to the ORF1 protein of Kernow P6 HEV and that lysine residues within the RPS17 insertion, but not nuclear localization of the ORF1 protein, correlate with the enhanced replication of the HEV Kernow C-1 P6 strain. The results from this study have important implications for understanding the mechanism of cross-species infection and replication of HEV. IMPORTANCE HEV is an important pathogen worldwide. The virus causes high mortality (up to 30%) in pregnant women and has been recognized to cause chronic hepatitis in immunocompromised populations. The life cycle of HEV has been understudied due to a lack of sufficient cell culture systems in which to propagate the virus. Recently, insertions and rearrangements of the

  12. N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide measurement in plasma suggests covalent modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, Ingrid; Alehagen, Urban; Dahlström, Ulf

    2011-01-01

    different proANP assays on clinical outcome. METHODS: We examined 474 elderly patients with symptoms of heart failure presenting in a primary healthcare setting. Samples were analyzed with an automated immunoluminometric midregion proANP (MR-proANP) assay and a new processing-independent assay (PIA.......74 (95% CI, 0.66–0.81); P = 0.32]. The prognostic ability to report cardiovascular mortality during a 10-year follow-up revealed AUC values of 0.66 (95% CI, 0.60–0.71) for the proANP PIA and 0.69 (95% CI, 0.63–0.74) for the MR-proANP assay (P = 0.08, for comparing the 2 assays). CONCLUSIONS: Our data......BACKGROUND: The N-terminal fragment of cardiac-derived pro–B-type natriuretic peptide is a glycosylated polypeptide. It is unknown whether N-terminal pro–atrial natriuretic peptide (proANP) fragments are also covalently modified. We therefore evaluated the clinical performance of 2 distinctly...

  13. UV laser-induced histone-DNA crosslinking proceeds via the N-terminal tails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanovski, V.; Dimitrov, S.; Angelov, D.; Keskinova, E.; Pashev, I.

    1990-01-01

    The covalent crosslinking of histones to DNA by UV laser irradiation is accomplished solely via the N-terminal part of the molecule. Irradiated isolated calfthymus nuclei are treated with clostripain. The crosslinked protein-DNA complexes are isolated and the presence of each core histone analyzed by dot-immunoassay using antibodies, specific to the central globular domain of the respective histone. The reaction is negative for all core histones i.e. the globular domain is absent. It means that this domain has not been crosslinked to DNA and, once cleaved by clostripain, it has been stripped from DNA during the centrigugation in CsCl. This peculiar property of the crosslinked procedure makes it particularly useful in addressing some yet unanswered questions concerning histone-DNA interactions, such as the interaction of the N-terminal tails with linker DNA, the effect of the transient postsynthetic histone acetylation on its interaction with DNA, etc. These questions are now under study. 1 fig., 6 refs

  14. Implementación de los Servicios Terminal Server en un Sistema Corporativo

    OpenAIRE

    PUCHALT RODRÍGUEZ, ANA ELVIRA; GÓMEZ GARCÍA, PABLO JOSÉ

    2014-01-01

    Este proyecto final de carrera presenta el diseño e implementación de los sistemas de acceso a la red y de los servicios de Terminal Server en un sistema corporativo basado en Windows Server 2008 R2. Dado que no hay posibilidad de realizar el proyecto en un sistema corporativo real, se establecerá un sistema corporativo ficticio, donde cada uno de los trabajadores obtendrá acceso a su propia sesión con sus credenciales identificadoras. En esta sesión, se tendrá acceso a determi...

  15. Antimicrobial activity of human prion protein is mediated by its N-terminal region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Pasupuleti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular prion-related protein (PrP(c is a cell-surface protein that is ubiquitously expressed in the human body. The multifunctionality of PrP(c, and presence of an exposed cationic and heparin-binding N-terminus, a feature characterizing many antimicrobial peptides, made us hypothesize that PrP(c could exert antimicrobial activity. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Intact recombinant PrP exerted antibacterial and antifungal effects at normal and low pH. Studies employing recombinant PrP and N- and C-terminally truncated variants, as well as overlapping peptide 20mers, demonstrated that the antimicrobial activity is mediated by the unstructured N-terminal part of the protein. Synthetic peptides of the N-terminus of PrP killed the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, as well as the fungus Candida parapsilosis. Fluorescence studies of peptide-treated bacteria, paired with analysis of peptide effects on liposomes, showed that the peptides exerted membrane-breaking effects similar to those seen after treatment with the "classical" human antimicrobial peptide LL-37. In contrast to LL-37, however, no marked helix induction was detected for the PrP-derived peptides in presence of negatively charged (bacteria-mimicking liposomes. PrP furthermore showed an inducible expression during wounding of human skin ex vivo and in vivo, as well as stimulation of keratinocytes with TGF-alpha in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: The demonstration of an antimicrobial activity of PrP, localisation of its activity to the N-terminal and heparin-binding region, combined with results showing an increased expression of PrP during wounding, indicate that PrPs could have a previously undisclosed role in host defense.

  16. Genome-scale metabolic network validation of Shewanella oneidensis using transposon insertion frequency analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Yang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Transposon mutagenesis, in combination with parallel sequencing, is becoming a powerful tool for en-masse mutant analysis. A probability generating function was used to explain observed miniHimar transposon insertion patterns, and gene essentiality calls were made by transposon insertion frequency analysis (TIFA. TIFA incorporated the observed genome and sequence motif bias of the miniHimar transposon. The gene essentiality calls were compared to: 1 previous genome-wide direct gene-essentiality assignments; and, 2 flux balance analysis (FBA predictions from an existing genome-scale metabolic model of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. A three-way comparison between FBA, TIFA, and the direct essentiality calls was made to validate the TIFA approach. The refinement in the interpretation of observed transposon insertions demonstrated that genes without insertions are not necessarily essential, and that genes that contain insertions are not always nonessential. The TIFA calls were in reasonable agreement with direct essentiality calls for S. oneidensis, but agreed more closely with E. coli essentiality calls for orthologs. The TIFA gene essentiality calls were in good agreement with the MR-1 FBA essentiality predictions, and the agreement between TIFA and FBA predictions was substantially better than between the FBA and the direct gene essentiality predictions.

  17. Genome-wide retroviral insertional tagging of genes involved in cancer in Cdkn2a-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders H; Turner, Geoffrey; Trubetskoy, Alla

    2002-01-01

    We have used large-scale insertional mutagenesis to identify functional landmarks relevant to cancer in the recently completed mouse genome sequence. We infected Cdkn2a(-/-) mice with Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMuLV) to screen for loci that can participate in tumorigenesis in collaboration...... retroviral integration sites and mapped them against the mouse genome sequence databases from Celera and Ensembl. In addition to 17 insertions targeting gene loci known to be cancer-related, we identified a total of 37 new common insertion sites (CISs), of which 8 encode components of signaling pathways...... that are involved in cancer. The effectiveness of large-scale insertional mutagenesis in a sensitized genetic background is demonstrated by the preference for activation of MAP kinase signaling, collaborating with Cdkn2a loss in generating the lymphoid and myeloid tumors. Collectively, our results show that large...

  18. A Portable Piezoelectric Tactile Terminal for Braille Readers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiro Velázquez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a novel concept on reading assistive technologies for the blind: the TactoBook, a system that is able to translate entire electronic books (eBooks to Braille code and to reproduce them in portable electronic Braille terminals. The TactoBook consists of a computer-based translator that converts fast and automatically any eBook into Braille. The Braille version of the eBook is then encrypted as a file and stored in a USB memory drive which is later inserted and reproduced in a compact, lightweight, and highly-portable tactile terminal. In particular, this paper presents a piezoelectric ultrasonic actuation approach to design and implement such portable Braille terminal. Actuating mechanism, design concept, first prototype, and performance results are presented and discussed.

  19. El tacto como factor de humanización en la fase terminal Tact as a humanization factor during the terminal phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiberio Alvarez Echeverri

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Se hace una descripción del tacto como el sentido que aparece más precozmente durante la vida embrionaria y de su significado para el desarrollo armónico de la personalidad y como forma de comunicación Interhumana. Se discute cuándo es apropiado el tacto en las relaciones con los demás; se describen sus cualidades y niveles comunicativos. Finalmente, se destaca la importancia del sentido del tacto como una forma muy efectiva de comunicación con el enfermo en fase terminal.

    The sense of touch is the first one to appear during embryonic Life and Its significance for the armonic development of personality and as an effective mean of communication are described, as well as, the appropiateness of touching in the relationship between persons and the quality and communicative levels of tact. Finally, the relevance of tact for communicating with terminal patients is emphasized.

  20. Molecular cloning and sequence of the B880 holochrome gene from Rhodospirillum rubrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Restriction fragments of genomic Rhodospirillum rubrum DNA were selected according to size by electrophoresis followed by hybridization with [ 32 P]mRNA encoding the two B880 holochrome polypeptides. The fragments were cloned into Escherchia coli C600 with plasmid pBR327 as a vector. The clones were selected by colony hybridization with 32 P-holochrome-mRNA and counter selected by hybridization with Rs. rubrum ribosomal RNA, a minor contaminant of the mRNA preparation. Chimeric plasmid pRR22 was shown to contain the B880 genes by hybrid selection of B880 holochrome-mRNA. A restriction map of its 2.2-kilobase insert and the sequence of a 430 base pair fragment thereof is reported. Genes α and β are nearly contiguous, indicating that they are transcribed as a single operon. The predicted amino acid sequences coincide with the sequences of the α and β polypeptides established in other laboratories, except for additional C-terminal tails of 10 and 13 amino acid residues, respectively

  1. RNA sequence determinants of a coupled termination-reinitiation strategy for downstream open reading frame translation in Helminthosporium victoriae virus 190S and other victoriviruses (Family Totiviridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Havens, Wendy M; Nibert, Max L; Ghabrial, Said A

    2011-07-01

    The genome-length, dicistronic mRNA of the double-stranded RNA fungal virus Helminthosporium victoriae virus 190S (genus Victorivirus, family Totiviridae) contains two long open reading frames (ORFs) that overlap in the tetranucleotide AUGA. Translation of the downstream ORF, which encodes the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), has been proposed to depend on ribosomal reinitiation following termination of the upstream ORF, which encodes the capsid protein. In the current study, we examined the RNA sequence determinants for RdRp translation in this virus and demonstrated that a coupled termination-reinitiation (stop-restart) strategy is indeed used. Signals for termination-reinitiation are found within a 32-nucleotide stretch of RNA immediately upstream of the AUGA motif, including a predicted pseudoknot structure. The close proximity in which this predicted structure is followed by the upstream ORF's stop codon appears to be especially important for promoting translation of the downstream ORF. The normal strong preferences for an AUG start codon and the canonical sequence context to favor translation initiation appear somewhat relaxed for the downstream ORF. Similar sequence motifs and predicted RNA structures in other victoriviruses suggest that they all share a related stop-restart strategy for RdRp translation. Members of the genus Victorivirus thus provide new and unique opportunities for exploring the molecular mechanisms of translational coupling, which remain only partly understood in this and other systems.

  2. The unique N-terminal zinc finger of synaptotagmin-like protein 4 reveals FYVE structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Kazuhide; Nakatani, Arisa; Saito, Kazuki

    2017-12-01

    Synaptotagmin-like protein 4 (Slp4), expressed in human platelets, is associated with dense granule release. Slp4 is comprised of the N-terminal zinc finger, Slp homology domain, and C2 domains. We synthesized a compact construct (the Slp4N peptide) corresponding to the Slp4 N-terminal zinc finger. Herein, we have determined the solution structure of the Slp4N peptide by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Furthermore, experimental, chemical modification of Cys residues revealed that the Slp4N peptide binds two zinc atoms to mediate proper folding. NMR data showed that eight Cys residues coordinate zinc atoms in a cross-brace fashion. The Simple Modular Architecture Research Tool database predicted the structure of Slp4N as a RING finger. However, the actual structure of the Slp4N peptide adopts a unique C 4 C 4 -type FYVE fold and is distinct from a RING fold. To create an artificial RING finger (ARF) with specific ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2)-binding capability, cross-brace structures with eight zinc-ligating residues are needed as the scaffold. The cross-brace structure of the Slp4N peptide could be utilized as the scaffold for the design of ARFs. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  3. Controlled acrylate insertion regioselectivity in diazaphospholidine- sulfonato palladium(II) complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Wucher, Philipp

    2012-12-24

    Diazaphospholidine-sulfonato Pd(II) complexes [{κ2-P,O-(N- Ar2C2H4N2P)C6H 4SO3}PdMe(L)] 1-L (L = dmso, pyridine, lutidine, or μ-LiCl(solvent); 1a: Ar = Ph, 1b: Ar = 2-MeC6H4, 1c: Ar = 2-MeOC6H4, 1d: Ar = 2,4,6-Me3C 6H2, 1e: Ar = 2,6-iPr2C6H 3, 1f: Ar = 2,6-(p-tolyl)2C6H3) were prepared and structurally characterized. The regioselectivity of methyl acrylate (MA) insertion into the Pd-Me bond is entirely inverted from >93% 1,2-insertion for bulky substituents (1d-f, yielding the insertion products [(P̂O)Pd{κ2-C,O-CH2CHMeC(O)OMe], 12) to the usual electronically controlled 2,1-insertion (>95%) for the less bulky Ar = Ph (1a, yielding the insertion product [(P̂O)Pd{κ2-C,O- CHEtC(O)OMe], 11, and β-H elimination product methyl crotonate). DFT studies underline that this is due to a more favorable insertion transition state (2,1- favored by 12 kJ mol-1 over 1,2- for 1a) vs destabilization of the 2,1-insertion transition state in 1d,e. By contrast, MA insertion into the novel isolated and structurally characterized hydride and deuteride complexes [{κ2-P,O-(N-Ar2C 2H4N2P)C6H4SO 3}PdR(lutidine)] (Ar = 2,6-iPr2C6H3; 9e: R = H, 10e: R = D) occurs 2,1-selectively. This is due to the insertion occurring from the isomer with the P-donor and the olefin in trans arrangement, rather than the insertion into the alkyl from the cis isomer in which the olefin is in proximity to the bulky diazaphospholidine. 1a-f are precursors to active catalysts for ethylene polymerization to highly linear polyethylene with M n up to 35 000 g mol-1. In copolymerization experiments, norbornene was incorporated in up to 6.1 mol % into the polyethylene backbone. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  4. Efficiency to Discovery Transgenic Loci in GM Rice Using Next Generation Sequencing Whole Genome Re-sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doori Park

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Molecular characterization technology in genetically modified organisms, in addition to how transgenic biotechnologies are developed now require full transparency to assess the risk to living modified and non-modified organisms. Next generation sequencing (NGS methodology is suggested as an effective means in genome characterization and detection of transgenic insertion locations. In the present study, we applied NGS to insert transgenic loci, specifically the epidermal growth factor (EGF in genetically modified rice cells. A total of 29.3 Gb (~72× coverage was sequenced with a 2 × 150 bp paired end method by Illumina HiSeq2500, which was consecutively mapped to the rice genome and T-vector sequence. The compatible pairs of reads were successfully mapped to 10 loci on the rice chromosome and vector sequences were validated to the insertion location by polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification. The EGF transgenic site was confirmed only on chromosome 4 by PCR. Results of this study demonstrated the success of NGS data to characterize the rice genome. Bioinformatics analyses must be developed in association with NGS data to identify highly accurate transgenic sites.

  5. Nucleotide sequence of the human N-myc gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanton, L.W.; Schwab, M.; Bishop, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Human neuroblastomas frequently display amplification and augmented expression of a gene known as N-myc because of its similarity to the protooncogene c-myc. It has therefore been proposed that N-myc is itself a protooncogene, and subsequent tests have shown that N-myc and c-myc have similar biological activities in cell culture. The authors have now detailed the kinship between N-myc and c-myc by determining the nucleotide sequence of human N-myc and deducing the amino acid sequence of the protein encoded by the gene. The topography of N-myc is strikingly similar to that of c-myc: both genes contain three exons of similar lengths; the coding elements of both genes are located in the second and third exons; and both genes have unusually long 5' untranslated regions in their mRNAs, with features that raise the possibility that expression of the genes may be subject to similar controls of translation. The resemblance between the proteins encoded by N-myc and c-myc sustains previous suspicions that the genes encode related functions

  6. Designer Self-Assembling Peptide Nanofiber Scaffolds Containing Link Protein N-Terminal Peptide Induce Chondrogenesis of Rabbit Bone Marrow Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baichuan Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Designer self-assembling peptide nanofiber hydrogel scaffolds have been considered as promising biomaterials for tissue engineering because of their excellent biocompatibility and biofunctionality. Our previous studies have shown that a novel designer functionalized self-assembling peptide nanofiber hydrogel scaffold (RLN/RADA16, LN-NS containing N-terminal peptide sequence of link protein (link N can promote nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs adhesion and three-dimensional (3D migration and stimulate biosynthesis of type II collagen and aggrecan by NPCs in vitro. The present study has extended these investigations to determine the effects of this functionalized LN-NS on bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs, a potential cell source for NP regeneration. Although the functionalized LN-NS cannot promote BMSCs proliferation, it significantly promotes BMSCs adhesion compared with that of the pure RADA16 hydrogel scaffold. Moreover, the functionalized LN-NS remarkably stimulates biosynthesis and deposition of type II collagen and aggrecan. These data demonstrate that the functionalized peptide nanofiber hydrogel scaffold containing link N peptide as a potential matrix substrate will be very useful in the NP tissue regeneration.

  7. Interaction of N-terminal peptide analogues of the Na+,K+-ATPase with membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khoa; Garcia, Alvaro; Sani, Marc-Antoine; Diaz, Dil; Dubey, Vikas; Clayton, Daniel; Dal Poggetto, Giovanni; Cornelius, Flemming; Payne, Richard J; Separovic, Frances; Khandelia, Himanshu; Clarke, Ronald J

    2018-06-01

    The Na + ,K + -ATPase, which is present in the plasma membrane of all animal cells, plays a crucial role in maintaining the Na + and K + electrochemical potential gradients across the membrane. Recent studies have suggested that the N-terminus of the protein's catalytic α-subunit is involved in an electrostatic interaction with the surrounding membrane, which controls the protein's conformational equilibrium. However, because the N-terminus could not yet be resolved in any X-ray crystal structures, little information about this interaction is so far available. In measurements utilising poly-l-lysine as a model of the protein's lysine-rich N-terminus and using lipid vesicles of defined composition, here we have identified the most likely origin of the interaction as one between positively charged lysine residues of the N-terminus and negatively charged headgroups of phospholipids (notably phosphatidylserine) in the surrounding membrane. Furthermore, to isolate which segments of the N-terminus could be involved in membrane binding, we chemically synthesized N-terminal fragments of various lengths. Based on a combination of results from RH421 UV/visible absorbance measurements and solid-state 31 P and 2 H NMR using these N-terminal fragments as well as MD simulations it appears that the membrane interaction arises from lysine residues prior to the conserved LKKE motif of the N-terminus. The MD simulations indicate that the strength of the interaction varies significantly between different enzyme conformations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. 48 CFR 52.249-7 - Termination (Fixed-Price Architect-Engineer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Architect-Engineer). 52.249-7 Section 52.249-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION... Clauses 52.249-7 Termination (Fixed-Price Architect-Engineer). As prescribed in 49.503(b), insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts for architect-engineer services when a fixed-price contract...

  9. Nucleotide sequence of a human tRNA gene heterocluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.N.; Pirtle, I.L.; Pirtle, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Leucine tRNA from bovine liver was used as a hybridization probe to screen a human gene library harbored in Charon-4A of bacteriophage lambda. The human DNA inserts from plaque-pure clones were characterized by restriction endonuclease mapping and Southern hybridization techniques, using both [3'- 32 P]-labeled bovine liver leucine tRNA and total tRNA as hybridization probes. An 8-kb Hind III fragment of one of these γ-clones was subcloned into the Hind III site of pBR322. Subsequent fine restriction mapping and DNA sequence analysis of this plasmid DNA indicated the presence of four tRNA genes within the 8-kb DNA fragment. A leucine tRNA gene with an anticodon of AAG and a proline tRNA gene with an anticodon of AGG are in a 1.6-kb subfragment. A threonine tRNA gene with an anticodon of UGU and an as yet unidentified tRNA gene are located in a 1.1-kb subfragment. These two different subfragments are separated by 2.8 kb. The coding regions of the three sequenced genes contain characteristic internal split promoter sequences and do not have intervening sequences. The 3'-flanking region of these three genes have typical RNA polymerase III termination sites of at least four consecutive T residues

  10. The C-terminal sequence of several human serine proteases encodes host defense functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasetty, Gopinath; Papareddy, Praveen; Kalle, Martina; Rydengård, Victoria; Walse, Björn; Svensson, Bo; Mörgelin, Matthias; Malmsten, Martin; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteases of the S1 family have maintained a common structure over an evolutionary span of more than one billion years, and evolved a variety of substrate specificities and diverse biological roles, involving digestion and degradation, blood clotting, fibrinolysis and epithelial homeostasis. We here show that a wide range of C-terminal peptide sequences of serine proteases, particularly from the coagulation and kallikrein systems, share characteristics common with classical antimicrobial peptides of innate immunity. Under physiological conditions, these peptides exert antimicrobial effects as well as immunomodulatory functions by inhibiting macrophage responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharide. In mice, selected peptides are protective against lipopolysaccharide-induced shock. Moreover, these S1-derived host defense peptides exhibit helical structures upon binding to lipopolysaccharide and also permeabilize liposomes. The results uncover new and fundamental aspects on host defense functions of serine proteases present particularly in blood and epithelia, and provide tools for the identification of host defense molecules of therapeutic interest. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Contribution of insertions and deletions to the variability of hepatitis C virus populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Puente, Manuela; Cuevas, José M; Jiménez-Hernández, Nuria; Bracho, María A; García-Robles, Inmaculada; Carnicer, Fernando; del Olmo, Juan; Ortega, Enrique; Moya, Andrés; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2007-08-01

    Little is known about the potential effects of insertions and deletions (indels) on the evolutionary dynamics of hepatitis C virus (HCV). In fact, the consequences of indels on antiviral treatment response are a field of investigation completely unexplored. Here, an extensive sequencing project was undertaken by cloning and sequencing serum samples from 25 patients infected with HCV subtype 1a and 48 patients with subtype 1b. For 23 patients, samples obtained after treatment with alpha interferon plus ribavirin were also available. Two genome fragments containing the hypervariable regions in the envelope 2 glycoprotein and the PKR-BD domain in NS5A were sequenced, yielding almost 16 000 sequences. Our results show that insertions are quite rare, but they are often present in biologically relevant domains of the HCV genome. Moreover, their frequency distributions between different time samples reflect the quasispecies dynamics of HCV populations. Deletions seem to be subject to negative selection.

  12. Sequence-indexed mutations in maize using the UniformMu transposon-tagging population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baier John

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene knockouts are a critical resource for functional genomics. In Arabidopsis, comprehensive knockout collections were generated by amplifying and sequencing genomic DNA flanking insertion mutants. These Flanking Sequence Tags (FSTs map each mutant to a specific locus within the genome. In maize, FSTs have been generated using DNA transposons. Transposable elements can generate unstable insertions that are difficult to analyze for simple knockout phenotypes. Transposons can also generate somatic insertions that fail to segregate in subsequent generations. Results Transposon insertion sites from 106 UniformMu FSTs were tested for inheritance by locus-specific PCR. We confirmed 89% of the FSTs to be germinal transposon insertions. We found no evidence for somatic insertions within the 11% of insertion sites that were not confirmed. Instead, this subset of insertion sites had errors in locus-specific primer design due to incomplete or low-quality genomic sequences. The locus-specific PCR assays identified a knockout of a 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase gene that co-segregates with a seed mutant phenotype. The mutant phenotype linked to this knockout generates novel hypotheses about the role for the plastid-localized oxidative pentose phosphate pathway during grain-fill. Conclusion We show that FSTs from the UniformMu population identify stable, germinal insertion sites in maize. Moreover, we show that these sequence-indexed mutations can be readily used for reverse genetic analysis. We conclude from these data that the current collection of 1,882 non-redundant insertion sites from UniformMu provide a genome-wide resource for reverse genetics.

  13. The Rhizobium etli rpoN locus: DNA sequence analysis and phenotypical characterization of rpoN, ptsN, and ptsA mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michiels, J; Van Soom, T; D'hooghe, I; Dombrecht, B; Benhassine, T; de Wilde, P; Vanderleyden, J

    1998-04-01

    The rpoN region of Rhizobium etli was isolated by using the Bradyrhizobium japonicum rpoN1 gene as a probe. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a 5,600-bp DNA fragment of this region revealed the presence of four complete open reading frames (ORFs), ORF258, rpoN, ORF191, and ptsN, coding for proteins of 258, 520, 191, and 154 amino acids, respectively. The gene product of ORF258 is homologous to members of the ATP-binding cassette-type permeases. ORF191 and ptsN are homologous to conserved ORFs found downstream from rpoN genes in other bacterial species. Unlike in most other microorganisms, rpoN and ORF191 are separated by approximately 1.6 kb. The R. etli rpoN gene was shown to control in free-living conditions the production of melanin, the activation of nifH, and the metabolism of C4-dicarboxylic acids and several nitrogen sources (ammonium, nitrate, alanine, and serine). Expression of the rpoN gene was negatively autoregulated and occurred independently of the nitrogen source. Inactivation of the ptsN gene resulted in a decrease of melanin synthesis and nifH expression. In a search for additional genes controlling the synthesis of melanin, an R. etli mutant carrying a Tn5 insertion in ptsA, a gene homologous to the Escherichia coli gene coding for enzyme I of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system, was obtained. The R. etli ptsA mutant also displayed reduced expression of nifH. The ptsN and ptsA mutants also displayed increased sensitivity to the toxic effects of malate and succinate. Growth of both mutants was inhibited by these C4-dicarboxylates at 20 mM at pH 7.0, while wild-type cells grow normally under these conditions. The effect of malate occurred independently of the nitrogen source used. Growth inhibition was decreased by lowering the pH of the growth medium. These results suggest that ptsN and ptsA are part of the same regulatory cascade, the inactivation of which renders the cells sensitive to toxic effects of elevated concentrations of

  14. Mix-and-match considerations for EUV insertion in N7 HVM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuemei; Gabor, Allen; Samudrala, Pavan; Meyers, Sheldon; Hosler, Erik; Johnson, Richard; Felix, Nelson

    2017-03-01

    An optimal mix-match control strategy for EUV and 193i scanners is crucial for the insertion of EUV lithography at 7nm technology node. The systematic differences between these exposure systems introduce additional cross-platform mixmatch overlay errors. In this paper, we quantify the EUV specific contributions to mix-match overlay, and explore the effectiveness of higher-order interfield and intrafield corrections on minimizing the on-product mix-match overlay errors. We also analyze the impact of intra-field sampling plans in terms of model accuracy and adequacy in capturing EUV specific intra-field signatures. Our analysis suggests that more intra-field measurements and appropriate placement of the metrology targets within the field are required to achieve the on-product overlay control goals for N7 HVM.

  15. A unique DNA repair and recombination gene (recN) sequence for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-04-23

    Apr 23, 2013 ... the recN-sequence-based phylogenetic tree generated with the Bayesian model depicted 21 ..... recN sequences showed a haplotype diversity value 0.92; ..... veals dynamic recruitment of Bacillus subtilis RecF, RecO and.

  16. Rapid molecular sexing of three-spined sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus L., based on large Y-chromosomal insertions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Theo C M; Giger, Thomas; Frommen, Joachim G; Largiadèr, Carlo R

    2017-08-01

    There is a need for rapid and reliable molecular sexing of three-spined sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus, the supermodel species for evolutionary biology. A DNA region at the 5' end of the sex-linked microsatellite Gac4202 was sequenced for the X chromosome of six females and the Y chromosome of five males from three populations. The Y chromosome contained two large insertions, which did not recombine with the phenotype of sex in a cross of 322 individuals. Genetic variation (SNPs and indels) within the insertions was smaller than on flanking DNA sequences. Three molecular PCR-based sex tests were developed, in which the first, the second or both insertions were covered. In five European populations (from DE, CH, NL, GB) of three-spined sticklebacks, tests with both insertions combined showed two clearly separated bands on agarose minigels in males and one band in females. The tests with the separate insertions gave similar results. Thus, the new molecular sexing method gave rapid and reliable results for sexing three-spined sticklebacks and is an improvement and/or alternative to existing methods.

  17. Retroviral insertions in the VISION database identify molecular pathways in mouse lymphoid leukemia and lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Keith C; Liu, Bin; Hansen, Gwenn M; Skapura, Darlene; Hentges, Kathryn E; Yarlagadda, Sujatha; Morse Iii, Herbert C; Justice, Monica J

    2007-10-01

    AKXD recombinant inbred (RI) strains develop a variety of leukemias and lymphomas due to somatically acquired insertions of retroviral DNA into the genome of hematopoetic cells that can mutate cellular proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. We generated a new set of tumors from nine AKXD RI strains selected for their propensity to develop B-cell tumors, the most common type of human hematopoietic cancers. We employed a PCR technique called viral insertion site amplification (VISA) to rapidly isolate genomic sequence at the site of provirus insertion. Here we describe 550 VISA sequence tags (VSTs) that identify 74 common insertion sites (CISs), of which 21 have not been identified previously. Several suspected proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes lie near CISs, providing supportive evidence for their roles in cancer. Furthermore, numerous previously uncharacterized genes lie near CISs, providing a pool of candidate disease genes for future research. Pathway analysis of candidate genes identified several signaling pathways as common and powerful routes to blood cancer, including Notch, E-protein, NFkappaB, and Ras signaling. Misregulation of several Notch signaling genes was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. Our data suggest that analyses of insertional mutagenesis on a single genetic background are biased toward the identification of cooperating mutations. This tumor collection represents the most comprehensive study of the genetics of B-cell leukemia and lymphoma development in mice. We have deposited the VST sequences, CISs in a genome viewer, histopathology, and molecular tumor typing data in a public web database called VISION (Viral Insertion Sites Identifying Oncogenes), which is located at http://www.mouse-genome.bcm.tmc.edu/vision .

  18. Sequence diversity of the leukotoxin (lktA) gene in caprine and ovine strains of Mannheimia haemolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vougidou, C; Sandalakis, V; Psaroulaki, A; Petridou, E; Ekateriniadou, L

    2013-04-20

    Mannheimia haemolytica is the aetiological agent of pneumonic pasteurellosis in small ruminants. The primary virulence factor of the bacterium is a leukotoxin (LktA), which induces apoptosis in susceptible cells via mitochondrial targeting. It has been previously shown that certain lktA alleles are associated either with cattle or sheep. The objective of the present study was to investigate lktA sequence variation among ovine and caprine M haemolytica strains isolated from pneumonic lungs, revealing any potential adaptation for the caprine host, for which there is no available data. Furthermore, we investigated amino acid variation in the N-terminal part of the sequences and its effect on targeting mitochondria. Data analysis showed that the prevalent caprine genotype differed at a single non-synonymous site from a previously described uncommon bovine allele, whereas the ovine sequences represented new, distinct alleles. N-terminal sequence differences did not affect the mitochondrial targeting ability of the isolates; interestingly enough in one case, mitochondrial matrix targeting was indicated rather than membrane association, suggesting an alternative LktA trafficking pattern.

  19. A macaque's-eye view of human insertions and deletions: differences in mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika M Kvikstad

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Insertions and deletions (indels cause numerous genetic diseases and lead to pronounced evolutionary differences among genomes. The macaque sequences provide an opportunity to gain insights into the mechanisms generating these mutations on a genome-wide scale by establishing the polarity of indels occurring in the human lineage since its divergence from the chimpanzee. Here we apply novel regression techniques and multiscale analyses to demonstrate an extensive regional indel rate variation stemming from local fluctuations in divergence, GC content, male and female recombination rates, proximity to telomeres, and other genomic factors. We find that both replication and, surprisingly, recombination are significantly associated with the occurrence of small indels. Intriguingly, the relative inputs of replication versus recombination differ between insertions and deletions, thus the two types of mutations are likely guided in part by distinct mechanisms. Namely, insertions are more strongly associated with factors linked to recombination, while deletions are mostly associated with replication-related features. Indel as a term misleadingly groups the two types of mutations together by their effect on a sequence alignment. However, here we establish that the correct identification of a small gap as an insertion or a deletion (by use of an outgroup is crucial to determining its mechanism of origin. In addition to providing novel insights into insertion and deletion mutagenesis, these results will assist in gap penalty modeling and eventually lead to more reliable genomic alignments.

  20. Caracterización de las necesidades psicosociales del enfermo oncológico terminal Characterization of the psychosocial needs of oncological terminal patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de los Angeles Garrido Pérez

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: a pesar del desarrollo alcanzado en la medicina, se han incrementado las enfermedades crónicas degenerativas y malignas y con ellas el aumento de los enfermos terminales. Este estudio tuvo como objetivo principal la identificación de las necesidades psicosociales de los enfermos oncológicos en situación terminal del policlínico José Martí del municipio de Camagüey que se encontraban ingresados en el hogar durante el año 2011. Material y métodos: se les aplicó una encuesta a 50 pacientes para valorar comportamiento de la comunicación sobre la enfermedad tanto con el médico como con sus familiares, así como la satisfacción ante el tratamiento médico, acompañamiento familiar y atención recibida por el equipo de salud. Los datos obtenidos fueron procesados de forma computarizada mediante el empleo de métodos de estadística descriptiva, los mismos se expresaron en forma de tablas. Resultados y Discusión: el análisis de los resultados indicó que el 90 % de los enfermos habla poco del tema con el médico que lo atiende; asimismo, el 84 % de los pacientes terminales conversa poco con la familia acerca de la enfermedad y sus complicaciones. El 100 % de los pacientes mostraron satisfacción con la atención recibida. La relación con los integrantes del equipo de cuidados paliativos, el 100 % de los encuestados lo calificó como bueno. Conclusiones: aunque hay aspectos del bienestar psicosocial de estos enfermos que pueden considerarse de nivel satisfactorio existen otros que requieren un mejor enfoque tanto por los pacientes, como por el personal médico.Introduction: Despite the development reached in the field of medicine, degenerative and malignant chronic diseases have increased, and with them, the number of terminal patients. The main objective of this work was to identify the psychosocial needs of the oncological terminal patients that had been hospitalized in 2011, at José Martí polyclinic in the

  1. Implementing reverse genetics in Rosaceae: analysis of T-DNA flanking sequences of insertional mutant lines in the diploid strawberry, Fragaria vesca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosumi, Teruko; Ruiz-Rojas, Juan Jairo; Veilleux, Richard E; Dickerman, Allan; Shulaev, Vladimir

    2010-09-01

    Reverse genetics is used for functional genomics research in model plants. To establish a model system for the systematic reverse genetics research in the Rosaceae family, we analyzed genomic DNA flanking the T-DNA insertions in 191 transgenic plants of the diploid strawberry, Fragaria vesca. One hundred and seventy-six T-DNA flanking sequences were amplified from the right border (RB) and 37 from the left border (LB) by thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR. Analysis of the T-DNA nick positions revealed that T-DNA was most frequently nicked at the cleavage sites. Analysis of 11 T-DNA integration sites indicated that T-DNA was integrated into the F. vesca genome by illegitimate recombination, as reported in other model plants: Arabidopsis, rice and tobacco. First, deletion of DNA was found at T-DNA integration target sites in all transgenic plants tested. Second, microsimilarities of a few base pairs between the left and/or right ends of the T-DNA and genomic sites were found in all transgenic plants tested. Finally, filler DNA was identified in four break-points. Out of 191 transgenic plants, T-DNA flanking sequences of 79 plants (41%) showed significant similarity to genes, elements or proteins of other plant species and 67 (35%) of the sequences are still unknown strawberry gene fragments. T-DNA flanking sequences of 126 plants (66%) showed homology to plant ESTs. This is the first report of T-DNA integration in a sizeable population of a rosaceous species. We have shown in this paper that T-DNA integration in strawberry is not random but directed by sequence microsimilarities in the host genome.

  2. Structure and assembly properties of the N-terminal domain of the prion Ure2p in isolation and in its natural context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Bousset

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aggregation of the baker's yeast prion Ure2p is at the origin of the [URE3] trait. The Q- and N-rich N-terminal part of the protein is believed to drive Ure2p assembly into fibrils of amyloid nature and the fibrillar forms of full-length Ure2p and its N-terminal part generated in vitro have been shown to induce [URE3] occurrence when introduced into yeast cells. This has led to the view that the fibrillar form of the N-terminal part of the protein is sufficient for the recruitment of constitutive Ure2p and that it imprints its amyloid structure to full-length Ure2p. RESULTS: Here we generate a set of Ure2p N-terminal fragments, document their assembly and structural properties and compare them to that of full-length Ure2p. We identify the minimal region critical for the assembly of Ure2p N-terminal part into amyloids and show that such fibrils are unable to seed the assembly of full length Ure2p unlike fibrils made of intact Ure2p. CONCLUSION: Our results clearly indicate that fibrillar Ure2p shares no structural similarities with the amyloid fibrils made of Ure2p N-terminal part. Our results further suggest that the induction of [URE3] by fibrils made of full-length Ure2p is likely the consequence of fibrils growth by depletion of cytosolic Ure2p while it is the consequence of de novo formation of prion particles following, for example, titration within the cells of a specific set of molecular chaperones when fibrils made of Ure2p N-terminal domain are introduced within the cytoplasm.

  3. c-Jun N-terminal kinase mediates AML1-ETO protein-induced connexin-43 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Fenghou; Wang Qiong; Wu Yingli; Li Xi; Zhao Kewen; Chen Guoqiang

    2007-01-01

    AML1-ETO fusion protein, a product of leukemia-related chromosomal translocation t(8;21), was reported to upregulate expression of connexin-43 (Cx43), a member of gap junction-constituted connexin family. However, its mechanism(s) remains unclear. By bioinformatic analysis, here we showed that there are two putative AML1-binding consensus sequences followed by two activated protein (AP)1 sites in the 5'-flanking region upstream to Cx43 gene. AML1-ETO could directly bind to these two AML1-binding sites in electrophoretic mobility shift assay, but luciferase reporter assay revealed that the AML1 binding sites were not indispensable for Cx43 induction by AML1-ETO protein. Conversely, AP1 sites exerted an important role in this event. In agreement, AML1-ETO overexpression in leukemic U937 cells activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), while its specific inhibitor SP600125 effectively abrogated AML1-ETO-induced Cx43 expression, indicating that JNK signaling pathway contributes to AML1-ETO induced Cx43 expression. These results would shed new insights for understanding mechanisms of AML1-ETO-associated leukemogenesis

  4. Abl N-terminal Cap stabilization of SH3 domain dynamics†

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Shugui; Dumitrescu, Teodora Pene; Smithgall, Thomas E.; Engen, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Crystal structures and other biochemical data indicate that the N-terminal cap (NCap) region of the Abelson tyrosine kinase (c-Abl) is important for maintaining the downregulated conformation of the kinase domain. The exact contributions that NCap makes in stabilizing the various intramolecular interactions within c-Abl are less clear. While the NCap appears important for locking the SH3/SH2 domains to the back of the kinase domain, there may be other more subtle elements of regulation. Hydro...

  5. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of HIV fusion peptide 13CO to lipid 31P proximities support similar partially inserted membrane locations of the α helical and β sheet peptide structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrys, Charles M; Qiang, Wei; Sun, Yan; Xie, Li; Schmick, Scott D; Weliky, David P

    2013-10-03

    Fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) membrane and the host cell membrane is an initial step of infection of the host cell. Fusion is catalyzed by gp41, which is an integral membrane protein of HIV. The fusion peptide (FP) is the ∼25 N-terminal residues of gp41 and is a domain of gp41 that plays a key role in fusion catalysis likely through interaction with the host cell membrane. Much of our understanding of the FP domain has been accomplished with studies of "HFP", i.e., a ∼25-residue peptide composed of the FP sequence but lacking the rest of gp41. HFP catalyzes fusion between membrane vesicles and serves as a model system to understand fusion catalysis. HFP binds to membranes and the membrane location of HFP is likely a significant determinant of fusion catalysis perhaps because the consequent membrane perturbation reduces the fusion activation energy. In the present study, many HFPs were synthesized and differed in the residue position that was (13)CO backbone labeled. Samples were then prepared that each contained a singly (13)CO labeled HFP incorporated into membranes that lacked cholesterol. HFP had distinct molecular populations with either α helical or oligomeric β sheet structure. Proximity between the HFP (13)CO nuclei and (31)P nuclei in the membrane headgroups was probed by solid-state NMR (SSNMR) rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) measurements. For many samples, there were distinct (13)CO shifts for the α helical and β sheet structures so that the proximities to (31)P nuclei could be determined for each structure. Data from several differently labeled HFPs were then incorporated into a membrane location model for the particular structure. In addition to the (13)CO labeled residue position, the HFPs also differed in sequence and/or chemical structure. "HFPmn" was a linear peptide that contained the 23 N-terminal residues of gp41. "HFPmn_V2E" contained the V2E mutation that for HIV leads to greatly reduced extent of fusion and

  6. Effect of N-Terminal Acylation on the Activity of Myostatin Inhibitory Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Kentaro; Nakamura, Akari; Rentier, Cédric; Mino, Yusaku; Asari, Tomo; Saga, Yusuke; Taguchi, Akihiro; Yakushiji, Fumika; Hayashi, Yoshio

    2016-04-19

    Inhibition of myostatin, which negatively regulates skeletal muscle growth, is a promising strategy for the treatment of muscle atrophic disorders, such as muscular dystrophy, cachexia and sarcopenia. Recently, we identified peptide A (H-WRQNTRYSRIEAIKIQILSKLRL-NH2 ), the 23-amino-acid minimum myostatin inhibitory peptide derived from mouse myostatin prodomain, and highlighted the importance of its N-terminal tryptophan residue for the effective inhibition. In this study, we synthesized a series of acylated peptide derivatives focused on the tryptophan residue to develop potent myostatin inhibitors. As a result of the investigation, a more potent derivative of peptide A was successfully identified in which the N-terminal tryptophan residue is replaced with a 2-naphthyloxyacetyl moiety to give an inhibitory peptide three times (1.19±0.11 μm) more potent than parent peptide A (3.53±0.25 μm). This peptide could prove useful as a new starting point for the development of improved inhibitory peptides. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. An Amyloidogenic Sequence at the N-Terminus of the Androgen Receptor Impacts Polyglutamine Aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Oppong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The human androgen receptor (AR is a ligand inducible transcription factor that harbors an amino terminal domain (AR-NTD with a ligand-independent activation function. AR-NTD is intrinsically disordered and displays aggregation properties conferred by the presence of a poly-glutamine (polyQ sequence. The length of the polyQ sequence as well as its adjacent sequence motifs modulate this aggregation property. AR-NTD also contains a conserved KELCKAVSVSM sequence motif that displays an intrinsic property to form amyloid fibrils under mild oxidative conditions. As peptide sequences with intrinsic oligomerization properties are reported to have an impact on the aggregation of polyQ tracts, we determined the effect of the KELCKAVSVSM on the polyQ stretch in the context of the AR-NTD using atomic force microscopy (AFM. Here, we present evidence for a crosstalk between the amyloidogenic properties of the KELCKAVSVSM motif and the polyQ stretch at the AR-NTD.

  8. Suppression of cell death by the secretory form of N-terminal ERC/mesothelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tegexibaiyin; Kajino, Kazunori; Abe, Masaaki; Tan, Ke; Maruo, Masumi; Sun, Guodong; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Maeda, Masahiro; Hino, Okio

    2010-08-01

    ERC/mesothelin is highly expressed in malignant mesothelioma, pancreatic cancer, and ovarian cancer. It is cleaved to a 30 kDa N-terminal secretory form (N-ERC) and a 40 kDa C-terminal membranous form (C-ERC). Several functions have been reported for full-length ERC (full-ERC) and C-ERC/mesothelin, such as in cell adhesion and invasion, stimulation of cell proliferation, and the suppression of cell death. However, there have been no studies to date on the function of secretory N-ERC, despite the fact that it is abundantly secreted into the sera of mesothelioma patients. In this study, we investigated whether N-ERC could function as a secretory factor to stimulate tumor progression. Full-, N, or C-ERC was overexpressed in the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line Huh7 that lacks endogenous expression of ERC/mesothelin. Changes in the rates of cell proliferation and cell death were determined, and the state of signal transducers was examined using various endpoints: total cell counts, trypan blue exclusion rate, BrdU incorporation rate, TUNEL assay, and the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Stat3. In cells overexpressing N-ERC, phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was enhanced and the rate of cell death decreased, leading to the increase of cell number. The culture medium containing the secretory N-ERC also had the activity to increase the number of cells. Our data suggested that one of the full-ERC functions reported previously was mediated by the secretory N-ERC.

  9. 75 FR 60258 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Termination for Default Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ..., Sequence 1] RIN 9000-AL45 Federal Acquisition Regulation; Termination for Default Reporting AGENCIES... terminations for cause or default and defective cost or pricing data, into the Past Performance Information... defective cost or pricing data and terminations for cause or default into the FAPIIS module of the PPIRS...

  10. Isolation and amino acid sequence of corticotropin-releasing factor from pig hypothalami.

    OpenAIRE

    Patthy, M; Horvath, J; Mason-Garcia, M; Szoke, B; Schlesinger, D H; Schally, A V

    1985-01-01

    A polypeptide was isolated from acid extracts of porcine hypothalami on the basis of its high ability to stimulate the release of corticotropin from superfused rat pituitary cells. After an initial separation by gel filtration on Sephadex G-25, further purification was carried out by reversed-phase HPLC. The isolated material was homogeneous chromatographically and by N-terminal sequencing. Based on automated gas-phase sequencing of the intact and CNBr-cleaved peptide and on carboxypeptidase ...

  11. Generation and analysis of a barcode-tagged insertion mutant library in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Barcodes are unique DNA sequence tags that can be used to specifically label individual mutants. The barcode-tagged open reading frame (ORF) haploid deletion mutant collections in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe allow for high-throughput mutant phenotyping because the relative growth of mutants in a population can be determined by monitoring the proportions of their associated barcodes. While these mutant collections have greatly facilitated genome-wide studies, mutations in essential genes are not present, and the roles of these genes are not as easily studied. To further support genome-scale research in S. pombe, we generated a barcode-tagged fission yeast insertion mutant library that has the potential of generating viable mutations in both essential and non-essential genes and can be easily analyzed using standard molecular biological techniques. Results An insertion vector containing a selectable ura4+ marker and a random barcode was used to generate a collection of 10,000 fission yeast insertion mutants stored individually in 384-well plates and as six pools of mixed mutants. Individual barcodes are flanked by Sfi I recognition sites and can be oligomerized in a unique orientation to facilitate barcode sequencing. Independent genetic screens on a subset of mutants suggest that this library contains a diverse collection of single insertion mutations. We present several approaches to determine insertion sites. Conclusions This collection of S. pombe barcode-tagged insertion mutants is well-suited for genome-wide studies. Because insertion mutations may eliminate, reduce or alter the function of essential and non-essential genes, this library will contain strains with a wide range of phenotypes that can be assayed by their associated barcodes. The design of the barcodes in this library allows for barcode sequencing using next generation or standard benchtop cloning approaches. PMID:22554201

  12. Generation and analysis of a barcode-tagged insertion mutant library in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Bo-Ruei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Barcodes are unique DNA sequence tags that can be used to specifically label individual mutants. The barcode-tagged open reading frame (ORF haploid deletion mutant collections in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe allow for high-throughput mutant phenotyping because the relative growth of mutants in a population can be determined by monitoring the proportions of their associated barcodes. While these mutant collections have greatly facilitated genome-wide studies, mutations in essential genes are not present, and the roles of these genes are not as easily studied. To further support genome-scale research in S. pombe, we generated a barcode-tagged fission yeast insertion mutant library that has the potential of generating viable mutations in both essential and non-essential genes and can be easily analyzed using standard molecular biological techniques. Results An insertion vector containing a selectable ura4+ marker and a random barcode was used to generate a collection of 10,000 fission yeast insertion mutants stored individually in 384-well plates and as six pools of mixed mutants. Individual barcodes are flanked by Sfi I recognition sites and can be oligomerized in a unique orientation to facilitate barcode sequencing. Independent genetic screens on a subset of mutants suggest that this library contains a diverse collection of single insertion mutations. We present several approaches to determine insertion sites. Conclusions This collection of S. pombe barcode-tagged insertion mutants is well-suited for genome-wide studies. Because insertion mutations may eliminate, reduce or alter the function of essential and non-essential genes, this library will contain strains with a wide range of phenotypes that can be assayed by their associated barcodes. The design of the barcodes in this library allows for barcode sequencing using next generation or standard benchtop cloning

  13. Asparagine 326 in the extremely C-terminal region of XRCC4 is essential for the cell survival after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanotayan, Rujira; Fukuchi, Mikoto; Imamichi, Shoji; Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa, E-mail: yoshim@nr.titech.ac.jp

    2015-02-20

    XRCC4 is one of the crucial proteins in the repair of DNA double-strand break (DSB) through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). As XRCC4 consists of 336 amino acids, N-terminal 200 amino acids include domains for dimerization and for association with DNA ligase IV and XLF and shown to be essential for XRCC4 function in DSB repair and V(D)J recombination. On the other hand, the role of the remaining C-terminal region of XRCC4 is not well understood. In the present study, we noticed that a stretch of ∼20 amino acids located at the extreme C-terminus of XRCC4 is highly conserved among vertebrate species. To explore its possible importance, series of mutants in this region were constructed and assessed for the functionality in terms of ability to rescue radiosensitivity of M10 cells lacking XRCC4. Among 13 mutants, M10 transfectant with N326L mutant (M10-XRCC4{sup N326L}) showed elevated radiosensitivity. N326L protein showed defective nuclear localization. N326L sequence matched the consensus sequence of nuclear export signal. Leptomycin B treatment accumulated XRCC4{sup N326L} in the nucleus but only partially rescued radiosensitivity of M10-XRCC4{sup N326L}. These results collectively indicated that the functional defects of XRCC4{sup N326L} might be partially, but not solely, due to its exclusion from nucleus by synthetic nuclear export signal. Further mutation of XRCC4 Asn326 to other amino acids, i.e., alanine, aspartic acid or glutamine did not affect the nuclear localization but still exhibited radiosensitivity. The present results indicated the importance of the extremely C-terminal region of XRCC4 and, especially, Asn326 therein. - Highlights: • Extremely C-terminal region of XRCC4 is highly conserved among vertebrate species. • XRCC4 C-terminal point mutants, R325F and N326L, are functionally deficient in terms of survival after irradiation. • N326L localizes to the cytoplasm because of synthetic nuclear export signal. • Leptomycin B restores the

  14. N-terminal segments modulate the α-helical propensities of the intrinsically disordered basic regions of bZIP proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rahul K; Crick, Scott L; Pappu, Rohit V

    2012-02-17

    Basic region leucine zippers (bZIPs) are modular transcription factors that play key roles in eukaryotic gene regulation. The basic regions of bZIPs (bZIP-bRs) are necessary and sufficient for DNA binding and specificity. Bioinformatic predictions and spectroscopic studies suggest that unbound monomeric bZIP-bRs are uniformly disordered as isolated domains. Here, we test this assumption through a comparative characterization of conformational ensembles for 15 different bZIP-bRs using a combination of atomistic simulations and circular dichroism measurements. We find that bZIP-bRs have quantifiable preferences for α-helical conformations in their unbound monomeric forms. This helicity varies from one bZIP-bR to another despite a significant sequence similarity of the DNA binding motifs (DBMs). Our analysis reveals that intramolecular interactions between DBMs and eight-residue segments directly N-terminal to DBMs are the primary modulators of bZIP-bR helicities. We test the accuracy of this inference by designing chimeras of bZIP-bRs to have either increased or decreased overall helicities. Our results yield quantitative insights regarding the relationship between sequence and the degree of intrinsic disorder within bZIP-bRs, and might have general implications for other intrinsically disordered proteins. Understanding how natural sequence variations lead to modulation of disorder is likely to be important for understanding the evolution of specificity in molecular recognition through intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Plasmatic levels of N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide in preeclamptic patients and healthy normotensive pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyna-Villasmil, Eduardo; Mejia-Montilla, Jorly; Reyna-Villasmil, Nadia; Mayner-Tresol, Gabriel; Herrera-Moya, Pedro; Fernández-Ramírez, Andreina; Rondón-Tapía, Marta

    2018-05-11

    To compare plasma N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide concentrations in preeclamptic patients and healthy normotensive pregnant women. A cases-controls study was done with 180 patients at Hospital Central Dr. Urquinaona, Maracaibo, Venezuela, that included 90 preeclamptic patients (group A; cases) and 90 healthy normotensive pregnant women selected with the same age and body mass index similar to group A (group B; controls). Blood samples were collected one hour after admission and prior to administration of any medication in group A to determine plasma N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide and other laboratory parameters. Plasma N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide concentrations in group A (mean 1.01 [0.26] pg/mL) showed a significant difference when compared with patients in group B (mean 0.55 [0.07] pg/mL; P<.001]. There was no significant correlation with systolic and diastolic blood pressure values in preeclamptic patients (P=ns). A cut-off value of 0.66ng/mL had an area under the curve of 0.93, sensitivity of 87.8%, specificity of 83.3%, a positive predictive value of 84.0% and a negative predictive value of 87.2%, with a diagnostic accuracy of 85.6%. Preeclamptic patients have significantly higher concentrations of plasma N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide compared with healthy normotensive pregnant women, with high predictive values for diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. SDSS-IV MaNGA: Spatially Resolved Star Formation Main Sequence and LI(N)ER Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, B. C.; Lin, Lihwai; Lin, J. H.; Pan, H. A.; Hsu, C. H.; Sánchez, S. F.; Cano-Díaz, M.; Zhang, K.; Yan, R.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Boquien, M.; Riffel, R.; Brownstein, J.; Cruz-González, I.; Hagen, A.; Ibarra, H.; Pan, K.; Bizyaev, D.; Oravetz, D.; Simmons, A.

    2017-12-01

    We present our study on the spatially resolved Hα and M * relation for 536 star-forming and 424 quiescent galaxies taken from the MaNGA survey. We show that the star formation rate surface density ({{{Σ }}}{SFR}), derived based on the Hα emissions, is strongly correlated with the M * surface density ({{{Σ }}}* ) on kiloparsec scales for star-forming galaxies and can be directly connected to the global star-forming sequence. This suggests that the global main sequence may be a consequence of a more fundamental relation on small scales. On the other hand, our result suggests that ∼20% of quiescent galaxies in our sample still have star formation activities in the outer region with lower specific star formation rate (SSFR) than typical star-forming galaxies. Meanwhile, we also find a tight correlation between {{{Σ }}}{{H}α } and {{{Σ }}}* for LI(N)ER regions, named the resolved “LI(N)ER” sequence, in quiescent galaxies, which is consistent with the scenario that LI(N)ER emissions are primarily powered by the hot, evolved stars as suggested in the literature.

  17. Factor IX[sub Madrid 2]: A deletion/insertion in Facotr IX gene which abolishes the sequence of the donor junction at the exon IV-intron d splice site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solera, J. (Unidades de Genetica Molecular, Madrid (Spain)); Magallon, M.; Martin-Villar, J. (Hemofilia Hospital, Madrid (Spain)); Coloma, A. (Departamento deBioquimica de la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad Autonoma, Madrid (Spain))

    1992-02-01

    DNA from a patient with severe hemophilia B was evaluated by RFLP analysis, producing results which suggested the existence of a partial deletion within the factor IX gene. The deletion was further localized and characterized by PCR amplification and sequencing. The altered allele has a 4,442-bp deletion which removes both the donor splice site located at the 5[prime] end of intron d and the two last coding nucleotides located at the 3[prime] end of exon IV in the normal factor IX gene; this fragment has been inserted in inverted orientation. Two homologous sequences have been discovered at the ends of the deleted DNA fragment.

  18. Structural Insight into the Critical Role of the N-Terminal Region in the Catalytic Activity of Dual-Specificity Phosphatase 26.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Young Won

    Full Text Available Human dual-specificity phosphatase 26 (DUSP26 is a novel target for anticancer therapy because its dephosphorylation of the p53 tumor suppressor regulates the apoptosis of cancer cells. DUSP26 inhibition results in neuroblastoma cell cytotoxicity through p53-mediated apoptosis. Despite the previous structural studies of DUSP26 catalytic domain (residues 61-211, DUSP26-C, the high-resolution structure of its catalytically active form has not been resolved. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of a catalytically active form of DUSP26 (residues 39-211, DUSP26-N with an additional N-terminal region at 2.0 Å resolution. Unlike the C-terminal domain-swapped dimeric structure of DUSP26-C, the DUSP26-N (C152S monomer adopts a fold-back conformation of the C-terminal α8-helix and has an additional α1-helix in the N-terminal region. Consistent with the canonically active conformation of its protein tyrosine phosphate-binding loop (PTP loop observed in the structure, the phosphatase assay results demonstrated that DUSP26-N has significantly higher catalytic activity than DUSP26-C. Furthermore, size exclusion chromatography-multiangle laser scattering (SEC-MALS measurements showed that DUSP26-N (C152S exists as a monomer in solution. Notably, the crystal structure of DUSP26-N (C152S revealed that the N-terminal region of DUSP26-N (C152S serves a scaffolding role by positioning the surrounding α7-α8 loop for interaction with the PTP-loop through formation of an extensive hydrogen bond network, which seems to be critical in making the PTP-loop conformation competent for phosphatase activity. Our study provides the first high-resolution structure of a catalytically active form of DUSP26, which will contribute to the structure-based rational design of novel DUSP26-targeting anticancer therapeutics.

  19. Identification of new IS711 insertion sites in Brucella abortus field isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancilla, Marcos; Ulloa, Marcos; López-Goñi, Ignacio; Moriyón, Ignacio; María Zárraga, Ana

    2011-08-03

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis caused by Brucella spp., a group of highly homogeneous bacteria. The insertion sequence IS711 is characteristic of these bacteria, and occurs in variable numbers and positions, but always constant within a given species. This species-associated polymorphism is used in molecular typing and identification. Field isolates of B. abortus, the most common species infecting cattle, typically carry seven IS711 copies (one truncated). Thus far, IS711 transposition has only been shown in vitro and only for B. ovis and B. pinnipedialis, two species carrying a high number of IS711 copies, but never in other Brucella species, neither in vitro nor in field strains. We found several B. abortus strains isolated from milk and aborted fetuses that carried additional IS711 copies in two hitherto undescribed insertion sites: one in an intergenic region near to the 3' end of a putative lactate permease gene and the other interrupting the sequence of a marR transcriptional regulator gene. Interestingly, the second type of insertion was identified in isolates obtained repeatedly from the same herd after successive brucellosis outbreaks, an observation that proves the stability and virulence of the new genotype under natural conditions. Sequence analyses revealed that the new copies probably resulted from the transposition of a single IS711 copy common to all Brucella species sequenced so far. Our results show that the replicative transposition of IS711 can occur under field conditions. Therefore, it represents an active mechanism for the emergence of genetic diversity in B. abortus thus contributing to intra-species genetic polymorphism.

  20. Facile construction of a random protein domain insertion library using an engineered transposon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Vandan; Pierre, Brennal; Kim, Jin Ryoun

    2013-01-15

    Insertional fusion between multiple protein domains represents a novel means of creating integrated functionalities. Currently, there is no robust guideline for selection of insertion sites ensuring the desired functional outcome of insertional fusion. Therefore, construction and testing of random domain insertion libraries, in which a host protein domain is randomly inserted into a guest protein domain, significantly benefit extensive exploration of sequence spaces for insertion sites. Short peptide residues are usually introduced between protein domains to alleviate structural conflicts, and the interdomain linker residues may affect the functional outcome of protein insertion complexes. Unfortunately, optimal control of interdomain linker residues is not always available in conventional methods used to construct random domain insertion libraries. Moreover, most conventional methods employ blunt-end rather than sticky-end ligation between host and guest DNA fragments, thus lowering library construction efficiency. Here, we report the facile construction of random domain insertion libraries using an engineered transposon. We show that random domain insertion with optimal control of interdomain linker residues was possible with our engineered transposon-based method. In addition, our method employs sticky-end rather than blunt-end ligation between host and guest DNA fragments, thus allowing for facile construction of relatively large sized libraries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Membrane insertion and assembly of epitope-tagged gp9 at the tip of the M13 phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuhn Andreas

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Filamentous M13 phage extrude from infected Escherichia coli with a tip structure composed of gp7 and gp9. This tip structure is extended by the assembly of the filament composed of the major coat protein gp8. Finally, gp3 and gp6 terminate the phage structure at the proximal end. Up to now, gp3 has been the primary tool for phage display technology. However, gp7, gp8 and gp9 could also be used for phage display and these phage particles should bind to two different or more surfaces when the modified coat proteins are combined. Therefore, we tested here if the amino-terminal end of gp9 can be modified and whether the modified portion is exposed and detectable on the M13 phage particles. Results The amino-terminal region of gp9 was modified by inserting short sequences that encode antigenic epitopes. We show here that the modified gp9 proteins correctly integrate into the membrane using the membrane insertase YidC exposing the modified epitope into the periplasm. The proteins are then efficiently assembled onto the phage particles. Also extensions up to 36 amino acid residues at the amino-terminal end of gp9 did not interfere with membrane integration and phage assembly. The exposure of the antigenic tags on the phage was visualised with immunogold labelling by electron microscopy and verified by dot blotting with antibodies to the tags. Conclusions Our results suggest that gp9 at the phage tip is suitable for the phage display technology. The modified gp9 can be supplied in trans from a plasmid and fully complements M13 phage with an amber mutation in gene 9. The modified phage tip is very well accessible to antibodies.

  2. Cross-protective immunity to Leishmania amazonensis is mediated by CD4+ and CD8+-epitopes of Leishmania donovani Nucleoside Hydrolase terminal domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirlei eNico

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Nucleoside hydrolase of Leishmania donovani (NH36 is a phylogenetic marker of high homology among Leishmania parasites. In mice and dog vaccination NH36 induces a CD4+ T cell-driven protective response against Leishmania chagasi infection directed against its C-terminal domain (F3. The C-terminal and N-terminal domain vaccines also decreased the footpad lesion caused by Leishmania amazonensis. We studied the basis of the crossed immune response using recombinant generated peptides covering the whole NH36 sequence and saponin for mice prophylaxis against L. amazonensis. The F1 (amino acids 1-103 and F3 peptide (amino acids 199-314 vaccines enhanced the IgG and IgG2a anti-NH36 antibodies to similar levels. The F3 vaccine induced the strongest DTH response, the highest proportions of NH36-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells after challenge and the highest expression of IFN-γ and TNF-α. The F1 vaccine, on the other hand, induced a weaker but significant DTH response and a mild enhancement of IFN-γ and TNF-α levels. The in vivo depletion with anti-CD4 or CD8 monoclonal antibodies disclosed that cross-protection against L. amazonensis infection was mediated by a CD4+ T cell response directed against the C-terminal domain (75% of reduction of the size of footpad lesion followed by a CD8+ T cell response against the N-terminal domain of NH36 (57% of reduction of footpad lesions. Both vaccines were capable of inducing long-term cross-immunity. The amino acid sequence of NH36 showed 93% identity to the sequence of the NH A34480 of L. amazonensis which also showed the presence of completely conserved predicted epitopes for CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in F1 domain, and of CD4+ epitopes differing in a single amino acid, in F1 and F3 domains. The identification of the C-terminal and N-terminal domains as the targets of the immune response to NH36 in the model of L. amazonesis infection represents a basis for the rationale development of a bivalent vaccine

  3. Machine Learned Replacement of N-Labels for Basecalled Sequences in DNA Barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Eddie Y T; Ratnasingham, Sujeevan; Kremer, Stefan C

    2018-01-01

    This study presents a machine learning method that increases the number of identified bases in Sanger Sequencing. The system post-processes a KB basecalled chromatogram. It selects a recoverable subset of N-labels in the KB-called chromatogram to replace with basecalls (A,C,G,T). An N-label correction is defined given an additional read of the same sequence, and a human finished sequence. Corrections are added to the dataset when an alignment determines the additional read and human agree on the identity of the N-label. KB must also rate the replacement with quality value of in the additional read. Corrections are only available during system training. Developing the system, nearly 850,000 N-labels are obtained from Barcode of Life Datasystems, the premier database of genetic markers called DNA Barcodes. Increasing the number of correct bases improves reference sequence reliability, increases sequence identification accuracy, and assures analysis correctness. Keeping with barcoding standards, our system maintains an error rate of percent. Our system only applies corrections when it estimates low rate of error. Tested on this data, our automation selects and recovers: 79 percent of N-labels from COI (animal barcode); 80 percent from matK and rbcL (plant barcodes); and 58 percent from non-protein-coding sequences (across eukaryotes).

  4. Detection of sodium azide-induced mutagenicity in the regenerated shoots of artemisia annual L., using internal transcribed spacer (its) sequences of nrDNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Qurainy, F.; Al-Hemaidi, F.M.; Khan, S.; Ali, M.A.; Tarroum, M.; Ashraf, M.

    2011-01-01

    Sodium azide (NaN/sub 3/) is a well known chemical mutagen which can effectively cause point mutation in plant genome. The mutagenicity by this potential mutagen was assessed in the regenerated mutant shoots of Artemisia annua using internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of n rDNA. Insertions and/or deletions were detected in n rDNA-ITS sequences of all mutant shoots and compared with control ones using the ClustalX program. The regenerated shoots TS1 and TS2 had deleted bases, whereas TS3, TS4 and TS5 had insertions, because NaN/sub 3/ replaced the cytosine (C) by thymine (T) (C - T) (shoots; TS1 and TS4) and thymine (T) replaced by guanine (G) (T - G) (shoot; TS5), respectively. Artemisinin content was also measured in the regenerated six-week-old shoots of A. annua. All regenerated shoots had enhanced level of this compound as compared to that in the controls, being highest in the regenerated shoot TS3. (author)

  5. Glycosylation of the N-terminal potential N-glycosylation sites in the human α1,3-fucosyltransferase V and -VI (hFucTV and -VI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lise Lotte; Bross, Peter Gerd; Ørntoft, Torben Falck

    2000-01-01

    Human alpha1,3-fucosyltransferase V and -VI (hFucTV and -VI) each contain four potential N-glycosylation sites (hFucTV: Asn60, Asn105, Asn167 and Asn198 and hFucTVI: Asn46, Asn91, Asn153 and Asn184). Glycosylation of the two N-terminal potential N-glycosylation sites (hFucTV: Asn60, Asn105 and h......FucTVI: Asn46 and Asn91) have never been studied in detail. In the present study, we have analysed the glycosylation of these potential N-glycosylation sites. Initially, we compared the molecular mass of hFucTV and -VI expressed in COS-7 cells treated with tunicamycin with the mass of the proteins...... in untreated cells. The difference in molecular mass between the proteins in treated and untreated cells corresponded to the presence of at least three N-linked glycans. We then made a series of mutants, in which the asparagine residues in the N-terminal potential N-glycosylation sites were replaced...

  6. Transduplication resulted in the incorporation of two protein-coding sequences into the Turmoil-1 transposable element of C. elegans

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    Pupko Tal

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transposable elements may acquire unrelated gene fragments into their sequences in a process called transduplication. Transduplication of protein-coding genes is common in plants, but is unknown of in animals. Here, we report that the Turmoil-1 transposable element in C. elegans has incorporated two protein-coding sequences into its inverted terminal repeat (ITR sequences. The ITRs of Turmoil-1 contain a conserved RNA recognition motif (RRM that originated from the rsp-2 gene and a fragment from the protein-coding region of the cpg-3 gene. We further report that an open reading frame specific to C. elegans may have been created as a result of a Turmoil-1 insertion. Mutations at the 5' splice site of this open reading frame may have reactivated the transduplicated RRM motif. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dan Graur and William Martin. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' Reports section.

  7. Novel tetra-peptide insertion in Gag-p6 ALIX-binding motif in HIV-1 subtype C associated with protease inhibitor failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, Ujjwal; RAO, Shwetha D; BONTELL, Irene; VERHEYEN, Jens; RAO, Vasudev R; GORE, Sagar C; SONI, Neelesh; SHET, Anita; SCHÜLTER, Eugen; EKSTRAND, Maria L.; WONDWOSSEN, Amogne; KAISER, Rolf; MADHUSUDHAN, Mallur S.; PRASAD, Vinayaka R; SONNERBORG, Anders

    2014-01-01

    A novel tetra-peptide insertion was identified in Gag-p6 ALIX-binding region which is appears in protease inhibitor (PI) failure Indian HIV-1C sequences (Odds Ratio 17.1, p<0.001) but naturally present in half of untreated Ethiopian sequences. The insertion will probably restore the ALIX mediated virus release pathway, which is lacking in HIV-1C. The clinical importance of such insertion need to be evaluated in HIV-1C dominating regions were PI-drugs are being scaled up as second line treatment options. PMID:25102091

  8. Detection of mitochondrial insertions in the nucleus (NuMts of Pleistocene and modern muskoxen

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    MacPhee Ross DE

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nuclear insertions of mitochondrial sequences (NuMts have been identified in a wide variety of organisms. Trafficking of genetic material from the mitochondria to the nucleus has occurred frequently during mammalian evolution and can lead to the production of a large pool of sequences with varying degrees of homology to organellar mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA sequences. This presents both opportunities and challenges for forensics, population genetics, evolutionary genetics, conservation biology and the study of DNA from ancient samples. Here we present a case in which difficulties in ascertaining the organellar mtDNA sequence from modern samples hindered their comparison to ancient DNA sequences. Results We obtained mitochondrial hypervariable region (HVR sequences from six ancient samples of tundra muskox (Ovibos moschatus that were reproducible but distinct from modern muskox sequences reported previously. Using the same PCR primers applied to the ancient specimens and the primers used to generate the modern muskox DNA sequences in a previous study, we failed to definitively identify the organellar sequence from the two modern muskox samples tested. Instead of anticipated sequence homogeneity, we obtained multiple unique sequences from both hair and blood of one modern specimen. Sequencing individual clones of a >1 kb PCR fragment from modern samples did not alleviate the problem as there was not a consistent match across the entire length of the sequences to Ovibos when compared to sequences in GenBank. Conclusion In specific taxa, due to nuclear insertions some regions of the mitochondrial genome may not be useful for the characterization of modern or ancient DNA.

  9. A novel eight amino acid insertion contributes to the hemagglutinin cleavability and the virulence of a highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H7N3) virus in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Xiangjie; Belser, Jessica A.; Tumpey, Terrence M.

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, an avian influenza A H7N3 (A/Mexico/InDRE7218/2012; Mx/7218) virus was responsible for two confirmed cases of human infection and led to the death or culling of more than 22 million chickens in Jalisco, Mexico. Interestingly, this virus acquired an 8-amino acid (aa)-insertion (..PENPK-DRKSRHRR-TR/GLF) near the hemagglutinin (HA) cleavage site by nonhomologous recombination with host rRNA. It remains unclear which specific residues at the cleavage site contribute to the virulence of H7N3 viruses in mammals. Using loss-of-function approaches, we generated a series of cleavage site mutant viruses by reverse genetics and characterized the viruses in vitro and in vivo. We found that the 8-aa insertion and the arginine at position P4 of the Mx/7218 HA cleavage site are essential for intracellular HA cleavage in 293T cells, but have no effect on the pH of membrane fusion. However, we identified a role for the histidine residue at P5 position in viral fusion pH. In mice, the 8-aa insertion is required for Mx/7218 virus virulence; however, the basic residues upstream of the P4 position are dispensable for virulence. Overall, our study provides the first line of evidence that the insertion in the Mx/7218 virus HA cleavage site confers its intracellular cleavability, and consequently contributes to enhanced virulence in mice. - Highlights: • An avian influenza H7N3 virus acquired a unique 8-amino acid (aa) insertion. • The role of specific basic residues in the HA insertion in viral pathogenesis was determined. • In mice, the 8-aa insertion is required for H7N3 virus virulence. • The R residue at position P4 is essential for HA intracellular cleavage and virus virulence.

  10. A novel eight amino acid insertion contributes to the hemagglutinin cleavability and the virulence of a highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H7N3) virus in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xiangjie; Belser, Jessica A.; Tumpey, Terrence M., E-mail: tft9@cdc.gov

    2016-01-15

    In 2012, an avian influenza A H7N3 (A/Mexico/InDRE7218/2012; Mx/7218) virus was responsible for two confirmed cases of human infection and led to the death or culling of more than 22 million chickens in Jalisco, Mexico. Interestingly, this virus acquired an 8-amino acid (aa)-insertion (..PENPK-DRKSRHRR-TR/GLF) near the hemagglutinin (HA) cleavage site by nonhomologous recombination with host rRNA. It remains unclear which specific residues at the cleavage site contribute to the virulence of H7N3 viruses in mammals. Using loss-of-function approaches, we generated a series of cleavage site mutant viruses by reverse genetics and characterized the viruses in vitro and in vivo. We found that the 8-aa insertion and the arginine at position P4 of the Mx/7218 HA cleavage site are essential for intracellular HA cleavage in 293T cells, but have no effect on the pH of membrane fusion. However, we identified a role for the histidine residue at P5 position in viral fusion pH. In mice, the 8-aa insertion is required for Mx/7218 virus virulence; however, the basic residues upstream of the P4 position are dispensable for virulence. Overall, our study provides the first line of evidence that the insertion in the Mx/7218 virus HA cleavage site confers its intracellular cleavability, and consequently contributes to enhanced virulence in mice. - Highlights: • An avian influenza H7N3 virus acquired a unique 8-amino acid (aa) insertion. • The role of specific basic residues in the HA insertion in viral pathogenesis was determined. • In mice, the 8-aa insertion is required for H7N3 virus virulence. • The R residue at position P4 is essential for HA intracellular cleavage and virus virulence.

  11. Involvement of the N-terminal unique domain of Chk tyrosine kinase in Chk-induced tyrosine phosphorylation in the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Yuji; Kawana, Akiko; Igarashi, Asae; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2006-01-01

    Chk tyrosine kinase phosphorylates Src-family kinases and suppresses their kinase activity. We recently showed that Chk localizes to the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm and inhibits cell proliferation. In this study, we explored the role of the N-terminal unique domain of Chk in nuclear localization and Chk-induced tyrosine phosphorylation in the nucleus. In situ binding experiments showed that the N-terminal domain of Chk was associated with the nucleus and the nuclear matrix. The presence of the N-terminal domain of Chk led to a fourfold increase in cell population exhibiting Chk-induced tyrosine phosphorylation in the nucleus. Expression of Chk but not kinase-deficient Chk induced tyrosine phosphorylation of a variety of proteins ranging from 23 kDa to ∼200 kDa, especially in Triton X-100-insoluble fraction that included chromatin and the nuclear matrix. Intriguingly, in situ subnuclear fractionations revealed that Chk induced tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins that were associated with the nuclear matrix. These results suggest that various unidentified substrates of Chk, besides Src-family kinases, may be present in the nucleus. Thus, our findings indicate that the importance of the N-terminal domain to Chk-induced tyrosine phosphorylation in the nucleus, implicating that these nuclear tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins may contribute to inhibition of cell proliferation

  12. Hiperplasia linfoide de íleon terminal, presentación de un caso

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    Arley Fajardo Ochoa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso de un adolescente masculino de 16 años de edad que acudió a la consulta por dolor abdominal recurrente, localizado en la fosa ilíaca derecha, el cual había recibido tratamiento sintomático con antiespasmódicos y antiparasitarios sin lograr mejoría del dolor, por lo que fue remitido a la consulta de Gastroenterología donde se le realizaron exámenes complementarios que evidenciaron la existencia de una patología en el íleon terminal, se remitió al Instituto de Gastroenterología, donde se le realizó una colonoscopia y se le diagnosticó una hiperplasia linfoide severa de Ileon terminal que con el tratamiento higiénico dietético, se logró disminuir la frecuencia y la intensidad del dolor, sin embargo en las colonoscopías evolutivas se observó un incremento en la intensidad y la extensión de la hiperplasia por lo que se le indicaron exámenes endoscópicos e histológicos cada seis meses, llama la atención que a pesar de la severidad del cuadro, nunca se ha observado ningún episodio de sangrado digestivo que es la forma de presentación más frecuente de esta entidad

  13. Tumor suppressor BLU inhibits proliferation of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells by regulation of cell cycle, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and the cyclin D1 promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiangning; Liu, Hui; Li, Binbin; Huang, Peichun; Shao, Jianyong; He, Zhiwei

    2012-01-01

    Tumor suppressor genes function to regulate and block tumor cell proliferation. To explore the mechanisms underlying the tumor suppression of BLU/ZMYND10 gene on a frequently lost human chromosomal region, an adenoviral vector with BLU cDNA insert was constructed. BLU was re-expressed in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells by transfection or viral infection. Clonogenic growth was assayed; cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry-based DNA content detection; c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and cyclin D1 promoter activities were measured by reporter gene assay, and phosphorylation was measured by immunoblotting. The data for each pair of groups were compared with Student t tests. BLU inhibits clonogenic growth of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells, arrests cell cycle at G1 phase, downregulates JNK and cyclin D1 promoter activities, and inhibits phosphorylation of c-Jun. BLU inhibits growth of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells by regulation of the JNK-cyclin D1 axis to exert tumor suppression

  14. Mapping the transcription termination region of the mouse immunoglobulin kappa gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, M.; Garrard, W.T.

    1986-01-01

    To define the transcription termination region of the mouse immunoglobulin kappa gene, they have subcloned single copy DNA sequences corresponding to both the template and the non-template strands of this locus. In vitro nuclear transcription with isolated MPC-11 nuclei was performed and the resulting 32 P-labeled RNA was hybridized to slot-blotted, single-stranded M13 probes covering regions within and flanking the kappa gene. The hybridization pattern for the template-strand reveals that transcription terminates within the region between 1.1 to 2.3 kb downstream from the poly(A) site. Ten different short sequences (8-13 bp) reside within 460 bp of this region that exhibit homology with sequences found in the termination regions of mouse β-globin and chicken ovalbumin genes. Transcription of the non-template strand occurs on either side of this termination region. They note that no transcription is detectable on the non-template strand downstream of the enhancer, indicating that if RNA polymerase II enters at this site, it does not initiate transcription during transit to the promoter region. They conclude that transcription of the kappa gene passes the poly(A) addition site and terminates within 2.3 Kb downstream

  15. High-Throughput Analysis of T-DNA Location and Structure Using Sequence Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Soichi; Henry, Isabelle M; Lieberman, Meric C; Comai, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of plants with T-DNA is used both to introduce transgenes and for mutagenesis. Conventional approaches used to identify the genomic location and the structure of the inserted T-DNA are laborious and high-throughput methods using next-generation sequencing are being developed to address these problems. Here, we present a cost-effective approach that uses sequence capture targeted to the T-DNA borders to select genomic DNA fragments containing T-DNA-genome junctions, followed by Illumina sequencing to determine the location and junction structure of T-DNA insertions. Multiple probes can be mixed so that transgenic lines transformed with different T-DNA types can be processed simultaneously, using a simple, index-based pooling approach. We also developed a simple bioinformatic tool to find sequence read pairs that span the junction between the genome and T-DNA or any foreign DNA. We analyzed 29 transgenic lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, each containing inserts from 4 different T-DNA vectors. We determined the location of T-DNA insertions in 22 lines, 4 of which carried multiple insertion sites. Additionally, our analysis uncovered a high frequency of unconventional and complex T-DNA insertions, highlighting the needs for high-throughput methods for T-DNA localization and structural characterization. Transgene insertion events have to be fully characterized prior to use as commercial products. Our method greatly facilitates the first step of this characterization of transgenic plants by providing an efficient screen for the selection of promising lines.

  16. Family of pH-Low-Insertion-Peptides (pHLIPs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerakkody, Dhammika; Moshnikova, Anna; Moshnikova, Valentina; Thakur, Mak; Rossi, Bethany; Engelman, Donald; Andreev, Oleg; Reshetnyak, Yana

    2012-02-01

    pHLIP (pH (Low) Insertion Peptide) is a novel delivery system for targeting of acidic diseased tissue such as solid tumors, sites of inflammation, arthritis and other pathological states. The molecular mechanism of pHLIP action is based on pH-dependent insertion and folding of pHLIP in membrane. We performed sequence variation and investigated 16 pHLIP variants with main goals of understanding the main principles of peptide-lipid interactions and tune delivery capability of pHLIP. The biophysical studies including thermodynamics and kinetics of the peptides interaction with a lipid bilayer of liposomes and cellular membranes were carried out. We found that peptides association to membrane at neutral and low pH could be modulated by 3-4 times. The apparent pK of transition from surface bound to membrane-inserted state could be tuned from 6.5 to 4.5. The rate of peptide's insertion across a bilayer could be enhanced 100 times compared to parent pHLIP. As a result, blood clearance and tumor targeting were modulated in a significant degree. The work is supported by NIH grants CA133890 to OAA, DME, YRK.

  17. Fine de novo sequencing of a fungal genome using only SOLiD short read data: verification on Aspergillus oryzae RIB40.

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    Myco Umemura

    Full Text Available The development of next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies has dramatically increased the throughput, speed, and efficiency of genome sequencing. The short read data generated from NGS platforms, such as SOLiD and Illumina, are quite useful for mapping analysis. However, the SOLiD read data with lengths of <60 bp have been considered to be too short for de novo genome sequencing. Here, to investigate whether de novo sequencing of fungal genomes is possible using only SOLiD short read sequence data, we performed de novo assembly of the Aspergillus oryzae RIB40 genome using only SOLiD read data of 50 bp generated from mate-paired libraries with 2.8- or 1.9-kb insert sizes. The assembled scaffolds showed an N50 value of 1.6 Mb, a 22-fold increase than those obtained using only SOLiD short read in other published reports. In addition, almost 99% of the reference genome was accurately aligned by the assembled scaffold fragments in long lengths. The sequences of secondary metabolite biosynthetic genes and clusters, whose products are of considerable interest in fungal studies due to their potential medicinal, agricultural, and cosmetic properties, were also highly reconstructed in the assembled scaffolds. Based on these findings, we concluded that de novo genome sequencing using only SOLiD short reads is feasible and practical for molecular biological study of fungi. We also investigated the effect of filtering low quality data, library insert size, and k-mer size on the assembly performance, and recommend for the assembly use of mild filtered read data where the N50 was not so degraded and the library has an insert size of ∼2.0 kb, and k-mer size 33.

  18. The N-terminal domain of the repressor of Staphylococcus aureus phage Φ11 possesses an unusual dimerization ability and DNA binding affinity.

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    Anindya Biswas

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage Φ11 uses Staphylococcus aureus as its host and, like lambdoid phages, harbors three homologous operators in between its two divergently oriented repressor genes. None of the repressors of Φ11, however, showed binding to all three operators, even at high concentrations. To understand why the DNA binding mechanism of Φ11 repressors does not match that of lambdoid phage repressors, we studied the N-terminal domain of the Φ11 lysogenic repressor, as it harbors a putative helix-turn-helix motif. Our data revealed that the secondary and tertiary structures of the N-terminal domain were different from those of the full-length repressor. Nonetheless, the N-terminal domain was able to dimerize and bind to the operators similar to the intact repressor. In addition, the operator base specificity, binding stoichiometry, and binding mechanism of this domain were nearly identical to those of the whole repressor. The binding affinities of the repressor and its N-terminal domain were reduced to a similar extent when the temperature was increased to 42°C. Both proteins also adequately dislodged a RNA polymerase from a Φ11 DNA fragment carrying two operators and a promoter. Unlike the intact repressor, the binding of the N-terminal domain to two adjacent operator sites was not cooperative in nature. Taken together, we suggest that the dimerization and DNA binding abilities of the N-terminal domain of the Φ11 repressor are distinct from those of the DNA binding domains of other phage repressors.

  19. The C-terminal tail of the gp41 transmembrane envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 clades A, B, C, and D may exist in two conformations: an analysis of sequence, structure, and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollier, Mark J.; Dimmock, Nigel J.

    2005-01-01

    In addition to the major ectodomain, the gp41 transmembrane glycoprotein of HIV-1 is now known to have a minor ectodomain that is part of the long C-terminal tail. Both ectodomains are highly antigenic, carry neutralizing and non-neutralizing epitopes, and are involved in virus-mediated fusion activity. However, data have so far been biologically based, and derived solely from T cell line-adapted (TCLA), B clade viruses. Here we have carried out sequence and theoretically based structural analyses of 357 gp41 C-terminal sequences of mainly primary isolates of HIV-1 clades A, B, C, and D. Data show that all these viruses have the potential to form a tail loop structure (the minor ectodomain) supported by three, β-sheet, membrane-spanning domains (MSDs). This means that the first (N-terminal) tyrosine-based sorting signal of the gp41 tail is situated outside the cell membrane and is non-functional, and that gp41 that reaches the cell surface may be recycled back into the cytoplasm through the activity of the second tyrosine-sorting signal. However, we suggest that only a minority of cell-associated gp41 molecules - those destined for incorporation into virions - has 3 MSDs and the minor ectodomain. Most intracellular gp41 has the conventional single MSD, no minor ectodomain, a functional first tyrosine-based sorting signal, and in line with current thinking is degraded intracellularly. The gp41 structural diversity suggested here can be viewed as an evolutionary strategy to minimize HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein expression on the cell surface, and hence possible cytotoxicity and immune attack on the infected cell

  20. Crystal Structure of the Full-Length Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Capsid Protein Shows an N-Terminal β-Hairpin in the Absence of N-Terminal Proline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Folio

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV is a member of the Retroviridae family. It is the causative agent of an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS in cats and wild felines. Its capsid protein (CA drives the assembly of the viral particle, which is a critical step in the viral replication cycle. Here, the first atomic structure of full-length FIV CA to 1.67 Å resolution is determined. The crystallized protein exhibits an original tetrameric assembly, composed of dimers which are stabilized by an intermolecular disulfide bridge induced by the crystallogenesis conditions. The FIV CA displays a standard α-helical CA topology with two domains, separated by a linker shorter than other retroviral CAs. The β-hairpin motif at its amino terminal end, which interacts with nucleotides in HIV-1, is unusually long in FIV CA. Interestingly, this functional β-motif is formed in this construct in the absence of the conserved N-terminal proline. The FIV CA exhibits a cis Arg–Pro bond in the CypA-binding loop, which is absent in known structures of lentiviral CAs. This structure represents the first tri-dimensional structure of a functional, full-length FIV CA.

  1. Scrutinizing virus genome termini by high-throughput sequencing.

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    Shasha Li

    Full Text Available Analysis of genomic terminal sequences has been a major step in studies on viral DNA replication and packaging mechanisms. However, traditional methods to study genome termini are challenging due to the time-consuming protocols and their inefficiency where critical details are lost easily. Recent advances in next generation sequencing (NGS have enabled it to be a powerful tool to study genome termini. In this study, using NGS we sequenced one iridovirus genome and twenty phage genomes and confirmed for the first time that the high frequency sequences (HFSs found in the NGS reads are indeed the terminal sequences of viral genomes. Further, we established a criterion to distinguish the type of termini and the viral packaging mode. We also obtained additional terminal details such as terminal repeats, multi-termini, asymmetric termini. With this approach, we were able to simultaneously detect details of the genome termini as well as obtain the complete sequence of bacteriophage genomes. Theoretically, this application can be further extended to analyze larger and more complicated genomes of plant and animal viruses. This study proposed a novel and efficient method for research on viral replication, packaging, terminase activity, transcription regulation, and metabolism of the host cell.

  2. Optimization of sequence alignment for simple sequence repeat regions

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    Ogbonnaya Francis C

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs, are tandemly repeated DNA sequences, including tandem copies of specific sequences no longer than six bases, that are distributed in the genome. SSR has been used as a molecular marker because it is easy to detect and is used in a range of applications, including genetic diversity, genome mapping, and marker assisted selection. It is also very mutable because of slipping in the DNA polymerase during DNA replication. This unique mutation increases the insertion/deletion (INDELs mutation frequency to a high ratio - more than other types of molecular markers such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs. SNPs are more frequent than INDELs. Therefore, all designed algorithms for sequence alignment fit the vast majority of the genomic sequence without considering microsatellite regions, as unique sequences that require special consideration. The old algorithm is limited in its application because there are many overlaps between different repeat units which result in false evolutionary relationships. Findings To overcome the limitation of the aligning algorithm when dealing with SSR loci, a new algorithm was developed using PERL script with a Tk graphical interface. This program is based on aligning sequences after determining the repeated units first, and the last SSR nucleotides positions. This results in a shifting process according to the inserted repeated unit type. When studying the phylogenic relations before and after applying the new algorithm, many differences in the trees were obtained by increasing the SSR length and complexity. However, less distance between different linage had been observed after applying the new algorithm. Conclusions The new algorithm produces better estimates for aligning SSR loci because it reflects more reliable evolutionary relations between different linages. It reduces overlapping during SSR alignment, which results in a more realistic

  3. Biogenesis of the mitochondrial TOM complex: Mim1 promotes insertion and assembly of signal-anchored receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Thomas; Pfannschmidt, Sylvia; Guiard, Bernard; Stojanovski, Diana; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Kutik, Stephan; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Meisinger, Chris; Wiedemann, Nils

    2008-01-04

    The translocase of the outer membrane (TOM complex) is the central entry gate for nuclear-encoded mitochondrial precursor proteins. All Tom proteins are also encoded by nuclear genes and synthesized as precursors in the cytosol. The channel-forming beta-barrel protein Tom40 is targeted to mitochondria via Tom receptors and inserted into the outer membrane by the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM complex). A further outer membrane protein, Mim1, plays a less defined role in assembly of Tom40 into the TOM complex. The three receptors Tom20, Tom22, and Tom70 are anchored in the outer membrane by a single transmembrane alpha-helix, located at the N terminus in the case of Tom20 and Tom70 (signal-anchored) or in the C-terminal portion in the case of Tom22 (tail-anchored). Insertion of the precursor of Tom22 into the outer membrane requires pre-existing Tom receptors while the import pathway of the precursors of Tom20 and Tom70 is only poorly understood. We report that Mim1 is required for efficient membrane insertion and assembly of Tom20 and Tom70, but not Tom22. We show that Mim1 associates with SAM(core) components to a large SAM complex, explaining its role in late steps of the assembly pathway of Tom40. We conclude that Mim1 is not only required for biogenesis of the beta-barrel protein Tom40 but also for membrane insertion and assembly of signal-anchored Tom receptors. Thus, Mim1 plays an important role in the efficient assembly of the mitochondrial TOM complex.

  4. Autocatalytic activity and substrate specificity of the pestivirus N-terminal protease N{sup pro}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottipati, Keerthi; Acholi, Sudheer [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0647 (United States); Ruggli, Nicolas [Institute of Virology and Immunology, CH-3147 Mittelhäusern (Switzerland); Choi, Kyung H., E-mail: kychoi@utmb.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0647 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Pestivirus N{sup pro} is the first protein translated in the viral polypeptide, and cleaves itself off co-translationally generating the N-terminus of the core protein. Once released, N{sup pro} blocks the host's interferon response by inducing degradation of interferon regulatory factor-3. N{sup pro'}s intracellular autocatalytic activity and lack of trans-activity have hampered in vitro cleavage studies to establish its substrate specificity and the roles of individual residues. We constructed N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins that carry the authentic cleavage site and determined the autoproteolytic activities of N{sup pro} proteins containing substitutions at the predicted catalytic sites Glu22 and Cys69, at Arg100 that forms a salt bridge with Glu22, and at the cleavage site Cys168. Contrary to previous reports, we show that N{sup pro'}s catalytic activity does not involve Glu22, which may instead be involved in protein stability. Furthermore, N{sup pro} does not have specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site even though this residue is conserved throughout the pestivirus genus. - Highlights: • N{sup pro'}s autoproteolysis is studied using N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins. • N-terminal 17 amino acids are dispensable without loss of protease activity. • The putative catalytic residue Glu22 is not involved in protease catalysis. • No specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site despite evolutionary conservation. • N{sup pro} prefers small amino acids with non-branched beta carbons at the P1 position.

  5. Nucleotide sequence of tomato ringspot virus RNA-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rott, M E; Tremaine, J H; Rochon, D M

    1991-07-01

    The sequence of tomato ringspot virus (TomRSV) RNA-2 has been determined. It is 7273 nucleotides in length excluding the 3' poly(A) tail and contains a single long open reading frame (ORF) of 5646 nucleotides in the positive sense beginning at position 78 and terminating at position 5723. A second in-frame AUG at position 441 is in a more favourable context for initiation of translation and may act as a site for initiation of translation. The TomRSV RNA-2 3' noncoding region is 1550 nucleotides in length. The coat protein is located in the C-terminal region of the large polypeptide and shows significant but limited amino acid sequence similarity to the putative coat proteins of the nepoviruses tomato black ring (TBRV), Hungarian grapevine chrome mosaic (GCMV) and grapevine fanleaf (GFLV). Comparisons of the coding and non-coding regions of TomRSV RNA-2 and the RNA components of TBRV, GCMV, GFLV and the comovirus cowpea mosaic virus revealed significant similarity for over 300 amino acids between the coding region immediately to the N-terminal side of the putative coat proteins of TomRSV and GFLV; very little similarity could be detected among the non-coding regions of TomRSV and any of these viruses.

  6. Solution structure of the N-terminal domain of a replication restart primosome factor, PriC, in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramaki, Takahiko; Abe, Yoshito; Katayama, Tsutomu; Ueda, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    In eubacterial organisms, the oriC-independent primosome plays an essential role in replication restart after the dissociation of the replication DNA-protein complex by DNA damage. PriC is a key protein component in the replication restart primosome. Our recent study suggested that PriC is divided into two domains: an N-terminal and a C-terminal domain. In the present study, we determined the solution structure of the N-terminal domain, whose structure and function have remained unknown until now. The revealed structure was composed of three helices and one extended loop. We also observed chemical shift changes in the heteronuclear NMR spectrum and oligomerization in the presence of ssDNA. These abilities may contribute to the PriC-ssDNA complex, which is important for the replication restart primosome. PMID:23868391

  7. Two tandemly repeated telomere-associated sequences in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C M; Wang, C T; Wang, C J; Ho, C H; Kao, Y Y; Chen, C C

    1997-12-01

    Two tandemly repeated telomere-associated sequences, NP3R and NP4R, have been isolated from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. The length of a repeating unit for NP3R and NP4R is 165 and 180 nucleotides respectively. The abundance of NP3R, NP4R and telomeric repeats is, respectively, 8.4 x 10(4), 6 x 10(3) and 1.5 x 10(6) copies per haploid genome of N. plumbaginifolia. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that NP3R is located at the ends and/or in interstitial regions of all 10 chromosomes and NP4R on the terminal regions of three chromosomes in the haploid genome of N. plumbaginifolia. Sequence homology search revealed that not only are NP3R and NP4R homologous to HRS60 and GRS, respectively, two tandem repeats isolated from N. tabacum, but that NP3R and NP4R are also related to each other, suggesting that they originated from a common ancestral sequence. The role of these repeated sequences in chromosome healing is discussed based on the observation that two to three copies of a telomere-similar sequence were present in each repeating unit of NP3R and NP4R.

  8. Identification of new IS711 insertion sites in Brucella abortus field isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moriyón Ignacio

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brucellosis is a zoonosis caused by Brucella spp., a group of highly homogeneous bacteria. The insertion sequence IS711 is characteristic of these bacteria, and occurs in variable numbers and positions, but always constant within a given species. This species-associated polymorphism is used in molecular typing and identification. Field isolates of B. abortus, the most common species infecting cattle, typically carry seven IS711 copies (one truncated. Thus far, IS711 transposition has only been shown in vitro and only for B. ovis and B. pinnipedialis, two species carrying a high number of IS711 copies, but never in other Brucella species, neither in vitro nor in field strains. Results We found several B. abortus strains isolated from milk and aborted fetuses that carried additional IS711 copies in two hitherto undescribed insertion sites: one in an intergenic region near to the 3' end of a putative lactate permease gene and the other interrupting the sequence of a marR transcriptional regulator gene. Interestingly, the second type of insertion was identified in isolates obtained repeatedly from the same herd after successive brucellosis outbreaks, an observation that proves the stability and virulence of the new genotype under natural conditions. Sequence analyses revealed that the new copies probably resulted from the transposition of a single IS711 copy common to all Brucella species sequenced so far. Conclusions Our results show that the replicative transposition of IS711 can occur under field conditions. Therefore, it represents an active mechanism for the emergence of genetic diversity in B. abortus thus contributing to intra-species genetic polymorphism.

  9. Migratory Insertion of Hydrogen Isocyanide in the Pentacyano(methyl)cobaltate(III) Anion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Pauli; Harris, Pernille Hanne; Larsen, Sine

    2003-01-01

    The preparation of the pentacyano(iminiumacetyl)cobaltate(III) anion and its N-methyl and N,N-dimethyl derivatives is reported. The iminiumacetyl group is formed by migratory insertion of cis hydrogen isocyanide in the pentacyano(methyl)cobaltate(III) anion. The new compounds have been spectrosco......The preparation of the pentacyano(iminiumacetyl)cobaltate(III) anion and its N-methyl and N,N-dimethyl derivatives is reported. The iminiumacetyl group is formed by migratory insertion of cis hydrogen isocyanide in the pentacyano(methyl)cobaltate(III) anion. The new compounds have been...

  10. Rhizomucor miehei triglyceride lipase is processed and secreted from transformed Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huge-Jensen, B; Andreasen, F; Christensen, T; Christensen, M; Thim, L; Boel, E

    1989-09-01

    The cDNA encoding the precursor of the Rhizomucor miehei triglyceride lipase was inserted in an Aspergillus oryzae expression vector. In this vector the expression of the lipase cDNA is under control of the Aspergillus oryzae alpha-amylase gene promoter and the Aspergillus niger glucoamylase gene terminator. The recombinant plasmid was introduced into Aspergillus oryzae, and transformed colonies were selected and screened for lipase expression. Lipase-positive transformants were grown in a small fermentor, and recombinant triglyceride lipase was purified from the culture broth. The purified enzymatically active recombinant lipase (rRML) secreted from A. oryzae was shown to have the same characteristics with respect to mobility on reducing SDS-gels and amino acid composition as the native enzyme. N-terminal amino acid sequencing indicated that approximately 70% of the secreted rRML had the same N-terminal sequence as the native Rhizomucor miehei enzyme, whereas 30% of the secreted rRML was one amino acid residue shorter in the N-terminal. The recombinant lipase precursor, which has a 70 amino acid propeptide, is thus processed in and secreted from Aspergillus oryzae. We have hereby demonstrated the utility of this organism as a host for the production of recombinant triglyceride lipases.

  11. Solution and crystal structures of a C-terminal fragment of the neuronal isoform of the polypyrimidine tract binding protein (nPTB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar Joshi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The eukaryotic polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB serves primarily as a regulator of alternative splicing of messenger RNA, but is also co-opted to other roles such as RNA localisation and translation initiation from internal ribosome entry sites. The neuronal paralogue of PTB (nPTB is 75% identical in amino acid sequence with PTB. Although the two proteins have broadly similar RNA binding specificities and effects on RNA splicing, differential expression of PTB and nPTB can lead to the generation of alternatively spliced mRNAs. RNA binding by PTB and nPTB is mediated by four RNA recognition motifs (RRMs. We present here the crystal and solution structures of the C-terminal domain of nPTB (nPTB34 which contains RRMs 3 and 4. As expected the structures are similar to each other and to the solution structure of the equivalent fragment from PTB (PTB34. The result confirms that, as found for PTB, RRMs 3 and 4 of nPTB interact with one another to form a stable unit that presents the RNA-binding surfaces of the component RRMs on opposite sides that face away from each other. The major differences between PTB34 and nPTB34 arise from amino acid side chain substitutions on the exposed β-sheet surfaces and adjoining loops of each RRM, which are likely to modulate interactions with RNA.

  12. FUNCTIONAL-ANALYSIS OF THE N-TERMINAL PREPEPTIDES OF WATERMELON MITOCHONDRIAL AND GLYOXYSOMAL MALATE-DEHYDROGENASES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LEHNERER, M; KEIZERGUNNIK, [No Value; VEENHUIS, M; GIETL, C

    1994-01-01

    Mitochondrial and glyoxysomal malate dehydrogenase (mMDH; gMDH; L-malate : NAD(+) oxidoreductase; EC 1.1.1.37) of watermelon (Citrullus vulgaris) cotyledons are synthesized with N-terminal cleavable presequences which are shown to specify sorting of the two proteins. The two presequences differ in

  13. Sequence spaces M ( ϕ $M(\\phi$ and N ( ϕ $N(\\phi$ with application in clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Shoaib Khan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Distance measures play a central role in evolving the clustering technique. Due to the rich mathematical background and natural implementation of l p $l_{p}$ distance measures, researchers were motivated to use them in almost every clustering process. Beside l p $l_{p}$ distance measures, there exist several distance measures. Sargent introduced a special type of distance measures m ( ϕ $m(\\phi$ and n ( ϕ $n(\\phi$ which is closely related to l p $l_{p}$ . In this paper, we generalized the Sargent sequence spaces through introduction of M ( ϕ $M(\\phi$ and N ( ϕ $N(\\phi$ sequence spaces. Moreover, it is shown that both spaces are BK-spaces, and one is a dual of another. Further, we have clustered the two-moon dataset by using an induced M ( ϕ $M(\\phi$ -distance measure (induced by the Sargent sequence space M ( ϕ $M(\\phi$ in the k-means clustering algorithm. The clustering result established the efficacy of replacing the Euclidean distance measure by the M ( ϕ $M(\\phi$ -distance measure in the k-means algorithm.

  14. Improving cell penetration of helical peptides stabilized by N-terminal crosslinked aspartic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui; Jiang, Yanhong; Tian, Yuan; Yang, Dan; Qin, Xuan; Li, Zigang

    2017-01-04

    Cell penetration and nucleus translocation efficiency are important for the cellular activities of peptide therapeutics. For helical peptides stabilized by N-terminal crosslinked aspartic acid, correlations between their penetration efficiency/nucleus translocation and physicochemical properties were studied. An increase in hydrophobicity and isoelectric point will promote cellular uptake and nucleus translocation of stabilized helices.

  15. Structure of the N-terminal domain of the protein Expansion: an ‘Expansion’ to the Smad MH2 fold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beich-Frandsen, Mads; Aragón, Eric; Llimargas, Marta; Benach, Jordi; Riera, Antoni; Pous, Joan; Macias, Maria J.

    2015-01-01

    Expansion is a modular protein that is conserved in protostomes. The first structure of the N-terminal domain of Expansion has been determined at 1.6 Å resolution and the new Nα-MH2 domain was found to belong to the Smad/FHA superfamily of structures. Gene-expression changes observed in Drosophila embryos after inducing the transcription factor Tramtrack led to the identification of the protein Expansion. Expansion contains an N-terminal domain similar in sequence to the MH2 domain characteristic of Smad proteins, which are the central mediators of the effects of the TGF-β signalling pathway. Apart from Smads and Expansion, no other type of protein belonging to the known kingdoms of life contains MH2 domains. To compare the Expansion and Smad MH2 domains, the crystal structure of the Expansion domain was determined at 1.6 Å resolution, the first structure of a non-Smad MH2 domain to be characterized to date. The structure displays the main features of the canonical MH2 fold with two main differences: the addition of an α-helical region and the remodelling of a protein-interaction site that is conserved in the MH2 domain of Smads. Owing to these differences, to the new domain was referred to as Nα-MH2. Despite the presence of the Nα-MH2 domain, Expansion does not participate in TGF-β signalling; instead, it is required for other activities specific to the protostome phyla. Based on the structural similarities to the MH2 fold, it is proposed that the Nα-MH2 domain should be classified as a new member of the Smad/FHA superfamily

  16. Structure of the N-terminal domain of the protein Expansion: an ‘Expansion’ to the Smad MH2 fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beich-Frandsen, Mads; Aragón, Eric [Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Llimargas, Marta [Institut de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona, IBMB–CSIC, Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Benach, Jordi [ALBA Synchrotron, BP 1413, km 3.3, Cerdanyola del Vallès (Spain); Riera, Antoni [Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franqués 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Pous, Joan [Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Platform of Crystallography IBMB–CSIC, Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Macias, Maria J., E-mail: maria.macias@irbbarcelona.org [Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies (ICREA), Passeig Lluís Companys 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-04-01

    Expansion is a modular protein that is conserved in protostomes. The first structure of the N-terminal domain of Expansion has been determined at 1.6 Å resolution and the new Nα-MH2 domain was found to belong to the Smad/FHA superfamily of structures. Gene-expression changes observed in Drosophila embryos after inducing the transcription factor Tramtrack led to the identification of the protein Expansion. Expansion contains an N-terminal domain similar in sequence to the MH2 domain characteristic of Smad proteins, which are the central mediators of the effects of the TGF-β signalling pathway. Apart from Smads and Expansion, no other type of protein belonging to the known kingdoms of life contains MH2 domains. To compare the Expansion and Smad MH2 domains, the crystal structure of the Expansion domain was determined at 1.6 Å resolution, the first structure of a non-Smad MH2 domain to be characterized to date. The structure displays the main features of the canonical MH2 fold with two main differences: the addition of an α-helical region and the remodelling of a protein-interaction site that is conserved in the MH2 domain of Smads. Owing to these differences, to the new domain was referred to as Nα-MH2. Despite the presence of the Nα-MH2 domain, Expansion does not participate in TGF-β signalling; instead, it is required for other activities specific to the protostome phyla. Based on the structural similarities to the MH2 fold, it is proposed that the Nα-MH2 domain should be classified as a new member of the Smad/FHA superfamily.

  17. Efficient farnesylation of an extended C-terminal C(x)3X sequence motif expands the scope of the prenylated proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanden, Melanie J; Suazo, Kiall F; Hildebrandt, Emily R; Hardgrove, Daniel S; Patel, Meet; Saunders, William P; Distefano, Mark D; Schmidt, Walter K; Hougland, James L

    2018-02-23

    Protein prenylation is a post-translational modification that has been most commonly associated with enabling protein trafficking to and interaction with cellular membranes. In this process, an isoprenoid group is attached to a cysteine near the C terminus of a substrate protein by protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) or protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I or II (GGTase-I and GGTase-II). FTase and GGTase-I have long been proposed to specifically recognize a four-amino acid C AAX C-terminal sequence within their substrates. Surprisingly, genetic screening reveals that yeast FTase can modify sequences longer than the canonical C AAX sequence, specifically C( x ) 3 X sequences with four amino acids downstream of the cysteine. Biochemical and cell-based studies using both peptide and protein substrates reveal that mammalian FTase orthologs can also prenylate C( x ) 3 X sequences. As the search to identify physiologically relevant C( x ) 3 X proteins begins, this new prenylation motif nearly doubles the number of proteins within the yeast and human proteomes that can be explored as potential FTase substrates. This work expands our understanding of prenylation's impact within the proteome, establishes the biologically relevant reactivity possible with this new motif, and opens new frontiers in determining the impact of non-canonically prenylated proteins on cell function. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Preparation and Analysis of N-Terminal Chemokine Receptor Sulfopeptides Using Tyrosylprotein Sulfotransferase Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Christoph; Sanfiz, Anthony; Sakmar, Thomas P; Veldkamp, Christopher T

    2016-01-01

    In most chemokine receptors, one or multiple tyrosine residues have been identified within the receptor N-terminal domain that are, at least partially, modified by posttranslational tyrosine sulfation. For example, tyrosine sulfation has been demonstrated for Tyr-3, -10, -14, and -15 of CCR5, for Tyr-3, -14, and -15 of CCR8, and for Tyr-7, -12, and -21 of CXCR4. While there is evidence for several chemokine receptors that tyrosine sulfation is required for optimal interaction with the chemokine ligands, the precise role of tyrosine sulfation for chemokine receptor function remains unclear. Furthermore, the function of the chemokine receptor N-terminal domain in chemokine binding and receptor activation is also not well understood. Sulfotyrosine peptides corresponding to the chemokine receptor N-termini are valuable tools to address these important questions both in structural and functional studies. However, due to the lability of the sulfotyrosine modification, these peptides are difficult to obtain using standard peptide chemistry methods. In this chapter, we provide methods to prepare sulfotyrosine peptides by enzymatic in vitro sulfation of peptides using purified recombinant tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase (TPST) enzymes. In addition, we also discuss alternative approaches for the generation of sulfotyrosine peptides and methods for sulfopeptide analysis. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Essential Genes for In Vitro Growth of the Endophyte Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1 as Revealed by Transposon Insertion Site Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosconi, Federico; de Vries, Stefan P W; Baig, Abiyad; Fabiano, Elena; Grant, Andrew J

    2016-11-15

    The interior of plants contains microorganisms (referred to as endophytes) that are distinct from those present at the root surface or in the surrounding soil. Herbaspirillum seropedicae strain SmR1, belonging to the betaproteobacteria, is an endophyte that colonizes crops, including rice, maize, sugarcane, and sorghum. Different approaches have revealed genes and pathways regulated during the interactions of H. seropedicae with its plant hosts. However, functional genomic analysis of transposon (Tn) mutants has been hampered by the lack of genetic tools. Here we successfully employed a combination of in vivo high-density mariner Tn mutagenesis and targeted Tn insertion site sequencing (Tn-seq) in H. seropedicae SmR1. The analysis of multiple gene-saturating Tn libraries revealed that 395 genes are essential for the growth of H. seropedicae SmR1 in tryptone-yeast extract medium. A comparative analysis with the Database of Essential Genes (DEG) showed that 25 genes are uniquely essential in H. seropedicae SmR1. The Tn mutagenesis protocol developed and the gene-saturating Tn libraries generated will facilitate elucidation of the genetic mechanisms of the H. seropedicae endophytic lifestyle. A focal point in the study of endophytes is the development of effective biofertilizers that could help to reduce the input of agrochemicals in croplands. Besides the ability to promote plant growth, a good biofertilizer should be successful in colonizing its host and competing against the native microbiota. By using a systematic Tn-based gene-inactivation strategy and massively parallel sequencing of Tn insertion sites (Tn-seq), it is possible to study the fitness of thousands of Tn mutants in a single experiment. We have applied the combination of these techniques to the plant-growth-promoting endophyte Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1. The Tn mutant libraries generated will enable studies into the genetic mechanisms of H. seropedicae-plant interactions. The approach that we

  20. Suppression of leaky expression of adenovirus genes by insertion of microRNA-targeted sequences in the replication-incompetent adenovirus vector genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahori Shimizu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leaky expression of adenovirus (Ad genes occurs following transduction with a conventional replication-incompetent Ad vector, leading to an induction of cellular immunity against Ad proteins and Ad protein-induced toxicity, especially in the late phase following administration. To suppress the leaky expression of Ad genes, we developed novel Ad vectors by incorporating four tandem copies of sequences with perfect complementarity to miR-122a or miR-142-3p into the 3′-untranslated region (UTR of the E2A, E4, or pIX gene, which were mainly expressed from the Ad vector genome after transduction. These Ad vectors easily grew to high titers comparable to those of a conventional Ad vector in conventional 293 cells. The leaky expression of these Ad genes in mouse organs was significantly suppressed by 2- to 100-fold, compared with a conventional Ad vector, by insertion of the miRNA-targeted sequences. Notably, the Ad vector carrying the miR-122a–targeted sequences into the 3′-UTR of the E4 gene expressed higher and longer-term transgene expression and more than 20-fold lower levels of all the Ad early and late genes examined in the liver than a conventional Ad vector. miR-122a–mediated suppression of the E4 gene expression in the liver significantly reduced the hepatotoxicity which an Ad vector causes via both adaptive and non-adaptive immune responses.

  1. Identification of ISMyo2, a novel insertion sequence element of IS21 family and its diagnostic potential for detection of Mycobacterium yongonense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byoung-Jun; Kim, Kijeong; Kim, Bo-Ram; Kook, Yoon-Hoh; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2015-10-15

    Mycobacterium yongonense, as a novel member of the M. avium complex (MAC), was recently reported to be isolated from human specimens in South Korea and Italy. Due to its close relatedness to other MAC members, particularly M. intracellulare in taxonomic aspects, the development of a novel diagnostic method for its specific detection is necessary for clinical or epidemiologic purposes. Using the Mycobacterium yongonense genome information, we have identified a novel IS-element, ISMyo2. Targeting the ISMyo2 sequence, we developed a real-time PCR method and applied the technique to Mycobacterial genomic DNA. To identify proper nucleic acid targets for the diagnosis, comparisons of all insertion sequence (IS) elements of 3 M. intracellulare and 3 M. yongonense strains, whose complete genome sequences we reported recently, led to the selection of a novel target gene, the M. yongonense-specific IS element, ISMyo2 (2,387 bp), belonging to the IS21 family. Next, we developed a real-time PCR method using SYBR green I for M. yongonense-specific detection targeting ISMyo2, producing a 338-bp amplicon. When this assay was applied to 28 Mycobacterium reference strains and 63 MAC clinical isolates, it produced amplicons in only the 6 M. yongonense strains, showing a sensitivity of 100 fg of genomic DNA, suggesting its feasibility as a diagnostic method for M. yongonense strains. We identified a novel ISMyo2 IS element belonging to the IS21 family specific to M. yongonense strains via genome analysis, and a real-time PCR method based on its sequences was developed.

  2. Proyecto básico de adecuación y ampliación de una terminal de almacenamiento y distribución de combustible a buques

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Hinojosa, María Isabel

    2018-01-01

    El objeto de este proyecto es la definición básica de una planta de almacenamiento de productos petrolíferos no inflamables con punto de inflamación superior a 55ºC (Clase C) y 98.000 m3 de capacidad que permita llevar a cabo la solicitud de permisos y licencias necesarios para su posterior construcción. La capacidad total se alcanzará a partir de la adaptación de la terminal existente de 30.000 m3,que estaba destinada al manejo de aceites vegetales, y de la construcción ...

  3. High-Throughput Analysis of T-DNA Location and Structure Using Sequence Capture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soichi Inagaki

    Full Text Available Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of plants with T-DNA is used both to introduce transgenes and for mutagenesis. Conventional approaches used to identify the genomic location and the structure of the inserted T-DNA are laborious and high-throughput methods using next-generation sequencing are being developed to address these problems. Here, we present a cost-effective approach that uses sequence capture targeted to the T-DNA borders to select genomic DNA fragments containing T-DNA-genome junctions, followed by Illumina sequencing to determine the location and junction structure of T-DNA insertions. Multiple probes can be mixed so that transgenic lines transformed with different T-DNA types can be processed simultaneously, using a simple, index-based pooling approach. We also developed a simple bioinformatic tool to find sequence read pairs that span the junction between the genome and T-DNA or any foreign DNA. We analyzed 29 transgenic lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, each containing inserts from 4 different T-DNA vectors. We determined the location of T-DNA insertions in 22 lines, 4 of which carried multiple insertion sites. Additionally, our analysis uncovered a high frequency of unconventional and complex T-DNA insertions, highlighting the needs for high-throughput methods for T-DNA localization and structural characterization. Transgene insertion events have to be fully characterized prior to use as commercial products. Our method greatly facilitates the first step of this characterization of transgenic plants by providing an efficient screen for the selection of promising lines.

  4. Autoantibodies to N-terminally truncated GAD improve clinical phenotyping of individuals with adult-onset diabetes: Action LADA 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achenbach, Peter; Hawa, Mohammed I; Krause, Stephanie; Lampasona, Vito; Jerram, Samuel T; Williams, Alistair J K; Bonifacio, Ezio; Ziegler, Anette G; Leslie, R David

    2018-04-04

    Adult-onset type 1 diabetes, in which the 65 kDa isoform of GAD (GAD65) is a major autoantigen, has a broad clinical phenotype encompassing variable need for insulin therapy. This study aimed to evaluate whether autoantibodies against N-terminally truncated GAD65 more closely defined a type 1 diabetes phenotype associated with insulin therapy. Of 1114 participants with adult-onset diabetes from the Action LADA (latent autoimmune diabetes in adults) study with sufficient sera, we selected those designated type 1 (n = 511) or type 2 diabetes (n = 603) and retested the samples in radiobinding assays for human full-length GAD65 autoantibodies (f-GADA) and N-terminally truncated (amino acids 96-585) GAD65 autoantibodies (t-GADA). Individuals' clinical phenotypes were analysed according to antibody binding patterns. Overall, 478 individuals were f-GADA-positive, 431 were t-GADA-positive and 628 were negative in both assays. Risk of insulin treatment was augmented in t-GADA-positive individuals (OR 4.69 [95% CI 3.57, 6.17]) compared with f-GADA-positive individuals (OR 3.86 [95% CI 2.95, 5.06]), irrespective of diabetes duration. Of 55 individuals who were f-GADA-positive but t-GADA-negative, i.e. with antibody binding restricted to the N-terminus of GAD65, the phenotype was similar to type 2 diabetes with low risk of progression to insulin treatment. Compared with these individuals with N-terminal GAD65-restricted GADA, t-GADA-positive individuals were younger at diagnosis (p = 0.005), leaner (p N-terminally truncated GAD65 autoantibodies is associated with the clinical phenotype of autoimmune type 1 diabetes and predicts insulin therapy.

  5. Outer membrane lipoprotein biogenesis: Lol is not the end.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalova, Anna; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2015-10-05

    Bacterial lipoproteins are lipid-anchored proteins that contain acyl groups covalently attached to the N-terminal cysteine residue of the mature protein. Lipoproteins are synthesized in precursor form with an N-terminal signal sequence (SS) that targets translocation across the cytoplasmic or inner membrane (IM). Lipid modification and SS processing take place at the periplasmic face of the IM. Outer membrane (OM) lipoproteins take the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) export pathway, which ends with the insertion of the N-terminal lipid moiety into the inner leaflet of the OM. For many lipoproteins, the biogenesis pathway ends here. We provide examples of lipoproteins that adopt complex topologies in the OM that include transmembrane and surface-exposed domains. Biogenesis of such lipoproteins requires additional steps beyond the Lol pathway. In at least one case, lipoprotein sequences reach the cell surface by being threaded through the lumen of a beta-barrel protein in an assembly reaction that requires the heteropentomeric Bam complex. The inability to predict surface exposure reinforces the importance of experimental verification of lipoprotein topology and we will discuss some of the methods used to study OM protein topology. © 2015 The Author(s).

  6. Structure of a double hexamer of the Pyrococcus furiosus minichromosome maintenance protein N-terminal domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meagher, Martin; Enemark, Eric J.

    2016-06-22

    The crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of thePyrococcus furiosusminichromosome maintenance (MCM) protein as a double hexamer is described. The MCM complex is a ring-shaped helicase that unwinds DNA at the replication fork of eukaryotes and archaea. Prior to replication initiation, the MCM complex assembles as an inactive double hexamer at specific sites of DNA. The presented structure is highly consistent with previous MCM double-hexamer structures and shows two MCM hexamers with a head-to-head interaction mediated by the N-terminal domain. Minor differences include a diminished head-to-head interaction and a slightly reduced inter-hexamer rotation.

  7. DNA Polymerases Drive DNA Sequencing-by-Synthesis Technologies: Both Past and Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yao eChen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies have revolutionized modern biological and biomedical research. The engines responsible for this innovation are DNA polymerases; they catalyze the biochemical reaction for deriving template sequence information. In fact, DNA polymerase has been a cornerstone of DNA sequencing from the very beginning. E. coli DNA polymerase I proteolytic (Klenow fragment was originally utilized in Sanger's dideoxy chain terminating DNA sequencing chemistry. From these humble beginnings followed an explosion of organism-specific, genome sequence information accessible via public database. Family A/B DNA polymerases from mesophilic/thermophilic bacteria/archaea were modified and tested in today's standard capillary electrophoresis (CE and NGS sequencing platforms. These enzymes were selected for their efficient incorporation of bulky dye-terminator and reversible dye-terminator nucleotides respectively. Third generation, real-time single molecule sequencing platform requires slightly different enzyme properties. Enterobacterial phage ⱷ29 DNA polymerase copies long stretches of DNA and possesses a unique capability to efficiently incorporate terminal phosphate-labeled nucleoside polyphosphates. Furthermore, ⱷ29 enzyme has also been utilized in emerging DNA sequencing technologies including nanopore-, and protein-transistor-based sequencing. DNA polymerase is, and will continue to be, a crucial component of sequencing technologies.

  8. Alu element insertion in PKLR gene as a novel cause of pyruvate kinase deficiency in Middle Eastern patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesmana, Harry; Dyer, Lisa; Li, Xia; Denton, James; Griffiths, Jenna; Chonat, Satheesh; Seu, Katie G; Heeney, Matthew M; Zhang, Kejian; Hopkin, Robert J; Kalfa, Theodosia A

    2018-03-01

    Pyruvate kinase deficiency (PKD) is the most frequent red blood cell enzyme abnormality of the glycolytic pathway and the most common cause of hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia. Over 250 PKLR-gene mutations have been described, including missense/nonsense, splicing and regulatory mutations, small insertions, small and gross deletions, causing PKD and hemolytic anemia of variable severity. Alu retrotransposons are the most abundant mobile DNA sequences in the human genome, contributing to almost 11% of its mass. Alu insertions have been associated with a number of human diseases either by disrupting a coding region or a splice signal. Here, we report on two unrelated Middle Eastern patients, both born from consanguineous parents, with transfusion-dependent hemolytic anemia, where sequence analysis revealed a homozygous insertion of AluYb9 within exon 6 of the PKLR gene, causing precipitous decrease of PKLR RNA levels. This Alu element insertion consists a previously unrecognized mechanism underlying pathogenesis of PKD. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Masking as an effective quality control method for next-generation sequencing data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sajung; Yun, Sijung

    2014-12-13

    Next generation sequencing produces base calls with low quality scores that can affect the accuracy of identifying simple nucleotide variation calls, including single nucleotide polymorphisms and small insertions and deletions. Here we compare the effectiveness of two data preprocessing methods, masking and trimming, and the accuracy of simple nucleotide variation calls on whole-genome sequence data from Caenorhabditis elegans. Masking substitutes low quality base calls with 'N's (undetermined bases), whereas trimming removes low quality bases that results in a shorter read lengths. We demonstrate that masking is more effective than trimming in reducing the false-positive rate in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) calling. However, both of the preprocessing methods did not affect the false-negative rate in SNP calling with statistical significance compared to the data analysis without preprocessing. False-positive rate and false-negative rate for small insertions and deletions did not show differences between masking and trimming. We recommend masking over trimming as a more effective preprocessing method for next generation sequencing data analysis since masking reduces the false-positive rate in SNP calling without sacrificing the false-negative rate although trimming is more commonly used currently in the field. The perl script for masking is available at http://code.google.com/p/subn/. The sequencing data used in the study were deposited in the Sequence Read Archive (SRX450968 and SRX451773).

  10. The AAA+ ATPase TRIP13 remodels HORMA domains through N-terminal engagement and unfolding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Qiaozhen; Kim, Dong Hyun; Dereli, Ihsan; Rosenberg, Scott C.; Hagemann, Goetz; Herzog, Franz; Tóth, Attila; Cleveland, Don W.; Corbett, Kevin D.

    2017-06-28

    Proteins of the conserved HORMA domain family, including the spindle assembly checkpoint protein MAD2 and the meiotic HORMADs, assemble into signaling complexes by binding short peptides termed “closure motifs”. The AAA+ ATPase TRIP13 regulates both MAD2 and meiotic HORMADs by disassembling these HORMA domain–closure motif complexes, but its mechanisms of substrate recognition and remodeling are unknown. Here, we combine X-ray crystallography and crosslinking mass spectrometry to outline how TRIP13 recognizes MAD2 with the help of the adapter protein p31comet. We show that p31comet binding to the TRIP13 N-terminal domain positions the disordered MAD2 N-terminus for engagement by the TRIP13 “pore loops”, which then unfold MAD2 in the presence of ATP. N-terminal truncation of MAD2 renders it refractory to TRIP13 action in vitro, and in cells causes spindle assembly checkpoint defects consistent with loss of TRIP13 function. Similar truncation of HORMAD1 in mouse spermatocytes compromises its TRIP13-mediated removal from meiotic chromosomes, highlighting a conserved mechanism for recognition and disassembly of HORMA domain–closure motif complexes by TRIP13.

  11. Band termination in the N=Z nucleus 44Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ur, C.A.; Lenzi, S.M.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclei in the vicinity of the middle of the 1f 7/2 shell show strong prolate deformation at low spins resulting in rotational-like band structures. With increasing angular momentum the structure of these nuclei evolves through triaxial and spherical shapes. Recently, band terminating states corresponding to fully aligned configurations of valence nucleons in the f 7/2 shell have been reported. Further increase of the angular momentum can be achieved by particle excitations on the higher shell. This will result in high energy γ-ray transitions as it was observed in 50 Cr. We have investigated the structure of 44 Ti up to the band termination. Excited states in 44 Ti have been populated via the 28 Si + 24 Mg at 110 MeV beam energy. The target consisted of ∼0.5 mg/cm 2 of 24 Mg deposited on a gold backing. Gamma-rays were detected with the GASP multidetector array composed by 40 HPGe Compton-suppressed detectors and the inner ball built of 80 BGO detectors. The preliminary level scheme of 44 Ti, as determined in our work, is presented. This nucleus has 2 valence protons and 2 valence neutrons filling the f 7/2 shell. The band terminating state corresponding to their total alignment is the 12 + state. Several γ-rays transitions above this state have been identified. Also, we have identified two negative parity bands strongly connected to the yrast positive parity structure. Such structures have also been observed in other two even-even N=Z nuclei in the f 7/2 shell, namely, 44 Cr and 52 Fe, but they were less populated. The structure of 44 Ti is also interesting from the point of view of the cross-conjugate symmetry. Comparing the level structure of 44 Ti and the one of its cross-conjugate nucleus at the other end of the shell, 52 Fe, it can be noticed that up to spin 10ℎ their structure is very similar, but in 44 Ti the band terminating state 12 + is not below the 10 + state as in the case of 52 Fe. This was related to a reminiscent degree of collectivity in the

  12. The N-terminal domain of human DNA helicase Rtel1 contains a redox active iron-sulfur cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Aaron P; Ding, Huangen

    2014-01-01

    Human telomere length regulator Rtel1 is a superfamily II DNA helicase and is essential for maintaining proper length of telomeres in chromosomes. Here we report that the N-terminal domain of human Rtel1 (RtelN) expressed in Escherichia coli cells produces a protein that contains a redox active iron-sulfur cluster with the redox midpoint potential of -248 ± 10 mV (pH 8.0). The iron-sulfur cluster in RtelN is sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, indicating that reactive oxygen/nitrogen species may modulate the DNA helicase activity of Rtel1 via modification of its iron-sulfur cluster. Purified RtelN retains a weak binding affinity for the single-stranded (ss) and double-stranded (ds) DNA in vitro. However, modification of the iron-sulfur cluster by hydrogen peroxide or nitric oxide does not significantly affect the DNA binding activity of RtelN, suggesting that the iron-sulfur cluster is not directly involved in the DNA interaction in the N-terminal domain of Rtel1.

  13. The N-Terminal Domain of Human DNA Helicase Rtel1 Contains a Redox Active Iron-Sulfur Cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron P. Landry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human telomere length regulator Rtel1 is a superfamily II DNA helicase and is essential for maintaining proper length of telomeres in chromosomes. Here we report that the N-terminal domain of human Rtel1 (RtelN expressed in Escherichia coli cells produces a protein that contains a redox active iron-sulfur cluster with the redox midpoint potential of −248 ± 10 mV (pH 8.0. The iron-sulfur cluster in RtelN is sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, indicating that reactive oxygen/nitrogen species may modulate the DNA helicase activity of Rtel1 via modification of its iron-sulfur cluster. Purified RtelN retains a weak binding affinity for the single-stranded (ss and double-stranded (ds DNA in vitro. However, modification of the iron-sulfur cluster by hydrogen peroxide or nitric oxide does not significantly affect the DNA binding activity of RtelN, suggesting that the iron-sulfur cluster is not directly involved in the DNA interaction in the N-terminal domain of Rtel1.

  14. Long Terminal Repeat Retrotransposon Content in Eight Diploid Sunflower Species Inferred from Next-Generation Sequence Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetreault, Hannah M.; Ungerer, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    The most abundant transposable elements (TEs) in plant genomes are Class I long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons represented by superfamilies gypsy and copia. Amplification of these superfamilies directly impacts genome structure and contributes to differential patterns of genome size evolution among plant lineages. Utilizing short-read Illumina data and sequence information from a panel of Helianthus annuus (sunflower) full-length gypsy and copia elements, we explore the contribution of these sequences to genome size variation among eight diploid Helianthus species and an outgroup taxon, Phoebanthus tenuifolius. We also explore transcriptional dynamics of these elements in both leaf and bud tissue via RT-PCR. We demonstrate that most LTR retrotransposon sublineages (i.e., families) display patterns of similar genomic abundance across species. A small number of LTR retrotransposon sublineages exhibit lineage-specific amplification, particularly in the genomes of species with larger estimated nuclear DNA content. RT-PCR assays reveal that some LTR retrotransposon sublineages are transcriptionally active across all species and tissue types, whereas others display species-specific and tissue-specific expression. The species with the largest estimated genome size, H. agrestis, has experienced amplification of LTR retrotransposon sublineages, some of which have proliferated independently in other lineages in the Helianthus phylogeny. PMID:27233667

  15. Isolation and molecular characterization of dTnp1, a mobile and defective transposable element of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C; Pouteau, S; Rouzé, P; Caboche, M

    1994-01-01

    By Northern blot analysis of nitrate reductase-deficient mutants of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia, we identified a mutant (mutant D65), obtained after gamma-ray irradiation of protoplasts, which contained an insertion sequence in the nitrate reductase (NR) mRNA. This insertion sequence was localized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the first exon of NR and was also shown to be present in the NR gene. The mutant gene contained a 565 bp insertion sequence that exhibits the sequence characteristics of a transposable element, which was thus named dTnp1. The dTnp1 element has 14 bp terminal inverted repeats and is flanked by an 8-bp target site duplication generated upon transposition. These inverted repeats have significant sequence homology with those of other transposable elements. Judging by its size and the absence of a long open reading frame, dTnp1 appears to represent a defective, although mobile, transposable element. The octamer motif TTTAGGCC was found several times in direct orientation near the 5' and 3' ends of dTnp1 together with a perfect palindrome located after the 5' inverted repeat. Southern blot analysis using an internal probe of dTnp1 suggested that this element occurs as a single copy in the genome of N. plumbaginifolia. It is also present in N. tabacum, but absent in tomato or petunia. The dTnp1 element is therefore of potential use for gene tagging in Nicotiana species.

  16. N-terminal amphipathic helix as a trigger of hemolytic activity in antimicrobial peptides: a case study in latarcins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyansky, Anton A; Vassilevski, Alexander A; Volynsky, Pavel E; Vorontsova, Olga V; Samsonova, Olga V; Egorova, Natalya S; Krylov, Nicolay A; Feofanov, Alexei V; Arseniev, Alexander S; Grishin, Eugene V; Efremov, Roman G

    2009-07-21

    In silico structural analyses of sets of alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are performed. Differences between hemolytic and non-hemolytic AMPs are revealed in organization of their N-terminal region. A parameter related to hydrophobicity of the N-terminal part is proposed as a measure of the peptide propensity to exhibit hemolytic and other unwanted cytotoxic activities. Based on the information acquired, a rational approach for selective removal of these properties in AMPs is suggested. A proof of concept is gained through engineering specific mutations that resulted in elimination of the hemolytic activity of AMPs (latarcins) while leaving the beneficial antimicrobial effect intact.

  17. The isolation, purification and amino-acid sequence of insulin from the teleost fish Cottus scorpius (daddy sculpin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutfield, J F; Cutfield, S M; Carne, A; Emdin, S O; Falkmer, S

    1986-07-01

    Insulin from the principal islets of the teleost fish, Cottus scorpius (daddy sculpin), has been isolated and sequenced. Purification involved acid/alcohol extraction, gel filtration, and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography to yield nearly 1 mg pure insulin/g wet weight islet tissue. Biological potency was estimated as 40% compared to porcine insulin. The sculpin insulin crystallised in the absence of zinc ions although zinc is known to be present in the islets in significant amounts. Two other hormones, glucagon and pancreatic polypeptide, were copurified with the insulin, and an N-terminal sequence for pancreatic polypeptide was determined. The primary structure of sculpin insulin shows a number of sequence changes unique so far amongst teleost fish. These changes occur at A14 (Arg), A15 (Val), and B2 (Asp). The B chain contains 29 amino acids and there is no N-terminal extension as seen with several other fish. Presumably as a result of the amino acid substitutions, sculpin insulin does not readily form crystals containing zinc-insulin hexamers, despite the presence of the coordinating B10 His.

  18. Dynamic programming algorithms for biological sequence comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, W R; Miller, W

    1992-01-01

    Efficient dynamic programming algorithms are available for a broad class of protein and DNA sequence comparison problems. These algorithms require computer time proportional to the product of the lengths of the two sequences being compared [O(N2)] but require memory space proportional only to the sum of these lengths [O(N)]. Although the requirement for O(N2) time limits use of the algorithms to the largest computers when searching protein and DNA sequence databases, many other applications of these algorithms, such as calculation of distances for evolutionary trees and comparison of a new sequence to a library of sequence profiles, are well within the capabilities of desktop computers. In particular, the results of library searches with rapid searching programs, such as FASTA or BLAST, should be confirmed by performing a rigorous optimal alignment. Whereas rapid methods do not overlook significant sequence similarities, FASTA limits the number of gaps that can be inserted into an alignment, so that a rigorous alignment may extend the alignment substantially in some cases. BLAST does not allow gaps in the local regions that it reports; a calculation that allows gaps is very likely to extend the alignment substantially. Although a Monte Carlo evaluation of the statistical significance of a similarity score with a rigorous algorithm is much slower than the heuristic approach used by the RDF2 program, the dynamic programming approach should take less than 1 hr on a 386-based PC or desktop Unix workstation. For descriptive purposes, we have limited our discussion to methods for calculating similarity scores and distances that use gap penalties of the form g = rk. Nevertheless, programs for the more general case (g = q+rk) are readily available. Versions of these programs that run either on Unix workstations, IBM-PC class computers, or the Macintosh can be obtained from either of the authors.

  19. Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus C-terminal LANA concentrates at pericentromeric and peri-telomeric regions of a subset of mitotic chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley-Clarke, Brenna; Ballestas, Mary E.; Komatsu, Takashi; Kaye, Kenneth M.

    2007-01-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) tethers KSHV terminal repeat (TR) DNA to mitotic chromosomes to efficiently segregate episomes to progeny nuclei. LANA contains N- and C-terminal chromosome binding regions. We now show that C-terminal LANA preferentially concentrates to paired dots at pericentromeric and peri-telomeric regions of a subset of mitotic chromosomes through residues 996-1139. Deletions within C-terminal LANA abolished both self-association and chromosome binding, consistent with a requirement for self-association to bind chromosomes. A deletion abolishing TR DNA binding did not affect chromosome targeting, indicating LANA's localization is not due to binding its recognition sequence in chromosomal DNA. LANA distributed similarly on human and non-human mitotic chromosomes. These results are consistent with C-terminal LANA interacting with a cell factor that concentrates at pericentromeric and peri-telomeric regions of mitotic chromosomes

  20. Feed rate affecting surface roughness and tool wear in dry hard turning of AISI 4140 steel automotive parts using TiN+AlCrN coated inserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paengchit, Phacharadit; Saikaew, Charnnarong

    2018-02-01

    This work aims to investigate the effects of feed rate on surface roughness (Ra) and tool wear (VB) and to obtain the optimal operating condition of the feed rate in dry hard turning of AISI 4140 chromium molybdenum steel for automotive industry applications using TiN+AlCrN coated inserts. AISI 4140 steel bars were employed in order to carry out the dry hard turning experiments by varying the feed rates of 0.06, 0.08 and 0.1 mm/rev based on experimental design technique that can be analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA). In addition, the cutting tool inserts were examined after machining experiments by SEM to evaluate the effect of turning operations on tool wear. The results showed that averages Ra and VB were significantly affected by the feed rate at the level of significance of 0.05. Averages Ra and VB values at the feed rate of 0.06 mm/rev were lowest compared to average values at the feed rates of 0.08 and 0.1 mm/rev, based on the main effect plot.

  1. Characterization of expressed sequence tags from developing fibers of Gossypium barbadense and evaluation of insertion-deletion variation in tetraploid cultivated cotton species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yuanda; Zhao, Liang; Xu, Xiaoyang; Wang, Lei; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Tianzhen; Guo, Wangzhen

    2013-03-13

    Cotton is the leading fiber crop worldwide. Gossypium barbadense is an important species of cotton because of its extra-long staple fibers with superior luster and silkiness. However, a systematic analysis and utilization of cDNA sequences from G. barbadense fiber development remains understudied. A total of 21,079 high quality sequences were generated from two non-normalized cDNA libraries prepared by using a mixture of G. barbadense Hai7124 fibers and ovules. After assembly processing, a set of 8,653 unigenes were obtained. Of those, 7,786 were matched to known proteins and 7,316 were assigned to functional categories. The molecular functions of these unigenes were mostly related to binding and catalytic activity, and carbohydrate, amino acid, and energy metabolisms were major contributors among the subsets of metabolism. Sequences comparison between G. barbadense and G. hirsutum revealed that 8,245 unigenes from G. barbadense were detected the similarity with those released publicly in G. hirsutum, however, the remaining 408 sequences had no hits against G. hirsutum unigenes database. Furthermore, 13,275 putative ESTs InDels loci involved in the orthologous and/or homoeologous differences between/within G. barbadense and G. hirsutum were discovered by in silico analyses, and 2,160 InDel markers were developed by ESTs with more than five insertions or deletions. By gel electrophoresis combined with sequencing verification, 71.11% candidate InDel loci were reconfirmed orthologous and/or homoeologous loci polymorphisms using G. hirsutum acc TM-1 and G. barbadense cv Hai7124. Blastx result showed among 2,160 InDel loci, 81 with significant function similarity with known genes associated with secondary wall synthesis process, indicating the important roles in fiber quality in tetraploid cultivated cotton species. Sequence comparisons and InDel markers development will lay the groundwork for promoting the identification of genes related to superior agronomic traits

  2. Spark igniter having precious metal ground electrode inserts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, N.A.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes an igniter comprising a shell of a shell metal alloy which is resistant to spark erosion and corrosion, the shell having a firing end which terminates at its lower end in an annular ring, an insulator sealed within the metal shell and having a central bore and a surface extending inwardly toward the bore from the annular ring, a center electrode sealed within the bore of the insulator and having a firing end which is in spark gap relation with the annular ring of the shell and so positioned that a spark discharge between the firing end and the annular ring occurs along the inwardly extending surface of the insulator, and a plurality of oxidation and erosion resistant inserts, each of the inserts comprising a body of a metal selected from the group consisting of iridium, osmium, ruthenium, rhodium, platinum, and tungsten or an alloy or a ductile alloy of one of the foregoing metals, each of the bodies being embedded within a matching opening which extends from the exterior of the shell through the annular ring, being bonded to the shell

  3. Method of inserting fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamimoto, Shuji; Imoo, Makoto; Tsuchida, Kenji.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method of inserting a fuel rod upon automatic assembling, automatic dismantling and reassembling of a fuel assembly in a light water moderated reactor, as well as a device and components used therefor. That is, a fuel rod is inserted reliably to an aimed point of insertion by surrounding the periphery of the fuel rod to be inserted with guide rods, and thereby suppressing the movement of the fuel rod during insertion. Alternatively, a fuel rod is inserted reliably to a point of insertion by inserting guide rods at the periphery of the point of insertion for the fuel rod to be inserted thereby surrounding the point of insertion with the guide rods or fuel rods. By utilizing fuel rods already present in the fuel assembly as the guide rods described above, the fuel rod can be inserted reliably to the point of insertion with no additional devices. Dummy fuel rods are previously inserted in a fuel assembly which are then utilized as the above-mentioned guide rods to accurately insert the fuel rod to the point of insertion. (I.S.)

  4. Genome-wide LORE1 retrotransposon mutagenesis and high-throughput insertion detection in Lotus japonicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbanski, Dorian Fabian; Malolepszy, Anna; Stougaard, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Insertion mutants facilitate functional analysis of genes, but for most plant species it has been difficult to identify a suitable mutagen and to establish large populations for reverse genetics. The main challenge is developing efficient high-throughput procedures for both mutagenesis and insert......Insertion mutants facilitate functional analysis of genes, but for most plant species it has been difficult to identify a suitable mutagen and to establish large populations for reverse genetics. The main challenge is developing efficient high-throughput procedures for both mutagenesis...... plants. The identified insertions showed that the endogenous LORE1 retrotransposon is well suited for insertion mutagenesis due to its homogenous gene targeting and exonic insertion preference. Since LORE1 transposition occurs in the germline, harvesting seeds from a single founder line and cultivating...... progeny generates a complete mutant population. This ease of LORE1 mutagenesis combined with the efficient FSTpoolit protocol, which exploits 2D pooling, Illumina sequencing, and automated data analysis, allows highly cost-efficient development of a comprehensive reverse genetic resource....

  5. Characterization of niphatenones that inhibit androgen receptor N-terminal domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen A Banuelos

    Full Text Available Androgen ablation therapy causes a temporary reduction in tumor burden in patients with advanced prostate cancer. Unfortunately the malignancy will return to form lethal castration-recurrent prostate cancer (CRPC. The androgen receptor (AR remains transcriptionally active in CRPC in spite of castrate levels of androgens in the blood. AR transcriptional activity resides in its N-terminal domain (NTD. Possible mechanisms of continued AR transcriptional activity may include, at least in part, expression of constitutively active splice variants of AR that lack the C-terminal ligand-binding domain (LBD. Current therapies that target the AR LBD, would not be effective against these AR variants. Currently no drugs are clinically available that target the AR NTD which should be effective against these AR variants as well as full-length AR. Niphatenones were originally isolated and identified in active extracts from Niphates digitalis marine sponge. Here we begin to characterize the mechanism of niphatenones in blocking AR transcriptional activity. Both enantiomers had similar IC50 values of 6 µM for inhibiting the full-length AR in a functional transcriptional assay. However, (S-niphatenone had significantly better activity against the AR NTD compared to (R-niphatenone. Consistent with niphatenones binding to and inhibiting transactivation of AR NTD, niphatenones inhibited AR splice variant. Niphatenone did not affect the transcriptional activity of the related progesterone receptor, but slightly decreased glucocorticoid receptor (GR activity and covalently bound to GR activation function-1 (AF-1 region. Niphatenone blocked N/C interactions of AR without altering either AR protein levels or its intracellular localization in response to androgen. Alkylation with glutathione suggests that niphatenones are not a feasible scaffold for further drug development.

  6. Discovery and development of the N-terminal procollagen type II (NPII) biomarker: a tool for measuring collagen type II synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemirovskiy, O V; Sunyer, T; Aggarwal, P; Abrams, M; Hellio Le Graverand, M P; Mathews, W R

    2008-12-01

    Progression of joint damage in osteoarthritis (OA) is likely to result from an imbalance between cartilage degradation and synthesis processes. Markers reflecting these two components appear to be promising in predicting the rate of OA progression. Both N- and C-terminal propeptides of type II collagen reflect the rates of collagen type II synthesis. The ability to quantify the procollagen peptides in biological fluids would enable a better understanding of OA disease pathology and provide means for assessing the proof of mechanism of anabolic disease modifying OA drugs (DMOADs). A polyclonal antibody that recognizes the sequence GPKGQKGEPGDIKDI in the propeptide region of rat, dog, and human type II collagen was raised in chicken and peptide-affinity purified. The immunoaffinity liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to extensively characterize N-terminal procollagen type II (NPII) peptides found in biological fluids. The novel competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assay was developed to quantitatively measure the NPII peptides. Several peptides ranging from 17 to 41 amino acids with various modifications including hydroxylations on proline and lysine residues, oxidation of lysines to allysines, and attachments of glucose and galactose moieties to hydroxylysines were identified in a simple system such as ex vivo cultures of human articular cartilage (HAC) explants as well as in more complex biological fluids such as human urine and plasma. A competitive ELISA assay has been developed and applied to urine, plasma, and synovial fluid matrices in human, rat and dog samples. A novel NPII assay has been developed and applied to OA and normal human subjects to understand the changes in collagen type II synthesis related to the pathology of OA.

  7. Gift from statistical learning: Visual statistical learning enhances memory for sequence elements and impairs memory for items that disrupt regularities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Sachio; Saiki, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Prior studies have shown that visual statistical learning (VSL) enhances familiarity (a type of memory) of sequences. How do statistical regularities influence the processing of each triplet element and inserted distractors that disrupt the regularity? Given that increased attention to triplets induced by VSL and inhibition of unattended triplets, we predicted that VSL would promote memory for each triplet constituent, and degrade memory for inserted stimuli. Across the first two experiments, we found that objects from structured sequences were more likely to be remembered than objects from random sequences, and that letters (Experiment 1) or objects (Experiment 2) inserted into structured sequences were less likely to be remembered than those inserted into random sequences. In the subsequent two experiments, we examined an alternative account for our results, whereby the difference in memory for inserted items between structured and random conditions is due to individuation of items within random sequences. Our findings replicated even when control letters (Experiment 3A) or objects (Experiment 3B) were presented before or after, rather than inserted into, random sequences. Our findings suggest that statistical learning enhances memory for each item in a regular set and impairs memory for items that disrupt the regularity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Interaction of N-terminal peptide analogues of the Na+,K+-ATPase with membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Khoa; Garcia, Alvaro; Sani, Marc Antoine

    2018-01-01

    phosphatidylserine) in the surrounding membrane. Furthermore, to isolate which segments of the N-terminus could be involved in membrane binding, we chemically synthesized N-terminal fragments of various lengths. Based on a combination of results from RH421 UV/visible absorbance measurements and solid-state 31P and 2...

  9. Transcriptional Enhancers Induce Insertional Gene Deregulation Independently From the Vector Type and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruggi, Giulietta; Porcellini, Simona; Facchini, Giulia; Perna, Serena K; Cattoglio, Claudia; Sartori, Daniela; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Schambach, Axel; Baum, Christopher; Bonini, Chiara; Bovolenta, Chiara; Mavilio, Fulvio; Recchia, Alessandra

    2009-01-01

    The integration characteristics of retroviral (RV) vectors increase the probability of interfering with the regulation of cellular genes, and account for a tangible risk of insertional mutagenesis in treated patients. To assess the potential genotoxic risk of conventional or self-inactivating (SIN) γ-RV and lentiviral (LV) vectors independently from the biological consequences of the insertion event, we developed a quantitative assay based on real-time reverse transcriptase—PCR on low-density arrays to evaluate alterations of gene expression in individual primary T-cell clones. We show that the Moloney leukemia virus long terminal repeat (LTR) enhancer has the strongest activity in both a γ-RV and a LV vector context, while an internal cellular promoter induces deregulation of gene expression less frequently, at a shorter range and to a lower extent in both vector types. Downregulation of gene expression was observed only in the context of LV vectors. This study indicates that insertional gene activation is determined by the characteristics of the transcriptional regulatory elements carried by the vector, and is largely independent from the vector type or design. PMID:19293778

  10. Novel tetra-peptide insertion in Gag-p6 ALIX-binding motif in HIV-1 subtype C associated with protease inhibitor failure in Indian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neogi, Ujjwal; Rao, Shwetha D; Bontell, Irene; Verheyen, Jens; Rao, Vasudev R; Gore, Sagar C; Soni, Neelesh; Shet, Anita; Schülter, Eugen; Ekstrand, Maria L; Wondwossen, Amogne; Kaiser, Rolf; Madhusudhan, Mallur S; Prasad, Vinayaka R; Sonnerborg, Anders

    2014-09-24

    A novel tetra-peptide insertion was identified in Gag-p6 ALIX-binding region, which appeared in protease inhibitor failure Indian HIV-1C sequences (odds ratio=17.1, P < 0.001) but was naturally present in half of untreated Ethiopian HIV-1C sequences. The insertion is predicted to restore ALIX-mediated virus release pathway, which is lacking in HIV-1C. The clinical importance of the insertion needs to be evaluated in HIV-1C dominating regions wherein the use of protease inhibitor drugs are being scaled up.

  11. On the terminal homologation of physiologically active peptides as a means of increasing stability in human serum--neurotensin, opiorphin, B27-KK10 epitope, NPY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seebach, Dieter; Lukaszuk, Aneta; Patora-Komisarska, Krystyna; Podwysocka, Dominika; Gardiner, James; Ebert, Marc-Olivier; Reubi, Jean Claude; Cescato, Renzo; Waser, Beatrice; Gmeiner, Peter; Hübner, Harald; Rougeot, Catherine

    2011-05-01

    The terminal homologation by CH(2) insertion into the peptides mentioned in the title is described. This involves replacement of the N-terminal amino acid residue by a β(2) - and of the C-terminal amino acid residue by a β(3) -homo-amino acid moiety (β(2) hXaa and β(3) hXaa, resp.; Fig. 1). In this way, the structure of the peptide chain from the N-terminal to the C-terminal stereogenic center is identical, and the modified peptide is protected against cleavage by exopeptidases (Figs. 2 and 3). Neurotensin (NT; 1) and its C-terminal fragment NT(8-13) are ligands of the G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) NT1, NT2, NT3, and NT analogs are promising tools to be used in cancer diagnostics and therapy. The affinities of homologated NT analogs, 2b-2e, for NT1 and NT2 receptors were determined by using cell homogenates and tumor tissues (Table 1); in the latter experiments, the affinities for the NT1 receptor are more or less the same as those of NT (0.5-1.3 vs. 0.6 nM). At the same time, one of the homologated NT analogs, 2c, survives in human plasma for 7 days at 37° (Fig. 6). An NMR analysis of NT(8-13) (Tables 2 and 4, and Fig. 8) reveals that this N-terminal NT fragment folds to a turn in CD(3) OH. - In the case of the human analgesic opiorphin (3a), a pentapeptide, and of the HIV-derived B27-KK10 (4a), a decapeptide, terminal homologation (→3b and 4b, resp.) led to a 7- and 70-fold half-life increase in plasma (Fig. 9). With N-terminally homologated NPY, 5c, we were not able to determine serum stability; the peptide consisting of 36 amino acid residues is subject to cleavage by endopetidases. Three of the homologated compounds, 2b, 2c, and 5c, were shown to be agonists (Fig. 7 and 11). A comparison of terminal homologation with other stability-increasing terminal modifications of peptides is performed (Fig. 5), and possible applications of the neurotensin analogs, described herein, are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Verlag Helvetica Chimica

  12. N-terminal protein processing: A comparative proteogenomic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonissone, Stefano; Gupta, Nitin; Romine, Margaret F.; Bradshaw, Ralph A.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2013-01-01

    N-Terminal Methionine Excision (NME) is a universally conserved mechanism with the same specificity across all life forms that removes the first Methionine in proteins when the second residue is Gly, Ala, Ser, Cys, Thr, Pro, or Val. In spite of its necessity for proper cell functioning, the functional role of NME remains unclear. In 1988, Arfin and Bradshaw connected NME with the N-end protein degradation rule and postulated that the role of NME is to expose the stabilizing residues with the goal to resist protein degradation. While this explanation (that treats 7 stabilizing residues in the same manner) has become the de facto dogma of NME, comparative proteogenomics analysis of NME tells a different story. We suggest that the primary role of NME is to expose only two (rather than seven) amino acids Ala and Ser for post-translational modifications (e.g., acetylation) rather than to regulate protein degradation. We argue that, contrary to the existing view, NME is not crucially important for proteins with 5 other stabilizing residue at the 2nd positions that are merely bystanders (their function is not affected by NME) that become exposed to NME because their sizes are comparable or smaller than the size of Ala and Ser.

  13. Lattice insertions for POPAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Y.; Crosbie, E.A.; Diebold, R.; Johnson, D.E.; Ohnuma, S.; Ruggiero, A.G.; Teng, L.C.

    1977-01-01

    Four types of insertions are described for the six 200-m straight sections of POPAE. All have dispersion matched to zero. (1) Injection-ejection insertion--This has proper high-β values and phase advances for horizontal injection and vertical ejection. (2) Phase-adjust insertion--The phase advance in this insertion is adjustable over a range of approximately 100 0 . (3) General-purpose insertion--The β* is adjustable from 2.5. to 200 m and the crossing angle is adjustable from 0 to 11 mrad. (4) High-luminosity insertion--This gives an even lower β + of meter

  14. Delineation of the Exact Transcription Termination Signal for Type 3 Polymerase III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongliang Gao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Type 3 Pol III promoters such as U6 are widely used for expression of small RNAs, including short hairpin RNA for RNAi applications and guide RNA in CRISPR genome-editing platforms. RNA polymerase III uses a T-stretch as termination signal, but the exact properties have not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we systematically measured the in vivo termination efficiency and the actual site of termination for different T-stretch signals in three commonly used human Pol III promoters (U6, 7SK, and H1. Both the termination efficiency and the actual termination site depend on the T-stretch signal. The T4 signal acts as minimal terminator, but full termination efficiency is reached only with a T-stretch of ≥6. The termination site within the T-stretch is quite heterogeneous, and consequently small RNAs have a variable U-tail of 1–6 nucleotides. We further report that such variable U-tails can have a significant negative effect on the functionality of the crRNA effector of the CRISPR-AsCpf1 system. We next improved these crRNAs by insertion of the HDV ribozyme to avoid U-tails. This study provides detailed design guidelines for small RNA expression cassettes based on Pol III.

  15. Structure of bacteriophage T4 fibritin: a segmented coiled coil and the role of the C-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Y; Strelkov, S V; Mesyanzhinov, V V; Rossmann, M G

    1997-06-15

    Oligomeric coiled-coil motifs are found in numerous protein structures; among them is fibritin, a structural protein of bacteriophage T4, which belongs to a class of chaperones that catalyze a specific phage-assembly process. Fibritin promotes the assembly of the long tail fibers and their subsequent attachment to the tail baseplate; it is also a sensing device that controls the retraction of the long tail fibers in adverse environments and, thus, prevents infection. The structure of fibritin had been predicted from sequence and biochemical analyses to be mainly a triple-helical coiled coil. The determination of its structure at atomic resolution was expected to give insights into the assembly process and biological function of fibritin, and the properties of modified coiled-coil structures in general. The three-dimensional structure of fibritin E, a deletion mutant of wild-type fibritin, was determined to 2.2 A resolution by X-ray crystal